Science.gov

Sample records for stress hormone levels

  1. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  2. Somatotype and stress hormone levels in young soccer players.

    PubMed

    Handziska, E; Handziski, Z; Gjorgoski, I; Dalip, M

    2015-11-01

    process (R=0.59; P<0.01) and some somatotypes (mesomorph ectomorph, mesomorph endomorph, balanced endomorph and endomorph mesomorph) and after the finishing of training process (R=0.62; P<0.01) and some somatotypes (central, balanced ectomorph and mesomorph ectomorph). The significant decreases of cortisol plasma levels during soccer training process could indicate a stagnation of training process, accordingly with insignificant changes of AnT. The significant correlations of some somatotypes with stress hormonal responses could only suggest that the somatotype characteristics of young soccer players could be of interest in process of selection and planning of soccer training process with an essential need for more studies.

  3. Plasma. beta. -endorphin and stress hormone levels during adaptation and stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lishmanov, Yu.B.; Trifonova, Zh.V.; Tsibin, A.N.; Maslova, L.V.; Dement'eva, L.A.

    1987-09-01

    This paper describes a comparative study of ..beta..-endorphin and stress hormone levels in the blood plasma of rats during stress and adaptation. Immunoreactive ..beta..-endorphin in the blood plasma was assayed by means of a kit after preliminary isolation of the ..beta..-endorphin fraction by affinity chromatography on sepharose; ACTH was assayed with a kit and cortisol, insulin, thyroxine and tri-iodothyronine by means of kits from Izotop. Determination of plasma levels of ..beta..-endorphin and other opioids could evidently be an important method of assessing the state of resistance of the organism to stress.

  4. Hormone levels in neonatal hair reflect prior maternal stress exposure during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Amita; Lubach, Gabriele R; Ziegler, Toni E; Coe, Christopher L

    2016-04-01

    Hormones present in hair provide summative information about endocrine activity while the hair was growing. Therefore, it can be collected from an infant after birth and still provide retrospective information about hormone exposure during prenatal development. We employed this approach to determine whether a delimited period of maternal stress during pregnancy affected the concentrations of glucocorticoids and gonadal hormones in the hair of neonatal rhesus monkeys. Hair from 22 infant monkeys exposed to 5 weeks of gestational disturbance was compared to specimens from 13 infants from undisturbed control pregnancies. Using an LC/MS/MS based technique, which permitted seven steroid hormones to be quantified simultaneously, we found 2 hormones were significantly different in infants from disturbed pregnancies. Cortisol and testosterone levels were lower in the hair of both male and female neonates. Maternal hair hormone levels collected on the same day after delivery no longer showed effects of the disturbance earlier during pregnancy. This study documents that a period of acute stress, lasting for 20% of gestation, has sustained effects on the hormones to which a developing fetus is exposed.

  5. Hormone levels in neonatal hair reflect prior maternal stress exposure during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Amita; Lubach, Gabriele R.; Ziegler, Toni E.; Coe, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Hormones present in hair provide summative information about endocrine activity while the hair was growing. Therefore, it can be collected from an infant after birth and still provide retrospective information about hormone exposure during prenatal development. We employed this approach to determine whether a delimited period of maternal stress during pregnancy affected the concentrations of glucocorticoids and gonadal hormones in the hair of neonatal rhesus monkeys. Hair from 22 infant monkeys exposed to 5 weeks of gestational disturbance was compared to specimens from 13 infants from undisturbed control pregnancies. Using an LC/MS/MS based technique, which permitted seven steroid hormones to be quantified simultaneously, we found 2 hormones were significantly different in infants from disturbed pregnancies. Cortisol and testosterone levels were lower in the hair of both male and female neonates. Maternal hair hormone levels collected on the same day after delivery no longer showed effects of the disturbance earlier during pregnancy. This study documents that a period of acute stress, lasting for 20% of gestation, has sustained effects on the hormones to which a developing fetus is exposed. PMID:26802598

  6. The effects of physical therapeutic agents on serum levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tönük, Şükrü Burak; Serin, Erdinc; Ayhan, Fikriye Figen; Yorgancioglu, Zeynep Rezan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the effects of physical agents on the levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, hot packs, and therapeutic ultrasound were applied to the lumbar region and knees of patients with OA. Blood samples were taken for the measurement of the serum levels of glucose, insulin (INS), growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), cortisol (COR), and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) immediately before and after the 1st session, to investigate the acute effects of those physical agents on the endocrine system. The hormone levels were also measured every 5 sessions in a total of 10 sessions. The treatment response was also evaluated by using the visual analogue scale (VAS), Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) throughout the therapy period. After the 1st session, there was a decrease in INS levels and a mild decrease in PRL levels (P = 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Throughout the 10-session therapy period, the INS levels increased, whereas the ACTH and COR levels decreased (P < 0.05 for all). The VAS-spine, RMDQ, VAS-knee, and WOMAC scores decreased (P = 0.001 for VAS-spine and P < 0.001 for all others). A positive correlation was detected between the changes in serum COR and WOMAC-pain score (P < 0.05). Although the combination therapy caused changes in INS level accompanied with steady glucose levels, the application of physical agents did not adversely affect the hormone levels. The decrease in ACTH and COR levels may be attributed to the analgesic effect of agents and may be an indicator of patient comfort through a central action. PMID:27583888

  7. Elevated stress hormone levels relate to Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Barrett, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of stress and spaceflight on levels of neuroendocrine hormones and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific antibodies in astronauts. METHODS: Antiviral antibody titers and stress hormones were measured in plasma samples collected from 28 astronauts at their annual medical exam (baseline), 10 days before launch (L-10), landing day (R+0), and 3 days after landing (R+3). Urinary stress hormones were also measured at L-10 and R+0. RESULTS: Significant increases (p <.01) in EBV virus capsid antigen antibodies were found at all three time points (L-10, R+0, and R+3) as compared with baseline samples. Anti-EBV nuclear antigen antibodies were significantly decreased at L-10 (p <.05) and continued to decrease after spaceflight (R+0 and R+3, p <.01). No changes were found in antibodies to the nonlatent measles virus. The 11 astronauts who showed evidence of EBV reactivation had significant increases in urinary epinephrine and norepinephrine as compared with astronauts without EBV reactivation. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that physical and psychological stresses associated with spaceflight resulted in decreased virus-specific T-cell immunity and reactivation of EBV.

  8. Elevated stress hormone levels relate to Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Barrett, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of stress and spaceflight on levels of neuroendocrine hormones and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific antibodies in astronauts. METHODS: Antiviral antibody titers and stress hormones were measured in plasma samples collected from 28 astronauts at their annual medical exam (baseline), 10 days before launch (L-10), landing day (R+0), and 3 days after landing (R+3). Urinary stress hormones were also measured at L-10 and R+0. RESULTS: Significant increases (p <.01) in EBV virus capsid antigen antibodies were found at all three time points (L-10, R+0, and R+3) as compared with baseline samples. Anti-EBV nuclear antigen antibodies were significantly decreased at L-10 (p <.05) and continued to decrease after spaceflight (R+0 and R+3, p <.01). No changes were found in antibodies to the nonlatent measles virus. The 11 astronauts who showed evidence of EBV reactivation had significant increases in urinary epinephrine and norepinephrine as compared with astronauts without EBV reactivation. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that physical and psychological stresses associated with spaceflight resulted in decreased virus-specific T-cell immunity and reactivation of EBV.

  9. Preliminary evidence that hippocampal volumes in monkeys predict stress levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, David M.; Parker, Karen J.; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Buckmaster, Christine L.; Schatzberg, Alan F.

    2007-01-01

    Background Hippocampal volumes previously determined in monkeys by magnetic resonance imaging are used to test the hypothesis that small hippocampi predict increased stress levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Methods Plasma ACTH levels were measured after restraint stress in 19 male monkeys pretreated with saline or hydrocortisone. Monkeys were then randomized to an undisturbed control condition or intermittent social separations followed by new pair formations. After 17-months of exposure to the intermittent social manipulations, restraint stress tests were repeated to determine test/retest correlations. Results Individual differences in post-restraint stress ACTH levels over the 17-month test/retest interval were remarkably consistent for the saline (rs=0.82, P=0.0004) and hydrocortisone (rs=0.78, P=0.001) pretreatments. Social manipulations did not affect post-restraint stress ACTH levels, but monkeys with smaller hippocampal volumes responded to restraint after saline pretreatment with greater increases in ACTH levels with total brain volume variation controlled as a statistical covariate (β= −0.58, P=0.031). Monkeys with smaller hippocampal volumes also responded with diminished sensitivity to glucocorticoid feedback determined by greater post-restraint ACTH levels after pretreatment with hydrocortisone (β= −0.68, P=0.010). Conclusions These findings support clinical reports that small hippocampi may be a risk for impaired regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in humans with stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:17573043

  10. Stressed snakes strike first: Hormone levels and defensive behavior in free ranging cottonmouths (Agkistrodon piscivorus).

    PubMed

    Herr, Mark W; Graham, Sean P; Langkilde, Tracy

    2017-03-01

    Stress is believed to be an important factor mediating animal behavior. Here we explore the relationship between concentrations of a stress hormone and defensive behavior of a snake. The cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus) is an abundant, large-bodied pitviper that is well known for its intense defensive behaviors. The defensive behaviors and hormonal ecology of cottonmouths have been studied extensively, but the interaction between these is not well understood. We conducted field trials, recording the snake's behavior and obtaining blood samples to quantify plasma CORT concentrations, both upon first encountering a snake and after a 30min standardized confinement stressor. We found that snakes with elevated levels of baseline CORT at first encounter were more likely to strike than exhibit a threat display when approached in the field. However, this behavior was not related to the magnitude of the snake's CORT increase following confinement, suggesting that more stress-prone snakes are not more defensive. Post-stressor antipredator behavior was also not related to any of our CORT measures. This study suggests that baseline CORT levels can be important correlates of defensive behavior. If this is a causative relationship, environmental challenges that increase baseline stress levels of populations may elevate cottonmouth defensive behavior. This would increase costs associated with defensive behavior (energetic, lost opportunity, etc.) and have important consequences for animal-human interactions.

  11. Correlations between stress hormone levels in umbilical cord blood and duration of delivery.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yoko; Doi, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Suguru; Kawai, Kennta; Tanaka, Minoru

    2015-07-01

    Correlations between umbilical cord blood concentration of stress response hormone cortisol and prolactin, and delivery duration were examined. Thirty-three cases were selected in which both mothers and neonates were healthy, and the neonates were delivered at full term. The umbilical cord blood was collected at the time of delivery and concentrations of cortisol and prolactin were measured. The cortisol level was significantly higher after vacuum-assisted delivery than after spontaneous delivery (p=0.044). Significant positive correlations (p=0.0289) were observed between cortisol level and delivery duration. In particular, the duration of the second stage of delivery showed stronger positive correlation (p=0.0304) with the cortisol level. The prolactin level showed weak correlation with the duration of full delivery and the second stage of delivery. The findings suggest that foetuses may respond to stress by uterine contraction during delivery.

  12. Stress hormone levels in a freshwater turtle from sites differing in human activity

    PubMed Central

    Polich, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, such as corticosterone (CORT), commonly serve as a measure of stress levels in vertebrate populations. These hormones have been implicated in regulation of feeding behaviour, locomotor activity, body mass, lipid metabolism and other crucial behaviours and physiological processes. Thus, understanding how glucocorticoids fluctuate seasonally and in response to specific stressors can yield insight into organismal health and the overall health of populations. I compared circulating CORT concentrations between two similar populations of painted turtle, Chrysemys picta, which differed primarily in the level of exposure to human recreational activities. I measured basal CORT concentrations as well as the CORT stress response and did not find any substantive difference between the two populations. This similarity may indicate that painted turtles are not stressed by the presence of humans during the nesting season. The results of this study contribute to our understanding of CORT concentrations in freshwater reptiles, a group that is historically under-represented in studies of circulating hormone concentrations; specifically, studies that seek to use circulating concentrations of stress hormones, such as CORT, as a measure of the effect of human activities on wild populations. They also give insight into how these species as a whole may respond to human recreational activities during crucial life-history stages, such as the nesting season. Although there was no discernable difference between circulating CORT concentrations between the urban and rural populations studied, I did find a significant difference in circulating CORT concentrations between male and female C. picta. This important finding provides better understanding of the sex differences between male and female painted turtles and adds to our understanding of this species and other species of freshwater turtle. PMID:27293763

  13. Social support reduces stress hormone levels in wild chimpanzees across stressful events and everyday affiliations

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Roman M.; Crockford, Catherine; Weltring, Anja; Langergraber, Kevin E.; Deschner, Tobias; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Stress is a major cause of poor health and mortality in humans and other social mammals. Close social bonds buffer stress, however much of the underlying physiological mechanism remains unknown. Here, we test two key hypotheses: bond partner effects occur only during stress (social buffering) or generally throughout daily life (main effects). We assess urinary glucocorticoids (uGC) in wild chimpanzees, with or without their bond partners, after a natural stressor, resting or everyday affiliation. Chimpanzees in the presence of, or interacting with, bond partners rather than others have lowered uGC levels across all three contexts. These results support the main effects hypothesis and indicate that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis regulation is mediated by daily engagement with bond partners both within and out of stressful contexts. Regular social support with bond partners could lead to better health through daily ‘micro-management' of the HPA axis, a finding with potential medical implications for humans. PMID:27802260

  14. Water stress, CO2 and photoperiod influence hormone levels in wheat.

    PubMed

    Nan, Rubin; Carman, John G; Salisbury, Frank B

    2002-03-01

    'Super Dwarf' wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants have been grown from seed to maturity in the Mir space station where they were periodically exposed, because of microgravity and other constraints, to water deficit, waterlogging, high CO2 levels, and low light intensities. The plants produced many tillers, but none of them produced viable seed. Studies have been initiated to determine why the plants responded in these ways. In the present study, effects of the listed stresses on abscisic acid (ABA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and isopentenyl adenosine ([9R]iP) levels in roots and leaves of plants grown under otherwise near optimal conditions on earth were measured. Hormones were extracted, purified by HPLC, and quantified by noncompetitive indirect ELISA. In response to water deficit, ABA levels increased in roots and leaves, IAA levels decreased in roots and leaves, and [9R]iP levels increased in leaves but decreased in roots. In response to waterlogging, ABA, IAA and [9R]iP levels briefly increased in roots and leaves and then decreased. When portions of the root system were exposed to waterlogging and/or water deficit, ABA levels in leaves increased while [9R]iP and IAA levels decreased. These responses were correlated with the percentage of the root system stressed. At a low photosynthetic photon flux (100 micromoles m-2 s-1), plants grown in continuous light had higher leaf ABA levels than plants grown using an 18 or 21 h photoperiod.

  15. Water stress, CO2 and photoperiod influence hormone levels in wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nan, Rubin; Carman, John G.; Salisbury, Frank B.; Campbell, W. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    'Super Dwarf' wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants have been grown from seed to maturity in the Mir space station where they were periodically exposed, because of microgravity and other constraints, to water deficit, waterlogging, high CO2 levels, and low light intensities. The plants produced many tillers, but none of them produced viable seed. Studies have been initiated to determine why the plants responded in these ways. In the present study, effects of the listed stresses on abscisic acid (ABA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and isopentenyl adenosine ([9R]iP) levels in roots and leaves of plants grown under otherwise near optimal conditions on earth were measured. Hormones were extracted, purified by HPLC, and quantified by noncompetitive indirect ELISA. In response to water deficit, ABA levels increased in roots and leaves, IAA levels decreased in roots and leaves, and [9R]iP levels increased in leaves but decreased in roots. In response to waterlogging, ABA, IAA and [9R]iP levels briefly increased in roots and leaves and then decreased. When portions of the root system were exposed to waterlogging and/or water deficit, ABA levels in leaves increased while [9R]iP and IAA levels decreased. These responses were correlated with the percentage of the root system stressed. At a low photosynthetic photon flux (100 micromoles m-2 s-1), plants grown in continuous light had higher leaf ABA levels than plants grown using an 18 or 21 h photoperiod.

  16. Water stress, CO2 and photoperiod influence hormone levels in wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nan, Rubin; Carman, John G.; Salisbury, Frank B.; Campbell, W. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    'Super Dwarf' wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants have been grown from seed to maturity in the Mir space station where they were periodically exposed, because of microgravity and other constraints, to water deficit, waterlogging, high CO2 levels, and low light intensities. The plants produced many tillers, but none of them produced viable seed. Studies have been initiated to determine why the plants responded in these ways. In the present study, effects of the listed stresses on abscisic acid (ABA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and isopentenyl adenosine ([9R]iP) levels in roots and leaves of plants grown under otherwise near optimal conditions on earth were measured. Hormones were extracted, purified by HPLC, and quantified by noncompetitive indirect ELISA. In response to water deficit, ABA levels increased in roots and leaves, IAA levels decreased in roots and leaves, and [9R]iP levels increased in leaves but decreased in roots. In response to waterlogging, ABA, IAA and [9R]iP levels briefly increased in roots and leaves and then decreased. When portions of the root system were exposed to waterlogging and/or water deficit, ABA levels in leaves increased while [9R]iP and IAA levels decreased. These responses were correlated with the percentage of the root system stressed. At a low photosynthetic photon flux (100 micromoles m-2 s-1), plants grown in continuous light had higher leaf ABA levels than plants grown using an 18 or 21 h photoperiod.

  17. Role of Sex Hormone Levels and Psychological Stress in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Assad, Salman; Khan, Hamza H; Ghazanfar, Haider; Khan, Zarak H; Mansoor, Salman; Rahman, Muhammad A; Khan, Ghulam H; Zafar, Bilal; Tariq, Usman; Malik, Shuja A

    2017-06-05

    The aim of this review article is to assess the connection between psychological stress and sex hormones and their effect on the development of autoimmune diseases. Psychological stress describes what people feel when they are under mental, physical, or emotional pressure. We searched for online articles using MEDLINE®, Embase, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar. Our research yielded a total of 165 articles out of which 30 articles were considered for further perusal. The articles were reviewed from February 2016 to February 2017. Case reports and patients suffering from hematolymphoid malignancies and active infections were excluded from the review. Estrogen and testosterone are potential physiological regulatory factors for the peripheral development of CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells. Stress at any age leads to the depletion of estrogen and testosterone stores in the body, leading to the loss of expansion of T regulatory cells, making the immature B cells evade the negative selection at the germinal center, or in other words, leading to the loss of central tolerance, a triggering event in autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus. Autoimmune diseases in women are most likely due to changes in estrogen levels during mental, physical, pre-menopausal, post-menopausal, and pregnancy-induced stress. We conclude that modulating estrogen in females (pre-menopausal and post-menopausal) and testosterone in males can be used to treat stress-related immune imbalance resulting in autoimmune diseases in both sexes.

  18. Plasma levels of trace elements and exercise induced stress hormones in well-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Soria, Marisol; González-Haro, Carlos; Ansón, Miguel; López-Colón, José L; Escanero, Jesús F

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the variation and relationship of several trace elements, metabolic substrates and stress hormones activated by exercise during incremental exercise. Seventeen well-trained endurance athletes performed a cycle ergometer test: after a warm-up of 10 min at 2.0 W kg(-1), the workload was increased by 0.5 W kg(-1) every 10 min until exhaustion. Prior diet, activity patterns, and levels of exercise training were controlled, and tests timed to minimize variations due to the circadian rhythm. Oxygen uptake, blood lactate concentration, plasma ions (Zn, Se, Mn and Co), serum glucose, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) and several hormones were measured at rest, at the end of each stage and 3, 5 and 7 min post-exercise. Urine specific gravity was measured before and after the test, and participants drank water ad libitum. Significant differences were found in plasma Zn and Se levels as a function of exercise intensity. Zn was significantly correlated with epinephrine, norepinephrine and cortisol (r = 0.884, P < 0.01; r = 0.871, P < 0.01; and r = 0.808, P = 0.05); and Se showed significant positive correlations whit epinephrine and cortisol (r = 0.743, P < 0.05; and r = 0.776, P < 0.05). Neither Zn nor Se levels were associated with insulin or glucagon, and neither Mn nor Co levels were associated with any of the hormones or substrate metabolites studied. Further, while Zn levels were found to be associated only with lactate, plasma Se was significantly correlated with lactate and glucose (respectively for Zn: r = 0.891, P < 0.01; and for Se: r = 0.743, P < 0.05; r = 0.831, P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data suggest that there is a positive correlation between the increases in plasma Zn or Se and stress hormones variations induced by exercise along different submaximal intensities in well-hydrated well-trained endurance athletes.

  19. Central serotonin transporter levels are associated with stress hormone response and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Reimold, Matthias; Knobel, Astrid; Rapp, Michael A.; Batra, Anil; Wiedemann, Klaus; Ströhle, Andreas; Zimmer, Anke; Schönknecht, Peter; Smolka, Michael N.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Goldman, David; Machulla, Hans-Jürgen; Bares, Roland; Heinz, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Negative mood states are characterized by both stress hormone dysregulation and serotonergic dysfunction, reflected by altered thalamic serotonin transporter (5-HTT) levels. However, so far, no study examined the individual association between cortisol response and cerebral in vivo 5-HTT levels in patients suffering from negative mood states. Objective The objective of this cross-sectional study was to assess the interrelation of cortisol response, thalamic 5-HTT levels, and anxiety in healthy subjects and two previously published samples of patients with unipolar major depression (UMD) and obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), controlling for age, gender, 5-HTT genotype, smoking, and seasonality. Methods Regional 5-HTT levels and cortisol response to dexamethasone-corticotropin (Dex-CRH) challenge were assessed in consecutive samples of medication-free patients suffering from UMD (N=10) and OCD (N=10), and 20 healthy volunteers. The intervention used was combined Dex-CRH test and [11C]DASB positron emission tomography. The main outcome measures were: 5-HTT binding potential (BPND) in a predefined thalamic ROI, cortisol response defined as the maximum cortisol increase in the combined Dex-CRH-test, and state of anxiety from the state-trait-anxiety inventory. Results Reduced thalamic 5-HTT BPND was associated with increased cortisol response (r=−0.35, p<0.05; in patients: r=−0.53, p<0.01) and with increased state anxiety (r=−0.46, p<0.01), surviving correction for age, gender, 5-HTT genotype, smoking, and seasonality (p<0.05). The 5-HTT genotype, on the contrary, was not significantly associated with cortisol response (p=0.19) or negative mood (p=0.23). Conclusion The association between stress hormone response, thalamic 5-HTT levels, and anxiety in patients suffering from negative mood states suggests an interaction between two major mechanisms implicated in negative mood states in humans. PMID:20585760

  20. Plasma hormone levels in human subject during stress loads in microgravity and at readaptation to Earth's gravity.

    PubMed

    Macho, L; Koska, J; Ksinantova, L; Vigas, M; Noskov, V B; Grigoriev, A I; Kvetnansky, R

    2001-07-01

    In great part of the investigations of endocrine system functions in astronauts during space flights the plasma levels of hormones and metabolites were determined only in resting conditions, usually from one blood sample collection. Such levels reflected the psychical and physical state and new hormonal homeostasis of organism at the time of blood collection, however, the functional capacity of neuroendocrine system to respond to various stress stimuli during space flight remained unknown. The aim of present investigations was to study dynamic changes of hormone levels during the stress and metabolic loads (insulin induced hypoglycemia, physical exercise and oral glucose tolerance test) at the exposure of human subject to microgravity on the space station MIR. The responses of sympatico-adrenomedullary system to these stress and workloads were presented by Kvetnansky et al.

  1. The effects of palm vitamin E on stress hormone levels and gastric lesions in stress-induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Aziz Ibrahim, Ibrahim Abdel; Kamisah, Yusof; Nafeeza, Mohd Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This study examines the effects of palm vitamin E (PVE) or α-tocopherol (α-TF) supplementation on adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), corticosterone and gastric lesions in rats exposed to water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS). Material and methods Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were divided into three groups. Group I: 20 rats as a control group were given a normal diet. Group II: 20 rats received oral supplementation of PVE at 60 mg/kg body weight. Group III: 20 rats received oral supplementation of α-TF at 60 mg/kg body weight. After the treatment period of 28 days, each group was further subdivided into two groups: 10 rats not exposed to stress, and the other 10 rats subjected to WIRS for 3.5 h. Blood samples were taken to measure the ACTH and corticosterone levels. The rats were then sacrificed and the stomach excised and opened along the greater curvature and examined for lesions. Results Rats exposed to WIRS had lesions in their stomach mucosa. Our findings showed that dietary supplementation of PVE or α-TF was able to reduce gastric lesions significantly in comparison to the stressed controls. The WIRS increased plasma ACTH and corticosterone significantly. Palm vitamin E and α-TF treatments reduced these parameters significantly compared to the stressed controls. Conclusions Supplementation with either PVE or α-TF reduces the formation of gastric lesions, probably by inhibiting the elevation of ACTH and corticosterone levels induced by stress. PMID:22457670

  2. Acute melatonin and para-chloroamphetamine interactions on pineal, brain and serum serotonin levels as well as stress hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Manzana, E J; Chen, W J; Champney, T H

    2001-08-03

    para-Chloroamphetamine, an amphetamine analog, alters serotonergic neurochemistry. In previous reports, melatonin (MEL), when administered with other amphetamine analogs, altered the decline in serotonin content produced by these analogs. The present studies assessed the effects of various doses of melatonin and p-chloroamphetamine on serotonin levels in numerous brain regions in male rats. Melatonin (10, 25 or 50 mg/kg, s.c.) and p-chloroamphetamine (3 or 5 mg/kg, s.c.) were administered and, 3 h later, brain samples and serum were collected. Serotonin levels in the serum and various regions of the brain were assayed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Melatonin in combination with a high dose of p-chloroamphetamine (5 mg/kg) produced cumulative deficits in serotonin levels in the serum. However, serotonin levels in the pineal, cortex or brain stem in all combined melatonin and p-chloroamphetamine groups were not significantly different from groups that received p-chloroamphetamine alone. Serum adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone levels were significantly elevated in the melatonin and p-chloroamphetamine combined groups, suggesting that animals receiving both treatments were more stressed than control animals or animals receiving melatonin or p-chloroamphetamine alone. These results indicate that melatonin does not alter p-chloroamphetamine-induced deficits in central serotonin levels. The increased serum adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone and serotonin levels observed following melatonin and p-chloroamphetamine treatment suggest that this combination may have adverse peripheral effects.

  3. The influence of occupational heat exposure on cognitive performance and blood level of stress hormones: a field study report.

    PubMed

    Mazlomi, Adel; Golbabaei, Farideh; Farhang Dehghan, Somayeh; Abbasinia, Marzieh; Mahmoud Khani, Somayeh; Ansari, Mohammad; Hosseini, Mostafa

    2017-09-01

    This article aimed to investigate the effect of heat stress on cognitive performance and the blood concentration of stress hormones among workers of a foundry plant. Seventy workers within the exposed (35 people) and unexposed (35 people) groups were studied. The wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index was measured for heat stress assessment. The cognitive performance tests were conducted using the Stroop color word test (SCWT) before and during working hours. For the assessment of the serum level of cortisol and the plasma level of adrenaline and noradrenaline, blood samples were taken during working hours from both groups. Only for SCWT III was there a significant relationship between heat stress and test duration, error rate and reaction time. The laboratory test results revealed significantly higher concentrations of cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline in the exposed subjects than in the unexposed group. There existed a positive correlation between cortisol, adrenaline, noradrenaline and WBGT index and also test duration and reaction time of SCWT III, and number of errors of SCWT I, SCWT II and SCWT III during work. Heat stress can lead to an increase in the blood level of stress hormones, resulting in cognitive performance impairment.

  4. Long-Term Impact of Maternal Substance Use during Pregnancy and Extrauterine Environmental Adversity: Stress Hormone Levels of Preadolescent Children

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Charles R.; Lambert, Brittany L.; Bann, Carla M.; Lester, Barry M.; Shankaran, Seetha; Bada, Henrietta S.; Whitaker, Toni M.; LaGasse, Linda L.; Hammond, Jane; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) is associated with blunted stress responsivity within the extrauterine environment. This study investigated the association between PCE and diurnal salivary cortisol levels in preadolescent children characterized by high biological and/or social risk (N = 725). Saliva samples were collected at their home. Analyses revealed no group differences in basal evening or morning cortisol levels; however, children with higher degrees of PCE exhibited blunted overnight increases in cortisol, controlling for additional risk factors. Race and caregiver depression were also associated with diurnal cortisol patterns. While repeated PCE may contribute to alterations in the normal or expected stress response later in life, sociodemographic and environmental factors are likewise important in understanding hormone physiology, especially as more time elapses from the PCE. Anticipating the potential long-term medical, developmental, or behavioral effects of an altered ability to mount a normal protective cortisol stress response is essential in optimizing the outcomes of children with PCE. PMID:21546861

  5. The effects of heat stress on a number of hematological parameters and levels of thyroid hormones in foundry workers.

    PubMed

    Norloei, Sahar; Jafari, Mohammad Javad; Omidi, Leila; Khodakarim, Soheila; Bashash, Davood; Abdollahi, Mohammad Bagher; Jafari, Mina

    2016-11-24

    The objective of this research was to determine the effects of heat stress on some hematological parameters and thyroid hormones among foundry workers. This study was performed on 25 heat-acclimated subjects while 10 office workers were selected as the control group. Wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) was determined to estimate the heat stress. Blood sampling was conducted before and after the daily work shift. The mean value of the WBGT index was 35 °C. The levels of plasma osmolality (p = 0.04) and white blood cells (p = 0.03) in the case group (before exposure to heat) were significantly higher than those in control group. No significant differences were observed between the average levels of T3 (p = 0.79) and T4 (p = 0.17) hormones between two groups. A positive relationship was found between the variation of some hematological parameters and thyroid hormones with WBGT index and air temperature.

  6. Stress Hormones and their Regulation in a Captive Dolphin Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    stimulation experiments, an animal’s hormonal and physiological response to a simulated stressor can be evaluated. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Stress Hormones and Their Regulation in a Captive...will determine baseline levels of putative stress hormones and evaluate the functional consequences of increased stress in the bottlenose dolphin

  7. Environmental prenatal stress eliminates brain and maternal behavioral sex differences and alters hormone levels in female rats.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, M C R; Ortega, E; Gómez, F; Segovia, S; Pérez-Laso, C

    2015-07-01

    Environmental prenatal stress (EPS) has effects on fetuses that are long-lasting, altering their hormone levels, brain morphology and behavior when they reach maturity. In previous research, we demonstrated that EPS affects the expression of induced maternal behavior (MB), the neuroendocrine system, and morphology of the sexually dimorphic accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) involved in reproductive behavior patterns. The bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT) is another vomeronasal (VN) structure that plays an inhibitory role in rats in the expression of induced maternal behavior in female and male virgins. In the present study, we have ascertained whether the behavioral, neuroendocrine, and neuromorphological alterations of the AOB found after EPS also appear in the BAOT. After applying EPS to pregnant rats during the late gestational period, in their female offspring at maturity we tested induced maternal behavior, BAOT morphology and plasma levels of testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), progesterone (P), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (Cpd B). EPS: a) affected the induction of MB, showed a male-like pattern of care for pups, b) elevated plasma levels of Cpd B and reduced E2 in comparison with the controls, and c) significantly increased the number of BAOT neurons compared to the control females and comparable to the control male group. These findings provide further evidence that stress applied to pregnant rats produces long-lasting behavioral, endocrine and neuroanatomical alterations in the female offspring that are evident when they become mature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of neonatal maternal stress on plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone, leptin, and ghrelin in adult male rats exposed to acute heterotypic stressor.

    PubMed

    Holubová, A; Štofková, A; Jurčovičová, J; Šlamberová, R

    2016-12-22

    Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is important for maintenance of homeostasis during stress. Recent studies have shown a connection between the HPA axis and adipose tissue. The present study investigated the effect of acute heterotypic stress on plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), corticosterone (CORT), leptin, and ghrelin in adult male rats with respect to neonatal maternal social and physical stressors. Thirty rat mothers and sixty of their male progeny were used. Pups were divided into three groups: unstressed control (C), stressed by maternal social stressor (S), stressed by maternal social and physical stressors (SW). Levels of hormones were measured in adult male progeny following an acute swimming stress (10 min) or no stress. ELISA immunoassay was used to measured hormones. The ACTH and CORT levels were significantly increased in all groups of adult progeny after acute stress; however, CORT levels were significantly lower in both neonatally stressed groups compared to controls. After acute stress, plasma leptin levels were decreased in the C and SW groups but increased in the S group. The data suggest that long-term neonatal stressors lead to lower sensitivity of ACTH receptors in the adrenal cortex, which could be a sign of stress adaptation in adulthood. Acute stress in adult male rats changes plasma levels of leptin differently relative to social or physical neonatal stressors.

  9. Molt-associated changes in hematologic and plasma biochemical values and stress hormone levels in African penguins (Spheniscus demersus).

    PubMed

    Mazzaro, Lisa M; Meegan, Jenny; Sarran, Delphine; Romano, Tracy A; Bonato, Vinicius; Deng, Shibing; Dunn, J Lawrence

    2013-12-01

    Handling, including blood collection, has often been discouraged in molting penguins because it is considered an additional stress imposed on birds already experiencing major physiologic stress associated with molting. To evaluate the degree of physiologic stress posed by molting, we compared the hematologic and plasma biochemical values and hormone levels of molting and nonmolting African penguins, Spheniscus demersus. Five male and 5 female penguins randomly chosen were given complete physical examinations, were weighed, and blood samples were taken at 7 time points before, during, and after the molt. Data were analyzed by linear mixed-model analysis of variance. Throughout the study, behavior and appetite remained normal. Catecholamine levels were highly variable within and among subjects, whereas mean corticosterone levels were significantly different between baseline, molt, and postmolt values. Significant differences from baseline values were observed in many of the hematologic analytes; however, only decreases in hematocrit and red blood cell count values were considered clinically significant. Anemia due to experimentally induced blood loss as a possible cause of the significant hematologic changes was ruled out based on results of a follow-up control study during the nonmolt season, which showed no significant changes in hematocrit level or total red blood cell counts when using similar sampling protocols, which indicates that these changes were associated with molt.

  10. Are stress hormone levels a good proxy of foraging success? An experiment with king penguins, Aptenodytes patagonicus.

    PubMed

    Angelier, Frédéric; Giraudeau, Mathieu; Bost, Charles-André; Le Bouard, Fabrice; Chastel, Olivier

    2009-09-01

    In seabirds, variations in stress hormone (corticosterone; henceforth CORT) levels have been shown to reflect changing marine conditions and, especially, changes in food availability. However, it remains unclear how CORT levels can be mechanistically affected by these changes at the individual level. Specifically, the influence of food acquisition and foraging success on CORT secretion is poorly understood. In this study, we tested whether food acquisition can reduce baseline CORT levels (;the food intake hypothesis') by experimentally reducing foraging success of King Penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus). Although CORT levels overall decreased during a foraging trip, CORT levels did not differ between experimental birds and controls. These results demonstrate that mass gain at sea is not involved in changes in baseline CORT levels in this species. The overall decrease in CORT levels during a foraging trip could result from CORT-mediated energy regulation (;the energy utilisation hypothesis'). Along with other evidence, we suggest that the influence of foraging success and food intake on CORT levels is complex and that the ecological meaning of baseline CORT levels can definitely vary between species and ecological contexts. Therefore, further studies are needed to better understand (1) how baseline CORT levels are functionally regulated according to energetic status and energetic demands and (2) to what extent CORT can be used to aid in the conservation of seabird populations.

  11. Evaluation of immune and stress status in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena): can hormones and mRNA expression levels serve as indicators to assess stress?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The harbour porpoise is exposed to increasing pressure caused by anthropogenic activities in its marine environment. Numerous offshore wind farms are planned or under construction in the North and Baltic Seas, which will increase underwater noise during both construction and operation. A better understanding of how anthropogenic impacts affect the behaviour, health, endocrinology, immunology and physiology of the animals is thus needed. The present study compares levels of stress hormones and mRNA expression of cytokines and acute-phase proteins in blood samples of harbour porpoises exposed to different levels of stress during handling, in rehabilitation or permanent human care. Free-ranging harbour porpoises, incidentally caught in pound nets in Denmark, were compared to harbour porpoises in rehabilitation at SOS Dolfijn in Harderwijk, the Netherlands, and individuals permanently kept in human care in the Dolfinarium Harderwijk and Fjord & Belt Kerteminde, Denmark. Blood samples were investigated for catecholamines, adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine, as well as for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, metanephrine and normetanephrine. mRNA expression levels of relevant cell mediators (cytokines IL-10 and TNFα, acute-phase proteins haptoglobin and C-reactive protein and the heat shock protein HSP70) were measured using real-time PCR. Results Biomarker expression levels varied between free-ranging animals and porpoises in human care. Hormone and cytokine ranges showed correlations to each other and to the health status of investigated harbour porpoises. Hormone concentrations were higher in free-ranging harbour porpoises than in animals in human care. Adrenaline can be used as a parameter for the initial reaction to acute stress situations; noradrenaline, dopamine, ACTH and cortisol are more likely indicators for the following minutes of acute stress. There is evidence for different correlations between production of normetanephrine

  12. Aspartame and Soft Drink-Mediated Neurotoxicity in Rats: Implication of Oxidative Stress, Apoptotic Signaling Pathways, Electrolytes and Hormonal Levels.

    PubMed

    Lebda, Mohamed A; Sadek, Kadry M; El-Sayed, Yasser S

    2017-06-28

    A significant association between fructose corn syrup in sweetened beverages consumption and increased risk of detrimental central nervous system effects has been recently reported. We hypothesized that the aspartame and soft drink induced disturbances in energy production and endocrine function, which play a role in the induction of brain damage. Therefore, we aimed to assess the effect of aspartame and soft drink on brain function and the link between energy status in the brain, oxidative stress and molecular pathways of apoptosis. Thirty rats were randomly assigned to drink water, aspartame (240 mg/kg orally) and cola soft drinks (free access) daily for two months. Subchronic intake of aspartame and soft drink significantly disrupted the brain energy production, as indicated by inhibited serum and brain creatine kinase, specifically in soft drink-received rats. Moreover, they substantially altered serum electrolytes (increased Ca and Na, and depleted Cu, Fe, Zn and K levels), and accordingly the related hormonal status (increased T4 and PTH, and lowered T3 and aldosterone levels), particularly in soft drink-received rats reflecting brain damage. Additionally, significant increment of acetylcholine esterase activity concomitant with the reduction of antioxidant molecules (SOD, CAT, GSH-Px and GSH), and induction of malondialdehyde level are precisely indicative of oxidative brain damage. Brain mRNA transcripts of target genes showed that aspartame and soft drink induced upregulation of BAX, Casp3, P27 and Mdm2 (1.5-fold) and down-regulation of Bcl2, suggesting an activation of cellular apoptosis. Collectively, subchronic aspartame and soft drink-induced brain damage in rats may be driven via a mechanism that involves energy production disruption, electrolytes and hormonal imbalance, increased oxidative stress and activation of molecular pathway of neuronal apoptosis.

  13. Stress Hormones and Their Regulation in a Captive Dolphin Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Stress Hormones and Their Regulation in a Captive Dolphin ...understanding of how the stress response operates in marine mammals by evaluating markers of stress in a captive dolphin population. This research effort will...determine baseline levels of putative stress hormones and evaluate the functional consequences of increased stress in the bottlenose dolphin

  14. Withania somnifera improves semen quality by regulating reproductive hormone levels and oxidative stress in seminal plasma of infertile males.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad Kaleem; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Shukla, Kamla Kant; Islam, Najmul; Rajender, Singh; Madhukar, Dama; Shankhwar, Satya Narain; Ahmad, Sohail

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the impact of Withania somnifera roots on semen profile, oxidative biomarkers, and reproductive hormone levels of infertile men. Prospective study. Departments of Biochemistry and Urology, Chhatrapati Shahuji Maharaj Medical University, Lucknow, India. Seventy-five normal healthy fertile men (control subjects) and 75 men undergoing infertility screening. High-performance liquid chromatography assay procedure for quantization of vitamin A and E in seminal plasma. Biochemical parameters in seminal plasma were estimated by standard spectrophotometric procedures. Estimation of T, LH, FSH, and PRL in blood serum by RIA methods. Before and after the treatment, seminal plasma biochemical parameters, antioxidant vitamins, and serum T, LH, FSH, and PRL levels were measured. Withania somnifera inhibited lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content and improved sperm count and motility. Treatment of infertile men recovered the seminal plasma levels of antioxidant enzymes and vitamins A, C, and E and corrected fructose. Moreover, treatment also significantly increased serum T and LH and reduced the levels of FSH and PRL. The treatment with W. somnifera effectively reduced oxidative stress, as assessed by decreased levels of various oxidants and improved level of diverse antioxidants. Moreover, the levels of T, LH, FSH and PRL, good indicators of semen quality, were also reversed in infertile subjects after treatment with the herbal preparation. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased Lead Biomarker Levels Are Associated with Changes in Hormonal Response to Stress in Occupationally Exposed Male Participants

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Marie C.; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A.; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Nwankwo, Chizoba; Yanger, T. Steven; Todd, Andrew C.; Moynihan, Jan; Walton, James; Brooks, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Background: Lead (Pb) exposure has been associated with a host of pathological conditions in humans. In rodents Pb exposure has been shown to alter the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis function. Objective: We investigated the effects of lead on responses of the HPA axis to a psychosocial laboratory stressor administered to Pb-exposed workers. Methods: Seventy male participants completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Serum cortisol (CORT) and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were assessed in response to and during recovery from the stressor. We measured Pb in blood, a biomarker of recent exposure, and in tibia bone by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), a biomarker of chronic exposure. Results: The TSST induced statistically significant increases in ACTH and CORT in the participants. At baseline, ACTH was not significantly higher (p = 0.052) in participants with higher blood Pb concentration, but CORT was significantly lower in these participants (p = 0.016). Adjusted linear regression models indicated a positive association between blood and bone Pb and the increase in ACTH in response to stress. However, Pb was not strongly associated with changes in CORT in response to stress. Pb was also associated with the ACTH:CORT ratio at baseline and throughout the course of the protocol, suggesting an adrenal hyporesponsiveness in participants with higher Pb concentrations. Conclusion: The altered HPA-axis stress response observed in participants exposed to higher levels of Pb further supports the idea that lead may contribute to a host of biological dysfunctions beyond the classical neurotoxic effects. PMID:22112310

  16. Telomere length is inversely correlated with urinary stress hormone levels in healthy controls but not in un-medicated depressed individuals-preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Fair, Brittany; Mellon, Synthia H; Epel, Elissa S; Lin, Jue; Révész, Dóra; Verhoeven, Josine E; Penninx, Brenda W; Reus, Victor I; Rosser, Rebecca; Hough, Christina M; Mahan, Laura; Burke, Heather M; Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Wolkowitz, Owen M

    2017-08-01

    Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is a biomarker of cellular aging affected by chronic stress. The relationship of LTL to the stress hormones, cortisol and catecholamines, is unclear, as are possible differences between healthy controls (HC) and individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). This small pilot study is the first to examine the relationship between cortisol, catecholamines and LTL specifically in un-medicated MDD in comparison with HC. Participants included 16 un-medicated MDD subjects and 15 HC for assay of LTL, 12-hour overnight urinary free cortisol and catecholamine levels. LTL, cortisol and catecholamine levels did not significantly differ between groups. In HC, a hierarchical regression analysis indicated that higher levels of cortisol were correlated with shorter LTL (p=0.003) above and beyond age and sex. Higher catecholamine levels were nearly-significant with shorter LTL (p=0.055). Neither hormone was correlated with shorter LTL in MDD (p's>0.28). To assess a possible cumulative effect of stress hormone activation, a summary score was calculated for each subject based on the number of stress hormone levels above the median for that group (HC or MDD). A significant inverse graded relationship was observed between LTL and the number of activated systems in HC (p=0.001), but not in MDD (p=0.96). This pilot study provides preliminary evidence that stress hormone levels, especially cortisol, are inversely related to LTL in HC, but not in un-medicated MDD. Clarification of these relationships in larger samples could aid in understanding differential mechanisms underlying stress-related cellular aging in healthy and depressed populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reproductive and stress hormone levels in goldfish (Carassius auratus) exposed to oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Lister, A; Nero, V; Farwell, A; Dixon, D G; Van Der Kraak, G

    2008-05-01

    Athabasca oil sands mining in northern Alberta produces process-affected waters that are characterized by the presence of naphthenic acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high salinity. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of these process-affected waters on reproductive and stress related endpoints in mature goldfish, Carassius auratus. In two separate studies, testosterone and 17beta-estradiol levels in the plasma were significantly reduced in both male and female goldfish caged for 19 days in process-affected waters relative to controls. This effect was most pronounced in goldfish caged at a site containing mature fine tailing and tailings pond water (P5). Ovarian and testicular tissues from fish in the caging studies were incubated in vitro to evaluate potential differences in basal steroid production levels and responsiveness to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Basal levels of testosterone were reduced significantly in males and females from P5 compared with the control pond (P1) demonstrating that the gonads from exposed fish had a diminished steroidogenic capacity. Gonadal tissues of fish from all ponds responded similarly to hCG suggesting that the steroid biosynthetic pathway remained functionally intact. Plasma cortisol levels were significantly higher in male goldfish caged in a pond containing mature fine tailings and capped with uncontaminated water (P3) and in P5 compared with P1. Collectively, these studies suggest that waste products of oil sands mining have the potential to disrupt the normal endocrine functioning in exposed fish through alterations to both reproductive and glucocorticoid hormone biosynthesis. In additional laboratory studies, exposure of goldfish to a naphthenic acid extract for 7 days failed to replicate the effects of processes-affected waters on plasma steroid levels and the causative agent(s) responsible for the effects on steroid biosynthesis remains to be identified.

  18. [The experimental study on melatonin gastro intestinal motility and plasma levels of stress hormones in overtraining rat].

    PubMed

    Jing, Hui-feng; Wang, Xiao-mei

    2015-09-01

    To study the effect of melatonin on the gastrointestinal motility and plasma levels of the stress hormone in overtraining rats. Thirty adult SD rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10): control group, over-training group, melatonin intervention group. 30 min before each training, rats in the control and over-training groups were fed with normal saline (15 mg/kg) once a day and 5 times per week, while rats in the melatonin intervention group were administrated with melatonin, perfusion in the intervention group (15 mg/kg). Excessive training group and melatonin intervention group rats were subjected to excessive training at 5 times a week for 6 weeks. After 6 weeks, the gastric emptying rate, small intestinal propulsion ratio and levels of plasma motilin (MTL) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), cortisol (CORT) and catecholamines (CA) were observed in all groups. Compared with the control group, the gastric emptying rate, small intestinal propulsion ratio and levels of plasma MTL, CORT and CA were increased significantly (P < 0.01) while the content of CGRP was reduced (P < 0.01) in over-training group. After treated with melatonin, this trend was reversed, that was, the gastric emptying rate, small intestinal propulsion ratio and levels of plasma MTL, CORT and CA were surpressed significantly (P < 0.01) while the content of CGRP was improved obviously (P < 0.01) in over-training group. Melatonin plays an important role in protecting gastrointestinal tract from dysfunction, in which MTL, CGRP, CORT and CA are all involved.

  19. Noise Stress-Induced Changes in mRNA Levels of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Family Molecules and Glucocorticoid Receptors in the Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, E; Akyazi, İ; Ergül-Ekiz, E; Matur, E

    2015-01-01

    Noise is a widespread stress resource that may lead to detrimental effects on the health. However, the molecular basis of the stress response caused by noise remains elusive. We have studied the effects of acute and chronic noise stress on stress-related molecules in the hypothalamus and hippocampus and also corticosterone responses. Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into control, acute and chronic noise stress groups. While the chronic noise stress group animals were exposed to 100 dB white noise for 4 h/a day during 30 days, the acute noise stress group of animals was exposed to the same level of stress once for 4 h. The expression profiles of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), CRH1, CRH2 receptors and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNAs were analysed by RT-PCR. Chronic noise stress upregulated CRH mRNA levels in the hypothalamus. Both acute and chronic noise increased CRH-R1 mRNA in the hypothalamus but decreased it in the hippocampus. GR mRNA levels were decreased by chronic noise stress in the hippocampus. The present results suggest that while corticosterone responses have habituated to continuous noise stress, the involvement of CRH family molecules and glucocorticoid receptors in the noise stress responses are different and structure specific.

  20. Assessment of stress levels in girls with central precocious puberty before and during long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Menk, Tais A S; Inácio, Marlene; Macedo, Delanie B; Bessa, Danielle S; Latronico, Ana C; Mendonca, Berenice B; Brito, Vinicius Nahime

    2017-05-23

    The objective of the study was to determine the stress levels of girls with central precocious puberty (CPP) before and during treatment with a long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa). The Child Stress Scale (CSS) was used for 10 unrelated girls with CPP before and after the first year of GnRHa treatment. The CSS is divided into four subscales (physical, psychological, psychological with depressive component and psychophysiological reactions). Through a quantitative analysis, it is possible to classify stress into four stages: alarm, resistance, near-exhaustion and exhaustion. At diagnosis, 90% of the girls showed stress levels scores at the alarm or resistance stage on at least one subscale, mostly in terms of physical and psychological reactions. The mean total stress score was significantly higher before when compared to after GnRHa treatment (43.4±15.6 vs. 28.9±9.7; p<0.05). The mean stress scores obtained in all subscales, except the one on psychophysiological reactions, were significantly higher before GnRHa treatment. Higher stress levels were a common finding in girls with CPP before treatment. The significant stress level reduction after pubertal suppression reinforces the idea that sexual precocity is a stressful condition in children. The CSS might be a useful tool for psychological assessment of patients with CPP.

  1. Host stress hormones alter vector feeding preferences, success, and productivity

    PubMed Central

    Burkett-Cadena, Nathan; Burgan, Sarah C.; Schrey, Aaron W.; Hassan, Hassan K.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Martin, Lynn B.

    2016-01-01

    Stress hormones might represent a key link between individual-level infection outcome, population-level parasite transmission, and zoonotic disease risk. Although the effects of stress on immunity are well known, stress hormones could also affect host–vector interactions via modification of host behaviours or vector-feeding patterns and subsequent reproductive success. Here, we experimentally manipulated songbird stress hormones and examined subsequent feeding preferences, feeding success, and productivity of mosquito vectors in addition to defensive behaviours of hosts. Despite being more defensive, birds with elevated stress hormone concentrations were approximately twice as likely to be fed on by mosquitoes compared to control birds. Moreover, stress hormones altered the relationship between the timing of laying and clutch size in blood-fed mosquitoes. Our results suggest that host stress could affect the transmission dynamics of vector-borne parasites via multiple pathways. PMID:27512147

  2. Host stress hormones alter vector feeding preferences, success, and productivity.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Stephanie S; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan; Burgan, Sarah C; Schrey, Aaron W; Hassan, Hassan K; Unnasch, Thomas R; Martin, Lynn B

    2016-08-17

    Stress hormones might represent a key link between individual-level infection outcome, population-level parasite transmission, and zoonotic disease risk. Although the effects of stress on immunity are well known, stress hormones could also affect host-vector interactions via modification of host behaviours or vector-feeding patterns and subsequent reproductive success. Here, we experimentally manipulated songbird stress hormones and examined subsequent feeding preferences, feeding success, and productivity of mosquito vectors in addition to defensive behaviours of hosts. Despite being more defensive, birds with elevated stress hormone concentrations were approximately twice as likely to be fed on by mosquitoes compared to control birds. Moreover, stress hormones altered the relationship between the timing of laying and clutch size in blood-fed mosquitoes. Our results suggest that host stress could affect the transmission dynamics of vector-borne parasites via multiple pathways.

  3. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Antonio; Di Segni, Chantal; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Olivieri, Giulio; Silvestrini, Andrea; Meucci, Elisabetta; Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases.

  4. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Sebastiano; Olivieri, Giulio; Meucci, Elisabetta; Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases. PMID:27051079

  5. Hormone signaling pathways under stress combinations.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-11-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are continuously exposed to various environmental stresses. In contrast to the controlled conditions employed in many researches, more than one or more abiotic and/or biotic stresses simultaneously occur and highly impact growth of plants and crops in the field environments. Therefore, an urgent need to generate crops with enhanced tolerance to stress combinations exists. Researchers, however, focused on the mechanisms underlying acclimation of plants to combined stresses only in recent studies. Plant hormones might be a key regulator of the tailored responses of plants to different stress combinations. Co-ordination between different hormone signaling, or hormone signaling and other pathways such as ROS regulatory mechanisms could be flexible, being altered by timing and types of stresses, and could be different depending on plant species under the stress combinations. In this review, update on recent studies focusing on complex-mode of hormone signaling under stress combinations will be provided.

  6. Determining Baseline Stress-Related Hormone Values in Large Cetaceans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    related hormone levels associated with capture methods used prior to the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972. In other words, there will be no stress...Office of Naval Research’s Marine Mammal Physiology Program (Code 32) seeks to develop an understanding of the natural variation of stress markers...in marine mammals and acoustic exposure and ‘biologically significant’ disturbances. This study is aimed at determining baseline stress-hormone

  7. Energy sources and levels influenced on performance parameters, thyroid hormones, and HSP70 gene expression of broiler chickens under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Raghebian, Majid; Sadeghi, Ali Asghar; Aminafshar, Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of energy sources and levels on body and organs weights, thyroid hormones, and heat shock protein (HSP70) gene expression in broilers under heat stress. In a completely randomized design, 600 1-day-old Cobb chickens were assigned to five dietary treatments and four replicates. The chickens were fed diet based on corn as main energy source and energy level based on Cobb standard considered as control (C), corn-based diet with 3 % lesser energy than the control (T1), corn-based diet with 6 % lesser energy than the control (T2), corn and soybean oil-based diet according to Cobb standard (T3), and corn and soybean oil-based diet with 3 % upper energy than the control (T4). Temperature was increased to 34 °C for 8 h daily from days 12 to 41 of age to induce heat stress. The chickens in T1 and T2 had lower thyroid hormones and corticosterone levels than those in C, T3, and T4. The highest liver weight was for C and the lowest one was for T4. The highest gene expression was found in chickens fed T4 diet, and the lowest gene expression was for those in T2 group. The highest feed intake and worse feed conversion ratio was related to chickens in T2. The chickens in T3 and T4 had higher feed intake and weight gain than those in C. The results showed that the higher energy level supplied from soybean oil could enhance gene expression of HSP70 and decline the level of corticosterone and thyroid hormones and consequently improved performance.

  8. Hormonal actions in the Protozoan stress: A review.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2015-12-01

    In the higher ranked animals the alteration of the environment can provoke a uniform reaction named general adaptation system (GAS), which is a manifestation of stress, caused by different stressors. During GAS certain organs show typical reactions and two members of the hormonal system are activated: epinephine and glucocorticoids. As the unicellular ciliate Tetrahymena also synthesize most of the mammalian-like hormones (except steroids), it can respond to stress by a hormonal reaction. The main differences, related to the mammalian GAS hormonal reaction are, that 1) in Tetrahymena the level of all of the hormones studied significantly elevates under the effect of heat, osmotic or chemical stress and 2) the single stress effect is durable. It is manifested at least to the 100th generations, which means that it is inherited epigenetically. Not only hormone synthesis but the receptorial hormone binding is also elevated, which means that the whole hormonal system is activated. The stress reaction (GAS) phylogenetically can be deduced to a unicellular (Protozoan) level however, prokaryotes - which are also stress-reactive - are using another mechanisms.

  9. Oxidative stress levels are reduced in postmenopausal women with exercise training regardless of hormone replacement therapy status.

    PubMed

    Attipoe, Selasi; Park, Joon-Young; Fenty, Nicola; Phares, Dana; Brown, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether postmenopausal women on HRT would experience a greater reduction in oxidative stress after 24 weeks of aerobic exercise training compared to postmenopausal women not on HRT. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), an indicator of oxidative stress, was measured in 48 previously sedentary postmenopausal women on HRT (n = 21) and not on HRT (n = 27) before and after 24 weeks of aerobic exercise training. Baseline levels of TBARS differed significantly between groups after controlling for age, BMI, and fasting blood glucose (P = 0.03). There was a significant reduction in TBARS after 24 weeks of training in the overall group. When analyzed separately, both postmenopausal women on HRT and those not on HRT had a significant reduction in TBARS; however, there was no significant difference between groups (-0.71 +/- 0.14 nmol/ml in non-HRT users vs. -0.50 +/- 0.16 nmol/ml in HRT users; P = 0.33) even after controlling for age, BMI, and baseline levels of TBARS. Our results showed that aerobic exercise training significantly decreased oxidative stress in postmenopausal women; however, both HRT users and non-HRT users benefited equally.

  10. Effect of thermal stress, restricted feeding and combined stresses (thermal stress and restricted feeding) on growth and plasma reproductive hormone levels of Malpura ewes under semi-arid tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Sejian, V; Maurya, V P; Naqvi, S M K

    2011-04-01

    A study was conducted to assess the effect of thermal, nutritional and combined stresses (thermal and nutritional) on the growth, oestradiol and progesterone levels during oestrus cycles in Malpura ewes. Twenty-eight adult Malpura ewes were used in the present study. The ewes were randomly allocated into four groups, viz., GI (n=7; control), GII (n=7; thermal stress), GIII (n=7; restricted feeding) and GIV (n=7; combined stress). The animals were stall fed with a diet consisting of 60% roughage and 40% concentrate. GI and GII ewes were provided with ad libitum feeding while GIII and GIV ewes were provided with restricted feed (30% intake of GI and GII ewes) to induce nutritional insufficiency. GII and GIV ewes were kept in climatic chamber at 40°C and 55% RH for 6 h a day between 10:00 and 16:00 hours to induce thermal stress for a period of two oestrous cycles. Parameters studied were body weight, oestrus incidences, plasma oestradiol 17-β, plasma progesterone, conception rate, gestation period, lambing rate, and birth weight of lambs. The results indicate that combined stress significantly (p<0.05) reduced body weight, oestrus duration, birth weight of lambs, and oestradiol 17-β whereas significantly (p < 0.05) increased oestrus cycle length and progesterone. Furthermore, the results reveal that on comparative basis, ewes were able to better adapt in terms of growth and reproduction to restricted feeding than thermal stress. However, when restricted feeding was coupled with thermal stress it had significant (p<0.05) influence on body weight, average daily gain, oestradiol 17-β and progesterone concentrations. This showed that combined stress were more detrimental for these reproductive hormones in Malpura ewes under a hot semi-arid environment. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Stress, stress hormones, and adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Timothy J; Gould, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus continues to produce new neurons throughout adulthood. Adult neurogenesis has been linked to hippocampal function, including learning and memory, anxiety regulation and feedback of the stress response. It is thus not surprising that stress, which affects hippocampal function, also alters the production and survival of new neurons. Glucocorticoids, along with other neurochemicals, have been implicated in stress-induced impairment of adult neurogenesis. Paradoxically, increases in corticosterone levels are sometimes associated with enhanced adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. In these circumstances, the factors that buffer against the suppressive influence of elevated glucocorticoids remain unknown; their discovery may provide clues to reversing pathological processes arising from chronic exposure to aversive stress.

  12. Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, J.; Smith, S.M.; Aung, K.; Dyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a well-recognized cause of impaired cognition due to hypercalcemia. However, recent studies have suggested that perhaps parathyroid hormone itself plays a role in cognition, especially executive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of parathyroid hormone levels in a study cohort of elders with impaied cognition. Methods: Sixty community-living adults, 65 years of age and older, reported to Adult Protective Services for self-neglect and 55 controls matched (on age, ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status) consented and participated in this study. The research team conducted in-home comprehensive geriatric assessments which included the Mini-mental state exam (MMSE), the 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS) , the Wolf-Klein clock test and a comprehensive nutritional panel, which included parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium. Students t tests and linear regression analyses were performed to assess for bivariate associations. Results: Self-neglecters (M = 73.73, sd=48.4) had significantly higher PTH levels compared to controls (M =47.59, sd=28.7; t=3.59, df=98.94, p<.01). There was no significant group difference in ionized calcium levels. Overall, PTH was correlated with the MMSE (r=-.323, p=.001). Individual regression analyses revealed a statistically significant correlation between PTH and MMSE in the self-neglect group (r=-.298, p=.024) and this remained significant after controlling for ionized calcium levels in the regression. No significant associations were revealed in the control group or among any of the other cognitive measures. Conclusion: Parathyroid hormone may be associated with cognitive performance.

  13. Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, J.; Smith, S.M.; Aung, K.; Dyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a well-recognized cause of impaired cognition due to hypercalcemia. However, recent studies have suggested that perhaps parathyroid hormone itself plays a role in cognition, especially executive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of parathyroid hormone levels in a study cohort of elders with impaied cognition. Methods: Sixty community-living adults, 65 years of age and older, reported to Adult Protective Services for self-neglect and 55 controls matched (on age, ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status) consented and participated in this study. The research team conducted in-home comprehensive geriatric assessments which included the Mini-mental state exam (MMSE), the 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS) , the Wolf-Klein clock test and a comprehensive nutritional panel, which included parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium. Students t tests and linear regression analyses were performed to assess for bivariate associations. Results: Self-neglecters (M = 73.73, sd=48.4) had significantly higher PTH levels compared to controls (M =47.59, sd=28.7; t=3.59, df=98.94, p<.01). There was no significant group difference in ionized calcium levels. Overall, PTH was correlated with the MMSE (r=-.323, p=.001). Individual regression analyses revealed a statistically significant correlation between PTH and MMSE in the self-neglect group (r=-.298, p=.024) and this remained significant after controlling for ionized calcium levels in the regression. No significant associations were revealed in the control group or among any of the other cognitive measures. Conclusion: Parathyroid hormone may be associated with cognitive performance.

  14. Hormonal, cardiovascular, and subjective responses to acute stress in smokers.

    PubMed

    Childs, Emma; de Wit, Harriet

    2009-03-01

    There are complex relationships between stress and smoking; smoking may reduce the emotional discomfort of stress, yet nicotine activates stress systems and may alter responses to acute stress. It is important to understand how smoking affects physiological and psychological outcomes after stress and how these may interact to motivate smoking. This study aimed to examine the magnitude and time course of hormonal, cardiovascular, and psychological responses to acute psychosocial stress in smokers and non-smokers to investigate whether responses to acute stress are altered in smokers. Healthy male non-smokers (n = 20) and smokers (n = 15) participated in two experimental sessions involving a standardized public speaking stress procedure and a control non-stressful task. The outcome measures included self-reported mood, cardiovascular measures (heart rate and blood pressure), and plasma hormone levels (noradrenaline, cortisol, progesterone, and allopregnanolone). Smokers exhibited blunted increases in cortisol after the Trier Social Stress Test, and they reported greater and more prolonged subjective agitation than non-smokers. Stress-induced changes in progesterone were similar between smokers and non-smokers, although responses overall were smaller among smokers. Stress did not significantly alter levels of allopregnanolone, but smokers exhibited lower plasma concentrations of this neurosteroid. These findings suggest that smoking dampens hormonal responses to stress and prolongs subjective discomfort. Dysregulated stress responses may represent a breakdown in the body's ability to cope efficiently and effectively with stress and may contribute to smokers' susceptibility to acute stress, especially during abstinence.

  15. The effect of low level radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation on the excretion rates of stress hormones in operators during 24-hour shifts.

    PubMed

    Vangelova, K; Israel, M; Mihaylov, S

    2002-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of long term exposure to low level radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) radiation on the excretion rates of stress hormones in satellite station operators during 24-hour shifts. Twelve male operators at a satellite station for TV communications and space research were studied during 24-hour shifts. Dosimetric evaluation of the exposure was carried out and showed low level exposure with specific absorption of 0.1127 J.kg-1. A control group of 12 unexposed male operators with similar job task and the same shift system were studied, too. The 11-oxycorticosteroids (11-OCS), adrenaline and noradrenaline were followed by spectrofluorimetric methods on 3-hour intervals during the 24-hour shifts. The data were analyzed by tests for interindividual analysis, Cosinor analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Significant increase in the 24-hour excretion of 11-OCS and disorders in its circadian rhythm, manifested by increase in the mesor, decrease in the amplitude and shift in the acrophase were found in the exposed operators. The changes in the excretion rates of the catecholamines were significant and showed greater variability of both variables. The long term effect of the exposure to low-level RF EM radiation evoked pronounced stress reaction with changes in the circadian rhythm of 11-OCS and increased variability of catecholamines secretion. The possible health hazards associated with observed alteration in the stress system need to be clarified by identification of their significance and prognostic relevance.

