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Sample records for striated muscle sarcoplasmic

  1. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  2. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-10-20

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components.

  3. Titin: major myofibrillar components of striated muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K; McClure, J; Tu, A

    1979-01-01

    Electrophoretic analyses of protein components of striated muscle myofibril purified from various vertebrate and invertebrate species revealed that proteins much larger than myosin heavy chain are present in significant amounts. To define possible roles of these heretofore unidentified proteins, we purified a combination of two uncommonly large proteins, designated as titin, from chicken breast myofibrils. Chemical and immunological studies indicated that titin is distinct from myosin, actin, and filamin. Specific titin anti body crossreacts with similar protein in both skeletal and cardiac myofibrils of many vertebrate and invertebrate species. Immunofluorescent staining of glycerinated chicken breast myofibrils indicated that titin is present in M lines, Z lines, the junctions of A and I bands, and perhaps throughout the entire A bands. Similar staining studies of myofibrils from other species suggest that titinlike proteins may be organized in all myofibrils according to a common architectural plan. We conclude that titin is a structurally conserved myofibrillar component of vertebrate and invertebrate striated muscles. Images PMID:291034

  4. Subcellular distribution of potassium in striated muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Edelmann, L.

    1984-01-01

    Microanalytical experiments have been performed to answer the question whether the main cellular cation, K+, follows the water distribution in the striated muscle cell or whether K+ follows the distribution of negative fixed charges (beta- and gamma-carboxyl groups of aspartic and glutamic acid residues). Subcellular localization of K and/or of the K surrogates Rb, Cs, and Tl has been investigated by the following methods: Chemical precipitation of K with tetraphenylborate. Autoradiography of alkali-metals and Tl in air-dried and frozen-hydrated preparations. TEM visualization of electron dense Cs and Tl in sections of freeze-dried and plastic embedded muscle. X-ray microanalysis of air-dried myofibrils and muscle cryosections. The experiments consistently show that K, Rb, Cs, and Tl do not follow the water distribution but are mainly accumulated in the A band, especially in the marginal regions, and at Z lines. The same sites preferentially accumulate Cs or uranyl cations when sections of freeze-dried, embedded muscle are exposed to these electron microscopic stains. It is concluded that the detected uneven distribution of K, Rb, Cs, and Tl in muscle is neither a freeze-drying artifact nor an embedding artifact and may result from a weak ion binding to the beta- and gamma-carboxyl groups of cellular proteins.

  5. Poorly Understood Aspects of Striated Muscle Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Månsson, Alf

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contraction results from cyclic interactions between the contractile proteins myosin and actin, driven by the turnover of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Despite intense studies, several molecular events in the contraction process are poorly understood, including the relationship between force-generation and phosphate-release in the ATP-turnover. Different aspects of the force-generating transition are reflected in the changes in tension development by muscle cells, myofibrils and single molecules upon changes in temperature, altered phosphate concentration, or length perturbations. It has been notoriously difficult to explain all these events within a given theoretical framework and to unequivocally correlate observed events with the atomic structures of the myosin motor. Other incompletely understood issues include the role of the two heads of myosin II and structural changes in the actin filaments as well as the importance of the three-dimensional order. We here review these issues in relation to controversies regarding basic physiological properties of striated muscle. We also briefly consider actomyosin mutation effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle function and the possibility to treat these defects by drugs. PMID:25961006

  6. Mitochondria Are Linked to Calcium Stores in Striated Muscle by Developmentally Regulated Tethering Structures

    PubMed Central

    Boncompagni, Simona; Rossi, Ann E.; Micaroni, Massimo; Beznoussenko, Galina V.; Polishchuk, Roman S.; Dirksen, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Bi-directional calcium (Ca2+) signaling between mitochondria and intracellular stores (endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum) underlies important cellular functions, including oxidative ATP production. In striated muscle, this coupling is achieved by mitochondria being located adjacent to Ca2+ stores (sarcoplasmic reticulum [SR]) and in proximity of release sites (Ca2+ release units [CRUs]). However, limited information is available with regard to the mechanisms of mitochondrial-SR coupling. Using electron microscopy and electron tomography, we identified small bridges, or tethers, that link the outer mitochondrial membrane to the intracellular Ca2+ stores of muscle. This association is sufficiently strong that treatment with hypotonic solution results in stretching of the SR membrane in correspondence of tethers. We also show that the association of mitochondria to the SR is 1) developmentally regulated, 2) involves a progressive shift from a longitudinal clustering at birth to a specific CRU-coupled transversal orientation in adult, and 3) results in a change in the mitochondrial polarization state, as shown by confocal imaging after JC1 staining. Our results suggest that tethers 1) establish and maintain SR–mitochondrial association during postnatal maturation and in adult muscle and 2) likely provide a structural framework for bi-directional signaling between the two organelles in striated muscle. PMID:19037102

  7. Neurohypophyseal Hormones: Novel Actors of Striated Muscle Development and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Alessandra; Rossi, Eleonora; Scicchitano, Bianca Maria; Coletti, Dario; Moresi, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1980’s, novel functional roles of the neurohypophyseal hormones vasopressin and oxytocin have emerged. Several studies have investigated the effects of these two neurohormones on striated muscle tissues, both in vitro and in vivo. The effects of vasopressin on skeletal myogenic cells, developing muscle and muscle homeostasis have been documented. Oxytocin appears to have a greater influence on cardiomyocite differentiation and heart homeostasis. This review summarizes the studies on these novel roles of the two neurohypophyseal hormones, and open the possibility of new therapeutic approaches for diseases affecting striated muscle. PMID:26913138

  8. Striated Muscle Regulation of Isometric Tension by Multiple Equilibria

    PubMed Central

    Zot, Henry G.; Hasbun, Javier E.; Van Minh, Nguyen

    2009-01-01

    Cooperative activation of striated muscle by calcium is based on the movement of tropomyosin described by the steric blocking theory of muscle contraction. Presently, the Hill model stands alone in reproducing both myosin binding data and a sigmoidal-shaped curve characteristic of calcium activation (Hill TL (1983) Two elementary models for the regulation of skeletal muscle contraction by calcium. Biophys J 44: 383–396.). However, the free myosin is assumed to be fixed by the muscle lattice and the cooperative mechanism is based on calcium-dependent interactions between nearest neighbor tropomyosin subunits, which has yet to be validated. As a result, no comprehensive model has been shown capable of fitting actual tension data from striated muscle. We show how variable free myosin is a selective advantage for activating the muscle and describe a mechanism by which a conformational change in tropomyosin propagates free myosin given constant total myosin. This mechanism requires actin, tropomyosin, and filamentous myosin but is independent of troponin. Hence, it will work equally well with striated, smooth and non-muscle contractile systems. Results of simulations with and without data are consistent with a strand of tropomyosin composed of ∼20 subunits being moved by the concerted action of 3–5 myosin heads, which compares favorably with the predicted length of tropomyosin in the overlap region of thick and thin filaments. We demonstrate that our model fits both equilibrium myosin binding data and steady-state calcium-dependent tension data and show how both the steepness of the response and the sensitivity to calcium can be regulated by the actin-troponin interaction. The model simulates non-cooperative calcium binding both in the presence and absence of strong binding myosin as has been observed. Thus, a comprehensive model based on three well-described interactions with actin, namely, actin-troponin, actin-tropomyosin, and actin-myosin can explain the

  9. Enrichment and terminal differentiation of striated muscle progenitors in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Ulrich M.; Breitbach, Martin; Sasse, Philipp; Garbe, Stephan; Ven, Peter F.M. van der; Fuerst, Dieter O.; Fleischmann, Bernd K.

    2009-10-01

    Enrichment and terminal differentiation of mammalian striated muscle cells is severely hampered by fibroblast overgrowth, de-differentiation and/or lack of functional differentiation. Herein we report a new, reproducible and simple method to enrich and terminally differentiate muscle stem cells and progenitors from mice and humans. We show that a single gamma irradiation of muscle cells induces their massive differentiation into structurally and functionally intact myotubes and cardiomyocytes and that these cells can be kept in culture for many weeks. Similar results are also obtained when treating skeletal muscle-derived stem cells and progenitors with Mitomycin C.

  10. Transplantation and regeneration of striated muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Allbrook, D.

    1975-01-01

    This lecture explores the factors controlling regeneration and reconstitution of skeletal muscle following vascular and neural injury by giving an account of some experimental work in this field, which is then linked to the problem of the use of whole-muscle transplants in clinical surgery. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:1147539

  11. Role of titin in vertebrate striated muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Tskhovrebova, L; Trinick, J

    2002-01-01

    Titin is a giant muscle protein with a molecular weight in the megaDalton range and a contour length of more than 1 microm. Its size and location within the sarcomere structure determine its important role in the mechanism of muscle elasticity. According to the current consensus, elasticity stems directly from more than one type of spring-like behaviour of the I-band portion of the molecule. Starting from slack length, extension of the sarcomere first causes straightening of the molecule. Further extension then induces local unfolding of a unique sequence, the PEVK region, which is named due to the preponderance of these amino-acid residues. High speeds of extension and/or high forces are likely to lead to unfolding of the beta-sandwich domains from which the molecule is mainly constructed. A release of tension leads to refolding and recoiling of the polypeptide. Here, we review the literature and present new experimental material related to the role of titin in muscle elasticity. In particular, we analyse the possible influence of the arrangement and environment of titin within the sarcomere structure on its extensible behaviour. We suggest that, due to the limited conformational space, elongation and compression of the molecule within the sarcomere occur in a more ordered way or with higher viscosity and higher forces than are observed in solution studies of the isolated protein. PMID:11911777

  12. Mechanical Stretch-Induced Activation of ROS/RNS Signaling in Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Christopher W.; Prosser, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Mechanical activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) occurs in striated muscle and affects Ca2+ signaling and contractile function. ROS/RNS signaling is tightly controlled, spatially compartmentalized, and source specific. Recent Advances: Here, we review the evidence that within the contracting myocyte, the trans-membrane protein NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2) is the primary source of ROS generated during contraction. We also review a newly characterized signaling cascade in cardiac and skeletal muscle in which the microtubule network acts as a mechanotransduction element that activates Nox2-dependent ROS generation during mechanical stretch, a pathway termed X-ROS signaling. Critical Issues: In the heart, X-ROS acts locally and affects the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors) and tunes Ca2+ signaling during physiological behavior, but excessive X-ROS can promote Ca2+-dependent arrhythmias in pathology. In skeletal muscle, X-ROS sensitizes Ca2+-permeable sarcolemmal “transient receptor potential” channels, a pathway that is critical for sustaining SR load during repetitive contractions, but when in excess, it is maladaptive in diseases such as Duchenne Musclar dystrophy. Future Directions: New advances in ROS/RNS detection as well as molecular manipulation of signaling pathways will provide critical new mechanistic insights into the details of X-ROS signaling. These efforts will undoubtedly reveal new avenues for therapeutic intervention in the numerous diseases of striated muscle in which altered mechanoactivation of ROS/RNS production has been identified. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 929–936. PMID:23971496

  13. Ultrastructure of mouse striated muscle fibers following pravastatin administration.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Michael; Salman, Hertzel; Djaldetti, Meir; Alexandrova, Svetlana; Punsky, Igor; Bessler, Hanna

    2003-01-01

    To examine the effect of pravastatin administration on striated muscle ultrastructure, 10 BalbC mice were given pravastatin 40 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. At the end of the study, blood was withdrawn for evaluation of the serum creatine phospho-kinase (CPK) level and the muscles of the hind legs, as well as the heart and liver of the animals were examined with a light and transmission electron microscope. After treatment with pravastatin the results showed a 101% increase in serum CPK level in comparison to untreated controls. Hematoxillin-eosin stained tissues of pravastatin treated mice did not show any abnormal findings. While the ultrastructure of the heart and liver of the treated animals appeared normal, the muscle fibers showed a marked alterations of the mitochondria, which were increased in size compared to those of the controls. The cristae were heavily damaged and even completely destructed, giving the mitochondria appearance of empty vacuoles. The findings are in favor of a specificity of pravastatin for striated muscles.

  14. Regulation of actin filament length in erythrocytes and striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Fowler, V M

    1996-02-01

    Actin filaments polymerize in vitro to lengths which display an exponential distribution, yet in many highly differentiated cells they can be precisely maintained at uniform lengths in elaborate supramolecular structures. Recent results obtained using two classic model systems, the erythrocyte membrane cytoskeleton and the striated muscle sarcomere, reveal surprising similarities and instructive differences in the molecules and mechanisms responsible for determining and maintaining actin filament lengths in these two systems. Tropomodulin caps the slow-growing, pointed filament ends in muscle and in erythrocytes. CapZ caps the fast-growing, barbed filament ends in striated muscle, whereas a newly discovered barbed end capping protein, adducin, may cap the barbed filament ends in erythrocytes. The mechanisms responsible for specifying the characteristic filament lengths in these systems are more elusive and may include strict control of the relative amounts of actin filament capping proteins and side-binding proteins, molecular templates (e.g. tropomyosin and nebulin) and/or verniers (e.g. tropomyosin).

  15. Elemental distribution in striated muscle and the effects of hypertonicity: Electron probe analysis of cryo sections

    PubMed Central

    Somlyo, AV; Shuman, H; Somlyo, AP

    1977-01-01

    A method of rapid freezing in supercooled Freon 22 (monochlorodifluoromethane) followed by cryoultramicrotomy is described and shown to yield ultrathin sections in which both the cellular ultrastructure and the distribution of diffusible ions across the cell membrane are preserved and intracellular compartmentalization of diffusabler ions can be quantitated. Quantitative electron probe analysis (Shuman, H., A.V. Somlyo, and A.P. Somlyo. 1976. Ultramicros. 1:317-339.) of freeze-dried ultrathin cryto sections was found to provide a valid measure of the composition of cells and cellular organelles and was used to determine the ionic composition of the in situ terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), the distribution of CI in skeletal muscle, and the effects of hypertonic solutions on the subcellular composition if striated muscle. There was no evidence of sequestered CI in the terminal cisternae of resting muscles, although calcium (66mmol/kg dry wt +/- 4.6 SE) was detected. The values of [C1](i) determined with small (50-100 nm) diameter probes over cytoplasm excluding organelles over nuclei or terminal cisternae were not significantly different. Mitochondria partially excluded C1, with a cytoplasmic/ mitochondrial Ci ratio of 2.4 +/- 0.88 SD. The elemental concentrations (mmol/kg dry wt +/- SD) of muscle fibers measured with 0.5-9-μm diameter electron probes in normal frog striated muscle were: P, 302 +/- 4.3; S, 189 +/- 2.9;C1, 24 +/- 1.1;K, 404 +/- 4.3, and Mg, 39 +/- 2.1. It is concluded that: (a) in normal muscle the "excess CI" measured with previous bulk chemical analyses and flux studies is not compartmentalized in the SR or in other cellular organelles, and (b) the cytoplasmic C1 in low [K](0) solutions exceeds that predicted by a passive electrochemical distribution. Hypertonic 2.2 X NaCl, 2.5 X sucrose, or 2.2 X Na isethionate produced: (a) swollen vacuoles, frequently paired, adjacent to the Z lines and containing significantly higher than

  16. X-ray Diffraction Studies of Striated Muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.M.; Knupp, C.; Roessle, M.; Al-Khayat, H.A.; Irving, T.C.; Eakins, F.; Mok, N.-S.; Harford, J.J.; Reedy, M.K.

    2006-04-24

    In this short review a number of recent X-ray diffraction results on the highly ordered striated muscles in insects and in bony fish have been briefly described. What is clear is that this technique applied to muscles which are amenable to rigorous analysis, taken together with related data from other sources (e.g. protein crystallography, biochemistry, mechanics, computer modelling) can provide not only the best descriptions yet available on the myosin head organisations on different myosin filaments in the relaxed state, but can also show the sequence of molecular events that occurs in the contractile cycle, and may also help to explain such phenomena as stretch-activation. X-ray diffraction is clearly an enormously powerful tool in studies of muscle. It has already provided a wealth of detail on muscle ultrastructure; it is providing ever more fascinating insights into molecular events in the 50-year old sliding filament mechanism, and there remains a great deal more potential that is as yet untapped.

  17. Muscle Lim Protein isoform negatively regulates striated muscle actin dynamics and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Vafiadaki, Elizabeth; Arvanitis, Demetrios A.; Papalouka, Vasiliki; Terzis, Gerasimos; Roumeliotis, Theodoros I.; Spengos, Konstantinos; Garbis, Spiros D.; Manta, Panagiota; Kranias, Evangelia G.; Sanoudou, Despina

    2015-01-01

    Muscle Lim Protein (MLP) has emerged as a critical regulator of striated muscle physiology and pathophysiology. Mutations in cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3 (CSRP3), the gene encoding MLP, have been directly associated with human cardiomyopathies, while aberrant expression patterns are reported in human cardiac and skeletal muscle diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that MLP has an important role in both myogenic differentiation and myocyte cytoarchitecture, although the full spectrum of its intracellular roles has not been delineated. We report the discovery of an alternative splice variant of MLP, designated as MLP-b, showing distinct expression in neuromuscular disease and direct roles in actin dynamics and muscle differentiation. This novel isoform originates by alternative splicing of exons 3 and 4. At the protein level, it contains the N-terminus first half LIM domain of MLP and a unique sequence of 22 amino acids. Physiologically it is expressed during early differentiation, whereas its overexpression reduces C2C12 differentiation and myotube formation. This may be mediated through its inhibition of MLP/CFL2-mediated F-actin dynamics. In differentiated striated muscles, MLP-b localizes to the sarcomeres and binds directly to Z-disc components including α-actinin, T-cap and MLP. Our findings unveil a novel player in muscle physiology and pathophysiology that is implicated in myogenesis as a negative regulator of myotube formation, and in differentiated striated muscles as a contributor to sarcomeric integrity. PMID:24860983

  18. Emerging importance of oxidative stress in regulating striated muscle elasticity.

    PubMed

    Beckendorf, Lisa; Linke, Wolfgang A

    2015-02-01

    The contractile function of striated muscle cells is altered by oxidative/nitrosative stress, which can be observed under physiological conditions but also in diseases like heart failure or muscular dystrophy. Oxidative stress causes oxidative modifications of myofilament proteins and can impair myocyte contractility. Recent evidence also suggests an important effect of oxidative stress on muscle elasticity and passive stiffness via modifications of the giant protein titin. In this review we provide a short overview of known oxidative modifications in thin and thick filament proteins and then discuss in more detail those oxidative stress-related modifications altering titin stiffness directly or indirectly. Direct modifications of titin include reversible disulfide bonding within the cardiac-specific N2-Bus domain, which increases titin stiffness, and reversible S-glutathionylation of cryptic cysteines in immunoglobulin-like domains, which only takes place after the domains have unfolded and which reduces titin stiffness in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Indirect effects of oxidative stress on titin can occur via reversible modifications of protein kinase signalling pathways (especially the NO-cGMP-PKG axis), which alter the phosphorylation level of certain disordered titin domains and thereby modulate titin stiffness. Oxidative stress also activates proteases such as matrix-metalloproteinase-2 and (indirectly via increasing the intracellular calcium level) calpain-1, both of which cleave titin to irreversibly reduce titin-based stiffness. Although some of these mechanisms require confirmation in the in vivo setting, there is evidence that oxidative stress-related modifications of titin are relevant in the context of biomarker design and represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention in some forms of muscle and heart disease.

  19. Discontinuity of sarcoplasmic reticulum in the mid-sarcomere region in flight muscle of dragonflies.

    PubMed

    de Eguileor, M; Valvassori, R; Lanzavecchia, G

    1980-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum organization of dragonfly flight muscles is analyzed, with particular reference to the doubling existing at H-band level. This doubling could be explained as a consequence of a regular discontinuity in the sarcoplasmic reticulum covering myofibrils. In each sarcomere, two sleeves of the sarcoplasmic reticulum seem to overlap forming a telescopic system which can slide outside each other during the lengthening and shortening movements of the fiber.

  20. The striated muscles in pulmonary arterial hypertension: adaptations beyond the right ventricle.

    PubMed

    Manders, Emmy; Rain, Silvia; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; Handoko, M Louis; Stienen, Ger J M; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; de Man, Frances S

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a fatal lung disease characterised by progressive remodelling of the small pulmonary vessels. The daily-life activities of patients with PAH are severely limited by exertional fatigue and dyspnoea. Typically, these symptoms have been explained by right heart failure. However, an increasing number of studies reveal that the impact of the PAH reaches further than the pulmonary circulation. Striated muscles other than the right ventricle are affected in PAH, such as the left ventricle, the diaphragm and peripheral skeletal muscles. Alterations in these striated muscles are associated with exercise intolerance and reduced quality of life. In this Back to Basics article on striated muscle function in PAH, we provide insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms causing muscle dysfunction in PAH and discuss potential new therapeutic strategies to restore muscle dysfunction.

  1. Use of flow, electrical, and mechanical stimulation to promote engineering of striated muscles.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Swathi; Madden, Lauran; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-07-01

    The field of tissue engineering involves design of high-fidelity tissue substitutes for predictive experimental assays in vitro and cell-based regenerative therapies in vivo. Design of striated muscle tissues, such as cardiac and skeletal muscle, has been particularly challenging due to a high metabolic demand and complex cellular organization and electromechanical function of the native tissues. Successful engineering of highly functional striated muscles may thus require creation of biomimetic culture conditions involving medium perfusion, electrical and mechanical stimulation. When optimized, these external cues are expected to synergistically and dynamically activate important intracellular signaling pathways leading to accelerated muscle growth and development. This review will discuss the use of different types of tissue culture bioreactors aimed at providing conditions for enhanced structural and functional maturation of engineered striated muscles.

  2. Use of flow, electrical, and mechanical stimulation to promote engineering of striated muscles

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Swathi; Madden, Lauran; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering involves design of high-fidelity tissue substitutes for predictive experimental assays in vitro and cell-based regenerative therapies in vivo. Design of striated muscle tissues, such as cardiac and skeletal muscle, has been particularly challenging due to a high metabolic demand and complex cellular organization and electromechanical function of the native tissues. Successful engineering of highly functional striated muscles may thus require creation of biomimetic culture conditions involving medium perfusion, electrical and mechanical stimulation. When optimized, these external cues are expected to synergistically and dynamically activate important intracellular signaling pathways leading to accelerated muscle growth and development. This review will discuss the use of different types of tissue culture bioreactors aimed at providing conditions for enhanced structural and functional maturation of engineered striated muscles. PMID:24366526

  3. Nuclear tropomyosin and troponin in striated muscle: new roles in a new locale?

    PubMed

    Chase, P Bryant; Szczypinski, Mark P; Soto, Elliott P

    2013-08-01

    Tropomyosin and troponin have well known Ca(2+)-regulatory functions in the striated muscle sarcomere. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence that tropomyosin and troponin are localized, with as yet unidentified functional roles, in the striated muscle cell nucleus. We also apply bioinformatics approaches that predict localization of some tropomyosin and troponin to the nucleus, and that SUMOylation could be a covalent modification that modulates their nuclear localization and function. Further, we provide examples of cardiomyopathy mutations that alter the predicted likelihood of nuclear localization and SUMOylation of tropomyosin. These observations suggest novel mechanisms by which cardiomyopathy mutations in tropomyosin and troponin might alter not only cardiac contractility but also nuclear function.

  4. Segregation of striated and smooth muscle lineages by a Notch-dependent regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lineage segregation from multipotent epithelia is a central theme in development and in adult stem cell plasticity. Previously, we demonstrated that striated and smooth muscle cells share a common progenitor within their epithelium of origin, the lateral domain of the somite-derived dermomyotome. However, what controls the segregation of these muscle subtypes remains unknown. We use this in vivo bifurcation of fates as an experimental model to uncover the underlying mechanisms of lineage diversification from bipotent progenitors. Results Using the strength of spatio-temporally controlled gene missexpression in avian embryos, we report that Notch harbors distinct pro-smooth muscle activities depending on the duration of the signal; short periods prevent striated muscle development and extended periods, through Snail1, promote cell emigration from the dermomyotome towards a smooth muscle fate. Furthermore, we define a Muscle Regulatory Network, consisting of Id2, Id3, FoxC2 and Snail1, which acts in concert to promote smooth muscle by antagonizing the pro-myogenic activities of Myf5 and Pax7, which induce striated muscle fate. Notch and BMP closely regulate the network and reciprocally reinforce each other’s signal. In turn, components of the network strengthen Notch signaling, while Pax7 silences this signaling. These feedbacks augment the robustness and flexibility of the network regulating muscle subtype segregation. Conclusions Our results demarcate the details of the Muscle Regulatory Network, underlying the segregation of muscle sublineages from the lateral dermomyotome, and exhibit how factors within the network promote the smooth muscle at the expense of the striated muscle fate. This network acts as an exemplar demonstrating how lineage segregation occurs within epithelial primordia by integrating inputs from competing factors. PMID:25015411

  5. The ESCRT-II proteins are involved in shaping the sarcoplasmic reticulum in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Christophe; Largeau, Céline; Michelet, Xavier; Fourrage, Cécile; Maniere, Xavier; Matic, Ivan; Legouis, Renaud; Culetto, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum is a network of tubules and cisternae localized in close association with the contractile apparatus, and regulates Ca(2+)dynamics within striated muscle cell. The sarcoplasmic reticulum maintains its shape and organization despite repeated muscle cell contractions, through mechanisms which are still under investigation. The ESCRT complexes are essential to organize membrane subdomains and modify membrane topology in multiple cellular processes. Here, we report for the first time that ESCRT-II proteins play a role in the maintenance of sarcoplasmic reticulum integrity inC. elegans ESCRT-II proteins colocalize with the sarcoplasmic reticulum marker ryanodine receptor UNC-68. The localization at the sarcoplasmic reticulum of ESCRT-II and UNC-68 are mutually dependent. Furthermore, the characterization of ESCRT-II mutants revealed a fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum network, associated with an alteration of Ca(2+)dynamics. Our data provide evidence that ESCRT-II proteins are involved in sarcoplasmic reticulum shaping.

  6. Multiparity causes uncoordinated activity of pelvic- and perineal-striated muscles and urodynamic changes in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Mendoza-Martínez, Germán; Corona-Quintanilla, Dora Luz; Fajardo, Víctor; Rodríguez-Antolín, Jorge; Castelán, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    Temporal and coordinated activation of pelvic- (pubococcygeous) and perineal- (bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus) striated muscles occurs during micturition in female rabbits. We have hypothesized that the coordinated activation of pelvic and perineal muscles is modified during the micturition of young multiparous rabbits. Young virgin and multiparous female chinchilla rabbits were used to simultaneously record cystometrograms and electromyograms of the pubococcygeous, ischocavernosus, and bulbospongiosus muscles. Bladder function was assessed using standard urodynamic variables. The temporal coordination of pelvic- and perineal-striated muscle activity was changed in multiparous rabbits. The cystometrogram recordings were different than those obtained from virgin rabbits, as seen in alterations of the threshold volume, the residual volume, the voiding duration, and the maximum pressure. In rabbits, we find that multiparity causes uncoordinated activity of pubococcygeous, ischiocavernosus, and bulbospongiosus muscles and modifies the urodynamics.

  7. Thienylhydrazone derivative increases sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release in mammalian skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Sudo, Roberto T; Maronas, Patricia A; Silva, Gisele L M; Moreira, Orlando R; Aguiar, Marli I S; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2003-05-30

    3,4-Methylenedioxybenzoyl-2-thienylhydrazone (L-294) is a cardiac inotropic drug whose action is mediated by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration as a result of enhanced Ca(2+) accumulation in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In the present study we tested whether this new thienylhydrazone derivative was effective in mammalian skeletal muscle. We investigated the effect of L-294 on the contractility of isolated skeletal muscle, on Ca(2+) uptake and release by sarcoplasmic reticulum in skinned fibers and in membrane vesicles. L-294 increased in a dose-dependent manner tension of isolated rat soleus muscle. In skinned type I fibers, L-294 induced tension and did not alter sarcoplasmic reticulum loading with Ca(2+). L-294 reduced the threshold Ca(2+) to induce Ca(2+) release and did not affect the ATP-dependent accumulation of Ca(2+) by sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. These results suggest that L-294 is an inotropic agent in skeletal muscle through an increase in the amount of Ca(2+) released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  8. Effects of boldine on mouse diaphragm and sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kang, J J; Cheng, Y W

    1998-02-01

    The effects of boldine [(S)-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxyaporphine], a major alkaloid in the leaves and bark of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.), on skeletal muscle were studied using mouse diaphragm and isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles. Boldine, at 10-200 microM, has little effect on the muscle-evoked twitches; however, the ryanodine-induced contracture was potentiated dose-dependently. At higher concentrations of 300 microM, boldine by itself induced muscle contracture of two phases, which were caused by the influx of extracellular Ca2+ and induction of Ca2+ release from the internal Ca2+ storage site, the sarcoplasmic reticulum, respectively. When tested with isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles, boldine dose-dependently induced Ca2+ release from actively loaded sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from skeletal muscle of rabbit or rat which was inhibited by ruthenium red, suggesting that the release was through the Ca2+ release channel, also known as the ryanodine receptor. Boldine also dose-dependently increased apparent [3H]-ryanodine binding with the EC50 value of 50 microM. In conclusion, we have shown that boldine could sensitize the ryanodine receptor and induce Ca2+ release from the internal Ca2+ storage site of skeletal muscle.

  9. Transcriptional networks regulating the costamere, sarcomere, and other cytoskeletal structures in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Nelsa L; Naya, Francisco J

    2014-05-01

    Structural abnormalities in striated muscle have been observed in numerous transcription factor gain- and loss-of-function phenotypes in animal and cell culture model systems, indicating that transcription is important in regulating the cytoarchitecture. While most characterized cytoarchitectural defects are largely indistinguishable by histological and ultrastructural criteria, analysis of dysregulated gene expression in each mutant phenotype has yielded valuable information regarding specific structural gene programs that may be uniquely controlled by each of these transcription factors. Linking the formation and maintenance of each subcellular structure or subset of proteins within a cytoskeletal compartment to an overlapping but distinct transcription factor cohort may enable striated muscle to control cytoarchitectural function in an efficient and specific manner. Here we summarize the available evidence that connects transcription factors, those with established roles in striated muscle such as MEF2 and SRF, as well as other non-muscle transcription factors, to the regulation of a defined cytoskeletal structure. The notion that genes encoding proteins localized to the same subcellular compartment are coordinately transcriptionally regulated may prompt rationally designed approaches that target specific transcription factor pathways to correct structural defects in muscle disease.

  10. Modulation of the cytosolic androgen receptor in striated muscle by sex steroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rance, N. E.; Max, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of orchiectomy (GDX) and steroid administration on the level of the cytosolic androgen receptor in the rat levator ani muscle and in rat skeletal muscles (tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus) was studied. Androgen receptor binding to muscle cytosol was measured using H-3 methyltrienolone (R1881) as ligand, 100 fold molar excess unlabeled R1881 to assess nonspecific binding, and 500 fold molar excess of triamcinolone acetonide to prevent binding to glucocorticoid and progestin receptors. Results demonstrate that modification of the levels of sex steroids can alter the content of androgen receptors of rat striated muscle. Data suggest that: (1) cytosolic androgen receptor levels increase after orchiectomy in both levator ani muscle and skeletal muscle; (2) the acute increase in receptor levels is blocked by an inhibitor of protein synthesis; and (3) administration of estradiol-17 beta to castrated animals increases receptor binding in levator ani muscle but not in skeletal muscle.

  11. CAS-1, a C. elegans cyclase-associated protein, is required for sarcomeric actin assembly in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazumi; Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2012-09-01

    Assembly of contractile apparatuses in striated muscle requires precisely regulated reorganization of the actin cytoskeletal proteins into sarcomeric organization. Regulation of actin filament dynamics is one of the essential processes of myofibril assembly, but the mechanism of actin regulation in striated muscle is not clearly understood. Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin is a key enhancer of actin filament dynamics in striated muscle in both vertebrates and nematodes. Here, we report that CAS-1, a cyclase-associated protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, promotes ADF/cofilin-dependent actin filament turnover in vitro and is required for sarcomeric actin organization in striated muscle. CAS-1 is predominantly expressed in striated muscle from embryos to adults. In vitro, CAS-1 binds to actin monomers and enhances exchange of actin-bound ATP/ADP even in the presence of UNC-60B, a muscle-specific ADF/cofilin that inhibits the nucleotide exchange. As a result, CAS-1 and UNC-60B cooperatively enhance actin filament turnover. The two proteins also cooperate to shorten actin filaments. A cas-1 mutation is homozygous lethal with defects in sarcomeric actin organization. cas-1-mutant embryos and worms have aggregates of actin in muscle cells, and UNC-60B is mislocalized to the aggregates. These results provide genetic and biochemical evidence that cyclase-associated protein is a critical regulator of sarcomeric actin organization in striated muscle.

  12. Cannabinoid receptor antagonist-induced striated muscle toxicity and ethylmalonic-adipic aciduria in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Lindsay; Tirmenstein, Mark A; Janovitz, Evan B; Aranibar, Nelly; Ott, Karl-Heinz; Kozlosky, John C; Patrone, Laura M; Achanzar, William E; Augustine, Karen A; Brannen, Kimberly C; Carlson, Kenneth E; Charlap, Jeffrey H; Dubrow, Katherine M; Kang, Liya; Rosini, Laura T; Panzica-Kelly, Julieta M; Flint, Oliver P; Moulin, Frederic J; Megill, John R; Zhang, Haiying; Bennett, Michael J; Horvath, Joseph J

    2012-10-01

    Ibipinabant (IBI), a potent cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist, previously in development for the treatment of obesity, causes skeletal and cardiac myopathy in beagle dogs. This toxicity was characterized by increases in muscle-derived enzyme activity in serum and microscopic striated muscle degeneration and accumulation of lipid droplets in myofibers. Additional changes in serum chemistry included decreases in glucose and increases in non-esterified fatty acids and cholesterol, and metabolic acidosis, consistent with disturbances in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. No evidence of CB1R expression was detected in dog striated muscle as assessed by polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and competitive radioligand binding. Investigative studies utilized metabonomic technology and demonstrated changes in several intermediates and metabolites of fatty acid metabolism including plasma acylcarnitines and urinary ethylmalonate, methylsuccinate, adipate, suberate, hexanoylglycine, sarcosine, dimethylglycine, isovalerylglycine, and 2-hydroxyglutarate. These results indicated that the toxic effect of IBI on striated muscle in beagle dogs is consistent with an inhibition of the mitochondrial flavin-containing enzymes including dimethyl glycine, sarcosine, isovaleryl-CoA, 2-hydroxyglutarate, and multiple acyl-CoA (short, medium, long, and very long chain) dehydrogenases. All of these enzymes converge at the level of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and ETF oxidoreductase. Urinary ethylmalonate was shown to be a biomarker of IBI-induced striated muscle toxicity in dogs and could provide the ability to monitor potential IBI-induced toxic myopathy in humans. We propose that IBI-induced toxic myopathy in beagle dogs is not caused by direct antagonism of CB1R and could represent a model of ethylmalonic-adipic aciduria in humans.

  13. Loss of skeletal muscle strength by ablation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum protein JP45.

    PubMed

    Delbono, Osvaldo; Xia, Jinyu; Treves, Susan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Jimenez-Moreno, Ramon; Payne, Anthony M; Messi, María Laura; Briguet, Alexandre; Schaerer, Florian; Nishi, Miyuki; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Zorzato, Francesco

    2007-12-11

    Skeletal muscle constitutes approximately 40% of the human body mass, and alterations in muscle mass and strength may result in physical disability. Therefore, the elucidation of the factors responsible for muscle force development is of paramount importance. Excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) is a process during which the skeletal muscle surface membrane is depolarized, causing a transient release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum that activates the contractile proteins. The ECC machinery is complex, and the functional role of many of its protein components remains elusive. This study demonstrates that deletion of the gene encoding the sarcoplasmic reticulum protein JP45 results in decreased muscle strength in young mice. Specifically, this loss of muscle strength in JP45 knockout mice is caused by decreased functional expression of the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel Ca(v)1.1, which is the molecule that couples membrane depolarization and calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. These results point to JP45 as one of the molecules involved in the development or maintenance of skeletal muscle strength.

  14. Synapse formation between clonal neuroblastoma X glioma hybrid cells and striated muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, P; Christian, C; Nirenberg, M

    1976-01-01

    Clonal neuroblastoma X glioma hybrid cells were shown to form synapses with cultured, striated muscle cells. The properties of the synapses between hybrid and muscle cells were similar to those of the normal, neuromuscular synapse at an early stage of development. The number of synapses formed and the efficiency of transmission across synapses were found to be regulated, apparently independently, by components in the culture medium. Under appropriate conditions synapses were found with 20% of the hybrid-muscle cell pairs examined; thus, the hybrid cells form synapses with relatively high frequency. Images PMID:1061105

  15. Sarcoplasmic masses in the skeletal muscle of a stranded pigmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps).

    PubMed

    Sierra, Eva; de los Monteros, Antonio Espinosa; Fernández, Antonio; Arbelo, Manuel; Caballero, María José; Rivero, Miguel; Herráez, Pedro

    2013-07-01

    We measured the abundance of sarcoplasmic masses within skeletal muscle myocytes of an adult female stranded pigmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps). The presence of these masses in other species has been reported in association with myopathies, including myotonic dystrophy, the most frequently related pathology. Other histopathologic muscle changes included a high number of internal nuclei, variations in fiber size and shape, and the predominance of type I fibers.

  16. Electron microscopical and histochemical studies on the transverse striated muscles of birds after prolonged hypokinesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belak, M.; Kocisova, J.; Marcanik, J.; Boda, K.; Skarda, R.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of the gastrocnemius muscle were carried out in 4 month old cockerels of the laying hybrid after hypokinesis lasting 15 and 30 days. It was found that restricted movement resulted in dystrophic changes of myotibrils, enlargement of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and oedem of interfibrillar spaces. Histochemical studies revealed focuses of increased activity of non-specific esterase, decreased activity of dehydrogenase of lactic acid and a positive reaction of acid phosphatase.

  17. Kinetic studies of Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum of normal and malignant hyperthermia susceptible pig muscles.

    PubMed

    Kim, D H; Sreter, F A; Ohnishi, S T; Ryan, J F; Roberts, J; Allen, P D; Meszaros, L G; Antoniu, B; Ikemoto, N

    1984-09-05

    The time-course of Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum isolated from muscles of normal pigs and those of pigs susceptible to malignant hyperthermia were investigated using stopped-flow spectrophotometry and arsenazo III as a Ca2+ indicator. Several methods were used to trigger Ca2+ release: (a) addition of halothane (e.g., 0.2 mM); (b) an increase of extravesicular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+0]); (c) a combination of (a) and (b), and (d) replacement of ions (potassium gluconate with choline chloride) to produce membrane depolarization. The initial rates of Ca2+ release induced by either halothane or Ca2+ alone, or both, are at least 70% higher in malignant hyperthermic sarcoplasmic reticulum than in normal. The amount of Ca2+ released by halothane at low [Ca2+0] in malignant hyperthermic sarcoplasmic reticulum is about twice as large as in normal sarcoplasmic reticulum. Membrane depolarization led to biphasic Ca2+ release in both malignant hyperthermic and normal sarcoplasmic reticulum, the rate constant of the rapid phase of Ca2+ release induced by membrane depolarization being significantly higher in malignant hyperthermic sarcoplasmic reticulum (k = 83 s-1) than in normal (k = 37 s-1). Thus, all types of Ca2+ release investigated (a, b, c and d) have higher rates in malignant hyperthermic sarcoplasmic reticulum than normal sarcoplasmic reticulum. These results suggest that the putative Ca2+ release channels located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum are altered in malignant hyperthermic sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  18. The formation of synapses in amphibian striated muscle during development.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M R; Pettigrew, A G

    1975-10-01

    1. A study has been made of the formation of synapses in developing reinnervated and cross-reinnervated amphibian twitch muscles which receive either a focal (iliofibularis) or a distributed (sartorius) innervation from 'en plaque' nerve terminals using histological, ultrastructural and electrophysiological techniques. 2. During the development of the tadpole through metamorphosis to the adult frog, the sartorius myofibres increased in length at about twice the rate of the iliofibularis myofibres, due to a fast rate of growth at their insertions on to the pelvic tendon. 3. The short iliofibularis and sartorius myofibres of young tadpoles (800 mum long) possessed only a single synapse and the iliofibularis myofibres did not receive any further innervation during development. However the sartorius myofibres received further transient innervation on the new muscle laid down during development at the fast growing pelvic insertion, until the distance between the original synapse formed on the myofibres and the synapse at the pelvic end of the muscle was about 12 mm. 4. During development synapses possessed either skewed, multimodal, or unimodal m.e.p.p. amplitude-frequency distributions; the intervals between m.e.p.p.s. were not distributed randomly according to a Poisson process, as m.e.p.p.s. of similar amplitudes tended to be separated by very short intervals; the unit-size e.p.p. had a similar amplitude-frequency distribution as the m.e.p.p.s. if these had a unimodal distribution. 5. Reinnervation or cross-reinnervation of the sartorius and the iliofibularis muscles in adults or at a late stage of development simply reconstituted the normal focal and distributed innervation patterns of the muscles, as found in the control muscles of the contralateral and unoperated legs. 6. These observations on synapse formation in amphibia are consistent with the hypothesis that during development the axon making the initial synaptic contact on the muscle cells induces a property

  19. Striated muscle involvement in experimental oral infection by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, María Inés; Sanjuan, Norberto A

    2013-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is one of the most frequent causes of oral infection in humans, especially during early childhood. Several experimental models have been developed to study the pathogenesis of this virus but all of them employed adult animals. In this work, we developed an experimental model that uses mice younger than 4 days old, to more closely resemble human infection. Mice were infected subcutaneously with the prototype strain McIntyre of Herpes simplex-1, and the progression of infection was studied by immunoperoxidase. All animals died within 24-72 h post-infection, while viral antigens were found in the oral epithelium, nerves and brain. The most striking result was the finding of viral antigens in the nucleus and cytoplasm of cells belonging to striated muscles. Organotypic cultures of striated muscles were performed, and viral replication was observed in them by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy and viral isolation. We conclude that the infection of striated muscles is present from the onset of oral infection and, eventually, could explain some clinical observations in humans.

  20. Reduced effect of caffeine on twitch contraction of oesophageal striated muscle from stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Kawata, Kyoko; Shimamura, Keiichi; Sunano, Satoru

    2003-04-01

    1. There are known differences in the sensitivity to caffeine between skeletal muscle (soleus) of normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The present study was performed in order to examine differences in the effects of caffeine on twitch contraction between visceral striated muscle using the outer layer of the oesophagus from WKY rats and stroke-prone SHR (SHRSP). 2. Caffeine, at concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 10 mmol/L, exhibited potentiating effects on twitch contraction in preparations from both WKY rats and SHRSP. The potentiating effect of caffeine was markedly less prominent in preparations from SHRSP compared with preparations from WKY rats. 3. The rate of contraction and relaxation, the time to peak tension and 80% relaxation time were not significantly altered by caffeine at concentrations lower than 3 mmol/L in preparations from either strain. 4. With 10 mmol/L caffeine, the rate of relaxation was markedly reduced and the 80% relaxation time was prolonged, with no significant changes in the rate of contraction, in preparations from WKY rats. These changes were significantly smaller in preparations from SHRSP. 5. The duration of the action potential was greater in preparations from SHRSP than in preparations from WKY rats, although the membrane potential and the amplitude of the action potential were not significantly different between preparations from WKY rats and SHRSP. 6. Caffeine, at 10 mmol/L, prolonged the duration of the action potential in preparations from both strains. The effect of caffeine was not different between preparations from WKY rats and SHRSP. 7. The results of the present study suggest that caffeine augments release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) at low concentrations and attenuates Ca2+ re-uptake at 10 mmol/L. Decreased reactivity of SR to caffeine may be a cause of the lesser potentiation of twitch contraction by caffeine in preparations from SHRSP.

  1. Fiber type characterization of striated muscles related to micturition in female rabbits.

    PubMed

    López-García, Kenia; Mariscal-Tovar, Silvia; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Jiménez-Estrada, Ismael; Castelán, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    Pelvic and perineal striated muscles are relevant for reproduction and micturition in female mammals. Damage to these muscles is associated with pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence. The fiber type composition of skeletal muscle influences the susceptibility for damage and/or regeneration. The aim of the present study was to determine the fiber type composition of a perineal muscle, the bulbospongiosus, and a pelvic muscle, the pubococcygeus. Both muscles were harvested from adult female rabbits (8-10 months old). NADH-TR (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide tetrazolium reductase) histochemistry was undertaken to identify oxidative and glycolytic muscle fibers. Alkaline (pH 9.4) ATP-ase (actomyosin adenosine triphosphatase) histochemistry was used to classify type I, type IIb or type IIa/IId muscle fibers. Results showed that the content of glycolytic fibers in the bulbospongiosus muscle was higher than that of oxidative fibers. Meanwhile, the opposite was true for the pubococcygeus. In the bulbospongiosus muscle, the content of type IIb muscle fibers was higher than that of type I, but was similar to that of type IIa/IId. In contrast, the content of each fiber type was similar in the pubococcygeus muscle. The relative proportion of fibers in bulbospongiosus and pubococcygeus muscles is consistent with their function during voiding and storage phases of micturition.

  2. Fine structures in the light diffraction pattern of striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Leung, A F

    1984-10-01

    Single skeletal muscle fibres of frog were illuminated with a He-Ne, argon-ion or rhodamine 6G dye laser. The fine structures lying within the diffraction columns moved parallel to the fibre axis without changing their pattern when either the wavelength or the incident angle of the laser beam was varied, or when the fibre was stretched slightly. However, their pattern remained nearly constant when the fibre was submerged in hypotonic or hypertonic solution. As the illumination of about 1 mm or 0.1 mm width scanned along the length of the fibre, new structures emerged while others faded away giving rise to the notion that the diffraction columns were moving in the direction of the scan. A decrease in the illumination width caused the structures lying on the periphery of the diffraction column to disappear and the width of the remaining structures to increase. Measurements rule out the existence of large diffraction planes in these muscles. In addition, they indicate that the fine structures come from the diffraction of the whole rather than independent components of the illuminated volume. The origin of the fine structures is explained by two diffraction models.

  3. Perineal striated muscles: Anatomy, spinal motoneurons, and participation on copulatory behavior in male rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Zempoalteca, R; Lucio, R A; Eguibar, J R

    2008-09-01

    Despite the importance of rabbits in reproductive studies, little information is available on the anatomy and participation of the striated-perineal muscles in male copulatory behavior. In our study, we describe the gross anatomy of two striated-perineal muscles: the ischiocavernosus (ICm) and the bulbospongiosus (BSm). Both muscles have their origin at the ischiadic arc, but the ICm is inserted into the penile crura and the BSm onto the ligamentum suspensorium of the penis. The motoneurons of both muscles were identified using retrograde labeling with horseradish peroxidase coupled to wheat-germ agglutinin. Motoneurons were dispersed in the lower-lumbar and upper-sacral spinal-cord segments, instead of being aggregated in the neuronal nucleus as in other species: the rat, mouse, gerbil, cat, and man. Bilateral dennervation of the ICm or BSm or both in sexually experienced male rabbits did not affect copulatory variables measured at 10, 20, and 30 days after surgery. However, muscular dennervation produced extravaginal ejaculations in 42% of copulatory tests and no ejaculation in 7% of tests, although male pelvic thrusting occurred. These results suggest the participation of the ICm and BSm perineal muscles in penile orientation during copulation but not in seminal emission as described in other mammalian species.

  4. In vitro binding of dantrolene to sarcoplasmic reticulum of rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Dehpour, A R; Mofakham, S; Mahmoudian, M

    1982-03-15

    Dantrolene upon binding to microsomes containing sarcoplasmic reticulum of rabbit thigh muscle exhibits a fluorescence with emission at 490 nm, which shows a blue shift of 35 nm compared with its fluorescence in ethylacetate. Using fluorescence techniques, dantrolene binding to microsomes isolated from rabbit thigh muscle was investigated. From Scatchard plots of binding studies, the association constant (Kass) and the number of binding sites of dantrolene to sarcoplasmic reticulum were calculated, which was found to be 9.6 X 10(4) M-1 and 1.71 mumole/g of membrane proteins, respectively. In the presence of verapamil (1.25 X 10(-4) M), another calcium antagonist, the binding of dantrolene to microsomes was enhanced. However, at a high concentration of verapamil (3.75 X 10(-4) M), the Scatchard plot of dantrolene binding was found to be biphasic.

  5. The ultrastructure and contractile properties of a fast-acting, obliquely striated, myosin-regulated muscle: the funnel retractor of squids.

    PubMed

    Rosenbluth, Jack; Szent-Györgyi, Andrew G; Thompson, Joseph T

    2010-07-15

    We investigated the ultrastructure, contractile properties, and in vivo length changes of the fast-acting funnel retractor muscle of the long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii. This muscle is composed of obliquely striated, spindle-shaped fibers ~3 mum across that have an abundant sarcoplasmic reticulum, consisting primarily of membranous sacs that form 'dyads' along the surface of each cell. The contractile apparatus consists of 'myofibrils' approximately 0.25-0.5 microm wide in cross section arrayed around the periphery of each cell, surrounding a central core that contains the nucleus and large mitochondria. Thick myofilaments are approximately 25 nm in diameter and approximately 2.8 microm long. 'Dense bodies' are narrow, resembling Z lines, but are discontinuous and are not associated with the cytoskeletal fibrillar elements that are so prominent in slower obliquely striated muscles. The cells approximate each other closely with minimal intervening intercellular connective tissue. Our physiological experiments, conducted at 17 degrees C, showed that the longitudinal muscle fibers of the funnel retractor were activated rapidly (8 ms latent period following stimulation) and generated force rapidly (peak twitch force occurred within 50 ms). The longitudinal fibers had low V(max) (2.15 +/-0.26 L(0) s(-1), where L(0) was the length that generated peak isometric force) but generated relatively high isometric stress (270+/-20 mN mm(-2) physiological cross section). The fibers exhibited a moderate maximum power output (49.9 W kg(-1)), compared with vertebrate and arthropod cross striated fibers, at a V/V(max) of 0.33+/-0.044. During ventilation of the mantle cavity and locomotion, the funnel retractor muscle operated in vivo over a limited range of strains (+0.075 to -0.15 relative to resting length, L(R)) and at low strain rates (from 0.16 to 0.91 L(R) s(-1) ), corresponding to a range of V/V(max) from 0.073 to 0.42. During the exhalant phase of the jet the range of

  6. The ultrastructure and contractile properties of a fast-acting, obliquely striated, myosin-regulated muscle: the funnel retractor of squids

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbluth, Jack; Szent-Györgyi, Andrew G.; Thompson, Joseph T.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the ultrastructure, contractile properties, and in vivo length changes of the fast-acting funnel retractor muscle of the long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii. This muscle is composed of obliquely striated, spindle-shaped fibers ~3 μm across that have an abundant sarcoplasmic reticulum, consisting primarily of membranous sacs that form ‘dyads’ along the surface of each cell. The contractile apparatus consists of ‘myofibrils’ ~0.25–0.5 μm wide in cross section arrayed around the periphery of each cell, surrounding a central core that contains the nucleus and large mitochondria. Thick myofilaments are ~25 nm in diameter and ~2.8 μm long. ‘Dense bodies’ are narrow, resembling Z lines, but are discontinuous and are not associated with the cytoskeletal fibrillar elements that are so prominent in slower obliquely striated muscles. The cells approximate each other closely with minimal intervening intercellular connective tissue. Our physiological experiments, conducted at 17°C, showed that the longitudinal muscle fibers of the funnel retractor were activated rapidly (8 ms latent period following stimulation) and generated force rapidly (peak twitch force occurred within 50 ms). The longitudinal fibers had low Vmax (2.15 ±0.26 L0 s−1, where L0 was the length that generated peak isometric force) but generated relatively high isometric stress (270±20 mN mm−2 physiological cross section). The fibers exhibited a moderate maximum power output (49.9 W kg−1), compared with vertebrate and arthropod cross striated fibers, at a V/Vmax of 0.33±0.044. During ventilation of the mantle cavity and locomotion, the funnel retractor muscle operated in vivo over a limited range of strains (+0.075 to −0.15 relative to resting length, LR) and at low strain rates (from 0.16 to 0.91 LR s−1 ), corresponding to a range of V/Vmax from 0.073 to 0.42. During the exhalant phase of the jet the range of strains was even narrower: maximum range less than ±0

  7. An early post-traumatic reaction of lymph-heart striated muscle fibers in adult frog Rana temporaria during the first postoperative week: An electron microscopic and autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Krylova, Marina I; Bogolyubov, Dmitry S

    2015-12-01

    According to the current opinion, lymph-heart striated muscle represents a specialized type of skeletal muscles in frogs. Here, we studied muscle fibers in mechanically damaged lymph hearts during the first postoperative week using electron-microscopic autoradiography. We present evidence that both, the satellite cells and pre-existing muscle fibers bordering the site of injury, contribute directly to the lymph-heart muscle regeneration. Several muscle fibers located in the vicinity of the damaged area displayed features of nuclear and sarcoplasmic activation. We also observed ultrastructural changes indicating activation of a few satellite cells, namely decondensation of chromatin, enlargement of nuclei and nucleoli, appearance of free ribosomes and rough endoplasmic reticulum tubules in the cytoplasm. Electron-microscopic autoradiography showed that 4 h after single (3)H-thymidine administration on the seventh day after injury not only the activated satellite cells, but also some nuclei of myofibers bordering the injured zone are labeled. We showed that both, the myonuclei of fibers displaying the signs of degenerative/reparative processes in the sarcoplasm and the myonuclei of the fibers enriched with highly organized myofibrils, can re-enter into the S-phase. Our results indicate that the nuclei of lymph-heart myofibers can reactivate DNA synthesis during regenerative myogenesis, unlike the situation in regenerating frog skeletal muscle where myogenic cells do not synthesize DNA at the onset of myofibrillogenesis.

  8. Ultrastructural studies of the mitochondriae in the striated muscles of birds with regard to experimental hypokinesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belak, M.; Kocisova, J.; Boda, K.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microscopic studies were carried out on the mitochrondria of the transversely striated muscles with regard to experimental hypokinesia. As compared to the central group the mitochondria of m. pectoralis thoracicus and the m. iliotibialis posterior in hypokinetic birds reveal marked changes. In filamentous and ovoid mitochondria, vacuoles can be observed which in some cases produced larger light formations with following disappearance of the cristae and destruction of mitochondria. Fat particles located at the poles of the altered mitochondria, sporadically occurring also laterally, presented another finding. The Z-lines of the sarcomere did not form a continuous line, but were somewhat shifted.

  9. Actin capping proteins, CapZ (β-actinin) and tropomodulin in amphioxus striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yulong; Kake, Takei; Hanashima, Akira; Nomiya, Yui; Kubokawa, Kaoru; Kimura, Sumiko

    2012-11-15

    CapZ (β-actinin) and tropomodulin (Tmod) are capping proteins involved in the maintenance of thin filaments in vertebrate skeletal muscles. In this study, we focused on amphioxus, the most primitive chordate. We searched for CapZ and Tmod genes in the amphioxus genome and determined their primary structures. Amphioxus possess one CapZα gene (CAPZA) and one CapZβ gene (CAPZB), and the transcripts of these genes were found to be 67%-85% identical to those of human CapZ genes. On the other hand, amphioxus contain one Tmod gene (TMOD), and the product of this gene has an identity of approximately 50% with human Tmod genes 1-4. However, helix 2 of amphioxus Tmod, which is involved in protein-binding to tropomyosin, was highly conserved with approximately 74% identity to human Tmod genes. Western blotting indicated the presence of CapZ and Tmod in the striated muscle of amphioxus. These results suggest that unlike most of vertebrates, such as fish, amphibian, bird, and mammal, CapZ from amphioxus striated muscle is derived from two genes CAPZA and CAPZB, and Tmod is derived from one TMOD gene.

  10. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and their Function in Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Roland FR; Scotton, Chiara; French, Vanessa; Ferlini, Alessandra; Brand, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Popeye domain containing (POPDC) genes encode a novel class of cAMP effector proteins, which are abundantly expressed in heart and skeletal muscle. Here we will review their role in striated muscle as deduced from work in cell and animal models and the recent analysis of patients carrying a missense mutation in POPDC1. Evidence suggests that POPDC proteins control membrane trafficking of interacting proteins. Furthermore, we will discuss the current catalogue of established protein-protein interactions. In recent years, the number of POPDC-interacting proteins is rising and currently includes ion channels (TREK-1), sarcolemma-associated proteins serving functions in mechanical stability (Dystrophin), compartmentalization (Caveolin 3), scaffolding (ZO-1), trafficking (NDRG4, VAMP2/3) and repair (Dysferlin), or acting as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho-family GTPases (GEFT). Recent evidence suggests that POPDC proteins might also control the cellular level of the nuclear proto-oncoprotein c-Myc. These data suggests that this family of cAMP-binding proteins probably serves multiple roles in striated muscle. PMID:27347491

  11. Isoform composition, gene expression and sarcomeric protein phosphorylation in striated muscle of mice after space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikhlyantsev, Ivan; Ulanova, Anna; Salmov, Nikolay; Gritsyna, Yulia; Bobylev, Alexandr; Rogachevsky, Vadim; Shenkman, Boris; Podlubnaya, Zoya

    Using RT-PCR and SDS-PAGE, changes in isoform composition, gene expression, titin and nebulin phosphorylation, as well as changes in isoform composition of myosin heavy chains in striated muscles of mice were studied after 30-day-long space flight onboard the Russian spacecraft “BION-M” No. 1. The muscle fibre-type shift from slow-to-fast was observed in m. gastrocnemius and m. tibialis anterior of animals from “Flight” group. A decrease in the content of the NT and N2A titin isoforms and nebulin in the skeletal muscles of animals from “Flight” group was found. Meanwhile, significant differences in gene expression of these proteins in skeletal muscles of mice from “Flight” and “Control” groups were not observed. Using Pro-Q Diamond stain, an increase in titin phosphorylation in m. gastrocnemius of mice from “Flight” group was detected. The content of the NT, N2BA and N2B titin isoforms in cardiac muscle of mice from “Flight” and “Control” groups did not differ, nevertheless an increase in titin gene expression in the myocardium of the “Flight” group animals was found. The observed changes will be discussed in the context of theirs role in contractile activity of striated muscles of mice in conditions of weightlessness. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants No. 14-04-32240, 14-04-00112). Acknowledgement. We express our gratitude to the teams of Institute of Biomedical Problems RAS and “PROGRESS” Corporation involved in the preparation of the “BION-M” mission.

  12. Comparative studies on troponin, a Ca²⁺-dependent regulator of muscle contraction, in striated and smooth muscles of protochordates.

    PubMed

    Obinata, Takashi; Sato, Naruki

    2012-01-01

    Troponin is well known as a Ca(2+)-dependent regulator of striated muscle contraction and it has been generally accepted that troponin functions as an inhibitor of muscle contraction or actin-myosin interaction at low Ca(2+) concentrations, and Ca(2+) at higher concentrations removes the inhibitory action of troponin. Recently, however, troponin became detectable in non-striated muscles of several invertebrates and in addition, unique troponin that functions as a Ca(2+)-dependent activator of muscle contraction has been detected in protochordate animals, although troponin in vertebrate striated muscle is known as an inhibitor of the contraction in the absence of a Ca(2+). Further studies on troponin in invertebrate muscle, especially in non-striated muscle, would provide new insight into the evolution of regulatory systems for muscle contraction and diverse function of troponin and related proteins. The methodology used for preparation and characterization of functional properties of protochordate striated and smooth muscles will be helpful for further studies of troponin in other invertebrate animals.

  13. Oesophageal tone and sensation in the transition zone between proximal striated and distal smooth muscle oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Karamanolis, G; Stevens, W; Vos, R; Tack, J; Clave, P; Sifrim, D

    2008-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that the proximal striated muscle oesophagus is less compliant and more sensitive than the distal smooth muscle oesophagus. Conventional and high resolution manometry described a transition zone between striated and smooth muscle oesophagus. We aimed to evaluate oesophageal tone and sensitivity at the transition zone of oesophagus in healthy volunteers. In 18 subjects (seven men, mean age: 28 years) an oesophageal barostat study was performed. Tone and sensitivity were assessed using stepwise isobaric distensions with the balloon located at transition zone and at distal oesophagus in random order. To study the effect induced on transition zone by a previous distension at the distal oesophagus and vice versa, identical protocol was repeated after 7 days with inverted order. Initial distension of a region is referred to as 'naïf' distension and distension of a region following the distension of the other segment as 'primed' distension. Assessment of three oesophageal symptoms (chest pain, heartburn and 'other') was obtained at the end of every distension step. Compliance was significantly higher in the transition zone than in the distal oesophagus (1.47 +/- 0.14 vs 1.09 +/- 0.09 mL mmHg(-1), P = 0.03) after 'naif' distensions. This difference was not observed during 'primed' distensions. Higher sensitivity at transition zone level was found in 11/18 (61%) subjects compared to 6/18 (33%, P < 0.05) at smooth muscle oesophagus. Chest pain and 'other' symptom were more often induced by distention of the transition zone, whereas heartburn was equally triggered by distension of either region. The transition zone is more complaint and more sensitive than smooth muscle oesophagus.

  14. Regulation of structure and function of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been used as a valuable system to study structure and function of striated muscle. The body wall muscle of C. elegans is obliquely striated muscle with highly organized sarcomeric assembly of actin, myosin, and other accessary proteins. Genetic and molecular biological studies in C. elegans have identified a number of genes encoding structural and regulatory components for the muscle contractile apparatuses, and many of them have counterparts in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscles or striated muscles in other invertebrates. Applicability of genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry has made C. elegans an excellent system to study mechanisms of muscle contractility and assembly and maintenance of myofibrils. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms of structure and function of actin filaments in the C. elegans body wall muscle. Sarcomeric actin filaments in C. elegans muscle are associated with the troponin-tropomyosin system that regulates the actin-myosin interaction. Proteins that bind to the side and ends of actin filaments support ordered assembly of thin filaments. Furthermore, regulators of actin dynamics play important roles in initial assembly, growth, and maintenance of sarcomeres. The knowledge acquired in C. elegans can serve as bases to understand the basic mechanisms of muscle structure and function. PMID:25125169

  15. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum of Airway Smooth Muscle. Implications for Airway Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel P.; Rector, Michael V.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Li, Xiaopeng; Stroik, Mallory R.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Thompson, Michael A.; Prakash, Y. S.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Meyerholz, David K.; Seow, Chun Y.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: An asthma-like airway phenotype has been described in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Whether these findings are directly caused by loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function or secondary to chronic airway infection and/or inflammation has been difficult to determine. Objectives: Airway contractility is primarily determined by airway smooth muscle. We tested the hypothesis that CFTR is expressed in airway smooth muscle and directly affects airway smooth muscle contractility. Methods: Newborn pigs, both wild type and with CF (before the onset of airway infection and inflammation), were used in this study. High-resolution immunofluorescence was used to identify the subcellular localization of CFTR in airway smooth muscle. Airway smooth muscle function was determined with tissue myography, intracellular calcium measurements, and regulatory myosin light chain phosphorylation status. Precision-cut lung slices were used to investigate the therapeutic potential of CFTR modulation on airway reactivity. Measurements and Main Results: We found that CFTR localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum compartment of airway smooth muscle and regulates airway smooth muscle tone. Loss of CFTR function led to delayed calcium reuptake following cholinergic stimulation and increased myosin light chain phosphorylation. CFTR potentiation with ivacaftor decreased airway reactivity in precision-cut lung slices following cholinergic stimulation. Conclusions: Loss of CFTR alters porcine airway smooth muscle function and may contribute to the airflow obstruction phenotype observed in human CF. Airway smooth muscle CFTR may represent a therapeutic target in CF and other diseases of airway narrowing. PMID:26488271

  16. Contractile properties of the striated adductor muscle in the bay scallop Argopecten irradians at several temperatures.

    PubMed

    Olson, J M; Marsh, R L

    1993-03-01

    The isometric and isotonic contractile properties of the cross-striated adductor muscle of the bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) were measured in vitro at 10, 15 and 20 degrees C. The length at which twitch force was maximal as a function of the closed length in situ (L0/Lcl) averaged 1.38 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- S.E.M.) at 10 degrees C. This length is very close to the typical length at maximum gape during natural swimming at this temperature. Passive force was very low over the range of lengths measured here; at L0, passive force averaged approximately 0.08 N cm-2, or only 0.5% of the corresponding peak twitch force. The mean peak isometric twitch force (Ptw,max) at 10 degrees C was 21.43 +/- 0.68 N cm-2 (S.E.M.), and the ratio of peak twitch force to tetanic force (Ptw,max/P0) averaged 0.89 +/- 0.01. Temperature did not affect either twitch force (Ptw), once fatigue was taken into account, or Ptw,max/P0. In contrast, the time-related properties of twitch contractions (latent period, tL; time to peak tension, tPtw; and time from peak tension to half-relaxation, t50%R) were positively modified by temperature at all temperatures measured (Q10 > 1.8). All three properties were more temperature-sensitive over the range 10-15 degrees C than over the range 15-20 degrees C. The force-velocity relationships of the striated adductor muscle were fitted to the hyperbolic-linear (HYP-LIN) equation. The force-velocity curves of the striated adductor muscle of the scallop were strongly influenced by temperature. Maximal velocity at zero force (Vmax), and therefore maximal power output, increased significantly with temperature. The Q10 over the temperature range 10-15 degrees C (1.42) was significantly lower than that over the range 15-20 degrees C (2.41). The shape of the force-velocity relationship, assessed through comparisons of the power ratio (Wmax/VmaxP0), was not influenced by temperature.

  17. Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors Are Localized in Striated Muscle Mitochondria and Regulate Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Melser, Su; Bénard, Giovanni; Ramos, Almudena; Reguero, Leire; Arrabal, Sergio; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Gerrikagoitia, Inmaculada; Suarez, Juan; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Puente, Nagore; Marsicano, Giovanni; Grandes, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor is widely distributed in the brain and peripheral organs where it regulates cellular functions and metabolism. In the brain, CB1 is mainly localized on presynaptic axon terminals but is also found on mitochondria (mtCB1), where it regulates cellular respiration and energy production. Likewise, CB1 is localized on muscle mitochondria, but very little is known about it. The aim of this study was to further investigate in detail the distribution and functional role of mtCB1 in three different striated muscles. Immunoelectron microscopy for CB1 was used in skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius and rectus abdominis) and myocardium from wild-type and CB1-KO mice. Functional assessments were performed in mitochondria purified from the heart of the mice and the mitochondrial oxygen consumption upon application of different acute delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) concentrations (100 nM or 200 nM) was monitored. About 26% of the mitochondrial profiles in gastrocnemius, 22% in the rectus abdominis and 17% in the myocardium expressed CB1. Furthermore, the proportion of mtCB1 versus total CB1 immunoparticles was about 60% in the gastrocnemius, 55% in the rectus abdominis and 78% in the myocardium. Importantly, the CB1 immunolabeling pattern disappeared in muscles of CB1-KO mice. Functionally, acute 100 nM or 200 nM THC treatment specifically decreased mitochondria coupled respiration between 12 and 15% in wild-type isolated mitochondria of myocardial muscles but no significant difference was noticed between THC treated and vehicle in mitochondria isolated from CB1-KO heart. Furthermore, gene expression of key enzymes involved in pyruvate synthesis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and mitochondrial respiratory chain was evaluated in the striated muscle of CB1-WT and CB1-KO. CB1-KO showed an increase in the gene expression of Eno3, Pkm2, and Pdha1, suggesting an increased production of pyruvate. In contrast, no significant difference was

  18. Macrophage density in pharyngeal and laryngeal muscles greatly exceeds that in other striated muscles: an immunohistochemical study using elderly human cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sunki; Kitamura, Kei; Masaaki, Kasahara; Katori, Yukio; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in aging-related muscle atrophy (i.e., sarcopenia). We examined macrophage density in six striated muscles (cricopharyngeus muscle, posterior cricoarytenoideus muscle, genioglossus muscle, masseter muscle, infraspinatus muscle, and external anal sphincter). We examined 14 donated male cadavers and utilized CD68 immunohistochemistry to clarify macrophage density in muscles. The numbers of macrophages per striated muscle fiber in the larynx and pharynx (0.34 and 0.31) were 5–6 times greater than those in the tongue, shoulder, and anus (0.05–0.07) with high statistical significance. Thick muscle fibers over 80 µm in diameter were seen in the pharynx, larynx, and anal sphincter of two limited specimens. Conversely, in the other sites or specimens, muscle fibers were thinner than 50 µm. We did not find any multinuclear muscle cells suggestive of regeneration. At the beginning of the study, we suspected that mucosal macrophages might have invaded into the muscle layer of the larynx and pharynx, but we found no evidence of inflammation in the mucosa. Likewise, the internal anal sphincter (a smooth muscle layer near the mucosa) usually contained fewer macrophages than the external sphincter. The present result suggest that, in elderly men, thinning and death of striated muscle fibers occur more frequently in the larynx and pharynx than in other parts of the body. PMID:27722010

  19. Revealing T-Tubules in Striated Muscle with New Optical Super-Resolution Microscopy Techniquess.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Isuru D; Clowsley, Alexander H; Munro, Michelle; Hou, Yufeng; Crossman, David J; Soeller, Christian

    2015-01-07

    The t-tubular system plays a central role in the synchronisation of calcium signalling and excitation-contraction coupling in most striated muscle cells. Light microscopy has been used for imaging t-tubules for well over 100 years and together with electron microscopy (EM), has revealed the three-dimensional complexities of the t-system topology within cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibres from a range of species. The emerging super-resolution single molecule localisation microscopy (SMLM) techniques are offering a near 10-fold improvement over the resolution of conventional fluorescence light microscopy methods, with the ability to spectrally resolve nanometre scale distributions of multiple molecular targets. In conjunction with the next generation of electron microscopy, SMLM has allowed the visualisation and quantification of intricate t-tubule morphologies within large areas of muscle cells at an unprecedented level of detail. In this paper, we review recent advancements in the t-tubule structural biology with the utility of various microscopy techniques. We outline the technical considerations in adapting SMLM to study t-tubules and its potential to further our understanding of the molecular processes that underlie the sub-micron scale structural alterations observed in a range of muscle pathologies.

  20. A theory on auto-oscillation and contraction in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Ohtaki, Masako; Shimamoto, Yuta; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2011-05-01

    It is widely accepted that muscle cells take either force-generating or relaxing state in an all-or-none fashion through the so-called excitation-contraction coupling. On the other hand, the membrane-less contractile apparatus takes the third state, i.e., the auto-oscillation (SPOC) state, at the activation level that is intermediate between full activation and relaxation. Here, to explain the dynamics of all three states of muscle, we construct a novel theoretical model based on the balance of forces not only parallel but also perpendicular to the long axis of myofibrils, taking into account the experimental fact that the spacing of myofilament lattice changes with sarcomere length and upon contraction. This theory presents a phase diagram composed of several states of the contractile apparatus and explains the dynamic behavior of SPOC, e.g., periodical changes in sarcomere length with the saw-tooth waveform. The appropriate selection of the constant of the molecular friction due to the cross-bridge formation can explain the difference in the SPOC periods observed under various activating conditions and in different muscle types, i.e., skeletal and cardiac. The theory also predicts the existence of a weak oscillation state at the boundary between SPOC and relaxation regions in the phase diagram. Thus, the present theory comprehensively explains the characteristics of auto-oscillation and contraction in the contractile system of striated muscle.

  1. Detection of a troponin I-like protein in non-striated muscle of the tardigrades (water bears).

    PubMed

    Obinata, Takashi; Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2011-03-01

    Tardigrades, also known as water bears, have somatic muscle fibers that are responsible for movement of their body and legs. These muscle fibers contain thin and thick filaments in a non-striated pattern. However, the regulatory mechanism of muscle contraction in tardigrades is unknown. In the absence of extensive molecular and genomic information, we detected a protein of 31 kDa in whole lysates of tardigrades that cross-reacted with the antibody raised against nematode troponin I (TnI). TnI is a component of the troponin complex that regulates actin-myosin interaction in a Ca(2+)-dependent and actin-linked manner. This TnI-like protein was co-extracted with actin in a buffer containing ATP and EGTA, which is known to induce relaxation of a troponin-regulated contractile system. The TnI-like protein was specifically expressed in the somatic muscle fibers in adult animals and partially co-localized with actin filaments in a non-striated manner. Interestingly, the pharyngeal muscle did not express this protein. These observations suggest that the non-striated somatic muscle of tardigrades has an actin-linked and troponin-regulated system for muscle contraction.

  2. Time Course of the Response of Myofibrillar and Sarcoplasmic Protein Metabolism to Unweighting of the Soleus Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Kathryn A.; Satarug, Soisungwan; Tischler, Marc E.

