Science.gov

Sample records for string-guided fast transport

  1. Stable transport in proton driven fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.

    2009-09-15

    Proton beam transport in the context of proton driven fast ignition is usually assumed to be stable due to proton high inertia, but an analytical analysis of the process is still lacking. The stability of a charge and current neutralized proton beam passing through a plasma is therefore conducted here, for typical proton driven fast ignition parameters. In the cold regime, two fast growing modes are found, with an inverse growth rate much smaller than the beam time of flight to the target core. The stability issue is thus not so obvious, and kinetic effects are investigated. One unstable mode is found stabilized by the background plasma proton and electron temperatures. The second mode is also damped, providing the proton beam thermal spread is larger than {approx}10 keV. In fusion conditions, the beam propagation should therefore be stable.

  2. Fast atomic transport without vibrational heating

    SciTech Connect

    Torrontegui, E.; Ibanez, S.; Chen Xi; Ruschhaupt, A.; Guery-Odelin, D.; Muga, J. G.

    2011-01-15

    We use the dynamical invariants associated with the Hamiltonian of an atom in a one dimensional moving trap to inverse engineer the trap motion and perform fast atomic transport without final vibrational heating. The atom is driven nonadiabatically through a shortcut to the result of adiabatic, slow trap motion. For harmonic potentials this only requires designing appropriate trap trajectories, whereas perfect transport in anharmonic traps may be achieved by applying an extra field to compensate the forces in the rest frame of the trap. The results can be extended to atom stopping or launching. The limitations due to geometrical constraints, energies, and accelerations involved are analyzed along with the relation to previous approaches based on classical trajectories or ''fast-forward'' and ''bang-bang'' methods, which can be integrated in the invariant-based framework.

  3. Transport Simulations for Fast Ignition on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, D. J.; Tabak, M.; Grote, D. P.; Town, R. P. J.; Kemp, A. J.

    2009-11-01

    Calculations of the transport and deposition of a relativistic electron beam into fast-ignition fuel configurations are presented. The hybrid PIC code LSP is used, run in implicit mode and with fluid background particles. The electron beam distribution is chosen based on explicit PIC simulations of the short-pulse LPI. These generally display two hot-electron temperatures, one close to the ponderomotive scaling and one that is much lower. Fast-electron collisions utilize the formulae of J. R. Davies [S. Atzeni et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51 (2009)], and are done with a conservative, relativistic grid-based method similar to Lemons et al., J. Comput. Phys. 228 (2009). We include energy loss off both bound and free electrons in partially-ionized media (such as a gold cone), and have started to use realistic ionization and non-ideal EOS models. We have found the fractional energy coupling into the dense fuel is higher for CD than DT targets, due to the enhanced resistivity and resulting magnetic fields. The coupling enhancement due to magnetic fields and beam characteristics (such as angular spectrum) will be quantified.

  4. Fast axonal transport in early experimental disc edema.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1980-02-01

    Previous work has documented impairment of slow axonal transport in papilledema, but the abnormalities in rapid transport were less certain. Therefore fast axonal transport was studied in 19 primate eyes subjected to ocular hypotony for 6 to 72 hr following surgical fistulization of the anterior chamber. Mild, irregular alterations in fast axonal transport were detected only after nerve head swelling was apparent. These changes in fast transport mechanisms in cases of nerve head edema occur after, and may be secondary to, impaired slow axoplasmic flow and the resultant axonal swelling. Furthermore, since prolonged complete interruption of axonal transport is theoretically inconsistent with the continued normal neuron function characteristic of papilledema and, moreover, since previous data shows a "slowdown" rather than complete blockade of axonal transport in papilledema, it is likely that in eyes with papilledema there does not exist a complete flock of axonal transport. Therefore we hypothesize that the swelling results when slow axoplasmic flow is locally slowed down but not totally stopped, with the axon distention producing secondary mild, irregular changes in fast axonal transport.

  5. Automated measurement of fast mitochondrial transport in neurons.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kyle E; Liu, Xin-An; Puthanveettil, Sathyanarayanan V

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that fast mitochondrial transport in neurons is disrupted in multiple neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, a major constraint in identifying novel therapeutics based on mitochondrial transport is that the large-scale analysis of fast transport is time consuming. Here we describe methodologies for the automated analysis of fast mitochondrial transport from data acquired using a robotic microscope. We focused on addressing questions of measurement precision, speed, reliably, workflow ease, statistical processing, and presentation. We used optical flow and particle tracking algorithms, implemented in ImageJ, to measure mitochondrial movement in primary cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons. With it, we are able to generate complete descriptions of movement profiles in an automated fashion of hundreds of thousands of mitochondria with a processing time of approximately one hour. We describe the calibration of the parameters of the tracking algorithms and demonstrate that they are capable of measuring the fast transport of a single mitochondrion. We then show that the methods are capable of reliably measuring the inhibition of fast mitochondria transport induced by the disruption of microtubules with the drug nocodazole in both hippocampal and cortical neurons. This work lays the foundation for future large-scale screens designed to identify compounds that modulate mitochondrial motility.

  6. Fast ignition transport simulations for NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, D. J.; Grote, D. P.; Tabak, M.; Cohen, B. I.; Town, R. P. J.; Kemp, A. J.

    2010-08-01

    This paper shows work at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) devoted to modeling the propagation of, and heating by, a relativistic electron beam in a idealized dense fuel assembly for fast ignition [1]. The implicit particle-in-cell (PIC) code LSP is used. Experiments planned on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in the next few years using the Advanced Radiography Capability (ARC) short-pulse laser motivate this work. We demonstrate significant improvement in the heating of dense fuel due to magnetic forces, increased beam collimation, and insertion of a finite-radius carbon region between the beam excitation and fuel regions.

  7. Fast Ignition Transport Simulations for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, D J; Grote, D P; Tabak, M; Cohen, B I; Town, R P; Kemp, A J

    2009-10-05

    This paper shows work at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) devoted to modeling the propagation of, and heating by, a relativistic electron beam in a idealized dense fuel assembly for fast ignition. The implicit particle-in-cell (PIC) code LSP is used. Experiments planned on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in the next few years using the Advanced Radiography Capability (ARC) short-pulse laser motivate this work. We demonstrate significant improvement in the heating of dense fuel due to magnetic forces, increased beam collimation, and insertion of a finite-radius carbon region between the beam excitation and fuel regions.

  8. Fast Ion Transport in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonofiglo, P. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Kim, J.; Sears, S. H.; Egedal, J.

    2016-10-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) provides a unique environment to study fast ion confinement and transport. The magnetic topology of the RFP establishes guiding center drifts along flux surfaces, resulting in naturally well-confined fast ions. Past experiments reveal reduced confinement and a redistribution of fast ions with beam-driven instabilities or transition to a 3D equilibrium state. A fast ion transport model characterized by a temporally and spatially dependent diffusion profile describes the fast ion evolution. The diffusion coefficient varies as the square of the measured mode amplitude, and the width is inferred from comparison with correlated density fluctuations. In studying multiple interacting modes, the model reproduces the dynamic NPA-measured 20 % drop in core fast ion concentration. In the case of long-lived frequency chirping modes, there is a consistent time evolution of the fast ion distribution and measured mode frequency on a spatially varying Alfven continuum. Additional studies probe the dynamics of energetic particle modes (EPMs) during the growth of the core-localized kink mode and the rapid loss of fast ion confinement as a transition to a 3D equilibrium occurs. This research is supported by US DOE.

  9. Fast electron generation and transport in a turbulent, magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneking, Matthew Randall

    1994-05-01

    The nature of fast electron generation and transport in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated using two electron energy analyzer (EEA) probes and a thermocouple calorimeter. The parallel velocity distribution of the fast electron population is well fit by a drifted Maxwellian distribution with temperature of about 100 eV and drift velocity of about 2 x 106 m/s. Cross-calibration of the EEA with the calorimeter provides a measurement of the fast electron perpendicular temperature of 30 eV, much lower than the parallel temperature, and is evidence that the kinetic dynamo mechanism (KDT) is not operative in MST. The fast electron current is found to match to the parallel current at the edge, and the fast electron density is about 4 x 1011 cm-3 independent of the ratio of the applied toroidal electric field to the critical electric field for runaways. First time measurements of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport are reported. By correlating electron current fluctuations with radial magnetic fluctuations the transported flux of electrons is found to be negligible outside r/a~0.9, but rises the level of the expected total particle losses inside r/a~0.85. A comparison of the measured diffusion coefficient is made with the ausilinear stochastic diffusion coefficient. Evidence exists that the reduction of the transport is due to the presence of a radial ambipolar electric field of magnitude 500 V/m, that acts to equilibrate the ion and electron transport rates. The convective energy transport associated with the measured particle transport is large enough to account for the observed magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport in MST.

  10. Fast damping in mismatched high intensity beam transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variale, V.

    2001-08-01

    A very fast damping of beam envelope oscillation amplitudes was recently observed in simulations of high intensity beam transport, through periodic FODO cells, in mismatched conditions [V. Variale, Nuovo Cimento Soc. Ital. Fis. 112A, 1571-1582 (1999) and T. Clauser et al., in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, New York, 1999 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1999), p. 1779]. A Landau damping mechanism was proposed at the origin of observed effect. In this paper, to further investigate the source of this fast damping, extensive simulations have been carried out. The results presented here support the interpretation of the mechanism at the origin of the fast damping as a Landau damping effect.

  11. Transport Simulations for Fast Ignition on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, D J; Tabak, M; Grote, D P; Cohen, B I; Shay, H D; Town, R J; Kemp, A J; Key, M

    2009-10-26

    We are designing a full hydro-scale cone-guided, indirect-drive FI coupling experiment, for NIF, with the ARC-FIDO short-pulse laser. Current rad-hydro designs with limited fuel jetting into cone tip are not yet adequate for ignition. Designs are improving. Electron beam transport simulations (implicit-PIC LSP) show: (1) Magnetic fields and smaller angular spreads increase coupling to ignition-relevant 'hot spot' (20 um radius); (2) Plastic CD (for a warm target) produces somewhat better coupling than pure D (cryogenic target) due to enhanced resistive B fields; and (3) The optimal T{sub hot} for this target is {approx} 1 MeV; coupling falls by 3x as T{sub hot} rises to 4 MeV.

  12. Turbulent transport of fast ions due to magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiwisch, Adam

    The transport of fast ions in magnetic flux ropes in a laboratory plasma is studied. Strong perturbing flux ropes (deltaE ~175 V/m, deltaB ~7 G) are generated by secondary cathode-anode pair at the upgraded LArge Plasma Device (LAPD). A 500-1000 eV lithium ion test beam is passed through the turbulent region and recollected by a gridded collimated analyzer, revealing enhanced fast ion broadening attributable to flux rope perturbations. The broadening is observed to be well in excess of Coulomb scattering levels. Monte Carlo simulation is performed with model electrostatic and magnetic fields, revealing negligible spreading as a result of the magnetic perturbations. Modeled electrostatic perturbations are observed to broaden the beam by 3.0 mm2 at the closest recollection plane, increasing as the transit time squared further downstream. Transport attributed to electrostatic fluctuations has been shown to decrease with energy while magnetic transport does not. Enhanced fast ion transport observed during the flux rope off phase is presently unexplained.

  13. Reduced Fast Ion Transport Model For The Tokamak Transport Code TRANSP

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta,, Mario; Gorelenkova, Marina; White, Roscoe

    2014-02-28

    Fast ion transport models presently implemented in the tokamak transport code TRANSP [R. J. Hawryluk, in Physics of Plasmas Close to Thermonuclear Conditions, CEC Brussels, 1 , 19 (1980)] are not capturing important aspects of the physics associated with resonant transport caused by instabilities such as Toroidal Alfv en Eigenmodes (TAEs). This work describes the implementation of a fast ion transport model consistent with the basic mechanisms of resonant mode-particle interaction. The model is formulated in terms of a probability distribution function for the particle's steps in phase space, which is consistent with the MonteCarlo approach used in TRANSP. The proposed model is based on the analysis of fast ion response to TAE modes through the ORBIT code [R. B. White et al., Phys. Fluids 27 , 2455 (1984)], but it can be generalized to higher frequency modes (e.g. Compressional and Global Alfv en Eigenmodes) and to other numerical codes or theories.

  14. Stopping and transport of fast electrons in superdense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Okabayashi, A.; Habara, H.; Yabuuchi, T.; Iwawaki, T.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2013-08-15

    Studied is the stopping and transport of relativistic fast electrons in the vicinity of compressed dense plasma core relevant to fast ignition. Electromagnetic cascade Monte-Carlo is coupled to 2D-PIC simulation. The 2D PIC simulates input electron energy spectrum and angular dependence. The electron energy distributions after passing through the plasma core are calculated at different viewing angles, which well agree with the experiment below several MeV energy range. The implications of calculated results as to collisional damping on several MeV electrons are discussed with the theory based on the stopping power model. The spatial distribution of plasma temperature is also estimated via deposited energy by fast electrons, showing the strong heating at the core surface.

  15. Transportation fuels from biomass via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2013-09-21

    Biomass is a renewable source of carbon, which could provide a means to reduce the greenhouse gas impact from fossil fuels in the transportation sector. Biomass is the only renewable source of liquid fuels, which could displace petroleum-derived products. Fast pyrolysis is a method of direct thermochemical conversion (non-bioconversion) of biomass to a liquid product. Although the direct conversion product, called bio-oil, is liquid; it is not compatible with the fuel handling systems currently used for transportation. Upgrading the product via catalytic processing with hydrogen gas, hydroprocessing, is a means that has been demonstrated in the laboratory. By this processing the bio-oil can be deoxygenated to hydrocarbons, which can be useful replacements of the hydrocarbon distillates in petroleum. While the fast pyrolysis of biomass is presently commercial, the upgrading of the liquid product by hydroprocessing remains in development, although it is moving out of the laboratory into scaled-up process demonstration systems.

  16. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica [San Leandro, CA; Holt, Jason [Berkeley, CA; Noy, Aleksandr [Belmont, CA; Park, Hyung Gyu [Oakland, CA

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  17. Energy transport in ultra-fast eated solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Kemp, Andreas

    2008-11-01

    We discuss hot electron generation in ultra intense laser interaction with initially non-ionized matter. Hot electron energy and the transport inside the target are strongly affected by collisional effects and ionization processes, especially in high-Z material. We have introduced an ionization model into our collisional particle-in-cell code, PICLS, to study hot electron transport in ultra-fast heated matter. Our description of collisional ionization is based on the Thomas-Fermi model, where a local average charge state is calculated from the bulk electron temperature and density. Field ionization is taken into account for ionization of low density plasmas. We have studied laser matter interaction under an irradiation of a laser with 10^20W/cm^2. A strong heat inhibition within a micron distance was observed in a gold target because of the large number of lower energy hot electrons produced at the steepened interface by the laser photon pressure. We will discuss the generation of hot electrons and their transport in ultra-fast heated solid targets of various materials.

  18. Hysteresis and fast timescales in transport relations of toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.; Kamada, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Dong, J. Q.; Hidalgo, C.; Evans, T.; Ko, W. H.; Park, H.; Tokuzawa, T.; Kubo, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kosuga, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Yun, G. S.; Song, S. D.; Kasuya, N.; Nagashima, Y.; Moon, C.; Yoshinuma, M.; Makino, R.; Tsujimura, T.; Tsuchiya, H.; Stroth, U.

    2017-10-01

    This article assesses current understanding of hysteresis in transport relations, and its impact on the field. The rapid changes of fluxes compared to slow changes of plasma parameters are overviewed for both core and edge plasmas. The modulation ECH experiment is explained, in which the heating power cycles on-and-off periodically, revealing hysteresis and fast changes in the gradient-flux relation. The key finding is that hystereses were observed simultaneously in both the the gradient-flux and gradient-fluctuation relations. Hysteresis with rapid timescale exists in the channels of energy, electron and impurity densities, and plausibly in momentum. Advanced methods of data analysis are explained. Transport hysteresis can be studied by observing the higher harmonics of temperature perturbation δ Tm in heating modulation experiments. The hysteresis introduces the term δ Tm , which depends on the harmonic number m in an algebraic manner (not exponential decay). Next, the causes of hysteresis and its fast timescale are discussed. The nonlocal-in-space coupling works here, but does not suffice. One mechanism for ‘the heating heats turbulence’ is that the external source S in phase space for heating has its fluctuation in turbulent plasma. This coupling can induce the direct input of heating power into fluctuations. The height of the jump in transport hysteresis is smaller for heavier hydrogen isotopes, and could be one of the origins of isotope effects on confinement. Finally, the impacts of transport hysteresis on the control system are assessed. Control systems must be designed so as to protect the system from sudden plasma loss.

  19. Modeling Fast Ion Transport in TAE Avalanches in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E D; Bell, R E; Darrow, D; Gorelenkov, N N; Kramer, G; Kubota, S; Levinton, F M; Liu, D; Medley, S S; Podesta, M; Tritz, K

    2009-08-17

    Experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557 ] have found strong bursts of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) activity correlated with abrupt drops in the neutron rate. A fairly complete data set offers the opportunity to benchmark the NOVA [C. Z. Cheng, Phys. Reports 211, 1-51 (1992)] and ORBIT [R. B. White and M. S. Chance, Phys. Fluids 27, 2455 (1984)] codes in the low aspect ratio tokamak (ST) geometry. The internal structure of TAE were modeled with NOVA and good agreement is found with measurements made with an array of five fixed-frequency reflectometers. The fast-ion transport resulting from these bursts of multiple TAE were then modeled with the ORBIT code. The simulations are reasonably consistent with the observed drop in neutron rate. While these results represent our best attempts to find agreement, we believe that further refinements in both the simulation of the TAE structure and in the modeling of the fast ion transport are needed. Benchmarking stability codes against present experiments is an important step in developing the predictive capability needed to plan future experiments.

  20. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Roecker, C.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; ...

    2016-04-12

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV andmore » a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm2 rising to 5000 cm2. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm2 and 2500 cm2. As a result, the multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.« less

  1. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, C.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Dazeley, S.; Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; Sweany, M. D.; Vetter, K.

    2016-08-01

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV and a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm2 rising to 5000 cm2. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm2 and 2500 cm2. The multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.

  2. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Roecker, C.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Dazeley, S.; Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; Sweany, M. D.; Vetter, K.

    2016-04-12

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV and a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm2 rising to 5000 cm2. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm2 and 2500 cm2. As a result, the multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.

  3. Visualizing fast electron energy transport into laser-compressed high-density fast-ignition targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrott, L. C.; Wei, M. S.; McGuffey, C.; Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.; Qiao, B.; Stoeckl, C.; Betti, R.; Chen, H.; Delettrez, J.; Döppner, T.; Giraldez, E. M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.; Key, M. H.; Luo, R. W.; Marshall, F. J.; McLean, H. S.; Mileham, C.; Patel, P. K.; Santos, J. J.; Sawada, H.; Stephens, R. B.; Yabuuchi, T.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-05-01

    Recent progress in kilojoule-scale high-intensity lasers has opened up new areas of research in radiography, laboratory astrophysics, high-energy-density physics, and fast-ignition (FI) laser fusion. FI requires efficient heating of pre-compressed high-density fuel by an intense relativistic electron beam produced from laser-matter interaction. Understanding the details of electron beam generation and transport is crucial for FI. Here we report on the first visualization of fast electron spatial energy deposition in a laser-compressed cone-in-shell FI target, facilitated by doping the shell with copper and imaging the K-shell radiation. Multi-scale simulations accompanying the experiments clearly show the location of fast electrons and reveal key parameters affecting energy coupling. The approach provides a more direct way to infer energy coupling and guide experimental designs that significantly improve the laser-to-core coupling to 7%. Our findings lay the groundwork for further improving efficiency, with 15% energy coupling predicted in FI experiments using an existing megajoule-scale laser driver.

  4. Fast ion transport induced by saturated infernal mode

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, V. S.

    2014-05-15

    Tokamak discharges with extended weak-shear central core are known to suffer from infernal modes when the core safety factor approaches the mode ratio. These modes can cause an outward convection of the well-passing energetic ions deposited in the core by fusion reactions and/or neutral beam injection. Convection mechanism consists in collisional slowing down of energetic ions trapped in the Doppler-precession resonance with a finite-amplitude infernal mode. Convection velocity can reach a few m/s in modern spherical tori. Possible relation of this transport with the enhanced fast ion losses in the presence of “long lived modes” in the MAST tokamak [I. T. Chapman et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 045007 (2010)] is discussed.

  5. Why are carbon nanotubes fast transporters of water?

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sony; Aluru, N R

    2008-02-01

    Extraordinarily fast transport of water in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in recent experiments has been generally attributed to the smoothness of the CNT surface. Using molecular dynamics simulations we investigate water flow in (16,16) CNTs and show that the enhanced flow rates over Hagen-Poiseuille flow arise from a velocity "jump" in a depletion region at the water nanotube interface and that the water orientations and hydrogen bonding at the interface significantly affect the flow rates. For nanotube with the same smooth wall structure but with more hydrophilic Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters of silicon, the enhancement is greatly reduced because it does not have "free" OH bonds pointing to the wall as in CNTs that would reduce the number of hydrogen bonds in the depletion layer. Roughness in the tube walls causes strong hydrogen-bonding network and no significant flow enhancement is attained in rough tubes.

  6. Kinesin-1/Hsc70-dependent mechanism of slow axonal transport and its relation to fast axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Sumio; Kinjo, Masataka; Aihara, Makoto; Takei, Yosuke; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2010-01-01

    Cytoplasmic protein transport in axons (‘slow axonal transport') is essential for neuronal homeostasis, and involves Kinesin-1, the same motor for membranous organelle transport (‘fast axonal transport'). However, both molecular mechanisms of slow axonal transport and difference in usage of Kinesin-1 between slow and fast axonal transport have been elusive. Here, we show that slow axonal transport depends on the interaction between the DnaJ-like domain of the kinesin light chain in the Kinesin-1 motor complex and Hsc70, scaffolding between cytoplasmic proteins and Kinesin-1. The domain is within the tetratricopeptide repeat, which can bind to membranous organelles, and competitive perturbation of the domain in squid giant axons disrupted cytoplasmic protein transport and reinforced membranous organelle transport, indicating that this domain might have a function as a switchover system between slow and fast transport by Hsc70. Transgenic mice overexpressing a dominant-negative form of the domain showed delayed slow transport, accelerated fast transport and optic axonopathy. These findings provide a basis for the regulatory mechanism of intracellular transport and its intriguing implication in neuronal dysfunction. PMID:20111006

  7. Fast electron transport and spatial energy deposition in imploded fast ignition cone-in-shell targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrott, Leonard

    2014-10-01

    We report on the first experimental observation and model validation of the spatial energy deposition of fast electrons into the imploded, high-density core of integrated cone-in-shell fast ignition experiments on OMEGA. Spatial energy deposition was characterized via fast electron produced K α fluorescence from a Cu tracer added to the CD shell. 2-D images of the Cu K α fluorescence were obtained using a spherically bent Bragg crystal imager. 54 of the 60 OMEGA beams (18 kJ) were used for fuel assembly, and the high intensity EP beam (10 ps, 0.5--1.5 kJ, Ip >1019 W/cm2) , was focused onto the inner cone tip to produce fast electrons. Cu K α emission from a 300 μm region surrounding the cone tip correlated well with the predicted core size from radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the shell implosion. The emission also emanated from as far back as 100 μm from the cone tip, indicative of an electron source position with a large standoff distance from the cone tip, consistent with the presence of an extended pre-plasma from the EP pre-pulse. We observed a simultaneous increase in both K α yield (up to 70%) and thermal neutron number (up to 2×) with increasing EP beam energy. K α yield data also show an improved energy coupling using the high contrast EP pulse. Comprehensive simulations of the electron production within the cone and subsequent transport into the imploded core have been performed using the implicit PIC code LSP and the hybrid-PIC code ZUMA. These simulations explain the observed K α shape and yield trends and identify parameters that constrain energy coupling into the compressed core. This work was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under Contracts DE-FC02-04ER54789 (FSC), DE-FG02-05ER54834 (ACE) and DE-NA0000854 (NLUF).

  8. Fast electron transport in lower-hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, K.; Bers, A.

    1991-01-01

    We generalize the quasilinear-Fokker-Planck formulation for lower-hybrid current drive to include the wave induced radial transport of fast electrons. Toroidal ray tracing shows that the wave fields in the plasma develop a large poloidal component associated with the upshift in k1l and the filling of the "spectral gap". These fields lead to an enhanced radial E x B drift of resonant electrons. Two types of radial flows are obtained: an outward convective flow driven by the asymmetry in the poloidal wave spectrum, and a diffusive flow proportional to the width of the poloidal spectrum. Simulations of Alcator C and JT60, show that the radial convection velocity has a broad maximum of nearly 1 m/sec and is independent of the amplitude of fields. In both cases, the radial diffusion is found to be highly localized near the magnetic axis. For JT60, the peak of the diffusion profile can be quite large, nearly 1 m2/sec.

  9. Bifurcation of velocity distributions in cooperative transport of filaments by fast and slow motors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Kierfeld, Jan

    2013-02-05

    Several intracellular processes are governed by two different species of molecular motors, fast and slow ones, that both move in the same direction along the filaments but with different velocities. The transport of filaments arising from the cooperative action of these motors has been recently studied by three in vitro experiments, in which the filament velocity was measured for varying fraction of the fast motors adsorbed onto substrate surfaces in a gliding assay. As the fast motor fraction was increased, two experiments found a smooth change whereas the third one observed an abrupt increase of the filament velocity. Here, we show that all of these experimental results reflect the competition between fast and slow motors and can be understood in terms of an underlying saddle-node bifurcation. The comparison between theory and experiment leads to predictions for the detachment forces of the two motor species. Our theoretical study shows the existence of three different motility regimes: 1), fast transport with a single velocity; 2), slow transport with a single velocity; and 3), bistable transport, where the filament velocity stochastically switches between fast and slow transport. We determine the parameter regions for these regimes in terms of motility diagrams as a function of the surface fraction of fast motors and microscopic single-motor parameters. An abrupt increase of the filament velocity for an increasing fraction of fast motors is associated with the occurrence of bistable transport.

  10. Bifurcation of Velocity Distributions in Cooperative Transport of Filaments by Fast and Slow Motors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Kierfeld, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Several intracellular processes are governed by two different species of molecular motors, fast and slow ones, that both move in the same direction along the filaments but with different velocities. The transport of filaments arising from the cooperative action of these motors has been recently studied by three in vitro experiments, in which the filament velocity was measured for varying fraction of the fast motors adsorbed onto substrate surfaces in a gliding assay. As the fast motor fraction was increased, two experiments found a smooth change whereas the third one observed an abrupt increase of the filament velocity. Here, we show that all of these experimental results reflect the competition between fast and slow motors and can be understood in terms of an underlying saddle-node bifurcation. The comparison between theory and experiment leads to predictions for the detachment forces of the two motor species. Our theoretical study shows the existence of three different motility regimes: 1), fast transport with a single velocity; 2), slow transport with a single velocity; and 3), bistable transport, where the filament velocity stochastically switches between fast and slow transport. We determine the parameter regions for these regimes in terms of motility diagrams as a function of the surface fraction of fast motors and microscopic single-motor parameters. An abrupt increase of the filament velocity for an increasing fraction of fast motors is associated with the occurrence of bistable transport. PMID:23442917

  11. Critical Gradient Threshold for Alfvén Eigenmode Induced Fast-Ion Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidbrink, W. W.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have identified how multiple simultaneous Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) lead to overlapping wave-particle resonances and stochastic fast ion transport in fusion grade plasmas. The behavior results in a sudden increase in fast ion transport at a threshold that is well above the linear stability threshold for Alfvén instability. This causes fast ion transport to become stiff, leading to virtually unchanged equilibrium fast-ion density profiles as beam drive increases further. A novel beam modulation technique in conjunction with an array of fast-ion diagnostics probes the critical gradient by measuring the fast-ion flux in different phase-space volumes. Above a threshold, which occurs when more than four AEs are simultaneously destabilized, the modulated flux suddenly increases. Fast-ion D α (FIDA) spectroscopy indicates the peak of the modulated flux is localized to mid-core radii, corresponding to the radial location of AEs. As distributions and instability behavior are manipulated further through variations in electron cyclotron heating and beam deposition, measured thresholds track the resulting shifts in resonances. Well above threshold, the fast-ion losses often become intermittent and exhibit a bursty behavior. Theoretical analysis confirms that fast-ion orbits become stochastic in the measured modes. This critical gradient transport, wherein the fast-ion pressure gradient destabilizes AEs and the fast ions respond by diffusing in phase space to flatten the pressure profile, suggests that reduced models for fast ion transport in ITER can effectively describe the fusion alpha and beam ion profiles. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  12. Vesicular glycolysis provides on-board energy for fast axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Zala, Diana; Hinckelmann, Maria-Victoria; Yu, Hua; Lyra da Cunha, Marcel Menezes; Liot, Géraldine; Cordelières, Fabrice P; Marco, Sergio; Saudou, Frédéric

    2013-01-31

    Fast axonal transport (FAT) requires consistent energy over long distances to fuel the molecular motors that transport vesicles. We demonstrate that glycolysis provides ATP for the FAT of vesicles. Although inhibiting ATP production from mitochondria did not affect vesicles motility, pharmacological or genetic inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH reduced transport in cultured neurons and in Drosophila larvae. GAPDH localizes on vesicles via a huntingtin-dependent mechanism and is transported on fast-moving vesicles within axons. Purified motile vesicles showed GAPDH enzymatic activity and produced ATP. Finally, we show that vesicular GAPDH is necessary and sufficient to provide on-board energy for fast vesicular transport. Although detaching GAPDH from vesicles reduced transport, targeting GAPDH to vesicles was sufficient to promote FAT in GAPDH deficient neurons. This specifically localized glycolytic machinery may supply constant energy, independent of mitochondria, for the processive movement of vesicles over long distances in axons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Transportation Test of Fast Pallet with Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) and Projectile Loads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    Damage was caused from engagement with a plate on the pallet . Pallet chocks were replaced and spaced to prevent pallet engagement. TEST SEQUENCE STARTED...AD-A236 147 FINAl_ REPORT February 1990 EVT 12-90 Transportation Test of Fast Pallet with Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) and Projectile Loads...ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. IACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Oassification) Transportation Test of "Fast Pallet " with Multiple Launch Rocket System

  14. Global anomalous transport of ICRH- and NBI-heated fast ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkie, G. J.; Pusztai, I.; Abel, I.; Dorland, W.; Fülöp, T.