  16. Psychological and hormonal stress response patterns during a blood donation.

    PubMed

    Hoogerwerf, M D; Veldhuizen, I J T; Merz, E-M; de Kort, W L A M; Frings-Dresen, M H W; Sluiter, J K

    2017-09-27

    Donating blood has been associated with increased stress responses, with scarce evidence indicating that levels of psychological and hormonal stress are higher pre-donation than post-donation. We investigated whether a blood donation induces psychological and/or hormonal stress during the course of a blood donation, and whether responses differed between men and women, first-time and experienced donors and donors with high or low non-acute stress. In 363 donors, psychological (donation-stress and arousal) and hormonal (cortisol) stress were measured by questionnaire and salivary sample at seven key moments during a routine donation. Non-acute stress was assessed by a questionnaire. Repeated measurement analyses were performed, using the last measurement (leaving the donation center) as reference value. Levels of donation-stress, arousal and cortisol were significantly higher during donation than when leaving the donation center. When compared with men, women reported higher levels of donation-stress and cortisol in the first part of the visit. When compared with first-time donors, experienced donors reported lower levels of donation-stress during the first part of the visit, and higher levels of arousal but less reactivity throughout the visit. When compared to donors high on non-acute stress, donors low on non-acute stress reported lower levels of donation-stress during the first part of the visit, and showed less cortisol reactivity throughout the visit. Donating blood influences psychological and hormonal stress response patterns. The response patterns differ between women and men, first-time and experienced donors and between donors high and low on non-acute stress. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  17. Stress hormones, sleep deprivation and cognition in older adults.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Marcello; Colizzi, Elena; Fisichella, Alberto; Valenti, Giorgio; Ceresini, Graziano; Dall'Aglio, Elisabetta; Ruffini, Livia; Lauretani, Fulvio; Parrino, Liborio; Ceda, Gian Paolo

    2013-09-01

    Cognition can be deteriorated in older persons because of several potential mechanisms including the hormonal changes occurring with age. Stress events cause modification in hormonal balance with acute and chronic changes such as increase in cortisol and thyroid hormones, and simultaneous alterations in dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, testosterone and insulin like growth factor-1 levels. The ability to cope with stress and regain previous healthy status, also called resiliency, is particularly impaired in older persons Thus, stressful conditions and hormonal dysregulation might concur to the onset of cognitive impairment in this population. In this review we address the relationship between stress hormones and cognitive function in older persons focusing on the role of one of the main stress factors, such as sleep deprivation (SD). We extracted and cross-checked data from 2000 to 2013 March and selected 112 full-text articles assessed for eligibility. In particular we considered 68 studies regarding the contribution of hormonal pathway to cognition in older adults, and 44 regarding hormones and SD both in rats and humans. We investigated how the activation of a stress-pattern response, like the one evoked from SD, can influence cognitive development and worsen cognitive status in the elderly. We will show the limited number of studies targeting the effects of SD and the consequent changes in stress hormones on cognitive function in this age group. We conclude that the current literature is not strong enough to give definitive answers on the role of stress hormonal pathway to the development of cognitive impairment in older individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Disruption of the salmon reproductive endocrine axis through prolonged nutritional stress: changes in circulating hormone levels and transcripts for ovarian genes involved in steroidogenesis and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoji; Adam Luckenbach, J; Goetz, Frederick W; Young, Graham; Swanson, Penny

    2011-07-01

    Mechanisms regulating the normal progression of ovarian follicular growth versus onset of atresia in fishes are poorly understood. To gain a better understanding of these processes, we exposed immature female coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to prolonged fasting to induce follicular atresia and monitored body growth, development of the ovarian follicles, changes in reproductive hormones, and transcripts for ovarian genes. Prolonged fasting reduced body and ovary weight and increased the appearance of atretic follicles relative to normally fed controls. Endocrine analyses showed that fasting reduced plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), estradiol-17β (E2), and pituitary, but not plasma, levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Transcripts for ovarian fsh receptor (fshr) and steroidogenesis-related genes, such as steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (star), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (hsd3b), and P450 aromatase (cyp19a1a) were significantly lower in fasted fish. Ovarian expression of apoptosis-related genes, such as Fas-associated death domain (fadd), caspase 8 (casp8), caspase 3 (casp3), and caspase 9 (casp9) were significantly elevated in fasted fish compared to fed fish, indicating that apoptosis is involved in the process of atresia in this species. Interestingly, some genes such as fadd, casp8, casp3, and hsd3b, were differentially expressed prior to increases in the number of atretic follicles and reductions in hormone levels induced by fasting, and may therefore have potential as early indicators of atresia. Together these results suggest that prolonged nutritional stress may disrupt the reproductive system and induce follicular atresia in part via reductions in ovarian IGF and FSH signaling, and downstream effects on steroidogenesis-related genes and E2 production.

  19. Effects of time-of-day on oxidative stress, cardiovascular parameters, biochemical markers, and hormonal response following level-1 Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test.

    PubMed

    Aloui, K; Abedelmalek, S; Chtourou, H; Wong, D P; Boussetta, N; Souissi, N

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of time-of-day on oxidative stress, cardiovascular parameters, muscle damage parameters, and hormonal responses following the level-1 Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test (YYIRT). A total of 11 healthy subjects performed an intermittent test (YYIRT) at two times-of-day (i.e., 07:00 h and 17:00 h), with a recovery period of ≥36 h in-between, in a randomized order. Blood samples were taken at the rest (baseline) and immediately (post-YYIRT) after the YYIRT for measuring oxidative stress, biochemical markers, and hormonal response. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way and two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Bonferroni test at p < 0.05. Observed power (α = 0.05) and partial eta-squared were used. Our results showed that oxygen uptake (VO2max), maximal aerobic speed, and the total distance covered tended to be higher in the evening (17:00 h). There was also a main effect of time-of-day for cortisol and testosterone concentration, which were higher after the YYIRT in the morning (p < 0.05). The heart rate peak and the rating of perceived exertion scales were lower in the morning (p < 0.05). However, the plasma glucose (p < 0.01), malondialdehyde, creatine kinase (p < 0.01), lactate dehydrogenase (p < 0.05), high-density lipoprotein (p < 0.01), total cholesterol (p < 0.01), and triglycerides (p < 0.05) were higher after the YYIRT in the evening. Low-density lipoprotein, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and lactate levels (p > 0.05) were similar for the morning and evening test. In conclusion, our findings suggest that aerobic performance presents diurnal variation with great result observed in the evening accompanied by an improvement of hormonal, metabolic, and oxidative responses. These data may help to guide athletes and coaches and contribute to public health recommendations on exercise and muscle damage particularly in the competitive periods.

  20. Predator-based psychosocial stress animal model of PTSD: Preclinical assessment of traumatic stress at cognitive, hormonal, pharmacological, cardiovascular and epigenetic levels of analysis.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Diamond, David M

    2016-10-01

    Research on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is faced with the challenge of understanding how a traumatic experience produces long-lasting detrimental effects on behavior and brain functioning, and more globally, how stress exacerbates somatic disorders, including cardiovascular disease. Moreover, the design of translational research needs to link animal models of PTSD to clinically relevant risk factors which address why only a subset of traumatized individuals develop persistent psychopathology. In this review, we have summarized our psychosocial stress rodent model of PTSD which is based on well-described PTSD-inducing risk factors, including a life-threatening experience, a sense of horror and uncontrollability, and insufficient social support. Specifically, our animal model of PTSD integrates acute episodes of inescapable exposure of immobilized rats to a predator with chronic daily social instability. This stress regimen produces PTSD-like effects in rats at behavioral, cognitive, physiological, pharmacological and epigenetic levels of analysis. We have discussed a recent extension of our animal model of PTSD in which stress exacerbated coronary pathology following an ischemic event, assessed in vitro. In addition, we have reviewed our research investigating pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic strategies which may have value in clinical approaches toward the treatment of traumatized people. Overall, our translational approach bridges the gap between human and animal PTSD research to create a framework with which to enhance our understanding of the biological basis of trauma-induced pathology and to assess therapeutic approaches in the treatment of psychopathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Glutamate neurotransmission, stress and hormone secretion].

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Vigas, M

    1995-11-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission has been investigated in relation to several physiological processes (learning, memory) as well as to neurodegenerative and other disorders. Little attention has been paid to its involvement in neuroendocrine response during stress. Penetration of excitatory amino acids from blood to the brain is limited by the blood-brain barrier. As a consequence, several toxic effects but also bioavailability for therapeutic purposes are reduced. A free access to circulating glutamate is possible only in brain structures lacking the blood-brain barrier or under conditions of its increased permeability. Excitatory amino acids were shown to stimulate the pituitary hormone release, though the mechanism of their action is still not fully understood. Stress exposure in experimental animals induced specific changes in mRNA levels coding the glutamate receptor subunits in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. The results obtained with the use of glutamate receptor antagonists indicate that a number of specific receptor subtypes contribute to the stimulation of ACTH release during stress. The authors provided also data on the role of NMDA receptors in the control of catecholamine release, particularly in stress-induced secretion of epinephrine. These results were the first piece of evidence on the involvement of endogenous excitatory amino acids in neuroendocrine activation during stress. Neurotoxic effects of glutamate in animals are well described, especially after its administration in the neonatal period. In men, glutamate toxicity and its use as a food additive are a continuous subject of discussions. The authors found an increase in plasma cortisol and norepinephrine, but not epinephrine and prolactin, in response to the administration of a high dose of glutamate. It cannot be excluded that these effects might be induced even by lower doses in situations with increased vulnerability to glutamate action (age, individual variability). (Tab. 1, Fig. 6, Ref. 44.).

  2. Stress-Induced Hormones Cortisol and Epinephrine Impair Wound Epithelization.

    PubMed

    Stojadinovic, Olivera; Gordon, Katherine A; Lebrun, Elizabeth; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2012-02-01

    Stress-induced disruption of hormonal balance in animals and humans has a detrimental effect on wound healing. After the injury, keratinocytes migrate over the wound bed to repair a wound. However, their nonmigratory phenotype plays a role in pathogenesis of chronic wounds. Despite many therapeutic approaches, there is a dearth of treatments targeting the molecular mechanisms mediated by stress that prevent epithelization. Recent studies show that epidermal keratinocytes synthesize stress hormones. During acute wound healing, cortisol synthesis in the epidermis is tightly controlled. Further, a key intermediate molecule in the cholesterol synthesis pathway, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), can bind glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and activate GR. Additionally, keratinocytes express beta-2-adrenergic-receptor (β2AR), a receptor for the stress hormone epinephrine. Importantly, migratory rates of keratinocytes are reduced by cortisol, FPP, epinephrine, and other β2AR agonists, thus indicating their role in the inhibition of epithelization. Topical inhibition of local glucocorticoid and FPP synthesis, as well as treatment with β2AR antagonists promotes wound epithelization. Modulation of local stress hormone production may represent an important therapeutic target for wound healing disorders. Topical administration of inhibitors of cortisol synthesis, statins, β2AR antagonists, and systemic beta-blockers can decrease cortisol synthesis, FPP, and epinephrine levels, respectively, thus restoring keratinocyte migration capacity. These treatment modalities could represent a novel therapeutic approach for wound healing disorders. Attenuation of the local stress-induced hormonal imbalance in epidermis may advance therapeutic modalities, thereby leading to enhanced epithelization and improved wound healing.

  3. [Influence of acupoint injection with small dose of fentanyl-droperidol mixed liquor on labor analgesia and level of stress hormone in parturient].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Xia; Yao, Yuan; Wu, Yong-Sheng; Liu, Yuan; Yan, Li-Rong; Su, Xin-Jing

    2013-04-01

    To observe the clinical effect of acupoint injection with small dose of fentanyl-droperido mixed liquor at different time stages on labor analgesia, and explore its function mechanism. One hundred and fifty cases of full-term primiparas who were intended to take vaginal delivery were randomly divided into 3 groups, 50 cases in each one. The acupoint injection with fentanyl-droperido mixed liquor at different time stages was applied in the group I, where Shenshu (BL 23) was selected in active phase and Ciliao (BL 32) was selected in the 2nd stage of labor. The subcutaneous injection with fentanyl-droperido mixed liquor was adopted in group II. The group III, which was considered as a control group, was treated with subcutaneous injection of 0.9% NaCl at the same time stage as group I and II. The blood pressure, VAS score and level of norepinephrine and adrenaline were observed at different time stages. Compared before the injection, the blood pressure of group III in the active phase and 2nd stage of labor was significantly increased (P < 0.05), and that in group II and III was obviously higher than that in the group I (P < 0.05). The VAS score of group I in the active phase and 2nd stage of labor was significantly lower than that in the group II and III (P < 0.01). After the injection, the level of NE and E was significantly decreased (P < 0.05), which was lower than that in the group II and III (P < 0.05). The acupoint injection with small dose of fentanyl-droperido mixed liquor at different time stages has positive effect on labor analgesia, and it could significantly relieve stress reaction of parturient during the labor. Its mechanism could be related to the reduction of stress hormone in parturient.

  4. Habitat degradation increases stress-hormone levels during the breeding season, and decreases survival and reproduction in adult common lizards.

    PubMed

    Josserand, Rémy; Dupoué, Andréaz; Agostini, Simon; Haussy, Claudy; Le Galliard, Jean-François; Meylan, Sandrine

    2017-05-01

    The allostatic load model describes how individuals maintain homeostasis in challenging environment and posits that costs induced by a chronic perturbation (i.e., allostatic load) are correlated to the secretion of glucocorticoids, such as corticosterone. Habitat perturbations from anthropogenic activities are multiple and functional responses to those are still unclear. Here, we manipulated the habitat quality in 24 semi-natural populations of the common lizard during 1 year. We tested the predictions of the allostatic load model that habitat degradation should increase baseline corticosterone levels, and should induce concomitant physiological changes, such as lipid mobilization and lower immunocompetence, and demographic changes, such as lower body growth, survival and/or reproductive performances. Our results highlight stage-dependent effects of habitat degradation on physiological traits during the breeding season: adult lizards had higher baseline corticosterone levels and yearling lizards had a lower inflammatory response than adults, whereas juveniles had higher circulating lipid levels than yearlings and adults without concomitant change in corticosterone levels. In addition, habitat degradation reduced the performances of adults but not of juveniles: in low habitat quality populations, adult males had a lower survival and females had a smaller fecundity. These results are in accordance with the allostatic load model given that allostatic load was detected only during the season and in life stages of maximal energy expenditure. This underlines the importance to account for individual energy requirements to better understand demographic responses to habitat perturbation.

  5. Effects of a chair-yoga exercises on stress hormone levels, daily life activities, falls and physical fitness in institutionalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Furtado, G E; Uba-Chupel, M; Carvalho, H M; Souza, N R; Ferreira, J P; Teixeira, A M

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes mediated by exercise on activities of daily life and falls, physical fitness, salivary cortisol and alpha amylase in older adults living in social and health care givers centers. Sample consisted in 35 women (83.81 ± 6.6 years old) were divided into two groups: chair-yoga exercises group (CY, n = 20) and control group (CG, n = 15). All subjects were evaluated before and after 14-weeks. CY was involved in exercise classes two times per week, while the GC did not participate in any exercise. Fear of falling decreased in both groups, cortisol increased and alpha-amylase decreased in the CG. No significant changes occurred in physical fitness outcomes. CY practice was able to maintain the physical fitness scores and stress hormone levels, but was not able to improve the subject's perception on the ability to perform the instrumental activities of daily life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), stress, and sex hormones.

    PubMed

    King, S Bradley; Toufexis, Donna J; Hammack, Sayamwong E

    2017-06-14

    Stressor exposure is associated with the onset and severity of many psychopathologies that are more common in women than men. Moreover, the maladaptive expression and function of stress-related hormones have been implicated in these disorders. Evidence suggests that PACAP has a critical role in the stress circuits mediating stress-responding, and PACAP may interact with sex hormones to contribute to sex differences in stress-related disease. In this review, we describe the role of the PACAP/PAC1 system in stress biology, focusing on the role of stress-induced alterations in PACAP expression and signaling in the development of stress-induced behavioral change. Additionally, we present more recent data suggesting potential interactions between stress, PACAP, and circulating estradiol in pathological states, including PTSD. These studies suggest that the level of stress and circulating gonadal hormones may differentially regulate the PACAPergic system in males and females to influence anxiety-like behavior and may be one mechanism underlying the discrepancies in human psychiatric disorders.

  7. Ubiquitin, hormones and biotic stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Dreher, Kate; Callis, Judy

    2007-05-01

    The covalent attachment of ubiquitin to a substrate protein changes its fate. Notably, proteins typically tagged with a lysine48-linked polyubiquitin chain become substrates for degradation by the 26S proteasome. In recent years many experiments have been performed to characterize the proteins involved in the ubiquitylation process and to identify their substrates, in order to understand better the mechanisms that link specific protein degradation events to regulation of plant growth and development. This review focuses on the role that ubiquitin plays in hormone synthesis, hormonal signalling cascades and plant defence mechanisms. Several examples are given of how targeted degradation of proteins affects downstream transcriptional regulation of hormone-responsive genes in the auxin, gibberellin, abscisic acid, ethylene and jasmonate signalling pathways. Additional experiments suggest that ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis may also act upstream of the hormonal signalling cascades by regulating hormone biosynthesis, transport and perception. Moreover, several experiments demonstrate that hormonal cross-talk can occur at the level of proteolysis. The more recently established role of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) in defence against biotic threats is also reviewed. The UPS has been implicated in the regulation of almost every developmental process in plants, from embryogenesis to floral organ production probably through its central role in many hormone pathways. More recent evidence provides molecular mechanisms for hormonal cross-talk and links the UPS system to biotic defence responses.

  8. Ubiquitin, Hormones and Biotic Stress in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Dreher, Kate; Callis, Judy

    2007-01-01

    Background The covalent attachment of ubiquitin to a substrate protein changes its fate. Notably, proteins typically tagged with a lysine48-linked polyubiquitin chain become substrates for degradation by the 26S proteasome. In recent years many experiments have been performed to characterize the proteins involved in the ubiquitylation process and to identify their substrates, in order to understand better the mechanisms that link specific protein degradation events to regulation of plant growth and development. Scope This review focuses on the role that ubiquitin plays in hormone synthesis, hormonal signalling cascades and plant defence mechanisms. Several examples are given of how targeted degradation of proteins affects downstream transcriptional regulation of hormone-responsive genes in the auxin, gibberellin, abscisic acid, ethylene and jasmonate signalling pathways. Additional experiments suggest that ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis may also act upstream of the hormonal signalling cascades by regulating hormone biosynthesis, transport and perception. Moreover, several experiments demonstrate that hormonal cross-talk can occur at the level of proteolysis. The more recently established role of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) in defence against biotic threats is also reviewed. Conclusions The UPS has been implicated in the regulation of almost every developmental process in plants, from embryogenesis to floral organ production probably through its central role in many hormone pathways. More recent evidence provides molecular mechanisms for hormonal cross-talk and links the UPS system to biotic defence responses. PMID:17220175

  9. Thyroid function and stress hormones in children with stress hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Taj-Aldini, Reza; Karamizadeh, Zohre; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Karimi, Mehran; Omrani, Gholam Hossein

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the prevalence of stress hyperglycemia and to investigate how thyroid and stress hormones alter during stress hyperglycemia in children admitted to pediatric emergency wards. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in children, less than 19 years old, who were admitted to pediatric emergency wards of Nemazee and Dastgheib Hospitals, Shiraz, Southern Iran. Those patients taking steroids, beta-agonists or intravenously administered glucose before venipuncture, and patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) or thyroid diseases were excluded. Children with blood glucose ≥ 150 mg/dL during admission were regarded as cases. The controls were age- and- sex- matched, euglycemic children. Stress hormones including cortisol, insulin, growth hormone, and prolactin were measured, and thyroid function was tested with a radioimmunoassay (RIA) method in all cases and controls. The results showed that among 1,054 screened children, 39 cases (3.7 %) had stress hyperglycemia and 89 controls were included in the study. The occurrence of hyperglycemia was independent of sex, but it occurred mostly in children under 6 years old. Hyperglycemia occurred more frequently in patients with a positive family history of DM (odds ratio = 3.2, 95 % CI = 1.3-7.9, and P = 0.009). There were no significant differences between cases and controls regarding any hormones except higher cortisol, and lower total T3 and T4 in cases compared with controls. Neither of cases developed diabetes in the 24-month follow-up period. These findings led us to the conclusion that stress hyperglycemia is occasionally seen in critically ill patients. Among the stress hormones measured, only cortisol increased during hyperglycemia. It seems that hyperglycemia is not an important risk factor for future diabetes.

  10. Metaplasticity of amygdalar responses to the stress hormone corticosterone

    PubMed Central

    Karst, Henk; Berger, Stefan; Erdmann, Gitta; Schütz, Günther; Joëls, Marian

    2010-01-01

    High levels of corticosteroids (as circulate after stress) quickly and reversibly enhance hippocampal glutamatergic transmission via nongenomic actions requiring mineralocorticoid receptors. Subsequently, the hormone slowly and long-lastingly normalizes hippocampal cell function, through nuclear glucocorticoid receptors. Here we describe a rapid mineralocorticoid receptor-dependent enhancement of glutamatergic transmission in basolateral amygdala neurons. Contrary to the hippocampus, this rapid enhancement is long-lasting, potentially allowing an extended window for encoding of emotional aspects during stressful events. Importantly, the long-lasting change in state of amygdala neurons greatly affects the responsiveness to subsequent surges of corticosterone, revealing a quick suppression of glutamatergic transmission, which requires the glucocorticoid receptor. Responses of basolateral amygdala neurons to the stress hormone corticosterone can thus switch from excitatory to inhibitory, depending on the recent stress history of the organism. PMID:20663957

  11. The role of thyroid hormones in stress response of fish.

    PubMed

    Peter, M C Subhash

    2011-06-01

    Thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)), the principal thyroid hormones (THs) secreted from the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, produce a plethora of physiologic actions in fish. The diverse actions of THs in fishes are primarily due to the sensitivity of thyroid axis to many physical, chemical and biological factors of both intrinsic and extrinsic origins. The regulation of THs homeostasis becomes more complex due to extrathyroidal deiodination pathways by which the delivery of biologically active T(3) to target cells has been controlled. As primary stress hormones and the end products of hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) and brain-sympathetic-chromaffin (BSC) axes, cortisol and adrenaline exert its actions on its target tissues where it promote and integrate osmotic and metabolic competence. Despite possessing specific osmoregulatory and metabolic actions at cellular and whole-body levels, THs may fine-tune these processes in accordance with the actions of hormones like cortisol and adrenaline. Evidences are presented that THs can modify the pattern and magnitude of stress response in fishes as it modifies either its own actions or the actions of stress hormones. In addition, multiple lines of evidence indicate that hypothalamic and pituitary hormones of thyroid and interrenal axes can interact with each other which in turn may regulate THs/cortisol-mediated actions. Even though it is hard to define these interactions, the magnitude of stress response in fish has been shown to be modified by the changes in the status of THs, pointing to its functional relationship with endocrine stress axes particularly with the interrenal axis. The fine-tuned mechanism that operates in fish during stressor-challenge drives the THs to play both fundamental and modulator roles in stress response by controlling osmoregulation and metabolic regulation. A major role of THs in stress response is thus evident in fish.

  12. Stress-Induced Hormones Cortisol and Epinephrine Impair Wound Epithelization

    PubMed Central

    Stojadinovic, Olivera; Gordon, Katherine A.; Lebrun, Elizabeth; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2012-01-01

    Background Stress-induced disruption of hormonal balance in animals and humans has a detrimental effect on wound healing. The Problem After the injury, keratinocytes migrate over the wound bed to repair a wound. However, their nonmigratory phenotype plays a role in pathogenesis of chronic wounds. Despite many therapeutic approaches, there is a dearth of treatments targeting the molecular mechanisms mediated by stress that prevent epithelization. Basic/Clinical Science Advances Recent studies show that epidermal keratinocytes synthesize stress hormones. During acute wound healing, cortisol synthesis in the epidermis is tightly controlled. Further, a key intermediate molecule in the cholesterol synthesis pathway, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), can bind glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and activate GR. Additionally, keratinocytes express beta-2-adrenergic-receptor (β2AR), a receptor for the stress hormone epinephrine. Importantly, migratory rates of keratinocytes are reduced by cortisol, FPP, epinephrine, and other β2AR agonists, thus indicating their role in the inhibition of epithelization. Topical inhibition of local glucocorticoid and FPP synthesis, as well as treatment with β2AR antagonists promotes wound epithelization. Clinical Care Relevance Modulation of local stress hormone production may represent an important therapeutic target for wound healing disorders. Topical administration of inhibitors of cortisol synthesis, statins, β2AR antagonists, and systemic beta-blockers can decrease cortisol synthesis, FPP, and epinephrine levels, respectively, thus restoring keratinocyte migration capacity. These treatment modalities could represent a novel therapeutic approach for wound healing disorders. Conclusion Attenuation of the local stress-induced hormonal imbalance in epidermis may advance therapeutic modalities, thereby leading to enhanced epithelization and improved wound healing. PMID:24527275

  13. Ultraviolet B irradiation of the mouse eye induces pigmentation of the skin more strongly than does stress loading, by increasing the levels of prohormone convertase 2 and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, K; Yamate, Y; Kobayashi, H; Ishii, M; Sato, E F; Inoue, M

    2013-01-01

    In previous studies, we made the unexpected finding that in mice, ultraviolet (UV)B irradiation of the eye increased the concentration of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) in plasma, and systemically stimulated epidermal melanocytes. To compare the extent of the pigmentation induced by social and restraint stress (which activate the hippocampus-pituitary system) with that induced by UVB irradiation. DBA/2 and sham-operated or hypophysectomized DBA/2 mice were subjected to local UVB exposure using a sunlamp directed at the eye, and two types of stress (social and restraint) were imposed. UVB irradiation of the eye or exposure to stress loading both increased the number of Dopa-positive melanocytes in the epidermis, and hypophysectomy strongly inhibited the UVB-induced and stress-induced stimulation of melanocytes. Irradiation of the eye caused a much greater increase in dopamine than did the stress load. Both UVB eye irradiation and stress increased the blood levels of α-MSH and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). In addition, the increase in plasma α-MSH was greater in animals subjected to UVB eye irradiation than in those subjected to stress loading, whereas the reverse occurred for plasma ACTH. UVB irradiation to the eye and stress loading increased the expression of prohormone convertase (PC)1/3 and PC2 in the pituitary gland. The increase in expression of pituitary PC2 was greater in animals subjected to UVB eye irradiation than to stress, whereas no difference was seen between the two groups for the increase in PC1/3. UVB eye irradiation exerts a stronger effect on pigmentation than stress loading, and is related to increased levels of α-MSH and PC2. © The Author(s). CED © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  14. Early stress causes sex-specific, life-long changes in behaviour, levels of gonadal hormones, and gene expression in chickens.

    PubMed

    Elfwing, Magnus; Nätt, Daniel; Goerlich-Jansson, Vivian C; Persson, Mia; Hjelm, Jonas; Jensen, Per

    2015-01-01

    Early stress can have long-lasting phenotypic effects. Previous research shows that male and female chickens differ in many behavioural aspects, and respond differently to chronic stress. The present experiment aimed to broadly characterize long-term sex differences in responses to brief events of stress experienced during the first weeks of life. Chicks from a commercial egg-laying hybrid were exposed to stress by inducing periods of social isolation during their first three weeks of life, followed by a broad behavioural, physiological and genomic characterization throughout life. Early stressed males, but not females, where more anxious in an open field-test, stayed shorter in tonic immobility and tended to have delayed sexual maturity, as shown by a tendency for lower levels of testosterone compared to controls. While early stressed females did not differ from non-stressed in fear and sexual maturation, they were more socially dominant than controls. The differential gene expression profile in hypothalamus was significantly correlated from 28 to 213 days of age in males, but not in females. In conclusion, early stress had a more pronounced long-term effect on male than on female chickens, as evidenced by behavioral, endocrine and genomic responses. This may either be attributed to inherent sex differences due to evolutionary causes, or possibly to different stress related selection pressures on the two sexes during commercial chicken breeding.

  15. Cold-induced changes in stress hormone and steroidogenic transcript levels in cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus), a fish capable of metabolic depression.

    PubMed

    Alzaid, Abdullah; Hori, Tiago S; Hall, Jennifer R; Rise, Matthew L; Gamperl, A Kurt

    2015-12-01

    The cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) is a fish with a wide latitudinal distribution that is capable of going into metabolic depression during the winter months, and thus, represents a unique model to investigate the impacts of cold temperatures on the stress response. In this study, we measured resting (pre-stress) plasma cortisol levels in 10 °C and 0 °C acclimated cunner from Newfoundland, and both catecholamine and cortisol levels after they were given a standardized handling stress (i.e. 1 min air exposure). In addition, we cloned and characterized cDNAs for several key genes of the cortisol-axis [cytochrome P450scc, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) most likely to be an ortholog of the teleost GR2], determined the tissue distribution of their transcripts, and measured their constitutive (i.e. pre-stress) transcript levels in individuals acclimated to both temperatures. In cunner acclimated to 0 °C, post-stress epinephrine and norepinephrine levels were much lower (by approximately 9- and 5-fold, respectively) compared to 10 °C acclimated fish, and these fish had relatively low resting cortisol levels (~15 ngml(-1)) and showed a typical post-stress response. In contrast, those acclimated to 10 °C had quite high resting cortisol levels (~75 ngml(-1)) that actually decreased (to ~20 ngml(-1)) post-stress before returning to pre-stress levels. Finally, fish acclimated to 10 °C had higher P450scc transcript levels in the head kidney and lower levels of GR transcript in both the head kidney and liver. Taken together, these results suggest that: (1) temperature has a profound effect on the stress response of this species; and (2) although the ancestors of this species inhabited warm waters (i.e. they are members of the family Labridae), populations of cunner from colder regions may show signs of stress at temperatures as low as 10 °C.

  16. Plasma stress hormones in resting rats - Eighty four day study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Vojin; Honeycutt, Clegg

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a repeated mild stress of handling and placing rats temporarily into unfamiliar cages on the blood-plasma concentration of the stress hormones (corticosterone, ACDH, and prolactin) were investigated in male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to this type of stress once every week during a period of three months. Results showed that repeated mild stress of handling (as well as repeated blood sampling) did not affect the plasma stress-hormone concentrations in these animals.

  17. Plasma stress hormones in resting rats - Eighty four day study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Vojin; Honeycutt, Clegg

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a repeated mild stress of handling and placing rats temporarily into unfamiliar cages on the blood-plasma concentration of the stress hormones (corticosterone, ACDH, and prolactin) were investigated in male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to this type of stress once every week during a period of three months. Results showed that repeated mild stress of handling (as well as repeated blood sampling) did not affect the plasma stress-hormone concentrations in these animals.

  18. Stress hormones and vascular function in firefighters during concurrent challenges.

    PubMed

    Webb, Heather E; Garten, Ryan S; McMinn, David R; Beckman, Jamie L; Kamimori, Gary H; Acevedo, Edmund O

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of concurrent physical and mental challenge on stress hormones and indicators of vascular function in firefighters. Twelve professional firefighters exercised at 60% VO(2max) while participating in a computerized Fire Strategies and Tactics Drill (FSTD-fire strategies condition [FSC]), and again at the same intensity without the mental challenge (EAC). No differences in the amount of work performed between conditions existed, although the FSC resulted in greater perceptions of overall workload. Epinephrine and norepinephrine demonstrated significant interaction effects with elevated levels during the FSC. Cortisol responses were significantly elevated across time and for the FSC. Positive correlations were found between cortisol and interleukin-6, endothelin-1, and thromboxane-B(2), and a negative correlation between interleukin-6 and thromboxane-B(2). These results suggest that concurrent challenges results in exacerbated responses of stress hormones and suggests mechanisms that could contribute to the prevalence of cardiovascular events among firefighters.

  19. Kouksundo, a traditional Korean mind-body practice, regulates oxidative stress profiles and stress hormones.

    PubMed

    Im, Hwi-Jin; Kim, Yoon-Jung; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Kim, Hyo-Seon; Son, Chang-Gue

    2015-03-15

    Kouksundo is a traditional Korean mind-body practice that has been practiced for thousands of years. We investigated the effects of Kouksundo on oxidative stress-related biomarkers and stress hormones. A single-arm observational study was conducted on 57 Kouksundo trainees (34 males and 23 females). Blood samples were collected 30 min before and after Kouksundo practice (25 min for warm-up, 45 min for breathing meditation, and 20 min for cool-down). Kouksundo significantly reduced serum levels of oxidant markers, including reactive oxygen species (p<0.01), nitric oxide (p<0.01), and malondialdehyde (p<0.05), induced elevation of superoxide dismutase (p<0.01), and reduction of catalase (p<0.001). No significant changes were observed in total antioxidant capacity or total glutathione content levels (p>0.05). Kouksundo practice also significantly reduced the serum level of cortisol (p<0.001), norepinephrine (p<0.001), and dopamine (p<0.05), and significantly increased serum epinephrine concentrations (p<0.05). The traditional Korean mind-body practice Kouksundo provided health benefits by regulating oxidative stress and levels of stress hormones. This study is the first investigation of the changes in oxidative stress and stress hormones induced by mind-body therapy, producing reference data for mechanistic studies on these practices. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Neuronal control of breathing: sex and stress hormones.

    PubMed

    Behan, Mary; Kinkead, Richard

    2011-10-01

    There is a growing public awareness that hormones can have a significant impact on most biological systems, including the control of breathing. This review will focus on the actions of two broad classes of hormones on the neuronal control of breathing: sex hormones and stress hormones. The majority of these hormones are steroids; a striking feature is that both groups are derived from cholesterol. Stress hormones also include many peptides which are produced primarily within the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and secreted into the brain or into the circulatory system. In this article we will first review and discuss the role of sex hormones in respiratory control throughout life, emphasizing how natural fluctuations in hormones are reflected in ventilatory metrics and how disruption of their endogenous cycle can predispose to respiratory disease. These effects may be mediated directly by sex hormone receptors or indirectly by neurotransmitter systems. Next, we will discuss the origins of hypothalamic stress hormones and their relationship with the respiratory control system. This relationship is 2-fold: (i) via direct anatomical connections to brainstem respiratory control centers, and (ii) via steroid hormones released from the adrenal gland in response to signals from the pituitary gland. Finally, the impact of stress on the development of neural circuits involved in breathing is evaluated in animal models, and the consequences of early stress on respiratory health and disease is discussed.

  1. Natural Variation in Stress Hormones, Comparisons Across Matrices, and Impacts Resulting from Induced Stress in the Bottlenose Dolphin.

    PubMed

    Houser, Dorian S; Champagne, Cory D; Crocker, Daniel E; Kellar, Nicholas M; Cockrem, John; Romano, Tracy; Booth, Rebecca K; Wasser, Samuel K

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge regarding stress hormones and how they vary in response to seasonality, gender, age, and reproductive status for any marine mammal is limited. Furthermore, stress hormones may be measured in more than one matrix (e.g., feces, blood, blubber), but the relationships between levels of a given hormone across these matrices are unknown, further complicating the interpretations of hormones measured in samples collected from wild animals. A study is underway to address these issues in a population of bottlenose dolphins trained for voluntary participation in sample collections from different matrices and across season and time of day.

  2. Hormonal modulation of the heat shock response: insights from fish with divergent cortisol stress responses.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Sacha; Höglund, Erik; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Currie, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Acute temperature stress in animals results in increases in heat shock proteins (HSPs) and stress hormones. There is evidence that stress hormones influence the magnitude of the heat shock response; however, their role is equivocal. To determine whether and how stress hormones may affect the heat shock response, we capitalized on two lines of rainbow trout specifically bred for their high (HR) and low (LR) cortisol response to stress. We predicted that LR fish, with a low cortisol but high catecholamine response to stress, would induce higher levels of HSPs after acute heat stress than HR trout. We found that HR fish have significantly higher increases in both catecholamines and cortisol compared with LR fish, and LR fish had no appreciable stress hormone response to heat shock. This unexpected finding prevented further interpretation of the hormonal modulation of the heat shock response but provided insight into stress-coping styles and environmental stress. HR fish also had a significantly greater and faster heat shock response and less oxidative protein damage than LR fish. Despite these clear differences in the physiological and cellular responses to heat shock, there were no differences in the thermal tolerance of HR and LR fish. Our results support the hypothesis that responsiveness to environmental change underpins the physiological differences in stress-coping styles. Here, we demonstrate that the heat shock response is a distinguishing feature of the HR and LR lines and suggest that it may have been coselected with the hormonal responses to stress.

  3. The stress hormone system in various sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Lattova, Zuzana; Keckeis, Marietta; Maurovich-Horvat, Eszter; Wetter, Thomas C; Wilde-Frenz, Johanna; Schuld, Andreas; Pollmächer, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-system activity is regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the primary endogenous circadian pacemaker. In addition, sleep plays an important modulatory role. However, data on HPA-system activity in sleep disorders are quite conflicting. A sensitive challenge test to assess negative feedback sensitivity of the HPA-system like the dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing-hormone (DEX/CRH)-test has never been used so far in sleep disorders. Therefore we studied 25 obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients, 18 restless legs syndrome (RLS) patients, 21 patients with primary insomnia and compared them to 33 healthy controls. The dynamic response of the HPA-system was assessed by the DEX/CRH-test which combines suppression (dexamethasone) and stimulation (CRH) of the stress hormone system. After HPA-axis suppression the number of non-suppressors did not differ among groups indicating normal negative feedback sensitivity. In RLS patients ACTH levels were slightly lower compared to controls while cortisol levels were similar between groups. Following CRH stimulation we did not detect differences in ACTH- or cortisol levels and adrenocortical responsitivity to ACTH was comparable between groups. These results for the first time document normal HPA-system feedback sensitivity in various sleep disorders and suggest that abnormalities of the stress hormone system in affective disorders are unlikely due to concomitant sleep problems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hormone balance and abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Zvi; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2011-06-01

    Plant hormones play central roles in the ability of plants to adapt to changing environments, by mediating growth, development, nutrient allocation, and source/sink transitions. Although ABA is the most studied stress-responsive hormone, the role of cytokinins, brassinosteroids, and auxins during environmental stress is emerging. Recent evidence indicated that plant hormones are involved in multiple processes. Cross-talk between the different plant hormones results in synergetic or antagonic interactions that play crucial roles in response of plants to abiotic stress. The characterization of the molecular mechanisms regulating hormone synthesis, signaling, and action are facilitating the modification of hormone biosynthetic pathways for the generation of transgenic crop plants with enhanced abiotic stress tolerance.

  5. Durable effect of heat-stress on the hormone production of Tetrahymena. Effect of insulin on the consequences of stress.

    PubMed

    Lajkó, Eszter; Pállinger, Eva; Csaba, György

    2012-06-01

    The unicellular Tetrahymena pyriformis was stressed by 37°C heat for 1 h and its hormone (serotonin, histamine, triiodothyronine) content was measured by immunocytochemical flow cytometry in different time points (immediately after treatment and after 1, 2, 8, 16 weeks). The treatment increased each hormone level for two weeks, however, after 8 weeks the hormone concentration inside the cells decreased and in case of serotonin this was similar in the 16th week, while the other two hormones' level was similar to the control. Insulin further increased the hormone production during treatment, but this effect was not durable. After one week the cells behave similar to those, subjected to heath shock only. The results show that a single stress causes deep and durable changes in the hormone household of Tetrahymena which is influenced by exogenously given insulin only in the acute phase.

  6. Artificially Increased Yolk Hormone Levels and Neophobia in Domestic Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Aline; Arnould, Cécile; Moussu, Chantal; Meurisse, Maryse; Constantin, Paul; Leterrier, Christine; Calandreau, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    In birds there is compelling evidence that the development and expression of behavior is affected by maternal factors, particularly via variation in yolk hormone concentrations of maternal origin. In the present study we tested whether variation in yolk hormone levels lead to variation in the expression of neophobia in young domestic chicks. Understanding how the prenatal environment could predispose chicks to express fear-related behaviors is essential in order to propose preventive actions and improve animal welfare. We simulated the consequences of a maternal stress by experimentally enhancing yolk progesterone, testosterone and estradiol concentrations in hen eggs prior to incubation. The chicks from these hormone-treated eggs (H) and from sham embryos (C) that received the vehicle-only were exposed to novel food, novel object and novel environment tests. H chicks approached a novel object significantly faster and were significantly more active in a novel environment than controls, suggesting less fearfulness. Conversely, no effect of the treatment was found in food neophobia tests. Our study highlights a developmental influence of yolk hormones on a specific aspect of neophobia. The results suggest that increased yolk hormone levels modulate specifically the probability of exploring novel environments or novel objects in the environment. PMID:26633522

  7. The reciprocal regulation of stress hormones and GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Mody, Istvan; Maguire, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    Stress-derived steroid hormones regulate the expression and function of GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs). Changes in GABA(A)R subunit expression have been demonstrated under conditions of altered steroid hormone levels, such as stress, as well as following exogenous steroid hormone administration. In addition to the effects of stress-derived steroid hormones on GABA(A)R subunit expression, stress hormones can also be metabolized to neuroactive derivatives which can alter the function of GABA(A)Rs. Neurosteroids allosterically modulate GABA(A)Rs at concentrations comparable to those during stress. In addition to the actions of stress-derived steroid hormones on GABA(A)Rs, GABA(A)Rs reciprocally regulate the production of stress hormones. The stress response is mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the activity of which is governed by corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) neurons. The activity of CRH neurons is largely controlled by robust GABAergic inhibition. Recently, it has been demonstrated that CRH neurons are regulated by neurosteroid-sensitive, GABA(A)R δ subunit-containing receptors representing a novel feedback mechanism onto the HPA axis. Further, it has been demonstrated that neurosteroidogenesis and neurosteroid actions on GABA(A)R δ subunit-containing receptors on CRH neurons are necessary to mount the physiological response to stress. Here we review the literature describing the effects of steroid hormones on GABA(A)Rs as well as the importance of GABA(A)Rs in regulating the production of steroid hormones. This review incorporates what we currently know about changes in GABA(A)Rs following stress and the role in HPA axis regulation.

  8. Regulatory Cross-Talks and Cascades in Rice Hormone Biosynthesis Pathways Contribute to Stress Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Arindam; Grewal, Rumdeep K.; Kundu, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Crosstalk among different hormone signaling pathways play an important role in modulating plant response to both biotic and abiotic stress. Hormone activity is controlled by its bio-availability, which is again influenced by its biosynthesis. Thus, independent hormone biosynthesis pathways must be regulated and co-ordinated to mount an integrated response. One of the possibilities is to use cis-regulatory elements to orchestrate expression of hormone biosynthesis genes. Analysis of CREs, associated with differentially expressed hormone biosynthesis related genes in rice leaf under Magnaporthe oryzae attack and drought stress enabled us to obtain insights about cross-talk among hormone biosynthesis pathways at the transcriptional level. We identified some master transcription regulators that co-ordinate different hormone biosynthesis pathways under stress. We found that Abscisic acid and Brassinosteroid regulate Cytokinin conjugation; conversely Brassinosteroid biosynthesis is affected by both Abscisic acid and Cytokinin. Jasmonic acid and Ethylene biosynthesis may be modulated by Abscisic acid through DREB transcription factors. Jasmonic acid or Salicylic acid biosynthesis pathways are co-regulated but they are unlikely to influence each others production directly. Thus, multiple hormones may modulate hormone biosynthesis pathways through a complex regulatory network, where biosynthesis of one hormone is affected by several other contributing hormones. PMID:27617021

  9. Stress hormones and sociality: integrating social and environmental stressors.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2007-04-07

    In cooperatively breeding species, reproductive decisions and breeding roles may be influenced by environmental (food resources) or social factors (reproductive suppression of subordinates by dominants). Studies of glucocorticoid stress hormones in cooperatively breeding species suggest that breeding roles and hormone levels are related to the relative costs of dominance and subordination, which are driven primarily by social interactions. Few studies, however, have considered how environmental factors affect glucocorticoid levels and breeding roles in cooperative breeders, even though environmental stressors modulate seasonal glucocorticoid release and often influence breeding roles. I examined baseline and stress-induced levels of the glucocorticoid corticosterone (CORT) across 4 years in the plural breeding superb starling, Lamprotornis superbus, to determine whether (i) environmental factors (namely rainfall) directly influence breeding roles or (ii) environmental factors influence social interactions, which in turn drive breeding roles. Chronic baseline and maximal stress-induced CORT changed significantly across years as a function of pre-breeding rainfall, but dominant and subordinate individuals responded differently. Pre-breeding rainfall was also correlated directly with breeding roles. The results are most consistent with the hypothesis that environmental conditions influenced the relative costs of dominance and subordination, which in turn affected the degree and intensity of social interactions and ultimately reproductive decisions and breeding roles.

  10. Stress hormones and sociality: integrating social and environmental stressors

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2007-01-01

    In cooperatively breeding species, reproductive decisions and breeding roles may be influenced by environmental (food resources) or social factors (reproductive suppression of subordinates by dominants). Studies of glucocorticoid stress hormones in cooperatively breeding species suggest that breeding roles and hormone levels are related to the relative costs of dominance and subordination, which are driven primarily by social interactions. Few studies, however, have considered how environmental factors affect glucocorticoid levels and breeding roles in cooperative breeders, even though environmental stressors modulate seasonal glucocorticoid release and often influence breeding roles. I examined baseline and stress-induced levels of the glucocorticoid corticosterone (CORT) across 4 years in the plural breeding superb starling, Lamprotornis superbus, to determine whether (i) environmental factors (namely rainfall) directly influence breeding roles or (ii) environmental factors influence social interactions, which in turn drive breeding roles. Chronic baseline and maximal stress-induced CORT changed significantly across years as a function of pre-breeding rainfall, but dominant and subordinate individuals responded differently. Pre-breeding rainfall was also correlated directly with breeding roles. The results are most consistent with the hypothesis that environmental conditions influenced the relative costs of dominance and subordination, which in turn affected the degree and intensity of social interactions and ultimately reproductive decisions and breeding roles. PMID:17251100

  11. Stress hormone regulation: biological role and translation into therapy.

    PubMed

    Holsboer, Florian; Ising, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Stress is defined as a state of perturbed homeostasis following endangerment that evokes manifold adaptive reactions, which are summarized as the stress response. In the case of mental stress, the adaptive response follows the perception of endangerment. Different peptides, steroids, and biogenic amines operate the stress response within the brain and also after they have been released into circulation. We focus in this review on the biological roles of corticosteroids, corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), and arginine vasopressin (AVP), and we evaluate the effects of treatments directed against the actions of these hormones. CRH and AVP are the central drivers of the stress hormone system, but they also act as neuromodulators in the brain, affecting higher mental functions including emotion, cognition, and behavior. When released toward the pituitary, these central neuropeptides elicit corticotrophin into the periphery, which activates corticosteroid release from the adrenal cortex. These stress hormones are essential for the adequate adaptation to stress, but they can also evoke severe clinical conditions once persistently hypersecreted. Depression and anxiety disorders are prominent examples of stress-related disorders associated with an impaired regulation of stress hormones. We summarize the effects of drugs acting at specific targets of the stress hormone axis, and we discuss their potential use as next-generation antidepressant medications. Such treatments require the identification of patients that will optimally benefit from such specific interventions. These could be a first step into personalized medicine using treatments tailored to the specific pathology of the patients.

  12. Prolactin, thyrotropin, and growth hormone release during stress associated with parachute jumping.

    PubMed

    Noel, G L; Dimond, R C; Earll, J M; Frantz, A G

    1976-05-01

    Prolactin, growth hormone, and thyrotropin (TSH) release during the stress of parachute jumping has been evaluated in 14 male subjects. Subjects were studied at several times before and immediately after their first military parachute jump. All three hormones had risen significantly 1 to 14 min after the jump, compared to mean levels measured immediately beforehand. Earlier studies of physical exercise by ourselves and others would suggest that emotional stress played a role in producing changes of this magnitude. We conclude that prolactin, TSH, and growth hormone are released in physiologically significant amounts in association with the stress of parachute jumping.

  13. Agricultural land use and human presence around breeding sites increase stress-hormone levels and decrease body mass in barn owl nestlings.

    PubMed

    Almasi, Bettina; Béziers, Paul; Roulin, Alexandre; Jenni, Lukas

    2015-09-01

    Human activities can have a suite of positive and negative effects on animals and thus can affect various life history parameters. Human presence and agricultural practice can be perceived as stressors to which animals react with the secretion of glucocorticoids. The acute short-term secretion of glucocorticoids is considered beneficial and helps an animal to redirect energy and behaviour to cope with a critical situation. However, a long-term increase of glucocorticoids can impair e.g. growth and immune functions. We investigated how nestling barn owls (Tyto alba) are affected by the surrounding landscape and by human activities around their nest sites. We studied these effects on two response levels: (a) the physiological level of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, represented by baseline concentrations of corticosterone and the concentration attained by a standardized stressor; (b) fitness parameters: growth of the nestlings and breeding performance. Nestlings growing up in intensively cultivated areas showed increased baseline corticosterone levels late in the season and had an increased corticosterone release after a stressful event, while their body mass was decreased. Nestlings experiencing frequent anthropogenic disturbance had elevated baseline corticosterone levels, an increased corticosterone stress response and a lower body mass. Finally, breeding performance was better in structurally more diverse landscapes. In conclusion, anthropogenic disturbance affects offspring quality rather than quantity, whereas agricultural practices affect both life history traits.

  14. Stress hormones link food availability and population processes in seabirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kitaysky, A.S.; Piatt, John F.; Wingfield, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Catastrophic population declines in marine top predators in the northern Pacific have been hypothesized to result from nutritional stress affecting reproduction and survival of individuals. However, empirical evidence for food-related stress in wild animals is frequently lacking or inconclusive. We used a field endocrinology approach to measure stress, identify its causes, and examine a link between stress and population processes in the common murre Uria aalge. We tested the empirical relationship between variations in the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) and food abundance, reproduction, and persistence of individuals at declining and increasing colonies in Cook Inlet, Alaska, from 1996 to 2001. We found that CORT secretion in murres is independent of colony, reproductive stage effects, and gender of individuals, but is directly negatively correlated with abundance of their food. Baseline CORT reflected current food abundance, whereas acute stress-induced CORT reflected food abundance in the previous month. As food supply diminished, increased CORT secretion predicted a decrease in reproductive performance. At a declining colony, increased baseline levels of CORT during reproduction predicted disappearance of individuals from the population. Persistence of individuals in a growing colony was independent of CORT during reproduction. The obtained results support the hypothesis that nutritional stress during reproduction affects reproduction and survival in seabirds. This study provides the first unequivocal evidence for CORT secretion as a mechanistic link between fluctuations in food abundance and population processes in seabirds. ?? Inter-Research 2007.

  15. Fasting growth hormone levels in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nazaimoon, W M; Ng, M L; Khalid, B A

    1993-11-01

    Fasting serum growth hormone (GH) levels of different groups of diabetic patients were measured and compared to age-matched normal subjects. Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) children (aged 12-17 years) were found to have significantly lower fasting GH levels than age-matched normal children (p < 0.001). In the adult age groups of 18-44 and 45-76 years, the IDDM patients showed increased fasting GH levels compared to age-matched normal subjects (p < 0.06 and p < 0.001 respectively) and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001 respectively). The fasting GH levels of IDDM patients of the age group 18-44 years also showed significant correlations with glycated haemoglobin (r = 0.510, p = 0.002) and fasting blood sugar levels (r = 0.571, p = 0.01).

  16. Hormone supply of the organism in prolonged emotional stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amiragova, M. G.; Stulnikov, B. V.; Svirskaya, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of prolonged emotional stress of varying genesis on the hormonal function of the pancreas, thyroid gland, and adrenal cortex was studied. The amount of the hormonal secretion was found to depend on the type of adaptation activity and its duration. High secretion of the hormones observed outside the adaptation activity was examined as an index of the phase transition of defense reactions to the phase of overstress.

  17. Evaluation of the influence of ayurvedic formulation (Ayushman-15) on psychopathology, heart rate variability and stress hormonal level in major depression (Vishada).

    PubMed

    Kishore, Ramakrishna K; Abhishekh, Hulegar A; Udupa, Kaviraja; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Lavekar, Gandhidas S; Gangadhar, Bangalore N; Raju, Trichur R; Sathyaprabha, Talakad N

    2014-12-01

    Ayurveda (Indian-complimentary and alternative medicine) is still most sought after in India and has promising potential in management of Vishada [major depressive disorder (MDD)]. But, systematic research is lacking. In this study we evaluated of influence of ayurvedic treatment (Panchakarma and Ayushman-15) on psychopathology, heart rate variability (HRV) and endocrinal parameters in patients with major depression. 81 drug naive patients diagnosed as Vishada by ayurvedic physician and MDD according to DSM IV-TR were given ayurvedic Virechana module (therapeutic purgation) and were randomized into two groups. Patients in group A (n=41) received Ayushman-15A while group B (n=40) received Ayushman-15B for two months and Shirodhara (forehead-oil pouring therapy). Patients were assessed with Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Heart Rate Variability (HRV). Cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were estimated at baseline and after ayurvedic therapy. HRV and endocrinal parameters were compared with age and gender matched healthy volunteers. HRV parameters showed significant sympathetic dominance in patients compared to healthy volunteers. Two months of ayurvedic treatment significantly decreased psychopathology, showed increase in vagal tone, decrease in sympathetic tone and reduced cortisol levels. However, there was no significant difference between groups receiving Ayushman A and B. This study provides evidence for antidepressant, cardiac (HRV) and beneficial neuroendocrine modulatory influence of Ayurveda therapy in patients of Vishada (MDD). Further studies are needed to confirm these findings. Greater insight into the neurobiology behind this therapy might provide valuable information about newer drug target. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers and Stress Responses in a Large Cross-Sectional Sample of Elephant Seals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) challenges and characterize the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers and Stress...number. 1. REPORT DATE 2012 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers and Stress

  19. Stress Hormones Bring Birds, Pathogens and Mosquitoes Together.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, André A; Dobson, Andrew P

    2017-05-01

    Do stress hormones, such as corticosterone, enhance bird susceptibility to mosquitoes in ways that enhance rates of co-infection? Does this then enhance pathogen emergence? Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Plant hormone-mediated regulation of stress responses.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Ravindran, Pratibha; Kumar, Prakash P

    2016-04-14

    Being sessile organisms, plants are often exposed to a wide array of abiotic and biotic stresses. Abiotic stress conditions include drought, heat, cold and salinity, whereas biotic stress arises mainly from bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes and insects. To adapt to such adverse situations, plants have evolved well-developed mechanisms that help to perceive the stress signal and enable optimal growth response. Phytohormones play critical roles in helping the plants to adapt to adverse environmental conditions. The elaborate hormone signaling networks and their ability to crosstalk make them ideal candidates for mediating defense responses. Recent research findings have helped to clarify the elaborate signaling networks and the sophisticated crosstalk occurring among the different hormone signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the roles of the major plant hormones in regulating abiotic and biotic stress responses with special focus on the significance of crosstalk between different hormones in generating a sophisticated and efficient stress response. We divided the discussion into the roles of ABA, salicylic acid, jasmonates and ethylene separately at the start of the review. Subsequently, we have discussed the crosstalk among them, followed by crosstalk with growth promoting hormones (gibberellins, auxins and cytokinins). These have been illustrated with examples drawn from selected abiotic and biotic stress responses. The discussion on seed dormancy and germination serves to illustrate the fine balance that can be enforced by the two key hormones ABA and GA in regulating plant responses to environmental signals. The intricate web of crosstalk among the often redundant multitudes of signaling intermediates is just beginning to be understood. Future research employing genome-scale systems biology approaches to solve problems of such magnitude will undoubtedly lead to a better understanding of plant development. Therefore, discovering additional crosstalk

  1. Hormonal Influence on Coenzyme Q10 Levels in Blood Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Antonio; Festa, Roberto; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Littarru, Gian Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), also known as ubiquinone for its presence in all body cells, is an essential part of the cell energy-producing system. However, it is also a powerful lipophilic antioxidant protecting lipoproteins and cell membranes. Due to these two actions, CoQ10 is commonly used in clinical practice in chronic heart failure, male infertility, and neurodegenerative disease. However, it is also taken as an anti-aging substance by healthy people aiming for long-term neuroprotection and by sportsmen to improve endurance. Many hormones are known to be involved in body energy regulation, in terms of production, consumption and dissipation, and their influence on CoQ10 body content or blood values may represent an important pathophysiological mechanism. We summarize the main findings of the literature about the link between hormonal systems and circulating CoQ10 levels. In particular the role of thyroid hormones, directly involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, is discussed. There is also a link with gonadal and adrenal hormones, partially due to the common biosynthetic pathway with CoQ10, but also to the increased oxidative stress found in hypogonadism and hypoadrenalism. PMID:22272129

  2. Hormonal responses to psychological stress in men preparing for skydiving.

    PubMed

    Chatterton, R T; Vogelsong, K M; Lu, Y C; Hudgens, G A

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between the hormonal and psychological responses of young men about to engage in a potentially life-threatening event. Subjects were recruited to take their first skydiving jump. The scores on questionnaires designed to assess anxiety were not significantly increased at 0800 h on the morning before the jump by comparison with scores obtained from the same subjects 3-5 days previously. However, a psychological instrument for rating of events indicated significantly increased intensity, and sympathetic nervous system activity, as measured by the salivary amylase response, was increased over self-control values. Salivary cortisol and testosterone levels were significantly lower on the morning of the jump than self-control values and values in control subjects determined at the same time of day. However, plasma LH was not suppressed. The anxiety and stress measures as well as the rating of events rose to high levels just before the jump. With the exception of testosterone, which remained low, serum cortisol, PRL, and GH all increased greatly subsequent to the rise in psychological measures, reached peak values before or shortly after landing, and declined significantly within the next hour. Anxiety and subjective stress scores declined to those of the self-control values within 15 min after landing, but the rating of events scale remained significantly elevated. In summary, reported anxiety associated with a purely psychological stressor was suppressed until within a few hours preceding the event, but was preceded by an increase in sympathetic nervous system activity and suppression of plasma cortisol and salivary testosterone levels. The event itself was associated with a reversal of the cortisol decline; other stress-associated hormones increased, but salivary testosterone remained low.

  3. A specific area of olfactory cortex involved in stress hormone responses to predator odours.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Kunio; Lu, Zhonghua; Ye, Xiaolan; Olson, David P; Lowell, Bradford B; Buck, Linda B

    2016-04-07

    Instinctive reactions to danger are critical to the perpetuation of species and are observed throughout the animal kingdom. The scent of predators induces an instinctive fear response in mice that includes behavioural changes, as well as a surge in blood stress hormones that mobilizes multiple body systems to escape impending danger. How the olfactory system routes predator signals detected in the nose to achieve these effects is unknown. Here we identify a specific area of the olfactory cortex in mice that induces stress hormone responses to volatile predator odours. Using monosynaptic and polysynaptic viral tracers, we found that multiple olfactory cortical areas transmit signals to hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons, which control stress hormone levels. However, only one minor cortical area, the amygdalo-piriform transition area (AmPir), contained neurons upstream of CRH neurons that were activated by volatile predator odours. Chemogenetic stimulation of AmPir activated CRH neurons and induced an increase in blood stress hormones, mimicking an instinctive fear response. Moreover, chemogenetic silencing of AmPir markedly reduced the stress hormone response to predator odours without affecting a fear behaviour. These findings suggest that AmPir, a small area comprising <5% of the olfactory cortex, plays a key part in the hormonal component of the instinctive fear response to volatile predator scents.

  4. A specific area of olfactory cortex involved in stress hormone responses to predator odors

    PubMed Central

    Kondoh, Kunio; Lu, Zhonghua; Ye, Xiaolan; Olson, David P.; Lowell, Bradford B.; Buck, Linda B.

    2016-01-01

    Instinctive reactions to danger are critical to the perpetuation of species and are observed throughout the animal kingdom. The scent of predators induces an instinctive fear response in mice that includes behavioral changes as well as a surge in blood stress hormones that mobilizes multiple body systems to escape impending danger1,2. How the olfactory system routes predator signals detected in the nose to achieve these effects is unknown. Here we identify a specific area of the olfactory cortex that induces stress hormone responses to volatile predator odors. Using monosynaptic and polysynaptic viral tracers, we found that multiple olfactory cortical areas transmit signals to hypothalamic CRH (corticotropin releasing hormone) neurons, which control stress hormone levels. However, only one minor cortical area, the amygdalo-piriform transition area (AmPir), contained neurons upstream of CRH neurons that were activated by volatile predator odors. Chemogenetic stimulation of AmPir activated CRH neurons and induced an increase in blood stress hormone, mimicking an instinctive fear response. Moreover, chemogenetic silencing of AmPir markedly reduced the stress hormone response to predator odors without affecting a fear behavior. These findings suggest that AmPir, a small area comprising <5% of the olfactory cortex, plays a key role in the hormonal component of the instinctive fear response to volatile predator scents. PMID:27001694

  5. A ghrelin-growth hormone axis drives stress-induced vulnerability to enhanced fear

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Retsina M.; Burgos-Robles, Anthony; Liu, Elizabeth; Correia, Susana S.; Goosens, Ki A.

    2014-01-01

    Hormones in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis mediate many of the bodily responses to stressors, yet there is not a clear relationship between the levels of these hormones and stress-associated mental illnesses such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Therefore, other hormones are likely to be involved in this effect of stress. Here we used a rodent model of PTSD in which rats repeatedly exposed to a stressor display heightened fear learning following auditory Pavlovian fear conditioning. Our results show that stress-related increases in circulating ghrelin, a peptide hormone, are necessary and sufficient for stress-associated vulnerability to exacerbated fear learning and these actions of ghrelin occur in the amygdala. Importantly, these actions are also independent of the classic HPA stress axis. Repeated systemic administration of a ghrelin receptor agonist enhanced fear memory but did not increase either corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) or corticosterone. Repeated intra-amygdala infusion of a ghrelin receptor agonist produced a similar enhancement of fear memory. Ghrelin receptor antagonism during repeated stress abolished stress-related enhancement of fear memory without blunting stress-induced corticosterone release. We also examined links between ghrelin and growth hormone (GH), a major downstream effector of the ghrelin receptor. GH protein was upregulated in the amygdala following chronic stress, and its release from amygdala neurons was increased by ghrelin receptor stimulation. Virus-mediated overexpression of GH in the amygdala was also sufficient to increase fear. Finally, virus-mediated overexpression of a GH receptor antagonist was sufficient to block the fear enhancing effects of repeated ghrelin receptor stimulation. Thus, ghrelin requires GH in the amygdala to exert fear-enhancing effects. These results suggest that ghrelin mediates a novel branch of the stress response and highlight a previously unrecognized role for ghrelin

  6. Acute Serum Hormone Levels: Characterization and Prognosis after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Emily H.; Niyonkuru, Christian; Ozawa, Haishin; Loucks, Tammy L.; Dobos, Julie A.; Brett, Christopher A.; Santarsieri, Martina; Dixon, C. Edward; Berga, Sarah L.; Fabio, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) studies report the neuroprotective effects of female sex steroids on multiple mechanisms of injury, with the clinical assumption that women have hormonally mediated neuroprotection because of the endogenous presence of these hormones. Other literature indicates that testosterone may exacerbate injury. Further, stress hormone abnormalities that accompany critical illness may both amplify or blunt sex steroid levels. To better understand the role of sex steroid exposure in mediating TBI, we 1) characterized temporal profiles of serum gonadal and stress hormones in a population with severe TBI during the acute phases of their injury; and 2) used a biological systems approach to evaluate these hormones as biomarkers predicting global outcome. The study population was 117 adults (28 women; 89 men) with severe TBI. Serum samples (n=536) were collected for 7 days post-TBI for cortisol, progesterone, testosterone, estradiol, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Hormone data were linked with clinical data, including acute care mortality and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6 months. Hormone levels after TBI were compared to those in healthy controls (n=14). Group based trajectory analysis (TRAJ) was used to develop temporal hormone profiles that delineate distinct subpopulations in the cohort. Structural equations models were used to determine inter-relationships between hormones and outcomes within a multivariate model. Compared to controls, acute serum hormone levels were significantly altered after severe TBI. Changes in the post-TBI adrenal response and peripheral aromatization influenced hormone TRAJ profiles and contributed to the abnormalities, including increased estradiol in men and increased testosterone in women. In addition to older age and greater injury severity, increased estradiol and testosterone levels over time were associated with increased mortality and worse global

  7. Circulating Levels of Hormones, Lipids, and Immune Mediators in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder – A 3-Month Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Jergović, Mladen; Bendelja, Krešo; Savić Mlakar, Ana; Vojvoda, Valerija; Aberle, Neda; Jovanovic, Tanja; Rabatić, Sabina; Sabioncello, Ante; Vidović, Anđelko

    2015-01-01

    A number of peripheral blood analytes have been proposed as potential biomarkers of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Few studies have investigated whether observed changes in biomarkers persist over time. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of combat-related chronic PTSD with a wide array of putative PTSD biomarkers and to determine reliability of the measurements, i.e., correlations over time. Croatian combat veterans with chronic PTSD (n = 69) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 32), all men, were assessed at two time points separated by 3 months. Serum levels of lipids, cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), prolactin, and C-reactive protein were determined. Multiplex assay was used for the simultaneous assessment of 13 analytes in sera: cytokines [interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, TNF-α], adhesion molecules (sPECAM-1, sICAM-1), chemokines (IL-8 and MIP-1α), sCD40L, nerve growth factor, and leptin. Group differences and changes over time were tested by parametric or non-parametric tests, including repeated measures analysis of covariance. Reliability estimates [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and kappa] were also calculated. Robust associations of PTSD with higher levels of DHEA-S [F(1,75) = 8.14, p = 0.006)] and lower levels of prolactin [F(1,75) = 5.40, p = 0.023] were found. Measurements showed good to excellent reproducibility (DHEA-S, ICC = 0.50; prolactin, ICC = 0.79). Serum lipids did not differ between groups but significant increase of LDL-C after 3 months was observed in the PTSD group (t = 6.87, p < 0.001). IL-8 was lower in the PTSD group (t = 4.37, p < 0.001) but assessments showed poor reproducibility (ICC = −0.08). Stable DHEA-S and prolactin changes highlight their potential to be reliable markers of PTSD. Change in lipid profiles after 3 months suggests that PTSD patients may be more prone to hyperlipidemia. High

  8. Low Thyroid Hormone Levels Disrupt Thyrotrope Development.

    PubMed

    Tonyushkina, Ksenia N; Krug, Stefanie; Ortiz-Toro, Theresa; Mascari, Tibor; Karlstrom, Rolf O

    2017-09-01

    Low thyroid hormone (TH) conditions caused by a variety of prenatal and perinatal problems have been shown to alter postnatal regulatory thyrotropin (TSH) responsiveness to TH in humans and rodents. The mechanisms underlying this pituitary TH resistance remain unknown. Here we use the evolutionarily conserved zebrafish model to examine the effects of low TH on thyrotrope development and function. Zebrafish were exposed to the goitrogen 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) to block TH synthesis, and this led to an approximately 50% increase in thyrotrope numbers and an 8- to 10-fold increase in tshb mRNA abundance in 2-week-old larvae and 1-month-old juveniles. Thyrotrope numbers returned to normal 3 weeks after cessation of PTU treatment, demonstrating that these effects were reversible and revealing substantial plasticity in pituitary-thyroid axis regulation. Using a T4 challenge assay, we found that development under low-TH conditions did not affect the ability of T4 to suppress tshb mRNA levels despite the thyrotrope hyperplasia that resulted from temporary low-TH conditions. Together, these studies show that low developmental TH levels can lead to changes in thyrotrope number and function, providing a possible cellular mechanism underlying elevated TSH levels seen in neonates with either permanent or transient congenital hypothyroidism. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  9. Independent contributions of alcohol and stress axis hormones to painful peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Levine, E; Levine, J D

    2013-01-03

    Painful small-fiber peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating complication of chronic alcohol abuse. Evidence from previous studies suggests that neuroendocrine mechanisms, in combination with other, as yet unidentified actions of alcohol, are required to produce this neuropathic pain syndrome. In addition to neurotoxic effects of alcohol, in the setting of alcohol abuse neuroendocrine stress axes release glucocorticoids and catecholamines. Since receptors for these stress hormones are located on nociceptors, at which they can act to cause neuronal dysfunction, we tested the hypothesis that alcohol and stress hormones act on the nociceptor, independently, to produce neuropathic pain. We used a rat model, which allows the distinction of the effects of alcohol from those produced by neuroendocrine stress axis mediators. We now demonstrate that topical application of alcohol and exposure to unpredictable sound stress, each alone, has no effect on the nociceptive threshold. However, when animals that had previous exposure to alcohol were subsequently exposed to stress, they rapidly developed mechanical hyperalgesia. Conversely, sound stress followed by topical alcohol exposure also produced mechanical hyperalgesia. The contribution of stress hormones was prevented by spinal intrathecal administration of oligodeoxynucleotides antisense to β(2)-adrenergic or glucocorticoid receptor mRNA, which attenuates receptor level in nociceptors, as well as by adrenal medullectomy. These experiments establish an independent role of alcohol and stress hormones on the primary afferent nociceptor in the induction of painful peripheral neuropathy.