    1993-01-01

    Contributions of altered in vivo protein synthesis and degradation to unweighting atrophy of the soleus muscle in tail-suspended young female rats were analyzed daily for up to 6 days. Specific changes in myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins were also evaluated to assess their contributions to the loss of total protein. Synthesis of myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins was estimated by intramuscular (IM) injection and total protein by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of flooding doses of H-3-phenylaianine. Total protein loss was greatest during the first 3 days following suspension and was a consequence of the loss of myofibrillar rather than sarcoplasmic proteins. However, synthesis of total myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins diminished in parallel beginning in the first 24 hours. Therefore sarcoplasmic proteins must be spared due to a decrease in their degradation. In contrast, myofibrillar protein degradation increased, thus explaining the elevated degradation of the total pool. Following 72 hours of suspension, protein synthesis remained low, but the rate of myofibrillar protein loss diminished, suggesting a slowing of degradation. These various results show acute loss of protein during unweighting atrophy is a consequence of decreased synthesis and increased degradation of myofibrillar proteins, and sarcoplasmic proteins are spared due to slower degradation, likely explaining the sparing of plasma membrane receptors. Based on other published data, we propose that the slowing of atrophy after the initial response may be attributed to an increased effect of insulin.

  3. SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM AND THE TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT CONTRACTION OF SMOOTH MUSCLE IN CALCIUM-FREE SOLUTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Somlyo, Andrew P.; Devine, Carrick E.; Somlyo, Avril V.; North, Stanley R.

    1971-01-01

    The contractile response of turtle oviduct smooth muscle to acetylcholine after 30 min of incubation of muscles in Ca-free, 4 mM ethylene (bis) oxyethylenenitrilotetraacetic acid (EGTA) solutions at room temperature was greater than the contractile response after 30 min of incubation in the Ca-free medium at 37°C. Incubation in Ca-free solution at 37°C before stimulation with acetylcholine in Ca-free solutions at room temperature also reduced the contractile response, suggesting that activator calcium was lost from the fibers at a faster rate at higher temperatures. Electron micrographs of turtle oviduct smooth muscle revealed a sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) occupying approximately 4% of the nucleus- and mitochondria-free cell volume. Incubation of oviduct smooth muscle with ferritin confirmed that the predominantly longitudinally oriented structures described as the SR did not communicate with the extracellular space. The SR formed fenestrations about the surface vesicles, and formed close contacts (couplings) with the surface membrane and surface vesicles in oviduct and vena caval smooth muscle; it is suggested that these are sites of electromechanical coupling. Calculation of the calcium requirements for smooth muscle contraction suggest that the amount of SR observed in the oviduct smooth muscle could supply the activator calcium for the contractions observed in Ca-free solutions. Incubation of oviduct smooth muscle in hypertonic solutions increased the electron opacity of the fibers. A new feature of some of the surface vesicles observed in oviduct, vena caval, and aortic smooth muscle was the presence of approximately 10 nm striations running approximately parallel to the openings of the vesicles to the extracellular space. Thick, thin, and intermediate filaments were observed in turtle oviduct smooth muscle, although the number of thick filaments seen in the present study appeared less than that previously found in mammalian smooth muscles. PMID:4331503

  4. External gill motility and striated muscle presence in the embryos of anuran amphibians.

    PubMed

    Nokhbatolfoghahai, M; Downie, J R; Atherton, L

    2013-02-01

    Anuran external gills were assessed for motility and striated muscle content in 16 species from seven families. Motility of three kinds was observed. Pulsatory movements related to heart beat rhythm were common. In embryos developing to a late stage before hatching, movements of the whole embryo were frequent, with gills rearranging as a consequence. The only clearly active movement, presumably muscle driven, was 'gill flicking', a posterior movement of the entire gill into the body either on one side only, or both together, followed by a return to the normal spread-out position. Some species may actively spread their gills when hanging from the water surface film, but we did not observe this. In some species, active gill movement developed over time, but we were not able to follow all species over such a developmental sequence. The relationship between active motility and muscle content was good in most cases. Observations on late stage embryos of the aromobatid Mannophryne trinitatis are presented for the first time. In one species, we noted spread external gills being used to adhere hatchlings to a surface.

  5. Characterization of beta-connectin (titin 2) from striated muscle by dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, H; Nakauchi, Y; Maruyama, K; Fujime, S

    1993-01-01

    Connectin (titin) is a large filamentous protein (single peptide) with a molecular mass of approximately 3 MDa, contour length approximately 900 nm, and diameter approximately 4 nm, and resides in striated muscle. Connectin links the thick filaments to the Z-lines in a sarcomere and produces a passive elastic force when muscle fiber is stretched. The aim of this study is to elucidate some aspects of physical properties of isolated beta-connectin (titin 2), a proteolytic fragment of connectin, by means of dynamic light-scattering (DLS) spectroscopy. The analysis of DLS spectra for beta-connectin gave the translational diffusion coefficient of 3.60 x 10(-8) cm2/s at 10 degrees C (or the hydrodynamic radius of 44.1 nm), molecular mass little smaller than 3.0 MDa (for a literature value of sedimentation coefficient), the root-mean-square end-to-end distance of 163 nm (or the radius of gyration of 66.6 nm), and the Kuhn segment number of 30 and segment length of 30 nm (or the persistence length of 15 nm). These results permitted to estimate the flexural rigidity of 6.0 x 10(-20) dyn x cm2 for filament bending, and the elastic constant of 7 dyn/cm for extension of one persistence length. Based on a simple model, implications of the present results in muscle physiology are discussed. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8298020

  6. Involvement of catecholaminergic neurons in motor innervation of striated muscle in the mouse esophagus.

    PubMed

    van der Keylen, Piet; Garreis, Fabian; Steigleder, Ruth; Sommer, Daniel; Neuhuber, Winfried L; Wörl, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Enteric co-innervation is a peculiar innervation pattern of striated esophageal musculature. Both anatomical and functional data on enteric co-innervation related to various transmitters have been collected in different species, although its function remains enigmatic. However, it is unclear whether catecholaminergic components are involved in such a co-innervation. Thus, we examined to identify catecholaminergic neuronal elements and clarify their relationship to other innervation components in the esophagus, using immunohistochemistry with antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), α-bungarotoxin (α-BT) and PCR with primers for amplification of cDNA encoding TH and dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH). TH-positive nerve fibers were abundant throughout the myenteric plexus and localized on about 14% of α-BT-labelled motor endplates differing from VAChT-positive vagal nerve terminals. TH-positive perikarya represented a subpopulation of only about 2.8% of all PGP 9.5-positive myenteric neurons. Analysis of mRNA showed both TH and DBH transcripts in the mouse esophagus. As ChAT-positive neurons in the compact formation of the nucleus ambiguus were negative for TH, the TH-positive nerve varicosities on motor endplates are presumably of enteric origin, although a sympathetic origin cannot be excluded. In the medulla oblongata, the cholinergic ambiguus neurons were densely supplied with TH-positive varicosities. Thus, catecholamines may modulate vagal motor innervation of esophageal-striated muscles not only at the peripheral level via enteric co-innervation but also at the central level via projections to the nucleus ambiguus. As Parkinson's disease, with a loss of central dopaminergic neurons, also affects the enteric nervous system and dysphagia is prevalent in patients with this disease, investigation of intrinsic catecholamines in the esophagus may

  7. Large-scale Models Reveal the Two-component Mechanics of Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jarosch, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive explanation of striated muscle mechanics and contraction on the basis of filament rotations. Helical proteins, particularly the coiled-coils of tropomyosin, myosin and α-actinin, shorten their H-bonds cooperatively and produce torque and filament rotations when the Coulombic net-charge repulsion of their highly charged side-chains is diminished by interaction with ions. The classical “two-component model” of active muscle differentiated a “contractile component” which stretches the “series elastic component” during force production. The contractile components are the helically shaped thin filaments of muscle that shorten the sarcomeres by clockwise drilling into the myosin cross-bridges with torque decrease (= force-deficit). Muscle stretch means drawing out the thin filament helices off the cross-bridges under passive counterclockwise rotation with torque increase (= stretch activation). Since each thin filament is anchored by four elastic α-actinin Z-filaments (provided with force-regulating sites for Ca2+ binding), the thin filament rotations change the torsional twist of the four Z-filaments as the “series elastic components”. Large scale models simulate the changes of structure and force in the Z-band by the different Z-filament twisting stages A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Stage D corresponds to the isometric state. The basic phenomena of muscle physiology, i. e. latency relaxation, Fenn-effect, the force-velocity relation, the length-tension relation, unexplained energy, shortening heat, the Huxley-Simmons phases, etc. are explained and interpreted with the help of the model experiments. PMID:19330099

  8. Matching of sarcoplasmic reticulum and contractile properties in rat fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Huong H; Lamb, Graham D

    2006-07-01

    1. The twitch characteristics (fast-twitch or slow-twitch) of skeletal muscle fibres are determined not only by the contractile apparatus properties of the fibre, but also by the time-course of Ca2+ release and re-uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The present study examined, in individual fibres from non-transforming muscle of the rat, whether particular SR properties are matched to the contractile apparatus properties of the fibre, in particular in the case of fibres with fast-twitch contractile apparatus located in a slow-twitch muscle, namely the soleus. 2. Force was recorded in single, mechanically skinned fibres from extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius, peroneus longus and soleus muscles. Using repeated cycles in which the SR was emptied of all releasable Ca2+ and then reloaded, it was possible to determine the relative amount of Ca2+ present in the SR endogenously, the maximum SR capacity and the rate of Ca2+ loading. The sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to Ca2+ and Sr2+ was used to classify the fibres as fast-twitch (FT), slow-twitch (ST) or mixed (< 3% of the fibres examined) and thereby identify the likely troponin C and myosin heavy chain types present. 3. There was no significant difference in SR properties between the groups of FT fibres obtained from the four different muscles, including soleus. Despite some overlap in the SR properties of individual fibres between the FT and ST groups, the properties of the FT fibres in all four muscles studied were significantly different from those of the ST and mixed fibres. 4. In general, in FT fibres the SR had a larger capacity and the endogenous Ca2+ content was a relatively lower percentage of maximum compared with ST fibres. Importantly, in terms of their SR properties, FT fibres from soleus muscle more closely resembled FT fibres from other muscles than they did ST fibres from soleus muscle.

  9. Dietary Fish Oil Blocks the Microcirculatory Manifestations of Ischemia- Reperfusion Injury in Striated Muscle in Hamsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehr, Hans-Anton; Hubner, Christoph; Nolte, Dirk; Kohlschutter, Alfried; Messmer, Konrad

    1991-08-01

    Epidemiologic observations and experimental studies have demonstrated a protective effect of dietary fish oil on the clinical manifestations of ischemia-reperfusion injury. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, we used the dorsal skinfold chamber model for intravital fluorescence microscopy of the microcirculation in striated muscle of awake hamsters. In control hamsters (n = 7), reperfusion after a 4-hr pressure-induced ischemia to the muscle tissue elicited the adhesion of fluorescently stained leukocytes to the endothelium of postcapillary venules, capillary obstruction, and the breakdown of endothelial integrity. These microvascular manifestations of ischemia-reperfusion injury were significantly attenuated in animals (n = 7) when fed with a fish oil-enriched diet for 4 weeks prior to the experiments. In leukocyte total lipids, the fish oil diet resulted in a substantial displacement of arachidonic acid, the precursor of the potent adhesionpromoting leukotriene (LT) B_4, by fish oil-derived eicosapentaenoic acid, the precursor of biologically less potent LTB_5, emphasizing the mediator role of LTB_4 in ischemia-reperfusion injury. These results suggest that the preservation of microvascular perfusion by dietary fish oil contributes to its protective effects on the clinical manifestations of ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  10. Isoforms of gelsolin from lobster striated muscles differ in calcium-dependence.

    PubMed

    Unger, Andreas; Brunne, Bianka; Hinssen, Horst

    2013-08-01

    Two distinct isoforms of the Ca-dependent actin filament severing protein gelsolin were identified in cross-striated muscles of the American lobster. The variants (termed LG1 and LG2) differ by an extension of 18 AA at the C-terminus of LG1, and by two substitutions at AA735 and AA736, the two C-terminal amino acids of LG2. Functional comparison of the isolated and purified proteins revealed gelsolin-typical properties for both with differences in Ca(2+)-sensitivity, LG2 being activated at significant lower Ca-concentration than LG1: Half maximal activation for both filament severing and G-actin binding was ∼4×10(-7)M Ca(2+) for LG2 vs. ∼2×10(-6)M Ca(2+) for LG1. This indicates a differential activation for the two isoproteins in vivo where they are present in almost equal amounts in the muscle cell. Structure prediction modeling on the basis of the known structure of mammalian gelsolin shows that LG2 lacks the C-terminal alpha-helix which is involved in contact formation between domains G6 and G2. In both mammalian gelsolin and LG1, this "latch bridge" is assumed to play a critical role in Ca(2+)-activation by keeping gelsolin in a closed, inactive conformation at low [Ca(2+)]. In LG2, the reduced contact between G6 and G2 may be responsible for its activation at low Ca(2+)-concentration.

  11. The Intriguing Dual Lattices of the Myosin Filaments in Vertebrate Striated Muscles: Evolution and Advantage

    PubMed Central

    Luther, Pradeep K.; Squire, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Myosin filaments in vertebrate striated muscle have a long roughly cylindrical backbone with cross-bridge projections on the surfaces of both halves except for a short central bare zone. In the middle of this central region the filaments are cross-linked by the M-band which holds them in a well-defined hexagonal lattice in the muscle A-band. During muscular contraction the M-band-defined rotation of the myosin filaments around their long axes influences the interactions that the cross-bridges can make with the neighbouring actin filaments. We can visualise this filament rotation by electron microscopy of thin cross-sections in the bare-region immediately adjacent to the M-band where the filament profiles are distinctly triangular. In the muscles of teleost fishes, the thick filament triangular profiles have a single orientation giving what we call the simple lattice. In other vertebrates, for example all the tetrapods, the thick filaments have one of two orientations where the triangles point in opposite directions (they are rotated by 60° or 180°) according to set rules. Such a distribution cannot be developed in an ordered fashion across a large 2D lattice, but there are small domains of superlattice such that the next-nearest neighbouring thick filaments often have the same orientation. We believe that this difference in the lattice forms can lead to different contractile behaviours. Here we provide a historical review, and when appropriate cite recent work related to the emergence of the simple and superlattice forms by examining the muscles of several species ranging back to primitive vertebrates and we discuss the functional differences that the two lattice forms may have. PMID:25478994

  12. The intriguing dual lattices of the Myosin filaments in vertebrate striated muscles: evolution and advantage.

    PubMed

    Luther, Pradeep K; Squire, John M

    2014-12-03

    Myosin filaments in vertebrate striated muscle have a long roughly cylindrical backbone with cross-bridge projections on the surfaces of both halves except for a short central bare zone. In the middle of this central region the filaments are cross-linked by the M-band which holds them in a well-defined hexagonal lattice in the muscle A-band. During muscular contraction the M-band-defined rotation of the myosin filaments around their long axes influences the interactions that the cross-bridges can make with the neighbouring actin filaments. We can visualise this filament rotation by electron microscopy of thin cross-sections in the bare-region immediately adjacent to the M-band where the filament profiles are distinctly triangular. In the muscles of teleost fishes, the thick filament triangular profiles have a single orientation giving what we call the simple lattice. In other vertebrates, for example all the tetrapods, the thick filaments have one of two orientations where the triangles point in opposite directions (they are rotated by 60° or 180°) according to set rules. Such a distribution cannot be developed in an ordered fashion across a large 2D lattice, but there are small domains of superlattice such that the next-nearest neighbouring thick filaments often have the same orientation. We believe that this difference in the lattice forms can lead to different contractile behaviours. Here we provide a historical review, and when appropriate cite recent work related to the emergence of the simple and superlattice forms by examining the muscles of several species ranging back to primitive vertebrates and we discuss the functional differences that the two lattice forms may have.

  13. Digital image analysis of striated skeletal muscle tissue injury during reperfusion after induced ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosero Salazar, Doris Haydee; Salazar Monsalve, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Conditions such as surgical procedures or vascular diseases produce arterial ischemia and reperfusion injuries, which generate changes in peripheral tissues and organs, for instance, in striated skeletal muscle. To determine such changes, we conducted an experimental method in which 42 male Wistar rat were selected, to be undergone to tourniquet application on the right forelimb and left hind limb, to induce ischemia during one and three hours, followed by reperfusion periods starting at one hour and it was prolonged up to 32 days. Extensor carpi radialis longus and soleus respectively, were obtained to be processed for histochemical and morphometric analysis. By means of image processing and detection of regions of interest, variations of areas occupied by muscle fibers and intramuscular extracellular matrix (IM-ECM) throughout reperfusion were observed. In extensor carpi radialis longus, results shown reduction in the area occupied by muscle fibers; this change is significant between one hour and three hours ischemia followed by 16 hours, 48 hours and 32 days reperfusión (p˂0.005). To compare only periods of reperfusión that continued to three hours ischemia, were found significant differences, as well. For area occupied by IM-ECM, were identified increments in extensor carpi radialis longus by three hours ischemia and eight to 16 days reperfusion; in soleus, was observed difference by one hour ischemia with 42 hours reperfusion, and three hours ischemia followed by four days reperfusion (p˂0.005). Skeletal muscle develops adaptive changes in longer reperfusion, to deal with induced injury. Descriptions beyond 32 days reperfusion, can determine recovering normal pattern.

  14. Calcium Uptake and Release through Sarcoplasmic Reticulum in the Inferior Oblique Muscles of Patients with Inferior Oblique Overaction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Seon; Chang, Yoon-Hee; Kim, Do Han; Park, So Ra; Han, Sueng-Han

    2006-01-01

    We characterized and compared the characteristics of Ca2+ movements through the sarcoplasmic reticulum of inferior oblique muscles in the various conditions including primary inferior oblique overaction (IOOA), secondary IOOA, and controls, so as to further understand the pathogenesis of primary IOOA. Of 15 specimens obtained through inferior oblique myectomy, six were from primary IOOA, 6 from secondary IOOA, and the remaining 3 were controls from enucleated eyes. Ryanodine binding assays were performed, and Ca2+ uptake rates, calsequestrins and SERCA levels were determined. Ryanodine bindings and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake rates were significantly decreased in primary IOOA (p<0.05). Western blot analysis conducted to quantify calsequestrins and SERCA, found no significant difference between primary IOOA, secondary IOOA, and the controls. Increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration due to reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake may play a role in primary IOOA. PMID:16642550

  15. Lessons from mammalian hibernators: molecular insights into striated muscle plasticity and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Shannon N; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-05-01

    Striated muscle shows an amazing ability to adapt its structural apparatus based on contractile activity, loading conditions, fuel supply, or environmental factors. Studies with mammalian hibernators have identified a variety of molecular pathways which are strategically regulated and allow animals to endure multiple stresses associated with the hibernating season. Of particular interest is the observation that hibernators show little skeletal muscle atrophy despite the profound metabolic rate depression and mechanical unloading that they experience during long weeks of torpor. Additionally, the cardiac muscle of hibernators must adjust to low temperature and reduced perfusion, while the strength of contraction increases in order to pump cold, viscous blood. Consequently, hibernators hold a wealth of knowledge as it pertains to understanding the natural capacity of myocytes to alter structural, contractile and metabolic properties in response to environmental stimuli. The present review outlines the molecular and biochemical mechanisms which play a role in muscular atrophy, hypertrophy, and remodeling. In this capacity, four main networks are highlighted: (1) antioxidant defenses, (2) the regulation of structural, contractile and metabolic proteins, (3) ubiquitin proteosomal machinery, and (4) macroautophagy pathways. Subsequently, we discuss the role of transcription factors nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), Myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), and Forkhead box (FOXO) and their associated posttranslational modifications as it pertains to regulating each of these networks. Finally, we propose that comparing and contrasting these concepts to data collected from model organisms able to withstand dramatic changes in muscular function without injury will allow researchers to delineate physiological versus pathological responses.

  16. Differential expression of beta 1 integrins in nonneoplastic smooth and striated muscle cells and in tumors derived from these cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mechtersheimer, G.; Barth, T.; Quentmeier, A.; Möller, P.

    1994-01-01

    Integrins are a superfamily of transmembrane alpha beta heterodimers that play an important role in cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions by acting as receptors for extracellular matrix proteins and for cell adhesion molecules. Using monoclonal antibodies against beta 1, alpha 1 to alpha 6, and alpha v subunits, the in situ distribution pattern of beta 1 integrins was examined immunohistochemically in nonneoplastic smooth and striated muscle cells and in their tumors. Nonneoplastic smooth muscle cells were beta 1+, alpha 1+, alpha 3+, alpha v+ and, in diverse localizations, also alpha 5+ or even alpha 6+. The expression of the beta 1 chain was conserved in all leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas. The distribution pattern of the alpha subunits by contrast underwent several changes during malignant transformation of smooth muscle cells. These alterations consisted in a neoexpression of alpha 2, alpha 4, and alpha 6 as well as in an abnormal abrogation of alpha 1 and alpha 3 in some leiomyosarcomas. Except for the absence of alpha 5 in the majority of epithelioid leiomyosarcomas, expression of the alpha 5 and alpha v subunits was mainly conserved. In addition, tumors with epithelioid differentiation differed from typical cases by the absence of alpha 1 and the simultaneous presence of alpha 4. Adult striated muscle cells were beta 1+ but alpha 1- to alpha 6- and alpha v-, whereas fetal striated muscle cells were not only beta 1+ but also alpha 3+/-, alpha 4+/-, alpha 5+ and alpha 6+. In all rhabdomyosarcomas the expression of beta 1 was retained. Furthermore, the majority of cases showed the expression of one or more alpha subunits most of which, ie, alpha 4, alpha 5, and alpha 6, were also found in fetal striated muscle cells. In conclusion, beta 1 integrins exhibited a differential expression pattern along the two lines of myogenic differentiation. This integrin profile underwent characteristic changes during malignant transformation. Nevertheless, the compiled

  17. Vanilloid receptor expressed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Xin Hong; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Yamaguchi, Maki; Takemori, Shigeru; Nakamura, Akio; Kohama, Kazuhiro . E-mail: kohamak@med.gunma-u.ac.jp

    2005-07-08

    Vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (VR1) was cloned as a capsaicin receptor from neuronal cells of dorsal root ganglia. VR1 was subsequently found in a few non-neuronal tissues, including skeletal muscle [Onozawa et al., Tissue distribution of capsaicin receptor in the various organs of rats, Proc. Jpn. Acad. Ser. B 76 (2000) 68-72]. We confirmed the expression of VR1 in muscle cells using the RT-PCR method and Western blot analysis. Immunostaining studies with a confocal microscope and an electron microscope indicated that VR1 was present in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), a store of Ca{sup 2+}. The SR releases Ca{sup 2+} to cause a contraction when a muscle is excited. However, SR still releases a small amount of Ca{sup 2+} under relaxed conditions. We found that this leakage was enhanced by capsaicin and was antagonized by capsazepine, a capsaicin blocker, indicating that leakage of Ca{sup 2+} occurs through a channel composed of VR1.

  18. Cylindrical Spirals in Skeletal Muscles Originate From the Longitudinal Sarcoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing-Wen; Liu, Fu-Chen; Li, Wei; Zhao, Yu-Ying; Zhao, Dan-Dan; Luo, Yue-Bei; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Yan, Chuan-Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Cylindrical spirals (CSs) are rare but distinct subsarcolemmal accumulations in skeletal muscle fibers. To date, CSs have been reported in only 16 patients with a variety of neuromuscular conditions. The origin and composition of CSs are unknown, although there are some morphologic similarities between CSs and tubular aggregates (TAs). To clarify the nature of CSs, we characterized the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and other intracellular membrane system proteins in CSs of muscle biopsies from 2 adult Chinese siblings. Immunohistochemical studies revealed subsarcolemmal immunoreactivity for sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2þ-ATPase 1 (SERCA 1) in the longitudinal SR, but no immunoreactivity for calsequestrin in the terminal cisternae or type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1) in the junctional SR. Muscles biopsied from 2 patients with TAs showed immunoreactivity not only for SERCA1 but also for other SR proteins, including calsequestrin and RYR1. CSs exhibited no immunoreactivity for the Golgi apparatus marker GM130, the nuclear membrane emerin, desmin, the autophagosome marker LC3, the lysosomal membrane marker LAMP2, dystrophin, or myosin. Our results suggest CSs may originate only from the longitudinal SR, whereas TAs are composed of both the junctional and longitudinal SR. Immunochemical staining with antibodies against calsequestrin and RYR1 help to distinguish these 2 pathological alterations.

  19. Differential sensitivity of C2-C12 striated muscle cells to lovastatin and pravastatin.

    PubMed

    Gadbut, A P; Caruso, A P; Galper, J B

    1995-10-01

    One of the major side-effects of the use of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia is the development of myositis and, in some patients undergoing concomitant immunosuppressive treatment, the development of rhabdomyolysis. Experiments outlined in these studies demonstrate that inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase activity which differ primary in the substitution of a methyl group for a hydroxyl group have differential effects on both cholesterol levels and cell viability in a striated muscle cell model, the mouse C2-C12 myoblast. Thus, concentrations as high as 200 microM of pravastatin had little effect on total cholesterol level while 25 microM of lovastatin decreased cellular cholesterol by over 90%. Simvastatin and lovastatin decreased viability of C2-C12 myoblasts by nearly 50% at concentrations as low as 1 and 5 microM, respectively, and decreased viability by almost 90% at 10 and 15 microM respectively. However, 300 microM of pravastatin decreased cell viability by less than 50%. The order of potency for the effects on cell viability wassimvastatin>lovastatin>pravastatin. The possible relationship between effects on cell viability and the development of myositis is discussed.

  20. Testosterone enhances C-14 2-deoxyglucose uptake by striated muscle. [sex hormones and muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toop, J.; Max, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of testosterone propionate (TP) on C-14 2-deoxyglucose (C-14 2DG) uptake was studied in the rat levator ani muscle in vivo using the autoradiographic technique. Following a delay of 1 to 3 h after injecting TP, the rate of C-14 2DG uptake in experimental animals began to increase and continued to increase for at least 20 h. The label, which corresponds to C-14 2-deoxyglucose 6-phosphate, as demonstrated by chromatographic analysis of muscle extracts, was uniformly distributed over the entire muscle and was predominantly in muscle fibers, although nonmuscular elements were also labeled. The 1 to 3 h time lag suggests that the TP effect may be genomic, acting via androgen receptors, rather than directly on muscle membranes. Acceleration of glucose uptake may be an important early event in the anabolic response of the rat levator ani muscle to androgens.

  1. Calcium releasing action of quercetin on sarcoplasmic reticulum from frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kurebayashi, N; Ogawa, Y

    1984-10-01

    The release of Ca by quercetin from the sarcoplasmic reticulum has been claimed to be a result of the well-known inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity, or to be due to an intrinsic property of quercetin. To get a clearer understanding of the effect of quercetin, we examined it using fragmented sarcoplasmic reticulum (FSR) from bullfrog skeletal muscle. The rapid phase of Ca release (hereafter simply referred to as "Ca release") from loaded FSR was almost completed within 5 s after addition of quercetin in the presence of ATP. It cannot be ascribed to the inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity on the basis of following findings. First, when Ca uptake was driven by carbamylphosphate, no or little Ca release was observed in marked contrast to a stronger reduction in the rate of Ca uptake. Secondly, procaine reverses the Ca releasing action of quercetin, whereas it show a synergistic action in the inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity. Thirdly, HFSR released more Ca than LFSR, while the Ca2+-ATPase activities of both fractions were inhibited to a similar extent. The Ca release by quercetin is enhanced by ATP or beta, gamma-methylene adenosine triphosphate, and decreased by procaine or a high concentration of Mg2+. In the presence of 2.5 mM caffeine, the amount of Ca2+ released by quercetin was decreased, and the dose-effect relationship was shifted to higher doses of quercetin. This indicates that quercetin and caffeine probably overlap in the site(s) of the action, but that quercetin is dissimilar from halothane in the mode of its Ca-releasing action.

  2. Maximum shortening velocity of lymphatic muscle approaches that of striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongzhen; Taucer, Anne I; Gashev, Anatoliy A; Muthuchamy, Mariappan; Zawieja, David C; Davis, Michael J

    2013-11-15

    Lymphatic muscle (LM) is widely considered to be a type of vascular smooth muscle, even though LM cells uniquely express contractile proteins from both smooth muscle and cardiac muscle. We tested the hypothesis that LM exhibits an unloaded maximum shortening velocity (Vmax) intermediate between that of smooth muscle and cardiac muscle. Single lymphatic vessels were dissected from the rat mesentery, mounted in a servo-controlled wire myograph, and subjected to isotonic quick release protocols during spontaneous or agonist-evoked contractions. After maximal activation, isotonic quick releases were performed at both the peak and plateau phases of contraction. Vmax was 0.48 ± 0.04 lengths (L)/s at the peak: 2.3 times higher than that of mesenteric arteries and 11.4 times higher than mesenteric veins. In cannulated, pressurized lymphatic vessels, shortening velocity was determined from the maximal rate of constriction [rate of change in internal diameter (-dD/dt)] during spontaneous contractions at optimal preload and minimal afterload; peak -dD/dt exceeded that obtained during any of the isotonic quick release protocols (2.14 ± 0.30 L/s). Peak -dD/dt declined with pressure elevation or activation using substance P. Thus, isotonic methods yielded Vmax values for LM in the mid to high end (0.48 L/s) of those the recorded for phasic smooth muscle (0.05-0.5 L/s), whereas isobaric measurements yielded values (>2.0 L/s) that overlapped the midrange of values for cardiac muscle (0.6-3.3 L/s). Our results challenge the dogma that LM is classical vascular smooth muscle, and its unusually high Vmax is consistent with the expression of cardiac muscle contractile proteins in the lymphatic vessel wall.

  3. Effects of imperatoxin A on local sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release in frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Shtifman, A; Ward, C W; Wang, J; Valdivia, H H; Schneider, M F

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of imperatoxin A (IpTx(a)) on local calcium release events in permeabilized frog skeletal muscle fibers, using laser scanning confocal microscopy in linescan mode. IpTx(a) induced the appearance of Ca(2+) release events from the sarcoplasmic reticulum that are approximately 2 s and have a smaller amplitude (31 +/- 2%) than the "Ca(2+) sparks" normally seen in the absence of toxin. The frequency of occurrence of long-duration imperatoxin-induced Ca(2+) release events increased in proportion to IpTx(a) concentrations ranging from 10 nM to 50 nM. The mean duration of imperatoxin-induced events in muscle fibers was independent of toxin concentration and agreed closely with the channel open time in experiments on isolated frog ryanodine receptors (RyRs) reconstituted in planar lipid bilayer, where IpTx(a) induced opening of single Ca(2+) release channels to prolonged subconductance states. These results suggest involvement of a single molecule of IpTx(a) in the activation of a single Ca(2+) release channel to produce a long-duration event. Assuming the ratio of full conductance to subconductance to be the same in the fibers as in bilayer, the amplitude of a spark relative to the long event indicates involvement of at most four RyR Ca(2+) release channels in the production of short-duration Ca(2+) sparks. PMID:10920014

  4. Intensity of light diffraction from striated muscle as a function of incident angle.

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, R J; Lieber, R L; Oba, T; Yeh, Y

    1981-01-01

    In a recently developed theory of light diffraction by single striated muscle fibers, we considered only the case of normal beam incidence. The present investigation represents both an experimental and theoretical extension of the previous work to arbitrary incident angle. Angle scan profiles over a 50 degrees range of incident angle (+25 degrees to -25 degrees) were obtained at different sarcomere lengths. Left and right first-order scan peak separations were found to be a function of sarcomere length (separation angle = 2 theta B), and good agreement was found between theory and experiment. Our theoretical analysis further showed that a myofibrillar population with a single common skew angle can yield an angle scan profile containing many peaks. Thus, it is not necessary to associate each peak with a different skew population. Finally, we have found that symmetry angle, theta s, also varies with sarcomere length, but not in a regular manner. Its value at a given sarcomere length is a function of a particular region of a given fiber and represents the average skew angle of all the myofibril populations illuminated. The intensity of a diffraction order line is considered to be principally the resultant of two interference phenomena. The first is a volume-grating phenomenon which results from the periodic A-I band structure of the fiber (with some contribution from Z bands and H zones). The second is Bragg reflection from skew planes, if the correct relation between incident angle and skew angle is met. This may result in intensity asymmetry between the left and right first order lines. PMID:6976802

  5. Quantitative second harmonic generation imaging and modeling of the optical clearing mechanism in striated muscle and tendon.

    PubMed

    LaComb, Ronald; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Carey, Shawn; Campagnola, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms and capabilities of optical clearing in conjunction with second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging in tendon and striated muscle. Our approach combines three-dimensional (3-D) SHG imaging of the axial attenuation and directional response with Monte Carlo simulation (based on measured bulk optical properties) of the creation intensity and propagation through the tissues. Through these experiments and simulations, we show that reduction of the primary filter following glycerol treatment dominates the axial attenuation response in both muscle and tendon. However, these disparate tissue types are shown to clear through different mechanisms of the glycerol-tissue interaction. In the acellular tendon, glycerol application reduces scattering by both index matching as well as increasing the interfibril separation. This results in an overall enhancement of the 3-D SHG intensity, where good agreement is found between experiment and simulation. Through analysis of the axial response as a function of glycerol concentration in striated muscle, we conclude that the mechanism in this tissue arises from matching of the refractive index of the cytoplasm of the muscle cells with that of the surrounding higher-index collagenous perimysium. We further show that the proportional decrease in the scattering coefficient mu(s) with increasing glycerol fraction can be well-approximated by Mie theory.

  6. The Influence of Hydrogen Ion Concentration on Calcium Binding and Release by Skeletal Muscle Sarcoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Nakamaru, Yoshiaki; Schwartz, Arnold

    1972-01-01

    Calcium release and binding produced by alterations in pH were investigated in isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) from skeletal muscle. When the pH was abruptly increased from 6.46 to 7.82, after calcium loading for 30 sec, 80–90 nanomoles (nmole) of calcium/mg protein were released. When the pH was abruptly decreased from 7.56 to 6.46, after calcium loading for 30 sec, 25–30 nmole of calcium/mg protein were rebound. The calcium release process was shown to be a function of pH change: 57 nmole of calcium were released per 1 pH unit change per mg protein. The amount of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bound to the SR was not altered by the pH changes. The release phenomenon was not due to alteration of ATP concentration by the increased pH. Native actomyosin was combined with SR in order to study the effectiveness of calcium release from the SR by pH change in inducing super-precipitation of actomyosin. It was found that SR, in an amount high enough to inhibit superprecipitation at pH 6.5, did not prevent the process when the pH was suddenly increased to 7.3, indicating that the affinity of SR for calcium depends specifically on pH. These data suggest the possible participation of hydrogen ion concentration in excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:5007263

  7. Calsequestrin depolymerizes when calcium is depleted in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of working muscle

    PubMed Central

    Manno, Carlo; Figueroa, Lourdes C.; Gillespie, Dirk; Fitts, Robert; Kang, ChulHee; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Rios, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Calsequestrin, the only known protein with cyclical storage and supply of calcium as main role, is proposed to have other functions, which remain unproven. Voluntary movement and the heart beat require this calcium flow to be massive and fast. How does calsequestrin do it? To bind large amounts of calcium in vitro, calsequestrin must polymerize and then depolymerize to release it. Does this rule apply inside the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of a working cell? We answered using fluorescently tagged calsequestrin expressed in muscles of mice. By FRAP and imaging we monitored mobility of calsequestrin as [Ca2+] in the SR--measured with a calsequestrin-fused biosensor--was lowered. We found that calsequestrin is polymerized within the SR at rest and that it depolymerized as [Ca2+] went down: fully when calcium depletion was maximal (a condition achieved with an SR calcium channel opening drug) and partially when depletion was limited (a condition imposed by fatiguing stimulation, long-lasting depolarization, or low drug concentrations). With fluorescence and electron microscopic imaging we demonstrated massive movements of calsequestrin accompanied by drastic morphological SR changes in fully depleted cells. When cells were partially depleted no remodeling was found. The present results support the proposed role of calsequestrin in termination of calcium release by conformationally inducing closure of SR channels. A channel closing switch operated by calsequestrin depolymerization will limit depletion, thereby preventing full disassembly of the polymeric calsequestrin network and catastrophic structural changes in the SR. PMID:28069951

  8. Freeze-fracture studies of nexuses between smooth muscle cells. Close relationship to sarcoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    The freeze-fracture appearance of the nexus was compared in the smooth muscle of guinea pig sphincter pupillac, portal vein, pulmonary artery, taenia coli, uretzr, and vas diferens, mouse vas deferens, chicken gizzard and anterior mesenteric artery, and toad stomach. Nexuses are particularly numerous in the guinea pig sphincter pupillae; they are usually oval and their average area is 0.15 mum2, although some as large as 0.6 mum2 were seen. Small aggregations of particles were observed which would not be recognizable as nexuses in thin section. What constitutes the minimum size of a nexus is discussed. It is estimated that the number of nexuses per cell in this preparation is of the order of tens rather than hundreds. All nexuses examined had 6-9-nm particles in the PF face, with corresponding 3-4-nm pits on the EF face forming a polygonal tending towards a hexagonal lattice. The nexuses are arranged in rows parallel to the main axis of the cell, usually alternating with longitudinal rows of plasmalemmal vesicles. Many nexuses in the guinea pig sphincter pupillae, chicken gizzard, and toad stomach show a close relationship with sarcoplasmic reticulum. The possibility that this may have some role in current flow across this specialized junction is discussed. PMID:401506

  9. Calcium handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum during oscillatory contractions of skinned skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Szentesi, P; Zaremba, R; Stienen, G J

    1998-08-01

    Isometric ATP consumption and force were investigated in mechanically skinned fibres from iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis. Measurements were performed at different [Ca2+], in the presence and absence of caffeine (5 nM). In weakly Ca2+-buffered solutions without caffeine, spontaneous oscillations in force and ATPase activity occurred. The repetition frequency was [Ca2+]-and temperature-dependent. The Ca2+ threshold (+/- SEM) for the oscillations corresponded to a pCa of 6.5 +/- 0.1. The maximum ATP consumption associated with calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) reached during the oscillations was similar to the activity under steady-state conditions at saturating calcium concentrations in the presence of caffeine. Maximum activity was reached when the force relaxation was almost complete. The calculated amount of Ca2+ taken up by the SR during a complete cycle corresponded to 5.4 +/ 0.4 mmol per litre cell volume. In strongly Ca2+-buffered solutions, caffeine enhanced the calcium sensitivity of the contractile apparatus and, at low calcium concentrations, SR Ca uptake. These results suggest that when the SR is heavily loaded by net Ca uptake, there is a massive calcium-induced calcium release. Subsequent net Ca uptake by the SR then gives rise to the periodic nature of the calcium transient.

  10. Relationships between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and sarcolemmal calcium transport revealed by rapidly cooling rabbit ventricular muscle

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Rabbit right ventricular papillary muscles were cooled from 30 to approximately 1 degree C immediately after discontinuing electrical stimulation (0.5 Hz). This produced a contracture that was 30-50% of the preceding twitch magnitude and required 20-30 s to develop. The contractures were identical in cooling solutions with normal (144 mM) or low (2.0 mM) Na. They were therefore not Na-withdrawal contractures. Contracture activation was considerably slower than muscle cooling (approximately 2.5 s to cool below 2 degrees C). Cooling contractures were suppressed by caffeine treatment (10.0 mM). Rapid cooling did not cause sufficient membrane depolarization (16.5 +/- 1.2 mV after 30 s of cooling) to produce either a voltage-dependent activation of contracture or a gated entry of Ca from the extracellular space. Contractures induced by treating resting muscles with 5 X 10(-5) M strophanthidin at 30 degrees C exhibited pronounced tension noise. The Fourier spectrum of this noise revealed a periodic component (2-3 Hz) that disappeared when the muscle was cooled. Cooling contractures decayed with rest (t1/2 = 71.0 +/- 9.3 s). This decay accelerated in the presence of 10.0 mM caffeine and was prevented and to some extent reversed when extracellular Na was reduced to 2.0 mM. 20 min of rest resulted in a net decline in intracellular Ca content of 1.29 +/- 0.38 mmol/kg dry wt. I infer that cooling contractures are principally activated by Ca from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The properties of these contractures suggest that they may provide a convenient relative index of the availability of SR Ca for contraction. The rest decay of cooling contractures (and hence the decay in the availability of activating Ca) is consistent with the measured loss in analytic Ca during rest. The results suggest that contraction in heart muscle can be regulated by an interaction between sarcolemmal and SR Ca transport. PMID:3783123

  11. Activation of inositol trisphosphate-sensitive Ca2+ channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum from frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Isla, B A; Alcayaga, C; Marengo, J J; Bull, R

    1991-01-01

    1. The modulation by Ca2+ of the activation by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) of Ca2+ channels present in native sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes from frog skeletal muscle was studied after channel incorporation into planar phospholipid bilayers in the presence of Ca2+ or Ba2+ as current carrier species. 2. Channel activity expressed as fractional open time (Po) was low (less than or equal to 0.15) in the presence of varying free Ca2+ concentrations bathing the myoplasmic face of the channel (cis side), and did not increase significantly between 0.01 and 30 microM-Ca2+. 3. Channel activation mediated by IP3 could be elicited from free Ca2+ levels similar to those of resting skeletal muscle (about 0.1 microM) and was found to be strongly regulated by the free Ca2+ concentration present at the myoplasmic moiety of the channel. 4. Channel activation by 10 microM-IP3 depended on the Ca2+ concentration on the cis side. Po reached a maximum between pCa 7.0 and 6.0, but decreased at higher concentrations of free Ca2+. Thus, Ca2+ exerted a modulatory influence on IP3-mediated activation in a concentration range where the channel was insensitive to Ca2+. 5. The results indicate that Ca2+ ions act as modulators of IP3 efficacy to open the channel. This could arise from an interaction of Ca2+ with the channel gating mechanism or with the agonist binding site. PMID:1667801

  12. Non-proteolytic functions of calpain-3 in sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Koichi; Ono, Yasuko; Ottenheijm, Coen; Hata, Shoji; Suzuki, Hidenori; Granzier, Henk; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2011-04-01

    Mutations in CAPN3/Capn3, which codes for skeletal muscle-specific calpain-3/p94 protease, are responsible for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A. Using "knock-in" (referred to as Capn3(CS/CS)) mice, in which the endogenous calpain-3 is replaced with a mutant calpain-3:C129S, which is a proteolytically inactive but structurally intact calpain-3, we demonstrated in our previous studies that loss of calpain-3 protease activity causes muscular dystrophy [Ojima, K. et al. (2010) J. Clin. Invest. 120, 2672-2683]. However, compared to Capn3-null (Capn3(-/-)) mice, Capn3(CS/CS) mice showed less severe dystrophic symptoms. This suggests that calpain-3 also has a non-proteolytic function. This study aimed to elucidate the non-proteolytic functions of calpain-3 through comparison of Capn3(CS/CS) mice with Capn3(-/-) mice. We found that calpain-3 is a component of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and that calpain-3 interacts with, but does not proteolyze, typical SR components such as ryanodine receptor and calsequestrin. Furthermore, Capn3(CS/CS) mice showed that the nonenzymatic role of calpain-3 is required for proper Ca(2+) efflux from the SR to cytosol during muscle contraction. These results indicate that calpain-3 functions as a nonenzymatic element for the Ca(2+) efflux machinery in the SR, rather than as a protease. Thus, defects in the nonenzymatic function of calpain-3 must also be involved in the pathogenesis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A.

  13. Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum compared in amphibian and mammalian skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Puzzled by recent reports of differences in specific ligand binding to muscle Ca2+ channels, we quantitatively compared the flux of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in skeletal muscle fibers of an amphibian (frog) and a mammal (rat), voltage clamped in a double Vaseline gap chamber. The determinations of release flux were carried out by the "removal" method and by measuring the rate of Ca2+ binding to dyes in large excess over other Ca2+ buffers. To have a more meaningful comparison, the effects of stretching the fibers, of rapid changes in temperature, and of changes in the Ca2+ content of the SR were studied in both species. In both frogs and rats, the release flux had an early peak followed by fast relaxation to a lower sustained release. The peak and steady values of release flux, Rp and Rs, were influenced little by stretching. Rp in frogs was 31 mM/s (SEM = 4, n = 24) and in rats 7 +/- 2 mM/s (n = 12). Rs was 9 +/- 1 and 3 +/- 0.7 mM/s in frogs and rats, respectively. Transverse (T) tubule area, estimated from capacitance measurements and normalized to fiber volume, was greater in rats (0.61 +/- 0.04 microns-1) than in frogs (0.48 +/- 0.04 micron-1), as expected from the greater density of T tubuli. Total Ca in the SR was estimated as 3.4 +/- 0.6 and 1.9 +/- 0.3 mmol/liter myoplasmic water in frogs and rats. With the above figures, the steady release flux per unit area of T tubule was found to be fourfold greater in the frog, and the steady permeability of the junctional SR was about threefold greater. The ratio Rp/Rs was approximately 2 in rats at all voltages, whereas it was greater and steeply voltage dependent in frogs, going through a maximum of 6 at -40 mV, then decaying to approximately 3.5 at high voltage. Both Rp and Rs depended strongly on the temperature, but their ratio, and its voltage dependence, did not. Assuming that the peak of Ca2+ release is contributed by release channels not in contact with voltage sensors, or not under

  14. Ryanodine modification of cardiac muscle responses to potassium-free solutions. Evidence for inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    To test whether ryanodine blocks the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac muscle, we examined its effects on the aftercontractions and transient depolarizations or transient inward currents developed by guinea pig papillary muscles and voltage-clamped calf cardiac Purkinje fibers in potassium-free solutions. Ryanodine (0.1-1.0 microM) abolished or prevented aftercontractions and transient depolarizations by the papillary muscles without affecting any of the other sequelae of potassium removal. In the presence of 4.7 mM potassium and at a stimulation rate of 1 Hz, ryanodine had only a small variable effect on papillary muscle force development and action potential characteristics. In calf Purkinje fibers, ryanodine (1 nM-1 microM) completely blocked the aftercontractions and transient inward currents without altering the steady state current-voltage relationship. Ryanodine also abolished the twitch in potassium-free solutions, but it enhanced the tonic force during depolarizing voltage- clamp steps. This latter effect was dependent on the combination of ryanodine and potassium-free solutions. The slow inward current was not blocked by 1 microM ryanodine, but ryanodine did appear to abolish an outward current that remained in the presence of 0.5 mM 4- aminopyridine. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that ryanodine, by inhibiting the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, prevents the oscillations in intracellular calcium that activate the transient inward currents and aftercontractions associated with calcium overload states. PMID:6631403

  15. Evolution of the regulatory control of vertebrate striated muscle: the roles of troponin I and myosin binding protein-C.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Justin F; Gillis, Todd E

    2010-08-01

    Troponin I (TnI) and myosin binding protein-C (MyBP-C) are key regulatory proteins of contractile function in vertebrate muscle. TnI modulates the Ca(2+) activation signal, while MyBP-C regulates cross-bridge cycling kinetics. In vertebrates, each protein is distributed as tissue-specific paralogs in fast skeletal (fs), slow skeletal (ss), and cardiac (c) muscles. The purpose of this study is to characterize how TnI and MyBP-C have changed during the evolution of vertebrate striated muscle and how tissue-specific paralogs have adapted to different physiological conditions. To accomplish this we have completed phylogenetic analyses using the amino acid sequences of all known TnI and MyBP-C isoforms. This includes 99 TnI sequences (fs, ss, and c) from 51 different species and 62 MyBP-C sequences from 26 species, with representatives from each vertebrate group. Results indicate that the role of protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) in regulating contractile function has changed during the evolution of vertebrate striated muscle. This is reflected in an increased number of phosphorylatable sites in cTnI and cMyBP-C in endothermic vertebrates and the loss of two PKC sites in fsTnI in a common ancestor of mammals, birds, and reptiles. In addition, we find that His(132), Val(134), and Asn(141) in human ssTnI, previously identified as enabling contractile function during cellular acidosis, are present in all vertebrate cTnI isoforms except those from monotremes, marsupials, and eutherian mammals. This suggests that the replacement of these residues with alternative residues coincides with the evolution of endothermy in the mammalian lineage.

  16. Calcium release by noradrenaline from central sarcoplasmic reticulum in rabbit main pulmonary artery smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kowarski, D; Shuman, H; Somlyo, A P; Somlyo, A V

    1985-01-01

    The subcellular composition of relaxed and noradrenaline-contracted rabbit main pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells was measured by electron probe X-ray microanalysis of cryosections of rapidly frozen tissue. Some of the preparations were made permeable with saponin and exposed to a known free Ca ion concentration, rapidly frozen, freeze-substituted, and also analysed by electron probe X-ray microanalysis. 98% of intracellular K could be replaced by Rb. This was done to remove the K peak that partially overlaps the Ca peak in the X-ray spectra. The final [Rb]i plus residual [K]i was not significantly different from the [K]i of normal tissue. The [Ca]i in Rb-containing tissue was not significantly different from the [Ca]i in normal, K-containing tissue. Non-mitochondrial micro-regions containing high [Ca] (up to 33 mmol/kg dry wt.) were found at sites 200 nm or more away from the plasma membrane. These micro-regions also contained high [P]. We consider the identification of these regions containing high [Ca] as sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.), validated by: (a) conventional electron micrographs that show no other structures in main pulmonary artery smooth muscle in sufficient quantity and location to account for the frequency of these regions, (b) the previous localization of strontium, a functional calcium analogue, in the central s.r. in these smooth muscles (Somlyo & Somlyo, 1971 a), (c) the present demonstration that the central s.r. in this tissue can accumulate large amounts of calcium oxalate. The proportion of regions containing high [Ca] (greater than 12.0 mmol/kg dry wt.) was significantly higher in relaxed (35 of 330 measurements) than in the contracted (14 of 337) tissues (P less than 0.005), or 26 of 34 vs. 6 of 31 high [Ca] measurements in regions identified as s.r. through their high phosphorus content (P less than 0.006). This difference is thought to represent Ca release from the central s.r. There was no significant difference (P greater than 0

  17. Acute vascular endothelial growth factor expression during hypertrophy is muscle phenotype specific and localizes as a striated pattern within fibres.

    PubMed

    Parvaresh, Kevin C; Huber, Ashley M; Brochin, Robert L; Bacon, Phoebe L; McCall, Gary E; Huey, Kimberly A; Hyatt, Jon-Philippe K

    2010-11-01

    Skeletal muscle hypertrophy requires the co-ordinated expression of locally acting growth factors that promote myofibre growth and concurrent adaptive changes in the microvasculature. These studies tested the hypothesis that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) expression are upregulated during the early stages of compensatory muscle growth induced by chronic functional overload (FO). Bilateral FO of the plantaris and soleus muscles was induced for 3 or 7 days in the hindlimbs of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 5 per group) and compared with control (non-FO) rats. Relative muscle mass (in mg (kg body weight)(-1)) increased by 18 and 24% after 3 days and by 20 and 33% after 7 days in the plantaris and soleus muscles, respectively. No differences in HB-EGF mRNA or protein were observed in either muscle of FO rats relative to control muscles. The VEGF mRNA was similar in the soleus muscles of FO and control rats, whereas a significant elevation occurred at 3 and 7 days of FO in the plantaris muscle. However, VEGF protein expression after 3 days of FO exhibited a differential response; expression in the soleus muscle decreased 1.6-fold, whereas that in the plantaris muscle increased 1.8-fold compared with the control muscle. After 7 days of FO, VEGF protein remained elevated within the plantaris muscle, but returned to basal levels in the soleus. Robust basal HB-EGF and VEGF protein expression was consistently seen in control muscles. In all groups, immunohistochemistry for VEGF protein displayed a distinct striated expression pattern within myofibres, with considerably less labelling in extracellular spaces. Constitutive expression of HB-EGF and VEGF in control myofibres is consistent with housekeeping roles for these growth factors in skeletal muscle tissue. However, the specific patterns of VEGF expression in these muscles during FO may reflect the chronic changes in neural recruitment between muscles

  18. Alterations in the sarcoplasmic protein fraction of beef muscle with postmortem aging and hydrodynamic pressure processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) analysis were utilized to detect differences in the sarcoplasmic protein profiles of beef strip loins subjected to aging and hydrodynamic pressure processing (HDP) treatments. At 48 h postmortem, stri...

  19. Effect of gadolinium on the ryanodine receptor/sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channel of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sárközi, Sándor; Szegedi, Csaba; Lukács, Balázs; Ronjat, Michel; Jóna, István

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gadolinium ions on the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release channel/ryanodine receptor (RyR1) was studied using heavy SR (HSR) vesicles and RyR1 isolated from rabbit fast twitch muscle. In the [(3)H]ryanodine binding assay, 5 microM Gd(3+) increased the K(d) of the [(3)H]ryanodine binding of the vesicles from 33.8 nM to 45.6 nM while B(max), referring to the binding capacity, was not affected significantly. In the presence of 18 nM[(3)H]ryanodine and 100 microM free Ca(2+), Gd(3+) inhibited the binding of the radiolabeled ryanodine with an apparent K(d) value of 14.7 microM and a Hill coefficient of 3.17. In (45)Ca(2+) experiments the time constant of (45)Ca(2+) efflux from HSR vesicles increased from 90.9 (+/- 11.1) ms to 187.7 (+/- 24.9) ms in the presence of 20 microM gadolinium. In single channel experiments gadolinium inhibited the channel activity from both the cytoplasmic (cis) (IC(50) = 5.65 +/- 0.33 microM, n(Hill) = 4.71) and the luminal (trans) side (IC(50) = 5.47 +/- 0.24 microM, n(Hill) = 4.31). The degree of inhibition on the cis side didn't show calcium dependency in the 100 microM to 1 mM Ca(2+) concentration range which indicates no competition with calcium on its regulatory binding sites. When Gd(3+) was applied at the trans side, EGTA was present at the cis side to prevent the binding of Gd(+3) to the cytoplasmic calcium binding regulatory sites of the RyR1 if Gd(3+) accidentally passed through the channel. The inhibition of the channel did not show any voltage dependence, which would be the case if Gd(3+) exerted its effect after getting to the cis side. Our results suggest the presence of inhibitory binding sites for Gd(3+) on both sides of the RyR1 with similar Hill coefficients and IC(50) values.

  20. ZASP Interacts with the Mechanosensing Protein Ankrd2 and p53 in the Signalling Network of Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Valentina C.; Kyle, W. Buck; Kojic, Snezana; Vitulo, Nicola; Li, Zhaohui; Belgrano, Anna; Maiuri, Paolo; Banks, Lawrence; Vatta, Matteo; Valle, Giorgio; Faulkner, Georgine

    2014-01-01

    ZASP is a cytoskeletal PDZ-LIM protein predominantly expressed in striated muscle. It forms multiprotein complexes and plays a pivotal role in the structural integrity of sarcomeres. Mutations in the ZASP protein are associated with myofibrillar myopathy, left ventricular non-compaction and dilated cardiomyopathy. The ablation of its murine homologue Cypher results in neonatal lethality. ZASP has several alternatively spliced isoforms, in this paper we clarify the nomenclature of its human isoforms as well as their dynamics and expression pattern in striated muscle. Interaction is demonstrated between ZASP and two new binding partners both of which have roles in signalling, regulation of gene expression and muscle differentiation; the mechanosensing protein Ankrd2 and the tumour suppressor protein p53. These proteins and ZASP form a triple complex that appears to facilitate poly-SUMOylation of p53. We also show the importance of two of its functional domains, the ZM-motif and the PDZ domain. The PDZ domain can bind directly to both Ankrd2 and p53 indicating that there is no competition between it and p53 for the same binding site on Ankrd2. However there is competition for this binding site between p53 and a region of the ZASP protein lacking the PDZ domain, but containing the ZM-motif. ZASP is negative regulator of p53 in transactivation experiments with the p53-responsive promoters, MDM2 and BAX. Mutations in the ZASP ZM-motif induce modification in protein turnover. In fact, two mutants, A165V and A171T, were not able to bind Ankrd2 and bound only poorly to alpha-actinin2. This is important since the A165V mutation is responsible for zaspopathy, a well characterized autosomal dominant distal myopathy. Although the mechanism by which this mutant causes disease is still unknown, this is the first indication of how a ZASP disease associated mutant protein differs from that of the wild type ZASP protein. PMID:24647531

  1. Comparison of the calcium release channel of cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by target inactivation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McGrew, S.G.; Inui, Makoto; Chadwick, C.C.; Boucek, R.J. Jr.; Jung, C.Y.; Fleischer, S. )

    1989-02-07

    The calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum which triggers muscle contraction in excitation-contraction coupling has recently been isolated. The channel has been found to be morphologically identical with the feet structures of the junctional face membrane of terminal cisternae and consists of an oligomer of a unique high molecular weight polypeptide. In this study, the authors compare the target size of the calcium release channel from heart and skeletal muscle using target inactivation analysis. The target molecular weights of the calcium release channel estimated by measuring ryanodine binding after irradiation are similar for heart (139,000) and skeletal muscle (143,000) and are smaller than the monomeric unit (estimated to be about 360,000). The target size, estimated by measuring polypeptide remaining after irradiation, was essentially the same for heart and skeletal muscle, 1,061,000 and 1,070,000, respectively, indicating an oligomeric association of protomers. Thus, the calcium release channel of both cardiac and skeletal muscle reacts uniquely with regard to target inactivation analysis in that (1) the size by ryanodine binding is smaller than the monomeric unit and (2) a single hit leads to destruction of more than one polypeptide, by measuring polypeptide remaining. The target inactivation analysis studies indicate that heart and skeletal muscle receptors are structurally very similar.

  2. Correction of Multiple Striated Muscles in Murine Pompe Disease Through Adeno-associated Virus-Mediated Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Young, Sarah P.; Li, Ping; Di, Chunhui; Brown, Talmage; Salva, Maia Z.; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Yan, Zhen; Auten, Richard; Hauschka, Stephen D.; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2009-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease; MIM 232300) stems from the deficiency of acid-α-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase; EC 3.2.1.20), which primarily involves cardiac and skeletal muscles. We hypothesized that systemic administration of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing a muscle specific regulatory cassette could drive efficacious transgene expression in GAA-knockout (GAA-KO) mice. AAV2/8 vectors containing the muscle creatine kinase (CK1) or hybrid α-myosin heavy chain enhancer-/muscle creatine kinase enhancer-promoter (MHCK7) cassettes were compared. The CK1 reduced glycogen content by approximately 50% in the heart and quadriceps, in comparison to untreated GAA-KO mice, whereas the MHCK7 containing vector reduced glycogen content even further: >95% in heart and >75% in the diaphragm and quadriceps. Administration of the MHCK7-containing vector significantly increased striated muscle function as assessed by increased Rotarod times at 18 weeks post-injection, whereas the CK1-containing vector did not increase Rotarod performance. Transduction efficiency was evaluated with an AAV2/8 vector in which MHCK7 drives alkaline-phosphatase, revealing that many more myofibers were transduced in the quadriceps than in the gastrocnemius. An AAV2/9 vector containing the MHCK7 cassette corrected GAA deficiency in the skeletal muscles of the distal limb, including the gastrocnemius, extensor digitalis longus, and soleus; furthermore, glycogen accumulations were substantially cleared by hGAA expression therein. Importantly, type IIb myofibers in the extensor digitalis longus were transduced, thereby correcting a myofiber type that is unresponsive to enzyme replacement therapy. In summary, AAV8 and AAV9-pseudotyped vectors containing the MHCK7 regulatory cassette achieved enhanced efficacy in Pompe disease mice. PMID:18560415

  3. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release in frog skeletal muscle fibres estimated from Arsenazo III calcium transients.

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, S M; Chandler, W K; Marshall, M W

    1983-01-01

    Single twitch fibres, dissected from frog muscle, were injected with the metallochromic dye Arsenazo III. Changes in dye-related absorbance measured at 650 or 660 nm were used to estimate the time course of myoplasmic free [Ca2+] following either action potential stimulation or voltage-clamp depolarization (temperature, 15-17 degrees C). The amplitude of the Ca2+ transient decreased when fibres were stretched to sarcomere spacings approaching 4 microns. The effect appeared to be less marked in H2O Ringer than in D2O Ringer, where a reduction of about 40% was observed in going from 3.0 microns to 3.7-3.9 microns. In fibres heavily injected with dye (1.5-2.2 mM-dye) at least 0.1 mM-Ca2+ was complexed with Arsenazo III following a single action potential, implying that at least 0.1 mM-Ca2+ was released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.) into the myoplasm. Computer simulations were carried out to estimate the flux of Ca2+ between the s.r. and myoplasm (in fibres containing no more that 0.8 mM-dye). The amounts and time courses of Ca2+ bound to the Ca2+-regulatory sites on troponin and to the Ca2+, Mg2+ sites on parvalbumin were estimated from the free [Ca2+] wave form and the law of mass action. In the computations the total myoplasmic [Ca2+] was taken as the total amount of Ca2+ existing either as free ion or as ion complexed with dye, troponin or parvalbumin. The time derivative of total myoplasmic [Ca2+] was used as an estimate of net Ca2+ flux (release minus uptake) from the s.r. into myoplasm. Rate constants for formation of cation: receptor complex were taken from published values. For the Ca2+-regulatory sites on troponin, three sets of rate constants, corresponding to two values of dissociation constant (0.2 and 2 microM) were used. Each set of three simulations was carried out both with and without parvalbumin. The simulations show that following action potential stimulation, 0.2-0.3 mM-Ca2+ enters the myoplasm from the s.r. The wave form of s.r. Ca2

  4. Effect of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium depletion on intramembranous charge movement in frog cut muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Cut muscle fibers from Rana temporaria (sarcomere length, 3.3-3.5 microns; temperature, 13-16 degrees C) were mounted in a double Vaseline-gap chamber and equilibrated for at least an hour with an internal solution that contained 20 mM EGTA and phenol red and an external solution that contained predominantly TEA-gluconate; both solutions were nominally Ca-free. The increase in total myoplasmic concentration of Ca (delta[CaT]) produced by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca release was estimated from the change in pH produced when the released Ca was complexed by EGTA (Pape, P.C., D.-S. Jong, and W.K. Chandler. 1995. Journal of General Physiology. 106:259-336). The resting value of SR Ca content, [CaSR]R (expressed as myoplasmic concentration), was taken to be equal to the value of delta[CaT] obtained during a step depolarization (usually to -50 to -40 mV) that was sufficiently long (200-750 ms) to release all of the readily releasable Ca from the SR. In ten fibers, the first depolarization gave [CaSR]R = 839-1,698 microM. Progressively smaller values were obtained with subsequent depolarizations until, after 30-40 depolarizations, the value of [CaSR]R had usually been reduced to < 10 microM. Measurements of intramembranous charge movement, Icm, showed that, as the value of [CaSR]R decreased, ON-OFF charge equality held and the amount of charge moved remained constant. ON Icm showed brief initial I beta components and prominent I gamma "humps", even after the value of [CaSR]R was < 10 microM. Although the amplitude of the hump component decreased during depletion, its duration increased in a manner that preserved the constancy of ON charge. In the depleted state, charge movement was steeply voltage dependent, with a mean value of 7.2 mV for the Boltzmann factor k. These and other results are not consistent with the idea that there is one type of charge, Q beta, and that I gamma is a movement of Q beta caused by SR Ca release, as proposed by Pizarro, Csernoch, Uribe

  5. Correction of multiple striated muscles in murine Pompe disease through adeno-associated virus-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Young, Sarah P; Li, Ping; Di, Chunhui; Brown, Talmage; Salva, Maja Z; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Yan, Zhen; Auten, Richard; Hauschka, Stephen D; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2008-08-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease; MIM 232300) stems from the deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase; EC 3.2.1.20), which primarily involves cardiac and skeletal muscles. An adeno-associated virus 2/8 (AAV2/8) vector containing the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) (CK1) reduced glycogen content by approximately 50% in the heart and quadriceps in GAA-knockout (GAA-KO) mice; furthermore, an AAV2/8 vector containing the hybrid alpha-myosin heavy chain enhancer-/MCK enhancer-promoter (MHCK7) cassette reduced glycogen content by >95% in heart and >75% in the diaphragm and quadriceps. Transduction with an AAV2/8 vector was higher in the quadriceps than in the gastrocnemius. An AAV2/9 vector containing the MHCK7 cassette corrected GAA deficiency in the distal hindlimb, and glycogen accumulations were substantially cleared by human GAA (hGAA) expression therein; however, the analogous AAV2/7 vector achieved much lower efficacy. Administration of the MHCK7-containing vectors significantly increased striated muscle function as assessed by increased Rotarod times at 18 weeks after injection, whereas the CK1-containing vector did not increase Rotarod performance. Importantly, type IIb myofibers in the extensor digitalis longus (EDL) were transduced, thereby correcting a myofiber type that is unresponsive to enzyme replacement therapy. In summary, AAV8 and AAV9-pseudotyped vectors containing the MHCK7 regulatory cassette achieved enhanced efficacy in Pompe disease mice.

  6. Expression of distinct classes of titin isoforms in striated and smooth muscles by alternative splicing, and their conserved interaction with filamins.

    PubMed

    Labeit, Siegfried; Lahmers, Sunshine; Burkart, Christoph; Fong, Chi; McNabb, Mark; Witt, Stephanie; Witt, Christian; Labeit, Dietmar; Granzier, Henk

    2006-09-29

    While the role of titin as a sarcomeric protein is well established, its potential functional role(s) in smooth muscles and non-muscle tissues are controversial. We used a titin exon array to search for which part(s) of the human titin transcriptional unit encompassing 363 exons is(are) expressed in non-striated muscle tissues. Expression profiling of adult smooth muscle tissues (aorta, bladder, carotid, stomach) identified alternatively spliced titin isoforms, encompassing 80 to about 100 exons. These exons code for parts of the titin Z-disk, I-band and A-band regions, allowing the truncated smooth muscle titin isoform to link Z-disks/dense bodies together with thick filaments. Consistent with the array data, Western blot studies detected the expression of approximately 1 MDa smooth muscle titin in adult smooth muscles, reacting with selected Z-disc, I-band, and A-band titin antibodies. Immunofluorescence with these antibodies located smooth muscle titin in the cytoplasm of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells and in the tunica media of intact adult bovine aorta. Real time PCR studies suggested that smooth muscle titins are expressed from a promoter located 35 kb or more upstream of the transcription initiation site used for striated muscle titin, driving expression of a bi-cistronic mRNA, coding 5' for the anonymous gene FL39502, followed 3' by titin, respectively. Our work showed that smooth muscle and striated muscle titins share in their conserved amino-terminal regions binding sites for alpha-actinin and filamins: Yeast two-hybrid screens using Z2-Zis1 titin baits identified prey clones coding for alpha-actinin-1 and filamin-A from smooth muscle, and alpha-actinin-2/3, filamin-C, and nebulin from skeletal muscle cDNA libraries, respectively. This suggests that the titin Z2-Zis1 domain can link filamins and alpha-actinin together in the periphery of the Z-line/dense bodies in a fashion that is conserved in smooth and striated muscles.

  7. (−)-EPICATECHIN IMPROVES MITOCHONDRIAL RELATED PROTEIN LEVELS AND AMELIORATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN DYSTROPHIC DELTA SARCOGLYCAN NULL MOUSE STRIATED MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; De los Santos, Sergio; Gonzalez-Basurto, Silvia; Canto, Patricia; Mendoza-Lorenzo, Patricia; Palma-Flores, Carlos; Ceballos-Reyes, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Coral-Vazquez, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are a group of heterogeneous genetic disorders characterized by progressive striated muscle wasting and degeneration. Although the genetic basis for many of these disorders has been identified, the exact mechanism for disease pathogenesis remains unclear. The presence of oxidative stress (OS) is known to contribute to the pathophysiology and severity of the MD. Mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in MD and likely represents an important determinant of increased OS. Experimental antioxidant therapies have been implemented with the aim of protecting against disease progression, but results from clinical trials have been disappointing. In this study, we explored the capacity of the cacao flavonoid (−)-epicatechin (Epi) to mitigate OS by acting as a positive regulator of mitochondrial structure/function endpoints and redox balance control systems in skeletal and cardiac muscles of dystrophic, δ-sarcoglycan (δ-SG) null mice. Wild type or δ-SG null 2.5 month old male mice were treated via oral gavage with either water (control animals) or Epi (1 mg/kg, twice/day) for 2 weeks. Results evidence a significant normalization of total protein carbonylation, recovery of reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio) and enhanced superoxide dismutase 2, catalase and citrate synthase activities with Epi treatment. These effects were accompanied by increases in protein levels for thiolredoxin, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase 2, catalase and mitochondrial endpoints. Furthermore, we evidence decreases in heart and skeletal muscle fibrosis, accompanied with an improvement in skeletal muscle function with treatment. These results warrant the further investigation of Epi as a potential therapeutic agent to mitigate MD associated muscle degeneration. PMID:25284161

  8. Direct x-ray observation of a single hexagonal myofilament lattice in native myofibrils of striated muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Yukihiro; Wakayama, Jun'ichi; Fujisawa, Tetsuro

    2002-01-01

    A striated muscle fiber consists of thousands of myofibrils with crystalline hexagonal myofilament lattices. Because the lattices are randomly oriented, the fiber gives rise to an equatorial x-ray diffraction pattern, which is essentially a rotary-averaged "powder diffraction," carrying only information about the distance between the lattice planes. We were able to record an x-ray diffraction pattern from a single myofilament lattice, very likely originating from a single myofibril from the flight muscle of a bumblebee, by orienting the incident x-ray microbeam along the myofibrillar axis (end-on diffraction). The pattern consisted of a number of hexagonally symmetrical diffraction spots whose originating lattice planes were readily identified. This also held true for some of the weak higher order reflections. The spot-like appearance of reflections implies that the lattice order is extremely well maintained for a distance of millimeters, covering up to a thousand of approximately 2.5-microm-long sarcomeres connected in series. The results open the possibility of applying the x-ray microdiffraction technique to study many other micrometer-sized assemblies of functional biomolecules in the cell. PMID:12124287

  9. On the Rate of Synthesis of Individual Proteins within and between Different Striated Muscles of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, Stuart; Srisawat, Kanchana; Sutherland, Hazel; Jarvis, Jonathan; Burniston, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    The turnover of muscle protein is responsive to different (patho)-physiological conditions but little is known about the rate of synthesis at the level of individual proteins or whether this varies between different muscles. We investigated the synthesis rate of eight proteins (actin, albumin, ATP synthase alpha, beta enolase, creatine kinase, myosin essential light chain, myosin regulatory light chain and tropomyosin) in the extensor digitorum longus, diaphragm, heart and soleus of male Wistar rats (352 ± 30 g body weight). Animals were assigned to four groups (n = 3, in each), including a control and groups that received deuterium oxide (2H2O) for 4 days, 7 days or 14 days. Deuterium labelling was initiated by an intraperitoneal injection of 10 μL/g body weight of 99.9% 2H2O-saline, and was maintained by administration of 5% (v/v) 2H2O in drinking water provided ad libitum. Homogenates of the isolated muscles were analysed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry. Proteins were identified against the SwissProt database using peptide mass fingerprinting. For each of the eight proteins investigated, the molar percent enrichment (MPE) of 2H and rate constant (k) of protein synthesis was calculated from the mass isotopomer distribution of peptides based on the amino acid sequence and predicted number of exchangeable C–H bonds. The average MPE (2.14% ± 0.2%) was as expected and was consistent across muscles harvested at different times (i.e., steady state enrichment was achieved). The synthesis rate of individual proteins differed markedly within each muscle and the rank-order of synthesis rates differed among the muscles studied. After 14 days the fraction of albumin synthesised (23% ± 5%) was significantly (p < 0.05) greater than for other muscle proteins. These data represent the first attempt to study the synthesis rates of individual proteins across a number of different striated

  10. [Striated lichen].

    PubMed

    Méndez-Santillán, E

    1991-02-01

    Striated lichen is a rare disease seen primarily in pediatric ages. Of more of less quick appearance, generally persisting for a year, and later spontaneously involuting. Its etiology and pathogenia are unkown. It is a disease essentially clinically diagnosed and should be differentiated from other entities of linear distribution.