    2017-04-01

    By taking advantage of the trace approximation, one can gain an enormous computational advantage when solving for the global turbulent transport of impurities. In particular, this makes feasible the study of non-Maxwellian transport coupled in radius and energy, allowing collisions and transport to be accounted for on similar time scales, as occurs for fast ions. In this work, we study the fully-nonlinear ITG-driven trace turbulent transport of locally heated and injected fast ions. Previous results indicated the existence of MeV-range minorities heated by cyclotron resonance, and an associated density pinch effect. Here, we build upon this result using the t3core code to solve for the distribution of these minorities, consistently including the effects of collisions, gyrokinetic turbulence, and heating. Using the same tool to study the transport of injected fast ions, we contrast the qualitative features of their transport with that of the heated minorities. Our results indicate that heated minorities are more strongly affected by microturbulence than injected fast ions. The physical interpretation of this difference provides a possible explanation for the observed synergy when neutral beam injection (NBI) heating is combined with ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). Furthermore, we move beyond the trace approximation to develop a model which allows one to easily account for the reduction of anomalous transport due to the presence of fast ions in electrostatic turbulence.

  15. Fast-ion transport by Alfvén eigenmodes above a critical gradient threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Collins, C. S.; Podestà, M.; Kramer, G. J.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Stagner, L.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; White, R. B.; Zhu, Y. B.

    2017-05-01

    Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have identified how multiple simultaneous Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) lead to overlapping wave-particle resonances and stochastic fast-ion transport in fusion grade plasmas [C. S. Collins et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 095001 (2016)]. The behavior results in a sudden increase in fast-ion transport at a threshold that is well above the linear stability threshold for Alfvén instability. A novel beam modulation technique [W. W. Heidbrink et al., Nucl. Fusion 56, 112011 (2016)], in conjunction with an array of fast-ion diagnostics, probes the transport by measuring the fast-ion flux in different phase-space volumes. Well above the threshold, simulations that utilize the measured mode amplitudes and structures predict a hollow fast-ion profile that resembles the profile measured by fast-ion Dα spectroscopy; the modelling also successfully reproduces the temporal response of neutral-particle signals to beam modulation. The use of different modulated sources probes the details of phase-space transport by populating different regions in phase space and by altering the amplitude of the AEs. Both effects modulate the phase-space flows.

  16. Fast axonal transport by neurons from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P A; Schwab, W E; Gilbert, S; Allen, R D

    1986-01-01

    Neurons of the motor nerve net of Cyanea capillata were examined using video-enhanced DIC optics. A variety of organelles were visible within the axons and many were mobile. To quantify the movement organelles were divided into three classes (large, medium, and small) and the rates, direction, and types of movement displayed by the different particle types examined. The overall behavior and rates of movement of transported particles were comparable with those in axons from other species. The largest particles, mainly mitochondria were the slowest moving but were the only particles to reverse their direction of movement or to undergo interactions with other particles. The fastest movement was by the small particles, but both they and medium sized particles were transported continuously. In addition, the linear elements in these axons underwent considerable lateral movement.

  17. Simulations of Fuel Assembly and Fast-Electron Transport in Integrated Fast-Ignition Experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.; Anderson, K. S.; Shvydky, A.; Epstein, R.; Betti, R.; Myatt, J. F.; Stoeckl, C.; Jarrott, L. C.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Stephens, R. B.

    2013-10-01

    Integrated fast-ignition experiments on OMEGA benefit from improved performance of the OMEGA EP laser, including higher contrast, higher energy, and a smaller focus. Recent 8-keV, Cu-Kα flash radiography of cone-in-shell implosions and cone-tip breakout measurements showed good agreement with the 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the code DRACO. DRACO simulations show that the fuel assembly can be further improved by optimizing the compression laser pulse, evacuating air from the shell, and by adjusting the material of the cone tip. This is found to delay the cone-tip breakout by ~220 ps and increase the core areal density from ~80 mg/cm2 in the current experiments to ~500 mg/cm2 at the time of the OMEGA EP beam arrival before the cone-tip breakout. Simulations using the code LSP of fast-electron transport in the recent integrated OMEGA experiments with Cu-doped shells will be presented. Cu-doping is added to probe the transport of fast electrons via their induced Cu K-shell fluorescent emission. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration DE-NA0001944 and the Office of Science under DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  18. Measurement of energetic-particle-driven core magnetic fluctuations and induced fast-ion transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Koliner, J. J.; Eilerman, S.; Reusch, J. A.; Anderson, J. K.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Waksman, J.; Liu, D.

    2013-03-01

    Internal fluctuations arising from energetic-particle-driven instabilities, including both density and radial magnetic field, are measured in a reversed-field-pinch plasma. The fluctuations peak near the core where fast ions reside and shift outward along the major radius as the instability transits from the n = 5 to n = 4 mode. During this transition, strong nonlinear three-wave interaction among multiple modes accompanied by enhanced fast-ion transport is observed.

  19. Fast Algorithms for Earth Mover Distance Based on Optimal Transport and L1 Regularization II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    FAST ALGORITHMS FOR EARTH MOVER DISTANCE BASED ON OPTIMAL TRANSPORT AND L1 REGULARIZATION II WUCHEN LI, STANLEY OSHER, AND WILFRID GANGBO Abstract...We modify a fast algorithm which we designed in [15] for computing the Earth mover’s distance (EMD), whose cost is a Manhattan metric. From the theory...and converges very rapidly. Several numerical examples are presented. 1. Introduction The Earth Mover’s distance (EMD), also named the Monge problem

  20. On the Criticality Safety of Transuranic Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Transport Casks

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Bays; Ayodeji Alajo

    2010-05-01

    This work addresses the neutronic performance and criticality safety issues of transport casks for fuel pertaining to low conversion ratio sodium cooled fast reactors, conventionally known as Advanced Burner Reactors. The criticality of a one, three, seven and 19-assembly cask capacity is presented. Both dry “helium” and flooded “water” filled casks are considered. No credit for fuel burnup or fission products was assumed. As many as possible of the conservatisms used in licensing light water reactor universal transport casks were incorporated into this SFR cask criticality design and analysis. It was found that at 7-assemblies or more, adding moderator to the SFR cask increases criticality margin. Also, removal of MAs from the fuel increases criticality margin of dry casks and takes a slight amount of margin away for wet casks. Assuming credit for borated fuel tube liners, this design analysis suggests that as many as 19 assemblies can be loaded in a cask if limited purely by criticality safety. If no credit for boron is assumed, the cask could possibly hold seven assemblies if low conversion ratio fast reactor grade fuel and not breeder reactor grade fuel is assumed. The analysis showed that there is a need for new cask designs for fast reactors spent fuel transportation. There is a potential of modifying existing transportation cask design as the starting point for fast reactor spent fuel transportation.

  1. Nonlinear alfvénic fast particle transport and losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneller, M.; Lauber, Ph; García-Muñoz, M.; Brüdgam, M.; Günter, S.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic instabilities like Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes or core-localized modes such as Beta Induced Alfvén Eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfvén Eigenmodes driven by fast particles can lead to significant redistribution and losses in fusion devices. This is observed in many ASDEX Upgrade discharges. The present work aims to understand the underlying resonance mechanisms, especially in the presence of multiple modes with different frequencies. Resonant mode coupling mechanisms are investigated using the drift kinetic HAGIS code [Pinches 1998]. Simulations were performed for different plasma equilibria, in particular for different q profiles, employing the availability of improved experimental data. A study was carried out, investigating double-resonant mode coupling with respect to various overlapping scenarios. It was found that, depending on the radial mode distance, double-resonance is able to enhance growth rates as well as mode amplitudes significantly. Small radial mode distances, however can also lead to strong nonlinear mode stabilization of a linear dominant mode. With the extended version of HAGIS, losses were simulated and directly compared with experimental loss measurements. The losses' phase space distribution as well as their ejection signal is consistent with experimental data. Furthermore, it allowed to characterize them as prompt, resonant or stochastic. It was found that especially in multiple mode scenarios (with different mode frequencies), abundant incoherent losses occur in the lower energy range, due to a broad phase-space stochastization. The incoherent higher energetic losses are "prompt", i.e. their initial energy is too large for confined orbits.

  2. Tissue-specific expression of monocarboxylate transporters during fasting in mice.

    PubMed

    Schutkowski, Alexandra; Wege, Nicole; Stangl, Gabriele I; König, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Monocarboxylates such as pyruvate, lactate and ketone bodies are crucial for energy supply of all tissues, especially during energy restriction. The transport of monocarboxylates across the plasma membrane of cells is mediated by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Out of 14 known mammalian MCTs, six isoforms have been functionally characterized to transport monocarboxylates and short chain fatty acids (MCT1-4), thyroid hormones (MCT8, -10) and aromatic amino acids (MCT10). Knowledge on the regulation of the different MCT isoforms is rare. In an attempt to get more insights in regulation of MCT expression upon energy deprivation, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of tissue specific expression of five MCT isoforms upon 48 h of fasting in mice. Due to the crucial role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α as a central regulator of energy metabolism and as known regulator of MCT1 expression, we included both wildtype (WT) and PPARα knockout (KO) mice in our study. Liver, kidney, heart, small intestine, hypothalamus, pituitary gland and thyroid gland of the mice were analyzed. Here we show that the expression of all examined MCT isoforms was markedly altered by fasting compared to feeding. Expression of MCT1, MCT2 and MCT10 was either increased or decreased by fasting dependent on the analyzed tissue. MCT4 and MCT8 were down-regulated by fasting in all examined tissues. However, PPARα appeared to have a minor impact on MCT isoform regulation. Due to the fundamental role of MCTs in transport of energy providing metabolites and hormones involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, we assumed that the observed fasting-induced adaptations of MCT expression seem to ensure an adequate energy supply of tissues during the fasting state. Since, MCT isoforms 1-4 are also necessary for the cellular uptake of drugs, the fasting-induced modifications of MCT expression have to be considered in future clinical care algorithms.

  3. Tissue-Specific Expression of Monocarboxylate Transporters during Fasting in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schutkowski, Alexandra; Wege, Nicole; Stangl, Gabriele I.; König, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Monocarboxylates such as pyruvate, lactate and ketone bodies are crucial for energy supply of all tissues, especially during energy restriction. The transport of monocarboxylates across the plasma membrane of cells is mediated by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Out of 14 known mammalian MCTs, six isoforms have been functionally characterized to transport monocarboxylates and short chain fatty acids (MCT1-4), thyroid hormones (MCT8, -10) and aromatic amino acids (MCT10). Knowledge on the regulation of the different MCT isoforms is rare. In an attempt to get more insights in regulation of MCT expression upon energy deprivation, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of tissue specific expression of five MCT isoforms upon 48 h of fasting in mice. Due to the crucial role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α as a central regulator of energy metabolism and as known regulator of MCT1 expression, we included both wildtype (WT) and PPARα knockout (KO) mice in our study. Liver, kidney, heart, small intestine, hypothalamus, pituitary gland and thyroid gland of the mice were analyzed. Here we show that the expression of all examined MCT isoforms was markedly altered by fasting compared to feeding. Expression of MCT1, MCT2 and MCT10 was either increased or decreased by fasting dependent on the analyzed tissue. MCT4 and MCT8 were down-regulated by fasting in all examined tissues. However, PPARα appeared to have a minor impact on MCT isoform regulation. Due to the fundamental role of MCTs in transport of energy providing metabolites and hormones involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, we assumed that the observed fasting-induced adaptations of MCT expression seem to ensure an adequate energy supply of tissues during the fasting state. Since, MCT isoforms 1–4 are also necessary for the cellular uptake of drugs, the fasting-induced modifications of MCT expression have to be considered in future clinical care algorithms. PMID:25390336

  4. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pincha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Anderson, J. K.; Brower, D. L.; Capecchi, W.; Ding, W. X.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Liu, D.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.

    2014-05-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n =5 to n =6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m =1. The transition occurs when the m =1, n =5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (qfi) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

  5. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-05-15

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q{sub fi}) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

  6. Vehicle Emission Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Provision in the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is a memorandum regarding Vehicle Emission Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Provision in Fixing America's Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, which provides long-term funding certainty for surface transportation infrastructure planning

  7. Fast axonal transport of the proteasome complex depends on membrane interaction and molecular motor function.

    PubMed

    Otero, Maria G; Alloatti, Matías; Cromberg, Lucas E; Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Encalada, Sandra E; Pozo Devoto, Victorio M; Bruno, Luciana; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Falzone, Tomás L

    2014-04-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in neurons depends on the correct delivery of the proteasome complex. In neurodegenerative diseases, aggregation and accumulation of proteins in axons link transport defects with degradation impairments; however, the transport properties of proteasomes remain unknown. Here, using in vivo experiments, we reveal the fast anterograde transport of assembled and functional 26S proteasome complexes. A high-resolution tracking system to follow fluorescent proteasomes revealed three types of motion: actively driven proteasome axonal transport, diffusive behavior in a viscoelastic axonema and proteasome-confined motion. We show that active proteasome transport depends on motor function because knockdown of the KIF5B motor subunit resulted in impairment of the anterograde proteasome flux and the density of segmental velocities. Finally, we reveal that neuronal proteasomes interact with intracellular membranes and identify the coordinated transport of fluorescent proteasomes with synaptic precursor vesicles, Golgi-derived vesicles, lysosomes and mitochondria. Taken together, our results reveal fast axonal transport as a new mechanism of proteasome delivery that depends on membrane cargo 'hitch-hiking' and the function of molecular motors. We further hypothesize that defects in proteasome transport could promote abnormal protein clearance in neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. MCNPX Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport in SiC semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, K.; Zat'ko, B.; Šagátová, A.; Pavlovič, M.; Nečas, V.; Stacho, M.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate particle transport properties of a fast neutron detector based on silicon carbide. MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was used in our study because it allows seamless particle transport, thus not only interacting neutrons can be inspected but also secondary particles can be banked for subsequent transport. Modelling of the fast-neutron response of a SiC detector was carried out for fast neutrons produced by 239Pu-Be source with the mean energy of about 4.3 MeV. Using the MCNPX code, the following quantities have been calculated: secondary particle flux densities, reaction rates of elastic/inelastic scattering and other nuclear reactions, distribution of residual ions, deposited energy and energy distribution of pulses. The values of reaction rates calculated for different types of reactions and resulting energy deposition values showed that the incident neutrons transfer part of the carried energy predominantly via elastic scattering on silicon and carbon atoms. Other fast-neutron induced reactions include inelastic scattering and nuclear reactions followed by production of α-particles and protons. Silicon and carbon recoil atoms, α-particles and protons are charged particles which contribute to the detector response. It was demonstrated that although the bare SiC material can register fast neutrons directly, its detection efficiency can be enlarged if it is covered by an appropriate conversion layer. Comparison of the simulation results with experimental data was successfully accomplished.

  9. Studies of Electron Transport and Isochoric Heating and Their Applicability to Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M H; Amiranoff, F; Andersen, C; Batani, D; Baton, S D; Cowan, T; Fisch, N; Freeman, R; Gremillet, L; Hall, T; Hatchett, S; Hill, J; King, J; Kodama, R; Koch, J; Koenig, M; Lasinski, B; Langdon, B; MacKinnon, A; Martinolli, E; Norreys, P; Parks, P; Perrelli-Cippo, E; Rabec Le Gloahec, M; Rosenbluth, M; Rousseaux, C; Santon, J J; Scianitti, F; Snavely, R; Tabak, M; Tanaka, K; Town, R; Tsutumi, T; Stephens, R

    2003-10-30

    Experimental measurements of electron transport and isochoric heating in 100 J, 1 ps laser irradiation of solid A1 targets are presented. Modeling with a hybrid PIC code is compared with the data and good agreement is obtained using a heuristic model for the electron injection. The relevance for fast ignition is discussed.

  10. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang

    2013-10-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) modes with fishbone-like structures are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection into MST reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to large fast ion beta and stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of these instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport and interaction with global tearing modes. Internal magnetic field fluctuations associated with the EP modes are directly observed for the first time by Faraday-effect polarimetry (frequency ~ 90 kHz and amplitude ~ 2 G). Simultaneously measured density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving and asymmetric spatial structure that peaks near the core where fast ions reside and shifts outward as the instability evolves. Furthermore, the EP mode frequencies appear at ~k∥VA , consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growing phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop (~ 15 %) when the EP modes peak, indicating the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced (× 2) with the onset of multiple nonlinearly-interacting EP modes. The fast ions also impact global tearing modes, reducing their amplitudes by up to 65%. This mode reduction is lessened following the EP-bursts, further evidence for fast ion redistribution that weakens the suppression mechanism. Possible tearing mode suppression mechanisms will be discussed. Work supported by US DoE.

  11. Effects of transport, fasting and anaesthesia on the faecal microbiota of healthy adult horses.

    PubMed

    Schoster, A; Mosing, M; Jalali, M; Staempfli, H R; Weese, J S

    2016-09-01

    The intestinal microbiota is important for health and disease. Factors that disturb the equine intestinal microbiota need further investigation. To determine the effects of transport, fasting and anaesthesia on the faecal microbiota of healthy adult horses using next-generation sequencing. Experimental trial. Faecal samples were taken from 8 horses at baseline, after transport, 12 h of fasting and 24, 48 and 72 h after a 6 h anaesthesia. Next generation sequencing of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene was used to assess the microbial composition of faeces. Alpha diversity, phylogenetic structures and beta diversity were assessed. There were significant changes in the relative abundances of phyla, classes, orders and families after transport, fasting and anaesthesia. Most notably horses had a significantly lower abundance of Clostridiales after transport compared with baseline (P = 0.03) and a decreased abundance of Rickettsiales after fasting (P = 0.024). Alpha diversity was not significantly different between time points (all P>0.21). When parsimony analysis was applied, anaesthesia had a significant effect on community membership and structure (Jaccard index and Yue and Clayton index both P = 0.02). There was some effect of transport, fasting and anaesthesia on the composition and structure of the microbiota of healthy horses. This indicates these are potentially stress factors for the equine intestinal microbiota. Further investigation is required to look at the potential impact of changes in the microbiota on the development of disease in the post anaesthetic period. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  12. Fast-ion transport and NBI current drive in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, Benedikt; Weiland, Markus; Mlynek, Alexander; Dunne, Mike; Dux, Ralph; Fischer, Rainer; Hobirk, Joerg; Hopf, Christian; Reich, Matthias; Rittich, David; Ryter, Francois; Schneider, Philip; Tardini, Giovanni; Garcia-Munoz, Manuel; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-10-01

    Good confinement of fast ions is essential in fusion devices because these suprathermal particles are responsible for plasma heating, current drive and can, if poorly confined, damage surrounding walls. The degradation of the fast-ion confinement caused by large and small scale instabilities must consequently be investigated. In the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, fast ions are generated by neutral beam injection (NBI) and their slowing down distribution can be studied using FIDA spectroscopy, neutral particle analyzers and neutron detectors. Neo-classical fast-ion transport is observed by these measurements in MHD-quiescent discharges with relatively weak heating power (less than 5 MW). The presence of sawtooth instabilities, in contrast, yields a strong internal fast-ion redistribution that can be modelled very well when assuming full reconnection of the helical magnetic field. The fast-ion current drive efficiency has been studied in discharges with up to 10 MW of heating power in which on-axis and off-axis NBI were exchanged. The radial shape of the fast-ion population, generated by the different NBIs, changes as predicted and a corresponding modification of the current profile is measured.

  13. A monocarboxylate transporter required for hepatocyte secretion of ketone bodies during fasting.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Sarah E; Cruz-Garcia, Lourdes; Karanth, Santhosh; Anderson, Ryan M; Stainier, Didier Y R; Schlegel, Amnon

    2012-02-01

    To find new genes that influence liver lipid mass, we performed a genetic screen for zebrafish mutants with hepatic steatosis, a pathological accumulation of fat. The red moon (rmn) mutant develops hepatic steatosis as maternally deposited yolk is depleted. Conversely, hepatic steatosis is suppressed in rmn mutants by adequate nutrition. Adult rmn mutants show increased liver neutral lipids and induction of hepatic lipid biosynthetic genes when fasted. Positional cloning of the rmn locus reveals a loss-of-function mutation in slc16a6a (solute carrier family 16a, member 6a), a gene that we show encodes a transporter of the major ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate. Restoring wild-type zebrafish slc16a6a expression or introducing human SLC16A6 in rmn mutant livers rescues the mutant phenotype. Radiotracer analysis confirms that loss of Slc16a6a function causes diversion of liver-trapped ketogenic precursors into triacylglycerol. Underscoring the importance of Slc16a6a to normal fasting physiology, previously fed rmn mutants are more sensitive to death by starvation than are wild-type larvae. Our unbiased, forward genetic approach has found a heretofore unrecognized critical step in fasting energy metabolism: hepatic ketone body transport. Since β-hydroxybutyrate is both a major fuel and a signaling molecule in fasting, the discovery of this transporter provides a new direction for modulating circulating levels of ketone bodies in metabolic diseases.

  14. A monocarboxylate transporter required for hepatocyte secretion of ketone bodies during fasting

    PubMed Central

    Hugo, Sarah E.; Cruz-Garcia, Lourdes; Karanth, Santhosh; Anderson, Ryan M.; Stainier, Didier Y.R.; Schlegel, Amnon

    2012-01-01

    To find new genes that influence liver lipid mass, we performed a genetic screen for zebrafish mutants with hepatic steatosis, a pathological accumulation of fat. The red moon (rmn) mutant develops hepatic steatosis as maternally deposited yolk is depleted. Conversely, hepatic steatosis is suppressed in rmn mutants by adequate nutrition. Adult rmn mutants show increased liver neutral lipids and induction of hepatic lipid biosynthetic genes when fasted. Positional cloning of the rmn locus reveals a loss-of-function mutation in slc16a6a (solute carrier family 16a, member 6a), a gene that we show encodes a transporter of the major ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate. Restoring wild-type zebrafish slc16a6a expression or introducing human SLC16A6 in rmn mutant livers rescues the mutant phenotype. Radiotracer analysis confirms that loss of Slc16a6a function causes diversion of liver-trapped ketogenic precursors into triacylglycerol. Underscoring the importance of Slc16a6a to normal fasting physiology, previously fed rmn mutants are more sensitive to death by starvation than are wild-type larvae. Our unbiased, forward genetic approach has found a heretofore unrecognized critical step in fasting energy metabolism: hepatic ketone body transport. Since β-hydroxybutyrate is both a major fuel and a signaling molecule in fasting, the discovery of this transporter provides a new direction for modulating circulating levels of ketone bodies in metabolic diseases. PMID:22302940

  15. Mesoscale Simulation Data for Initializing Fast-Time Wake Transport and Decay Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.; Vanvalkenburg, Randal L.; Pruis, Mathew J.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    The fast-time wake transport and decay models require vertical profiles of crosswinds, potential temperature and the eddy dissipation rate as initial conditions. These inputs are normally obtained from various field sensors. In case of data-denied scenarios or operational use, these initial conditions can be provided by mesoscale model simulations. In this study, the vertical profiles of potential temperature from a mesoscale model were used as initial conditions for the fast-time wake models. The mesoscale model simulations were compared against available observations and the wake model predictions were compared with the Lidar measurements from three wake vortex field experiments.

  16. Effect of MSH/ACTH peptides on fast axonal transport in intact and regenerating sciatic nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Crescitelli, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Fast axonal transport was examined in intact rats treated with ACTH 4-10 or ACTH 4-9 (ORG 2766), hypophysectomized rats, adrenalectomized rats, and in ACTH 4-10 treated rats with crushed regenerating sciatic nerves by injecting /sup 3/H-leucine into the ventral horn region of the spinal cord. The distance traveled by the transported activity along the sciatic nerve and the rate of fast axonal transport were not significantly altered as a result of treatment with ACTH 4-10, ACTH 4-9 (ORG 2766), hypophysectomy, or adrenalectomy. Treatment with ACTH 4-9 (ORG 2766) at concentrations of 1 ..mu..g/Kg /day and 10 ..mu..g/Kg/day caused significant reductions (62% and 64% respectively) in the crest height of the fast axonal transport curve as compared to 0.9% saline treated control animals. No significant differences were found in comparing the distance, rate, slope, or crest height of ACTH 4-10 treated animals with crushed regenerating (7 or 14d) sciatic nerves to control animals. In the group of animals in days, the amount of radiolabeled activity was significantly increased in the ACTH 4-10 treated animals as compared to control animals. The results indicate that during regeneration the peptide acts to prolong the initially high levels of synthetic activity which occur in regenerating axons.

  17. Identification of an Axonal Kinesin-3 Motor for Fast Anterograde Vesicle Transport that Facilitates Retrograde Transport of Neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    Barkus, Rosemarie V.; Klyachko, Olga; Horiuchi, Dai; Dickson, Barry J.

    2008-01-01

    A screen for genes required in Drosophila eye development identified an UNC-104/Kif1 related kinesin-3 microtubule motor. Analysis of mutants suggested that Drosophila Unc-104 has neuronal functions that are distinct from those of the classic anterograde axonal motor, kinesin-1. In particular, unc-104 mutations did not cause the distal paralysis and focal axonal swellings characteristic of kinesin-1 (Khc) mutations. However, like Khc mutations, unc-104 mutations caused motoneuron terminal atrophy. The distributions and transport behaviors of green fluorescent protein-tagged organelles in motor axons indicate that Unc-104 is a major contributor to the anterograde fast transport of neuropeptide-filled vesicles, that it also contributes to anterograde transport of synaptotagmin-bearing vesicles, and that it contributes little or nothing to anterograde transport of mitochondria, which are transported primarily by Khc. Remarkably, unc-104 mutations inhibited retrograde runs by neurosecretory vesicles but not by the other two organelles. This suggests that Unc-104, a member of an anterograde kinesin subfamily, contributes to an organelle-specific dynein-driven retrograde transport mechanism. PMID:17989365

  18. Integrated Kinetic Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions, Fast-Electron Generation and Transport in Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, A; Cohen, B; Divol, L

    2009-11-16

    We present new results on the physics of short-pulse laser-matter interaction of kilojoule-picosecond pulses at full spatial and temporal scale, using a new approach that combines a 3D collisional electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code with an MHD-hybrid model of high-density plasma. In the latter, collisions damp out plasma waves, and an Ohm's law with electron inertia effects neglected determines the electric field. In addition to yielding orders of magnitude in speed-up while avoiding numerical instabilities, this allows us to model the whole problem in a single unified framework: the laser-plasma interaction at sub-critical densities, energy deposition at relativistic critical densities, and fast-electron transport in solid densities. Key questions such as the multi-picosecond temporal evolution of the laser energy conversion into hot electrons, the impact of return currents on the laser-plasma interaction, and the effect of self-generated electric and magnetic fields on electron transport will be addressed. We will report applications to current experiments.

  19. Integrated kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions, fast-electron generation, and transport in fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, A. J.; Cohen, B. I.; Divol, L.

    2010-05-15

    We present new results on the physics of short-pulse laser-matter interaction of kilojoule-picosecond pulses at full spatial and temporal scale using a new approach that combines a three-dimensional collisional electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with a magnetohydrodynamic-hybrid model of high-density plasma. In the latter, collisions damp out plasma waves, and an Ohm's law with electron inertia effects neglected determines the electric field. In addition to yielding orders of magnitude in speed-up while avoiding numerical instabilities, this allows us to model the whole problem in a single unified framework: the laser-plasma interaction at subcritical densities, energy deposition at relativistic critical densities, and fast- electron transport in solid densities. Key questions such as the multipicosecond temporal evolution of the laser energy conversion into hot electrons, the impact of return currents on the laser-plasma interaction, and the effect of self-generated electric and magnetic fields on electron transport will be addressed. We will report applications to current experiments.

  20. Optic nerve fast axonal transport abnormalities in primates. Occurrence after short posterior ciliary artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1980-11-01

    Fast axonal transport abnormalities in primate (Aotus trivirgatus) optic nerve were studied in ten eyes at various intervals after occlusion of the lateral short posterior ciliary circulation. Evidence of focal axonal ischemia, as indicated by swelling of mitochondria and dissolution of cytoplasmic detail, was noted as early as one hour after occlusion. Accumulation of mitochondria, microvesicles, and dense bodies, indicating focal interruption of axonal transport mechanisms, was noted in eyes examined at 2, 4, and 6 hours. This accumulation of organelles was limited to the region of the lamina cribrosa. Nerve head abnormalities were not seen in two eyes studied at two weeks.

  1. A Fast Fourier transform stochastic analysis of the contaminant transport problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deng, F.W.; Cushman, J.H.; Delleur, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional stochastic analysis of the contaminant transport problem is developed in the spirit of Naff (1990). The new derivation is more general and simpler than previous analysis. The fast Fourier transformation is used extensively to obtain numerical estimates of the mean concentration and various spatial moments. Data from both the Borden and Cape Cod experiments are used to test the methodology. Results are comparable to results obtained by other methods, and to the experiments themselves.

  2. Fast Monte Carlo Electron-Photon Transport Method and Application in Accurate Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lijuan; Sun, Guangyao; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing; Chen, Zhenping; Li, Gui

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most accurate computational method for dose calculation, but its wide application on clinical accurate radiotherapy is hindered due to its poor speed of converging and long computation time. In the MC dose calculation research, the main task is to speed up computation while high precision is maintained. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the calculation speed of MC method for electron-photon transport with high precision and ultimately to reduce the accurate radiotherapy dose calculation time based on normal computer to the level of several hours, which meets the requirement of clinical dose verification. Based on the existing Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team, a fast MC method for electron-photon coupled transport was presented with focus on two aspects: firstly, through simplifying and optimizing the physical model of the electron-photon transport, the calculation speed was increased with slightly reduction of calculation accuracy; secondly, using a variety of MC calculation acceleration methods, for example, taking use of obtained information in previous calculations to avoid repeat simulation of particles with identical history; applying proper variance reduction techniques to accelerate MC method convergence rate, etc. The fast MC method was tested by a lot of simple physical models and clinical cases included nasopharyngeal carcinoma, peripheral lung tumor, cervical carcinoma, etc. The result shows that the fast MC method for electron-photon transport was fast enough to meet the requirement of clinical accurate radiotherapy dose verification. Later, the method will be applied to the Accurate/Advanced Radiation Therapy System ARTS as a MC dose verification module.

  3. Simulations of electron transport and ignition for direct-drive fast-ignition targets

    SciTech Connect

    Solodov, A. A.; Anderson, K. S.; Betti, R.; Gotcheva, V.; Myatt, J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C.