  10. Steroid hormones, stress and the adolescent brain: a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Brown, G R; Spencer, K A

    2013-09-26

    Steroid hormones, including those produced by the gonads and the adrenal glands, are known to influence brain development during sensitive periods of life. Until recently, most brain organisation was assumed to take place during early stages of development, with relatively little neurogenesis or brain re-organisation during later stages. However, an increasing body of research has shown that the developing brain is also sensitive to steroid hormone exposure during adolescence (broadly defined as the period from nutritional independence to sexual maturity). In this review, we examine how steroid hormones that are produced by the gonads and adrenal glands vary across the lifespan in a range of mammalian and bird species, and we summarise the evidence that steroid hormone exposure influences behavioural and brain development during early stages of life and during adolescence in these two taxonomic groups. Taking a cross-species, comparative perspective reveals that the effects of early exposure to steroid hormones depend upon the stage of development at birth or hatching, as measured along the altricial-precocial dimension. We then review the evidence that exposure to stress during adolescence impacts upon the developing neuroendocrine systems, the brain and behaviour. Current research suggests that the effects of adolescent stress vary depending upon the sex of the individual and type of stressor, and the effects of stress could involve several neural systems, including the serotonergic and dopaminergic systems. Experience of stressors during adolescence could also influence brain development via the close interactions between the stress hormone and gonadal hormone axes. While sensitivity of the brain to steroid hormones during early life and adolescence potentially leaves the developing organism vulnerable to external adversities, developmental plasticity also provides an opportunity for the developing organism to respond to current circumstances and for behavioural

  11. Diagnostic value and clinical significance of stress hormones in patients with tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Kee; Chung, Dae Young; Bae, Seung Chun; Park, Kyoung-Ho; Yeo, Sang Won; Park, Shi-Nae

    2014-11-01

    Tinnitus has been found to be modulated by stress and is also closely related to the emotional state and the limbic system. In the present study, we evaluated the diagnostic and clinical values of several stress hormones in a large number of tinnitus patients. This study included 344 patients with sensorineural tinnitus and 87 normal controls. A questionnaire about tinnitus was administered to the participants, and blood levels of norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (Epi), a metabolite of serotonin (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-HIAA) and cortisol were compared between groups. In results, the mean values of Beck's depression inventory (BDI), Brief Encounter Psychosocial Instrument (BEPSI), NE, and 5-HIAA levels were higher in the tinnitus group, although there was no statistical significance. But, the proportion of participants with elevated 5-HIAA was significantly higher in the tinnitus group (21.8 vs. 8.0 %, P < 0.05), and the 5-HIAA level significantly correlated with the duration of tinnitus, NE and cortisol. Elevated stress-related hormones, as well as hearing loss, BDI, and BEPSI were the most related factors with tinnitus in multiple regression test with age adjustment. However, levels of stress-related hormones did not correlate with subjective measures including BDI, BEPSI and severity of tinnitus. In conclusion, blood stress hormones seemed to have some diagnostic and clinical value in patients with tinnitus, and serotonin is supposed to be the most important hormone in tinnitus. Further studies about the values of stress and stress hormones in tinnitus patients may lead to new approaches regarding diagnosis and clinical management of the disease.

  12. The excretion rates of stress hormones under mental work.

    PubMed

    Vangelova, K

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess stress on the basis of the excretion rates of stress hormones in occupational groups under mental stress. The investigation includes 293 persons, working in power engineering, education, public health and information sector. The stress hormones adrenaline, noradrenaline and 11-oxycorticosteroids (11-OCS) were followed during the working day using spectrofluorimetric methods. Very high excretion rates of adrenaline, noradrenaline and/or 11-OCS were found with leading radio editors, responsible engineers and operators in nuclear power station (NPS), teachers in secondary schools, designing engineers. In conclusion our data indicate high stress in occupational groups working under high psychological demands, high responsibility, making important managing decisions, low job control and are discussed with regard to the health risk.

  13. Spearmint induced hypothalamic oxidative stress and testicular anti-androgenicity in male rats - altered levels of gene expression, enzymes and hormones.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Kural, Mool Raj; Pereira, B M J; Roy, Partha

    2008-12-01

    Mentha spicata Labiatae, commonly known as spearmint, can be used for various kinds of illnesses in herbal medicines and food industries. One of the prominent functions of this plant extract is its anti-androgenic activity. The present study investigated the probable correlation between oxidative stress in hypothalamic region and anti-androgenic action of this plant's aqueous extract on rats. Decreased activities of enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in hypothalamus of treated rats indicated spearmint induced oxidative stress. Further RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis demonstrated the decreased expression of some of the steroidogenic enzymes, cytochrome P450scc, cytochrome P450C17, 3beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD), 17beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD) and other related proteins like, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, androgen receptor and scavenger receptor class B-1. Further, in vitro enzyme assays demonstrated depressed activities of testicular 3beta-HSD and 17beta-HSD enzymes. Histopathology indicated a decreased sperm density in cauda epididymis and degeneration of ductus deference. Our study suggested that spearmint probably induced oxidative stress in hypothalamus resulting in decreased synthesis of LH and FSH which in turn down-regulated the production of testicular testosterone through the disruption of a number of intermediate cascades.

  14. Stress-related hormones and glycinebetaine interplay in protection of photosynthesis under abiotic stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Kurepin, Leonid V; Ivanov, Alexander G; Zaman, Mohammad; Pharis, Richard P; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Hurry, Vaughan; Hüner, Norman P A

    2015-12-01

    Plants subjected to abiotic stresses such as extreme high and low temperatures, drought or salinity, often exhibit decreased vegetative growth and reduced reproductive capabilities. This is often associated with decreased photosynthesis via an increase in photoinhibition, and accompanied by rapid changes in endogenous levels of stress-related hormones such as abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and ethylene. However, certain plant species and/or genotypes exhibit greater tolerance to abiotic stress because they are capable of accumulating endogenous levels of the zwitterionic osmolyte-glycinebetaine (GB). The accumulation of GB via natural production, exogenous application or genetic engineering, enhances plant osmoregulation and thus increases abiotic stress tolerance. The final steps of GB biosynthesis occur in chloroplasts where GB has been shown to play a key role in increasing the protection of soluble stromal and lumenal enzymes, lipids and proteins, of the photosynthetic apparatus. In addition, we suggest that the stress-induced GB biosynthesis pathway may well serve as an additional or alternative biochemical sink, one which consumes excess photosynthesis-generated electrons, thus protecting photosynthetic apparatus from overreduction. Glycinebetaine biosynthesis in chloroplasts is up-regulated by increases in endogenous ABA or SA levels. In this review, we propose and discuss a model describing the close interaction and synergistic physiological effects of GB and ABA in the process of cold acclimation of higher plants.

  15. Differential expression of ferritin genes in response to abiotic stresses and hormones in pear (Pyrus pyrifolia).

    PubMed

    Xi, Li; Xu, Kuanyong; Qiao, Yushan; Qu, Shenchun; Zhang, Zhen; Dai, Wenhao

    2011-10-01

    In this study, the expression patterns of four ferritin genes (PpFer1, PpFer2, PpFer3, and PpFer4) in pear were investigated using quantitative real-time PCR. Analysis of tissue-specific expression revealed higher expression level of these genes in leaves than in other tested tissues. These ferritin genes were differentially expressed in response to various abiotic stresses and hormones treatments. The expression of ferritin wasn't affected by Fe(III)-citrate treatment. Abscisic acid significantly enhanced the expression of all four ferritin genes, especially PpFer2, followed by N-benzylyminopurine, gibberellic acid, and indole-3-acetic acid. The expression peaks of PpFer1 and PpFer3 in leaves appeared at 6, 6, and 12 h, respectively, after pear plant was exposed to oxidative stress (5 mM H(2)O(2)), salt stress (200 mM NaCl), and heat stress (40°C). A significant increase in PpFer4 expression was detected at 6 h after salt stress or heat stress. The expression of ferritin genes was not altered by cold stress. These results suggested that ferritin genes might be functionally important in acclimation of pear to salt and oxidative stresses. Hormone treatments had no significant effect on expression of ferritin genes compared to abiotic stresses. This showed accumulation of ferritin genes could be operated by different transduction pathways under abiotic stresses and hormones treatments.

  16. Parents' adulthood stress induces behavioral and hormonal alterations in male rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Niknazar, Somayeh; Nahavandi, Arezo; Najafi, Rezvan; Danialy, Samira; Zare Mehrjerdi, Fatemeh; Karimi, Mohsen

    2013-09-01

    Exposure to stress can influence hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in mammals and impair their behavioral/hormonal development. Stress during fetal or early life may have wide range effects on the offspring phenotype in rodents. Since the role of parents' adulthood stress before mating is not fully understood yet, we investigated the effects of parents' adulthood stress on behavioral and hormonal parameters in 10- and 30-day-old male offspring. To induce stress in the adult male and female rats, a repeated forced swimming paradigm was employed daily over the course of 21 days. Then, they were categorized into four parental breeding groups: stressed parents (SP), stressed mother (SM), stressed father (SF) and non-stressed parents (NSP). Anxiety-like behavior was tested in adult rats and 30-day-old male pups, using the elevated plus maze (EPM). The level of serum corticosterone was measured by ELISA in all groups. Stressed adult rats showed enhanced serum corticosterone concentration and anxiety-like behavior. Serum corticosterone level of the 10- and 30-day-old pups of the SP, SM and SF groups was significantly higher than pups from the non-stressed group. Furthermore, 30-day-old pups of the SP, SM and SF groups had lower time spent in the open arms compared to the control group, but stress had no significant effects on the percent of entries into the open arms. In addition, serum corticosterone level in 30-day-old pups were raised by a stressed mother was markedly more than 10-day-old pups. These findings revealed that parents' adulthood stress have negative impacts on behavioral and hormonal responses of their male offspring. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hormonal control of cold stress responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Eremina, Marina; Rozhon, Wilfried; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2016-02-01

    Cold stress responses in plants are highly sophisticated events that alter the biochemical composition of cells for protection from damage caused by low temperatures. In addition, cold stress has a profound impact on plant morphologies, causing growth repression and reduced yields. Complex signalling cascades are utilised to induce changes in cold-responsive gene expression that enable plants to withstand chilling or even freezing temperatures. These cascades are governed by the activity of plant hormones, and recent research has provided a better understanding of how cold stress responses are integrated with developmental pathways that modulate growth and initiate other events that increase cold tolerance. Information on the hormonal control of cold stress signalling is summarised to highlight the significant progress that has been made and indicate gaps that still exist in our understanding.

  18. Genetic Polymorphisms, Hormone Levels, and Hot Flashes in Midlife Women

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, Chrissy; Gallicchio, Lisa; Miller, Susan R.; Langenberg, Patricia; Zacur, Howard; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Hot flashes disrupt the lives of millions of women each year. Although hot flashes are a public health concern, little is known about risk factors that predispose women to hot flashes. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine whether sex steroid hormone levels and genetic polymorphisms in hormone biosynthesis and degradation enzymes are associated with the risk of hot flashes. Methods In a cross-sectional study design, midlife women aged 45 to 54 years (n=639) were recruited from Baltimore and its surrounding counties. Participants completed a questionnaire and donated a blood sample for steroid hormone analysis and genotyping. The associations between genetic polymorphisms and hormone levels, as well as the associations between genetic polymorphisms, hormone levels, and hot flashes were examined using statistical models. Results A polymorphism in CYP1B1 was associated with lower dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S) and progesterone levels, while a polymorphism in CYP19 (aromatase) was associated with higher testosterone and DHEA-S levels. Lower progesterone and sex hormone binding globulin levels, lower free estradiol index, and a higher ratio of total androgens to total estrogens were associated with the experiencing of hot flashes. A polymorphism in CYP1B1 and a polymorphism in 3βHSD were both associated with hot flashes. Conclusion Some genetic polymorphisms may be associated with altered levels of hormones in midlife women. Further, selected genetic polymorphisms and altered hormone levels may be associated with the risk of hot flashes in midlife women. PMID:17187946

  19. HPA-Axis Hormone Modulation of Stress Response Circuitry Activity in Women with Remitted Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Holsen, Laura M.; Lancaster, Katie; Klibanski, Anne; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Cherkerzian, Sara; Buka, Stephen; Goldstein, Jill M.

    2013-01-01

    Decades of clinical and basic research indicate significant links between altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis hormone dynamics and major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent neuroimaging studies of MDD highlight abnormalities in stress response circuitry regions which play a role in the regulation of the HPA-axes. However, there is a dearth of research examining these systems in parallel, especially as related to potential trait characteristics. The current study addresses this gap by investigating neural responses to a mild visual stress challenge with real-time assessment of adrenal hormones in women with MDD in remission and controls. 15 women with recurrent MDD in remission (rMDD) and 15 healthy control women were scanned on a 3T Siemens MR scanner while viewing neutral and negative (stress-evoking) stimuli. Blood samples were obtained before, during, and after scanning for measurement of HPA-axis hormone levels. Compared to controls, rMDD women demonstrated higher anxiety ratings, increased cortisol levels, and hyperactivation in the amygdala and hippocampus, p<0.05, FWE-corrected in response to the stress challenge. Among rMDD women, amygdala activation was negatively related to cortisol changes and positively associated with duration of remission. Findings presented here provide evidence for differential effects of altered HPA-axis hormone dynamics on hyperactivity in stress response circuitry regions elicited by a well-validated stress paradigm in women with recurrent MDD in remission. PMID:23891965

  20. HPA-axis hormone modulation of stress response circuitry activity in women with remitted major depression.

    PubMed

    Holsen, L M; Lancaster, K; Klibanski, A; Whitfield-Gabrieli, S; Cherkerzian, S; Buka, S; Goldstein, J M

    2013-10-10

    Decades of clinical and basic research indicate significant links between altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis hormone dynamics and major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent neuroimaging studies of MDD highlight abnormalities in stress response circuitry regions which play a role in the regulation of the HPA-axes. However, there is a dearth of research examining these systems in parallel, especially as related to potential trait characteristics. The current study addresses this gap by investigating neural responses to a mild visual stress challenge with real-time assessment of adrenal hormones in women with MDD in remission and controls. Fifteen women with recurrent MDD in remission (rMDD) and 15 healthy control women were scanned on a 3T Siemens MR scanner while viewing neutral and negative (stress-evoking) stimuli. Blood samples were obtained before, during, and after scanning for the measurement of HPA-axis hormone levels. Compared to controls, rMDD women demonstrated higher anxiety ratings, increased cortisol levels, and hyperactivation in the amygdala and hippocampus, p<0.05, family-wise error (FWE)-corrected in response to the stress challenge. Among rMDD women, amygdala activation was negatively related to cortisol changes and positively associated with the duration of remission. Findings presented here provide evidence for differential effects of altered HPA-axis hormone dynamics on hyperactivity in stress response circuitry regions elicited by a well-validated stress paradigm in women with recurrent MDD in remission.

  1. Circulating thyroid hormone levels in children

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, J. M.; Eastman, C. J.; Carter, J. N.; Lazarus, L.

    1977-01-01

    Extensive use of radioimmunoassay for routine measurement of serum thyroid hormones in paediatric thyroid disorders showed inconsistencies between laboratory results based upon adult criteria and clinical observation. To resolve this disparity, serum triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay in 354 healthy children aged between 3 weeks and 17 years. The mean serum T3 concentration in children up to 10 years of age was 1·94±0·35 ng/ml (SD) which was higher than the mean serum T3 of 1·37±0·25 ng/ml in healthy adults. Similarly, the mean serum T4 of 10±2·5 μg/100 ml was higher than the adult mean serum T4 of 8·5±1·5 μg/100 ml. Neither concentration changed significantly from 3 weeks to 10 years of age, nor was there any sex difference. In girls serum T3 and T4 concentrations declined gradually from age 10 to maturity. A perimenarcheal nadir observed in the T4 data was thought to reflect the joint effects of the age-dependent fall in circulating T4 and the concomitant oestrogen-dependent rise in thyroxine-binding globulin. In boys the decline in serum T3 occurred approximately 2 years later than in the girls. These observations show that the normal ranges for serum T3 and T4 in children are higher than those in adults and that reference to normal adult ranges may lead to misclassification in diagnosis and monitoring of paediatric thyroid disorders. PMID:921322

  2. Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone Levels in Ground Based Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, B. O.

    1972-01-01

    Baseline values of immunoreactive ACTH were established in the normal healthy adult. Normal levels of ACTH secretion were determined for both the male and the female in circulating plasma and serum. The data obtained in these studies are particularly significant in that the sampling was carefully controlled; only healthy employed individuals of both sexes were tested in a routine work situation that would not be considered conducive to stress. It has been found that alterations in the classically described circadian rhythm of ACTH secretion can occur when activities (such as work/rest cycles) are imposed on the individual studied. These changes can be demonstrated even when there is no appreciable change noted in the rhythm of hydrocortisone secretion.

  3. Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers Collected from a Managed Dolphin Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    five bottlenose dolphins. Since abrupt cessation of cortisol treatment has been observed to cause side-effects, dolphin subjects will be weaned off...by stress, which can lead to conditions of both hypo- and hyperthyroidism . Persistent elevated or diminished levels of these hormones are known to

  4. Hormonal contraception use alters stress responses and emotional memory.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Shawn E; Segal, Sabrina K; Worden, Ian V; Yim, Ilona S; Cahill, Larry

    2013-02-01

    Emotionally arousing material is typically better remembered than neutral material. Since norepinephrine and cortisol interact to modulate emotional memory, sex-related influences on stress responses may be related to sex differences in emotional memory. Two groups of healthy women - one naturally cycling (NC women, n=42) and one using hormonal contraceptives (HC women, n=36) - viewed emotionally arousing and neutral images. Immediately after, they were assigned to Cold Pressor Stress (CPS) or a control procedure. One week later, participants received a surprise free recall test. Saliva samples were collected and later assayed for salivary alpha-amylase (biomarker for norepinephrine) and cortisol. Compared to NC women, HC women exhibited significantly blunted stress hormone responses to the images and CPS. Recall of emotional images differed between HC and NC women depending on noradrenergic and cortisol responses. These findings may have important implications for understanding the neurobiology of emotional memory disorders, especially those that disproportionately affect women.

  5. Hormonal modulation of catecholaminergic neurotransmission in a prenatal stress model.

    PubMed

    Pallarés, María Eugenia; Antonelli, Marta C

    2015-01-01

    Our laboratory has a long-standing interest in the effects of prenatal stress (PS) on various neurotransmitter pathways and the morphology of the developing brain as well as in behavioural aspects of the offspring. Employing a commonly used PS paradigm in which the dams were subjected to restraint stress during the last week of gestation, we observed that several of these pathways were altered in the offspring brain. In this chapter, we will summarize and discuss the results obtained with the main catecholaminergic pathways, namely dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE). In our hands, PS produces an increase in dopamine D2-type receptors in limbic areas, a decreased DA release after amphetamine stimulation in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and an increase in NE release in the same area of the adult offspring brain. In addition, DA uptake is altered at prepubertal stages that persist through adulthood. However, the expression of the step-limiting enzyme of the DA synthesis, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), is only impaired at early stages of development after PS in the neuronal bodies. At the nuclear regulation level, dopaminergic transcription factors Nurr1 and Ptx3 showed a high vulnerability to PS showing changes along the lifespan. It was striking to observe that many impairments observed in most of these pathways differed depending on whether they were tested before or after puberty indicating a particular sensitivity of the systems to variations in gonadal hormones peaks. In fact, we observed that PS induced long-term effects on the male offspring reproductive system and spermatogenesis development, particularly by inducing a long-term imbalance of circulating sexual hormone levels. Our findings suggest that PS exerts long-term effects on various neurotransmitter pathways altering the normal connectivity between brain areas. Since the developing forebrain was shown to be influenced by androgen exposure, and PS was shown to disrupt prenatal testosterone surges, our results

  6. Effect of psychological stress on fertility hormones and seminal quality in male partners of infertile couples.

    PubMed

    Bhongade, M B; Prasad, S; Jiloha, R C; Ray, P C; Mohapatra, S; Koner, B C

    2015-04-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of psychological stress on male fertility hormones and seminal quality in male partner of infertile couples. Seventy male partners of infertile couples were evaluated for level of psychological stress using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) questionnaire, serum total testosterone, luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) by electrochemiluminescence assay and serum GnRH by ELISA. Seminal analysis was performed as per WHO guideline. Nineteen (27%) of them had HADS anxiety and depression score ≥8 (abnormal HADS score). The persons having abnormal HADS had lower serum total testosterone, higher serum FSH and LH than those of persons having normal HADS. Serum total testosterone correlated negatively with HADS, but LH and FSH correlated positively. There was no change in GnRH with the change in stress or testosterone levels. Sperm count, motility and morphologically normal spermatozoa were lower in persons having abnormal HADS. Sperm count correlated positively with total testosterone and negatively with FSH and LH. Abnormal sperm motility and morphology were related to lower testosterone and higher LH and FSH levels. Psychological stress primarily lowers serum total testosterone level with secondary rise in serum LH and FSH levels altering seminal quality. Stress management is warranted for male infertility cases.

  7. Hormonal responses of pilots to training flights: the effects of experience on apparent stress.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yasutami; Onozawa, Akihiko; Miyamoto, Yoshinori

    2006-04-01

    The levels of urinary noradrenaline (NAd), adrenaline (Ad) and salivary cortisol (Cor) were determined in student and instructor pilots during Phase 1 (training with propeller engine; PH1), and Phase 2 (training with jet engine; PH2) flight training. The subjects in PH1 were 30 students and 33 instructors, and in PH2 were 17 students and 15 instructors. Urine and saliva were collected approximately 30 min before and 20 min after the flights. The ratio (post/preflight) of the hormonal levels was calculated to compare the students with the instructors and/or PH1 with PH2. In PH1, the levels of all three hormones for postflight were significantly higher than for preflight in students, and the ratios of all three hormones in students were significantly higher than in instructors. In PH2, the ratios of all three hormones for students and instructors did not differ significantly, and the ratios of Ad and Cor levels in students for PH2 were significantly lower than for PH1 (Ad: 1.64 +/- 0.10 vs. 2.23 +/- 0.14; Cor: 0.86 +/- 0.16 vs. 1.68 +/- 0.11, respectively). The results from PH1 clearly demonstrated that flight stress for students was significantly higher than for instructors. The ratios might be regarded as result of adaptation to flight stress in students. We conclude that the ratios of Ad and Cor levels are a good indicator of stress coping in student pilots.

  8. Stress hormones: physiological stress and regulation of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kyrou, Ioannis; Tsigos, Constantine

    2009-12-01

    Stress, defined as a state of threatened homeostasis, mobilizes a complex spectrum of adaptive physiologic and behavioral responses that aim to re-establish the challenged body homeostasis. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) constitute the main effector pathways of the stress system, mediating its adaptive functions. In western societies, indices of stress correlate with increasing rates of both obesity and metabolic syndrome which have reached epidemic proportions. Recent data indicate that chronic stress, associated with mild hypercortisolemia and prolonged SNS activation, favors accumulation of visceral fat and contributes to the clinical presentation of visceral obesity, type 2 diabetes, and related cardiometabolic complications. Reciprocally, obesity promotes a systemic low-grade inflammation state, mediated by increased adipokine secretion, which can chronically stimulate the stress system.

  9. Do stress hormones connect environmental effects with behavior in the forced swim test?

    PubMed

    Pintér, Ottó; Domokos, Ágnes; Mergl, Zsuzsa; Mikics, Éva; Zelena, Dóra

    2011-01-01

    Forced swim test (FST) is a widely used test for antidepressant development. Depression is a stress related disease, as hormones of the stress-axis can modify mood. However it is not clear, how the appearance of depressive-like behavior (floating) in FST is connected with changes in the stress-hormone levels. We hypothesized, that different manipulations would alter the behavior through changes in stress-hormone levels. First the effect of environmental alterations was studied. Increasing water-temperature enhanced floating time together with a decrease in adrenocorticotropin levels. During the dark phase of the day rats spent more time with floating independently from the actual lighting. Neither the phase nor the actual lighting had significant effect on adrenocorticotropin concentrations with higher corticosterone levels during the dark phase. At greater water depth rats float less but the size of animals had no effect. Water depth did not influence adrenocorticotropin and corticosterone responses, but the size of the rats significantly affected both factors. Secondly, administration of imipramine reduced floating and adrenocorticotropin level without affecting corticosterone. Despite the known connection between depression and stress we did not find a correlation between floating behavior and hormone levels. As an alternative mechanism imipramine-induced heart rate and core body temperature decrease was found by telemetric approach. This study is the first summary in rats examining the effect of wide range of environmental alterations during FST. It seems likely that both brain monoamines and stress-axis take part in the development of depression, but these pathways are regulated independently.

  10. Neurobehavioral risk is associated with gestational exposure to stress hormones

    PubMed Central

    Sandman, Curt A; Davis, Elysia Poggi

    2012-01-01

    The developmental origins of disease or fetal programming model predict that early exposures to threat or adverse conditions have lifelong consequences that result in harmful outcomes for health. The maternal endocrine ‘fight or flight’ system is a source of programming information for the human fetus to detect threats and adjust their developmental trajectory for survival. Fetal exposures to intrauterine conditions including elevated stress hormones increase the risk for a spectrum of health outcomes depending on the timing of exposure, the timetable of organogenesis and the developmental milestones assessed. Recent prospective studies, reviewed here, have documented the neurodevelopmental consequences of fetal exposures to the trajectory of stress hormones over the course of gestation. These studies have shown that fetal exposures to biological markers of adversity have significant and largely negative consequences for fetal, infant and child emotional and cognitive regulation and reduced volume in specific brain structures. PMID:23144647

  11. Thyroid hormone action at the nuclear level.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, J H

    1985-03-01

    Recent findings have led to a greater understanding of thyroid hormone action. The nuclear receptor for triiodothyronine is an integral component of a larger chromatin fragment. A stereospecific energy-dependent transport system appears responsible for translocation of triiodothyronine from cytosol to nucleus. In the liver, a multiplicative interaction between a signal from the triiodothyronine-nuclear receptor complex and a signal generated from carbohydrate metabolism results in the induction of specific mRNAs. Two-dimensional mRNA activity profiles suggest that approximately 8% of the visible mRNA sequences are differentially affected by alterations in thyroid states. Almost 30% to 40% of these changes are mediated by an increase in pituitary growth hormone induced by triiodothyronine. Sequential analyses of mRNA activity profiles have identified an mRNA sequence (mRNAs14) coding for a protein (S14) with Mr 17 010 and pI 4.9 which responds to triiodothyronine with a lag time of less than 20 minutes. The coordinate regulation of mRNAs14 by carbohydrate and triiodothyronine and its presence in lipogenic tissues (fat, liver, lactating mammary tissue) suggests that S14 is involved in some aspect of fatty acid synthesis degradation or storage.

  12. Stress Hormones and their Regulation in a Captive Dolphin Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    the 21st Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals (Dec 2015). HPT axis stimulations were completed in June of 2015 and the hormone assays...Dolphin Population Cory D Champagne & Dorian S. Houser National Marine Mammal Foundation 2240 Shelter Island Dr, Suite 200 San Diego, CA 92106 phone...of how markers of stress relate to marine mammal health. This information will inform Navy environmental stewardship efforts and will guide decision

  13. How plants handle multiple stresses: hormonal interactions underlying responses to abiotic stress and insect herbivory.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy; Rieu, Ivo; Mariani, Celestina; van Dam, Nicole M

    2016-08-01

    Adaptive plant responses to specific abiotic stresses or biotic agents are fine-tuned by a network of hormonal signaling cascades, including abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene, jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid. Moreover, hormonal cross-talk modulates plant responses to abiotic stresses and defenses against insect herbivores when they occur simultaneously. How such interactions affect plant responses under multiple stresses, however, is less understood, even though this may frequently occur in natural environments. Here, we review our current knowledge on how hormonal signaling regulates abiotic stress responses and defenses against insects, and discuss the few recent studies that attempted to dissect hormonal interactions occurring under simultaneous abiotic stress and herbivory. Based on this we hypothesize that drought stress enhances insect resistance due to synergistic interactions between JA and ABA signaling. Responses to flooding or waterlogging involve ethylene signaling, which likely reduces plant resistance to chewing herbivores due to its negative cross-talk with JA. However, the outcome of interactions between biotic and abiotic stress signaling is often plant and/or insect species-dependent and cannot simply be predicted based on general knowledge on the involvement of signaling pathways in single stress responses. More experimental data on non-model plant and insect species are needed to reveal general patterns and better understand the molecular mechanisms allowing plants to optimize their responses in complex environments.

  14. Exhaustive exercise and vitamins C and E modulate thyroid hormone levels at low and high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Al-Hashem, Fahaid; Alkhateeb, Mahmoud; Al-Ani, Bahjat; Sakr, Hussein; Khalil, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play an important role in cell growth and differentiation and regulation of oxygen consumption and thermogenesis. The effect of altitude and vitamin supplementation on thyroid hormone levels in animals or humans performing acute exhaustive exercise have not been investigated before. Therefore, we thought to test whether exhaustive exercise-induced stress with antioxidant supplementation was capable of modulating the level of thyroid hormones at different altitudes. Serum levels of T4 (Thyroxin), T3 (Triiodothyronine), and TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) were measured in rats (N=36) born and bred in low altitude (600 m above sea level) and high altitude (2200 m above sea level) following forced swimming with or without vitamins C and E (25 mg/kg) pre-treatments. Thyroid levels were significantly decreased in resting rats at high altitude compared to low altitude, and swimming exercise moderately increased T3 and TSH at both high and low altitudes, whereas T4 was markedly increased (62 %) at low altitude compared to a moderate high altitude increase (28 %). Co-administration of vitamins C and E augmented the observed forced swimming-induced thyroid release. However, the conversion of T4 to T3 was reduced in both altitude areas following swimming exercise and vitamin pre-treatment had no effect. We conclude that acute stress induced thyroidal hormones in rats, which was augmented by antioxidant drugs in both high and low altitude areas. These findings may play an important role in the human pathophysiology of thyroid gland at different altitudes.

  15. A secretagogin locus of the mammalian hypothalamus controls stress hormone release.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Roman A; Alpár, Alán; Zhang, Ming-Dong; Zeisel, Amit; Calas, André; Landry, Marc; Fuszard, Matthew; Shirran, Sally L; Schnell, Robert; Dobolyi, Árpád; Oláh, Márk; Spence, Lauren; Mulder, Jan; Martens, Henrik; Palkovits, Miklós; Uhlen, Mathias; Sitte, Harald H; Botting, Catherine H; Wagner, Ludwig; Linnarsson, Sten; Hökfelt, Tomas; Harkany, Tibor

    2015-01-02

    A hierarchical hormonal cascade along the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis orchestrates bodily responses to stress. Although corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), produced by parvocellular neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and released into the portal circulation at the median eminence, is known to prime downstream hormone release, the molecular mechanism regulating phasic CRH release remains poorly understood. Here, we find a cohort of parvocellular cells interspersed with magnocellular PVN neurons expressing secretagogin. Single-cell transcriptome analysis combined with protein interactome profiling identifies secretagogin neurons as a distinct CRH-releasing neuron population reliant on secretagogin's Ca(2+) sensor properties and protein interactions with the vesicular traffic and exocytosis release machineries to liberate this key hypothalamic releasing hormone. Pharmacological tools combined with RNA interference demonstrate that secretagogin's loss of function occludes adrenocorticotropic hormone release from the pituitary and lowers peripheral corticosterone levels in response to acute stress. Cumulatively, these data define a novel secretagogin neuronal locus and molecular axis underpinning stress responsiveness.

  16. A secretagogin locus of the mammalian hypothalamus controls stress hormone release

    PubMed Central

    Romanov, Roman A; Alpár, Alán; Zhang, Ming-Dong; Zeisel, Amit; Calas, André; Landry, Marc; Fuszard, Matthew; Shirran, Sally L; Schnell, Robert; Dobolyi, Árpád; Oláh, Márk; Spence, Lauren; Mulder, Jan; Martens, Henrik; Palkovits, Miklós; Uhlen, Mathias; Sitte, Harald H; Botting, Catherine H; Wagner, Ludwig; Linnarsson, Sten; Hökfelt, Tomas; Harkany, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    A hierarchical hormonal cascade along the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis orchestrates bodily responses to stress. Although corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), produced by parvocellular neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and released into the portal circulation at the median eminence, is known to prime downstream hormone release, the molecular mechanism regulating phasic CRH release remains poorly understood. Here, we find a cohort of parvocellular cells interspersed with magnocellular PVN neurons expressing secretagogin. Single-cell transcriptome analysis combined with protein interactome profiling identifies secretagogin neurons as a distinct CRH-releasing neuron population reliant on secretagogin’s Ca2+ sensor properties and protein interactions with the vesicular traffic and exocytosis release machineries to liberate this key hypothalamic releasing hormone. Pharmacological tools combined with RNA interference demonstrate that secretagogin’s loss of function occludes adrenocorticotropic hormone release from the pituitary and lowers peripheral corticosterone levels in response to acute stress. Cumulatively, these data define a novel secretagogin neuronal locus and molecular axis underpinning stress responsiveness. PMID:25430741

  17. Thyroid Hormone Levels and Psychological Symptoms in Sexually Abused Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haviland, Mark G.; Sonne, Janet L.; Anderson, Donald L.; Nelson, Jerald C.; Sheridan-Matney, Clare; Nichols, Joy G.; Carlton, Esther I.; Murdoch, William G. C.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationships between psychological symptoms and thyroid hormone levels in adolescent girls who had experienced the traumatic stress of sexual abuse. Method: The study design was cross-sectional/correlational. Subjects ("N"=22; age range=12-18 years) had their blood drawn, and they completed 2 psychological tests…

  18. Thyroid Hormone Levels and Psychological Symptoms in Sexually Abused Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haviland, Mark G.; Sonne, Janet L.; Anderson, Donald L.; Nelson, Jerald C.; Sheridan-Matney, Clare; Nichols, Joy G.; Carlton, Esther I.; Murdoch, William G. C.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationships between psychological symptoms and thyroid hormone levels in adolescent girls who had experienced the traumatic stress of sexual abuse. Method: The study design was cross-sectional/correlational. Subjects ("N"=22; age range=12-18 years) had their blood drawn, and they completed 2 psychological tests…

  19. Analysis of plant hormone profiles in response to moderate dehydration stress.

    PubMed

    Urano, Kaoru; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2017-04-01

    Plant responses to dehydration stress are mediated by highly complex molecular systems involving hormone signaling and metabolism, particularly the major stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and ABA-dependent gene expression. To understand the roles of plant hormones and their interactions during dehydration, we analyzed the plant hormone profiles with respect to dehydration responses in Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type (WT) plants and ABA biosynthesis mutants (nced3-2). We developed a procedure for moderate dehydration stress, and then investigated temporal changes in the profiles of ABA, jasmonic acid isoleucine (JA-Ile), salicylic acid (SA), cytokinin (trans-zeatin, tZ), auxin (indole-acetic acid, IAA), and gibberellin (GA4 ), along with temporal changes in the expression of key genes involved in hormone biosynthesis. ABA levels increased in a bi-phasic pattern (at the early and late phases) in response to moderate dehydration stress. JA-Ile levels increased slightly in WT plants and strongly increased in nced3-2 mutant plants at 72 h after the onset of dehydration. The expression profiles of dehydration-inducible genes displayed temporal responses in an ABA-dependent manner. The early phase of ABA accumulation correlated with the expression of touch-inducible genes and was independent of factors involved in the major ABA regulatory pathway, including the ABA-responsive element-binding (AREB/ABF) transcription factor. JA-Ile, SA, and tZ were negatively regulated during the late dehydration response phase. Transcriptome analysis revealed important roles for hormone-related genes in metabolism and signaling during dehydration-induced plant responses.

  20. Converging, Synergistic Actions of Multiple Stress Hormones Mediate Enduring Memory Impairments after Acute Simultaneous Stresses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuncai; Molet, Jenny; Lauterborn, Julie C; Trieu, Brian H; Bolton, Jessica L; Patterson, Katelin P; Gall, Christine M; Lynch, Gary; Baram, Tallie Z

    2016-11-02

    Stress influences memory, an adaptive process crucial for survival. During stress, hippocampal synapses are bathed in a mixture of stress-released molecules, yet it is unknown whether or how these interact to mediate the effects of stress on memory. Here, we demonstrate novel synergistic actions of corticosterone and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) on synaptic physiology and dendritic spine structure that mediate the profound effects of acute concurrent stresses on memory. Spatial memory in mice was impaired enduringly after acute concurrent stresses resulting from loss of synaptic potentiation associated with disrupted structure of synapse-bearing dendritic spines. Combined application of the stress hormones corticosterone and CRH recapitulated the physiological and structural defects provoked by acute stresses. Mechanistically, corticosterone and CRH, via their cognate receptors, acted synergistically on the spine-actin regulator RhoA, promoting its deactivation and degradation, respectively, and destabilizing spines. Accordingly, blocking the receptors of both hormones, but not each alone, rescued memory. Therefore, the synergistic actions of corticosterone and CRH at hippocampal synapses underlie memory impairments after concurrent and perhaps also single, severe acute stresses, with potential implications to spatial memory dysfunction in, for example, posttraumatic stress disorder.

  1. Melatonin Attenuates Noise Stress-induced Gastrointestinal Motility Disorder and Gastric Stress Ulcer: Role of Gastrointestinal Hormones and Oxidative Stress in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Gong, Ji T; Zhang, Hu Q; Song, Quan H; Xu, Guang H; Cai, Lei; Tang, Xiao D; Zhang, Hai F; Liu, Fang-E; Jia, Zhan S; Zhang, Hong W

    2015-03-30

    There are increasing evidences for gastrointestinal motility disorder (GIMD) and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The present study was to investigate the reversed effect of melatonin on GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress and potential mechanism. Noise stress was induced on rats, and melatonin (15 mg/kg) was administered to rats by intraperitoneal injection. Differences were assessed in gastric residual rate (GRR), small intestine propulsion rate (SPR), Guth injury score, cortisol, gastrointestinal hormones (calcitonin-gene-related peptide and motilin) and oxidative stress markers (superoxide dismutase and malondialde hyde) in blood plasma as well as gastric mucosa homogenate with or without melatonin. The pathological examination of gastric mucosa was also performed. The GRR and SPR were improved by noise stress compared with control (P < 0.05). The pathological examination and Guth injury score revealed gastric stress ulcer. Moreover, the levels of cortisol, motilin and malondialdehyde in blood plasma and ma-londialdehyde in gastric mucosa homogenate were increased by noise stress (P < 0.05). CGRP and superoxide dismutase activ-ity in both of blood plasma and gastric mucosa homogenate were significantly decreased (P< 0.05). Furthermore, melatonin reversed changes in GRR, SPR, pathological examination, Guth injury score, cortisol, motilin, CGRP, superoxide dismutase activity and malondialdehyde (P < 0.05). Melatonin is effective in reversing the GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The underlying mechanism may be involved in oxidative stress and gastrointestinal hormones.

  2. Melatonin Attenuates Noise Stress-induced Gastrointestinal Motility Disorder and Gastric Stress Ulcer: Role of Gastrointestinal Hormones and Oxidative Stress in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Gong, Ji T; Zhang, Hu Q; Song, Quan H; Xu, Guang H; Cai, Lei; Tang, Xiao D; Zhang, Hai F; Liu, Fang-E; Jia, Zhan S; Zhang, Hong W

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims There are increasing evidences for gastrointestinal motility disorder (GIMD) and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The present study was to investigate the reversed effect of melatonin on GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress and potential mechanism. Methods Noise stress was induced on rats, and melatonin (15 mg/kg) was administered to rats by intraperitoneal injection. Differences were assessed in gastric residual rate (GRR), small intestine propulsion rate (SPR), Guth injury score, cortisol, gastrointestinal hormones (calcitonin-gene-related peptide and motilin) and oxidative stress markers (superoxide dismutase and malondialde hyde) in blood plasma as well as gastric mucosa homogenate with or without melatonin. The pathological examination of gastric mucosa was also performed. Results The GRR and SPR were improved by noise stress compared with control (P < 0.05). The pathological examination and Guth injury score revealed gastric stress ulcer. Moreover, the levels of cortisol, motilin and malondialdehyde in blood plasma and malondialdehyde in gastric mucosa homogenate were increased by noise stress (P < 0.05). CGRP and superoxide dismutase activity in both of blood plasma and gastric mucosa homogenate were significantly decreased (P< 0.05). Furthermore, melatonin reversed changes in GRR, SPR, pathological examination, Guth injury score, cortisol, motilin, CGRP, superoxide dismutase activity and malondialdehyde (P < 0.05). Conclusions Melatonin is effective in reversing the GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The underlying mechanism may be involved in oxidative stress and gastrointestinal hormones. PMID:25537679

  3. Gonadal hormones differently modulate cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Romana-Souza, Bruna; Assis de Brito, Thatiana L; Pereira, Gabriela R; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2014-02-01

    Gonadal hormones influence physiological responses to stress and cutaneous wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of gonadal hormones on cutaneous wound healing in chronically stressed mice. Male and female mice were gonadectomized, and after 25 days, they were spun daily at 115 rpm for 15 min every hour until euthanasia. Twenty-eight days after the gonadectomy, an excisional lesion was created. The animals were killed 7 or 14 days after wounding, and the lesions were collected. Myofibroblast density, macrophage number, catecholamine level, collagen deposition, and blood vessel number were evaluated. In the intact and gonadectomized groups, stress increased the plasma catecholamine levels in both genders. In intact groups, stress impaired wound contraction and re-epithelialization and increased the macrophage number in males but not in females. In addition, stress compromised myofibroblastic differentiation and blood vessel formation and decreased collagen deposition in males but not in females. In contrast to intact mice, wound healing in ovariectomized female mice was affected by stress, while wound healing in castrated male mice was not. In conclusion, gender differences contribute to the cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice. In addition, androgens contribute to the stress-induced impairment of the healing of cutaneous wounds but estrogens inhibit it. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hormonal Regulation of Response to Oxidative Stress in Insects-An Update.

    PubMed

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Bednářová, Andrea; Zemanová, Milada; Krishnan, Natraj

    2015-10-27

    Insects, like other organisms, must deal with a wide variety of potentially challenging environmental factors during the course of their life. An important example of such a challenge is the phenomenon of oxidative stress. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of adipokinetic hormones (AKH) as principal stress responsive hormones in insects involved in activation of anti-oxidative stress response pathways. Emphasis is placed on an analysis of oxidative stress experimentally induced by various stressors and monitored by suitable biomarkers, and on detailed characterization of AKH's role in the anti-stress reactions. These reactions are characterized by a significant increase of AKH levels in the insect body, and by effective reversal of the markers-disturbed by the stressors-after co-application of the stressor with AKH. A plausible mechanism of AKH action in the anti-oxidative stress response is discussed as well: this probably involves simultaneous employment of both protein kinase C and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathways in the presence of extra and intra-cellular Ca(2+) stores, with the possible involvement of the FoxO transcription factors. The role of other insect hormones in the anti-oxidative defense reactions is also discussed.

  5. Hormonal Regulation of Response to Oxidative Stress in Insects—An Update

    PubMed Central

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Bednářová, Andrea; Zemanová, Milada; Krishnan, Natraj

    2015-01-01

    Insects, like other organisms, must deal with a wide variety of potentially challenging environmental factors during the course of their life. An important example of such a challenge is the phenomenon of oxidative stress. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of adipokinetic hormones (AKH) as principal stress responsive hormones in insects involved in activation of anti-oxidative stress response pathways. Emphasis is placed on an analysis of oxidative stress experimentally induced by various stressors and monitored by suitable biomarkers, and on detailed characterization of AKH’s role in the anti-stress reactions. These reactions are characterized by a significant increase of AKH levels in the insect body, and by effective reversal of the markers—disturbed by the stressors—after co-application of the stressor with AKH. A plausible mechanism of AKH action in the anti-oxidative stress response is discussed as well: this probably involves simultaneous employment of both protein kinase C and cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate pathways in the presence of extra and intra-cellular Ca2+ stores, with the possible involvement of the FoxO transcription factors. The role of other insect hormones in the anti-oxidative defense reactions is also discussed. PMID:26516847

  6. Leadership is associated with lower levels of stress

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Gary D.; Lee, Jooa J.; Cuddy, Amy J. C.; Renshon, Jonathan; Oveis, Christopher; Gross, James J.; Lerner, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    As leaders ascend to more powerful positions in their groups, they face ever-increasing demands. As a result, there is a common perception that leaders have higher stress levels than nonleaders. However, if leaders also experience a heightened sense of control—a psychological factor known to have powerful stress-buffering effects—leadership should be associated with reduced stress levels. Using unique samples of real leaders, including military officers and government officials, we found that, compared with nonleaders, leaders had lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol and lower reports of anxiety (study 1). In study 2, leaders holding more powerful positions exhibited lower cortisol levels and less anxiety than leaders holding less powerful positions, a relationship explained significantly by their greater sense of control. Altogether, these findings reveal a clear relationship between leadership and stress, with leadership level being inversely related to stress. PMID:23012416

  7. Effects of Electromagnetic Radiation Exposure on Stress-Related Behaviors and Stress Hormones in Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sahraei, Hedayat; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Tavakoli, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that electromagnetic waves, as the one of the most important physical factors, may alter cognitive and non-cognitive behaviors, depending on the frequency and energy. Moreover, non-ionizing radiation of low energy waves e.g. very low frequency waves could alter this phenomenon via alterations in neurotransmitters and neurohormones. In this study, short, medium, and long-term exposure to the extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) (1 and 5 Hz radiation) on behavioral, hormonal, and metabolic changes in male Wistar rats (250 g) were studied. In addition, changes in plasma concentrations for two main stress hormones, noradrenaline and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were evaluated. ELF-EMF exposure did not alter body weight, and food and water intake. Plasma glucose level was increased and decreased in the groups which exposed to the 5 and 1Hz wave, respectively. Plasma ACTH concentration increased in both using frequencies, whereas nor-adrenaline concentration showed overall reduction. At last, numbers of rearing, sniffing, locomotor activity was increased in group receiving 5 Hz wave over the time. In conclusions, these data showed that the effects of 1 and 5 Hz on the hormonal, metabolic and stress-like behaviors may be different. Moreover, the influence of waves on stress system is depending on time of exposure. PMID:25489427

  8. Effects of electromagnetic radiation exposure on stress-related behaviors and stress hormones in male wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sahraei, Hedayat; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Tavakoli, Hassan

    2014-11-01

    Studies have demonstrated that electromagnetic waves, as the one of the most important physical factors, may alter cognitive and non-cognitive behaviors, depending on the frequency and energy. Moreover, non-ionizing radiation of low energy waves e.g. very low frequency waves could alter this phenomenon via alterations in neurotransmitters and neurohormones. In this study, short, medium, and long-term exposure to the extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) (1 and 5 Hz radiation) on behavioral, hormonal, and metabolic changes in male Wistar rats (250 g) were studied. In addition, changes in plasma concentrations for two main stress hormones, noradrenaline and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were evaluated. ELF-EMF exposure did not alter body weight, and food and water intake. Plasma glucose level was increased and decreased in the groups which exposed to the 5 and 1Hz wave, respectively. Plasma ACTH concentration increased in both using frequencies, whereas nor-adrenaline concentration showed overall reduction. At last, numbers of rearing, sniffing, locomotor activity was increased in group receiving 5 Hz wave over the time. In conclusions, these data showed that the effects of 1 and 5 Hz on the hormonal, metabolic and stress-like behaviors may be different. Moreover, the influence of waves on stress system is depending on time of exposure.

  9. Stress hormones are associated with the neuronal correlates of instructed fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Merz, Christian Josef; Stark, Rudolf; Vaitl, Dieter; Tabbert, Katharina; Wolf, Oliver Tobias

    2013-01-01

    The effects of sex and stress hormones on classical fear conditioning have been subject of recent experimental studies. A correlation approach between basal cortisol concentrations and neuronal activation in fear-related structures seems to be a promising alternative approach in order to foster our understanding of how cortisol influences emotional learning. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, participants with varying sex hormone status (20 men, 15 women taking oral contraceptives, 15 women tested in the luteal phase) underwent an instructed fear conditioning protocol with geometrical figures as conditioned stimuli and an electrical stimulation as unconditioned stimulus. Salivary cortisol concentrations were measured and afterwards correlated with fear conditioned brain responses. Results revealed a positive correlation between basal cortisol levels and differential activation in the amygdala in men and OC women only. These results suggest that elevated endogenous cortisol levels are associated with enhanced fear anticipation depending on current sex hormone availability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sex hormone levels and intraocular pressure in postmenopausal Nigerian women.

    PubMed

    Ebeigbe, J A; Ebeigbe, P N

    2013-12-01

    A number of hormones are known to affect intra ocular pressure (IOP). Of these, the female sex hormones are the predominant ones to cause variations in IOP. During menopause, a changing hormone profile in the body causes important shifts in the levels of these hormones. Studies on the effect of menopause on visual function, cardiovascular and ocular hemodynamics showed that menopausal women had significantly higher IOP as compared to premenopausal women. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of serum levels of sex hormones on IOP in postmenopausal Nigerian women. This study was an experimental, cross sectional study. Twenty postmenopausal women aged 50 to 55 years (mean age 52 +/- 2.32) and twenty premenopausal women aged 45 to 50 years (mean age 50 +/- 2.13) were selected by systematic random sampling. The women were free from systemic or ocular diseases. IOP was measured and serum levels of progesterone, estradiol and testosterone were determined by hormone assay for all subjects. Data was analyzed by correlation analysis. Mean IOP between the postmenopausal (16.00 +/- 5.81 mmHg) and premenopausal women (15.50 +/- 3.28 mmHg, p = 0.24) was not statistically significant. Although there was a positive correlation between IOP and estradiol level in the postmenopausal women (r = 0.567, p = 0.009), no significant correlation was found between IOP and serum levels of sex hormones among the premenopausal women. Our result suggests a relation between levels of estradiol and IOP in postmenopausal Nigerian women. However further studies may be required to determine a direct cause and effect relationship.

  11. Coping style and stress hormone responses in genetically heterogeneous rats: comparison with the Roman rat strains.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Morán, Sira; Palència, Marta; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; López-Aumatell, Regina; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate for the first time the stress-induced hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), corticosterone and prolactin responses of the National Institutes of Health genetically heterogeneous rat stock (N/Nih-HS rats) in comparison with responses of the relatively high and low stress-prone Roman Low- (RLA-I) and High-Avoidance (RHA-I) rat strains. The same rats were also compared (experiment 1) with respect to their levels of unconditioned anxiety (elevated zero-maze test), novelty-induced exploratory behavior, conditioned fear and two-way active avoidance acquisition. In experiment 2, naive rats from these three strains/stocks were evaluated for "depressive-like" behavior in the forced swimming test. N/Nih-HS and RLA-I rats showed significantly higher post-stress ACTH, corticosterone and prolactin levels than RHA-I rats. N/Nih-HS rats also presented the highest context-conditioned freezing responses, extremely poor two-way avoidance acquisition and very low novelty-induced exploratory behavior. Experiment 2 showed that, compared to RHA-I rats, N/Nih-HS and RLA-I rats displayed significantly less struggling (escape-directed) and increased immobility responses in the forced swimming test. Factor analysis of data from experiment 1 showed associations among behavioral and hormonal responses, with a first factor comprising high loadings of elevated zero-maze variables and lower loadings of conditioned fear, two-way avoidance acquisition and hormonal measures, while a second factor mainly grouped conditioned fear and two-way avoidance acquisition with novelty-induced exploration and post-stress prolactin. Thus, regarding their anxiety/fearfulness, passive coping style, "depressive-like" and stress-induced hormonal responses the N/Nih-HS rats resemble the phenotype profiles of the relatively high-anxious and stress-prone RLA-I rat strain.

  12. The influence of stress hormones on fear circuitry.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Sarina M; LeDoux, Joseph E; Sapolsky, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Fear arousal, initiated by an environmental threat, leads to activation of the stress response, a state of alarm that promotes an array of autonomic and endocrine changes designed to aid self-preservation. The stress response includes the release of glucocorticoids from the adrenal cortex and catecholamines from the adrenal medulla and sympathetic nerves. These stress hormones, in turn, provide feedback to the brain and influence neural structures that control emotion and cognition. To illustrate this influence, we focus on how it impacts fear conditioning, a behavioral paradigm widely used to study the neural mechanisms underlying the acquisition, expression, consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction of emotional memories. We also discuss how stress and the endocrine mediators of the stress response influence the morphological and electrophysiological properties of neurons in brain areas that are crucial for fear-conditioning processes, including the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. The information in this review illuminates the behavioral and cellular events that underlie the feedforward and feedback networks that mediate states of fear and stress and their interaction in the brain.

  13. Pubertal shifts in adrenal responsiveness to stress and adrenocorticotropic hormone in male rats.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Russell D; Minhas, Sumeet; Svirsky, Sarah E; Hall, Baila S; Savenkova, Marina; Karatsoreos, Ilia N

    2014-04-01

    Studies have indicated significant pubertal-related differences in hormonal stress reactivity. We report here that prepubertal (30 days) male rats display a more protracted stress-induced corticosterone response than adults (70 days), despite showing relatively similar levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Additionally, we show that adrenal expression of the ACTH receptor, melanocortin 2 receptor (Mc2r), is higher in prepubertal compared to adult animals, and that expression of melanocortin receptor accessory protein (Mrap), a molecule that chaperones MC2R to the cell surface, is greater in prepubertal males following stress. Given that these data suggest a pubertal shift in adrenal sensitivity to ACTH, we directly tested this possibility by injecting prepubertal and adult males with 6.25 or 9.375μg/kg of exogenous rat ACTH and measured their hormone levels 30 and 60min post-injection. As these doses resulted in different circulating levels of ACTH at these two ages, we performed regression analyses to assess the relationship between circulating ACTH and corticosterone concentrations. We found no difference between the ages in the correlation between ACTH and corticosterone levels at the 30min time point. However, 60min following the ACTH injection, we found prepubertal rats had significantly higher corticosterone concentrations at lower levels of ACTH compared to adults. These data suggest that prolonged exposure to ACTH leads to greater corticosterone responsiveness prior to puberty, and indicate that changes in adrenal sensitivity to ACTH may, in part, contribute to the protracted hormonal stress response in prepubertal rats.

  14. Short-term and continuing stresses differentially interplay with multiple hormones to regulate plant survival and growth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cangjing; Liu, Jingjing; Dong, Xinran; Cai, Zhenying; Tian, Weidong; Wang, Xuelu

    2014-05-01

    The stress phytohormone, abscisic acid (ABA), plays important roles in facilitating plants to survive and grow well under a wide range of stress conditions. Previous gene expression studies mainly focused on plant responses to short-term ABA treatment, but the effect of sustained ABA treatment and their difference are poorly studied. Here, we treated plants with ABA for 1 h or 9 d, and our genome-wide analysis indicated the differentially regulated genes under the two conditions were tremendously different. We analyzed other hormones' signaling changes by using their whole sets of known responsive genes as reporters and integrating feedback regulation of their biosynthesis. We found that, under short-term ABA treatment, signaling outputs of growth-promoting hormones, brassinosteroids and gibberellins, and a biotic stress-responsive hormone, jasmonic acid, were significantly inhibited, while auxin and ethylene signaling outputs were promoted. However, sustained ABA treatment repressed cytokinin and gibberellin signaling, but stimulated auxin signaling. Using several sets of hormone-related mutants, we found candidates in corresponding hormonal signaling pathways, including receptors or transcription regulators, are essential in responding to ABA. Our findings indicate interactions of ABA-dependent stress signals with hormones at different levels are involved in plants to survive under transient stress and to adapt to continuing stressful environments.

  15. Association of plasma hormones, nutritional status, and stressful life events in anorexia nervosa patients.

    PubMed

    Śmiarowska, Małgorzata; Safranow, Krzysztof; Dziedziejko, Violetta; Bialecka, Monika; Koziołek, Monika; Samochowiec, Jerzy

    2014-02-06

    The aim of the current study was to analyze the relationships between plasma hormones, body weight parameters and stressful life events in anorexia nervosa (AN). 72 females in the active phase of AN were evaluated. 52 healthy women constituted the control group. RIA kits were used to measure plasma hormone levels. The concentrations of leptin, insulin, IGF-1, triiodothyronine, LH, FSH, estradiol, and testosterone were significantly lower and those of cortisol and growth hormone significantly higher in the AN than the control group. No hormonal differences between restrictive and binge-purging AN subtypes were found. Leptin, IGF-1, gonadotropins, and sex steroids correlated significantly negatively and growth hormone positively with total reduction of body weight or the degree of undernutrition. Associations were also found between lower insulin concentration and family violence, lower cortisol and psychiatric diseases in the family, higher testosterone and patient's alcohol or drug abuse. The changed activity of the somatotropin-somatomedin, gonadal, and corticotrophin axes corresponds to the clinical stage of AN. Plasma IGF-1 seems to be the most sensitive and useful independent hormonal marker of cachexia.

  16. Effect of Tongkat Ali on stress hormones and psychological mood state in moderately stressed subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Eurycoma longifolia is a medicinal plant commonly called tongkat ali (TA) and “Malaysian ginseng.” TA roots are a traditional “anti-aging” remedy and modern supplements are intended to improve libido, energy, sports performance and weight loss. Previous studies have shown properly-standardized TA to stimulate release of free testosterone, improve sex drive, reduce fatigue, and improve well-being. Methods We assessed stress hormones and mood state in 63 subjects (32 men and 31 women) screened for moderate stress and supplemented with a standardized hot-water extract of TA root (TA) or Placebo (PL) for 4 weeks. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) with significance set at p < 0.05 was used to determine differences between groups. Results Significant improvements were found in the TA group for Tension (−11%), Anger (−12%), and Confusion (−15%). Stress hormone profile (salivary cortisol and testosterone) was significantly improved by TA supplementation, with reduced cortisol exposure (−16%) and increased testosterone status (+37%). Conclusion These results indicate that daily supplementation with tongkat ali root extract improves stress hormone profile and certain mood state parameters, suggesting that this “ancient” remedy may be an effective approach to shielding the body from the detrimental effects of “modern” chronic stress, which may include general day-to-day stress, as well as the stress of dieting, sleep deprivation, and exercise training. PMID:23705671

  17. Postprandial Oxidative Stress and Gastrointestinal Hormones: Is There a Link?

    PubMed Central

    Malinska, Hana; Kahleova, Hana; Topolcan, Ondrej; Vrzalova, Jindra; Oliyarnyk, Olena; Kazdova, Ludmila; Belinova, Lenka; Hill, Martin; Pelikanova, Terezie

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal postprandial elevation of plasma glucose and lipids plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and strongly predicts cardiovascular mortality. In patients suffering from type 2 diabetes (T2D) postprandial state is associated with oxidative stress, cardiovascular risk and, probably, with impairment of both secretion and the effect of gastrointestinal peptides. Evaluating postprandial changes of gastrointestinal hormones together with changes in oxidative stress markers may help to understand the mechanisms behind the postprandial state in diabetes as well as suggest new preventive and therapeutical strategies. Methods A standard meal test has been used for monitoring the postprandial concentrations of gastrointestinal hormones and oxidative stress markers in patients with T2D (n = 50) compared to healthy controls (n = 50). Blood samples were drawn 0, 30, 60, 120 and 180 minutes after the standard meal. Results Both basal and postprandial plasma concentrations of glucose and insulin proved to be significantly higher in patients with T2D, whereas plasma concentrations of ghrelin showed significantly lower values during the whole meal test. In comparison with healthy controls, both basal and postprandial concentrations of almost all other gastrointestinal hormones and lipoperoxidation were significantly increased while ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity were decreased in patients with T2D. A positive relationship was found between changes in GIP and those of glucose and immunoreactive insulin in diabetic patients (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively) and between changes in PYY and those of glucose (p<0.01). There was a positive correlation between changes in GIP and PYY and changes in ascorbic acid in patients with T2D (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively). Conclusion/Interpretation Apart from a positive relationship of postprandial changes in GIP and PYY with changes in ascorbic acid, there was no

  18. Effects of stress and stress hormones on amyloid-beta protein and plaque deposition.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongxin; Csernansky, John G

    2009-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that physical and psychosocial stressors, in part acting through the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, may accelerate the process of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this review, we summarize recent research related to the effects of stress and stress hormones on the various disease process elements associated with AD. Specifically, we focus on the relationships among chronic stressors, HPA axis activity, amyloid-beta protein, and amyloid-beta plaque deposition in mouse models of AD. The potential mechanisms by which stress and stress-related components, especially corticotrophin-releasing factor and its receptors, influence the pathogenesis of AD are discussed.

  19. Associations between dietary acrylamide intake and plasma sex hormone levels

    PubMed Central

    Hogervorst, Janneke G.; Fortner, Renee T.; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Eliassen, A. Heather; Hankinson, Susan E.; Wilson, Kathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The rodent carcinogen acrylamide was discovered in 2002 in commonly consumed foods. Epidemiological studies have observed positive associations between acrylamide intake and endometrial, ovarian and breast cancer risks, which suggests that acrylamide may have sex-hormonal effects. Methods We cross-sectionally investigated the relationship between acrylamide intake and plasma levels of sex hormones and SHBG among 687 postmenopausal and 1300 premenopausal controls from nested case-control studies within the Nurses’ Health Studies. Results There were no associations between acrylamide and sex hormones or SHBG among premenopausal women overall or among never-smokers. Among normal-weight premenopausal women, acrylamide intake was statistically significantly positively associated with luteal total and free estradiol levels. Among postmenopausal women overall and among never-smokers, acrylamide was borderline statistically significantly associated with lower estrone sulfate levels but not with other estrogens, androgens, prolactin or SHBG. Among normal weight women, (borderline) statistically significant inverse associations were noted for estrone, free estradiol, estrone sulfate, DHEA, and prolactin, while statistically significant positive associations for testosterone and androstenedione were observed among overweight women. Conclusions Overall, this study did not show conclusive associations between acrylamide intake and sex hormones that would lend unequivocal biological plausibility to the observed increased risks of endometrial, ovarian and breast cancer. The association between acrylamide and sex hormones may differ by menopausal and overweight status. We recommend other studies investigate the relationship between acrylamide and sex hormones in women, specifically using acrylamide biomarkers. Impact The present study showed some interesting associations between acrylamide intake and sex hormones that urgently need confirmation. PMID:23983241

  20. Growth hormone ameliorates adipose dysfunction during oxidative stress and inflammation and improves glucose tolerance in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, M; Okamoto, Y; Katsumata, H; Ishikawa, M; Ishii, S; Okamoto, M; Minami, S

    2014-08-01

    Patients with adult growth hormone deficiency exhibit visceral fat accumulation, which gives rise to a cluster of metabolic disorders such as impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia. Plasma growth hormone levels are lower in obese patients with metabolic syndrome than in healthy subjects. Here we examined the hypothesis that exogenous growth hormone administration regulates function of adipose tissue to improve glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese mice. Twelve-week-old obese male C57BL/6 J mice received bovine growth hormone daily for 6 weeks. In epididymal fat, growth hormone treatment antagonized diet-induced changes in the gene expression of adiponectin, leptin, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and significantly increased the gene expression of interleukin-10 and CD206. Growth hormone also suppressed the accumulation of oxidative stress marker, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, in the epididymal fat and enhanced the gene expression of anti-oxidant enzymes. Moreover, growth hormone significantly restored glucose tolerance in obese mice. In cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes, growth hormone prevented the decline in adiponectin gene expression in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that growth hormone administration ameliorates glucose intolerance in obese mice presumably by decreasing adipose mass, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation in the visceral fat. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Effects of Anesthetic Agent Propofol on Postoperative Sex Hormone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H.; Ku, S.-Y.; Kim, H. C.; Suh, C. S.; Kim, S. H.; Choi, Y. M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have found anesthetic agents including propofol in ovarian follicular fluid. However, little is known about the effect of anesthetic agents on ovarian function. We aimed to investigate whether there were differences in the postoperative levels of sex hormones when propofol was used as the anesthetic agent. Methods: A retrospective review was done of 80 patients who underwent ovarian surgery, with 72 infertile women serving as controls. Patients were included in the study if their serum estradiol (E2) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were measured during their first postoperative menstrual cycle. Results: Patients were grouped according to the use or non-use of propofol as follows: propofol group (n = 39) and non-propofol group (n = 41). The control group did not undergo surgery. Postoperative E2 levels did not differ between the three groups, but FSH levels were significantly higher in the patients who had undergone surgery compared to controls (p < 0.05). Post-hoc analysis of E2 and FSH levels in the propofol and non-propofol groups did not show any significant differences. Conclusions: The use of propofol did not result in any differences compared to other anesthetic agents in terms of postoperative sex hormone levels after gynecologic surgery. The type of anesthetic agent does not seem to affect the postoperative levels of female sex hormones. PMID:27134297

  2. Corticotropin Releasing Hormone and Imaging, Rethinking the Stress Axis

    PubMed Central

    Contoreggi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The stress system provides integration of both neurochemical and somatic physiologic functions within organisms as an adaptive mechanism to changing environmental conditions throughout evolution. In mammals and primates the complexity and sophistication of these systems has surpassed other species in triaging neurochemical and physiologic signaling to maximize chances of survival. Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and its related peptides and receptors have been identified over the last three decades and are fundamental molecular initiators of the stress response. They are crucial in the top down regulatory cascade over a myriad of neurochemical, neuroendocrine and sympathetic nervous system events. From neuroscience, we’ve seen that stress activation impacts behavior, endocrine and somatic physiology and influences neurochemical events that one can capture in real time with current imaging technologies. To delineate these effects one can demonstrate how the CRH neuronal networks infiltrate critical cognitive, emotive and autonomic regions of the central nervous system (CNS) with somatic effects. Abundant preclinical and clinical studies show inter-regulatory actions of CRH with multiple neurotransmitters/peptides. Stress, both acute and chronic has epigenetic effects which magnify genetic susceptibilities to alter neurochemistry; stress system activation can add critical variables in design and interpretation of basic and clinical neuroscience and related research. This review will attempt to provide an overview of the spectrum of known functions and speculative actions of CRH and stress responses in light of imaging technology and its interpretation. Metabolic and neuroreceptor positron emission/single photon tomography (PET/SPECT), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), anatomic MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (pMRS) are technologies that can delineate basic mechanisms of neurophysiology and pharmacology

  3. [Pediatric reference intervals : retrospective study on thyroid hormone levels].