  11. A Novel Striated Muscle-Specific Myosin-Blocking Drug for the Study of Neuromuscular Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Heredia, Dante J.; Schubert, Douglas; Maligireddy, Siddhardha; Hennig, Grant W.; Gould, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    The failure to transmit neural action potentials (APs) into muscle APs is referred to as neuromuscular transmission failure (NTF). Although synaptic dysfunction occurs in a variety of neuromuscular diseases and impaired neurotransmission contributes to muscle fatigue, direct evaluation of neurotransmission by measurement of successfully transduced muscle APs is difficult due to the subsequent movements produced by muscle. Moreover, the voltage-gated sodium channel inhibitor used to study neurotransmitter release at the adult neuromuscular junction is ineffective in embryonic tissue, making it nearly impossible to precisely measure any aspect of neurotransmission in embryonic lethal mouse mutants. In this study we utilized 3-(N-butylethanimidoyl)-4-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (BHC), previously identified in a small-molecule screen of skeletal muscle myosin inhibitors, to suppress movements without affecting membrane currents. In contrast to previously characterized drugs from this screen such as N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide (BTS), which inhibit skeletal muscle myosin ATPase activity but also block neurotransmission, BHC selectively blocked nerve-evoked muscle contraction without affecting neurotransmitter release. This feature allowed a detailed characterization of neurotransmission in both embryonic and adult mice. In the presence of BHC, neural APs produced by tonic stimulation of the phrenic nerve at rates up to 20 Hz were successfully transmitted into muscle APs. At higher rates of phrenic nerve stimulation, NTF was observed. NTF was intermittent and characterized by successful muscle APs following failed ones, with the percentage of successfully transmitted muscle APs diminishing over time. Nerve stimulation rates that failed to produce NTF in the presence of BHC similarly failed to produce a loss of peak muscle fiber shortening, which was examined using a novel optical method of muscle fatigue, or a loss of peak cytosolic calcium transient intensity, examined

  12. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ depletion in adult skeletal muscle fibres measured with the biosensor D1ER.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Moreno, Ramón; Wang, Zhong-Ming; Messi, María Laura; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2010-04-01

    The endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) plays a crucial role in cytoplasmic signalling in a variety of cells. It is particularly relevant to skeletal muscle fibres, where this organelle constitutes the main Ca2+ store for essential functions, such as contraction. In this work, we expressed the cameleon biosensor D1ER by in vivo electroporation in the mouse flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle to directly assess SR Ca2+ depletion in response to electrical and pharmacological stimulation. The main conclusions are: (1) D1ER is expressed in the SR of FDB fibres according to both di-8-(amino naphthyl ethenyl pyridinium) staining experiments and reductions in the Förster resonance energy transfer signal consequent to SR Ca2+ release; (2) the amplitude of D1ER citrine/cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) ratio evoked by either 4-chloro-m-cresol (4-CmC) or electrical stimulation is directly proportional to the basal citrine/CFP ratio, which indicates that SR Ca2+ modulates ryanodine-receptor-isoform-1-mediated SR Ca2+ release in the intact muscle fibre; (3) SR Ca2+ release, measured as D1ER citrine/CFP signal, is voltage-dependent and follows a Boltzmann function; and (4) average SR Ca2+ depletion is 20% in response to 4-CmC and 6.4% in response to prolonged sarcolemmal depolarization. These results indicate that significantly depleting SR Ca2+ content under physiological conditions is difficult.

  13. Thyroid hormone regulates Ca(2+)-ATPase mRNA levels of sarcoplasmic reticulum during neonatal development of fast skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, G C; Simonides, W S; van Hardeveld, C

    1992-12-01

    In gastrocnemius muscle from newborn rats the mRNA for the fast sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform (SERCA1) comprised over 90% of total SR Ca(2+)-ATPase mRNA content and increased 5-fold between day 5 and 20 after birth, whereas in hypothyroid muscle the SERCA1 message level remained constant. Triiodothyronine (T3) treatment of 2-day-old euthyroid rats induced a precocious stimulation of SERCA1 mRNA levels, indicating that T3 is the determining factor in the stimulation of SERCA1 message levels and that this stimulation underlies the previously reported effect of the thyroid status on the neonatal development of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity. The low mRNA level for the slow SR Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform (SERCA2) was constant in both euthyroid and hypothyroid muscle development. Nevertheless, T3 treatment of hypothyroid neonates induced a transient stimulation of SERCA2 message levels, indicating that SERCA2 is responsive to higher levels of T3.

  14. Effects of thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump of skinned fibres from frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Du, G G; Ashley, C C; Lea, T J

    1994-12-01

    Thapsigargin has been reported to inhibit ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake by isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles of vertebrate skeletal muscle fibres at nanomolar concentrations. There have been no reports confirming this effect in skinned muscle fibre preparations. We have examined the ability of thapsigargin to inhibit the uptake of Ca2+ by the SR in mechanically skinned fibres of frog iliofibularis muscles, using the size of the caffeine-induced contracture to assess the Ca2+ content of the SR. The SR was first depleted of Ca2+ and then reloaded for 1 min at pCa 6.2 in the presence and absence of thapsigargin. When 5 min were allowed for diffusion, a thapsigargin concentration of at least 131 microM was required to inhibit Ca2+ loading by 50%. In contrast, another SR Ca2+ uptake inhibitor, cyclopiazonic acid, was more effective, producing 50% inhibition at 7.0 microM and total inhibition at 50 microM. When cyclopiazonic acid (100 microM) was applied after, rather than during, Ca2+ loading, the caffeine-induced contracture was not changed. Thapsigargin (300 microM), on the other hand, caused some reduction in the peak amplitude of the caffeine-induced contracture when applied after Ca2+ loading. The poor effectiveness of thapsigargin in the skinned fibres, compared with in SR vesicles, is attributed to its slow diffusion into the skinned fibres, perhaps as a result of binding to myofibrillar components.

  15. High endocytotic activity occurs periodically in the endplate region of denervated mouse striated muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Lawoko, G; Tågerud, S

    1995-08-01

    High endocytotic activity after denervation of skeletal muscle occurs in a proportion of muscle fibers (both slow and fast fiber types) in the endplate region. The present study was performed in order to examine if a periodicity in the endocytotic activity could explain why the process is not observed in all fibers at a given time. Three markers, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), rhodamine B isothiocyanate-labeled dextran, and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran were used to demonstrate endocytotic activity of muscle fibers of the denervated mouse hemidiaphragm in vivo. Acetylcholine esterase staining was used in conjunction with HRP uptake to determine the proportion of denervated muscle fibers with endocytotic activity in the endplate region at any one time. The results show that 25-50% of the muscle fibers display high endocytotic activity in the endplate region at a given time 10 days after denervation. The existence of a periodicity in this endocytotic activity is suggested by results obtained using two different endocytotic markers administered at time intervals of 0-7 days. We conclude that loss of contact with the innervating motorneuron induces a high endocytotic activity which occurs periodically in the perisynaptic region of skeletal muscle fibers.

  16. Alterations in mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum from heart and skeletal muscle of horizontally casted primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sordahl, L. A.; Stone, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontally body-casted rhesus monkeys are used as an animal model in order to study the physiological changes known as cardiovascular deconditioning which occur during weightless conditions. No difference was found between the experimental and control animals in heart mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation which indicates that no apparent changes occurred in the primary energy-producing system of the heart. A marked increase in cytochrome oxidase activity was observed in the casted primate heart mitochondria compared to controls, while a 25% decrease in respiratory substrate-supported calcium uptake was found in casted primate heart mitochondria compared to controls. Sacroplasmic reticulum isolated from the primate hearts revealed marked changes in calcium transport activities. It is concluded that the marked depression in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum functions indicates altered calcium homeostasis in the casted-primate heart which could be a factor in cardiovascular deconditioning.

  17. Triclosan impairs excitation–contraction coupling and Ca2+ dynamics in striated muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cherednichenko, Gennady; Zhang, Rui; Bannister, Roger A.; Timofeyev, Valeriy; Li, Ning; Fritsch, Erika B.; Feng, Wei; Barrientos, Genaro C.; Schebb, Nils H.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Beam, Kurt G.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Pessah, Isaac N.

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS), a high-production-volume chemical used as a bactericide in personal care products, is a priority pollutant of growing concern to human and environmental health. TCS is capable of altering the activity of type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), but its potential to influence physiological excitation–contraction coupling (ECC) and muscle function has not been investigated. Here, we report that TCS impairs ECC of both cardiac and skeletal muscle in vitro and in vivo. TCS acutely depresses hemodynamics and grip strength in mice at doses ≥12.5 mg/kg i.p., and a concentration ≥0.52 μM in water compromises swimming performance in larval fathead minnow. In isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes, skeletal myotubes, and adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers TCS depresses electrically evoked ECC within ∼10–20 min. In myotubes, nanomolar to low micromolar TCS initially potentiates electrically evoked Ca2+ transients followed by complete failure of ECC, independent of Ca2+ store depletion or block of RyR1 channels. TCS also completely blocks excitation-coupled Ca2+ entry. Voltage clamp experiments showed that TCS partially inhibits L-type Ca2+ currents of cardiac and skeletal muscle, and [3H]PN200 binding to skeletal membranes is noncompetitively inhibited by TCS in the same concentration range that enhances [3H]ryanodine binding. TCS potently impairs orthograde and retrograde signaling between L-type Ca2+ and RyR channels in skeletal muscle, and L-type Ca2+ entry in cardiac muscle, revealing a mechanism by which TCS weakens cardiac and skeletal muscle contractility in a manner that may negatively impact muscle health, especially in susceptible populations. PMID:22891308

  18. Androgens enhance in vivo 2-deoxyglucose uptake by rat striated muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Toop, J.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that testosterone propionate (TP) causes a striking increase in the in vivo uptake of 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) by the levator ani muscle of immature male rats, which was found to be uniformly distributed over the entire muscle. After a single subcutaneous injection of TP, no enhancement of 2-DG was observed before 3.5 hr, at which time uptake was increased 2-fold; maximum enhancement (4-fold) was attained at 12 hr. At 72 hr, 2-DG uptake remained elevated at twice the control value. It was determined that the effect of TP probably is mediated by specific androgen receptors. In addition, it was found that the effect of TP was blocked by the simultaneous administration of an androgen antagonist, cyproterone acetate. TP also was found to enhance the uptake of 2-DG in the bulbocavernosus (253 percent over control) and extensor digitorum longus muscles (150 percent over control), but not in the biceps brachii or soleus. It is suggested that the increased uptake of glucose may be an important early step in the anabolic response of muscle to androgens.

  19. Effects of different activity and inactivity paradigms on myosin heavy chain gene expression in striated muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Haddad, F.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this mini-review is to summarize findings concerning the role that different models of muscular activity and inactivity play in altering gene expression of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) family of motor proteins in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscle. This was done in the context of examining parallel findings concerning the role that thyroid hormone (T(3), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine) plays in MHC expression. Findings show that both cardiac and skeletal muscles of experimental animals are initially undifferentiated at birth and then undergo a marked level of growth and differentiation in attaining the adult MHC phenotype in a T(3)/activity level-dependent fashion. Cardiac MHC expression in small mammals is highly sensitive to thyroid deficiency, diabetes, energy deprivation, and hypertension; each of these interventions induces upregulation of the beta-MHC isoform, which functions to economize circulatory function in the face of altered energy demand. In skeletal muscle, hyperthyroidism, as well as interventions that unload or reduce the weight-bearing activity of the muscle, causes slow to fast MHC conversions. Fast to slow conversions, however, are seen under hypothyroidism or when the muscles either become chronically overloaded or subjected to intermittent loading as occurs during resistance training and endurance exercise. The regulation of MHC gene expression by T(3) or mechanical stimuli appears to be strongly regulated by transcriptional events, based on recent findings on transgenic models and animals transfected with promoter-reporter constructs. However, the mechanisms by which T(3) and mechanical stimuli exert their control on transcriptional processes appear to be different. Additional findings show that individual skeletal muscle fibers have the genetic machinery to express simultaneously all of the adult MHCs, e.g., slow type I and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb, in unique combinations under certain experimental conditions. This degree of

  20. Skeletal Muscle Myofibrillar and Sarcoplasmic Protein Synthesis Rates Are Affected Differently by Altitude-Induced Hypoxia in Native Lowlanders

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Lars; Haslund, Mads Lyhne; Robach, Paul; van Hall, Gerrit; Calbet, Jose A. L.; Saltin, Bengt; Lundby, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    As a consequence to hypobaric hypoxic exposure skeletal muscle atrophy is often reported. The underlying mechanism has been suggested to involve a decrease in protein synthesis in order to conserve O2. With the aim to challenge this hypothesis, we applied a primed, constant infusion of 1-13C-leucine in nine healthy male subjects at sea level and subsequently at high-altitude (4559 m) after 7–9 days of acclimatization. Physical activity levels and food and energy intake were controlled prior to the two experimental conditions with the aim to standardize these confounding factors. Blood samples and expired breath samples were collected hourly during the 4 hour trial and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained at 1 and 4 hours after tracer priming in the overnight fasted state. Myofibrillar protein synthesis rate was doubled; 0.041±0.018 at sea-level to 0.080±0.018%⋅hr−1 (p<0.05) when acclimatized to high altitude. The sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rate was in contrast unaffected by altitude exposure; 0.052±0.019 at sea-level to 0.059±0.010%⋅hr−1 (p>0.05). Trends to increments in whole body protein kinetics were seen: Degradation rate elevated from 2.51±0.21 at sea level to 2.73±0.13 µmol⋅kg−1⋅min−1 (p = 0.05) at high altitude and synthesis rate similar; 2.24±0.20 at sea level and 2.43±0.13 µmol⋅kg−1⋅min−1 (p>0.05) at altitude. We conclude that whole body amino acid flux is increased due to an elevated protein turnover rate. Resting skeletal muscle myocontractile protein synthesis rate was concomitantly elevated by high-altitude induced hypoxia, whereas the sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rate was unaffected by hypoxia. These changed responses may lead to divergent adaptation over the course of prolonged exposure. PMID:21187972

  1. Novel diabetes mellitus treatment: mature canine insulin production by canine striated muscle through gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Niessen, S J M; Fernandez-Fuente, M; Mahmoud, A; Campbell, S C; Aldibbiat, A; Huggins, C; Brown, A E; Holder, A; Piercy, R J; Catchpole, B; Shaw, J A M; Church, D B

    2012-07-01

    Muscle-targeted gene therapy using insulin genes has the potential to provide an inexpensive, low maintenance alternative or adjunctive treatment method for canine diabetes mellitus. A canine skeletal muscle cell line was established through primary culture, as well as through transdifferentiation of canine fibroblasts after infection with a myo-differentiation gene containing adenovirus vector. A novel mutant furin-cleavable canine preproinsulin gene insert (cppI4) was designed and created through de novo gene synthesis. Various cell lines, including the generated canine muscle cell line, were transfected with nonviral plasmids containing cppI4. Insulin and desmin immunostaining were used to prove insulin production by muscle cells and specific canine insulin ELISA to prove mature insulin secretion into the medium. The canine myoblast cultures proved positive on desmin immunostaining. All cells tolerated transfection with cppI4-containing plasmid, and double immunostaining for insulin and desmin proved present in the canine cells. Canine insulin ELISA assessment of medium of cppI4-transfected murine myoblasts and canine myoblast and fibroblast mixture proved presence of mature fully processed canine insulin, 24 and 48 h after transfection. The present study provides proof of principle that canine muscle cells can be induced to produce and secrete canine insulin on transfection with nonviral plasmid DNA containing a novel mutant canine preproinsulin gene that produces furin-cleavable canine preproinsulin. This technology could be developed to provide an alternative canine diabetes mellitus treatment option or to provide a constant source for background insulin, as well as C-peptide, alongside current treatment options.

  2. Impact of a nickel-reduced stainless steel implant on striated muscle microcirculation: a comparative in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Kraft, C N; Burian, B; Perlick, L; Wimmer, M A; Wallny, T; Schmitt, O; Diedrich, O

    2001-12-05

    The impairment of skeletal muscle microcirculation by a biomaterial may have profound consequences. With moderately good physical and corrosion characteristics, implant-quality stainless steel is particularly popular in orthopedic surgery. However, due to the presence of a considerable amount of nickel in the alloy, concern has been voiced in respect to local tissue responses. More recently a stainless steel alloy with a significant reduction of nickel has become commercially available. We, therefore, studied in vivo nutritive perfusion and leukocytic response of striated muscle to this nickel-reduced alloy, and compared these results with those of the materials conventional stainless steel and titanium. Using the hamster dorsal skinfold chamber preparation and intravital microscopy, we could demonstrate that reduction of the nickel quantity in a stainless steel implant has a positive effect on local microvascular parameters. Although the implantation of a conventional stainless steel sample led to a distinct and persistent activation of leukocytes combined with disruption of the microvascular endothelial integrity, marked leukocyte extravasation, and considerable venular dilation, animals with a nickel-reduced stainless steel implant showed only a moderate increase of these parameters, with a clear tendency of recuperation. Titanium implants merely caused a transient increase of leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction within the first 120 min, and no significant change in macromolecular leakage, leukocyte extravasation, or venular diameter. Pending biomechanical and corrosion testing, nickel-reduced stainless steel may be a viable alternative to conventional implant-quality stainless steel for biomedical applications. Concerning tolerance by the local vascular system, titanium currently remains unsurpassed.

  3. Peeled mammalian skeletal muscle fibers. Possible stimulation of Ca2+ release via a transverse tubule-sarcoplasmic reticulum mechanism

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Single muscle fibers from rabbit soleus and adductor magnus and from semitendinosus muscles were peeled to remove the sarcolemma and then stimulated to release Ca2+ by (a) caffeine application or (b) ionic depolarization accomplished via substitution of choline chloride for potassium propionate at constant [K+] X [Cl-] in the bathing solution. Each stimulus, ionic or caffeine, elicited an isometric tension transient that appeared to be due to Ca2+ released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The peak magnitude of the ionic (Cl- - induced) tension transient increased with increasing Cl- concentration. The application of ouabain to fibers after peeling had no effect on either type of tension transient. However, soaking the fibers in a ouabain solution before peeling blocked the Cl- -induced but not the caffeine-induced tension transient, which suggests that ouabain's site of action is extracellular, perhaps inside transverse tubules (TTs). Treating the peeled fibers with saponin, which should disrupt TTs to a greater extent than SR membrane, greatly reduced or eliminated the Cl- - induced tension transient without significantly altering the caffeine- induced tension transient. These results suggest that the Cl- -induced tension transient is elicited via stimulation of sealed, polarized TTs rather than via ionic depolarization of the SR. PMID:4056734

  4. The interactions between mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum and the proteome characterization of mitochondrion-associated membrane from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhouying; Du, Xiangning; Deng, Jie; Gu, Mingyue; Hu, Hongli; Gui, Miao; Yin, Chang-Cheng; Chang, Zhenzhan

    2015-08-01

    To obtain a comprehensive understanding of proteins involved in mitochondrion-sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) linking, a catalog of proteins from mitochondrion-associated membrane (MAM) of New Zealand white rabbit skeletal muscle were analyzed by an optimized shotgun proteomic method. The membrane fractions were prepared by differential centrifugation and separated by 1D electrophoresis followed by a highly reproducible, automated LC-MS/MS on the hybrid linear ion trap (LTQ)-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. By integrating as low as 1% false discovery rate as one of the features for quality control method, 459 proteins were identified from both of the two independent MAM preparations. Protein pI value, molecular weight range, and transmembrane region were calculated using bioinformatics softwares. One hundred one proteins were recognized as membrane proteins. This protein database suggested that the MAM preparations composed of proteins from mitochondrion, SR, and transverse-tubule. This result indicated mitochondria physically linked with SR in rabbit skeletal muscle, voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), VDAC2, and VDAC3 might participate in formation of the tethers between SR and mitochondria.

  5. A novel isoform of delta-sarcoglycan is localized at the sarcoplasmic reticulum of mouse skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Francisco J.; Mornet, Dominique; Rosas-Vargas, Haydeé; Angulo, Alexandra; Hernández, Manuel; Becker, Viola; Rendón, Alvaro; Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M.

    2006-01-01

    The sarcoglycan-sarcospan complex (α-, β-, χ-, δ-, ε-, and ζ-SG-SSPN), a component of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DAGC), is located at the sarcolemma of muscle fibers where it contributes to maintain cell integrity during contraction-relaxation cycles; χ-and δ-SG are also expressed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). In this study, we report the identification of a novel isoform of murine δ-SG produced by alternative splicing that we named δ-SG3. This isoform is present at transcript level in several tissues, with its highest expression in skeletal and cardiac muscle. The δ-SG3 protein lacks the last 122 amino acids at the C-terminal, which are replaced by 10 new amino acids (EGFLNMQLAG). Interestingly, double immunofluorescence analysis for δ-SG3 and the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) shows a close localization of these two proteins. We propose the subcellular distribution of this novel δ-SG3 isoform at the SR and its involvement in intracellular calcium concentration regulation. PMID:16403451

  6. Effect of chloride on Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of mechanically skinned skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Coonan, J R; Lamb, G D

    1998-04-01

    The effect of intracellular Cl- on Ca2+ release in mechanically skinned fibres of rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and toad iliofibularis muscles was examined under physiological conditions of myoplasmic [Mg2+] and [ATP] and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ loading. Both in rat and toad fibres, the presence of 20 mM Cl- in the myoplasm increased Ca2+ leakage from the SR at pCa (i.e. -log10 [Ca2+]) 6.7, but not at pCa 8. Ca2+ uptake was not significantly affected by the presence of Cl-. This Ca2+-dependent effect of Cl- on Ca2+ leakage was most likely due to a direct action on the ryanodine receptor/Ca2+ release channel, and could influence channel sensitivity and the resting [Ca2+] in muscle fibres in vivo. In contrast to this effect, acute addition of 20 mM Cl- to the myoplasm caused a 40-50% reduction in Ca2+ release in response to a low caffeine concentration both in toad and rat fibres. One possible explanation for this latter effect is that the addition of Cl- induces a potential across the SR (lumen negative) which might reduce Ca2+ release via several different mechanisms.

  7. Influence of inorganic phosphate and pH on sarcoplasmic reticular ATPase in skinned muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Stienen, G J; Papp, Z; Zaremba, R

    1999-08-01

    1. The influence of 30 mM inorganic phosphate (Pi) and pH (6.2-7.4) on the rate of ATP utilization was determined in mechanically skinned bundles of myofibrils from the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis at approximately 5 C. 2. BDM (2,3-butanedione monoxime; 10 mM) depressed isometric force production and actomyosin (AM) ATPase activity equally. Therefore sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) ATPase activity could be determined by extrapolation of the total ATPase activity to zero force. 3. The SR ATPase activity without added Pi at pH 7.1 was 42 +/- 2 % of the total ATPase activity. Addition of 30 mM Pi reduced SR ATPase activity slightly, by 9 +/- 5 %, and depressed force by 62 +/- 2 % and AM ATPase activity by 21 +/- 6 %. 4. At pH 6.2, force, SR ATPase activity and AM ATPase activity were reduced by 21 +/- 5, 61 +/- 5 and 10 +/- 4 % of their respective values at pH 7.1. 5. The SR ATPase activity at 30 mM Pi and pH 6.2 was reduced markedly to 20 +/- 6 % of the value under control conditions, suggesting that the maximum rate of Ca2+ uptake during muscle fatigue was strongly depressed. This reduction was larger than expected on the basis of the effects of Pi and pH alone.

  8. High-speed video imaging and digital analysis of microscopic features in contracting striated muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Kenneth P.; Taylor, Stuart R.

    1993-02-01

    The rapid motion of microscopic features such as the cross striations of single contracting muscle cells are difficult to capture with conventional optical microscopes, video systems, and image processing approaches. An integrated digital video imaging microscope system specifically designed to capture images from single contracting muscle cells at speeds of up to 240 Hz and to analyze images to extract features critical for the understanding of muscle contraction is described. This system consists of a brightfield microscope with immersion optics coupled to a high-speed charge-coupled device (CCD) video camera, super-VHS (S- VHS) and optical media disk video recording (OMDR) systems, and a semiautomated digital image analysis system. Components are modified to optimize spatial and temporal resolution to permit the evaluation of submicrometer features in real physiological time. This approach permits the critical evaluation of the magnitude, time course, and uniformity of contractile function throughout the volume of a single living cell with higher temporal and spatial resolutions than previously possible.

  9. Proteomic study of muscle sarcoplasmic proteins using AUT-PAGE/SDS-PAGE as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Picariello, Gianluca; De Martino, Alessandra; Mamone, Gianfranco; Ferranti, Pasquale; Addeo, Francesco; Faccia, Michele; Spagnamusso, Salvatore; Di Luccia, Aldo

    2006-03-20

    In the present study, an alternative procedure for two-dimensional (2D) electrophoretic analysis in proteomic investigation of the most represented basic muscle water-soluble proteins is suggested. Our method consists of Acetic acid-Urea-Triton polyacrylamide gel (AUT-PAGE) analysis in the first dimension and standard sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel (SDS-PAGE) in the second dimension. Although standard two-dimensional Immobilized pH Gradient-Sodium Dodecyl-Sulphate (2D IPG-SDS) gel electrophoresis has been successfully used to study these proteins, most of the water-soluble proteins are spread on the alkaline part of the 2D map and are poorly focused. Furthermore, the similarity in their molecular weights impairs resolution of the classical approach. The addition of Triton X-100, a non-ionic detergent, into the gel induces a differential electrophoretic mobility of proteins as a result of the formation of mixed micelles between the detergent and the hydrophobic moieties of polypeptides, separating basic proteins with a criterion similar to reversed phase chromatography based on their hydrophobicity. The acid pH induces positive net charges, increasing with the isoelectric point of proteins, thus allowing enhanced resolution in the separation. By using 2D AUT-PAGE/SDS electrophoresis approach to separate water-soluble proteins from fresh pork and from dry-cured products, we could spread proteins over a greater area, achieving a greater resolution than that obtained by IPG in the pH range 3-10 and 6-11. Sarcoplasmic proteins undergoing proteolysis during the ripening of products were identified by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry peptide mass fingerprinting in a easier and more effective way. Two-dimensional AUT-PAGE/SDS electrophoresis has allowed to simplify separation of sarcoplasmic protein mixtures making this technique suitable in the defining of quality of dry-cured pork products by immediate

  10. Effect of saponin treatment on the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rat, cane toad and crustacean (yabby) skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Launikonis, B S; Stephenson, D G

    1997-10-15

    1. Mechanically skinned fibres from skeletal muscles of the rat, toad and yabby were used to investigate the effect of saponin treatment on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ loading properties. The SR was loaded submaximally under control conditions before and after treatment with saponin and SR Ca2+ was released with caffeine. 2. Treatment with 10 micrograms ml-1 saponin greatly reduced the SR Ca2+ loading ability of skinned fibres from the extensor digitorum longus muscle of the rat with a rate constant of 0.24 min-1. Saponin concentrations up to 150 micrograms ml-1 and increased exposure time up to 30 min did not further reduce the SR Ca2+ loading ability of the SR, which indicates that the inhibitory action of 10-150 micrograms ml-1 saponin is not dose dependent. The effect of saponin was also not dependent on the state of polarization of the transverse-tubular system. 3. Treatment with saponin at concentrations up to 100 micrograms ml-1 for 30 min did not affect the Ca2+ loading ability of SR in skinned skeletal muscle fibres from the twitch portion of the toad iliofibularis muscle but SR Ca2+ loading ability decreased markedly with a time constant of 0.22 min-1 in the presence of 150 micrograms ml-1 saponin. 4. The saponin dependent increase in permeability could be reversed in both rat and toad fibres by short treatment with 6 microM Ruthenium Red, a potent SR Ca2+ channel blocker, suggesting that saponin does affect the SR Ca2+ channel properties in mammalian and anuran skeletal muscle. 5. Treatment of skinned fibres of long sarcomere length (> 6 microns) from the claw muscle of the yabby (a freshwater decapod crustacean) with 10 micrograms ml-1 saponin for 30 min abolished the ability of the SR to load Ca2+, indicating that saponin affects differently the SR from skeletal muscles of mammals, anurans and crustaceans. 6. It is concluded that at relatively low concentrations, saponin causes inhibition of the skeletal SR Ca2+ loading ability in a species

  11. Dynamic coupling of regulated binding sites and cycling myosin heads in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kenneth S

    2014-03-01

    In an activated muscle, binding sites on the thin filament and myosin heads switch frequently between different states. Because the status of the binding sites influences the status of the heads, and vice versa, the binding sites and myosin heads are dynamically coupled. The functional consequences of this coupling were investigated using MyoSim, a new computer model of muscle. MyoSim extends existing models based on Huxley-type distribution techniques by incorporating Ca(2+) activation and cooperative effects. It can also simulate arbitrary cross-bridge schemes set by the researcher. Initial calculations investigated the effects of altering the relative speeds of binding-site and cross-bridge kinetics, and of manipulating cooperative processes. Subsequent tests fitted simulated force records to experimental data recorded using permeabilized myocardial preparations. These calculations suggest that the rate of force development at maximum activation is limited by myosin cycling kinetics, whereas the rate at lower levels of activation is limited by how quickly binding sites become available. Additional tests investigated the behavior of transiently activated cells by driving simulations with experimentally recorded Ca(2+) signals. The unloaded shortening profile of a twitching myocyte could be reproduced using a model with two myosin states, cooperative activation, and strain-dependent kinetics. Collectively, these results demonstrate that dynamic coupling of binding sites and myosin heads is important for contractile function.

  12. Modulation of the cytosolic androgen receptor in striated muscle by sex steroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rance, N. E.; Max, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of orchiectomy (GDX) and of subsequent administration of testosterone propionate (TP) or 17(beta)-estradiol (E2) on the maximum binding (Bmax) and apparent Kd of the cytosolic androgen receptor in levator ani (LA) and skeletal muscles of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats are investigated experimentally. The results are presented in graphs and discussed. In LA, BMAX is found to rise from a control level of 2.5 fmol/mg protein to 280, 600, 478, and 133 percent of control at 12 h, 14 d, 30 d, and 44 d after GDX, respectively, while Kd increased only insignificantly (from 680 to 960 fM); Bmax is held at control levels for 6 h by cycloheximide given at GDX, is unaffected by TP given at 30 d, and is further increased (by 480 percent at 44 d) by administration of E2 at 30 d. Bmax in skeletal muscles is found to increase to 139, 212, 220, and 158 percent of control at 12 h, 14 d, 30 d, and 44 d, respectively; Bmax is returned to control at 44 d by TP at 30 d but is not affected by E2. The effect of E2 in LA is attributed to either induction of the cytosolic receptor or a decreased rate of receptor degradation.

  13. Effects of Mg2+ on Ca2+ handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skinned skeletal and cardiac muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Kabbara, A A; Stephenson, D G

    1994-10-01

    The influence of myoplasmic Mg2+ (0.05-10 mM) on Ca2+ accumulation (net Ca2+ flux) and Ca2+ uptake (pump-driven Ca2+ influx) by the intact sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied in skinned fibres from the toad iliofibularis muscle (twitch portion), rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle (fast twitch), rat soleus muscle (slow twitch) and rat cardiac trabeculae. Ca2+ accumulation was optimal between 1 and 3 mM Mg2+ in toad fibres and reached a plateau between 1 and 10 mM Mg2+ in the rat EDL fibres and between 3 and 10 mM Mg2+ in the rat cardiac fibres. In soleus fibres, optimal Ca2+ accumulation occurred at 10 mM Mg2+. The same trend was obtained with all preparations at 0.3 and 1 microM Ca2+. Experiments with 2,5-di-(tert-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone, a specific inhibitor of the Ca2+ pump, revealed a marked Ca2+ efflux from the SR of toad iliofibularis fibres in the presence of 0.2 microM Ca2+ and 1 mM Mg2+. Further experiments indicated that the SR Ca2+ leak could be blocked by 10 microM ruthenium red without affecting the SR Ca2+ pump and this allowed separation between SR Ca2+ uptake and SR Ca2+ accumulation. At 0.3 microM Ca2+, Ca2+ uptake was optimal with 1 mM Mg2+ in the toad iliofibularis and rat EDL fibres and between 1 and 10 mM Mg2+ in the rat soleus and trabeculae preparations. At higher [Ca2+] (1 microM), Ca2+ uptake was optimal with 1 mM Mg2+ in the iliofibularis fibres and between 1 and 3 mM Mg2+ in the EDL fibres.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Potentiation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release by 2,3-butanedione monoxime in crustacean muscle.

    PubMed

    Györke, S; Dettbarn, C; Palade, P

    1993-06-01

    The effect of the chemical phosphatase 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) on various aspects of excitation/contraction coupling in crustacean muscle was investigated. Despite having a depressant effect on vertebrate skeletal and cardiac muscle, BDM was a potentiator of contraction in crustacean muscle. At concentrations of 1-3 mM BDM caused an increase of potassium contractures in bundles of fibers isolated from crayfish muscle. At higher concentrations BDM caused oscillatory contractions by itself. In single voltage-clamped cut muscle fibers loaded with rhod-2, BDM (0.5-2 mM) potentiated the magnitude and duration of intracellular Ca2+ transients elicited by depolarization. At the same time BDM did not affect the rate of Ca2+ removal from the myoplasm under conditions where Ca2+ release was blocked by tetracaine. Nor did BDM increase Ca2+ entry; in fact it caused a decrease in the amplitude of the inward Ca2+ current (ICa). In microsomes isolated from lobster muscle, BDM also potentiated Ca2+ release induced by caffeine and at higher concentrations (above 3 mM) induced release by itself. At the same time it had little effect on Ca2+ uptake. These results indicate that BDM potentiates Ca2+ release in crustacean muscle possibly by dephosphorylation of the Ca(2+)-release channel.

  15. Mechanosensitive channels in striated muscle and the cardiovascular system: not quite a stretch anymore.

    PubMed

    Stiber, Jonathan A; Seth, Malini; Rosenberg, Paul B

    2009-08-01

    Stretch-activated or mechanosensitive channels transduce mechanical forces into ion fluxes across the cell membrane. These channels have been implicated in several aspects of cardiovascular physiology including regulation of blood pressure, vasoreactivity, and cardiac arrhythmias, as well as the adverse remodeling associated with cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. This review discusses mechanosensitive channels in skeletal muscle and the cardiovascular system and their role in disease pathogenesis. We describe the regulation of gating of mechanosensitive channels including direct mechanisms and indirect activation by signaling pathways, as well as the influence on activation of these channels by the underlying cytoskeleton and scaffolding proteins. We then focus on the role of transient receptor potential channels, several of which have been implicated as mechanosensitive channels, in the pathogenesis of adverse cardiac remodeling and as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of heart failure.

  16. In Vitro and In Vivo Single Myosin Step-Sizes in Striated Muscle a

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Thomas P.; Sun, Xiaojing; Wang, Yihua; Ajtai, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Myosin in muscle transduces ATP free energy into the mechanical work of moving actin. It has a motor domain transducer containing ATP and actin binding sites, and, mechanical elements coupling motor impulse to the myosin filament backbone providing transduction/mechanical-coupling. The mechanical coupler is a lever-arm stabilized by bound essential and regulatory light chains. The lever-arm rotates cyclically to impel bound filamentous actin. Linear actin displacement due to lever-arm rotation is the myosin step-size. A high-throughput quantum dot labeled actin in vitro motility assay (Qdot assay) measures motor step-size in the context of an ensemble of actomyosin interactions. The ensemble context imposes a constant velocity constraint for myosins interacting with one actin filament. In a cardiac myosin producing multiple step-sizes, a “second characterization” is step-frequency that adjusts longer step-size to lower frequency maintaining a linear actin velocity identical to that from a shorter step-size and higher frequency actomyosin cycle. The step-frequency characteristic involves and integrates myosin enzyme kinetics, mechanical strain, and other ensemble affected characteristics. The high-throughput Qdot assay suits a new paradigm calling for wide surveillance of the vast number of disease or aging relevant myosin isoforms that contrasts with the alternative model calling for exhaustive research on a tiny subset myosin forms. The zebrafish embryo assay (Z assay) performs single myosin step-size and step-frequency assaying in vivo combining single myosin mechanical and whole muscle physiological characterizations in one model organism. The Qdot and Z assays cover “bottom-up” and “top-down” assaying of myosin characteristics. PMID:26728749

  17. Human recombinant erythropoietin protects the striated muscle microcirculation of the dorsal skinfold from postischemic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Contaldo, Claudio; Meier, Christoph; Elsherbiny, Ahmed; Harder, Yves; Trentz, Otmar; Menger, Michael D; Wanner, Guido A

    2007-07-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been proposed as a novel cytoprotectant in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury of the brain, heart, and kidney. However, whether EPO exerts its protection by prevention of postischemic microcirculatory deterioration is unknown. We have investigated the effect of EPO on I/R-induced microcirculatory dysfunctions. We used the mouse dorsal skinfold chamber preparation to study nutritive microcirculation and leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction in striated muscle of the dorsal skinfold by in vivo fluorescence microscopy before 3 h of ischemia and during 5 days of reperfusion. Animals were pretreated with EPO (5,000 U/kg body wt) 1 or 24 h before ischemia. Vehicle-treated I/R-injured animals served as controls. Additional animals underwent sham operation only or were pretreated with EPO but not subjected to I/R. I/R significantly (P < 0.05) reduced functional capillary density, increased microvascular permeability, and enhanced venular leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction during early reperfusion. These findings were associated with pronounced (P < 0.05) arteriolar constriction and diminution of blood flow during late reperfusion. Pretreatment with EPO induced EPO receptor and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression at 6 h of reperfusion (P < 0.05). In parallel, EPO significantly (P < 0.05) reduced capillary perfusion failure and microvascular hyperpermeability during early reperfusion and arteriolar constriction and flow during late reperfusion. EPO pretreatment substantially (P < 0.05) diminished I/R-induced leukocytic inflammation by reducing the number of rolling and firmly adhering leukocytes in postcapillary venules. EPO applied 1 h before ischemia induced angiogenic budding and sprouting at 1 and 3 days of reperfusion and formation of new capillary networks at 5 days of reperfusion. Thus our study demonstrates for the first time that EPO effectively attenuates I/R injury by preserving nutritive perfusion, reducing leukocytic

  18. Structure and interactions of the carboxyl terminus of striated muscle alpha-tropomyosin: it is important to be flexible.

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Norma J; Palm, Thomas; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah E

    2002-01-01

    Tropomyosin (TM) binds to and regulates the actin filament. We used circular dichroism and heteronuclear NMR to investigate the secondary structure and interactions of the C terminus of striated muscle alpha-TM, a major functional determinant, using a model peptide, TM9a(251-284). The (1)H(alpha) and (13)C(alpha) chemical shift displacements show that residues 252 to 277 are alpha-helical but residues 278 to 284 are nonhelical and mobile. The (1)H(N) and (13)C' displacements suggest that residues 257 to 269 form a coiled coil. Formation of an "overlap" binary complex with a 33-residue N-terminal chimeric peptide containing residues 1 to 14 of alpha-TM perturbs the (1)H(N) and (15)N resonances of residues 274 to 284. Addition of a fragment of troponin T, TnT(70-170), to the binary complex perturbs most of the (1)H(N)-(15)N cross-peaks. In addition, there are many new cross-peaks, showing that the binding is asymmetric. Q263, in a proposed troponin T binding site, shows two sets of side-chain (15)N-(1)H cross-peaks, indicating conformational flexibility. The conformational equilibrium of the side chain changes upon formation of the binary and ternary complexes. Replacing Q263 with leucine greatly increases the stability of TM9a(251-284) and reduces its ability to form the binary and ternary complexes, showing that conformational flexibility is crucial for the binding functions of the C terminus. PMID:12414708

  19. Expression of eight distinct MHC isoforms in bovine striated muscles: evidence for MHC-2B presence only in extraocular muscles.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, L; Maccatrozzo, L; Patruno, M; Caliaro, F; Mascarello, F; Reggiani, C

    2005-11-01

    This study aimed to analyse the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms in bovine muscles, with particular attention to the MHC-2B gene. Diaphragm, longissimus dorsi, masseter, several laryngeal muscles and two extraocular muscles (rectus lateralis and retractor bulbi) were sampled in adult male Bos taurus (age 18-24 months, mass 400-500 kg) and analysed by RT-PCR, gel electrophoresis and immunohistochemistry. Transcripts and proteins corresponding to eight MHC isoforms were identified: MHC-alpha and MHC-beta/slow (or MHC-1), two developmental isoforms (MHC-embryonic and MHC-neonatal), three adult fast isoforms (MHC-2A, MHC-2X and MHC-2B) and the extraocular isoform MHC-Eo. All eight MHC isoforms were found to be co-expressed in extrinsic eye muscles, retractor bulbi and rectus lateralis, four (beta/slow, 2A, 2X, neonatal) in laryngeal muscles, three (beta/slow, 2A and 2X) in trunk and limb muscles and two (beta/slow and alpha) in masseter. The expression of MHC-2B and MHC-Eo was restricted to extraocular muscles. Developmental MHC isoforms (neonatal and embryonic) were only found in specialized muscles in the larynx and in the eye. MHC-alpha was only found in extraocular and masseter muscle. Single fibres dissected from masseter, diaphragm and longissimus were classified into five groups (expressing, respectively, beta/slow, alpha, slow and 2A, 2A and 2X) on the basis of MHC isoform electrophoretical separation, and their contractile properties [maximum shortening velocity (v(0)) and isometric tension (P(0))] were determined. v(0) increased progressively from slow to fast 2A and fast 2X, whereas hybrid 1-2A fibres and fibres containing MHC-alpha were intermediate between slow and fast 2A.

  20. Ca2+-releasing effect of cerivastatin on the sarcoplasmic reticulum of mouse and rat skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ryotaku; Tanabe, Mitsuo; Kono, Keita; Maruyama, Kei; Ikemoto, Takaaki; Endo, Makoto

    2003-11-01

    We analyzed the effect of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors on Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) using chemically skinned skeletal muscle fibers from the mouse and the rat. Cerivastatin (>20 microM) released Ca(2+) from the SR, while pravastatin showed only a little effect. The rates of Ca(2+) release were increased by cerivastatin at all Ca(2+) concentrations tested. Cerivastatin-induced Ca(2+) release in the presence of Ca(2+) was affected by adenosine monophosphate, Mg(2+), and procaine in essentially the same way as for caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release. The Ca(2+)-uptake capacity of the SR was reduced after co-treatment with ryanodine and cerivastatin at pCa 6.0 to a much greater extent than with ryanodine alone. Thus, cerivastatin-induced Ca(2+) release in the presence of Ca(2+) must be a result of the activation of the Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) mechanism of the ryanodine receptor. However, even when CICR was maximally inhibited by Mg(2+) and procaine, or in the practical absence of Ca(2+) (pCa >8), cerivastatin still caused Ca(2+) release. These results indicate that cerivastatin causes Ca(2+) release also by activating some other mechanism(s) in addition to the activation of CICR. Either or both of these effects might be related to its adverse effect, rhabdomyolysis.

  1. Sensory and autonomic neurons project both to the smooth retractor penis and to the striated bulbospongiosus muscles. Neurochemical features of the sympathetic subset.

    PubMed

    Botti, Maddalena; Gazza, Ferdinando; Ragionieri, Luisa; Minelli, Luisa Bo; Panu, Rino

    2012-08-01

    Aim of the present study was to verify, by means of double retrograde neuronal tracers technique, the hypothesis that a subpopulation of sensory and autonomic neurons send collateral axons to both smooth and striated genital muscles. We also wanted to define the neurochemical content of the eventually retrogradelly double labeled (RDL) neurons in the sympathetic trunk ganglia (STG). We used six intact pigs and we injected the tracer Diamidino Yellow (DY) in the smooth left retractor penis muscle (RPM) and the tracer Fast Blue (FB) in the striated left bulbospongiosus muscle (BSM). Rare (2 ± 0.6) RDL neurons were found in the ipsilateral S2 spinal ganglion (SG), 220 ± 42 in the ipsilateral STGs, from L3 to S3, 19 ± 15 in the contralateral S1-S2 ones and 22 ± 5 in the bilateral caudal mesenteric ganglia (CMG). The RDL neurons of the STG were IR for TH (85 ± 13%), DβH (69 ± 17%), NPY (69 ± 23%), nNOS (60 ± 11%), LENK (54 ± 19%), VIP (53±26%), SOM (40 ± 8%), CGRP (34 ± 12%), SP (31 ± 16%), and VAChT (28 ± 3%). Our research highlights the presence of sensory and sympathetic neurons with qualitatively different neurochemical content sending axons both to the smooth RPM and to the striated BSM of the pig. These RDL neurons are likely to project to the smooth vasal musculature to create the ideal physiological conditions in which these muscles can optimize the erectile function.

  2. Mechanical load induces sarcoplasmic wounding and FGF release in differentiated human skeletal muscle cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. S.; Feeback, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    The transduction mechanism (or mechanisms) responsible for converting a mechanical load into a skeletal muscle growth response are unclear. In this study we have used a mechanically active tissue culture model of differentiated human skeletal muscle cells to investigate the relationship between mechanical load, sarcolemma wounding, fibroblast growth factor release, and skeletal muscle cell growth. Using the Flexcell Strain Unit we demonstrate that as mechanical load increases, so too does the amount of sarcolemma wounding. A similar relationship was also observed between the level of mechanical load inflicted on the cells and the amount of bFGF (FGF2) released into the surrounding medium. In addition, we demonstrate that the muscle cell growth response induced by chronic mechanical loading in culture can be inhibited by the presence of an antibody capable of neutralizing the biological activity of FGF. This study provides direct evidence that mechanically induced, sarcolemma wound-mediated FGF release is an important autocrine mechanism for transducing the stimulus of mechanical load into a skeletal muscle growth response.

  3. Phosphorylation of anchoring protein by calmodulin protein kinase associated to the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rabbit fast-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Damiani, E; Sacchetto, R; Margreth, A

    2000-12-09

    Regulatory phosphorylation of phospholamban and of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase SERCA2a isoform by endogenous CaM-K II in slow-twitch skeletal and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is well documented, but much less is known of the exact functional role of CaM K II in fast-twitch muscle SR. Recently, it was shown that RNA splicing of brain-specific alpha CaM K II, gives rise to a truncated protein (alpha KAP), consisting mainly of the association domain, serving to anchor CaM K II to SR membrane in rat skeletal muscle [Bayer, K.-U., et al. (1998) EMBO J. 19, 5598-5605]. In the present study, we searched for the presence of alpha KAP in sucrose-density purified SR membrane fractions from representative fast-twitch and slow-twitch limb muscles, both of the rabbit and the rat, using immunoblot techniques and antibody directed against the association domain of alpha CaM K II. Putative alpha KAP was immunodetected as a 23-kDa electrophoretic component on SDS-PAGE of the isolated SR from fast-twitch but not from slow-twitch muscle, and was further identified as a specific substrate of endogenous CaM K II, in the rabbit. Immunodetected, (32)P-labeled, non-calmodulin binding protein, behaved as a single 23-kDa protein species under several electrophoretic conditions. The 23-kDa protein, with defined properties, was isolated as a complex with 60-kDa delta CaM K II isoform, by sucrose-density sedimentation analysis. Moreover, we show here that putative alphaKAP, in spite of its inability to bind CaM in ligand blot overlay, co-eluted with delta CaM K II from CaM-affinity columns. That raises the question of whether CaM K II-mediated phosphorylation of alpha KAP and triadin together might be involved in a molecular signaling pathway important for SR Ca(2+)-release in fast-twitch muscle SR.

  4. Effect of taurine on sarcoplasmic reticulum function and force in skinned fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibres of the rat.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Anthony J; Berg, Helen M

    2002-01-01

    We examined the effect of taurine on depolarisation-induced force responses and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function in mechanically skinned skeletal muscle fibres from the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of the rat. Taurine (20 mM) produced a small but significant (P < 0.01) decrease in the sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to Ca(2+) (increase in the [Ca(2+)] corresponding to 50 % of maximum force of about 7 %; n = 10) and in maximum force (92.0 +/- 1.0 % of controls) in the skinned fibres. Taurine had no statistically significant effect on the slope of the force-pCa curve. Depolarisation-induced force responses in the skinned fibres were markedly increased in peak value by 20 mM taurine, to 120.8 +/- 5.3 % of control measurements (P = 0.0006, n = 27). Taurine (20 mM) significantly increased the SR Ca(2+) accumulation in the skinned fibres by 34.6 +/- 9.3 % compared to control conditions (measured by comparing the integral of caffeine contractures in fibres previously loaded with Ca(2+) in the absence or presence of taurine; P = 0.0014, n = 10). Taurine (20 mM) also increased both the peak and rate of rise of caffeine-induced force responses in the fibres by 29.2 +/- 9.7 % (P = 0.0298, n = 6) and 27.6 +/- 8.9 % (P = 0.037), respectively, compared with controls. This study shows that taurine is a modulator of contractile function in mammalian skeletal muscle. Taurine may increase the size of depolarisation-induced force responses by augmenting SR Ca(2+) accumulation and release.

  5. Effect of 23-day muscle disuse on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ properties and contractility in human type I and type II skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Lamboley, C R; Wyckelsma, V L; Perry, B D; McKenna, M J; Lamb, G D

    2016-08-01

    Inactivity negatively impacts on skeletal muscle function mainly through muscle atrophy. However, recent evidence suggests that the quality of individual muscle fibers is also altered. This study examined the effects of 23 days of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS) on specific force and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content in individual skinned muscle fibers. Muscle biopsies of the vastus lateralis were taken from six young healthy adults prior to and following ULLS. After disuse, the endogenous SR Ca(2+) content was ∼8% lower in type I fibers and maximal SR Ca(2+) capacity was lower in both type I and type II fibers (-11 and -5%, respectively). The specific force, measured in single skinned fibers from three subjects, decreased significantly after ULLS in type II fibers (-23%) but not in type I fibers (-9%). Western blot analyses showed no significant change in the amounts of myosin heavy chain (MHC) I and MHC IIa following the disuse, whereas the amounts of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 1 (SERCA1) and calsequestrin increased by ∼120 and ∼20%, respectively, and the amount of troponin I decreased by ∼21%. These findings suggest that the decline in force and power occurring with muscle disuse is likely to be exacerbated in part by reductions in maximum specific force in type II fibers, and in the amount of releasable SR Ca(2+) in both fiber types, the latter not being attributable to a reduced calsequestrin level. Furthermore, the ∼3-wk disuse in human elicits change in SR properties, in particular a more than twofold upregulation in SERCA1 density, before any fiber-type shift.

  6. COORDINATED DEVELOPMENT OF THE SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM AND T SYSTEM DURING POSTNATAL DIFFERENTIATION OF RAT SKELETAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Schiaffino, S.; Margreth, A.

    1969-01-01

    An electron microscope study has been carried out on rat psoas muscle, during the early postnatal stages of development. Among the several subcellular components, the sarcotubular system undergoes the most striking modifications during this period. In muscle fibers of the newborn rat, junctional contacts between the T system and the SR are sparse and are, mostly, longitudinally or obliquely oriented. The T tubules do not penetrate deeply into the muscle cell, as indicated by the predominantly peripheral location of the triads and the persistence, at these stages of development, of a highly branched subsarcolemmal system of tubules. Diadic associations of junctional SR elements with the plasma membrane are also occasionally observed. The early SR elaborations incompletely delineate the myofibrils, at both the A- and I-band level. Longitudinal sections show irregularly oriented SR tubules, running continuously over successive sarcomeres. Flattened junctional cisterns filled with granular material are sparse and laterally interconnected, at circumscribed sites, with the SR tubules. Between 1 and 2 wk postpartum, transversal triadic contacts are extensively established, at the A-I band level, and the SR network differentiates into two portions in register with the A and I band, respectively. At 10–15 days after birth, the SR provides a transversely continuous double sheet around the myofibrils at the I-band level, whereas it forms a single discontinuous layer at the A-band level. The relationship that these morphological modifications of the sarcotubular system may bear to previously described biochemical and physiological changes of rat muscle fibers after birth is discussed. PMID:5814005

  7. Calcium release and ionic changes in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of tetanized muscle: an electron-probe study

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Approximately 60-70% of the total fiber calcium was localized in the terminal cisternae (TC) in resting frog muscle as determined by electron-probe analysis of ultrathin cryosections. During a 1.2 s tetanus, 59% (69 mmol/kg dry TC) of the calcium content of the TC was released, enough to raise total cytoplasmic calcium concentration by approximately 1 mM. This is equivalent to the concentration of binding sites on the calcium-binding proteins (troponin and parvalbumin) in frog muscle. Calcium release was associated with a significant uptake of magnesium and potassium into the TC, but the amount of calcium released exceeded the total measured cation accumulation by 62 mEq/kg dry weight. It is suggested that most of the charge deficit is apparent, and charge compensation is achieved by movement of protons into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and/or by the movement of organic co- or counterions not measured by energy dispersive electron-probe analysis. There was no significant change in the sodium or chlorine content of the TC during tetanus. The unchanged distribution of a permeant anion, chloride, argues against the existence of a large and sustained transSR potential during tetanus, if the chloride permeability of the in situ SR is as high as suggested by measurements on fractionated SR. The calcium content of the longitudinal SR (LSR) during tetanus did not show the LSR to be a major site of calcium storage and delayed return to the TC. The potassium concentration in the LSR was not significantly different from the adjacent cytoplasmic concentration. Analysis of small areas of I-band and large areas, including several sarcomeres, suggested that chloride is anisotropically distributed, with some of it probably bound to myosin. In contrast, the distribution of potassium in the fiber cytoplasm followed the water distribution. The mitochondrial concentration of calcium was low and did not change significantly during a tetanus. The TC of both tetanized and resting

  8. A role of the LIN-12/Notch signaling pathway in diversifying the non-striated egg-laying muscles in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Hale, Jared J; Amin, Nirav M; George, Carolyn; Via, Zachary; Shi, Herong; Liu, Jun

    2014-05-15

    The proper formation and function of an organ is dependent on the specification and integration of multiple cell types and tissues. An example of this is the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite egg-laying system, which requires coordination between the vulva, uterus, neurons, and musculature. While the genetic constituents of the first three components have been well studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the specification of the egg-laying musculature. The egg-laying muscles are non-striated in nature and consist of sixteen cells, four each of type I and type II vulval muscles and uterine muscles. These 16 non-striated muscles exhibit distinct morphology, location, synaptic connectivity and function. Using an RNAi screen targeting the putative transcription factors in the C. elegans genome, we identified a number of novel factors important for the diversification of these different types of egg-laying muscles. In particular, we found that RNAi knockdown of lag-1, which encodes the sole C. elegans ortholog of the transcription factor CSL (CBF1, Suppressor of Hairless, LAG-1), an effector of the LIN-12/Notch pathway, led to the production of extra type I vulval muscles. Similar phenotypes were also observed in animals with down-regulation of the Notch receptor LIN-12 and its DSL (Delta, Serrate, LAG-2) ligand LAG-2. The extra type I vulval muscles in animals with reduced LIN-12/Notch signaling resulted from a cell fate transformation of type II vulval muscles to type I vulval muscles. We showed that LIN-12/Notch was activated in the undifferentiated type II vulval muscle cells by LAG-2/DSL that is likely produced by the anchor cell (AC). Our findings provide additional evidence highlighting the roles of LIN-12/Notch signaling in coordinating the formation of various components of the functional C. elegans egg-laying system. We also identify multiple new factors that play critical roles in the proper specification of the different types

  9. Sarcoplasmic reticulum lumenal Ca2+ has access to cytosolic activation and inactivation sites of skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel.

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, A; Meissner, G

    1996-01-01

    The effects of sarcoplasmic reticulum lumenal (trans) Ca2+ on cytosolic (cis) ATP-activated rabbit skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors) were examined using the planar lipid bilayer method. Single channels were recorded in symmetric 0.25 M KCl media with K+ as the major current carrier. With nanomolar [Ca2+] in both bilayer chambers, the addition of 2 mM cytosolic ATP greatly increased the number of short channel openings. As lumenal [Ca2+] was increased from < 0.1 microM to approximately 250 microM, increasing channel activities and events with long open time constants were seen at negative holding potentials. Channel activity remained low at positive holding potentials. Further increase in lumenal [Ca2+] to 1, 5, and 10 mM resulted in a decrease in channel activities at negative holding potentials and increased activities at positive holding potentials. A voltage-dependent activation by 50 microM lumenal Ca2+ was also observed when the channel was minimally activated by < 1 microM cytosolic Ca2+ in the absence of ATP. With microM cytosolic Ca2+ in the presence or absence of 2 mM ATP, single-channel activities showed no or only a weak voltage dependence. Other divalent cations (Mg2+, Ba2+) could not replace lumenal Ca2+. On the contrary, cytosolic ATP-activated channel activities were decreased as lumenal Ca2+ fluxes were reduced by the addition of 1-5 mM BaCl2 or MgCl2 to the lumenal side, which contained 50 microM Ca2+. An increase in [KCl] from 0.25 M to 1 M also reduced single-channel activities. Addition of the "fast" Ca2+ buffer 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethanetetraacetic acid (BAPTA) to the cls chamber increased cytosolic ATP-, lumenal Ca(2+)-activated channel activities to a nearly maximum level. These results suggested that lumenal Ca2+ flowing through the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel may regulate channel activity by having access to cytosolic Ca2+ activation and Ca2+ inactivation sites that are located in "BAPTA

  10. Role of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content in Ca2+ entry of bovine airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bazán-Perkins, Blanca; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Barajas-López, Carlos; Montaño, Luis M

    2003-10-01

    Depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores induces the opening of an unknown Ca(2+ )entry pathway to the cell. We measured the intracellular free-Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) at different sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content in fura-2-loaded smooth muscle cells isolated from bovine tracheas. The absence of Ca(2+) in the extracellular medium generated a time-dependent decrement in [Ca(2+)]i which was proportional to the reduction in the SR-Ca(2+) content. This SR-Ca(2+) level was indirectly determined by measuring the amount of Ca(2+) released by caffeine. Ca(2+) restoration at different times after Ca(2+)-free incubation (2, 4, 6 and 10 min) induced an increment of [Ca(2+)]i. This increase in [Ca(2+)]i was considered as Ca(2+) entry to the cell. The rate of this entry was slow (~0.3 nM/s) when SR-Ca(2+) content was higher than 50% (2 and 4 min in Ca(2+)-free medium), and significantly ( p<0.01) accelerated (>1.0 nM/s) when SR-Ca(2+) content was lower than 50% (6 and 10 min in Ca(2+)-free medium). Thapsigargin significantly induced a higher rate of this Ca(2+) entry ( p<0.01). Variations in Ca(2+) influx after SR-Ca(2+) depletion were estimated more directly by a Mn(2+) quench approach. Ca(2+) restoration to the medium 4 min after Ca(2+) removal did not modify the Mn(2+) influx. However, when Ca(2+) was added after 10 min in Ca(2+)-free medium, an increment of Mn(2+) influx was observed, corroborating an increase in Ca(2+) entry. The fast Ca(2+) influx was Ni(2+) sensitive but was not affected by other known capacitative Ca(2+) entry blockers such as La(3+), Mg(2+), SKF 96365 and 2-APB. It was also not affected by the blockage of L-type Ca2(+) channels with methoxyverapamil or by the sustained K(+)-induced depolarisation. The slow Ca(2+) influx was only sensitive to SKF 96365. In conclusion, our results indicate that in bovine airway smooth muscle cells Ca(2+) influx after SR-Ca(2+) depletion has two rates: A) The slow Ca(2+) influx, which occurred in cells

  11. Striated perineal muscles: location of autonomic, sensory, and somatic neurons projecting to the male pig bulbospongiosus muscle.

    PubMed

    Botti, Maddalena; Ragionieri, Luisa; Gazza, Ferdinando; Acone, Franca; Bo Minelli, Luisa; Panu, Rino

    2009-11-01

    The location, number, and size of the neurons innervating the bulbospongiosus muscle (BSM) were studied in male pigs, by means of Fast Blue (FB) retrograde transport. After injection of FB into the left BSM, labeled neurons were found bilaterally in the L2-S4 sympathetic trunk ganglia (STGs), in the caudal mesenteric ganglia (CMGs), in the microganglia of the pelvic plexus (PGs), in a dorsolateral area with respect to the central canal of S1-S3 segments of the spinal cord (SC) and in the S1-S4 ipsilateral and S2-S3 contralateral spinal ganglia (SGs). The mean number of labeled FB cells was 3,122 +/- 1,968 in STGs, 979 +/- 667 in CMGs, 108 +/- 104 in PGs, 89 +/- 39 in SC and 77 +/- 23 in SGs. The area of the multipolar neurons was 852 +/- 22 microm(2) in the STGs, 878 +/- 23 microm(2) in the CMGs and 922 +/- 31 microm(2) in the PGs. The multipolar SC neurons had an area of 1,057 +/- 38 microm(2), while pseudounipolar SG cells had dimensions of 2,281 +/- 129 microm(2). Our research enables us to highlight two peculiarities regarding the innervation of the boar BSM: the very high number of labeled autonomic neurons and the particular localization of the motor somatic nucleus.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Striated Muscle-Specific Gab1 Isoform as a Critical Signal Transducer for Neuregulin-1/ErbB Signaling in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Taku; Masaki, Takeshi; Arita, Yoh; Ishibashi, Tomohiko; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Okazawa, Makoto; Oka, Toru; Shioyama, Wataru; Yamauchi-Takihara, Keiko; Komuro, Issei; Sakata, Yasushi; Nakaoka, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Grb2-associated binder (Gab) docking proteins regulate signals downstream of a variety of growth factors and receptor tyrosine kinases. Neuregulin-1 (NRG-1), a member of epidermal growth factor family, plays a critical role for cardiomyocyte proliferation and prevention of heart failure via ErbB receptors. We previously reported that Gab1 and Gab2 in the myocardium are essential for maintenance of myocardial function in the postnatal heart via transmission of NRG-1/ErbB-signaling through analysis of Gab1/Gab2 cardiomyocyte-specific double knockout mice. In that study, we also found that there is an unknown high-molecular weight (high-MW) Gab1 isoform (120 kDa) expressed exclusively in the heart, in addition to the ubiquitously expressed low-MW (100 kDa) Gab1. However, the high-MW Gab1 has been molecularly ill-defined to date. Here, we identified the high-MW Gab1 as a striated muscle-specific isoform. The high-MW Gab1 has an extra exon encoding 27 amino acid residues between the already-known 3rd and 4th exons of the ubiquitously expressed low-MW Gab1. Expression analysis by RT-PCR and immunostaining with the antibody specific for the high-MW Gab1 demonstrate that the high-MW Gab1 isoform is exclusively expressed in striated muscle including heart and skeletal muscle. The ratio of high-MW Gab1/ total Gab1 mRNAs increased along with heart development. The high-MW Gab1 isoform in heart underwent tyrosine-phosphorylation exclusively after intravenous administration of NRG-1, among several growth factors. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of the high-MW Gab1 induces more sustained activation of AKT after stimulation with NRG-1 in cardiomyocytes compared with that of β-galactosidase. On the contrary, siRNA-mediated knockdown of the high-MW Gab1 significantly attenuated AKT activation after stimulation with NRG-1 in cardiomyocytes. Taken together, these findings suggest that the striated muscle-specific high-MW isoform of Gab1 has a crucial role for NRG-1/ErbB signaling

  13. Effect of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content on action potential-induced Ca2+ release in rat skeletal muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Posterino, G S; Lamb, G D

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the level of Ca2+ loading in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and the amount of Ca2+ released by an action potential (AP) in fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibres of the rat. Single muscle fibres were mechanically skinned and electric field stimulation was used to induce an AP in the transverse-tubular system and a resulting twitch response. Responses were elicited in the presence of known amounts (0–0.38 mM) of BAPTA, a fast Ca2+ buffer, with the SR Ca2+ pump either functional or blocked by 50 μM 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-hydroquinone (TBQ). When Ca2+ reuptake was blocked, an estimate of the amount of Ca2+ released by an AP could be derived from the size of the force response. In a fibre with the SR loaded with Ca2+ at the endogenous level (≈1.2 mM, expressed as total Ca2+ per litre fibre volume; approximately one-third of maximal loading), a single AP triggered the release of ≈230 μM Ca2+. If a second AP was elicited 10 ms after the first, only a further ≈60 μM Ca2+ was released, the reduction probably being due to Ca2+ inactivation of Ca2+ release. When Ca2+ reuptake was blocked, APs applied 15 s apart elicited similar amounts of Ca2+ release (≈230 μM) on the first two or three occasions and then progressively less Ca2+ was released until the SR was fully depleted after a total of approximately eight APs. When the SR was loaded to near-maximal capacity (≈3–4 mM), each AP (or pair of APs 10 ms apart) still only released approximately the same amount of Ca2+ as that released when the fibre was endogenously loaded. Consistent with this, successive APs (15 s apart) elicited similar amounts of Ca2+ release ≈10–16 times before the amount released declined, and the SR was fully depleted of Ca2+ after a total release calculated to be ≈3–4 mM. When the SR was loaded maximally, increasing the [BAPTA] above 280 μM resulted in an increase in the amount of Ca2+ released per AP, probably because the greater level

  14. Isoform composition and gene expression of thick and thin filament proteins in striated muscles of mice after 30-day space flight.

    PubMed

    Ulanova, Anna; Gritsyna, Yulia; Vikhlyantsev, Ivan; Salmov, Nikolay; Bobylev, Alexander; Abdusalamova, Zarema; Rogachevsky, Vadim; Shenkman, Boris; Podlubnaya, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    Changes in isoform composition, gene expression of titin and nebulin, and isoform composition of myosin heavy chains as well as changes in titin phosphorylation level in skeletal (m. gastrocnemius, m. tibialis anterior, and m. psoas) and cardiac muscles of mice were studied after a 30-day-long space flight onboard the Russian spacecraft "BION-M" number 1. A muscle fibre-type shift from slow-to-fast and a decrease in the content of titin and nebulin in the skeletal muscles of animals from "Flight" group was found. Using Pro-Q Diamond staining, an ~3-fold increase in the phosphorylation level of titin in m. gastrocnemius of mice from the "Flight" group was detected. The content of titin and its phosphorylation level in the cardiac muscle of mice from "Flight" and "Control" groups did not differ; nevertheless an increase (2.2 times) in titin gene expression in the myocardium of flight animals was found. The observed changes are discussed in the context of their role in the contractile activity of striated muscles of mice under conditions of weightlessness.

  15. Isoform Composition and Gene Expression of Thick and Thin Filament Proteins in Striated Muscles of Mice after 30-Day Space Flight

    PubMed Central

    Ulanova, Anna; Gritsyna, Yulia; Vikhlyantsev, Ivan; Salmov, Nikolay; Bobylev, Alexander; Abdusalamova, Zarema; Rogachevsky, Vadim; Shenkman, Boris; Podlubnaya, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    Changes in isoform composition, gene expression of titin and nebulin, and isoform composition of myosin heavy chains as well as changes in titin phosphorylation level in skeletal (m. gastrocnemius, m. tibialis anterior, and m. psoas) and cardiac muscles of mice were studied after a 30-day-long space flight onboard the Russian spacecraft “BION-M” number 1. A muscle fibre-type shift from slow-to-fast and a decrease in the content of titin and nebulin in the skeletal muscles of animals from “Flight” group was found. Using Pro-Q Diamond staining, an ~3-fold increase in the phosphorylation level of titin in m. gastrocnemius of mice from the “Flight” group was detected. The content of titin and its phosphorylation level in the cardiac muscle of mice from “Flight” and “Control” groups did not differ; nevertheless an increase (2.2 times) in titin gene expression in the myocardium of flight animals was found. The observed changes are discussed in the context of their role in the contractile activity of striated muscles of mice under conditions of weightlessness. PMID:25664316

  16. Mechanism of chloride-dependent release of Ca2+ in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Sukhareva, M; Morrissette, J; Coronado, R

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Cl- on the Ca2+ permeability of rabbit skeletal muscle junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) using 45Ca2+ fluxes and single channel recordings. In 45Ca2+ efflux experiments, the lumen of the SR was passively loaded with solutions of 150 mM univalent salt containing 5 mM 45Ca2+. Release of 45Ca2+ was measured by rapid filtration in the presence of extravesicular 0.4-0.8 microM free Ca2+ and 150 mM of the same univalent salt loaded into the SR lumen. The rate of release was 5-10 times higher when the univalent salt equilibrated across the SR-contained Cl- (Tris-Cl, choline-Cl, KCl) instead of an organic anion or other halides (gluconate-, methanesulfonate-, acetate-, HEPES-, Br-, I-). Cations (K+, Tris+) could be interchanged without a significant effect on the release rate. To determine whether Cl- stimulated ryanodine receptors, we measured the stimulation of release by ATP (5 mM total) and caffeine (20 mM total) and the inhibition by Mg2+ (0.8 mM estimated free) in Cl(-)-free and Cl(-)-containing solutions. The effects of ATP, caffeine, and Mg2+ were the largest in K-gluconate and Tris-gluconate, intermediate in KCl, and notably poor or absent in choline-Cl and Tris-Cl. Procaine (10 mM) inhibited the caffeine-stimulated release measured in K-gluconate, whereas the Cl- channel blocker clofibric acid (10 mM) but not procaine inhibited the caffeine-insensitive release measured in choline-Cl. Ruthenium red (20 microM) inhibited release in all solutions. In SR fused to planar bilayers we identified a nonselective Cl- channel (PCl: PTris: PCa = 1:0.5:0.3) blocked by ruthenium red and clofibric acid but not by procaine. These conductive and pharmacological properties suggested the channel was likely to mediate Cl(-)-dependent SR Ca2+ release. The absence of a contribution of ryanodine receptors to the Cl(-)-dependent release were indicated by the lack of an effect of Cl- on the open probability of this channel, a complete block by procaine

  17. Seasonal changes in isoform composition of giant proteins of thick and thin filaments and titin (connectin) phosphorylation level in striated muscles of bears (Ursidae, Mammalia).

    PubMed

    Salmov, N N; Vikhlyantsev, I M; Ulanova, A D; Gritsyna, Yu V; Bobylev, A G; Saveljev, A P; Makariushchenko, V V; Maksudov, G Yu; Podlubnaya, Z A

    2015-03-01

    Seasonal changes in the isoform composition of thick and thin filament proteins (titin, myosin heavy chains (MyHCs), nebulin), as well as in the phosphorylation level of titin in striated muscles of brown bear (Ursus arctos) and hibernating Himalayan black bear (Ursus thibetanus ussuricus) were studied. We found that the changes that lead to skeletal muscle atrophy in bears during hibernation are not accompanied by a decrease in the content of nebulin and intact titin-1 (T1) isoforms. However, a decrease (2.1-3.4-fold) in the content of T2 fragments of titin was observed in bear skeletal muscles (m. gastrocnemius, m. longissimus dorsi, m. biceps) during hibernation. The content of the stiffer N2B titin isoform was observed to increase relative to the content of its more compliant N2BA isoform in the left ventricles of hibernating bears. At the same time, in spite of the absence of decrease in the total content of T1 in the myocardium of hibernating brown bear, the content of T2 fragments decreased ~1.6-fold. The level of titin phosphorylation only slightly increased in the cardiac muscle of hibernating brown bear. In the skeletal muscles of brown bear, the level of titin phosphorylation did not vary between seasons. However, changes in the composition of MyHCs aimed at increasing the content of slow (I) and decreasing the content of fast (IIa) isoforms of this protein during hibernation of brown bear were detected. Content of MyHCs I and IIa in the skeletal muscles of hibernating Himalayan black bear corresponded to that in the skeletal muscles of hibernating brown bear.

  18. Bromo-eudistomin D, a novel inducer of calcium release from fragmented sarcoplasmic reticulum that causes contractions of skinned muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Kobayashi, J; Gilmore, J; Mascal, M; Rinehart, K L; Nakamura, H; Ohizumi, Y

    1986-03-25

    Bromo-eudistomin D induced a contraction of the chemically skinned fibers from skeletal muscle at concentrations of 10 microM or more. This contractile response to bromo-eudistomin D was completely blocked by 10 mM procaine. The extravascular Ca2+ concentrations of the heavy fractions of the fragmented sarcoplasmic reticulum (HSR) were measured directly by a Ca2+ electrode to examine the effect of bromo-eudistomin D on the sarcoplasmic reticulum. After the HSR was loaded with Ca2+ by the ATP-dependent Ca2+ pump, the addition of 10 microM bromo-eudistomin D caused Ca2+ release that was followed by spontaneous Ca2+ reuptake. In the presence of 2 microM ruthenium red or 4 mM MgCl2, no Ca2+ release was induced by 20 microM bromo-eudistomin D. The rate of 45Ca2+ efflux from HSR, which had been passively preloaded with 45Ca2+, was accelerated 7 times by 10 microM bromo-eudistomin D. The concentration of bromo-eudistomin D for half-maximum effect on the apparent efflux rate was 1.5 microM, while that of caffeine was 0.6 mM. The bromo-eudistomin D-evoked efflux of 45Ca2+ was abolished by 2 microM ruthenium red or 0.5 mM MgCl2. Bromo-eudistomin D was found to be 400 times more potent than caffeine in its Ca2+-releasing action but was similar in its action in other respects. These results indicate that bromo-eudistomin D may induce Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum through physiologically relevant Ca2+ channels.

  19. The genome of the diploid anuran Xenopus tropicalis contains a novel array of sarcoplasmic myosin heavy chain genes expressed in larval muscle and larynx

    PubMed Central

    Nasipak, Brian T.; Kelley, Darcy B.