    2008-11-15

    The performance of high-gain, fast-ignition fusion targets is investigated using one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of implosion and two-dimensional (2D) hybrid fluid-particle simulations of hot-electron transport, ignition, and burn. The 2D/3D hybrid-particle-in-cell code LSP[D. R. Welch et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 464, 134 (2001)] and the 2D fluid code DRACO[P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] are integrated to simulate the hot-electron transport and heating for direct-drive fast-ignition targets. LSP simulates the transport of hot electrons from the place where they are generated to the dense fuel core where their energy is absorbed. DRACO includes the physics required to simulate compression, ignition, and burn of fast-ignition targets. The self-generated resistive magnetic field is found to collimate the hot-electron beam, increase the coupling efficiency of hot electrons with the target, and reduce the minimum energy required for ignition. Resistive filamentation of the hot-electron beam is also observed. The minimum energy required for ignition is found for hot electrons with realistic angular spread and Maxwellian energy-distribution function.

  4. Simulations of electron transport and ignition for direct-drive fast-ignition targets

    SciTech Connect

    Solodov, A. A.; Anderson, K. S.; Betti, R.; Gotcheva, V.; Myatt, J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of high-gain, fast-ignition fusion targets is investigated using one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of implosion and two-dimensional (2D) hybrid fluid-particle simulations of hot-electron transport, ignition, and burn. The 2D/3D hybrid-particle-in-cell code LSP [D. R. Welch et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 464, 134 (2001)] and the 2D fluid code DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] are integrated to simulate the hot-electron transport and heating for direct-drive fast-ignition targets. LSP simulates the transport of hot electrons from the place where they are generated to the dense fuel core where their energy is absorbed. DRACO includes the physics required to simulate compression, ignition, and burn of fast-ignition targets. The self-generated resistive magnetic field is found to collimate the hot-electron beam, increase the coupling efficiency of hot electrons with the target, and reduce the minimum energy required for ignition. Resistive filamentation of the hot-electron beam is also observed. The minimum energy required for ignition is found for hot electrons with realistic angular spread and Maxwellian energy-distribution function.

  5. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklich, Bradley J.; Fink, Charles L.; Sagalovsky, Leonid

    1995-09-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutron is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy (FNTS) and pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ration is greater than about 0.01. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projections angles and modest (2 cm) reolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and the reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA technqiues are presented.

  6. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutrons is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) and Pulsed Fast-Neutron Analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ratio is greater than about 0.01. The Monte-Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projection angles and modest (2 cm) resolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and these reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte-Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA techniques are presented.

  7. Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01

    The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of the particle transport in semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, Katarína; Zaťko, Bohumír; Šagátová, Andrea; Nečas, Vladimír

    2013-05-01

    Several Monte Carlo all-particle transport codes are under active development around the world. In this paper we focused on the capabilities of the MCNPX code (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) to follow the particle transport in semiconductor detector of fast neutrons. Semiconductor detector based on semi-insulating GaAs was the object of our investigation. As converter material capable to produce charged particles from the (n, p) interaction, a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was employed. As the source of fast neutrons, the 239Pu-Be neutron source was used in the model. The simulations were performed using the MCNPX code which makes possible to track not only neutrons but also recoiled protons at all interesting energies. Hence, the MCNPX code enables seamless particle transport and no other computer program is needed to process the particle transport. The determination of the optimal thickness of the conversion layer and the minimum thickness of the active region of semiconductor detector as well as the energy spectra simulation were the principal goals of the computer modeling. Theoretical detector responses showed that the best detection efficiency can be achieved for 500 μm thick HDPE converter layer. The minimum detector active region thickness has been estimated to be about 400 μm.

  9. Redistribution of proteins of fast axonal transport following administration of beta,beta'-iminodipropionitrile: a quantitative autoradiographic study

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Beta,beta'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) produces a rearrangement of axoplasmic organelles with displacement of microtubules, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria toward the center and of neurofilaments toward the periphery of the axon, whereas the rate of the fast component of axonal transport is unchanged. Separation of microtubules and neurofilaments makes the IDPN axons an excellent model for study of the role of these two organelles in axonal transport. The cross-sectional distribution of [3H]-labeled proteins moving with the front of the fast transport was analyzed by quantitative electron microscopic autoradiography in sciatic nerves of IDPN-treated and control rats, 6 h after injection of a 1:1 mixture of [3H]-proline and [3H]-lysine into lumbar ventral horns. In IDPN axons most of the transported [3H] proteins were located in the central region with microtubules, smooth endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, whereas few or none were in the periphery with neurofilaments. In control axons the [3H]-labeled proteins were uniformly distributed within the axoplasm. It is concluded that in fast axonal transport: (a) neurofilaments play no primary role; (b) the normal architecture of the axonal cytoskeleton and the normal cross-sectional distribution of transported materials are not indispensable for the maintenance of a normal rate of transport. The present findings are consistent with the models of fast transport that envision microtubules as the key organelles in providing directionality and propulsive force to the fast component of axonal transport. PMID:6183280

  10. Integrated simulations of implosion, electron transport, and heating for direct-drive fast-ignition targets

    SciTech Connect

    Solodov, A. A.; Anderson, K. S.; Betti, R.; Gotcheva, V.; Myatt, J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C.

    2009-05-15

    A thorough understanding of future integrated fast-ignition experiments combining compression and heating of high-density thermonuclear fuel requires hybrid (fluid+particle) simulations of the implosion and ignition process. Different spatial and temporal scales need to be resolved to model the entire fast-ignition experiment. The two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric hydrocode DRACO[P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] and the 2D/three-dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell code LSP[D. R. Welch et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 464, 134 (2001)] have been integrated to simulate the implosion and heating of direct-drive, fast-ignition fusion targets. DRACO includes the physics required to simulate compression, ignition, and burn of fast-ignition targets. LSP simulates the transport of hot electrons from the place where they are generated to the dense fuel core where their energy is absorbed. The results from integrated simulations of cone-in-shell CD targets designed for fast-ignition experiments on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997); C. Stoeckl et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 49, 367 (2006)] are presented. Target heating and neutron yields are computed. The results from LSP simulations of electron transport in solid-density plastic targets are also presented. They confirm an increase in the electron divergence angle with the laser intensity in the current experiments. The self-generated resistive magnetic field is found to collimate the hot-electron beam and increase the coupling efficiency of hot electrons with the target. Resistive filamentation of the hot-electron beam is also observed.

  11. Integrated Simulations of Implosion, Electron Transport, and Heating for Direct-Drive Fast-Ignition Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Solodov, A.A.; Anderson, K.S.; Betti, R.; Gotcheva, V.; Myatt, J.; Delettrez, J.A.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C.

    2009-04-28

    A thorough understanding of future integrated fast-ignition experiments combining compression and heating of high-density thermonuclear fuel requires hybrid (fluid+particle) simulations of the implosion and ignition process. Different spatial and temporal scales need to be resolved to model the entire fast-ignition experiment. The two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] and the 2D/three-dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell code LSP [D. R. Welch et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 464, 134 (2001)] have been integrated to simulate the implosion and heating of direct-drive, fast-ignition fusion targets. DRACO includes the physics required to simulate compression, ignition, and burn of fast-ignition targets. LSP simulates the transport of hot electrons from the place where they are generated to the dense fuel core where their energy is absorbed. The results from integrated simulations of cone-in-shell CD targets designed for fast-ignition experiments on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997); C. Stoeckl et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 49, 367 (2006)] are presented. Target heating and neutron yields are computed. The results from LSP simulations of electron transport in solid-density plastic targets are also presented. They confirm an increase in the electron divergence angle with the laser intensity in the current experiments. The self-generated resistive magnetic field is found to collimate the hot-electron beam and increase the coupling efficiency of hot electrons with the target. Resistive filamentation of the hot-electron beam is also observed.

  12. A fast low-pressure transport route to large black phosphorus single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nilges, Tom Kersting, Marcel; Pfeifer, Thorben

    2008-08-15

    Black phosphorus, a promising candidate for lithium battery electrodes, can be prepared by a low-pressure transport reaction route representing the first effective and scalable access to this element modification. Crystal sizes larger than 1 cm were obtained at low-pressure conditions in silica ampoules. X-ray phase analyses, EDX, ICP-MS and optical microscopy were applied to characterize the resulting black phosphorus. The present method drastically improves the traditional preparation ways like mercury catalysis, bismuth-flux or high-pressure techniques and represents an easy, non-toxic, fast and highly efficient method to achieve black phosphorus. In contrast to a previously reported low-pressure route the present transport reaction allows an up-scaling to higher masses of starting materials, a larger black phosphorus yield and faster reaction time under retention of the high product crystallinity. - Graphical abstract: A low-pressure transport reaction route representing the first effective and scalable access to black phosphorus.

  13. Urban transportation of Beijing in a fast expansion based on the resident satisfaction survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiuwei; Zhang, Wenzhong; Jin, Fengjun; Hong, Min; Wang, Chengjin

    2008-10-01

    This study examines the satisfaction degree of the transportation convenient level by the questionnaire survey and the spatial characteristics by the method of spatial autocorrelation in order to reveal the transportation problems as a consequence of rapid urban development in the city of Beijing. The results demonstrated that the satisfaction degree of traffic congestion was the lowest and the satisfaction degree of transportation convenient level in suburb was lower than it in central city. The supply of traffic facilities, the pattern of resident traffic mode, the road system organization, and the land-use type in a fast expansion were the important causes. According to the research, three major reasons of urban expansion issues are detected. The first reason is lack of comprehensive development planning mechanism to associate the land use with urban transit system which resulted in the lack of transportation facilities. Secondly, Beijing's ring-road structure cannot afford rapid traffic growth and become a main reason to cause traffic congestion. Thirdly, land-use type is deep cause of transportation problems. This study also gave some suggestion in order to minimize the negative aspects: "control" and "regulation" are the two ways to solve the traffic problem; urban spatial expansion oriented by the public transportation and service is the efficient pattern of spatial expansion.

  14. Observation of Critical-Gradient Behavior in Alfvén-Eigenmode-Induced Fast-Ion Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C. S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Austin, M. E.; Kramer, G. J.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Stagner, L.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; White, R. B.; Zhu, Y. B.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that fast-ion transport suddenly becomes stiff above a critical threshold in the presence of many overlapping small-amplitude Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs). The threshold is phase-space dependent and occurs when particle orbits become stochastic due to resonances with AEs. Above threshold, equilibrium fast-ion density profiles are unchanged despite increased drive, and intermittent fast-ion losses are observed. Fast-ion D α spectroscopy indicates radially localized transport of the copassing population at radii that correspond to the location of midcore AEs. The observation of stiff fast-ion transport suggests that reduced models can be used to effectively predict alpha profiles, beam ion profiles, and losses to aid in the design of optimized scenarios for future burning plasma devices.

  15. Observation of Critical-Gradient Behavior in Alfvén-Eigenmode-Induced Fast-Ion Transport.

    PubMed

    Collins, C S; Heidbrink, W W; Austin, M E; Kramer, G J; Pace, D C; Petty, C C; Stagner, L; Van Zeeland, M A; White, R B; Zhu, Y B

    2016-03-04

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that fast-ion transport suddenly becomes stiff above a critical threshold in the presence of many overlapping small-amplitude Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs). The threshold is phase-space dependent and occurs when particle orbits become stochastic due to resonances with AEs. Above threshold, equilibrium fast-ion density profiles are unchanged despite increased drive, and intermittent fast-ion losses are observed. Fast-ion Dα spectroscopy indicates radially localized transport of the copassing population at radii that correspond to the location of midcore AEs. The observation of stiff fast-ion transport suggests that reduced models can be used to effectively predict alpha profiles, beam ion profiles, and losses to aid in the design of optimized scenarios for future burning plasma devices.

  16. Integrated LSP Modeling of Fast-electron Production and Transport in a Wire Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Mingsheng; Pasley, John; Beg, Farhat; Stephens, Richard; Welch, Dale

    2007-11-01

    Integrated simulations using the implicit PIC code LSP^# have been performed to study the production of relativistic electrons from ultra-intense (I ˜ 7 x 10^19 W/cm^2) sub-picosecond laser solid interactions including a preformed plasma and the transport of such beam in a thin (50 μm in diameter), 100's μm long wire target. Our 3D simulations show that greater than 40% of laser energy is transferred to fast electrons whose energy spectrum can be fitted to a two-temperature Maxwellian distribution. The fast electrons have a typical propagation length of about 100 μm inside the wire target. A very small fraction of the fast electrons is confined in the wire target surface by strong electric and magnetic fields and these electrons have a much longer range. The simulation results agree well with recent Titan wire experiments [1], as well as with other collisional PIC modeling. [1] F. N. Beg, Invited talk, 9th International Fast Ignition Workshop, Cambridge, MA, Nov. 3-5, 2006; J. Pasley et al., to be submitted to Phys. of Plasmas. ^# LSP is a software product of ATK Mission Research.

  17. Fast-ion studies in the National Spherical Torus Experiment: Transport by instabilities and acceleration by high harmonic fast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Deyong

    2009-12-01

    An extensive set of fast-ion diagnostics, including neutron detectors, a E∣∣B type neutral particle analyzer (NPA) and the newly built four-chord solid state neutral particle analyzer array (SSNPA) and a 16-channel Fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) diagnostic, provides a good test-bed to study fast ion physics in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). During combined neutral beam injection (NBI) and High-Harmonic Fast-Wave (HHFW) heating, the acceleration of fast ions is evident in all fast ion diagnostics. The neutron rate is about three times larger during the HHFW heating. A fast-ion tail above the beam injection is observed in the NPA, SSNPA and FIDA diagnostics. It is also shown that the accelerated fast ions observed by the NPA and SSNPA diagnostics mainly come from passive charge exchange reactions at the edge due to the NPA/SSNPA localization in phase space. The spatial profile of accelerated fast ions that is measured by the FIDA diagnostic is much broader than in conventional tokamaks because of the multiple resonance layers and large orbits in NSTX. The fast-ion distribution function calculated by the CQL3D Fokker-Planck code differs from the measured spatial profile, presumably because the current version of CQL3D uses a zero-banana-width model. In addition, the effects of bursting instabilities on the fast ion distribution in neutral beam heated plasmas are examined. Fishbone events generally have a minor effect on the fast ion distribution and no clear correlation is observed in the NPA and SSNPA diagnostics. However, sawteeth or the combinations of fishbones and CAEs always cause neutron rate drops up to 25% and bursts at outer chords of the SSNPA, which indicate fast ion loss. It is also observed that high energy fast ions respond earlier than low energy fast ions.

  18. A fast Monte Carlo code for proton transport in radiation therapy based on MCNPX.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2014-07-01

    An important requirement for proton therapy is a software for dose calculation. Monte Carlo is the most accurate method for dose calculation, but it is very slow. In this work, a method is developed to improve the speed of dose calculation. The method is based on pre-generated tracks for particle transport. The MCNPX code has been used for generation of tracks. A set of data including the track of the particle was produced in each particular material (water, air, lung tissue, bone, and soft tissue). This code can transport protons in wide range of energies (up to 200 MeV for proton). The validity of the fast Monte Carlo (MC) code is evaluated with data MCNPX as a reference code. While analytical pencil beam algorithm transport shows great errors (up to 10%) near small high density heterogeneities, there was less than 2% deviation of MCNPX results in our dose calculation and isodose distribution. In terms of speed, the code runs 200 times faster than MCNPX. In the Fast MC code which is developed in this work, it takes the system less than 2 minutes to calculate dose for 10(6) particles in an Intel Core 2 Duo 2.66 GHZ desktop computer.

  19. A fast Monte Carlo code for proton transport in radiation therapy based on MCNPX

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    An important requirement for proton therapy is a software for dose calculation. Monte Carlo is the most accurate method for dose calculation, but it is very slow. In this work, a method is developed to improve the speed of dose calculation. The method is based on pre-generated tracks for particle transport. The MCNPX code has been used for generation of tracks. A set of data including the track of the particle was produced in each particular material (water, air, lung tissue, bone, and soft tissue). This code can transport protons in wide range of energies (up to 200 MeV for proton). The validity of the fast Monte Carlo (MC) code is evaluated with data MCNPX as a reference code. While analytical pencil beam algorithm transport shows great errors (up to 10%) near small high density heterogeneities, there was less than 2% deviation of MCNPX results in our dose calculation and isodose distribution. In terms of speed, the code runs 200 times faster than MCNPX. In the Fast MC code which is developed in this work, it takes the system less than 2 minutes to calculate dose for 106 particles in an Intel Core 2 Duo 2.66 GHZ desktop computer. PMID:25190994

  20. Study of fast electron transport and ionization in isochorically heated solid foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Pandit, Rishi; Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Zastrau, Ulf; Foerster, Eckhart; Beg, Farhat; McLean, Harry; Chen, Hui; Park, J.-B.; Patel, Prav; Link, Anthony; Ping, Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Interaction of a high-power, short-pulse laser with a solid target generates a significant number of relativistic MeV electrons, subsequently heating the target isochorically in the transport process. Fast electron driven ionization of a solid titanium foil was studied by measuring Ti K-alpha x-rays and performing 2-D particle-in-cell simulations. The experiment was performed using the 50 TW Leopard short-pulse laser at UNR's Nevada Terawatt Facility. The 15 J, 0.35 ps laser was tightly focused on to a various sized, 2- μm thick Ti foil within a 8 μm spot to achieve the peak intensity of 2×1019 W/cm2. The transport of the fast electrons produced 4.51 keV Ti K-alpha x-rays. The yields and 2-D monochromatic images were recorded with a Bragg crystal spectrometer and a spherically bent crystal imager. The ionization degree of the heated foil was determined to be 15 from the ionized K-alpha lines and the missing emission in the images. 2-D PIC simulations using a PICLS code with a radiation transport module were performed to calculate the K-alpha profiles and spectra. Details of the experiment and comparison will be presented.

  1. High effective cytosolic H+ buffering in mouse cortical astrocytes attributable to fast bicarbonate transport.

    PubMed

    Theparambil, Shefeeq M; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2015-09-01

    Cytosolic H(+) buffering plays a major role for shaping intracellular H(+) shifts and hence for the availability of H(+) for biochemical reactions and acid/base-coupled transport processes. H(+) buffering is one of the prime means to protect the cell from large acid/base shifts. We have used the H(+) indicator dye BCECF and confocal microscopy to monitor the cytosolic H(+) concentration, [H(+)]i, in cultured cortical astrocytes of wild-type mice and of mice deficient in sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1 (NBCe1-KO) or in carbonic anhydrase isoform II (CAII-KO). The steady-state buffer strength was calculated from the amplitude of [H(+)]i transients as evoked by CO2/HCO3(-) and by butyric acid in the presence and absence of CO2/HCO3(-). We tested the hypotheses if, in addition to instantaneous physicochemical H(+) buffering, rapid acid/base transport across the cell membrane contributes to the total, "effective" cytosolic H(+) buffering. In the presence of 5% CO2/26 mM HCO3(-), H(+) buffer strength in astrocytes was increased 4-6 fold, as compared with that in non-bicarbonate, HEPES-buffered solution, which was largely attributable to fast HCO3 (-) transport into the cells via NBCe1, supported by CAII activity. Our results show that within the time frame of determining physiological H(+) buffering in cells, fast transport and equilibration of CO2/H(+)/HCO3(-) can make a major contribution to the total "effective" H(+) buffer strength. Thus, "effective" cellular H(+) buffering is, to a large extent, attributable to membrane transport of base equivalents rather than a purely passive physicochemical process, and can be much larger than reported so far. Not only physicochemical H(+) buffering, but also rapid import of HCO3(-) via the electrogenic sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1, supported by carbonic anhydrase II (CA II), was identified to enhance cytosolic H(+) buffer strength substantially.

  2. Quantum transport in neutron-irradiated modulation-doped heterojunctions. I. Fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, W.; Zhou, J.; Huang, Y.; Cai, L.

    1988-12-15

    We have investigated the characteristics of low-temperature quantum transport in Al/sub x/Ga/sub 1-//sub x/As/GaAs modulation-doped heterojunctions irradiated by fast neutrons of about 14 MeV energy. The concentration and the mobility of the two-dimensional electron gas (2D EG) under low magnetic fields decrease with increase in the concentrations of scatterers, such as ionized impurities, lattice defects, and interface roughness. On the other hand, under strong magnetic fields, the Hall plateau broadening associated with the Landau localized states, and the Shubnikov--de Hass (SdH) oscillation enhancement associated with the Landau extended states, increase markedly after fast-neutron irradiation.

  3. Flywheel-Based Fast Charging Station – FFCS for Electric Vehicles and Public Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbar, Hossam A.; Othman, Ahmed M.

    2017-08-01

    This paper demonstrates novel Flywheel-based Fast Charging Station (FFCS) for high performance and profitable charging infrastructures for public electric buses. The design criteria will be provided for fast charging stations. The station would support the private and open charging framework. Flywheel Energy storage system is utilized to offer advanced energy storage for charging stations to achieve clean public transportation, including electric buses with reducing GHG, including CO2 emission reduction. The integrated modelling and management system in the station is performed by a decision-based control platform that coordinates the power streams between the quick chargers, the flywheel storage framework, photovoltaic cells and the network association. There is a tidy exchange up between the capacity rate of flywheel framework and the power rating of the network association.”

  4. Extended friction elucidates the breakdown of fast water transport in graphene oxide membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montessori, A.; Amadei, C. A.; Falcucci, G.; Sega, M.; Vecitis, C. D.; Succi, S.

    2016-12-01

    The understanding of water transport in graphene oxide (GO) membranes stands out as a major theoretical problem in graphene research. Notwithstanding the intense efforts devoted to the subject in the recent years, a consolidated picture of water transport in GO membranes is yet to emerge. By performing mesoscale simulations of water transport in ultrathin GO membranes, we show that even small amounts of oxygen functionalities can lead to a dramatic drop of the GO permeability, in line with experimental findings. The coexistence of bulk viscous dissipation and spatially extended molecular friction results in a major decrease of both slip and bulk flow, thereby suppressing the fast water transport regime observed in pristine graphene nanochannels. Inspection of the flow structure reveals an inverted curvature in the near-wall region, which connects smoothly with a parabolic profile in the bulk region. Such inverted curvature is a distinctive signature of the coexistence between single-particle zero-temperature (noiseless) Langevin friction and collective hydrodynamics. The present mesoscopic model with spatially extended friction may offer a computationally efficient tool for future simulations of water transport in nanomaterials.

  5. Fast Responsive and Controllable Liquid Transport on a Magnetic Fluid/Nanoarray Composite Interface.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dongliang; Zhang, Na; Zheng, Xi; Hou, Guanglei; Tian, Ye; Du, Yi; Jiang, Lei; Dou, Shi Xue

    2016-06-28

    Controllable liquid transport on surface is expected to occur by manipulating the gradient of surface tension/Laplace pressure and external stimuli, which has been intensively studied on solid or liquid interface. However, it still faces challenges of slow response rate, and uncontrollable transport speed and direction. Here, we demonstrate fast responsive and controllable liquid transport on a smart magnetic fluid/nanoarray interface, i.e., a composite interface, via modulation of an external magnetic field. The wettability of the composite interface to water instantaneously responds to gradient magnetic field due to the magnetically driven composite interface gradient roughness transition that takes place within a millisecond, which is at least 1 order of magnitude faster than that of other responsive surfaces. A water droplet can follow the motion of the gradient composite interface structure as it responds to the gradient magnetic field motion. Moreover, the water droplet transport direction can be controlled by modulating the motion direction of the gradient magnetic field. The composite interface can be used as a pump for the transport of immiscible liquids and other objects in the microchannel, which suggests a way to design smart interface materials and microfluidic devices.

  6. Fast electron temperature, MHD and transport measurements on NSTX using a multi-energy SXR array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Finkenthal, M.; Bell, R.; Hosea, J.; Kaye, S.; Leblanc, B.; Sabbagh, S.

    2007-11-01

    A compact multi-energy soft X-ray array has been developed for fast (<=0.1 ms) time and space-resolved electron temperature, MHD and transport measurements on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The electron temperature is obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the Abel inverted radial emissivity profiles in three energy ranges [1]. The applicability of this diagnostic technique to radio frequency electron heating and current drive experiments, perturbative electron and impurity transport studies, as well as an analysis of the impact of several types of MHD activity such as NTMs, RWMs, ELMs and Fishbones will be discussed. This work supported by U.S. DoE Contract No. DE-AC02-76CH03073 DoE and grant No. DE-FG02-99ER5452 at The Johns Hopkins University. [1] L. F. Delgado-Aparicio, et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion, 49, 1245 (2007).

  7. Theory of ion transport with fast acid-base equilibrations in bioelectrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykstra, J. E.; Biesheuvel, P. M.; Bruning, H.; Ter Heijne, A.

    2014-07-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems recover valuable components and energy in the form of hydrogen or electricity from aqueous organic streams. We derive a one-dimensional steady-state model for ion transport in a bioelectrochemical system, with the ions subject to diffusional and electrical forces. Since most of the ionic species can undergo acid-base reactions, ion transport is combined in our model with infinitely fast ion acid-base equilibrations. The model describes the current-induced ammonia evaporation and recovery at the cathode side of a bioelectrochemical system that runs on an organic stream containing ammonium ions. We identify that the rate of ammonia evaporation depends not only on the current but also on the flow rate of gas in the cathode chamber, the diffusion of ammonia from the cathode back into the anode chamber, through the ion exchange membrane placed in between, and the membrane charge density.

  8. Theory of ion transport with fast acid-base equilibrations in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, J E; Biesheuvel, P M; Bruning, H; Ter Heijne, A

    2014-07-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems recover valuable components and energy in the form of hydrogen or electricity from aqueous organic streams. We derive a one-dimensional steady-state model for ion transport in a bioelectrochemical system, with the ions subject to diffusional and electrical forces. Since most of the ionic species can undergo acid-base reactions, ion transport is combined in our model with infinitely fast ion acid-base equilibrations. The model describes the current-induced ammonia evaporation and recovery at the cathode side of a bioelectrochemical system that runs on an organic stream containing ammonium ions. We identify that the rate of ammonia evaporation depends not only on the current but also on the flow rate of gas in the cathode chamber, the diffusion of ammonia from the cathode back into the anode chamber, through the ion exchange membrane placed in between, and the membrane charge density.

  9. Alfv?nic Instabilities and Fast Ion Transport in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zeeland, M; Heidbrink, W; Nazikian, R; Austin, M; Berk, H; Gorelenkov, N; Holcomb, C; Kramer, G; Lohr, J; Luo, Y; Makowski, M; McKee, G; Petty, C; Prater, R; Solomon, W; White, R

    2008-10-14

    Neutral beam injection into reversed magnetic shear DIII-D plasmas produces a variety of Alfvenic activity including Toroidicity and Ellipticity induced Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE/EAE, respectively) and Reversed Shear Alfven Eigenmodes (RSAE) as well as their spatial coupling. These modes are typically studied during the discharge current ramp phase when incomplete current penetration results in a high central safety factor and strong drive due to multiple higher order resonances. During this same time period Fast-Ion D{sub {alpha}} (FIDA) spectroscopy shows that the central fast ion profile is flattened, the degree of which depends on the Alfven eigenmode amplitude. Interestingly, localized electron cyclotron heating (ECH) near the mode location stabilizes RSAE activity and results in significantly improved fast ion confinement relative to discharges with ECH deposition on axis. In these discharges, RSAE activity is suppressed when ECH is deposited near the radius of the shear reversal point and enhanced with deposition near the axis. To simulate the observed neutral beam ion redistribution, NOVA calculations of the 3D eigenmode structures are matched with experimental measurements and used in combination with the ORBIT guiding center following code. For fixed frequency eigenmodes, it is found that ORBIT calculations cannot explain the observed beam ion transport with experimentally measured mode amplitudes. Possible explanations are considered including recent simulation results incorporating eigenmodes with time dependent frequencies.

  10. Modeling fast-ion transport during toroidal Alfven eigenmode avalanches in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Bell, R. E.; Darrow, D. S.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Kramer, G. J.; Medley, S. S.; White, R. B.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; Levinton, F. M.; Yuh, H.; Liu, D.; Podesta, M.; Tritz, K.

    2009-12-15

    Experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] found strong bursts of toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) activity correlated with abrupt drops in the neutron rate. A fairly complete data set offers the opportunity to benchmark the NOVA[C. Z. Cheng, Phys. Rep. 211, 1 (1992)] and ORBIT[R. B. White and M. S. Chance, Phys. Fluids 27, 2455 (1984)] codes in the low aspect ratio tokamak (ST) geometry. The internal structure of TAE was modeled with NOVA and good agreement is found with measurements made with an array of five fixed-frequency reflectometers. The fast-ion transport resulting from these bursts of multiple TAE was then modeled with the ORBIT code. The simulations are reasonably consistent with the observed drop in neutron rate, however, further refinements in both the simulation of the TAE structure and in the modeling of the fast-ion transport are needed. Benchmarking stability codes against present experiments is an important step in developing the predictive capability needed to plan future experiments.