    PubMed

    Ladang, A; Vranken, L; Luyckx, F; Lebrethon, M-C; Cavalier, E

    2017-01-01

    Defining reference range is an essential tool for diagnostic. Age and sexe influences on thyroid hormone levels have been already discussed. In this study, we are defining a new pediatric reference range for TSH, FT3 and FT4 for Cobas C6000 analyzer. To do so, we have taken in account 0 to 18 year old outclinic patients. During the first year of life, thyroid hormone levels change dramatically before getting stabilized around 3 years old. We also compared our results to those obtained in a Canadian large-scale prospective study (the CALIPER initiative).

  4. Interactions between immune, stress-related hormonal and cardiovascular systems following strenuous physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Menicucci, Danilo; Piarulli, Andrea; Mastorci, Francesca; Sebastiani, Laura; Laurino, Marco; Garbella, Erika; Castagnini, Cinzia; Pellegrini, Silvia; Lubrano, Valter; Bernardi, Giulio; Metelli, Maria; Bedini, Remo; L'abbate, Antonio; Pingitore, Alessandro; Gemignani, Angelo

    2013-09-01

    Physical exercise represents a eustress condition that promotes rapid coordinated adjustments in the immune, stress-related hormonal and cardiovascular systems, for maintaining homeostasis in response to increased metabolic demands. Compared to the tight multisystem coordination during exercise, evidence of between-systems cross talk in the early post exercise is still lacking. This study was aimed at identifying possible interactions between multiple systems following strenuous physical exercise (Ironman race) performed by twenty well-trained triathletes. Cardiac hemodynamics, left ventricle systolic and diastolic function and heart rate variability were measured along with plasma concentrations of immune messengers (cytokines and C-reactive protein) and stress-related hormones (catecholamines and cortisol) both 24h before and within 20 min after the race. Observed changes in antiinflammatory pathways, stress-related hormones and cardiovascular function were in line with previous findings; moreover, correlating parameters' changes (post versus pre-race) highlighted a dependence of cardiovascular function on the post-race biohumoral milieu: in particular, individual post-race variations of heart rate and diastolic function were strongly correlated with individual variations of anti-inflammatory cytokines, while individual baroreflex sensitivity changes were linked to IL-8 increase. Multiple correlations between anti-inflammatory cytokines and catecholamines were also found according with the autonomic regulation of immune function. Observed post-race cytokine and hormone levels were presumptively representative of the increases reached at the effort end while the cardiovascular parameters after the race were measured during the cardiovascular recovery; thus, results suggest that sustained strenuous exercise produced a stereotyped cardiovascular early recovery, whose speed could be conditioned by the immune and stress-related hormonal milieu.

  5. Role of counterregulatory hormones in the catabolic response to stress.

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, R A; Matthews, D E; Bier, D M; Sherwin, R S

    1984-01-01

    Patients with major injury or illness develop protein wasting, hypermetabolism, and hyperglycemia with increased glucose flux. To assess the role of elevated counterregulatory hormones in this response, we simultaneously infused cortisol (6 mg/m2 per h), glucagon (4 ng/kg per min), epinephrine (0.6 microgram/m2 per min), and norepinephrine (0.8 micrograms/m2 per min) for 72 h into five obese subjects receiving only intravenous glucose (150 g/d). Four obese subjects received cortisol alone under identical conditions. Combined infusion maintained plasma hormone elevations typical of severe stress for 3 d. This caused a sustained increase in plasma glucose (60-80%), glucose production (100%), and total glucose flux (40%), despite persistent hyperinsulinemia. In contrast, resting metabolic rate changed little (9% rise, P = NS). Urinary nitrogen excretion promptly doubled and remained increased by approximately 4 g/d, reflecting increased excretion of urea and ammonia. Virtually all plasma amino acids declined. The increment in nitrogen excretion was similar in three additional combined infusion studies performed in 3-d fasted subjects not receiving glucose. Cortisol alone produced a smaller glycemic response (20-25%), an initially smaller insulin response, and a delayed rise in nitrogen excretion. By day 3, however, daily nitrogen excretion was equal to the combined group as was the elevation in plasma insulin. Most plasma amino acids rose rather than fell. In both infusion protocols nitrogen wasting was accompanied by only modest increments in 3-methylhistidine excretion (approximately 20-30%) and no significant change in leucine flux. We conclude: (a) Prolonged elevations of multiple stress hormones cause persistent hyperglycemia, increased glucose turnover, and increased nitrogen loss; (b) The sustained nitrogen loss is no greater than that produced by cortisol alone; (c) Glucagon, epinephrine, and norepinephrine transiently augment cortisol-induced nitrogen loss

  6. Adrenal-derived stress hormones modulate ozone-induced ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ozone-induced systemic effects are modulated through activation of the neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Adrenal demedullation (DEMED)or bilateral total adrenalectomy (ADREX) inhibits systemic and pulmonary effect of acute ozone exposure. To understand the influence of adrenal-derived stress hormones in mediating ozone-induced lung injury/inflammation, we assessed global gene expression (mRNA sequencing) and selected proteins in lung tissues from male Wistar-Kyoto rats that underwent DEMED, ADREX, or sham surgery (SHAM)prior to their exposure to air or ozone (1 ppm),4 h/day for 1 or 2days. Ozone exposure significantly changed the expression of over 2300 genes in lungs of SHAM rats, and these changes were markedly reduced in DEMED and ADREX rats. SHAM surgery but not DEMED or ADREX resulted in activation of multiple ozone-responsive pathways, including glucocorticoid, acute phase response, NRF2, and Pl3K-AKT.Predicted targets from sequencing data showed a similarity between transcriptional changes induced by ozone and adrenergic and steroidal modulation of effects in SHAM but not ADREX rats. Ozone-induced Increases in lung 116 in SHAM rats coincided with neutrophilic Inflammation, but were diminished in DEMED and ADREX rats. Although ozone exposure in SHAM rats did not significantly alter mRNA expression of lfny and 11-4, the IL-4 protein and ratio of IL-4 to IFNy (IL-4/IFNy) proteins increased suggesting a tendency for a Th2 response. This did not occur

  7. Associations of acute and chronic stress hormones with cognitive functions in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shino; Lee, Young-A; Yamaguchi, Yoshie; Shibata, Yuka; Goto, Yukiori

    2017-02-20

    Extensive studies have reported cognitive abnormalities in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Another line of evidence suggests that stress also affects cognitive functions. In this study, we investigated whether there were associations between stress hormones and cognitive functions in ASD and typically developing (TD) children. Cognitive functions in ASD and TD children were evaluated with a battery of psychological tests for working memory, behavioral flexibility, and social cognition for emotional assessments of others. ASD children exhibited higher hair and salivary cortisol, which reflects chronic and acute stress hormone levels of subjects, respectively, than TD children. Autism-spectrum quotient (AQ) was positively correlated with hair cortisol and the scores of Spence Children's Anxiety Scale in ASD children. In addition, a negative correlation was present between spatial working memory performance and hair cortisol in ASD, but not in TD, children. These results suggest that chronic stress hormone elevation may have relationships with some aspects of cognitive dysfunction in ASD subjects. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Sex differences, hormones, and fMRI stress response circuitry deficits in psychoses.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jill M; Lancaster, Katie; Longenecker, Julia M; Abbs, Brandon; Holsen, Laura M; Cherkerzian, Sara; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Makris, Nicolas; Tsuang, Ming T; Buka, Stephen L; Seidman, Larry J; Klibanski, Anne

    2015-06-30

    Response to stress is dysregulated in psychosis (PSY). fMRI studies showed hyperactivity in hypothalamus (HYPO), hippocampus (HIPP), amygdala (AMYG), anterior cingulate (ACC), orbital and medial prefrontal (OFC; mPFC) cortices, with some studies reporting sex differences. We predicted abnormal steroid hormone levels in PSY would be associated with sex differences in hyperactivity in HYPO, AMYG, and HIPP, and hypoactivity in PFC and ACC, with more severe deficits in men. We studied 32 PSY cases (50.0% women) and 39 controls (43.6% women) using a novel visual stress challenge while collecting blood. PSY males showed BOLD hyperactivity across all hypothesized regions, including HYPO and ACC by FWE-correction. Females showed hyperactivity in HIPP and AMYG and hypoactivity in OFC and mPFC, the latter FWE-corrected. Interaction of group by sex was significant in mPFC (F = 7.00, p = 0.01), with PSY females exhibiting the lowest activity. Male hyperactivity in HYPO and ACC was significantly associated with hypercortisolemia post-stress challenge, and mPFC with low androgens. Steroid hormones and neural activity were dissociated in PSY women. Findings suggest disruptions in neural circuitry-hormone associations in response to stress are sex-dependent in psychosis, particularly in prefrontal cortex.

  9. Evaluation of Stress Levels of Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnorr, Janet K.; McWilliams, Jettie M.

    This study was conducted to analyze levels and areas of stress of professionals in selected service professions and to establish national norms of stress for these professions. The 60-item Tennessee Stress Scale-R (TSS-R) is a work-related stress inventory for professionals which provides a measure of stress in three areas: stress producers,…

  10. Sex steroid hormones and circulating IgE levels.

    PubMed

    Mathur, S; Mathur, R S; Goust, J M; Williamson, H O; Fudenberg, H H

    1977-12-01

    The possible influence of sex steroid hormones on circulating IgE levels in general and IgE anti-Candida antibodies in particular was studied by quantification of plasma levels of progesterone, estradiol and IgE (total and anti-Candida-specific) in females during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle, and during pregnancy. IgE levels during the follicular and luteal phases were not significantly different, although the mean values for the luteal phase were slightly lower. This trend was apparent in daily samples from two normal females during one menstrual cycle. During pregnancy, when the levels of circulating sex steroids were high, IgE levels were only slightly higher than in the follicular and luteal phases. In men and in gonadal dysgenetics, circulating progesterone levels were similar to those of women during the follicular phase (i.e., lower than in the luteal phase or in pregnancy), but the IgE levels were not different. The apparently low levels of IgE during the luteal phase may therefore be due to physiological factors other than fluctuations in the sex steroid hormones. From the present studies, it is apparent that sex steroid hormones have little or no effect on humoral IgE levels, in marked contrast to previously described correlations for other immunoglobulins, especially anti-Candida antibodies.

  11. Prevalence of stress and stress tolerance levels among adolescent boys - a district level cross sectional study in South India.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kallol; Kamath, Veena G; Kamath, Asha; Alex, Johnson; Hegde, Asha

    2015-11-10

    Adolescence is a tumultuous period of hormonal and psychological transitions ranging from 10 to 19 years (WHO). This growth phase is usually accompanied by stressors. Very few studies have reported the prevalence of stress levels among adolescent boys. Our aim was to assess the prevalence and determinants of stress and its tolerance levels among high school boys. A cross sectional study design was selected for this purpose. A standardized self reported questionnaire was administered to 1153 high school boys. A score of 130 and more was used to classify the participants as stressed. The prevalence of stress and its tolerance levels was found to be 55% and 33.7%, respectively. Also correlations suggest that parental education and occupational status play a significant role in adolescent stress. Together, these findings suggest necessitating an intervention to counter the same. The proportion of stressed adolescent boys (55.5%) reported to have poor stress tolerance (41%). Studies addressing stress among high school adolescents remain unexplored. The basic determinants of stress are not researched upon these age groups. Our study reports the prevalence of stress to be 55% among high school boys. This could be the fundamental basis of designing suitable stress management programs for adolescents that could reduce their stress levels.

  12. Modulation of Fear Extinction by Stress, Stress Hormones and Estradiol: A Review.

    PubMed

    Stockhorst, Ursula; Antov, Martin I

    2015-01-01

    Fear acquisition and extinction are valid models for the etiology and treatment of anxiety, trauma- and stressor-related disorders. These disorders are assumed to involve aversive learning under acute and/or chronic stress. Importantly, fear conditioning and stress share common neuronal circuits. The stress response involves multiple changes interacting in a time-dependent manner: (a) the fast first-wave stress response [with central actions of noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), plus increased sympathetic tone and peripheral catecholamine release] and (b) the second-wave stress response [with peripheral release of glucocorticoids (GCs) after activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis]. Control of fear during extinction is also sensitive to these stress-response mediators. In the present review, we will thus examine current animal and human data, addressing the role of stress and single stress-response mediators for successful acquisition, consolidation and recall of fear extinction. We report studies using pharmacological manipulations targeting a number of stress-related neurotransmitters and neuromodulators [monoamines, opioids, endocannabinoids (eCBs), neuropeptide Y, oxytocin, GCs] and behavioral stress induction. As anxiety, trauma- and stressor-related disorders are more common in women, recent research focuses on female sex hormones and identifies a potential role for estradiol in fear extinction. We will thus summarize animal and human data on the role of estradiol and explore possible interactions with stress or stress-response mediators in extinction. This also aims at identifying time-windows of enhanced (or reduced) sensitivity for fear extinction, and thus also for successful exposure therapy.

  13. Modulation of Fear Extinction by Stress, Stress Hormones and Estradiol: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Stockhorst, Ursula; Antov, Martin I.

    2016-01-01

    Fear acquisition and extinction are valid models for the etiology and treatment of anxiety, trauma- and stressor-related disorders. These disorders are assumed to involve aversive learning under acute and/or chronic stress. Importantly, fear conditioning and stress share common neuronal circuits. The stress response involves multiple changes interacting in a time-dependent manner: (a) the fast first-wave stress response [with central actions of noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), plus increased sympathetic tone and peripheral catecholamine release] and (b) the second-wave stress response [with peripheral release of glucocorticoids (GCs) after activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis]. Control of fear during extinction is also sensitive to these stress-response mediators. In the present review, we will thus examine current animal and human data, addressing the role of stress and single stress-response mediators for successful acquisition, consolidation and recall of fear extinction. We report studies using pharmacological manipulations targeting a number of stress-related neurotransmitters and neuromodulators [monoamines, opioids, endocannabinoids (eCBs), neuropeptide Y, oxytocin, GCs] and behavioral stress induction. As anxiety, trauma- and stressor-related disorders are more common in women, recent research focuses on female sex hormones and identifies a potential role for estradiol in fear extinction. We will thus summarize animal and human data on the role of estradiol and explore possible interactions with stress or stress-response mediators in extinction. This also aims at identifying time-windows of enhanced (or reduced) sensitivity for fear extinction, and thus also for successful exposure therapy. PMID:26858616

  14. Interpretation of Hormone Levels in Older Patients: Points for Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Sztefko, Krystyna; Szybowska, Patrycja

    2012-01-01

    Blood hormone and tumor marker concentrations are usually determined by immunochemical methods which are based on an unique reaction between antigen and assay capture antibody. Despite the speed and simplicity of assays performance on automatic immunochemistry platforms, the interpretation of final results requires a deep knowledge of method fallibility. General lack of immunoassays standardization, presence of cross-reacting substances in patient's sample, limitation of free hormones measurement due to abnormal analyte binding protein concentrations, assay interferences due to patient's autoantibodies, and heterophilic antibodies, as well as proper interpretation of very low- and very high-sample analyte levels, are the main points discussed in respect to hormones and tumor markers measurement in geriatric population. PMID:22666247

  15. The Effects of Stress and Stress Hormones on Human Cognition: Implications for the Field of Brain and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lupien, S. J.; Maheu, F.; Tu, M.; Fiocco, A.; Schramek, T. E.

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we report on studies that have assessed the effects of exogenous and endogenous increases in stress hormones on human cognitive performance. We first describe the history of the studies on the effects of using exogenous stress hormones such as glucocorticoids as anti-inflammatory medications on human cognition and mental health.…

  16. The Effects of Stress and Stress Hormones on Human Cognition: Implications for the Field of Brain and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lupien, S. J.; Maheu, F.; Tu, M.; Fiocco, A.; Schramek, T. E.

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we report on studies that have assessed the effects of exogenous and endogenous increases in stress hormones on human cognitive performance. We first describe the history of the studies on the effects of using exogenous stress hormones such as glucocorticoids as anti-inflammatory medications on human cognition and mental health.…

  17. Impacts of stress and sex hormones on dopamine neurotransmission in the adolescent brain.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Duncan; Purves-Tyson, Tertia D; Allen, Katherine M; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon

    2014-04-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period of complex neurobiological change and heightened vulnerability to psychiatric illness. As a result, understanding factors such as sex and stress hormones which drive brain changes in adolescence, and how these factors may influence key neurotransmitter systems implicated in psychiatric illness, is paramount. In this review, we outline the impact of sex and stress hormones at adolescence on dopamine neurotransmission, a signaling pathway which is critical to healthy brain function and has been implicated in psychiatric illness. We review normative developmental changes in dopamine, sex hormone, and stress hormone signaling during adolescence and throughout postnatal life, then highlight the interaction of sex and stress hormones and review their impacts on dopamine neurotransmission in the adolescent brain. Adolescence is a time of increased responsiveness to sex and stress hormones, during which the maturing dopaminergic neural circuitry is profoundly influenced by these factors. Testosterone, estrogen, and glucocorticoids interact with each other and have distinct, brain region-specific impacts on dopamine neurotransmission in the adolescent brain, shaping brain maturation and cognitive function in adolescence and adulthood. Some effects of stress/sex hormones on cortical and subcortical dopamine parameters bear similarities with dopaminergic abnormalities seen in schizophrenia, suggesting a possible role for sex/stress hormones at adolescence in influencing risk for psychiatric illness via modulation of dopamine neurotransmission. Stress and sex hormones may prove useful targets in future strategies for modifying risk for psychiatric illness.

  18. Adrenal Gland Microenvironment and Its Involvement in the Regulation of Stress-Induced Hormone Secretion during Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Sue, Mariko; Bornstein, Stefan R.

    2016-01-01

    Survival of all living organisms depends on maintenance of a steady state of homeostasis, which process relies on its ability to react and adapt to various physical and emotional threats. The defense against stress is executed by the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and the sympathetic–adrenal medullary system. Adrenal gland is a major effector organ of stress system. During stress, adrenal gland rapidly responds with increased secretion of glucocorticoids (GCs) and catecholamines into circulation, which hormones, in turn, affect metabolism, to provide acutely energy, vasculature to increase blood pressure, and the immune system to prevent it from extensive activation. Sepsis resulting from microbial infections is a sustained and extreme example of stress situation. In many critical ill patients, levels of both corticotropin-releasing hormone and adrenocorticotropin, the two major regulators of adrenal hormone production, are suppressed. Levels of GCs, however, remain normal or are elevated in these patients, suggesting a shift from central to local intra-adrenal regulation of adrenal stress response. Among many mechanisms potentially involved in this process, reduced GC metabolism and activation of intra-adrenal cellular systems composed of adrenocortical and adrenomedullary cells, endothelial cells, and resident and recruited immune cells play a key role. Hence, dysregulated function of any of these cells and cellular compartments can ultimately affect adrenal stress response. The purpose of this mini review is to highlight recent insights into our understanding of the adrenal gland microenvironment and its role in coordination of stress-induced hormone secretion. PMID:28018291

  19. Adrenal Gland Microenvironment and Its Involvement in the Regulation of Stress-Induced Hormone Secretion during Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Sue, Mariko; Bornstein, Stefan R

    2016-01-01

    Survival of all living organisms depends on maintenance of a steady state of homeostasis, which process relies on its ability to react and adapt to various physical and emotional threats. The defense against stress is executed by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic-adrenal medullary system. Adrenal gland is a major effector organ of stress system. During stress, adrenal gland rapidly responds with increased secretion of glucocorticoids (GCs) and catecholamines into circulation, which hormones, in turn, affect metabolism, to provide acutely energy, vasculature to increase blood pressure, and the immune system to prevent it from extensive activation. Sepsis resulting from microbial infections is a sustained and extreme example of stress situation. In many critical ill patients, levels of both corticotropin-releasing hormone and adrenocorticotropin, the two major regulators of adrenal hormone production, are suppressed. Levels of GCs, however, remain normal or are elevated in these patients, suggesting a shift from central to local intra-adrenal regulation of adrenal stress response. Among many mechanisms potentially involved in this process, reduced GC metabolism and activation of intra-adrenal cellular systems composed of adrenocortical and adrenomedullary cells, endothelial cells, and resident and recruited immune cells play a key role. Hence, dysregulated function of any of these cells and cellular compartments can ultimately affect adrenal stress response. The purpose of this mini review is to highlight recent insights into our understanding of the adrenal gland microenvironment and its role in coordination of stress-induced hormone secretion.

  20. Endocrine consequences of an acute stress under different thermal conditions: A study of corticosterone, prolactin, and thyroid hormones in the pigeon (Columbia livia).

    PubMed

    Angelier, Frédéric; Parenteau, Charline; Ruault, Stéphanie; Angelier, Nicole

    2016-06-01

    In the context of global change, the physiological and hormonal stress responses have received much attention because of their implications in terms of allostasis. However, most studies have focused on glucocorticoids only as the "common" response to stressors while neglecting other endocrine axes and hormones (e.g. prolactin, thyroid hormones) that play a crucial role in metabolic adjustments. Interestingly, the responsiveness of all these endocrine axes to stress may depend on the energetic context and this context-dependent stress response has been overlooked so far. In the wild, temperature can vary to a large extent within a short time window and ambient temperature may affect these metabolic-related endocrine axes, and potentially, their responsiveness to an acute stressor. Here, we explicitly tested this hypothesis by examining the effect of a standardized stress protocol on multiple hormonal responses in the rock pigeon (Columbia livia). We tested the effect of an acute restraint stress on (1) corticosterone levels, (2) prolactin levels, and (3) thyroid hormone levels (triiodothyronine, thyroxine) in pigeons that were held either at cool temperature (experimental birds) or at room temperature (control birds) during the stress protocol. Although we found a significant influence of restraint stress on most hormone levels (corticosterone, prolactin, and thyroxine), triiodothyronine levels were not affected by the restraint stress. This demonstrates that stressors can have significant impact on multiple endocrine mechanisms. Importantly, all of these hormonal responses to stress were not affected by temperature, demonstrating that the exposure to cold temperature does not affect the way these hormone levels change in response to handling stress. This suggests that some endocrine responses to temperature decreases may be overridden by the endocrine responses to an acute restraint stress.

  1. Influence of diet and stress on reproductive hormones in Nigerian olive baboons.

    PubMed

    Lodge, E; Ross, C; Ortmann, S; MacLarnon, A M

    2013-09-15

    A female mammal's reproductive function and output are limited by the energy she is able to extract from her environment. Previous studies of the interrelationships between energetic circumstances and reproductive function in a variety of mammal species have produced varied results, which do not all support the common assumption that higher female reproductive hormone levels, specifically progesterone, indicate better ovarian function and greater reproductive potential, and are associated with lower energetic stress. In the present study faecal progesterone and glucocorticoid levels were assessed in two troops of olive baboons (Papio anubis) in the same population. They face similar ecological challenges, except that one troop crop-raids, potentially affecting its energetic intake and stress levels. The energy intake of individual females was assessed by combining detailed feeding observations with nutritional analysis of food samples. The crop-raiding troop experienced 50% higher energy intake rates and 50% lower glucocorticoid levels compared to the non-crop-raiding troop alongside substantially lower progesterone levels. This suggests that energetic stress is associated with elevated progesterone levels and may be the cause of the non-crop-raiding troop's lower reproductive output. By comparing groups which differ little, except in terms of food access, and also by directly assessing energy intake, our study addresses some of the design limitations of previous research investigating variation in progesterone levels and energetic stress. It therefore has the potential to contribute to greater understanding of the factors affecting differences in reproductive and stress hormone levels and reproductive function in mammals experiencing different energetic circumstances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exhaustive exercise and vitamins C and E modulate thyroid hormone levels at low and high altitudes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashem, Fahaid; Alkhateeb, Mahmoud; Al-Ani, Bahjat; Sakr, Hussein; Khalil, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play an important role in cell growth and differentiation and regulation of oxygen consumption and thermogenesis. The effect of altitude and vitamin supplementation on thyroid hormone levels in animals or humans performing acute exhaustive exercise have not been investigated before. Therefore, we thought to test whether exhaustive exercise-induced stress with antioxidant supplementation was capable of modulating the level of thyroid hormones at different altitudes. Serum levels of T4 (Thyroxin), T3 (Triiodothyronine), and TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) were measured in rats (N=36) born and bred in low altitude (600 m above sea level) and high altitude (2200 m above sea level) following forced swimming with or without vitamins C and E (25 mg/kg) pre-treatments. Thyroid levels were significantly decreased in resting rats at high altitude compared to low altitude, and swimming exercise moderately increased T3 and TSH at both high and low altitudes, whereas T4 was markedly increased (62 %) at low altitude compared to a moderate high altitude increase (28 %). Co-administration of vitamins C and E augmented the observed forced swimming-induced thyroid release. However, the conversion of T4 to T3 was reduced in both altitude areas following swimming exercise and vitamin pre-treatment had no effect. We conclude that acute stress induced thyroidal hormones in rats, which was augmented by antioxidant drugs in both high and low altitude areas. These findings may play an important role in the human pathophysiology of thyroid gland at different altitudes. PMID:27540343

  3. Between- and within-sex variation in hormonal responses to psychological stress in a large sample of college students.

    PubMed

    Maestripieri, Dario; Baran, Nicole M; Sapienza, Paola; Zingales, Luigi

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated (1) sex differences in hormonal responses to psychosocial stress; (2) the relation between variability in pre-test hormone concentrations and stress-induced hormonal changes; and (3) some possible sources of within-sex variation in pre-test hormone concentrations and in hormonal responses to the test in a large human subject population. To this end, changes in salivary concentrations of testosterone and cortisol in response to a mild psychosocial stressor (a set of computerized economic decision-making tests) were measured in a sample of over 500 MBA students. Males had higher concentrations of testosterone and cortisol than females both before and after the test. After taking effects of time of testing on hormone concentrations into account, testosterone showed a post-test decrease in males but not in females. Cortisol level increased in both sexes but the post-test increase was larger in females than in males. At the individual level, the pre-test concentrations of testosterone and cortisol predicted both the direction and the magnitude of the post-test hormone change, so that low pre-test hormone concentrations showed large post-test increases whereas high pre-test concentrations showed large post-test decreases. Within-sex variation in hormone concentrations was not accounted for by variation in 2D:4D digit length ratio, a marker of prenatal androgen exposure, but by social variables. Single males without a stable romantic partner had higher testosterone level than males with stable partners, and both males and females without a partner showed a greater cortisol response to the test than married individuals with or without children. Studies conducted with large sample sizes such as this one can help understand normative patterns of hormonal responses to psychosocial stimuli as well as identify the sources of interindividual variation in endocrine function.

  4. Female reproductive hormones and biomarkers of oxidative stress in genital Chlamydia infection in tubal factor infertility.

    PubMed

    Nsonwu-Anyanwu, Augusta Chinyere; Charles-Davies, Mabel Ayebantoyo; Taiwo, Victor Olusegun; Li, Bin; Oni, Anthony Alabar; Bello, Folashade Adenike

    2015-01-01

    Genital Chlamydia infection (GCI) and the associated pathologies have been implicated in tubal infertility. Though the actual pathologic mechanisms are still uncertain, oxidative stress and other factors have been implicated. The purpose of the study was to determine the possible contribution of female reproductive hormones and biomarkers of oxidative stress in genital Chlamydial infection to tubal occlusion. This prospective case control study was carried out by recruiting 150 age matched women grouped into infertile Chlamydia positive women (n = 50), fertile Chlamydia positive women (n = 50) and fertile Chlamydia negative women as controls (n = 50). High vaginal swabs and endocervical swabs were collected for screening Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Treponema pallidum, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. Sera were collected for estimation of Chlamydia trachomatis antibody, female reproductive hormones [Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), Luteinizing Hormone (LH), Oestradiol (E2), Progesterone (P4), Prolactin (PRL)] and biomarkers of oxidative stress [Total Antioxidant Capacity (TAC) and 8-hydroxyl-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)] by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Data were analyzed using chi square, analysis of variance and LSD Post hoc to determine mean differences at p = 0.05. Among women with GCI, higher levels of LH and 8-OHdG were observed in infertile Chlamydia positive women compared to fertile Chlamydia positive women (p < 0.05). Higher levels of LH and 8-OHdG and lower TAC levels were observed in infertile Chlamydia positive women compared to fertile Chlamydia negative controls (p < 0.05). Mechanisms including oxidative DNA damage and reduced antioxidant capacity may be involved in the pathology of Chlamydia induced tubal damage.

  5. Maternal corticotropin-releasing hormone levels in the early third trimester predict length of gestation in human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, P D; Porto, M; Garite, T J; Chicz-DeMet, A; Sandman, C A

    1998-10-01

    Corticotropin releasing hormone, a hypothalamic neuropeptide, plays a major role in regulating pituitary-adrenal function and the physiologic response to stress. During pregnancy corticotropin-releasing hormone is synthesized in large amounts by the placenta and released into the maternal and fetal circulations. Various endocrine, autocrine, and paracrine roles have been suggested for placental corticotropin-releasing hormone. The aim of this study was to prospectively assess the relationship between maternal plasma concentrations of corticotropin-releasing hormone in the early third trimester of pregnancy and the length of gestation in two groups of deliveries, with and without spontaneous labor. In a sample of 63 women with singleton intrauterine pregnancies, maternal plasma samples were collected between 28 and 30 weeks' gestation and corticotropin-releasing hormone concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. Each pregnancy was dated on the basis of last menstrual period and early ultrasonography. Parity, antepartum risk conditions, presence or absence of spontaneous labor, and birth outcomes were abstracted from the medical record. Maternal corticotropin-releasing hormone levels between 28 and 30 weeks' gestation significantly and negatively predicted gestational length (P < .01) after adjustment for antepartum risk. Moreover, subjects who were delivered preterm had significantly higher corticotropin-releasing hormone levels in the early third trimester (P < .01) than did those who were delivered at term. In deliveries preceded by spontaneous onset of labor, maternal third-trimester corticotropin-releasing hormone levels significantly and independently predicted earlier onset of labor (P < .01) and preterm labor (P < .05), whereas in deliveries effected by induction of labor or cesarean delivery, maternal corticotropin-releasing hormone levels were a marker of antepartum risk but not a statistically independent predictor of gestational length. These

  6. Elevated Plasma Corticosterone Decreases Yolk Testosterone and Progesterone in Chickens: Linking Maternal Stress and Hormone-Mediated Maternal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Rie

    2011-01-01

    Despite considerable research on hormone-mediated maternal effects in birds, the underlying physiology remains poorly understood. This study investigated a potential regulation mechanism for differential accumulation of gonadal hormones in bird eggs. Across vertebrates, glucocorticoids can suppress reproduction by downregulating gonadal hormones. Using the chicken as a model species, we therefore tested whether elevated levels of plasma corticosterone in female birds influence the production of gonadal steroids by the ovarian follicles and thus the amount of reproductive hormones in the egg yolk. Adult laying hens of two different strains (ISA brown and white Leghorn) were implanted subcutaneously with corticosterone pellets that elevated plasma corticosterone concentrations over a period of nine days. Steroid hormones were subsequently quantified in plasma and yolk. Corticosterone-implanted hens of both strains had lower plasma progesterone and testosterone levels and their yolks contained less progesterone and testosterone. The treatment also reduced egg and yolk mass. Plasma estrogen concentrations decreased in white Leghorns only whereas in both strains yolk estrogens were unaffected. Our results demonstrate for the first time that maternal plasma corticosterone levels influence reproductive hormone concentrations in the yolk. Maternal corticosterone could therefore mediate environmentally induced changes in yolk gonadal hormone concentrations. In addition, stressful situations experienced by the bird mother might affect the offspring via reduced amounts of reproductive hormones present in the egg as well as available nutrients for the embryo. PMID:21886826

  7. Variations in serum magnesium and hormonal levels during incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Soria, Marisol; González-Haro, Carlos; Ansón, Miguel Angel; Iñigo, Carmen; Calvo, Maria Luisa; Escanero, Jesús Fernando

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined the relationship between plasma magnesium levels and hormonal variations during an incremental exercise test until exhaustion in 27, well-trained, male endurance athletes. After a warm-up of 10 min at 2 W/kg, the test began at an initial workload of 2.5 W/kg and continued with increments of 0.5 W/kg every 10 min until exhaustion. Plasma magnesium, catecholamine, insulin, glucagon, parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, aldosterone and cortisol levels were determined at rest, at the end of each stage and three, five and seven minutes post-exercise. With the incremental exercise test, no variations in plasma magnesium levels were found, while plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline, PTH, glucagon and cortisol levels increased significantly. Over the course of the exercise, plasma levels of insulin decreased significantly, but those of calcitonin remained steady. During the recovery period, catecholamines and insulin returned to basal levels. These findings indicate that the magnesium status of euhydrated endurance athletes during incremental exercise testing may be the result of the interrelation between several hormonal variations.

  8. Cross-cultural variation in women's preferences for cues to sex- and stress-hormones in the male face

    PubMed Central

    Moore, F. R.; Coetzee, V.; Contreras-Garduño, J.; Debruine, L. M.; Kleisner, K.; Krams, I.; Marcinkowska, U.; Nord, A.; Perrett, D. I.; Rantala, M. J.; Schaum, N.; Suzuki, T. N.

    2013-01-01

    Women in the UK prefer the faces of men with low levels of the stress hormone cortisol, and the relationship is moderated by the sex hormone testosterone. In a Latvian sample, however, women's preferences were not affected by cortisol, and the interaction with testosterone differed from that of the UK. To further explore cross-cultural variation in preferences for facial cues to sex- and stress-hormones, we tested the preferences of women from 13 countries for facial composites constructed to differ in combinations of the hormones. We found significant relationships between a measure of societal development (the United Nations human development index 2011) and preferences for cues to testosterone in the face, and the interaction between preferences for cues to testosterone and cortisol. We also found a significant relationship between preferences for cues to testosterone and a societal-level measure of parasite stress. We conclude that societal-level ecological factors influence the relative value of traits revealed by combinations of sex- and stress-hormones. PMID:23536442

  9. Sex, stress, and mood disorders: at the intersection of adrenal and gonadal hormones.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guasti, A; Fiedler, J L; Herrera, L; Handa, R J

    2012-07-01

    The risk for neuropsychiatric illnesses has a strong sex bias, and for major depressive disorder (MDD), females show a more than 2-fold greater risk compared to males. Such mood disorders are commonly associated with a dysregulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Thus, sex differences in the incidence of MDD may be related with the levels of gonadal steroid hormone in adulthood or during early development as well as with the sex differences in HPA axis function. In rodents, organizational and activational effects of gonadal steroid hormones have been described for the regulation of HPA axis function and, if consistent with humans, this may underlie the increased risk of mood disorders in women. Other developmental factors, such as prenatal stress and prenatal overexposure to glucocorticoids can also impact behaviors and neuroendocrine responses to stress in adulthood and these effects are also reported to occur with sex differences. Similarly, in humans, the clinical benefits of antidepressants are associated with the normalization of the dysregulated HPA axis, and genetic polymorphisms have been found in some genes involved in controlling the stress response. This review examines some potential factors contributing to the sex difference in the risk of affective disorders with a focus on adrenal and gonadal hormones as potential modulators. Genetic and environmental factors that contribute to individual risk for affective disorders are also described. Ultimately, future treatment strategies for depression should consider all of these biological elements in their design.

  10. Sex, Stress, and Mood Disorders: At the Intersection of Adrenal and Gonadal Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Guasti, A.; Fiedler, J. L.; Herrera, L.; Handa, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The risk for neuropsychiatric illnesses has a strong sex bias, and for major depressive disorder (MDD), females show a more than 2-fold greater risk compared to males. Such mood disorders are commonly associated with a dysregulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Thus, sex differences in the incidence of MDD may be related with the levels of gonadal steroid hormone in adulthood or during early development as well as with the sex differences in HPA axis function. In rodents, organizational and activational effects of gonadal steroid hormones have been described for the regulation of HPA axis function and, if consistent with humans, this may underlie the increased risk of mood disorders in women. Other developmental factors, such as prenatal stress and prenatal overexposure to glucocorticoids can also impact behaviors and neuroendocrine responses to stress in adulthood and these effects are also reported to occur with sex differences. Similarly, in humans, the clinical benefits of antidepressants are associated with the normalization of the dysregulated HPA axis, and genetic polymorphisms have been found in some genes involved in controlling the stress response. This review examines some potential factors contributing to the sex difference in the risk of affective disorders with a focus on adrenal and gonadal hormones as potential modulators. Genetic and environmental factors that contribute to individual risk for affective disorders are also described. Ultimately, future treatment strategies for depression should consider all of these biological elements in their design. PMID:22581646

  11. Behavioural and Hormonal Stress Responses to Social Separation in Ravens, Corvus corax.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Alexandru M; Stocker, Martina; Stöwe, Mareike; Massen, Jorg J M; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Social life is profitable, but it facilitates conflicts over resources and creates interdependence between individuals. Separating highly social animals triggers intense reactions aimed at re-establishing lost connections. Less is known, however, about behavioural and physiological responses to separation in socially facultative species, where individuals temporarily form groups and may subsequently leave them. Non-breeding common ravens (Corvus corax) gather in large numbers at feeding and roosting sites, but otherwise spend time seemingly solitary or in small subgroups. We here studied how ravens cope with being socially isolated, and investigated the life characteristics that might explain potential individual differences. For this, we individually separated captive subadult ravens (n = 25) and housed them in physical and visual isolation from their group members across 4 d. During the separation period, we collected behavioural data and measured the amount of immunoreactive corticosterone metabolites from bird droppings to assess the ravens' physiological stress response. We found behavioural indicators of stress at the start of the separation, when ravens showed higher levels of tension than of comfort - a pattern that reversed at the end of the separation. Furthermore, we found that the upbringing of ravens affected their behaviour during separation. Hand-raised birds produced more vocalisations in the beginning of the separation, and were less active at the end, while the reverse pattern occurred with parent-raised ravens. Contrary to our predictions, we did not find differences in hormonal responses between the beginning and end of the separation period or any link between hormonal responses and behaviours. Ravens' behavioural responses to social separation stress seem to be dependent on their arousal states, although possible links with hormonal reactions remain unclear. Our results show that behavioural reactions are not always linked with hormonal

  12. Environmental novelty exacerbates stress hormones and Aβ pathology in an Alzheimer's model.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Kimberley E; King, Anna E; Fernandez-Martos, Carmen M; Summers, Mathew J; Vickers, James C

    2017-06-05

    Cognitive stimulation has been proposed as a non-pharmacological intervention to be used in primary, secondary and tertiary prevention approaches for Alzheimer's disease. A common familial Alzheimer's disease transgenic model showed heightened levels of the stress hormone, corticosterone. When exposed to periodic enhanced cognitive stimulation, these animals demonstrated further heightened levels of corticosterone as well as increased Aβ pathology. Hence, Alzheimer's disease may be associated with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction, causing stimulatory environments to become stress-inducing, leading to a glucocorticoid-pathology cycle contributing to further Aβ release and plaque formation. This finding suggests that stimulation-based interventions and local environments for people with Alzheimer's disease need to be designed to minimise a stress response that may exacerbate brain pathology.

  13. Flight influence on the plasma level of sex hormones of women pilots.

    PubMed

    Shen, D Y; Wang, Y M

    1990-06-01

    The plasma concentrations of six sex hormones were measured before and after flight by radioimmunoassay in 38 female pilots. The results showed 1) the plasma activity of estradiol, testosterone, and progesterone revealed no significant change after flight (p greater than 0.05), while the plasma activity of prolactin, cortisol, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone increased obviously; 2) compared with the ground crew's, the pilots' plasma estradiol, progesterone, and cortisol had no distinct change (p greater than 0.05); however, their testosterone, prolactin, and follicle stimulating hormone plasma levels were prominently varied (p less than 0.05). 3) there was no statistical difference between the plasma levels of sex hormones in pilots who had more than 2,000 hours of flight experience and in those with less than 500 hours of flight experience (p greater than 0.05). 4) the testosterone: estradiol ratio of pilots without immediate flight stress was much higher than that of the ground crew.

  14. Hormonal contraceptive use diminishes salivary cortisol response to psychosocial stress and naltrexone in healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Daniel J.O.; King, Andrea C.; Cohoon, Andrew J.; Lovallo, William R.

    2013-01-01

    The use of hormonal contraception (HC) may affect salivary cortisol levels at rest and in response to a pharmacological or stress challenge. Therefore, the current study used a secondary data analysis to investigate the effect of HC on salivary cortisol levels in response to the mu-opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone and a psychosocial stressor, and also across the diurnal curve. Two hundred and nine women (n = 72 using hormonal contraception; HC+) completed a two-session stress response study that consisted of a stress day, in which they were exposed to public speaking and mental arithmetic, and a rest day, in which unstimulated cortisol levels were measured to assess the diurnal rhythm. A subset of seventy women (n = 24 HC+) also completed a second study in which they were administered oral naltrexone (50 mg) or placebo in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind fashion. Women who were HC+ had a significantly reduced salivary cortisol response to both the psychosocial stressor (p < 0.001) and naltrexone (p < 0.05) compared to HC− women. Additionally, HC+ women had a significantly altered morning diurnal cortisol rhythm (p < 0.01), with a delayed peak and higher overall levels. The results of the current study confirm that HC attenuates salivary cortisol response to a psychosocial stressor and mu-opioid receptor antagonism, and also alters the morning diurnal cortisol curve. PMID:23672966

  15. Oxidative stress biomarkers and hormonal profile in human patients undergoing varicocelectomy.

    PubMed

    Hurtado de Catalfo, Graciela E; Ranieri-Casilla, Adalberto; Marra, Fernando A; de Alaniz, María J T; Marra, Carlos A

    2007-12-01

    The aetiology of varicocele is multifactorial although hormonal imbalance and oxidative stress play a key role in the progression of illness. No conclusive evidence has been presented previously, describing the changes in these two factors and the evolution of patients after varicocelectomy. Semen characteristics and hormonal profile were analysed in 36 infertile men with unilateral left varicocele and 33 age-paired controls (proved to be fertile men), after careful inclusion/exclusion selection criteria. Liposoluble and hydrosoluble antioxidants, oligoelements and enzyme activities of the antioxidant defence system were also determined in plasma and erythrocyte from antecubital and spermatic veins, and in spermatozoa. Data were compared between groups at different times before and after varicocelectomy. Decreased levels of liposoluble and hydrosoluble antioxidants and increased activities of the antioxidant defence system enzymes were observed in patients compared with controls. Varicocelectomy normalized this condition at different post-surgical times. Levels of Zn and Se in seminal plasma, protein carbonyls and fragmented DNA remained elevated up to 1 month after surgery. Luteinizing and follicle stimulating hormone concentrations exhibited a biphasic behaviour while testosterone was diminished in patients but normalized soon after varicocelectomy. The results clearly demonstrate the link between the antioxidant defence system, hormonal status and semen characteristics along the post-varicocelectomy period. We suggest that oxidative biomarkers may be appropriate in controlling the evolution of post-varicocelectomy patients, and antioxidant supplementation may improve the clinical condition of infertile men with varicocele.

  16. Non-invasive monitoring of stress hormones in the bat Eptesicus isabellinus - Do fecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations correlate with survival?

    PubMed

    Kelm, Detlev H; Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G; Dehnhard, Martin; Ibáñez, Carlos

    2016-01-15

    Chronic stress may negatively impact fitness and survival in wildlife. Stress hormone analysis from feces is a non-invasive tool for identifying stressors and deducing about individual and population level fitness. Although many bat populations are endangered, fecal stress hormone analysis has not been established in bats as a method for focusing conservation efforts. The isabelline serotine bat, Eptesicus isabellinus, is exposed to human disturbance as its roosts are mostly found in anthropogenic structures. Moreover, this bat is host to various diseases and survival rates between colonies may vary significantly. To validate the analysis of fecal glucocorticoid metabolites, we applied an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge and tested four different enzyme immunoassays (EIA) for measuring glucocorticoid concentrations. Cortisol and its metabolites showed the highest increase in blood and feces after the ACTH challenge, but corticosterone and its metabolites also increased significantly. Baseline fecal cortisol metabolite (FCM) concentrations did not increase until 1.5h after the animals were captured, which is a convenient time lag for sample collection from captured animals. We furthermore compared baseline FCM concentrations between five colonies of E. isabellinus in Andalusia, Spain, and tested for their correlation with survival rates. FCM concentrations did not vary between colonies, but FCM levels increased with the animals' age. FCM analysis may prove a useful tool for identifying bat colonies that experience uncommon environmental stress. However, inter-individual variation in hormone secretion, due to factors such as age, may require additional information to properly interpret differences in hormone concentrations.

  17. Chronopharmacological effects of growth hormone on the executive function and oxidative stress response in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Carlos K B; França, Eduardo L; Monteiro, Luciane A; Santos, Bruno L; Pereira-Junior, Alfredo; Honorio-França, Adenilda C

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the chronopharmacological effects of growth hormone on executive function and the oxidative stress response in rats. Materials and Methods: Fifty male Wistar rats (36-40 weeks old) had ad libitum access to water and food and were separated into four groups: diurnal control, nocturnal control, diurnal GH-treated, and nocturnal GH-treated animals. Levels of Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn-SOD), and superoxide release by spleen macrophages were evaluated. For memory testing, adaptation and walking in an open field platform was used. GH-treated animals demonstrated better performance in exploratory and spatial open-field tests. Results: The latency time in both GH-treated groups was significantly lower compared with the latency time of the control groups. The diurnal GH treatment did not stimulate superoxide release but increased the CuZn-SOD enzyme levels. The nocturnal GH treatment did not influence the superoxide release and CuZn-SOD concentration. GH treatment also resulted in heart atrophy and lung hypertrophy. Conclusion: Growth hormone treatment improved the performance of executive functions at the cost of oxidative stress triggering, and this effect was dependent on the circadian period of hormone administration. However, GH treatment caused damaging effects such as lung hypertrophy and heart atrophy. PMID:28133519

  18. Cadmium stress alters the redox reaction and hormone balance in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Filardo, Fiona; Hu, Xiaotao; Zhao, Xiaomin; Fu, DongHui

    2016-02-01

    In order to understand the physiological response of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) leaves to cadmium (Cd) stress and exploit the physiological mechanisms involved in Cd tolerance, macro-mineral and chlorophyll concentrations, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, activities of enzymatic antioxidants, nonenzymatic compounds metabolism, endogenous hormonal changes, and balance in leaves of oilseed rape exposed to 0, 100, or 200 μM CdSO4 were investigated. The results showed that under Cd exposure, Cd concentrations in the leaves continually increased while macro-minerals and chlorophyll concentrations decreased significantly. Meanwhile, with increased Cd stress, superoxide anion (O2(• -)) production rate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations in the leaves increased significantly, which caused malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation and oxidative stress. For scavenging excess accumulated ROS and alleviating oxidative injury in the leaves, the activity of enzymatic antioxidants, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT), was increased significantly at certain stress levels. However, with increased Cd stress, the antioxidant enzyme activities all showed a trend towards reduction. The nonenzymatic antioxidative compounds, such as proline and total soluble sugars, accumulated continuously with increased Cd stress to play a long-term role in scavenging ROS. In addition, ABA levels also increased continuously with Cd stress while ZR decreased and the ABA/ZR ratio increased, which might also be providing a protective role against Cd toxicity.

  19. Effects of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist on cognitive, sexual, and hormonal functions in patients with prostate cancer: relationship with testicular and adrenal androgen levels.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kohei; Sekine, Yositaka; Nomura, Masashi; Koike, Hidekazu; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kazuto; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    To assess the cognitive and sexual/hormonal functioning of prostate cancer patients treated with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist, and the relationships thereof with adrenal and residual testicular androgen levels. Previously, we reported the effect of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist on testicular and adrenal androgen production in patients with prostate cancer. A 6-month treatment with an LH-RH agonist significantly reduced testicular androgens by 90-95% and adrenal androgens by 26-40%. This study evaluated the changes in cognitive and sexual/hormonal functions in the same cohort using the Mini-Mental State Evaluation (MMSE) and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire, respectively. In addition, the associations of each function with the serum testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estradiol (E2), dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenedione (A-dione), and cortisol levels were studied. Cognitive functions did not change significantly during the treatment. Sexual functions were relatively low before treatment and worsened significantly after 6 and 12 months of treatment. Interestingly, sexual bothers were improved with the treatment. The treatment significantly worsened hormonal functions and bothers. Regarding specific items in the hormonal domains, hot flashes and body weight changes were the main effects of worsened hormonal function. Low levels of T and E2 and high levels of A-dione were associated with low MMSE scores at 6 months. Regarding sexual and hormonal functions, A-dione, E2, T, cortisol, and DHEA-S were associated with poorer functioning and bother. Especially, low T levels and high E2 levels were the most significant factors associated with worse sexual and hormonal bothers. The LH-RH agonist monotherapy worsened sexual and hormonal functions and hormonal bothers, but not sexual bothers or cognitive functions. The changes in these

  20. Structural coloration signals condition, parental investment, and circulating hormone levels in Eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis).

    PubMed

    Grindstaff, Jennifer L; Lovern, Matthew B; Burtka, Jennifer L; Hallmark-Sharber, Alesia

    2012-08-01

    Many of the brilliant plumage coloration displays of birds function as signals to conspecifics. One species in which the function of plumage ornaments has been assessed is the Eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis). Studies of a population breeding in Alabama (USA) have established that plumage ornaments signal quality, parental investment, and competitive ability in both sexes. Here we tested the additional hypotheses that (1) Eastern bluebird plumage ornamentation signals nest defense behavior in heterospecific competitive interactions and (2) individual variation in plumage ornamentation reflects underlying differences in circulating hormone levels. We also tested the potential for plumage ornaments to signal individual quality and parental investment in a population breeding in Oklahoma (USA). We found that Eastern bluebirds with more ornamented plumage are in better condition, initiate breeding earlier in the season, produce larger clutches, have higher circulating levels of the stress hormone corticosterone, and more ornamented males have lower circulating androgen levels. Plumage coloration was not related to nest defense behavior. Thus, plumage ornamentation may be used by both sexes to assess the physiological condition and parental investment of prospective mates. Experimental manipulations of circulating hormone levels during molt are needed to define the role of hormones in plumage ornamentation.

  1. Maturation of the inhibitory response of growth hormone secretion to ether stress in postnatal rat.

    PubMed

    Strbák, V; Jurcovicová, J; Vigas, M

    1985-05-01

    To study the maturation of inhibitory influences on growth hormone (GH) secretion the effect of ether stress on plasma GH levels was studied during postnatal ontogenesis in female rats. Ether stress did not affect plasma GH levels in 1-day-old pups. A distinct decrease of plasma GH was found in 3- and 9-day-old pups, and the response was prevented by treatment of 3-day-old animals with somatostatin antiserum. No effect of ether stress on plasma GH was noted in 12-, 15-, 18- and 21-day-old rats. Treatment of intact 12-day-old pups with the somatostatin antiserum increased plasma GH level under basal conditions. The inhibitory effect of ether stress on plasma GH was noted again at the age 30 days and in adult animals. It is concluded that the hypothalamus of 3-day-old rats is able to release enough somatostatin to inhibit GH secretion after stress. At the period 12-18 days a phase of pituitary refractoriness was noted: ether stress as well as TRH injection (our previous observation) fail to affect plasma GH in female pups, probably due to high somatostatin secretion under basal conditions and (or) low capacity of pituitary to release GH. It is suggested that regulation of GH secretion is not mature until after the 21st day of life.

  2. Corticotropin-releasing hormone, stress and human reproduction: an update.

    PubMed

    Kalantaridou, S N; Zoumakis, E; Makrigiannakis, A; Lavasidis, L G; Vrekoussis, T; Chrousos, G P

    2010-05-01

    The stress system has suppressive effects on female and male reproductive function. Corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), the principal regulator of stress, has been identified in the female and male reproductive system. Reproductive CRH participates in various reproductive functions that have an inflammatory component, where it serves as an autocrine and paracrine modulator. These include ovarian and endometrial CRH, which may participate in the regulation of steroidogenesis and the inflammatory processes of the ovary (ovulation and luteolysis) and the endometrium (decidualization and blastocyst implantation) and placental CRH, which is secreted mostly during the latter half of pregnancy and is responsible for the onset of labor. It has been suggested that there is a "CRH placental clock" which determines the length of gestation and the timing of parturition and delivery. The potential use of CRH-antagonists is presently under intense investigation. CRH-R1 antagonists have been used in animal studies to elucidate the role of CRH in blastocyst implantation and invasion, early fetal immunotolerance and premature labor. The present review article focuses on the potential roles of CRH on the physiology and pathophysiology of reproduction and highlights its participation in crucial steps of pregnancy, such as implantation, fetal immune tolerance, parturition and fetal programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of smoking cessation on hormonal levels in men.

    PubMed

    Hruškovičová, H; Dušková, M; Simůnková, K; Hill, M; Pospíšilová, H; Rácz, B; Králíková, E; Vondra, K; Stárka, L

    2013-01-01

    Chronic smoking can cause imbalance in endocrine homeostasis and impairment of fertility in both sexes. The male reproductive system is more resilient, still the literature provides conflicting results about the influence of smoking on the steroid hormone levels. The data about smoking cessation are limited; there has not yet been a study primarily focused on changes in steroids levels. In our study, we analyzed levels of testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), cortisol and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in male smokers and during smoking cessation. Monitored analytes were determined by RIA. The free testosterone index was calculated. Basal samples of men successful and unsuccessful in smoking cessation did not differ and monitored hormones could hardly predict success of smoking cessation. After one year without smoking, a significant BMI increase and SHBG decrease in former smokers was observed. The decrease in total testosterone was non-significant. Changes in SHBG and testosterone did not correlate with BMI, presumably due to the direct effect of smoking cessation.

  4. Pituitary hormone level changes and hypxonatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    MAIMAITILI, AISHA; MAIMAITILI, MIJITI; REXIDAN, AIKEREMU; LU, JUNYI; AJIMU, KUERBAN; CHENG, XIAOJIANG; LUO, KUN; SAILIKE, DUISHANBAI; LIU, YUAN; KAHEERMAN, KADEER; TANG, CHANGJIU; ZHANG, TINGRONG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in serum pituitary hormone levels and the mechanism of hyponatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Nuclear medical tests and serum electrolyte monitoring were performed in 49 aneurysmal SAH cases and 10 healthy volunteers. The levels of serum pituitary hormones were significantly higher in the SAH patients compared with the control group on days 1–3 and 7–9 after SAH onset (P<0.05). The peak value occurred on days 7–9. The rate of hyponatremia was 49.0% in the 49 SAH patients. The incidence of severe hyponatremia was significantly higher in Fisher grades III–IV and Hunt-Hess grades III–IV compared with Fisher grades I–II and Hunt-Hess grades I–II, respectively (P<0.05). There was no correlation between the site of aneurysm and the rate of hyponatremia. The incidence of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm was significantly higher in the hyponatremia group and Fisher grades III–IV compared with the normal serum sodium group and Fisher grades I–II, respectively. Serum pituitary hormone levels were positively correlated with blood loss and disease severity in patients with aneurysmal SAH. Hyponatremia may be considered an important indicator of SAH. SAH patients are likely to benefit from intense monitoring and regulation of serum sodium. PMID:23837049

  5. Acute psychological stress increases plasma levels of cortisol, prolactin and TSH.

    PubMed

    Schedlowski, M; Wiechert, D; Wagner, T O; Tewes, U

    1992-01-01

    The effects of acute stress during a parachute jump on hormonal responses were studied in 12 experienced and 11 inexperienced military parachutists. Each subject performed two jumps. Prior to and immediately after each jump blood samples were drawn and analysed for plasma levels of cortisol, prolactin, thyrotropin (TSH), somatotropin (STH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). While there was a significant increase in cortisol, prolactin and TSH levels after both jumps, no alterations could be observed in STH and LH levels. Stress-induced hormonal responses were not affected by jump experience. There was also no association between the endocrine variables and anxiety scores.

  6. Stress hormones at rest and following exercise testing predict coronary artery disease severity and outcome.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Dejana; Damjanovic, Svetozar; Djordjevic, Tea; Martic, Dejana; Ignjatovic, Svetlana; Milinkovic, Neda; Banovic, Marko; Lasica, Ratko; Petrovic, Milan; Guazzi, Marco; Arena, Ross

    2017-08-28

    Despite considerable knowledge regarding the importance of stress in coronary artery disease (CAD) pathogenesis, its underestimation persists in routine clinical practice, in part attributable to lack of a standardized, objective assessment. The current study examined the ability of stress hormones to predict CAD severity and prognosis at basal conditions as well as during and following an exertional stimulus. Forty Caucasian subjects with significant coronary artery lesions (≥50%) were included. Within 2 months of coronary angiography, cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) on a recumbent ergometer was performed in conjunction with stress echocardiography (SE). At rest, peak and after 3 min of recovery following CPET, plasma levels of cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and NT-pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) were measured by immunoassay sandwich technique, radioimmunoassay, and radioimmunometric technique, respectively. Subjects were subsequently followed a mean of 32 ± 10 months. Mean ejection fraction was 56.7 ± 9.6%. Subjects with 1-2 stenotic coronary arteries (SCA) demonstrated a significantly lower plasma cortisol levels during CPET compared to those with 3-SCA (p < .05), whereas ACTH and NT-pro-BNP were not significantly different (p > .05). Among CPET, SE, and hormonal parameters, cortisol at rest and during CPET recovery demonstrated the best predictive value in distinguishing between 1-, 2-, and 3-SCA [area under ROC curve 0.75 and 0.77 (SE = 0.11, 0.10; p = .043, .04) for rest and recovery, respectively]. ΔCortisol peak/rest predicted cumulative cardiac events (area under ROC curve 0.75, SE = 0.10, p = .049). Cortisol at rest and following an exercise test holds predictive value for CAD severity and prognosis, further demonstrating a link between stress and unwanted cardiac events.

  7. Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and levels of thyroid hormones in children.

    PubMed Central

    Osius, N; Karmaus, W; Kruse, H; Witten, J

    1999-01-01

    As part of an epidemiologic study on exposure to a toxic waste incineration plant we investigated whether blood concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), lead, and cadmium, as well as concentration of mercury in 24-hr urine samples were associated with thyroid hormone status. As an indication of status, we determined levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT(4)), and free triiodothyronine (FT(3)) in children living in households where [less than/equal to] 10 cigarettes were smoked per day. Eight PCB congeners (PCBs 101, 118, 138, 153, 170, 180, 183, and 187) were measured in whole blood samples. Of these, seven congeners (PCB 101 was not detected in any sample) and the sum of all PCB congeners were analyzed as predictors for thyroid hormone status in separate linear regression models adjusted for potential confounders. In addition, the possible effects of cadmium, lead, and mercury on levels of thyroid hormones were examined. Blood concentrations and information on questionnaire data were available for 320 children 7-10 years of age. We found a statistically significant positive association between the mono-ortho congener PCB 118 and TSH as well as statistically significant negative relationships of PCBs 138, 153, 180, 183, and 187 to FT(3). There was no association for the PCB congeners and FT(4). Blood cadmium concentration was associated with increasing TSH and diminishing FT(4). Blood lead and urine concentration of mercury were of no importance to thyroid hormone levels. The results stress the need for future studies on the possible influences of PCB and cadmium exposure on thyroid hormones, particularly in children. These studies should also take neurologic development into account. PMID:10504153

  8. Cognitive correlates of white matter growth and stress hormones in female squirrel monkey adults.

    PubMed

    Lyons, David M; Yang, Chou; Eliez, Stephan; Reiss, Allan L; Schatzberg, Alan F

    2004-04-07

    Neurobiological studies of stress and cognitive aging seldom consider white matter despite indications that complex brain processes depend on networks and white matter interconnections. Frontal and temporal lobe white matter volumes increase throughout midlife adulthood in humans, and this aspect of aging is thought to enhance distributed brain functions. Here, we examine spatial learning and memory, neuroendocrine responses to psychological stress, and regional volumes of gray and white matter determined by magnetic resonance imaging in 31 female squirrel monkeys between the ages of 5 and 17 years. This period of lifespan development corresponds to the years 18-60 in humans. Older adults responded to stress with greater increases in plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and modest reductions in glucocorticoid feedback sensitivity relative to young adults. Learning and memory did not differ with age during the initial cognitive test sessions, but older adults more often failed to inhibit the initial learned response after subsequent spatial reversals. Impaired cognitive response inhibition correlated with the expansion of white matter volume statistically controlling for age, stress hormones, gray matter, and CSF volumes. These results indicate that instead of enhancing cognitive control during midlife adulthood, white matter volume expansion contributes to aspects of cognitive decline. Cellular and molecular research combined with brain imaging is needed to determine the basis of white matter growth in adults, elucidate its functions during lifespan development, and provide potential new targets for therapies aimed at maintaining in humans cognitive vitality with aging.

  9. Hormonal and nonhormonal factors affecting sex hormone-binding globulin levels in blood.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, J H

    1988-01-01

    Researchers in Utrecht, the Netherlands have studied the effects of different factors, such as oral contraceptives (OCs), on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in blood. The SHBG levels in women who continuously used OCs consisting only of .05 mg of ethinyl estradiol (EE2) rose as high as 260% + or - 25% of those in women not using OCs. Further, mean SHBG levels of women using combination OCs of EE2 and levonorgestrel were 10-60% higher than women not using OCs. SHBG levels were significantly higher than the use of a sequential OC containing decreasing amounts of EE2 and increasing amounts of levonorgestrel than those cause by use of a continuous combined OC with .03 mg and .15 mg respectively. As the dosage of EE2 increased in combination OCs with 2.5 mg lynestrenol, the SHBG increased from 20% (.05 mg EE2) to 150% (.75 mg EE2). SHBG levels after taking EE2 and cyproterone acetate increased significantly more (240%) than levels after EE2 and desogestrel (170%), or after EE2 and gestoden (140%) [p.001]. SHBG levels of women who took OCs containing only .03 mg of levonorgestrel daily decreased 35% (p.01). These levels fell by 30% in women who received 150 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate intramuscularly every 3 months (p.001). SHBG concentrations increased when estrogens were taken orally for noncontraceptive purposes, but they did not change when they were administered percutaneously. As body weight increased the SHBG levels decreased despite hormonal status or sex. Further, the lower the fat content of one's diet the higher the SHBG levels and vice versa. SHBG levels are higher in males with flaccid lungs than they are in males with healthy lungs.

  10. Development of a bionanodevice for detecting stress levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, S.; Handri, S.; Honda, H.

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in molecular analysis techniques have enabled scientists to assess the tiny amounts of biochemical substances secreted in our bodies. This has revealed that the levels of various secretory hormones and immune substances vary sensitively with the mental state of a person. Such hormones and immune substances exhibit transient increases with various psychological stressors. They thus have the potential to be used as a novel biometric for monitoring stress. Biomarkers that occur in saliva can be monitored non-invasively and are thus potentially useful as practical indicators of mental stress. Stress biomarkers are considered to be released into the blood stream or other secretory fluids by physiological stress reactions. Stress biomarkers are expected to be detectable in sweat and other humoral fluids that are exuded from the skin surface. Based on this, we have developed a bionanodevice for detecting stress by capturing stress biomarkers on the skin surface in a non-invasive manner. A prototype bionanodevice is described in which a motor protein is introduced for molecular handling.

  11. Common and divergent physiological, hormonal and metabolic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana and Thellungiella halophila to water and salt stress.