    2010-01-01

    The sarcomeric myosin heavy chain (MyHC) proteins are a family of molecular motors responsible for the transduction of chemical energy into mechanical work in striated muscle. The vertebrate genome contains multiple copies of the MyHC gene, and expression of different isoforms correlates with differences in the physiological properties of muscle fibers. Most MyHC isoforms are found in two arrays, one containing the “fast-twitch” skeletal muscle isoforms and the other the “slow-twitch” or cardiac isoforms. To extend our understanding of MyHC evolution, we have examined the genome of the anuran Xenopus tropicalis. The X. tropicalis genome includes15 full-length MyHC genes organized in seven genomic locations. One unique array of MyHC genes is similar to the mammalian fast-skeletal array, but is not found in amniotes. The isoforms in this array are expressed during larval stages and in muscles of the adult larynx. Duplication of the fast-skeletal MyHC array appears to have led to expression divergence of muscle proteins in the larval and adult stages of the anuran life cycle. A striking similarity of gene order between regions flanking X. tropicalis MyHC arrays and human arrays was evident; genomic organization of MyHC isoforms may thus be highly conserved across tetrapods. PMID:18551304

  20. The Influence of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ Concentration on Ca2+ Sparks and Spontaneous Transient Outward Currents in Single Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    ZhuGe, Ronghua; Tuft, Richard A.; Fogarty, Kevin E.; Bellve, Karl; Fay, Fredric S.; Walsh, John V.

    1999-01-01

    Localized, transient elevations in cytosolic Ca2+, known as Ca2+ sparks, caused by Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum, are thought to trigger the opening of large conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels in the plasma membrane resulting in spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) in smooth muscle cells. But the precise relationships between Ca2+ concentration within the sarcoplasmic reticulum and a Ca2+ spark and that between a Ca2+ spark and a STOC are not well defined or fully understood. To address these problems, we have employed two approaches using single patch-clamped smooth muscle cells freshly dissociated from toad stomach: a high speed, wide-field imaging system to simultaneously record Ca2+ sparks and STOCs, and a method to simultaneously measure free global Ca2+ concentration in the sarcoplasmic reticulum ([Ca2+]SR) and in the cytosol ([Ca2+]CYTO) along with STOCs. At a holding potential of 0 mV, cells displayed Ca2+ sparks and STOCs. Ca2+ sparks were associated with STOCs; the onset of the sparks coincided with the upstroke of STOCs, and both had approximately the same decay time. The mean increase in [Ca2+]CYTO at the time and location of the spark peak was ∼100 nM above a resting concentration of ∼100 nM. The frequency and amplitude of spontaneous Ca2+ sparks recorded at −80 mV were unchanged for a period of 10 min after removal of extracellular Ca2+ (nominally Ca2+-free solution with 50 μM EGTA), indicating that Ca2+ influx is not necessary for Ca2+sparks. A brief pulse of caffeine (20 mM) elicited a rapid decrease in [Ca2+]SR in association with a surge in [Ca2+]CYTO and a fusion of STOCs, followed by a fast restoration of [Ca2+]CYTO and a gradual recovery of [Ca2+]SR and STOCs. The return of global [Ca2+]CYTO to rest was an order of magnitude faster than the refilling of the sarcoplasmic reticulum with Ca2+. After the global [Ca2+]CYTO was fully restored, recovery of STOC frequency and amplitude were correlated with the

  1. Identification of striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) as a novel calmodulin target by a newly developed genome-wide screen.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yusui; Denda, Miwako; Sakane, Kyohei; Ogusu, Tomoko; Takahashi, Sumio; Magari, Masaki; Kanayama, Naoki; Morishita, Ryo; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    To search for novel target(s) of the Ca(2+)-signaling transducer, calmodulin (CaM), we performed a newly developed genome-wide CaM interaction screening of 19,676 GST-fused proteins expressed in human. We identified striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) as a novel CaM target and characterized its CaM binding ability and found that the Ca(2+)/CaM complex interacted stoichiometrically with the N-terminal region (Ala13-Gln35) of STARS in vitro as well as in living cells. Mutagenesis studies identified Ile20 and Trp33 as the essential hydrophobic residues in CaM anchoring. Furthermore, the CaM binding deficient mutant (Ile20Ala, Trp33Ala) of STARS further enhanced its stimulatory effect on SRF-dependent transcriptional activation. These results suggest a connection between Ca(2+)-signaling via excitation-contraction coupling and the regulation of STARS-mediated gene expression in muscles.

  2. Effects of Diaspirin Crosslinked Hemoglobin (DCLHb) on microcirculation and local tissue pO2 of striated skin muscle following resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Hungerer, Sven; Nolte, Dirk; Botzlar, Andreas; Messmer, Konrad

    2006-01-01

    The hemoglobin based oxygen carrier (HBOC) Diaspirin Crosslinked Hemoglobin (DCLHb) has been developed to substitute not only the blood volume, but also to restore the oxygen-carrying properties of blood during hemorrhagic shock. However, it has been suggested that HBOCs may enhance the formation of free oxygen radicals through the release of free iron ions via the Haber-Weiss reaction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DCLHb on the microcirculation, leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction and local tissue oxygenation in striated skin muscle of Syrian golden hamsters during and after resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock. In particular we focused on the local tissue oxygenation after resuscitation with DCLHb (hemoglobin content 10 g%) compared to resuscitation using autologous blood diluted to a hemoglobin content of 10 g%. Hemorrhagic shock was induced for 45 minutes by bleeding the animals at a rate of 33 ml/kg BW maintaining a mean arterial pressure of 30 +/- 5 mmHg. Animals were resuscitated either with 33 ml/kg BW 6% Dextran-60.000 or with 10 g% DCLHb. The control group received shed blood diluted with Ringers to a hemoglobin content of 10 g%. Intravital microscopy was used for investigation of the microcirculatory parameters and a multiwire platinum surface electrode for measurement of local tissue pO2 in striated skin muscle in the dorsal skinfold chamber of Syrian golden hamsters. Resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock with 10 g% AUB revealed significant increase of leukocytes rolling in postcapillary venules at 30 to 120 minutes after resuscitation compared to baseline values. DCLHb turned out to reduce the number of firmly adherent leukocytes after resuscitation compared to 10 g% AUB. Microvascular permeability as an indicator for functional endothelial integrity revealed no significant differences between the groups. DCLHb and 10 g% AUB led to a significant increase in local tissue oxygenation after resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock

  3. The expression of the neonatal sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump (SERCA1b) hints to a role in muscle growth and development.

    PubMed

    Zádor, Erno; Vangheluwe, Peter; Wuytack, Frank

    2007-04-01

    The neonatal isoform of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 1 (SERCA1b) is a Ca2+ pump with a well-known developmentally regulated transcript level but an undefined protein expression and function. Specific antibodies were generated to show that SERCA1b is exclusively expressed in myoblasts and myotubes of cultured and regenerating muscle. However, the SERCA1b protein was not detectable in normal adult fast and slow muscles. Studies of the in vitro differentiating myogenic cell lines C2C12 and sol8 showed that SERCA1b is the main SERCA1 protein isoform induced during differentiation and that it is found in the myotubes. Remarkably in BC3H1 cells, which show incomplete differentiation and are reluctant to form myotubes, express the SERCA1b mRNA but not the corresponding protein. SERCA1b protein was also absent from stretched or denervated adult soleus, in spite of the fact that its mRNA level was upregulated. SERCA1b accounts for nearly the total of SERCA1 expression in the diaphragm of newborn mice, which suggests that the insufficient function and development of the diaphragm in the SERCA1 null mutant mice may be due to the lack of SERCA1b. Our studies point to an important regulation of SERCA1b expression at the protein level and hints to a role in the growth of the developing muscle.

  4. Response of the JAK-STAT pathway to mammalian hibernation in 13-lined ground squirrel striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Logan, Samantha M; Tessier, Shannon N; Tye, Joann; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-03-01

    Over the course of the torpor-arousal cycle, hibernators must make behavioral, physiological, and molecular rearrangements in order to keep a very low metabolic rate and retain organ viability. 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) remain immobile during hibernation, and although the mechanisms of skeletal muscle survival are largely unknown, studies have shown minimal muscle loss in hibernating organisms. Additionally, the ground squirrel heart undergoes cold-stress, reversible cardiac hypertrophy, and ischemia-reperfusion without experiencing fatal impairment. This study examines the role of the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway in the regulation of cell stress in cardiac and skeletal muscles, comparing euthermic and hibernating ground squirrels. Immunoblots showed a fivefold decrease in JAK3 expression during torpor in skeletal muscle, along with increases in STAT3 and 5 phosphorylation and suppressors of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1) protein levels. Immunoblots also showed coordinated increases in STAT1, 3 and 5 phosphorylation and STAT1 inhibitor protein expression in cardiac muscle during torpor. PCR analysis revealed that the activation of these pro-survival signaling cascades did not result in coordinate changes in downstream genes such as anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family gene expression. Overall, these results indicate activation of the JAK-STAT pathway in both cardiac and skeletal muscles, suggesting a response to cellular stress during hibernation.

  5. Beta 1D integrin displaces the beta 1A isoform in striated muscles: localization at junctional structures and signaling potential in nonmuscle cells.

    PubMed

    Belkin, A M; Zhidkova, N I; Balzac, F; Altruda, F; Tomatis, D; Maier, A; Tarone, G; Koteliansky, V E; Burridge, K

    1996-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domains of integrins provide attachment of these extracellular matrix receptors to the cytoskeleton and play a critical role in integrin-mediated signal transduction. In this report we describe the identification, expression, localization, and initial functional characterization of a novel form of beta 1 integrin, termed beta 1D. This isoform contains a unique alternatively spliced cytoplasmic domain of 50 amino acids, with the last 24 amino acids encoded by an additional exon. Of these 24 amino acids, 11 are conserved when compared to the beta 1A isoform, but 13 are unique (Zhidkova, N. I., A. M. Belkin, and R. Mayne. 1995. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 214:279-285; van der Flier, A., I. Kuikman, C. Baudoin, R, van der Neuf, and A. Sonnenberg. 1995. FEBS Lett. 369:340-344). Using an anti-peptide antibody against the beta 1D integrin subunit, we demonstrated that the beta 1D isoform is synthesized only in skeletal and cardiac muscles, while very low amounts of beta 1A were detected by immunoblot in striated muscles. Whereas beta 1A could not be detected in adult skeletal muscle fibers and cardiomyocytes by immunofluorescence, beta 1D was localized to the sarcolemma of both cell types. In skeletal muscle, beta 1D was concentrated in costameres, myotendinous, and neuromuscular junctions. In cardiac muscle this beta 1 isoform was found in costamers and intercalated discs. beta 1D was associated with alpha 7A and alpha 7B in adult skeletal muscle. In cardiomyocytes of adult heart, alpha 7B was the major partner for the beta 1D isoform. beta 1D could not be detected in proliferating C2C12 myoblasts, but it appeared immediately after myoblast fusion and its amount continued to rise during myotube growth and maturation. In contrast, expression of the beta 1A isoform was downregulated during myodifferentiation in culture and it was completely displaced by beta 1D in mature differentiated myotubes. We also analyzed some functional properties of the beta 1D

  6. Nanojunctions of the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Deliver Site- and Function-Specific Calcium Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscles.

    PubMed

    Evans, A M

    2017-01-01

    Vasoactive agents may induce myocyte contraction, dilation, and the switch from a contractile to a migratory-proliferative phenotype(s), which requires changes in gene expression. These processes are directed, in part, by Ca(2+) signals, but how different Ca(2+) signals are generated to select each function is enigmatic. We have previously proposed that the strategic positioning of Ca(2+) pumps and release channels at membrane-membrane junctions of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) demarcates cytoplasmic nanodomains, within which site- and function-specific Ca(2+) signals arise. This chapter will describe how nanojunctions of the SR may: (1) define cytoplasmic nanospaces about the plasma membrane, mitochondria, contractile myofilaments, lysosomes, and the nucleus; (2) provide for functional segregation by restricting passive diffusion and by coordinating active ion transfer within a given nanospace via resident Ca(2+) pumps and release channels; (3) select for contraction, relaxation, and/or changes in gene expression; and (4) facilitate the switch in myocyte phenotype through junctional reorganization. This should serve to highlight the need for further exploration of cellular nanojunctions and the mechanisms by which they operate, that will undoubtedly open up new therapeutic horizons.

  7. Expression of cardiac alpha-actin spares extraocular muscles in skeletal muscle alpha-actin diseases--quantification of striated alpha-actins by MRM-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Colley, Stephen M J; Walker, Kendall R; Clement, Sophie; Bringans, Scott; Lipscombe, Richard; Fabian, Victoria A; Laing, Nigel G; Nowak, Kristen J

    2008-12-01

    As with many skeletal muscle diseases, the extraocular muscles (EOMs) are spared in skeletal muscle alpha-actin diseases, with no ophthalmoplegia even in severely affected patients. We hypothesised that the extraocular muscles sparing in these patients was due to significant expression of cardiac alpha-actin, the alpha-actin isoform expressed in heart and foetal skeletal muscle. We have shown by immunochemistry, Western blotting and a novel MRM-mass spectrometry technique, comparable levels of cardiac alpha-actin in the extraocular muscles of human, pig and sheep to those in the heart. The sparing of extraocular muscles in skeletal muscle alpha-actin disease is thus probably due to greater levels of cardiac alpha-actin, than the negligible amounts in skeletal muscles, diluting out the effects of the mutant skeletal muscle alpha-actin.

  8. The increase in non-cross-bridge forces after stretch of activated striated muscle is related to titin isoforms.

    PubMed

    Cornachione, Anabelle S; Leite, Felipe; Bagni, Maria Angela; Rassier, Dilson E

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscles present a non-cross-bridge increase in sarcomere stiffness and tension on Ca(2+) activation, referred to as static stiffness and static tension, respectively. It has been hypothesized that this increase in tension is caused by Ca(2+)-dependent changes in the properties of titin molecules. To verify this hypothesis, we investigated the static tension in muscles containing different titin isoforms. Permeabilized myofibrils were isolated from the psoas, soleus, and heart ventricle from the rabbit, and tested in pCa 9.0 and pCa 4.5, before and after extraction of troponin C, thin filaments, and treatment with the actomyosin inhibitor blebbistatin. The myofibrils were tested with stretches of different amplitudes in sarcomere lengths varying between 1.93 and 3.37 μm for the psoas, 2.68 and 4.21 μm for the soleus, and 1.51 and 2.86 μm for the ventricle. Using gel electrophoresis, we confirmed that the three muscles tested have different titin isoforms. The static tension was present in psoas and soleus myofibrils, but not in ventricle myofibrils, and higher in psoas myofibrils than in soleus myofibrils. These results suggest that the increase in the static tension is directly associated with Ca(2+)-dependent change in titin properties and not associated with changes in titin-actin interactions.

  9. Evolutionarily conserved sequences of striated muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms. Epitope mapping by cDNA expression.

    PubMed

    Miller, J B; Teal, S B; Stockdale, F E

    1989-08-05

    A cDNA expression strategy was used to localize amino acid sequences which were specific for fast, as opposed to slow, isoforms of the chicken skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) and which were conserved in vertebrate evolution. Five monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), termed F18, F27, F30, F47, and F59, were prepared that reacted with all of the known chicken fast MHC isoforms but did not react with any of the known chicken slow nor with smooth muscle MHC isoforms. The epitopes recognized by mAbs F18, F30, F47, and F59 were on the globular head fragment of the MHC, whereas the epitope recognized by mAb F27 was on the helical tail or rod fragment. Reactivity of all five mAbs also was confined to fast MHCs in the rat, with the exception of mAb F59, which also reacted with the beta-cardiac MHC, the single slow MHC isoform common to both the rat heart and skeletal muscle. None of the five epitopes was expressed on amphioxus, nematode, or Dictyostelium MHC. The F27 and F59 epitopes were found on shark, electric ray, goldfish, newt, frog, turtle, chicken, quail, rabbit, and rat MHCs. The epitopes recognized by these mAbs were conserved, therefore, to varying degrees through vertebrate evolution and differed in sequence from homologous regions of a number of invertebrate MHCs and myosin-like proteins. The sequence of those epitopes on the head were mapped using a two-part cDNA expression strategy. First, Bal31 exonuclease digestion was used to rapidly generate fragments of a chicken embryonic fast MHC cDNA that were progressively deleted from the 3' end. These cDNA fragments were expressed as beta-galactosidase/MHC fusion proteins using the pUR290 vector; the fusion proteins were tested by immunoblotting for reactivity with the mAbs; and the approximate locations of the epitopes were determined from the sizes of the cDNA fragments that encoded a particular epitope. The epitopes were then precisely mapped by expression of overlapping cDNA fragments of known sequence that

  10. Contractile properties and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content in type I and type II skeletal muscle fibres in active aged humans

    PubMed Central

    Lamboley, C R; Wyckelsma, V L; Dutka, T L; McKenna, M J; Murphy, R M; Lamb, G D

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the contractile properties and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content in mechanically skinned vastus lateralis muscle fibres of Old (70 ± 4 years) and Young (22 ± 3 years) humans to investigate whether changes in muscle fibre properties contribute to muscle weakness in old age. In type II fibres of Old subjects, specific force was reduced by ∼17% and Ca2+ sensitivity was also reduced (pCa50 decreased ∼0.05 pCa units) relative to that in Young. S-Glutathionylation of fast troponin I (TnIf) markedly increased Ca2+ sensitivity in type II fibres, but the increase was significantly smaller in Old versus Young (+0.136 and +0.164 pCa unit increases, respectively). Endogenous and maximal SR Ca2+ content were significantly smaller in both type I and type II fibres in Old subjects. In fibres of Young, the SR could be nearly fully depleted of Ca2+ by a combined caffeine and low Mg2+ stimulus, whereas in fibres of Old the amount of non-releasable Ca2+ was significantly increased (by > 12% of endogenous Ca2+ content). Western blotting showed an increased proportion of type I fibres in Old subjects, and increased amounts of calsequestrin-2 and calsequestrin-like protein. The findings suggest that muscle weakness in old age is probably attributable in part to (i) an increased proportion of type I fibres, (ii) a reduction in both maximum specific force and Ca2+ sensitivity in type II fibres, and also a decreased ability of S-glutathionylation of TnIf to counter the fatiguing effects of metabolites on Ca2+ sensitivity, and (iii) a reduction in the amount of releasable SR Ca2+ in both fibre types. Key points Muscle weakness in old age is due in large part to an overall loss of skeletal muscle tissue, but it remains uncertain how much also stems from alterations in the properties of the individual muscle fibres. This study examined the contractile properties and amount of stored intracellular calcium in single muscle fibres of Old (70

  11. The volume of the T-system and its association with the sarcoplasmic reticulum in slow muscle fibres of the frog

    PubMed Central

    Flitney, F. W.

    1971-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the T-system and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in slow muscle fibres of the frog, Rana temporaria. 2. The size of the T-system was measured by an autoradiographic method, using tritium-labelled albumin as a marker. Its volume, expressed as a fraction of that of the fibre, was found to be 1·8 × 10-3, as compared with a figure of 3·9 × 10-3 for the T-system in a twitch fibre. 3. The spatial distribution of the T-tubules, and their association with the SR, was studied with the electron microscope, employing ferritin and the enzyme peroxidase as markers. The observations show (a) the tubules form a three dimensional, rather than transverse, network and (b) the area of triadic (and diadic) contact with the SR is 5-10 × smaller than in a twitch fibre. 4. The possibility that the T-system and SR of the slow fibre participate in linking membrane excitation with contraction is discussed in the light of these findings. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Plate 2Figs. 1 and 2Plate 4 PMID:5571928

  12. Identification of 30 kDa protein for Ca(2+) releasing action of myotoxin a with a mechanism common to DIDS in skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Y; Nakahata, N; Ohkura, M; Ohizumi, Y

    1999-08-12

    The molecular mechanism of Ca(2+) release by myotoxin a (MTYX), a polypeptide toxin isolated from the venom of prairie rattlesnakes (Crotalus viridis viridis), was investigated in the heavy fraction of sarcoplasmic reticulum (HSR) of rabbit skeletal muscles. [(125)I]MYTX bound to four HSR proteins (106, 74, 53 and 30 kDa) on polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane. DIDS, 4, 4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid, bound predominantly to 30 kDa protein on the PVDF membrane, the molecular weight of which was similar to one of the MYTX binding proteins. The maximum (45)Ca(2+) release induced by caffeine (30 mM) was further increased in the presence of MYTX (10 microM) or DIDS (30 microM), whereas that induced by DIDS (30 microM) was not affected by MYTX (10 microM). MYTX inhibited [(3)H]DIDS binding to HSR in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, [(125)I]MYTX binding to 30 kDa protein was inhibited by DIDS in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that MYTX and DIDS release Ca(2+) from HSR in a common mechanism. The 30 kDa protein may be a target protein for the Ca(2+) releasing action of MYTX and DIDS.

  13. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release compared in slow-twitch and fast-twitch fibres of mouse muscle.

    PubMed

    Baylor, S M; Hollingworth, S

    2003-08-15

    Experiments were carried out to compare the amplitude and time course of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in intact slow-twitch and fast-twitch mouse fibres. Individual fibres within small bundles were injected with furaptra, a low-affinity, rapidly responding Ca2+ indicator. In response to a single action potential at 16 degrees C, the peak amplitude and half-duration of the change in myoplasmic free [Ca2+] (Delta[Ca2+]) differed significantly between fibre types (slow-twitch: peak amplitude, 9.4 +/- 1.0 microM (mean +/- S.E.M.); half-duration, 7.7 +/- 0.6 ms; fast-twitch: peak amplitude 18.5 +/- 0.5 microM; half-duration, 4.9 +/- 0.3 ms). SR Ca2+ release was estimated from Delta[Ca2+] with a computational model that calculated Ca2+ binding to the major myoplasmic Ca2+ buffers (troponin, ATP and parvalbumin); buffer concentrations and reaction rate constants were adjusted to reflect fibre-type differences. In response to an action potential, the total concentration of released Ca2+ (Delta[CaT]) and the peak rate of Ca2+ release ((d/dt)Delta[CaT]) differed about 3-fold between the fibre types (slow-twitch: Delta[CaT], 127 +/- 7 microM; (d/dt)Delta[CaT], 70 +/- 6 microM ms-1; fast-twitch: Delta[CaT], 346 +/- 6 microM; (d/dt)Delta[CaT], 212 +/- 4 microM ms-1). In contrast, the half-duration of (d/dt)Delta[CaT] was very similar in the two fibre types (slow-twitch, 1.8 +/- 0.1 ms; fast-twitch, 1.6 +/- 0.0 ms). When fibres were stimulated with a 5-shock train at 67 Hz, the peaks of (d/dt)Delta[CaT] in response to the second and subsequent shocks were much smaller than that due to the first shock; the later peaks, expressed as a fraction of the amplitude of the first peak, were similar in the two fibre types (slow-twitch, 0.2-0.3; fast-twitch, 0.1-0.3). The results support the conclusion that individual SR Ca2+ release units function similarly in slow-twitch and fast-twitch mammalian fibres.

  14. Action of lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin on sterol synthesis and their antiproliferative effect in cultured myoblasts from human striated muscle.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, A K; Nègre-Aminou, P; van Thiel, G C; Bolhuis, P A; Cohen, L H

    1996-11-08

    Lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin are fairly strong inhibitors of sterol synthesis in human myoblasts in culture. Lovastatin and simvastatin have IC50 values of 19 +/- 6 nM and 4.0 +/- 2.3 nM, respectively. Pravastatin is a weaker inhibitor of sterol synthesis (IC50 value of 110 +/- 38 nM). Through inhibition of mevalonate production, these compounds have a distinct inhibiting effect on cell proliferation. Because proliferation of myoblasts is important in the repair of damaged skeletal muscle, experiments were performed to investigate the effect of lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin on cell proliferation and cell viability. The more potent inhibitors of sterol synthesis, lovastatin, and simvastatin, were able to inhibit the proliferation of these cells during 3 days of incubation with drug concentrations of 1 microM for lovastatin and 0.1 microM or 1 microM for simvastatin. DNA synthesis was decreased by more than 80% in the presence of 1 microM of lovastatin or simvastatin. In contrast, under these conditions, pravastatin had no influence on cell proliferation or DNA synthesis, which is probably related to the lack of inhibition of sterol synthesis by pravastatin on extended incubation. The three 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors did not disturb cell viability because mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity and ATP content remained proportional to the number of cells in the culture at any concentration used.

  15. Acute effects of taurine on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ accumulation and contractility in human type I and type II skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Dutka, T L; Lamboley, C R; Murphy, R M; Lamb, G D

    2014-10-01

    Taurine occurs in high concentrations in muscle and is implicated in numerous physiological processes, yet its effects on many aspects of contractility remain unclear. Using mechanically skinned segments of human vastus lateralis muscle fibers, we characterized the effects of taurine on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ accumulation and contractile apparatus properties in type I and type II fibers. Prolonged myoplasmic exposure (>10 min) to taurine substantially increased the rate of accumulation of Ca2+ by the SR in both fiber types, with no change in the maximum amount accumulated; no such effect was found with carnosine. SR Ca2+ accumulation was similar with 10 or 20 mM taurine, but was significantly slower at 5 mM taurine. Cytoplasmic taurine (20 mM) had no detectable effects on the responsiveness of the Ca2+ release channels in either fiber type. Taurine caused a small increase in Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus in type I fibers, but type II fibers were unaffected; maximum Ca(2+)-activated force was unchanged in both cases. The effects of taurine on SR Ca2+ accumulation (1) only became apparent after prolonged cytoplasmic exposure, and (2) persisted for some minutes after complete removal of taurine from the cytoplasm, consistent with the hypothesis that the effects were due to an action of taurine from inside the SR. In summary, taurine potentiates the rate of SR Ca2+ uptake in both type I and type II human fibers, possibly via an action from within the SR lumen, with the degree of potentiation being significantly reduced at low physiological taurine levels.

  16. Biphasic contractions induced by milrinone at low temperature in ferret ventricular muscle: role of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and transmembrane calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Malecot, C O; Bers, D M; Katzung, B G

    1986-08-01

    The effects of milrinone were studied in ferret papillary muscle stimulated at various rates and temperatures from 23 degrees to 36 degrees C. In voltage-clamp experiments, 50 micrograms/ml (0.237 mM) milrinone induced a 2.1-fold increase in calcium current at 28 degrees or 36 degrees C. At 50 micrograms/ml, milrinone transiently increased contractility in all muscles at 28 degrees C, but its steady-state effect was either increased (+50%) or decreased (-24.7%) steady-state twitch amplitude. A negative inotropic effect always occurred below 27 degrees C. Milrinone decreased the total twitch duration and split the twitch into two components (P1 and P2) in the absence of any evidence of aberrant conduction. Increasing milrinone concentration from 50 to 300 micrograms/ml decreased P1 and increased P2. Ryanodine (100 mM) or caffeine (10 mM) suppressed P1. Contractions elicited after 30 seconds of rest were also biphasic in the presence of milrinone, but not in its absence. P2 of post-rest contraction was increased by caffeine or calcium (10 mM) and decreased by cobalt (2 mM) when drugs were applied at the beginning of the rest. Ryanodine and caffeine also suppressed P1 of post-rest contraction. The evidence suggests that P1 may be caused by Ca release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and P2 by increased Ca influx during the action potential via the calcium channel. It is also suggested that P2 may be present under control conditions, but to a lesser extent, and masked by a large P1.

  17. Modulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle expressing ryanodine receptor impaired in regulation by calmodulin and S100A1.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Prosser, Benjamin L; Ghassemi, Farshid; Xu, Le; Pasek, Daniel A; Eu, Jerry P; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Cannon, Brian R; Wilder, Paul T; Lovering, Richard M; Weber, David; Melzer, Werner; Schneider, Martin F; Meissner, Gerhard

    2011-05-01

    In vitro, calmodulin (CaM) and S100A1 activate the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor ion channel (RyR1) at submicromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, whereas at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, CaM inhibits RyR1. One amino acid substitution (RyR1-L3625D) has previously been demonstrated to impair CaM binding and regulation of RyR1. Here we show that the RyR1-L3625D substitution also abolishes S100A1 binding. To determine the physiological relevance of these findings, mutant mice were generated with the RyR1-L3625D substitution in exon 74, which encodes the CaM and S100A1 binding domain of RyR1. Homozygous mutant mice (Ryr1(D/D)) were viable and appeared normal. However, single RyR1 channel recordings from Ryr1(D/D) mice exhibited impaired activation by CaM and S100A1 and impaired CaCaM inhibition. Isolated flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers from Ryr1(D/D) mice had depressed Ca(2+) transients when stimulated by a single action potential. However, during repetitive stimulation, the mutant fibers demonstrated greater relative summation of the Ca(2+) transients. Consistently, in vivo stimulation of tibialis anterior muscles in Ryr1(D/D) mice demonstrated reduced twitch force in response to a single action potential, but greater summation of force during high-frequency stimulation. During repetitive stimulation, Ryr1(D/D) fibers exhibited slowed inactivation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release flux, consistent with increased summation of the Ca(2+) transient and contractile force. Peak Ca(2+) release flux was suppressed at all voltages in voltage-clamped Ryr1(D/D) fibers. The results suggest that the RyR1-L3625D mutation removes both an early activating effect of S100A1 and CaM and delayed suppressing effect of CaCaM on RyR1 Ca(2+) release, providing new insights into CaM and S100A1 regulation of skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling.

  18. Modulation of the Frequency of Spontaneous Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ Release Events (Ca2+ Sparks) by Myoplasmic [Mg2+] in Frog Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lacampagne, Alain; Klein, Michael G.; Schneider, Martin F.

    1998-01-01

    The modulation by internal free [Mg2+] of spontaneous calcium release events (Ca2+ “sparks”) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied in depolarized notched frog skeletal muscle fibers using a laser scanning confocal microscope in line-scan mode (x vs. t). Over the range of [Mg2+] from 0.13 to 1.86 mM, decreasing the [Mg2+] induced an increase in the frequency of calcium release events in proportion to [Mg2+]−1.6. The change of event frequency was not due to changes in [Mg-ATP] or [ATP]. Analysis of individual SR calcium release event properties showed that the variation in event frequency induced by the change of [Mg2+] was not accompanied by any changes in the spatiotemporal spread (i.e., spatial half width or temporal half duration) of Ca2+ sparks. The increase in event frequency also had no effect on the distribution of event amplitudes. Finally, the rise time of calcium sparks was independent of the [Mg2+], indicating that the open time of the SR channel or channels underlying spontaneous calcium release events was not altered by [Mg2+] over the range tested. These results suggest that in resting skeletal fibers, [Mg2+] modulates the SR calcium release channel opening frequency by modifying the average closed time of the channel without altering the open time. A kinetic reaction scheme consistent with our results and those of bilayer and SR vesicle experiments indicates that physiological levels of resting Mg2+ may inhibit channel opening by occupying the site for calcium activation of the SR calcium release channel. PMID:9450940

  19. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  20. Ultrastructural study of muscles fibers in tick Hyalomma (Hyalomma) anatolicum anatolicum (Ixodoidea: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Bughdadi, Faisal A

    2010-09-01

    In the present study, ticks were obtained from a colony maintained at 28 degrees C and 75% relative humidity in at the Department of Biology, University College Umm Al-Qura University, Saudi Arabia and the Transmission Electron Microscope technique (TEM) was used to describes the ultrastructure and description of muscle of the of ixodid tick Hyalomma (Hyalomma) anatolicum anatolicum. The results showed that muscles of the unfed ticks Hyalomma (Hyalomma) anatolicum anatolicum in longitudinal sections are spindle-shaped to cylindrical muscle fibers. In the unfed nymph Hyalomma (Hyalomma) anatolicum anatolicum skeletal and visceral muscles are distinguished according to structure, function and position. These muscles include the capitulum, dorsoventral and leg oblique muscles. All muscle fibers are ensheathed (covered by sheath) in a sarcolemma. Their muscle fibers have striated pattern of successive sarcomeres whose thick myosin filaments are surrounded by orbitals of up to 12 thin actin filaments. The cytoplasm of the epidermal cell appears largely devoted with complicated microtubules present in parallel with long axis of adjacent muscle fibers. The cell membrane invaginates into tubular system extending deeply into the sarcoplasm and closely associated to cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum. The tubular system and sarcoplasmic reticulum forming two-membered (dyads) are considered to be the main route of calcium ions whose movement are synchronized with the motor impulse to control muscles contraction. In the sarcoplasm two types of muscle fibers are recognized according to thickness and density and mitochondrial size, distribution and population. Both skeletal and visceral muscles are invaginated by tracheoles and innervated by nerve axons containing synaptic vesicles. The actin and myosin filaments are slightly interrupted and the tubular system sarcoplasmic reticulum is well demonstrated.

  1. Role of calsequestrin evaluated from changes in free and total calcium concentrations in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of frog cut skeletal muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Paul C; Fénelon, Karine; Lamboley, Cédric R H; Stachura, Dorothy

    2007-01-01

    Calsequestrin is a large-capacity Ca-binding protein located in the terminal cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) suggesting a role as a buffer of the concentration of free Ca in the SR ([Ca2+]SR) serving to maintain the driving force for SR Ca2+ release. Essentially all of the functional studies on calsequestrin to date have been carried out on purified calsequestrin or on disrupted muscle preparations such as terminal cisternae vesicles. To obtain information about calsequestrin's properties during physiological SR Ca2+ release, experiments were carried out on frog cut skeletal muscle fibres using two optical methods. One – the EGTA–phenol red method – monitored the content of total Ca in the SR ([CaT]SR) and the other used the low affinity Ca indicator tetramethylmurexide (TMX) to monitor the concentration of free Ca in the SR. Both methods relied on a large concentration of the Ca buffer EGTA (20 mm), in the latter case to greatly reduce the increase in myoplasmic [Ca2+] caused by SR Ca2+ release thereby almost eliminating the myoplasmic component of the TMX signal. By releasing almost all of the SR Ca, these optical signals provided information about [CaT]SR versus [Ca2+]SR as [Ca2+]SR varied from its resting level ([Ca2+]SR,R) to near zero. Since almost all of the Ca in the SR is bound to calsequestrin, this information closely resembles the binding curve of the Ca–calsequestrin reaction. Calcium binding to calsequestrin was found to be cooperative (estimated Hill coefficient = 2.95) and to have a very high capacity (at the start of Ca2+ release, 23 times more Ca was estimated to initiate from calsequestrin as opposed to the pool of free Ca in the SR). The latter result contrasts with an earlier report that only ∼25% of released Ca2+ comes from calsequestrin and ∼75% comes from the free pool. The value of [Ca2+]SR,R was close to the KD for calsequestrin, which has a value near 1 mm in in vitro studies. Other evidence indicates that [Ca2+]SR

  2. Calcium buffering properties of sarcoplasmic reticulum and calcium-induced Ca(2+) release during the quasi-steady level of release in twitch fibers from frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fénelon, Karine; Lamboley, Cédric R H; Carrier, Nicole; Pape, Paul C

    2012-10-01

    Experiments were performed to characterize the properties of the intrinsic Ca(2+) buffers in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of cut fibers from frog twitch muscle. The concentrations of total and free calcium ions within the SR ([Ca(T)](SR) and [Ca(2+)](SR)) were measured, respectively, with the EGTA/phenol red method and tetramethylmurexide (a low affinity Ca(2+) indicator). Results indicate SR Ca(2+) buffering was consistent with a single cooperative-binding component or a combination of a cooperative-binding component and a linear binding component accounting for 20% or less of the bound Ca(2+). Under the assumption of a single cooperative-binding component, the most likely resting values of [Ca(2+)](SR) and [Ca(T)](SR) are 0.67 and 17.1 mM, respectively, and the dissociation constant, Hill coefficient, and concentration of the Ca-binding sites are 0.78 mM, 3.0, and 44 mM, respectively. This information can be used to calculate a variable proportional to the Ca(2+) permeability of the SR, namely d[Ca(T)](SR)/dt ÷ [Ca(2+)](SR) (denoted release permeability), in experiments in which only [Ca(T)](SR) or [Ca(2+)](SR) is measured. In response to a voltage-clamp step to -20 mV at 15°C, the release permeability reaches an early peak followed by a rapid decline to a quasi-steady level that lasts ~50 ms, followed by a slower decline during which the release permeability decreases by at least threefold. During the quasi-steady level of release, the release amplitude is 3.3-fold greater than expected from voltage activation alone, a result consistent with the recruitment by Ca-induced Ca(2+) release of 2.3 SR Ca(2+) release channels neighboring each channel activated by its associated voltage sensor. Release permeability at -60 mV increases as [Ca(T)](SR) decreases from its resting physiological level to ~0.1 of this level. This result argues against a release termination mechanism proposed in mammalian muscle fibers in which a luminal sensor of [Ca(2+)](SR) inhibits

  3. Effects of free oxygen radicals on Ca2+ release mechanisms in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of scallop (Pecten jacobaeus) adductor muscle.

    PubMed

    Burlando, B; Viarengo, A; Pertica, M; Ponzano, E; Orunesu, M

    1997-08-01

    In vitro oxyradical effects on SR Ca2+ regulation were studied by using a SR-containing cell-free preparation from scallop (Pecten jacobaeus) adductor muscle. Ca2+ variations were fluorimetrically detected after incubation with Fluo-3 in the presence of ATP. Exposure to Fe3+/ascorbate produced dose-dependent Ca2+ release from SR vesicles, eventually leading to massive Ca2+ loss. Exposure to hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase also caused Ca2+ release but at a much slower rate. Pre-incubations with catalase or with the hydroxyl radical scavenger KMBA led to a significant decrease in the Fe3+/ascorbate-induced Ca2+ release rate and to a delay of massive Ca2+ loss. Pre-incubations with GSH or DTT strongly reduced the Ca2+ release caused by Fe3+/ascorbate and, moreover, they prevented massive Ca2+ loss from SR vesicles. Addition of GSH or DTT after Fe3+/ascorbate promptly reduced the Ca2+ release rate and delayed massive Ca2+ release. Pre-incubation with the SR Ca2+ channel blocker ruthenium red strongly reduced the Ca2+ release caused by Fe3+/ascorbate, and also prevented massive Ca2+ loss. In the presence of ruthenium red, Fe3+/ascorbate treatments followed by Ca2+ addition revealed that Ca2+ uptake inhibition was slower than Ca2+ release. Taken together, data showed that free radicals and, in particular, hydroxyl radicals, affected the scallop SR Ca2+ regulation. This mainly occurred through Ca2+ channel opening, most likely triggered by sulfhydryl oxidation, which eventually led to massive Ca2+ release from SR vesicles. The demonstration of a specific effect of oxyradicals on SR Ca2+ channels is in line with their possible involvement in cell signaling.

  4. Role of malignant hyperthermia domain in the regulation of Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor) of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Zorzato, F; Menegazzi, P; Treves, S; Ronjat, M

    1996-09-13

    A fusion protein encompassing Gly341 of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor was used to raise monoclonal antibodies; epitope mapping demonstrates that monoclonal antibody 419 (mAb419) reacts with a sequence a few residues upstream from Gly341. The mAb419 was then used to probe ryanodine receptor (RYR) functions. Our results show that upon incubation of triads vesicles with mAb419 the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release rate at pCa 8 was increased. Equilibrium evaluation of [3H]ryanodine binding at different [Ca2+] indicates that mAb419 shifted the half-maximal [Ca2+] for stimulation of ryanodine binding to lower value (0.1 versus 1.2 microM). Such functional effects may be due to a direct action of the Ab on the Ca2+ binding domain of the RYR or to the perturbation by the Ab of the intramolecular interaction between the immunopositive region and regulatory domain of the RYR. The latter hypothesis was tested directly using the optical biosensor BIAcore (Pharmacia Biotech Inc.): we show that the immunopositive RYR polypeptide is able to interact with the native RYR complex. Ligand overlays with immunopositive digoxigenin-RYR fusion protein indicate that such an interaction might occur with a calmodulin binding domain (defined by residues 3010-3225) and with a polypeptide defined by residues 799-1172. In conclusion our results suggest that the stimulation by the mAb419 of the RYR channel activity is due to the perturbation of an intramolecular interaction between the immunopositive polypeptide and a Ca2+ regulatory site probably corresponding to a calmodulin binding domain.

  5. Ca2+ homeostasis and fast-type sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in L6 muscle cells. Role of thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Muller, A; van Hardeveld, C; Simonides, W S; van Rijn, J

    1992-05-01

    The effect of thyroid hormone (L-tri-iodothyronine; T3) on the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in L6 myotubes was studied at rest and during activation to explore the possible mediating role of [Ca2+]i in the T3-induced net synthesis of fast-type sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase. The mean [Ca2+]i at rest was approx. 115 nM in myoblasts, control myotubes and T3-treated myotubes. Therefore it is unlikely that the T3-induced elevation of Ca(2+)-ATPase levels is mediated by [Ca2+]i changes. To investigate the influence of the 4-fold higher Ca(2+)-ATPase levels in T3-treated myotubes (compared with controls) on [Ca2+]i, interventions with caffeine (10 mM) and a high extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o) (30 mM) were applied which initially mobilize Ca2+ predominantly from the SR. The results showed a lower (caffeine) or not significantly different (high [K+]o) increase in [Ca2+]i in T3-treated myotubes compared with controls. No rise in [Ca2+]i was found in myoblasts with caffeine or high [K+]o. The role of [Ca2+]i in the regulation of Ca(2+)-ATPase levels was investigated by varying [Ca2+]i through exposure of cells to different concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ (0.2-1.8 mM) and ionomycin (0.1-0.25 microM). At subnormal [Ca2+]i (55 nM) the T3-induced net synthesis of Ca(2+)-ATPase was virtually abolished, and at supranormal [Ca2+]i (195 nM) it was greatly depressed. Intermediate stimulation of net Ca(2+)-ATPase synthesis was found at [Ca2+]i of 95 and 165 nM, with an optimum at approx. 125 nM. Similar but less pronounced effects were found for the basal Ca(2+)-ATPase levels. In contracting primary rat myotubes, Ca(2+)-ATPase levels were significantly lower than in tetrodotoxin-arrested myotubes. The same results were obtained in the presence of T3. Since the mean [Ca2+]i in contracting cells is higher than in resting cells, these data agree with those obtained in the L6 cells with ionomycin. A major conclusion of this study is the existence of

  6. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart because it controls the heartbeat. Skeletal Muscle Now, let's talk about the kind of muscle ... soccer ball into the goal. These are your skeletal muscles — sometimes called striated (say: STRY-ay-tud) muscle ...

  7. Novel targets for treating heart and muscle disease: stabilizing ryanodine receptors and preventing intracellular calcium leak.

    PubMed

    Lehnart, Stephan E

    2007-04-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) function as intracellular Ca(2+) release channels on the endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes. In striated muscles, Ca(2+) release through RyRs controls muscle excitation-contraction coupling. RyR channel function is regulated by a cytoplasmic scaffold domain that forms a macromolecular signaling complex including calstabin (formerly known as FK506-binding protein), calmodulin, phosphodiesterase, kinase and phosphatase proteins. An increasing number of genetic and acquired diseases has been associated with intracellular Ca(2+) leak. In heart failure, for instance, the RyR complex becomes altered, resulting in chronic channel dysfunction and chronic sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) leak. Recently, the efficacy of novel Ca(2+) release channel-stabilizing drugs has been demonstrated in cardiac and skeletal muscle disease models.

  8. Striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) is a PGC-1α/oestrogen-related receptor-α target gene and is upregulated in human skeletal muscle after endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Marita A; Hock, M Benjamin; Hazen, Bethany C; Kralli, Anastasia; Snow, Rod J; Russell, Aaron P

    2011-04-15

    The striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) is an actin-binding protein specifically expressed in cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle. STARS has been suggested to provide an important link between the transduction of external stress signals to intracellular signalling pathways controlling genes involved in the maintenance of muscle function. The aims of this study were firstly, to establish if STARS, as well as members of its downstream signalling pathway, are upregulated following acute endurance cycling exercise; and secondly, to determine if STARS is a transcriptional target of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-α (PGC-1α) and oestrogen-related receptor-α (ERRα). When measured 3 h post-exercise, STARS mRNA and protein levels as well as MRTF-A and serum response factor (SRF) nuclear protein content, were significantly increased by 140, 40, 40 and 40%, respectively. Known SRF target genes, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1β (CPT-1β) and jun B proto-oncogene (JUNB), as well as the exercise-responsive genes PGC-1α mRNA and ERRα were increased by 2.3-, 1.8-, 4.5- and 2.7-fold, 3 h post-exercise. Infection of C2C12 myotubes with an adenovirus-expressing human PGC-1α resulted in a 3-fold increase in Stars mRNA, a response that was abolished following the suppression of endogenous ERRα. Over-expression of PGC-1α also increased Cpt-1β, Cox4 and Vegf mRNA by 6.2-, 2.0- and 2.0-fold, respectively. Suppression of endogenous STARS reduced basal Cpt-1β levels by 8.2-fold and inhibited the PGC-1α-induced increase in Cpt-1β mRNA. Our results show for the first time that the STARS signalling pathway is upregulated in response to acute endurance exercise. Additionally, we show in C2C12 myotubes that the STARS gene is a PGC-1α/ERRα transcriptional target. Furthermore, our results suggest a novel role of STARS in the co-ordination of PGC-1α-induced upregulation of the fat oxidative gene, CPT-1β.

  9. In vivo aging of rat skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase. Chemical analysis and quantitative simulation by exposure to low levels of peroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Viner, R I; Ferrington, D A; Aced, G I; Miller-Schlyer, M; Bigelow, D J; Schöneich, C

    1997-10-23

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca-ATPase of young adult (5 months) and aged (28 months) Fischer 344 male rat skeletal muscle was analyzed for posttranslational modifications as a result of biological aging and their potential functional consequences. The significant differences in the amino acid composition were a 6.8% lower content of sulfhydryl groups and a ca. 4% lower content of Arg residues of the Ca-ATPase from old as compared to young rats. Based on a total of 24 Cys residues the difference in protein thiols corresponds to a loss of 1.5 mol Cys/mol Ca-ATPase as a result of in vivo aging. The loss of Cys residues was not accompanied by a loss of enzyme activity though the 'aged' Ca-ATPase was more sensitive to heat inactivation, aggregation, and tryptic digestion. A comparison of the total sulfhydryl content of all SR proteins present revealed a 13% lower amount for SR vesicles isolated from aged rats. Compared to the alterations of Cys and Arg, there was only a slight and probably physiologically insignificant increase of protein carbonyls with aging, i.e. from 0.32 to 0.46 mol carbonyl groups per mol of Ca-ATPase. When SR vesicles from young rats were exposed to AAPH-derived peroxyl radicals, there was a loss of ca. 1.38 x 10(-4) M total SR sulfhydryl groups per 4 mg SR protein/ml (corresponding to ca. 25%) and a loss of 9.6 x 10(-5) M Ca-ATPase sulfhydryl groups (corresponding to ca. 31%) per 1.6 x 10(-5) M initiating peroxyl radicals, indicating that the stoichiometry of sulfhydryl oxidation was > or = 6 oxidized thiols per initiating AAPH-derived peroxyl radical. Besides Cys, the exposure to AAPH-derived radicals caused a slight loss of Ca-ATPase Arg, Met, and Ser residues. Most importantly, the SR Ca-ATPase exposed to this low concentration of peroxyl radicals displayed physical and functional properties quantitatively comparable to those of SR Ca-ATPase isolated from aged rats, i.e. no immediate loss of activity, increased susceptibility to heat

  10. Changes in sarcoplasmic metabolite concentrations and pH associated with the catch contraction and relaxation of the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis measured by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Ishii, N; Mitsumori, F; Takahashi, K

    1991-06-01

    The sarcoplasmic concentrations of phosphorus metabolites and pH (pHin) were measured in the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. During an active contraction induced by 10(-3) acetylcholine, the concentration of arginine phosphate ([Arg-P]in) decreased from the resting value of 7.47 +/- 0.26 (mean +/- SE, n = 8) to 6.67 +/- 0.29 (n = 6) mumol g-1, and that of inorganic phosphate (Pi) consistently increased from 0.84 +/- 0.06 (n = 7) to 1.61 +/- 0.12 (n = 5) mumol g-1. In the 'catch' state following the active contraction, these concentrations were close to their resting levels, indicating that the catch is an inactive state. 5-hydroxytryptamine caused a rapid relaxation of the catch, which was associated with a slight decrease in [Arg-P]in and an increase in pHin by ca 0.2 units. The sarcoplasmic concentration of ATP (mean, 1.6 mumol g-1) did not change throughout the contraction-relaxation cycle.

  11. Ryanodine receptors in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín; Gómez-Viquez, Leticia; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Rueda, Angélica

    2002-07-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of smooth muscle is endowed with two different types of Ca2+ release channels, i.e. inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In general, both release channels mobilize Ca2+ from the same internal store in smooth muscle. While the importance of IP3Rs in agonist-induced contraction is well established, the role of RyRs in excitation-contraction coupling of smooth muscle is not clear. The participation of smooth muscle RyRs in the amplification of Ca2+ transients induced by either opening of Ca2+-permeable channels or IP3-triggered Ca2+ release has been studied. The efficacy of both processes to activate RyRs by calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is highly variable and not widely present in smooth muscle. Although RyRs in smooth muscle generate Ca2+ sparks that are similar to those observed in striated muscles, the contribution of these local Ca2+ events to depolarization-induced global rise in [Ca2+]i is rather limited. Recent data suggest that RyRs are involved in regulating the luminal [Ca2+] of SR and also in smooth muscle relaxation. This review summarizes studies that were carried out mainly in muscle strips or in freshly isolated myocytes, and that were aimed to determine the physiological role of RyRs in smooth muscle.

  12. Spectroscopic and ITC study of the conformational change upon Ca{sup 2+}-binding in TnC C-lobe and TnI peptide complex from Akazara scallop striated muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Yumoto, Fumiaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Koji; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Miyakawa, Takuya; Ojima, Takao; Tanokura, Masaru

    2008-04-25

    Akazara scallop (Chlamys nipponensis akazara) troponin C (TnC) of striated adductor muscle binds only one Ca{sup 2+} ion at the C-terminal EF-hand motif (Site IV), but it works as the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent regulator in adductor muscle contraction. In addition, the scallop troponin (Tn) has been thought to regulate muscle contraction via activating mechanisms that involve the region spanning from the TnC C-lobe (C-lobe) binding site to the inhibitory region of the TnI, and no alternative binding of the TnI C-terminal region to TnC because of no similarity between second TnC-binding regions of vertebrate and the scallop TnIs. To clarify the Ca{sup 2+}-regulatory mechanism of muscle contraction by scallop Tn, we have analyzed the Ca{sup 2+}-binding properties of the complex of TnC C-lobe and TnI peptide, and their interaction using isothermal titration microcalorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance, circular dichroism, and gel filtration chromatography. The results showed that single Ca{sup 2+}-binding to the Site IV leads to a structural transition not only in Site IV but also Site III through the structural network in the C-lobe of scallop TnC. We therefore assumed that the effect of Ca{sup 2+}-binding must lead to a change in the interaction mode between the C-lobe of TnC and the TnI peptide. The change should be the first event of the transmission of Ca{sup 2+} signal to TnI in Tn ternary complex.

  13. The microscopic and ultramicroscopic changes in the skeletal muscles, caused by heavy metal salts

    PubMed Central

    Tymoshenko, Alexey; Tkach, Gennadii; Sikora, Vitalii; Bumeister, Valentina; Shpetnyi, Ihor; Lyndin, Mykola; Maksymova, Olena; Maslenko, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The article is devoted to study the structural changes in the skeletal muscles caused by heavy metal salts. Materials and methods The study was conducted on 72 mature male rats. The experimental groups were given to drink water with combinations of heavy metal salts for one, two and three months. This type of water is typical for the water basins in the northern districts of the Sumy region. The study of morphological changes in the striated muscles was concluded using light and scanning electron microscopy. Results The data analysis revealed that a prolonged duration of negative factor could intensify sclerotic and edematous processes. The structure of muscle fibers was destroyed, nuclei were deformed and placed irregularly, and many petechial hemorrhages occurred. Besides, cross-striation was irregular, I and A bands were deformed and destroyed, H band was hardly visualized. The inner mitochondrial membrane and cristae become deformed. The symplastic nuclei were placed irregularly within sarcoplasm. Besides, they were swollen. Against swollen and enlarged symplastic nuclei, pyknotic nuclei were also found. The structures of sarcoplasmic reticulum were mainly dilated with deformed and ruptured areas. Conclusion Our study approves that high concentrations of heavy metal salts have a destructive influence on the skeletal striated muscles. PMID:28386464

  14. Muscle weakness in Ryr1I4895T/WT knock-in mice as a result of reduced ryanodine receptor Ca2+ ion permeation and release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Ryan E.; Orynbayev, Murat; Xu, Le; Andronache, Zoita; Apostol, Simona; Zvaritch, Elena; MacLennan, David H.; Meissner, Gerhard; Melzer, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The type 1 isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RYR1) is the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) that is activated during skeletal muscle excitation–contraction (EC) coupling. Mutations in the RYR1 gene cause several rare inherited skeletal muscle disorders, including malignant hyperthermia and central core disease (CCD). The human RYR1I4898T mutation is one of the most common CCD mutations. To elucidate the mechanism by which RYR1 function is altered by this mutation, we characterized in vivo muscle strength, EC coupling, SR Ca2+ content, and RYR1 Ca2+ release channel function using adult heterozygous Ryr1I4895T/+ knock-in mice (IT/+). Compared with age-matched wild-type (WT) mice, IT/+ mice exhibited significantly reduced upper body and grip strength. In spite of normal total SR Ca2+ content, both electrically evoked and 4-chloro-m-cresol–induced Ca2+ release were significantly reduced and slowed in single intact flexor digitorum brevis fibers isolated from 4–6-mo-old IT/+ mice. The sensitivity of the SR Ca2+ release mechanism to activation was not enhanced in fibers of IT/+ mice. Single-channel measurements of purified recombinant channels incorporated in planar lipid bilayers revealed that Ca2+ permeation was abolished for homotetrameric IT channels and significantly reduced for heterotetrameric WT:IT channels. Collectively, these findings indicate that in vivo muscle weakness observed in IT/+ knock-in mice arises from a reduction in the magnitude and rate of RYR1 Ca2+ release during EC coupling that results from the mutation producing a dominant-negative suppression of RYR1 channel Ca2+ ion permeation. PMID:21149547

  15. Muscle weakness in Ryr1I4895T/WT knock-in mice as a result of reduced ryanodine receptor Ca2+ ion permeation and release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Loy, Ryan E; Orynbayev, Murat; Xu, Le; Andronache, Zoita; Apostol, Simona; Zvaritch, Elena; MacLennan, David H; Meissner, Gerhard; Melzer, Werner; Dirksen, Robert T

    2011-01-01

    The type 1 isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RYR1) is the Ca(2+) release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) that is activated during skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. Mutations in the RYR1 gene cause several rare inherited skeletal muscle disorders, including malignant hyperthermia and central core disease (CCD). The human RYR1(I4898T) mutation is one of the most common CCD mutations. To elucidate the mechanism by which RYR1 function is altered by this mutation, we characterized in vivo muscle strength, EC coupling, SR Ca(2+) content, and RYR1 Ca(2+) release channel function using adult heterozygous Ryr1(I4895T/+) knock-in mice (IT/+). Compared with age-matched wild-type (WT) mice, IT/+ mice exhibited significantly reduced upper body and grip strength. In spite of normal total SR Ca(2+) content, both electrically evoked and 4-chloro-m-cresol-induced Ca(2+) release were significantly reduced and slowed in single intact flexor digitorum brevis fibers isolated from 4-6-mo-old IT/+ mice. The sensitivity of the SR Ca(2+) release mechanism to activation was not enhanced in fibers of IT/+ mice. Single-channel measurements of purified recombinant channels incorporated in planar lipid bilayers revealed that Ca(2+) permeation was abolished for homotetrameric IT channels and significantly reduced for heterotetrameric WT:IT channels. Collectively, these findings indicate that in vivo muscle weakness observed in IT/+ knock-in mice arises from a reduction in the magnitude and rate of RYR1 Ca(2+) release during EC coupling that results from the mutation producing a dominant-negative suppression of RYR1 channel Ca(2+) ion permeation.

  16. Oxidation in HiOx-packaged pork Longissimus muscle predisposes myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins to N-nitrosamine formation in nitrite-curing solution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Meng, Peipei; Xiong, Youling L; Ma, Lizhen; Wang, Changlu; Zhu, Yingchun

    2013-11-01

    The effect of meat protein in situ oxidation on the formation of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) was investigated. Fresh minced pork was untreated (Con) or treated with 700mg/kg α-tocopherol (Toc) or 300mg/kg tea polyphenols (PPE), packaged in a HiOx atmosphere (78.8% O2, 18.8% CO2, 2.4% N2), then stored at 2±1°C for up to 10days. Crude myofibrillar (MP) or sarcoplasmic (SP) protein (20mg/mL) extracted from stored meat was reacted with 43μM sodium nitrite at 80°C for 1h. Lipid oxidation was totally inhibited in PPE pork but increased in Con and Toc samples after 10days. There was significant protein oxidation (losses of sulfhydryls, formation of protein carbonyls) in both MP and SP in all samples during storage. However, the Con group suffered more extensive protein oxidation than Toc and PPE and produced more NDEA (P<0.05), indicating that protein oxidation promoted nitrosation.

  17. The evolutionary origin of bilaterian smooth and striated myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Thibaut; Fischer, Antje HL; Steinmetz, Patrick RH; Lauri, Antonella; Bertucci, Paola; Arendt, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    The dichotomy between smooth and striated myocytes is fundamental for bilaterian musculature, but its evolutionary origin is unsolved. In particular, interrelationships of visceral smooth muscles remain unclear. Absent in fly and nematode, they have not yet been characterized molecularly outside vertebrates. Here, we characterize expression profile, ultrastructure, contractility and innervation of the musculature in the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii and identify smooth muscles around the midgut, hindgut and heart that resemble their vertebrate counterparts in molecular fingerprint, contraction speed and nervous control. Our data suggest that both visceral smooth and somatic striated myocytes were present in the protostome-deuterostome ancestor and that smooth myocytes later co-opted the striated contractile module repeatedly – for example, in vertebrate heart evolution. During these smooth-to-striated myocyte conversions, the core regulatory complex of transcription factors conveying myocyte identity remained unchanged, reflecting a general principle in cell type evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19607.001 PMID:27906129

  18. Single-channel properties of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-release channel in slow- and fast-twitch muscles of Rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bastide, B; Mounier, Y

    1998-08-01

    RyR1 is the main isoform of ryanodine receptor expressed in fast- and slow-twitch mammalian skeletal muscles although differences in Ca2+-release kinetics and properties have been reported. Single-channel measurements reveal that a large proportion (82%) of Ca2+-release channels measured in slow-twitch muscle preparations have properties similar to those of the Ca2+-release channels of fast-twitch preparations, i.e. the same conductance, an identical sensitivity to caffeine and a bell-shaped Ca2+ activation curve for pCa (-log10[Ca2+]) 7 to 3. A low proportion (18%) of Ca2+-release channels observed in preparations from slow-twitch muscles were characterized by a very high activity level. These channels were not inhibited at a millimolar concentration of Ca2+. Our data suggest that the different properties of Ca2+ release in slow- and fast-twitch muscles might not be related to intrinsic properties of the Ca2+-release channels of each type of muscle but rather to the co-expression of two isoforms of ryanodine receptor and the lower amount of Ca2+-release channels expressed in slow- than in fast-twitch muscles.

  19. The effect of Mg2+ on cardiac muscle function: Is CaATP the substrate for priming myofibril cross-bridge formation and Ca2+ reuptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G A; Vandenberg, J I; Freestone, N S; Dixon, H B

    2001-01-01

    of the kinetics of the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase to those of the myofibril, in particular the positive co-operativity of both Mg2+ inhibition and Ca2+ activation, leads to the conclusion that this ATPase also has an initiation step that utilizes CaATP. The first-order activation by sub-millimolar [Mg2+], similar to that of the myofibril, may be explained by Mg2+ involvement in the phosphate-release step of the ATPase. The inhibition of both the myofibril and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ transporting ATPases by Mg2+ offers an explanation for the specific requirement for phosphocreatine (PCr) for full activity of both enzymes in situ and its effect on their apparent affinities for ATP. This explanation is based on the slow diffusion of Mg2+ within the myofibril and on the contrast of PCr with both ATP and phosphoenolpyruvate, in that PCr does not bind Mg2+ under physiological conditions, whereas both the other two bind it more tightly than the products of their hydrolysis do. The switch to supply of energy by diffusion of MgATP into the myofibril when depletion of PCr raises [ATP]/[PCr] greatly, e.g. during anoxia, results in a local [Mg2+] increase, which inhibits the ATPase. It is possible that mechanisms similar to those described above occur in skeletal muscle but the Ca2+ co-operativity involved would be masked by the presence of two Ca2+ binding sites on each troponin. PMID:11237858

  20. Oxygen-coupled redox regulation of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel by NADPH oxidase 4.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi-An; Hess, Douglas T; Nogueira, Leonardo; Yong, Sandro; Bowles, Dawn E; Eu, Jerry; Laurita, Kenneth R; Meissner, Gerhard; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2011-09-20

    Physiological sensing of O(2) tension (partial O(2) pressure, pO(2)) plays an important role in some mammalian cellular systems, but striated muscle generally is not considered to be among them. Here we describe a molecular mechanism in skeletal muscle that acutely couples changes in pO(2) to altered calcium release through the ryanodine receptor-Ca(2+)-release channel (RyR1). Reactive oxygen species are generated in proportion to pO(2) by NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and the consequent oxidation of a small set of RyR1 cysteine thiols results in increased RyR1 activity and Ca(2+) release in isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum and in cultured myofibers and enhanced contractility of intact muscle. Thus, Nox4 is an O(2) sensor in skeletal muscle, and O(2)-coupled hydrogen peroxide production by Nox4 governs the redox state of regulatory RyR1 thiols and thereby governs muscle performance. These findings reveal a molecular mechanism for O(2)-based signaling by an NADPH oxidase and demonstrate a physiological role for oxidative modification of RyR1.

  1. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase pump is a major regulator of glucose transport in the healthy and diabetic heart.

    PubMed

    Waller, Amanda P; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Hayes, Summer; Periasamy, Muthu; Lacombe, Véronique A

    2015-05-01

    Despite intensive research, the pathways that mediate calcium (Ca(2+))-stimulated glucose transport in striated muscle remain elusive. Since the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) pump tightly regulates cytosolic [Ca(2+)], we investigated whether the SERCA pump is a major regulator of cardiac glucose transport. We used healthy and insulin-deficient diabetic transgenic (TG) mice expressing SERCA1a in the heart. Active cell surface glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 was measured by a biotinylated photolabeled assay in the intact perfused myocardium and isolated myocytes. In healthy TG mice, cardiac-specific SERCA1a expression increased active cell-surface GLUT4 and glucose uptake in the myocardium, as well as whole body glucose tolerance. Diabetes reduced active cell-surface GLUT4 content and glucose uptake in the heart of wild type mice, all of which were preserved in diabetic TG mice. Decreased basal AS160 and increased proportion of calmodulin-bound AS160 paralleled the increase in cell surface GLUT4 content in the heart of TG mice, suggesting that AS160 regulates GLUT trafficking by a Ca(2+)/calmodulin dependent pathway. In addition, cardiac-specific SERCA1a expression partially rescues hyperglycemia during diabetes. Collectively, these data suggested that the SERCA pump is a major regulator of cardiac glucose transport by an AS160 dependent mechanism during healthy and insulin-deficient state. Our data further indicated that cardiac-specific SERCA overexpression rescues diabetes induced-alterations in cardiac glucose transport and improves whole body glucose homeostasis. Therefore, findings from this study provide novel mechanistic insights linking upregulation of the SERCA pump in the heart as a potential therapeutic target to improve glucose metabolism during diabetes.

  2. Effect of taurine depletion on excitation-contraction coupling and Cl- conductance of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Pierno, S; Camerino, D C

    1996-01-25

    The pharmacological action of taurine on skeletal muscle is to stabilize sarcolemma by increasing macroscopic conductance to Cl- (GCl), whereas a proposed physiological role for the amino acid is to modulate excitation-contraction coupling mechanism via Ca2+ availability. To get insight in the physiological role of taurine in skeletal muscle, the effects of its depletion were evaluated on voltage threshold for mechanical activation and GCl with the two intracellular microelectrode method in 'point' voltage clamp mode and current clamp mode, respectively. The experiments were performed on extensor digitorum longus muscle fibers from rats depleted of taurine by a chronic 4 week treatment with guanidinoethane sulfonate, a known inhibitor of taurine transporter. The treatment significantly modified the mechanical threshold of striated fibers; i.e. at each pulse duration they needed significantly less depolarization to contract and the fitted rheobase voltage was more negative by 10 mV with respect to untreated muscle fibers. In parallel, the treatment with guanidinoethane sulfonate produced a significant 40% lowering of GCl. In vitro application of 60 mM of taurine to such depleted muscles almost completely restored the mechanical threshold and increased GCl even above the value of untreated control. However, in vitro application of 60 mM of either taurine or guanidinoethane sulfonate to untreated control muscles did not cause any change of the mechanical threshold but increased GCl by 40% and 21%, respectively. Furthermore, 100 microM of the S-(-) enantiomer of 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)propionic acid almost fully blocked GCl but did not produce any change in the mechanical threshold of normal muscle fibers. The present results show that the large amount of intracellular taurine plays a role in the excitation-contraction coupling mechanism of striated muscle fibers. This action is independent from any effect involving muscle Cl- channels, but it is likely mediated by the

  3. Nitric oxide synthase in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Xu, K Y; Huso, D L; Dawson, T M; Bredt, D S; Becker, L C

    1999-01-19

    NO. is a free radical that modulates heart function and metabolism. We report that a neuronal-type NO synthase (NOS) is located on cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane vesicles and that endogenous NO. produced by SR-associated NOS inhibits SR Ca2+ uptake. Ca2+-dependent biochemical conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline was observed from isolated rabbit cardiac SR vesicles in the presence of NOS substrates and cofactors. Endogenous NO. was generated from the vesicles and detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping measurements. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated labeling of cardiac SR vesicles by using anti-neuronal NOS (nNOS), but not anti-endothelial NOS (eNOS) or anti-inducible NOS (iNOS) antibodies, whereas skeletal muscle SR vesicles had no nNOS immunoreactivity. The nNOS immunoreactivity also displayed a pattern consistent with SR localization in confocal micrographs of sections of human myocardium. Western blotting demonstrated that cardiac SR NOS is larger than brain NOS (160 vs. 155 kDa). No immunodetection was observed in cardiac SR vesicles from nNOS knockout mice or with an anti-nNOS mu antibody, suggesting the possibility of a new nNOS-type isoform. 45Ca uptake by cardiac SR vesicles, catalyzed by Ca2+-ATPase, was inhibited by NO. produced endogenously from cardiac SR NOS, and 7-nitroindazole, a selective nNOS inhibitor, completely prevented this inhibition. These results suggest that a cardiac muscle nNOS isoform is located on SR of cardiac myocytes, where it may respond to intracellular Ca2+ concentration and modulate SR Ca2+ ion active transport in the heart.

  4. Nitric oxide synthase in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kai Y.; Huso, David L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Bredt, David S.; Becker, Lewis C.

    1999-01-01

    NO⋅ is a free radical that modulates heart function and metabolism. We report that a neuronal-type NO synthase (NOS) is located on cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane vesicles and that endogenous NO⋅ produced by SR-associated NOS inhibits SR Ca2+ uptake. Ca2+-dependent biochemical conversion of l-arginine to l-citrulline was observed from isolated rabbit cardiac SR vesicles in the presence of NOS substrates and cofactors. Endogenous NO⋅ was generated from the vesicles and detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping measurements. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated labeling of cardiac SR vesicles by using anti-neuronal NOS (nNOS), but not anti-endothelial NOS (eNOS) or anti-inducible NOS (iNOS) antibodies, whereas skeletal muscle SR vesicles had no nNOS immunoreactivity. The nNOS immunoreactivity also displayed a pattern consistent with SR localization in confocal micrographs of sections of human myocardium. Western blotting demonstrated that cardiac SR NOS is larger than brain NOS (160 vs. 155 kDa). No immunodetection was observed in cardiac SR vesicles from nNOS knockout mice or with an anti-nNOSμ antibody, suggesting the possibility of a new nNOS-type isoform. 45Ca uptake by cardiac SR vesicles, catalyzed by Ca2+-ATPase, was inhibited by NO⋅ produced endogenously from cardiac SR NOS, and 7-nitroindazole, a selective nNOS inhibitor, completely prevented this inhibition. These results suggest that a cardiac muscle nNOS isoform is located on SR of cardiac myocytes, where it may respond to intracellular Ca2+ concentration and modulate SR Ca2+ ion active transport in the heart. PMID:9892689

  5. Differential abundance of sarcoplasmic proteome explains animal effect on beef Longissimus lumborum color stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sarcoplasmic proteome of beef Longissimus lumborum demonstrating animal-to-animal variation in color stability was examined to correlate proteome profile with color. Longissimus lumborum (36 h post-mortem) muscles were obtained from 73 beef carcasses, aged for 13 days, and fabricated to 2.5-cm s...

  6. Occurrence and Characteristics of a Rapid Exchange of Phosphate Oxygens Catalyzed by Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Vesicles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kanazawa, T.; Boyer, P. D.

    1972-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from skeletal muscle actively take up Ca{sup ++} from the medium in the presence of Mg{sup ++} and ATP. This transport is coupled to ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by membrane-bound Ca{sup++}, Mg{sup ++}-ATPase which is activated by concurrent presence of Ca{sup ++} and Mg{sup ++}. Considerable informations have accumulated that give insight into the ATPase and its coupling to the calcium transport. The hydrolysis of ATP by this enzyme occurs through a phosphorylated intermediate. Formation and decomposition of the intermediate show vectorial requirements for Ca{sup ++} and Mg{sup ++}, suggesting an intimate involvement of the intermediate in the transport process. ATP synthesis from P{sub i} and ADP coupled to outflow of Ca{sup ++} from sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles has recently been demonstrated. This indicates the reversibility of the entire process of calcium transport in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles.

  7. Transport AC Losses in Striated YBCO Coated Conductors (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2012-0124 TRANSPORT AC LOSSES IN STRIATED YBCO COATED CONDUCTORS (POSTPRINT) G.A. Levin and P.N. Barnes Mechanical Energy...TRANSPORT AC LOSSES IN STRIATED YBCO COATED CONDUCTORS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...2006. 14. ABSTRACT DC current-voltage characteristics and transport ac losses of striated and non-striated Y1Ba2Cu3O7-δ ( YBCO ) coated conductors

  8. Abnormal response to calmodulin in vitro of dystrophic chicken muscle membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Galindo, J; Hudecki, M S; Davis, F B; Davis, P J; Thacore, H R; Pollina, C M; Blas, S D; Schoenl, M

    1988-09-20

    A skeletal muscle membrane fraction enriched in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) contained Ca2+-ATPase activity which was stimulated in vitro in normal chickens (line 412) by 6 nM purified bovine calmodulin (33% increase over control, P less than 0.001). In contrast, striated muscle from chickens (line 413) affected with an inherited form of muscular dystrophy, but otherwise genetically similar to line 412, contained SR-enriched Ca2+-ATPase activity which was resistant to stimulation in vitro by calmodulin. Basal levels of Ca2+-ATPase activity (no added calmodulin) were comparable in muscles of unaffected and affected animals, and the Ca2+ optima of the enzymes in normal and dystrophic muscle were identical. Purified SR vesicles, obtained by calcium phosphate loading and sucrose density gradient centrifugation, showed the same resistance of dystrophic Ca2+-ATPase to exogenous calmodulin as the SR-enriched muscle membrane fraction. Dystrophic muscle had increased Ca2+ content compared to that of normal animals (P less than 0.04) and has been previously shown to contain increased levels of immuno- and bioactive calmodulin and of calmodulin mRNA. The calmodulin resistance of the Ca2+-ATPase in dystrophic muscle reflects a defect in regulation of cell Ca2+ metabolism associated with elevated cellular Ca2+ and calmodulin concentrations.

  9. Supravital morphology of small branches of lateral striate arteries as observed with Nomarski optics.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, C J

    1996-01-01

    Lateral striate arteries were dissected from the fixed brains of 6 patients of increasing age. Small branches of arteries were observed--unprocessed and unstained--by Nomarski optics. Among the findings there was fibrous intimal proliferation, replacement of medial muscle by collagen, tortuosity, twisting or coiling. The severity of changes seemed to progress with aging. The advantages of the used methodology that aims at avoiding artifacts of processing are discussed briefly.

  10. Objective forensic analysis of striated, quasi-striated and impressed toolmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spotts, Ryan E.