  11. Divergent mechanisms for the insulin resistant and hyperresponsive glucose transport in adipose cells from fasted and refed rats. Alterations in both glucose transporter number and intrinsic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, B B; Simpson, I A; Cushman, S W

    1988-01-01

    The effects of fasting and refeeding on the glucose transport response to insulin in isolated rat adipose cells have been examined using 3-O-methylglucose transport in intact cells and cytochalasin B binding and Western blotting in subcellular membrane fractions. After a 72-h fast, basal glucose transport activity decreases slightly and insulin-stimulated activity decreases greater than 85%. Following 48 h of fasting, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity is diminished from 3.9 +/- 0.5 to 1.3 +/- 0.3 fmol/cell per min (mean +/- SEM). Similarly, the concentrations of glucose transporters are reduced with fasting in both the plasma membranes from insulin-stimulated cells from 38 +/- 5 to 18 +/- 3 pmol/mg of membrane protein and the low density microsomes from basal cells from 68 +/- 8 to 34 +/- 9 pmol/mg of membrane protein. Ad lib. refeeding for 6 d after a 48-h fast results in up to twofold greater maximally insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity compared with the control level (7.1 +/- 0.4 vs. 4.5 +/- 0.2 fmol/cell per min), before returning to baseline at 10 d. However, the corresponding concentration of glucose transporters in the plasma membranes is restored only to the control level (45 +/- 5 vs. 50 +/- 5 pmol/mg of membrane protein). Although the concentration of glucose transporters in the low density microsomes of basal cells remains decreased, the total number is restored to the control level due to an increase in low density microsomal protein. Thus, the insulin-resistant glucose transport in adipose cells from fasted rats can be explained by a decreased translocation of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane due to a depleted intracellular pool. In contrast, the insulin hyperresponsive glucose transport observed with refeeding appears to result from (a) a restored translocation of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane from a repleted intracellular pool and (b) enhanced plasma membrane glucose transporter intrinsic activity

  12. Mechanisms and Control of Phloem Transport in Trees: Fast and Slow - Sink and Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessler, Arthur; Hagedorn, Frank; Galiano, Lucia; Schaub, Marcus; Joseph, Jobin; Arend, Matthias; Hommel, Robert; Kayler, Zachary

    2017-04-01

    Trees are large global stores of carbon that will be affected by increased carbon dioxide levels and climate change in the future. However, at present we cannot properly predict the carbon balance of forests as we lack knowledge on how plant physiological processes and especially the transport of carbon within the plant interact with environmental drivers and ecosystem-scale processes. The central conveyor belt for C allocation and distribution within the tree is the phloem and its functionality under environmental stress (esp. drought) is important for the avoidance of C starvation. This paper addresses the distribution of new assimilates within the plant, and sheds light on phloem transport mechanisms and transport control using 13C pulse labelling techniques. We provide experimental evidence that at least two mechanisms are employed to couple C sink processes to assimilation. We observed a fast increase of belowground respiration with the onset of photosynthesis, which we assume is induced by pressure concentration waves travelling through the phloem. A second, much later occurring peak in respiration is fueled by new 13C labeled assimilates. Moreover, we relate phloem transport velocity and intensity of labelled 13C assimilates to drought stress intensity and give indication how sink rather than source control might affect phloem transport in trees. During drought, net photosynthesis, soil respiration and the allocation of recent assimilates below ground were reduced. Carbohydrates accumulated in metabolically resting roots but not in leaves, indicating sink control of the tree carbon balance. After drought release, soil respiration recovered faster than assimilation and CO2 fluxes exceeded those in continuously watered trees for months. This stimulation was related to greater assimilate allocation to and metabolization in the rhizosphere. These findings show that trees prioritize the investment of assimilates below ground, probably to regain root functions

  13. Fasting induces basolateral uptake transporters of the SLC family in the liver via HNF4alpha and PGC1alpha.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Christoph G; Martin, Ina V; Porn, Anne C; Voigt, Sebastian; Gartung, Carsten; Trautwein, Christian; Geier, Andreas

    2007-09-01

    Fasting induces numerous adaptive changes in metabolism by several central signaling pathways, the most important represented by the HNF4alpha/PGC-1alpha-pathway. Because HNF4alpha has been identified as central regulator of basolateral bile acid transporters and a previous study reports increased basolateral bile acid uptake into the liver during fasting, we hypothesized that HNF4alpha is involved in fasting-induced bile acid uptake via upregulation of basolateral bile acid transporters. In rats, mRNA of Ntcp, Oatp1, and Oatp2 were significantly increased after 48 h of fasting. Protein expression as determined by Western blot showed significant increases for all three transporters 72 h after the onset of fasting. Whereas binding activity of HNF1alpha in electrophoretic mobility shift assays remained unchanged, HNF4alpha binding activity to the Ntcp promoter was increased significantly. In line with this result, we found significantly increased mRNA expression of HNF4alpha and PGC-1alpha. Functional studies in HepG2 cells revealed an increased endogenous NTCP mRNA expression upon cotransfection with either HNF4alpha, PGC-1alpha, or a combination of both. We conclude that upregulation of the basolateral bile acid transporters Ntcp, Oatp1, and Oatp2 in fasted rats is mediated via the HNF4alpha/PGC-1alpha pathway.

  14. Fast axonal transport in isolated axoplasm from the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuyu; Kang, Minsu; Morfini, Gerardo; Brady, Scott T

    2016-01-01

    The giant axon of the squid provides a unique cell biological model for analyzing the biochemistry and cell biology of the axon. These axons may exceed 500 μm in diameter and can be readily dissected. Once the surrounding small axons and connective tissue are removed, the axoplasm can be extruded as an intact cylinder of isolated cytoplasm. This isolated axoplasm is morphologically indistinguishable from the intact axon, but without permeability barriers. Fast axonal transport will continue for more than 4 h after extrusion and can be visualized in real time. By perfusing defined concentrations of proteins and/or reagents into the axoplasm, this preparation represents a powerful model for study of intracellular trafficking and its underlying molecular mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular origin of fast water transport in carbon nanotube membranes: superlubricity versus curvature dependent friction.

    PubMed

    Falk, Kerstin; Sedlmeier, Felix; Joly, Laurent; Netz, Roland R; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2010-10-13

    In this paper, we study the interfacial friction of water at graphitic interfaces with various topologies, water between planar graphene sheets, inside and outside carbon nanotubes, with the goal to disentangle confinement and curvature effects on friction. We show that the friction coefficient exhibits a strong curvature dependence; while friction is independent of confinement for the graphene slab, it decreases with carbon nanotube radius for water inside, but increases for water outside. As a paradigm the friction coefficient is found to vanish below a threshold diameter for armchair nanotubes. Using a statistical description of the interfacial friction, we highlight here a structural origin of this curvature dependence, mainly associated with a curvature-induced incommensurability between the water and carbon structures. These results support the recent experiments reporting fast transport of water in nanometric carbon nanotube membranes.

  16. Cadmium transport through molten salts in the reprocessing of spent fuel for the integral fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, K.M.; Schneider, A. ); Battles, J.E. )

    1993-06-01

    The reprocessing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor is to be accomplished with a pyrochemical process employing molten LiCl-KCl salt covering a pool of cadmium. An examination of this system demonstrates that cadmium metal is soluble to a small extent in this salt and that it diffuses through the salt covering and vaporizes at the surface. The cadmium is soluble in the salt because of either chemical or physical solubility, both of which are dependent on the salt's surface tension. Mixing increases the vaporization rate of the cadmium by increasing its transport to the salt surface. The cadmium vapors can therefore be reduced by decreasing the mixing conditions, by choosing a salt with a higher surface tension so that the cadmium is less soluble, or by decreasing the temperature of the system, thereby lowering the vapor pressure of the cadmium.

  17. Fast transport in phase space due to nonlinear wave-particle interaction in the radiation belts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, Anton; Vasiliev, Alexii; Mourenas, Didier; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Boscher, Daniel; Rolland, Guy

    2014-05-01

    We present an analytical, simplified formulation accounting for the fast transport of particles in phase space, in the presence of nonlinear wave-particle resonant interactions in an inhomogeneous magnetic field representative of the radiation belts. We show that the general approach for the description of the evolution of the particle velocity distribution based on the Fokker-Plank equation can be modified to consider the process of nonlinear wave-particle interaction, including particle trapping. Such a modification consists in one additional operator describing fast particle jumps in phase space. The proposed approach is illustrated by considering the acceleration of relativistic electrons by strongly oblique whistler waves. We determine the typical variation of electron phase-density due to nonlinear wave-particle interaction and compare this variation with pitch-angle/energy diffusion due to quasi-linear electron scattering. We show that relation between nonlinear and quasi-linear effects is controlled by the distribution of wave-amplitudes. When this distribution has a heavy tail, nonlinear effects can become dominant in the formation of the electron energy distribution.

  18. Electroless Formation of Hybrid Lithium Anodes for Fast Interfacial Ion Transport.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Snehashis; Tu, Zhengyuan; Stalin, Sanjuna; Vu, Duylinh; Fawole, Kristen; Gunceler, Deniz; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Archer, Lynden A

    2017-10-09

    Rechargeable batteries based on metallic anodes are of interest for fundamental and application-focused studies of chemical and physical kinetics of liquids at solid interfaces. Approaches that allow facile creation of uniform coatings on these metals to prevent physical contact with liquid electrolytes, while enabling fast ion transport, are essential to address chemical instability of the anodes. Here, we report a simple electroless ion-exchange chemistry for creating coatings of indium on lithium. By means of joint density functional theory and interfacial characterization experiments, we show that In coatings stabilize Li by multiple processes, including exceptionally fast surface diffusion of lithium ions and high chemical resistance to liquid electrolytes. Indium coatings also undergo reversible alloying reactions with lithium ions, facilitating design of high-capacity hybrid In-Li anodes that use both alloying and plating approaches for charge storage. By means of direct visualization, we further show that the coatings enable remarkably compact and uniform electrodeposition. The resultant In-Li anodes are shown to exhibit minimal capacity fade in extended galvanostatic cycling when paired with commercial-grade cathodes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Fasting activates the gene expression of UCP3 independent of genes necessary for lipid transport and oxidation in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tunstall, Rebecca J; Mehan, Kate A; Hargreaves, Mark; Spriet, Lawrence L; Cameron-Smith, David

    2002-06-07

    Fasting triggers a complex array of adaptive metabolic and hormonal responses including an augmentation in the capacity for mitochondrial fatty acid (FA) oxidation in skeletal muscle. This study hypothesized that this adaptive response is mediated by increased mRNA of key genes central to the regulation of fat oxidation in human skeletal muscle. Fasting dramatically increased UCP3 gene expression, by 5-fold at 15 h and 10-fold at 40 h. However the expression of key genes responsible for the uptake, transport, oxidation, and re-esterification of FA remained unchanged following 15 and 40 h of fasting. Likewise there was no change in the mRNA abundance of transcription factors. This suggests a unique role for UCP3 in the regulation of FA homeostasis during fasting as adaptation to 40 h of fasting does not require alterations in the expression of other genes necessary for lipid metabolism.

  20. Fast Algorithms for Earth Mover’s Distance Based on Optimal Transport and L1 Type Regularization I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    FAST ALGORITHMS FOR EARTH MOVER’S DISTANCE BASED ON OPTIMAL TRANSPORT AND L1 TYPE REGULARIZATION I WUCHEN LI, STANLEY OSHER, AND WILFRID GANGBO...Abstract. We propose a new algorithm to approximate the Earth Mover’s distance (EMD). Our main idea is motivated by the theory of optimal transport, in...provided. 1. Introduction In this paper we propose a new algorithm to approximate the Earth Mover’s distance (EMD), which is motivated by the theory

  1. Computation of Alfvèn eigenmode stability and saturation through a reduced fast ion transport model in the TRANSP tokamak transport code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; White, R. B.

    2017-09-01

    Alfvénic instabilities (AEs) are well known as a potential cause of enhanced fast ion transport in fusion devices. Given a specific plasma scenario, quantitative predictions of (i) expected unstable AE spectrum and (ii) resulting fast ion transport are required to prevent or mitigate the AE-induced degradation in fusion performance. Reduced models are becoming an attractive tool to analyze existing scenarios as well as for scenario prediction in time-dependent simulations. In this work, a neutral beam heated NSTX discharge is used as reference to illustrate the potential of a reduced fast ion transport model, known as kick model, that has been recently implemented for interpretive and predictive analysis within the framework of the time-dependent tokamak transport code TRANSP. Predictive capabilities for AE stability and saturation amplitude are first assessed, based on given thermal plasma profiles only. Predictions are then compared to experimental results, and the interpretive capabilities of the model further discussed. Overall, the reduced model captures the main properties of the instabilities and associated effects on the fast ion population. Additional information from the actual experiment enables further tuning of the model’s parameters to achieve a close match with measurements.

  2. Computation of Alfvèn eigenmode stability and saturation through a reduced fast ion transport model in the TRANSP tokamak transport code

    DOE PAGES

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; ...

    2017-07-20

    Alfvénic instabilities (AEs) are well known as a potential cause of enhanced fast ion transport in fusion devices. Given a specific plasma scenario, quantitative predictions of (i) expected unstable AE spectrum and (ii) resulting fast ion transport are required to prevent or mitigate the AE-induced degradation in fusion performance. Reduced models are becoming an attractive tool to analyze existing scenarios as well as for scenario prediction in time-dependent simulations. Here, in this work, a neutral beam heated NSTX discharge is used as reference to illustrate the potential of a reduced fast ion transport model, known as kick model, that hasmore » been recently implemented for interpretive and predictive analysis within the framework of the time-dependent tokamak transport code TRANSP. Predictive capabilities for AE stability and saturation amplitude are first assessed, based on given thermal plasma profiles only. Predictions are then compared to experimental results, and the interpretive capabilities of the model further discussed. Overall, the reduced model captures the main properties of the instabilities and associated effects on the fast ion population. Finally, additional information from the actual experiment enables further tuning of the model's parameters to achieve a close match with measurements.« less

  3. Development and evaluation of a transportable fast gas chromatograph for the monitoring of organic vapors in air

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, J.A.; Levine, S.P.; Berkley, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Gas chromatography has the potential to be a real-time or near real-time monitoring method for organics in air. A transportable fast GC with FID/ECD and PID/ECD configurations has been developed. Preliminary evaluation has shown that all design features and improvements of the instrument worked successfully.

  4. Fast-ignition transport studies: Realistic electron source, integrated particle-in-cell and hydrodynamic modeling, imposed magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, D. J.; Tabak, M.; Larson, D. J.; Divol, L.; Kemp, A. J.; Bellei, C.; Marinak, M. M.; Key, M. H.

    2012-07-15

    Transport modeling of idealized, cone-guided fast ignition targets indicates the severe challenge posed by fast-electron source divergence. The hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) code Zuma is run in tandem with the radiation-hydrodynamics code Hydra to model fast-electron propagation, fuel heating, and thermonuclear burn. The fast electron source is based on a 3D explicit-PIC laser-plasma simulation with the PSC code. This shows a quasi two-temperature energy spectrum and a divergent angle spectrum (average velocity-space polar angle of 52 Degree-Sign ). Transport simulations with the PIC-based divergence do not ignite for >1 MJ of fast-electron energy, for a modest (70 {mu}m) standoff distance from fast-electron injection to the dense fuel. However, artificially collimating the source gives an ignition energy of 132 kJ. To mitigate the divergence, we consider imposed axial magnetic fields. Uniform fields {approx}50 MG are sufficient to recover the artificially collimated ignition energy. Experiments at the Omega laser facility have generated fields of this magnitude by imploding a capsule in seed fields of 50-100 kG. Such imploded fields will likely be more compressed in the transport region than in the laser absorption region. When fast electrons encounter increasing field strength, magnetic mirroring can reflect a substantial fraction of them and reduce coupling to the fuel. A hollow magnetic pipe, which peaks at a finite radius, is presented as one field configuration which circumvents mirroring.

  5. Phase-space dependent critical gradient behavior of fast-ion transport due to Alfvén eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C. S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Podestà, M.; White, R. B.; Kramer, G. J.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Stagner, L.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Zhu, Y. B.; The DIII-D Team

    2017-08-01

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that many overlapping small-amplitude Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) cause fast-ion transport to sharply increase above a critical threshold in beam power, leading to fast-ion density profile resilience and reduced fusion performance. The threshold is above the AE linear stability limit and varies between diagnostics that are sensitive to different parts of fast-ion phase-space. Comparison with theoretical analysis using the nova and orbit codes shows that, for the neutral particle diagnostic, the threshold corresponds to the onset of stochastic particle orbits due to wave-particle resonances with AEs in the measured region of phase space. The bulk fast-ion distribution and instability behavior was manipulated through variations in beam deposition geometry, and no significant differences in the onset threshold outside of measurement uncertainties were found, in agreement with the theoretical stochastic threshold analysis. Simulations using the ‘kick model’ produce beam ion density gradients consistent with the empirically measured radial critical gradient and highlight the importance of including the energy and pitch dependence of the fast-ion distribution function in critical gradient models. The addition of electron cyclotron heating changes the types of AEs present in the experiment, comparatively increasing the measured fast-ion density and radial gradient. These studies provide the basis for understanding how to avoid AE transport that can undesirably redistribute current and cause fast-ion losses, and the measurements are being used to validate AE-induced transport models that use the critical gradient paradigm, giving greater confidence when applied to ITER.

  6. Phase-space dependent critical gradient behavior of fast-ion transport due to Alfvén eigenmodes

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, C. S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Podestà, M.; ...

    2017-06-09

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that many overlapping small-amplitude Alfv en eigenmodes (AEs) cause fast-ion transport to sharply increase above a critical threshold, leading to fast-ion density profile resilience and reduced fusion performance. The threshold is above the AE linear stability limit and varies between diagnostics that are sensitive to different parts of fast-ion phase-space. A comparison with theoretical analysis using the nova and orbit codes shows that, for the neutral particle diagnostic, the threshold corresponds to the onset of stochastic particle orbits due to wave-particle resonances with AEs in the measured region of phase space. We manipulated themore » bulk fast-ion distribution and instability behavior through variations in beam deposition geometry, and no significant differences in the onset threshold outside of measurement uncertainties were found, in agreement with the theoretical stochastic threshold analysis. Simulations using the `kick model' produce beam ion density gradients consistent with the empirically measured radial critical gradient and highlight the importance of including the energy and pitch dependence of the fast-ion distribution function in critical gradient models. The addition of electron cyclotron heating changes the types of AEs present in the experiment, comparatively increasing the measured fast-ion density and radial gradient. Our studies provide the basis for understanding how to avoid AE transport that can undesirably redistribute current and cause fast-ion losses, and the measurements are being used to validate AE-induced transport models that use the critical gradient paradigm, giving greater confidence when applied to ITER.« less

  7. Experimental studies on fast-ion transport by Alfven wave avalanches on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Liu, D.; Ruskov, E.; Bell, R. E.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Kramer, G. J.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Medley, S. S.; Roquemore, A. L.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; Yuh, H.

    2009-05-15

    Fast-ion transport induced by Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) is studied in beam-heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] through space, time, and energy resolved measurements of the fast-ion population. Fast-ion losses associated with multiple toroidicity-induced AEs (TAEs), which interact nonlinearly and terminate in avalanches, are characterized. A depletion of the energy range >20 keV, leading to sudden drops of up to 40% in the neutron rate over 1 ms, is observed over a broad spatial range. It is shown that avalanches lead to a relaxation of the fast-ion profile, which in turn reduces the drive for the instabilities. The measured radial eigenmode structure and frequency of TAEs are compared with the predictions from a linear magnetohydrodynamics stability code. The partial disagreement suggests that nonlinearities may compromise a direct comparison between experiment and linear theory.

  8. Confinement degradation by Alfvén-eigenmode induced fast-ion transport in steady-state scenario discharges

    DOE PAGES

    Heidbrink, William W.; Ferron, John R.; Holcomb, Christopher T.; ...

    2014-08-21

    Here, analysis of neutron and fast-ion Dα data from the DIII-D tokamak shows that Alfvén eigenmode activity degrades fast-ion confinement in many high βN, high qmin, steady-state scenario discharges. (βN is the normalized plasma pressure and qmin is the minimum value of the plasma safety factor.) Fast-ion diagnostics that are sensitive to the co-passing population exhibit the largest reduction relative to classical predictions. The increased fast-ion transport in discharges with strong AE activity accounts for the previously observed reduction in global confinement with increasing qmin; however, not all high qmin discharges show appreciable degradation. Two relatively simple empirical quantities providemore » convenient monitors of these effects: (1) an 'AE amplitude' signal based on interferometer measurements and (2) the ratio of the neutron rate to a zero-dimensional classical prediction.« less

  9. Fast-ion transport in qmin>2, high- β steady-state scenarios on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, C. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Ferron, J. R.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Gong, X.; Mueller, D.; Grierson, B.; Bass, E. M.; Collins, C.; Park, J. M.; Kim, K.; Luce, T. C.; Turco, F.; Pace, D. C.; Ren, Q.; Podesta, M.

    2015-05-22

    The results from experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 828 (2005)] aimed at developing high β steady-state operating scenarios with high-qminqmin confirm that fast-ion transport is a critical issue for advanced tokamak development using neutral beam injection current drive. In DIII-D, greater than 11 MW of neutral beam heating power is applied with the intent of maximizing βN and the noninductive current drive. However, in scenarios with qmin>2 that target the typical range of q95= 5–7 used in next-step steady-state reactor models, Alfvén eigenmodes cause greater fast-ion transport than classical models predict. This enhanced transport reduces the absorbed neutral beam heating power and current drive and limits the achievable βN. Conversely similar plasmas except with qmin just above 1 have approximately classical fast-ion transport. Experiments that take qmin>3 plasmas to higher βP with q95= 11–12 for testing long pulse operation exhibit regimes of better than expected thermal confinement. Compared to the standard high-qmin scenario, the high βP cases have shorter slowing-down time and lower ∇βfast, and this reduces the drive for Alfvénic modes, yielding nearly classical fast-ion transport, high values of normalized confinement, βN, and noninductive current fraction. These results suggest DIII-D might obtain better performance in lower-q95, high-qmin plasmas using broader neutral beam heating profiles and increased direct electron heating power to lower the drive for Alfvén eigenmodes.

  10. Fast-ion transport in qmin>2, high- β steady-state scenarios on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Holcomb, C. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Ferron, J. R.; ...

    2015-05-22

    The results from experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 828 (2005)] aimed at developing high β steady-state operating scenarios with high-qminqmin confirm that fast-ion transport is a critical issue for advanced tokamak development using neutral beam injection current drive. In DIII-D, greater than 11 MW of neutral beam heating power is applied with the intent of maximizing βN and the noninductive current drive. However, in scenarios with qmin>2 that target the typical range of q95= 5–7 used in next-step steady-state reactor models, Alfvén eigenmodes cause greater fast-ion transport than classical models predict. This enhanced transport reducesmore » the absorbed neutral beam heating power and current drive and limits the achievable βN. Conversely similar plasmas except with qmin just above 1 have approximately classical fast-ion transport. Experiments that take qmin>3 plasmas to higher βP with q95= 11–12 for testing long pulse operation exhibit regimes of better than expected thermal confinement. Compared to the standard high-qmin scenario, the high βP cases have shorter slowing-down time and lower ∇βfast, and this reduces the drive for Alfvénic modes, yielding nearly classical fast-ion transport, high values of normalized confinement, βN, and noninductive current fraction. These results suggest DIII-D might obtain better performance in lower-q95, high-qmin plasmas using broader neutral beam heating profiles and increased direct electron heating power to lower the drive for Alfvén eigenmodes.« less

  11. Fast-ion transport in qmin>2, high- β steady-state scenarios on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Holcomb, C. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Ferron, J. R.; ...

    2015-05-22

    The results from experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 828 (2005)] aimed at developing high β steady-state operating scenarios with high-qminqmin confirm that fast-ion transport is a critical issue for advanced tokamak development using neutral beam injection current drive. In DIII-D, greater than 11 MW of neutral beam heating power is applied with the intent of maximizing βN and the noninductive current drive. However, in scenarios with qmin>2 that target the typical range of q95= 5–7 used in next-step steady-state reactor models, Alfvén eigenmodes cause greater fast-ion transport than classical models predict. This enhanced transport reducesmore » the absorbed neutral beam heating power and current drive and limits the achievable βN. Conversely similar plasmas except with qmin just above 1 have approximately classical fast-ion transport. Experiments that take qmin>3 plasmas to higher βP with q95= 11–12 for testing long pulse operation exhibit regimes of better than expected thermal confinement. Compared to the standard high-qmin scenario, the high βP cases have shorter slowing-down time and lower ∇βfast, and this reduces the drive for Alfvénic modes, yielding nearly classical fast-ion transport, high values of normalized confinement, βN, and noninductive current fraction. These results suggest DIII-D might obtain better performance in lower-q95, high-qmin plasmas using broader neutral beam heating profiles and increased direct electron heating power to lower the drive for Alfvén eigenmodes.« less

  12. Fast-ion transport in qmin>2, high- β steady-state scenarios on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, C. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Ferron, J. R.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Gong, X.; Mueller, D.; Grierson, B.; Bass, E. M.; Collins, C.; Park, J. M.; Kim, K.; Luce, T. C.; Turco, F.; Pace, D. C.; Ren, Q.; Podesta, M.

    2015-05-22

    The results from experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 828 (2005)] aimed at developing high β steady-state operating scenarios with high-qminqmin confirm that fast-ion transport is a critical issue for advanced tokamak development using neutral beam injection current drive. In DIII-D, greater than 11 MW of neutral beam heating power is applied with the intent of maximizing βN and the noninductive current drive. However, in scenarios with qmin>2 that target the typical range of q95= 5–7 used in next-step steady-state reactor models, Alfvén eigenmodes cause greater fast-ion transport than classical models predict. This enhanced transport reduces the absorbed neutral beam heating power and current drive and limits the achievable βN. Conversely similar plasmas except with qmin just above 1 have approximately classical fast-ion transport. Experiments that take qmin>3 plasmas to higher βP with q95= 11–12 for testing long pulse operation exhibit regimes of better than expected thermal confinement. Compared to the standard high-qmin scenario, the high βP cases have shorter slowing-down time and lower ∇βfast, and this reduces the drive for Alfvénic modes, yielding nearly classical fast-ion transport, high values of normalized confinement, βN, and noninductive current fraction. These results suggest DIII-D might obtain better performance in lower-q95, high-qmin plasmas using broader neutral beam heating profiles and increased direct electron heating power to lower the drive for Alfvén eigenmodes.

  13. Deterministic and Monte Carlo Neutron Transport Calculations of the Dounreay Fast Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ziver, A. Kemal; Shahdatullah, Sabu; Eaton, Matthew D.; Oliviera, Cassiano R.E. de; Ackroyd, Ron T.; Umpleby, Adrian P.; Pain, Christopher C.; Goddard, Antony J. H.; Fitzpatrick, James

    2004-12-15

    A homogenized whole-reactor cylindrical model of the Dounreay Fast Reactor has been constructed using both deterministic and Monte Carlo codes to determine neutron flux distributions inside the core and at various out-of-core components. The principal aim is to predict neutron-induced activation levels using both methods and make comparisons against the measured thermal reaction rates. Neutron transport calculations have been performed for a fixed source using a spatially lumped fission neutron distribution, which has been derived from measurements. The deterministic code used is based on the finite element approximation to the multigroup second-order even-parity neutron transport equation, which is implemented in the EVENT code. The Monte Carlo solutions were obtained using the MCNP4C code, in which neutron cross sections are represented in pointwise (or continuous) form. We have compared neutron spectra at various locations not only to show differences between using multigroup deterministic and continuous energy (point nuclear data) Monte Carlo methods but also to assess neutron-induced activation levels calculated using the spectra obtained from both methods. Results were also compared against experiments that were carried out to determine neutron-induced reaction rates. To determine activation levels, we employed the European Activation Code System FISPACT. We have found that the neutron spectra calculated at various in-core and out-of-core components show some differences, which mainly reflect the use of multigroup and point energy nuclear data libraries and methods employed, but these differences have not resulted in large errors on the calculated activation levels of materials that are important (such as steel components) for decommissioning studies of the reactor. The agreement of calculated reaction rates of thermal neutron detectors such as the {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}){sup 56}Mn against measurements was satisfactory.

  14. Mass transport induced by internal Kelvin waves beneath shore-fast ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    StøYlen, Eivind; Weber, Jan Erik H.

    2010-03-01

    A one-layer reduced-gravity model is used to investigate the wave-induced mass flux in internal Kelvin waves along a straight coast beneath shore-fast ice. The waves are generated by barotropic tidal pumping at narrow sounds, and the ice lid introduces a no-slip condition for the horizontal wave motion. The mean Lagrangian fluxes to second order in wave steepness are obtained by integrating the equations of momentum and mass between the material interface and the surface. The mean flow is forced by the conventional radiation stress for internal wave motion, the mean pressure gradient due to the sloping surface, and the frictional drag at the boundaries. The equations that govern the mean fluxes are expressed in terms of mean Eulerian variables, while the wave forcing terms are given by the horizontal divergence of the Stokes flux. Analytical results show that the effect of friction induces a mean Eulerian flux along the coast that is comparable to the Stokes flux. In addition, the horizontal divergence of the total mean flux along the coast induces a small mass flux in the cross-shore direction. This flux changes the mean thickness of the upper layer outside the trapping region and may facilitate geostrophically balanced boundary currents in enclosed basins. This is indeed demonstrated by numerical solutions of the flux equations for confined areas larger than the trapping region. Application of the theory to Arctic waters is discussed, with emphasis on the transport of biological material and pollutants in nearshore regions.

  15. Simulation of laser-plasma interactions and fast-electron transport in inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I. Kemp, A.J.; Divol, L.

    2010-06-20

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogeneous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  16. Hybrid Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Fast Electron Transport in Inhomogeneous Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I; Kemp, A; Divol, L

    2009-05-27

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogenous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  17. Magnetic field measurements for study of fast electron transport in magnetized HED plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Griffin, Brandon; Presura, Radu; Haque, Showera; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2014-10-01

    Interaction of megagauss magnetic fields with high energy density (HED) plasma is of great interest in the field of magnetized plasma. The field changes fundamental properties of the HED plasma such as thermal and magnetic diffusion. A coupled capability utilizing the 1.0 MA Zebra pulsed power generator and the 50 TW Leopard laser at Nevada Terawatt Facility enables to create such a condition for studies of magnetized plasma properties. We have conducted an experiment to measure magnetic fields generated by a 1.0 MA, 100 ns Zebra pulsed current in stainless steel coils. Using a 532 nm continuous laser from a single longitudinal mode laser system, the temporal change in the magnetic field was measured with the Faraday rotation in F2 glass. The probe laser passing through the 1.5 mm in radius and 1.75 mm thick glass placed in the vicinity of the inductive coils was split with a Glan-Taylor prism to measure vertical and horizontal polarization components with photodiodes. We will present the analysis of the experimental result and a design of a coupled experiment for study of fast electron transport in the magnetized plasma.

  18. Using the transportable, computer-operated, liquid-scintillator fast-neutron spectrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Thorngate, J.H.

    1988-11-01

    When a detailed energy spectrum is needed for radiation-protection measurements from approximately 1 MeV up to several tens of MeV, organic-liquid scintillators make good neutron spectrometers. However, such a spectrometer requires a sophisticated electronics system and a computer to reduce the spectrum from the recorded data. Recently, we added a Nuclear Instrument Module (NIM) multichannel analyzer and a lap-top computer to the NIM electronics we have used for several years. The result is a transportable fast-neutron spectrometer system. The computer was programmed to guide the user through setting up the system, calibrating the spectrometer, measuring the spectrum, and reducing the data. Measurements can be made over three energy ranges, 0.6--2 MeV, 1.1--8 MeV, or 1.6--16 MeV, with the spectrum presented in 0.1-MeV increments. Results can be stored on a disk, presented in a table, and shown in graphical form. 5 refs., 51 figs.

  19. Numerical modeling for energy transport and isochoric heating in ultra-fast heated high Z target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohini; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Hakel, Peter; Mancini, Roberto C.

    2010-11-01

    Collisional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code is an effective tool to study extreme energy density conditions achieved in intense laser-solid interactions. In the continuous process of developing PIC code, we have recently implemented models to incorporate dynamic ionizations, namely Saha and Thomas Fermi, and radiation cooling (due to Bremsstrahlung and line emissions). We have also revised the existing collision model to take into account bounded electrons in dynamically ionizing target (partially ionized target). One-dimensional PIC simulation of a gold target with new collision model shows strong local heating in a micron distance due to shorter stopping range of fast electrons, which reflects the increased collision frequency due to bound electrons. The peak temperature in the heated region drops significantly due to the radiation cooling to a level of a few hundred eV from keV. We also discuss the target Z dependence on radiation loss and two-dimensional effects such as the resistive magnetic fields in the hot electron transport in metal targets.