    PubMed

    Arbona, Vicent; Argamasilla, Rosa; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2010-11-01

    To explain the higher tolerance of Thellungiella to abiotic stress in comparison to Arabidopsis, several studies have focused on differences in ion absorption and gene expression. However, little is known about hormone regulation and metabolic responses. In this work, plants of both species were subjected to desiccation and salt stress to compare common and divergent responses. In control conditions, the number of significantly upregulated mass features as well as proline levels was higher in Tellungiella than in Arabidopsis. When subjected to desiccation, both species exhibited similar rates of water loss but proline over accumulation only occurred in Thellungiella; both species accumulated ABA and JA with a similar trend although Arabidopsis showed higher concentrations of both hormones which indicated a stronger impact of desiccation on Arabidopsis. However, Arabidopsis showed a higher number of significantly altered mass features than Thellungiella. Under salt stress, Thellungiella plants accumulated lower amounts of Cl(-) ions than Arabidopsis but exhibited a similar proline response. Under these conditions, ABA and JA levels increased in Arabidopsis whereas minimal changes in both hormone concentrations were recorded in Thellungiella. Contrastingly, the impact of salt stress on metabolite profiles was higher in Thellungiella than in Arabidopsis. Overall, data indicated that physiological responses in Arabidopsis are induced after stress imposition through hormonal regulation whereas Thellungiella has a basal metabolic configuration, better prepared to endure environmental cues.

  12. Does Ventriculoperitoneal Shunting Improve Thyroid Hormone Levels in Hydrocephalic Newborns?

    PubMed

    Ucler, Necati; Erol, Fatih Serhat; Ozturk, Sait; Akgun, Bekir; Kaplan, Metin; Sen, Yasar

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this report was to investigate the effect of ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion for the treatment of hydrocephalus on thyroid hormones in the first 3 months of life. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free T3 (fT3), and free T4 (fT4) levels were compared at 7 days (preoperatively) and at 30 and 90 days (postoperatively) after birth between 25 ventriculoperitoneal shunt-inserted hydrocephalic newborns and 20 healthy newborns. The TSH level at 7 days was higher in the hydrocephalic patient group (6.33 µIU) compared to the control group (3.76 µIU). This value was significantly decreased at 90 days in the ventriculoperitoneal shunt-inserted newborns (2.35 µIU) compared to the control group (3.33 µIU; p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between time points for fT4 and fT3 values in the patient group or for TSH, fT4, and fT3 values in the control group. We propose that a ventriculoperitoneal shunt inserted in the early period of life may have beneficial effects on thyroid hormones. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. The influence of stress and gonadal hormones on neuronal structure and function.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Mollee R; Gruene, Tina M; Shansky, Rebecca M

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". The brain is highly plastic, allowing us to adapt and respond to environmental and physiological challenges and experiences. In this review, we discuss the relationships among alterations in dendritic arborization, spine morphology, and behavior due to stress exposure, endogenous hormone fluctuation, or exogenous hormonal manipulation. Very few studies investigate structure-function associations directly in the same cohort of animals, and there are notable inconsistencies in evidence of structure-function relationships in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Moreover, little work has been done to probe the causal relationship between dendritic morphology and neuronal excitability, leaving only speculation about the adaptive versus maladaptive nature of experience-dependent dendritic remodeling. We propose that future studies combine electrophysiology with a circuit-level approach to better understand how dendritic structure contributes to neuronal functional properties and behavioral outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Chromium(III) nanoparticles affect hormone and immune responses in heat-stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Zha, Longying; Zeng, Jingwen; Sun, Suxia; Deng, Hong; Luo, Haiji; Li, Wanli

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of chromium nanoparticles (CrNano) on the hormone and immune responses of rats in heat stress condition. A total of 80 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four dietary treatment groups (n = 20). The first group was offered a basal diet as a control. The second, third, and fourth groups received basal diet supplemented with 150, 300, and 450 microg/kg Cr, respectively, in the form of CrNano. At the end of the 8-week trial, growth performance, food utilization, and sera concentrations of hormones, immunoglobulins, and alexins were determined. Lymphocyte proliferation activity, antibody response to injected sheep red blood cells (SRBCs), and phagocytosis of peritoneal macrophages were determined by (3)H-thymidine uptake method, plaque-forming cells (PFC) assay, and ingesting chicken red blood cells test, respectively. The results indicated that rats that received CrNano exhibited no changes in growth rate and food efficiency compared to the control group. However, dietary supplementation of 150, 300, and 450 microg/kg Cr from CrNano significantly decreased serum concentrations of insulin and cortisol, increased sera levels of insulin-like growth factor I and immunoglobulin G, and enhanced the lymphoproliferative response, anti-SRBC PFC response, and phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages. These results suggest that dietary supplementation of Cr as CrNano affects hormone and immune status in heat-stressed rats.

  15. Variations of melatonin and stress hormones under extended shifts and radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Vangelova, Katia Koicheva; Israel, Mishel Salvador

    2005-01-01

    We studied the time-of-day variations in urinary levels of 6-sulphatoxy-melatonin and three stress hormones in operators working fast-rotating extended shifts under radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (EMR). The excretion rate of the hormones was monitored by radioimmunoassay and spectrofluorimetry at 4-hour intervals in a group of 36 male operators comprising 12 broadcasting station operators, 12 TV station operators, and a control group of 12 satellite station operators. Measuring the time-weighted average (TWA) of EMR exposure revealed a high-level of exposure in broadcasting station operators (TWAmean= 3.10 microW/ cm2, TWAmax = 137.00 microW/cm2), a low-level in TV station operators (TWAmean = 1.89 microW/cm2, TWAmax = 5.24 microW/cm2), and a very low level in satellite station operators. The differences among the groups remained the same after confounding factors were taken into account. Radiofrequency EMR had no effect on the typical diurnal pattern of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin. High-level radiofrequency EMR exposure significantly increased the excretion rates of cortisol (p < 0.001), adrenaline (p = 0.028), and noradrenaline (p < 0.000), whereas changes under low-level exposure did not reach significance. The 24-hour excretion of cortisol and noradrenaline correlated with TWAmean and TWAmax. In conclusion, the excretion of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin retained a typical diurnal pattern under fast-rotating extended shifts and radiofrequency EMR, but showed an exposure-effect relation with stress hormones.

  16. [Stress, cortisone and homeostasis. Adrenal cortex hormones and physiological equilibrium, 1936-1960].

    PubMed

    Haller, Lea

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the emergence of the concept of stress in the 1930s and outlines its changing disciplinary and conceptual frames up until 1960. Originally stress was a physiological concept applied to the hormonal regulation of the body under stressful conditions. Correlated closely with chemical research into corticosteroids for more than a decade, the stress concept finally became a topic in cognitive psychology. One reason for this shift of the concept to another discipline was the fact that the hormones previously linked to the stress concept were successfully transferred from laboratory to medical practice and adopted by disciplines such as rheumatology and dermatology. Thus the stress concept was dissociated from its hormonal context and became a handy formula that allowed postindustrial society to conceive of stress as a matter of individual concern. From a physiological phenomenon stress turned into an object of psychological discourse and individual coping strategies.

  17. Effects of sub-chronic nandrolone administration on hormonal adaptive response to acute stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Racca, Silvia; Piccione, Francesca; Spaccamiglio, Angela; Carriero, Vitina M A; De Francia, Silvia; Cangemi, Luigi; Esculapio, Paola; Papotti, Mauro; Migliaretti, Giuseppe; Portaleone, Paolo; Di Carlo, Francesco; Abbadessa, Giuliana

    2012-08-01

    Androgenic-anabolic steroid (AAS) misuse has been associated with depression. It has been proposed that stress has a role in depression and that serotonin is involved in both endocrine responses to stress and depressive physiopathology. Although reports demonstrate that AAS chronic administration modifies components of stress-responsive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA), no study has evaluated AAS effect on the response to stressful stimuli. We studied the effects of the subchronic administration (once a day for 14 days in rats) of a supratherapeutical dose of nandrolone decanoate (ND) on HPAA and cortical serotoninergic system response to acute restraint stress (RS). Acute RS produced the following effects: increase in CORT (in blood) and ACTH (both in blood and in pituitary corticotropes), GR depletion in hippocampus and hypothalamus cytosol and GR translocation in hippocampus nuclear fraction, cortical serotonin re-uptake stimulation and hippocampus cytosolic ERK2 activation. ND by itself, i.e. in non-stressed rats, did not modify these parameters, except for a decrease of plasma CORT and ACTH levels and an increase in hippocampus cytosolic phospho-ERK1/2. On the contrary, in stressed rats ND affected stress-induced plasma ACTH increase and prevented all other above reported stress effects, except the increase in pituitary ACTH positive cell density. Our results show that the prolonged administration of a supratherapeutical dose of ND in rats, albeit did not affect in a notable way HPAA and serotonin transporter activity in the absence of stress, may deregulate the stress-induced hormonal cascade which plays a crucial role in depressive psychopathology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The behavior of renal-regulating hormones during hypogravic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of fluid and electrolyte behavior during space flight is believed to be under control, in large part, of a group of hormones which have their major effects on renal excretion. The hormones studied include renin-angitensin, aldosterone, and antidiuretic hormone (ADH). The regulatory systems of these renal-regulating hormones as they act individually and in concert with each other are analyzed. The analysis is based on simulations of the mathematical model of Guyton. A generalized theory is described which accounts for both short-term and long-term behavior of this set of hormones.

  19. Magnetic storms and variations in hormone levels among residents of North Polar area - Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breus, T. K.; Boiko, E. R.; Zenchenko, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work four examinations (January, March, June, October 1991-1992) of the blood concentration of adrenal hormones (cortisol) and thyroid hormones (triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine T4) and their dependence on space and terrestrial weather parameters have been done for large groups of healthy inhabitants of high latitudes (Svalbard, the most northerly in the world year-round inhabited settlements). The aim of this study was to find the possible sensitivity of these biochemical parameters to variations of external natural factors at high latitudes in three independent groups of people living in this region (miners and people working underground (364 samples), the men working on the ground (274 samples) and women working on the ground (280 samples)). The obtained data indicate that the most expressed dependence of concentration of the three studied hormones is on the level of geomagnetic activity (GMA) - Kp, Ap, Kpmax - 3h. For two of the four seasons (June and October) with increasing levels of GMA a significant (p < 0.05) increase in cortisol concentration in all three independent groups of people was observed. Range of increases in cortisol concentration in different groups were about 30% of the observed variation in the average intragroup concentration in June and from 16% to 38% in October. For T3 dependence was found only in June: drop in hormone secretion with increasing levels of GMA from 18 to 30% of the average range of intragroup variations. Thus it was shown for the first time that at high geographical latitudes with increased level of GMA a significant change in the level of secretion of several hormones leads to the type of adaptive stress reaction.

  20. Magnetic storms and variations in hormone levels among residents of North Polar area--Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Breus, T K; Boiko, E R; Zenchenko, T A

    2015-01-01

    In the present work four examinations (January, March, June, October 1991-1992) of the blood concentration of adrenal hormones (cortisol) and thyroid hormones (triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine T4) and their dependence on space and terrestrial weather parameters have been done for large groups of healthy inhabitants of high latitudes (Svalbard, the most northerly in the world year-round inhabited settlements). The aim of this study was to find the possible sensitivity of these biochemical parameters to variations of external natural factors at high latitudes in three independent groups of people living in this region (miners and people working underground (364 samples), the men working on the ground (274 samples) and women working on the ground (280 samples)). The obtained data indicate that the most expressed dependence of concentration of the three studied hormones is on the level of geomagnetic activity (GMA) - Kp, Ap, Kpmax - 3h. For two of the four seasons (June and October) with increasing levels of GMA a significant (p<0.05) increase in cortisol concentration in all three independent groups of people was observed. Range of increases in cortisol concentration in different groups were about 30% of the observed variation in the average intragroup concentration in June and from 16% to 38% in October. For T3 dependence was found only in June: drop in hormone secretion with increasing levels of GMA from 18 to 30% of the average range of intragroup variations. Thus it was shown for the first time that at high geographical latitudes with increased level of GMA a significant change in the level of secretion of several hormones leads to the type of adaptive stress reaction. Copyright © 2014 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional Characterization of Hypertrehalosemic Hormone Receptor in Relation to Hemolymph Trehalose and to Oxidative Stress in the Cockroach Blattella germanica.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jia-Hsin; Bellés, Xavier; Lee, How-Jing

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrehalosemic hormone (HTH) is a peptide hormone that belongs to the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment concentrating hormone (AKH/RPCH) family, which exerts pleiotropic actions related to catabolic reaction and stress response. AKH peptides have been demonstrated to participate in stress response including oxidative stress in several insects. In order to study the signaling pathway of HTH involved in anti-oxidative stress, we have characterized a HIH receptor cDNA in Blattella germanica (Blage-HTHR) in structural and in functional terms using RNA interference (RNAi). Blage-HTHR is expressed in various female adult tissues (brain-CC-CA, ventral nerve cord, midgut, fat body, oviduct), but maximal expression is observed in the fat body. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Blage-HTHR expression results in a significantly lower level of hemolymph trehalose, even though HTH is exogenously administered. Paraquat elicits lethal oxidative stress in B. germanica, and co-injection of paraquat and HTH reduces this detrimental effect and extends the median survival time. Interestingly, the "rescue" effect of HTH on mortality caused by paraquat is diminished in specimens with depleted expression of Blage-HTH and Blage-HTHR. Finally, lipid peroxidation in the hemolymph increases 4 h after paraquat treatment, in comparison with control specimens or with HTH-treated specimens. However, lipid peroxidation induced by paraquat was not "rescued" by HTH in Blage-HTH and Blage-HTHR knockdown specimens. Our results demonstrate that HTH acts as a stress hormone mediating anti-oxidative protection in B. germanica, and that its receptor, Blage-HTHR, is essential for this action.

  2. Stressed lungs: unveiling the role of circulating stress hormones in ozone-induced lung injury and inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our recent work demonstrated that circulating stress hormones, epinephrine and corticosterone/cortisol, are involved in mediating ozone pulmonary effects through the activation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Adrenalectomy in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats diminished circu...

  3. Cascading effects of thermally-induced anemone bleaching on associated anemonefish hormonal stress response and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Beldade, Ricardo; Blandin, Agathe; O'Donnell, Rory; Mills, Suzanne C

    2017-10-10

    Organisms can behaviorally, physiologically, and morphologically adjust to environmental variation via integrative hormonal mechanisms, ultimately allowing animals to cope with environmental change. The stress response to environmental and social changes commonly promotes survival at the expense of reproduction. However, despite climate change impacts on population declines and diversity loss, few studies have attributed hormonal stress responses, or their regulatory effects, to climate change in the wild. Here, we report hormonal and fitness responses of individual wild fish to a recent large-scale sea warming event that caused widespread bleaching on coral reefs. This 14-month monitoring study shows a strong correlation between anemone bleaching (zooxanthellae loss), anemonefish stress response, and reproductive hormones that decreased fecundity by 73%. These findings suggest that hormone stress responses play a crucial role in changes to population demography following climate change and plasticity in hormonal responsiveness may be a key mechanism enabling individual acclimation to climate change.Elevated temperatures can cause anemones to bleach, with unknown effects on their associated symbiotic fish. Here, Beldade and colleagues show that climate-induced bleaching alters anemonefish hormonal stress response, resulting in decreased reproductive hormones and severely impacted reproduction.

  4. Prostate Cancer, High Cortisol Levels and Complex Hormonal Interaction.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Bibiana; Grosman, Halina; Gonzalez, Diego; Machulsky, Nahuel Fernandez; Repetto, Esteban M; Mesch, Viviana; Lopez, Miguel Angel; Mazza, Osvaldo; Berg, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common diseases in men. It is important to assess prognostic factors and whether high cortisol levels and complex hormonal interactions could be responsible for PCa development. We evaluated the relationship between cortisol, leptin and estrogens in 141 men, 71 with PCa and the remaining 70 constituting a low risk group (LRG). They were recruited for this study from a total of 2906 middleaged men (ages 4570 years) who completed an evaluation for prostatic diseases at the Urology Division, Hospital de Clinicas "Jose de San Martin", University of Buenos Aires, in May 2009. In this cross sectional study, cortisol, PSA, totaltestosterone, freetestosterone, bioavailable testosterone, LH and estradiol were measured in serum. We observed increased cortisol levels in PCa patients as compared to LRG cases (p=0.004,). Leptin and estradiol levels were also higher in PCa patients (p=0.048; p<0.0001, respectively). Logistic regression analysis indicated that serum cortisol (OR: 1.110 (95% CI 1.0161.213), p=0.022), estradiol (OR: 1.044 (95% CI 1.0081.081), p=0.016) and leptin (OR: 1.248 (95% CI 1.0481.487), p=0.013) explained 27% of the variance of dependent variables, even after adjusting for age, smoking, BMI and waist circumference. We found increased cortisol levels in PCa patients as compared to LRG, as well as an altered circulating hormonal profile.

  5. Vitamin D metabolites and bioactive parathyroid hormone levels during Spacelab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Schnoes, Heinrich K.; Deluca, Hector F.; Phelps, Mary E.; Klein, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of an 8-day space flight (Spacelab mission 2) on plasma levels of the vitamin D and parathyroid hormones is investigated experimentally in four crew members. The results are presented in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. Parathyroid hormone levels remained normal throughout the flight, whereas vitamin D hormone levels increased significantly on day 1 but returned to normal by day 7.

  6. Vitamin D metabolites and bioactive parathyroid hormone levels during Spacelab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Schnoes, Heinrich K.; Deluca, Hector F.; Phelps, Mary E.; Klein, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of an 8-day space flight (Spacelab mission 2) on plasma levels of the vitamin D and parathyroid hormones is investigated experimentally in four crew members. The results are presented in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. Parathyroid hormone levels remained normal throughout the flight, whereas vitamin D hormone levels increased significantly on day 1 but returned to normal by day 7.

  7. Influences of dietary soy isoflavones on metabolism but not nociception and stress hormone responses in ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lihong; Setchell, Kenneth D R; Lephart, Edwin D

    2005-10-26

    Isoflavones, the most abundant phytoestrogens in soy foods, are structurally similar to 17beta-estradiol. Few studies have examined the nociception and stress hormone responses after consumption of soy isoflavones. In this study, ovariectomized (OVX) female Long-Evans rats were fed either an isoflavone-rich diet (Phyto-600) or an isoflavone-free diet (Phyto-free). We examined the effects of soy isoflavones on metabolism by measuring body weights, food/water intake, adipose tissue weights as well as serum leptin levels. Also, circulating isoflavone levels were quantified. During chemically induced estrous, nociceptive thresholds were recorded. Then, the animals were subjected to a stressor and stress hormone levels were quantified. Body weights were significantly lower in Phyto-600 fed rats compared to Phyto-free values within one week and during long-term consumption of soy isoflavones. Correspondingly, Phyto-600 fed animals displayed significantly less adipose deposition and lower serum leptin levels than Phyto-free values. However, rats on the Phyto-600 diet displayed greater food/water intake compared to Phyto-free levels. No changes in thermal pain threshold or stress hormone levels (ACTH and corticosterone) were observed after activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis. In summary, these data show that consumption of soy isoflavones 1) increases metabolism, demonstrated by significantly decreased body weights, adipose tissue deposition and leptin levels, but 2) does not alter nociception or stress hormone responses, as indexed by thermal pain threshold, serum corticosterone and ACTH levels in chemically-induced estrous OVX rats.

  8. Influences of dietary soy isoflavones on metabolism but not nociception and stress hormone responses in ovariectomized female rats

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Lihong; Setchell, Kenneth DR; Lephart, Edwin D

    2005-01-01

    Background Isoflavones, the most abundant phytoestrogens in soy foods, are structurally similar to 17beta-estradiol. Few studies have examined the nociception and stress hormone responses after consumption of soy isoflavones. Methods In this study, ovariectomized (OVX) female Long-Evans rats were fed either an isoflavone-rich diet (Phyto-600) or an isoflavone-free diet (Phyto-free). We examined the effects of soy isoflavones on metabolism by measuring body weights, food/water intake, adipose tissue weights as well as serum leptin levels. Also, circulating isoflavone levels were quantified. During chemically induced estrous, nociceptive thresholds were recorded. Then, the animals were subjected to a stressor and stress hormone levels were quantified. Results Body weights were significantly lower in Phyto-600 fed rats compared to Phyto-free values within one week and during long-term consumption of soy isoflavones. Correspondingly, Phyto-600 fed animals displayed significantly less adipose deposition and lower serum leptin levels than Phyto-free values. However, rats on the Phyto-600 diet displayed greater food/water intake compared to Phyto-free levels. No changes in thermal pain threshold or stress hormone levels (ACTH and corticosterone) were observed after activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis. Conclusion In summary, these data show that consumption of soy isoflavones 1) increases metabolism, demonstrated by significantly decreased body weights, adipose tissue deposition and leptin levels, but 2) does not alter nociception or stress hormone responses, as indexed by thermal pain threshold, serum corticosterone and ACTH levels in chemically-induced estrous OVX rats. PMID:16250912

  9. Hormones: commentary. Riding the physiological roller coaster: adaptive significance of cortisol stress reactivity to social contexts.

    PubMed

    Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Peres, Jeremy C; Dismukes, Andrew R; Lee, Yoojin; Phan, Jenny M

    2014-02-01

    The authors conjecture that to understand normal stress regulation, including cortisol stress reactivity, it is important to understand why these biomarkers are released and what they function to accomplish within the individual. This perspective holds that high (or rising) cortisol has advantages and disadvantages that must be understood within a context to understand how individual differences unfold. This perspective is juxtaposed with a popular vantage point of this stress hormone or of stress exposure that emphasizes the deleterious consequences or problems of this hormone. While the costs and benefits of cortisol are emphasized for normal stress regulation, this dynamic context-dependent purpose of stress hormones should extend to the development of psychopathology as well. This functional and dynamic view of cortisol is helpful for interpreting why Tackett and colleagues (2014) appear to observe advantageous cortisol recovery from stress in individuals with elevated personality disorder symptoms.

  10. Chronic effects of marihuana smoking on luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and prolactin levels in human males.

    PubMed

    Vescovi, P P; Pedrazzoni, M; Michelini, M; Maninetti, L; Bernardelli, F; Passeri, M

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the chronic effects of marihuana smoking on the basal and stimulated secretion of the pituitary hormones luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating (FSH) and prolactin (PRL). Ten male chronic marihuana users and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were studied by measuring hormone levels before and after i.v. administration of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). The basal and stimulated levels of LH were reduced in marihuana users, whereas FSH and PRL levels and responses were not different from the control subjects. The chronic use of marihuana may selectively impair the hypothalamic control mechanisms regulating LH secretion.

  11. Serum leptin levels, hormone levels, and hot flashes in midlife women.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Carolyn; Cochran, Chrissy J; Gallicchio, Lisa; Miller, Susan R; Flaws, Jodi A; Zacur, Howard

    2010-08-01

    To examine the associations between serum leptin levels, sex steroid hormone levels, and hot flashes in normal weight and obese midlife women. Cross-sectional study. University clinic. 201 Caucasian, nonsmoking women aged 45 to 54 years with a body mass index of <25 kg/m2 or >or=30 kg/m2. Questionnaire, fasting blood samples. Serum leptin and sex steroid hormone levels. Correlation and regression models were performed to examine associations between leptin levels, hormone levels, and hot flashes. Leptin levels were associated with BMI, with "ever experiencing hot flashes" (questionnaire), with hot flashes within the last 30 days, and with duration of hot flashes (>1 year, P=.03). Leptin was positively correlated with testosterone, free testosterone index, and free estrogen index and inversely associated with levels of sex hormone-binding globulin. In women with a body mass index>or=30 kg/m2, leptin levels no longer correlated with testosterone levels. Serum leptin levels are associated with the occurrence and duration of hot flashes in midlife women; however, no correlation was found between leptin and serum estradiol. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Voluntary wheel running modulates glutamate receptor subunit gene expression and stress hormone release in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Makatsori, A; Duncko, R; Schwendt, M; Moncek, F; Johansson, B B; Jezova, D

    2003-07-01

    Lewis rats that are known to be addiction-prone, develop compulsive running if they have access to running wheels. The present experiments were aimed 1) to evaluate the activation of stress systems following chronic and acute voluntary wheel running in Lewis rats by measurement of hormone release and gene expression of neuropeptides related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and 2) to test the hypothesis that wheel running as a combined model of addictive behavior and stress exposure is associated with modulation of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in the ventral tegmental area. Voluntary running for three weeks but not for one night resulted in a rise in plasma corticosterone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels (p<0.05) compared to those in control rats. Principal component analysis revealed the relation between POMC gene expression in the intermediate pituitary and running rate. Acute exposure of animals to voluntary wheel running induced a significant decrease in alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptor GluR1 subunit mRNA levels (p<0.01), while repeated voluntary physical activity increased levels of GluR1 mRNA in the ventral tegmentum (p<0.05). Neither acute nor chronic wheel running influenced N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR1 mRNA levels in the ventral tegmental area. Thus, the present study revealed changes in AMPA receptor subunit gene expression in a reward-related brain structure as well as an activation of HPA axis in response to compulsive wheel running in Lewis rats. It may be suggested that hormones of HPA axis and glutamate receptors belong to the factors that substantiate higher vulnerability to addictive behavior.

  13. Role of various hormones in photosynthetic responses of green plants under environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Poonam; Bhardwaj, Renu; Kaur, Ravdeep; Bali, Shagun; Kaur, Parminder; Sirhindi, Geetika; Thukral, Ashwani K; Ohri, Puja; Vig, Adarsh P

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stress includes adverse factors like water deficit, high salinity, enhanced temperature and heavy metals etc. These stresses alter the normal growth and metabolic processes of plants including photosynthesis. Major photosynthetic responses under various stresses include inhibition of photosystems (I and II), changes in thylakoid complexes, decreased photosynthetic activity and modifications in structure and functions of chloroplasts etc. Various defense mechanisms are triggered inside the plants in response to these stresses that are regulated by plant hormones or plant growth regulators. These phytohormones include abscisic acid, auxins, cytokinins, ethylene, brassinosteroids, jasmonates and salicylic acid etc. The present review focuses on stress protective effects of plants hormones on the photosynthetic responses.

  14. Hormonal and hydroxycinnamic acids profiles in banana leaves in response to various periods of water stress.

    PubMed

    Mahouachi, Jalel; López-Climent, María F; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    The pattern of change in the endogenous levels of several plant hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in addition to growth and photosynthetic performance was investigated in banana plants (Musa acuminata cv. "Grand Nain") subjected to various cycles of drought. Water stress was imposed by withholding irrigation for six periods with subsequent rehydration. Data showed an increase in abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels, a transient increase in salicylic acid (SA) concentration, and no changes in jasmonic acid (JA) after each period of drought. Moreover, the levels of ferulic (FA) and cinnamic acids (CA) were increased, and plant growth and leaf gas exchange parameters were decreased by drought conditions. Overall, data suggest an involvement of hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in plant avoidance of tissue dehydration. The increase in IAA concentration might alleviate the senescence of survival leaves and maintained cell elongation, and the accumulation of FA and CA could play a key role as a mechanism of photoprotection through leaf folding, contributing to the effect of ABA on inducing stomatal closure. Data also suggest that the role of SA similarly to JA might be limited to a transient and rapid increase at the onset of the first period of stress.

  15. Hormonal and Hydroxycinnamic Acids Profiles in Banana Leaves in Response to Various Periods of Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    López-Climent, María F.; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    The pattern of change in the endogenous levels of several plant hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in addition to growth and photosynthetic performance was investigated in banana plants (Musa acuminata cv. “Grand Nain”) subjected to various cycles of drought. Water stress was imposed by withholding irrigation for six periods with subsequent rehydration. Data showed an increase in abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels, a transient increase in salicylic acid (SA) concentration, and no changes in jasmonic acid (JA) after each period of drought. Moreover, the levels of ferulic (FA) and cinnamic acids (CA) were increased, and plant growth and leaf gas exchange parameters were decreased by drought conditions. Overall, data suggest an involvement of hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in plant avoidance of tissue dehydration. The increase in IAA concentration might alleviate the senescence of survival leaves and maintained cell elongation, and the accumulation of FA and CA could play a key role as a mechanism of photoprotection through leaf folding, contributing to the effect of ABA on inducing stomatal closure. Data also suggest that the role of SA similarly to JA might be limited to a transient and rapid increase at the onset of the first period of stress. PMID:24977208

  16. Illness-induced changes in thyroid hormone metabolism: focus on the tissue level.

    PubMed

    Kwakkel, J; Fliers, E; Boelen, A

    2011-05-01

    During illness changes in thyroid hormone metabolism occur, collectively known as the non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). NTIS is characterised by low serum thyroid hormone levels without the expected rise in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, indicating a major change in thyroid hormone feedback regulation. Recent studies have made clear that during NTIS differential changes in thyroid hormone metabolism occur in various tissues, the net effect of which may be either activation or inhibition of thyroid hormone action. In this review we discuss systemic and local changes in thyroid hormone metabolism during illness, highlighting their physiological implications in terms of disease course.

  17. Wild jackdaws' reproductive success and their offspring's stress hormones are connected to provisioning rate and brood size, not to parental neophobia.

    PubMed

    Greggor, Alison L; Spencer, Karen A; Clayton, Nicola S; Thornton, Alex

    2017-03-01

    Many species show individual variation in neophobia and stress hormones, but the causes and consequences of this variation in the wild are unclear. Variation in neophobia levels could affect the number of offspring animals produce, and more subtly influence the rearing environment and offspring development. Nutritional deficits during development can elevate levels of stress hormones that trigger long-term effects on learning, memory, and survival. Therefore measuring offspring stress hormone levels, such as corticosterone (CORT), helps determine if parental neophobia influences the condition and developmental trajectory of young. As a highly neophobic species, jackdaws (Corvus monedula) are excellent for exploring the potential effects of parental neophobia on developing offspring. We investigated if neophobic responses, alongside known drivers of fitness, influence nest success and offspring hormone responses in wild breeding jackdaws. Despite its consistency across the breeding season, and suggestions in the literature that it should have importance for reproductive fitness, parental neophobia did not predict nest success, provisioning rates or offspring hormone levels. Instead, sibling competition and poor parental care contributed to natural variation in stress responses. Parents with lower provisioning rates fledged fewer chicks, chicks from larger broods had elevated baseline CORT levels, and chicks with later hatching dates showed higher stress-induced CORT levels. Since CORT levels may influence the expression of adult neophobia, variation in juvenile stress responses could explain the development and maintenance of neophobic variation within the adult population.

  18. Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers Collected from a Managed Dolphin Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Managed Dolphin Population Dorian S. Houser National Marine Mammal Foundation 2240 Shelter Island Drive, #200 San Diego, CA 92107 phone: (877...00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers Collected from a Managed Dolphin Population 5a. CONTRACT...objectives of this effort are to: 1) determine the variation in corticosteroid hormones, thyroid hormones, and catecholamines within a dolphin

  19. Imbalance in sex hormone levels exacerbates diabetic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Wells, Corinne C; Garman, Joseph H; Asico, Laureano; Escano, Crisanto S; Maric, Christine

    2008-04-01

    Studies suggest that the presence of testosterone exacerbates, whereas the absence of testosterone attenuates, the development of nondiabetic renal disease. However, the effects of the absence of testosterone in diabetic renal disease have not been studied. The study was performed in male Sprague-Dawley nondiabetic, streptozotocin-induced diabetic, and streptozotocin-induced castrated rats (n=10 to 11 per group) for 14 weeks. Diabetes was associated with the following increases: 3.2-fold in urine albumin excretion, 6.3-fold in glomerulosclerosis, 6.0-fold in tubulointerstitial fibrosis, 1.6-fold in collagen type I, 1.2-fold in collagen type IV, 1.3-fold in transforming growth factor-beta protein expression, and 32.7-fold in CD68-positive cell abundance. Diabetes was also associated with a 1.3-fold decrease in matrix metalloproteinase protein expression and activity. Castration further exacerbated all of these parameters. Diabetes was also associated with a 4.7-fold decrease in plasma testosterone, 2.9-fold increase in estradiol, and 2.1-fold decrease in plasma progesterone levels. Castration further decreased plasma testosterone levels but had no additional effects on plasma estradiol and progesterone. These data suggest that diabetes is associated with abnormal sex hormone levels that correlate with the progression of diabetic renal disease. Most importantly, our results suggest an important role for sex hormones in the pathophysiology of diabetic renal complications.

  20. Parathyroid hormone levels in pubertal uremic adolescents treated with growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Picca, Stefano; Cappa, Marco; Martinez, Chiara; Moges, Seyoum Ido; Osborn, John; Perfumo, Francesco; Ardissino, Gianluigi; Bonaudo, Roberto; Montini, Giovanni; Rizzoni, Gianfranco

    2004-01-01

    We have previously described severe hyperparathyroidism during the pubertal growth spurt in three uremic adolescents treated with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). Here we investigate the possible role of puberty in the genesis of hyperparathyroidism during rhGH treatment of a large cohort of patients. Data from 67 uremic patients treated with rhGH from five Italian pediatric nephrology centers were retrospectively recorded every 3 months starting 1 year before rhGH administration. The mean (+/-SD) rhGH treatment observation period was 19.9+/-5.9 months. The mean age at the start of rhGH treatment was 8.3+/-3.6 years. Of the 67 patients, 15 reached pubertal stage 2 during the 1st year of rhGH treatment and 12 of these 15 progressed to pubertal stage 3. The relative increase in parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels after rhGH initiation was greater in pubertal [1.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.43-2.66] than in prepubertal patients (1.19, 95% CI 1.01-1.40). Increases in PTH levels were significantly different between the two groups (Delta=1.64, 95% CI 1.16-3.19, P=0.007). Multiple regression analysis showed an inverse correlation between PTH and calcium levels and a positive correlation between PTH and pubertal stage 3. There was no correlation with phosphate levels and calcitriol dosage. In conclusion, these results suggest that in uremic adolescents treated with rhGH puberty may influence PTH levels.

  1. Restraint effects on stress-related hormones and blood natural killer cell cytotoxicity in pigs with a mutated ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Ciepielewski, Z M; Stojek, W; Glac, W; Wrona, D

    2013-05-01

    A mutation in the ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) of the calcium release channel is responsible for increased stress susceptibility in pigs. In the present study, the relation of a mutation in RYR1 with the neuroendocrine (stress-related hormone) response and the immune defense represented by natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) during a 4-h restraint and recovery phase in 60 male pigs was investigated. Blood samples were collected from pigs previously divided into RYR1 genotypes (nn, Nn, NN), based on PCR amplification and restriction analyses. The blood samples collected during the restraint and recovery phases of the experiment were used to determine NKCC ((51)Cr-release assay), large granular lymphocyte number (hematologic method), and plasma concentrations of prolactin (PRL), GH, ACTH, and cortisol (COR) (by specific RIA). The greatest degree of NKCC response (P < 0.05) to restraint stress relative to controls was observed for the stress-susceptible homozygote group (nn). Measures of stress-related hormones were positively correlated with NKCC during the entire experimental period (P < 0.001 for all investigated hormones) in the nn group. Immunostimulatory effects in the early (0-60 min) phase of restraint were associated with increased hormone responses, especially PRL and GH. In the late (180-240 min) phase of stress and the recovery phase (480 min), a decrease in immune response was accompanied by an elevated COR response in all RYR1 genotypes. Moreover, divergent responses of both PRL (greatest in nn, P < 0.001) and GH (greatest in NN, P < 0.001) to the 4-h restraint were observed. Our results suggest that stress-susceptible RYR1-mutated homozygotes develop a greater level of immune defense, including cytotoxic activity of NK cells, and accompanied by more pronounced stress-induced changes in neuroendocrine response than stress-resistant heterozygous (Nn) and homozygous (NN) pigs.

  2. Insulin Plant (Costus pictus) Extract Restores Thyroid Hormone Levels in Experimental Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Ashwini, S.; Bobby, Zachariah; Sridhar, M. G.; Cleetus, C. C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to investigate the preventive effect of Costus pictus leaf extract in experimental hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups with ten rats in each group: Control (C), hypothyroid (H), control+extract (C+E), and hypothyroid+extract (H+E). Rats in C group did not receive any intervention throughout the experimental period. The rats in the C+E and H+E groups received pretreatment with C. pictus leaf extract for 4 weeks. Subsequently, for the next 6 weeks, rats in the H group received 0.05% propylthiouracil in drinking water while C+E group received C. pictus leaf extract and H+E group received propyl thiouracil and C. pictus leaf extract. Results: Hypothyroid group rats exhibited dramatic increase in thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels with concomitant depletion in the levels of thyroid hormones. Treatment with the extract resulted in remarkable improvement in thyroid profile. Extract produced 10.59-fold increase in plasma free T3, 8.65-fold increase in free T4, and 3.59-fold decrease in TSH levels in H+E group in comparison with H group. Treatment with the extract ameliorated hypercholesterolemia, decreased levels of plasma C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor alpha, suppressed tissue oxidative stress and prevented hepatic and renal damage caused due to thyroid hormone depletion in the H+E group. Pentacyclic triterpenes alpha and beta amyrins were identified and quantified in the extract. Conclusions: This is the first study to reveal that C. pictus extract has therapeutic potential to restore thyroid hormone levels and prevent the biochemical complications due to thyroid hormone insufficiency in the animal model of experimental hypothyroidism. SUMMARY The preventive effect of Costus pictus leaf extract in experimental hypothyroidism was evaluated in the present study.Hypothyroidism was induced in the experimental animals by giving 0

  3. Behavioural and hormonal stress responses during chick rearing do not predict brood desertion by female in a small Arctic seabird.

    PubMed

    Wojczulanis-Jakubas, Katarzyna; Jakubas, Dariusz; Chastel, Olivier

    2013-08-01

    We examined behavioural and hormonal stress responses in a small seabird (little auk, Alle alle), which exhibits a transition from biparental to male-only care towards the end of the nesting period, in order to understand the mechanisms underlying this parental strategy. We hypothesized that the male staying with the chick should be less sensitive to stressors. As such the male might offer the offspring more efficient protection during the fledging period than the female. We tested this hypothesis by observing male and female behaviour in a neophobia test. We also measured the birds' baseline and stress-induced levels of corticosterone and prolactin using the standardized capture-and-restraint protocol. Both sexes respond rapidly to foreign objects, delaying the entry time to the nest with food, consuming the food load, and/or temporarily abandoning feeding. However, we did not find any differences between the sexes in the frequency of each behaviour or in the time of the first reaction to the experimental treatment. Level of both corticosterone and prolactin increased after the experimental treatment. However, we did not find sex differences in baseline and stress-induced hormone levels. The results indicate that the males are as much sensitive to the stress situation as the females. Thus, the pattern of male and female behavioural and hormonal responses to stress does not predict their behaviour at the final breeding stage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Thyroid hormone level is associated with the frequency and severity of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Ying, Zhaojian; Chen, Zhibo; Xiang, Weiwei; Su, Zhongqian; Quan, Weiwei; Weng, Yiyun; Zhang, Xu

    2017-10-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a neurodegenerative and inflammatory demyelination disorder, and oxidative stress is concerned with the pathogenesis of the disease. Also, we found that thyroid hormone level is correlated to the oxidative and antioxidant status in previous studies. Our study was aimed to find the possible relationship between the frequency and severity of GBS and thyroid hormone levels. We measured serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) in 238 individuals, including 90 GBS, 44 multiple sclerosis and 104 healthy controls. Our findings demonstrate that the patients with GBS had lower TSH and higher FT4, FT4/FT3 than healthy controls in the normal range. Furthermore, it was also shown in our study that TSH levels in patients with GBS were correlated with disease severity measured by the Hughes Functional Grading Scale. Lower TSH, higher FT4 and FT4/FT3 stand for the oxidative status and are associated with the incidence and severity of GBS.

  5. BioCycle study: design of the longitudinal study of the oxidative stress and hormone variation during the menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Schisterman, Enrique F.; Hovey, Kathleen M.; Howards, Penelope P.; Browne, Richard W.; Hediger, Mary; Liu, Aiyi; Trevisan, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Summary Studies in both human and animal species have suggested that oxidative stress may be associated with health outcomes, including the risk of infertility in both males and females. Sex hormones have been shown to have antioxidant properties. The difficulty in studying the role of oxidative stress in females is partly due to fluctuation in these endogenous sex hormones across the menstrual cycle. The aim of this study was to determine the association of oxidative stress levels with endogenous reproductive hormone levels and antioxidants, including vitamin levels, across the menstrual cycle in a prospective cohort of premenopausal women. The goal was to enrol 250 healthy, regularly menstruating premenopausal women for two menstrual cycles. Participants visited the clinic up to 8 times per cycle, at which time blood and urine were collected. The visits occurred at key hormonally defined phases of the menstrual cycle, with the help of an algorithm based on cycle length and data from a fertility monitor. In addition, participants were administered standardised questionnaires, had various physical measures taken, and had other pertinent data collected. A total of 259 women were enrolled in this study, with 250 completing two cycles, despite a demanding study protocol which participants were required to follow. This report describes the study design, baseline characteristics and visit completion rate for the BioCycle study. PMID:19159403

  6. Sex differences, hormones, and fMRI stress response circuitry deficits in psychoses

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jill M.; Lancaster, Katie; Longenecker, Julia M.; Abbs, Brandon; Holsen, Laura M.; Cherkerzian, Sara; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Makris, Nicolas; Tsuang, Ming T.; Buka, Stephen L.; Seidman, Larry J.; Klibanski, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Psychosis involves dysregulation of response to stress, particularly to negative valence stimuli. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of psychosis have shown hyperactivity in hypothalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, and anterior cingulate cortex, and orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal cortices. Sex differences in these deficits may be associated with steroid hormone pathway abnormalities, i.e., dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal and -gondal axes. We predicted abnormal steroid hormone levels in psychosis cases would be associated with hyperactivity in hypothalamus, amygdala, and hippocampus, and hypoactivity in prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices in a sex-dependent way, with more severe deficits in men than women with psychosis. We studied 32 psychosis cases (50.0% women) and 39 controls (43.6% women) using a novel visual stress challenge while collecting blood throughout functional magnetic resonance imaging procedures. Males with psychosis showed hyperactivity across all hypothesized regions, including the hypothalamus and anterior cingulate cortex by family-wise corrected significance. Females showed hyperactivity in the hippocampus and amygdala and hypoactivity in orbital and medial prefrontal cortices, the latter by family-wise correction. Interaction of case status by sex was significant in the medial prefrontal cortex and, marginally so, in the left orbitofrontal cortex, with female cases (vs. healthy females and males) exhibiting the lowest activity. Male and female cases compared with their healthy counterparts were hypercortisolemic, which was associated with hyperactivity in prefrontal cortices in male cases and hypoactivity in female cases. This was further associated, respectively, with low bioavailable testosterone in male cases and low estradiol in female cases. Findings suggest disruptions in neural-hormone associations in response to stress are sex-dependent in psychosis, particularly in the prefrontal cortex. PMID

  7. Ozone Exposure Increases Circulating Stress Hormones and Lipid Metabolites in Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    RATIONALE: Air pollution has been associated with increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes; however, the mechanisms remain unknown. We have shown that acute ozone exposure in rats induces release of stress hormones, hyperglycemia, leptinemia, and gluoose intolerance that are assoc...

  8. Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation are Modulated by Adrenal-Derived Stress Hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone exposure promotes pulmonary injury and inflammation. Previously we have characterized systemic changes that occur immediately after acute ozone exposure and are mediated by neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Both HPA axis and sympathetic tone alterations induce the rel...

  9. Ozone Exposure Increases Circulating Stress Hormones and Lipid Metabolites in Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    RATIONALE: Air pollution has been associated with increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes; however, the mechanisms remain unknown. We have shown that acute ozone exposure in rats induces release of stress hormones, hyperglycemia, leptinemia, and gluoose intolerance that are assoc...

  10. Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation are Modulated by Adrenal-Derived Stress Hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone exposure promotes pulmonary injury and inflammation. Previously we have characterized systemic changes that occur immediately after acute ozone exposure and are mediated by neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Both HPA axis and sympathetic tone alterations induce the rel...

  11. The effects of stress hormones on growth of selected periodontitis related bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jentsch, H F R; März, Diana; Krüger, Monika

    2013-12-01

    The focus of this study was to examine in vitro the effects of stress hormones (catecholamines: epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine and hydrocortisone: cortisol) on the growth of four anaerobic species of periodontitis-related bacteria (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Tannerella forsythia) and one facultative anaerobic species (Eikenella corrodens). Bacterial growth was determined by two different methods: fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and the viable count by culture method. To simulate stress, each single strain was grown in a special growth medium with three different concentrations of each hormone, using an anaerobic chamber at 37 °C. Growth of F. nucleatum increased in the presence of all stress hormones. Growth of P. gingivalis was not significantly influenced by any hormone. Growth of P. intermedia and E. corrodens was inhibited by almost all stress hormones tested. Both methods of analysis revealed that the highest concentrations of norepinephrine and cortisol increased the growth of T. forsythia. Different hormones have a different effect on the growth of periodontitis-related bacteria in vitro. It appears that bacterial viability is more strongly influenced than is bacterial metabolic activity. The growth of F. nucleatum particularly and partially of T. forsythia is increased by several stress hormones and may have an additional negative impact on periodontal disease.

  12. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  13. Stress hormones predict a host superspreader phenotype in the West Nile virus system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gervasi, Stephanie; Burgan, Sarah; Hofmeister, Erik K.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Martin, Lynn B.

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid stress hormones, such as corticosterone (CORT), have profound effects on the behaviour and physiology of organisms, and thus have the potential to alter host competence and the contributions of individuals to population- and community-level pathogen dynamics. For example, CORT could alter the rate of contacts among hosts, pathogens and vectors through its widespread effects on host metabolism and activity levels. CORT could also affect the intensity and duration of pathogen shedding and risk of host mortality during infection. We experimentally manipulated songbird CORT, asking how CORT affected behavioural and physiological responses to a standardized West Nile virus (WNV) challenge. Although all birds became infected after exposure to the virus, only birds with elevated CORT had viral loads at or above the infectious threshold. Moreover, though the rate of mortality was faster in birds with elevated CORT compared with controls, most hosts with elevated CORT survived past the day of peak infectiousness. CORT concentrations just prior to inoculation with WNV and anti-inflammatory cytokine concentrations following viral exposure were predictive of individual duration of infectiousness and the ability to maintain physical performance during infection (i.e. tolerance), revealing putative biomarkers of competence. Collectively, our results suggest that glucocorticoid stress hormones could directly and indirectly mediate the spread of pathogens.

  14. Hyper-G stress-induced hyperglycemia in rats mediated by glucoregulatory hormones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daligcon, B. C.; Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with possible relations of the hyperglycemic response of rats exposed to hyper-G stress to (1) alterations in blood levels of the glucoregulatory hormones and gluconeogenic substrates, and (2) changes in insulin response on muscle glucose uptake. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250-300 g were used in the study. The results of the experiments indicate that the initial rapid rise in blood glucose of rats exposed to hyper-G stress is mediated by increases in circulating catecholamines and glucagon, both potent stimulators of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Lactate, derived from epinephrine stimulation of muscle glycogenolysis, appears to be a major precursor for the initial rise in blood glucose. The inhibition of the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by muscle tissues may be a factor in the observed sustained hyperglycemia.

  15. Hyper-G stress-induced hyperglycemia in rats mediated by glucoregulatory hormones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daligcon, B. C.; Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with possible relations of the hyperglycemic response of rats exposed to hyper-G stress to (1) alterations in blood levels of the glucoregulatory hormones and gluconeogenic substrates, and (2) changes in insulin response on muscle glucose uptake. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250-300 g were used in the study. The results of the experiments indicate that the initial rapid rise in blood glucose of rats exposed to hyper-G stress is mediated by increases in circulating catecholamines and glucagon, both potent stimulators of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Lactate, derived from epinephrine stimulation of muscle glycogenolysis, appears to be a major precursor for the initial rise in blood glucose. The inhibition of the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by muscle tissues may be a factor in the observed sustained hyperglycemia.

  16. Mild Potassium Chloride Stress Alters the Mineral Composition, Hormone Network, and Phenolic Profile in Artichoke Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Lucini, Luigi; Borgognone, Daniela; Rouphael, Youssef; Cardarelli, Mariateresa; Bernardi, Jamila; Colla, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest among consumers and researchers in the globe artichoke [Cynara cardunculus L. subsp. scolymus (L.) Hegi] leaf extract due to its nutraceutical and therapeutic properties. The application of an abiotic stress such as salinity can activate the stress-signaling pathways, thus enhancing the content of valuable phytochemicals. The aim of this study was to assess the metabolic changes in artichokes by probing the leaf metabolome of artichoke plants grown in a floating system and exposed to a relatively mild (30 mM) potassium chloride (KCl) salt stress. Potassium chloride treatment decreased the leaf dry biomass of artichoke, macro- and microelements in leaves (e.g., Ca, Mg, Mn, Zn, and B) but increased the concentrations of K and Cl. Metabolomics highlighted that the hormonal network of artichokes was strongly imbalanced by KCl. The indole-3-acetic acid conjugates, the brassinosteroids hormone 6-deoxocastasterone, and even more the cytokinin precursor N6-(Delta-2-isopentenyl)-adenosine-5′-triphosphate, strongly increased in leaves of KCl-treated plants. Moreover, KCl saline treatment induced accumulation of GA4, a bioactive form additional to the already known GA3. Another specific response to salinity was changes in the phenolic compounds profile, with flavones and isoflavones being decreased by KCl treatment, whereas flavonoid glycosides increased. The osmotic/oxidative stress that salinity generates also induced some expected changes at the biochemical level (e.g., ascorbate degradation, membrane lipid peroxidation, and accumulation of mannitol phosphate). These latter results help explain the molecular/physiological mechanisms that the plant uses to cope with potassium chloride stress exposure. PMID:27446175

  17. Concurrent and Predictive Relations between Hormone Levels and Social-Emotional Functioning in Early Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nottelmann, Editha D.; And Others

    Hormone levels and changes in hormone levels were evaluated three times across a 1-year period as concurrent and predictive correlates of the socio-emotional functioning of 56 boys 10- to 14-years-old and 52 girls 9- to 14-years-old who represented the five stages of Tanner's criteria of pubertal development. The hormone measures were serum levels…

  18. Neurodevelopmental Consequences of Low-Level Thyroid Hormone Disruption Induced by Environmental Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inadequate levels of thyroid hormone during critical developmental periods lead to stunted growth, mental retardation, and neurological 'cretinism'. Animal models of developmental thyroid hormone deficiency mirror well the impact of severe insults to the thyroid system. However, ...

  19. Neurodevelopmental Consequences of Low-Level Thyroid Hormone Disruption Induced by Environmental Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inadequate levels of thyroid hormone during critical developmental periods lead to stunted growth, mental retardation, and neurological 'cretinism'. Animal models of developmental thyroid hormone deficiency mirror well the impact of severe insults to the thyroid system. However, ...

  20. Multicenter study on adult growth hormone level in postoperative pituitary tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-min; Gu, Jian-wen; Kuang, Yong-qin; Ma, Yuan; Xia, Xun; Yang, Tao; Lu, Min; He, Wei-qi; Sun, Zhi-yong; Zhang, Yan-chao

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study is to observe the adult growth hormone level in postoperative pituitary tumor patients of multi-centers, and explore the change of hypophyseal hormones in postoperative pituitary tumor patients. Sixty patients with pituitary tumor admitted during March, 2011-March, 2012 were selected. Postoperative hypophyseal hormone deficiency and the change of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative growth hormone levels were recorded. Growth hormone hypofunction was the most common hormonal hypofunction, which took up to 85.0 %. Adrenocortical hormone hypofunction was next to it and accounted for 58.33 %. GH + ACTH + TSH + Gn deficiency was the most common in postoperative hormone deficiency, which took up to 40.00 %, and GH + ACTH + TSH + Gn + AVP and GH deficiencies were next to it and accounted for 23.33 and 16.67 %, respectively. The hormone levels in patients after total pituitary tumor resection were significantly lower than those after partial pituitary tumor resection, and the difference was statistically significant; growth hormone and serum prolactin levels after surgery in two groups were decreased, and the difference was statistically significant. The incidence rate of growth hormone deficiency in postoperative pituitary tumor patients is high, which is usually complicated with deficiency of various hypophyseal hormones. In clinical, we should pay attention to the levels of the hypopnyseal hormones, and take timely measures to avoid postoperative complications.

  1. Magnetic storms and variations in hormone levels among residents of North Polar area - Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breus, Tamara; Zenchenko, Tatiana; Boiko, Evgeni

    average intragroup level in June and from 16% to 38% in October. For T3 dependence found only in June: drop in hormone secretion with increasing levels of GMA from 18 to 30% of the average amplitude of intragroup variations). Thus, we showed for the first time that at high latitudes increase in the level of geomagnetic activity leads to a significant change in the level of secretion of several hormones in residing at high latitudes area healthy individuals, indicating that they revealed the type of adaptive stress reaction in reply on GMA disturbance. 1. Breus T.K. and Rapoport S.I. Magnetic storms. Medico- biological aspects (in Russian), Publ.Co Soviet Sport,.Moscow, 2003, 271p.

  2. Thyroid Hormones and Antioxidant Systems: Focus on Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Antonio; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Di Segni, Chantal; Persano, Mariasara; Gadotti, Giovanni; Silvestrini, Andrea; Festa, Roberto; Tiano, Luca; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Meucci, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    In previous works we demonstrated an inverse correlation between plasma Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and thyroid hormones; in fact, CoQ10 levels in hyperthyroid patients were found among the lowest detected in human diseases. On the contrary, CoQ10 is elevated in hypothyroid subjects, also in subclinical conditions, suggesting the usefulness of this index in assessing metabolic status in thyroid disorders. A Low-T3 syndrome is a condition observed in several chronic diseases: it is considered an adaptation mechanism, where there is a reduction in pro-hormone T4 conversion. Low T3-Syndrome is not usually considered to be corrected with replacement therapy. We review the role of thyroid hormones in regulation of antioxidant systems, also presenting data on total antioxidant capacity and Coenzyme Q10. Published studies suggest that oxidative stress could be involved in the clinical course of different heart diseases; our data could support the rationale of replacement therapy in low-T3 conditions. PMID:24351864

  3. Interkingdom crosstalk: host neuroendocrine stress hormones drive the hemolytic behavior of Salmonella typhi.

    PubMed

    Karavolos, Michail H; Williams, Paul; Khan, C M Anjam

    2011-01-01

    The ability of bacterial pathogens to sense their immediate environment plays a significant role on their capacity to survive and cause disease. Salmonella enterica serovar typhi (S. typhi) is an exclusively human pathogen that causes typhoid fever. In a recent study, we have shown that S. typhi senses and responds to host neuroendocrine stress hormones to release the toxin hemolysin E. Hormone-mediated hemolysis by S. typhi was inhibited by the β-blocker propranolol and was dependent on the presence of the CpxAR signal transduction system. Furthermore, we demonstrate that normal expression of the small RNA micA is necessary for the arbitration of the response to host  neuroendocrine hormones. This leads to a significant decrease in the levels of the outer membrane protein OmpA and increased formation of membrane vesicles containing HlyE. The exploration of host pathogen interactions is  of paramount importance in deciphering pathogen virulence and the discovery of novel treatments.

  4. Stress hormones and human memory function across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Lupien, Sonia J; Fiocco, Alexandra; Wan, Nathalie; Maheu, Francoise; Lord, Catherine; Schramek, Tania; Tu, Mai Thanh

    2005-04-01

    In this paper, we summarize the data obtained in our laboratory showing the effects of glucocorticoids on human cognitive function in older adults, young adults and children. We first present data obtained in the aged human population which showed that long-term exposure to high endogenous levels of glucocorticoids is associated with both memory impairments and a 14% smaller volume of the hippocampus. We then report on studies showing that in older adults with moderate levels of glucocorticoids, memory performance can be acutely modulated by pharmacological manipulations of glucocorticoids. In young adults, we present data obtained in our laboratory showing that cognitive processing sustained by the frontal lobes is also sensitive to acute increases of glucocorticoids. We also summarize studies showing that just as in older adults, memory performance in young adults can be acutely modulated by pharmacological manipulations of glucocorticoids. We then present a study in which we showed a differential involvement of adrenergic and glucocorticoid hormones for short- and long-term memory of neutral and emotional information. In the last section of the paper, we present data obtained in a population of young children and teenagers from low and high socioeconomic status (SES), where we showed that children from low SES present significantly higher levels of basal cortisol when compared to children from high SES. We then present new data obtained in this population showing that children and teenagers from low and high SES do not process the plausibility of positive and negative attributes in the same way. Children from low SES tended to process positive and negative attributes on a more negative note than children from high SES, and this type of processing was significantly related to basal cortisol at age 10, 12 and 14. Altogether, the results of these studies show that both bottom-up (effects of glucocorticoids on cognitive function), and top-down (effects of cognitive

  5. [Usefulness of luteinizant hormone levels to determine the oocyte quality].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Anguas, Julián; Carballo Mondragón, Esperanza; Anta Jaen, Everardo; Díaz Calvillo, Jenny; Kably Ambe, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the luteinizing hormone serum preovulatory levels and correlate them with the embryo number and quality, and with the fertilization and clavage rates. Prospective, descriptive and observational. We included 286 patients that underwent to IVF-ET program, we excluded patients with no mesurement of LH preovulatory levels, or patients that in the oocyte retrieval we do not found oocytes. The protocols for pituitary inhibition were: stop Lupron, long luteal phase and GnRH antagonist, the ovarian stimulation was realized with recombinant FSH. The studied variables were: LH preovulatory levels, number and quality of oocytes, fertilization and clevage rates and embryo quality. Statistical analysis was done with p Pearson and ANOVA tests. The mean age for patients was 34 +/- 3.96 years, the principal factor of infertility was tubal and pelvis pathology. The mean LH preovulatory levels were 2.19 +/- 1.83 UI/L by patient, we observed a negative correlation between LH levels and number of oocytes retrieved (p = -0.157, IC 99%), and the correlation between LH levels and number of metaphase 2 oocyte was negative too (p = 0.113, IC 95%). We observed greater levels of LH (3.15 UI/L) in the degenerated oocytes during oocyte retrieval. We did not found a statistical correlation between fertilization and cleavage rates with LH levels. LH preovulatory levels of 0.85 UI/L could predict good quality oocytes with a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 25%. Normogonadotrophic patients without deep suppression of gonadotrophins by the use of GnRH analogues, high LH preovulatory levels correlates with a less number of oocytes, and with degenerated oocytes. Preovulatory LH levels of 0.85 UI/L could predict good quality oocytes.

  6. Association Between Thyroid Hormones, Lipids and Oxidative Stress Markers in Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Cheserek, Maureen Jepkorir; Wu, Gui-Rong; Ntazinda, Arsene; Shi, Yong-Hui; Shen, Li-Ye; Le, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Oxidative stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases. It is recognized in overt hypothyroidism while its existence in subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is not well established. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was increased oxidation of lipids and proteins in SCH, and examine their association with lipids and thyroid hormones. Methods Male adults (35–59 years) with SCH (n=467) and euthyroid controls (n=190) were studied. Anthropometric measurements, plasma lipids, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), lipid peroxidation products, malondialdehyde (MDA), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and dityrosine concentrations were measured. Results Plasma concentrations of MDA were significantly higher (p<0.05) in SCH (8.11±1.39 nmol/mL) compared with euthyroid controls (7.34±1.31 nmol/mL) while AOPP, dityrosine and T-AOC levels were not different. MDA was not associated with TSH (β=−0.019, P=0.759), FT4 (β=−0.062, P=0.323) and FT3 (β=−0.018, P=0.780) in SCH while levels increased with elevated total cholesterol (β=0.229, P=0.001), LDL (β=0.203, P=0.009) and triglycerides (β=0.159, P=0.036) after adjustment for age and body mass index. T-AOC reduced (β=−0.327, P=0.030) with increased MDA in euthyroid controls and not in SCH (β=−0.068, P=0.349), while levels increased with elevated triglycerides in both groups. Conclusions Oxidative stress was increased in subclinical hypothyroidism as evidenced by the elevated lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde, while protein oxidation was absent. Thus, reduction of oxidative stress may be beneficial in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. PMID:28356843

  7. Thyroid hormone level is associated with the frequency and severity of acute transverse myelitis.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yiyun; Lin, Huiyue; Ye, Xiaoxian; Xie, Dewei; Chen, Zhibo; Zheng, Juzeng; Su, Zhongqian; Xie, Hongli; Zhang, Xu; Li, Xiang

    2017-03-22

    Acute transverse myelitis (ATM) is a progressive and autoimmune disease with inflammatory cell infiltrates into the spinal cord, and thyroid hormone (TH) level is associated with the oxidative and antioxidant status. Variations in oxidative stress and antioxidant levels are related to the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Our study aimed to investigate the possible correlation between ATM and TH levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), and FT4/FT3. We measured serum concentrations of TSH, FT4, and FT3 in 205 individuals, including 42 ATM patients, 49 multiple sclerosis patients, and 114 healthy controls. Our findings show that ATM patients had lower levels of TSH and FT3 and higher levels of FT4 and FT4/FT3 compared with healthy controls, whether male or female. Moreover, levels of TSH and FT3 in patients with ATM were inversely correlated with disease severity measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale. Variations in TH level may represent the oxidative status and are surrogate biomarkers of the incidence and severity of ATM.

  8. Investigating First Year Education Students' Stress Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geng, Gretchen; Midford, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated the stress levels of first-year education students who undertake teaching practicum and theory units during their first year of teacher education program. First, 139 first-year and 143 other years' education students completed the PSS-10 scale, which measures perceived level of stress. Then, 147 first-year education…

  9. The Role of Thyroid Hormones as Inductors of Oxidative Stress and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, I.; Alva-Sánchez, C.; Pacheco-Rosado, J.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are oxidizing agents amply implicated in tissue damage. ROS production is inevitably linked to ATP synthesis in most cells, and the rate of production is related to the rate of cell respiration. Multiple antioxidant mechanisms limit ROS dispersion and interaction with cell components, but, when the balance between ROS production and scavenging is lost, oxidative damage develops. Many traits of aging are related to oxidative damage by ROS, including neurodegenerative diseases. Thyroid hormones (THs) are a major factor controlling metabolic and respiratory rates in virtually all cell types in mammals. The general metabolic effect of THs is a relative acceleration of the basal metabolism that includes an increase of the rate of both catabolic and anabolic reactions. THs are related to oxidative stress not only by their stimulation of metabolism but also by their effects on antioxidant mechanisms. Thyroid dysfunction increases with age, so changes in THs levels in the elderly could be a factor affecting the development of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the relationship is not always clear. In this review, we analyze the participation of thyroid hormones on ROS production and oxidative stress, and the way the changes in thyroid status in aging are involved in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24386502

  10. Energy balance regulation by thyroid hormones at central level.

    PubMed

    López, Miguel; Alvarez, Clara V; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos

    2013-07-01

    Classically, medical textbooks taught that most effects of thyroid hormones (THs) on energy homeostasis are directly exerted in peripheral tissues. However, current evidence is changing (and challenging) our perspective about the role of THs from a 'peripheral' to a 'central' vision, implying that they affect food intake, energy expenditure, and metabolism by acting, to a large extent, at the central level. Interestingly, effects of THs are interrelated with global energy sensors in the central nervous system (CNS), such as uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK; the 'AMPK-BAT axis'), and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). Here, we review what is currently known about THs and their regulation of energy balance and metabolism in both peripheral and central tissues.

  11. Coordinate Regulation of Metabolite Glycosylation and Stress Hormone Biosynthesis by TT8 in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kiat, Lim Boon

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites play a key role in coordinating ecology and defense strategies of plants. Diversity of these metabolites arises by conjugation of core structures with diverse chemical moieties, such as sugars in glycosylation. Active pools of phytohormones, including those involved in plant stress response, are also regulated by glycosylation. While much is known about the enzymes involved in glycosylation, we know little about their regulation or coordination with other processes. We characterized the flavonoid pathway transcription factor TRANSPARENT TESTA8 (TT8) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using an integrative omics strategy. This approach provides a systems-level understanding of the cellular machinery that is used to generate metabolite diversity by glycosylation. Metabolomics analysis of TT8 loss-of-function and inducible overexpression lines showed that TT8 coordinates glycosylation of not only flavonoids, but also nucleotides, thus implicating TT8 in regulating pools of activated nucleotide sugars. Transcriptome and promoter network analyses revealed that the TT8 regulome included sugar transporters, proteins involved in sugar binding and sequestration, and a number of carbohydrate-active enzymes. Importantly, TT8 affects stress response, along with brassinosteroid and jasmonic acid biosynthesis, by directly binding to the promoters of key genes of these processes. This combined effect on metabolite glycosylation and stress hormones by TT8 inducible overexpression led to significant increase in tolerance toward multiple abiotic and biotic stresses. Conversely, loss of TT8 leads to increased sensitivity to these stresses. Thus, the transcription factor TT8 is an integrator of secondary metabolism and stress response. These findings provide novel approaches to improve broad-spectrum stress tolerance. PMID:27432888

  12. Growth hormone response to different consecutive stress stimuli in healthy men: is there any difference?

    PubMed

    Jezova, D; Radikova, Z; Vigas, M

    2007-06-01

    The contribution of growth hormone (GH), released during acute and repeated stressful situations, to the development of stress-related disorders is often neglected. We have hypothesized that the modulation of the GH response to sequential stress exposure in humans depends mainly on the nature of the stressor. To test this hypothesis, we compared GH responses to different stressful situations, namely aerobic exercise, hypoglycemia and hyperthermia, which were applied in two sequential sessions separated by 80-150 min. In addition, administration of the dopaminergic drug apomorphine was used as a pharmacological stimulus. GH responses to submaximal exercise (bicycle ergometer, increasing work loads of 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 W/kg, total duration 20 min) and hyperthermia in a sauna (80 degrees C, 30 min) were prevented when preceded by the same stress stimulus. Hypoglycemia induced by insulin (0.1 IU/kg intravenously) resulted in a significant GH response also during the second of the two consecutive insulin tests, though the response was reduced. Administration of apomorphine (0.75 mg subcutaneously) or insulin prevented the increase in GH release in response to a sequential bolus of apomorphine, while hypoglycemia induced a significant elevation in GH levels even if applied after a previous treatment with apomorphine. In conclusion, the feedback inhibition of the GH response to a sequential stress stimulus depends on the stimulus used. Unlike in the case of exercise and hyperthermia, mechanisms involved in the stress response to hypoglycemia appear to overcome the usual feedback mechanisms and to re-induce the GH response when applied after another stimulus.