    Following the 1993 Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. court case and continuing to the 2010 National Academy of Sciences report, comparative forensic toolmark examination has received many challenges to its admissibility in court cases and its scientific foundations. Many of these challenges deal with the subjective nature in determining whether toolmarks are identifiable. This questioning of current identification methods has created a demand for objective methods of identification - "objective" implying known error rates and statistically reliability. The demand for objective methods has resulted in research that created a statistical algorithm capable of comparing toolmarks to determine their statistical similarity, and thus the ability to separate matching and nonmatching toolmarks. This was expanded to the creation of virtual toolmarking (characterization of a tool to predict the toolmark it will create). The statistical algorithm, originally designed for two-dimensional striated toolmarks, had been successfully applied to striated screwdriver and quasi-striated plier toolmarks. Following this success, a blind study was conducted to validate the virtual toolmarking capability using striated screwdriver marks created at various angles of incidence. Work was also performed to optimize the statistical algorithm by implementing means to ensure the algorithm operations were constrained to logical comparison regions (e.g. the opposite ends of two toolmarks do not need to be compared because they do not coincide with each other). This work was performed on quasi-striated shear cut marks made with pliers - a previously tested, more difficult application of the statistical algorithm that could demonstrate the difference in results due to optimization. The final research conducted was performed with pseudostriated impression toolmarks made with chisels. Impression marks, which are more complex than striated marks, were analyzed using the algorithm to separate

  11. Hyperthyroidism increases the uncoupled ATPase activity and heat production by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Ana Paula; Da-Silva, Wagner S; Carvalho, Denise P; De Meis, Leopoldo

    2003-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase is able to modulate the distribution of energy released during ATP hydrolysis, so that a portion of energy is used for Ca2+ transport (coupled ATPase activity) and a portion is converted into heat (uncoupled ATPase activity). In this report it is shown that T4 administration to rabbits promotes an increase in the rates of both the uncoupled ATPase activity and heat production in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, and that the degree of activation varies depending on the muscle type used. In white muscles hyperthyroidism promotes a 0.8-fold increase of the uncoupled ATPase activity and in red muscle a 4-fold increase. The yield of vesicles from hyperthyroid muscles is 3-4-fold larger than that obtained from normal muscles; thus the rate of heat production by the Ca2+-ATPase expressed in terms of g of muscle in hyperthyroidism is increased by a factor of 3.6 in white muscles and 12.0 in red muscles. The data presented suggest that the Ca2+-ATPase uncoupled activity may represent one of the heat sources that contributes to the enhanced thermogenesis noted in hyperthyroidism. PMID:12887329

  12. Normalization of cell responses in cat striate cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeger, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Simple cells in the striate cortex have been depicted as half-wave-rectified linear operators. Complex cells have been depicted as energy mechanisms, constructed from the squared sum of the outputs of quadrature pairs of linear operators. However, the linear/energy model falls short of a complete explanation of striate cell responses. In this paper, a modified version of the linear/energy model is presented in which striate cells mutually inhibit one another, effectively normalizing their responses with respect to stimulus contrast. This paper reviews experimental measurements of striate cell responses, and shows that the new model explains a significantly larger body of physiological data.

  13. Localisation of AMPK γ subunits in cardiac and skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Katalin; Grignani, Robert T; Watkins, Hugh; Redwood, Charles

    2013-12-01

    The trimeric protein AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important sensor of energetic status and cellular stress, and mutations in genes encoding two of the regulatory γ subunits cause inherited disorders of either cardiac or skeletal muscle. AMPKγ2 mutations cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with glycogen deposition and conduction abnormalities; mutations in AMPKγ3 result in increased skeletal muscle glycogen. In order to gain further insight into the roles of the different γ subunits in muscle and into possible disease mechanisms, we localised the γ2 and γ3 subunits, along with the more abundant γ1 subunit, by immunofluorescence in cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibres. The predominant cardiac γ2 variant, γ2-3B, gave a striated pattern in cardiomyocytes, aligning with the Z-disk but with punctate staining similar to T-tubule (L-type Ca(2+) channel) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SERCA2) markers. In skeletal muscle fibres AMPKγ3 localises to the I band, presenting a uniform staining that flanks the Z-disk, also coinciding with the position of Ca(2+) influx in these muscles. The localisation of γ2-3B- and γ3-containing AMPK suggests that these trimers may have similar functions in the different muscles. AMPK containing γ2-3B was detected in oxidative skeletal muscles which had low expression of γ3, confirming that these two regulatory subunits may be co-ordinately regulated in response to metabolic requirements. Compartmentalisation of AMPK complexes is most likely dependent on the regulatory γ subunit and this differential localisation may direct substrate selection and specify particular functional roles.

  14. Types of muscle tissue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... appear striated, and are under involuntary control. Smooth muscle fibers are located in walls of hollow visceral organs, except the heart, appear spindle-shaped, and are also under involuntary control. Skeletal ...

  15. Distinctive serum miRNA profile in mouse models of striated muscular pathologies.

    PubMed

    Vignier, Nicolas; Amor, Fatima; Fogel, Paul; Duvallet, Angélique; Poupiot, Jérôme; Charrier, Sabine; Arock, Michel; Montus, Marie; Nelson, Isabelle; Richard, Isabelle; Carrier, Lucie; Servais, Laurent; Voit, Thomas; Bonne, Gisèle; Israeli, David

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers are critically important for disease diagnosis and monitoring. In particular, close monitoring of disease evolution is eminently required for the evaluation of therapeutic treatments. Classical monitoring methods in muscular dystrophies are largely based on histological and molecular analyses of muscle biopsies. Such biopsies are invasive and therefore difficult to obtain. The serum protein creatine kinase is a useful biomarker, which is however not specific for a given pathology and correlates poorly with the severity or course of the muscular pathology. The aim of the present study was the systematic evaluation of serum microRNAs (miRNAs) as biomarkers in striated muscle pathologies. Mouse models for five striated muscle pathologies were investigated: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D (LGMD2D), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD2C), Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Two-step RT-qPCR methodology was elaborated, using two different RT-qPCR miRNA quantification technologies. We identified miRNA modulation in the serum of all the five mouse models. The most highly dysregulated serum miRNAs were found to be commonly upregulated in DMD, LGMD2D and LGMD2C mouse models, which all exhibit massive destruction of striated muscle tissues. Some of these miRNAs were down rather than upregulated in the EDMD mice, a model without massive myofiber destruction. The dysregulated miRNAs identified in the HCM model were different, with the exception of one dysregulated miRNA common to all pathologies. Importantly, a specific and distinctive circulating miRNA profile was identified for each studied pathological mouse model. The differential expression of a few dysregulated miRNAs in the DMD mice was further evaluated in DMD patients, providing new candidates of circulating miRNA biomarkers for DMD.

  16. Ultrastructure of sarcoplasmic reticulum in atrial myocardium of patients with mitral valvular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Thiedermann, K. U.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1976-01-01

    Alterations observed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells in left and right atrial myocardium from 10 patients with mitral valvular disease consisted of: a) proliferation of rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum, which formed large cisterns in perinuclear areas of hypertrophied cells and was considered indicative of increased protein synthesis; b) proliferation of free sarcoplasmic reticulum, a change that occurred in degenerated cells and appeared to be related to loss of contractile elements; c) two types of aggregates of tubules of free SR--one type was associated wtih abnormal Z-band material and was found only in cells showing loss of myofibrils and proliferation of free SR, whereas the other was not associated with either of these changes and occurred in less severely altered cells; and d) proliferation and enlargement of cisterns of extended junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum, which formed two distinct types of complexes: the first of these consisted of large, convoluted (Type A) cisterns that were wide (550 to 650 A in thickness) and did not have a central dense lamina; the second was composed of stacks of concentric or parallel (Type B) cisterns that were narrower (220 to 300 A in thickness), had a central dense lamina, and were separated from one another by layers of glycogen granules. The formation of these complexes of cisterns was regarded as an extreme form of overdevelopment of extended junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum in atrial muscle cells. Images Figure 21 Figures 22-25 Figures 1-3 Figures 26-29 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figures 30 and 31 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figures 32-36 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figures 37-39 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figures 40 and 41 Figure 18 Figures 19 and 20 PMID:1275054

  17. Interrelated striated elements in vestibular hair cells of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Bourne, C.

    1983-01-01

    A series of interrelated striated organelles in types I and II vestibular hair cells of the rat which appear to be less developed in cochlear hair cells have been revealed by unusual fixation procedures, suggesting that contractile elements may play a role in sensory transduction in the inner ear, especially in the vestibular system. Included in the series of interrelated striated elements are the cuticular plate and its basal attachments to the hair cell margins, the connections of the strut array of the kinociliary basal body to the cuticular plate, and striated organelles associated with the plasma membrane and extending below the apical junctional complexes.

  18. Paspalum striate mosaic virus: an Australian mastrevirus from Paspalum dilatatum.

    PubMed

    Geering, Andrew D W; Thomas, John E; Holton, Timothy; Hadfield, James; Varsani, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Three monocot-infecting mastreviruses from Australia, all found primarily in pasture and naturalised grasses, have been characterised at the molecular level. Here, we present the full genome sequence of a fourth, Paspalum striate mosaic virus (PSMV), isolated from Paspalum dilatatum from south-east Queensland. The genome was 2816 nt long and had an organisation typical of other monocot-infecting mastreviruses. Its nearest relative is Bromus cartharticus striate mosaic virus (BCSMV), with which it shares an overall genome identity of 75%. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome and each of the putative viral proteins places PSMV in a group with the other three Australian striate mosaic viruses. PSMV, BCSMV and Digitaria didactyla striate mosaic virus all contain a similar, small recombinant sequence in the small intergenic region.

  19. Characterization of sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein (SCP) variants from freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    White, Alexandra J; Northcutt, Michael J; Rohrback, Suzanne E; Carpenter, Robert O; Niehaus-Sauter, Margaret M; Gao, Yongping; Wheatly, Michele G; Gillen, Christopher M

    2011-09-01

    Sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein (SCP) is an invertebrate EF-hand calcium buffering protein that has been proposed to fulfill a similar function in muscle relaxation as vertebrate parvalbumin. We have identified three SCP variants in the freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii. The variants (pcSCP1a, pcSCP1b, and pcSCP1c) differ across a 37 amino acid region that lies mainly between the second and third EF-hand calcium binding domains. We evaluated tissue distribution and response of the variants to cold exposure, a stress known to affect expression of parvalbumin. Expression patterns of the variants were not different and therefore do not provide a functional rationale for the polymorphism of pcSCP1. Compared to hepatopancreas, expression of pcSCP1 variants was 100,000-fold greater in axial abdominal muscle and 10-fold greater in cardiac muscle. Expression was 10-100 greater in fast-twitch deep flexor and extensor muscles compared to slow-twitch superficial flexor and extensors. In axial muscle, no significant changes of pcSCP1, calmodulin (CaM), or sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) expression were measured after one week of 4°C exposure. In contrast, large decreases of pcSCP1 were measured in cardiac muscle, with no changes in CaM or SERCA. Knockdown of pcSCP1 by dsRNA led to reduced muscle activity and decreased expression of SERCA. In summary, the pattern of pcSCP1 tissue expression is similar to parvalbumin, supporting a role in muscle contraction. However, the response of pcSCP1 to cold exposure differs from parvalbumin, suggesting possible functional divergence between the two proteins.

  20. Function and regulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase: advances during the past decade and prospects for the coming decade.

    PubMed

    Arai, M

    2000-01-01

    In cardiac muscle, the contraction-relaxation cycle is tightly controlled by the regulated release and uptake of intracellular Ca2+ between sarcoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm. A major protein controlling Ca2+ cycling is Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a) located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. The function of SERCA2a protein is regulated by the phosphorylatable protein, phospholamban. Phosphorylation of phospholamban releases its inhibitory effect on SERCA2a through direct molecular interaction. Recently, mice whose SERCA2a function is increased (overexpression of the gene) or lost (knock out) were developed. These mice demonstrated that SERCA2a pump levels are a major determinant of cardiac muscle contractility and relaxation. These studies open the prospect that the overexpression of SERCA2a can correct cardiac dysfunction seen in heart failure. Advances in knowledge concerning the function and gene regulation of SERCA2a are discussed in this review.

  1. Hand-Held Model of a Sarcomere to Illustrate the Sliding Filament Mechanism in Muscle Contraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jittivadhna, Karnyupha; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    From our teaching of the contractile unit of the striated muscle, we have found limitations in using textbook illustrations of sarcomere structure and its related dynamic molecular physiological details. A hand-held model of a striated muscle sarcomere made from common items has thus been made by us to enhance students' understanding of the…

  2. Insights from diploblasts; the evolution of mesoderm and muscle.

    PubMed

    Burton, Patrick Michael

    2008-01-15

    The origin of both mesoderm and muscle are central questions in metazoan evolution. The majority of metazoan phyla are triploblasts, possessing three discrete germ layers. Attention has therefore been focused on two outgroups to triploblasts, Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Modern texts describe these taxa as diploblasts, lacking a mesodermal germ layer. However, some members of Medusozoa, one of two subphyla within Cnidaria, possess tissue independent of either the ectoderm or endoderm referred to as the entocodon. Furthermore, members of both Cnidaria and Ctenophora have been described as possessing striated muscle, a mesodermal derivative. While it is widely accepted that the ancestor of Eumetazoa was diploblastic, homology of the entocodon and mesoderm as well as striated muscle within Eumetazoa has been suggested. This implies a potential triploblastic ancestor of Eumetazoa possessing striated muscle. In the following review, I examine the evidence for homology of both muscle and mesoderm. Current data support a diploblastic ancestor of cnidarians, ctenophores, and triploblasts lacking striated muscle.

  3. Evaluation of Vascular Delivery Methodologies to Enhance rAAV6-mediated Gene Transfer to Canine Striated Musculature

    PubMed Central

    Gregorevic, Paul; Schultz, Brian R; Allen, James M; Halldorson, Jeffrey B; Blankinship, Michael J; Meznarich, Norman A; Kuhr, Christian S; Doremus, Caitlin; Finn, Eric; Liggitt, Denny; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of research supports the development of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors for delivery of gene expression cassettes to striated musculature as a method of treating severe neuromuscular conditions. However, it is unclear whether delivery protocols that achieve extensive gene transfer in mice can be adapted to produce similarly extensive gene transfer in larger mammals and ultimately patients. Consequently, we sought to investigate methodological modifications that would facilitate rAAV-mediated gene transfer to the striated musculature of canines. A simple procedure incorporating acute (i) occlusion of limb blood flow, (ii) exsanguination via compression bandage, and (iii) vector “dwell” time of <20 minutes, markedly enhanced the transduction of limb muscles, compared with a simple bolus limb infusion of vector. A complementary method whereby vector was infused into the jugular vein led to efficient transduction of cardiomyocytes and to a lesser degree the diaphragm. Together these methods can be used to achieve transgene expression in heart, diaphragm, and limb muscles of juvenile dogs using rAAV6 vectors. These results establish that rAAV-mediated gene delivery is a viable approach to achieving systemic transduction of striated musculature in mammals approaching the dimensions of newborn humans. PMID:19471246

  4. Doxorubicin cardiomyopathy is associated with a decrease in calcium release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a chronic rabbit model.

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, D A; Atkinson, J B; Olson, R D; Buck, S; Cusack, B J; Fleischer, S; Boucek, R J

    1993-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a highly effective cancer chemotherapeutic agent that produces a dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that limits its clinical usefulness. Clinical and animal studies of morphological changes during the early stages of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy have suggested that the sarcoplasmic reticulum, the intracellular membrane system responsible for myoplasmic calcium regulation in adult mammalian heart, may be the early target of doxorubicin. To detect changes in the calcium pump protein or the calcium release channel (ryanodine receptor) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum during chronic doxorubicin treatment, rabbits were treated with intravenous doxorubicin (1 mg/kg) twice weekly for 12 to 18 doses. Pair-fed controls received intravenous normal saline. The severity of cardiomyopathy was scored by light and electron microscopy of left ventricular papillary muscles. Developed tension was measured in isolated atrial strips. In subcellular fractions from heart, [3H]ryanodine binding was decreased in doxorubicin-treated rabbits (0.33 +/- 0.03 pmol/mg) compared with control rabbits (0.66 +/- 0.02 pmol/mg; P < 0.0001). The magnitude of the decrease in [3H]ryanodine binding correlated with both the severity of the cardiomyopathy graded by pathology score (light and electron microscopy) and the decrease in developed tension in isolated atrial strips. Bmax for [3H]ryanodine binding and the amount of immunoreactive ryanodine receptor by Western blot analysis using sequence-specific antibody were both decreased, consistent with a decrease in the amount of calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum in doxorubicin-treated rabbits. In contrast, there was no decrease in the amount or the activity of the calcium pump protein of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in doxorubicin-treated rabbits. Doxorubicin treatment did not decrease [3H]ryanodine binding or the amount of immunoreactive calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle. Since the sarcoplasmic

  5. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Matthew E; Pavlath, Grace K

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease.

  6. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  7. Differential abundance of sarcoplasmic proteome explains animal effect on beef Longissimus lumborum color stability.

    PubMed

    Canto, Anna C V C S; Suman, Surendranath P; Nair, Mahesh N; Li, Shuting; Rentfrow, Gregg; Beach, Carol M; Silva, Teofilo J P; Wheeler, Tommy L; Shackelford, Steven D; Grayson, Adria; McKeith, Russell O; King, D Andy

    2015-04-01

    The sarcoplasmic proteome of beef Longissimus lumborum demonstrating animal-to-animal variation in color stability was examined to correlate proteome profile with color. Longissimus lumborum (36 h post-mortem) muscles were obtained from 73 beef carcasses, aged for 13 days, and fabricated to 2.5-cm steaks. One steak was allotted to retail display, and another was immediately vacuum packaged and frozen at -80°C. Aerobically packaged steaks were stored under display, and color was evaluated on days 0 and 11. The steaks were ranked based on redness and color stability on day 11, and ten color-stable and ten color-labile carcasses were identified. Sarcoplasmic proteome of frozen steaks from the selected carcasses was analyzed. Nine proteins were differentially abundant in color-stable and color-labile steaks. Three glycolytic enzymes (phosphoglucomutase-1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase M2) were over-abundant in color-stable steaks and positively correlated (P<0.05) to redness and color stability. These results indicated that animal variations in proteome contribute to differences in beef color.

  8. Colour and sarcoplasmic protein evaluation of pork following water bath and ohmic cooking.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yan; Miao, Jing; Yuan, Shan-Zhen; Liu, Yi; Li, Xing-Min; Dai, Rui-Tong

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of ohmic (OH) and waterbath (WB) cooking on colour attributes and sarcoplasmic changes of porcine longissimus dorsi muscle at the same endpoint temperatures (EPTs; range 10°C-80°C). The OH treatment was carried out at 10 Vcm(-1), and the WB temperature at 85°C. The colour parameters, deoxymyoglobin% (DeoMb) and metmyoglobin% (MetMb) of the OH-cooked meat were significantly lower (P<0.05) than those obtained by WB-cooking at the same EPTs (range 60°C-80°C). SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the meat treated with WB-cooking had a lower sarcoplasmic protein solubility (5.97 mg/g vs.14.89 mg/g, P<0.05) and fainter protein bands than that of OH-cooking thus, indicating paler colour, and lower water-holding capacity especially in WB-cooked meat at EPTs above 40°C. Strong correlations among lightness, browness, metmyoglobin% and soluble proteins were observed in meat following OH-cooking.

  9. Smooth muscle alpha-actinin interaction with smitin.

    PubMed

    Chi, Richard J; Olenych, Scott G; Kim, Kyoungtae; Keller, Thomas C S

    2005-07-01

    Actin-myosin II filament-based contractile structures in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and nonmuscle cells also contain the actin filament-crosslinking protein alpha-actinin. In striated muscle sarcomeres, interactions between the myosin-binding protein titin and alpha-actinin in the Z-line provide an important structural linkage. We previously discovered a titin-like protein, smitin, associated with the contractile apparatus of smooth muscle cells. Purified native smooth muscle alpha-actinin binds with nanomolar affinity to smitin in smitin-myosin coassemblies in vitro. Smooth muscle alpha-actinin also interacts with striated muscle titin. In contrast to striated muscle alpha-actinin interaction with titin and smitin, which is significantly enhanced by PIP2, smooth muscle alpha-actinin interacts with smitin and titin equally well in the presence and absence of PIP2. Using expressed regions of smooth muscle alpha-actinin, we have demonstrated smitin-binding sites in the smooth muscle alpha-actinin R2-R3 spectrin-like repeat rod domain and a C-terminal domain formed by cryptic EF-hand structures. These smitin-binding sites are highly homologous to the titin-binding sites of striated muscle alpha-actinin. Our results suggest that direct interaction between alpha-actinin and titin or titin-like proteins is a common feature of actin-myosin II contractile structures in striated muscle and smooth muscle cells and that the molecular bases for alpha-actinin interaction with these proteins are similar, although regulation of these interactions may differ according to tissue.

  10. Prolonged exercise potentiates sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake in rat diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Stavrianeas, Stasinos; Spangenburg, Espen; Batts, Tim; Williams, Jay H; Klug, Gary A

    2003-03-01

    The effects of a single bout of prolonged treadmill exercise [mean=81 (13) min] on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release, uptake and ATPase activity were determined in the costal region of rat diaphragm (D) and red gastrocnemius (RG). Glycogen depletion measurements made immediately following exercise suggested that treadmill running substantially recruited the fibers throughout both muscles. SR Ca(2+) ATPase activity, measured in isolated SR vesicles, decreased in the RG by 33% but remained unchanged in D in response to the exercise bout. This effect in RG was matched by a 37% decline in Ca(2+) uptake and a 28% depression in Ca(2+) release when measured in muscle homogenates. Conversely, Ca(2+) uptake increased between 157% and 263% in the D in the absence of any change in Ca(2+) release. These data show that the attenuation of SR function that has been consistently observed in limb muscle over the last several decades is absent in diaphragm despite the fact that its fibers appear to experience sufficient activity to deplete their glycogen. In fact, the large increase in Ca(2+) uptake in D shows that prolonged activity actually potentiates the ability of SR vesicles to sequester Ca(2+) in the absence of any increase in energy cost. Thus, it appears necessary to re-evaluate the role of exercise in regulating Ca(2+) sequestration by the SR as different muscles may respond in ways that are dictated by their function.

  11. Deoxyglucose Analysis of Retinotopic Organization in Primate Striate Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tootell, Roger B. H.; Silverman, Martin S.; Switkes, Eugene; de Valois, Russell L.

    1982-11-01

    We have anatomically analyzed retinotopic organization using the 14C-labeled 2-deoxy-D-glucose method. The method has several advantages over conventional electrophysiological mapping techniques. In the striate cortex, the anatomical substrate for retinotopic organization is suprisingly well ordered, and there seems to be a systematic relationship between ocular dominance strips and cortical magnification. The 2-deoxyglucose maps in this area appear to be largely uninfluenced by known differences in long-term metabolic activity. This method should prove useful in analyzing retinotopic organization in various visual areas of the brain and in different species.

  12. Thyroid hormones differentially affect sarcoplasmic reticulum function in rat atria and ventricles.

    PubMed

    Kaasik, A; Minajeva, A; Paju, K; Eimre, M; Seppet, E K

    1997-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-pump activity, together with assessment of the functional role of SR in providing activator Ca2+ under these altered thyroid states. In response to a shift from hypothyroid to hyperthyroid state, a 10 fold and 2 fold increase in SR Ca(2+)-pump activity in atria and ventricles, respectively, were observed. This was associated with the 8-9 fold increases in atrial contractility (+dT/dt) and relaxation (-dT/dt), but only with a 3-4 fold increase in their ventricular counterparts. Also, the recirculation fraction of activator Ca2+ (RFA) increased to a far greater extent in atria (4 fold) than in papillary muscles, and the relative increment in inhibition of developed tension by ryanodine became 3 times larger in atria than in papillary muscles. A positive force-frequency relationship (FFR) was observed in hypothyroid atria, whereas the hyperthyroid atria, hypothyroid and hyperthyroid papillary muscles showed a negative FFR. These results suggest the greater role of transsarcolemmal (SL) Ca2+ and smaller role of SR Ca2+ in activating contraction in hypothyroid atria compared to other preparations. Thyroid hormones decrease the contribution of SL and increase that of SR in providing activator Ca2+ to the greater extent in atria than in ventricles. This effect of thyroid hormones is based on larger stimulation of SR Ca(2+)-pump in atria compared to ventricles.

  13. Allergic Interstitial Nephritis Manifesting as a Striated Nephrogram

    PubMed Central

    Moinuddin, Irfan; Bracamonte, Erika; Thajudeen, Bijin; Sussman, Amy; Madhrira, Machaiah; Costello, James

    2015-01-01

    Allergic interstitial nephritis (AIN) is an underdiagnosed cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). Guidelines suggest that AIN should be suspected in a patient who presents with an elevated serum creatinine and a urinalysis that shows white cells, white cell casts, or eosinophiluria. Drug-induced AIN is suspected if AKI is temporally related to the initiation of a new drug. However, patients with bland sediment and normal urinalysis can also have AIN. Currently, a definitive diagnosis of AIN is made by renal biopsy which is invasive and fraught with risks such as bleeding, infection, and hematoma. Additionally, it is frequently unclear when a kidney biopsy should be undertaken. We describe a biopsy proven case of allergic interstitial nephritis which manifested on contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as a striated nephrogram. Newer and more stable macrocyclic gadolinium contrast agents have a well-demonstrated safety profile. Additionally, in the presentation of AKI, gadolinium contrast agents are safe to administer in patients who demonstrate good urine output and a downtrending creatinine. We propose that the differential for a striated nephrogram may include AIN. In cases in which the suspicion for AIN is high, this diagnostic consideration may be further characterized by contrast enhanced MRI. PMID:26664405

  14. Affi-gel blue treatment simplifies the protein composition of sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles.

    PubMed

    Papp, S; Dux, L; Martonosi, A

    1986-04-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated by conventional techniques usually contain, in addition to the recognized sarcoplasmic reticulum components, several other proteins (phosphorylase, myosin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, etc.) in variable amounts; these proteins complicate the interpretation of chemical modification data. Incubation of sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles with Affi-Gel blue particles for 1-4 h at 2 degrees C, followed by sedimentation of the Affi-Gel in a clinical centrifuge, simplifies the protein composition by selective adsorption of the accessory proteins, and improves the consistency of the preparations. The Affi-Gel blue treatment is recommended as part of the standard procedure for the isolation of sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles.

  15. The basal apparatus. Mass isolation from the molluscan ciliated gill epithelium and a preliminary characterization of striated rootlets

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The basal apparatus, consisting of an array of interconnected basal bodies bearing bifurcating striated rootlets encompassing a nucleus, has been isolated from hypertonically deciliated columnar gill epithelial cells of the bay scallop Aequipecten irradians through gentle lysis with Triton X-100. The rootlets, 8-10 mum in length, were not easily preserved with conventional electron microscope fixatives, suggesting that the extent of their contribution to cellular architecture has been somewhat underestimated, even though Englemann described many of the structural details of the basal apparatus in 1880. The striated rootlets were soluble at high but not at low pH, in 2 M solutions of sodium azide and potassium thiocyanate but not sodium or potassium chloride, in 1% deoxycholate but not digitonin, and in the denaturing solvents 6 M guanidine-HC1, 8 M urea, and 1% sodium dodecylsulfate at 100 degrees C. The protein found consistently when rootlets were solubilized migrated on SDS-polyacrylamide gels as a closely spaced doublet with apparent molecular weights of 230,000 and 250,000 daltons. This unique protein, distinct from tropocollagen or various muscle components, has been named ankyrin because of the rootlet's anchor-like function in the cell. PMID:1090630

  16. Calcium uptake and ATPase activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from control and selenium deficient lambs.

    PubMed

    Tripp, M J; Whanger, P D; Schmitz, J A

    1993-06-01

    The calcium uptake and ATPase activity were studied using fragmented sarcoplasmic reticulum (FSR) vesicles from normal and selenium (vitamin E)--deficient lambs. The latter group was suffering from white muscle disease (WMD). The calcium uptake of FSR vesicles from muscle of WMD lambs was reduced 10-fold as compared to those from normal lambs. An inverse relationship was found with the calcium uptake ability of the FSR vesicles and the severity of WMD. ATPase activity was nonsignificantly lower in vesicles from WMD lambs. The most active FSR vesicles from both normal and WMD lambs banded at 27% when purified on linear sucrose density gradients. The number of protein bands appearing in acrylamide gels of the purified vesicles appeared to be directly proportional to the severity of WMD. The 75Se cosedimented with the calcium uptake and ATPase activity when FSR vesicles from a lamb injected with 75Se-selenite were subjected to linear sucrose density gradient centrifugation, suggesting that selenium is incorporated into these vesicles. Injection of selenium into WMD lambs resulted in significantly greater calcium uptake activity in vesicles 18 and 38 days later as compared with untreated WMD lambs. Injection of selenium in WMD lambs resulted in a marked decrease in plasma CPK activity and a significant increase of glutathione peroxidase activity in the blood.

  17. Model simulation of the SPOC wave in a bundle of striated myofibrils.

    PubMed

    Nakagome, Koutaro; Sato, Katsuhiko; Shintani, Seine A; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2016-01-01

    SPOC (spontaneous oscillatory contraction) is a phenomenon observed in striated muscle under intermediate activation conditions. Recently, we constructed a theoretical model of SPOC for a sarcomere, a unit sarcomere model, which explains the behavior of SPOC at each sarcomere level. We also constructed a single myofibril model, which visco-elastically connects the unit model in series, and explains the behaviors of SPOC at the myofibril level. In the present study, to understand the SPOC properties in a bundle of myofibrils, we extended the single myofibril model to a two-dimensional (2D) model and a three-dimensional (3D) model, in which myofibrils were elastically connected side-by-side through cross-linkers between the Z-lines and M-lines. These 2D and 3D myofibril models could reproduce various patterns of SPOC waves experimentally observed in a 2D sheet and a 3D bundle of myofibrils only by choosing different values of elastic constants of the cross-linkers and the external spring. The results of these 2D and 3D myofibril models provide insight into the SPOC properties of the higher-ordered assembly of myofibrils.

  18. Model simulation of the SPOC wave in a bundle of striated myofibrils

    PubMed Central

    Nakagome, Koutaro; Sato, Katsuhiko; Shintani, Seine A.; Ishiwata, Shin’ichi

    2016-01-01

    SPOC (spontaneous oscillatory contraction) is a phenomenon observed in striated muscle under intermediate activation conditions. Recently, we constructed a theoretical model of SPOC for a sarcomere, a unit sarcomere model, which explains the behavior of SPOC at each sarcomere level. We also constructed a single myofibril model, which visco-elastically connects the unit model in series, and explains the behaviors of SPOC at the myofibril level. In the present study, to understand the SPOC properties in a bundle of myofibrils, we extended the single myofibril model to a two-dimensional (2D) model and a three-dimensional (3D) model, in which myofibrils were elastically connected side-by-side through cross-linkers between the Z-lines and M-lines. These 2D and 3D myofibril models could reproduce various patterns of SPOC waves experimentally observed in a 2D sheet and a 3D bundle of myofibrils only by choosing different values of elastic constants of the cross-linkers and the external spring. The results of these 2D and 3D myofibril models provide insight into the SPOC properties of the higher-ordered assembly of myofibrils. PMID:27924277

  19. An Investigation of Cholinergic Circuitry in Cat Striate Cortex Using Acetylcholinesterase Histochemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-10

    experience of the kitten , the suggestion has been made that they are the neural substrate of a form of learning and memory (Spinelli and Jensen, 1979...enzymes, especially AChE, show provocative changes in kitten striate cortex during the critical period when area 17 is modifiable by the visual...Singer (1982) has found that lesions of the intralaminar thalamus will abolish the normal response of kitten striate cortex to extended periods of

  20. [Striate receptive fields mapped with single and bipartite stimuli].

    PubMed

    Lazareva, N A; Shevelev, I A; Saltykov, K A; Novikova, R V; Tikhomirov, A S; Sharaev, G A; Tsutskiridze, D Iu; Eĭdeland, P V

    2008-01-01

    In 22 acute experiments with anesthetized and immobilized adult cats, 364 maps of receptive fields (RF) of 47 striate neurons were obtained by means of single local stimuli flashed at different parts of the visual field, or with additional asynchronous activation of the RF excitatory center with oscillating bar of the optimal orientation. Under bipartite stimulation, considerable and significant decrease in the square and weight of the central excitatory RF zone was revealed in more then 75% of the studied cells. Additional excitatory zones appeared in 54% of cases, or the square and weight of the excitatory zones substantially increased, and inhibitory zones developed in 90% of cases. These effects were correlated with the degree of increase in the background firing during transition from the mode of mapping with single stimulation to that with bipartite stimulation. The mechanism and possible functional role of cooperative excitatory and inhibitory intracortical interactions in organization of receptive fields and detection of features of a visual image are discussed.

  1. Striated spectral activity in Jovian and Saturnian radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, James R.; Alexander, Joseph K.; Arias, Tomas A.; Staelin, David H.

    1988-01-01

    Examination of high time resolution frequency-time spectrograms of radio emission measured near the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters with Jupiter reveals occasional striation patterns within the normally diffuse hectometric radiation. The patterns are characterized by distinctive banded structures of enhanced intensity meandering in frequency over time scales of minutes to tens of minutes. This banded form of striated spectral activity (SSA) has an occurrence probability of the order of 5 percent during the three weeks before and after Jupiter encounters. Plots of single 6-s frequency sweeps often exhibit a slow rise in intensity followed by a sharp drop-off in each band as frequency decreases. Banded SSA is often preceded or followed by chaotic SSA in which banding of the emission becomes discontinuous or unrecognizable, although the intensity modulation is still evident. Although SSA normally occurs in the frequency range of roughly 0.2-1.0 MHz, similar but longer-lasting patterns have been found occasionally in decametric emission above 10 MHz. Analogous modulation has also been observed in the Saturnian radio emission, suggesting that SSA may be a common feature intrinsic to the radio emission at both planets.

  2. Neuronal basis of perceptual learning in striate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhen; Zhou, Jiawei; Yao, Zhimo; Wang, Zhengchun; Yuan, Nini; Xu, Guangwei; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Bing; Hess, Robert F.; Zhou, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that, in humans, contrast sensitivity training at high spatial frequency (SF) not only leads to contrast sensitivity improvement, but also results in an improvement in visual acuity as assessed with gratings (direct effect) or letters (transfer effect). However, the underlying neural mechanisms of this high spatial frequency training improvement remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we examined four properties of neurons in primary visual cortex (area 17) of adult cats that exhibited significantly improved acuity after contrast sensitivity training with a high spatial frequency grating and those of untrained control cats. We found no difference in neuronal contrast sensitivity or tuning width (Width) between the trained and untrained cats. However, the trained cats showed a displacement of the cells’ optimal spatial frequency (OSF) to higher spatial frequencies as well as a larger neuronal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Furthermore, both the neuronal differences in OSF and SNR were significantly correlated with the improvement of acuity measured behaviorally. These results suggest that striate neurons might mediate the perceptual learning-induced improvement for high spatial frequency stimuli by an alteration in their spatial frequency representation and by an increased SNR. PMID:27094565

  3. Spatially congruent model for the striate visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fontoura Costa, Luciano

    1994-05-01

    A spatially congruent new model for the striate visual cortex (SVC) is proposed which accounts for some of the known functional and organizational properties of the superior mammalian SVC. Even though there is a broad consensus that the topographical representation of the visual field is one of the principal structuring principles underlying the SVC organization, the orientation maps in the SVC have often been described as non-topographical maps. In the present model, the adopted foot-of-normal representation of straight lines has allowed full congruency between the visual field topographic map and the orientation maps in the SVC. The proposed computational model includes three neural layers and assumes that the ocular dominance columns are already established at birth; three possibilities of neural mechanisms leading to orientation encoding are outlined and discussed. The model provides reasonable explanation to some of the most intriguing recently verified properties of the SVC such as the increased neural activity at the cytochrome oxidase blobs, the reduced orientation selectivity at these same places, and the pinwheel-like organization of the orientation selectivity in the SVC.

  4. Characteristics of sarcoplasmic proteins and their interaction with surimi and kamaboko gel.

    PubMed

    Jafarpour, A; Gorczyca, E M

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of adding common carp sarcoplasmic proteins (Sp- P) on the gel characteristics of threadfin bream surimi and kamaboko while maintaining constant moisture and myofibrillar levels. Based on the temperature sweep test, which is involved in heating of surimi gel from 10 to 80 degrees C to monitor the viscoelastic properties, at temperature range of 40 to 50 degrees C, the decrease level (depth of valley) in storage modulus (G') thermograph was in proportion to the concentration of added Sp- P. Storage modulus (G') showed greater elasticity after adding Sp- P compared with the control without Sp- P. Furthermore, the breaking force and distance and consequently gel strength of the resultant kamaboko were improved significantly (P > 0.05). Thus, added Sp- P did not interfere with myofibrillar proteins during sol-gel transition phase but associated with textural quality enhancement of resultant kamaboko; however, addition of Sp- P from the dark muscle of the carp decreased the whiteness of the resultant surimi. Furthermore, according to the SEM micrographs, the gel strength could not be associated with either the number of polygonal structures/mm(2) or the area of the polygonal structures in the kamaboko gel microstructure.

  5. Transport mechanism of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -ATPase pump.

    PubMed

    Møller, Jesper V; Nissen, Poul; Sørensen, Thomas L-M; le Maire, Marc

    2005-08-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA1a) belongs to the group of P-type ATPases, which actively transport inorganic cations across membranes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Three-dimensional structures of several transport intermediates of SERCA1a, stabilized by structural analogues of ATP and phosphoryl groups, are now available at atomic resolution. This has enabled the transport cycle of the protein to be described, including the coupling of Ca(2+) occlusion and phosphorylation by ATP, and of proton counter-transport and dephosphorylation. From these structures, Ca(2+)-ATPase gradually emerges as a molecular mechanical device in which some of the transmembrane segments perform Ca(2+) transport by piston-like movements and by the transmission of reciprocating movements that affect the chemical reactivity of the cytosolic globular domains.

  6. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium mobilization in right ventricular pressure-overload hypertrophy in the ferret: relationships to diastolic dysfunction and a negative treppe.

    PubMed

    Gwathmey, J K; Morgan, J P

    1993-03-01

    In a model of right-ventricular pressure-overload hypertrophy (POH) in the ferret, action potential duration (to 90% repolarization) was found to be significantly longer (228 +/- 11 vs 314 +/- 12 ms) with no change in amplitude (85 +/- 3 vs 85 +/- 2 mV) or resting membrane potential (-79 +/- 1.5 vs -79 +/- 1 mV) for control and POH, respectively. Peak sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release (expressed as the logarithm of the fractional luminescence, -4.2 +/- 0.1 vs -4.4 +/- 0.3) and resting calcium concentrations (-5.5 +/- 0.1 vs -5.7 +/- 0.1) were not different between the two groups (control vs POH respectively). Muscles from control and POH animals demonstrated a positive force/interval relationship in the presence of physiological extracellular [Ca2+]. However, unlike muscles from control animals, muscles from animals with POH subjected to increasing frequencies of contraction in the presence of increased extracellular [Ca2+] demonstrated further impairment of diastolic relaxation and a negative treppe. Exposure of muscles from POH animals to isoproterenol returned the slowed Ca2+ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum as detected with aequorin to control values, although the relaxation phase of the isometric twitch remained prolonged compared to non-hypertrophied muscles. Exposure to milrinone also abbreviated the time course of the intracellular Ca2+ transient, but did not return it to that seen in normal myocardium. The exposure of non-hypertrophied isolated muscles to caffeine resulted in similar prolongation of the isometric twitch duration to that seen in hypertrophied myocardium. Results of these experiments suggest that impaired muscle relaxation in POH reflects changes at the level of the myofilaments. Thus, although slowed intracellular calcium mobilization contributes to diastolic relaxation abnormalities, it can not be the sole factor responsible for the slowed relaxation as has been suggested.

  7. ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF A VERY FAST LOBSTER MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Mendelson, Martin

    1969-01-01

    The remotor muscle of the second antenna of the American lobster is functionally divided into two parts. One part produces slow, powerful contractions and is used for postural control. The other part produces very brief twitches, can follow frequencies over 100/sec without fusion and is probably used for sound production. This great speed is due, in part, to synchronous arrival of nerve impulses at multiple terminals, a very brief membrane electrical response and electrical continuity throughout large volumes of sarcoplasm. Calculations indicate that the very extensive sarcoplasmic reticulum is probably responsible for the rapid decline of tension in this muscle. PMID:5792339

  8. Membrane asymmetry and enhanced ultrastructural detail of sarcoplasmic reticulum revealed with use of tannic acid

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Fixation of purified sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane vesicles, using glutaraldehyde supplemented with 1% tannic acid, reveals newly visualized ultrastructure in thin sections. The trilaminar appearance of the membrane is highly asymmetric; the outer electron-opaque layer is appreciably wider (70 A) than the inner layer (20 A). The asymmetry is not referable to lack of penetration of the tannic acid since: (a) SR vesicles made permeable with 1 mM EDTA, pH 8.5, show similar asymmetry; (b) treatment of SR with trypsin results in progressive loss in protein content and decrease in the thickness of the outer layer, until in the limit the trilayer has a symmetric appearance; (c) within the same muscle section, the SR membrane appears highly asymmetric whereas the sarcolemma has a more symmetric appearance; (d) reconstituted SR vesicles have a symmetric appearance with equally broad inner and outer layers (approximately 70 A); the symmetric structure is confirmed by freeze-fracture and negative staining electron microscopy. Heavy and light SR vesicles obtained by isopycnic density sedimentation of purified SR have the same asymmetric appearance of the membrane and seem to differ mainly in that the heavy vesicles contain internal contents consisting largely of Ca++-binding protein. The asymmetry of the SR membrane is referable mainly to the unidirectional alignment of the Ca++ pump protein, the major component (90% of the protein) of the membrane. The asymmetry of the SR membrane can be visualized now for the first time in situ in thin sections of muscle. PMID:83321

  9. Voltage-Independent Calcium Release in Heart Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niggli, Ernst; Lederer, W. Jonathan

    1990-10-01

    The Ca2+ that activates contraction in heart muscle is regulated as in skeletal muscle by processes that depend on voltage and intracellular Ca2+ and involve a positive feedback system. How the initial electrical signal is amplified in heart muscle has remained controversial, however. Analogous protein structures from skeletal muscle and heart muscle have been identified physiologically and sequenced; these include the Ca2+ channel of the sarcolemma and the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although the parallels found in cardiac and skeletal muscles have provoked valuable experiments in both tissues, separation of the effects of voltage and intracellular Ca2+ on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release in heart muscle has been imperfect. With the use of caged Ca2+ and flash photolysis in voltage-clamped heart myocytes, effects of membrane potential in heart muscle cells on Ca2+ release from intracellular stores have been studied. Unlike the response in skeletal muscle, voltage across the sarcolemma of heart muscle does not affect the release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, suggesting that other regulatory processes are needed to control Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release.

  10. Role of Golgi derived clathrin coated vesicles in the transport of calsequestrin to the sarcoplasmic reticulum of developing myotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is the major intracellular calcium sequestering organelle in skeletal and heart muscle. Calsequestrin (CSQ) is a glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 42,000. This protein is located in the lumen of the SR and it binds Ca/sup 2 +/ to maintain the concentration of this cation in the lumen at 10/sup /minus/3/M. Highly purified coated vesicles (CVs) were isolated from chick muscle and a Western blot using polyclonal anti-CSQ revealed the presence of CSQ within the CVs. Another major protein in the SR, the Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase, was not contained in CVs suggesting different routes of insertion into the SR. Cultured chick myotubes were labelled with Trans/sup 35/S-label contain (/sup 35/S)-methionine and (/sup 35/S)-cysteine to follow the transport of CSQ. Labelled CSQ remained high in the CVs until after 45 minutes of chase, then declined. The amount of labelled CSQ in the SR continued to rise over the chase period. No CSQ was secreted. All the CSQ in CVs and SR was sensitive to the activity of endoglycosidase H, and a significant fraction also bound wheat germ agglutinin. A small amount of CSQ was also co-transported with the muscle protein acetylcholinesterase within CVs. Non-secreted forms of acetylcholinesterase had the same carbohydrate structure as CSQ and were shown to be degraded in the SR.

  11. A mutation in the CASQ1 gene causes a vacuolar myopathy with accumulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Daniela; Vezzani, Bianca; Galli, Lucia; Paolini, Cecilia; Toniolo, Luana; Pierantozzi, Enrico; Spinozzi, Simone; Barone, Virginia; Pegoraro, Elena; Bello, Luca; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Vattemi, Gaetano; Tomelleri, Giuliano; Ricci, Giulia; Siciliano, Gabriele; Protasi, Feliciano; Reggiani, Carlo; Sorrentino, Vincenzo

    2014-10-01

    A missense mutation in the calsequestrin-1 gene (CASQ1) was found in a group of patients with a myopathy characterized by weakness, fatigue, and the presence of large vacuoles containing characteristic inclusions resulting from the aggregation of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) proteins. The mutation affects a conserved aspartic acid in position 244 (p.Asp244Gly) located in one of the high-affinity Ca(2+) -binding sites of CASQ1 and alters the kinetics of Ca(2+) release in muscle fibers. Expression of the mutated CASQ1 protein in COS-7 cells showed a markedly reduced ability in forming elongated polymers, whereas both in cultured myotubes and in in vivo mouse fibers induced the formation of electron-dense SR vacuoles containing aggregates of the mutant CASQ1 protein that resemble those observed in muscle biopsies of patients. Altogether, these results support the view that a single missense mutation in the CASQ1 gene causes the formation of abnormal SR vacuoles containing aggregates of CASQ1, and other SR proteins, results in altered Ca(2+) release in skeletal muscle fibers, and, hence, is responsible for the clinical phenotype observed in these patients.

  12. Dystrophy of the diaphragmatic muscles in Holstein-Friesian steers.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, N

    1996-01-01

    Diaphragmatic muscles in two slaughtered Holstein-Friesian revealed slightly pale color, swelling, and stiffness on palpation. Histologically the muscle fibers showed internal nuclei, fiber-splitting, variation in diameter, central core-like structures, sarcoplasmic masses, and vacuolar degeneration. These lesions were the same as those in dystrophy of the diaphragmatic muscles in Holstein-Friesian cows. It was demonstrated that muscular dystrophy of the diaphragm in Holstein-Friesian cattle occurred also in males, probably by inheriting an autosomal recessive trait.

  13. Role of glucocorticoids in the response of rat leg muscles to reduced activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, Stephen R.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1986-01-01

    Adrenalectomy did not prevent atrophy of rat soleus muscle during 6 days of tail cast suspension. Cortisol treatment enhanced the atrophy and caused atrophy of the weight-bearing soleus and both extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Unloading led to increased sarcoplasmic protein concentration in the soleus but cortisol administration increased the myhofibrillar (+stromal) protein concentration in both muscles. Suspension of hindlimbs of adrenalectomized animals led to faster protein degradation, slower sarcoplasmic protein degradation, and faster myofibrillar protein synthesis in the isolated soleus, whereas with cortisol-treated animals, the difference in synthesis of myofibrillar proteins was enhanced and that of sarcoplasmic proteins was abolished. Both soleus and EDL of suspended, cortisol-treated animals showed faster protein degradation. It is unlikely that any elevation in circulating glucocorticoids was solely responsible for atrophy of the soleus in this model, but catabolic amounts of glucocorticoids could alter the response of muscle to unloading.

  14. Development of binocular vision in the kitten's striate cortex.

    PubMed

    Freeman, R D; Ohzawa, I

    1992-12-01

    Studies of the development and plasticity of the visual pathway are well documented, but a basic question remains open: what is the physiological status of the system prior to extensive visual experience? Somewhat conflicting answers have been put forward, and in a major area, binocular vision, reports have ranged from severe immaturity to well-developed maturity. This is an important question to resolve since binocular cells in the visual cortex are thought to be the neural substrate for stereoscopic depth perception. We have addressed this question by recording from single cells in the striate cortex of kittens at postnatal ages 2, 3, and 4 weeks and from adults for comparison. Gratings with sinusoidal luminance distribution are presented to left, right, or both eyes. For each cell, we determine optimal values for orientation and spatial frequency. Relative phase (retinal disparity) is then varied in a dichoptic sequence so that binocular interaction may be studied. Results are as follows. In the normal adult, we have shown in previous work that most binocular interaction in the visual cortex can be accounted for on the basis of linear summation. Results from 3 and 4 week postnatal kittens are closely similar to those from adults. All types of binocular interaction found in adults are present in kittens. This includes phase-specific and non-phase-specific suppression or facilitation. Furthermore, monocular and binocular tuning characteristics are comparable in kittens and adults. The clear changes that occur with age are optimal spatial frequencies and peak responses. In addition, at 2 weeks, there is a substantially higher proportion of monocular cells compared to other ages and correspondingly, lower relative numbers of cells that exhibit phase-specific or suppressive binocular interactions. From increases in optimal spatial frequency and interpupillary distance with age, we calculated predicted changes in binocular disparity thresholds (stereo acuity) with age

  15. Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise.

    PubMed

    Place, Nicolas; Ivarsson, Niklas; Venckunas, Tomas; Neyroud, Daria; Brazaitis, Marius; Cheng, Arthur J; Ochala, Julien; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Girard, Sebastien; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Paužas, Henrikas; Mekideche, Abdelhafid; Kayser, Bengt; Martinez-Redondo, Vicente; Ruas, Jorge L; Bruton, Joseph; Truffert, Andre; Lanner, Johanna T; Skurvydas, Albertas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-12-15

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of improving physical performance in healthy subjects and in patients with common chronic diseases, but less so in elite endurance athletes. The mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of HIIT are uncertain. Here, recreationally active human subjects performed highly demanding HIIT consisting of 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min rest in between bouts (≤3 min total exercise time). Skeletal muscle biopsies taken 24 h after the HIIT exercise showed an extensive fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channel, the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). The HIIT exercise also caused a prolonged force depression and triggered major changes in the expression of genes related to endurance exercise. Subsequent experiments on elite endurance athletes performing the same HIIT exercise showed no RyR1 fragmentation or prolonged changes in the expression of endurance-related genes. Finally, mechanistic experiments performed on isolated mouse muscles exposed to HIIT-mimicking stimulation showed reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS)-dependent RyR1 fragmentation, calpain activation, increased SR Ca(2+) leak at rest, and depressed force production due to impaired SR Ca(2+) release upon stimulation. In conclusion, HIIT exercise induces a ROS-dependent RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of recreationally active subjects, and the resulting changes in muscle fiber Ca(2+)-handling trigger muscular adaptations. However, the same HIIT exercise does not cause RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of elite endurance athletes, which may explain why HIIT is less effective in this group.

  16. Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise

    PubMed Central

    Place, Nicolas; Ivarsson, Niklas; Venckunas, Tomas; Neyroud, Daria; Brazaitis, Marius; Cheng, Arthur J.; Ochala, Julien; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Girard, Sebastien; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Paužas, Henrikas; Mekideche, Abdelhafid; Kayser, Bengt; Martinez-Redondo, Vicente; Bruton, Joseph; Truffert, Andre; Lanner, Johanna T.; Skurvydas, Albertas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of improving physical performance in healthy subjects and in patients with common chronic diseases, but less so in elite endurance athletes. The mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of HIIT are uncertain. Here, recreationally active human subjects performed highly demanding HIIT consisting of 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min rest in between bouts (≤3 min total exercise time). Skeletal muscle biopsies taken 24 h after the HIIT exercise showed an extensive fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channel, the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). The HIIT exercise also caused a prolonged force depression and triggered major changes in the expression of genes related to endurance exercise. Subsequent experiments on elite endurance athletes performing the same HIIT exercise showed no RyR1 fragmentation or prolonged changes in the expression of endurance-related genes. Finally, mechanistic experiments performed on isolated mouse muscles exposed to HIIT-mimicking stimulation showed reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS)-dependent RyR1 fragmentation, calpain activation, increased SR Ca2+ leak at rest, and depressed force production due to impaired SR Ca2+ release upon stimulation. In conclusion, HIIT exercise induces a ROS-dependent RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of recreationally active subjects, and the resulting changes in muscle fiber Ca2+-handling trigger muscular adaptations. However, the same HIIT exercise does not cause RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of elite endurance athletes, which may explain why HIIT is less effective in this group. PMID:26575622

  17. Voltage-sensitive dyes reveal a modular organization in monkey striate cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasdel, Gary G.; Salama, Guy

    1986-06-01

    Voltage-sensitive dyes allow neuronal activity to be studied by non-invasive optical techniques. They provide an attractive means of investigating striate cortex, where important response properties are organized in two dimensions. In the present study, patterns of ocular dominance and orientation selectivity were obtained repeatedly from the same patch of cortex using the dye merocyanine oxazolone, together with current image-processing techniques. The patterns observed agree with most established features of monkey striate cortex and suggest a new unit of cortical organization; one that is modular in structure and which appears to link the organization of orientation selectivity with that of ocular dominance.

  18. Calcium binding to Procambarus clarkii sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein splice variants.

    PubMed

    E Rohrback, Suzanne; Wheatly, Michele G; Gillen, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein (SCP) is a high-affinity calcium buffering protein expressed in muscle of crayfish and other invertebrates. In previous work, we identified three splice variants of Procambarus clarkii SCP (pcSCP1a, pcSCP1b, and pcSCP1c) that differ in a 37 amino acid region that lies mainly between the 2nd and 3ed EF-hand calcium binding domain. To evaluate the function of the proteins encoded by the pcSCP1 transcripts, we produced recombinant pcSCP1 and used tryptophan fluorescence to characterize calcium binding. Tryptophan fluorescence of pcSCP1a decreased in response to increased calcium, while tryptophan fluorescence of the pcSCP1b and pcSCP1c variants increased. We estimated calcium binding constants and Hill coefficients with two different equations: the standard Hill equation and a modified Hill equation that accounts for contributions from two different tryptophans. The approaches gave similar results. Steady-state calcium binding constants (Kd) ranged from 2.7±0.7×10(-8)M to 5.6±0.1×10(-7)M, consistent with previous work. Variants displayed significantly different apparent calcium affinities, which were decreased in the presence of magnesium. Calcium Kd was lowest for pcSCP1a and highest for pcSCP1c. Site-directed mutagenesis of pcSCP1c residues to the amino acids of pcSCP1b decreased the calcium Kd, identifying residues outside the EF-hand domains that contribute to calcium binding in crayfish SCP.

  19. Lipogenesis mitigates dysregulated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Paran, Christopher W; Zou, Kai; Ferrara, Patrick J; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Muscular dystrophy is accompanied by a reduction in activity of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) that contributes to abnormal Ca(2+) homeostasis in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER). Recent findings suggest that skeletal muscle fatty acid synthase (FAS) modulates SERCA activity and muscle function via its effects on SR membrane phospholipids. In this study, we examined muscle's lipid metabolism in mdx mice, a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). De novo lipogenesis was ~50% reduced in mdx muscles compared to wildtype (WT) muscles. Gene expressions of lipogenic and other ER lipid-modifying enzymes were found to be differentially expressed between wildtype (WT) and mdx muscles. A comprehensive examination of muscles' SR phospholipidome revealed elevated phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) ratio in mdx compared to WT mice. Studies in primary myocytes suggested that defects in key lipogenic enzymes including FAS, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), and Lipin1 are likely contributing to reduced SERCA activity in mdx mice. Triple transgenic expression of FAS, SCD1, and Lipin1 (3TG) in mdx myocytes partly rescued SERCA activity, which coincided with an increase in SR PE that normalized PC/PE ratio. These findings implicate a defect in lipogenesis to be a contributing factor for SERCA dysfunction in muscular dystrophy. Restoration of muscle's lipogenic pathway appears to mitigate SERCA function through its effects on SR membrane composition.

  20. Muscle assembly: a titanic achievement?

    PubMed

    Gregorio, C C; Granzier, H; Sorimachi, H; Labeit, S

    1999-02-01

    The formation of perfectly aligned myofibrils in striated muscle represents a dramatic example of supramolecular assembly in eukaryotic cells. Recently, considerable progress has been made in deciphering the roles that titin, the third most abundant protein in muscle, has in this process. An increasing number of sarcomeric proteins (ligands) are being identified that bind to specific titin domains. Titin may serve as a molecular blueprint for sarcomere assembly and turnover by specifying the precise position of its ligands within each half-sarcomere in addition to functioning as a molecular spring that maintains the structural integrity of the contracting myofibrils.

  1. Hypernitrosylated ryanodine receptor calcium release channels are leaky in dystrophic muscle.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Andrew M; Reiken, Steven; Carlson, Christian; Mongillo, Marco; Liu, Xiaoping; Rothman, Lisa; Matecki, Stefan; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R

    2009-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and early death resulting from dystrophin deficiency. Loss of dystrophin results in disruption of a large dystrophin glycoprotein complex, leading to pathological calcium (Ca2+)-dependent signals that damage muscle cells. We have identified a structural and functional defect in the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel, in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy that contributes to altered Ca2+ homeostasis in dystrophic muscles. RyR1 isolated from mdx skeletal muscle showed an age-dependent increase in S-nitrosylation coincident with dystrophic changes in the muscle. RyR1 S-nitrosylation depleted the channel complex of FKBP12 (also known as calstabin-1, for calcium channel stabilizing binding protein), resulting in 'leaky' channels. Preventing calstabin-1 depletion from RyR1 with S107, a compound that binds the RyR1 channel and enhances the binding affinity of calstabin-1 to the nitrosylated channel, inhibited sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak, reduced biochemical and histological evidence of muscle damage, improved muscle function and increased exercise performance in mdx mice. On the basis of these findings, we propose that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak via RyR1 due to S-nitrosylation of the channel and calstabin-1 depletion contributes to muscle weakness in muscular dystrophy, and that preventing the RyR1-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak may provide a new therapeutic approach.

  2. Potentiation of fractional sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release by total and free intra-sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, T R; Ginsburg, K S; Bers, D M

    2000-01-01

    Our aim was to measure the influence of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content ([Ca](SRT)) and free SR [Ca] ([Ca](SR)) on the fraction of SR calcium released during voltage clamp steps in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes. [Ca](SRT), as measured by caffeine application, was progressively increased by conditioning pulses. Sodium was absent in both the intracellular and in the extracellular solutions to block sodium/calcium exchange. Total cytosolic calcium flux during the transient was inferred from I(Ca), [Ca](SRT), [Ca](i), and cellular buffering characteristics. Fluxes via the calcium current (I(Ca)), the SR calcium pump, and passive leak from the SR were evaluated to determine SR calcium release flux (J(rel)). Excitation-contraction (EC) coupling was characterized with respect to both gain (integral J(rel)/integral I(Ca)) and fractional SR calcium release. Both parameters were virtually zero for a small, but measurable [Ca](SRT). Gain and fractional SR calcium release increased steeply and nonlinearly with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). We conclude that potentiation of EC coupling can be correlated with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). While fractional SR calcium release was not linearly dependent upon [Ca](SR), intra-SR calcium may play a crucial role in regulating the SR calcium release process. PMID:10620297

  3. Inhibition of mouth skeletal muscle relaxation by flavonoids of Cistus ladanifer L.: a plant defense mechanism against herbivores.

    PubMed

    Sosa, T; Chaves, N; Alias, J C; Escudero, J C; Henao, F; Gutiérrez-Merino, C

    2004-06-01

    Cistus ladanifer exudate is a potent inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (Ca2+-pump) of rabbit skeletal muscle, a well-established model for active transport that plays a leading role in skeletal muscle relaxation. The low concentration of exudate needed to produce 50% of the maximum inhibition of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase activity, 40-60 microg/ml, suggests that eating only a few milligrams of C. ladanifer leaves can impair the relaxation of the mouth skeletal muscle of herbivores, as the exudate reaches up to 140 mg/g of dry leaves in summer season. The flavonoid fraction of the exudate accounts fully for the functional impairment of the sarcoplasmic reticulum produced by the exudate (up to a dose of 250-300 microg/ml). The flavonoids present in this exudate impair the skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum function at two different levels: (i) by inhibition of the Ca2+-ATPase activity, and (ii) by decreasing the steady state ATP-dependent Ca2+-accumulation. Among the exudate flavonoids, apigenin and 3,7-di-O-methyl kaempferol are the most potent inhibitors of the skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. We conclude that the flavonoids of this exudate can elicit an avoidance reaction of the herbivores eating C. ladanifer leaves through impairment of mouth skeletal muscle relaxation.

  4. Molecular dynamics in mouse atrial tumor sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Voss, J C; Mahaney, J E; Jones, L R; Thomas, D D

    1995-01-01

    We have determined directly the effects of the inhibitory peptide phospholamban (PLB) on the rotational dynamics of the calcium pump (Ca-ATPase) of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). This was accomplished by comparing mouse ventricular SR, which has PLB levels similar to those found in other mammals, with mouse atrial SR, which is effectively devoid of PLB and thus has much higher (unregulated) calcium pump activity. To obtain sufficient quantities of atrial SR, we isolated the membranes from atrial tumor cells. We used time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy of an erythrosin isothiocyanate label attached selectively and rigidly to the Ca-ATPase, to detect the microsecond rotational motion of the Ca-ATPase in the two preparations. The time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy decays of both preparations at 25 degrees C were multi-exponential, because of the presence of different oligomeric species. The rotational correlation times for the different oligomers were similar for the two preparations, but the total decay amplitude was substantially greater for atrial tumor SR, indicating that a smaller fraction of the Ca-ATPase molecules exists as large aggregates. Phosphorylation of PLB in ventricular SR decreased the population of large-scale Ca-ATPase aggregates to a level similar to that of atrial tumor SR. Lipid chain mobility (fluidity), detected by electron paramagnetic resonance of stearic acid spin labels, was very similar in the two preparations, indicating that the higher protein mobility in atrial tumor SR is not due to higher lipid fluidity. We conclude that PLB inhibits by inducing Ca-ATPase lateral aggregation, which can be relieved either by phosphorylating or removing PLB. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:7612820

  5. The retinotopic organization of striate cortex is well predicted by surface topology

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Noah C.; Butt, Omar H.; Datta, Ritobrato; Radoeva, Petya D.; Brainard, David H.; Aguirre, Geoffrey Karl

    2012-01-01

    Summary In 1918, Gordon Holmes combined observations of visual field scotomas across brain lesioned soldiers to produce a schematic map of the projection of the visual field upon the striate cortex [1]. One limit to the precision of his result, and the mapping of anatomy to retinotopy generally, is the substantial individual variation in the size [2,3], volumetric position [4], and cortical magnification [5] of area V1. When viewed within the context of the curvature of the cortical surface, however, the boundaries of striate cortex fall at a consistent location across individuals [6]. We asked if the surface topology of the human brain can be used to accurately predict the internal, retinotopic function of striate cortex as well. We used fMRI to measure polar angle and eccentricity in 25 participants and combined their maps within a left-right, transform-symmetric representation of the cortical surface [7]. These data were then fit using a deterministic, algebraic model of visual field representation [8]. We found that an anatomical image alone can be used to predict the retinotopic organization of striate cortex for an individual as accurately as 10–25 minutes of functional mapping. This indicates tight developmental linkage of structure and function within a primary, sensory cortical area. PMID:23041195

  6. Magnetization transfer imaging reveals geniculocalcarine and striate area degeneration in primary glaucoma: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Liang, Wenwen; Wu, Guijun; Zhang, Xuelin

    2016-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease that affects both the retina and central visual pathway. Magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) is a sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that can detect degenerative changes in the brain. Purpose To investigate the geniculocalcarine (GCT) and striate areas in primary glaucoma patients using region of interest (ROI) analysis of magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). Material and Methods Twenty patients with primary glaucoma in both eyes were compared with 31 healthy control patients. All of the participants were examined on a 3.0 T scanner using a three-dimensional T1-weighted spoiled gradient recalled acquisition (SPGR) with and without a MT saturation pulse. A two-sample t-test was used to evaluate the MTR difference between the groups. P < 0.05 was used to determine statistical significance. Results The MTR of the glaucoma group was lower than the healthy controls in both the bilateral GCT (t = 3.781, P = 0.001) and striate areas (t = 4.177, P = 0.000). Conclusion The MTR reductions in the bilateral GCT and striate areas suggest that there is GCT demyelination and striate area degeneration in primary glaucoma. These neurodegenerative effects may be induced as a direct effect of retrograde axonal degeneration along with the indirect effect of anterograde trans-synaptic degeneration. PMID:27651931

  7. Striated boulder pavements within glaciomarine diamicts of the Yakataga Formation, Middleton Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Eyles, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of striated boulder pavements in glacial sequences is often cited as evidence of transport and deposition by grounded glacier ice. However, recent reports show that striated pavements also form in non-glacial environments by the abrasion of boulder lag surfaces by floating glacier and seasonal ice. Several striated boulder pavements are identified within Early Pleistocene upper Yakataga Formation sediments exposed on Middleton Island close to the southern edge of the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf. The sequence is dominated by thick stratiform units of massive and stratified diamict formed by the settling of fine-grained sands and muds from suspension together with ice-rafted debris. Boulder pavements outcrop as extensive planar horizons within the diamicts, can be traced for several kilometers along strike and consist of single lines of clasts with faceted upper surfaces showing consistently oriented striation directions. Clasts are not preferentially aligned, however, and do not have the characteristic bullet shape of boulders transported at a glacier base and deposited by lodgement processes. Striated boulder pavements on Middleton Island appear to have formed as boulder lag surfaces generated by wave and tidal current reworking of diamict on relatively shallow banks. Lags were then overridden and abraded by a grounding ice shelf. The glacially-abraded boulder pavements on Middleton Island record the repeated expansion of a continuous ice shelf to the edge of the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf during the Early Pleistocene.

  8. Ultrastructure of geniculocortical synaptic connections in the tree shrew striate cortex.

    PubMed

    Familtsev, Dmitry; Quiggins, Ranida; Masterson, Sean P; Dang, Wenhao; Slusarczyk, Arkadiusz S; Petry, Heywood M; Bickford, Martha E

    2016-04-15

    To determine whether thalamocortical synaptic circuits differ across cortical areas, we examined the ultrastructure of geniculocortical terminals in the tree shrew striate cortex to compare directly the characteristics of these terminals with those of pulvinocortical terminals (examined previously in the temporal cortex of the same species; Chomsung et al. [] Cereb Cortex 20:997-1011). Tree shrews are considered to represent a prototype of early prosimian primates but are unique in that sublaminae of striate cortex layer IV respond preferentially to light onset (IVa) or offset (IVb). We examined geniculocortical inputs to these two sublayers labeled by tracer or virus injections or an antibody against the type 2 vesicular glutamate antibody (vGLUT2). We found that layer IV geniculocortical terminals, as well as their postsynaptic targets, were significantly larger than pulvinocortical terminals and their postsynaptic targets. In addition, we found that 9-10% of geniculocortical terminals in each sublamina contacted GABAergic interneurons, whereas pulvinocortical terminals were not found to contact any interneurons. Moreover, we found that the majority of geniculocortical terminals in both IVa and IVb contained dendritic protrusions, whereas pulvinocortical terminals do not contain these structures. Finally, we found that synaptopodin, a protein uniquely associated with the spine apparatus, and telencephalin (TLCN, or intercellular adhesion molecule type 5), a protein associated with maturation of dendritic spines, are largely excluded from geniculocortical recipient layers of the striate cortex. Together our results suggest major differences in the synaptic organization of thalamocortical pathways in striate and extrastriate areas.

  9. A region of the myosin rod important for interaction with paramyosin in Caenorhabditis elegans striated muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, P E; Waterston, R H

    2000-01-01

    The precise arrangement of molecules within the thick filament, as well as the mechanisms by which this arrangement is specified, remains unclear. In this article, we have exploited a unique genetic interaction between one isoform of myosin heavy chain (MHC) and paramyosin in Caenorhabditis elegans to probe the molecular interaction between MHC and paramyosin in vivo. Using chimeric myosin constructs, we have defined a 322-residue region of the MHC A rod critical for suppression of the structural and motility defects associated with the unc-15(e73) allele. Chimeric constructs lacking this region of MHC A either fail to suppress, or act as dominant enhancers of, the e73 phenotype. Although the 322-residue region is required for suppression activity, our data suggest that sequences along the length of the rod also play a role in the isoform-specific interaction between MHC A and paramyosin. Our genetic and cell biological analyses of construct behavior suggest that the 322-residue region of MHC A is important for thick filament stability. We present a model in which this region mediates an avid interaction between MHC A and paramyosin in parallel arrangement in formation of the filament arms. PMID:11014812

  10. Chronic electrical stimulation drives mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle of a lizard, Varanus exanthematicus.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Paul J; Nichols, Scott D; Lindstedt, Stan L

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the capacity for phenotypic plasticity of skeletal muscle from Varanus exanthematicus, the savannah monitor lizard. Iliofibularis muscle from one leg of each lizard was electrically stimulated for 8 weeks. Both stimulated and contralateral control muscles were collected and processed for electron microscopy. We used stereological analysis of muscle cross-sections to quantify the volume densities of contractile elements, sarcoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and intracellular lipids. We found that mitochondrial volume density was approximately fourfold higher in the stimulated muscle compared to controls, which were similar to previously reported values. Sarcoplasmic reticulum volume density was reduced by an amount similar to the increase in mitochondrial volume density while the volume density of contractile elements remained unchanged. Intracellular lipid accumulation was visibly apparent in many stimulated muscle sections but the volume density of lipids did not reach a significant difference. Although monitor lizards lack the highly developed aerobic metabolism of mammals, they appear to possess the capacity for muscle plasticity.

  11. Short-term effects of β2-AR blocker ICI 118,551 on sarcoplasmic reticulum SERCA2a and cardiac function of rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haibin; Li, Yanfei; Wang, Lei; Lv, Qian; Wang, Xiuli

    2016-09-01

    The study was conducted to examine the effects of ICI 118,551 on the systolic function of cardiac muscle cells of rats in heart failure and determine the molecular mechanism of selective β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) antagonist on these cells. The chronic heart failure model for rats was prepared through abdominal aortic constriction and separate cardiac muscle cells using the collagenase digestion method. The rats were then divided into Sham, HF and HF+ICI 50 nM goups and cultivated for 48 h. β2-AR, Gi/Gs and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a) protein expression levels in the cardiac muscle cells were evaluated by western blotting and changes in the systolic function of cardiac muscle cells based on the boundary detection system of contraction dynamics for individual cells was measured. The results showed that compared with the Sham group, the survival rate, percentage of basic contraction and maximum contraction amplitude percentage of cardiac muscle cells with heart failure decreased, Gi protein expression increased while Gs and SERCA2a protein expression decreased. Compared with the HF group, the maximum contraction amplitude percentage of cardiac muscle cells in group HF+ICI 50 nM decreased, the Gi protein expression level increased while the SERCA2a protein expression level decreased. Following the stimulation of Ca(2+) and ISO, the maximum contraction amplitude percentage of cardiac muscle cells in the HF+ICI 50 nM group was lower than that in group HF. This indicated that ICI 118,551 has negative inotropic effects on cardiac muscle cells with heart failure, which may be related to Gi protein. Systolic function of cardiac muscle cells with heart failure can therefore be reduced by increasing Gi protein expression and lowering SERCA2a protein expression.

  12. Muscle as a “Mediator“ of Systemic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Kedryn K.; Winders, Benjamin R.; Olson, Eric N.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal and cardiac muscles play key roles in the regulation of systemic energy homeostasis and display remarkable plasticity in their metabolic responses to caloric availability and physical activity. In this Perspective we discuss recent studies highlighting transcriptional mechanisms that govern systemic metabolism by striated muscles. We focus on the participation of the Mediator complex in this process, and suggest that tissue-specific regulation of Mediator subunits impacts metabolic homeostasis. PMID:25651178

  13. Differential mechanism of the effects of ester-type local anesthetics on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, G A; Di Croce, D E; de la Cal, C; Richard, S B; Takara, D

    2013-12-01

    The effect of the local anesthetics procaine and tetracaine on sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from two masticatory muscles, masseter and medial pterygoid, was tested and compared to fast-twitch muscles. The effects of the anesthetics on Ca-ATPase activity, calcium binding, uptake, and phosphorylation of the enzyme by inorganic phosphate (Pi) were tested with radioisotopic methods. Calcium binding to the Ca-ATPase was non-competitively inhibited, and the enzymatic activity decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibition of the activity depended on pH, calcium concentration, the presence of the calcium ionophore calcimycin, and the membrane protein concentration. Unlike fast-twitch membranes, the pre-exposure of the masseter and medial pterygoid membranes to the anesthetics enhanced the enzymatic activity in the absence of calcimycin, supporting their permeabilizing effect. Procaine and tetracaine also interfered with the calcium transport capability, decreasing the maximal uptake without modification of the calcium affinity for the ATPase. Besides, the anesthetics inhibited the phosphorylation of the enzyme by Pi in a competitive manner. Tetracaine revealed a higher inhibitory potency on Ca-ATPase compared to procaine, and the inhibitory concentrations were lower than usual clinical doses. It is concluded that procaine and tetracaine not only affect key steps of the Ca-ATPase enzymatic cycle but also exert an indirect effect on membrane permeability to calcium and suggest that the consequent myoplasmic calcium increase induced by the anesthetics might account for myotoxic effects, such as sustained contraction and eventual rigidity of both fast-twitch and masticatory muscles.