  20. Inhibition of Fast Axonal Transport by Pathogenic SOD1 Involves Activation of p38 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Morfini, Gerardo A.; Bosco, Daryl A.; Brown, Hannah; Gatto, Rodolfo; Kaminska, Agnieszka; Song, Yuyu; Molla, Linda; Baker, Lisa; Marangoni, M. Natalia; Berth, Sarah; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Bagnato, Carolina; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Hayward, Lawrence J.; Pigino, Gustavo F.; Watterson, D. Martin; Huang, Chun-Fang; Banker, Gary; Brown, Robert H.; Brady, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    Dying-back degeneration of motor neuron axons represents an established feature of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) associated with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations, but axon-autonomous effects of pathogenic SOD1 remained undefined. Characteristics of motor neurons affected in FALS include abnormal kinase activation, aberrant neurofilament phosphorylation, and fast axonal transport (FAT) deficits, but functional relationships among these pathogenic events were unclear. Experiments in isolated squid axoplasm reveal that FALS-related SOD1 mutant polypeptides inhibit FAT through a mechanism involving a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. Mutant SOD1 activated neuronal p38 in mouse spinal cord, neuroblastoma cells and squid axoplasm. Active p38 MAP kinase phosphorylated kinesin-1, and this phosphorylation event inhibited kinesin-1. Finally, vesicle motility assays revealed previously unrecognized, isoform-specific effects of p38 on FAT. Axon-autonomous activation of the p38 pathway represents a novel gain of toxic function for FALS-linked SOD1 proteins consistent with the dying-back pattern of neurodegeneration characteristic of ALS. PMID:23776455

  1. Radial Transport Characteristics of Fast Ions Due to Energetic-Particle Modes inside the Last Closed-Flux Surface in the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Kenichi; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Toi, Kazuo; Shimizu, Akihiro; Fujisawa, Akihide; Ohshima, Shunsuke; Nakano, Haruhisa; Osakabe, Masaki; Todo, Yasushi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Chihiro; Nishimura, Shin; Yoshimura, Yasuo; Matsuoka, Keisuke; Okamura, Shoichi; Nagashima, Yoshihiko

    2008-02-15

    The internal behavior of fast ions interacting with magnetohydrodynamic bursts excited by energetic ions has been experimentally investigated in the compact helical system. The resonant convective oscillation of fast ions was identified inside the last closed-flux surface during an energetic-particle mode (EPM) burst. The phase difference between the fast-ion oscillation and the EPM, indicating the coupling strength between them, remains a certain value during the EPM burst and drives an anomalous transport of fast ions.

  2. HIV Glycoprotein Gp120 Impairs Fast Axonal Transport by Activating Tak1 Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Berth, Sarah H.; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole; Wang, Bin; Kim, Hajwa; Song, Yuyu; Sapar, Maria; Morfini, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neuropathies are the most common neurological complication of HIV. Of these, distal sensory polyneuropathy (DSP) is directly caused by HIV infection and characterized by length-dependent axonal degeneration of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Mechanisms for axonal degeneration in DSP remain unclear, but recent experiments revealed that the HIV glycoprotein gp120 is internalized and localized within axons of DRG neurons. Based on these findings, we investigated whether intra-axonal gp120 might impair fast axonal transport (FAT), a cellular process critical for appropriate maintenance of the axonal compartment. Significantly, we found that gp120 severely impaired both anterograde and retrograde FAT. Providing a mechanistic basis for these effects, pharmacological experiments revealed an involvement of various phosphotransferases in this toxic effect, including members of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways (Tak-1, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)), inhibitor of kappa-B-kinase 2 (IKK2), and PP1. Biochemical experiments and axonal outgrowth assays in cell lines and primary cultures extended these findings. Impairments in neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons by gp120 were rescued using a Tak-1 inhibitor, implicating a Tak-1 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in gp120 neurotoxicity. Taken together, these observations indicate that kinase-based impairments in FAT represent a novel mechanism underlying gp120 neurotoxicity consistent with the dying-back degeneration seen in DSP. Targeting gp120-based impairments in FAT with specific kinase inhibitors might provide a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent axonal degeneration in DSP. PMID:27872270

  3. Intense femtosecond laser driven collimated fast electron transport in a dielectric medium-role of intensity contrast.

    PubMed

    Dey, Indranuj; Adak, Amitava; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Shaikh, Moniruzzaman; Chatterjee, Gourab; Sarkar, Deep; Lad, Amit D; Kumar, G Ravindra

    2016-12-12

    Ultra-high intensity (> 1018 W/cm2), femtosecond (~30 fs) laser induced fast electron transport in a transparent dielectric has been studied for two laser systems having three orders of magnitude different peak to pedestal intensity contrast, using ultrafast time-resolved shadowgraphy. Use of a 400 nm femtosecond pulse as a probe enables the exclusive visualization of the dynamics of highest density electrons (> 7 × 1021 cm-3) observed so far. High picosecond contrast (~109) results in greater coupling of peak laser energy to the plasma electrons, enabling long (~1 mm), collimated (divergence angle ~2°) transport of fast electrons inside the dielectric medium at relativistic speeds (~0.66c). In comparison, the laser system with a contrast of ~106 has a large pre-plasma, limiting the coupling of laser energy to the solid and yielding limited fast electron injection into the dielectric. In the lower contrast case, bulk of the electrons expand as a cloud inside the medium with an order of magnitude lower speed than that of the fast electrons obtained with the high contrast laser. The expansion speed of the plasma towards vacuum is similar for the two contrasts.

  4. Collective Thomson scattering measurements of fast-ion transport due to sawtooth crashes in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, J.; Nielsen, S. K.; Stejner, M.; Galdon-Quiroga, J.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Jaulmes, F.; Korsholm, S. B.; Lazanyi, N.; Leipold, F.; Ryter, F.; Salewski, M.; Schubert, M.; Stober, J.; Wagner, D.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROFusion MST1 Team

    2016-11-01

    Sawtooth instabilities can modify heating and current-drive profiles and potentially increase fast-ion losses. Understanding how sawteeth redistribute fast ions as a function of sawtooth parameters and of fast-ion energy and pitch is hence a subject of particular interest for future fusion devices. Here we present the first collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements of sawtooth-induced redistribution of fast ions at ASDEX Upgrade. These also represent the first localized fast-ion measurements on the high-field side of this device. The results indicate fast-ion losses in the phase-space measurement volume of about 50% across sawtooth crashes, in good agreement with values predicted with the Kadomtsev sawtooth model implemented in TRANSP and with the sawtooth model in the EBdyna_go code. In contrast to the case of sawteeth, we observe no fast-ion redistribution in the presence of fishbone modes. We highlight how CTS measurements can discriminate between different sawtooth models, in particular when aided by multi-diagnostic velocity-space tomography, and briefly discuss our results in light of existing measurements from other fast-ion diagnostics.

  5. Transcriptional regulation of the gene for glucose transporter GLUT4 in skeletal muscle. Effects of diabetes and fasting.

    PubMed

    Neufer, P D; Carey, J O; Dohm, G L

    1993-07-05

    GLUT4 glucose transporter protein and mRNA levels in rat skeletal muscle are decreased with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and increased by fasting, indicating that GLUT4 expression may be regulated at the pretranslational level. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether GLUT4 is subject to transcriptional regulation in skeletal muscle under the altered metabolic conditions of diabetes and fasting. Nuclei were isolated from red and white portions of the quadriceps and gastrocnemius/plantaris muscles of control, 7-day STZ-diabetic, and 3-day fasted rats. STZ-induced diabetes resulted in a 35% reduction in GLUT4 transcription in red skeletal muscle and thus accounted for a major portion of the corresponding 50% reduction in GLUT4 mRNA observed in red skeletal muscle. STZ-induced diabetes had no significant effect on GLUT4 transcription or mRNA in white skeletal muscle. Fasting, however, significantly increased both GLUT4 transcription (2.2-fold) and mRNA (2.9-fold) in white skeletal muscle with no change detected for either parameter in red skeletal muscle. The nearly 2-fold higher steady-state GLUT4 mRNA in red versus white skeletal muscle of control rats was not associated with any difference in basal transcription. These findings demonstrate that expression of the GLUT4 glucose transporter protein in skeletal muscle is subject to regulation in vivo at the level of transcription of the GLUT4 gene. In addition, GLUT4 transcription is regulated in a fiber type-specific manner in response to the metabolic challenges elicited by STZ-induced diabetes and fasting.

  6. Fast electron transport and induced heating in solid targets from rear-side interferometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Malka, G; Nicolaï, Ph; Brambrink, E; Santos, J J; Aléonard, M M; Amthor, K; Audebert, P; Breil, J; Claverie, G; Gerbaux, M; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Méot, V; Morel, P; Scheurer, J N; Tarisien, M; Tikhonchuk, V

    2008-02-01

    Fast adiabatic plasma heating of a thin solid target irradiated by a high intensity laser has been observed by an optical fast interferometry diagnostic. It is driven by the hot electron current induced by the laser plasma interaction at the front side of the target. Radial and longitudinal temperature profiles are calculated to reproduce the observed rear-side plasma expansion. The main parameters of the suprathermal electrons (number, temperature, and divergence) have been deduced from these observations.

  7. Fast electron transport and induced heating in solid targets from rear-side interferometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Malka, G.; Aleonard, M. M.; Claverie, G.; Gerbaux, M.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Scheurer, J. N.; Tarisien, M.; Brambrink, E.; Audebert, P.; Amthor, K.; Meot, V.; Morel, P.

    2008-02-15

    Fast adiabatic plasma heating of a thin solid target irradiated by a high intensity laser has been observed by an optical fast interferometry diagnostic. It is driven by the hot electron current induced by the laser plasma interaction at the front side of the target. Radial and longitudinal temperature profiles are calculated to reproduce the observed rear-side plasma expansion. The main parameters of the suprathermal electrons (number, temperature, and divergence) have been deduced from these observations.

  8. Experimental Study on Fast Electrons Transport in Ultra-intense Laser Irradiated Solid Targets by Transition Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhijian, Zheng; Guangcan, Wang; Yuqiu, Gu

    2008-11-01

    The experiment was performed with SILEX laser facility(Ti-saphhire) at LFRC in China. The SILEX parameter: wavelength 0.8μm, duration 35fs, output power 280TW, contrast 5*105, The focal spot φ10μm(F/1.7), intensity on target surface 1*10^19W/cm^2(F/3). The main diagnostic equipments are the electron spectrometer, OMA spectrometer, optical streak camera. Some experimental results are given: The spectrum of optical emission from rear surface is rather narrow around some particular frequencies(1φ, 2φ, 3φ), We ascribe and confirm that the spike-like spectral line that is coherent transition radiation; The coherent light is also seen on time-integrated image with ring-patter due to Weibel instability of the fast electron transport; Obtained experimental cure of target thickness vs OTR image intensity is relative to mean free path of fast electron; The measuring optical transition radiation(OTR) duration of 171ps much longer than 1ps duration of fast electron transport target, the possible explanation is that the OTR duration to be determined magnetic diffusion time.

  9. Confinement degradation by Alfvén-eigenmode induced fast-ion transport in steady-state scenario discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, William W.; Ferron, John R.; Holcomb, Christopher T.; Van Zeeland, Michael A.; Chen, Xi; Collins, Cami M.; Garofalo, Andrea; Gong, Xianzu; Grierson, Brian A.; Podestà, Mario; Stagner, Luke; Zhu, Yubao

    2014-08-21

    Here, analysis of neutron and fast-ion Dα data from the DIII-D tokamak shows that Alfvén eigenmode activity degrades fast-ion confinement in many high βN, high qmin, steady-state scenario discharges. (βN is the normalized plasma pressure and qmin is the minimum value of the plasma safety factor.) Fast-ion diagnostics that are sensitive to the co-passing population exhibit the largest reduction relative to classical predictions. The increased fast-ion transport in discharges with strong AE activity accounts for the previously observed reduction in global confinement with increasing qmin; however, not all high qmin discharges show appreciable degradation. Two relatively simple empirical quantities provide convenient monitors of these effects: (1) an 'AE amplitude' signal based on interferometer measurements and (2) the ratio of the neutron rate to a zero-dimensional classical prediction.

  10. Distribution of pressure-induced fast axonal transport abnormalities in primate optic nerve. An autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1981-07-01

    The distribution of transport abnormalities in primate optic nerve from eyes subjected to five hours of pressure elevation (perfusion pressure of 35 mm Hg) was studied. Tissue autoradiography and electron microscopy were used to localize regions of the lamina cribrosa with increased transport interruption. A preferential involvement by this transport abnormality involved the superior, temporal, and inferior portions, to the exclusion of the nasal portion, of the optic nerve head. This observation supports the hypothesis that transport interruption seen in this model may be pertinent to the study of clinical glaucomatous neuropathy.

  11. Effects of colchicine on the intestinal transport of endogenous lipid. Ultrastructural, biochemical, and radiochemical studies in fasting rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pavelka, M.; Gangl, A.

    1983-03-01

    The involvement of microtubules in the transepithelial transport of exogenous lipid in intestinal absorptive cells has been suggested. Using electronmicroscopic, biochemical, and radiochemical methods, researchers have studied the effects of the antimicrotubular agent colchicine on the intestinal mucosa and on the intestinal transport of endogenous lipid of rats in the fasting state. After colchicine treatment, the concentration of triglycerides in intestinal mucosa of rats fasted for 24 h doubled, and electron microscopic studies showed a striking accumulation of lipid particles in absorptive epithelial cells of the tips of jejunal villi. These findings suggest that colchicine interferes with the intestinal transepithelial transport of endogenous lipoproteins. Additional studies, using an intraduodenal pulse injection of (/sup 14/C)linoleic acid, showed that colchicine does not affect the uptake of fatty acids by intestinal mucosa. However, it had divergent effects on fatty acid esterification, enhancing their incorporation into triglycerides relative to phospholipids, and caused a significant accumulation of endogenous diglycerides, triglycerides, and cholesterol esters within the absorptive intestinal epithelium. Detailed ultrastructural and morphometric studies revealed a decrease of visible microtubules, and a displacement of the smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, it is shown that after colchicine treatment, microvilli appear at the lateral plasma membrane of intestinal absorptive cells, a change not previously reported to our knowledge. Thus, our study shows that colchicine causes significant changes in enterocyte ultrastructure and colchicine perturbs the reesterification of absorbed endogenous fatty acids and their secretion in the form of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from the enterocyte.

  12. Parametric Dependence Of Fast-ion Transport Events On The National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Erik; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Podesta, M.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B.; Bortolon, A.

    2014-03-31

    Neutral-beam heated tokamak plasmas commonly have more than one third of the plasma kinetic energy in the non-thermal energetic beam ion population. This population of fast ions heats the plasma, provides some of the current drive, and can affect the stability (positively or negatively) of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. This population of energetic ions is not in thermodynamic equilibrium, thus there is free-energy available to drive instabilities, which may lead to redistribution of the fast ion population. Understanding under what conditions beam-driven instabilities arise, and the extent of the resulting perturbation to the fast ion population, is important for predicting and eventually demonstrating non-inductive current ramp-up and sustainment in NSTX-U, as well as the performance of future fusion plasma experiments such as ITER. This paper presents an empirical approach towards characterizing the stability boundaries for some common energetic-ion-driven instabilities seen on NSTX.

  13. Comparison of measured and calculated air-transported radiation from a fast unshielded nuclear reactor. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Robitaille, H.A.; Hoffarth, B.E.

    1980-12-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray spectra have been measured at various distances up to 1100 metres from the fast-neutron reactor of the U.S. Army Pulse Radiation Division (Materiel Testing Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.) The spectra were obtained at a height of two metres above the air-ground interface and are compared to previous measurements performed by two other research laboratories, and also to the results of theoretical predictions based on two-dimensional discrete-ordinates transport theory. Integral quantities such as partial and total radiation kermas are generally in good agreement, however the theoretical calculations tend to predict somewhat softer neutron spectra than are observed experimentally.

  14. Influence of Ramadan-type fasting on carbohydrate metabolism, brush border membrane enzymes and phosphate transport in rat kidney used as a model.

    PubMed

    Salim, Samina; Farooq, Neelam; Priyamvada, Shubha; Asghar, Mohammad; Khundmiri, Syed Jalal; Khan, Samia; Khan, Farah; Yusufi, Ahad Noor Khan

    2007-11-01

    Ramadan fasting is a unique model of fasting in which Muslims the world over abstain from food and water from dawn to sunset for 1 month. We hypothesized that this model of prolonged intermittent fasting would result in specific adaptive alterations in rat kidney to keep a positive balance of metabolites and inorganic phosphate (Pi). The effect of Ramadan-type fasting was studied on enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism and brush border membrane (BBM) and BBM uptake of 32Pi in different renal tissue zones in the rat model. Rats were fasted (12 h) and then re-fed (12 h) daily for 30 d similar to human Ramadan fasting. Ramadan-type fasting resulted in increased serum Pi and phospholipids, whereas Pi clearance decreased. Serum creatinine and its clearance were not affected. Fasting caused a significant decrease in the activities of lactate and malate dehydrogenases, glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, both in the renal cortex and medulla. However, the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase profoundly increased but that of malic enzyme decreased. The activities of alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase in BBM decreased, whereas transport of 32Pi significantly increased. The decrease in enzyme activities and increase in 32Pi transport were due to alterations of both maximal velocities and relative affinities. The results indicate that Ramadan-type fasting caused specific metabolic alterations with enhanced Pi conservation in different kidney tissues in a rat model used for Ramadan fasting in man.

  15. Fast ion transport during applied 3D magnetic perturbations on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zeeland, Michael A.; Ferraro, Nathaniel M.; Grierson, Brian A.; Heidbrink, William W.; Kramer, Gerrit J.; Lasnier, Charles J.; Pace, David C.; Allen, Steve L.; Chen, Xi; Evans, Todd E.; García-Muñoz, Manuel; Hanson, Jeremy M.; Lanctot, Matthew J.; Lao, Lang L.; Meyer, William H.; Moyer, Richard A.; Nazikian, Raffi; Orlov, Dmitriy M.; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Wingen, Andreas

    2015-06-26

    In this paper, measurements show fast ion losses correlated with applied three-dimensional (3D) fields in a variety of plasmas ranging from L-mode to resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppressed H-mode discharges. In DIII-D L-mode discharges with a slowly rotating $n=2$ magnetic perturbation, scintillator detector loss signals synchronized with the applied fields are observed to decay within one poloidal transit time after beam turn-off indicating they arise predominantly from prompt loss orbits. Full orbit following using M3D-C1 calculations of the perturbed fields and kinetic profiles reproduce many features of the measured losses and points to the importance of the applied 3D field phase with respect to the beam injection location in determining the overall impact on prompt beam ion loss. Modeling of these results includes a self-consistent calculation of the 3D perturbed beam ion birth profiles and scrape-off-layer ionization, a factor found to be essential to reproducing the experimental measurements. Extension of the simulations to full slowing down timescales, including fueling and the effects of drag and pitch angle scattering, show the applied $n=3$ RMPs in ELM suppressed H-mode plasmas can induce a significant loss of energetic particles from the core. With the applied $n=3$ fields, up to 8.4% of the injected beam power is predicted to be lost, compared to 2.7% with axisymmetric fields only. These fast ions, originating from minor radii $\\rho >0.7$ , are predicted to be primarily passing particles lost to the divertor region, consistent with wide field-of-view infrared periscope measurements of wall heating in $n=3$ RMP ELM suppressed plasmas. Edge fast ion ${{\\text{D}}_{\\alpha}}$ (FIDA) measurements also confirm a large change in edge fast ion profile due to the $n=3$ fields, where the effect was isolated by using short 50 ms RMP-off periods during which ELM suppression was maintained yet the fast ion profile was allowed

  16. Fast ion transport during applied 3D magnetic perturbations on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Van Zeeland, Michael A.; Ferraro, Nathaniel M.; Grierson, Brian A.; ...

    2015-06-26

    In this paper, measurements show fast ion losses correlated with applied three-dimensional (3D) fields in a variety of plasmas ranging from L-mode to resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppressed H-mode discharges. In DIII-D L-mode discharges with a slowly rotatingmore » $n=2$ magnetic perturbation, scintillator detector loss signals synchronized with the applied fields are observed to decay within one poloidal transit time after beam turn-off indicating they arise predominantly from prompt loss orbits. Full orbit following using M3D-C1 calculations of the perturbed fields and kinetic profiles reproduce many features of the measured losses and points to the importance of the applied 3D field phase with respect to the beam injection location in determining the overall impact on prompt beam ion loss. Modeling of these results includes a self-consistent calculation of the 3D perturbed beam ion birth profiles and scrape-off-layer ionization, a factor found to be essential to reproducing the experimental measurements. Extension of the simulations to full slowing down timescales, including fueling and the effects of drag and pitch angle scattering, show the applied $n=3$ RMPs in ELM suppressed H-mode plasmas can induce a significant loss of energetic particles from the core. With the applied $n=3$ fields, up to 8.4% of the injected beam power is predicted to be lost, compared to 2.7% with axisymmetric fields only. These fast ions, originating from minor radii $$\\rho >0.7$$ , are predicted to be primarily passing particles lost to the divertor region, consistent with wide field-of-view infrared periscope measurements of wall heating in $n=3$ RMP ELM suppressed plasmas. Edge fast ion $${{\\text{D}}_{\\alpha}}$$ (FIDA) measurements also confirm a large change in edge fast ion profile due to the $n=3$ fields, where the effect was isolated by using short 50 ms RMP-off periods during which ELM suppression was maintained yet the fast ion profile

  17. Synergy between fast-ion transport by core MHD and test blanket module fields in DIII-D experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Austin, M. E.; Collins, C. S.; ...

    2015-07-21

    We measured fast-ion transport caused by the combination of MHD and a mock-up test-blanket module (TBM) coil in the DIII-D tokamak. The primary diagnostic is an infrared camera that measures the heat flux on the tiles surrounding the coil. The combined effects of the TBM and four other potential sources of transport are studied: neoclassical tearing modes, Alfvén eigenmodes, sawteeth, and applied resonant magnetic perturbation fields for the control of edge localized modes. A definitive synergistic effect is observed at sawtooth crashes where, in the presence of the TBM, the localized heat flux at a burst increases from 0.36±0.27 tomore » 2.6±0.5 MW/m-2.« less

  18. Synergy between fast-ion transport by core MHD and test blanket module fields in DIII-D experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Austin, M. E.; Collins, C. S.; Gray, T.; Grierson, B. A.; Kramer, G. J.; Lanctot, M.; Pace, D. C.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Mclean, A. G.

    2015-07-21

    We measured fast-ion transport caused by the combination of MHD and a mock-up test-blanket module (TBM) coil in the DIII-D tokamak. The primary diagnostic is an infrared camera that measures the heat flux on the tiles surrounding the coil. The combined effects of the TBM and four other potential sources of transport are studied: neoclassical tearing modes, Alfvén eigenmodes, sawteeth, and applied resonant magnetic perturbation fields for the control of edge localized modes. A definitive synergistic effect is observed at sawtooth crashes where, in the presence of the TBM, the localized heat flux at a burst increases from 0.36±0.27 to 2.6±0.5 MW/m-2.

  19. Depression of fast axonal transport in axons demyelinated by intraneural injection of a neurotoxin from K. humboldtiana.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Martínez, E J; Cuéllar-Pedroza, L H; Rubio-Franchini, C; Jáuregui-Rincón, J; Joseph-Nathan, P

    1994-11-01

    Tullidinol, a neurotoxin extracted from the Karwinskia humboldtiana fruit, dissolved in peanut oil was injected into the right sciatic nerve of adult cats. The contralateral sciatic nerve received an equivalent volume of peanut oil alone. The fast axonal transport of labeled ([3H]Leucine) protein was studied in sensory and motor axons of both sciatic nerves. The radioactive label was pressure injected either into the L7 dorsal root ganglion or the ventral region of the same spinal cord segment. Several days after the toxin injection, the cat limped and the Achilles tendon reflex was nearly absent in the right hind limb. The amount of transported label was decreased distal to the site of toxin injection. Proximal to this site, the transported material was damned. Sensory and motor axons showed similar changes. In addition, the toxin produced demyelination and axonal degeneration. Axonal transport and the structure of the axons were normal in the contralateral nerve. Both, Schwann cells and axons of the right sciatic nerve showed globular inclusions, presumably oil droplets containing the toxin. We conclude that Schwann cells and axons as well are tullidinol targets.

  20. Life cycle assessment of the production of hydrogen and transportation fuels from corn stover via fast pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanan; Hu, Guiping; Brown, Robert C.

    2013-06-01

    This life cycle assessment evaluates and quantifies the environmental impacts of the production of hydrogen and transportation fuels from the fast pyrolysis and upgrading of corn stover. Input data for this analysis come from Aspen Plus modeling, a GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model database and a US Life Cycle Inventory Database. SimaPro 7.3 software is employed to estimate the environmental impacts. The results indicate that the net fossil energy input is 0.25 MJ and 0.23 MJ per km traveled for a light-duty vehicle fueled by gasoline and diesel fuel, respectively. Bio-oil production requires the largest fossil energy input. The net global warming potential (GWP) is 0.037 kg CO2eq and 0.015 kg CO2eq per km traveled for a vehicle fueled by gasoline and diesel fuel, respectively. Vehicle operations contribute up to 33% of the total positive GWP, which is the largest greenhouse gas footprint of all the unit processes. The net GWPs in this study are 88% and 94% lower than for petroleum-based gasoline and diesel fuel (2005 baseline), respectively. Biomass transportation has the largest impact on ozone depletion among all of the unit processes. Sensitivity analysis shows that fuel economy, transportation fuel yield, bio-oil yield, and electricity consumption are the key factors that influence greenhouse gas emissions.

  1. Guidelines for Transportation, Handling, and Use of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-Oil. Part 1. Flammability and Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Oasmaa, Anja; Kalli, Anssi; Lindfors, Christian; Elliott, Douglas C.; Springer, David L.; Peacocke, Cordner; Chiaramonti, David

    2012-05-04

    An alternative sustainable fuel, biomass-derived fast pyrolysis oil or 'bio-oil', is coming into the market. Fast pyrolysis pilot and demonstration plants for fuel applications producing tonnes of bio-oil are in operation, and commercial plants are under design. There will be increasingly larger amounts of bio-oil transportation on water and by land, leading to a need for specifications and supporting documentation. Bio-oil is different from conventional liquid fuels, and therefore must overcome both technical and marketing hurdles for its acceptability in the fuels market. A comprehensive Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is required, backed with independent testing and certification. In order to standardise bio-oil quality specifications are needed. The first bio-oil burner fuel standard in ASTM (D7544) was approved in 2009. CEN standardisation has been initiated in Europe. In the EU a new chemical regulation system, REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals) is being applied. Registration under REACH has to be made if bio-oil is produced or imported to the EU. In the USA and Canada, bio-oil has to be filed under TOSCA (US Toxic Substances Control Act). In this paper the state of the art on standardisation is discussed, and new data for the transportation guidelines is presented. The focus is on flammability and toxicity.

  2. Very low density lipoproteins in intestinal lymph: origin, composition, and role in lipid transport in the fasting state

    PubMed Central

    Ockner, Robert K.; Hughes, Faith B.; Isselbacher, Kurt J.

    1969-01-01

    The transport of endogenous lipids in the lipoproteins of mesenteric lymph was studied in fasting rats with mesenteric lymph fistulas. The lymph was found to contain, in addition to chylomicrons (Sf >400), a significant amount of another, more dense, triglyceride-rich fraction, the very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), which showed a peak Sf of 102. The VLDL differed from chylomicrons not only in flotation, but also in per cent lipid composition and electrophoretic mobility in agarose gel. The VLDL fraction was found to contain 47% of the triglyceride and 54% of the cholesterol of fasting lymph and, in the fasting state, was the major lipoprotein species present. When cholestyramine resin was administered intraduodenally, or bile flow was acutely diverted from the intestine, it was demonstrated that the lipids in lymph VLDL, like those in chylomicrons, were derived from the intestine and bile. These data indicate that the VLDL in intestinal lymph are not derived from the plasma but are of intestinal origin. Because certain properties of lymph VLDL were similar to those reported for plasma VLDL (per cent lipid composition, flotation coefficient, and continuing entry into plasma in the fasting state), additional comparisons between these fractions were made. Although lymph VLDL moved to the α2 region in agarose gel, when they were mixed with VLDL-free serum immediately before electrophoresis they showed the α2 mobility of rat serum VLDL. Furthermore, immunoelectrophoretic comparison of partially delipidated lymph and serum VLDL revealed that these fractions shared in common their major apoprotein, and possibly others as well. The fatty acid composition of lymph and serum triglycerides, as determined by gas-liquid chromatography, revealed that although they were generally similar, differences existed which most likely reflected the presence in serum of triglycerides of hepatic origin. These experiments demonstrate the importance of intestinal VLDL in the transport

  3. A CFD-based wind solver for a fast response transport and dispersion model

    SciTech Connect

    Gowardhan, Akshay A; Brown, Michael J; Pardyjak, Eric R; Senocak, Inanc

    2010-01-01

    In many cities, ambient air quality is deteriorating leading to concerns about the health of city inhabitants. In urban areas with narrow streets surrounded by clusters of tall buildings, called street canyons, air pollution from traffic emissions and other sources is difficult to disperse and may accumulate resulting in high pollutant concentrations. For various situations, including the evacuation of populated areas in the event of an accidental or deliberate release of chemical, biological and radiological agents, it is important that models should be developed that produce urban flow fields quickly. For these reasons it has become important to predict the flow field in urban street canyons. Various computational techniques have been used to calculate these flow fields, but these techniques are often computationally intensive. Most fast response models currently in use are at a disadvantage in these cases as they are unable to correlate highly heterogeneous urban structures with the diagnostic parameterizations on which they are based. In this paper, a fast and reasonably accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for complex urban areas has been developed called QUIC-CFD (Q-CFD). This technique represents an intermediate balance between fast (on the order of minutes for a several block problem) and reasonably accurate solutions. The paper details the solution procedure and validates this model for various simple and complex urban geometries.

  4. Microwave-assisted fast vapor-phase transport synthesis of MnAPO-5 molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Hui; Yao Jianfeng; Ke Xuebin; Zhang Lixiong Xu Nanping

    2009-04-02

    MnAPO-5 was prepared by a microwave-assisted vapor-phase transport method at 180 deg. C in short times. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectra, UV-vis spectroscopic measurement, NH{sub 3}-temperature-programmed desorption and esterification reaction. It was found that dry gels prepared with aluminum isopropoxide, phosphoric acid and manganese acetate could be transferred to MnAPO-5 in the vapors of triethylamine and water by the microwave-assisted vapor-phase transport method at 180 deg. C for less than 30 min. The crystallization time was greatly reduced by the microwave heating compared with the conventional heating. The resulting MnAPO-5 exhibited much smaller particle sizes, higher surface areas and slightly higher catalytic activity in the esterification of acetic acid and butyl alcohol than those prepared by the conventional vapor-phase transport method and hydrothermal synthesis.