  13. The effect of a scalp massage on stress hormone, blood pressure, and heart rate of healthy female.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Hong; Kim, Tae-Young; Ko, Young-Wan

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] A scalp massage was conducted on female office workers divided into a 15 minute group and 25 minute group and its effect on stress hormone, blood pressure and heart rate was analyzed in order to provide a theoretical rationale to apply scalp massage as stress therapy. [Subjects and Methods] A scalp massage was applied to 34 female office workers twice a week for a total of 10 weeks; the subjects were classified into 15 min., 25 min. and control groups, and their stress hormone levels, blood pressure and heart rate were evaluated. [Results] Significant differences in norepinephrine, cortisol and blood pressure (SBP & DBP) were found in terms of interaction by time interval and between groups. [Conclusion] As a result of applying scalp massage to female office workers for 15 and 25 minutes, positive effects were observed on stress hormone, blood pressure and heart rate. Therefore, scalp massage can be used for stress control with no spatial or time limit.

  14. The effect of a scalp massage on stress hormone, blood pressure, and heart rate of healthy female

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Hong; Kim, Tae-Young; Ko, Young-Wan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] A scalp massage was conducted on female office workers divided into a 15 minute group and 25 minute group and its effect on stress hormone, blood pressure and heart rate was analyzed in order to provide a theoretical rationale to apply scalp massage as stress therapy. [Subjects and Methods] A scalp massage was applied to 34 female office workers twice a week for a total of 10 weeks; the subjects were classified into 15 min., 25 min. and control groups, and their stress hormone levels, blood pressure and heart rate were evaluated. [Results] Significant differences in norepinephrine, cortisol and blood pressure (SBP & DBP) were found in terms of interaction by time interval and between groups. [Conclusion] As a result of applying scalp massage to female office workers for 15 and 25 minutes, positive effects were observed on stress hormone, blood pressure and heart rate. Therefore, scalp massage can be used for stress control with no spatial or time limit. PMID:27821918

  15. Effect of noise stress on cardiovascular system in adult male albino rat: implication of stress hormones, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Said, Mona A; El-Gohary, Ola A

    2016-07-01

    Noise pollution has been realized as an environmental stressor associated with modern life style that affects our health without being consciously aware of it. The present study investigated the effect of acute, chronic intermittent and chronic continuous exposure to noise of intensity 80-100 dB on heart rate and mean systemic arterial blood pressure in rats and the possible underlying mechanisms. Noise stress causes significant increase in heart rate, mean systemic arterial blood pressure as well as significant increase in plasma levels of corticosterone, adrenaline, noradrenaline, endothelin-1, nitric oxide and malondialdehyde with significant decrease in superoxide dismutase and these values are significantly more worse in chronic continuous exposure to noise than acute or chronic intermittent exposure. These findings suggest that noise stress has many adverse effects on cardiovascular system via increasing plasma levels of stress hormones, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. These findings have major implication in the management of adverse cardiovascular reactions of people subjected to daily noise stress.

  16. Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mode Based Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Method for Simultaneous Quantification of Brassinolide and Other Plant Hormones Involved in Abiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Kasote, Deepak M; Ghosh, Ritesh; Chung, Jun Young; Kim, Jonggeun; Bae, Inhwan; Bae, Hanhong

    2016-01-01

    Plant hormones are the key regulators of adaptive stress response. Abiotic stresses such as drought and salt are known to affect the growth and productivity of plants. It is well known that the levels of plant hormones such as zeatin (ZA), abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and brassinolide (BR) fluctuate upon abiotic stress exposure. At present, there is not any single suitable liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method for simultaneous analysis of BR and other plant hormones involved in abiotic stresses. In the present study, we developed a simple, sensitive, and rapid method for simultaneous analysis of five major plant hormones, ZA, ABA, JA, SA, and BR, which are directly or indirectly involved in drought and salt stresses. The optimized extraction procedure was simple and easy to use for simultaneous measurement of these plant hormones in Arabidopsis thaliana. The developed method is highly reproducible and can be adapted for simultaneous measurement of changes in plant hormones (ZA, ABA, JA, SA, and BR) in response to abiotic stresses in plants like A. thaliana and tomato.

  17. Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mode Based Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Method for Simultaneous Quantification of Brassinolide and Other Plant Hormones Involved in Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Kasote, Deepak M.; Ghosh, Ritesh; Chung, Jun Young; Kim, Jonggeun; Bae, Inhwan; Bae, Hanhong

    2016-01-01

    Plant hormones are the key regulators of adaptive stress response. Abiotic stresses such as drought and salt are known to affect the growth and productivity of plants. It is well known that the levels of plant hormones such as zeatin (ZA), abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and brassinolide (BR) fluctuate upon abiotic stress exposure. At present, there is not any single suitable liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method for simultaneous analysis of BR and other plant hormones involved in abiotic stresses. In the present study, we developed a simple, sensitive, and rapid method for simultaneous analysis of five major plant hormones, ZA, ABA, JA, SA, and BR, which are directly or indirectly involved in drought and salt stresses. The optimized extraction procedure was simple and easy to use for simultaneous measurement of these plant hormones in Arabidopsis thaliana. The developed method is highly reproducible and can be adapted for simultaneous measurement of changes in plant hormones (ZA, ABA, JA, SA, and BR) in response to abiotic stresses in plants like A. thaliana and tomato. PMID:27022397

  18. Measuring Science Teachers' Stress Level Triggered by Multiple Stressful Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halim, Lilia; Samsudin, Mohd Ali; Meerah, T. Subahan M.; Osman, Kamisah

    2006-01-01

    The complexity of science teaching requires science teachers to encounter a range of tasks. Some tasks are perceived as stressful while others are not. This study aims to investigate the extent to which different teaching situations lead to different stress levels. It also aims to identify the easiest and most difficult conditions to be regarded…

  19. EFFECT OF ACUTE STRESS ON PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS OF SEX AND STRESS HORMONES IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS LIVING IN CONTROL AND CONTAMINATED LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental contaminants can act as stressors, inducing elevated circulating concentrations of stress hormones such as corticosterone and cortisol. Development in contaminated eggs has been reported to modify circulating sex steroid hormone concentrations in alligators (Alligat...

  20. EFFECT OF ACUTE STRESS ON PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS OF SEX AND STRESS HORMONES IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS LIVING IN CONTROL AND CONTAMINATED LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental contaminants can act as stressors, inducing elevated circulating concentrations of stress hormones such as corticosterone and cortisol. Development in contaminated eggs has been reported to modify circulating sex steroid hormone concentrations in alligators (Alligat...

  1. Effect of space flights on plasma hormone levels in man and in experimental animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, L.; Kvetňanský, R.; Vigaš, M.; Németh, S.; Popova, I.; Tigranian, R. A.; Noskov, V. B.; Serova, L.; Grigoriev, I. A.

    An important increase of plasma hormone levels like insulin, TSH and aldosterone was observed in human subjects after space flights, however in the changes of plasma content of ACTH, cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline the individual variations were observed in relation to number and duration of space flight. For evaluation of the effects of these changes in plasma hormone levels on metabolic processes also the experiments with small animals subjected to space flights on a board of biosatellite of Cosmos series were running. An elevation of plasma levels of corticosterone, adrenaline, noradrenaline and insulin was found in rats after the space flights of duration from 7 to 20 days. It was demonstrated, that the increase of corticosterone in plasma is followed by the activation of enzymes involved in the aminoacid metabolism in rat liver (tyrosine aminotransferase, tryptophanpyrolase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). After a short recovery period (2 to 6 days) the plasma corticosterone concentration and also the activity of liver enzymes returned to control levels. The exposition of animals to stress stimuli during this recovery period showed higher response of corticosterone levels in flight rats as compared to intact controls. The increase of plasma catecholamine levels was not followed by elevation of lipolysis in adipose tissue. This is due to lower response of adipose tissue to catecholamine because a decrease of the stimulation of lipolysis by noradrenaline was observed in animals after space flight. The increase of insulin was not followed by adequate decrease of glucose concentration suggesting a disturbances in glucose utilization similarly as in cosmonauts after a long-term space flight. These results showed that changes in plasma hormone levels, observed after space flight, affected the regulation of metabolic processes in tissues.

  2. NEURONAL ACTIVITY AND STRESS DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATE HIPPOCAMPAL AND HYPOTHALAMIC CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE EXPRESSION IN THE IMMATURE RAT

    PubMed Central

    HATALSKI, C. G.; BRUNSON, K. L.; TANTAYANUBUTR, B.; CHEN, Y.; BARAM, T. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone, a major neuromodulator of the neuroendocrine stress response, is expressed in the immature hippocampus, where it enhances glutamate receptor-mediated excitation of principal cells. Since the peptide influences hippocampal synaptic efficacy, its secretion from peptidergic interneuronal terminals may augment hippocampal-mediated functions such as learning and memory. However, whereas information regarding the regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone’s abundance in CNS regions involved with the neuroendocrine responses to stress has been forthcoming, the mechanisms regulating the peptide’s levels in the hippocampus have not yet been determined. Here we tested the hypothesis that, in the immature rat hippocampus, neuronal stimulation, rather than neuroendocrine challenge, influences the peptide’s expression. Messenger RNA levels of corticotropin-releasing hormone in hippocampal CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus, as well as in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, were determined after cold, a physiological challenge that activates the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal system in immature rats, and after activation of hippocampal neurons by hyperthermia. These studies demonstrated that, while cold challenge enhanced corticotropin-releasing hormone messenger RNA levels in the hypothalamus, hippocampal expression of this neuropeptide was unchanged. Secondly, hyperthermia stimulated expression of hippocampal immediate-early genes, as well as of corticotropin-releasing hormone. Finally, the mechanism of hippocampal corticotropin-releasing hormone induction required neuronal stimulation and was abolished by barbiturate administration. Taken together, these results indicate that neuronal stimulation may regulate hippocampal corticotropin-releasing hormone expression in the immature rat, whereas the peptide’s expression in the hypothalamus is influenced by neuroendocrine challenges. PMID:11113306

  3. Situation criticality and basketball officials' stress levels.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Jason; Basevitch, Itay; Rodenberg, Ryan; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2017-11-01

    Officials are expected to perform impeccably despite the wide range of stressors they experience. A stressor that officials frequently report is situation criticality. Situation criticality is comprised of score differential (i.e., more pressure in close games) and time remaining in a game (i.e., more pressure as time expires), which affects athletes' stress levels. The present study explored the effect of situation criticality on officials' stress levels. High school basketball officials (n = 108) with an average of 18.1 (SD = 11.2) years of officiating experience were given a survey packet containing game situations that varied in criticality. For each game situation (n = 9) officials completed the overall stress and appraisal portions of the Stress Appraisal Measure (SAM). Results revealed that situation criticality has an effect on officials' perceived stress levels. Both threat and challenge appraisals were positively correlated with perceived stress. Overall, these findings indicate that officials' stress levels fluctuate within games depending on score differential and time of game. The findings encourage officials to recognise and manage their stress, possibly through their appraisals. Additionally, the findings can affect the training of officials in the management of stress, as well as prompt the consideration of potential rule changes that reflect the increased situational demands on officials in critical situations (e.g., expanded instant replay).

  4. Effects of hormonal priming on seed germination of pigeon pea under cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Sneideris, Larissa C; Gavassi, Marina A; Campos, Marcelo L; D'Amico-Damião, Victor; Carvalho, Rogério F

    2015-09-01

    In this work we investigated whether priming with auxin, cytokinin, gibberellin, abscisic acid and ethylene, alters the physiological responses of seeds of pigeon pea germinated under water and cadmium stress. Seeds treated with water or non-treated seeds were used as control. Although compared to non-treated seeds we found that the hormone treatments improve the germination of pigeon pea under cadmium stress, however, these treatments did not differ from water. However, we also observed a trend of tolerance to the effects of cadmium in the presence of ethylene, suggesting that the use of this hormone may be an efficient method to overcome seed germination under metal stress.

  5. Alcohol, stress hormones, and the prefrontal cortex: a proposed pathway to the dark side of addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Ling; Richardson, Heather N.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to alcohol produces changes in the prefrontal cortex that are thought to contribute to the development and maintenance of alcoholism. A large body of literature suggests that stress hormones play a critical role in this process. Here we review the bi-directional relationship between alcohol and stress hormones, and discuss how alcohol acutely stimulates the release of glucocorticoids and induces enduring modifications to neuroendocrine stress circuits during the transition from non-dependent drinking to alcohol dependence. We propose a pathway by which alcohol and stress hormones elicit neuroadaptive changes in prefrontal circuitry that could contribute functionally to a dampened neuroendocrine state and the increased propensity to relapse—a spiraling trajectory that could eventually lead to dependence. PMID:24998895

  6. Antimullerian Hormone Level and Endometrioma Ablation Using Plasma Energy

    PubMed Central

    Bubenheim, Michael; Auber, Mathieu; Marpeau, Loïc; Puscasiu, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of ovarian endometrioma vaporization using plasma energy on antimullerian hormone (AMH) level. Method: We report a prospective, noncomparative series (NCT01596985). Twenty-two patients with unilateral ovarian endometriomas ≥30 mm, with no surgical antecedent and no ongoing pregnancy, underwent vaporization of ovarian endometriomas using plasma energy during the period of November 29, 2010 to November 28, 2012. We assessed AMH levels before surgery, 3 months postoperatively, and at the end of follow-up. Results: The mean length of postoperative follow-up was 18.2 ± 8 months. AMH level significantly varied through the 3 assessments performed in the study, as the mean values ± SD were 3.9 ± 2.6 ng/mL before the surgery, 2.3 ± 1.1 ng/mL at 3 months, and 3.1 ± 2.2 ng/mL at the end of the follow-up (P = .001). There was a significant increase from 3 months postoperatively to the end of follow-up (median change 0.7 ng/mL, P = .01). Seventy-one percent of patients had an AMH level >2 ng/mL at the end of the follow-up versus 76% before the surgery (P = 1). During the postoperative follow-up, 11 patients tried to conceive, of whom 8 (73%) became pregnant. Conclusions: The ablation of unilateral endometriomas is followed in a majority of cases by a significant decrease in AMH level 3 months after surgery. In subsequent months, this level progressively increases, raising questions about the real factors that impact postoperative ovarian AMH production. PMID:25392649

  7. Restraint-induced changes in serum luteinizing hormone, prolactin, growth hormone and corticosterone levels in rats: effect of superior cervical ganglionectomy.

    PubMed

    Martín, A I; López-Calderón, A; Tresguerres, J A; González-Quijano, M I; Cardinali, D P

    1995-02-01

    From about 10 to 36 h after superior cervical ganglionectomy (SCGx), peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals in the median eminence degenerate, nerve ending content is released, and a transient period of increased postsynaptic activity ensues. After this time, an irreversible, paralytic phase is established in the denervated territory. The present experiment was undertaken to examine, at single points during the wallerian degeneration phase (24 h after SCGx) and during the paralytic phase (10 days after denervation), the participation of peripheral sympathetic nerves in restraint-stress-induced changes of circulating luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and corticosterone levels. During the wallerian degeneration phase, serum LH did not augment after stress, as it did in sham-operated controls. In the paralytic phase, the poststress increases in LH attained similar values in sham-operated and SCGx rats. Immobilization stress augmented PRL levels to a similar extent in sham-operated and SCGx rats either 24 h or 10 days after surgery. During the wallerian degeneration phase, a decrease in serum GH levels was found in unrestrained rats. Immobilization stress decreased GH levels to 5-12% of unrestrained values in sham-operated and SCGx rats at both examination time points after surgery. Rats studied 24 h after SCGx exhibited significantly augmented serum corticosterone levels and failed to show restraint-stress-induced stimulation of corticosterone release. In rats subjected to SCGx 10 days earlier, both basal and poststress levels of corticosterone did not differ from sham-operated controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Estradiol levels modulate brain activity and negative responses to psychosocial stress across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Albert, Kimberly; Pruessner, Jens; Newhouse, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Although ovarian hormones are thought to have a potential role in the well-known sex difference in mood and anxiety disorders, the mechanisms through which ovarian hormone changes contribute to stress regulation are not well understood. One mechanism by which ovarian hormones might impact mood regulation is by mediating the effect of psychosocial stress, which often precedes depressive episodes and may have mood consequences that are particularly relevant in women. In the current study, brain activity and mood response to psychosocial stress was examined in healthy, normally cycling women at either the high or low estradiol phase of the menstrual cycle. Twenty eight women were exposed to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST), with brain activity determined through functional magnetic resonance imaging, and behavioral response assessed with subjective mood and stress measures. Brain activity responses to psychosocial stress differed between women in the low versus high estrogen phase of the menstrual cycle: women with high estradiol levels showed significantly less deactivation in limbic regions during psychosocial stress compared to women with low estradiol levels. Additionally, women with higher estradiol levels also had less subjective distress in response to the MIST than women with lower estradiol levels. The results of this study suggest that, in normally cycling premenopausal women, high estradiol levels attenuate the brain activation changes and negative mood response to psychosocial stress. Normal ovarian hormone fluctuations may alter the impact of psychosocially stressful events by presenting periods of increased vulnerability to psychosocial stress during low estradiol phases of the menstrual cycle. This menstrual cycle-related fluctuation in stress vulnerability may be relevant to the greater risk for affective disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder in women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Insulin resistance and normal thyroid hormone levels: prospective study and metabolomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrannini, Ele; Iervasi, Giorgio; Cobb, Jeff; Ndreu, Rudina; Nannipieri, Monica

    2017-02-28

    While hyper/hypothyroidism causes dysglycemia, the relationship between thyroid hormone levels within the normal range and insulin resistance (IR) is unclear. In 940 participants with strictly normal serum concentrations of free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)) followed up for 3 years, we measured insulin sensitivity (by the insulin clamp technique) and a panel of 35 circulating metabolites. At baseline, across quartiles of increasing fT3 levels (or fT3/fT4 ratio) there emerged most features of IR (male sex, higher BMI, waist circumference, heart rate, blood pressure, fatty liver index, free fatty acids, and triglycerides levels, reduced insulin-mediated glucose disposal and ß-cell glucose sensitivity). In multiadjusted analyses, fT3 was reciprocally related to insulin sensitivity and, in a subset of 303 subjects, directly related to endogenous glucose production. In multiple regression models adjusting for sex, age, BMI and baseline value of insulin sensitivity, higher baseline fT3 levels were significant predictors of the decreases in insulin sensitivity. Moreover, baseline fT3 predicted follow-up increases in glycemia independently of sex, age, BMI, insulin sensitivity, ß-cell glucose sensitivity and baseline glycemia. Serum tyrosine levels were higher in IR and were directly associated with fT3; higher α-hydroxybutyrate levels signaled enhanced oxidative stress impairing tyrosine degradation. In 25 morbidly obese patients, surgery-induced weight loss improved IR and consensually lowered fT3 High-normal fT3 levels are associated with IR both cross-sectionally and longitudinally, and predict deterioration of glucose tolerance. This association is supported by a metabolite pattern that points at increased oxidative stress as part of the IR syndrome.

  10. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol enhances an increase of plasma corticosterone levels induced by forced swim-stress.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kazunori; Koushi, Emi; Irie, Keiichi; Higuchi, Sei; Tsuchihashi, Ryota; Kinjo, Junei; Egashira, Nobuaki; Oishi, Ryozo; Uchida, Naoki; Nagai, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Ryoji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi; Mishima, Kenichi; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2009-12-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effect of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on susceptibility to stress. We reported that THC significantly prolonged the immobility time during the forced swim-stress. The selective cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist O-2050 significantly reduced the enhancement of immobility by THC. We investigated the effect of THC on levels of stress hormone corticosterone under non-stress and forced swim-stress conditions. THC did not affect plasma corticosterone levels under non-stress conditions. However, THC, together with forced swim-stress, significantly increased plasma corticosterone levels. This effect was inhibited by O-2050. This evidence suggests that THC, under stressful conditions, enhances the susceptibility of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-axis to stress via the CB(1) receptor, thereby increasing the risk of depression.

  11. Stress-related hormones and genetic diversity in sea otters (Enhydra lutris)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, S.; Monson, D.; Ballachey, B.; Jameson, R.; Wasser, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) once ranged throughout the coastal regions of the north Pacific, but were extirpated throughout their range during the fur trade of the 18th and 19th centuries, leaving only small, widely scattered, remnant populations. All extant sea otter populations are believed to have experienced a population bottleneck and thus have lost genetic variation. Populations that undergo severe population reduction and associated inbreeding may suffer from a general reduction in fitness termed inbreeding depression. Inbreeding depression may result in decreased testosterone levels in males, and reduced ability to respond to stressful stimuli associated with an increase in the stress-related adrenal glucocorticoid hormones, cortisol and corticosterone. We investigated correlations of testosterone, cortisol, and corticosterone with genetic diversity in sea otters from five populations. We found a significant negative correlation between genetic diversity and both mean population-level (r2 = 0.27, P < 0.001) and individual-level (r2 = 0.54, P < 0.001) corticosterone values, as well as a negative correlation between genetic diversity and cortisol at the individual level (r2 = 0.17, P = 0.04). No relationship was found between genetic diversity and testosterone (P = 0.57). The strength of the correlations, especially with corticosterone, suggests potential negative consequences for overall population health, particularly for populations with the lowest genetic diversity. ?? 2009 by the Society for Marine Mammalogy.

  12. Restraint stress and stress hormones significantly impact T lymphocyte migration and function through specific alterations of the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Flint, Melanie S; Budiu, Raluca A; Teng, Pang-ning; Sun, Mai; Stolz, Donna B; Lang, Megan; Hood, Brian L; Vlad, Anda M; Conrads, Thomas P

    2011-08-01

    Stress triggers complex response mechanisms designed to recognize and adapt to perturbations in homeostasis. The immune system is highly responsive to stress, although the complete mechanisms linking stress and immune mediators including T lymphocytes, are not fully understood. Stress exerts its effects on immune effectors through two primary pathways: the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary pathway, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal pathway which modulate adaptive immunity and lymphocyte migration. In this report we show that stress via release of stress hormones induces early T cell activation and greatly impacts the cytoskeleton by modulating numerous actin-regulating proteins. In particular, proteomic profiling revealed significant decreases in numerous key actin-binding proteins including moesin. Although confocal microscopy showed that moesin and actin were uniformly distributed on the surface of resting T cells, a remarkable polarization and redistribution of moesin and actin was observed following treatment with stress hormones with moesin localizing at the distal pole complex. In addition, the alteration in moesin localization and eventual decrease in expression were accompanied by a loss of CD43; a receptor involved in negatively regulating T cell activation. In conclusion, we have defined a novel molecular mechanism whereby stress hormones negatively impact T cell activation and migration through regulation of key cytoskeletal and plasma membrane factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Isolation of stress-related genes of rubber particles and latex in fig tree (Ficus carica) and their expressions by abiotic stress or plant hormone treatments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Sun; Kim, Yeon Ok; Ryu, Hyun Ju; Kwak, Yeon Sig; Lee, Ji Yeon; Kang, Hunseung

    2003-04-01

    Two rubber particle protein genes and one latex gene in fig tree (Ficus carica) have been isolated and their expression following various abiotic stress treatments have been investigated. The two major proteins that are tightly associated with the catalytically active rubber particles have been sequenced to be peroxidase (POX) and trypsin inhibitor (TRI). A cDNA encoding a basic class I chitinase (CHI) has also been isolated from the fig tree latex. Wounding treatment strongly induced the expression of the three stress-related genes. Among the abiotic stresses investigated, drought treatment greatly induced the expression of POX, whereas the expression of CHI and TRI decreased after the same treatment. Cold treatment reduced slightly the transcript levels of the thee genes, and NaCl reduced marginally the expression of CHI. The expression of POX, CHI, and TRI was induced by jasmonic acid and abscisic acid, by jasmonic acid, and by salicylic acid, respectively. Different expression of the stress-related genes following various abiotic stress or plant hormone treatments suggests that a crosstalk exists between the signal transduction pathways elicited by abiotic stresses and hormones in plants. Our present results showing the expression of stress-related proteins on the surface of rubber particles and latex in F. carica also imply the possible role of rubber particles and latex in defense in rubber-producing plant species.

  14. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to acute psychosocial stress: Effects of biological sex and circulating sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mary Ann C; Mahon, Pamela B; McCaul, Mary E; Wand, Gary S

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis influences the risk for developing stress-related disorders. Sex-dependent differences in the HPA axis stress response are believed to contribute to the different prevalence rates of stress-related disorders found in men and women. However, studies examining the HPA axis stress response have shown mixed support for sex differences, and the role of endogenous sex hormones on HPA axis response has not been adequately examined in humans. This study utilized the largest sample size to date to analyze the effects of biological sex and sex hormones on HPA axis social stress responses. Healthy, 18- to 30- year-old community volunteers (N=282) completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a widely used and well-validated stress-induction laboratory procedure. All women (n=135) were tested during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle (when progesterone levels are most similar to men). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol measures were collected at multiple points throughout pre- and post-TSST. Testosterone and progesterone (in men) and progesterone and estradiol (in women) were determined pre-TSST. Following the TSST, men had greater ACTH and cortisol levels than women. Men had steeper baseline-to-peak and peak-to-end ACTH and cortisol response slopes than women; there was a trend for more cortisol responders among men than women. Testosterone negatively correlated with salivary cortisol response in men, while progesterone negatively correlated with ACTH and cortisol responses in women. These data confirm that men show more robust activation of the HPA axis response to the TSST than do women in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Testosterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in men. Progesterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in women. Future work is needed to explain why men mount a greater ACTH and cortisol response to the

  15. Investigation of the serum levels of anterior pituitary hormones in male children with autism.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Miyachi, Taishi; Shimmura, Chie; Suda, Shiro; Tsuchiya, Kenji J; Matsumoto, Kaori; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Iwata, Yasuhide; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Sugiyama, Toshirou; Sato, Kohji; Mori, Norio

    2011-10-19

    The neurobiological basis of autism remains poorly understood. The diagnosis of autism is based solely on behavioural characteristics because there are currently no reliable biological markers. To test whether the anterior pituitary hormones and cortisol could be useful as biological markers for autism, we assessed the basal serum levels of these hormones in subjects with autism and normal controls. Using a suspension array system, we determined the serum levels of six anterior pituitary hormones, including adrenocorticotropic hormone and growth hormone, in 32 drug-naive subjects (aged 6 to 18 years, all boys) with autism, and 34 healthy controls matched for age and gender. We also determined cortisol levels in these subjects by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone, growth hormone and cortisol were significantly higher in subjects with autism than in controls. In addition, there was a significantly positive correlation between cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels in autism. Our results suggest that increased basal serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone accompanied by increased cortisol and growth hormone may be useful biological markers for autism.

  16. Investigation of the serum levels of anterior pituitary hormones in male children with autism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The neurobiological basis of autism remains poorly understood. The diagnosis of autism is based solely on behavioural characteristics because there are currently no reliable biological markers. To test whether the anterior pituitary hormones and cortisol could be useful as biological markers for autism, we assessed the basal serum levels of these hormones in subjects with autism and normal controls. Findings Using a suspension array system, we determined the serum levels of six anterior pituitary hormones, including adrenocorticotropic hormone and growth hormone, in 32 drug-naive subjects (aged 6 to 18 years, all boys) with autism, and 34 healthy controls matched for age and gender. We also determined cortisol levels in these subjects by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone, growth hormone and cortisol were significantly higher in subjects with autism than in controls. In addition, there was a significantly positive correlation between cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels in autism. Conclusion Our results suggest that increased basal serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone accompanied by increased cortisol and growth hormone may be useful biological markers for autism. PMID:22011527

  17. [Effects of obesity on peak level of luteinizing hormone in gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist test and obesity-related hormones in girls with central precocious puberty].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue-Lian; Fu, Jun-Fen; Jin, Ju-Hua; Dong, Guan-Ping; Jiang, You-Jun; Huang, Ke; Chen, Xue-Feng; Wu, Wei

    2015-08-01

    To explore the effects of obesity on the peak level of luteinizing hormone (LH) in the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist test and obesity-related hormones in girls with central precocious puberty (CPP). Three hundred and thirty-three girls with CPP who underwent the GnRH agonist test between 2012 and 2014 were classified into three groups: normal weight (n=123), overweight (n=108), and obesity (n=102), according to body mass index (BMI). The sexual development indices were compared between the three groups. Twenty girls were randomly selected from each group for evaluation of the serum levels of leptin, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), neurokinin B, and kisspeptin. The correlation of BMI with the levels of various hormones was assessed using Pearson correlation analysis. There was no significant difference in mean age at diagnosis between the three groups; however, the bone age was significantly higher in the overweight and obesity groups than in the normal weight group (P<0.05). The peak level of LH in the GnRH agonist test and SHBG level in the normal weight group were significantly higher than those in the overweight and the obesity groups, while the serum levels of leptin and neurokinin B were significantly lower in the normal weight group than in the overweight and the obesity groups (P<0.05). BMI was negatively correlated with the peak level of LH in the GnRH agonist test and SHBG level (P<0.05), and positively correlated with the levels of leptin and neurokinin B (P<0.05). The effects of BMI on the result of the GnRH agonist test and levels of obesity-related hormones should be taken into account in girls with precocious puberty.

  18. Thymic atrophy in acute experimental Chagas disease is associated with an imbalance of stress hormones.

    PubMed

    Lepletier, Ailin; de Frias Carvalho, Vinícius; Morrot, Alexandre; Savino, Wilson

    2012-07-01

    Disorders in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis are associated with the pathogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. During the acute phase of this disease, increased levels of circulating glucocorticoids (GCs) correlate with thymic atrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that this phenomenon is paralleled by a decrease of prolactin (PRL) secretion, another stress hormone that seems to counteract many immunosuppressive effects of GCs. Both GCs and PRL are intrathymically produced and exhibit mutual antagonism through the activation of their respective receptors, GR, and PRLR. Considering that GCs induce apoptosis and inhibit double-positive (DP) thymocyte proliferation and that PRL administration prevents these effects, it seems plausible that a local imbalance of GR-PRLR crosstalk underlies the thymic involution occurring in acute T. cruzi infection. In this respect, preserving PRLR signaling seems to be crucial for protecting DP from GC-induced apoptosis.

  19. Assessing Stress in Arctic Lemmings: Fecal Metabolite Levels Reflect Plasma Free Corticosterone Levels.

    PubMed

    Fauteux, Dominique; Gauthier, Gilles; Berteaux, Dominique; Bosson, Curtis; Palme, Rupert; Boonstra, Rudy

    Interest in the ecology of stress in wild populations has triggered the development of noninvasive methods for quantifying stress hormones. Measurement of fecal corticosteroid metabolites (FCMs) is one such method, but it is still unclear whether FCMs can be a reliable proxy of free plasma glucocorticoids. To assess the validity of this assumption, we carried out a robust assessment on brown lemmings (Lemmus trimucronatus) from Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada, that were hand captured and anesthetized and related plasma glucocorticoid levels to fecal metabolite glucocorticoid levels. We examined endogenous factors that could explain interindividual variability. Blood corticosterone was measured from samples obtained on capture and 30 min later, and FCM levels were measured from animals kept in captivity for 72 h. Plasma free corticosterone increased 135-fold over baseline values 30 min after capture, which confirmed that initial handling was perceived as a stressor. We found that FCM levels were highly related with free (marginal [Formula: see text] = 0.53) but not with total ([Formula: see text] = 0.02) corticosterone levels, regardless of age, sex, and reproductive condition. FCM levels started increasing 2 h after capture and reached maximum levels 4 h after capture. No circadian rhythm in FCMs was found. Plasma total corticosterone levels were much higher in adult females compared with adult males, but this difference was much smaller when measuring free corticosterone levels and FCM levels. Our results suggest that FCM levels are good measures of stress by being closely related to plasma free corticosterone levels in brown lemmings.

  20. Propofol-containing sedatives increase levels of parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, G P; Youngs, E; Teres, D

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of propofol and propofol containing disodium edetate (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA]) on the parathyroid-calcium axis in normal subjects. Randomised, double-blind, age-stratified, crossover trial. Single centre. A total of 50 healthy subjects. Each subject was randomised to receive propofol or propofol containing EDTA on day 1 and the alternate treatment between days 15 and 29, with a 2-week wash-out period in between. On the day of treatment, subjects received a bolus of trial medication (1 or 2 mg/kg) followed by a 60-minute observation period. At the end of 60 minutes, subjects received trial medication infused for 60 minutes at 1 of 4 randomised infusion rates (25, 50, 100, or 200 microg/kg per min). Subjects were monitored for an additional 60 minutes following the infusion. Blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, blood ionised calcium concentration, serum total magnesium concentration, serum intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) level, and plasma EDTA level were assessed at periodic intervals during and following the bolus and continuous infusion of trial medication. Mean arterial pressure significantly decreased (p < 0.05) following the bolus injection of both trial medications and returned to baseline at 60 minutes; it significantly decreased again during the continuous infusion and returned to baseline during recovery. Heart rate and respiratory rate fluctuated in both groups with significant increases and decreases throughout the study period following the bolus injection; both returned to baseline during the recovery period in each group. Ionised calcium and total magnesium concentrations remained within normal limits and were unchanged in response to both study medications. PTH levels significantly increased following the bolus injection of both study drugs. The increase in PTH levels was greater with higher doses of study medication during the infusion period. There was no difference in the response

  1. Associations among dehydration, testosterone and stress hormones in terms of body weight loss before competition.

    PubMed

    İrfan, Yldrm

    2015-08-01

    In weight class sports, such as judo, taekwondo and wrestling, reducing body weight before competitions is common. However, it is recommended that weight loss per week should not exceed 1.5% of total body weight otherwise, athletes' metabolism and endocrine parameters are negatively affected, which will deteriorate their physiology and psychology and thus decrease their performance. The aim of this study was to determine weight loss and hydration levels after weight loss before competitions among the elite wrestlers and to explore the association between hydration levels, and stress and testosterone. This was an observational study. The study was undertaken with 56 voluntary athletes who participated in wrestling championship. With blood samples taken from the wrestlers, glucose, blood urea nitrogen, sodium (Na), cortisol, prolactin and testosterone hormone analyses were evaluated by a specialist at a biochemical laboratory. It was found out that according to plasma osmolarity levels, there were significant differences between those dehydrated and those who maintained euhydration in terms of cortisol and total testosterone levels (P < 0.001). It was detected that an association was present between plasma osmolarity, and cortisol (r = 0.667) and total testosterone levels (r = -0.627) among the elite wrestlers. It was discovered that elite wrestlers were subjected to quick and high level of weight losses before competitions in a very short time (1-5 days). It was seen that their hydration levels differed due to the weight loss, which was explored to be causing acute dehydration among the wrestlers.

  2. Physical Exercise Counteracts Stress-induced Upregulation of Melanin-concentrating Hormone in the Brain and Stress-induced Persisting Anxiety-like Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress induces anxiety disorders, whereas physical exercise is believed to help people with clinical anxiety. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying stress-induced anxiety and its counteraction by exercise using an established animal model of anxiety. Mice treated with restraint for 2 h daily for 14 days exhibited anxiety-like behaviors, including social and nonsocial behavioral symptoms, and these behavioral impairments lasted for more than 12 weeks after the stress treatment was removed. Despite these lasting behavioral changes, wheel-running exercise treatment for 1 h daily from post-stress days 1 - 21 counteracted anxiety-like behaviors, and these anxiolytic effects of exercise persisted for more than 2 months, suggesting that anxiolytic effects of exercise stably induced. Repeated restraint treatment up-regulated the expression of the neuropeptide, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), in the lateral hypothalamus, hippocampus, and basolateral amygdala, the brain regions important for emotional behaviors. In an in vitro study, treatment of HT22 hippocampal cells with glucocorticoid increased MCH expression, suggesting that MCH upregulation can be initially triggered by the stress hormone, corticosterone. In contrast, post-stress treatment with wheel-running exercise reduced the stress-induced increase in MCH expression to control levels in the lateral hypothalamus, hippocampus and basolateral amygdala. Administration of an MCH receptor antagonist (SNAP94847) to stress-treated mice was therapeutic against stress-induced anxiety-like behaviors. These results suggest that repeated stress produces long-lasting anxiety-like behaviors and upregulates MCH in the brain, while exercise counteracts stress-induced MCH expression and persisting anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:27574483

  3. Stress-related hormones in horses before and after stunning by captive bolt gun.

    PubMed

    Micera, Elisabetta; Albrizio, Maria; Surdo, Nicoletta C; Moramarco, Angela M; Zarrilli, Antonia

    2010-04-01

    In this work the slaughter-linked plasma modifications of some stress-related hormones in horses subject to standardized butchering procedures were investigated in order to highlight the compromised animal welfare during pre-slaughter handling. During pre-slaughter, animals show strong hardship behavioural patterns, probably due to being under life-threatening conditions. Blood samples from 12 male horses, ageing from 3 to 5 years, were collected before slaughtering in lairage, and during exsanguination after stunning. Catecholamines, cortisol and beta-endorphin concentrations were assessed in plasma samples by EIA. Results show that plasma beta-endorphin concentration did not increase significantly after stunning, while cortisol (P<0.05) and catecholamines (P<0.001) increased significantly. The ratio between the plasma level of norepinephrine and epinephrine decreased significantly (P<0.001) during the time considered for observation underlining a greater involvement of adrenal medulla in the stress response. Moreover these results suggest that, under stress, the release of beta-endorphin could be different from that of ACTH. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of simultaneous combined exposure to CDMA and WCDMA electromagnetic fields on serum hormone levels in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yeung Bae; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Byung Chan; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Kim, Nam; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2013-01-01

    Despite more than a decade of research on the endocrine system, there have been no published studies about the effects of concurrent exposure of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on this system. The present study investigated the several parameters of the endocrine system including melatonin, thyroid stimulating hormone, stress hormone and sex hormone after code division multiple access (CDMA, 849 MHz) and wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA, 1.95 GHz) signals for simultaneous exposure in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to RF-EMF signals for 45 min/day, 5 days/week for up to 8 weeks. The whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of CDMA or WCDMA was 2.0 W/kg (total 4.0 W/kg). At 4 and 8 weeks after the experiment began, each experimental group's 40 rats (male 20, female 20) were autopsied. Exposure for 8 weeks to simultaneous CDMA and WCDMA RF did not affect serum levels in rats of melatonin, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxin (T4), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and sex hormones (testosterone and estrogen) as assessed by the ELISA method. PMID:23239176

  5. Effects of simultaneous combined exposure to CDMA and WCDMA electromagnetic fields on serum hormone levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yeung Bae; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Byung Chan; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Kim, Nam; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2013-05-01

    Despite more than a decade of research on the endocrine system, there have been no published studies about the effects of concurrent exposure of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on this system. The present study investigated the several parameters of the endocrine system including melatonin, thyroid stimulating hormone, stress hormone and sex hormone after code division multiple access (CDMA, 849 MHz) and wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA, 1.95 GHz) signals for simultaneous exposure in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to RF-EMF signals for 45 min/day, 5 days/week for up to 8 weeks. The whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of CDMA or WCDMA was 2.0 W/kg (total 4.0 W/kg). At 4 and 8 weeks after the experiment began, each experimental group's 40 rats (male 20, female 20) were autopsied. Exposure for 8 weeks to simultaneous CDMA and WCDMA RF did not affect serum levels in rats of melatonin, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxin (T4), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and sex hormones (testosterone and estrogen) as assessed by the ELISA method.

  6. Heat Stress and Cardiovascular, Hormonal, and Heat Shock Proteins in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Masaki; Littmann, Andrew E.; Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Wester, Lydia A.; Knipper, Jane S.; Shields, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Conditions such as osteoarthritis, obesity, and spinal cord injury limit the ability of patients to exercise, preventing them from experiencing many well-documented physiologic stressors. Recent evidence indicates that some of these stressors might derive from exercise-induced body temperature increases. Objective: To determine whether whole-body heat stress without exercise triggers cardiovascular, hormonal, and extra-cellular protein responses of exercise. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-five young, healthy adults (13 men, 12 women; age = 22.1 ± 2.4 years, height = 175.2 ± 11.6 cm, mass = 69.4 ± 14.8 kg, body mass index = 22.6 ± 4.0) volunteered. Intervention(s): Participants sat in a heat stress chamber with heat (73°C) and without heat (26°C) stress for 30 minutes on separate days. We obtained blood samples from a subset of 13 participants (7 men, 6 women) before and after exposure to heat stress. Main Outcome Measure(s): Extracellular heat shock protein (HSP72) and catecholamine plasma concentration, heart rate, blood pressure, and heat perception. Results: After 30 minutes of heat stress, body temperature measured via rectal sensor increased by 0.8°C. Heart rate increased linearly to 131.4 ± 22.4 beats per minute (F6,24 = 186, P < .001) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased by 16 mm Hg (F6,24 = 10.1, P < .001) and 5 mm Hg (F6,24 = 5.4, P < .001), respectively. Norepinephrine (F1,12 = 12.1, P = .004) and prolactin (F1,12 = 30.2, P < .001) increased in the plasma (58% and 285%, respectively) (P < .05). The HSP72 (F1,12 = 44.7, P < .001) level increased with heat stress by 48.7% ± 53.9%. No cardiovascular or blood variables showed changes during the control trials (quiet sitting in the heat chamber with no heat stress), resulting in differences between heat and control trials. Conclusions: We found that whole-body heat stress triggers some of the

  7. Heat stress and cardiovascular, hormonal, and heat shock proteins in humans.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Masaki; Littmann, Andrew E; Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Wester, Lydia A; Knipper, Jane S; Shields, Richard K

    2012-01-01

    Conditions such as osteoarthritis, obesity, and spinal cord injury limit the ability of patients to exercise, preventing them from experiencing many well-documented physiologic stressors. Recent evidence indicates that some of these stressors might derive from exercise-induced body temperature increases. To determine whether whole-body heat stress without exercise triggers cardiovascular, hormonal, and extracellular protein responses of exercise. Randomized controlled trial. University research laboratory. Twenty-five young, healthy adults (13 men, 12 women; age = 22.1 ± 2.4 years, height = 175.2 ± 11.6 cm, mass = 69.4 ± 14.8 kg, body mass index = 22.6 ± 4.0) volunteered. Participants sat in a heat stress chamber with heat (73°C) and without heat (26°C) stress for 30 minutes on separate days. We obtained blood samples from a subset of 13 participants (7 men, 6 women) before and after exposure to heat stress. Extracellular heat shock protein (HSP72) and catecholamine plasma concentration, heart rate, blood pressure, and heat perception. After 30 minutes of heat stress, body temperature measured via rectal sensor increased by 0.8°C. Heart rate increased linearly to 131.4 ± 22.4 beats per minute (F₆,₂₄ = 186, P < .001) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased by 16 mm Hg (F₆,₂₄ = 10.1, P < .001) and 5 mm Hg (F₆,₂₄ = 5.4, P < .001), respectively. Norepinephrine (F₁,₁₂ = 12.1, P = .004) and prolactin (F₁,₁₂ = 30.2, P < .001) increased in the plasma (58% and 285%, respectively) (P < .05). The HSP72 (F₁,₁₂ = 44.7, P < .001) level increased with heat stress by 48.7% ± 53.9%. No cardiovascular or blood variables showed changes during the control trials (quiet sitting in the heat chamber with no heat stress), resulting in differences between heat and control trials. We found that whole-body heat stress triggers some of the physiologic responses observed with exercise. Future studies are necessary to investigate whether

  8. [Changes of endogenous hormone contents and antioxidative enzyme activities in wheat leaves under low temperature stress at jointing stage].

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-yan; Xu, Wen; Liu, Li-wei; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Xin-kai; Guo, Wen-shan

    2015-07-01

    Low temperature stresses (-3 and -5 °C) were simulated using artificial temperature-controlled phytotrons to study the freezing rate, the contents of endogenous hormones, and the activities of antioxidative enzymes in the leaves of wheat plants of Yangmai 16 (YM 16) and Xumai 30 (XM 30) at jointing stage. The grade and index of freezing injury increased with lower temperature and longer stress. The freezing rate was at the 5th level and the main stems and tillers of both cultivars were finally dead under -5 °C lasting for 72 h. On the last day of stress initiation, the contents of abscisic acid (ABA) and zeatin riboside (ZR), and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxide dismutase (POD), and catalase (CAT) in leaves increased at the beginning and then declined as low temperature progressed. On the 3rd day after stress, the contents of ABA and ZR and the activities of antioxidative enzymes were higher than those on the last day of cold stress, and then reduced to the level of the control on the 6th day after stress. The content of gibberellins (GA3) was lowered by cold stress. For YM 16, GA3 content increased from the 3rd day to the 6th day after cold stress, whereas, for XM 30, it increased first and then decreased. For the treatment of -5 °C lasting for 72 h, the contents of hormones and the activities of antioxidative enzymes were significantly lower than those of the other treatments. Correlation analyses showed that higher ABA and ZR contents, and higher SOD, POD and CAT activities as well as lower GA3 content could alleviate the low-temperature injury in wheat plants under low temperature stress.

  9. Stressor-specific effects of sex on HPA axis hormones and activation of stress-related neurocircuitry.

    PubMed

    Babb, Jessica A; Masini, Cher V; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge

    2013-11-01

    Experiencing stress can be physically and psychologically debilitating to an organism. Women have a higher prevalence of some stress-related mental illnesses, the reasons for which are unknown. These experiments explore differential HPA axis hormone release in male and female rats following acute stress. Female rats had a similar threshold of HPA axis hormone release following low intensity noise stress as male rats. Sex did not affect the acute release, or the return of HPA axis hormones to baseline following moderate intensity noise stress. Sensitive indices of auditory functioning obtained by modulation of the acoustic startle reflex by weak pre-pulses did not reveal any sexual dimorphism. Furthermore, male and female rats exhibited similar c-fos mRNA expression in the brain following noise stress, including several sex-influenced stress-related regions. The HPA axis response to noise stress was not affected by stage of estrous cycle, and ovariectomy significantly increased hormone release. Direct comparison of HPA axis hormone release to two different stressors in the same animals revealed that although female rats exhibit robustly higher HPA axis hormone release after restraint stress, the same effect was not observed following moderate and high intensity loud noise stress. Finally, the differential effect of sex on HPA axis responses to noise and restraint stress cannot readily be explained by differential social cues or general pain processing. These studies suggest the effect of sex on acute stress-induced HPA axis hormone activity is highly dependent on the type of stressor.

  10. [An influence of mental stress, related to parachute jumping, on ACTH and cortizol hormones concentration in blood serum].

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Edward; Kura, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to estimate an influence of parachute jumps on the level of ACTH and cortizol hormones among professional soldiers from air-borne forces. The investigation was carried out on 46 professional soldiers from 16 Air-Borne Battalion, patients of the outpatient department--SPZOZ JW. 4495, men at 20 to 45 age, healthy--admitted to parachute jumping in air-borne forces. They were divided into groups according to their knowledge and an experience in parachuting. Venous blood samples were taken to examine the level of ACTH and cortizol hormones three times during experiment: on a free day, day of parachute jumping and 24hrs after jump. Additionally in order to estimate the level of nervous tension and mental stress, in every stage of the experiment, personal questionnaires in accordance with STAI were carried out. The results show the influence of psychological stress related to parachute jumps on the level of ACTH and cortizol hormones depending on experience in parachuting.

  11. Stress hormone concentration in Rocky Mountain populations of the American pika (Ochotona princeps)

    PubMed Central

    Wilkening, Jennifer L.; Ray, Chris; Sweazea, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    The American pika (Ochotona princeps) is considered a sentinel species for detecting ecological effects of climate change. Pikas are declining within a large portion of their range, but previous studies have focused only on local pika extinction as a metric of change. We designed a procedure which can provide an earlier warning signal, based on non-invasive sampling and analysis of physiological stress in living pikas. Pikas were sampled at several locations in the Rocky Mountains for the measurement of glucocorticoid metabolites (GCMs) in faeces. Using a time series of faecal pellets from 12 individuals, we detected a significant increase in faecal GCM level in response to capture, thus biologically validating the use of a corticosterone enzyme immunoassay. We also established baseline, peak, and post-peak GCM concentrations for pikas in the Rocky Mountains, which varied according to gender and individual. This is the first study to measure stress hormone metabolites in any species of pika. The methods developed and validated in this study can be used to add non-invasive measurements of physiological stress to pika monitoring programmes and other research designed to assess pika vulnerability to predicted changes in climate. Pika monitoring programmes currently in place use a protocol that relates current site use by pikas with data on local habitat characteristics, such as elevation, to infer potential effects of climate change. Data generated by these monitoring studies can be used to identify the trends in site use by pikas in relationship to habitat covariates. However, this approach does not take into account the role of behavioural thermoregulation and the pika's use of microhabitats to ameliorate variations in climate. Incorporating a stress metric, such as GCM concentration, will provide relatively direct evidence for or against the hypothesis that pikas can be stressed by climate regardless of behavioural adaptations. PMID:27293611

  12. Seasonal heat stress: Clinical implications and hormone treatments for the fertility of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    De Rensis, F; Garcia-Ispierto, I; López-Gatius, F

    2015-09-15

    Heat stress has consequences on both the physiology and reproductive performance of cows, but the most dramatic effect for dairy producers is the decrease produced in fertility. The effects of heat stress on fertility include an increased number of days open, reduced conception rate, and larger number of cows suffering different types of anestrus. Once becomes pregnant, heat stress affects also the reproductive success of the cow through its direct effects on the ovary, uterus, gametes, embryo, and early fetus. This article reviews current knowledge of the effects of heat stress on fertility in dairy cows and the hormonal strategies used to mitigate these effects at the farm level. Administration of GnRH at the moment of artificial insemination can improve the conception rate. Breeding synchronization protocols for fixed-time insemination may reduce the calving conception interval and the number of services per conception. Progesterone-based protocols seem resolve better the reproductive disorders related to a hot environment (anestrus) than GnRH-based protocols. The use of combinations of GnRH, eCG, and hCG in progesterone-based protocols can improve results. Progesterone supplementation during the late embryonic and/or early fetal period would be useful in curtailing pregnancy losses, mainly in single pregnancies, whereas a more positive effect of treatment with GnRH than progesterone has been found in twin pregnancies. Melatonin therapy is emerging as a promising strategy to improve the natural reproductive performance of cows suffering conditions of heat stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Stress hormone concentration in Rocky Mountain populations of the American pika (Ochotona princeps).

    PubMed

    Wilkening, Jennifer L; Ray, Chris; Sweazea, Karen L

    2013-01-01

    The American pika (Ochotona princeps) is considered a sentinel species for detecting ecological effects of climate change. Pikas are declining within a large portion of their range, but previous studies have focused only on local pika extinction as a metric of change. We designed a procedure which can provide an earlier warning signal, based on non-invasive sampling and analysis of physiological stress in living pikas. Pikas were sampled at several locations in the Rocky Mountains for the measurement of glucocorticoid metabolites (GCMs) in faeces. Using a time series of faecal pellets from 12 individuals, we detected a significant increase in faecal GCM level in response to capture, thus biologically validating the use of a corticosterone enzyme immunoassay. We also established baseline, peak, and post-peak GCM concentrations for pikas in the Rocky Mountains, which varied according to gender and individual. This is the first study to measure stress hormone metabolites in any species of pika. The methods developed and validated in this study can be used to add non-invasive measurements of physiological stress to pika monitoring programmes and other research designed to assess pika vulnerability to predicted changes in climate. Pika monitoring programmes currently in place use a protocol that relates current site use by pikas with data on local habitat characteristics, such as elevation, to infer potential effects of climate change. Data generated by these monitoring studies can be used to identify the trends in site use by pikas in relationship to habitat covariates. However, this approach does not take into account the role of behavioural thermoregulation and the pika's use of microhabitats to ameliorate variations in climate. Incorporating a stress metric, such as GCM concentration, will provide relatively direct evidence for or against the hypothesis that pikas can be stressed by climate regardless of behavioural adaptations.

  14. Baseline hormone levels are linked to reproductive success but not parental care behaviors.

    PubMed

    Burtka, Jennifer L; Lovern, Matthew B; Grindstaff, Jennifer L

    2016-04-01

    Consistent behavioral differences among individuals, or personalities, have been hypothesized to arise as a result of consistent individual differences in hormone levels. Individual variation in baseline hormone levels or hormonal similarity within a breeding pair may be related to reproductive success, as suggested by the corticosterone-fitness hypothesis and the hormonal similarity hypothesis, respectively. In a population of Eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis) with repeatable behavioral expression and coordination of behavior within pairs, we tested if baseline androgen and corticosterone levels are related to behavioral expression, if coordination in behavior within pairs is facilitated by hormonal coordination, and if baseline hormone levels are related to fledging success at the individual or pair level. We found no significant relationship between hormone levels and nest visit rate or nest defense for either sex. Androgen and corticosterone levels were not correlated within pairs, but pairs in which males exhibited more aggressive nest defense behavior than females were also more different in androgen levels. Females with higher baseline corticosterone levels fledged more young, but hormonal similarity within pairs was not related to fledging success. Our results provide support for the corticosterone-adaptation hypothesis, which suggests that elevation of baseline corticosterone levels may occur during breeding to meet increased energetic demands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Association of HPA axis hormones with copeptin after psychological stress differs by sex.

    PubMed

    Spanakis, Elias K; Wand, Gary S; Ji, Nan; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2016-01-01

    Copeptin levels are elevated in severe medical conditions, an effect that is attributed to elevated arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels in response to physiological stress, resulting in activation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In the current study, we wanted to determine if copeptin is responsive to psychological stress, correlates with cortisol and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), and if associations differed by sex. In a cross-sectional study that included 100 healthy men (41%) and women (59%) (aged 18-30 years; mean 24.6 ± 3 years), who underwent the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), we examined the association between percent change (peak-baseline/baseline) in copeptin levels and percent change in log ACTH and cortisol. Three baselines samples were drawn followed by blood sampling at 20, 35, 50, 65 and 85 min after TSST. There was a significant positive association between the percent change in copeptin and the percent change in log-transformed salivary cortisol (β-coefficient=0.95; p=0.02). The association between percent change in copeptin and log-transformed serum cortisol was not statistically significant in the overall population. There was a trend for a non-significant association between percent change in copeptin and percent change in log-transformed ACTH (β-coefficient=1.14; p=0.06). In males, there was a significant positive association between the percent change in copeptin levels and log-transformed salivary (β-coefficient=1.33, p=0.016) and serum cortisol (β-coefficient=0.69, p=0.01), whereas in women there was no statistically significant association. We found a significant positive association between percent change in copeptin and percent change in salivary and serum cortisol among males only. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Significance of rebounding parathyroid hormone levels during parathyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David F.; Ojomo, Kristin A.; Mazeh, Haggi; Oltmann, Sarah C.; Sippel, Rebecca S.; Chen, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Using minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP), most surgeons require a 50% decline in intraoperative parathyroid hormone (IoPTH) to determine cure, but the significance of IoPTH kinetics occurring after this drop remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of IoPTH levels that first meet criteria for cure, but then increase again, or rebound, between 10 and 15 minutes post-excision. METHODS We conducted a retrospective review of patients undergoing initial parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism at our institution from 2001 – 2011. Rebound IoPTH was defined as an increase in PTH ≥ 5 pg/mL after achieving the 50% drop required for cure. Comparisons were evaluated with the student's t-test, Chi-squared test, or Fisher's exact test where appropriate. RESULTS Of the 1,386 patients who met selection criteria, 86 (6.2%) patients exhibited rebound IoPTH. The mean magnitude of rebound was 13.8 ± 3.6 pg/mL. Compared to those not displaying rebound, more patients with rebound IoPTH were treated with open parathyroidectomy rather than MIP (10.8% vs. 4.5%, p<0.01). The recurrence rate among those with rebound IoPTH was more than double that of patients without rebound IoPTH (5.8% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.03). Magnitude of rebound, however, did not correlate with recurrence. The rate of persistent disease was not different between those with and without rebound IoPTH. Rebound was a much better indicator of recurrence than patients whose final IoPTH levels were not within the normal range. CONCLUSIONS Rebound IoPTH is more common in patients who develop recurrent hyperparathyroidism. Therefore, surgeons should closely monitor patients with rebound IoPTH for disease recurrence. PMID:23669749

  17. Preventive effects of chronic exogenous growth hormone levels on diet-induced hepatic steatosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by hepatic steatosis, can be reversed by early treatment. Several case reports have indicated that the administration of recombinant growth hormone (GH) could improve fatty liver in GH-deficient patients. Here, we investigated whether chronic exogenous GH levels could improve hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet in rats, and explored the underlying mechanisms. Results High-fat diet-fed rats developed abdominal obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance. Chronic exogenous GH improved fatty liver, by reversing dyslipidaemia, fat accumulation and insulin resistance. Exogenous GH also reduced serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels, and ameliorated hepatic lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress. Hepatic fat deposition was also reduced by exogenous GH levels, as was the expression of adipocyte-derived adipokines (adiponectin, leptin and resistin), which might improve lipid metabolism and hepatic steatosis. Exogenous GH seems to improve fatty liver by reducing fat weight, improving insulin sensitivity and correcting oxidative stress, which may be achieved through phosphorylation or dephosphorylation of a group of signal transducers and activators of hepatic signal transduction pathways. Conclusions Chronic exogenous GH has positive effects on fatty liver and may be a potential clinical application in the prevention or reversal of fatty liver. However, chronic secretion of exogenous GH, even at a low level, may increase serum glucose and insulin levels in rats fed a standard diet, and thus increase the risk of insulin resistance. PMID:20653983

  18. Enkephalins and hormonal-metabolic reactions in experimental stress depending on its severity

    SciTech Connect

    Lishmanov, Y.B.; Alekminskaya, L.A.; Lasukova, T.V.

    1985-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the action of enkephalins on changes in hormonal-metabolic constants in stress of varied severity. Catecholamine excretion with the urine was determined fluorometrically, serum cortisol and insulin concentrations were measured radioimmunologically and glucose was determined by the standard orthotoluidine method. The results of the investigation indicate that enkephalins have a modulating effect on various hormonal mechanisms of adaptation stress. The results confirm that the physiological action of the peptide regulator depends on the functional state of the biological systems and it may differ sharply, even to the extent of diametrically opposite effects.

  19. Sexual dimorphism of stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction: the corticotropin releasing hormone perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakopoulos, Nicholas V.

    1995-01-01

    This review higlghts key aspects of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) biology of potential relevance to the sexual dimorphism of the stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction, and introduces two important new concepts based on the regulatory potential of the human (h) CRH gene: (1) a proposed mechanism to account for the tissue-specific antithetical responses of hCRH gene expression to glucocorticolds, that may also explain the frequently observed antithetical effects of chronic glucocorticoid administration in clinical practice and (2) a heuristic diagram to illustrate the proposed modulation of the stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction by steroid hormones, from the perspective of the CRH system. PMID:18475634

  20. Energetics of stress: linking plasma cortisol levels to metabolic rate in mammals.

    PubMed

    Haase, Catherine G; Long, Andrea K; Gillooly, James F

    2016-01-01

    Physiological stress may result in short-term benefits to organismal performance, but also long-term costs to health or longevity. Yet, we lack an understanding of the variation in stress hormone levels (i.e. glucocorticoids) that exist within and across species. Here, we present comparative analyses that link the primary stress hormone in most mammals (i.e. cortisol) to metabolic rate. We show that baseline concentrations of plasma cortisol vary with mass-specific metabolic rate among cortisol-dominant mammals, and both baseline and elevated concentrations scale predictably with body mass. The results quantitatively link a classical measure of physiological stress to whole-organism energetics, providing a point of departure for cross-species comparisons of stress levels among mammals.

  1. Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers and Stress Responses in a Large Cross-Sectional Sample of Elephant Seals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    pituitary- thyroid (HPT) axes (grant # N000141110434). These investigations described natural variation in corticosteroid, thyroid , and catecholamine...mechanisms by which stress hormones interact with energy metabolism , salt balance, reproductive and immune systems. These research goals will...binding globulin (CBG) with life-history stage and gender in elephant seals; 2) determine the impact of variation in baseline cortisol on thyroid

  2. Homologous down-regulation of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Aleppo, G; Moskal, S F; De Grandis, P A; Kineman, R D; Frohman, L A

    1997-03-01

    Repeated stimulation of pituitary cell cultures with GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) results in diminished responsiveness, a phenomenon referred to as homologous desensitization. One component of GHRH-induced desensitization is a reduction in GHRH-binding sites, which is reflected by the decreased ability of GHRH to stimulate a rise in intracellular cAMP. In the present study, we sought to determine if homologous down-regulation of GHRH receptor number is due to a decrease in GHRH receptor synthesis. To this end, we developed and validated a quantitative RT-PCR assay system that was capable of assessing differences in GHRH-R messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in total RNA samples obtained from rat pituitary cell cultures. Treatment of pituitary cells with GHRH, for as little as 4 h, resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GHRH-R mRNA levels. The maximum effect was observed with 0.1 and 1 nM GHRH, which reduced GHRH-R mRNA levels to 49 +/- 4% (mean +/- SEM) and 54 +/- 11% of control values, respectively (n = three separate experiments; P < 0.05). Accompanying the decline in GHRH-R mRNA levels was a rise in GH release; reaching 320 +/- 31% of control values (P < 0.01). Because of the possibility that the rise in medium GH level is the primary regulator of GHRH-R mRNA, we pretreated pituitary cultures for 4 h with GH to achieve a concentration comparable with that induced by a maximal stimulation with GHRH (8 micrograms GH/ml medium). Following pretreatment, cultures were stimulated for 15 min with GHRH and intracellular cAMP accumulation was measured by RIA. GH pretreatment did not impair the ability of GHRH to induce a rise in cAMP concentrations. However, as anticipated, GHRH pretreatment (10 nM) significantly reduced subsequent GHRH-stimulated cAMP to 46% of untreated controls. These data suggest that GHRH, but not GH, directly reduces GHRH-R mRNA levels. To determine whether this effect was mediated through cAMP, cultures were treated with forskolin, a direct stimulator of

  3. Circadian rhythm of hormones is extinguished during prolonged physical stress, sleep and energy deficiency in young men.

    PubMed

    Opstad, K

    1994-07-01

    The circadian rhythm of hormones (N = 10) and mental performance (N = 18) was investigated in male cadets during a 5-day military training course with continuous heavy physical activities corresponding to 35% of the maximal oxygen uptake, with almost total lack of food and sleep. The 24-h means for androstenedione, dihydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, testosterone and thyroid-stimulating hormone decreased strongly during the course, and the circadian rhythm was extinguished below the minimum levels measured during the control experiment. The 24-h means for cortisol, dihydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) and progesterone increased during the course, and the circadian rhythm was abolished above the maximum levels of the control experiment. A gradual increase was found in thyroxine, free thyroxine and triiodothyronine during the first 12 h of activities, followed by a constant decrease for the rest of the course. Mental performance decreased during the course and the amplitude of its circadian rhythm increased from +/- 10% to +/- 30% of the 24-h mean. The circadian rhythms investigated were almost normalized after 4-5 days of rest. However, the nocturnal rise for cortisol, androstenedione and DHEA appeared earlier, and the plasma levels of thyroid hormones, estradiol and DHEA-S were lower during the recovery experiment than in the control experiment. The responses to stress of the circadian rhythm for mental performance and steroid hormones during the course indicate a differential regulation.