  14. Residual sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ concentration after Ca2+ release in skeletal myofibers from young adult and old mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Min; Tang, Shen; Messi, María Laura; Yang, Jenny J; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2012-04-01

    Contrasting information suggests either almost complete depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) or significant residual Ca(2+) concentration after prolonged depolarization of the skeletal muscle fiber. The primary obstacle to resolving this controversy is the lack of genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators targeted to the SR that exhibit low-Ca(2+) affinity, a fast biosensor: Ca(2+) off-rate reaction, and can be expressed in myofibers from adult and older adult mammalian species. This work used the recently designed low-affinity Ca(2+) sensor (Kd = 1.66 mM in the myofiber) CatchER (calcium sensor for detecting high concentrations in the ER) targeted to the SR, to investigate whether prolonged skeletal muscle fiber depolarization significantly alters residual SR Ca(2+) with aging. We found CatchER a proper tool to investigate SR Ca(2+) depletion in young adult and older adult mice, consistently tracking SR luminal Ca(2+) release in response to brief and repetitive stimulation. We evoked SR Ca(2+) release in whole-cell voltage-clamped flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers from young and old FVB mice and tested the maximal SR Ca(2+) release by directly activating the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) with 4-chloro-m-cresol in the same myofibers. Here, we report for the first time that the Ca(2+) remaining in the SR after prolonged depolarization (2 s) in myofibers from aging (~220 μM) was larger than young (~132 μM) mice. These experiments indicate that SR Ca(2+) is far from fully depleted under physiological conditions throughout life, and support the concept of excitation-contraction uncoupling in functional senescent myofibers.

  15. Diversity of Cnidarian Muscles: Function, Anatomy, Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Leclère, Lucas; Röttinger, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The ability to perform muscle contractions is one of the most important and distinctive features of eumetazoans. As the sister group to bilaterians, cnidarians (sea anemones, corals, jellyfish, and hydroids) hold an informative phylogenetic position for understanding muscle evolution. Here, we review current knowledge on muscle function, diversity, development, regeneration and evolution in cnidarians. Cnidarian muscles are involved in various activities, such as feeding, escape, locomotion and defense, in close association with the nervous system. This variety is reflected in the large diversity of muscle organizations found in Cnidaria. Smooth epithelial muscle is thought to be the most common type, and is inferred to be the ancestral muscle type for Cnidaria, while striated muscle fibers and non-epithelial myocytes would have been convergently acquired within Cnidaria. Current knowledge of cnidarian muscle development and its regeneration is limited. While orthologs of myogenic regulatory factors such as MyoD have yet to be found in cnidarian genomes, striated muscle formation potentially involves well-conserved myogenic genes, such as twist and mef2. Although satellite cells have yet to be identified in cnidarians, muscle plasticity (e.g., de- and re-differentiation, fiber repolarization) in a regenerative context and its potential role during regeneration has started to be addressed in a few cnidarian systems. The development of novel tools to study those organisms has created new opportunities to investigate in depth the development and regeneration of cnidarian muscle cells and how they contribute to the regenerative process. PMID:28168188

  16. Diversity of Cnidarian Muscles: Function, Anatomy, Development and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Leclère, Lucas; Röttinger, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The ability to perform muscle contractions is one of the most important and distinctive features of eumetazoans. As the sister group to bilaterians, cnidarians (sea anemones, corals, jellyfish, and hydroids) hold an informative phylogenetic position for understanding muscle evolution. Here, we review current knowledge on muscle function, diversity, development, regeneration and evolution in cnidarians. Cnidarian muscles are involved in various activities, such as feeding, escape, locomotion and defense, in close association with the nervous system. This variety is reflected in the large diversity of muscle organizations found in Cnidaria. Smooth epithelial muscle is thought to be the most common type, and is inferred to be the ancestral muscle type for Cnidaria, while striated muscle fibers and non-epithelial myocytes would have been convergently acquired within Cnidaria. Current knowledge of cnidarian muscle development and its regeneration is limited. While orthologs of myogenic regulatory factors such as MyoD have yet to be found in cnidarian genomes, striated muscle formation potentially involves well-conserved myogenic genes, such as twist and mef2. Although satellite cells have yet to be identified in cnidarians, muscle plasticity (e.g., de- and re-differentiation, fiber repolarization) in a regenerative context and its potential role during regeneration has started to be addressed in a few cnidarian systems. The development of novel tools to study those organisms has created new opportunities to investigate in depth the development and regeneration of cnidarian muscle cells and how they contribute to the regenerative process.

  17. Sarcoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria communication in cardiovascular pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Crisosto, Camila; Pennanen, Christian; Vasquez-Trincado, Cesar; Morales, Pablo E; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Quest, Andrew F G; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio

    2017-03-09

    Repetitive, calcium-mediated contractile activity renders cardiomyocytes critically dependent on a sustained energy supply and adequate calcium buffering, both of which are provided by mitochondria. Moreover, in vascular smooth muscle cells, mitochondrial metabolism modulates cell growth and proliferation, whereas cytosolic calcium levels regulate the arterial vascular tone. Physical and functional communication between mitochondria and sarco/endoplasmic reticulum and balanced mitochondrial dynamics seem to have a critical role for optimal calcium transfer to mitochondria, which is crucial in calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial metabolism in both types of muscle cells. Moreover, mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with myocardial damage and dysregulation of vascular smooth muscle proliferation. Therefore, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling and mitochondrial dynamics are now viewed as relevant factors in the pathogenesis of cardiac and vascular diseases, including coronary artery disease, heart failure, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. In this Review, we summarize the evidence related to the role of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria communication in cardiac and vascular muscle physiology, with a focus on how perturbations contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders.

  18. Altered Ca2+ sparks in aging skeletal and cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Weisleder, Noah; Ma, Jianjie

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+ sparks are the fundamental units that comprise Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) in striated muscle cells. In cardiac muscle, spontaneous Ca2+ sparks underlie the rhythmic CICR activity during heart contraction. In skeletal muscle, Ca2+ sparks remain quiescent during the resting state and are activated in a plastic fashion to accommodate various levels of stress. With aging, the plastic Ca2+ spark signal becomes static in skeletal muscle, whereas loss of CICR control leads to leaky Ca2+ spark activity in aged cardiomyocytes. Ca2+ spark responses reflect the integrated function of the intracellular Ca2+ regulatory machinery centered around the triad or dyad junctional complexes of striated muscles, which harbor the principal molecular players of excitation-contraction coupling. This review highlights the contribution of age-related modification of the Ca2+ release machinery and the effect of membrane structure and membrane cross-talk on the altered Ca2+ spark signaling during aging of striated muscles. PMID:18272434

  19. Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Release Channels in Ventricles of Older Adult Hamsters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholl, Peter A.; Howlett, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    Whether the density of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release channels/ryanodine receptors in the heart declines with age is not clear. We investigated age-related changes in the density of [3H]-ryanodine receptors in crude ventricular homogenates, which contained all ligand binding sites in heart and in isolated junctional SR membranes.…

  20. Sphingosylphosphocholine modulates the ryanodine receptor/calcium-release channel of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Betto, R; Teresi, A; Turcato, F; Salviati, G; Sabbadini, R A; Krown, K; Glembotski, C C; Kindman, L A; Dettbarn, C; Pereon, Y; Yasui, K; Palade, P T

    1997-01-01

    Sphingosylphosphocholine (SPC) modulates Ca2+ release from isolated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes; 50 microM SPC induces the release of 70 80% of the accumulated calcium. SPC release calcium from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum through the ryanodine receptor, since the release is inhibited by the ryanodine receptor channel antagonists ryanodine. Ruthenium Red and sphingosine. In intact cardiac myocytes, even in the absence of extracellular calcium. SPC causes a rise in diastolic Ca2+, which is greatly reduced when the sarcoplasmic reticulum is depleted of Ca2+ by prior thapsigargin treatment. SPC action on the ryanodine receptor is Ca(2+)-dependent. SPC shifts to the left the Ca(2+)-dependence of [3H]ryanodine binding, but only at high pCa values, suggesting that SPC might increase the sensitivity to calcium of the Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release mechanism. At high calcium concentrations (pCa 4.0 or lower), where [3H]ryanodine binding is maximally stimulated, no effect of SPC is observed. We conclude that SPC releases calcium from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes by activating the ryanodine receptor and possibly another intracellular Ca(2+)-release channel, the sphingolipid Ca(2+)-release-mediating protein of endoplasmic reticulum (SCaMPER) [Mao, Kim, Almenoff, Rudner, Kearney and Kindman (1996) Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci. U.S.A 93, 1993-1996], which we have identified for the first time in cardiac tissue. PMID:9078280

  1. Aldolase potentiates DIDS activation of the ryanodine receptor in rabbit skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Seo, In-Ra; Moh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Eun Hui; Meissner, Gerhard; Kim, Do Han

    2006-01-01

    DIDS (4,4′-di-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonate), an anion channel blocker, triggers Ca2+ release from skeletal muscle SR (sarcoplasmic reticulum). The present study characterized the effects of DIDS on rabbit skeletal single Ca2+-release channel/RyR1 (ryanodine receptor type 1) incorporated into a planar lipid bilayer. When junctional SR vesicles were used for channel incorporation (native RyR1), DIDS increased the mean Po (open probability) of RyR1 without affecting unitary conductance when Cs+ was used as the charge carrier. Lifetime analysis of single RyR1 activities showed that 10 μM DIDS induced reversible long-lived open events (Po=0.451±0.038) in the presence of 10 μM Ca2+, due mainly to a new third component for both open and closed time constants. However, when purified RyR1 was examined in the same condition, 10 μM DIDS became considerably less potent (Po=0.206±0.025), although the caffeine response was similar between native and purified RyR1. Hence we postulated that a DIDS-binding protein, essential for the DIDS sensitivity of RyR1, was lost during RyR1 purification. DIDS-affinity column chromatography of solubilized junctional SR, and MALDI–TOF (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization–time-of-flight) MS analysis of the affinity-column-associated proteins, identified four major DIDS-binding proteins in the SR fraction. Among them, aldolase was the only protein that greatly potentiated DIDS sensitivity. The association between RyR1 and aldolase was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and aldolase-affinity batch-column chromatography. Taken together, we conclude that aldolase is physically associated with RyR1 and could confer a considerable potentiation of the DIDS effect on RyR1. PMID:16817780

  2. Model of Ca(2+) Concentration Controlled by Sarcoplasmic Reticulum of Skeletal Muscle, Using the State Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    SR T tubule half sarcomere CS voltage sensor on TT V-channel Ca2+ pump C-channel Ca2+ nerve impulse A B C D TC LSR Fig.2 Model...Aff = σ /τ. III. MODEL STRUCTURE Let us focus on a half sarcomere . We approximate the form as a cylinder with a height of 1.1 µm, a radius 0.5 µm and...a volume of 0.86 µm3 [5]. The half sarcomere is divided into 4 parts: CS, V-channels, C-channels and Ca2+ pumps as illustrated in Fig.2. The

  3. Modulation of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and oxidative modification during the development of adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Strosova, Miriam K; Karlovska, Janka; Zizkova, Petronela; Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Ponist, Silvester; Spickett, Corinne M; Horakova, Lubica

    2011-07-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) was induced by intradermal administration of Mycobacterium butyricum to the tail of Lewis rats. In sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscles, we investigated the development of AA. SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity decreased on day 21, suggesting possible conformational changes in the transmembrane part of the enzyme, especially at the site of the calcium binding transmembrane part. These events were associated with an increased level of protein carbonyls, a decrease in cysteine SH groups, and alterations in SR membrane fluidity. There was no alteration in the nucleotide binding site at any time point of AA, as detected by a FITC fluorescence marker. Some changes observed on day 21 appeared to be reversible, as indicated by SERCA activity, cysteine SH groups, SR membrane fluidity, protein carbonyl content and fluorescence of an NCD-4 marker specific for the calcium binding site. The reversibility may represent adaptive mechanisms of AA, induced by higher relative expression of SERCA, oxidation of cysteine, nitration of tyrosine and presence of acidic phospholipids such as phosphatidic acid. Nitric oxide may regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) level through conformational alterations of SERCA, and decreasing levels of calsequestrin in SR may also play regulatory role in SERCA activity and expression.

  4. Structural similarities of Na,K-ATPase and SERCA, the Ca(2+)-ATPase of the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Sweadner, K J; Donnet, C

    2001-01-01

    The crystal structure of SERCA1a (skeletal-muscle sarcoplasmic-reticulum/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase) has recently been determined at 2.6 A (note 1 A = 0.1 nm) resolution [Toyoshima, Nakasako, Nomura and Ogawa (2000) Nature (London) 405, 647-655]. Other P-type ATPases are thought to share key features of the ATP hydrolysis site and a central core of transmembrane helices. Outside of these most-conserved segments, structural similarities are less certain, and predicted transmembrane topology differs between subclasses. In the present review the homologous regions of several representative P-type ATPases are aligned with the SERCA sequence and mapped on to the SERCA structure for comparison. Homology between SERCA and the Na,K-ATPase is more extensive than with any other ATPase, even PMCA, the Ca(2+)-ATPase of plasma membrane. Structural features of the Na,K-ATPase are projected on to the Ca(2+)-ATPase crystal structure to assess the likelihood that they share the same fold. Homology extends through all ten transmembrane spans, and most insertions and deletions are predicted to be at the surface. The locations of specific residues are examined, such as proteolytic cleavage sites, intramolecular cross-linking sites, and the binding sites of certain other proteins. On the whole, the similarity supports a shared fold, with some particular exceptions. PMID:11389677

  5. Fast drum strokes: novel and convergent features of sonic muscle ultrastructure, innervation, and motor neuron organization in the Pyramid Butterflyfish (Hemitaurichthys polylepis).

    PubMed

    Boyle, Kelly S; Dewan, Adam K; Tricas, Timothy C

    2013-04-01

    Sound production that is mediated by intrinsic or extrinsic swim bladder musculature has evolved multiple times in teleost fishes. Sonic muscles must contract rapidly and synchronously to compress the gas-filled bladder with sufficient velocity to produce sound. Muscle modifications that may promote rapid contraction include small fiber diameter, elaborate sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), triads at the A-I boundary, and cores of sarcoplasm. The diversity of innervation patterns indicate that sonic muscles have independently evolved from different trunk muscle precursors. The analysis of sonic motor pathways in distantly related fishes is required to determine the relationships between sonic muscle evolution and function in acoustic signaling. We examined the ultrastructure of sonic and adjacent hypaxial muscle fibers and the distribution of sonic motor neurons in the coral reef Pyramid Butterflyfish (Chaetodontidae: Hemitaurichthys polylepis) that produces sound by contraction of extrinsic sonic muscles near the anterior swim bladder. Relative to adjacent hypaxial fibers, sonic muscle fibers were sparsely arranged among the endomysium, smaller in cross-section, had longer sarcomeres, a more elaborate SR, wider t-tubules, and more radially arranged myofibrils. Both sonic and non-sonic muscle fibers possessed triads at the Z-line, lacked sarcoplasmic cores, and had mitochondria among the myofibrils and concentrated within the peripheral sarcoplasm. Sonic muscles of this derived eutelost possess features convergent with other distant vocal taxa (other euteleosts and non-euteleosts): small fiber diameter, a well-developed SR, and radial myofibrils. In contrast with some sonic fishes, however, Pyramid Butterflyfish sonic muscles lack sarcoplasmic cores and A-I triads. Retrograde nerve label experiments show that sonic muscle is innervated by central and ventrolateral motor neurons associated with spinal nerves 1-3. This restricted distribution of sonic motor neurons in the

  6. Enhanced dihydropyridine receptor calcium channel activity restores muscle strength in JP45/CASQ1 double knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Barbara; Delbono, Osvaldo; Messi, Maria Laura; Bergamelli, Leda; Wang, Zhong-Min; Vukcevic, Mirko; Lopez, Ruben; Treves, Susan; Nishi, Miyuki; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Paolini, Cecilia; Martini, Marta; Rispoli, Giorgio; Protasi, Feliciano; Zorzato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Muscle strength declines with age in part due to a decline of Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptors (Cav1.1) initiate muscle contraction by activating ryanodine receptors in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Cav1.1 channel activity is enhanced by a retrograde stimulatory signal delivered by the ryanodine receptor. JP45 is a membrane protein interacting with Cav1.1 and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ storage protein calsequestrin (CASQ1). Here we show that JP45 and CASQ1 strengthen skeletal muscle contraction by modulating Cav1.1 channel activity. Using muscle fibres from JP45 and CASQ1 double knockout mice, we demonstrate that Ca2+ transients evoked by tetanic stimulation are the result of massive Ca2+ influx due to enhanced Cav1.1 channel activity, which restores muscle strength in JP45/CASQ1 double knockout mice. We envision that JP45 and CASQ1 may be candidate targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies against decay of skeletal muscle strength caused by a decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content. PMID:23443569

  7. Effects of diltiazem on skinned skeletal muscle fibers of the African clawed toad.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, T; Endo, M

    1983-02-01

    To examine the effects of diltiazem and its l-cis isomer (which possesses only a weak Ca++-antagonistic action) on the contractile system and the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle, we used skinned fibers isolated from iliofibularis muscle of the African clawed toad, Xenopus laevis. Diltiazem showed the following effects: an increase in the Ca++ sensitivity of the contractile system, a decrease in the maximal tension developed in a saturating concentration of Ca++, an inhibition of Ca++ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum, an inhibition of Ca++ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum by caffeine, and an increase in the Ca++ permeability of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. The effects of the l-cis isomer were similar to those of diltiazem, and the potencies of the two substances were nearly equal, except with respect to the effect on the Ca++ release induced by caffeine: the l-cis isomer potentiated this type of Ca++ release. Diltiazem's effects on amphibian skinned skeletal muscle fibers may not be related qualitatively or quantitatively to the Ca++-antagonistic actions of the drug on mammalian cardiac and smooth muscles. The pharmacological spectrum of diltiazem on skinned skeletal muscle fibers is similar to that of some local anesthetics.

  8. THE STRUCTURE OF INSECT FIBRILLAR FLIGHT MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David S.

    1961-01-01

    The fine structure of fibrillar flight muscle of the mature adult beetle Tenebrio molitor is described. Although the very high frequency of contraction of fibrillar muscle has previously been in part accounted for as the result of mechanical specialization of the wing-bearing segment rather than of a correspondingly high rate of motor impulse supply, the problem of the nature of the pathway by which excitation is conducted into these large fibers remained. Therefore, particular attention has been given to the disposition and relationships of the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum in this tissue. The invading tracheoles draw with them a sheath of plasma membrane from the surface to all depths in the fiber, and it is suggested that these sheaths, together with the extensive tubular arborisations arising from them, reduce the maximum plasma membrane-to-fibril distance from the radius of the fiber to a value of less than 2 µ. The evidence presented here confirms Veratti's contention that in fibrillar muscle the "reticulum" is associated with, though entirely distinct from the fibrils. Unlike other muscles so far examined, these flight muscle fibers contain a plasma membrane reticulum only, but it is possible that elsewhere the general "sarcoplasmic reticulum" includes a component derived from the plasma membrane, likewise acting as the pathway for inward conduction of excitation. Profiles of the internalised plasma membrane in Tenebrio showing the usual triple-layered 25-25-25 A organization are frequently seen, in sections, in close association with isolated vesicles (defined by "simple" 50 A membranes) which are here considered to represent, in vestigial form, the portion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum which in other types of muscle is complex and highly developed. Such associations, in Tenebrio, between these two dissimilar elements are here termed "dyads" and the possible morphological and functional homology between these and the "triads" of other types of

  9. Food control by applied biochemistry of marine organisms: Comparison of proteins and metabolites from fish and invertebrate muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehbein, H.

    1995-03-01

    Most fishery products consist of muscle tissue from fish and invertebrates. Differences in the molecular structure and in metabolism of muscles can be utilized to characterize and identify various seafood. Creatine and arginine were found to be useful for the differentiation between imitation crab/shrimp meat and real crustacean meat. Octopine served as an indicator for the meat of cephalopods and mussels. In order to identify the animal species of a fishery product, several electrophoretic methods were used. It depended on the type of product, whether sarcoplasmic or myofibrillar proteins were better suited. Raw products were best analysed by isoelectric focusing of sarcoplasmic proteins. Two types of sarcoplasmic calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumins of fish and soluble calcium-binding proteins of invertebrates, were especially useful for species identification. Due to their thermal stability, these proteins gave species-specific patterns for cooked products, too. Two other techniques were also investigated: urea gel isoelectric focusing, and sodium dodecyl sulphate — polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These methods were applied in the analysis of products where the sarcoplasmic proteins had been removed by washing steps, i.e. imitation crab meat made from surimi, and of other raw and cooked products. The myosin light chains gave protein patterns that were characteristic for many species. Paramyosin, which is absent from vertebrate muscle, indicated the presence of mollusc muscle. It was shown that the determination, of arginine kinase activity enabled differentiation between raw fish muscle and invertebrate muscles.

  10. Calcium regulation of muscle contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Szent-Györgyi, A G

    1975-01-01

    Calcium triggers contraction by reaction with regulatory proteins that in the absence of calcium prevent interaction of actin and myosin. Two different regulatory systems are found in different muscles. In actin-linked regulation troponin and tropomyosin regulate actin by blocking sites on actin required for complex formation with myosin; in myosin-linked regulation sites on myosin are blocked in the absence of calcium. The major features of actin control are as follows: there is a requirement for tropomyosin and for a troponin complex having three different subunits with different functions; the actin displays a cooperative behavior; and a movement of tropomyosin occurs controlled by the calcium binding on troponin. Myosin regulation is controlled by a regulatory subunit that can be dissociated in scallop myosin reversibly by removing divalent cations with EDTA. Myosin control can function with pure actin in the absence of tropomyosin. Calcium binding and regulation of molluscan myosins depend on the presence of regulatory light chains. It is proposed that the light chains function by sterically blocking myosin sites in the absence of calcium, and that the "off" state of myosin requires cooperation between the two myosin heads. Both myosin control and actin control are widely distributed in different organisms. Many invertebrates have muscles with both types of regulation. Actin control is absent in the muscles of molluscs and in several minor phyla that lack troponin. Myosin control is not found in striated vertebrate muscles and in the fast muscles of crustacean decapods, although regulatory light chains are present. While in vivo myosin control may not be excluded from vertebrate striated muscles, myosin control may be absent as a result of mutations of the myosin heavy chain. PMID:806311

  11. Effect of cooking temperature on the percentage colour formation, nitrite decomposition and sarcoplasmic protein denaturation in processed meat products.

    PubMed

    Okayama, T; Fujii, M; Yamanoue, M

    1991-01-01

    The effect of cooking temperature and time on the percentage colour formation, nitrite decomposition and denaturation of sarcoplasmic proteins in processed meat products was investigated in detail. The colour forming percentage increased with a rise in temperature of heating, especially at 50-60°C (P < 0·05). The percentage nitrite decomposition was promoted by the retention time of cooking rather than by the cooking temperature (P < 0·05). The percentage of sarcoplasmic proteins denatured was enhanced by heating temperature in the range 50-80°C (especially at 50-60°C) (P < 0·05). The relationship between the percentage colour formation and the percentage of sarcoplasmic proteins denatured is discussed. The SDS-PAGE patterns of the heat-treated samples revealed the components of the sarcoplasmic proteins which had been denatured.

  12. Two close, too close: Sarcoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial cross-talk and cardiomyocyte fate

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W; Scorrano, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are key organelles in cell life, whose dysfunction is associated with a variety of diseases. Their crucial role in intermediary metabolism and energy conversion makes them a preferred target in tissues, like the heart, where the energetic demands are very high. In the cardiomyocyte, the spatial organization of mitochondria favors their interaction with the sarcoplasmic reticulum, thereby offering a mechanism for Ca2+mediated crosstalk between these two organelles. Recently, the molecular basis for this interaction has started to be unraveled, and we are learning how ER-mitochondrial interactions are often exploited by death signals, like proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members, to amplify the cell death cascade. Here we will review our current understanding of the structural basis and the functional consequences of the close interaction between sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria on cardiomyocyte function and death. PMID:20847324

  13. AKAP complex regulates Ca2+ re-uptake into heart sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Lygren, Birgitte; Carlson, Cathrine Rein; Santamaria, Katja; Lissandron, Valentina; McSorley, Theresa; Litzenberg, Jessica; Lorenz, Dorothea; Wiesner, Burkhard; Rosenthal, Walter; Zaccolo, Manuela; Taskén, Kjetil; Klussmann, Enno

    2007-11-01

    The beta-adrenergic receptor/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signalling pathway regulates heart rate and contractility. Here, we identified a supramolecular complex consisting of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2), its negative regulator phospholamban (PLN), the A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP18delta and PKA. We show that AKAP18delta acts as a scaffold that coordinates PKA phosphorylation of PLN and the adrenergic effect on Ca(2+) re-uptake. Inhibition of the compartmentalization of this cAMP signalling complex by specific molecular disruptors interferes with the phosphorylation of PLN. This prevents the subsequent release of PLN from SERCA2, thereby affecting the Ca(2+) re-uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum induced by adrenergic stimuli.

  14. Binding interactions of porphyrin derivatives with Ca2+ ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SERCA1a)

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Abdul; Kizilbash, Nadeem A; Zaidi, Syeda Huma H; Alruwaili, Jamal

    2013-01-01

    The use of Porphyrin derivatives as photosensitizers in Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) was investigated by means of a molecular docking study. These molecules can bind to intracellular targets such as P-type CaCa2+ ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SERCA1a). CAChe software was successfully employed for conducting the docking of Tetraphenylporphinesulfonate(TPPS), 5,10,15,20- Tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrinato Iron(III) Chloride (FeTPPS) and 5,10,15,20-Tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrinato Iron(III) nitrosyl Chloride (FeNOTPPS) with CaCa2+ ATPase from sarcoplasmic reticulum of rabbit. The results show that FeNOTPPS forms the most stable complex with CaCa2+ ATPase. PMID:23750090

  15. The syndrome of `continuous muscle-fibre activity' cured: further studies

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Hyam; Heffron, J. J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Two cases suffering from the syndrome of `continuous muscle-fibre activity' have been followed-up for 14 years. These patients have gradually gone into remission and no longer require therapy. The results of recent histology, histochemistry, and electronmicroscopy, as well as sural nerve biopsy studies, are presented. The sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium binding activity and ATPase activity are normal. Images PMID:4281819

  16. Altered calcium pump and secondary deficiency of γ-sarcoglycan and microspan in sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from δ-sarcoglycan knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Solares-Pérez, Alhondra; Álvarez, Rocío; Crosbie, Rachelle H.; Vega-Moreno, Jesús; Medina-Monares, Joel; Estrada, Francisco J.; Ortega, Alicia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoglycans (SGs) and sarcospan (SSPN) are transmembrane proteins of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Mutations in the genes encoding SGs cause many inherited forms of muscular dystrophy. In this study, using purified membranes of wild-type (WT) and δ-SG knockout (KO) mice, we found the specific localization of the SG-SSPN isoforms in transverse tubules (TT) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes. Immunoblotting revealed that the absence of δ-SG isoforms in TT and SR results in a secondary deficiency of γ-SG and µSPN. Our results showed augmented ATP hydrolytic activity, ATP-dependent calcium uptake and passive calcium efflux, probably through SERCA1 in KO compared to WT mice. Furthermore, we found a conformational change in SERCA1 isolated from KO muscle as demonstrated by calorimetric analysis. Following these alterations with mechanical properties, we found an increase in force in KO muscle with the same rate of fatigue but with a decreased fatigue recovery compared to WT. Together our observations suggest, for the first time, that the δ-SG isoforms may stabilize the expression of γ-SG and µSPN in the TT and SR membranes and that this possible complex may play a role in the maintenance of a stable level of resting cytosolic calcium concentration in skeletal muscle. PMID:20638123

  17. Sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in normal and failing human hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Movsesian, M A; Smith, C J; Krall, J; Bristow, M R; Manganiello, V C

    1991-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was examined in microsomes prepared from the left ventricular myocardium of eight heart transplant recipients with end-stage idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and six unmatched organ donors with normal cardiac function. At cAMP concentrations less than or equal to 1.0 microM, sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was functionally homogeneous. cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was inhibited competitively by cGMP (Ki = 0.031 +/- 0.008 microM) and the cilostamide derivative OPC 3911 (Ki = 0.018 +/- 0.004 microM), but was essentially insensitive to rolipram. Vmax and Km were 781.7 +/- 109.2 nmol/mg per min and 0.188 +/- 0.031 microM, respectively, in microsomes prepared from nonfailing hearts and 793.9 +/- 68.9 nmol/mg per min and 0.150 +/- 0.027 microM in microsomes prepared from failing hearts. Microsomes prepared from nonfailing and failing hearts did not differ with respect to either the ratio of cAMP phosphodiesterase activity to ATP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation activity or the sensitivity of cAMP phosphodiesterase activity to inhibition by OPC 3911. These data suggest that the diminished inotropic efficacy of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in failing human hearts does not result from changes in the level, kinetic properties, or pharmacologic sensitivity of sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity. PMID:1647414

  18. Ion pathways in the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Bublitz, Maike; Musgaard, Maria; Poulsen, Hanne; Thøgersen, Lea; Olesen, Claus; Schiøtt, Birgit; Morth, J Preben; Møller, Jesper Vuust; Nissen, Poul

    2013-04-12

    The sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) is a transmembrane ion transporter belonging to the P(II)-type ATPase family. It performs the vital task of re-sequestering cytoplasmic Ca(2+) to the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum store, thereby also terminating Ca(2+)-induced signaling such as in muscle contraction. This minireview focuses on the transport pathways of Ca(2+) and H(+) ions across the lipid bilayer through SERCA. The ion-binding sites of SERCA are accessible from either the cytoplasm or the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum lumen, and the Ca(2+) entry and exit channels are both formed mainly by rearrangements of four N-terminal transmembrane α-helices. Recent improvements in the resolution of the crystal structures of rabbit SERCA1a have revealed a hydrated pathway in the C-terminal transmembrane region leading from the ion-binding sites to the cytosol. A comparison of different SERCA conformations reveals that this C-terminal pathway is exclusive to Ca(2+)-free E2 states, suggesting that it may play a functional role in proton release from the ion-binding sites. This is in agreement with molecular dynamics simulations and mutational studies and is in striking analogy to a similar pathway recently described for the related sodium pump. We therefore suggest a model for the ion exchange mechanism in P(II)-ATPases including not one, but two cytoplasmic pathways working in concert.

  19. Total cytoplasmic calcium in relaxed and maximally contracted rabbit portal vein smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, M; Shuman, H; Somlyo, A P; Somlyo, A V

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of total cytoplasmic Ca in vascular smooth muscle was measured by electron probe microanalysis of strips of rabbit portal anterior mesenteric vein that were rapidly frozen either when relaxed or during a maintained (30 min) maximal contraction stimulated with high K and noradrenaline. Strips were also frozen and analysed after incubation in Ca-free, high-Mg2+ solution. Probe diameters of 0.1-0.2 micron and 1.0-1.5 micron were used to measure, respectively, cytoplasmic and cellular (including stored) Ca. There was a highly significant increase (P less than 0.0005) in cytoplasmic Ca of 1.0 +/- 0.2 (S.D.) mmol Ca/kg dry wt. from 0.8 +/- 0.2 (S.E. of mean) mmol/kg dry wt. (n = 262 spectra, six animals) to 1.8 +/- 0.2 (S.E. of mean) mmol Ca/kg dry wt. (n = 296 spectra, six animals), during maximal contraction. This increase is greater than can be accounted for by Ca binding to calmodulin and to myosin, suggesting the presence of other Ca-binding proteins in smooth muscle. A small amount (0.4-0.6 mmol/kg dry wt.) of cytoplasmic Ca remained after incubation in Ca-free, high-Mg2+ EGTA solution. This tightly bound, cytoplasmic Ca is insufficient to account for the total amount of divalent cation known to be bound to F-actin. We conclude that Mg is the major inexchangeably bound cation in F-actin in smooth as in striated muscle. In the contracted muscles, the cellular Ca concentration, measured with the large probes that include Ca stored in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.), was 3.2 +/- 0.3 (S.E. of mean) mmol Ca/kg dry wt. (n = 93), significantly higher than the cytoplasmic Ca concentration measured with small probes. This value of cellular Ca is probably an underestimate, as the large-diameter probes did not cover all of the peripheral s.r. The cellular Ca (measured with large probes) was highest in the contracted and lower in the relaxed tissue, and was significantly reduced in the muscles incubated in Ca-free solution. In contracted muscle, cytoplasmic

  20. [Proton magnetic resonance spectra of bound water in muscles].

    PubMed

    Viaznikova, M Iu; Denisov, V P; Nikolaeva, S S; Petrusevich, Iu M

    1993-01-01

    The state of water in a muscle tissue was investigated using 1H-NMR. Water spectra in the muscle were found after holding it out at variable humidity and after the muscle species had been pressed with different effort. The NMR-spectra demonstrated the existence of two different water fractions with poor exchange between them. One of them was associated with structured water in the sarcoplasm connected with the contractile proteins. The second fraction was related with the myoplasm. The absorption isotherms for two fractions of water were observed.

  1. Ca2+ translocation and catalytic activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase. Modulation by ATP, Ca2+, and Pi.

    PubMed

    Galina, A; de Meis, L

    1991-09-25

    The ratio between Ca2+ uptake and Ca(2+)-dependent ATP hydrolysis measured in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles of rabbit skeletal muscle was found to vary greatly depending on the concentrations of oxalate or Pi used. In the presence of 5 mM oxalate, 20 mM Pi, and 1 mM Pi, the ratios found were in the range of 1.4-2.3, 0.6-0.8, and 0.01-0.10, respectively. The rates of Ca2+ exchange and ATP synthesis were measured at the steady state by adding trace amounts of 45Ca and 32Pi, after the vesicles had been loaded with Ca2+. In the presence of 1 mM Pi, 10 mM MgCl2, and 0.2 mM CaCl2, the ratio between Ca2+ exchange and ATP synthesis varied from 9 to 14. This ratio approached two when Ca2+ in the medium was reduced to a very low level, or when in the presence of Ca2+, dimethyl sulfoxide was added to the assay medium, or when the Pi concentration was raised from 1 to 20 mM. A ratio of two was also measured when the steady state was attained using ITP instead of ATP. In all the conditions that led to a ratio close to two, there was an increase in the fraction of enzyme phosphorylated by Pi. It is proposed that the coupling between Ca2+ translocation and ATP hydrolysis or synthesis is modulated by the phosphorylation of the ATPase by Pi.

  2. Local signals from beyond the receptive fields of striate cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Müller, James R; Metha, Andrew B; Krauskopf, John; Lennie, Peter

    2003-08-01

    We examined in anesthetized macaque how the responses of a striate cortical neuron to patterns inside the receptive field were altered by surrounding patterns outside it. The changes in a neuron's response brought about by a surround are immediate and transient: they arise with the same latency as the response to a stimulus within the receptive field (this argues for a source locally in striate cortex) and become less effective as soon as 27 ms later. Surround signals appeared to exert their influence through divisive interaction (normalization) with those arising in the receptive field. Surrounding patterns presented at orientations slightly oblique to the preferred orientation consistently deformed orientation tuning curves of complex (but not simple) cells, repelling the preferred orientation but without decreasing the discriminability of the preferred grating and ones at slightly oblique orientations. By reducing responsivity and changing the tuning of complex cells locally in stimulus space, surrounding patterns reduce the correlations among responses of neurons to a particular stimulus, thus reducing the redundancy of image representation.

  3. THE ORGANIZATION OF THE FLIGHT MUSCLE IN A DRAGONFLY, AESHNA SP. (ODONATA)

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David S.

    1961-01-01

    The structure of the flight muscle of a dragonfly (Aeshna sp.) has been studied with the light and electron microscopes, and the organization of this specialized tubular muscle is described. This tissue is characterized by the great development of the sarcosomes, which are slab-like and are arranged within the fiber opposite each sarcomere of the radially oriented lamellar myofibrils. A well developed and highly ordered sarcoplasmic reticulum is present, consisting of perforated curtain-like cisternae extending across the face of each fibril, together with tubular invaginations of the fiber plasma membrane situated within indentations in the sarcosomes and traversing the fibril surface midway between the Z and M levels. The structure of these fibers, and notably the organization of the reticulum, is compared with that of other types of muscle, and the possible role of the two components of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the contraction physiology of the dragonfly muscle fiber is discussed. PMID:13914195

  4. Myosin filament structure in vertebrate smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The in vivo structure of the myosin filaments in vertebrate smooth muscle is unknown. Evidence from purified smooth muscle myosin and from some studies of intact smooth muscle suggests that they may have a nonhelical, side-polar arrangement of crossbridges. However, the bipolar, helical structure characteristic of myosin filaments in striated muscle has not been disproved for smooth muscle. We have used EM to investigate this question in a functionally diverse group of smooth muscles (from the vascular, gastrointestinal, reproductive, and visual systems) from mammalian, amphibian, and avian species. Intact muscle under physiological conditions, rapidly frozen and then freeze substituted, shows many myosin filaments with a square backbone in transverse profile. Transverse sections of fixed, chemically skinned muscles also show square backbones and, in addition, reveal projections (crossbridges) on only two opposite sides of the square. Filaments gently isolated from skinned smooth muscles and observed by negative staining show crossbridges with a 14.5-nm repeat projecting in opposite directions on opposite sides of the filament. Such filaments subjected to low ionic strength conditions show bare filament ends and an antiparallel arrangement of myosin tails along the length of the filament. All of these observations are consistent with a side-polar structure and argue against a bipolar, helical crossbridge arrangement. We conclude that myosin filaments in all smooth muscles, regardless of function, are likely to be side-polar. Such a structure could be an important factor in the ability of smooth muscles to contract by large amounts. PMID:8698822

  5. Neural control of muscle relaxation in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Elphick, M R; Melarange, R

    2001-03-01

    Smooth muscle relaxation in vertebrates is regulated by a variety of neuronal signalling molecules, including neuropeptides and nitric oxide (NO). The physiology of muscle relaxation in echinoderms is of particular interest because these animals are evolutionarily more closely related to the vertebrates than to the majority of invertebrate phyla. However, whilst in vertebrates there is a clear structural and functional distinction between visceral smooth muscle and skeletal striated muscle, this does not apply to echinoderms, in which the majority of muscles, whether associated with the body wall skeleton and its appendages or with visceral organs, are made up of non-striated fibres. The mechanisms by which the nervous system controls muscle relaxation in echinoderms were, until recently, unknown. Using the cardiac stomach of the starfish Asterias rubens as a model, it has been established that the NO-cGMP signalling pathway mediates relaxation. NO also causes relaxation of sea urchin tube feet, and NO may therefore function as a 'universal' muscle relaxant in echinoderms. The first neuropeptides to be identified in echinoderms were two related peptides isolated from Asterias rubens known as SALMFamide-1 (S1) and SALMFamide-2 (S2). Both S1 and S2 cause relaxation of the starfish cardiac stomach, but with S2 being approximately ten times more potent than S1. SALMFamide neuropeptides have also been isolated from sea cucumbers, in which they cause relaxation of both gut and body wall muscle. Therefore, like NO, SALMFamides may also function as 'universal' muscle relaxants in echinoderms. The mechanisms by which SALMFamides cause relaxation of echinoderm muscle are not known, but several candidate signal transduction pathways are discussed here. The SALMFamides do not, however, appear to act by promoting release of NO, and muscle relaxation in echinoderms is therefore probably regulated by at least two neuronal signalling systems acting in parallel. Recently, other

  6. YAP-Mediated Mechanotransduction in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Martina; Rikeit, Paul; Knaus, Petra; Coirault, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is not only translating chemical energy into mechanical work, it is also a highly adaptive and regenerative tissue whose architecture and functionality is determined by its mechanical and physical environment. Processing intra- and extracellular mechanical signaling cues contributes to the regulation of cell growth, survival, migration and differentiation. Yes-associated Protein (YAP), a transcriptional coactivator downstream of the Hippo pathway and its paralog, the transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), were recently found to play a key role in mechanotransduction in various tissues including skeletal muscle. Furthermore, YAP/TAZ modulate myogenesis and muscle regeneration and abnormal YAP activity has been reported in muscular dystrophy and rhabdomyosarcoma. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of mechanosensing and -signaling in striated muscle. We highlight the role of YAP signaling and discuss the different routes and hypotheses of its regulation in the context of mechanotransduction. PMID:26909043

  7. A muscle-targeting peptide displayed on AAV2 improves muscle tropism on systemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Yu, C-Y; Yuan, Z; Cao, Z; Wang, B; Qiao, C; Li, J; Xiao, X

    2009-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has become a leading gene transfer vector for striated muscles. However, the AAV vectors also exhibit broad tropisms after systemic delivery. In an attempt to improve muscle tropism, we inserted a 7-amino-acid (ASSLNIA) muscle-targeting peptide (MTP) in the capsids of AAV2 at residue 587 or 588, generating AAV(587)MTP and AAV(588)MTP. In vitro studies showed that both viruses diminished their infectivity on non-muscle cell lines as well as on un-differentiated myoblasts; however, preserved or enhanced their infectivity on differentiated myotubes. AAV(587)MTP, but not AAV(588)MTP, also abolished its heparin-binding capacity and infected myotubes in a heparin-independent manner. Furthermore, in vivo studies by intravenous vector administration in mice showed that AAV(587)MTP enhanced its tropism to various muscles and particularly to the heart (24.3-fold of unmodified AAV2), whereas reduced its tropism to the non-muscle tissues such as the liver, lungs, spleen and so on. This alteration of tissue tropism is not simply because of the loss of heparin-binding, as a mutant AAV2 (AAVHBSMut) containing heparin-binding site mutations lost infectivity on both non-muscle and muscle cells. Furthermore, free MTP peptide, but not the scrambled control peptide, competitively inhibited AAV(587)MTP infection on myotubes. These results suggest that AAV2 could be re-targeted to the striated muscles by a MTP inserted after residue 587 of the capsids. This proof of principle study showed first evidence of peptide-directed muscle targeting on systemic administration of AAV vectors.

  8. Artificial muscle: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Marcus C

    2011-12-19

    Mechanical devices are sought to support insufficient or paralysed striated muscles including the failing heart. Nickel-titanium alloys (nitinol) present the following two properties: (i) super-elasticity, and (ii) the potential to assume different crystal structures depending on temperature and/or stress. Starting from the martensite state nitinol is able to resume the austenite form (state of low potential energy and high entropy) even against an external resistance. This one-way shape change is deployed in self-expanding vascular stents. Heating induces the force generating transformation from martensite to the austenite state while cooling induces relaxation back to the martensite state. This two-way shape change oscillating between the two states may be used in cyclically contracting support devices of silicon-coated nitinol wires. Such a contractile device sutured to the right atrium has been tested in vitro in a bench model and in vivo in sheep. The contraction properties of natural muscles, specifically of the myocardium, and the tight correlation with ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria is briefly outlined. Force development by the nitinol device cannot be smoothly regulated as in natural muscle. Its mechanical impact is forced onto the natural muscle regardless of the actual condition with regard to metabolism and Ca2+-homeostasis. The development of artificial muscle on the basis of nitinol wires is still in its infancy. The nitinol artificial muscle will have to prove its viability in the various clinical settings.

  9. Neurochemical features of the autonomic neurons projecting to the cremaster muscle of the boar.

    PubMed

    Botti, Maddalena; Ragionieri, Luisa; Cacchioli, Antonio; Gazza, Ferdinando; Panu, Rino

    2015-12-01

    The cremaster muscle (CM) is a striated muscle showing some unusual features for ordinary striated muscles, in fact it receives, besides somatic innervation, a conspicuous autonomic sympathetic innervation. The autonomic neurons associated with the CM of 4 male intact pigs were typified combining the retrograde nontrans-synaptic fluorescent tracer Fast Blue (FB) and double labeling immunohistochemical methods. We collected the L4 sympathetic trunk ganglion (STG), that our preliminary studies proved to contain the highest number (575.5 ± 152.93; mean ± S.E.M., n = 4) of FB+ sympathetic neurons projecting to CM. About half of the CM projecting neurons of this ganglion were catecholaminergic and showed the colocalization of Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH) with Neuropeptide Y (NPY), Leu-Enkephaline (LENK), Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide (VIP), Calcitonine Gene Related Peptide (CGRP), Substance P (SP), neuronal Nitric Oxyde Sinthase (n-NOS), and Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT). The noncatecholaminergic neurons were immunoreactive for all the other markers tested, even if in small percentages. The conspicuous and heterogeneous contribution of the sympathetic autonomic neurons to the muscle innervation is consistent with the hypothesis of a possible origin of the CM fibers by transdifferentiation of the smooth muscle-like gubernaculum mesenchyma into striated myotubes, suggesting that the cremaster myogenesis is independent from that of the abdominal muscles.

  10. Analytical study of striated nozzle flow with small radius of curvature ratio throats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, D. J.; White, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical method was developed which is capable of estimating the chamber and throat conditions in a nozzle with a low radius of curvature throat. The method was programmed using standard FORTRAN 4 language and includes chemical equilibrium calculation subprograms (modified NASA Lewis program CEC71) as an integral part. The method determines detailed and gross rocket characteristics in the presence of striated flows and gives detailed results for the motor chamber and throat plane with as many as 20 discrete zones. The method employs a simultaneous solution of the mass, momentum, and energy equations and allows propellant types, 0/F ratios, propellant distribution, nozzle geometry, and injection schemes to be varied so to predict spatial velocity, density, pressure, and other thermodynamic variable distributions in the chamber as well as the throat. Results for small radius of curvature have shown good comparison to experimental results. Both gaseous and liquid injection may be considered with frozen or equilibrium flow calculations.

  11. Neurons in Striate Cortex Signal Disparity in Half-Matched Random-Dot Stereograms

    PubMed Central

    Read, Jenny C. A.; Cumming, Bruce G.

    2016-01-01

    Human stereopsis can operate in dense “cyclopean” images containing no monocular objects. This is believed to depend on the computation of binocular correlation by neurons in primary visual cortex (V1). The observation that humans perceive depth in half-matched random-dot stereograms, although these stimuli have no net correlation, has led to the proposition that human depth perception in these stimuli depends on a distinct “matching” computation possibly performed in extrastriate cortex. However, recording from disparity-selective neurons in V1 of fixating monkeys, we found that they are in fact able to signal disparity in half-matched stimuli. We present a simple model that explains these results. This reinstates the view that disparity-selective neurons in V1 provide the initial substrate for perception in dense cyclopean stimuli, and strongly suggests that separate correlation and matching computations are not necessary to explain existing data on mixed correlation stereograms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The initial step in stereoscopic 3D vision is generally thought to be a correlation-based computation that takes place in striate cortex. Recent research has argued that there must be an additional matching computation involved in extracting stereoscopic depth in random-dot stereograms. This is based on the observation that humans can perceive depth in stimuli with a mean binocular correlation of zero (where a correlation-based mechanism should not signal depth). We show that correlation-based cells in striate cortex do in fact signal depth here because they convert fluctuations in the correlation level into a mean change in the firing rate. Our results reinstate the view that these cells provide a sufficient substrate for the perception of stereoscopic depth. PMID:27559177

  12. Color processing in macaque striate cortex: relationships to ocular dominance, cytochrome oxidase, and orientation.

    PubMed

    Landisman, Carole E; Ts'o, Daniel Y

    2002-06-01

    We located clusters of color-selective neurons in macaque striate cortex, as mapped with optical imaging and confirmed with electrophysiological recordings. By comparing responses to an equiluminant red/green stimulus versus a high-contrast luminance stimulus, we were able to reveal a patchy distribution of color selectivity. Other color imaging protocols, when compared with electrophysiological data, did not reliably indicate the location of functional structures. The imaged color patches were compared with other known functional subdivisions of striate cortex. There was a high degree of overlap of the color patches with the cytochrome-oxidase (CO) blobs. The patches were often larger than a single blob in size, however, and in some instances spanned two neighboring blobs. More than one-half (56%) of the color-selective patches seen in optical imaging were not confined to one ocular dominance (OD) column. Almost one-quarter of color patches (23%) extended across OD columns to encompass two blobs of different eye preference. We also compared optical images of orientation selectivity to maps of color selectivity. Results indicate that the layout of orientation and color selectivity are not directly related. Specifically, despite having similar scales and distributions, the maps of orientation and color selectivity were not in consistent alignment or registration. Further, we find that the maps of color selectivity and of orientation are each only loosely related to maps of OD. This description stands in contrast to a common depiction of color-selective regions as identical to CO blobs, appearing as pegs in the centers of OD columns in the classical "ice cube" model. These results concerning the pattern of color selectivity in V1 support the view (put forth in previous imaging studies of the organization of orientation and ocular dominance) that there is not a fundamental registration of functional hypercolumns in V1.

  13. Synaptic organization of striate cortex projections in the tree shrew: A comparison of the claustrum and dorsal thalamus.

    PubMed

    Day-Brown, Jonathan D; Slusarczyk, Arkadiusz S; Zhou, Na; Quiggins, Ranida; Petry, Heywood M; Bickford, Martha E

    2017-04-15

    The tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri) striate cortex is reciprocally connected with the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN), the ventral pulvinar nucleus (Pv), and the claustrum. In the Pv or the dLGN, striate cortex projections are thought to either strongly "drive", or more subtly "modulate" activity patterns respectively. To provide clues to the function of the claustrum, we compare the synaptic arrangements of striate cortex projections to the dLGN, Pv, and claustrum, using anterograde tracing and electron microscopy. Tissue was additionally stained with antibodies against γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to identify GABAergic interneurons and non-GABAergic projection cells. The striate cortex terminals were largest in the Pv (0.94 ± 0.08 μm(2) ), intermediate in the claustrum (0.34 ± 0.02 μm(2) ), and smallest in the dLGN (0.24 ± 0.01 μm(2) ). Contacts on interneurons were most common in the Pv (39%), intermediate in the claustrum (15%), and least common in the dLGN (12%). In the claustrum, non-GABAergic terminals (0.34 ± 0.01 μm(2) ) and striate cortex terminals were not significantly different in size. The largest terminals in the claustrum were GABAergic (0.51 ± 0.02 μm(2) ), and these terminals contacted dendrites and somata that were significantly larger (1.90 ± 0.30 μm(2) ) than those contacted by cortex or non-GABAergic terminals (0.28 ± 0.02 μm(2) and 0.25 ± 0.02 μm(2) , respectively). Our results indicate that the synaptic organization of the claustrum does not correspond to a driver/modulator framework. Instead, the circuitry of the claustrum suggests an integration of convergent cortical inputs, gated by GABAergic circuits. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1403-1420, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cation pumps in skeletal muscle: potential role in muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Green, H J

    1998-03-01

    Two membrane bound pumps in skeletal muscle, the sarcolemma Na+-K+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase, provide for the maintenance of transmembrane ionic gradients necessary for excitation and activation of the myofibrillar apparatus. The rate at which the pumps are capable of establishing ionic homeostasis depends on the maximal activity of the enzyme and the potential of the metabolic pathways for supplying adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The activity of the Ca2+-ATPase appears to be expressed in a fibre type specific manner with both the amount of the enzyme and the isoform type related to the speed of contraction. In contrast, only minimal differences exist between slow-twitch and fast-twitch fibres in Na+-K+ ATPase activity. Evidence is accumulating that both active transport of Na+ and K+ across the sarcolemma and Ca2+-uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum may be impaired in vivo in a task specific manner resulting in loss of contractile function. In contrast to the Ca2+-ATPase, the Na+-K+ ATPase can be rapidly upregulated soon after the onset of a sustained pattern of activity. Similar programmes of activity result in a downregulation of Ca2+-ATPase but at a much later time point. The manner in which the metabolic pathways reorganize following chronic activity to meet the changes in ATP demand by the cation pumps and the degree to which these adaptations are compartmentalized is uncertain.

  15. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles A A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  16. Calsequestrin content and SERCA determine normal and maximal Ca2+ storage levels in sarcoplasmic reticulum of fast- and slow-twitch fibres of rat

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robyn M; Larkins, Noni T; Mollica, Janelle P; Beard, Nicole A; Lamb, Graham D

    2009-01-01

    Whilst calsequestrin (CSQ) is widely recognized as the primary Ca2+ buffer in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in skeletal muscle fibres, its total buffering capacity and importance have come into question. This study quantified the absolute amount of CSQ isoform 1 (CSQ1, the primary isoform) present in rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus fibres, and related this to their endogenous and maximal SR Ca2+ content. Using Western blotting, the entire constituents of minute samples of muscle homogenates or segments of individual muscle fibres were compared with known amounts of purified CSQ1. The fidelity of the analysis was proven by examining the relative signal intensity when mixing muscle samples and purified CSQ1. The CSQ1 contents of EDL fibres, almost exclusively type II fibres, and soleus type I fibres [SOL (I)] were, respectively, 36 ± 2 and 10 ± 1 μmol (l fibre volume)−1, quantitatively accounting for the maximal SR Ca2+ content of each. Soleus type II [SOL (II)] fibres (∼20% of soleus fibres) had an intermediate amount of CSQ1. Every SOL (I) fibre examined also contained some CSQ isoform 2 (CSQ2), which was absent in every EDL and other type II fibre except for trace amounts in one case. Every EDL and other type II fibre had a high density of SERCA1, the fast-twitch muscle sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform, whereas there was virtually no SERCA1 in any SOL (I) fibre. Maximal SR Ca2+ content measured in skinned fibres increased with CSQ1 content, and the ratio of endogenous to maximal Ca2+ content was inversely correlated with CSQ1 content. The relative SR Ca2+ content that could be maintained in resting cytoplasmic conditions was found to be much lower in EDL fibres than in SOL (I) fibres (∼20 versus, >60%). Leakage of Ca2+ from the SR in EDL fibres could be substantially reduced with a SR Ca2+ pump blocker and increased by adding creatine to buffer cytoplasmic [ADP] at a higher level, both results indicating that at least part

  17. Origin and development of the tergotrochanteral muscle in Chironomus (Diptera: Nematocera).

    PubMed

    Lebart-Pedebas, M C

    1992-01-01

    The origin and the development of the tubular tergo-trochanteral muscle (TTD) was studied by light and electron microscopy in Chironomus (Diptera: Nematocera). Unlike the flight muscles, the TTD was found to develop from myoblasts located around a larval axon, without contribution from a larval muscle. The myoblasts fuse together to form myotubes. Innervation of the TTD arises from the larval axon. The myotubes send out sarcoplasmic extensions towards the axon branches issued from the larval axon. The first differentiated synapses are described. The TTD begins to grow later than the flight muscles. The implications of this developmental lag are discussed.

  18. Stressed out: the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor as a target of stress

    PubMed Central

    Bellinger, Andrew M.; Mongillo, Marco; Marks, Andrew R.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past century, understanding the mechanisms underlying muscle fatigue and weakness has been the focus of much investigation. However, the dominant theory in the field, that lactic acidosis causes muscle fatigue, is unlikely to tell the whole story. Recently, dysregulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release has been associated with impaired muscle function induced by a wide range of stressors, from dystrophy to heart failure to muscle fatigue. Here, we address current understandings of the altered regulation of SR Ca2+ release during chronic stress, focusing on the role of the SR Ca2+ release channel known as the type 1 ryanodine receptor. PMID:18246195

  19. Phosphorylation of low-molecular-weight proteins in preparations of rat heart sarcolemma and sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Lamers, J M; Stinis, J T

    1982-01-01

    Two substrate proteins for cAMP-dependent protein kinase detected in a rat heart sarcolemma preparation displayed molecular weights of 24,000 and 9000 in sodium dodecyl sulfate gels and were shown to be interconvertible. The 9000-dalton protein could readily be separated from other low molecular weight phosphoproteins (mol. wt. 14,000 and 7000) by the use of 15% polyacrylamide gels. In addition to an endogenous cAMP-dependent protein kinase the membrane preparation also contained a protein-phosphorylation system that required Ca2+ and calmodulin. It appeared that both 24,000- and 55,000-dalton proteins were substrates for the endogenous Ca2+- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. Contaminating sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, first loaded with calcium oxalate, could be separated from the enriched sarcolemma preparation by sucrose gradient centrifugation. The separation was confirmed by comparative analysis of 5'-nucleotidase, Na+ -Ca2+ antiporter, and (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-dependent ATPase activities and by determination of gel electrophoretic (phospho)protein composition, sialic acid, cholesterol, and phospholipid contents. The 24,000-dalton phosphoprotein complex was equally distributed between sarcolemmal and sarcoplasmic reticulum fractions, whereas the 55,000- and 7000-dalton proteins were predominantly found in the sarcolemmal fraction. The 24,000-dalton protein was most likely phospholamban, because no other phosphoprotein was found in the 20,000 molecular weight range.

  20. Comparison of the profile structures of isolated and reconstituted sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Herbette, L; Scarpa, A; Blasie, J K; Wang, C T; Saito, A; Fleischer, S

    1981-01-01

    The profile structures of functional reconstituted sarcoplasmic reticulum (RSR) membranes were investigated as a function of the lipid/protein (L/P) ratio via x-ray diffraction studies of hydrated oriented multilayers of these membranes to a resolution of 10-15 A, and neutron diffraction studies on these multilayers to lower resolutions. Our results at this stage of investigation indicate that reconstitution of SR with variable amounts of Ca2+ pump protein for L/P ratios greater than 88 results in closed membraneous vesicles in which the Ca2+ pump protein is distributed asymmetrically in the membrane profile; a majority of the protein density is contained primarily in the extravesicular half of the membrane profile whereas a relatively lesser portion of the protein spans the hydrocarbon core of the RSR membranes. These RSR membranes are functionally similar and resemble isolated light sarcoplasmic reticulum in both profile structure and function at a comparable L/P ratio. Reconstitution with greater amounts of Ca2+ pump protein (e. g. L/P approximately 50-60) resulted in substantially less functional membranes with a dramatically thicker profile structure. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 11 FIGURE A1 PMID:6456782

  1. Clofibrate, calcium and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, A S; Wickie, G; Peabody, T

    1982-03-01

    The anti-hyperlipidemic drug clofibrate produces negative inotropic effects and arrythmias in isolated perfused rabbit heart Langendorff preparations. In electrically stimulated rat left atria, clofibrate produces negative inotropic effects, the speed of onset and extent of which are decreased by raising the Ca concentration of the bathing medium. Sensitivity of isolated rat atria to clofibrate is not increased when the tissues are stimulated under slow Ca channel conditions, in which the tissues are activated by either isoproterenol or dibutyryl cyclic AMP, although sensitivity to clofibrate is decreased when atria are exposed to increasing concentrations of norepinephrine. Increasing the stimulation frequency of isolated guinea-pig atria to produce a positive treppe also decreases the inhibitory effect of clofibrate, while in rat atria the typical negative treppe is altered towards a positive treppe in presence of clofibrate. The effects of paired electrical stimulation are not diminished by the drug, suggesting that Ca release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum is not affected by clofibrate, although the drug inhibits the rate of Ca uptake by isolated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. These results suggest that clofibrate has multiple effects on Ca functions in cardiac muscle.

  2. Locally and globally coupled oscillators in muscle.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Kuramoto, Yoshiki; Ohtaki, Masako; Shimamoto, Yuta; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2013-09-06

    At an intermediate activation level, striated muscle exhibits autonomous oscillations called SPOC, in which the basic contractile units, sarcomeres, oscillate in length, and various oscillatory patterns such as traveling waves and their disrupted forms appear in a myofibril. Here we show that these patterns are reproduced by mechanically connecting in series the unit model that explains characteristics of SPOC at the single-sarcomere level. We further reduce the connected model to phase equations, revealing that the combination of local and global couplings is crucial to the emergence of these patterns.

  3. Locally and Globally Coupled Oscillators in Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Kuramoto, Yoshiki; Ohtaki, Masako; Shimamoto, Yuta; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2013-09-01

    At an intermediate activation level, striated muscle exhibits autonomous oscillations called SPOC, in which the basic contractile units, sarcomeres, oscillate in length, and various oscillatory patterns such as traveling waves and their disrupted forms appear in a myofibril. Here we show that these patterns are reproduced by mechanically connecting in series the unit model that explains characteristics of SPOC at the single-sarcomere level. We further reduce the connected model to phase equations, revealing that the combination of local and global couplings is crucial to the emergence of these patterns.

  4. Strabismus and eye muscle function.

    PubMed

    Lennerstrand, Gunnar

    2007-11-01

    Studies of external eye muscle morphology and physiology are reviewed, with respect to both motor and sensory functions in concomitant strabismus. The eye muscles have a more complex fibre composition than other striated muscle, and they are among the fastest and most fatigue-resistant muscles in the body. However, it is not generally believed that concomitant strabismus is due to a primary abnormality of the eye muscles or the ocular motor system. The gross anatomy of eye muscles, including the shape and position of the eye muscle pulleys, was not changed in strabismus. The histology of the eye muscle fibres was also basically the same, but changes have been observed in the cellular and biochemical machinery of the fibres, most notably in the singly innervated orbital fibres. Functionally, this was seen as slower contractions and reduced fatigue resistance of eye muscles in animals with strabismus and defects of binocular vision. Most likely the changes represented an adaptation to modified visual demands on the ocular motor control, because of the defects of binocular vision in strabismus from an early age. Adaptation of eye muscle function to visual demands could be seen also in the adult human ocular motor system, but here the effects could be reversed with treatment in some conditions. External eye muscles in the human have sensory organs, muscle spindles and tendon organs, responding to changes in muscle force and length. It is not known how these proprioceptors are used more specifically in ocular motor control, and there is no stretch reflex in the external eye muscles. However, a clear influence on space localization and eye position can be demonstrated with vibratory stimulation of the eye muscles, presumably activating muscle spindles. Different effects were observed in normal subjects and in adult patients with strabismus, which would indicate that the proprioceptive input from one eye of strabismic patients could be suppressed by the other eye, similar

  5. Taurine and skeletal muscle disorders.

    PubMed

    Conte Camerino, Diana; Tricarico, Domenico; Pierno, Sabata; Desaphy, Jean-François; Liantonio, Antonella; Pusch, Michael; Burdi, Rosa; Camerino, Claudia; Fraysse, Bodvael; De Luca, Annamaria

    2004-01-01

    Taurine is abundantly present in skeletal muscle. We give evidence that this amino acid exerts both short-term and long-term actions in the control of ion channel function and calcium homeostasis in striated fibers. Short-term actions can be estimated as the ability of this amino acid to acutely modulate both ion channel gating and the function of the structures involved in calcium handling. Long-term effects can be disclosed in situations of tissue taurine depletion and are likely related to the ability of the intracellular taurine to control transducing pathways as well as homeostatic and osmotic equilibrium in the tissue. The two activities are strictly linked because the intracellular level of taurine modulates the sensitivity of skeletal muscle to the exogenous application of taurine. Myopathies in which ion channels are directly or indirectly involved, as well as inherited or acquired pathologies characterized by metabolic alterations and change in calcium homeostasis, are often correlated with change in muscle taurine concentration and consequently with an enhanced therapeutic activity of this amino acid. We discuss both in vivo and in vitro evidence that taurine, through its ability to control sarcolemmal excitability and muscle contractility, can prove beneficial effects in many muscle dysfunctions.

  6. Myosin flares and actin leptomeres as myofibril assembly/disassembly intermediates in sonic muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Nahirney, Patrick C; Fischman, Donald A; Wang, Kuan

    2006-04-01

    The sonic muscle of type 1 male midshipman fish produces loud and enduring mating calls. Each sonic muscle fiber contains a tubular contractile apparatus with radially arranged myofibrillar plates encased in a desmin-rich cytoskeleton that is anchored to broad Z bands (approximately 1.2 micro m wide). Immunomicroscopy has revealed patches of myosin-rich "flares" emanating from the contractile tubes into the peripheral sarcoplasm along the length of the fibers. These flares contain swirls of thick filaments devoid of associated thin filaments. In other regions of the sarcoplasm at the inner surface of the sarcolemma and near Z bands, abundant ladder-like leptomeres occur with rungs every 160 nm. Leptomeres consist of dense arrays of filaments (approximately 4 nm) with a structure that resembles myofibrillar Z band structure. We propose that flares and leptomeres are distinct filamentous arrays representing site-specific processing of myofibrillar components during the assembly and disassembly of the sarcomere. Recent reports that myosin assembles into filamentous aggregates before incorporating into the A band in the skeletal muscles of vertebrates and Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that sonic fibers utilize a similar pathway. Thus, sonic muscle fibers, with their tubular design and abundant sarcoplasmic space, may provide an attractive muscle model to identify myofibrillar intermediates by structural and molecular techniques.

  7. Developing cardiac and skeletal muscle share fast-skeletal myosin heavy chain and cardiac troponin-I expression.

    PubMed

    Clause, Kelly C; Tchao, Jason; Powell, Mary C; Liu, Li J; Huard, Johnny; Keller, Bradley B; Tobita, Kimimasa

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs) transplanted into injured myocardium can differentiate into fast skeletal muscle specific myosin heavy chain (sk-fMHC) and cardiac specific troponin-I (cTn-I) positive cells sustaining recipient myocardial function. We have recently found that MDSCs differentiate into a cardiomyocyte phenotype within a three-dimensional gel bioreactor. It is generally accepted that terminally differentiated myocardium or skeletal muscle only express cTn-I or sk-fMHC, respectively. Studies have shown the presence of non-cardiac muscle proteins in the developing myocardium or cardiac proteins in pathological skeletal muscle. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that normal developing myocardium and skeletal muscle transiently share both sk-fMHC and cTn-I proteins. Immunohistochemistry, western blot, and RT-PCR analyses were carried out in embryonic day 13 (ED13) and 20 (ED20), neonatal day 0 (ND0) and 4 (ND4), postnatal day 10 (PND10), and 8 week-old adult female Lewis rat ventricular myocardium and gastrocnemius muscle. Confocal laser microscopy revealed that sk-fMHC was expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern within ED13 ventricular myocardium, and the striated sk-fMHC expression was lost by ND4 and became negative in adult myocardium. cTn-I was not expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern throughout the myocardium until PND10. Western blot and RT-PCR analyses revealed that gene and protein expression patterns of cardiac and skeletal muscle transcription factors and sk-fMHC within ventricular myocardium and skeletal muscle were similar at ED20, and the expression patterns became cardiac or skeletal muscle specific during postnatal development. These findings provide new insight into cardiac muscle development and highlight previously unknown common developmental features of cardiac and skeletal muscle.

  8. Systemic RNAi Delivery to the Muscles of ROSA26 Mice Reduces lacZ Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jessica; Chamberlain, Joel R.

    2014-01-01

    RNAi has potential for therapeutically downregulating the expression of dominantly inherited genes in a variety of human genetic disorders. Here we used the ROSA26 mouse, which constitutively expresses the bacterial lacZ gene in tissues body wide, as a model to test the ability to downregulate gene expression in striated muscles. Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAVs) were generated that express short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) able to target the lacZ mRNA. Systemic delivery of these rAAV6 vectors led to a decrease of β-galactosidase expression of 30–50-fold in the striated muscles of ROSA26 mice. However, high doses of vectors expressing 21 nucleotide shRNA sequences were associated with significant toxicity in both liver and cardiac muscle. This toxicity was reduced in cardiac muscle using lower vector doses. Furthermore, improved knockdown in the absence of toxicity was obtained by using a shorter (19 nucleotide) shRNA guide sequence. These results support the possibility of using rAAV vectors to deliver RNAi sequences systemically to treat dominantly inherited disorders of striated muscle. PMID:25127128

  9. Muscle and neuronal differentiation in primary cell culture of larval Mytilus trossulus (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Odintsova, Nelly A; Dyachuk, Vyacheslav A; Nezlin, Leonid P

    2010-03-01

    Molluscan in vitro technology allows the study of the differentiation of isolated cells undergoing experimental manipulations. We have used the immunofluorescence technique and laser scanning microscopy to investigate the organization of muscle proteins (actin, myosin, paramyosin, and twitchin) and the localization of neurotransmitters (serotonin and FMRFamide) in cultured mussel larval cells. Differentiation into muscle and neuron-like cells occurs during the cultivation of mussel cells from premyogenic and prenervous larval stages. Muscle proteins are colocalized in contractile cells through all stages of cultivation. The cultivation of mussel cells on various substrates and the application of integrin receptor blockers suggest that an integrin-dependent mechanism is involved in cell adhesion and differentiation. Dissociated mussel cells aggregate and become self-organized in culture. After 20 days of cultivation, they form colonies in which serotonin- and FMRFamide-immunoreactive cells are located centrally, whereas muscle cells form a contractile network at the periphery. The pattern of thick and thin filaments in cultivated mussel cells changes according to the scenario of muscle arrangement in vivo: initially, a striated pattern of muscle filaments forms but is then replaced by a smooth muscle pattern with a diffuse distribution of muscle proteins, typical of muscles of adult molluscs. Myogenesis in molluscs thus seems to be a highly dynamic and potentially variable process. Such a "flexible" developmental program can be regarded as a prerequisite for the evolution of the wide variety of striated and smooth muscles in larval and adult molluscs.

  10. Interaction of phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylserine with the Ca2+-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum and the mechanism of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Dalton, K A; East, J M; Mall, S; Oliver, S; Starling, A P; Lee, A G

    1998-02-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle contains anionic phospholipids as well as the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Here we study the effects of anionic phospholipids on the activity of the Ca2+-ATPase purified from the membrane. Reconstitution of the Ca2+-ATPase into dioleoylphosphatidylserine [di(C18:1)PS] or dioleoylphosphatidic acid [di(C18:1)PA] leads to a decrease in ATPase activity. Measurements of the quenching of the tryptophan fluorescence of the ATPase by brominated phospholipids give a relative binding constant for the anionic lipids compared with dioleoylphosphatidylcholine close to 1 and suggest that phosphatidic acid only binds to the ATPase at the bulk lipid sites around the ATPase. Addition of di(C18:1)PS or di(C18:1)PA to the ATPase in the short-chain dimyristoleoylphosphatidylcholine [di(C14:1)PC] reverse the effects of the short-chain lipid on ATPase activity and on Ca2+ binding, as revealed by the response of tryptophan fluorescence intensity to Ca2+ binding. It is concluded that the lipid headgroup and lipid fatty acyl chains have separate effects on the function of the ATPase. The anionic phospholipids have no significant effect on Ca2+ binding to the ATPase; the level of Ca2+ binding to the ATPase, the affinity of binding and the rate of dissociation of Ca2+ are unchanged by reconstitution into di(C18:1)PA. The major effect of the anionic lipids is a reduction in the maximal level of binding of MgATP. This is attributed to the formation of oligomers of the Ca2+-ATPase, in which only one molecule of the ATPase can bind MgATP dimers in di(C18:1)PS and trimers or tetramers in di(C18:1)PA. The rates of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation for the proportion of the ATPase still able to bind ATP are unaffected by reconstitution. Larger changes were observed in the level of phosphorylation of the ATPase by Pi, which became very low in the anionic phospholipids. The fluorescence response to Mg2+ for the ATPase

  11. Vascular smooth muscle phenotypic diversity and function

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The control of force production in vascular smooth muscle is critical to the normal regulation of blood flow and pressure, and altered regulation is common to diseases such as hypertension, heart failure, and ischemia. A great deal has been learned about imbalances in vasoconstrictor and vasodilator signals, e.g., angiotensin, endothelin, norepinephrine, and nitric oxide, that regulate vascular tone in normal and disease contexts. In contrast there has been limited study of how the phenotypic state of the vascular smooth muscle cell may influence the contractile response to these signaling pathways dependent upon the developmental, tissue-specific (vascular bed) or disease context. Smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle lineages are traditionally classified into fast or slow sublineages based on rates of contraction and relaxation, recognizing that this simple dichotomy vastly underrepresents muscle phenotypic diversity. A great deal has been learned about developmental specification of the striated muscle sublineages and their phenotypic interconversions in the mature animal under the control of mechanical load, neural input, and hormones. In contrast there has been relatively limited study of smooth muscle contractile phenotypic diversity. This is surprising given the number of diseases in which smooth muscle contractile dysfunction plays a key role. This review focuses on smooth muscle contractile phenotypic diversity in the vascular system, how it is generated, and how it may determine vascular function in developmental and disease contexts. PMID:20736412

  12. Effects of pH-treated Fish Sarcoplasmic Proteins on the Functional Properties of Chicken Myofibrillar Protein Gel Mediated by Microbial Transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Hemung, Bung-Orn; Chin, Koo Bok

    2014-01-01

    pH adjustment would be of advantage in improving the water holding capacity of muscle proteins. The objective of this study was to evaluate the addition of fish sarcoplasmic protein (SP) solution, which was adjusted to pH 3.0 or 12.0, neutralized to pH 7.0, and lyophilized to obtain the acid- and alkaline-treated SP samples, on the functional properties of the chicken myofibrillar protein induced by microbial transglutaminase (MTG). The solubility of alkaline-treated SP was higher than that of the acid counterpart; however, those values of the two pH-treated samples were lower than that of normal SP (p<0.05). All SP solutions were mixed with myofibrillar proteins (MP) extracted from chicken breast, and incubated with MTG. The shear stresses of MP with acid- and alkaline-treated SP were higher than that of normal SP. The thermal stability of MP mixture reduced upon adding SP, regardless of the pH treatment. The breaking force of MP gels with acid-treated SP increased more than those of alkaline-treated SP, while normal SP showed the highest value. The MP gel lightness increased, but cooking loss reduced, with the addition of SP. Smooth microstructure of the gel surface was observed. These results indicated that adjusting the pH of SP improved the water holding capacity of chicken myofibrillar proteins induced by MTG.