  5. A Lower-hybrid/Fast-wave package for the TRANSP transport analysis code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobes, F. C.; Ignat, D. W.; McCune, D. C.

    1996-11-01

    A software package is being added to the TRANSP code which will permit analysis of tokamak plasmas with either lower hybrid current drive or fast wave heating or current drive. The package is a outgrowth of the LSC (Lower Hybrid Simulation) code(Ignat, D. W. et al.), Nucl. Fusion 34 837 (1994). used in conjunction with TSC (Tokamak Simulation Code)(Jardin, S. C. et al.), J. Comput. Phys. 66 481 (1986). The fastwave analysis was added to LSC, and and that combined package then adapted to TRANSP usage.

  6. Bioinspired tilt-angle fabricated structure gradient fibers: micro-drops fast transport in a long-distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuan; Wang, Lin; Xue, Yan; Jiang, Lei; Zheng, Yongmei

    2013-10-01

    Issues of surfaces, e.g., inspired from beetle's back, spider silk, cactus stem, etc., become the active area of research on designing novel materials in need of human beings to acquire fresh water resource from air. However, the design of materials on surface structure is little achieved on controlling of micro-scale drop transport in a long distance. Here, we report the ability of micro-drop transport in a long distance on a bioinspired Fibers with Gradient Spindle-knots (BFGS), which are fabricated by tilt angle dip-coating method. The micro-drop of ~0.25 μL transports in distance of ~5.00 mm, with velocity of 0.10-0.22 m s-1 on BFGS. It is attributed to the multi-level cooperation of the release energy of drop coalescence along the gradient spindle-knots, in addition to capillary adhesion force and continuous difference of Laplace pressure, accordingly, water drops are driven to move fast directionally in a long distance on BFGS.

  7. Development of a New and Fast Linear Solver for Multi-component Reactive Transport Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, C.; Li, L.; Bao, C.; Hu, X.; Johns, R.; Xu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Reactive transport models (RTM) have been extensively used to understand the coupling between solute transport and (bio) geochemical reactions in complex earth systems. RTM typically involves a large number of primary and secondary species with a complex reaction network in large domains. The computational expenses increase significantly with the number of grid blocks and the number of chemical species. Within both the operator splitting approach (OS) and the global implicit approach (GI) that are commonly used, the steps that involve Newton-Raphson method are typically one of the most time-consuming parts (up to 80% to 90% of CPU times). Under such circumstances, accelerating reactive transport simulation is very essential. In this research, we present a physics-based linear system solution strategy for general reactive transport models with many species. We observed up to five times speed up for the linear solver portion of the simulations in our test cases. Our new linear solver takes advantage of the sparsity of the Jacobian matrix arising from the reaction network. The Jacobian matrix for the speciation problem is typically considered as a dense matrix and solved with a direct method such as Gaussian elimination. For the reactive transport problem, the graph of the local Jacobian matrix has a one-to-one correspondence to the reaction network graph. The Jacobian matrix is commonly sparse and has the same sparsity structure for the same reaction network. We developed a strategy that performs a minimum degree of reordering and symbolic factorization to determine the non-zero pattern at the beginning of the OS and GI simulation. During the speciation calculation in OS, we calculate the L and U factors and solve the triangular matrices according to the non-zero pattern. For GI, our strategy can be applied to inverse the diagonal blocks in the block-Jacobi preconditioner and smoothers of the multigrid preconditioners in iterative solvers. Our strategy is naturally

  8. Fast Na/+/-ion transport in skeleton structures. [solid electrolyte applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodenough, J. B.; Hong, H. Y.-P.; Kafalas, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The skeleton structures considered in the investigations consist of a rigid subarray with an interconnected interstitial space in which ions move in three dimensions. The classes of skeleton structures investigated include the Im3 phase of high-pressure KSbO3, the defect-pyrochlore structure illustrated by RbMgAlF6, and the carnegieite structure of high-temperature NaAlSiO4. A description is given of the results obtained in transport measurements involving dense polycrystalline ceramic disks. Results obtained in the case of the Na(+)-ion transport in Na3Zr2PSi2O12 appear particularly promising concerning the possible use of such substances in solid-electrolyte applications.

  9. Fast Na/+/-ion transport in skeleton structures. [solid electrolyte applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodenough, J. B.; Hong, H. Y.-P.; Kafalas, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The skeleton structures considered in the investigations consist of a rigid subarray with an interconnected interstitial space in which ions move in three dimensions. The classes of skeleton structures investigated include the Im3 phase of high-pressure KSbO3, the defect-pyrochlore structure illustrated by RbMgAlF6, and the carnegieite structure of high-temperature NaAlSiO4. A description is given of the results obtained in transport measurements involving dense polycrystalline ceramic disks. Results obtained in the case of the Na(+)-ion transport in Na3Zr2PSi2O12 appear particularly promising concerning the possible use of such substances in solid-electrolyte applications.

  10. Fast Water Transport in CNTs: length dependence and entrane/exit effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Jens; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2011-11-01

    Superfast water transport in carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes has been reported in experimental studies. We use Molecular Dynamics simulations to elucidate the mechanisms of water entry, exit and transport in 2 nm -diameter hydrophobic CNTs embedded in a hydrophilic membrane matrix. We demonstrate, for the first time, that under imposed pressures of the order of 1 bar, water entry into the CNT cavity and exit from the CNT end, can occur only on pre-wetted membranes. We conduct large scale simulations for up to 500 nm long CNTs and observe a previously unseen dependence of the flow enhancement rates on the CNT length. We relate the present findings to past computational and experimental studies, we discuss previous continuum assessments for this flow and propose underlying physical mechanisms.

  11. On the Upscaling of Reaction-Transport Processes in Porous Media with Fast Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kechagi, P.; Tsimpanogiannis, I.; Yortsos, Y.C.; Lichtner, P.

    2001-01-09

    This report is organized as follows: Provide a brief review of the upscaling constraints of the type (2) for a typical diffusion-reaction system. In this an analogy with two-phase flow in porous media was drawn. Then, using the methodology of QW a problem at the unit cell for the computation of the effective mass transfer coefficient, in processes where local thermodynamic equilibrium applies was derived. This problem is found to be different than in QW, as it depends on the gradients of the macroscale variable, and can be cast in terms of an eigenvalue problem. Two simple, examples, one involving advection-dissolution and another involving drying in a pore network, was presented to illustrate the coupling between scales and to show the quantitative effect in case this coupling was neglected. Finally, similar ideas and an illustrative example was applied to reaction-diffusion systems with fast kinetics, where an equilibrium state is approached.

  12. Temporally resolved characterization of shock-heated foam target with Al absorption spectroscopy for fast electron transport study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuuchi, T.; Sawada, H.; Regan, S. P.; Anderson, K.; Wei, M. S.; Betti, R.; Hund, J.; Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McLean, H. S.; Paguio, R. R.; Patel, P. K.; Saito, K. M.; Stephens, R. B.; Wilks, S. C.; Beg, F. N.

    2012-09-01

    The CH foam plasma produced by a laser-driven shock wave has been characterized by a temporally resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy technique. A 200 mg/cm3 foam target with Al dopant was developed for this experiment, which used an OMEGA EP [D. D. Meyerhofer et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 244, 032010 (2010)] long pulse beam with an energy of 1.2 kJ and 3.5 ns pulselength. The plasma temperatures were inferred with the accuracy of 5 eV from the fits to the measurements using an atomic physics code. The results show that the inferred temperature is sustained at 40-45 eV between 6 and 7 ns and decreases to 25 eV at 8 ns. 2-D radiation hydrodynamic simulations show a good agreement with the measurements. Application of the shock-heated foam plasma platform toward fast electron transport experiments is discussed.

  13. Cyclodextrin Films with Fast Solvent Transport and Shape-Selective Permeability.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco; Huang, Tiefan; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2017-07-01

    This study describes the molecular-level design of a new type of filtration membrane made of crosslinked cyclodextrins-inexpensive macrocycles of glucose, shaped like hollow truncated cones. The channel-like cavities of cyclodextrins spawn numerous paths of defined aperture in the separation layer that can effectively discriminate between molecules. The transport of molecules through these membranes is highly shape-sensitive. In addition, the presence of hydrophobic (cavity) and hydrophilic (ester-crosslinked outer part) domains in these films results in high permeances for both polar and nonpolar solvents. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Quantitative measurements and modeling of cargo–motor interactions during fast transport in the living axon

    PubMed Central

    Seamster, Pamela E; Loewenberg, Michael; Pascal, Jennifer; Chauviere, Arnaud; Gonzales, Aaron; Cristini, Vittorio; Bearer, Elaine L

    2013-01-01

    The kinesins have long been known to drive microtubule-based transport of sub-cellular components, yet the mechanisms of their attachment to cargo remain a mystery. Several different cargo-receptors have been proposed based on their in vitro binding affinities to kinesin-1. Only two of these—phosphatidyl inositol, a negatively charged lipid, and the carboxyl terminus of the amyloid precursor protein (APP-C), a trans-membrane protein—have been reported to mediate motility in living systems. A major question is how these many different cargo, receptors and motors interact to produce the complex choreography of vesicular transport within living cells. Here we describe an experimental assay that identifies cargo–motor receptors by their ability to recruit active motors and drive transport of exogenous cargo towards the synapse in living axons. Cargo is engineered by derivatizing the surface of polystyrene fluorescent nanospheres (100 nm diameter) with charged residues or with synthetic peptides derived from candidate motor receptor proteins, all designed to display a terminal COOH group. After injection into the squid giant axon, particle movements are imaged by laser-scanning confocal time-lapse microscopy. In this report we compare the motility of negatively charged beads with APP-C beads in the presence of glycine-conjugated non-motile beads using new strategies to measure bead movements. The ensuing quantitative analysis of time-lapse digital sequences reveals detailed information about bead movements: instantaneous and maximum velocities, run lengths, pause frequencies and pause durations. These measurements provide parameters for a mathematical model that predicts the spatiotemporal evolution of distribution of the two different types of bead cargo in the axon. The results reveal that negatively charged beads differ from APP-C beads in velocity and dispersion, and predict that at long time points APP-C will achieve greater progress towards the presynaptic

  15. Quantitative measurements and modeling of cargo-motor interactions during fast transport in the living axon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seamster, Pamela E.; Loewenberg, Michael; Pascal, Jennifer; Chauviere, Arnaud; Gonzales, Aaron; Cristini, Vittorio; Bearer, Elaine L.

    2012-10-01

    The kinesins have long been known to drive microtubule-based transport of sub-cellular components, yet the mechanisms of their attachment to cargo remain a mystery. Several different cargo-receptors have been proposed based on their in vitro binding affinities to kinesin-1. Only two of these—phosphatidyl inositol, a negatively charged lipid, and the carboxyl terminus of the amyloid precursor protein (APP-C), a trans-membrane protein—have been reported to mediate motility in living systems. A major question is how these many different cargo, receptors and motors interact to produce the complex choreography of vesicular transport within living cells. Here we describe an experimental assay that identifies cargo-motor receptors by their ability to recruit active motors and drive transport of exogenous cargo towards the synapse in living axons. Cargo is engineered by derivatizing the surface of polystyrene fluorescent nanospheres (100 nm diameter) with charged residues or with synthetic peptides derived from candidate motor receptor proteins, all designed to display a terminal COOH group. After injection into the squid giant axon, particle movements are imaged by laser-scanning confocal time-lapse microscopy. In this report we compare the motility of negatively charged beads with APP-C beads in the presence of glycine-conjugated non-motile beads using new strategies to measure bead movements. The ensuing quantitative analysis of time-lapse digital sequences reveals detailed information about bead movements: instantaneous and maximum velocities, run lengths, pause frequencies and pause durations. These measurements provide parameters for a mathematical model that predicts the spatiotemporal evolution of distribution of the two different types of bead cargo in the axon. The results reveal that negatively charged beads differ from APP-C beads in velocity and dispersion, and predict that at long time points APP-C will achieve greater progress towards the presynaptic

  16. Quantitative measurements and modeling of cargo-motor interactions during fast transport in the living axon.

    PubMed

    Seamster, Pamela E; Loewenberg, Michael; Pascal, Jennifer; Chauviere, Arnaud; Gonzales, Aaron; Cristini, Vittorio; Bearer, Elaine L

    2012-10-01

    The kinesins have long been known to drive microtubule-based transport of sub-cellular components, yet the mechanisms of their attachment to cargo remain a mystery. Several different cargo-receptors have been proposed based on their in vitro binding affinities to kinesin-1. Only two of these-phosphatidyl inositol, a negatively charged lipid, and the carboxyl terminus of the amyloid precursor protein (APP-C), a trans-membrane protein-have been reported to mediate motility in living systems. A major question is how these many different cargo, receptors and motors interact to produce the complex choreography of vesicular transport within living cells. Here we describe an experimental assay that identifies cargo-motor receptors by their ability to recruit active motors and drive transport of exogenous cargo towards the synapse in living axons. Cargo is engineered by derivatizing the surface of polystyrene fluorescent nanospheres (100 nm diameter) with charged residues or with synthetic peptides derived from candidate motor receptor proteins, all designed to display a terminal COOH group. After injection into the squid giant axon, particle movements are imaged by laser-scanning confocal time-lapse microscopy. In this report we compare the motility of negatively charged beads with APP-C beads in the presence of glycine-conjugated non-motile beads using new strategies to measure bead movements. The ensuing quantitative analysis of time-lapse digital sequences reveals detailed information about bead movements: instantaneous and maximum velocities, run lengths, pause frequencies and pause durations. These measurements provide parameters for a mathematical model that predicts the spatiotemporal evolution of distribution of the two different types of bead cargo in the axon. The results reveal that negatively charged beads differ from APP-C beads in velocity and dispersion, and predict that at long time points APP-C will achieve greater progress towards the presynaptic

  17. Laser-driven cylindrical compression of targets for fast electron transport study in warm and dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vauzour, B.; Nicolaie, Ph.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Hulin, S.; Regan, C.; Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G.; Santos, J. J.; Perez, F.; Baton, S. D.; Brambrink, E.; Volpe, L.; Batani, D.; Jafer, R.; Lancaster, K.; Galimberti, M.; Heathcote, R.; Beg, F. N.; Chawla, S.

    2011-04-15

    Fast ignition requires a precise knowledge of fast electron propagation in a dense hydrogen plasma. In this context, a dedicated HiPER (High Power laser Energy Research) experiment was performed on the VULCAN laser facility where the propagation of relativistic electron beams through cylindrically compressed plastic targets was studied. In this paper, we characterize the plasma parameters such as temperature and density during the compression of cylindrical polyimide shells filled with CH foams at three different initial densities. X-ray and proton radiography were used to measure the cylinder radius at different stages of the compression. By comparing both diagnostics results with 2D hydrodynamic simulations, we could infer densities from 2 to 11 g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures from 30 to 120 eV at maximum compression at the center of targets. According to the initial foam density, kinetic, coupled (sometimes degenerated) plasmas were obtained. The temporal and spatial evolution of the resulting areal densities and electrical conductivities allow for testing electron transport in a wide range of configurations.

  18. Effects of eribulin, vincristine, paclitaxel and ixabepilone on fast axonal transport and kinesin-1 driven microtubule gliding: Implications for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    LaPointe, Nichole E.; Morfini, Gerardo; Brady, Scott T.; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Wilson, Leslie; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a serious, painful and dose-limiting side effect of cancer drugs that target microtubules. The mechanisms underlying the neuronal damage are unknown, but may include disruption of fast axonal transport, an essential microtubule-based process that moves cellular components over long distances between neuronal cell bodies and nerve terminals. This idea is supported by the “dying back” pattern of degeneration observed in CIPN, and by the selective vulnerability of sensory neurons bearing the longest axonal projections. In this study, we test the hypothesis that microtubule-targeting drugs disrupt fast axonal transport using vesicle motility assays in isolated squid axoplasm and a cell-free microtubule gliding assay with defined components. We compare four clinically-used drugs, eribulin, vincristine, paclitaxel and ixabepilone. Of these, eribulin is associated with a relatively low incidence of severe neuropathy, while vincristine has a relatively high incidence. In vesicle motility assays, we found that all four drugs inhibited anterograde (conventional kinesin-dependent) fast axonal transport, with the potency being vincristine = ixabepilone > paclitaxel = eribulin. Interestingly, eribulin and paclitaxel did not inhibit retrograde (cytoplasmic dynein-dependent) fast axonal transport, in contrast to vincristine and ixabepilone. Similarly, vincristine and ixabepilone both exerted significant inhibitory effects in an in vitro microtubule gliding assay consisting of recombinant kinesin (kinesin-1) and microtubules composed of purified bovine brain tubulin, whereas paclitaxel and eribulin had negligible effects. Our results suggest that (i) inhibition of microtubule-based fast axonal transport may be a significant contributor to neurotoxicity induced by microtubule-targeting drugs, and (ii) that individual microtubule-targeting drugs affect fast axonal transport through different mechanisms. PMID:23711742

  19. Antibodies Covalently Immobilized on Actin Filaments for Fast Myosin Driven Analyte Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Saroj; ten Siethoff, Lasse; Persson, Malin; Lard, Mercy; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Linke, Heiner; Månsson, Alf

    2012-01-01

    Biosensors would benefit from further miniaturization, increased detection rate and independence from external pumps and other bulky equipment. Whereas transportation systems built around molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments hold significant promise in the latter regard, recent proof-of-principle devices based on the microtubule-kinesin motor system have not matched the speed of existing methods. An attractive solution to overcome this limitation would be the use of myosin driven propulsion of actin filaments which offers motility one order of magnitude faster than the kinesin-microtubule system. Here, we realized a necessary requirement for the use of the actomyosin system in biosensing devices, namely covalent attachment of antibodies to actin filaments using heterobifunctional cross-linkers. We also demonstrated consistent and rapid myosin II driven transport where velocity and the fraction of motile actin filaments was negligibly affected by the presence of antibody-antigen complexes at rather high density (>20 µm−1). The results, however, also demonstrated that it was challenging to consistently achieve high density of functional antibodies along the actin filament, and optimization of the covalent coupling procedure to increase labeling density should be a major focus for future work. Despite the remaining challenges, the reported advances are important steps towards considerably faster nanoseparation than shown for previous molecular motor based devices, and enhanced miniaturization because of high bending flexibility of actin filaments. PMID:23056279

  20. Techno-Economic Analysis of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, M. M.; Satrio, J. A.; Brown, R. C.; Daugaard, D. E.; Hsu, D. D.

    2010-11-01

    This study develops techno-economic models for assessment of the conversion of biomass to valuable fuel products via fast pyrolysis and bio-oil upgrading. The upgrading process produces a mixture of naphtha-range (gasoline blend stock) and diesel-range (diesel blend stock) products. This study analyzes the economics of two scenarios: onsite hydrogen production by reforming bio-oil, and hydrogen purchase from an outside source. The study results for an nth plant indicate that petroleum fractions in the naphtha distillation range and in the diesel distillation range are produced from corn stover at a product value of $3.09/gal ($0.82/liter) with onsite hydrogen production or $2.11/gal ($0.56/liter) with hydrogen purchase. These values correspond to a $0.83/gal ($0.21/liter) cost to produce the bio-oil. Based on these nth plant numbers, product value for a pioneer hydrogen-producing plant is about $6.55/gal ($1.73/liter) and for a pioneer hydrogen-purchasing plant is about $3.41/gal ($0.92/liter). Sensitivity analysis identifies fuel yield as a key variable for the hydrogen-production scenario. Biomass cost is important for both scenarios. Changing feedstock cost from $50-$100 per short ton changes the price of fuel in the hydrogen production scenario from $2.57-$3.62/gal ($0.68-$0.96/liter).

  1. Fast Solutions of Maxwell's Equation for High Resolution Electromagnetic Imaging of Transport Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    DAY,DAVID M.; NEWMAN,GREGORY A.

    1999-10-01

    A fast precondition technique has been developed which accelerates the finite difference solutions of the 3D Maxwell's equations for geophysical modeling. The technique splits the electric field into its curl free and divergence free projections, and allows for the construction of an inverse operator. Test examples show an order of magnitude speed up compared with a simple Jacobi preconditioner. Using this preconditioner a low frequency Neumann series expansion is developed and used to compute responses at multiple frequencies very efficiently. Simulations requiring responses at multiple frequencies, show that the Neumann series is faster than the preconditioned solution, which must compute solutions at each discrete frequency. A Neumann series expansion has also been developed in the high frequency limit along with spectral Lanczos methods in both the high and low frequency cases for simulating multiple frequency responses with maximum efficiency. The research described in this report was to have been carried out over a two-year period. Because of communication difficulties, the project was funded for first year only. Thus the contents of this report are incomplete with respect to the original project objectives.

  2. Transport coefficient free scaling laws for convection and magnetism in fast rotating planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starchenko, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    In the limit of negligible molecular diffusivity, viscosity and magnetic diffusivity effects, Scaling laws for convection and magnetism are derived for fast rotating planets. In the Earth, Jupiter, Saturn and ancient dynamo active Mars it is reasonable to suppose domination of magnetic energy over kinetic one that results in the typical magnetic field B proportional to the third root of the buoyancy flux F [3] driving the convection, while B is independent on conductivity σ and angular rotation rate Ω. The same scaling law was previously obtained via compilation of many numerical planetary dynamo simulations [1-3]. Besides, new scaling laws are obtained for typical hydrodynamic scale h, velocity V, Archimedean acceleration A, electromagnetic scale d and sinus of the angle between magnetic and velocity vector s. In Uranus, Neptune and Ganymede a local magnetic Reynolds number rm=μσVd~1 with magnetic permeability in vacuum μ. Correspondent magnetic energy could be of order kinetic energy resulting in relatively lower magnetic field strength B=(μρ)1/2V with density ρ. That may explain magnetic field values and non-dipolar structures in Uranus, Neptune and Ganymede.

  3. A fast GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation of proton transport with detailed modeling of nonelastic interactions.

    PubMed

    Wan Chan Tseung, H; Ma, J; Beltran, C

    2015-06-01

    Very fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of proton transport have been implemented recently on graphics processing units (GPUs). However, these MCs usually use simplified models for nonelastic proton-nucleus interactions. Our primary goal is to build a GPU-based proton transport MC with detailed modeling of elastic and nonelastic proton-nucleus collisions. Using the cuda framework, the authors implemented GPU kernels for the following tasks: (1) simulation of beam spots from our possible scanning nozzle configurations, (2) proton propagation through CT geometry, taking into account nuclear elastic scattering, multiple scattering, and energy loss straggling, (3) modeling of the intranuclear cascade stage of nonelastic interactions when they occur, (4) simulation of nuclear evaporation, and (5) statistical error estimates on the dose. To validate our MC, the authors performed (1) secondary particle yield calculations in proton collisions with therapeutically relevant nuclei, (2) dose calculations in homogeneous phantoms, (3) recalculations of complex head and neck treatment plans from a commercially available treatment planning system, and compared with (GEANT)4.9.6p2/TOPAS. Yields, energy, and angular distributions of secondaries from nonelastic collisions on various nuclei are in good agreement with the (GEANT)4.9.6p2 Bertini and Binary cascade models. The 3D-gamma pass rate at 2%-2 mm for treatment plan simulations is typically 98%. The net computational time on a NVIDIA GTX680 card, including all CPU-GPU data transfers, is ∼ 20 s for 1 × 10(7) proton histories. Our GPU-based MC is the first of its kind to include a detailed nuclear model to handle nonelastic interactions of protons with any nucleus. Dosimetric calculations are in very good agreement with (GEANT)4.9.6p2/TOPAS. Our MC is being integrated into a framework to perform fast routine clinical QA of pencil-beam based treatment plans, and is being used as the dose calculation engine in a clinically

  4. The transport characteristics of passing fast ions produced by nonlocal overlapping of drift island surfaces and magnetic island surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jinjia; Gong, Xueyu; Xiang, Dong; Huang, Qianhong; Yu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The structure of the drift-island surface of passing fast ions (PFIs) is investigated in the presence of the resonant interaction with a magnetic island. Two overlapping regions of the drift-island surface and the magnetic island surface are found, one corresponding to local overlapping region and the other to non-local one. Here, the word "nonlocal" denotes that the resonances in the core plasma can have effects on the PFIs near the plasma boundary, while the "local" represents that the PFIs just near the resonant location are influenced. The nonlocal overlapping constructs a transport path along which the PFIs can become losses. There are three kinds of drift-island surfaces to join in forming the transport paths. A pitch angle region, which is called pitch angle gap, is found near the plasma boundary, where the drift-island surface cannot be formed and few PFIs are lost. The pitch-angle selective features of PFI losses are obtained by analyzing the three kinds of drift-island surfaces. The coupling between the crowd drift island surfaces and the collision can induce the prompt losses of PFIs and rapidly slowing down of PFI energy. The time of the prompt losses and the slowing down rate are calculated. Qualitatively, the theoretical results are in well agreement with the experimental observations in ASDEX Upgrade [M. García-Muñoz et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, L10 (2007)].

  5. The transport characteristics of passing fast ions produced by nonlocal overlapping of drift island surfaces and magnetic island surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Jinjia; Gong, Xueyu Xiang, Dong; Huang, Qianhong; Yu, Jun

    2016-08-15

    The structure of the drift-island surface of passing fast ions (PFIs) is investigated in the presence of the resonant interaction with a magnetic island. Two overlapping regions of the drift-island surface and the magnetic island surface are found, one corresponding to local overlapping region and the other to non-local one. Here, the word “nonlocal” denotes that the resonances in the core plasma can have effects on the PFIs near the plasma boundary, while the “local” represents that the PFIs just near the resonant location are influenced. The nonlocal overlapping constructs a transport path along which the PFIs can become losses. There are three kinds of drift-island surfaces to join in forming the transport paths. A pitch angle region, which is called pitch angle gap, is found near the plasma boundary, where the drift-island surface cannot be formed and few PFIs are lost. The pitch-angle selective features of PFI losses are obtained by analyzing the three kinds of drift-island surfaces. The coupling between the crowd drift island surfaces and the collision can induce the prompt losses of PFIs and rapidly slowing down of PFI energy. The time of the prompt losses and the slowing down rate are calculated. Qualitatively, the theoretical results are in well agreement with the experimental observations in ASDEX Upgrade [M. García-Muñoz et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, L10 (2007)].

  6. Molecular-flow time properties of RIB type vapor-transport systems using a fast-valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, G. D.; Bilheux, J.-C.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2014-06-01

    The advent of the fast-valve device, described previously, permits measurement of molecular-flow times of chemically active or inactive gaseous species through radioactive ion beam (RIB) target-ion-source systems, independent of size, geometry and materials of construction. Thus, decay losses of short-half-life RIBs can be determined for a given target/vapor-transport system in advance of on-line operation, thereby ascertaining the feasibility of the system design for successful processing of a given isotope. In this article, molecular-flow-time theory and experimentally measured molecular-flow time data are given for serial- and parallel-coupled Ta metal RIB vapor-transport systems similar to those used at ISOL based RIB facilities. In addition, the effect of source type on the molecular-flow time properties of a given system is addressed, and a chemical passivation method for negating surface adsorption enthalpies for chemically active gaseous species on Ta surfaces is demonstrated.

  7. An influence of long-lasting and gradual magnetic flux transport on fate of magnetotail fast plasma flows: An energetic particle injection substorm event study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowada, Motoharu; Fu, Suiyan; Parks, George K.; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.; Pu, Zuyin

    2014-10-01

    Based on multi-satellite and ground observations, we investigated an influence of long-lasting and gradual enhancements of magnetic flux transport rate on the magnetotail fast flow duration. On March 10th, 2009, THEMIS-B, which was located in the central plasma sheet of middle distant magnetotail (XGSM ~-25.8 RE), observed the fast flows with the velocity exceeding 300 km/s, lasting over 3 h for intense southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) period. During long-lasting fast flows, AL index variations were very extensive and their recovery was much slow. Pi 2 waves were observed at the ground observatories around the THEMIS's footpoints and at low-/mid-latitudes. The aspect for these AL variations suggests Steady Magnetospheric Convection (SMC), but clear substorm signatures were also observed. Further magnetic dipolarization was detected by THEMIS-A at XGSM ~-8.2 RE and its nearby THEMIS-E. Only THEMIS-A observed the associated energetic electron flux enhancements. Therefore, the fast flows occurred during substorm with energetic particle injections at “imitative” SMC, which would be driven by prolonged intense southward IMF. The cumulative transport rates of magnetic and Poynting fluxes consecutively and gradually enhanced. On the other hand, THEMIS-C detected much shorter fast flows with the duration of 37 min at XGSM ~-18.1 RE and weak/gradual substorm-associated dipolarization. However, the cumulative magnetic flux transport rate was enhanced only during the fast flow interval and was saturated after the fast flows. From different magnetic transport rate profiles at THEMIS-B and THEMIS-C, the realms of dipolar-configured field lines expanded to near THEMIS-C's position responsible for long-lasting fast flow-associated consecutive and gradual magnetic flux pileup. Because the resultant “high-speed flow braking” region was retreated into a few RE tailward direction, long-lasting fast flows were almost stemmed. These results suggest that the

  8. Fast cyclic electron transport around photosystem I in leaves under far-red light: a proton-uncoupled pathway?

    PubMed

    Laisk, Agu; Talts, Eero; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Peterson, Richard B

    2010-02-01

    Fast cyclic electron transport (CET) around photosystem I (PS I) was observed in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) leaves under intense far-red light (FRL) of up to 200 mumol quanta m(-2) s(-1). The electron transport rate (ETR) through PS I was found from the FRL-dark transmittance change at 810 and 950 nm, which was deconvoluted into redox states and pool sizes of P700, plastocyanin (PC) and cytochrome f (Cyt f). PC and P700 were in redox equilibrium with K(e) = 35 (ΔE(m) = 90 mV). PS II ETR was based on O(2) evolution. CET [(PS I ETR) - (PS II ETR)] increased to 50-70 mumol e(-) m(-2) s(-1) when linear electron transport (LET) under FRL was limited to 5 mumol e(-) m(-2) s(-1) in a gas phase containing 20-40 mumol CO(2) mol(-1) and 20 mumol O(2) mol(-1). Under these conditions, pulse-saturated fluorescence yield F(m) was non-photochemically quenched; however, F(m) was similarly quenched when LET was driven by low green or white light, which energetically precluded the possibility for active CET. We suggest that under FRL, CET is rather not coupled to transmembrane proton translocation than the CET-coupled protons are short-circuited via proton channels regulated to open at high ΔpH. A kinetic analysis of CET electron donors and acceptors suggests the CET pathway is that of the reversed Q-cycle: Fd -> (FNR) -> Cyt c(n) -> Cyt b(h) -> Cyt b(l) -> Rieske FeS -> Cyt f -> PC -> P700 ->-> Fd. CET is activated when PQH(2) oxidation is opposed by high ΔpH, and ferredoxin (Fd) is reduced due to low availability of e(-) acceptors. The physiological significance of CET may be photoprotective, as CET may be regarded as a mechanism of energy dissipation under stress conditions.