  4. Persistent Organochlorine Pollutants with Endocrine Activity and Blood Steroid Hormone Levels in Middle-Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Emeville, Elise; Giton, Frank; Giusti, Arnaud; Oliva, Alejandro; Fiet, Jean; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Blanchet, Pascal; Multigner, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies relating long-term exposure to persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) with endocrine activities (endocrine disrupting chemicals) on circulating levels of steroid hormones have been limited to a small number of hormones and reported conflicting results. Objective We examined the relationship between serum concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, androstenedione, androstenediol, testosterone, free and bioavailable testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, estrone, estrone sulphate, estradiol, sex-hormone binding globulin, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone as a function of level of exposure to three POPs known to interfere with hormone-regulated processes in different way: dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene (DDE), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener 153, and chlordecone. Methods We collected fasting, morning serum samples from 277 healthy, non obese, middle-aged men from the French West Indies. Steroid hormones were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, except for dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, which was determined by immunological assay, as were the concentrations of sex-hormone binding globulin, follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone. Associations were assessed by multiple linear regression analysis, controlling for confounding factors, in a backward elimination procedure, in multiple bootstrap samples. Results DDE exposure was negatively associated to dihydrotestosterone level and positively associated to luteinizing hormone level. PCB 153 was positively associated to androstenedione and estrone levels. No association was found for chlordecone. Conclusions These results suggested that the endocrine response pattern, estimated by determining blood levels of steroid hormones, varies depending on the POPs studied, possibly reflecting differences in the modes of action generally attributed to these compounds. It remains to be investigated whether this response pattern

  5. Effect of anticonvulsants on plasma testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin levels.

    PubMed Central

    Barragry, J M; Makin, H L; Trafford, D J; Scott, D F

    1978-01-01

    Plasma sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and testosterone levels were measured in 29 patients with epilepsy (16 men and 13 women), most of them on chronic therapy with anticonvulsant drugs. Sex hormone binding globulin concentrations were increased in both sexes and testosterone levels in male patients. It is postulated that anticonvulsants may induce hepatic synthesis of SHBG. PMID:569688

  6. Stress hormones increase cell proliferation and regulates interleukin-6 secretion in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bernabé, Daniel G; Tamae, Adriano C; Biasoli, Éder R; Oliveira, Sandra H P

    2011-03-01

    Patients with oral cancer can have high psychological distress levels, but the effects of stress-related hormones on oral cancer cells and possible mechanisms underlying these relationships are unknown. In this study, we have investigated the effects of stress-related hormones on interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion and proliferation of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. The effects of norepinephrine (NE), and cortisol were studied in SCC9, SCC15, and SCC25 cells and effects of isoproterenol in SCC9 and SCC25 cells. Real-time PCR studies revealed constitutive β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) expression in the SCC9, SCC15, and SCC25 cells. The results showed that NE and isoproterenol significantly enhanced IL-6 mRNA expression and protein production in supernatants of SCC9 and SCC25 cells. Physiological stress levels of NE and isoproterenol (10 μM) at 1 h elicited the most robust IL-6 increase. Regarding IL-6 secretion, 10 μM NE induced a 5-fold increase at 1 h, 3.7-fold increase at 6 h, and 3.2-fold at 24 h in SCC9 cells. These effects were blocked by the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol, supporting a role for β-ARs in IL-6 secretion. The effects of cortisol varied according to the hormone concentration. Pharmacological concentrations of cortisol (1000 nM) inhibited IL-6 production by SCC9 and SCC25 cells. Cortisol dose that simulates stress conditions (10 nM) tended to increase IL-6 expression in SCC9 cells. Hormonal doses that simulate stress conditions (10 μM NE, at 6 h in SCC9 and SCC15 cells and 10 nM cortisol, at 48 h in SCC15 cells) stimulated increased cell proliferation. Treatment of SCC9 cells with IL-6 neutralizing ab (10 μg/mL) partially inhibited NE-induced proliferation. Finally, 20 OSCC biopsies were shown to express β1- and β2-ARs. These findings suggest that stress hormones can affect oral cancer cells behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Correlation between the serum luteinizing hormone to folliclestimulating hormone ratio and the anti-Müllerian hormone levels in normo-ovulatory women.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Eun; Yoon, Sang Ho; Kim, Hye Ok; Min, Eung Gi

    2015-03-01

    Serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels are regarded as an age-specific marker for predicting the ovarian reserve in women of reproductive age. Some studies have shown that the luteinizing hormone (LH)/follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) ratio can be used as a predictor of ovarian reserve. The purpose of this study was to assess the variation of LH/FSH ratio with aging and to evaluate the correlation between serum LH/FSH ratio and AMH levels as a predictor of the ovarian reserve in normo-ovulatory women. We retrospectively analyzed the day 3 serum hormone levels in 1,251 patients (age range: 20-50 yr) between January 2010 and January 2011. We divided the patients into 6 groups according to their age. Relation between serum AMH level and LH/FSH ratio was analyzed statistically. The serum AMH level was inversely correlated with age (r = -0.400, P < 0.001). A significant negative correlation was found between serum LH/FSH ratio and age (r = -0.213, P < 0.001). There was a significant partial correlation between serum LH/FSH ratio and AMH level when adjusted by age (r = 0.348, P < 0.001). The LH/FSH ratio could be considered as a useful marker for the ovarian reserve and could be applied to the clinical evaluation with AMH.

  8. Cortisol level measurements in fingernails as a retrospective index of hormone production.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Shuhei; Miki, Keiichi; Tsuchiya, Masao; Mitani, Takeshi; Midorikawa, Toru; Fuchu, Tatsuya; Komatsu, Taiki; Togo, Fumiharu

    2015-04-01

    The cortisol level in fingernails may reflect the hormone's cumulative production over a long period, but the notions have not been fully established. In this study, we investigated the association of cortisol in fingernails with cortisol accumulation over a long period (hair cortisol) and over a relatively short period (salivary cortisol). In study 1, hair and fingernail samples were collected from 58 middle-aged and elderly men. The cortisol level in hair samples was moderately associated with the level in fingernail samples (r = 0.29, p < 0.05 and rs = 0.36, p < 0.01). In study 2, 37 workers provided 4 saliva samples over the course of one day (at awakening, 30 min after awakening, before lunch, and after work) and another set a month later. Further, the workers were asked to provide fingernail samples during a six-month period. We found that the cortisol level in saliva over the whole day (area under the curve for cortisol) was moderately associated with the cortisol level measured in fingernail samples that were collected 4 months (r = 0.43, p < 0.05 and rs = 0.50, p < 0.01) and 5 months later (r = 0.45, p < 0.05 and rs = 0.53, p < 0.01). These results indicated that the cortisol level in fingernail samples might retrospectively represent hormone production during a given period. The cortisol level in fingernail samples may be useful in the investigation of the link between psychosocial stress and health.

  9. Serum Parathyroid Hormone Levels Predict Falls in Older Diabetic Adults

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Denise K.; Schwartz, Ann V.; Cauley, Jane A.; Tylavsky, Frances A.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Harris, Tamara B.; de Rekeneire, Nathalie; Schwartz, Gary G.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and incident falls in older diabetic adults. Design Longitudinal analysis of incident falls over 1 year in a sub-study of diabetic participants in the Health, Aging and Body Composition study. Setting Pittsburgh, PA, and Memphis, TN. Participants Well-functioning, community-dwelling black and white adults aged 70-79 with diabetes (n = 472). Measurements Measured baseline serum PTH. Self-report of falls over the subsequent 12 months. Baseline physical performance and self-reported demographic, behavioral, and health status measures including kidney function, chronic conditions and medication use. Results 30.3% of participants reported falling over one year of follow-up. The mean ± SD baseline serum PTH was 53.5 ± 30.0 pg/mL in non-fallers and 62.6 ± 46.2 pg/mL in fallers (p = 0.01). For every 1 SD (36 pg/mL) increment in baseline serum PTH, there was approximately a 30% increased likelihood of reporting a fall in the subsequent year after adjusting for age, gender, race, field center, alcohol consumption, BMI, physical activity, and winter/spring season (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.59). Further adjustment for kidney function, chronic conditions, medication and supplement use, and physical performance attenuated the association slightly (OR (95% CI): 1.26 (1.01-1.58)). A trend remained after additional adjustment for reported falls in the previous year. Conclusion Higher serum PTH was associated with incident falls among older, well-functioning diabetic men and women. Further investigation aimed at understanding the underlying mechanism for the association between serum PTH and falls is needed. PMID:19016936

  10. Flow cytometry analysis of hormone receptors on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to identify stress-induced neuroendocrine effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding the role of circulating peptide hormones in the pathogenesis of space-flight induced disorders would be greatly facilitated by a method which monitors chronic levels of hormones and their effects upon in vivo cell physiology. Single and simultaneous multiparameter flow cytometry analysis was employed to identify subpopulations of mononuclear cells bearing receptors for ACTH, Endorphin, and Somatomedin-C using monoclonal antibodies and monospecific antisera with indirect immunofluorescence. Blood samples were obtained from normal donors and subjects participating in decompression chamber studies (acute stress), medical student academic examination (chronic stress), and a drug study (Dexamethasone). Preliminary results indicate most ACTH and Endorphin receptor positive cells are monocytes and B-cells, exhibit little diurnal variation but the relative percentages of receptor positive cells are influenced by exposure to various stressors and ACTH inhibition. This study demonstrates the capability of flow cytometry analysis to study cell surface hormone receptor regulation which should allow insight into neuroendocrine modulation of the immune and other cellular systems during exposure to stress or microgravity.

  11. Flow cytometry analysis of hormone receptors on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to identify stress-induced neuroendocrine effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding the role of circulating peptide hormones in the pathogenesis of space-flight induced disorders would be greatly facilitated by a method which monitors chronic levels of hormones and their effects upon in vivo cell physiology. Single and simultaneous multiparameter flow cytometry analysis was employed to identify subpopulations of mononuclear cells bearing receptors for ACTH, Endorphin, and Somatomedin-C using monoclonal antibodies and monospecific antisera with indirect immunofluorescence. Blood samples were obtained from normal donors and subjects participating in decompression chamber studies (acute stress), medical student academic examination (chronic stress), and a drug study (Dexamethasone). Preliminary results indicate most ACTH and Endorphin receptor positive cells are monocytes and B-cells, exhibit little diurnal variation but the relative percentages of receptor positive cells are influenced by exposure to various stressors and ACTH inhibition. This study demonstrates the capability of flow cytometry analysis to study cell surface hormone receptor regulation which should allow insight into neuroendocrine modulation of the immune and other cellular systems during exposure to stress or microgravity.

  12. Uniconazole-induced tolerance of soybean to water deficit stress in relation to changes in photosynthesis, hormones and antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingcai; Duan, Liusheng; Tian, Xiaoli; He, Zhongpei; Li, Jianmin; Wang, Baomin; Li, Zhaohu

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated whether uniconazole confers drought tolerance to soybean and if such tolerance is correlated with changes in photosynthesis, hormones and antioxidant system of leaves. Soybean plants were foliar treated with uniconazole at 50 mg L-1 at the beginning of bloom and then exposed to water deficit stress at pod initiation for 7 d. Uniconazole promoted biomass accumulation and seed yield under both water conditions. Plants treated with uniconazole showed higher leaf water potential only in water-stressed condition. Water stress decreased the chlorophyll content and photosynthetic rate, but those of uniconazole-treated plants were higher than the stressed control. Uniconazole increased the maximum quantum yield of photosystemand ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity of water-stressed plants. Water stress decreased partitioning of assimilated 14C from labeled leaf to the other parts of the plant. In contrast, uniconazole enhanced translocation of assimilated 14C from labeled leaves to the other parts, except stems, regardless of water treatment. Uniconazole-treated plants contained less GA3, GA4 and ABA under well-watered condition than untreated plants, while the IAA and zeatin levels were increased substantially under both water conditions, and ABA concentration was also increased under water stressed condition. Under water-stressed conditions, uniconazole increased the content of proline and soluble sugars, and the activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase in soybean leaves but not the malondialdehyde content or electrical conductivity. These results suggest that uniconazole-induced tolerance to water deficit stress in soybean was related to the changes of photosynthesis, hormones and antioxidant system of leaves.

  13. THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY AND BRAIN DEVELOPMENT -- DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICITY AT LOW LEVELS OF HORMONE DISRUPTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormone (TH) deficiencies during development produce deleterious effects on brain structure and function. The degree to which TH must be perturbed to induce neurotoxicity remains unclear. The present study was conducted as part of a Cooperative Agreement between US EPA, U...

  14. THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY AND BRAIN DEVELOPMENT -- DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICITY AT LOW LEVELS OF HORMONE DISRUPTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormone (TH) deficiencies during development produce deleterious effects on brain structure and function. The degree to which TH must be perturbed to induce neurotoxicity remains unclear. The present study was conducted as part of a Cooperative Agreement between US EPA, U...

  15. Short communication: Effect of maternal heat stress in late gestation on blood hormones and metabolites of newborn calves.

    PubMed

    Guo, J-R; Monteiro, A P A; Weng, X-S; Ahmed, B M; Laporta, J; Hayen, M J; Dahl, G E; Bernard, J K; Tao, S

    2016-08-01

    Maternal heat stress alters immune function of the offspring, as well as metabolism and future lactational performance, but its effect on the hormonal and metabolic responses of the neonate immediately after birth is still not clear. The objective of this study was to investigate the blood profiles of hormones and metabolites of calves born to cows that were cooled (CL) or heat-stressed (HS) during the dry period. Within 2 h after birth, but before colostrum feeding, blood samples were collected from calves [18 bulls (HS: n=10; CL: n=8) and 20 heifers (HS: n=10; CL: n=10)] born to CL or HS dry cows, and hematocrit and plasma concentrations of total protein, prolactin, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin, glucose, nonesterified fatty acid, and β-hydroxybutyrate were measured. Compared with CL, HS calves had lower hematocrit and tended to have lower plasma concentrations of insulin, prolactin, and insulin-like growth factor-I. However, maternal heat stress had no effect on plasma levels of total protein, glucose, fatty acid, and β-hydroxybutyrate immediately after birth. These results suggest that maternal heat stress desensitizes a calf's stress response and alters the fetal development by reducing the secretion of insulin-like growth factor-I, prolactin, and insulin.

  16. Sex Differences in Anxiety Disorders: Interactions between Fear, Stress, and Gonadal Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Lisa Y.; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2015-01-01

    Women are more vulnerable to stress- and fear-based disorders, such as anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. Despite the growing literature on this topic, the neural basis of these sex differences remains unclear, and the findings appear inconsistent. The neurobiological mechanisms of fear and stress in learning and memory processes have been extensively studied, and the crosstalk between these systems is beginning to explain the disproportionate incidence and differences in symptomatology and remission within these psychopathologies. In this review, we discuss the intersect between stress and fear mechanisms and their modulation by gonadal hormones and discuss the relevance of this information to sex differences in anxiety and fear-based disorders. Understanding these converging influences is imperative to the development of more effective, individualized treatments that take sex and hormones into account. PMID:25888456

  17. Sex differences in anxiety disorders: Interactions between fear, stress, and gonadal hormones.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Lisa Y; Milad, Mohammed R

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Women are more vulnerable to stress- and fear-based disorders, such as anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. Despite the growing literature on this topic, the neural basis of these sex differences remains unclear, and the findings appear inconsistent. The neurobiological mechanisms of fear and stress in learning and memory processes have been extensively studied, and the crosstalk between these systems is beginning to explain the disproportionate incidence and differences in symptomatology and remission within these psychopathologies. In this review, we discuss the intersect between stress and fear mechanisms and their modulation by gonadal hormones and discuss the relevance of this information to sex differences in anxiety and fear-based disorders. Understanding these converging influences is imperative to the development of more effective, individualized treatments that take sex and hormones into account.

  18. Transgenerational Effects of Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate (DEHP) on Stress Hormones and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Quinnies, Kayla M; Doyle, Timothy J; Kim, Kwan Hee; Rissman, Emilie F

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) has been linked to male reproductive abnormalities. Here, we assessed transgenerational actions of DEHP on several behaviors and stress responses. We used 2 doses of DEHP (150- and 200-mg/kg body weight) and a treatment regimen previously shown to produce transgenerational effects on male reproduction. Mice, 3 generations removed from DEHP exposure (F3), were tested for social behavior and anxiety on the elevated plus maze. We collected blood and pituitaries from undisturbed and restrained mice. Body weights, anogenital distances, and reproductive organ weights were collected at killing. In social interaction tests juvenile males from the DEHP lineage (200 mg/kg) displayed more digging and less self-grooming than did controls. Interestingly, 150-mg/kg lineage males, killed in early puberty, had smaller seminal vesicle weights than their controls. However, the 200-mg/kg males (killed on average 10 d later) did not show this effect. Females from a DEHP lineage had lower corticosterone concentrations than controls after restraint stress. We also found sex- and DEHP-specific mRNA expression changes in the pituitary in 2 of the 6 stress-related genes we measured. In particular, Gnas mRNA was elevated by the combination of DEHP lineage and stress. Thus, transgenerational effects of DEHP are noted in male behavior, and in females, DEHP had transgenerational effects on levels of corticosterone. Both of these results may be related to transgenerational modifications in the expression of several pituitary hormones involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  19. The Impact of Stress Hormones on Post-traumatic Stress Disorders Symptoms and Memory in Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Porhomayon, Jahan; Kolesnikov, Sergei; Nader, Nader D

    2014-01-01

    The relationship and interactions between stress hormones and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are well established from both animal and human research studies. This interaction is especially important in the post-operative phase of cardiac surgery where the development of PTSD symptoms will result in increased morbidity and mortality and prolong length of stay for critically ill cardiac surgery patients. Cardiopulmonary bypass itself will independently result in massive inflammation response and release of stress hormones in the perioperative period. Glucocorticoid may reduce this response and result in reduction of PTSD symptom clusters and therefore improve health outcome. In this review, we plan to conduct a systemic review and analysis of the literatures on this topic.

  20. Growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) signaling modulates intermittent hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and cognitive deficits in mouse.

    PubMed

    Nair, Deepti; Ramesh, Vijay; Li, Richard C; Schally, Andrew V; Gozal, David

    2013-11-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep, such as occurs in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), leads to degenerative changes in the hippocampus, and is associated with spatial learning deficits in adult mice. In both patients and murine models of OSA, the disease is associated with suppression of growth hormone (GH) secretion, which is actively involved in the growth, development, and function of the central nervous system (CNS). Recent work showed that exogenous GH therapy attenuated neurocognitive deficits elicited by IH during sleep in rats. Here, we show that administration of the Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 attenuates IH-induced neurocognitive deficits, anxiety, and depression in mice along with reduction in oxidative stress markers such as MDA and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, and increases in hypoxia inducible factor-1α DNA binding and up-regulation of insulin growth factor-1 and erythropoietin expression. In contrast, treatment with a GHRH antagonist (MIA-602) during intermittent hypoxia did not affect any of the IH-induced deleterious effects in mice. Thus, exogenous GHRH administered as the formulation of a GHRH agonist may provide a viable therapeutic intervention to protect IH-vulnerable brain regions from OSA-associated neurocognitive dysfunction. Sleep apnea, characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH), is associated with substantial cognitive and behavioral deficits. Here, we show that administration of a GHRH agonist (JI-34) reduces oxidative stress, increases both HIF-1α nuclear binding and downstream expression of IGF1 and erythropoietin (EPO) in hippocampus and cortex, and markedly attenuates water maze performance deficits in mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia during sleep.

  1. The activities of antioxidant enzymes in response to oxidative stresses and hormones in paraquat-tolerant Rehmannia glutinosa plants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong Geun; Yoo, Nam Hee; Yu, Chang Yeon; de Los Reyes, Benildo; Yun, Song Joong

    2004-09-30

    All members of R. glutinosa show the unique characteristic of intrinsic tolerance to paraquat (PQ). Antioxidant enzymes have been proposed to be the primary mechanism of PQ resistance in several plant species. Therefore, the antioxidant enzyme systems of R. glutinosa were evaluated by comparatively analyzing cellular antioxidant enzyme levels, and their responses of oxidative stresses and hormones. The levels of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), non-specific peroxidase (POX), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were 7.3-, 4.9-, 2.7- and 1.6-fold higher in PQ-tolerant R. glutinosa than in PQ-susceptible soybeans. However, the activity of catalase (CAT) was about 12-fold higher in the soybeans. The activities of antioxidant enzymes reduced after PQ treatment in the two species, with the exception of POX and SOD in R. glutinosa, which increased by about 40 %. Interestingly, the activities of APX, SOD and POX in R. glutinosa, relative to those in soybeans, were further increased by 49, 67 and 93 % after PQ treatment. The considerably higher intrinsic levels, and increases in the relative activities of antioxidant enzymes in R. glutinosa under oxidative stress support the possible role of these enzymes in the PQ tolerance of R. glutinosa. However, the relatively lower levels of SOD versus PQ tolerance, and the mixed responses of antioxidant enzymes to stresses and hormones, suggest a possible alternative mechanism(s) for PQ tolerance in R. glutinosa.

  2. DETERMINANTS OF PLASMA PARATHYROID HORMONE LEVELS IN YOUNG WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Julie M.; Curhan, Gary C.; Forman, John P.; Taylor, Eric N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose While the effects of calcium, phosphorus intake, and vitamin D on parathyroid hormone (PTH) have been well studied, less is known about other factors that impact PTH. Our goal was to delineate associations between demographic, dietary, and plasma factors and PTH. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of intact PTH among 1,288 non-black women in the Nurses Health Study II aged 33–53 with BMI < 30kg/m2 and eGFR ≥60 ml/min/1.73m2. Results Median PTH was 30.7pg/ml. After adjusting for 25-hydroxyvitamin D and other factors, PTH was 4.1pg/ml lower (95% CI −7.7 to −0.5) in women who smoked 1–14 cigarettes/day and 6.4pg/ml lower (95% CI −11.2 to −1.7) in women who smoked >15 cigarettes/day compared to non-smokers. After multivariate adjustment, women whose BMI was 27–29 kg/m2 had PTH levels 2.0pg/ml higher (95% CI 0.2–3.9) compared to BMI of 21–22 kg/m2, and women in the highest quartile of plasma phosphorus had PTH levels 4.1pg/ml lower (95% CI −5.8 to −2.4) than women in the lowest quartile. Higher vitamin A intake was independently associated with lower PTH whereas lower calcium intake, lower plasma calcium, lower plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and winter blood draw were associated with higher PTH. Intakes of phosphorus, animal protein, magnesium, alcohol, and caffeine were not associated with PTH. Conclusions Factors not classically associated with calcium-phosphorus metabolism impact PTH. Additional research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms whereby smoking, vitamin A, and phosphorus affect PTH and to examine how body size and season may affect PTH independent of 25(OH)D. PMID:20631996

  3. Measuring and Validating Levels of Steroid Hormones in the Skin of Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops Truncatus)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    hormones in non-invasively collected cetacean skin samples will bring new possibilities for the assessment of stress and general health in cetaceans...the Skin of Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops Truncatus) Thea Bechshoft Aarhus University Bioscience Roskilde Frederiksborgvej 399, P.O. Box 358...Bechshøft, has recently shown that it is possible to extract and measure hormones in cetacean skin (Bechshoft et al. 2015). The goal of this project

  4. Influences of menstrual cycle position and sex hormone levels on spontaneous intrusive recollections following emotional stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Ferree, Nikole K.; Kamat, Rujvi; Cahill, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous intrusive recollections (SIRs) are known to follow emotional events in clinical and nonclinical populations. Previous work in our lab has found that women report more SIRs than men after exposure to emotional films, and that this effect is driven entirely by women in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. To replicate and extend this finding, participants viewed emotional films, provided saliva samples for sex hormone concentration analysis, and estimated SIR frequency following film viewing. Women in the luteal phase reported significantly more SIRs than did women in the follicular phase, and SIR frequency significantly correlated with salivary progesterone levels. The results are consistent with an emerging pattern in the literature suggesting that menstrual cycle position of female participants can potently influence findings in numerous cognitive domains. The potential implications of these results for disorders characterized by intrusions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, are also discussed. PMID:21353599

  5. Role of adipokinetic hormone and adenosine in the anti-stress response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Zemanová, Milada; Stašková, Tereza; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The role of adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and adenosine in the anti-stress response was studied in Drosophila melanogaster larvae and adults carrying a mutation in the Akh gene (Akh(1)), the adenosine receptor gene (AdoR(1)), or in both of these genes (Akh(1) AdoR(1) double mutant). Stress was induced by starvation or by the addition of an oxidative stressor paraquat (PQ) to food. Mortality tests revealed that the Akh(1) mutant was the most resistant to starvation, while the AdoR(1) mutant was the most sensitive. Conversely, the Akh(1) AdoR(1) double mutant was more sensitive to PQ toxicity than either of the single mutants. Administration of PQ significantly increased the Drome-AKH level in w(1118) and AdoR(1) larvae; however, this was not accompanied by a simultaneous increase in Akh gene expression. In contrast, PQ significantly increased the expression of the glutathione S-transferase D1 (GstD1) gene. The presence of both a functional adenosine receptor and AKH seem to be important for the proper control of GstD1 gene expression under oxidative stress, however, the latter appears to play more dominant role. On the other hand, differences in glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity among the strains, and between untreated and PQ-treated groups were minimal. In addition, the glutathione level was significantly lower in all untreated AKH- or AdoR-deficient mutant flies as compared with the untreated control w(1118) flies and further declined following treatment with PQ. All oxidative stress characteristics modified by mutations in Akh gene were restored or even improved by 'rescue' mutation in flies which ectopically express Akh. Thus, the results of the present study demonstrate the important roles of AKH and adenosine in the anti-stress response elicited by PQ in a D. melanogaster model, and provide the first evidence for the involvement of adenosine in the anti-oxidative stress response in insects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of sex steroid hormones, thyroid hormone levels, and insulin regulation on thyrotoxic periodic paralysis in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Li, Wang; Changsheng, Chen; Jiangfang, Fu; Bin, Gao; Nanyan, Zhang; Xiaomiao, Li; Deqiang, Li; Ying, Xing; Wensong, Zai; Qiuhe, Ji

    2010-12-01

    Our study is to determine the expression of thyroid hormone, sex hormone, insulin, and C-peptide in Chinese male patients with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP). This study covered 102 patients with hyperthyroidism from Xijing Hospital. According to whether occurrence of TPP or not, patients were divided into two groups (those that were hyperthyroid with and without TPP) that were, matched with age, blood pressure, urea, and creatinine. We found the body mass index (BMI) in patients with TPP was higher than that in pure hyperthyroidism patients. The levels of the total thyroxine (T4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), and free thyroxine (FT4) were significantly lower in patients with TPP compared with pure hyperthyroidism patients, while serum testosterone levels were higher compared with pure hyperthyroidism patients. Moreover, after glucose administration, the concentration of insulin at 60, 120, and 180 min were significantly higher in patients with TPP than those in pure hyperthyroidism patients. The insulin area under the curve (AUC) was significantly increased in patients with TPP compared with pure hyperthyroidism patients. The levels of thyroid hormone, sex hormone, and insulin were different in Chinese male patients with TPP compared to those with only hyperthyroidism.

  7. Corticotropin-releasing hormone-binding protein and stress: from invertebrates to humans.

    PubMed

    Ketchesin, Kyle D; Stinnett, Gwen S; Seasholtz, Audrey F

    2017-05-18

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a key regulator of the stress response. This peptide controls the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis as well as a variety of behavioral and autonomic stress responses via the two CRH receptors, CRH-R1 and CRH-R2. The CRH system also includes an evolutionarily conserved CRH-binding protein (CRH-BP), a secreted glycoprotein that binds CRH with subnanomolar affinity to modulate CRH receptor activity. In this review, we discuss the current literature on CRH-BP and stress across multiple species, from insects to humans. We describe the regulation of CRH-BP in response to stress, as well as genetic mouse models that have been utilized to elucidate the in vivo role(s) of CRH-BP in modulating the stress response. Finally, the role of CRH-BP in the human stress response is examined, including single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human CRHBP gene that are associated with stress-related affective disorders and addiction. Lay summary The stress response is controlled by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), acting via CRH receptors. However, the CRH system also includes a unique CRH-binding protein (CRH-BP) that binds CRH with an affinity greater than the CRH receptors. In this review, we discuss the role of this highly conserved CRH-BP in regulation of the CRH-mediated stress response from invertebrates to humans.

  8. Adrenal-derived stress hormones modulate ozone-induced lung injury and inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone-induced systemic effects are modulated through activation of the neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Adrenal demedullation (DEMED)or bilateral total adrenalectomy (ADREX) inhibits systemic and pulmonary effect of acute ozone exposure. To understand the influence of adre...

  9. Social context-dependent relationships between mouse dominance rank and plasma hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Cait M; Lee, Won; Romeo, Russell D; Curley, James P

    2017-03-15

    The associations between social status and endogenous testosterone and corticosterone have been well-studied across taxa, including rodents. Dominant social status is typically associated with higher levels of circulating testosterone and lower levels of circulating corticosterone but findings are mixed and depend upon numerous contextual factors. Here, we determine that the social environment is a key modulator of these relationships in Mus musculus. In groups of outbred CD-1 mice living in stable dominance hierarchies, we found no evidence of simple linear associations between social rank and corticosterone or testosterone plasma levels. However, in social hierarchies with highly despotic alpha males that socially suppress other group members, testosterone levels in subordinate males were significantly lower than in alpha males. In less despotic hierarchies, where all animals engage in high rates of competitive interactions, subordinate males had significantly elevated testosterone compared to agonistically inhibited subordinates from despotic hierarchies. Subordinate males from highly despotic hierarchies also had elevated levels of corticosterone compared to alpha males. In pair-housed animals, the relationship was the opposite, with alpha males exhibiting elevated levels of corticosterone compared to subordinate males. Notably, subordinate males living in social hierarchies had significantly higher levels of plasma corticosterone than pair-housed subordinate males, suggesting that living in a large group is a more socially stressful experience for less dominant individuals. Our findings demonstrate the importance of considering social context when analyzing physiological data related to social behavior and using ethologically relevant behavioral paradigms to study the complex relationship between hormones and social behavior.

  10. Linking steroid hormone levels to sexual maturity index and energy reserves in Nereis diversicolor from clean and polluted estuaries.

    PubMed

    Durou, C; Mouneyrac, C

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to compare seasonal variations of reproduction physiology of the ragworm Nereis diversicolor --a key species in estuarine ecosystems--originating from a clean (Authie) and multi-polluted (Seine) estuaries. A particular attention was carried out in female worms, on relationships between sexual maturity stages, energy reserves (glycogen and lipids) and steroid hormone levels (progesterone, 17beta-estradiol, and testosterone). Sexual maturity index (SMI), energy reserves and steroid hormones are clearly influenced by season in worms from both sites. Depleted steroid hormone levels were depicted in specimens exhibiting high sexual maturity stage and energy reserves. Intersite analysis has revealed all over the sampling period:--a sexual precocity in worms from Seine,--glycogen concentrations generally higher in worms from Authie,--no clear tendency for lipids,--no differences in steroid hormone levels. Sexual precocity and lower glycogen levels in Seine could be explained by a specific strategy above all devoted to reproduction in these worms. Chemical stress could be a possible explanation of these observations.

  11. Hormone-regulated defense and stress response networks contribute to heterosis in Arabidopsis F1 hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Groszmann, Michael; Gonzalez-Bayon, Rebeca; Lyons, Rebecca L.; Greaves, Ian K.; Kazan, Kemal; Peacock, W. James; Dennis, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Plant hybrids are extensively used in agriculture to deliver increases in yields, yet the molecular basis of their superior performance (heterosis) is not well understood. Our transcriptome analysis of a number of Arabidopsis F1 hybrids identified changes to defense and stress response gene expression consistent with a reduction in basal defense levels. Given the reported antagonism between plant immunity and growth, we suggest that these altered patterns of expression contribute to the greater growth of the hybrids. The altered patterns of expression in the hybrids indicate decreases to the salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis pathway and increases in the auxin [indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)] biosynthesis pathway. SA and IAA are hormones known to control stress and defense responses as well as plant growth. We found that IAA-targeted gene activity is frequently increased in hybrids, correlating with a common heterotic phenotype of greater leaf cell numbers. Reduced SA concentration and target gene responses occur in the larger hybrids and promote increased leaf cell size. We demonstrated the importance of SA action to the hybrid phenotype by manipulating endogenous SA concentrations. Increasing SA diminished heterosis in SA-reduced hybrids, whereas decreasing SA promoted growth in some hybrids and phenocopied aspects of hybrid vigor in parental lines. Pseudomonas syringae infection of hybrids demonstrated that the reductions in basal defense gene activity in these hybrids does not necessarily compromise their ability to mount a defense response comparable to the parents. PMID:26527659

  12. Hormone-regulated defense and stress response networks contribute to heterosis in Arabidopsis F1 hybrids.

    PubMed

    Groszmann, Michael; Gonzalez-Bayon, Rebeca; Lyons, Rebecca L; Greaves, Ian K; Kazan, Kemal; Peacock, W James; Dennis, Elizabeth S

    2015-11-17

    Plant hybrids are extensively used in agriculture to deliver increases in yields, yet the molecular basis of their superior performance (heterosis) is not well understood. Our transcriptome analysis of a number of Arabidopsis F1 hybrids identified changes to defense and stress response gene expression consistent with a reduction in basal defense levels. Given the reported antagonism between plant immunity and growth, we suggest that these altered patterns of expression contribute to the greater growth of the hybrids. The altered patterns of expression in the hybrids indicate decreases to the salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis pathway and increases in the auxin [indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)] biosynthesis pathway. SA and IAA are hormones known to control stress and defense responses as well as plant growth. We found that IAA-targeted gene activity is frequently increased in hybrids, correlating with a common heterotic phenotype of greater leaf cell numbers. Reduced SA concentration and target gene responses occur in the larger hybrids and promote increased leaf cell size. We demonstrated the importance of SA action to the hybrid phenotype by manipulating endogenous SA concentrations. Increasing SA diminished heterosis in SA-reduced hybrids, whereas decreasing SA promoted growth in some hybrids and phenocopied aspects of hybrid vigor in parental lines. Pseudomonas syringae infection of hybrids demonstrated that the reductions in basal defense gene activity in these hybrids does not necessarily compromise their ability to mount a defense response comparable to the parents.

  13. The effects of ryanodine receptor (RYR1) mutation on natural killer cell cytotoxicity, plasma cytokines and stress hormones during acute intermittent exercise in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ciepielewski, Z M; Stojek, W; Borman, A; Myślińska, D; Pałczyńska, P; Kamyczek, M

    2016-04-01

    Stress susceptibility has been mapped to a single recessive gene, the ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) gene or halothane (Hal) gene. Homozygous (Hal(nn)), mutated pigs are sensitive to halothane and susceptible to Porcine Stress Syndrome (PSS). Previous studies have shown that stress-susceptible RYR1 gene mutated homozygotes in response to restraint stress showed an increase in natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) accompanied by more pronounced stress-related hormone and anti-inflammatory cytokine changes. In order to determine the relationship of a RYR1 gene mutation with NKCC, plasma cytokines and stress-related hormones following a different stress model - exercise - 36 male pigs (representing different genotypes according to RYR1 gene mutation: NN, homozygous dominant; Nn, heterozygous; nn, homozygous recessive) were submitted to an intermittent treadmill walking. During the entire experiment the greatest level of NKCC and the greatest concentrations of interleukin (IL-) 6, IL-10, IL-12, interferon (IFN-)γ and tumor necrosis factor-α and stress-related hormones (adrenaline, prolactin, beta-endorphin) were observed in nn pigs, and the greatest concentration of IL-1 and growth hormone in NN pigs. Immunostimulatory effects of intermittent exercise on NKCC in nn pigs were concomitant with increases in IL-2, IL-12 and IFN-γ, the potent NKCC activators. Our findings suggest that stress-susceptible pigs RYR1 gene mutated pigs develop a greater level of NKCC and cytokine production in response to exercise stress. These results suggest that the heterogeneity of immunological and neuroendocrine response to exercise stress in pigs could be influenced by RYR1 gene mutation.

  14. Model approach for stress induced steroidal hormone cascade changes in severe mental diseases.

    PubMed

    Volko, Claus D; Regidor, Pedro A; Rohr, Uwe D

    2016-03-01

    Stress was described by Cushing and Selye as an adaptation to a foreign stressor by the anterior pituitary increasing ACTH, which stimulates the release of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid hormones. The question is raised whether stress can induce additional steroidal hormone cascade changes in severe mental diseases (SMD), since stress is the common denominator. A systematic literature review was conducted in PubMed, where the steroidal hormone cascade of patients with SMD was compared to the impact of increasing stress on the steroidal hormone cascade (a) in healthy amateur marathon runners with no overtraining; (b) in healthy well-trained elite soldiers of a ranger training unit in North Norway, who were under extreme physical and mental stress, sleep deprivation, and insufficient calories for 1 week; and, (c) in soldiers suffering from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), schizophrenia (SI), and bipolar disorders (BD). (a) When physical stress is exposed moderately to healthy men and women for 3-5 days, as in the case of amateur marathon runners, only few steroidal hormones are altered. A mild reduction in testosterone, cholesterol and triglycerides is detected in blood and in saliva, but there was no decrease in estradiol. Conversely, there is an increase of the glucocorticoids, aldosterone and cortisol. Cellular immunity, but not specific immunity, is reduced for a short time in these subjects. (b) These changes are also seen in healthy elite soldiers exposed to extreme physical and mental stress but to a somewhat greater extent. For instance, the aldosterone is increased by a factor of three. (c) In SMD, an irreversible effect on the entire steroidal hormone cascade is detected. Hormones at the top of the cascade, such as cholesterol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), aldosterone and other glucocorticoids, are increased. However, testosterone and estradiol and their metabolites, and other hormones at the lower end of the cascade, seem to be reduced. 1

  15. The effects of stress and stress hormones on human cognition: Implications for the field of brain and cognition.

    PubMed

    Lupien, S J; Maheu, F; Tu, M; Fiocco, A; Schramek, T E

    2007-12-01

    In this review, we report on studies that have assessed the effects of exogenous and endogenous increases in stress hormones on human cognitive performance. We first describe the history of the studies on the effects of using exogenous stress hormones such as glucocorticoids as anti-inflammatory medications on human cognition and mental health. Here, we summarize the cases that led to the diagnosis of glucocorticoid-induced 'steroid psychosis' in human populations and which demonstrated that these stress hormones could thus cross the blood-brain barrier and access the brain where they could influence cognition and mental health. We then summarize studies that assessed the effects of the exogenous administration of glucocorticoids on cognitive performance supported by the hippocampus, the frontal lobes and amygdala. In the second section of the paper, we summarize the effects of the endogenous release of glucocorticoids induced by exposure to a stressful situation on human cognition and we further dissociate the effects of emotion from those of stress on human learning and memory. Finally, in the last section of the paper, we discuss the potential impact that the environmental context to which we expose participants when assessing their memory could have on their reactivity to stress and subsequent cognitive performance. In order to make our point, we discuss the field of memory and aging and we suggest that some of the 'age-related memory impairments' observed in the literature could be partly due to increased stress reactivity in older adults to the environmental context of testing. We also discuss the inverse negative correlations reported between hippocampal volume and memory for young and older adults and suggest that these inverse correlations could be partly due to the effects of contextual stress in young and older adults, as a function of age-related differences in hippocampal volume.

  16. Stress hormones reduce the efficacy of paclitaxel in triple negative breast cancer through induction of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Reeder, A; Attar, M; Nazario, L; Bathula, C; Zhang, A; Hochbaum, D; Roy, E; Cooper, K L; Oesterreich, S; Davidson, N E; Neumann, C A; Flint, M S

    2015-04-28

    The mechanisms by which stress hormones impact triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) etiology and treatment are unclear. We have previously shown that stress hormones, cortisol, and catecholamines induce rapid DNA damage and impact DNA repair in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. This study investigates whether stress hormones increase DNA damage in breast cancer cells and if this impacts drug efficacy. We first screened a panel of 39 breast cancer cell lines for expression of adrenergic and glucocorticoid receptors and examined if stress hormones induce DNA damage and alter cell cycle regulation in vitro. A TNBC xenograft model was used to assess the impact of restraint stress on tumour growth and chemosensitivity to paclitaxel. We found that stress hormones induced DNA damage, phosphorylation of ATR, which was accompanied by an up-regulation of the G1 cell kinase inhibitor p21 and a cell cycle halt of TNBCs in the G1 phase. p21 knockdown abrogated G1 arrest by stress hormones. We also demonstrated that stress significantly decreased efficacy of paclitaxel. We describe a novel mechanism through which stress hormones can induce drug resistance to paclitaxel, which may have profound implications for treating drug resistance in patients with TNBC.

  17. Pre-drought priming sustains grain development under post-anthesis drought stress by regulating the growth hormones in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Abid, Muhammad; Shao, Yuhang; Liu, Sixi; Wang, Feng; Gao, Jingwen; Jiang, Dong; Tian, Zhongwei; Dai, Tingbo

    2017-05-19

    Drought stress during grain filling is the most yield-damaging to wheat. Pre-drought priming facilitated the wheat plants to sustain grain development against the post-anthesis drought stress by modulating the levels of growth hormones. Post-anthesis drought stress substantially reduces grain yield in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) due to impaired grain development associated with imbalanced levels of growth hormones. To investigate whether pre-drought priming could sustain grain development in wheat by regulating favorable levels of growth hormones under post-anthesis drought conditions, the plants of a drought-sensitive (Yangmai-16) and drought-tolerant (Luhan-7) wheat cultivar were exposed to a moderate drought stress during tillering (Feekes 2 stage) for priming, and then, a subsequent severe drought stress was applied from 7 to 14 days after anthesis. The results showed that drought-stressed plants of both cultivars showed a decline in flag leaf water potential, chlorophyll contents, photosynthetic rate, grain size initiation, and grain filling as compared to well-watered plants; however, decline in these traits was less in pre-drought primed (PD) plants than in nonprimed (ND) plants. Under drought stress, the PD plants regulated higher concentrations of zeatin and zeatin riboside, indole-3-acetic acid, gibberellins, and lower abscisic acid content in grains, resulting in higher endosperm cell division and expansion, grain size initiation, grain-filling rate and duration, and finally higher grain dry weights as compared to ND plants. The PD plants of both cultivars showed higher potential to tolerate the post-anthesis drought stress, but more effect was displayed by drought-tolerant cultivar. From the achieved results, it was concluded that pre-drought priming facilitated the wheat plants to sustain higher grain development and yield against the most yield-damaging post-anthesis drought stress by modulating the levels of growth hormones.

  18. Levels of meaning in family stress theory.

    PubMed

    Patterson, J M; Garwick, A W

    1994-09-01

    Major stressful life events, particularly those that have chronic hardships, create a crisis for families that often leads to reorganization in the family's style of functioning. A major factor in this reorganization is the meaning the family gives to the stressful event. Often the meaning extends beyond the event itself and leads to a changed view of the family system and even to a changed view of the world. Building on other family stress models, we elaborate the family's definition of the stressor into three levels of family meanings: (1) situational meanings, (2) family identity, and (3) family world view. Examples from clinical work and studies of families adapting to chronic illness are used to illustrate the relationship between these three levels of meaning, particularly as they change in response to crisis. Implications for clinical and empirical work are discussed.

  19. Changes in hormone and stress-inducing activities of municipal wastewater in a conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Wojnarowicz, Pola; Yang, Wenbo; Zhou, Hongde; Parker, Wayne J; Helbing, Caren C

    2014-12-01

    Conventional municipal wastewater treatment plants do not efficiently remove contaminants of emerging concern, and so are primary sources for contaminant release into the aquatic environment. Although these contaminants are present in effluents at ng-μg/L concentrations (i.e. microcontaminants), many compounds can act as endocrine disrupting compounds or stress-inducing agents at these levels. Chemical fate analyses indicate that additional levels of wastewater treatment reduce but do not always completely remove all microcontaminants. The removal of microcontaminants from wastewater does not necessarily correspond to a reduction in biological activity, as contaminant metabolites or byproducts may still be biologically active. To evaluate the efficacy of conventional municipal wastewater treatment plants to remove biological activity, we examined the performance of a full scale conventional activated sludge municipal wastewater treatment plant located in Guelph, Ontario, Canada. We assessed reductions in levels of conventional wastewater parameters and thyroid hormone disrupting and stress-inducing activities in wastewater at three phases along the treatment train using a C-fin assay. Wastewater treatment was effective at reducing total suspended solids, chemical and biochemical oxygen demand, and stress-inducing bioactivity. However, only minimal reduction was observed in thyroid hormone disrupting activities. The present study underscores the importance of examining multiple chemical and biological endpoints in evaluating and monitoring the effectiveness of wastewater treatment for removal of microcontaminants.

  20. Serum luteinizing hormone level and luteinizing hormone/follicle-stimulating hormone ratio but not serum anti-Müllerian hormone level is related to ovarian volume in Korean women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sungwook

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between ovarian follicle count and volume on ultrasonography and serum hormone levels including the levels of the anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and gonadotropin in women with the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A total of 118 Korean women aged 18-35 years who were newly diagnosed with PCOS at a university hospital were included in this study. Serum LH, FSH, and AMH levels were measured in the early follicular phase, and the total antral follicle count (TFC) and the total ovarian volume (TOV) were assessed by ultrasonography. The correlations between serum hormonal parameters and ultrasonography characteristics in women with PCOS were evaluated using Pearson's correlation coefficients and a linear regression analysis. Serum AMH levels were significantly correlated with serum LH levels and LH/FSH ratios, and TFC and TOV were significantly correlated with each other on ultrasonography. Serum AMH and LH levels and the LH/FSH ratio were significantly correlated with TFC. Statistically significant correlations between TOV and the LH level (r=0.208, p=0.024) and the LH/FSH ratio (r=0.237, p=0.010) were observed. However, the serum AMH level was not significantly correlated with the ovarian volume, and this result did not change after adjusting for age and body mass index. Serum AMH is not related to the ovarian volume in women with PCOS. My results suggest that serum LH level and the LH/FSH ratio may be more useful than the serum AMH level for representing the status of the ovarian volume in women with PCOS.

  1. Prenatal and Neonatal Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Levels and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yau, Vincent M.; Lutsky, Marta; Yoshida, Cathleen K.; Lasley, Bill; Kharrazi, Martin; Windham, Gayle; Gee, Nancy; Croen, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are critical for normal brain development. This study examined autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels measured in mid-pregnancy maternal serum and infant blood after birth. Three groups of children born in Orange County, CA in 2000-2001 were identified: ASD (n = 78), developmental delay…

  2. Prenatal and Neonatal Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Levels and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yau, Vincent M.; Lutsky, Marta; Yoshida, Cathleen K.; Lasley, Bill; Kharrazi, Martin; Windham, Gayle; Gee, Nancy; Croen, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are critical for normal brain development. This study examined autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels measured in mid-pregnancy maternal serum and infant blood after birth. Three groups of children born in Orange County, CA in 2000-2001 were identified: ASD (n = 78), developmental delay…

  3. The effects of sex and hormonal status on the physiological response to acute psychosocial stress.

    PubMed

    Kajantie, Eero; Phillips, David I W

    2006-02-01

    Whether one is male or female is one of the most important determinants of human health. While males are more susceptible to cardiovascular and infectious disease, they are outnumbered by women for many autoimmune disorders, fibromyalgia and chronic pain. Recently, individual differences in the physiological response to stress have emerged as a potentially important risk factor for these disorders. This raises the possibility that sex differences in prevalence of disease could at least in part be explained by sex differences in the nature of the physiological response to stress. In a psychophysiological laboratory, the autonomic nervous system response can be provoked by many different stressors including physical, mental and psychosocial tasks, while the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) response seems to be more specific to a psychosocial challenge incorporating ego involvement. The responses of both systems to different psychosocial challenges have been subject to extensive research, although in respect of sex differences the HPAA response has probably been more systematically studied. In this review, we focus on sex differences in HPAA and autonomic nervous system responses to acute psychosocial stress. Although some differences are dependent on the stressor used, the responses of both systems show marked and consistent differences according to sex, with the phase of the menstrual cycle, menopausal status and pregnancy having marked effects. Between puberty and menopause, adult women usually show lower HPAA and autonomic responses than men of same age. However, the HPAA response is higher in the luteal phase, when for example post stress free cortisol levels approach those of men. After menopause, there is an increase in sympathoadrenal responsiveness, which is attenuated during oral hormone replacement therapy, with most evidence suggesting that HPAA activity shows the same trends. Interestingly, pregnancy is associated with an attenuated response of

  4. Effects of oral chlortetracycline and dietary protein level on plasma concentrations of growth hormone and thyroid hormones in beef steers before and after challenge with a combination of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Rumsey, T S; McLeod, K; Elsasser, T H; Kahl, S; Baldwin, R L

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a subtherapeutic level of chlortetracycline (CTC) fed to growing beef steers under conditions of limited and adequate dietary protein on plasma concentrations of GH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroid hormones before and after an injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) + GHRH. Young beef steers (n = 32; average BW = 285 kg) were assigned to a 2x2 factorial arrangement of treatments of either a 10 or 13% crude protein diet (70% concentrate, 15% wheat straw, and 15% cottonseed hulls) and either a corn meal carrier or carrier + 350 mg of CTC daily top dressed on the diet. Steers were fed ad libitum amounts of diet for 56 d, and a jugular catheter was then placed in each steer in four groups (two steers from each treatment combination per group) during four consecutive days (one group per day). Each steer was injected via the jugular catheter with 1.0 microg/kg BW TRH + .1 microg/kg BW GHRH in 10 mL of saline at 0800. Blood samples were collected at -30, -15, 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 120, 240, and 360 min after releasing hormone injection. Plasma samples were analyzed for GH, TSH, thyroxine (T4), and triiodothyronine (T3). After 84 d on trial, the steers were slaughtered and the pituitary and samples of liver were collected and analyzed for 5'-deiodinase activity. Feeding CTC attenuated the GH response to releasing hormone challenge by 26% for both area under the response curve (P<.03) and peak response (P<.10). Likewise, CTC attenuated the TSH response to releasing hormone challenge for area under the response curve by 16% (P<.10) and peak response by 33% (P<.02), and attenuated the T4 response for area under the curve by 12% (P<.08) and peak response by 14% (P<.04). Type II deiodinase activity in the pituitary was 36% less (P<.02) in CTC-fed steers than in steers not fed CTC. The results of this study are interpreted to suggest that feeding subtherapeutic levels of CTC to young

  5. Circulating cortisol levels after exogenous cortisol administration are higher in women using hormonal contraceptives: Data from two preliminary studies

    PubMed Central

    Gaffey, Allison E.; Wirth, Michelle M.; Hoks, Roxanne M.; Jahn, Allison L.; Abercrombie, Heather C.

    2014-01-01

    Exogenous cortisol administration has been used to test the influence of glucocorticoids on a variety of outcomes, including memory and affect. Careful control of factors known to influence cortisol and other endogenous hormone levels is central to the success of this research. While use of hormonal birth control (HBC) is known to exert many physiological effects, including decreasing the salivary cortisol response to stress, it is unknown how HBC influences circulating cortisol levels after exogenous cortisol administration. To determine those effects, we examined the role of HBC on participants’ cortisol levels after receiving synthetic cortisol (hydrocortisone) in two separate studies. In Study 1, 24 healthy women taking HBC and 26 healthy men were administered a 0.1 mg/kg body weight intravenous dose of hydrocortisone, and plasma cortisol levels were measured over 3 hours. In Study 2, 61 participants (34 women; 16 were on HBC) received a 15 mg hydrocortisone pill, and salivary cortisol levels were measured over 6 hours. Taken together, results from these studies suggest that HBC use is associated with a greater cortisol increase following cortisol administration. These data have important methodological implications: (1) when given a controlled dose of hydrocortisone, cortisol levels may increase more dramatically in women taking HBC vs. women not on HBC or men; and (2) in studies manipulating cortisol levels, women on hormonal contraceptives should be investigated as a separate group. PMID:24773147

  6. Circulating cortisol levels after exogenous cortisol administration are higher in women using hormonal contraceptives: data from two preliminary studies.

    PubMed

    Gaffey, Allison E; Wirth, Michelle M; Hoks, Roxanne M; Jahn, Allison L; Abercrombie, Heather C

    2014-07-01

    Exogenous cortisol administration has been used to test the influence of glucocorticoids on a variety of outcomes, including memory and affect. Careful control of factors known to influence cortisol and other endogenous hormone levels is central to the success of this research. While the use of hormonal birth control (HBC) is known to exert many physiological effects, including decreasing the salivary cortisol response to stress, it is unknown how HBC influences circulating cortisol levels after exogenous cortisol administration. To determine those effects, we examined the role of HBC on participants' cortisol levels after receiving synthetic cortisol (hydrocortisone) in two separate studies. In Study 1, 24 healthy women taking HBC and 26 healthy men were administered a 0.1 mg/kg body weight intravenous dose of hydrocortisone, and plasma cortisol levels were measured over 3 h. In Study 2, 61 participants (34 women; 16 were on HBC) received a 15 mg hydrocortisone pill, and salivary cortisol levels were measured over 6 h. Taken together, results from these studies suggest that HBC use is associated with a greater cortisol increase following cortisol administration. These data have important methodological implications: (1) when given a controlled dose of hydrocortisone, cortisol levels may increase more dramatically in women taking HBC versus women not on HBC or men; and (2) in studies manipulating cortisol levels, women on hormonal contraceptives should be investigated as a separate group.

  7. Roles of plant hormones and anti-apoptosis genes during drought stress in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Ubaidillah, Mohammad; Safitri, Fika Ayu; Jo, Jun-Hyeon; Lee, Sang-Kyu; Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Chung, Il Kyung; Yun, Byung-Wook; Kim, Kyung-Min

    2016-12-01

    We previously identified the rice (Oryza sativa) senescence-associated gene OsSAP which encodes a highly conserved protein involved in anti-apoptotic activity. This novel Bax suppressor-related gene regulates tolerance to multiple stresses in yeast. Here, we show the effects of drought stress on leaf and root tissues of plants over-expressing OsSAP in relation to the levels of phytohormones, abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), indole-3-carboxylic acid (ICA), gibberellic acid (GA3), and zeatin. Results showed that rice plants over-expressing SAP were tolerant to drought stress compared to wild type and the plants over-expressing AtBI-1, which is a homolog of the human Bax inhibitor-1 in Arabidopsis. ABA and JA levels in OsSAP and AtBI-1 transgenic plants consistently increased up to at least 3 days after drought treatment, whereas lower GA3 levels were recorded during early drought period. Comparison between control and transgenic plants overexpressing anti-apoptosis genes OsSAP and AtBI-1 resulted in different patterns of hormone levels, indicating that these genes are involved in the plant responses to drought stress and present an opportunity for further study on drought stress tolerance in rice and other plant species.

  8. Pilot study of adrenal steroid hormones in hair as an indicator of chronic mental and physical stress.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, E; Barthel, A; Petrowski, K; Stalder, T; Kirschbaum, C; Bornstein, S R

    2016-05-12

    Currently, the quantitative analysis of moderators affecting the function of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis in health and sickness is still unreliable. This is, in particular, due to physiological factors such as pulsatile ultradian and circadian glucocorticoid secretion as well as to methodological limitations of the current techniques for steroid hormone determination. Based on this background, the determination of long-term hair steroid concentrations is an important methodological improvement allowing for the quantitative analysis of chronic HPA axis-activation. In order to determine the relationship between chronic mental and physical stress and a chronic activation of the HPA axis, we performed a cross-sectional pilot-study with 40 healthy students and examined the relationships between physical activity, mental burden(s), subjective stress perceptions, depressiveness, anxiety, physical complaints, sense of coherence, resilience, and the long-term integrated steroid hormone levels in hair. The results showed that the concentrations of cortisol, cortisone, and dehydroepiandrosterone in hair were significantly correlated to mental (p = 0.034) and physical stress (p = 0.001) as well as to subjective stress perception (p = 0.006). We conclude that steroid concentrations in hair are decisive predictors for an increase in the long-term-HPA axis activity. Moreover, this biomarker is suitable for capturing the stresslevel after burdening events and physical activity.

  9. Pilot study of adrenal steroid hormones in hair as an indicator of chronic mental and physical stress

    PubMed Central

    Ullmann, E.; Barthel, A; Petrowski, K.; Stalder, T.; Kirschbaum, C.; Bornstein, S. R.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the quantitative analysis of moderators affecting the function of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis in health and sickness is still unreliable. This is, in particular, due to physiological factors such as pulsatile ultradian and circadian glucocorticoid secretion as well as to methodological limitations of the current techniques for steroid hormone determination. Based on this background, the determination of long-term hair steroid concentrations is an important methodological improvement allowing for the quantitative analysis of chronic HPA axis-activation. In order to determine the relationship between chronic mental and physical stress and a chronic activation of the HPA axis, we performed a cross-sectional pilot-study with 40 healthy students and examined the relationships between physical activity, mental burden(s), subjective stress perceptions, depressiveness, anxiety, physical complaints, sense of coherence, resilience, and the long-term integrated steroid hormone levels in hair. The results showed that the concentrations of cortisol, cortisone, and dehydroepiandrosterone in hair were significantly correlated to mental (p = 0.034) and physical stress (p = 0.001) as well as to subjective stress perception (p = 0.006). We conclude that steroid concentrations in hair are decisive predictors for an increase in the long-term-HPA axis activity. Moreover, this biomarker is suitable for capturing the stresslevel after burdening events and physical activity. PMID:27174654

  10. Relationship between estrogen levels, use of hormone replacement therapy, and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Colditz, G A

    1998-06-03

    We sought to determine the strength of the evidence suggesting that estrogen and postmenopausal replacement hormones play a role in the development of breast cancer. We reviewed the existing English language literature in MEDLINE on hormones and breast cancer, including reports on cell proliferation and endogenous hormone levels, as well as epidemiologic studies of the relationship between the use of postmenopausal hormones and the risk of breast cancer in women. A factor that increases the probability that cancer will develop in an individual has been defined as a cancer cause. The Hill criteria for demonstrating a link between environmental factors and disease were used to review the evidence for a causal relationship between female hormones and breast cancer. We found evidence of a causal relationship between these hormones and breast cancer, based on the following criteria: consistency, dose-response pattern, biologic plausibility, temporality, strength of association, and coherence. The magnitude of the increase in breast cancer risk per year of hormone use is comparable to that associated with delaying menopause by a year. The positive relationship between endogenous hormone levels in postmenopausal women and risk of breast cancer supports a biologic mechanism for the relationship between use of hormones and increased risk of this disease. The finding that the increase in risk of breast cancer associated with increasing duration of hormone use does not vary substantially across studies offers further evidence for a causal relationship. We conclude that existing evidence supports a causal relationship between use of estrogens and progestins, levels of endogenous estrogens, and breast cancer incidence in postmenopausal women. Hormones may act to promote the late stages of carcinogenesis among postmenopausal women and to facilitate the proliferation of malignant cells. Strategies that do not cause breast cancer are urgently needed for the relief of menopausal

  11. Effect of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal on Sex Hormone and Gonadotropin Levels in Addicted Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati, Batool; Ghosian Moghaddam, Mohammad Hassan; Khalili, Mohsen; Enayati, Ehsan; Maleki, Maryam; Rezaeei, Saeedeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioid consumption has been widely increasing across the globe; how- ever, it can cause adverse effects on the body. Morphine, an opioid, can reduce sex hor- mones and fertility. Withania somnifera (WS) is a traditional herb used to improve sexual activities. This study strives to investigate the effect of WS on sex hormones and gonado- tropins in addicted male rats. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, forty-eight male National Maritime Research Institute (NMRI) rats were randomly divided into four groups: i. Control group, ii. WS-treated control group, iii. Addicted group, and iv. WS-treated addicted group. Wa- ter-soluble morphine was given to rats for 21 days to induce addiction, concurrently the treated groups (2 and 4) also received WS plant-mixed pelleted food (6.25%). At the end of the treatment, the sex hormone and gonadotropin levels of the rats’ sera were deter- mined in all the groups. Results Except for follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), morphine reduced most of the gonadotropin and sex hormone levels. Whereas WS caused a considerable increase in the hormones in the treated addicted group, there was only a slight increase in the treated control group. Conclusion WS increased sex hormones and gonadotropins-especially testosterone, es- trogen, and luteinizing hormone-in the addicted male rats and even increased the proges- terone level, a stimulant of most sex hormones in addicted male rats. PMID:27441058

  12. Weathering the storm: parental effort and experimental manipulation of stress hormones predict brood survival.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, J Q; Lendvai, Áz; Dakin, R; Domalik, A D; Fasanello, V J; Vassallo, B G; Haussmann, M F; Moore, I T; Bonier, F

    2015-10-05

    Unpredictable and inclement weather is increasing in strength and frequency, challenging organisms to respond adaptively. One way in which animals respond to environmental challenges is through the secretion of glucocorticoid stress hormones. These hormones mobilize energy stores and suppress non-essential physiological and behavioral processes until the challenge passes. To investigate the effects of glucocorticoids on reproductive decisions, we experimentally increased corticosterone levels (the primary glucocorticoid in birds) in free-living female tree swallows, Tachycineta bicolor, during the chick-rearing stage. Due to an unprecedented cold and wet breeding season, 90 % of the nests in our study population failed, which created a unique opportunity to test how challenging environmental conditions interact with the physiological mechanisms underlying life-history trade-offs. We found that exogenous corticosterone influenced the regulation of parental decisions in a context-dependent manner. Control and corticosterone-treated females had similar brood failure rates under unfavorable conditions (cold and rainy weather), but corticosterone treatment hastened brood mortality under more favorable conditions. Higher female nest provisioning rates prior to implantation were associated with increased probability of brood survival for treatment and control groups. However, higher pre-treatment male provisioning rates were associated with increased survival probability in the control group, but not the corticosterone-treated group. These findings reveal complex interactions between weather, female physiological state, and partner parental investment. Our results also demonstrate a causal relationship between corticosterone concentrations and individual reproductive behaviors, and point to a mechanism for why naturally disturbed populations, which experience multiple stressors, could be more susceptible and unable to respond adaptively to changing environmental

  13. Anabolic hormone profiles in elite military men: Robust associations with age, stress, and fatigue.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Marcus K; Padilla, Genieleah A; Hernández, Lisa M

    2017-08-01

    We recently established stable daily profiles of the anabolic hormones dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and testosterone in 57 elite military men. In this follow-on study, we explored associations of salivary anabolic hormone profiles with demographic (i.e., age, body mass index [BMI]) and biobehavioral health indices (i.e., blood pressure, sleep, perceived stress, fatigue) via correlational models. Next, nuanced patterns were constructed using quartile splits followed by one-way analysis of variance and post hoc subgroup comparisons. Both DHEA (r range: -0.33 to -0.49) and testosterone (r range: -0.19 to -0.41) were inversely associated with age. Quartile comparisons revealed that age-related declines in DHEA were linear, curvilinear, or sigmoidal, depending on the summary parameter of interest. Anabolic hormone profiles did not associate with BMI, blood pressure, or sleep efficiency. Robust linear associations were observed between testosterone and perceived stress (r range: -0.29 to -0.36); concentration-dependent patterns were less discernible. Lower DHEA (r range: -0.22 to -0.30) and testosterone (r range: -0.22 to -0.36) concentrations associated with higher fatigue. Subsequent quartile comparisons suggested a concentration-dependent threshold with respect to evening testosterone. Specifically, those individuals within the lowest quartile (≤68.4pg/mL) endorsed the highest fatigue of the four groups (p=0.01), while the remaining three groups did not differ from each other. This study not only showed that anabolic hormone profiles have distinctive age trajectories, but are also valuable predictors of stress and fatigue in elite military men. This highlights the importance of routine monitoring of anabolic hormone profiles to sustain and optimize health and readiness in chronically stressed populations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Effects of a growth hormone-releasing hormone antagonist on telomerase activity, oxidative stress, longevity, and aging in mice.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A; Morley, John E; Farr, Susan A; Price, Tulin O; Ercal, Nuran; Vidaurre, Irving; Schally, Andrew V

    2010-12-21

    Both deficiency and excess of growth hormone (GH) are associated with increased mortality and morbidity. GH replacement in otherwise healthy subjects leads to complications, whereas individuals with isolated GH deficiency such as Laron dwarfs show increased life span. Here, we determined the effects of treatment with the GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor antagonist MZ-5-156 on aging in SAMP8 mice, a strain that develops with aging cognitive deficits and has a shortened life expectancy. Starting at age 10 mo, mice received daily s.c. injections of 10 μg/mouse of MZ-5-156. Mice treated for 4 mo with MZ-5-156 showed increased telomerase activity, improvement in some measures of oxidative stress in brain, and improved pole balance, but no change in muscle strength. MZ-5-156 improved cognition after 2 mo and 4 mo, but not after 7 mo of treatment (ages 12, 14 mo, and 17 mo, respectively). Mean life expectancy increased by 8 wk with no increase in maximal life span, and tumor incidence decreased from 10 to 1.7%. These results show that treatment with a GHRH antagonist has positive effects on some aspects of aging, including an increase in telomerase activity.

  15. Effects of a growth hormone-releasing hormone antagonist on telomerase activity, oxidative stress, longevity, and aging in mice

    PubMed Central

    Banks, William A.; Morley, John E.; Farr, Susan A.; Price, Tulin O.; Ercal, Nuran; Vidaurre, Irving; Schally, Andrew V.

    2010-01-01

    Both deficiency and excess of growth hormone (GH) are associated with increased mortality and morbidity. GH replacement in otherwise healthy subjects leads to complications, whereas individuals with isolated GH deficiency such as Laron dwarfs show increased life span. Here, we determined the effects of treatment with the GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor antagonist MZ-5-156 on aging in SAMP8 mice, a strain that develops with aging cognitive deficits and has a shortened life expectancy. Starting at age 10 mo, mice received daily s.c. injections of 10 μg/mouse of MZ-5-156. Mice treated for 4 mo with MZ-5-156 showed increased telomerase activity, improvement in some measures of oxidative stress in brain, and improved pole balance, but no change in muscle strength. MZ-5-156 improved cognition after 2 mo and 4 mo, but not after 7 mo of treatment (ages 12, 14 mo, and 17 mo, respectively). Mean life expectancy increased by 8 wk with no increase in maximal life span, and tumor incidence decreased from 10 to 1.7%. These results show that treatment with a GHRH antagonist has positive effects on some aspects of aging, including an increase in telomerase activity. PMID:21135231

  16. Hormonal and Behavioral Responses to Stress in Lactating and Non-lactating Female Common Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, Wendy; Abbott, David H.