  13. Variance in transneuronal retrograde ganglion cell degeneration in monkeys after removal of striate cortex: effects of size of the cortical lesion.

    PubMed

    Cowey, A; Stoerig, P; Williams, C

    1999-10-01

    The extent of transneuronal retrograde degeneration of ganglion cells in the primate retina depends on the age at which striate cortex was damaged, the survival time, the species, and retinal eccentricity. We here report on the effect of lesion size beyond striate cortex, which we assessed along with retinal ganglion cell degeneration in three groups of macaque monkeys who, in each group, had undergone striate cortical ablation at similar ages and survived for similar periods, which ranged from 302 days to 8 years. Where possible, the number of surviving projection neurones in the degenerated dLGN and its volume were also estimated. Results confirm that both geniculate and retinal degeneration correlate significantly with survival time but that the differences within a group can exceed differences between groups and are best accounted for by the extent of the damage to extra-striate visual cortex and underlying white matter.

  14. The ischiourethralis muscle of the rat: anatomy, innervation, and function.

    PubMed

    Dail, W G; Sachs, B D

    1991-02-01

    The ischiourethralis (IU), a striated perineal muscle presumed to be involved in sexual reflexes, was studied in the rat. The paired muscle arises from the penile crus and the penile bulb and unites in a raphe over the deep dorsal vein of the penis. Retrograde tracing studies show that the muscle is innervated by neurons in the dorsolateral nucleus of the lumbar spinal cord, a pudendal nerve motor nucleus which also innervates the ischiocavernosus muscle. Excision of the IU muscle did not interfere with the ability of males to display normal copulatory behavior, nor did it affect significantly the number and intensity of reflexive erections. It nevertheless remains possible that the IU may contribute to intense glans erection by compressing the deep dorsal vein.

  15. The STARS signaling pathway: a key regulator of skeletal muscle function.

    PubMed

    Lamon, Séverine; Wallace, Marita A; Russell, Aaron P

    2014-09-01

    During the last decade, the striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS), a muscle-specific protein, has been proposed to play an increasingly important role in skeletal muscle growth, metabolism, regeneration and stress adaptation. STARS influences actin dynamics and, as a consequence, regulates the myocardin-related transcription factor A/serum response factor (MRTF-A/SRF) transcriptional program, a well-known pathway controlling skeletal muscle development and function. Muscle-specific stress conditions, such as exercise, positively regulates, while disuse and degenerative muscle diseases are associated with a downregulation of STARS and its downstream partners, suggesting a pivotal role for STARS in skeletal muscle health. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the known role and regulation of STARS and the members of its signaling pathway, RhoA, MRTF-A and SRF, in skeletal muscle.

  16. [Biomechanics and bio-energetics of smooth muscle contraction. Relation to bronchial hyperreactivity].

    PubMed

    Coirault, C; Blanc, F X; Chemla, D; Salmeron, S; Lecarpentier, Y

    2000-06-01

    Mechanical studies of isolated muscle and analysis of molecular actomyosin interactions have improved our understanding of the pathophysiology of airway smooth muscle. Mechanical properties of airway smooth muscle are similar to those of other smooth muscles. Airway smooth muscle exhibits spontaneous intrinsic tone and its maximum shortening velocity (Vmax) is 10-30 fold lower than in striated muscle. Smooth muscle myosin generates step size and elementary force per crossbridge interaction approximately similar to those of skeletal muscle myosin. Special slow cycling crossbridges, termed latch-bridges, have been attributed to myosin light chain dephosphorylation. From a mechanical point of view, it has been shown that airway hyperresponsiveness is characterized by an increased Vmax and an increased shortening capacity, with no significant change in the force-generating capacity.

  17. Investigation of function similarities between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and platelet calcium-dependent adenosinetriphosphatases with the inhibitors quercetin and calmidazolium

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, T.H.; Campbell, K.P.; White, G.C. II

    1987-12-01

    The platelet and skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-dependent adenosinetriphosphatases (Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPases) were functionally compared with respect to substrate activation by steady-state kinetic methods using the inhibitors quercetin and calmidazolium. Quercetin inhibited platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activities in a dose-dependent manner with IC/sub 50/ values of 25 and 10 ..mu..M, respectively. Calmidazolium also inhibited platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activities, with half-maximal inhibition measured at 5 and 4 ..mu..M, respectively. Both inhibitors also affected the (/sup 45/Ca) calcium transport activity of intact platelet microsomes at concentrations similar to those which reduced Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. These inhibitors were then used to examine substrate ligation by the platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump proteins. For both Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase proteins, quercetin has an affinity for the E-Ca/sub 2/ (fully ligated with respect to calcium at the exterior high-affinity calcium binding sites, unligated with respect to ATP) conformational state of the protein that is approximately 10-fold grater than for other conformational states in the hydrolytic cycle. Quercetin can thus be considered a competitive inhibitor of the calcium pump proteins with respect to ATP. In contrast to the effect of quercetin, calmidazolium interacts with the platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPases in an uncompetitive manner. The dissociation constants for this inhibitor for the different conformational states of the calcium pump proteins were similar, indicating that calmidazolium has equal affinity for all of the reaction intermediates probed. These observations indicate that the substrate ligation processes are similar for the two pump proteins. This supports the concept that the hydrolytic cycles of the two proteins are comparable.

  18. Conformational changes in the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum detected using phosphorescence polarization.

    PubMed

    Restall, C J; Coke, M; Murray, E K; Chapman, D

    1985-02-28

    The technique of time-averaged phosphorescence has been used to study the interaction of calcium ions and ATP with the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. The presence of excess calcium ions was found to cause a 20% decrease in the phosphorescence emission anisotropy. This is interpreted as being due to a conformational change in the protein and is supported by data from time-resolved phosphorescence measurements which also show a lowering of the anisotropy. This change in the decay of the emission anisotropy is associated with only minor changes in the rotational relaxation time of the protein and is again suggestive of a conformational change in the protein. In some cases ATP was also observed to lower the time-averaged phosphorescence anisotropy possibly via an interaction with the low-affinity regulatory site of the protein.

  19. Mesodermal iPSC–derived progenitor cells functionally regenerate cardiac and skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Swinnen, Melissa; Giacomazzi, Giorgia; Camps, Jordi; Barthélemy, Ines; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Caluwé, Ellen; Grosemans, Hanne; Thorrez, Lieven; Pelizzo, Gloria; Muijtjens, Manja; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Blot, Stephane; Janssens, Stefan; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Conditions such as muscular dystrophies (MDs) that affect both cardiac and skeletal muscles would benefit from therapeutic strategies that enable regeneration of both of these striated muscle types. Protocols have been developed to promote induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to differentiate toward cardiac or skeletal muscle; however, there are currently no strategies to simultaneously target both muscle types. Tissues exhibit specific epigenetic alterations; therefore, source-related lineage biases have the potential to improve iPSC-driven multilineage differentiation. Here, we determined that differential myogenic propensity influences the commitment of isogenic iPSCs and a specifically isolated pool of mesodermal iPSC-derived progenitors (MiPs) toward the striated muscle lineages. Differential myogenic propensity did not influence pluripotency, but did selectively enhance chimerism of MiP-derived tissue in both fetal and adult skeletal muscle. When injected into dystrophic mice, MiPs engrafted and repaired both skeletal and cardiac muscle, reducing functional defects. Similarly, engraftment into dystrophic mice of canine MiPs from dystrophic dogs that had undergone TALEN-mediated correction of the MD-associated mutation also resulted in functional striatal muscle regeneration. Moreover, human MiPs exhibited the same capacity for the dual differentiation observed in murine and canine MiPs. The findings of this study suggest that MiPs should be further explored for combined therapy of cardiac and skeletal muscles. PMID:26571398

  20. Genetically enhancing mitochondrial antioxidant activity improves muscle function in aging.

    PubMed

    Umanskaya, Alisa; Santulli, Gaetano; Xie, Wenjun; Andersson, Daniel C; Reiken, Steven R; Marks, Andrew R

    2014-10-21

    Age-related skeletal muscle dysfunction is a leading cause of morbidity that affects up to half the population aged 80 or greater. Here we tested the effects of increased mitochondrial antioxidant activity on age-dependent skeletal muscle dysfunction using transgenic mice with targeted overexpression of the human catalase gene to mitochondria (MCat mice). Aged MCat mice exhibited improved voluntary exercise, increased skeletal muscle specific force and tetanic Ca(2+) transients, decreased intracellular Ca(2+) leak and increased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) load compared with age-matched wild type (WT) littermates. Furthermore, ryanodine receptor 1 (the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release channel required for skeletal muscle contraction; RyR1) from aged MCat mice was less oxidized, depleted of the channel stabilizing subunit, calstabin1, and displayed increased single channel open probability (Po). Overall, these data indicate a direct role for mitochondrial free radicals in promoting the pathological intracellular Ca(2+) leak that underlies age-dependent loss of skeletal muscle function. This study harbors implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies, including mitochondria-targeted antioxidants for treatment of mitochondrial myopathies and other healthspan-limiting disorders.

  1. The Structure of Mytilus Smooth Muscle and the Electrical Constants of the Resting Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Twarog, Betty M.; Dewey, Maynard M.; Hidaka, Tohoru

    1973-01-01

    The individual muscle fibers of the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis L. are uninucleate, 1.2–1.8 mm in length, 5 µm in diameter, and organized into bundles 100–200 µm in diameter, surrounded by connective tissue. Some bundles run the length of the whole muscle. Adjacent muscle cell membranes are interconnected by nexuses at frequent intervals. Specialized attachments exist between muscle fibers and connective tissue. Electrical constants of the resting muscle membrane were measured with intracellular recording electrodes and both extracellular and intracellular current-passing electrodes. With an intracellular current-passing electrode, the time constant τ, was 4.3 ± 1.5 ms. With current delivered via an extracellular electrode τ was 68.3 ± 15 ms. The space constant, λ, was 1.8 mm ± 0.4. The membrane input resistance, Reff, ranged from 23 to 51 MΩ. The observations that values of τ depend on the method of passing current, and that the value of λ is large relative to fiber length and diameter are considered evidence that the individual muscle fibers are electrically interconnected within bundles in a three-dimensional network. Estimations are made of the membrane resistance, Rm, to compare the values to fast and slow striated muscle fibers and mammalian smooth muscles. The implications of this study in reinterpreting previous mechanical and electrical studies are discussed. PMID:4688321

  2. H+ countertransport and electrogenicity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump in reconstituted proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Carroll, S; Rigaud, J L; Inesi, G

    1993-04-01

    The Ca2+ transport adenosine triphosphatase of sarcoplasmic reticulum was reconstituted in unilamellar liposomes prepared by reverse-phase evaporation. The size of the resulting proteoliposomes was similar to that of native sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, but their protein content was much lower, with a protein/lipid ratio (wt/wt) of 1:40-160, as compared with 1:1 in the native membrane. The proteoliposomes sustained adenosine triphosphate-dependent Ca2+ uptake at rates proportional to the protein content (1-2 mumol Ca2+/mg protein/min), reaching asymptotic levels corresponding to a lumenal calcium concentration of 10-20 mM. The low permeability of the proteoliposomes permitted direct demonstration of Ca2+/H+ countertransport and electrogenicity by parallel measurements in the same experimental system. Countertransport of one H+ per one Ca2+ was demonstrated, and inhibition of the Ca2+ pump by lumenal alkalinization was relieved by the H+ ionophore carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone. Consistent with the countertransport stoichiometry, net positive charge displacement was produced by Ca2+ transport, as revealed by a rapid oxonol VI absorption rise. The initial rise and the following steady-state level of oxonol absorption were highest when SO4(2-) was the prevalent anion and lowest in the presence of the lipophilic anion SCN-. The influence of anions was attributed to potential driven counterion compensation. The absorption rise was rapidly collapsed by addition of valinomycin in the presence of K+. Experimentation with Ca2+ and H+ ionophores was consistent with a primary role of Ca2+ and H+ in net charge displacement. The estimated value of the steady-state electrical potential observed under optimal conditions was approximately 50 mV and was accounted for by the estimated charge transfer associated with Ca2+ and H+ countertransport under the same conditions.

  3. Two Biological Active Fractions Isolated from Buthotus schach (BS)Scorpion Venom Examined on Striated Muscle Preparation, In-vitro

    PubMed Central

    Vatanpour, Hossein; Ahmadi, Farhad; Zare Mirakabadi, Abbas; Jalali, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Buthotus schach is one of the most dangerous scorpions in tropical part of Iran. The effects of its crude venom at 1, 3, 10 μg/mL and its obtained fractions by gel filtrations were investigated on neuromuscular transmission. CBC and MHD indirectly and directly stimulated preparations techniques were used to study their possible pre or post junctional activities. At 3 and 10 μg/mL (not at 1 μg/mL), BS venom caused initiall increase in twitch height followed by blockage due to large contraction that responded gradually at the same time. Contracture responses to exogenous Ach (1-2 mM, 30 sec) and Carb (30-40 μM, 60 sec) in the presence of the venom were not increased which does show no anticholinstrease effects. Furthermore Contracture response to KCl (20-40 mM, 30 sec) does changed exposure to venom in CBC preparations. On the other hand the effects of the venom in response to directly stimulated preparations was shallower than in indirect stimulated preparations. So in agreement with KCL response BS venom affects mostly prejunctionally to facilitate the neurotransmitter release rather than postjunctionally effects. To access bioactive components, seven fractions were collected by gel filtrations techniques. Among the fractions F6, LD50=21 μg < F4, LD50= 35.5 μg < Venom LD50= 84 μg per mice were more toxic respectively. Both fractions show the same effects but stronger than venom on twitch height responses in indirectly stimulated CBC preparations. Finally, according to our results venom as well as fractions F4 and F6 act mostly prejunctionally on Ach release. More attempt is carrying out to study their effects on ion channel activities. PMID:24250518

  4. Long axons within the striate cortex: their distribution, orientation, and patterns of connection.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchison, G; Crick, F

    1982-01-01

    Rockland and Lung [Rockland, K. S. & Lung, J. S. (1982) Science 215, 1532-1534] have recently observed that an injection of horseradish peroxidase into the striate cortex of the tree shrew produces a patchy distribution of label adjacent to the injection site. They proposed that this pattern might be due to populations of neurons with long-range cortico-cortical connections that are interspersed with populations having no such connections. We suggest here an alternative explanation. We can account for the pattern by supposing that the label is carrier by a system of oriented axons. We suppose that these axons link cells with similar orientation preferences and make their connections within a narrow strip of cortex whose direction is related to the orientation of the cells in question. We suggest that such connections could be involved in generating complex receptive fields from simple ones. Other possibilities are that they are used to generate very elongated receptive fields, inhibitory flanks, or end-stopping. We suggest a number of experimental tests of these ideas. Images PMID:6954508

  5. Information conveyed by onset transients in responses of striate cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Müller, J R; Metha, A B; Krauskopf, J; Lennie, P

    2001-09-01

    Normal eye movements ensure that the visual world is seen episodically, as a series of often stationary images. In this paper we characterize the responses of neurons in striate cortex to stationary grating patterns presented with abrupt onset. These responses are distinctive. In most neurons the onset of a grating gives rise to a transient discharge that decays with a time constant of 100 msec or less. The early stages of response have higher contrast gain and higher response gain than later stages. Moreover, the variability of discharge during the onset transient is disproportionately low. These factors together make the onset transient an information-rich component of response, such that the detectability and discriminability of stationary gratings grows rapidly to an early peak, within 150 msec of the onset of the response in most neurons. The orientation selectivity of neurons estimated from the first 150 msec of discharge to a stationary grating is indistinguishable from the orientation selectivity estimated from longer segments of discharge to moving gratings. Moving gratings are ultimately more detectable than stationary ones, because responses to the former are continuously renewed. The principal characteristics of the response of a neuron to a stationary grating-the initial high discharge rate, which decays rapidly, and the change of contrast gain with time-are well captured by a model in which each excitatory synaptic event leads to an immediate reduction in synaptic gain, from which recovery is slow.

  6. Power and control muscles of cicada song: structural and contractile heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Stokes, D R; Josephson, R K

    2004-04-01

    Sound production in cicadas is powered by a pair of large muscles whose contractions cause buckling of cuticular tymbals and thereby create sound pulses. Sound is modulated by control muscles that alter the stiffness of the tymbals or change the shape of the abdominal resonance chamber. Muscle ultrastructure and contractile properties were characterized for the tymbal muscle and two control muscles, the ventral longitudinal muscle and the tymbal tensor, of the periodical cicada Magicicada septendecim. The tymbal muscle is a fast muscle that is innervated by a single motoraxon. The control muscles are an order of magnitude less massive than the tymbal muscles, but their innervation patterns were considerably more complex. The tensor muscle is innervated by two axons, each of which evokes rather slow twitches, and the ventral muscle is innervated by at least six axons, some of which produce fast and the others slow contractions. Muscle contraction kinetics correlated well with ultrastructure. Fibers of the tymbal muscle and the portions of the ventral muscle thought to be fast were richly supplied with transverse tubules (T-tubules) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR); slow portions of the ventral muscle and the tensor muscle had relatively little SR.

  7. The length–tension curve in muscle depends on lattice spacing

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. David; Salcedo, Mary K.; Irving, Thomas C.; Regnier, Michael; Daniel, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Classic interpretations of the striated muscle length–tension curve focus on how force varies with overlap of thin (actin) and thick (myosin) filaments. New models of sarcomere geometry and experiments with skinned synchronous insect flight muscle suggest that changes in the radial distance between the actin and myosin filaments, the filament lattice spacing, are responsible for between 20% and 50% of the change in force seen between sarcomere lengths of 1.4 and 3.4 µm. Thus, lattice spacing is a significant force regulator, increasing the slope of muscle's force–length dependence. PMID:23843386

  8. The length-tension curve in muscle depends on lattice spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. D.; Salcedo, M. K.; Irving, T. C.; Regnier, M.; Daniel, T. L.

    2013-07-10

    Classic interpretations of the striated muscle length–tension curve focus on how force varies with overlap of thin (actin) and thick (myosin) filaments. New models of sarcomere geometry and experiments with skinned synchronous insect flight muscle suggest that changes in the radial distance between the actin and myosin filaments, the filament lattice spacing, are responsible for between 20% and 50% of the change in force seen between sarcomere lengths of 1.4 and 3.4 µm. Thus, lattice spacing is a significant force regulator, increasing the slope of muscle's force–length dependence.

  9. Pathology of Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection in Newborn Mice. Muscle, Heart and Brown Fat Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, G.

    1974-01-01

    Newborn mice were inoculated intracerebrally with murine cytomegalovirus and studies were made of the pathological changes in the striate and cardiac muscle and brown fat. Widespread necrosis was seen in muscle and brown fat in the early stages of the infection. Necrotic lesions became calcified. By 56 days lesions were not resolved in the heart and brown fat but were completely resolved in skeletal muscle. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8.Fig. 9. PMID:4363374

  10. Smooth Muscle Titin Zq Domain Interaction with the Smooth Muscle α-Actinin Central Rod*

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Richard J.; Simon, Alanna R.; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A.; Felix, Augustine; Keller, Thomas C. S.

    2008-01-01

    Actin-myosin II filament-based contractile structures in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and nonmuscle cells contain the actin filament-cross-linking protein α-actinin. In striated muscle Z-disks, α-actinin interacts with N-terminal domains of titin to provide a structural linkage crucial for the integrity of the sarcomere. We previously discovered a long titin isoform, originally smitin, hereafter sm-titin, in smooth muscle and demonstrated that native sm-titin interacts with C-terminal EF hand region and central rod R2-R3 spectrin-like repeat region sites in α-actinin. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis of RNA from human adult smooth muscles and cultured rat smooth muscle cells and Western blot analysis with a domain-specific antibody presented here revealed that sm-titin contains the titin gene-encoded Zq domain that may bind to the α-actinin R2-R3 central rod domain as well as Z-repeat domains that bind to the EF hand region. We investigated whether the sm-titin Zq domain binds to α-actinin R2 and R3 spectrin repeat-like domain loops that lie in proximity with two-fold symmetry on the surface of the central rod. Mutations in α-actinin R2 and R3 domain loop residues decreased interaction with expressed sm-titin Zq domain in glutathione S-transferase pull-down and solid phase binding assays. Alanine mutation of a region of the Zq domain with high propensity for α-helix formation decreased apparent Zq domain dimer formation and decreased Zq interaction with the α-actinin R2-R3 region in surface plasmon resonance assays. We present a model in which two sm-titin Zq domains interact with each other and with the two R2-R3 sites in the α-actinin central rod. PMID:18519573

  11. Task-specific design of skeletal muscle: balancing muscle structural composition.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, S L; McGlothlin, T; Percy, E; Pifer, J

    1998-05-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers are composed of three structural elements, each contributing a unique aspect of muscle function, yet each 'competing' in a sense for space inside the cell. The volume occupied by myofibrils determines the force of contraction, the volume of sarcoplasmic reticulum sets the rate of onset and relaxation of a fiber's contraction and hence contraction frequency, and the volume of mitochondria sets the level of sustained performance. The entirety of functional outcomes in muscle, from sustained isometric to high frequency contractions, and from high power output to high endurance, are all primarily attributable to shifts in the proportions (and relationships) of those three structures. This paper examines and reviews these components of muscle first to identify and summarize structure-function 'rules', and second to examine the balance between sometimes competing demands. In particular, we focus on those muscles in which power, endurance and frequency are all simultaneously high (flight muscles), and examine how muscle has 'solved' problems of space and energy demand. From these results and observations it would appear that for flight to have evolved in small animals, the double packing of inner mitochondrial membranes may be expected in animals under 50-80 g in mass, and asynchronous muscle is structurally essential for flight in small insects with wing beat frequencies above about 100 Hz.

  12. Slowed relaxation and preserved maximal force in soleus muscles of mice with targeted disruption of the Serca2 gene in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sjåland, Cecilie; Lunde, Per Kristian; Swift, Fredrik; Munkvik, Morten; Ericsson, Madelene; Lunde, Marianne; Boye, Sigurd; Christensen, Geir; Ellingsen, Øyvind; Sejersted, Ole M; Andersson, Kristin B

    2011-12-15

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases (SERCAs) play a major role in muscle contractility by pumping Ca(2+) from the cytosol into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) store, allowing muscle relaxation and refilling of the SR with releasable Ca(2+). Decreased SERCA function has been shown to result in impaired muscle function and disease in human and animal models. In this study, we present a new mouse model with targeted disruption of the Serca2 gene in skeletal muscle (skKO) to investigate the functional consequences of reduced SERCA2 expression in skeletal muscle. SkKO mice were viable and basic muscle structure was intact. SERCA2 abundance was reduced in multiple muscles, and by as much as 95% in soleus muscle, having the highest content of slow-twitch fibres (40%). The Ca(2+) uptake rate was significantly reduced in SR vesicles in total homogenates. We did not find any compensatory increase in SERCA1 or SERCA3 abundance, or altered expression of several other Ca(2+)-handling proteins. Ultrastructural analysis revealed generally well-preserved muscle morphology, but a reduced volume of the longitudinal SR. In contracting soleus muscle in vitro preparations, skKO muscles were able to fully relax, but with a significantly slowed relaxation time compared to controls. Surprisingly, the maximal force and contraction rate were preserved, suggesting that skKO slow-twitch fibres may be able to contribute to the total muscle force despite loss of SERCA2 protein. Thus it is possible that SERCA-independent mechanisms can contribute to muscle contractile function.

  13. Deletion of muscle GRP94 impairs both muscle and body growth by inhibiting local IGF production.

    PubMed

    Barton, Elisabeth R; Park, SooHyun; James, Jose K; Makarewich, Catherine A; Philippou, Anastassios; Eletto, Davide; Lei, Hanqin; Brisson, Becky; Ostrovsky, Olga; Li, Zihai; Argon, Yair

    2012-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are critical for development and growth of skeletal muscles, but because several tissues produce IGFs, it is not clear which source is necessary or sufficient for muscle growth. Because it is critical for production of both IGF-I and IGF-II, we ablated glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94) in murine striated muscle to test the necessity of local IGFs for normal muscle growth. These mice exhibited smaller skeletal muscles with diminished IGF contents but with normal contractile function and no apparent endoplasmic reticulum stress response. This result shows that muscles rely on GRP94 primarily to support local production of IGFs, a pool that is necessary for normal muscle growth. In addition, body weights were ∼30% smaller than those of littermate controls, and circulating IGF-I also decreased significantly, yet glucose homeostasis was maintained with little disruption to the growth hormone pathway. The growth defect was complemented on administration of recombinant IGF-I. Thus, unlike liver production of IGF-I, muscle IGF-I is necessary not only locally but also globally for whole-body growth.

  14. First- and second-order stimulus length selectivity in New World monkey striate cortex.

    PubMed

    Bourne, J A; Lui, L; Tweedale, R; Rosa, M G P

    2004-01-01

    Motion is a powerful cue for figure-ground segregation, allowing the recognition of shapes even if the luminance and texture characteristics of the stimulus and background are matched. In order to investigate the neural processes underlying early stages of the cue-invariant processing of form, we compared the responses of neurons in the striate cortex (V1) of anaesthetized marmosets to two types of moving stimuli: bars defined by differences in luminance, and bars defined solely by the coherent motion of random patterns that matched the texture and temporal modulation of the background. A population of form-cue-invariant (FCI) neurons was identified, which demonstrated similar tuning to the length of contours defined by first- and second-order cues. FCI neurons were relatively common in the supragranular layers (where they corresponded to 28% of the recorded units), but were absent from layer 4. Most had complex receptive fields, which were significantly larger than those of other V1 neurons. The majority of FCI neurons demonstrated end-inhibition in response to long first- and second-order bars, and were strongly direction selective. Thus, even at the level of V1 there are cells whose variations in response level appear to be determined by the shape and motion of the entire second-order object, rather than by its parts (i.e. the individual textural components). These results are compatible with the existence of an output channel from V1 to the ventral stream of extrastriate areas, which already encodes the basic building blocks of the image in an invariant manner.

  15. Thin filament proteins and thin filament-linked regulation of vertebrate muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Leavis, P C; Gergely, J

    1984-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of myofibrillar proteins will be reviewed. Consideration will be given to the proteins that participate in the contractile process itself as well as to those involved in Ca-dependent regulation of striated (skeletal and cardiac) and smooth muscle. The relation of protein structure to function will be emphasized and the relation of various physiologically and histochemically defined fiber types to the proteins found in them will be discussed.

  16. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  17. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  18. Structural changes in the lengthened rabbit muscle

    PubMed Central

    Berki, Sándor; Shisha, Tamás; Kiss, Sándor; Szőke, György

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the histological changes in muscle tissue after limb lengthening in skeletally mature and immature rabbits and assessed the most vulnerable level of striated muscle. Twenty-three male domestic white rabbits, divided into six groups, were operated on and different lengthening protocols were used in the mature and immature rabbits. The histopathological changes were analysed by a semi-quantitative method according to the scoring system of Lee et al. (Acta Orthop Scand 64(6):688–692, 1993). After the evaluation of the five main degenerative parameters (muscle atrophy, muscle nuclei internalisation, degeneration of the muscle fibre, perimysial and endomysial fibrosis, haematomas), it is evident that the adults lengthened at a rate of 1.6 mm/day showed more degenerative changes than those lengthened at 0.8 mm/day. The adult 1.6 mm/day lengthened group presented significantly higher damage in the muscle and lower regenerative signs compared with the young 1.6 mm/day lengthened group, according to the summarised degenerative scores. PMID:18259704

  19. Skeletal muscle atrophy and the E3 ubiquitin ligases MuRF1 and MAFbx/atrogin-1.

    PubMed

    Bodine, Sue C; Baehr, Leslie M

    2014-09-15

    Muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx)/atrogin-1 were identified more than 10 years ago as two muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases that are increased transcriptionally in skeletal muscle under atrophy-inducing conditions, making them excellent markers of muscle atrophy. In the past 10 years much has been published about MuRF1 and MAFbx with respect to their mRNA expression patterns under atrophy-inducing conditions, their transcriptional regulation, and their putative substrates. However, much remains to be learned about the physiological role of both genes in the regulation of mass and other cellular functions in striated muscle. Although both MuRF1 and MAFbx are enriched in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle, this review will focus on the current understanding of MuRF1 and MAFbx in skeletal muscle, highlighting the critical questions that remain to be answered.

  20. Atrogin-1, a muscle-specific F-box protein highly expressed during muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomes, M. D.; Lecker, S. H.; Jagoe, R. T.; Navon, A.; Goldberg, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Muscle wasting is a debilitating consequence of fasting, inactivity, cancer, and other systemic diseases that results primarily from accelerated protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. To identify key factors in this process, we have used cDNA microarrays to compare normal and atrophying muscles and found a unique gene fragment that is induced more than ninefold in muscles of fasted mice. We cloned this gene, which is expressed specifically in striated muscles. Because this mRNA also markedly increases in muscles atrophying because of diabetes, cancer, and renal failure, we named it atrogin-1. It contains a functional F-box domain that binds to Skp1 and thereby to Roc1 and Cul1, the other components of SCF-type Ub-protein ligases (E3s), as well as a nuclear localization sequence and PDZ-binding domain. On fasting, atrogin-1 mRNA levels increase specifically in skeletal muscle and before atrophy occurs. Atrogin-1 is one of the few examples of an F-box protein or Ub-protein ligase (E3) expressed in a tissue-specific manner and appears to be a critical component in the enhanced proteolysis leading to muscle atrophy in diverse diseases.

  1. Anesthetics alter the physical and functional properties of the Ca-ATPase in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Karon, B S; Geddis, L M; Kutchai, H; Thomas, D D

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the effects of the local anesthetic lidocaine, and the general anesthetic halothane, on the function and oligomeric state of the CA-ATPase in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Oligomeric changes were detected by time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy (TPA). Lidocaine inhibited and aggregated the Ca-ATPase in cardiac SR. Micromolar calcium or 0.5 M lithium chloride protected against lidocaine-induced inhibition, indicating that electrostatic interactions are essential to lidocaine inhibition of the Ca-ATPase. The phospholamban (PLB) antibody 2D12, which mimics PLB phosphorylation, had no effect on lidocaine inhibition of the Ca-ATPase in cardiac SR. Inhibition and aggregation of the Ca-ATPase in cardiac SR occurred at lower concentrations of lidocaine than necessary to inhibit and aggregate the Ca-ATPase in skeletal SR, suggesting that the cardiac isoform of the enzyme has a higher affinity for lidocaine. Halothane inhibited and aggregated the Ca-ATPase in cardiac SR. Both inhibition and aggregation of the Ca-ATPase by halothane were much greater in the presence of PLB antibody or when PLB was phosphorylated, indicating a protective effect of PLB on halothane-induced inhibition and aggregation. The effects of halothane on cardiac SR are opposite from the effects of halothane observed in skeletal SR, where halothane activates and dissociates the Ca-ATPase. These results underscore the crucial role of protein-protein interactions on Ca-ATPase regulation and anesthetic perturbation of cardiac SR. PMID:7756557

  2. Hofmeister effect of anions on calcium translocation by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Tadini-Buoninsegni, Francesco; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Peruzzi, Niccolò; Ninham, Barry W.; Dei, Luigi; Nostro, Pierandrea Lo

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of Hofmeister (specific ion) effects in various membrane-related physiological processes is well documented. For example the effect of anions on the transport activity of the ion pump Na+, K+-ATPase has been investigated. Here we report on specific anion effects on the ATP-dependent Ca2+ translocation by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA). Current measurements following ATP concentration jumps on SERCA-containing vesicles adsorbed on solid supported membranes were carried out in the presence of different potassium salts. We found that monovalent anions strongly interfere with ATP-induced Ca2+ translocation by SERCA, according to their increasing chaotropicity in the Hofmeister series. On the contrary, a significant increase in Ca2+ translocation was observed in the presence of sulphate. We suggest that the anions can affect the conformational transition between the phosphorylated intermediates E1P and E2P of the SERCA cycle. In particular, the stabilization of the E1P conformation by chaotropic anions seems to be related to their adsorption at the enzyme/water and/or at the membrane/water interface, while the more kosmotropic species affect SERCA conformation and functionality by modifying the hydration layers of the enzyme. PMID:26435197

  3. Impaired Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Uptake and Release Promote Electromechanically and Spatially Discordant Alternans: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Seth H.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac electrical dynamics are governed by cellular-level properties, such as action potential duration (APD) restitution and intracellular calcium (Ca) handling, and tissue-level properties, including conduction velocity restitution and cell–cell coupling. Irregular dynamics at the cellular level can lead to instabilities in cardiac tissue, including alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in the action potential and/or the intracellular Ca transient. In this study, we incorporate a detailed single cell coupled map model of Ca cycling and bidirectional APD-Ca coupling into a spatially extended tissue model to investigate the influence of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca uptake and release properties on alternans and conduction block. We find that an intermediate SR Ca uptake rate and larger SR Ca release resulted in the widest range of stimulus periods that promoted alternans. However, both reduced SR Ca uptake and release promote arrhythmogenic spatially and electromechanically discordant alternans, suggesting a complex interaction between SR Ca handling and alternans characteristics at the cellular and tissue level. PMID:27385917

  4. Diastolic, systolic and sarcoplasmic reticulum [Ca2+] during inotropic interventions in isolated rat myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, J E; Orchard, C H; Boyett, M R

    1991-01-01

    1. The fluorescent indicator Fura-2 has been used to monitor intracellular [Ca2+] (Ca2+i) in myocytes isolated from the ventricles of rat hearts. 2. The relationships between diastolic Ca2+i, systolic Ca2+i and the Ca2+ content of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR; assayed using caffeine) have been studied during changes of stimulation rate and bathing [Ca2+] (Ca2+o). 3. When stimulation rate was increased, there were increases in diastolic Ca2+i, systolic Ca2+i and the Ca2+ content of the SR. 4. The SR inhibitor ryanodine (1 mumol l-1) decreased the size of the Ca2+i transient, and abolished the increase of Ca2+i produced by caffeine (10 mmol l-1). In the presence of ryanodine, increasing stimulation rate increased diastolic Ca2+i but not systolic Ca2+i. 5. Increasing Ca2+o led to increases of diastolic Ca2+i, systolic Ca2+i and SR Ca2+ content similar to those observed during changes in stimulation rate. 6. Ryanodine altered the relationship between systolic and diastolic Ca2+i during changes of Ca2+o. 7. These results are consistent with a change of diastolic Ca2+i leading to an increase in the Ca2+ content of the SR, and hence an increase in the size of the Ca2+i transient during changes in stimulation rate and Ca2+o. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 10 PMID:1890639

  5. Intracellular Ca alternans: coordinated regulation by sarcoplasmic reticulum release, uptake, and leak.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lai-Hua; Sato, Daisuke; Garfinkel, Alan; Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N

    2008-09-15

    Beat-to-beat alternation in the cardiac intracellular Ca (Ca(i)) transient can drive action potential (AP) duration alternans, creating a highly arrhythmogenic substrate. Although a steep dependence of fractional sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca release on SR Ca load has been shown experimentally to promote Ca(i) alternans, theoretical studies predict that other factors are also important. Here we present an iterated map analysis of the coordinated effects of SR Ca release, uptake, and leak on the onset of Ca(i) alternans. Predictions were compared to numerical simulations using a physiologically realistic AP model as well as to AP clamp experiments in isolated patch-clamped rabbit ventricular myocytes exposed to 1), the Ca channel agonist BayK8644 (100 nM) to increase SR Ca load and release fraction, 2), overexpression of an adenoviral SERCA2a construct to increase SR Ca uptake, and 3), low-dose FK506 (20 microM) or ryanodine (1 microM) to increase SR Ca leak. Our findings show that SR Ca release, uptake, and leak all have independent direct effects that promote (release and leak) or suppress (uptake) Ca(i) alternans. However, since each factor affects the other by altering SR Ca load, the net balance of their direct and indirect effects determines whether they promote or suppress alternans. Thus, BayK8644 promotes, whereas Ad-SERCA2a overexpression, ryanodine, and FK506 suppress, Ca(i) alternans under AP clamp conditions.

  6. Atomic force microscopy of three-dimensional membrane protein crystals. Ca-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Lacapère, J J; Stokes, D L; Chatenay, D

    1992-01-01

    We have observed three-dimensional crystals of the calcium pump from sarcoplasmic reticulum by atomic force microscopy (AFM). From AFM images of dried crystals, both on graphite and mica, we measured steps in the crystal thickness, corresponding to the unit cell spacing normal to the substrate. It is known from transmission electron microscopy that crystal periodicity in the plane of the substrate is destroyed by drying, and it was therefore not surprising that we were unable to observe this periodicity by AFM. Thus, we were motivated to use the AFM on hydrated crystals. In this case, crystal adsorption appeared to be a limiting factor, and our studies indicate that adsorption is controlled by the composition of the medium and by the physical-chemical properties of the substrate. We used scanning electron microscopy to determine the conditions yielding the highest adsorption of crystals, and, under these conditions, we have obtained AFM images of hydrated crystals with a resolution similar to that observed with dried samples (i.e., relatively poor). In the same preparations, we have observed lipid bilayers with a significantly better resolution, indicating that the poor quality of crystal images was not due to instrumental limitations. Rather, we attribute poor images to the intrinsic flexibility of these multilamellar crystals, which apparently allow movement of one layer relative to another in response to shear forces from the AFM tip. We therefore suggest some general guidelines for future studies of membrane proteins with AFM. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:1420878

  7. Identification and characterization of alpha-I-proteinase inhibitor from common carp sarcoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Siriangkanakun, Siriphon; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y; Yongsawadigul, Jirawat

    2016-02-01

    Purification of proteinase inhibitor from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) sarcoplasmic proteins resulted in 2.8% yield with purification fold of 111. Two inhibitors, namely inhibitor I and II, exhibited molecular mass of 47 and 52 kDa, respectively, based on non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both inhibitors I and II were identified to be alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI) based on LC-MS/MS. They were glycoproteins and molecular mass after peptide-N-glycosidase F treatment was 38 and 45 kDa, respectively. The N-glycosylation sites of both inhibitors were determined to be at N214 and N226. The inhibitors specifically inhibited trypsin. The common carp α1-PI showed high thermal stability with denaturation temperatures of 65.43 and 73.31 °C, which were slightly less than those of ovomucoid. High stability toward NaCl was also evident up to 3M. The common carp α1-PI effectively reduced autolytic degradation of bigeye snapper surimi at the concentration as low as 0.025%.

  8. Fluorescence energy transfer as an indicator of Ca2+-ATPase interactions in sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Papp, S; Pikula, S; Martonosi, A

    1987-01-01

    Ca2+-ATPase molecules were labeled in intact sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles, sequentially with a donor fluorophore, fluorescein-5'-isothiocyanate (FITC), and with an acceptor fluorophore, eosin-5'-isothiocyanate (EITC), each at a mole ratio of 0.25-0.5 mol/mol of ATPase. The resonance energy transfer was determined from the effect of acceptor on the intensity and lifetime of donor fluorescence. Due to structural similarities, the two dyes compete for the same site(s) on the Ca2+-ATPase, and under optimal conditions each ATPase molecule is labeled either with donor or acceptor fluorophore, but not with both. There is only slight labeling of phospholipids and other proteins in SR, even at concentrations of FITC or EITC higher than those used in the reported experiments. Efficient energy transfer was observed from the covalently bound FITC to EITC that is assumed to reflect interaction between ATPase molecules. Protein denaturing agents (8 M urea and 4 M guanidine) or nonsolubilizing concentrations of detergents (C12E8 or lysolecithin) abolish the energy transfer. These results are consistent with earlier observations that a large portion of the Ca2+-ATPase is present in oligomeric form in the native membrane. The technique is suitable for kinetic analysis of the effect of various treatments on the monomer-oligomer equilibrium of Ca2+-ATPase. A drawback of the method is that the labeled ATPase, although it retains conformational responses, is enzymatically inactive. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:2950938

  9. Impaired Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Uptake and Release Promote Electromechanically and Spatially Discordant Alternans: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth H

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac electrical dynamics are governed by cellular-level properties, such as action potential duration (APD) restitution and intracellular calcium (Ca) handling, and tissue-level properties, including conduction velocity restitution and cell-cell coupling. Irregular dynamics at the cellular level can lead to instabilities in cardiac tissue, including alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in the action potential and/or the intracellular Ca transient. In this study, we incorporate a detailed single cell coupled map model of Ca cycling and bidirectional APD-Ca coupling into a spatially extended tissue model to investigate the influence of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca uptake and release properties on alternans and conduction block. We find that an intermediate SR Ca uptake rate and larger SR Ca release resulted in the widest range of stimulus periods that promoted alternans. However, both reduced SR Ca uptake and release promote arrhythmogenic spatially and electromechanically discordant alternans, suggesting a complex interaction between SR Ca handling and alternans characteristics at the cellular and tissue level.

  10. Mechanism of nitric oxide-induced vasodilatation: refilling of intracellular stores by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase and inhibition of store-operated Ca2+ influx.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R A; Weisbrod, R M; Gericke, M; Yaghoubi, M; Bierl, C; Bolotina, V M

    1999-02-05

    The precise mechanisms by which nitric oxide (NO) decreases free [Ca2+]i, inhibits Ca2+ influx, and relaxes vascular smooth muscle are poorly understood. In rabbit and mouse aorta, agonist-induced contractions and increases in [Ca2+]i were resistant to nifedipine, suggesting Ca2+ entry through non-L-type Ca2+ channels. Relaxations to NO were inhibited by thapsigargin (TG) or cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) indicating the involvement of sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA). Studies of the effect of NO on [Ca2+]i and the rate of Mn2+ influx with fura-2 fluorometry in rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells in primary culture were designed to test how SERCA is involved in mediating the response to NO. When cells were stimulated with angiotensin II (AII), NO accelerated the removal of Ca2+ from the cytoplasm, decreased [Ca2+]i, and inhibited Ca2+ and Mn2+ influx. Inhibition of SERCA abolished all the effects of NO. In contrast, inhibition of the Na+/Ca2+exchanger or the plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase had no influence on the ability of NO to decrease [Ca2+]i. NO maximally decreased [Ca2+]i within 5 s, whereas significant inhibition of AII-induced Ca2+ and Mn2+ influx required more than 15 s. The inhibition of cation influx strictly depended on [Ca2+]o and functional SERCA, suggesting that during the delay before NO inhibits Ca2+ influx, the influx of Ca2+ and the uptake into intracellular stores are required. In the absence of [Ca2+]o, NO diminished the AII-induced [Ca2+]i transient by a SERCA-dependent mechanism and increased the amount of Ca2+ in the stores subsequently released by ionomycin. The present study indicates that the initial rapid decrease in [Ca2+]i caused by NO in vascular smooth muscle is accounted for by the uptake of Ca2+ by SERCA into intracellular stores. It is proposed that the refilling of the stores inhibits store-operated Ca2+ influx through non-L-type Ca2+ conducting ion channels and that this maintains the decrease in [Ca2+]i and NO-induced relaxation.

  11. A Micropeptide Encoded by a Putative Long Non-coding RNA Regulates Muscle Performance

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Douglas M.; Anderson, Kelly M.; Chang, Chi-Lun; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Nelson, Benjamin R.; McAnally, John R.; Kasaragod, Prasad; Shelton, John M.; Liou, Jen; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional micropeptides can be concealed within RNAs that appear to be non-coding. We discovered a conserved micropeptide, that we named myoregulin (MLN), encoded by a skeletal muscle-specific RNA annotated as a putative long non-coding RNA. MLN shares structural and functional similarity with phospholamban (PLN) and sarcolipin (SLN), which inhibit SERCA, the membrane pump that controls muscle relaxation by regulating Ca2+ uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). MLN interacts directly with SERCA and impedes Ca2+ uptake into the SR. In contrast to PLN and SLN, which are expressed in cardiac and slow skeletal muscle in mice, MLN is robustly expressed in all skeletal muscle. Genetic deletion of MLN in mice enhances Ca2+ handling in skeletal muscle and improves exercise performance. These findings identify MLN as an important regulator of skeletal muscle physiology and highlight the possibility that additional micropeptides are encoded in the many RNAs currently annotated as non-coding. PMID:25640239

  12. Muscular dystrophy of the diaphragmatic muscles in Holstein-Friesian cows.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, N; Doi, T; Furuoka, H; Katoh, M; Inada, I; Iguchi, H; Osame, S; Matsui, T

    1994-10-01

    Six Holstein-Friesian cows suffering from recurrent rumenal tympany were pathologically investigated. Macroscopical lesions associated with the clinical symptoms were confined to the diaphragmatic muscles which were pale, and stiff on palpation. Histopathological examination revealed various degenerative changes in diaphragmatic muscles as follows: variation in muscle fiber diameter, vacuolar and hyalinized degeneration of muscle fibers, fiber splitting, central core-like structures, sarcoplasmic masses and ring fibers. These characteristic features in the present cases were consistent with dystrophy of the diaphragmatic muscles in Meuse-Rhine-Yssel cattle. From these observations, it is confirmed that muscular dystrophy of the diaphragmatic muscles dose occur in Holstein-Friesian cows, although a genetic mode was not proven.

  13. Role of the pelvic floor in bladder neck opening and closure I: muscle forces.

    PubMed

    Petros, P E; Ulmsten, U

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the striated muscle forces hypothesized to assist bladder neck opening and closure in females. Cadaveric dissection was used to identify the levator plate (LP), the anterior portion of pubococcygeus muscle (PCM), the longitudinal muscle of the anus (LMA), and their relation to the bladder, vagina and rectum. X-ray video recordings were made during coughing, straining, squeezing and micturition in a group of 20 incontinent patients and 4 controls, along with surface EMG, urethral pressure and digital palpation studies. During effort, urethral closure appeared to be activated by a forward muscle force corresponding to PCM, and bladder neck closure by backward muscle forces corresponding to LP and LMA. During micturition the PCM force appeared to relax, allowing LP and LMA to pull open the outflow tract. The data appear to support the hypothesis of specific directional muscle forces stretching the vagina to assist bladder neck opening and closure.

  14. Mechanism of action of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-uptake activators--discrimination between sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase and phospholamban interaction.

    PubMed

    Berrebi-Bertrand, I; Lahouratate, P; Lahouratate, V; Camelin, J C; Guibert, J; Bril, A

    1997-08-01

    The Ca2+ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) can be affected by direct modulation of the Ca2+ pump or by removing the inhibitory effect of dephosphorylated phospholamban. The effect of these mechanisms was assessed using ellagic acid and 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-dodecanone. Both compounds (30 micromol/l) enhanced SR-Ca2+ uptake in rabbit cardiomyocytes by 65.3 +/- 13% and 44.3 +/- 6.7% for 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-dodecanone and ellagic acid, respectively (at pCa 6.2). A similar effect was observed in cardiac SR microsomes (59.5 +/- 7.4% and 45.1 +/- 6.7) with 30 micromol/l 1-(3,4-dimethodoxyphenyl)-3-dodecanone and ellagic acid, respectively. 1-(3,4-Dimethoxyphenyl)-3-dodecanone increased Ca2+ storage by cardiac SR microsomes mainly at high [Ca2+] with a 57% increase of Vmax, whereas ellagic acid increased Vmax to a smaller extent (22%) and stimulated Ca2+ uptake at lower [Ca2+] with a leftward-shift of the pCa/ATPase relationship by pCa 0.24. Ellagic acid also differed from 1-(3,4-dimethoxylphenyl)-3-dodecanone in that it produced a Ca2+ sensitizing effect only in cardiac SR microsomes (by pCa 0.3) whereas 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-dodecanone stimulated the ATPase, at saturating Ca2+, in both cardiac and skeletal muscle SR vesicles. It is suggested that 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-dodecanone stimulates directly the Ca2+-ATPase activity, in contrast to ellagic acid which enhances the cardiac SR-Ca2+ uptake by interacting with phospholamban, as confirmed by the lack of additive effect between ellagic acid and monoclonal antibodies raised against phospholamban. 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-dodecanone and ellagic acid constitute attractive pharmacological tools to investigate the functional consequences of enhancing SR Ca2+, uptake by affecting different mechanisms.

  15. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase is inhibited by organic vanadium coordination compounds: pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylatodioxovanadium(V), BMOV, and an amavadine analogue.

    PubMed

    Aureliano, Manuel; Henao, Fernando; Tiago, Teresa; Duarte, Rui O; Moura, J J G; Baruah, Bharat; Crans, Debbie C

    2008-07-07

    The general affinity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca (2+)-ATPase was examined for three different classes of vanadium coordination complexes including a vanadium(V) compound, pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylatodioxovanadium(V) (PDC-V(V)), and two vanadium(IV) compounds, bis(maltolato)oxovanadium(IV) (BMOV), and an analogue of amavadine, bis( N-hydroxylamidoiminodiacetato)vanadium(IV) (HAIDA-V(IV)). The ability of vanadate to act either as a phosphate analogue or as a transition-state analogue with enzymes' catalysis phosphoryl group transfer suggests that vanadium coordination compounds may reveal mechanistic preferences in these classes of enzymes. Two of these compounds investigated, PDC-V(V) and BMOV, were hydrolytically and oxidatively reactive at neutral pH, and one, HAIDA-V(IV), does not hydrolyze, oxidize, or otherwise decompose to a measurable extent during the enzyme assay. The SR Ca (2+)-ATPase was inhibited by all three of these complexes. The relative order of inhibition was PDC-V(V) > BMOV > vanadate > HAIDA-V(IV), and the IC 50 values were 25, 40, 80, and 325 microM, respectively. Because the observed inhibition is more potent for PDC-V(V) and BMOV than that of oxovanadates, the inhibition cannot be explained by oxovanadate formation during enzyme assays. Furthermore, the hydrolytically and redox stable amavadine analogue HAIDA-V(IV) inhibited the Ca (2+)-ATPase less than oxovanadates. To gauge the importance of the lipid environment, studies of oxidized BMOV in microemulsions were performed and showed that this system remained in the aqueous pool even though PDC-V(V) is able to penetrate lipid interfaces. These findings suggest that the hydrolytic properties of these complexes may be important in the inhibition of the calcium pump. Our results show that two simple coordination complexes with known insulin enhancing effects can invoke a response in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of muscle contraction through the SR Ca (2+)-ATPase.

  16. Intermediate filaments in muscle and epithelial cells of nematodes

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Current concepts of the developmentally controlled multigene family of intermediate filament (IF) proteins expect the origin of their complexity in evolutionary precursors preceding all vertebrate classes. Among invertebrates, however, firm ultrastructural as well as molecular documentation of IFs is restricted to some giant axons and to epithelia of a few molluscs and annelids. As Ascaris lumbricoides is easily dissected into clean tissues, IF expression in this large nematode was analyzed by electron microscopic and biochemical procedures and a monoclonal antibody reacting with all mammalian IF proteins. We document for the first time the presence of IFs in muscle cells of an invertebrate. They occur in three muscle types (irregular striated pharynx muscle, obliquely striated body muscle, uterus smooth muscle). IFs are also found in the epithelia studied (syncytial epidermis, intestine, ovary, testis). Immunoblots on muscles, pharynx, intestine, uterus, and epidermis identify a pair of polypeptides (with apparent molecular masses of 71 and 63 kD) as IF constituents. In vitro reconstitution of filaments was obtained with the proteins purified from body muscle. In the small nematode Caenorhabditis elegans IF proteins are so far found only in the massive desmosome-anchored tonofilament bundles which traverse a special epithelial cell type, the marginal cells of the pharynx. We speculate that IFs may occur in most but perhaps not all invertebrates and that they may not occur in all cells in large amounts. As electron micrographs of the epidermis of a planarian--a member of the Platyhelminthes--reveal IFs, the evolutionary origin of this cytoplasmic structure can be expected either among the lowest metazoa or already in some unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:3519620

  17. Molecular regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Russell, Aaron P

    2010-03-01

    1. The maintenance of skeletal muscle mass is determined by a fine balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. Skeletal mass is increased when there is a net gain in protein synthesis, which can occur following progressive exercise training. In contrast, skeletal muscle mass is lost when degradation occurs more rapidly than synthesis and is observed in numerous conditions, including neuromuscular disease, chronic disease, ageing, as well as following limb immobilization or prolonged bed rest due to injury or trauma. 2. Understanding the molecular pathways that regulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis and degradation is vital for identifying potential therapeutic targets that can attenuate muscle atrophy during disease and disuse. 3. The regulation of skeletal mass is complex and involves the precise coordination of several intracellular signalling pathways. The present review focuses on the role and regulation of pathways involving Akt, atrogin-1 and muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1; atrogenes), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and striated activator of Rho signalling (STARS), with exercise and disease.

  18. Disruption of patterns of immunoreactive glial fibrillary acidic protein processes in the Cebus Apella striate cortex following loss of visual input.

    PubMed

    Colombo, J A; Yáñez, A; Lipina, S

    1999-01-01

    Long, interlaminar, astroglial processes and its patterned organization in the striate cortex of adult primates was previously described. Loss of visual input following bilateral retinal detachment and degeneration in an adult Cebus apella monkey resulted three months later in reduction of interlaminar processes immunoreactive to Glial Fibrillary Acid Protein antibody, loss of the honeycomb-like pattern normally present in tangential sections, and loss of high density patches of terminal segments of those processes in the opercular striate. These results further indicate the highly interactive nature of neuron-glial cerebral cortex architecture, and the dynamic regulation of astroglial interlaminar processes.

  19. Impact of physical training on the ultrastructure of midthigh muscle in normal subjects and in patients treated with glucocorticoids.

    PubMed Central

    Horber, F F; Hoopeler, H; Scheidegger, J R; Grünig, B E; Howald, H; Frey, F J

    1987-01-01

    Exercise-training might be a logical method to reverse muscle atrophy and weakness in patients treated with glucocorticoids. The purpose of the present investigation was to establish whether a treatment with low dose prednisone (10 +/- 2.9 mg/d) modulates the effect of a moderate strength type isokinetic training during 7 wk (21 sessions of 20 min) on "muscle efficiency" (power output/muscle mass) and on concomitant changes in ultrastructure of the thigh muscle measured by quantitative electron-microscopic morphometry. Training caused a similar increase in "muscle efficiency" in patients on prednisone (n = 9) as in normal volunteers (n = 9). In normal subjects the increase in muscle efficiency was associated with an increase in sarcoplasm, whereas in patients on prednisone the functional improvement was associated with an increase in sarcoplasm, capillaries, and mitochondria content. Thus, a therapy with low dose prednisone does not abrogate training-induced improvement of muscle efficiency but modulates the ultrastructural response of the muscle to the training. Images PMID:3558821

  20. Protein carbonylation and heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle: relationships to age and sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Beltran Valls, Maria R; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Narici, Marco V; Smith, Kenneth; Phillips, Bethan E; Caporossi, Daniela; Atherton, Philip J

    2015-02-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of muscle mass termed sarcopenia, which has significant impact on quality-of-life. Because oxidative stress is proposed to negatively impact upon musculoskeletal aging, we investigated links between human aging and markers of oxidative stress, and relationships to muscle mass and strength in young and old nonsarcopenic and sarcopenic adults. Sixteen young and 16 old males (further subdivided into "old" and "old sarcopenic") were studied. The abundance of protein carbonyl adducts within skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein subfractions from musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were determined using Oxyblot immunoblotting techniques. In addition, concentrations of recognized cytoprotective proteins (eg, heat shock proteins [HSP], αβ-crystallin) were also assayed. Aging was associated with increased mitochondrial (but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic) protein carbonyl adducts, independently of (stage-I) sarcopenia. Correlation analyses of all subjects revealed that mitochondrial protein carbonyl abundance negatively correlated with muscle strength ([1-repetition maximum], p = .02, r (2) = -.16), but not muscle mass (p = .13, r (2) = -.08). Abundance of cytoprotective proteins, including various HSPs (HSP 27 and 70), were unaffected by aging/sarcopenia. To conclude, these data reveal that mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases moderately with age, and that this increase may impact upon skeletal muscle function, but is not a hallmark of (stage-I) sarcopenia, per se.

  1. Beta-amyloid protein-containing inclusions in skeletal muscle of apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, T. A.; Dutton, N. S.; Martins, R. N.; Roses, A. D.; Kakulas, B. A.; Papadimitriou, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The tibialis anterior muscle and soleus muscle of apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice were examined by light and electron microscopy. By light microscopy, sarcoplasmic inclusions were seen in tibialis anterior muscle and 40% of type 2 myofibers were affected in all animals over 8 months of age. These inclusions reacted for nonspecific esterase, cytochrome oxidase, and myoadenylate deaminase and were also periodic acid Schiff positive and stained basophilic with hematoxylin. Moreover, they reacted immunocytochemically with an antibody specific to fragment 17 to 24 of the published sequence of Alzheimer's cerebrovascular amyloid peptide. Immunoreactivity was lost when the antibody was adsorbed with the appropriate synthetic peptide. Ultrastructurally, the inclusions consisted of tubular arrays and were similar to those observed in human muscle in several pathological conditions. In type 1 myofibers of both tibialis anterior and soleus muscle, however, mitochondrial abnormalities including an increase in their number and size were detected, but tubular aggregates were not seen. These large mitochondria possessed an electron-dense inner chamber with an increased number of tightly packed cristae. The results obtained suggest that in these mice there is a disturbed lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle fibers that manifests itself with an accumulation of phospholipid in the form of sarcoplasmic reticulum tubules in the type 2 fibers and enlarged mitochondria with tightly packed cristae in the type 1 fibers. In addition, beta-amyloid protein was closely associated with the accumulated tubules and vesicles of sarcoplasmic reticulum and may represent dysregulation of amyloid precursor protein metabolism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9033257

  2. Muscle differentiation in a colonial ascidian: organisation, gene expression and evolutionary considerations

    PubMed Central

    Degasperi, Valentina; Gasparini, Fabio; Shimeld, Sebastian M; Sinigaglia, Chiara; Burighel, Paolo; Manni, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Background Ascidians are tunicates, the taxon recently proposed as sister group to the vertebrates. They possess a chordate-like swimming larva, which metamorphoses into a sessile adult. Several ascidian species form colonies of clonal individuals by asexual reproduction. During their life cycle, ascidians present three muscle types: striated in larval tail, striated in the heart, and unstriated in the adult body-wall. Results In the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, we investigated organisation, differentiation and gene expression of muscle beginning from early buds to adults and during zooid regression. We characterised transcripts for troponin T (BsTnT-c), adult muscle-type (BsMA2) and cytoplasmic-type (BsCA1) actins, followed by in situ hybridisation (ISH) on sections to establish the spatio-temporal expression of BsTnT-c and BsMA2 during asexual reproduction and in the larva. Moreover, we characterised actin genomic sequences, which by comparison with other metazoans revealed conserved intron patterns. Conclusion Integration of data from ISH, phalloidin staining and TEM allowed us to follow the phases of differentiation of the three muscle kinds, which differ in expression pattern of the two transcripts. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses provided evidence for the close relationship between tunicate and vertebrate muscle genes. The characteristics and plasticity of muscles in tunicates are discussed. PMID:19737381

  3. Regulation of muscle contraction by Drebrin-like protein 1 probed by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, Renata; Butkevich, Eugenia; Platen, Mitja; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Biophysics Team

    Sarcomeres are the fundamental contractile units of striated muscle cells. They are composed of a variety of structural and regulatory proteins functioning in a precisely orchestrated fashion to enable coordinated force generation in striated muscles. Recently, we have identified a C. elegans drebrin-like protein 1 (DBN-1) as a novel sarcomere component, which stabilizes actin filaments during muscle contraction. To further characterize the function of DBN-1 in muscle cells, we generated a new dbn-1 loss-of-function allele. Absence of DBN-1 resulted in a unique worm movement phenotype, characterized by hyper-bending. It is not clear yet if DBN-1 acts to enhance or reduce the capacity for contraction. We present here an experimental mechanical study on C. elegans muscle mechanics. We measured the stiffness of the worm by indenting living C. eleganswith a micron-sized sphere adhered to the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Modeling the worm as a pressurized elastic shell allows us to monitor the axial tension in the muscle through the measured stiffness. We compared responses of wild-type and mutant C. elegans in which DBN-1 is not expressed..

  4. Design and function of superfast muscles: new insights into the physiology of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Rome, Lawrence C

    2006-01-01

    Superfast muscles of vertebrates power sound production. The fastest, the swimbladder muscle of toadfish, generates mechanical power at frequencies in excess of 200 Hz. To operate at these frequencies, the speed of relaxation has had to increase approximately 50-fold. This increase is accomplished by modifications of three kinetic traits: (a) a fast calcium transient due to extremely high concentration of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR)-Ca2+ pumps and parvalbumin, (b) fast off-rate of Ca2+ from troponin C due to an alteration in troponin, and (c) fast cross-bridge detachment rate constant (g, 50 times faster than that in rabbit fast-twitch muscle) due to an alteration in myosin. Although these three modifications permit swimbladder muscle to generate mechanical work at high frequencies (where locomotor muscles cannot), it comes with a cost: The high g causes a large reduction in attached force-generating cross-bridges, making the swimbladder incapable of powering low-frequency locomotory movements. Hence the locomotory and sound-producing muscles have mutually exclusive designs.

  5. Reconstruction of the muscle system in Antygomonas sp. (Kinorhyncha, Cyclorhagida) by means of phalloidin labeling and cLSM.

    PubMed

    Müller, Monika C M; Schmidt-Rhaesa, Andreas

    2003-05-01

    In the present investigation the entire muscle system of the cyclorhagid kinorhynch Antygomonas sp. was three-dimensionally reconstructed from whole mounts by means of FITC-phalloidin labeling and confocal scanning microscopy. With this technique, which proved to be especially useful for microscopically small species, we wanted to reinvestigate and supplement the findings obtained by histological and electron microscopical methods. The organization of the major muscle systems can be summarized as follows: 1) All muscle fibers, apart from the intestinal ones, the spine, and the mouth cone muscles, show a cross-striated pattern; 2) Dorsal longitudinal muscle fibers as well as segmentally arranged dorsoventral fibers occur from segment III to XIII; 3) Diagonal muscle fibers are located laterally in segments III to X; 4) Two rings of circular fibers are present in segment II, forming the closing apparatus in Cyclorhagida. Further circular muscles are present in segment I, forming the mouth cone and the eversible introvert, and in the pharyngeal bulb.

  6. Defective sarcoplasmic reticulum–mitochondria calcium exchange in aged mouse myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sanz, C; Ruiz-Meana, M; Miro-Casas, E; Nuñez, E; Castellano, J; Loureiro, M; Barba, I; Poncelas, M; Rodriguez-Sinovas, A; Vázquez, J; Garcia-Dorado, D

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial alterations are critically involved in increased vulnerability to disease during aging. We investigated the contribution of mitochondria–sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) communication in cardiomyocyte functional alterations during aging. Heart function (echocardiography) and ATP/phosphocreatine (NMR spectroscopy) were preserved in hearts from old mice (>20 months) with respect to young mice (5–6 months). Mitochondrial membrane potential and resting O2 consumption were similar in mitochondria from young and old hearts. However, maximal ADP-stimulated O2 consumption was specifically reduced in interfibrillar mitochondria from aged hearts. Second generation proteomics disclosed an increased mitochondrial protein oxidation in advanced age. Because energy production and oxidative status are regulated by mitochondrial Ca2+, we investigated the effect of age on mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Although no age-dependent differences were found in Ca2+ uptake kinetics in isolated mitochondria, mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake secondary to SR Ca2+ release was significantly reduced in cardiomyocytes from old hearts, and this effect was associated with decreased NAD(P)H regeneration and increased mitochondrial ROS upon increased contractile activity. Immunofluorescence and proximity ligation assay identified the defective communication between mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel and SR ryanodine receptor (RyR) in cardiomyocytes from aged hearts associated with altered Ca2+ handling. Age-dependent alterations in SR Ca2+ transfer to mitochondria and in Ca2+ handling could be reproduced in cardiomyoctes from young hearts after interorganelle disruption with colchicine, at concentrations that had no effect in aged cardiomyocytes or isolated mitochondria. Thus, defective SR–mitochondria communication underlies inefficient interorganelle Ca2+ exchange that contributes to energy demand/supply mistmach and oxidative stress in the aged heart. PMID:25522267

  7. Redox modification of ryanodine receptors contributes to sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Györke, Inna; Belevych, Andriy E; Terentyeva, Radmila; Sridhar, Arun; Nishijima, Yoshinori; de Blanco, Esperanza Carcache; Khanna, Savita; Sen, Chandan K; Cardounel, Arturo J; Carnes, Cynthia A; Györke, Sandor

    2008-12-05

    Abnormal cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) function is recognized as an important factor in the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF). However, the specific molecular causes underlying RyR2 defects in HF remain poorly understood. In the present study, we used a canine model of chronic HF to test the hypothesis that the HF-related alterations in RyR2 function are caused by posttranslational modification by reactive oxygen species generated in the failing heart. Experimental approaches included imaging of cytosolic ([Ca(2+)](c)) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) luminal Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]SR) in isolated intact and permeabilized ventricular myocytes and single RyR2 channel recording using the planar lipid bilayer technique. The ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione, as well as the level of free thiols on RyR2 decreased markedly in failing versus control hearts consistent with increased oxidative stress in HF. RyR2-mediated SR Ca(2+) leak was significantly enhanced in permeabilized myocytes, resulting in reduced [Ca(2+)](SR) in HF compared to control cells. Both SR Ca(2+) leak and [Ca(2+)](SR) were partially normalized by treating HF myocytes with reducing agents. Conversely, oxidizing agents accelerated SR Ca(2+) leak and decreased [Ca(2+)](SR) in cells from normal hearts. Moreover, exposure to antioxidants significantly improved intracellular Ca(2+)-handling parameters in intact HF myocytes. Single RyR2 channel activity was significantly higher in HF versus control because of increased sensitivity to activation by luminal Ca(2+) and was partially normalized by reducing agents through restoring luminal Ca(2+) sensitivity oxidation of control RyR2s enhanced their luminal Ca(2+) sensitivity, thus reproducing the HF phenotype. These findings suggest that redox modification contributes to abnormal function of RyR2s in HF, presenting a potential therapeutic target for treating HF.

  8. ATP regulation of calcium transport in back-inhibited sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles.

    PubMed

    de Meis, L; Sorenson, M M

    1989-09-18

    At high concentrations of ATP, ATP hydrolysis and Ca2+ transport by the (Ca2+ + MG2+)-ATPase of intact sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles exhibit a secondary activation that varies with the extent of back-inhibition by Ca2+ accumulated within the vesicles. When the internal ionized Ca2+ is clamped at low and intermediate levels by the use of Ca-precipitating anions, the apparent Km values for activation by ATP are lower than in fully back-inhibited vesicles (high internal Ca2+). In leaky vesicles unable to accumulate Ca2+, raising Ca2+ in the assay medium from 20-30 microM to 5 mM abolishes the activation of hydrolysis by high concentrations of ATP. The level of [32P]phosphoenzyme formed during ATP hydrolysis from [32P]phosphate added to the medium also varies with the extent of back-inhibition; it is highest when Ca2+ is raised to a level that saturates the internal, low-affinity Ca2+ binding sites. In intact vesicles, increasing the ATP concentration from 10 to 400 microM competitively inhibits the reaction of inorganic phosphate with the enzyme but does not change the rate of hydrolysis. In a previous report (De Meis, L., Gomez-Puyou, M.T. and Gomez-Puyou, A. (1988) Eur. J. Biochem. 171, 343-349), it has been shown that the hydrophobic molecules trifluoperazine and iron bathophenanthroline compete for the catalytic site of the Pi-reactive form of the enzyme. Here it is shown that inhibition of ATP hydrolysis by these compounds is reduced or abolished when Ca2+ binds to the low-affinity Ca2+ binding sites of the enzyme. Since inhibition by these agents is indifferent to activation of hydrolysis by high concentrations of ATP, it is suggested that the second Km for ATP and the inhibition by hydrophobic molecules involve two different Ca-free forms of the enzyme.

  9. Functional properties of a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase with an altered Ca(2+)-binding mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Azorin, F; Soler, F; Gomez-Fernandez, J C; Fernandez-Belda, F

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles with diethylpyrocarbonate in the presence of a large excess of reagent, at pH 6.2 and at room temperature, reveals both a fast- and a slow-reacting population of protein residues. The loss of the Ca(2+)-ATPase activity is mainly associated with the fast-reacting population being partially sensitive to hydroxylamine. There is also an effect on the Ca(2+)-binding mechanism. Shorter derivatization times (5 min) produce a loss of the positive cooperativity of Ca2+ binding. When the treatment was prolonged for 30 min there was an additional decrease in the overall Ca2+ affinity. Curve-fitting procedures applied to the non-cooperative binding isotherms provide the equilibrium constants for the two Ca2+ sites, although they cannot discriminate between interacting and independent site mechanisms. Prestationary kinetics assays show 2 Ca2+:1 ATP ratios, at any extent of Ca2+ saturation, indicating that the Ca2+ sites are not independent. The Ca2+ dissociation profile after derivatization shows a decrease in the dissociation constant for the release of the second Ca2+, which is consistent with interacting sites. Isotopic exchange experiments show fast and slow components of equal amplitude even at subsaturating Ca2+ concentrations, which is incompatible with independent binding sites. The experimental data suggest a modification of the equilibrium binding constants making them more similar, but keeping the interacting character. The structural position of the external (cytoplasmic) and the internal (lumenal) Ca2+ sites remains unaltered in the absence of positive cooperativity. PMID:7626012

  10. Action potential duration determines sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ reloading in mammalian ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Rosana A; Altamirano, Julio; Puglisi, José L; Bers, Donald M

    2004-01-01

    After sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ depletion in intact ventricular myocytes, electrical activity promotes SR Ca2+ reloading and recovery of twitch amplitude. In ferret, recovery of twitch and caffeine-induced contracture required fewer twitches than in rabbit or rat. In rat, there was no difference in action potential duration at 90% repolarization (APD90) at steady state (SS) versus at the first post-depletion (PD) twitch. The SS APD90 was similar in ferret and rabbit (but longer than in rat). However, compared to SS, the PD APD90 was lengthened in ferret, but shortened in rabbit. When rabbit myocytes were subjected to AP-clamp patterns during SR Ca2+ reloading (ferret- or rabbit-type APs), reloading was much faster using the ferret AP templates. We conclude that the faster SR Ca2+ refilling in ferret is due to the increased Ca2+ influx during the longer PD AP. The PD versus SS APD90 difference was suppressed by thapsigargin in ferret (indicating Ca2+ dependence). In rabbit, the PD AP shortening depended on the preceding diastolic interval (rather than Ca2+), because rest produced the same AP shortening, and SS APD90 increased as a function of frequency (in contrast to ferret). Transient outward current (Ito) was larger and recovered from inactivation much faster in ferret than in rabbit. Moreover, slow Ito recovery (τ ∼ 3 s) in rabbit was a much larger fraction of Ito. Our data and a computational model (including two Ito components) suggest that in rabbit the slowly recovering Ito is responsible for short post-rest and PD APs, for the unusual frequency dependence of APD90, and ultimately for the slower post-depletion SR Ca2+ reloading. PMID:15243136

  11. Reconstitution and regulation of cation-selective channels from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, E; Chabot, H; Beaudry, C; Muller, B

    1992-09-08

    In order to study the conductances of the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum (SR) membrane, microsomal fractions from cardiac SR were isolated by differential and sucrose gradient centrifugations and fused into planar lipid bilayers (PLB) made of phospholipids. Using either KCl or K-gluconate solutions, a large conducting K+ selective channel was characterized by its ohmic conductance (152 pS in 150 mM K+), and the presence of short and long lasting subconducting states. Its open probability Po increased with depolarizing voltages, thus supporting the idea that this channel might allow counter-charge movements of monovalent cations during rapid SR Ca2+ release. An heterogeneity in the kinetic behavior of this channel would suggest that the cardiac SR K+ channels might be regulated by cytoplasmic, luminal, or intra SR membrane biochemical mechanisms. Since the behavior was not modified by variations of [Ca2+] nor by the addition of soluble metabolites such as ATP, GTP, cAMP, cGMP, nor by phosphorylation conditions on both sides of the PLB, a specific interaction with a SR membrane component is postulated. Another cation selective channel was studied in asymmetric Ca2+, Ba2+ or Mg(2+)-HEPES buffers. This channel displayed large conductance values for the above divalent cations 90, 100, and 40 pS, respectively. This channel was activated by microM Ca2+ while its Ca2+ sensitivity was potentiated by millimolar ATP. However Mg2+ and calmodulin modulated its gating behavior. Ca2+ releasing drugs such as caffeine and ryanodine increased its Po. All these features are characteristics of the SR Ca2+ release channel. The ryanodine receptor which has been purified and reconstituted into PLB, may form a cation selective pathway.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Compartmentalization of NO signaling cascade in skeletal muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Buchwalow, Igor B. . E-mail: buchwalo@uni-muenster.de; Minin, Evgeny A.; Samoilova, Vera E.; Boecker, Werner; Wellner, Maren; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Neumann, Joachim

    2005-05-06

    Skeletal muscle functions regulated by NO are now firmly established. However, the literature on the compartmentalization of NO signaling in myocytes is highly controversial. To address this issue, we examined localization of enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling in the rat quadriceps muscle. Employing immunocytochemical labeling complemented with tyramide signal amplification and electron microscopy, we found NO synthase expressed not only in the sarcolemma, but also along contractile fibers, in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. The expression pattern of NO synthase in myocytes showed striking parallels with the enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling (arginase, phosphodiesterase, and soluble guanylyl cyclase). Our findings are indicative of an autocrine fashion of NO signaling in skeletal muscles at both cellular and subcellular levels, and challenge the notion that the NO generation is restricted to the sarcolemma.