  9. Radiological transportation risk assessment of the shipment of sodium-bonded fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.R.

    1995-01-31

    This document was written in support of Environmental Assessment: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It analyzes the potential radiological risks associated with the transportation of sodium-bonded metal alloy and mixed carbide fuel from the FFTF on the Hanford Site in Washington State to the Idaho Engineering Laboratory in Idaho in the T-3 Cask. RADTRAN 4 is used for the analysis which addresses potential risk from normal transportation and hypothetical accident scenarios.

  10. Plasmodesmata without callose and calreticulin in higher plants - open channels for fast symplastic transport?

    PubMed

    Demchenko, Kirill N; Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V; Pawlowski, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) represent membrane-lined channels that link adjacent plant cells across the cell wall. PD of higher plants contain a central tube of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) called desmotubule. Membrane and lumen proteins seem to be able to move through the desmotubule, but most transport processes through PD occur through the cytoplasmic annulus (Brunkard etal., 2013). Calreticulin (CRT), a highly conserved Ca(2+)-binding protein found in all multicellular eukaryotes, predominantly located in the ER, was shown to localize to PD, though not all PD accumulate CRT. In nitrogen-fixing actinorhizal root nodules of the Australian tree Casuarina glauca, the primary walls of infected cells containing the microsymbiont become lignified upon infection. TEM analysis of these nodules showed that during the differentiation of infected cells, PD connecting infected cells, and connecting infected and adjacent uninfected cells, were reduced in number as well as diameter (Schubert etal., 2013). In contrast with PD connecting young infected cells, and most PD connecting mature infected and adjacent uninfected cells, PD connecting mature infected cells did not accumulate CRT. Furthermore, as shown here, these PD were not associated with callose, and based on their diameter, they probably had lost their desmotubules. We speculate that either this is a slow path to PD degradation, or that the loss of callose accumulation and presumably also desmotubules leads to the PD becoming open channels and improves metabolite exchange between cells.

  11. Release of kinesin from vesicles by hsc70 and regulation of fast axonal transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, M. Y.; Morfini, G.; Szebenyi, G.; Brady, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The nature of kinesin interactions with membrane-bound organelles and mechanisms for regulation of kinesin-based motility have both been surprisingly difficult to define. Most kinesin is recovered in supernatants with standard protocols for purification of motor proteins, but kinesin recovered on membrane-bound organelles is tightly bound. Partitioning of kinesin between vesicle and cytosolic fractions is highly sensitive to buffer composition. Addition of either N-ethylmaleimide or EDTA to homogenization buffers significantly increased the fraction of kinesin bound to organelles. Given that an antibody against kinesin light chain tandem repeats also releases kinesin from vesicles, these observations indicated that specific cytoplasmic factors may regulate kinesin release from membranes. Kinesin light tandem repeats contain DnaJ-like motifs, so the effects of hsp70 chaperones were evaluated. Hsc70 released kinesin from vesicles in an MgATP-dependent and N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive manner. Recombinant kinesin light chains inhibited kinesin release by hsc70 and stimulated the hsc70 ATPase. Hsc70 actions may provide a mechanism to regulate kinesin function by releasing kinesin from cargo in specific subcellular domains, thereby effecting delivery of axonally transported materials.

  12. Release of kinesin from vesicles by hsc70 and regulation of fast axonal transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, M. Y.; Morfini, G.; Szebenyi, G.; Brady, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The nature of kinesin interactions with membrane-bound organelles and mechanisms for regulation of kinesin-based motility have both been surprisingly difficult to define. Most kinesin is recovered in supernatants with standard protocols for purification of motor proteins, but kinesin recovered on membrane-bound organelles is tightly bound. Partitioning of kinesin between vesicle and cytosolic fractions is highly sensitive to buffer composition. Addition of either N-ethylmaleimide or EDTA to homogenization buffers significantly increased the fraction of kinesin bound to organelles. Given that an antibody against kinesin light chain tandem repeats also releases kinesin from vesicles, these observations indicated that specific cytoplasmic factors may regulate kinesin release from membranes. Kinesin light tandem repeats contain DnaJ-like motifs, so the effects of hsp70 chaperones were evaluated. Hsc70 released kinesin from vesicles in an MgATP-dependent and N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive manner. Recombinant kinesin light chains inhibited kinesin release by hsc70 and stimulated the hsc70 ATPase. Hsc70 actions may provide a mechanism to regulate kinesin function by releasing kinesin from cargo in specific subcellular domains, thereby effecting delivery of axonally transported materials.

  13. A role for cyclin-dependent kinase(s) in the modulation of fast anterograde axonal transport: effects defined by olomoucine and the APC tumor suppressor protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, N.; Bloom, G. S.; Brady, S. T.

    1998-01-01

    Proteins that interact with both cytoskeletal and membrane components are candidates to modulate membrane trafficking. The tumor suppressor proteins neurofibromin (NF1) and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) both bind to microtubules and interact with membrane-associated proteins. The effects of recombinant NF1 and APC fragments on vesicle motility were evaluated by measuring fast axonal transport along microtubules in axoplasm from squid giant axons. APC4 (amino acids 1034-2844) reduced only anterograde movements, whereas APC2 (aa 1034-2130) or APC3 (aa 2130-2844) reduced both anterograde and retrograde transport. NF1 had no effect on organelle movement in either direction. Because APC contains multiple cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) consensus phosphorylation motifs, the kinase inhibitor olomoucine was examined. At concentrations in which olomoucine is specific for cyclin-dependent kinases (5 microM), it reduced only anterograde transport, whereas anterograde and retrograde movement were both affected at concentrations at which other kinases are inhibited as well (50 microM). Both anterograde and retrograde transport also were inhibited by histone H1 and KSPXK peptides, substrates for proline-directed kinases, including CDKs. Our data suggest that CDK-like axonal kinases modulate fast anterograde transport and that other axonal kinases may be involved in modulating retrograde transport. The specific effect of APC4 on anterograde transport suggests a model in which the binding of APC to microtubules may limit the activity of axonal CDK kinase or kinases in restricted domains, thereby affecting organelle transport.

  14. A role for cyclin-dependent kinase(s) in the modulation of fast anterograde axonal transport: effects defined by olomoucine and the APC tumor suppressor protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, N.; Bloom, G. S.; Brady, S. T.

    1998-01-01

    Proteins that interact with both cytoskeletal and membrane components are candidates to modulate membrane trafficking. The tumor suppressor proteins neurofibromin (NF1) and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) both bind to microtubules and interact with membrane-associated proteins. The effects of recombinant NF1 and APC fragments on vesicle motility were evaluated by measuring fast axonal transport along microtubules in axoplasm from squid giant axons. APC4 (amino acids 1034-2844) reduced only anterograde movements, whereas APC2 (aa 1034-2130) or APC3 (aa 2130-2844) reduced both anterograde and retrograde transport. NF1 had no effect on organelle movement in either direction. Because APC contains multiple cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) consensus phosphorylation motifs, the kinase inhibitor olomoucine was examined. At concentrations in which olomoucine is specific for cyclin-dependent kinases (5 microM), it reduced only anterograde transport, whereas anterograde and retrograde movement were both affected at concentrations at which other kinases are inhibited as well (50 microM). Both anterograde and retrograde transport also were inhibited by histone H1 and KSPXK peptides, substrates for proline-directed kinases, including CDKs. Our data suggest that CDK-like axonal kinases modulate fast anterograde transport and that other axonal kinases may be involved in modulating retrograde transport. The specific effect of APC4 on anterograde transport suggests a model in which the binding of APC to microtubules may limit the activity of axonal CDK kinase or kinases in restricted domains, thereby affecting organelle transport.

  15. Fast-ion transport in q{sub min}>2, high-β steady-state scenarios on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, C. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Collins, C.; Ferron, J. R.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Bass, E. M.; Luce, T. C.; Pace, D. C.; Solomon, W. M.; Mueller, D.; Grierson, B.; Podesta, M.; Gong, X.; Ren, Q.; Park, J. M.; Kim, K.; Turco, F.

    2015-05-15

    Results from experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 828 (2005)] aimed at developing high β steady-state operating scenarios with high-q{sub min} confirm that fast-ion transport is a critical issue for advanced tokamak development using neutral beam injection current drive. In DIII-D, greater than 11 MW of neutral beam heating power is applied with the intent of maximizing β{sub N} and the noninductive current drive. However, in scenarios with q{sub min}>2 that target the typical range of q{sub 95}= 5–7 used in next-step steady-state reactor models, Alfvén eigenmodes cause greater fast-ion transport than classical models predict. This enhanced transport reduces the absorbed neutral beam heating power and current drive and limits the achievable β{sub N}. In contrast, similar plasmas except with q{sub min} just above 1 have approximately classical fast-ion transport. Experiments that take q{sub min}>3 plasmas to higher β{sub P} with q{sub 95}= 11–12 for testing long pulse operation exhibit regimes of better than expected thermal confinement. Compared to the standard high-q{sub min} scenario, the high β{sub P} cases have shorter slowing-down time and lower ∇β{sub fast}, and this reduces the drive for Alfvénic modes, yielding nearly classical fast-ion transport, high values of normalized confinement, β{sub N}, and noninductive current fraction. These results suggest DIII-D might obtain better performance in lower-q{sub 95}, high-q{sub min} plasmas using broader neutral beam heating profiles and increased direct electron heating power to lower the drive for Alfvén eigenmodes.

  16. A FOCUSED TRANSPORT APPROACH TO THE TIME-DEPENDENT SHOCK ACCELERATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES AT A FAST TRAVELING SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.

    2012-02-10

    Some of the most sophisticated models for solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration at coronal mass ejection driven shocks are based on standard diffusive shock acceleration theory. However, this theory, which only applies when SEP pitch-angle anisotropies are small, might have difficulty in describing first-order Fermi acceleration or the shock pre-heating and injection of SEPs into first-order Fermi acceleration accurately at lower SEP speeds where SEP pitch-angle anisotropies upstream near the shock can be large. To avoid this problem, we use a time-dependent focused transport model to reinvestigate first-order Fermi acceleration at planar parallel and quasi-parallel spherical traveling shocks between the Sun and Earth with high shock speeds associated with rare extreme gradual SEP events. The focused transport model is also used to investigate and compare three different shock pre-heating mechanisms associated with different aspects of the nonuniform cross-shock solar wind flow, namely, the convergence of the flow (adiabatic compression), the shear tensor of the flow, and the acceleration of the flow, and a fourth shock pre-heating mechanism associated with the cross-shock electric field, to determine which pre-heating mechanism contributes the most to injecting shock pre-heated source particles into the first-order Fermi acceleration process. The effects of variations in traveling shock conditions, such as increasing shock obliquity and shock slowdown, and variations in the SEP source with increasing shock distance from the Sun on the coupled processes of shock pre-heating, injection, and first-order Fermi acceleration are analyzed. Besides the finding that the cross-shock acceleration of the solar wind flow yields the dominant shock pre-heating mechanism at high shock speeds, we find that first-order Fermi acceleration at fast traveling shocks differs in a number of respects from the predictions and assumptions of standard steady-state diffusive shock

  17. Enhanced Dopamine Release by Dopamine Transport Inhibitors Described by a Restricted Diffusion Model and Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Alexander F; Spivak, Charles E; Lupica, Carl R

    2016-06-15

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using carbon fiber electrodes is widely used to rapidly monitor changes in dopamine (DA) levels in vitro and in vivo. Current analytical approaches utilize parameters such as peak oxidation current amplitude and decay times to estimate release and uptake processes, respectively. However, peak amplitude changes are often observed with uptake inhibitors, thereby confounding the interpretation of these parameters. To overcome this limitation, we demonstrate that a simple five-parameter, two-compartment model mathematically describes DA signals as a balance of release (r/ke) and uptake (ku), summed with adsorption (kads and kdes) of DA to the carbon electrode surface. Using nonlinear regression, we demonstrate that our model precisely describes measured DA signals obtained in brain slice recordings. The parameters extracted from these curves were then validated using pharmacological manipulations that selectively alter vesicular release or DA transporter (DAT)-mediated uptake. Manipulation of DA release through altering the Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ratio or adding tetrodotoxin reduced the release parameter with no effect on the uptake parameter. DAT inhibitors methylenedioxypyrovalerone, cocaine, and nomifensine significantly reduced uptake and increased vesicular DA release. In contrast, a low concentration of amphetamine reduced uptake but had no effect on DA release. Finally, the kappa opioid receptor agonist U50,488 significantly reduced vesicular DA release but had no effect on uptake. Together, these data demonstrate a novel analytical approach to distinguish the effects of manipulations on DA release or uptake that can be used to interpret FSCV data.

  18. Experimental Transport Benchmarks for Physical Dosimetry to Support Development of Fast-Neutron Therapy with Neutron Capture Augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg; J. K. Hartwell; J. R. Venhuizen; C. A. Wemple; R. Risler; G. E. Laramore; W. Sauerwein; G. Hudepohl; A. Lennox

    2006-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the University of Washington (UW) Neutron Therapy Center, the University of Essen (Germany) Neutron Therapy Clinic, and the Northern Illinois University(NIU) Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab have been collaborating in the development of fast-neutron therapy (FNT) with concurrent neutron capture (NCT) augmentation [1,2]. As part of this effort, we have conducted measurements to produce suitable benchmark data as an aid in validation of advanced three-dimensional treatment planning methodologies required for successful administration of FNT/NCT. Free-beam spectral measurements as well as phantom measurements with Lucite{trademark} cylinders using thermal, resonance, and threshold activation foil techniques have now been completed at all three clinical accelerator facilities. The same protocol was used for all measurements to facilitate intercomparison of data. The results will be useful for further detailed characterization of the neutron beams of interest as well as for validation of various charged particle and neutron transport codes and methodologies for FNT/NCT computational dosimetry, such as MCNP [3], LAHET [4], and MINERVA [5].

  19. Fast and efficient charge transport across a lipid bilayer is electronically mediated by C{sub 70} fullerene aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, S.; Mauzerall, D.

    1996-06-19

    Fullerene anions, made by photoreduction in a lipid bilayer, produce the largest trans-membrane steady state photocurrents yet observed, nearly 6.0 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. Since these photocurrents are not light saturated, their maximum value is considerably larger. Dithionite was used as electron donor for its ability to reduce photoexcited fullerenes at the donor interface on a time scale faster than 15 ns. Both photovoltage and photocurrent increase 15-fold on adding the acceptor ferricyanide trans to the donor. There are two components to the transit time of negative charge across the bilayer, <100 ns and 6 {mu}s, in the 100 mM dithionite 0.6 mM C{sub 70} 5 mM ferricyanide system, where stands for the water-bilayer interface. This is strong evidence that the conduction is electronic and not diffusive-ionic. The plot of the ratio of photovoltage for the dithionite C{sub 70} system to that of the dithionite C{sub 70} ferricyanide system versus concentration of C{sub 70} in the lipid-forming solution is highly monlinear. This suggests that aggregates of the fullerene are responsible for the fast negative charge transport. The action spectrum of the photocurrent further supports the existence of photoactive C{sub 70} aggregates in the lipid bilayer. These aggregates may form the conductive path for electrons across the lipid bilayer. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Impact of Pre-Plasma on Fast Electron Generation and Transport from Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, J.; McGuffey, C.; Krauland, C.; Jarrott, L. C.; Sorokovikova, A.; Qiao, B.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Park, J.; Link, A.; Chen, H.; McLean, H. S.; Wagner, C.; Minello, V.; McCary, E.; Meadows, A.; Spinks, M.; Gaul, E.; Dyer, G.; Hegelich, B. M.; Martinez, M.; Donovan, M.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results and analysis from recent short pulse laser matter experiments using the Texas Petawatt Laser to study the impact of pre-plasma on fast electron generation and transport. The experimental setup consisted of 3 separate beam elements: a main, high intensity, short pulse beam for the interaction, a secondary pulse of equal intensity interacting with a separate thin foil target to generate protons for side-on proton imaging and a third, low intensity, wider beam to generate a varied scale length pre-plasma. The main target consisted of a multilayer planar Al foil with a buried Cu fluor layer. The electron beam was characterized with multiple diagnostics, including several bremsstrahlung spectrometers, magnetic electron spectrometers and Cu-K α imaging. The protons from the secondary target were used to image the fields on the front of the target in the region of laser plasma interaction. Features seen in the interaction region by these protons will be presented along with characteristics of the generated electron beam. This work performed under the auspices of the US DOE under Contracts DE-FOA-0000583 (FES, NNSA).

  1. The effect of biological shielding on fast neutron and photon transport in the VVER-1000 mock-up model placed in the LR-0 reactor.

    PubMed

    Košťál, Michal; Cvachovec, František; Milčák, Ján; Mravec, Filip

    2013-05-01

    The paper is intended to show the effect of a biological shielding simulator on fast neutron and photon transport in its vicinity. The fast neutron and photon fluxes were measured by means of scintillation spectroscopy using a 45×45 mm(2) and a 10×10 mm(2) cylindrical stilbene detector. The neutron spectrum was measured in the range of 0.6-10 MeV and the photon spectrum in 0.2-9 MeV. The results of the experiment are compared with calculations. The calculations were performed with various nuclear data libraries.

  2. Toward a Mechanistic Source Term in Advanced Reactors: Characterization of Radionuclide Transport and Retention in a Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Brunett, Acacia J.; Bucknor, Matthew; Grabaskas, David

    2016-04-17

    A vital component of the U.S. reactor licensing process is an integrated safety analysis in which a source term representing the release of radionuclides during normal operation and accident sequences is analyzed. Historically, source term analyses have utilized bounding, deterministic assumptions regarding radionuclide release. However, advancements in technical capabilities and the knowledge state have enabled the development of more realistic and best-estimate retention and release models such that a mechanistic source term assessment can be expected to be a required component of future licensing of advanced reactors. Recently, as part of a Regulatory Technology Development Plan effort for sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs), Argonne National Laboratory has investigated the current state of knowledge of potential source terms in an SFR via an extensive review of previous domestic experiments, accidents, and operation. As part of this work, the significant sources and transport processes of radionuclides in an SFR have been identified and characterized. This effort examines all stages of release and source term evolution, beginning with release from the fuel pin and ending with retention in containment. Radionuclide sources considered in this effort include releases originating both in-vessel (e.g. in-core fuel, primary sodium, cover gas cleanup system, etc.) and ex-vessel (e.g. spent fuel storage, handling, and movement). Releases resulting from a primary sodium fire are also considered as a potential source. For each release group, dominant transport phenomena are identified and qualitatively discussed. The key product of this effort was the development of concise, inclusive diagrams that illustrate the release and retention mechanisms at a high level, where unique schematics have been developed for in-vessel, ex-vessel and sodium fire releases. This review effort has also found that despite the substantial range of phenomena affecting radionuclide release, the

  3. Enhanced dopamine release by dopamine transport inhibitors described by a restricted diffusion model and fast scan cyclic voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Alexander F.; Spivak, Charles E.; Lupica, Carl R.

    2016-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using carbon fiber electrodes is widely used to rapidly monitor changes in dopamine (DA) levels in vitro and in vivo. Current analytical approaches utilize parameters such as peak oxidation current amplitude and decay times to estimate release and uptake processes, respectively. However, peak amplitude changes are often observed with uptake inhibitors, thereby confounding the interpretation of these parameters. To overcome this limitation, we demonstrate that a simple, 5 parameter, two compartment model mathematically describes DA signals as a balance of release (r/ke) and uptake (ku), summed with adsorption (kads and kdes) of DA to the carbon electrode surface. Using non-linear regression, we demonstrate that our model precisely describes measured DA signals obtained in brain slice recordings. The parameters extracted from these curves were then validated using pharmacological manipulations that selectively alter vesicular release or DA transporter (DAT)-mediated uptake. Manipulation of DA release through altered Ca2+/Mg2+ ratio or tetrodotoxin (TTX), reduced the release parameter with no effect on the uptake parameter. The DAT inhibitors methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), cocaine, and nomifensine significantly reduced uptake and increased vesicular DA release. In contrast, a low concentration of amphetamine reduced uptake but had no effect on DA release. Finally, the kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist U50,488 significantly reduced vesicular DA release but had no effect on uptake. Together, these data demonstrate a novel analytical approach to distinguish the effects of manipulations on DA release or uptake that can be used to interpret FSCV data. PMID:27018734

  4. Glucose transporters and in vivo glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscle: fasting, insulin stimulation and immunoisolation studies of GLUT1 and GLUT4.

    PubMed Central

    Kraegen, E W; Sowden, J A; Halstead, M B; Clark, P W; Rodnick, K J; Chisholm, D J; James, D E

    1993-01-01

    Our aim was to study glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4 in relation to in vivo glucose uptake in rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. The levels of both transporters were of a similar order of magnitude in whole muscle tissue (GLUT1/GLUT4 ratio varied from 0.1 to 0.6), suggesting that both may have an important physiological role in regulating muscle glucose metabolism. GLUT4 correlated very strongly (r2 = 0.97) with maximal insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (Rg' max., estimated using the glucose clamp plus 2-deoxy[3H]glucose bolus technique) in six skeletal muscles and heart. A distinct difference in regulation of the two transporters was evident in heart: in 5 h-fasted rats, basal glucose uptake and GLUT1 levels in heart were very high and both were reduced, by 90 and 60% respectively, by 48 h fasting. However, in heart (and in red skeletal muscle), neither GLUT4 levels nor Rg' max. were reduced by 48 h fasting. GLUT1 was shown to be specifically expressed in cardiac myocytes, because intracellular vesicles enriched in GLUT4 contained significant levels of GLUT1. In conclusion, the high association of muscle GLUT4 content with insulin responsiveness in different muscles, and the preservation of both with fasting, supports a predominant role of GLUT4 in insulin-mediated glucose uptake. GLUT1 may play an important role in mediating cardiac muscle glucose uptake in the basal metabolic state. Marked changes in GLUT1 expression with alterations in the metabolic state, such as prolonged fasting, may play an important role in cardiac glucose metabolism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8216230

  5. Epigenetic regulation of the glucose transporter gene Slc2a1 by β-hydroxybutyrate underlies preferential glucose supply to the brain of fasted mice.

    PubMed

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Funakoshi, Masabumi; Nishito, Yasumasa; Aigaki, Toshiro; Hara, Takahiko

    2017-01-01

    We carried out liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of metabolites in mice. Those metabolome data showed that hepatic glucose content is reduced, but that brain glucose content is unaffected, during fasting, consistent with the priority given to brain glucose consumption during fasting. The molecular mechanisms for this preferential glucose supply to the brain are not fully understood. We also showed that the fasting-induced production of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) enhances expression of the glucose transporter gene Slc2a1 (Glut1) via histone modification. Upon β-OHB treatment, Slc2a1 expression was up-regulated, with a concomitant increase in H3K9 acetylation at the critical cis-regulatory region of the Slc2a1 gene in brain microvascular endothelial cells and NB2a neuronal cells, shown by quantitative PCR analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated disruption of the Hdac2 gene increased Slc2a1 expression, suggesting that it is one of the responsible histone deacetylases (HDACs). These results confirm that β-OHB is a HDAC inhibitor and show that β-OHB plays an important role in fasting-induced epigenetic activation of a glucose transporter gene in the brain.

  6. Fasting Induces Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor 2 and ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters via Protein Kinase A and Sirtuin-1 in Mouse and Human

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Xu, Jialin; Wei, Wei; Cheng, Qiuqiong C.; Driscoll, Maureen V.; Johnson, Delinda A.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Li, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine whether 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) and Sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) dependent mechanisms modulate ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) transport protein expression. ABC transport proteins (ABCC2–4) are essential for chemical elimination from hepatocytes and biliary excretion. Nuclear factor-E2 related-factor 2 (NRF2) is a transcription factor that mediates ABCC induction in response to chemical inducers and liver injury. However, a role for NRF2 in the regulation of transporter expression in nonchemical models of liver perturbation is largely undescribed. Results: Here we show that fasting increased NRF2 target gene expression through NRF2- and SIRT1–dependent mechanisms. In intact mouse liver, fasting induces NRF2 target gene expression by at least 1.5 to 5-fold. In mouse and human hepatocytes, treatment with 8-Bromoadenosine-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased NRF2 target gene expression and antioxidant response element activity, which was decreased by the PKA inhibitor, H-89. Moreover, fasting induced NRF2 target gene expression was decreased in liver and hepatocytes of SIRT1 liver-specific null mice and NRF2-null mice. Lastly, NRF2 and SIRT1 were recruited to MAREs and Antioxidant Response Elements (AREs) in the human ABCC2 promoter. Innovation: Oxidative stress mediated NRF2 activation is well described, yet the influence of basic metabolic processes on NRF2 activation is just emerging. Conclusion: The current data point toward a novel role of nutrient status in regulation of NRF2 activity and the antioxidant response, and indicates that cAMP/PKA and SIRT1 are upstream regulators for fasting-induced activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 15–30. PMID:23725046

  7. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  8. A simple calculation of control assembly effectiveness in a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor by a transport-diffusion equivalence method

    SciTech Connect

    Benoist, P. ); Carta, M. ); Palmiotti, G. ); Salvatores, M. )

    1989-11-01

    A method to calculate the effectiveness of the control assembly in a fast neutron reactor is proposed. For each type of heterogeneous assembly (control or follower), a polar parameter, taking into account the assembly absorption and the axial leakage of neutrons inside the assembly, is defined. In a similar way, a bipolar parameter, taking into account the reaction of the assembly to a transverse flux gradient, is also defined. These two parameters, deduced from transport theory, are used to determine the absorption cross section and the diffusion coefficient of an equivalent homogeneous control or follower assembly. These new parameters are introduced in a one-group diffusion code, calculating the reactor as a whole with any number of control and follower assemblies. An approximate generalization to multigroup theory is proposed. Numerical comparisons show that this equivalent diffusion method gives results that are much closer to transport results than those obtained by the classical diffusion theory.

  9. Effect of diabetes and fasting on GLUT-4 (muscle/fat) glucose-transporter expression in insulin-sensitive tissues. Heterogeneous response in heart, red and white muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Camps, M; Castelló, A; Muñoz, P; Monfar, M; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Zorzano, A

    1992-01-01

    1. GLUT-4 glucose-transporter protein and mRNA levels were assessed in heart, red muscle and white muscle, as well as in brown and white adipose tissue from 7-day streptozotocin-induced diabetic and 48 h-fasted rats. 2. In agreement with previous data, white adipose tissue showed a substantial decrease in GLUT-4 mRNA and protein levels in response to both diabetes and fasting. Similarly, GLUT-4 mRNA and protein markedly decreased in brown adipose tissue in both insulinopenic conditions. 3. Under control conditions, the level of expression of GLUT-4 protein content differed substantially in heart, red and white skeletal muscle. Thus GLUT-4 protein was maximal in heart, and red muscle had a greater GLUT-4 content compared with white muscle. In spite of the large differences in GLUT-4 protein content, GLUT-4 mRNA levels were equivalent in heart and red skeletal muscle. 4. In heart, GLUT-4 mRNA decreased to a greater extent than GLUT-4 protein in response to diabetes and fasting. In contrast, red muscle showed a greater decrease in GLUT-4 protein than in mRNA in response to diabetes or fasting, and in fact no decrease in GLUT-4 mRNA content was detectable in fasting. On the other hand, preparations of white skeletal muscle showed a substantial increase in GLUT-4 mRNA under both insulinopenic conditions, and that was concomitant to either a modest decrease in GLUT-4 protein in diabetes or to no change in fasting. 5. These results indicate that (a) the effects of diabetes and fasting are almost identical and lead to changes in GLUT-4 expression that are tissue-specific, (b) white adipose tissue, brown adipose tissue and heart respond similarly to insulin deficiency by decreasing GLUT-4 mRNA to a larger extent than GLUT-4 protein, and (c) red and white skeletal muscle respond to insulinopenic conditions in a heterogeneous manner which is characterized by enhanced GLUT-4 mRNA/protein ratios. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1554359

  10. Pressure-induced fast axonal transport abnormalities and the anatomy at the lamina cribrosa in primate eyes.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1983-03-01

    In ten owl monkey eyes (Aotus trivirgatus) the location of pressure-induced (perfusion pressure 35 mmHg) axonal transport abnormalities was determined by the examination of serial step cross-section tissue radio autographs from the optic nerve head. The degree of the local transport interruption did not correlate with the fiber bundle cross-section area, the shape of the laminar pores or the density of the inter-bundle septa in that region.

  11. Differential screening of mutated SOD1 transgenic mice reveals early up-regulation of a fast axonal transport component in spinal cord motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, L; de Tapia, M; René, F; Lutz-Bucher, B; Gordon, J W; Mercken, L; Pradier, L; Loeffler, J P

    2000-08-01

    In the present study we analyze the molecular mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). For this, we used a transgenic mouse model expressing the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene with a Gly(86) to Arg (G86R) mutation equivalent to that found in a subset of human FALS. Using an optimized suppression subtractive hybridization method, a cDNA specifically up-regulated during the asymptomatic phase in the lumbar spinal cord of G86R mice was identified by sequence analysis as the KIF3-associated protein (KAP3), a regulator of fast axonal transport. RT-PCR analysis revealed that KAP3 induction was an early event arising long before axonal degeneration. Immunohistochemical studies further revealed that KAP3 protein predominantly accumulates in large motor neurons of the ventral spinal cord. We further demonstrated that KAP3 up-regulation occurs independent of any change in the other components of the kinesin II complex. However, since the ubiquitous KIF1A motor is up-regulated, our results show an early and complex rearrangement of the fast axonal transport machinery in the course of FALS pathology.

  12. Application of the Finite Orbit Width Version of the CQL3D Code to Transport of Fast Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Harvey, R. W.

    2016-10-01

    The CQL3D bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck (FP) code now includes the ``fully'' neoclassical version in which the diffusion and advection processes are averaged over actual drift orbits, rather than using a 1st-order expansion. Incorporation of Finite-Orbit-Width (FOW) effects results in neoclassical radial transport caused by collisions, RF wave heating and by toroidal electric field (radial pinch). We apply the CQL3D-full-FOW code to study the thermalization and radial transport of high-energy particles, such as alpha-particles produced by fusion in ITER or deuterons from NBI in NSTX, under effect of their interaction with auxiliary RF waves. A particular attention is given to visualization of transport in 3D space of velocity +major-radius coordinates. Supported by USDOE Grants FC02-01ER54649, FG02-04ER54744, and SC0006614.