    2011-01-01

    In several mammalian species, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and behavioral responses to stressors are down-regulated in lactating females, possibly preventing stress-induced disruptions of maternal care. Experimental elevations of HPA axis hormones have been found to inhibit maternal behavior in lactating common marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus), raising the question of whether lactating female marmosets also have blunted endogenous responses to stress. Therefore, we compared HPA and behavioral responses to standardized stressors in reproductively experienced female common marmosets that were undergoing ovulatory cycles and that either were (N=7) or were not lactating (N=8). Each marmoset underwent (1) a restraint stressor during the early follicular phase of the ovarian cycle (approximately 5 weeks postpartum for lactating females) and (2) exposure to a simulated hawk predator during the early to mid-luteal phase (approximately 7 weeks postpartum for lactating females). Lactating females were tested in the presence of one of their infants. Blood samples were collected before, during, and immediately after each test for determination of plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol concentrations. Both stressors caused significant elevations in plasma ACTH and cortisol levels, and significant decreases in cortisol:ACTH ratios; however, lactating and non-lactating females showed no significant differences in their endocrine or behavioral responses to either stressor, or in baseline ACTH or cortisol levels. These findings suggest that in contrast to several other mammalian species, lactating female marmosets maintain full behavioral and HPA responsiveness to stress, at least in the presence of their infants. PMID:21600906

  17. Levels of maternal serum corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) at midpregnancy in relation to maternal characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yumin; Holzman, Claudia; Chung, Hwan; Senagore, Patricia; Talge, Nicole M; Siler-Khodr, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    Summary BACKGROUND Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in maternal blood originates primarily from gestational tissues and elevated levels in midpregnancy have been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Investigators have hypothesized that high levels of maternal stress might lead to elevated CRH levels in pregnancy. Yet a few studies have measured maternal CRH levels among subgroups of women who experience disproportionate socioeconomic disadvantage, such as African-American and Hispanic women, and found that these groups have lower CRH levels in pregnancy. Our goal was to identify maternal characteristics related to CRH levels in midpregnancy and examine which if any of these factors help to explain race differences in CRH levels. METHODS The Pregnancy Outcomes and Community Health (POUCH) Study prospectively enrolled women at 15–27 weeks’ gestation from 52 clinics in five Michigan communities (1998–2004). Data from the POUCH Study were used to examine maternal demographics, anthropometrics, health behaviors, and psychosocial factors (independent variables) in relation to midpregnancy blood CRH levels modeled as log CRH pg/ml (dependent variable). Analyses were conducted within a subcohort from the POUCH Study (671 non-Hispanic Whites, 545 African Americans) and repeated in the subcohort subset with uncomplicated pregnancies (n=746). Blood levels of CRH and independent variables were ascertained at the time of enrollment. All regression models included week of enrollment as a covariate. In addition, final multivariable regression models alternately incorporated different psychosocial measures along with maternal demographics and weight. Psychosocial variables included measures of current depressive symptoms, perceived stress, coping style, hostility, mastery, anomie, and a chronic stressor (history of abuse as a child and adult). RESULTS In subcohort models, the adjusted mean CRH level was significantly lower in African Americans vs. non-Hispanic whites

  18. Reproductive toxicity after levetiracetam administration in male rats: Evidence for role of hormonal status and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Baysal, Merve; Ilgin, Sinem; Kilic, Gozde; Kilic, Volkan; Ucarcan, Seyda; Atli, Ozlem

    2017-01-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV) is an antiepileptic drug commonly used in the treatment of epilepsy because of its excellent safety profile in all age groups. It is remarkable that there are no studies evaluating the toxic effects of this drug on the male reproductive system, as it is commonly used in male patients of reproductive age. From this point of view, our aim was to evaluate the possible toxic effects of LEV on the male reproductive system. Therefore, LEV was administered to male rats orally at 50, 150, and 300 mg/kg for 70 consecutive days. At the end of this period, alterations to body and organ weights were calculated, and sperm concentration, motility, and morphology were investigated by a computer-assisted sperm analysis system. Sperm DNA damage was determined by comet assay and histopathological examination of the testes was carried out. Serum testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were measured by ELISAs to determine the effects of hormonal status, while glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and malondialdehyde levels in the testes were measured by colorimetric assay kits to determine the role of oxidative status in potential toxicity. According to the results, sperm quality was decreased by LEV treatment in a dose-dependent manner. LEV induced significant DNA damage in the 150 and 300 mg/kg LEV-administered groups. Histopathology of the testes showed that LEV resulted in testicular injury in the 300 mg/kg LEV-administered group. Serum testosterone, FSH, and LH levels were significantly decreased in the 300 mg/kg LEV-administered group. Glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase levels were significantly decreased in all experimental groups while malondialdehyde levels were significantly increased in 150 and 300 mg/kg LEV-administered groups. According to these results, it was determined that LEV administration decreased sperm quality and it was alleged that hormonal alteration and oxidative stress are

  19. Placental buffering of maternal steroid hormone effects on fetal and yolk hormone levels: a comparative study of a viviparous lizard, Sceloporus jarrovi, and an oviparous lizard, Sceloporus graciosus.

    PubMed

    Painter, Danika; Jennings, David H; Moore, Michael C

    2002-06-15

    We investigated maternal-fetal hormone transfer in the mountain spiny lizard, Sceloporus jarrovi, a viviparous species with a simple chorioallantoic placenta. In one experiment, we examined the effect of elevated maternal progesterone on fetal and yolk hormone levels. Progesterone implants increased maternal progesterone nearly 100-fold; however, the resulting increase in fetal and yolk progesterone was only about 2% of that seen in mothers, providing evidence that the placenta buffers hormone diffusion. In addition, some effects of progesterone treatment differed between male and female fetuses, suggesting that this buffering may differ between the sexes. In a second experiment, we examined the relationship between maternal and fetal hormone levels in viviparous versus oviparous species. We measured endogenous progesterone, testosterone, estradiol, and corticosterone levels in pregnant S. jarrovi and their fetuses and neonates, and in gravid S. graciosus (an oviparous congener) and their fetuses and hatchlings. No clear relationship was identified between maternal and fetal or hatchling S. graciosus hormone levels. However, the data for S. jarrovi suggest that maternal hormones may inhibit perinatal hormone secretion. These findings indicate that, despite the relatively recent evolutionary origin and simple structure of the S. jarrovi placenta, mechanisms for placental mediation of the maternal-fetal endocrine relationship have evolved. Although the placenta appears to buffer hormone transport, maternal hormones can affect fetal and yolk hormone levels, suggesting that disruption of endocrine regulation could be a physiological cost of the evolution of viviparity. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA)

  20. Examination of Attention Level in Nurses Working Night Shifts in terms of the Relationship between Electrodermal Activity and Sex Hormones

    PubMed Central

    DOLU, Nazan; ELALMIŞ, Derya Deniz; KELOĞLAN, Seval

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Electrodermal activity (EDA) is an electrical activity of eccrine sweat gland stimulated by the sympathetic nervous system. Skin conductance level (SCL) is measured with EDA. SCL and sweat gland activity increase in emotional situations, such as high activation, attention or stress. In this study, we investigated whether working in shifts affects attention level of nurses with EDA and explored the relationship between EDA and sex hormones. Method The study was carried out on nurses working night shifts (16.00–08.00 h) (n=22) and nurses working without a shift (08.00–16.00 h) (n=20). Firstly, The Epworth Sleepiness Scale which evaluates a person’s daytime sleepiness was applied to the subjects. For EDA measurement, Ag/AgCl electrodes were put on two fingers of their dominant hand. SCL was measured via MP30 system and GSR connection. The blood samples were analyzed for cortisol and ACTH hormone levels to investigate the changes in sleep and circadian rhythm. Result It was found that there was no statistically significant difference in skin conductance levels between the groups. Moreover, in the comparison of hormone values between the groups, the cortisol levels in night shift nurses were higher than in those working without a shift. Conclusion Night shift had no significant effect on the attention levels in the nurses. This situation is thought to be related to the fact that the nurses responsible for the night service raise their attention level to the highest point. The reason for higher level of cortisol in nurses working shifts may reflect that cortisol has no effect on the breadth of attention but reflects a high level of stress.

  1. Salmonella Typhi sense host neuroendocrine stress hormones and release the toxin haemolysin E

    PubMed Central

    Karavolos, Michail H; Bulmer, David M; Spencer, Hannah; Rampioni, Giordano; Schmalen, Ira; Baker, Stephen; Pickard, Derek; Gray, Joe; Fookes, Maria; Winzer, Klaus; Ivens, Alasdair; Dougan, Gordon; Williams, Paul; Khan, C M Anjam

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. typhi) causes typhoid fever. We show that exposure of S. typhi to neuroendocrine stress hormones results in haemolysis, which is associated with the release of haemolysin E in membrane vesicles. This effect is attributed to increased expression of the small RNA micA and RNA chaperone Hfq, with concomitant downregulation of outer membrane protein A. Deletion of micA or the two-component signal-transduction system, CpxAR, abolishes the phenotype. The hormone response is inhibited by the β-blocker propranolol. We provide mechanistic insights into the basis of neuroendocrine hormone-mediated haemolysis by S. typhi, increasing our understanding of inter-kingdom signalling. PMID:21331094

  2. Polyamine interactions with plant hormones: crosstalk at several levels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polyamines play important roles in diverse plant growth and development processes including seed germination, tissue lignification, organogenesis, flowering, pollination, embryogenesis, fruit development, ripening, abscission, senescence and stress responses. In all these processes, synergistic and ...

  3. Early life trauma is associated with decreased peripheral levels of thyroid-hormone T3 in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Machado, T D; Salum, G A; Bosa, V L; Goldani, M Z; Meaney, M J; Agranonik, M; Manfro, G G; Silveira, P P

    2015-12-01

    An adverse early life environment can induce changes on behavioral and metabolic responses later in life. Recent studies in rats showed that the quality of maternal care as measured by high levels of pup licking and grooming (LG) was associated with changes in the relationship between the precursor thyroid-hormone T4 and the more active T3. Here we investigated if early exposure to childhood abuse is associated with thyroid-hormone levels in human adolescents. Given the empirical evidence from animal models showing that good maternal care was associated with increased conversion of T4 to T3, we hypothesized that early adversity would be associated with a decreased peripheral conversion of T4 to T3. A sample of 80 adolescents (10-18 years) participated in this study. We used the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire to investigate early life stress. We calculate the body mass index (BMI) assessing weight and height and sexual maturation stage was determined by self-assessment. Blood samples were collected to measure T3 and T4 levels. ANCOVA were used to evaluate the influence of the Physical Abuse domain of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire as the early life stress variable in T3 and T4 separately, adjusted for potential confounders such as pubertal status, gender, socioeconomic status and BMI. Early life trauma was associated with reduced T3 levels in adolescents, when adjusted for potential confounders (p=0.013), but not with peripheral T4 levels (p=0.625). We extended findings from animal models showing that adverse early experience persistently impacts on the individual's responses to stress, which is marked by an abnormal metabolism of thyroid hormones. Further studies are needed to further investigate the nature of such associations.

  4. Effects of peppermint teas on plasma testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone levels and testicular tissue in rats.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, Mehmet; Ozguner, Meltem; Kocak, Ahmet; Oncu, Meral; Cicek, Ekrem

    2004-08-01

    To justify the effects of Mentha piperita labiatae and Mentha spicata labiatae herbal teas on plasma total testosterone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone levels and testicular histologic features. We performed this study because of major complaints in our area from men about the adverse effects of these herbs on male reproductive function. The experimental study included 48 male Wistar albino rats (body weight 200 to 250 g). The rats were randomized into four groups of 12 rats each. The control group was given commercial drinking water, and the experimental groups were given 20 g/L M. piperita tea, 20 g/L M. spicata tea, or 40 g/L M. spicata tea. The follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone levels had increased and total testosterone levels had decreased in the experimental groups compared with the control group; the differences were statistically significant. Also, the Johnsen testicular biopsy scores were significantly different statistically between the experimental groups and the control group. Although the mean seminiferous tubular diameter of the experimental groups was relatively greater than in the control group, the difference was not statistically significant. The only effects of M. piperita on testicular tissue was segmental maturation arrest in the seminiferous tubules; however, the effects of M. spicata extended from maturation arrest to diffuse germ cell aplasia in relation to the dose. Despite the beneficial effects of M. piperita and M. spicata in digestion, we should also be aware of the toxic effects when the herbs are not used in the recommended fashion or at the recommended dose.

  5. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to acute psychosocial stress: Effects of biological sex and circulating sex hormones

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Mary Ann C.; Mahon, Pamela B.; McCaul, Mary E.; Wand, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis influences the risk for developing stress-related disorders. Sex-dependent differences in the HPA axis stress response are believed to contribute to the different prevalence rates of stress-related disorders found in men and women. However, studies examining the HPA axis stress response have shown mixed support for sex differences, and the role of endogenous sex hormones on HPA axis response has not been adequately examined in humans. This study utilized the largest sample size to date to analyze the effects of biological sex and sex hormones on HPA axis social stress responses. Healthy, 18- to 30- year-old community volunteers (N=282) completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a widely used and well-validated stress-induction laboratory procedure. All women (n=135) were tested during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle (when progesterone levels are most similar to men). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol measures were collected at multiple points throughout pre- and post-TSST. Testosterone and progesterone (in men) and progesterone and estradiol (in women) were determined pre-TSST. Following the TSST, men had greater ACTH and cortisol levels than women. Men had steeper baseline-to-peak and peak-to-end ACTH and cortisol response slopes than women; there was a trend for more cortisol responders among men than women. Testosterone negatively correlated with salivary cortisol response in men, while progesterone negatively correlated with ACTH and cortisol responses in women. These data confirm that men show more robust activation of the HPA axis response to the TSST than do women in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Testosterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in men. Progesterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in women. Future work is needed to explain why men mount a greater ACTH and cortisol response to

  6. Lack of effects of a lyposterolic extract of Serenoa repens on plasma levels of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed

    Casarosa, C; Cosci di Coscio, M; Fratta, M

    1988-01-01

    Twenty men, aged 50 to 75 years (mean, 67 years), suffering from benign prostatic hypertrophy received 160 mg of a lyposterolic extract of Serenoa repens, twice daily for 30 days. Before and at the end of treatment, plasma levels of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone were determined. No changes in plasma hormone levels occurred as a result of treatment. It is concluded that Serenoa extract, which is useful in the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy, does not act via systemic changes of hormone levels.

  7. Serum Sclerostin Levels Negatively Correlate with Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Free Estrogen Index in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Faryal S.; Padhi, I. Desmond; Raisz, Lawrence G.; Lorenzo, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Sclerostin is a negative regulator of bone formation. Objective: The aim of the study was to compare serum sclerostin levels in premenopausal and postmenopausal women and evaluate its relationship to estrogen, TH, bone turnover, and bone mass. Design, Setting, and Participants: We conducted a cross-sectional observational study of healthy community-dwelling pre- and postmenopausal women. Intervention(s): There were no interventions. Main Outcome Measure(s): We compared serum sclerostin levels in pre- and postmenopausal women and correlated sclerostin levels with female sex hormones, calciotropic hormones, bone turnover markers, and bone mineral density. Results: Premenopausal women were 26.8 yr old, and postmenopausal women were 56.8 yr old. Postmenopausal women had lower values for estradiol (30 ± 23 vs. 10 ± 4 pg/ml; P < 0.001), estrone (61 ± 24 vs. 29 ± 10 pg/ml; P <0.001), and free estrogen index (FEI) (6 ± 4 vs. 3 ± 2 pmol/nmol; P = 0.008) and significantly lower bone mineral density at all sites compared to premenopausal women, with no significant differences in levels of PTH, 25-hydroxy or 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D levels. Postmenopausal women had significantly higher serum sclerostin levels (1.16 ± 0.38 ng/ml vs. 0.48 ± 0.15 ng/ml; P < 0.001). Because most of the premenopausal women were on oral contraceptives, subsequent analyses were limited to postmenopausal women. There were significant negative correlations between sclerostin and FEI and sclerostin and PTH in this group. Using multiple regression analysis, both FEI (β = −0.629; P = 0.002) and PTH (β = −0.554; P = 0.004) were found to be independent predictors of sclerostin levels in postmenopausal women. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that serum sclerostin levels are regulated by both estrogens and PTH in postmenopausal women. These findings need to be explored further in larger prospective studies. PMID:20156921

  8. Changes in serum growth hormone and prolactin levels, and in hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone, thyrotropin-releasing hormone and somatostatin content, after superior cervical sympathectomy in rats.

    PubMed

    Cardinalí, D P; Esquifino, A I; Arce, A; Vara, E; Ariznavarreta, C; Tresguerres, J A

    1994-01-01

    After bilateral superior cervical ganglionectomy (SCGx) of adult male rats, norepinephrine (NE) content of the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) decreased significantly by 39-47% from 16 h to 7 days after surgery. During this time the levels of serum growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) and of MBH GH-releasing hormone (GRH), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and somatostatin were measured by RIA. In sham-operated controls, serum PRL increased and serum GH decreased 16-24 h after surgery, attaining pre-surgical levels later on. In SCGx rats, significantly lower serum GH and PRL and higher MBH GRH and TRH content as compared to controls was observed 16-24 h after surgery, during the wallerian degeneration phase after SCGx. MBH somatostatin concentration decreased in SCGx rats 20 h after surgery. Two injections of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocker prazosin 45 and 90 min before sacrifice, alone or together with the beta-blocker propranolol, prevented the changes in MBH hypophysiotropic hormone content, as well as in serum GH and PRL levels, found in SCGx rats 20 h after surgery. Propranolol treatment did not affect hormone levels. Neither drug modified the decrease in MBH NE content observed after SCGx. The results argue in favor of the existence of physiologically relevant projections from superior cervical ganglion neurons to the MBH controlling hypophysiotropic hormone release.

  9. Sex steroid hormone levels in breast adipose tissue and serum in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Falk, Roni T; Gentzschein, Elisabet; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine D; Ioffe, Olga B; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise A; Sherman, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of circulating estrogens and androgens are linked to higher breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women; however, little is known about hormone levels within the breast. Hormone concentrations within the breast may not be reflected in the blood and are likely important contributors to breast carcinogenesis. We used a previously validated method to measure levels of estrone, estradiol, androstenedione, and testosterone in adipose tissue removed as part of breast excisions performed for cancer in 100 postmenopausal women (69 ER/PR +/+ and 31 ER/PR -/-) participating in a breast cancer case-control study. We also measured the same steroid hormones, as well as estrone sulfate, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in serum from these patients and 100 controls matched on ages at blood collection and on menopause. Overall, concentrations of serum hormones did not vary significantly between controls and cases. However, women with ER-/PR- breast cancers had lower circulating levels of all measured sex steroid hormones and higher SHBG levels than women with ER+/PR+ breast cancers and controls. Similarly, hormone concentrations in breast adipose tissue were higher among women with ER+/PR+ compared to ER-/PR- breast cancer, although differences were only significant for testosterone. These data demonstrate that high sex steroid concentrations in both serum and adipose tissues are more strongly related to ER+/PR+ than ER-/PR- breast cancers. Measurement of sex hormones in serum and in the microenvironment may help in understanding the hormonal etiology of breast cancer, suggest methods for prevention, and have value in gauging treatment response and prognosis.

  10. Stress Hormones Epinephrine and Corticosterone Selectively Modulate Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 Productive Infections in Adult Sympathetic, but Not Sensory, Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ives, Angela M; Bertke, Andrea S

    2017-07-01

    Herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infect and establish latency in peripheral neurons, from which they can reactivate to cause recurrent disease throughout the life of the host. Stress is associated with the exacerbation of clinical symptoms and the induction of recurrences in humans and animal models. The viruses preferentially replicate and establish latency in different subtypes of sensory neurons, as well as in neurons of the autonomic nervous system that are highly responsive to stress hormones. To determine if stress-related hormones modulate productive HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections within sensory and autonomic neurons, we analyzed viral DNA and the production of viral progeny after treatment of primary adult murine neuronal cultures with the stress hormones epinephrine and corticosterone. Both sensory trigeminal ganglion (TG) and sympathetic superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons expressed adrenergic receptors (activated by epinephrine) and the glucocorticoid receptor (activated by corticosterone). Productive HSV infection colocalized with these receptors in SCG but not in TG neurons. In productively infected neuronal cultures, epinephrine treatment significantly increased the levels of HSV-1 DNA replication and production of viral progeny in SCG neurons, but no significant differences were found in TG neurons. In contrast, corticosterone significantly decreased the levels of HSV-2 DNA replication and production of viral progeny in SCG neurons but not in TG neurons. Thus, the stress-related hormones epinephrine and corticosterone selectively modulate acute HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections in autonomic, but not sensory, neurons.IMPORTANCE Stress exacerbates acute disease symptoms resulting from HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections and is associated with the appearance of recurrent skin lesions in millions of people. Although stress hormones are thought to impact HSV-1 and HSV-2 through immune system suppression, sensory and autonomic neurons that become infected

  11. Relevance of stress and female sex hormones for emotion and cognition.

    PubMed

    ter Horst, J P; de Kloet, E R; Schächinger, H; Oitzl, M S

    2012-07-01

    There are clear sex differences in incidence and onset of stress-related and other psychiatric disorders in humans. Yet, rodent models for psychiatric disorders are predominantly based on male animals. The strongest argument for not using female rodents is their estrous cycle and the fluctuating sex hormones per phase which multiplies the number of animals to be tested. Here, we will discuss studies focused on sex differences in emotionality and cognitive abilities in experimental conditions with and without stress. First, female sex hormones such as estrogens and progesterone affect emotions and cognition, contributing to sex differences in behavior. Second, females respond differently to stress than males which might be related to the phase of the estrous cycle. For example, female rats and mice express less anxiety than males in a novel environment. Proestrus females are less anxious than females in the other estrous phases. Third, males perform in spatial tasks superior to females. However, while stress impairs spatial memory in males, females improve their spatial abilities, depending on the task and kind of stressor. We conclude that the differences in emotion, cognition and responses to stress between males and females over the different phases of the estrous cycle should be used in animal models for stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  12. Panax ginseng and Eleutherococcus senticosus may exaggerate an already existing biphasic response to stress via inhibition of enzymes which limit the binding of stress hormones to their receptors.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, B T; Hügel, H M; Rich, P A

    2001-05-01

    A mechanism of action for Panax ginseng (PG) and Eleutherococcus senticosus (ES) is proposed which explains how they could produce the paradoxical effect of sometimes increasing and sometimes decreasing the stress response. The mechanism suggests that this biphasic effect results from increased occupancy of positive and negative feedback stress hormone receptors by their natural ligands due to inhibition of specific enzymes which function to limit receptor occupancy. Specifically, it is suggested that PG inhibits 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase one and ES inhibits catechol- O -methyl transferase, both of which reside in close proximity to stress hormone receptors and catalyse the degradation of stress hormones into inactive compounds. In addition, it is suggested that the increased energy said to result from PG and ES may be a consequence of their increasing the occupancy of stress hormone receptors which function to redistribute the body's energy reserves from regeneration to activity.

  13. Effects of psychological stress on plasma interleukins-1 beta and 6, C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor alpha, anti-diuretic hormone and serum cortisol.

    PubMed

    Dugué, B; Leppänen, E A; Teppo, A M; Fyhrquist, F; Gräsbeck, R

    1993-10-01

    The study was undertaken to determine whether psychological stress influences immunobiological functions and is an important preanalytical factor to be considered in connection with blood specimen collection. Two kinds of stress were applied, the Stroop colour conflict test and the thrill of a novice about to make the first jump with a parachute. In both test situations, the level of the stress indicators cortisol or anti-diuretic hormone rose significantly. The concentrations of the cytokines studied did not change significantly. However, in the parachute test significant positive correlations were found, e.g. between the changes of cortisol and C-reactive protein and between anti-diuretic hormone and interleukin-1 beta. This suggests that there is an interaction between the endocrine and the immune systems in the response to a psychological stress.

  14. The role of Euglena gracilis paramylon in modulating xylem hormone levels, photosynthesis and water-use efficiency in Solanum lycopersicum L.

    PubMed

    Scartazza, Andrea; Picciarelli, Piero; Mariotti, Lorenzo; Curadi, Maurizio; Barsanti, Laura; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2017-08-02

    β-1,3-glucans such as paramylon act as elicitors in plants, modifying the hormonal levels and the physiological responses. Plant hormones affect all phases of the plant life cycle and their responses to environmental stresses, both biotic and abiotic. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a root treatment with Euglena gracilis paramylon on xylem hormonal levels, photosynthetic performance and dehydration stress in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). Paramylon granules were processed to obtain the linear fibrous structures capable to interact with tomato cell membrane. Modulation of hormone levels (abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid) and related physiological responses such as CO2 assimilation rate, stomatal and mesophyll conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration, transpiration rate, water-use efficiency, quantum yield of photosystem II and leaf water potential were investigated. The results indicate a clear dose-dependent effect of paramylon on the hormonal content of xylem sap, photosynthetic performance and dehydration tolerance. Paramylon has the capability to enhance plant defence capacity against abiotic stress, such as drought, by modulating the conductance to CO2 diffusion from air to the carboxylation sites and improving the water-use efficiency. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Stress hormones in relation to breeding status and territory location in colonial king penguin: a role for social density?

    PubMed

    Viblanc, Vincent A; Gineste, Benoit; Stier, Antoine; Robin, Jean-Patrice; Groscolas, René

    2014-07-01

    Because glucocorticoid (stress) hormones fundamentally affect various aspects of the behaviour, life history and fitness of free-living vertebrates, there is a need to understand the environmental factors shaping their variation in natural populations. Here, we examined whether spatial heterogeneity in breeding territory quality affected the stress of colonial king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus). We assessed the effects of local climate (wind, sun and ambient temperature) and social conditions (number of neighbours, distance to neighbours) on the baseline levels of plasma total corticosterone (CORT) in 77 incubating and 42 chick-brooding birds, breeding on territories of central or peripheral colony location. We also assessed the oxidative stress status of a sub-sample of central vs. peripheral chick-brooders to determine whether chronic stress arose from breeding on specific territories. On average, we found that brooders had 55% higher CORT levels than incubators. Regardless of breeding status, central birds experienced greater social density (higher number of neighbours, shorter distance between territories) and had higher CORT levels than peripheral birds. Increasing social density positively explained 40% of the variation in CORT levels of both incubators and brooders, but the effect was more pronounced in brooders. In contrast, climate was similar among breeding territories and did not significantly affect the CORT levels of breeding birds. In brooders, oxidative stress status was not affected by local density or weather conditions. These results highlight that local heterogeneity in breeding (including social) conditions may strongly affect the stress levels of breeding seabirds. The fitness consequences of such variation remain to be investigated.

  16. The stress hormone cortisol blocks perceptual learning in humans.

    PubMed

    Dinse, Hubert R; Kattenstroth, J C; Lenz, M; Tegenthoff, M; Wolf, O T

    2017-03-01

    Cortisol, the primary glucocorticoid (GC) in humans, influences neuronal excitability and plasticity by acting on mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors. Cellular studies demonstrated that elevated GC levels affect neuronal plasticity, for example through a reduction of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). At the behavioural level, after treatment with GCs, numerous studies have reported impaired hippocampal function, such as impaired memory retrieval. In contrast, relatively little is known about the impact of GCs on cortical plasticity and perceptual learning in adult humans. Therefore, in this study, we explored the impact of elevated GC levels on human perceptual learning. To this aim, we used a training-independent learning approach, where lasting changes in human perception can be induced by applying passive repetitive sensory stimulation (rss), the timing of which was determined from cellular LTP studies. In our placebo-controlled double-blind study, we used tactile LTP-like stimulation to induce improvements in tactile acuity (spatial two-point discrimination). Our results show that a single administration of hydrocortisone (30mg) completely blocked rss-induced changes in two-point discrimination. In contrast, the placebo group showed the expected rss-induced increase in two-point discrimination of over 14%. Our data demonstrate that high GC levels inhibit rss-induced perceptual learning. We suggest that the suppression of LTP, as previously reported in cellular studies, may explain the perceptual learning impairments observed here.

  17. Vinclozolin alters the expression of hormonal and stress genes in the midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Aquilino, Mónica; Sánchez-Argüello, Paloma; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-05-01

    Vinclozolin is a fungicide used in agriculture that can reach aquatic ecosystems and affect the organisms living there. Its effects have been intensively studied in vertebrates, where it acts as an antiandrogen, but there is a lack of information about its mechanistic effects on invertebrates. In this work, we analyzed the response of genes related to the endocrine system, the stress response, and the detoxification mechanisms of Chironomus riparius fourth instar larvae after 24h and 48h exposures to 20 (69.9nM), 200 (699nM), and 2000μg/L (6.99μM) of Vinclozolin. Survival analysis showed that this compound has low toxicity, as it was not lethal for this organism at the concentrations used. However, this fungicide was shown to modify the transcriptional activity of the ecdysone response pathway genes EcR, E74, and Kr-h1 by increasing their mRNA levels. While no changes were observed in disembodied, a gene related with the ecdysone synthesis metabolic pathway, Cyp18A1, which is involved in the inactivation of the active form of ecdysone, was upregulated. Additionally, the expression of two genes related to other hormones, FOXO and MAPR, did not show any changes when Vinclozolin was present. The analysis of stress response genes showed significant changes in the mRNA levels of Hsp70, Hsp24, and Gp93, indicating that Vinclozolin activates the cellular stress mechanisms. Finally, the expressions of the genes Cyp4G and GstD3, which encode enzymes involved in phase I and phase II detoxification, respectively, were analyzed. It was found that their mRNA levels were altered by Vinclozolin, suggesting their involvement in the degradation of this compound. For the first time, these results show evidence that Vinclozolin can modulate gene expression, leading to possible significant endocrine alterations of the insect endocrine system. These results also offer new clues about the mode of action of this compound in invertebrates.

  18. Effects of organochlorine contaminants on thyroid hormone levels in Arctic breeding glaucous gulls, Larus hyperboreus.

    PubMed Central

    Verreault, Jonathan; Skaare, Janneche Utne; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Gabrielsen, Geir Wing

    2004-01-01

    Studies on glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus) breeding in the Barents Sea have reported that high blood levels of halogenated organic contaminants in this species might cause reproductive, behavioral, and developmental stress. However, potential endocrine system modulation caused by contaminant exposure has yet not been reported in this Arctic apical predator. In this present study we aimed to investigate whether the current levels of a selection of organochlorines (OCs) were associated with altered circulating levels of thyroid hormones (THs) in free-ranging adult glaucous gulls breeding at Bear Island in the Barents Sea. Blood concentrations of 14 polychlorinated biphenyls, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), oxychlordane, and p,p' -dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p' -DDE) were quantified, in addition to free and total thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), in plasma of 66 glaucous gulls in the spring of 2001. Negative correlations were found between plasma levels of T4 and T4:T3 ratio, and blood levels of OCs in male glaucous gulls. Despite their relatively low contribution to the total OC fraction, HCB and oxychlordane were the most prominent compounds in terms of their negative effect on the variation of the T4:T3 ratio. Moreover, lower T4 levels and T4:T3 ratios were measured in glaucous gulls breeding in a colony exposed to high levels of OCs, compared with a less exposed colony. Levels of T3 were elevated in the high-OC-exposed colony. This may indicate that the glaucous gull is susceptible to changes to TH homeostasis mediated by exposure to halogenated organic contaminants. PMID:15064156

  19. The influence of stress hormones and aggression on cooperative behaviour in subordinate meerkats.

    PubMed

    Dantzer, Ben; Goncalves, Ines Braga; Spence-Jones, Helen C; Bennett, Nigel C; Heistermann, Michael; Ganswindt, Andre; Dubuc, Constance; Gaynor, David; Manser, Marta B; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2017-09-27

    In cooperative breeders, aggression from dominant breeders directed at subordinates may raise subordinate stress hormone (glucocorticoid) concentrations. This may benefit dominants by suppressing subordinate reproduction but it is uncertain whether aggression from dominants can elevate subordinate cooperative behaviour, or how resulting changes in subordinate glucocorticoid concentrations affect their cooperative behaviour. We show here that the effects of manipulating glucocorticoid concentrations in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta) on cooperative behaviour varied between cooperative activities as well as between the sexes. Subordinates of both sexes treated with a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist (mifepristone) exhibited significantly more pup protection behaviour (babysitting) compared to those treated with glucocorticoids (cortisol) or controls. Females treated with mifepristone had a higher probability of exhibiting pup food provisioning (pup-feeding) compared to those treated with cortisol. In males, there were no treatment effects on the probability of pup-feeding, but those treated with cortisol gave a higher proportion of the food they found to pups than those treated with mifepristone. Using 19 years of behavioural data, we also show that dominant females did not increase the frequency with which they directed aggression at subordinates at times when the need for assistance was highest. Our results suggest that it is unlikely that dominant females manipulate the cooperative behaviour of subordinates through the effects of aggression on their glucocorticoid levels and that the function of aggression directed at subordinates is probably to reduce the probability they will breed. © 2017 The Author(s).

  20. GABA Regulates Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Levels in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus in Newborn Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Matthew S.; Searcy, Brian T.; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2011-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) is a major regulator of stress responses via release of Corticotropin Releasing Hormone (CRH) to the pituitary gland. Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is characteristic of individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Postmortem data from individuals diagnosed with MDD show increased levels of CRH mRNA and CRH immunoreactive neurons in the PVN. In the current study, an immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis revealed increased levels of CRH in the PVN of newborn mice lacking functional GABAB receptors. There was no difference in the total number of CRH immunoreactive cells. By contrast, there was a significant increase in the amount of CRH immunoreactivity per cell. Interestingly, this increase in CRH levels in the GABAB receptor R1 subunit knockout was limited to the rostral PVN. While GABAergic regulation of the HPA axis has been previously reported in adult animals, this study provides evidence of region-specific GABA modulation of immunoreactive CRH in newborns. PMID:21236282

  1. Work related stress and blood glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Sancini, A; Ricci, S; Tomei, F; Sacco, C; Pacchiarotti, A; Nardone, N; Ricci, P; Suppi, A; De Cesare, D P; Anzelmo, V; Giubilati, R; Pimpinella, B; Rosati, M V; Tomei, G

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate work-related subjective stress in a group of workers on a major Italian company in the field of healthcare through the administration of a valid "questionnaire-tool indicator" (HSE Indicator Tool), and to analyze any correlation between stress levels taken from questionnaire scores and blood glucose values. We studied a final sample consisting of 241 subjects with different tasks. The HSE questionnaire - made up of 35 items (divided into 7 organizational dimensions) with 5 possible answers - has been distributed to all the subjects in occasion of the health surveillance examinations provided by law. The questionnaire was then analyzed using its specific software to process the results related to the 7 dimensions. These results were compared using the Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression with the blood glucose values obtained from each subject. From the analysis of the data the following areas resulted critical, in other words linked to an intermediate (yellow area) or high (red area) condition of stress: sustain from managers, sustain from colleagues, quality of relationships and professional changes. A significant positive correlation (p <0.05) between the mean values of all critical areas and the concentrations of glucose values have been highlighted with the correlation index of Pearson. Multiple linear regression confirmed these findings, showing that the critical dimensions resulting from the questionnaire were the significant variables that can increase the levels of blood glucose. The preliminary results indicate that perceived work stress can be statistically associated with increased levels of blood glucose.

  2. Massage Therapy for Reducing Stress Hormones and Enhancing Immune Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    effects suggesting that like many other interventions (e.g., exercise, diet, etc), for therapy effects to persist, continued massage treatments may be...In this study massage and relaxation therapies were examined for women with early stages of breast cancer for 1) reducing anxiety and stress hormone...16). Women in the massage and relaxation therapies received 3-30 minute sessions a week for 5 weeks. On the first and last days of the 5-week study

  3. Sex, stress and the brain: interactive actions of hormones on the developing and adult brain.

    PubMed

    McEwen, B S

    2014-12-01

    The brain is a target of steroid hormone actions that affect brain architecture, molecular and neurochemical processes, behavior and neuroprotection via both genomic and non-genomic actions. Estrogens have such effects throughout the brain and this article provides an historical and current view of how this new view has come about and how it has affected the study of sex differences, as well as other areas of neuroscience, including the effects of stress on the brain.

  4. Sex Differences in Stress Response Circuitry Activation Dependent on Female Hormonal Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jill M.; Jerram, Matthew; Abbs, Brandon; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Makris, Nikos

    2010-01-01

    Understanding sex differences in stress regulation has important implications for understanding basic physiological differences in the male and female brain and their impact on vulnerability to sex differences in chronic medical disorders associated with stress response circuitry. In this fMRI study, we demonstrated that significant sex differences in brain activity in stress response circuitry were dependent on women's menstrual cycle phase. Twelve healthy Caucasian premenopausal women were compared to a group of healthy men from the same population, based on age, ethnicity, education, and right-handedness. Subjects were scanned using negative valence/high arousal versus neutral visual stimuli that we demonstrated activated stress response circuitry (amygdala, hypothalamus, hippocampus, brainstem, orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal cortices (OFC and mPFC), and anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG). Women were scanned twice based on normal variation in menstrual cycle hormones (i.e., early follicular (EF) compared with late follicular-midcycle menstrual phases (LF/MC)). Using SPM8b, there were few significant differences in BOLD signal changes in men compared to EF women, except ventromedial (VMN) and lateral (LHA) hypothalamus, left amygdala, and ACG. In contrast, men exhibited significantly greater BOLD signal changes compared to LF/MC women on bilateral ACG and OFC, mPFC, LHA, VMN, hippocampus, and periaqueductal gray, with largest effect sizes in mPFC and OFC. Findings suggest that sex differences in stress response circuitry are hormonally regulated via the impact of subcortical brain activity on the cortical control of arousal, and demonstrate that females have been endowed with a natural hormonal capacity to regulate the stress response that differs from males. PMID:20071507

  5. The Plant Hormone Cytokinin Confers Protection against Oxidative Stress in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Eman; Stopper, Helga

    2016-01-01

    Modulating key dynamics of plant growth and development, the effects of the plant hormone cytokinin on animal cells gained much attention recently. Most previous studies on cytokinin effects on mammalian cells have been conducted with elevated cytokinin concentration (in the μM range). However, to examine physiologically relevant dose effects of cytokinins on animal cells, we systematically analyzed the impact of kinetin in cultured cells at low and high concentrations (1nM-10μM) and examined cytotoxic and genotoxic conditions. We furthermore measured the intrinsic antioxidant activity of kinetin in a cell-free system using the Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assay and in cells using the dihydroethidium staining method. Monitoring viability, we looked at kinetin effects in mammalian cells such as HL60 cells, HaCaT human keratinocyte cells, NRK rat epithelial kidney cells and human peripheral lymphocytes. Kinetin manifests no antioxidant activity in the cell free system and high doses of kinetin (500 nM and higher) reduce cell viability and mediate DNA damage in vitro. In contrast, low doses (concentrations up to 100 nM) of kinetin confer protection in cells against oxidative stress. Moreover, our results show that pretreatment of the cells with kinetin significantly reduces 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide mediated reactive oxygen species production. Also, pretreatment with kinetin retains cellular GSH levels when they are also treated with the GSH-depleting agent patulin. Our results explicitly show that low kinetin doses reduce apoptosis and protect cells from oxidative stress mediated cell death. Future studies on the interaction between cytokinins and human cellular pathway targets will be intriguing. PMID:28005918

  6. Association between sex hormone levels and abnormal metabolism in a population of elderly Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yanping; Xiao, Haiying; Bai, Jie; Li, Chunlin; Wen, Xinyu; Cheng, Xiaoling; Fu, Shuhong; Lu, Yanhui; Li, Xiaoxia; Shao, Yinghong; Li, Yanyan; Jin, Mengmeng; Sun, Banruo; Tian, Yaping; Li, Shuzhang

    2013-03-01

    Low testosterone levels may be a signal of poor health. This study aimed to investigate the effects of age and abnormal metabolism on sex hormones in Chinese male. Three hundred and thirty-seven elder men were enrolled into this single-center, cross-sectional study, and their sex hormone levels and metabolic parameters were assessed. Serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations increased with age, while free testosterone index (FTI), testosterone secretion index (TSI), estradiol (E2)/SHBG and progestin (PROG) decreased. Abnormal metabolisms were related to androgen indices (TT, FT, BT, FTI, TSI, T/E2), SHBG and E2/SHBG even after adjusting by age and macrovascular disease. Obesity and overweight, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia were the most important abnormal metabolism that related to decreased androgen indices. Including SHBG in the stepwise regression increased the explanation effect of TT and BT by 32.7% and 28.5%, respectively, and all metabolic indices were excluded. Abnormal metabolism indies (BMI and PBG) were correlated to the decrease in SHBG levels, while age and LH was positively correlated to SHBG levels. Age and abnormal metabolism were independently important factors associated with the sex hormone levels in elderly Chinese men, which were all mediated by SHBG.

  7. Associations between cadmium exposure and circulating levels of sex hormones in postmenopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Imran; Engström, Annette; Vahter, Marie; Skerfving, Staffan; Lundh, Thomas; Lidfeldt, Jonas; Samsioe, Göran; Halldin, Krister; Åkesson, Agneta

    2014-10-15

    Recent epidemiological as well as in vivo and in vitro studies collectively suggest that the metalloestrogen cadmium (Cd) could be a potential risk factor for hormone-related cancers in particularly breast cancer. Assessment of the association between Cd exposure and levels of endogenous sex hormones is of pivotal importance, as increased levels of such have been associated with a higher risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. The present study investigated the perceived relationship (multivariable-adjusted linear regression analyses) between Cd exposure [blood Cd (B-Cd) and urinary Cd (U-Cd)], and serum levels of androstenedione, testosterone, estradiol, and sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), in 438 postmenopausal Swedish women without hormone replacement therapy (HRT). A significant positive association between B-Cd (median 3.4 nmol/L) and serum testosterone levels, as well as a significant inverse association between B-Cd and serum estradiol levels and with the estradiol/testosterone ratio were encountered. However, U-Cd (median 0.69 nmol/mmol creatinine) was inversely associated with serum estradiol levels only. Our data may suggest that Cd interferes with the levels of testosterone and estradiol in postmenopausal women, which might have implications for breast cancer risk. - Highlights: • Low level cadmium exposure may interfere with the levels of steroid hormones. • Cadmium exposure was associated with increased serum testosterone concentrations. • Cadmium exposure was associated with decreased estradiol/testosterone ratio. • Cadmium exposure may have implications for breast-cancer promotion.

  8. Stress hormones promote growth of B16-F10 melanoma metastases: an interleukin 6- and glutathione-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-6 (mainly of tumor origin) activates glutathione (GSH) release from hepatocytes and its interorgan transport to B16-F10 melanoma metastatic foci. We studied if this capacity to overproduce IL-6 is regulated by cancer cell-independent mechanisms. Methods Murine B16-F10 melanoma cells were cultured, transfected with red fluorescent protein, injected i.v. into syngenic C57BL/6J mice to generate lung and liver metastases, and isolated from metastatic foci using high-performance cell sorting. Stress hormones and IL-6 levels were measured by ELISA, and CRH expression in the brain by in situ hybridization. DNA binding activity of NF-κB, CREB, AP-1, and NF-IL-6 was measured using specific transcription factor assay kits. IL-6 expression was measured by RT-PCR, and silencing was achieved by transfection of anti-IL-6 small interfering RNA. GSH was determined by HPLC. Cell death analysis was distinguished using fluorescence microscopy, TUNEL labeling, and flow cytometry techniques. Statistical analyses were performed using Student’s t test. Results Plasma levels of stress-related hormones (adrenocorticotropin hormone, corticosterone, and noradrenaline) increased, following a circadian pattern and as compared to non-tumor controls, in mice bearing B16-F10 lung or liver metastases. Corticosterone and noradrenaline, at pathophysiological levels, increased expression and secretion of IL-6 in B16-F10 cells in vitro. Corticosterone- and noradrenaline-induced transcriptional up-regulation of IL-6 gene involves changes in the DNA binding activity of nuclear factor-κB, cAMP response element-binding protein, activator protein-1, and nuclear factor for IL-6. In vivo inoculation of B16-F10 cells transfected with anti-IL-6-siRNA, treatment with a glucocorticoid receptor blocker (RU-486) or with a β-adrenoceptor blocker (propranolol), increased hepatic GSH whereas decreased plasma IL-6 levels and metastatic growth. Corticosterone, but not NORA, also induced

  9. Effects of forced swimming stress on thyroid function, pituitary thyroid-stimulating hormone and hypothalamus thyrotropin releasing hormone expression in adrenalectomy Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiuyan; Liu, Aihua; Ma, Yanan; Wang, Anyi; Guo, Xinhong; Teng, Weiping; Jiang, Yaqiu

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the impact that is imposed on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of adrenalectomy male Wistar rats by stress caused by swimming, the blood level of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), the expression of TSHβ mRNA at the pituitary and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) expression at the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) were measured. A total of 50 male Wistar rats of 6–8 weeks of age and with an average weight of 190–210 grams were randomly divided into the following two groups: The surgical (without adrenal glands) and non-surgical (adrenalectomy) group. These two groups were then divided into the following five groups, according to the time delay of sacrifice following forced swim (10 min, 2 h, 12 h and 24 h) and control (not subjected to swimming) groups. A bilateral adrenalectomy animal model was established. Serum TSH in the blood was measurement by chemiluminescent immunoassay, and cerebrum tissue were excised for the measurement of TRH expression using an immunohistochemistry assay. In addition, pituitaries were excised for the extraction of total RNA. Finally, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed for quantitation of TSHβ. Following swimming, the serum T3, T4 and TSH, the TSHβ mRNA expression levels in the pituitary and the TRH expression in the PVN of the surgical group were gradually increased. In the non-surgical group, no significant differences were observed in the serum T3, T4 and TSH levels compared with the control group. The TSHβ mRNA expression at the pituitary showed a similar result. Furthermore, the TRH expression at PVN was gradually increased and stress from swimming could increase the blood T4, T3 and TSH levels, TSHβ mRNA expression at the pituitary and TRH expression at the PVN in adrenalectomy Wistar rats. Moreover, the index in the surgical group changed significantly compared with the non-surgical group. In conclusion, the

  10. High-Cholesterol Diet Disrupts the Levels of Hormones Derived from Anterior Pituitary Basophilic Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Zhang, X; Liu, Z; Yuan, Z; Song, Y; Shao, S; Zhou, X; Yan, H; Guan, Q; Gao, L; Zhang, H; Zhao, J

    2016-03-01

    Emerging evidence shows that elevated cholesterol levels are detrimental to health. However, it is unclear whether there is an association between cholesterol and the pituitary. We investigated the effects of a high-cholesterol diet on pituitary hormones using in vivo animal studies and an epidemiological study. In the animal experiments, rats were fed a high-cholesterol or control diet for 28 weeks. In rats fed the high-cholesterol diet, serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; also known as thyrotrophin), luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) produced by the basophilic cells of the anterior pituitary were elevated in a time-dependent manner. Among these hormones, TSH was the first to undergo a significant change, whereas adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), another hormone produced by basophilic cells, was not changed significantly. As the duration of cholesterol feeding increased, cholesterol deposition increased gradually in the pituitary. Histologically, basophilic cells, and especially thyrotrophs and gonadotrophs, showed an obvious increase in cell area, as well as a potential increase in their proportion of total pituitary cells. Expression of the β-subunit of TSH, FSH and LH, which controls hormone specificity and activity, exhibited a corresponding increase. In the epidemiological study, we found a similar elevation of serum TSH, LH and FSH and a decrease in ACTH in patients with hypercholesterolaemia. Significant positive correlations existed between serum total cholesterol and TSH, FSH or LH, even after adjusting for confounding factors. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that the high-cholesterol diet affected the levels of hormones derived from anterior pituitary basophilic cells. This phenomenon might contribute to the pituitary functional disturbances described in hypercholesterolaemia.

  11. The relationship between bilateral oophorectomy and plasma hormone levels in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Shafrir, Amy L; Rice, Megan; Hankinson, Susan E; Eliassen, A Heather; Tworoger, Shelley S; Narod, Steven A

    2015-02-01

    Oophorectomy prior to natural menopause reduces breast cancer risk. We evaluated whether timing of oophorectomy (during premenopause vs. postmenopause) or hysterectomy was associated with hormone levels, specifically estradiol, estrone, estrone sulfate, testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and prolactin, using data from the Nurses' Health Study. We included 2,251 postmenopausal women not using hormones who provided blood samples in 1989-1990 and/or 2000-2002, and who were controls in various nested case-control studies. We used multivariate linear mixed-effects models to assess geometric mean hormone levels by surgery status. Bilateral oophorectomy was associated with 25% lower testosterone levels versus women with natural menopause (20.8 vs. 15.5 ng/dL) (P < 0.0001) with no effect of timing of surgery (P = 0.80). SHBG levels were lower among women with a premenopausal oophorectomy (52.2 nmol/L) versus those with natural menopause (58.1 nmol/L) or a postmenopausal oophorectomy (62.0 nmol/L) (P = 0.02). There was no significant association of oophorectomy with estradiol, estrone, estrone sulfate, DHEAS, or prolactin levels (P ≥ 0.23). A simple hysterectomy was associated with a significant 8% lower testosterone (P = 0.03) and 14 % lower DHEAS (P = 0.02) levels compared with women with natural menopause but not with other hormone levels. Although limited by small numbers, our findings suggest no differential influence of timing of surgery on sex hormone levels. The reduction of testosterone levels in women with oophorectomy or hysterectomy suggests a possible role of this hormone in postmenopausal breast cancer development.

  12. Dexamethasone increases growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) receptor mRNA levels in cultured rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, M; Sato, M; Matsubara, S; Wada, Y; Takahara, J

    1996-06-01

    To examine the effects of glucocorticoid (GC) on growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) receptor gene expression, a highly-sensitive and quantitative reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was used in this study. Rat anterior pituitary cells were isolated and cultured for 4 days. The cultured cells were treated with dexamethasone for 2, 6, and 24 h. GRH receptor mRNA levels were determined by competitive RT-PCR using a recombinant RNA as the competitor. Dexamethasone significantly increased GRH receptor mRNA levels at 5 nM after 6- and 24 h-incubations, and the maximal effect was found at 25 nM. The GC receptor-specific antagonist, RU 38486 completely eliminated the dexamethasone-induced enhancement of GRH receptor mRNA levels. Dexamethasone did not alter the mRNA levels of beta-actin and prolactin at 5 nM for 24 h, whereas GH mRNA levels were significantly increased by the same treatment. The GH response to GRH was significantly enhanced by the 24-h incubation with 5 nM dexamethasone. These findings suggest that GC stimulates GRH receptor gene expression through the ligand-activated GC receptors in the rat somatotrophs. The direct effects of GC on the GRH receptor gene could explain the enhancement of GRH-induced GH secretion.

  13. Hormone-injected gravid channel catfish held in individual mesh bag reduces handling stress and improves reproductive performance in hatcheries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study compared holding hormone-injected female channel catfish in soft-mesh bags to communally held hormone-injected female catfish in a tank as a stress reduction strategy to improve reproductive performance. Fish held in tanks were crowded, handled multiple times to record weight prior to ho...

  14. Sexual differentiation of oxytocin stress responsiveness: effect of neonatal androgenization, castration and a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist.

    PubMed

    Carter, D A; Saridaki, E; Lightman, S L

    1988-04-01

    The plasma OT increment following stress in rats is sexually dimorphic, females exhibiting greater responses than males. We have investigated the role of neonatal androgen secretion in determining the sex-typical level of response. Castration of male pups either surgically or functionally (GnRH antagonist treatment) within either 2 h or 5 days of birth did not elevate the OT responses of adult males. In contrast, androgenization of female pups (testosterone, 1.25 mg/pup) within 5 days of birth markedly reduced the OT stress responses of adults to a level insignificantly different to males. The results show that neonatal androgens can exert organizational effects on OT regulatory mechanisms. Since neonatal castration was ineffective it would appear that a prenatal defeminization or masculinization event determines OT stress responsiveness in males.

  15. Ethylene Response Factors: A Key Regulatory Hub in Hormone and Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is essential for many developmental processes and a key mediator of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. The ethylene signaling and response pathway includes Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), which belong to the transcription factor family APETALA2/ERF. It is well known that ERFs regulate molecular response to pathogen attack by binding to sequences containing AGCCGCC motifs (the GCC box), a cis-acting element. However, recent studies suggest that several ERFs also bind to dehydration-responsive elements and act as a key regulatory hub in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the ethylene signaling and response pathway, with emphasis on ERFs and their role in hormone cross talk and redox signaling under abiotic stresses. We conclude that ERFs act as a key regulatory hub, integrating ethylene, abscisic acid, jasmonate, and redox signaling in the plant response to a number of abiotic stresses.

  16. [Changes of Serum Gonadal Hormones Levels During Musk-secreting Period and Estrus of Moschus berezovskii].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng-ming; Yang, Jing; Wang, Jian-ming; Fu, Wen-long; Wang, Zhan-yin; Ye, Song-hua; Fu, Chun-mei

    2015-02-01

    To detect concentrations of serum gonadal hormones (testosterone, estradiol and progesterone) in musk-secreting period and estrus of Moschus berezovskii, and to study the association of serum gonadal hormones concentrations and musk-secreting. The concentrations of serum gonadal hormones were detected with magnetic particle separation ELISA. During musk-secreting period, concentration changes of three serum gonadal hormones showed clear regularity, three crests occurred synchronously. Before musk-secreting period, testosterone, estradiol and progesterone concentrations were at its lower level, in prime musk-secreting period, they increased rapidly to respective highest peak; at later musk-secreting period, they quickly dropped to close to its previous levels before musk-secreting period. During estrus, serum testosterone concentration increased to lower peaks than that at later musk-secreting period. Estradiol remained at a low level and progesterone level was closed to zero. Serum testosterone concentrations in prime musk-secreting period were 114.4 ~ 190.5 times of estrus. During musk-secreting period, there were significant positive correlation among three serum gonadal hormone levels, a positive correlation between musk yield and serum testosterone levels, and negative correlation of musk yield with serum estradiol and progesterone levels as well as musk deer ages. Serum testosterone concentrations in prime musk-secreting period increase to the highest levels,which can provide reference in musk secretion induced by artificial means.

  17. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia for carotid endarterectomy induces early hemodynamic and stress hormone changes.

    PubMed

    Hoefer, Judith; Pierer, Eve; Rantner, Barbara; Stadlbauer, Karl-Heinz; Fraedrich, Gustav; Fritz, Josef; Kleinsasser, Axel; Velik-Salchner, Corinna

    2015-07-01

    Locoregional anesthesia is an effective method for evaluating cerebral function during carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Landmark-guided regional anesthesia (RA) is currently used for CEA and can provoke substantial perioperative hypertension. Ultrasound-guided RA (US-RA) is a new method for performing RA in CEA; however, the effect on sympathetic activity and blood pressure is uncertain. This study assessed early sympathetic activity during CEA in US-RA compared with general anesthesia (GA). Patients were prospectively randomized to receive US-RA (n = 32) or GA (n = 28) for CEA. The primary end point was the change in systolic arterial blood pressure after induction of anesthesia (just before starting surgery) comparing US-RA with GA. We also recorded heart rate and analyzed concentrations of plasma blood hormones, including cortisol, metanephrine, and normetanephrine at five different times. Creatinine kinase, troponin I, and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide were analyzed to detect potential changes in cardiac biomarkers during the procedure. Systolic arterial blood pressure (mean ± standard deviation) increased significantly in US-RA patients compared with GA patients even before surgery was initiated (180 ± 26 mm Hg vs 109 ± 24 mm Hg; P < .001), then remained elevated during the entire surgery and returned to baseline values 1 hour after admission to the postoperative anesthesia care unit. Heart rate (US-RA: 78 ± 16 beats/min, GA: 52 ± 12 beats/min; P < .001) and cortisol levels (US-RA: 155 ± 97 μg/L, GA: 99 ± 43 μg/L; P = .006) were also significantly higher in the US-RA group after induction of anesthesia. Other values did not differ. The US-RA technique for CEA induces temporary intraoperative hypertension and an increase in stress hormone levels. Nevertheless, US-RA is a feasible, effective, and safe form of locoregional for CEA that enables targeted placement of low volumes of local anesthesia under direct visualization. Copyright © 2015

  18. Balance between salt stress and endogenous hormones influence dry matter accumulation in Jerusalem artichoke.

    PubMed

    Shao, Tianyun; Li, Lingling; Wu, Yawen; Chen, Manxia; Long, Xiaohua; Shao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed

    2016-10-15

    Salinity is one of the most serious environmental stresses limiting agricultural production. Production of Jerusalem artichoke on saline land is strategically important for using saline land resources. The interaction between plant hormones and salinity stress in governing Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) growth is unclear. Jerusalem artichoke (variety Nanyu-1) was grown under variable salinity stress in the field, and a role of endogenous hormones [zeatin (ZT), auxins (IAA), gibberellins (GA3) and abscisic acid (ABA)] in regulating sugar and dry matter accumulation in tubers was characterized. Under mild salt stress (≤2.2gNaClkg(-1) soil), Nanyu-1 grew well with no significant alteration of dry matter distribution to stems and tubers. In contrast, under moderate salt stress (2.7gNaClkg(-1) soil), the distribution to stem decreased and to tubers decreased significantly. Mild salt stress induced sugar accumulation in tubers at the beginning of the tuber-expansion period, but significantly inhibited (i) transfer of non-reducing sugars to tubers, and (ii) polymerization and accumulation of fructan during the tuber-expansion stage. Under different salinity stress, before the stolon growth, the ratio of IAA/ABA in leaves increased significantly and that of GA3/ABA increased slightly; during tuber development, these ratios continued to decrease and reached the minimum late in the tuber-expansion period. While, salt stress inhibited (i) underground dry matter accumulation, (ii) tuber dry matter accumulation efficiency, (iii) transport of non-reducing sugars to tubers, and (iv) fructan accumulation efficiency during the tuber-expansion period; these effects were accompanied by significantly decreased tuber yield with an increase in salinity. With soil salinity increasing, the synthesis of IAA and GA3 was inhibited in leaves and tubers, while ABA synthesis was stimulated. In brief, tuber yield would significantly decreased with the increase of salinity

  19. Biogas final digestive byproduct applied to croplands as fertilizer contains high levels of steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Navas, Carlos; Björklund, Erland; Halling-Sørensen, Bent; Hansen, Martin

    2013-09-01

    In this study we evaluate and demonstrate the occurrence of nine natural and one synthetic steroid hormone, including estrogens, androgens and progestagens in biogas final digestate byproduct (digestion liquid) commonly used as an agricultural fertilizer. We investigated two biogas sites that utilize different anaerobic digestion technologies (mesophilic and thermophilic) from swine manure and other organic wastes. Individual hormone concentration levels were observed up to 1478 ng g(-1) dry weight or 22.5 mg kg(-1) N with estrone and progesterone reaching highest concentration levels. Evaluation of the potential environmental burden through the application in agriculture was also assessed on the basis of predicted environmental concentrations. This study indicates that the biogas digestion process does not completely remove steroid hormones from livestock manure and use of final digestate byproduct on croplands contributes to the environmental emission of hormones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cognitive function, stress hormones, heart rate and nutritional status during simulated captivity in military survival training.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Harris R; Farina, Emily K; Caldwell, John; Williams, Kelly W; Thompson, Lauren A; Niro, Philip J; Grohmann, Kyle A; McClung, James P

    2016-10-15

    Stress influences numerous psychological and physiological processes, and its effects have practical implications in a variety of professions and real-world activities. However, few studies have concurrently assessed multiple behavioral, hormonal, nutritional and heart-rate responses of humans to acute, severe stress. This investigation simultaneously assessed cognitive, affective, hormonal, and heart-rate responses induced by an intensely stressful real-world environment designed to simulate wartime captivity. Sixty males were evaluated during and immediately following participation in U.S. Army Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) school, three weeks of intense but standardized training for Soldiers at risk of capture. Simulated captivity and intense mock interrogations degraded grammatical reasoning (p<0.005), sustained-attention (p<0.001), working memory (p<0.05) and all aspects of mood assessed by the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire: Tension/Anxiety, Depression/Dejection, Anger/Hostility, Vigor/Activity, Fatigue/Inertia; Confusion/Bewilderment, and Total Mood Disturbance (p<0.001) It also elevated heart rate (p<0.001); increased serum and salivary cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-s) (p<0.01); elevated serum epinephrine, norepinephrine, and soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR) (p<0.01); increased salivary neuropeptide-Y (NPY) (p<0.001); and decreased serum prolactin and serum and salivary testosterone (p<0.001). Partial recovery was observed immediately after training, but stress-induced changes, particularly in body weight and several of the biomarkers, persisted. This study demonstrates that when individuals were exposed to realistic and controlled simulated captivity, cognition, mood, stress hormones, nutritional status and heart rate are simultaneously altered, and each of these subsequently recovers at different rates. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Silicon: a duo synergy for regulating crop growth and hormonal signaling under abiotic stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Ha; Khan, Abdul Latif; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-12-01

    Abiotic stresses, such as salinity, heavy metals and drought, are some of the most devastating factors hindering sustainable crop production today. Plants use their own defensive strategies to cope with the adverse effects of these stresses, via the regulation of the expression of essential phytohormones, such as gibberellins (GA), salicylic acid (SA), jasmonates (JA), abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene (ET). However, the efficacy of the endogenous defensive arsenals of plants often falls short if the stress persists over an extended period. Various strategies are developed to improve stress tolerance in plants. For example, silicon (Si) is widely considered to possess significant potential as a substance which ameliorate the negative effects of abiotic stresses, and improves plant growth and biomass accumulation. This review aims to explain how Si application influences the signaling of the endogenous hormones GA, SA, ABA, JA and ET during salinity, wounding, drought and metal stresses in crop plants. Phytohormonal cross talk plays an important role in the regulation of induced defences against stress. However, detailed molecular and proteomic research into these interactions is needed in order to identify the underlying mechanisms of stress tolerance that is imparted by Si application and uptake.

  2. Personality, adrenal steroid hormones, and resilience in maltreated children: A multi-level perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2012-01-01

    In this multi-level investigation, resilience in adaptive functioning among maltreated and nonmaltreated low-income children (N = 677) was examined in relation to the regulation of two stress-responsive adrenal steroid hormones, cortisol and dehydroepiandosterone (DHEA), as well as the personality constructs of ego resiliency and ego control. Maltreatment status was not related to differences in average levels of morning or afternoon cortisol or DHEA. However, lower morning cortisol was related to higher resilient functioning, but only in nonmaltreated children. In contrast, among physically abused children, high morning cortisol was related to higher resilient functioning. Morning and afternoon DHEA was negatively related to resilient functioning. Although diurnal change in cortisol was not related to resilience, for DHEA, maltreated children with high resilience showed an atypical rise in DHEA from morning to afternoon. Morning and afternoon cortisol/DHEA ratios were positively related to resilient functioning, but did not interact with maltreatment status. Ego resiliency and ego control strongly differentiated maltreated and nonmaltreated children, and the personality variables were substantially predictive of resilience. When considered together, demonstrated effects of personality, cortisol, and DHEA maintained independent contributions in predicting resilience among high-risk youth. PMID:17705903

  3. Effects of the estrous cycle and ovarian hormones on central expression of interleukin-1 evoked by stress in female rats.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Keiko; Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Hueston, Cara M; Deak, Terrence

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to stressors such as foot shock (FS) leads to increased expression of multiple inflammatory factors, including the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) in the brain. Studies have indicated that there are sex differences in stress reactivity, suggesting that the fluctuations in gonadal steroid levels across the estrous cycle may play a regulatory role in the stress-induced cytokine expression. The present studies were designed to investigate the role of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (Pg) in regulating the cytokine response within the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus through analysis of gene expression with real-time RT-PCR. Regularly cycling female rats showed a stress-induced increase in PVN IL-1 levels during the diestrous, proestrous, and estrous stages. During the metestrous stage, no change in IL-1 levels was seen following FS; however, estrogen receptor (ER)-β levels did increase. Ovariectomy resulted in an increase in PVN IL-1 levels, which was attenuated by treatment with estradiol benzoate (10 or 50 µg), indicating an E2-mediated anti-inflammatory effect. Ovariectomized rats treated with Pg (500 or 1,250 µg) showed no alteration in IL-1 levels, but Pg did up-regulate ER-β gene expression. The results from the current study implicate a potential mechanism through which high availability of endogenous Pg during the metestrous stage increases ER-β sensitivity, which in turn attenuates the PVN IL-1 response to stress. Thus, the interaction between gonadal steroid hormones and their central receptors may exert a powerful inhibitory effect on neuroimmune consequences of stress throughout the estrous cycle.

  4. The neuroenergetics of stress hormones in the hippocampus and implications for memory

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Danielle M.; Pearson-Leary, Jiah; McNay, Ewan C.

    2015-01-01

    Acute stress causes rapid release of norepinephrine (NE) and glucocorticoids (GCs), both of which bind to hippocampal receptors. This release continues, at varying concentrations, for several hours following the stressful event, and has powerful effects on hippocampally-dependent memory that generally promote acquisition and consolidation while impairing retrieval. Several studies have characterized the brain's energy usage both at baseline and during memory processing, but there are few data on energy requirements of memory processes under stressful conditions. Because memory is enhanced by emotional arousal such as during stress, it is likely that molecular memory processes under these conditions differ from those under non-stressful conditions that do not activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Mobilization of peripheral and central energy stores during stress may increase hippocampal glucose metabolism that enhances salience and detail to facilitate memory enhancement. Several pathways activated by the HPA axis affect neural energy supply and metabolism, and may also prevent detrimental damage associated with chronic stress. We hypothesize that alterations in hippocampal metabolism during stress are key to understanding the effects of stress hormones on hippocampally-dependent memory formation. Second, we suggest that the effects of stress on hippocampal metabolism are bi-directional: within minutes, NE promotes glucose metabolism, while hours into the stress response GCs act to suppress metabolism. These bi-directional effects of NE and GCs on glucose metabolism may occur at least in part through direct modulation of glucose transporter-4. In contrast, chronic stress and prolonged elevation of hippocampal GCs cause chronically suppressed glucose metabolism, excitotoxicity and subsequent memory deficits. PMID:25999811

  5. The neuroenergetics of stress hormones in the hippocampus and implications for memory.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Danielle M; Pearson-Leary, Jiah; McNay, Ewan C

    2015-01-01

    Acute stress causes rapid release of norepinephrine (NE) and glucocorticoids (GCs), both of which bind to hippocampal receptors. This release continues, at varying concentrations, for several hours following the stressful event, and has powerful effects on hippocampally-dependent memory that generally promote acquisition and consolidation while impairing retrieval. Several studies have characterized the brain's energy usage both at baseline and during memory processing, but there are few data on energy requirements of memory processes under stressful conditions. Because memory is enhanced by emotional arousal such as during stress, it is likely that molecular memory processes under these conditions differ from those under non-stressful conditions that do not activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Mobilization of peripheral and central energy stores during stress may increase hippocampal glucose metabolism that enhances salience and detail to facilitate memory enhancement. Several pathways activated by the HPA axis affect neural energy supply and metabolism, and may also prevent detrimental damage associated with chronic stress. We hypothesize that alterations in hippocampal metabolism during stress are key to understanding the effects of stress hormones on hippocampally-dependent memory formation. Second, we suggest that the effects of stress on hippocampal metabolism are bi-directional: within minutes, NE promotes glucose metabolism, while hour