  13. Protein machines and self assembly in muscle organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barral, J. M.; Epstein, H. F.

    1999-01-01

    The remarkable order of striated muscle is the result of a complex series of protein interactions at different levels of organization. Within muscle, the thick filament and its major protein myosin are classical examples of functioning protein machines. Our understanding of the structure and assembly of thick filaments and their organization into the regular arrays of the A-band has recently been enhanced by the application of biochemical, genetic, and structural approaches. Detailed studies of the thick filament backbone have shown that the myosins are organized into a tubular structure. Additional protein machines and specific myosin rod sequences have been identified that play significant roles in thick filament structure, assembly, and organization. These include intrinsic filament components, cross-linking molecules of the M-band and constituents of the membrane-cytoskeleton system. Muscle organization is directed by the multistep actions of protein machines that take advantage of well-established self-assembly relationships. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  15. Calcium uptake and force development by skinned muscle fibres in EGTA buffered solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ford, L. E.; Podolsky, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    1. The uptake of 45Ca and the development of force by segments of skinned muscle fibres were measured in Ca solutions buffered with EGTA. When the Ca ion concentration in these solutions was above the contraction threshold, Ca was accumulated by the sarcoplasmic reticulum during the delay phase before force developed. The uptake rate increased, and the length of the delay decreased, when the concentration of the calcium buffer was increased. 2. The maximum accumulation of Ca was 2-3 mM. Force developed, ending the delay phase, when the calcium uptake approached this maximum level. 3. The pattern of force development suggested that this process was often accompanied by a sudden release of accumulated Ca. 4. The relation between the kinetics of 45Ca uptake and the interaction of calcium with EGTA and the sarcoplasmic reticulum is discussed. The data indicate that at the low concentrations necessary for relaxation the sarcoplasmic reticulum takes up Ca fast enough to account for the rate at which force falls when intact muscle fibres relax. PMID:5046147

  16. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  17. Muscle aches

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cause of muscle aches and pain is fibromyalgia , a condition that causes tenderness in your muscles ... imbalance, such as too little potassium or calcium Fibromyalgia Infections, including the flu, Lyme disease , malaria , muscle ...

  18. Characterisation of muscles from Frigate mackerel (Auxis thazard) and catfish (Clarias macrocephalus).

    PubMed

    Chaijan, Manat; Klomklao, Sappasith; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2013-08-15

    Frigate mackerel (Auxis thazard) and catfish (Clarias macrocephalus) can be used as alternative sources for surimi production. However, the functionality of surimi is species-dependent. This study aimed to characterise certain chemical and physical compositions of dark and ordinary muscles from these species. Catfish, particularly ordinary muscle, was composed of higher contents of lipid and carotenoid than Frigate mackerel muscle (p<0.05) but ordinary muscle from Frigate mackerel had the highest phospholipid content (p<0.05). Both dark and ordinary muscles of Frigate mackerel had greater contents of myofibrillar proteins than had catfish muscle (p<0.05). Myosin heavy chain and actin were predominant proteins found in both muscle types of both species. Dark muscle from Frigate mackerel had the highest sarcoplasmic protein content, especially extractable myoglobin (p<0.05). Muscles from Frigate mackerel had greater content of sodium chloride than had catfish (p<0.05). The highest contents of iron, copper and selenium were found in Frigate mackerel dark muscle (p<0.05). The pH of ordinary muscle from both species was higher than that of dark muscle (p<0.05). Frigate mackerel, especilly dark muscle, exhibited the most dark-red colour, as shown by the lowest L(*) and b(*) values with the highest a(*) value and redness index (a(*)/b(*)) (p<0.05).

  19. A mathematical model of cardiocyte Ca(2+) dynamics with a novel representation of sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+) control.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, S M; Palmer, B M; Moore, R L

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac contraction and relaxation dynamics result from a set of simultaneously interacting Ca(2+) regulatory mechanisms. In this study, cardiocyte Ca(2+) dynamics were modeled using a set of six differential equations that were based on theories, equations, and parameters described in previous studies. Among the unique features of the model was the inclusion of bidirectional modulatory interplay between the sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+) release channel (SRRC) and calsequestrin (CSQ) in the SR lumen, where CSQ acted as a dynamic rather than simple Ca(2+) buffer, and acted as a Ca(2+) sensor in the SR lumen as well. The inclusion of this control mechanism was central in overcoming a number of assumptions that would otherwise have to be made about SRRC kinetics, SR Ca(2+) release rates, and SR Ca(2+) release termination when the SR lumen is assumed to act as a simple, buffered Ca(2+) sink. The model was sufficient to reproduce a graded Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) response, CICR with high gain, and a system with reasonable stability. As constructed, the model successfully replicated the results of several previously published experiments that dealt with the Ca(2+) dependence of the SRRC (, J. Gen. Physiol. 85:247-289), the refractoriness of the SRRC (, Am. J. Physiol. 270:C148-C159), the SR Ca(2+) load dependence of SR Ca(2+) release (, Am. J. Physiol. 268:C1313-C1329;, J. Biol. Chem. 267:20850-20856), SR Ca(2+) leak (, J. Physiol. (Lond.). 474:463-471;, Biophys. J. 68:2015-2022), SR Ca(2+) load regulation by leak and uptake (, J. Gen. Physiol. 111:491-504), the effect of Ca(2+) trigger duration on SR Ca(2+) release (, Am. J. Physiol. 258:C944-C954), the apparent relationship that exists between sarcoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticular calcium concentrations (, Biophys. J. 73:1524-1531), and a variety of contraction frequency-dependent alterations in sarcoplasmic [Ca(2+)] dynamics that are normally observed in the laboratory, including rest potentiation, a

  20. The Evolution of the Mitochondria-to-Calcium Release Units Relationship in Vertebrate Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Boncompagni, Simona

    2011-01-01

    The spatial relationship between mitochondria and the membrane systems, more specifically the calcium release units (CRUs) of skeletal muscle, is of profound functional significance. CRUs are the sites at which Ca2+ is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during muscle activation. Close mitochondrion-CRU proximity allows the organelles to take up Ca2+ and thus stimulate aerobic metabolism. Skeletal muscles of most mammals display an extensive, developmentally regulated, close mitochondrion-CRU association, fostered by tethering links between the organelles. A comparative look at the vertebrate subphylum however shows that this specific association is only present in the higher vertebrates (mammals). Muscles in all other vertebrates, even if capable of fast activity, rely on a less precise and more limited mitochondrion-CRU proximity, despite some tethering connections. This is most evident in fish muscles. Clustering of free subsarcolemmal mitochondria in proximity of capillaries is also more frequently achieved in mammalian than in other vertebrates. PMID:22013386

  1. Drosophila UNC-45 accumulates in embryonic blastoderm and in muscles, and is essential for muscle myosin stability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi F; Melkani, Girish C; Yu, Qin; Suggs, Jennifer A; Kronert, William A; Suzuki, Yoko; Hipolito, Lori; Price, Maureen G; Epstein, Henry F; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2011-03-01

    UNC-45 is a chaperone that facilitates folding of myosin motor domains. We have used Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the role of UNC-45 in muscle development and function. Drosophila UNC-45 (dUNC-45) is expressed at all developmental stages. It colocalizes with non-muscle myosin in embryonic blastoderm of 2-hour-old embryos. At 14 hours, it accumulates most strongly in embryonic striated muscles, similarly to muscle myosin. dUNC-45 localizes to the Z-discs of sarcomeres in third instar larval body-wall muscles. We produced a dunc-45 mutant in which zygotic expression is disrupted. This results in nearly undetectable dUNC-45 levels in maturing embryos as well as late embryonic lethality. Muscle myosin accumulation is robust in dunc-45 mutant embryos at 14 hours. However, myosin is dramatically decreased in the body-wall muscles of 22-hour-old mutant embryos. Furthermore, electron microscopy showed only a few thick filaments and irregular thick-thin filament lattice spacing. The lethality, defective protein accumulation, and ultrastructural abnormalities are rescued with a wild-type dunc-45 transgene, indicating that the mutant phenotypes arise from the dUNC-45 deficiency. Overall, our data indicate that dUNC-45 is important for myosin accumulation and muscle function. Furthermore, our results suggest that dUNC-45 acts post-translationally for proper myosin folding and maturation.

  2. Resting calcium influx in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Luis M; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca

    2005-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+ leak remains the most uncertain of the cellular Ca2+ regulation pathways. During passive Ca2+ influx in non-stimulated smooth muscle cells, basal activity of constitutive Ca2+ channels seems to be involved. In vascular smooth muscle, the 3 following Ca2+ entry pathways contribute to this phenomenon: (i) via voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, (ii) receptor gated Ca2+ channels, and (iii) store operated Ca2+ channels, although, in airway smooth muscle it seems only 2 passive Ca2+ influx pathways are implicated, one sensitive to SKF 96365 (receptor gated Ca2+ channels) and the other to Ni2+ (store operated Ca2+ channels). Resting Ca2+ entry could provide a sufficient amount of Ca2+ and contribute to resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), maintenance of the resting membrane potential, myogenic tone, and sarcoplasmic reticulum-Ca2+ refilling. However, further research, especially in airway smooth muscle, is required to better explore the physiological role of this passive Ca2+ influx pathway as it could be involved in airway hyperresponsiveness.

  3. Potential dynamics of the human striate cortex cerebrum realistic neural network under the influence of an external signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Leonid A.; Novosselova, Anna V.; Blinova, Nadejda V.; Vinitsky, Sergey I.; Serov, Vladislav V.; Bakutkin, Valery V.; Camenskich, T. G.; Guileva, E. V.

    2000-03-01

    In this work the numerical investigations of a potential dynamics of a neural network as the non-linear system and dynamics of the visual nerve which connect the eye retina receptors with the striate cortex cerebrum as the answer to the through-skin excitement of the eye retina by the electrical signal were realized. The visual evoked potential is the answer and characterizes the human brain state over the structures retina state and the conduction of the visual nerve fibers. The results of these investigations were presented. Specific features of the neural network, such as the excitation and depression, we took into account too. The discussion about the model parameters, used at the time of the numerical investigation, was made. The comparative analysis of the retina potential data and the data of the external signal filing by the brain hemicerebrum visual centers was made too.

  4. Computed tomography of cerebral infarction along the distribution of the basal perforating arteries. Part 1. Striate arterial group

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Goto, K.; Fukasawa, H.; Kawata, Y.; Uemura, K.; Suzuki, K.

    1985-04-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) manifestations of cerebral infarction along the distribution of the basal perforating arteries were reviewed in correlation with cerebral angiography. Infarcts in the territories of perforators were demonstrated individually based on knowledge of their three dimensional distribution as demonstrated by microangiography of cadavers. In Part I of the study, the areas supplied by the medial (MSA) and lateral striate arteries (LSA) were examined. Infarction along the branches of the MSA usually involved the antero-inferior portion of the corpus striatum, immediately posterolateral to the most inferior part of the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle. Infarcts along the branches of the LSA abutted the territory of the MSA posteriorly and superiorly and involved the posterolateral region of the corpus striatum. Clinical and neuroradiological correlations are discussed.

  5. Charged local anesthetics block ionic conduction in the sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channel.

    PubMed Central

    Tinker, A; Williams, A J

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the effect of the charged local anesthetics QX314, QX222, and Procaine on monovalent cation conduction in the Ca2+ release channel of the sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum. All three blockers only affect cation conductance when present at the cytoplasmic face of the channel. QX222 and Procaine act as voltage-dependent blockers. With 500 Hz filtering, this is manifest as a relatively smooth reduction in single-channel current amplitude most prominent at positive holding potentials. Quantitative analysis gives an effective valence of approximately 0.9 for both ions and Kb(0)s of 9.2 and 15.8 mM for QX222 and Procaine, respectively. Analysis of the concentration dependence of block suggests that QX222 is binding to a single site with a Km of 491 microM at a holding potential of 60 mV. The use of amplitude distribution analysis, with the data filtered at 1 to 2 kHz, reveals that the voltage and concentration dependence of QX222 block occurs largely because of changes in the blocker on rate. The addition of QX314 has a different effect, leading to the production of a substate with an amplitude of approximately one-third that of the control. The substate's occurrence is dependent on holding potential and QX314 concentration. Quantitative analysis reveals that the effect is highly voltage dependent, with a valence of approximately 1.5 caused by approximately equal changes in the on and off rates. Kinetic analysis of the concentration dependence of the substate occurrence reveals positive cooperativity with at least two QX314s binding to the conduction pathway, and this is largely accounted for by changes in the on rate. A paradoxical increase in the off rate at high positive holding potentials and with increasing QX314 concentration at 80 mV suggests the existence of a further QX314-dependent reaction that is both voltage and concentration dependent. The substate block is interpreted physically as a form of partial occlusion in the vestibule of the

  6. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  7. Compliance Accelerates Relaxation in Muscle by Allowing Myosin Heads to Move Relative to Actin.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kenneth S

    2016-02-02

    The mechanisms that limit the speed at which striated muscles relax are poorly understood. This work presents, to our knowledge, novel simulations that show that the time course of relaxation is accelerated by interfilamentary movement resulting from series compliance; force drops faster when myosin heads move relative to actin during relaxation. This insight was obtained by using cross-bridge distribution techniques to simulate the mechanical behavior of half-sarcomeres that were connected in series with springs of varying stiffness. (The springs mimic the combined effects of half-sarcomere heterogeneity and muscle's series elastic component.) Half-sarcomeres that shortened by >∼10 nm when they were activated subsequently relaxed with a biphasic profile; force initially declined slowly and approximately linearly before collapsing with a fast exponential time course. Stretches imposed during the linear phase quickened relaxation, while shortening movements prolonged the time course. These predictions are consistent with data from experiments performed by many other groups using single muscle fibers and isolated myofibrils. When half-sarcomeres were linked to stiff springs (so that they did not shorten appreciably during the simulations), force relaxed with a slow exponential time course and did not show biphasic behavior. Together, these results suggest that fast relaxation of striated muscle is an emergent property that reflects multiscale interactions within the muscle architecture. The nonlinear behavior during relaxation reflects perturbations to the dynamic coupling of regulated binding sites and cycling myosin heads that are induced by interfilamentary movement.

  8. An adult-like pattern of ocular dominance columns in striate cortex of newborn monkeys prior to visual experience.

    PubMed

    Horton, J C; Hocking, D R

    1996-03-01

    In macaque monkeys, the geniculocortical afferents serving each eye segregate in layer IVc of striate cortex during early life into a pattern of alternating inputs called ocular dominance columns. It has been disputed whether visual experience is necessary for the formation of ocular dominance columns. To settle this issue, fetal monkeys were delivered prematurely by Caesarean section at embryonic day 157 (E157), 8 d before the end of normal gestation. To avoid light exposure, the Caesarean section and all subsequent feedings and procedures were done in absolute darkness, using infrared night-vision goggles. Tritiated proline was injected into the right eye 1 d after delivery (E158). One week later at postnatal age 0 (P0), the equivalent of a full-term pregnancy (E165/P0), alternate sections of unfolded and flattened visual cortex were prepared for autoradiography or cytochrome oxidase (CO). All three newborns studied at E165/P0 had well segregated ocular dominance columns organized into the characteristic mosaic present in adults. In the upper layers, a mature pattern of CO patches (also known as blobs or puffs) was visible, aligned with the ocular dominance columns in layer IVc. Every other row of patches in layers II, III was labeled by [3H]proline. In V2, a distinct system of alternating thick-pale-thin-pale CO stripes was present. These findings indicate that stimulation of the retina by light is not necessary for the development of columnar systems in the visual cortex. Ocular dominance columns, patches, and V2 stripes all are well formed before visual experience. Even the thalamic input to the patches in the upper layers of striate cortex is segregated by eye in newborns.

  9. Role of calcium influx through voltage-operated calcium channels and of calcium mobilization in the physiology of Schistosoma mansoni muscle contractions.

    PubMed

    Mendonça-Silva, D L; Novozhilova, E; Cobbett, P J R; Silva, C L M; Noël, F; Totten, M I J; Maule, A G; Day, T A

    2006-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that voltage-operated Ca2+ channels mediate an extracellular Ca2+ influx in muscle fibres from the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni and, along with Ca2+ mobilization from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, contribute to muscle contraction. Indeed, whole-cell voltage clamp revealed voltage-gated inward currents carried by divalent ions with a peak current elicited by steps to +20 mV (from a holding potential of -70 mV). Depolarization of the fibres by elevated extracellular K+ elicited contractions that were completely dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and inhibited by nicardipine (half inhibition at 4.1 microM). However these contractions were not very sensitive to other classical blockers of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, indicating that the schistosome muscle channels have an atypical pharmacology when compared to their mammalian counterparts. Futhermore, the contraction induced by 5 mM caffeine was inhibited after depletion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum either with thapsigargin (10 microM) or ryanodine (10 microM). These data suggest that voltage-operated Ca2+ channels do contribute to S. mansoni contraction as does the mobilization of stored Ca2+, despite the small volume of sarcoplasmic reticulum in schistosome smooth muscles.

  10. STEREOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF MAMMALIAN SKELETAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Brenda R.; Kuda, Aileen M.; Peter, James B.

    1974-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of the volumes, surface areas, and dimensions of the ultrastructural components in the soleus muscle fibers of the guinea pig was made by using point counting methods of stereology. Muscle fibers have structural orientation (anisotropy) and have spatial gradients of the structures within the fiber; therefore the standard stereological methods were modified where necessary. The entire analysis was repeated at two section orientations to test the modifications and identical results obtained from both. The volume of lipid droplets was 0.20 ± 0.06% (mean ± standard error, n = 5 animals) and the nuclei volume was 0.86 ± 0.20% of the fiber volume. The total mitochondrial volume was 4.85 ± 0.66% of the fiber volume with about one-third being found in an annulus within 1 µm of the sarcolemma. The mitochondrial volume in the remaining core of the fiber was 3.6 ± 0.4%. The T system has a volume of 0.14 ± 0.01% and a surface area of 0.064 ± 0.005 µm2/µm3 of the fiber volume. The surface area of the sarcolemma is 0.116 ± 0.013 µm2/µm3 which is twice the T system surface area. The volume of the entire sarcoplasmic reticulum is 3.52 ± 0.33% and the surface area is 0.97 ± 0.09 µm2/µm3. The sarcoplasmic reticulum is composed of the terminal cisternae whose volume is 1.04 ± 0.19% and surface area is 0.24 ± 0.05 µm2/µm3. The tubules of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the I band and A band have volumes of 1.97 ± 0.24% and 0.51 ± 0.08%, and the surface areas of the I and A band reticulum are 0.56 ± 0.07 µm2/µm3 and 0.16 ± 0.04 µm2/µm3, respectively. The Z line width, myofibril and fiber diameters were measured. PMID:4824293

  11. Cytoglobin modulates myogenic progenitor cell viability and muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvjeet; Canseco, Diana C; Manda, Shilpa M; Shelton, John M; Chirumamilla, Rajendra R; Goetsch, Sean C; Ye, Qiu; Gerard, Robert D; Schneider, Jay W; Richardson, James A; Rothermel, Beverly A; Mammen, Pradeep P A

    2014-01-07

    Mammalian skeletal muscle can remodel, repair, and regenerate itself by mobilizing satellite cells, a resident population of myogenic progenitor cells. Muscle injury and subsequent activation of myogenic progenitor cells is associated with oxidative stress. Cytoglobin is a hemoprotein expressed in response to oxidative stress in a variety of tissues, including striated muscle. In this study, we demonstrate that cytoglobin is up-regulated in activated myogenic progenitor cells, where it localizes to the nucleus and contributes to cell viability. siRNA-mediated depletion of cytoglobin from C2C12 myoblasts increased levels of reactive oxygen species and apoptotic cell death both at baseline and in response to stress stimuli. Conversely, overexpression of cytoglobin reduced reactive oxygen species levels, caspase activity, and cell death. Mice in which cytoglobin was knocked out specifically in skeletal muscle were generated to examine the role of cytoglobin in vivo. Myogenic progenitor cells isolated from these mice were severely deficient in their ability to form myotubes as compared with myogenic progenitor cells from wild-type littermates. Consistent with this finding, the capacity for muscle regeneration was severely impaired in mice deficient for skeletal-muscle cytoglobin. Collectively, these data demonstrate that cytoglobin serves an important role in muscle repair and regeneration.

  12. Insulin fails to enhance mTOR phosphorylation, mitochondrial protein synthesis, and ATP production in human skeletal muscle without amino acid replacement.

    PubMed

    Barazzoni, Rocco; Short, Kevin R; Asmann, Yan; Coenen-Schimke, Jill M; Robinson, Matthew M; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2012-11-01

    Systemic insulin administration causes hypoaminoacidemia by inhibiting protein degradation, which may in turn inhibit muscle protein synthesis (PS). Insulin enhances muscle mitochondrial PS and ATP production when hypoaminoacidemia is prevented by exogenous amino acid (AA) replacement. We determined whether insulin would stimulate mitochondrial PS and ATP production in the absence of AA replacement. Using l-[1,2-¹³C]leucine as a tracer, we measured the fractional synthetic rate of mitochondrial as well as sarcoplasmic and mixed muscle proteins in 18 participants during sustained (7-h) insulin or saline infusion (n = 9 each). We also measured muscle ATP production, mitochondrial enzyme activities, mRNA levels of mitochondrial genes, and phosphorylation of signaling proteins regulating protein synthesis. The concentration of circulating essential AA decreased during insulin infusion. Mitochondrial, sarcoplasmic, and mixed muscle PS rates were also lower during insulin (2-7 h) than during saline infusions despite increased mRNA levels of selected mitochondrial genes. Under these conditions, insulin did not alter mitochondrial enzyme activities and ATP production. These effects were associated with enhanced phosphorylation of Akt but not of protein synthesis activators mTOR, p70(S6K), and 4EBP1. In conclusion, sustained physiological hyperinsulinemia without AA replacement did not stimulate PS of mixed muscle or protein subfractions and did not alter muscle mitochondrial ATP production in healthy humans. These results support that insulin and AA act in conjunction to stimulate muscle mitochondrial function and mitochondrial protein synthesis.

  13. Depressant effect of active shortening in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Ekelund, M C

    1983-03-01

    The effect of shortening during activity, previously characterized in vertebrate striated muscle, was investigated in the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of the mollusc Mytilus edulis. This muscle is considered to have an essentially myosin-linked Ca2+-regulatory system. Release steps of different amplitude were performed during isometric phasic contraction, and force redevelopment was recorded at a muscle length L1, defined as 90% of the muscle length at which a slight resting tension, approximately 1 mN, appeared in the presence of 2.5 X 10(-5) M 5-HT. Active shortening caused a graded depression of the contractile force without affecting the total duration of the mechanical response. Peak redeveloped force after muscle shortening of 0.06 L1 and 0.18 L1 was reduced by approximately 1.5% and 7.0%, respectively, of the isometric tension value at L1. The shortening effect was fully reversible, and had a lifetime of approximately 8 to 9 s. The depressant effect of active shortening was augmented at a reduced degree of activation of the muscle. The presence of caffeine and dantrolene and altered tonicity of the extracellular medium (0.9 T-1.2 T) did not significantly affect the shortening induced depression obtained at maximum phasic activation of the preparation. The nature of the shortening effect is compared to that obtained in vertebrate striated muscle and is discussed on the basis of differences in Ca2+-regulation of the contractile system in these two muscles.

  14. Differences in myosin head arrangement on relaxed thick filaments from Lethocerus and rabbit muscles.

    PubMed

    Levine, R J

    1997-10-01

    Relaxed thick filaments from insect asynchronous flight muscle appear different from those of other striated muscles, both in sections and as separated, negatively-stained structures. Unlike relaxed filaments of scallops, chelicerate arthropods, or vertebrate striated muscle, all of which display a predominantly helical arrangement of surface myosin heads, insect asynchronous flight muscle filaments appear striped, with cross-striations or shelves at spacings of 14.5 nm. Using a bifunctional agent to cross-link the active sites of nearest-neighbour myosin heads we previously demonstrated that the helical arrays on the surfaces of scallop, arthropod, fish and frog filaments are produced by the association of two oppositely-oriented myosin heads, each of which originates from an axially sequential molecule within the same helical strand. The effect of similarly cross-linking nearest-neighbour heads with the bifunctional agent 3,3'-dithiobis[3'(2')-O-(6-propionylamino)hexanoyl]adenosine 5'-triphosphate in the presence of vanadate on the solubility of thick filaments separated from Lethocerus indirect flight muscle (an insect asynchronous flight muscle) and rabbit psoas muscle was examined. After incubation on high salt, treated rabbit filaments retained their length and surface myosin, while untreated filaments and those with severed cross-links dissolved, indicating that the myosin head arrangement on rabbit filaments is similar to those previously studied. Treated indirect flight muscles filaments, however, separated into distinct segments of variable lengths, usually multiples of 150 nm, while untreated filaments and those with severed cross-links dissolved completely. This implies that intermolecular associations on indirect flight muscles filaments most likely occur between circumferentially-adjacent heads within each crown, but originating from different helical strands. We interpret this difference in the relaxed orientations of splayed myosin heads on the two

  15. HDAC6 contributes to pathological responses of heart and skeletal muscle to chronic angiotensin-II signaling

    PubMed Central

    Demos-Davies, Kimberly M.; Ferguson, Bradley S.; Cavasin, Maria A.; Mahaffey, Jennifer H.; Williams, Sarah M.; Spiltoir, Jessica I.; Schuetze, Katherine B.; Horn, Todd R.; Chen, Bo; Ferrara, Claudia; Scellini, Beatrice; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Tesi, Chiara; Poggesi, Corrado; Jeong, Mark Y.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the function of the cytoplasmic histone deacetylase HDAC6 in striated muscle. Here, we addressed the role of HDAC6 in cardiac and skeletal muscle remodeling induced by the peptide hormone angiotensin II (ANG II), which plays a central role in blood pressure control, heart failure, and associated skeletal muscle wasting. Comparable with wild-type (WT) mice, HDAC6 null mice developed cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in response to ANG II. However, whereas WT mice developed systolic dysfunction upon treatment with ANG II, cardiac function was maintained in HDAC6 null mice treated with ANG II for up to 8 wk. The cardioprotective effect of HDAC6 deletion was mimicked in WT mice treated with the small molecule HDAC6 inhibitor tubastatin A. HDAC6 null mice also exhibited improved left ventricular function in the setting of pressure overload mediated by transverse aortic constriction. HDAC6 inhibition appeared to preserve systolic function, in part, by enhancing cooperativity of myofibrillar force generation. Finally, we show that HDAC6 null mice are resistant to skeletal muscle wasting mediated by chronic ANG-II signaling. These findings define novel roles for HDAC6 in striated muscle and suggest potential for HDAC6-selective inhibitors for the treatment of cardiac dysfunction and muscle wasting in patients with heart failure. PMID:24858848

  16. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase interactions with decaniobate, decavanadate, vanadate, tungstate and molybdate.

    PubMed

    Fraqueza, Gil; Ohlin, C André; Casey, William H; Aureliano, Manuel

    2012-02-01

    Over the last few decades there has been increasing interest in oxometalate and polyoxometalate applications to medicine and pharmacology. This interest arose, at least in part, due to the properties of these classes of compounds as anti-cancer, anti-diabetic agents, and also for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, among others. However, our understanding of the mechanism of action would be improved if biological models could be used to clarify potential toxicological effects in main cellular processes. Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles, containing a large amount of Ca(2+)-ATPase, an enzyme that accumulates calcium by active transport using ATP, have been suggested as a useful model to study the effects of oxometalates on calcium homeostasis. In the present article, it is shown that decavanadate, decaniobate, vanadate, tungstate and molybdate, all inhibited SR Ca(2+)-ATPase, with the following IC(50) values: 15, 35, 50, 400 μM and 45 mM, respectively. Decaniobate (Nb(10)), is the strongest P-type enzyme inhibitor, after decavanadate (V(10)). Atomic-absorption spectroscopy (AAS) analysis, indicates that decavanadate binds to the protein with a 1:1 decavanadate:Ca(2+)-ATPase stoichiometry. Furthermore, V(10) binds with similar extension to all the protein conformations, which occur during calcium translocation by active transport, namely E1, E1P, E2 and E2P, as analysed by AAS. In contrast, it was confirmed that the binding of monomeric vanadate (H(2)VO(4)(2-); V(1)) to the calcium pump is favoured only for the E2 and E2P conformations of the ATPase, whereas no significant amount of vanadate is bound to the E1 and E1P conformations. Scatchard plot analysis, confirmed a 1:1 ratio for decavanadate-Ca(2+)-ATPase, with a dissociation constant, k(d) of 1 μM(-1). The interaction of decavanadate V(10)O(28)(6-) (V(10)) with Ca(2+)-ATPase is prevented by the isostructural and isoelectronic decaniobate Nb(10)O(28)(6-) (Nb(10)), whereas no significant effects were

  17. The use of label-free mass spectrometry for relative quantification of sarcoplasmic proteins during the processing of dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Marta; Mora, Leticia; Concepción Aristoy, M; Toldrá, Fidel

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify changes in the abundance of the major sarcoplasmic proteins throughout the ham dry-curing process by using a label-free mass spectrometry methodology based on the measurement of mass spectral peak intensities obtained from the extracted ion chromatogram. For this purpose, extraction of sarcoplasmic proteins was followed by trypsin digestion and analysis by nanoliquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (Q/TOF) for the identification and relative quantification of sarcoplasmic proteins through individual quantification of trypsinised peptides. In total, 20 proteins, including 12 glycolytic enzymes, were identified and quantified. The accuracy of the protocol was based on MS/MS replicates, and beta-lactoglobulin protein was used to normalise data and correct possible variations during sample preparation or LC-MS/MS analysis. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides precise identification and quantification of proteins in comparison with traditional methodologies based on gel electrophoresis, especially in the case of overlapping proteins. Moreover, the label-free approach used in this study proved to be a simple, fast, reliable method for evaluating proteolytic degradation of sarcoplasmic proteins during the processing of dry-cured ham.

  18. Effects of sodium selenite on vascular smooth muscle reactivity.

    PubMed

    Togna, G; Russo, P; Pierconti, F; Caprino, L

    2000-02-01

    The effects of sodium selenite (Na(2)SeO(3)) on the vascular smooth muscle reactivity of rabbit aorta were studied. In isolated rabbit aorta, Na(2)SeO(3) inhibited contractile response to phenylephrine and developed a lasting contracture in the vascular tissue. Relaxation in phenylephrine-precontracted aortic rings induced by sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo-guanosine 3':5'-cyclic-monophosphate was also inhibited. Preliminary data obtained with ascorbic acid suggested a partial involvement of an oxidative mechanism. Excluding the possibility that Se damages actin or modifies its distribution (immunohistochemical evaluation), results indicate that Se alters vascular smooth muscle reactivity by inhibiting both its contracting and relaxing properties. Calcium-dependent mechanisms appear to be primarily involved and an interference with calcium re-uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum as a possible site of Se vascular action could be hypothesized.

  19. The PI-PLC inhibitor U-73122 is a potent inhibitor of the SERCA pump in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hollywood, M A; Sergeant, G P; Thornbury, K D; McHale, N G

    2010-07-01

    In this issue MacMillan and McCarron in 2010 demonstrated that the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U-73122 can potently inhibit Ca(2+) release from isolated smooth muscle cells independent of its effect on PLC. Their data suggest that the PLC inhibitor can block the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase pump in smooth muscle and cast doubt on the reliability of U-73122 as the main pharmacological tool to assess the role of the phosphotidyl inositol-PLC pathway in cellular signalling.

  20. The role of nitric oxide in muscle fibers with oxidative phosphorylation defects

    SciTech Connect

    Tengan, Celia H. . E-mail: chtengan@neuro.epm.br; Kiyomoto, Beatriz H.; Godinho, Rosely O.; Gamba, Juliana; Neves, Afonso C.; Schmidt, Beny; Oliveira, Acary S.B.; Gabbai, Alberto A.

    2007-08-03

    NO has been pointed as an important player in the control of mitochondrial respiration, especially because of its inhibitory effect on cytochrome c oxidase (COX). However, all the events involved in this control are still not completely elucidated. We demonstrate compartmentalized abnormalities on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity on muscle biopsies of patients with mitochondrial diseases. NOS activity was reduced in the sarcoplasmic compartment in COX deficient fibers, whereas increased activity was found in the sarcolemma of fibers with mitochondrial proliferation. We observed increased expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) in patients and a correlation between nNOS expression and mitochondrial content. Treatment of skeletal muscle culture with an NO donor induced an increase in mitochondrial content. Our results indicate specific roles of NO in compensatory mechanisms of muscle fibers with mitochondrial deficiency and suggest the participation of nNOS in the signaling process of mitochondrial proliferation in human skeletal muscle.

  1. The Structure and Regulation of Human Muscle α-Actinin

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Euripedes de Almeida; Pinotsis, Nikos; Ghisleni, Andrea; Salmazo, Anita; Konarev, Petr V.; Kostan, Julius; Sjöblom, Björn; Schreiner, Claudia; Polyansky, Anton A.; Gkougkoulia, Eirini A.; Holt, Mark R.; Aachmann, Finn L.; Žagrović, Bojan; Bordignon, Enrica; Pirker, Katharina F.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Gautel, Mathias; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Summary The spectrin superfamily of proteins plays key roles in assembling the actin cytoskeleton in various cell types, crosslinks actin filaments, and acts as scaffolds for the assembly of large protein complexes involved in structural integrity and mechanosensation, as well as cell signaling. α-actinins in particular are the major actin crosslinkers in muscle Z-disks, focal adhesions, and actin stress fibers. We report a complete high-resolution structure of the 200 kDa α-actinin-2 dimer from striated muscle and explore its functional implications on the biochemical and cellular level. The structure provides insight into the phosphoinositide-based mechanism controlling its interaction with sarcomeric proteins such as titin, lays a foundation for studying the impact of pathogenic mutations at molecular resolution, and is likely to be broadly relevant for the regulation of spectrin-like proteins. PMID:25433700

  2. The structure and regulation of human muscle α-actinin.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Euripedes de Almeida; Pinotsis, Nikos; Ghisleni, Andrea; Salmazo, Anita; Konarev, Petr V; Kostan, Julius; Sjöblom, Björn; Schreiner, Claudia; Polyansky, Anton A; Gkougkoulia, Eirini A; Holt, Mark R; Aachmann, Finn L; Zagrović, Bojan; Bordignon, Enrica; Pirker, Katharina F; Svergun, Dmitri I; Gautel, Mathias; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2014-12-04

    The spectrin superfamily of proteins plays key roles in assembling the actin cytoskeleton in various cell types, crosslinks actin filaments, and acts as scaffolds for the assembly of large protein complexes involved in structural integrity and mechanosensation, as well as cell signaling. α-actinins in particular are the major actin crosslinkers in muscle Z-disks, focal adhesions, and actin stress fibers. We report a complete high-resolution structure of the 200 kDa α-actinin-2 dimer from striated muscle and explore its functional implications on the biochemical and cellular level. The structure provides insight into the phosphoinositide-based mechanism controlling its interaction with sarcomeric proteins such as titin, lays a foundation for studying the impact of pathogenic mutations at molecular resolution, and is likely to be broadly relevant for the regulation of spectrin-like proteins.

  3. β-Adrenergic receptor blockade blunts postexercise skeletal muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis rates in humans

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Matthew M.; Bell, Christopher; Peelor, Frederick F.

    2011-01-01

    β-Adrenergic receptor (AR) signaling is a regulator of skeletal muscle protein synthesis and mitochondrial biogenesis in mice. We hypothesized that β-AR blockade blunts postexercise skeletal muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis rates in adult humans. Six healthy men (mean ± SD: 26 ± 6 yr old, 39.9 ± 4.9 ml·kg−1·min−1 peak O2 uptake, 26.7 ± 2.0 kg/m2 body mass index) performed 1 h of stationary cycle ergometer exercise (60% peak O2 uptake) during 1) β-AR blockade (intravenous propranolol) and 2) administration of saline (control). Skeletal muscle mitochondrial, myofibrillar, and sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rates were assessed using [2H5]phenylalanine incorporation into skeletal muscle proteins after exercise. The mRNA content of signals for mitochondrial biogenesis was determined using real-time PCR. β-AR blockade decreased mitochondrial (from 0.217 ± 0.076 to 0.135 ± 0.031%/h, P < 0.05), but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic, protein synthesis rates. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α mRNA was increased ∼2.5-fold (P < 0.05) at 5 h compared with 1 h postexercise but was not influenced by β-AR blockade. We conclude that decreased β-AR signaling during cycling can blunt the postexercise increase in mitochondrial protein synthesis rates without affecting mRNA content. PMID:21613574

  4. The effect of cryotherapy on the cremaster muscle microcirculation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Brown, N J; Pollock, K J; Bayjoo, P; Reed, M W

    1994-04-01

    The effect of cryotherapy on normal striated muscle was investigated using 18 adult male rats. Animals were divided into two groups, an experimental cryotherapy group and a control group receiving sham treatment. After the surgical procedure animals were allowed to equilibrate and vessel diameters, macromolecular leakage and blood flow were assessed before the cremaster muscle was frozen to -60 degrees C. After thawing measurements were taken every 15 min over a 2 h period. Cryotherapy resulted in an initial reduction in blood flow followed by a brief period of reperfusion, with complete vascular stasis eventually observed. Macromolecular leakage occurred from all vessels, which mirrored the fluctuations in blood flow. Transient changes in vessel diameters were also observed. Histology confirmed the in vivo observations of vessel congestion and muscle damage. The data suggest that cessation of flow and increased macromolecular leakage within the muscle may contribute to the cell death and tumour necrosis observed following cryotherapy.

  5. Thick filament mechano-sensing is a calcium-independent regulatory mechanism in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fusi, L.; Brunello, E.; Yan, Z.; Irving, M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent X-ray diffraction studies on actively contracting fibres from skeletal muscle showed that the number of myosin motors available to interact with actin-containing thin filaments is controlled by the stress in the myosin-containing thick filaments. Those results suggested that thick filament mechano-sensing might constitute a novel regulatory mechanism in striated muscles that acts independently of the well-known thin filament-mediated calcium signalling pathway. Here we test that hypothesis using probes attached to the myosin regulatory light chain in demembranated muscle fibres. We show that both the extent and kinetics of thick filament activation depend on thick filament stress but are independent of intracellular calcium concentration in the physiological range. These results establish direct control of myosin motors by thick filament mechano-sensing as a general regulatory mechanism in skeletal muscle that is independent of the canonical calcium signalling pathway. PMID:27796302

  6. Alterations in Skeletal Muscle Microcirculation of Head-Down Tilted Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Stepke, Bernhard; Fleming, John T.; Joshua, Irving G.

    1992-01-01

    In this study we assessed the function of microscopic blood vessels in skeletal muscle (cremaster muscle) for alterations which may contribute to the observed elevation of blood pressure associated with head-down tilted whole body suspension (HDT/WBS), a model of weightlessness. Arteriolar baseline diameters, vasoconstrictor responses to norepinephrine (NE) and vasodilation to nitroprusside (NP) were assessed in control rats, rats suspended for 7 or 14 day HDT/WBS rats, and rats allowed to recover for 1 day after 7 days HDT/WBS. Neither baseline diameters nor ability to dilate were influenced by HDT/WBS. Maximum vasoconstriction to norepinephrine was significantly greater in arterioles of hypertensive 14 day HDT/WBS rats. This first study of the intact microvasculature in skeletal muscle indicates that an elevated contractility of arterioles to norepinephrine in suspended rats, and suggests an elevated peripheral resistance in striated muscle may contribute to the increase in blood pressures among animals subjected to HDT/WBS.

  7. Titin, a Central Mediator for Hypertrophic Signaling, Exercise-Induced Mechanosignaling and Skeletal Muscle Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Martina; Kötter, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Titin is a giant scaffold protein with multiple functions in striated muscle physiology. Due to the elastic I-band domains and the filament-like integration in the half-sarcomere titin is an important factor for sarcomere assembly and serves as an adaptable molecular spring that determines myofilament distensibility. Protein-interactions e.g., with muscle ankyrin repeat proteins or muscle LIM-protein link titin to hypertrophic signaling and via p62 and Muscle Ring Finger proteins to mechanisms that control protein quality control. This review summarizes our current knowledge on titin as a central node for exercise-induced mechanosignaling and remodeling and further highlights the pathophysiological implications. PMID:26973541

  8. Bioengineered human myobundles mimic clinical responses of skeletal muscle to drugs.

    PubMed

    Madden, Lauran; Juhas, Mark; Kraus, William E; Truskey, George A; Bursac, Nenad

    2015-01-09

    Existing in vitro models of human skeletal muscle cannot recapitulate the organization and function of native muscle, limiting their use in physiological and pharmacological studies. Here, we demonstrate engineering of electrically and chemically responsive, contractile human muscle tissues ('myobundles') using primary myogenic cells. These biomimetic constructs exhibit aligned architecture, multinucleated and striated myofibers, and a Pax7(+) cell pool. They contract spontaneously and respond to electrical stimuli with twitch and tetanic contractions. Positive correlation between contractile force and GCaMP6-reported calcium responses enables non-invasive tracking of myobundle function and drug response. During culture, myobundles maintain functional acetylcholine receptors and structurally and functionally mature, evidenced by increased myofiber diameter and improved calcium handling and contractile strength. In response to diversely acting drugs, myobundles undergo dose-dependent hypertrophy or toxic myopathy similar to clinical outcomes. Human myobundles provide an enabling platform for predictive drug and toxicology screening and development of novel therapeutics for muscle-related disorders.

  9. The effect of cryotherapy on the cremaster muscle microcirculation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, N. J.; Pollock, K. J.; Bayjoo, P.; Reed, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of cryotherapy on normal striated muscle was investigated using 18 adult male rats. Animals were divided into two groups, an experimental cryotherapy group and a control group receiving sham treatment. After the surgical procedure animals were allowed to equilibrate and vessel diameters, macromolecular leakage and blood flow were assessed before the cremaster muscle was frozen to -60 degrees C. After thawing measurements were taken every 15 min over a 2 h period. Cryotherapy resulted in an initial reduction in blood flow followed by a brief period of reperfusion, with complete vascular stasis eventually observed. Macromolecular leakage occurred from all vessels, which mirrored the fluctuations in blood flow. Transient changes in vessel diameters were also observed. Histology confirmed the in vivo observations of vessel congestion and muscle damage. The data suggest that cessation of flow and increased macromolecular leakage within the muscle may contribute to the cell death and tumour necrosis observed following cryotherapy. Images Figure 6 PMID:8142258

  10. Compliance Accelerates Relaxation in Muscle by Allowing Myosin Heads to Move Relative to Actin

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that limit the speed at which striated muscles relax are poorly understood. This work presents, to our knowledge, novel simulations that show that the time course of relaxation is accelerated by interfilamentary movement resulting from series compliance; force drops faster when myosin heads move relative to actin during relaxation. This insight was obtained by using cross-bridge distribution techniques to simulate the mechanical behavior of half-sarcomeres that were connected in series with springs of varying stiffness. (The springs mimic the combined effects of half-sarcomere heterogeneity and muscle’s series elastic component.) Half-sarcomeres that shortened by >∼10 nm when they were activated subsequently relaxed with a biphasic profile; force initially declined slowly and approximately linearly before collapsing with a fast exponential time course. Stretches imposed during the linear phase quickened relaxation, while shortening movements prolonged the time course. These predictions are consistent with data from experiments performed by many other groups using single muscle fibers and isolated myofibrils. When half-sarcomeres were linked to stiff springs (so that they did not shorten appreciably during the simulations), force relaxed with a slow exponential time course and did not show biphasic behavior. Together, these results suggest that fast relaxation of striated muscle is an emergent property that reflects multiscale interactions within the muscle architecture. The nonlinear behavior during relaxation reflects perturbations to the dynamic coupling of regulated binding sites and cycling myosin heads that are induced by interfilamentary movement. PMID:26840730

  11. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflammatory diseases of muscle (such as polymyositis or dermatomyositis ) Diseases of the connective tissue and blood vessels ( ... disease that involves inflammation and a skin rash ( dermatomyositis ) Inherited muscle disorder ( Duchenne muscular dystrophy ) Inflammation of ...

  12. Ethanol has different effects on Ca(2+)-transport ATPases of muscle, brain and blood platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Mitidieri, F; de Meis, L

    1995-01-01

    The effects of ethanol on different sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-transport ATPases (SERCAs) were studied. In sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, ethanol concentrations varying from 5 to 20% promoted a progressive inhibition of Ca2+ uptake, enhancement of Ca2+ efflux, activation of the ATPase activity, increase of the enzyme phosphorylation by ATP and inhibition of enzyme phosphorylation by P1. The effects of ethanol on Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ efflux were antagonized by Mg2+, P(i) and spermine. The increased efflux promoted by ethanol was antagonized by Ca2+ and thapsigargin. In brain and platelet vesicles a biphasic effect of ethanol was observed, so that activation occurred at low concentrations (5-10%) and inhibition at higher concentrations. The activation was not observed with the use of n-propanol and n-butanol. Different from the situation in sarcoplasmic reticulum, the decrease of the Ca2+ uptake in brain and platelet vesicles was associated with an inhibition of the ATPase activity. Mg2+ and P(i) antagonized the enhancement of Ca2+ efflux and the inhibition of Ca2+ uptake promoted by ethanol. However, thapsigargin and Ca2+ did not arrest the Ca2+ efflux promoted by ethanol in brain and platelet preparations. These results suggest that, in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, ethanol uncouples the pump, promoting its activity as a Ca2+ channel. The SERCA isoform found in skeletal muscle has different properties from the isoforms found in brain and blood platelets. PMID:8554513

  13. Phosphate fluxes in single muscle fibres of the spider crab, Maia squinado.

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, P C; Lowe, A G

    1980-01-01

    1. The rates of influx and efflux of [32P]orthophosphate (Pi) have bben measured in single muscle fibres of the spider crab, Maia squinado. 2. Rates of influx of 32Pi from salines containing 0 . 11 to 0 . 37 mM-Pi ranged from 0 . 11 to 0 . 41 p-mole cm-2 sec-1. 3. After injection of [32P]orthophosphate there was an early rapid phase of 32P efflux which was maximal after about 5-10 min, then a gradual decline until a low steady-state efflux rate was established after about 100 min. The rate of decline of 32P efflux was similar to the rate of equilibration of injected 32Pi with arginine phosphate and ATP. 4. The steady-state rate of 32P efflux was typically about 0 . 70 p-mole cm-2 sec-1 when the sarcoplasmic Pi concentraion was 5 m-mole kg-1. Exposure of mucle fibres to conditions which caused contraction and increased the sarcoplasmic concentration of Pi also increased the rate of 32P efflux, which appeared to be linearly related to sarcoplasmic Pi concentration. 5. The results are compared with previous measurements of phosphate fluxes in nerve. PMID:7411440

  14. Phosphate fluxes in single muscle fibres of the spider crab, Maia squinado.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, P C; Lowe, A G

    1980-04-01

    1. The rates of influx and efflux of [32P]orthophosphate (Pi) have bben measured in single muscle fibres of the spider crab, Maia squinado. 2. Rates of influx of 32Pi from salines containing 0 . 11 to 0 . 37 mM-Pi ranged from 0 . 11 to 0 . 41 p-mole cm-2 sec-1. 3. After injection of [32P]orthophosphate there was an early rapid phase of 32P efflux which was maximal after about 5-10 min, then a gradual decline until a low steady-state efflux rate was established after about 100 min. The rate of decline of 32P efflux was similar to the rate of equilibration of injected 32Pi with arginine phosphate and ATP. 4. The steady-state rate of 32P efflux was typically about 0 . 70 p-mole cm-2 sec-1 when the sarcoplasmic Pi concentraion was 5 m-mole kg-1. Exposure of mucle fibres to conditions which caused contraction and increased the sarcoplasmic concentration of Pi also increased the rate of 32P efflux, which appeared to be linearly related to sarcoplasmic Pi concentration. 5. The results are compared with previous measurements of phosphate fluxes in nerve.

  15. Striated and pitted pebbles as paleostress markers: an example from the central transect of the Betic Cordillera (SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruano, Patricia; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús

    2004-02-01

    Striated and pitted pebbles provide scarce structures that preserve information on the stresses that their host rocks have undergone. This information can be obtained by the measurement of a large number of microfaults with striae and solution marks within a small rock volume. For non-rotational deformation, the statistical procedures for microfault analysis provide a valid tool for determining the overprinting of successive stress ellipsoids, including their axial ratios and the orientations of the main axes. The trends of compressions obtained from striae can be compared with the determinations from the pole of pebble solution pits. However, in complex tectonics settings, the solution pits of several deformation phases are mixed and only striae analysis allows overprinted paleostresses to be accurately distinguished. The analysis of several pebbles from the same outcrop, including five from moderately complex settings, allows determination of the homogeneity of the paleostresses at outcrop scale, the detection of redeposited pebbles, and supports the results of microtectonic analysis for large areas. Solution mark distributions on pebbles depend on the burial and tectonic stresses. Conglomerates from shallow levels, such as those from Quaternary fluvial terraces, only record horizontal compressional solution marks because the minimum vertical stress needed to develop these structures are not reached by burial. In the central Betic Cordillera, striated and pitted pebbles are composed of carbonate surrounded by a matrix containing siliciclastic elements. The study of several outcrops located across a transect of the Cordillera shows a change in the recent stress field. While conglomerates near the Internal-External zone boundary show extensional stresses that may be related to the uplift of the Cordillera since Tortonian times, the outcrops located in the External Zone and up to the mountain front indicate the existence of horizontal NW-SE and NE-SW compressions

  16. Purification and characterisation of sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein, a novel allergen of red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii).

    PubMed

    Chen, Heng-Li; Cao, Min-Jie; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Su, Wen-Jin; Mao, Hai-Yan; Liu, Guang-Ming

    2013-08-15

    Crayfish sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (SCP) was purified. The physicochemical and polymorphic characterisations were also analysed. SCP was purified by column chromatography to reveal a single band with molecular mass of 22 kDa and further confirmed by mass spectrometry. The results of physicochemical characterisation showed that SCP was stable in the processes of thermal or acid/alkali treatment, and could be digested by simulate gastrointestinal fluid. Importantly, the comparison of SCP polymorphism using sera from crustacean-allergic patients demonstrated SCP-II had a weaker IgE-binding activity. The isoelectric points of SCP subunits a, b and c were 4.6, 4.7, and 4.8, respectively, as determined by two-dimensional electrophoresis and IgE immunoblotting analysis showed that patients' sera reacted to three subunits of SCP. Finally, it can be concluded that SCP is a stable polymorphic allergen in crayfish, and all of its isotypes and subunits have allergenicity.

  17. Myopathic changes in murine skeletal muscle lacking synemin

    PubMed Central

    García-Pelagio, Karla P.; Muriel, Joaquin; O'Neill, Andrea; Desmond, Patrick F.; Lovering, Richard M.; Lund, Linda; Bond, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of striated muscle linked to intermediate filament (IF) proteins are associated with defects in the organization of the contractile apparatus and its links to costameres, which connect the sarcomeres to the cell membrane. Here we study the role in skeletal muscle of synemin, a type IV IF protein, by examining mice null for synemin (synm-null). Synm-null mice have a mild skeletal muscle phenotype. Tibialis anterior (TA) muscles show a significant decrease in mean fiber diameter, a decrease in twitch and tetanic force, and an increase in susceptibility to injury caused by lengthening contractions. Organization of proteins associated with the contractile apparatus and costameres is not significantly altered in the synm-null. Elastimetry of the sarcolemma and associated contractile apparatus in extensor digitorum longus myofibers reveals a reduction in tension consistent with an increase in sarcolemmal deformability. Although fatigue after repeated isometric contractions is more marked in TA muscles of synm-null mice, the ability of the mice to run uphill on a treadmill is similar to controls. Our results suggest that synemin contributes to linkage between costameres and the contractile apparatus and that the absence of synemin results in decreased fiber size and increased sarcolemmal deformability and susceptibility to injury. Thus synemin plays a moderate but distinct role in fast twitch skeletal muscle. PMID:25567810

  18. Electrostatic forces in muscle and cylindrical gel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Millman, B.M.; Nickel, B.G.

    1980-10-01

    Repulsive pressure has been measured as a function of lattice spacing in gels of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and in the filament lattice of vertebrate striated muscle. External pressures up to ten atm have been applied to these lattices by an osmotic stress method. Numerical solutions to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation in hexagonal lattices have been obtained and compared to the TMV and muscle data. The theoretical curves using values for kappa calculated from the ionic strength give a good fit to experimental data from TMV gels, and an approximate fit to that from the muscle lattice, provided that a charge radius for the muscle thick filaments of approx. 16 nm is assumed. Variations in ionic strength, sarcomere length and state of the muscle give results which agree qualitatively with the theory, though a good fit between experiment and theory in the muscle case will clearly require consideration of other types of forces. We conclude that Poisson-Boltzmann theory can provide a good first approximation to the long-range electrostatic forces operating in such biological gel systems.

  19. Nur77 deletion impairs muscle growth during developmental myogenesis and muscle regeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Cortez-Toledo, Omar; Schnair, Caitlin; Sangngern, Peer; Metzger, Daniel; Chao, Lily C

    2017-01-01

    Muscle atrophy is a prevalent condition in illness and aging. Identifying novel pathways that control muscle mass may lead to therapeutic advancement. We previously identified Nur77 as a transcriptional regulator of glycolysis in skeletal muscle. More recently, we showed that Nur77 expression also controls myofiber size in mice. It was unknown, however, whether Nur77's regulation of muscle size begins during developmental myogenesis or only in adulthood. To determine the importance of Nur77 throughout muscle growth, we examined myofiber size at E18.5, 3 weeks postnatal age, and in young adult mice. Using the global Nur77-/- mice, we showed that Nur77 deficiency reduced myofiber size as early as E18.5. The reduction in myofiber size became more pronounced by 3 weeks of age. We observed comparable reduction in myofiber size in young myofiber-specific Nur77-knockout mice. These findings suggest that Nur77's effect on muscle growth is intrinsic to its expression in differentiating myofibers, and not dependent on its expression in myogenic stem cells. To determine the importance of Nur77 expression in muscle accretion in mature mice, we generated an inducible-, muscle-specific, Nur77-deficient mouse model. We demonstrated that tamoxifen-induced deletion of Nur77 in 3-month-old mice reduced myofiber size. This change was accompanied by increased activity of Smad2 and FoxO3, two negative regulators of muscle mass. The role of Nur77 in muscle growth was further elaborated in the cardiotoxin-induced muscle regeneration model. Compared to wildtype mice, regenerated myofibers were smaller in Nur77-/- mice. However, when normalized to saline-injected muscle, the recovery of sarcoplasmic area was comparable between Nur77-/- and wildtype mice. These findings suggest that Nur77 deficiency compromises myofiber growth, but not the regenerative capacity of myogenic progenitor cells. Collectively, the findings presented here demonstrate Nur77 as an important regulator of muscle

  20. Nur77 deletion impairs muscle growth during developmental myogenesis and muscle regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cortez-Toledo, Omar; Schnair, Caitlin; Sangngern, Peer; Metzger, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Muscle atrophy is a prevalent condition in illness and aging. Identifying novel pathways that control muscle mass may lead to therapeutic advancement. We previously identified Nur77 as a transcriptional regulator of glycolysis in skeletal muscle. More recently, we showed that Nur77 expression also controls myofiber size in mice. It was unknown, however, whether Nur77’s regulation of muscle size begins during developmental myogenesis or only in adulthood. To determine the importance of Nur77 throughout muscle growth, we examined myofiber size at E18.5, 3 weeks postnatal age, and in young adult mice. Using the global Nur77-/- mice, we showed that Nur77 deficiency reduced myofiber size as early as E18.5. The reduction in myofiber size became more pronounced by 3 weeks of age. We observed comparable reduction in myofiber size in young myofiber-specific Nur77-knockout mice. These findings suggest that Nur77’s effect on muscle growth is intrinsic to its expression in differentiating myofibers, and not dependent on its expression in myogenic stem cells. To determine the importance of Nur77 expression in muscle accretion in mature mice, we generated an inducible-, muscle-specific, Nur77-deficient mouse model. We demonstrated that tamoxifen-induced deletion of Nur77 in 3-month-old mice reduced myofiber size. This change was accompanied by increased activity of Smad2 and FoxO3, two negative regulators of muscle mass. The role of Nur77 in muscle growth was further elaborated in the cardiotoxin-induced muscle regeneration model. Compared to wildtype mice, regenerated myofibers were smaller in Nur77-/- mice. However, when normalized to saline-injected muscle, the recovery of sarcoplasmic area was comparable between Nur77-/- and wildtype mice. These findings suggest that Nur77 deficiency compromises myofiber growth, but not the regenerative capacity of myogenic progenitor cells. Collectively, the findings presented here demonstrate Nur77 as an important regulator of muscle

  1. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  2. Overexpression of MHC Class I Heavy Chain Protein in Young Skeletal Muscle Leads to Severe Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Charles Kwok-chong; Knopp, Paul; Moncrieffe, Halima; Singh, Bhanu; Shah, Sonia; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Varsani, Hemlata; Gao, Bin; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

    2009-01-01

    Folding and transport of proteins, such as major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is tightly regulated in all cells, including muscle tissue, where the specialized ER sarcoplasmic reticulum is also critical to muscle fiber function. Overexpression of MHC class I protein is a common feature of many muscle pathologies including idiopathic myositis and can induce ER stress. However, there has been no comparison of the consequences of MHC overexpression in muscle at different ages. We have adapted a transgenic model of myositis induced by overexpression of MHC class I protein in skeletal muscle to investigate the effects of this protein overload on young muscle fibers, as compared with adult tissue. We find a markedly more severe disease phenotype in young mice, with rapid onset of muscle weakness and pathology. Gene expression profiling to compare the two models indicates rapid onset of ER stress in young muscle tissue but also that gene expression of key muscle structural proteins is affected more rapidly in young mice than adults after this insult. This novel model has important implications for our understanding of muscle pathology in dermatomyositis of both adults and children. PMID:19700752

  3. Effects of caffeine on mouse skeletal muscle power output during recovery from fatigue.

    PubMed

    James, Rob S; Wilson, Robbie S; Askew, Graham N

    2004-02-01

    The effects of 10 mM (high) and 70 microM (physiologically relevant) caffeine on force, work output, and power output of isolated mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles were investigated in vitro during recovery from fatigue at 35 degrees C. To monitor muscle performance during recovery from fatigue, we regularly subjected the muscle to a series of cyclical work loops. Force, work, and power output during shortening were significantly higher after treatment with 10 mM caffeine, probably as a result of increased Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. However, the work required to relengthen the muscle also increased in the presence of 10 mM caffeine. This was due to a slowing of relaxation and an increase in muscle stiffness. The combination of increased work output during shortening and increased work input during lengthening had different effects on the two muscles. Net power output of mouse soleus muscle decreased as a result of 10 mM caffeine exposure, whereas net power output of the EDL muscle showed a transient, significant increase. Treatment with 70 microM caffeine had no significant effect on force, work, or power output of EDL or soleus muscles, suggesting that the plasma concentrations found when caffeine is used to enhance performance in human athletes might not directly affect the contractile performance of fatigued skeletal muscle.

  4. Modified Protein Expression in the Tectorial Membrane of the Cochlea Reveals Roles for the Striated Sheet Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gareth P.; Elliott, Stephen J.; Russell, Ian J.; Lukashkin, Andrei N.

    2015-01-01

    The tectorial membrane (TM) of the mammalian cochlea is a complex extracellular matrix which, in response to acoustic stimulation, displaces the hair bundles of outer hair cells (OHCs), thereby initiating sensory transduction and amplification. Here, using TM segments from the basal, high-frequency region of the cochleae of genetically modified mice (including models of human hereditary deafness) with missing or modified TM proteins, we demonstrate that frequency-dependent stiffening is associated with the striated sheet matrix (SSM). Frequency-dependent stiffening largely disappeared in all three TM mutations studied where the SSM was absent either entirely or at least from the stiffest part of the TM overlying the OHCs. In all three TM mutations, dissipation of energy is decreased at low (<8 kHz) and increased at high (>8 kHz) stimulus frequencies. The SSM is composed of polypeptides carrying fixed charges, and electrostatic interaction between them may account for frequency-dependent stiffness changes in the material properties of the TM. Through comparison with previous in vivo measurements, it is proposed that implementation of frequency-dependent stiffening of the TM in the OHC attachment region facilitates interaction among tones, backward transmission of energy, and amplification in the cochlea. PMID:25564867

  5. Geologic continuous casting below continental and deep-sea detachment faults and at the striated extrusion of Sacsayhuaman, Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    In the common type of industrial continuous casting, partially molten metal is extruded from a vessel through a shaped orifice called a mold in which the metal assumes the cross-sectional form of the mold as it cools and solidifies. Continuous casting can be sustained as long as molten metal is supplied and thermal conditions are maintained. I propose that a similar process produced parallel sets of grooves in three geologic settings, as follows: (1) corrugated metamorphic core complexes where mylonized mid-crustal rocks were exhumed by movement along low-angle normal faults known as detachment faults; (2) corrugated submarine surfaces where ultramafic and mafic rocks were exhumed by normal faulting within oceanic spreading centers; and (3) striated magma extrusions exemplified by the famous grooved outcrops at the Inca fortress of Sacsayhuaman in Peru. In each case, rocks inferred to have overlain the corrugated surface during corrugation genesis molded and shaped a plastic to partially molten rock mass as it was extruded from a moderate- to high-temperature reservoir.

  6. Modified protein expression in the tectorial membrane of the cochlea reveals roles for the striated sheet matrix.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gareth P; Elliott, Stephen J; Russell, Ian J; Lukashkin, Andrei N

    2015-01-06

    The tectorial membrane (TM) of the mammalian cochlea is a complex extracellular matrix which, in response to acoustic stimulation, displaces the hair bundles of outer hair cells (OHCs), thereby initiating sensory transduction and amplification. Here, using TM segments from the basal, high-frequency region of the cochleae of genetically modified mice (including models of human hereditary deafness) with missing or modified TM proteins, we demonstrate that frequency-dependent stiffening is associated with the striated sheet matrix (SSM). Frequency-dependent stiffening largely disappeared in all three TM mutations studied where the SSM was absent either entirely or at least from the stiffest part of the TM overlying the OHCs. In all three TM mutations, dissipation of energy is decreased at low (<8 kHz) and increased at high (>8 kHz) stimulus frequencies. The SSM is composed of polypeptides carrying fixed charges, and electrostatic interaction between them may account for frequency-dependent stiffness changes in the material properties of the TM. Through comparison with previous in vivo measurements, it is proposed that implementation of frequency-dependent stiffening of the TM in the OHC attachment region facilitates interaction among tones, backward transmission of energy, and amplification in the cochlea.

  7. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and decreased fatigue resistance followed by severe muscle weakness in skeletal muscle of mitochondrial DNA mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takashi; Ivarsson, Niklas; Hernández, Andrés; Fahlström, Andreas; Cheng, Arthur J; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Bruton, Joseph D; Ulfhake, Brun; Westerblad, Håkan

    2012-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction can drastically impair muscle function, with weakness and exercise intolerance as key symptoms. Here we examine the time course of development of muscle dysfunction in a mouse model of premature ageing induced by defective proofreading function of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase (mtDNA mutator mouse). Isolated fast-twitch muscles and single muscle fibres from young (3-5 months) and end-stage (11 months) mtDNA mutator mice were compared to age-matched control mice. Force and free myoplasmic [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](i)) were measured under resting conditions and during fatigue induced by repeated tetani. Muscles of young mtDNA mutator mice displayed no weakness in the rested state, but had lower force and [Ca(2+)](i) than control mice during induction of fatigue. Muscles of young mtDNA mutator mice showed decreased activities of citrate synthase and β-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, reduced expression of cytochrome c oxidase, and decreased expression of triggers of mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α, PPARα, AMPK). Muscles from end-stage mtDNA mutator mice showed weakness under resting conditions with markedly decreased tetanic [Ca(2+)](i), force per cross-sectional area and protein expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump (SERCA1). In conclusion, fast-twitch muscles of prematurely ageing mtDNA mutator mice display a sequence of deleterious mitochondrial-to-nucleus signalling with an initial decrease in oxidative capacity, which was not counteracted by activation of signalling to increase mitochondrial biogenesis. This was followed by severe muscle weakness in the end stage. These results have implication for normal ageing and suggest that decreased mitochondrial oxidative capacity due to a sedentary lifestyle may predispose towards muscle weakness developing later in life.

  8. Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle of pigs with acute monensin myotoxicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1984-01-01

    Large doses of monensin, a Na+-selective carboxylic ionophore, produce polyfocal, monophasic necrosis of skeletal muscle, with Type I fiber selectivity, in swine. For a study of the sequential ultrastructural alterations in affected skeletal muscles, 14 weanling pigs were given 40 mg monensin/kg body weight and were euthanatized 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 days later. Myotoxicosis and myoglobinuria were apparent clinically. At necropsy, white, dry areas of necrosis were present in the muscle masses of the anterior and posterior thigh, shoulder, and loin. Two patterns of skeletal muscle necrosis were observed on Day 1, especially in Type I fibers. In fibers exhibiting the first of these patterns, the contractile material was disrupted, forming dense amorphous and filamentous clumps scattered within the persistent sheaths of external lamina (sarcolemmal tubes); the mitochondria were swollen and contained flocculent matrix densities, and the nuclei were pyknotic. Fibers showing the second pattern were uniformly dense, but their sarcoplasm was not disrupted. Sublethally injured fibers were also observed and showed focal myofibrillar lysis. On Days 2 and 4, the necrotic muscle had marked infiltration of macrophages in the interstitium and within sarcolemmal tubes. Rapid resolution of the fiber necrosis occurred by phagocytosis of the sarcoplasmic debris. Regeneration of affected muscles developed early following injury and progressed rapidly to complete restoration of the necrotic muscles without residual fibrosis. Regeneration was initiated on Day 1 by activation of satellite cells to form presumptive myoblasts; on Days 4 and 8 these cells showed evidence of fusion, forming myotubes to restore the necrotic fibers. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6696050

  9. Gene profiling of embryonic skeletal muscle lacking type I ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) release channel.

    PubMed

    Filipova, Dilyana; Walter, Anna M; Gaspar, John A; Brunn, Anna; Linde, Nina F; Ardestani, Mostafa A; Deckert, Martina; Hescheler, Jürgen; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Sachinidis, Agapios; Papadopoulos, Symeon

    2016-02-01

    In mature skeletal muscle, the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration rises dramatically upon membrane depolarization, constituting the link between excitation and contraction. This process requires Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum via the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1). However, RYR1's potential roles in muscle development remain obscure. We used an established RyR1- null mouse model, dyspedic, to investigate the effects of the absence of a functional RYR1 and, consequently, the lack of RyR1-mediated Ca(2+) signaling, during embryogenesis. Homozygous dyspedic mice die after birth and display small limbs and abnormal skeletal muscle organization. Skeletal muscles from front and hind limbs of dyspedic fetuses (day E18.5) were subjected to microarray analyses, revealing 318 differentially expressed genes. We observed altered expression of multiple transcription factors and members of key signaling pathways. Differential regulation was also observed for genes encoding contractile as well as muscle-specific structural proteins. Additional qRT-PCR analysis revealed altered mRNA levels of the canonical muscle regulatory factors Six1, Six4, Pax7, MyoD, MyoG and MRF4 in mutant muscle, which is in line with the severe developmental retardation seen in dyspedic muscle histology analyses. Taken together, these findings suggest an important non-contractile role of RyR1 or RYR1-mediated Ca(2+) signaling during muscle organ development.

  10. Muscle fibers in the central nervous system of nemerteans: spatial organization and functional role.

    PubMed

    Petrov, A A; Zaitseva, O V

    2012-08-01

    The system of muscle fibers associated with the brain and lateral nerve cords is present in all major groups of enoplan nemerteans. Unfortunately, very little is known about the functional role and spatial arrangement of these muscles of the central nervous system. This article examines the architecture of the musculature of the central nervous system in two species of monostiliferous nemerteans (Emplectonema gracile and Tetrastemma cf. candidum) using phalloidin staining and confocal microscopy. The article also briefly discusses the body-wall musculature and the muscles of the cephalic region. In both species, the lateral nerve cords possess two pairs of cardinal muscles that run the length of the nerve cords and pass through the ventral cerebral ganglia. A system of peripheral muscles forms a meshwork around the lateral nerve cords in E. gracile. The actin-rich processes that ramify within the nerve cords in E. gracile (transverse fibers) might represent a separate population of glia-like cells or sarcoplasmic projections of the peripheral muscles of the central nervous system. The lateral nerve cords in T. cf. candidum lack peripheral muscles but have muscles similar in their position and orientation to the transverse fibers. The musculature of the central nervous system is hypothesized to function as a support system for the lateral nerve cords and brain, preventing rupturing and herniation of the nervous tissue during locomotion. The occurrence of muscles of the central nervous system in nemerteans and other groups and their possible relevance in taxonomy are discussed.

  11. Halothane cooling contractures of skinned mammalian muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Sudo, R T; Zapata-Sudo, G; Suarez-Kurtz, G

    1990-11-01

    The effects of halothane or cooling on Ca2(+)-activated tensions and on the uptake and release of Ca2+ by the sarcoplasmic reticulum were investigated in chemically skinned fibers of the extensor digitorum longus muscle of adult rabbits. At 22 degrees C, halothane (greater than 0.46 mM) induced Ca2+ release from the SR of Ca2(+)-loaded skinned fibers that resulted in transient tensions. Higher concentrations of halothane (greater than 4.65 mM) reduced the steady-state accumulation of Ca2+ in the SR at 22 degrees C. Cooling (to less than 10 degrees C) elicited transient contractures (cooling-induced contractures [CC]) in Ca2(+)-loaded skinned fibers, despite the fact that the tensions elicited by adding Ca2+ to the bath were depressed at these low temperatures. The skinned fibers did not develop CCs at 12-16 degrees C. Halothane cooling contractures could be elicited at these temperatures by exposing the fibers to halothane concentrations that failed to elicit Ca2+ release at 22 degrees C. The halothane cooling contractures were blocked by procaine but not by lidocaine. It was concluded that these contractures resulted from a synergistic interaction between halothane and cooling that stimulates Ca2+ release from, and reduces Ca2+ uptake by, the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  12. Taurine rescues cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy in vitro: a morphological study.

    PubMed

    Stacchiotti, Alessandra; Rovetta, Francesca; Ferroni, Matteo; Corsetti, Giovanni; Lavazza, Antonio; Sberveglieri, Giorgio; Aleo, Maria Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug whose side effects include muscle weakness and cachexia. Here we analysed CisPt-induced atrophy in C2C12 myotubes by a multidisciplinary morphological approach, focusing on the onset and progression of autophagy, a protective cellular process that, when excessively activated, may trigger protein hypercatabolism and atrophy in skeletal muscle. To visualize autophagy we used confocal and transmission electron microscopy at different times of treatment and doses of CisPt. Moreover we evaluated the effects of taurine, a cytoprotective beta-amino acid able to counteract oxidative stress, apoptosis, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in different tissues and organs. Our microscopic results indicate that autophagy occurs very early in 50  μM CisPt challenged myotubes (4 h-8 h) before overt atrophy but it persists even at 24 h, when several autophagic vesicles, damaged mitochondria, and sarcoplasmic blebbings engulf the sarcoplasm. Differently, 25 mM taurine pretreatment rescues the majority of myotubes size upon 50  μM CisPt at 24 h. Taurine appears to counteract atrophy by restoring regular microtubular apparatus and mitochondria and reducing the overload and the localization of autophagolysosomes. Such a promising taurine action in preventing atrophy needs further molecular and biochemical studies to best define its impact on muscle homeostasis and the maintenance of an adequate skeletal mass in vivo.

  13. Ultrastructural features of degenerated cardiac muscle cells in patients with cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Maron, B. J.; Ferrans, V. J.; Roberts, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Degenerated cardiac muscle cells were presen