  13. FAST TRACK PAPER: A study of the applicability and divergence of the ray series using a modified transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buske, Stefan; Kravtsov, Yury A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we study an extension of the standard ray-theoretical transport equation. We include a higher-order term of the ray series and obtain a modified frequency-dependent transport equation. This equation is solved analytically and numerically for an elastic 1-D model. The analysis of the results documents that the ray series diverges just at the boundary of applicability of the underlying high-frequency approximation. This implies that taking into account higher-order terms in the ray series neither improves accuracy nor allows a shift of the boundary of its applicability towards lower frequencies.

  14. Fast sampling, rapid filtration apparatus: principal characteristics and validation from studies of D-glucose transport in human jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Berteloot, A; Malo, C; Breton, S; Brunette, M

    1991-06-01

    Kinetic data in (brush-border) membrane vesicles which rely on the validity of the initial rate assumption for their interpretation and depend on tracer flux studies using the rapid filtration technique for their experimental measurement have been limited to some extent by the absence of techniques that would allow for real-time data analysis. In this paper, we report on our successful design of a fast sampling, rapid filtration apparatus (FSRFA) which seems to fill up this technical gap since showing the following characteristics: (i) rapid injection (5 msec) and mixing (less than 100 msec) of small amounts of vesicles (10-40 microliters) with an incubation medium (0.2-1.0 ml); (ii) fast (20 to 80 msec depending on the sample volume) and multiple (up to 18 samples at a maximal rate of 4 sec) sampling of the uptake mixture followed by rapid quenching in the stop solution (approximately 5 msec) according to a predetermined time schedule (any time combination from 0.25 to 9999 sec); and (iii) fast, automated, and sampling-synchronized filtration and washings of the quenched uptake medium (only 15-20 sec are necessary for the first filtration followed by two washings and extra filtrations). As demonstrated using adult human jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles and Na(+)-D-glucose cotransport as models, the FSRFA accurately reproduces the manual aspects of the rapid filtration technique while allowing for very precise initial rate determinations. Moreover, the FSRFA has also been designed to provide as much versatility as possible and, in its present version, allows for a very precise control of the incubation temperature and also permits a few efflux protocols to be performed. Finally, its modular design, which separates the fast sampling unit from the rapid filtration device, should help in extending its use to fields other than transport measurement.

  15. Biorelevant media for transport experiments in the Caco-2 model to evaluate drug absorption in the fasted and the fed state and their usefulness.

    PubMed

    Markopoulos, C; Thoenen, F; Preisig, D; Symillides, M; Vertzoni, M; Parrott, N; Reppas, C; Imanidis, G

    2014-04-01

    In this work we developed and characterized transport media that simulate the composition of micellar phase of intestinal fluids in the fasted and, especially, in the fed state and are appropriate for evaluating intestinal drug permeability characteristics using the Caco-2 model (FaSSIF-TM(Caco) and FeSSIF-TM(Caco), respectively). Media composition was based on FaSSIF-V2 and FeSSIF-V2 and recently reported data on total lipid concentrations in the micellar phase of contents of the upper small intestine in the fasted and the fed state and was adapted for cell culture compatibility. Permeation data were evaluated by compartmental kinetic modeling. Permeability coefficients, P, of hydrophilic drugs were not affected by media composition. In contrast, P values of a series of lipophilic compounds measured with FaSSIF-TM(Caco) and FeSSIF-TM(Caco), and reflecting transport by diffusion were smaller than those obtained with a purely aqueous reference transport medium, aq-TM(Caco), following the rank order aq-TM(Caco)>FaSSIF-TM(Caco)>FeSSIF-TM(Caco). The decline of permeability values was stronger as lipophilicity of the compounds increased. Compared with values estimated using aq-TM(Caco), permeability was reduced, depending on the compound, by more than 20- to 100-fold when measured with FeSSIF-TM(Caco) whereas compound ranking in regard to the permeability characteristics was also affected. The impact of reduced P value on flux through the mucosa, hence on drug absorption, in combination with the drug amount loaded on colloidal particles needs to be taken into consideration in PBPK modeling especially when the food effect is evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Critical Gradient Behavior of Alfvén Eigenmode Induced Fast-Ion Transport in Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C. S.; Pace, D. C.; van Zeeland, M. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Stagner, L.; Zhu, Y. B.; Kramer, G. J.; Podesta, M.; White, R. B.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments on DIII-D have shown that energetic particle (EP) transport suddenly increases when multiple Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) cause particle orbits to become stochastic. Several key features have been observed; (1) the transport threshold is phase-space dependent and occurs above the AE linear stability threshold, (2) EP losses become intermittent above threshold and appear to depend on the types of AEs present, and (3) stiff transport causes the EP density profile to remain unchanged even if the source increases. Theoretical analysis using the NOVA and ORBIT codes shows that the threshold corresponds to when particle orbits become stochastic due to wave-particle resonances with AEs in the region of phase space measured by the diagnostics. The kick model in NUBEAM (TRANSP) is used to evolve the EP distribution function to study which modes cause the most transport and further characterize intermittent bursts of EP losses, which are associated with large scale redistribution through the domino effect. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  17. Divergence-free transport of laser-produced fast electrons along a meter-long wire target.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroaki; Tokita, Shigeki; Inoue, Shunsuke; Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji

    2013-04-12

    We demonstrate that, from a 10-μm metal wire irradiated by a 10(19)  W/cm2 laser pulse, fast electrons form a nearly perfect circular beam around the wire and propagate along it. The total charge and diameter of the electron beam are maintained over a propagation distance of 1 m. Moreover, the electron beam can be guided along a slightly bent wire. Numerical simulations suggest that a relatively weak steady electric field, which does not decay for several nanoseconds, is generated around the wire and plays a key role in the long-distance guidance.

  18. The China Clipper - Fast advective transport of radon-rich air from the Asian boundary layer to the upper troposphere near California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritz, Mark A.; Le Roulley, Jean-Claude; Danielsen, Edwin F.

    1990-01-01

    A series of upper tropospheric radon concentration measurements made over the eastern Pacific and west coast of the U.S. during the summers of 1983 and 1984 has revealed the occurrence of unexpectedly high radon concentrations for 9 of the 61 measurements. A frequency distribution plot of the set of 61 observations shows a distinct bimodal distribution, with approximately 2/5 of the observations falling close to 1 pCi/SCM, and 3/5 falling in a high concentration mode centered at about 11 pCi/SCM. Trajectory and synoptic analyses for two of the flights on which such high radon concentrations were observed indicate that this radon-rich air originated in the Asian boundary layer, ascended in cumulus updrafts, and was carried eastward in the fast moving air on the anticyclonic side of the upper tropospheric jet. The results suggest that the combination of rapid vertical transport from the surface boundary layer to the upper troposphere, followed by rapid horizontal transport eastward represents an efficient mode of long-transport for other, chemically reactive atmospheric trace constituents.

  19. Fast Transport from Southeast Asia Boundary Layer Sources to Northern Europe: Rapid Uplift in Typhoons and Eastward Eddy Shedding of the Asian Monsoon Anticyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R.; Vogel, B.; Guenther, G.; Grooss, J. U.; Hoor, P. M.; Kraemer, M.; Mueller, S.; Zahn, A.; Riese, M.

    2014-12-01

    During the TACTS aircraft campaign enhanced tropospheric trace gases such as CO, CH4, and H2O and reduced stratospheric O3 were measured in situ in the lowermost stratosphere over Northern Europe on 26 September 2012. The measurements indicate that these air masses differ from the stratospheric background. The calculation of 40 day backward trajectories with the trajectory module of the CLaMS model shows that these air masses are affected by the Asian monsoon anticyclone. Some air masses originate from the boundary layer in Southeast Asia/West Pacific and are rapidly lifted (1-2 days) within a typhoon. Afterwards they are injected directly into the anticyclonic circulation of the Asian monsoon. The subsequent long-range transport (8-14 days) of enhanced water vapour and pollutants to the lowermost stratosphere in Northern Europe is driven by eastward transport of tropospheric air from the Asian monsoon anticyclone caused by an eddy shedding event. We find that the combination of rapid uplift by a typhoon and eastward eddy shedding from the Asian monsoon anticyclone is an additional fast transport pathway that, for the case studied here, carries boundary emissions from Southeast Asia/West Pacific within approximately 5 weeks to the lowermost stratosphere in Northern Europe.

  20. Fast transport from Southeast Asia boundary layer sources to northern Europe: rapid uplift in typhoons and eastward eddy shedding of the Asian monsoon anticyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, B.; Günther, G.; Müller, R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Hoor, P.; Krämer, M.; Müller, S.; Zahn, A.; Riese, M.

    2014-12-01

    Enhanced tropospheric trace gases such as CO, CH4 and H2O and reduced stratospheric O3 were measured in situ in the lowermost stratosphere over northern Europe on 26 September 2012 during the TACTS aircraft campaign. The measurements indicate that these air masses clearly differ from the stratospheric background. The calculation of 40-day backward trajectories with the trajectory module of the CLaMS model shows that these air masses are affected by the Asian monsoon anticyclone. Some air masses originate from the boundary layer in Southeast Asia/West Pacific and are rapidly lifted (1-2 days) within a typhoon up to the outer edge of the Asian monsoon anticyclone. Afterwards, the air parcels are entrained by the anticyclonic circulation of the Asian monsoon. The subsequent long-range transport (8-14 days) of enhanced water vapour and pollutants to the lowermost stratosphere in northern Europe is driven by eastward transport of tropospheric air from the Asian monsoon anticyclone caused by an eddy shedding event. We found that the combination of rapid uplift by a typhoon and eastward eddy shedding from the Asian monsoon anticyclone is a novel fast transport pathway that may carry boundary emissions from Southeast Asia/West Pacific within approximately 5 weeks to the lowermost stratosphere in northern Europe.

  1. Fast transport from Southeast Asia boundary layer sources to Northern Europe: rapid uplift in typhoons and eastward eddy shedding of the Asian monsoon anticyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, B.; Günther, G.; Müller, R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Hoor, P.; Krämer, M.; Müller, S.; Zahn, A.; Riese, M.

    2014-07-01

    During the TACTS aircraft campaign enhanced tropospheric trace gases such as CO, CH4, and H2O and reduced stratospheric O3 were measured in situ in the lowermost stratosphere over Northern Europe on 26 September 2012. The measurements indicate that these air masses differ from the stratospheric background. The calculation of 40 day backward trajectories with the trajectory module of the CLaMS model shows that these air masses are affected by the Asian monsoon anticyclone. Some air masses originate from the boundary layer in Southeast Asia/West Pacific and are rapidly lifted (1-2 days) within a typhoon. Afterwards they are injected directly into the anticyclonic circulation of the Asian monsoon. The subsequent long-range transport (8-14 days) of enhanced water vapour and pollutants to the lowermost stratosphere in Northern Europe is driven by eastward transport of tropospheric air from the Asian monsoon anticyclone caused by an eddy shedding event. We find that the combination of rapid uplift by a typhoon and eastward eddy shedding from the Asian monsoon anticyclone is an additional fast transport pathway that, in this study, carries boundary emissions from Southeast Asia/West Pacific within approximately 5 weeks to the lowermost stratosphere in Northern Europe.

  2. The China Clipper - Fast advective transport of radon-rich air from the Asian boundary layer to the upper troposphere near California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritz, Mark A.; Le Roulley, Jean-Claude; Danielsen, Edwin F.

    1990-01-01

    A series of upper tropospheric radon concentration measurements made over the eastern Pacific and west coast of the U.S. during the summers of 1983 and 1984 has revealed the occurrence of unexpectedly high radon concentrations for 9 of the 61 measurements. A frequency distribution plot of the set of 61 observations shows a distinct bimodal distribution, with approximately 2/5 of the observations falling close to 1 pCi/SCM, and 3/5 falling in a high concentration mode centered at about 11 pCi/SCM. Trajectory and synoptic analyses for two of the flights on which such high radon concentrations were observed indicate that this radon-rich air originated in the Asian boundary layer, ascended in cumulus updrafts, and was carried eastward in the fast moving air on the anticyclonic side of the upper tropospheric jet. The results suggest that the combination of rapid vertical transport from the surface boundary layer to the upper troposphere, followed by rapid horizontal transport eastward represents an efficient mode of long-transport for other, chemically reactive atmospheric trace constituents.

  3. Evaluation of moisture and heat transport in the fast-response building-resolving urban transport code QUIC EnvSim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Kevin A.

    QUIC EnvSim (QES) is a complete building-resolving urban microclimate modeling system developed to rapidly compute mass, momentum, and heat transport for the design of sustainable cities. One of the more computationally intensive components of this type of modeling system is the transport and dispersion of scalars. In this paper, we describe and evaluate QESTransport, a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) scalar transport model. QESTransport makes use of light-weight methods and modeling techniques. It is parallelized for Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), utilizing NVIDIA's OptiX application programming interfaces (APIs). QESTransport is coupled with the well-validated QUIC Dispersion Modeling system. To couple the models, a new methodology was implemented to efficiently prescribe surface flux boundary conditions on both vertical walls and flat surfaces. In addition, a new internal boundary layer parameterization was introduced into QUIC to enable the representation of momentum advection across changing surface conditions. QESTransport is validated against the following three experimental test cases designed to evaluate the model's performance under idealized conditions: (i) flow over a step change in moisture, roughness, and temperature, (ii) flow over an isolated heated building, and (iii) flow through an array of heated buildings. For all three cases, the model is compared against published simulation results. QESTransport produces velocity, temperature, and moisture fields that are comparable to much more complex numerical models for each case. The code execution time performance is evaluated and demonstrates linear scaling on a single GPU for problem sizes up to 4.5 x 4.5 km at 5 m grid resolution, and is found to produce results at much better than real time for a 1.2 x 1.2 km section of downtown Salt Lake City, Utah.

  4. Fast Time Resolved Techniques as Key to the Understanding of Energy and Particle Transport in HPPMS-Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maszl, Christian; Breilmann, Wolfgang; Berscheid, Lars; Benedikt, Jan; von Keudell, Achim

    2014-10-01

    High power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) plasmas are pulsed discharges where the plasma composition as well as the fluxes and energies of ions are changing during the pulse. The time resolved energy distribution for Ar$^{1+}$ ions was measured and Phase Resolved Optical Emission Spectroscopy (PROES) for the Ar I line at 760 nm was done to get more insight in the transport properties of the plasma forming noble gas. These measurements were performed during HPPMS of titanium with argon at 0.5 Pa. The peak power density during the 50 $\\mu$s pulses was 1.8 kW/cm$^2$. In this contribution we demonstrate how time resolved mass spectrometry and ICCD cameras can be used to shed more light on energy and particle transport in HPPMS-plasmas.

  5. Risk assessment of the fatality due to explosion in land mass transport infrastructure by fast transient dynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, G; Larcher, M; Casadei, F; Solomos, G

    2010-01-15

    Terrorist attacks in New York have shocked the world community showing clearly the vulnerability of air transport in such events. However, the terrorist attacks in Madrid and London showed that land mass transport infrastructure is equally vulnerable in case of similar attacks. The fact that there has not been substantial investment in the domain of risk analysis and evaluation of the possible effects due to such events in land mass transportation infrastructure leaves large room for new developments that could eventually fill this gap. In the present work using the finite element code EUROPLEXUS there has been a large effort to perform a complete study of the land mass infrastructure in case of explosion events. This study includes a train station, a metro station and a metro carriage providing thus valuable simulation data for a variety of different situations. For the analysis of these structures it has been necessary to apply a laser scanning method for the acquisition of geometrical data, to improve the simulation capabilities of EUROPLEXUS by adding failure capabilities for specific finite elements, to implement new material models (e.g. glass), and to add new modules that achieve data post-processing for the calculation of fatal and non-fatal injuries risk. The aforementioned improvements are explained in the present work with emphasis in the newly developed risk analysis features of EUROPLEXUS.

  6. Fast Fabrication of a Stable Perovskite Solar Cell with an Ultrathin Effective Novel Inorganic Hole Transport Layer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aibin; Lei, Lei; Zhu, Jingting; Yu, Yu; Liu, Yan; Yang, Songwang; Bao, Shanhu; Cao, Xun; Jin, Ping

    2017-04-18

    With the aim of fabricating simple, reproducible, and scalable perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with least time consumption, a novel CoOx hole transport layer (HTL) was first proposed and introduced in this work. The CoOx HTL thickness was minimized to about 10 nm with complete coverage on the FTO substrate (F-doped SnO2) by direct current magnetron sputtering. The ultrathin HTL could minimize the incident light loss caused by cobalt ion absorption and reduce the carrier transport loss by shortening the transport path. Copper was incorporated into the CoOx lattice to address the low conductivity of the CoOx film and the energy-level mismatch between CoOx and the perovskite material. On the basis of cobalt-copper binary oxide (Co1-yCuyOx), the highest power conversion efficiency (PCE) of about 10% was achieved, which was acceptable for mass production. Moreover, the deposition of such Co1-yCuyOx films takes only 2 min without size limitation of substrates. A well-functioned device based on the Co1-yCuyOx HTL could hence be fabricated within 100 min. Excellent stability was demonstrated as well, with over 90% of the initial PCE remaining after being stored in a dark and humid environment (relative humidity 60%) for 12 days.

  7. Advancing the visualization of pure water transport in porous materials by fast, talbot interferometry-based multi-contrast x-ray micro-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fei; Griffa, Michele; Hipp, Alexander; Derluyn, Hannelore; Moonen, Peter; Kaufmann, Rolf; Boone, Matthieu N.; Beckmann, Felix; Lura, Pietro

    2016-10-01

    The spatio-temporal distribution (4D) of water in porous materials plays a fundamental role in many natural and technological processes. The dynamics of water transport is strongly entangled with the material's pore-scale structure. Understanding their correlation requires imaging simultaneously the 4D water distribution and the porous microstructure. To date, 4D images with high temporal and spatial resolution have been mainly acquired by attenuation-based X-ray micro-tomography, whereby pure water is substituted by saline solutions with high atomic number components to improve image contrast. The use of saline solutions is however not always desirable, as the altered fluid properties may affect the transport process as well or, as it is the case for hydrating cement-based materials, they may modify the chemical reactions and their kinetics. In this study, we aimed at visualizing pure water transport in porous building materials by a new implementation of fast Talbot interferometry-based multi-contrast X-ray micro-tomography at the P07 beamline of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht at DESY. We report results from a mortar specimen imaged at three different stages during evaporative drying. We show the possibility of visualizing simultaneously the microstructure and the pore-scale water redistribution by the phase contrast images. In addition, different solid material phases are clearly distinguished in these images. The higher contrast between water and the porous substrate, achievable in the phase contrast images, compared with the attenuation ones, empowers new analysis and allows investigating the correlation between the drying process and the porous microstructure. The approach offers the possibility of studying other chemically inert or reactive water transport processes without any chemical or physical perturbation of the processes themselves.

  8. Fast Neutron Transport in the Biological Shielding Model and Other Regions of the VVER-1000 Mock-Up on the LR-0 Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košťál, Michal; Milčák, Ján; Cvachovec, František; Jánský, Bohumil; Rypar, Vojtěch; Juříček, Vlastimil; Novák, Evžen; Egorov, Alexander; Zaritskiy, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    A set of benchmark experiments was carried out in the full scale VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0 in order to validate neutron transport calculation methodologies and to perform the optimization of the shape and locations of neutron flux operation monitors channels inside the shielding of the new VVER-1000 type reactors. Compared with previous experiments on the VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0, the fast neutron spectra were measured in the extended neutron energy interval (0.1-10 MeV) and new calculations were carried out with the MCNPX code using various nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B VII.0, JEFF 3.1, JENDL 3.3, JENDL 4, ROSFOND 2009, and CENDL 3.1). Measurements and calculations were carried out at different points in the mock-up. The calculation and experimental data are compared.

  9. Variable separation in curvature sensing: fast method for solving the irradiance transport equation in the context of optical telescopes.

    PubMed

    Salas, L

    1996-04-01

    A method to evaluate wave-front aberrations in optical telescopes that is based on the method of curvature sensing but that solves the irradiance transport equation by variable separation is presented. This technique is simpler for processing than are previously released techniques and can perform more efficiently, as is required by active and adaptive optics. Testing for consistency of the method by evaluation of several sets of out-of-focus images obtained with the 2-m telescope at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México was carried out, and a stability of 10% for the derived values of Zernike coefficients was found.

  10. N-Substituted Benztropine Analogs: Selective Dopamine Transporter Ligands with a Fast Onset of Action and Minimal Cocaine-Like Behavioral Effects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su-Min; Kopajtic, Theresa A.; O'Callaghan, Matthew J.; Agoston, Gregory E.; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that differences between the behavioral effects of cocaine and analogs of benztropine were related to the relatively slow onset of action of the latter compounds. Several N-substituted benztropine analogs with a relatively fast onset of effects were studied to assess whether a fast onset of effects would render the effects more similar to those of cocaine. Only one of the compounds increased locomotor activity, and the increases were modest compared with those of 10 to 20 mg/kg cocaine. In rats trained to discriminate 10 mg/kg cocaine from saline none of the compounds produced more than 40% cocaine-like responds up to 2 h after injection. None of the compounds produced place-conditioning when examined up to 90 min after injection, indicating minimal abuse liability. The compounds had 5.6 to 30 nM affinities at the dopamine transporter (DAT), with uniformly lower affinities at norepinephrine and serotonin transporters (from 490-4600 and 1420–7350 nM, respectively). Affinities at muscarinic M1 receptors were from 100- to 300-fold lower than DAT affinities, suggesting minimal contribution of those sites to the behavioral effects of the compounds. Affinities at histaminic H1 sites were from 11- to 43-fold lower than those for the DAT. The compounds also had affinity for sigma, 5-hydroxytryptamine1 (5-HT1), and 5-HT2 receptors that may have contributed to their behavioral effects. Together, the results indicate that a slow onset of action is not a necessary condition for reduced cocaine-like effects of atypical DAT ligands and suggest several mechanisms that may contribute to the reduced cocaine-like efficacy of these compounds. PMID:21088247

  11. Investigations on the heat transport capability of a cryogenic oscillating heat pipe and its application in achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell vitrification cryopreservation☆

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xu; Ma, Hongbin; Jiao, Anjun; Critser, John K.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretically, direct vitrification of cell suspensions with relatively low concentrations (~1 M) of permeating cryoprotective agents (CPA) is suitable for cryopreservation of almost all cell types and can be accomplished by ultra-fast cooling rates that are on the order of 106–7 K/min. However, the methods and devices currently available for cell cryopreservation cannot achieve such high cooling rates. In this study, we constructed a novel cryogenic oscillating heat pipe (COHP) using liquid nitrogen as its working fluid and investigated its heat transport capability to assess its application for achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell cryopreservation. The experimental results showed that the apparent heat transfer coefficient of the COHP can reach 2 × 105 W/m2·K, which is two orders of the magnitude higher than traditional heat pipes. Theoretical analyzes showed that the average local heat transfer coefficient in the thin film evaporation region of the COHP can reach 1.2 × 106 W/m2·K, which is approximately 103 times higher than that achievable with standard pool-boiling approaches. Based on these results, a novel device design applying the COHP and microfabrication techniques is proposed and its efficiency for cell vitrification is demonstrated through numerical simulation. The estimated average cooling rates achieved through this approach is 106–7 K/min, which is much faster than the currently available methods and sufficient for achieving vitrification with relatively low concentrations of CPA. PMID:18430413

  12. Investigations on the heat transport capability of a cryogenic oscillating heat pipe and its application in achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell vitrification cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Ma, Hongbin; Jiao, Anjun; Critser, John K

    2008-06-01

    Theoretically, direct vitrification of cell suspensions with relatively low concentrations ( approximately 1 M) of permeating cryoprotective agents (CPA) is suitable for cryopreservation of almost all cell types and can be accomplished by ultra-fast cooling rates that are on the order of 10(6-7) K/min. However, the methods and devices currently available for cell cryopreservation cannot achieve such high cooling rates. In this study, we constructed a novel cryogenic oscillating heat pipe (COHP) using liquid nitrogen as its working fluid and investigated its heat transport capability to assess its application for achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell cryopreservation. The experimental results showed that the apparent heat transfer coefficient of the COHP can reach 2 x 10(5) W/m(2).K, which is two orders of the magnitude higher than traditional heat pipes. Theoretical analyzes showed that the average local heat transfer coefficient in the thin film evaporation region of the COHP can reach 1.2 x 10(6) W/m(2).K, which is approximately 10(3) times higher than that achievable with standard pool-boiling approaches. Based on these results, a novel device design applying the COHP and microfabrication techniques is proposed and its efficiency for cell vitrification is demonstrated through numerical simulation. The estimated average cooling rates achieved through this approach is 10(6-7)K/min, which is much faster than the currently available methods and sufficient for achieving vitrification with relatively low concentrations of CPA.

  13. The Shortlist Method for Fast Computation of the Earth Mover's Distance and Finding Optimal Solutions to Transportation Problems

    PubMed Central

    Gottschlich, Carsten; Schuhmacher, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Finding solutions to the classical transportation problem is of great importance, since this optimization problem arises in many engineering and computer science applications. Especially the Earth Mover's Distance is used in a plethora of applications ranging from content-based image retrieval, shape matching, fingerprint recognition, object tracking and phishing web page detection to computing color differences in linguistics and biology. Our starting point is the well-known revised simplex algorithm, which iteratively improves a feasible solution to optimality. The Shortlist Method that we propose substantially reduces the number of candidates inspected for improving the solution, while at the same time balancing the number of pivots required. Tests on simulated benchmarks demonstrate a considerable reduction in computation time for the new method as compared to the usual revised simplex algorithm implemented with state-of-the-art initialization and pivot strategies. As a consequence, the Shortlist Method facilitates the computation of large scale transportation problems in viable time. In addition we describe a novel method for finding an initial feasible solution which we coin Modified Russell's Method. PMID:25310106

  14. Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of tether transportation is given. Four steps were used over a period of time. First, theoretical engineering feasibility and technology requirements were determined. Then the survivors of that effort went into step two in the analysis of promising candidates. Those survivors went into the third phase which is engineering design and cost benefits. Survivors entered into the demonstration mission definition phase. Transportation studies have covered two kinds of deployments. First, steady state deployment was studied. Like the TSS, it's nearly vertical. It takes a long time to deploy and involves relatively high tether tension. Secondly, dynamic deployment was studied. Deployment started in an almost horizontal direction under a very shallow angle which allows a high deployment rate under very low tension. Momentum transfer here occurs by libration. Specific payloads were used to study tethered transportation benefits. Four transportation concepts were studied with regard to cost benefits. A tethered orbiter deboost from the space station, an OTV boost up from the Space Station, a science platform on a tether with a possible micro-g lab moving in between platform and station, and a tethered boost of payloads fromthe orbiter are the four concepts. These benefits are examined in detail.

  15. Fast changes in chemical composition and size distribution of fine particles during the near-field transport of industrial plumes.

    PubMed

    Marris, Hélène; Deboudt, Karine; Augustin, Patrick; Flament, Pascal; Blond, François; Fiani, Emmanuel; Fourmentin, Marc; Delbarre, Hervé

    2012-06-15

    Aerosol sampling was performed inside the chimneys and in the close environment of a FeMn alloys manufacturing plant. The number size distributions show a higher abundance of ultrafine aerosols (10-100 nm) inside the plume than upwind of the plant, indicating the emissions of nanoparticles by the industrial process. Individual analysis of particles collected inside the plume shows a high proportion of metal bearing particles (Mn-/Fe-) consisting essentially of internally mixed aluminosilicate and metallic compounds. These particles evolve rapidly (in a few minutes) after emission by adsorption of VOC gas and sulfuric acid emitted by the plant but also by agglomeration with pre-existing particles. At the moment, municipalities require a monitoring of industrial emissions inside the chimneys from manufacturers. However those measures are insufficient to report such rapid changes in chemical composition and thus to evaluate the real impact of industrial plumes in the close environment of plants (when those particles leave the industrial site). Consequently, environmental authorities will have to consider such fast evolutions and then to adapt future regulations on air pollution sources. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Highly Repeatable and Recoverable Phototransistors Based on Multifunctional Channels of Photoactive CdS, Fast Charge Transporting ZnO, and Chemically Durable Al2O3 Layers.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Cheol Hyoun; Kang, Won Jun; Kim, Ye Kyun; Yun, Myeong Gu; Cho, Hyung Koun

    2016-06-22

    Highly repeatable and recoverable phototransistors were explored using a "multifunctional channels" structure with multistacked chalcogenide and oxide semiconductors. These devices were made of (i) photoactive CdS (with a visible band gap), (ii) fast charge transporting ZnO (with a high field-effect mobility), and (iii) a protection layer of Al2O3 (with high chemical durability). The CdS TFT without the Al2O3 protection layer did not show a transfer curve due to the chemical damage that occurred on the ZnO layer during the chemical bath deposition (CBD) process used for CdS deposition. Alternatively, compared to CdS phototransistors with long recovery time and high hysteresis (ΔVth = 19.5 V), our "multi-functional channels" phototransistors showed an extremely low hysteresis loop (ΔVth = 0.5V) and superior photosensitivity with repeatable high photoresponsivity (52.9 A/W at 400 nm). These improvements are likely caused by the physical isolation of the sensing region and charge transport region by the insertion of the ultrathin Al2O3 layer. This approach successfully addresses some of the existing problems in CdS phototransistors, such as the high gate-interface trap site density and high absorption of molecular oxygen, which originate from the polycrystalline CdS.

  17. R_transport_matrices of the Fast Extraction Beam (FEB) of the AGS, and Beam Parameters at the Starting point of the AtR Line

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas,N.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Glenn, W.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Gardner, C.; Tanaka, S.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the task to improve and further automate the 'AtR BPM Application' we provide the theoretically calculated R-transport-matrices for the following beam line sections, which are shown schematically in Figure 1: (a) the Fast Extraction Beam section (FEB) of the AGS synchrotron. The FEB section starts at the middle of the GlO-kicker and ends at the middle of the H1 0{_}septum. (b) the Drift Extraction Channel (DEC) section of the AGS synchrotron. The DEC section starts at the middle of the H10{_}septum, continues along the fringe field region of the H11,H12, and H13 AGS main magnets, and ends at the starting point of the AtR line. The knowledge of these R-transport-matrices are needed in order to calculate the beam parameters at the beginning of the AtR line, which in turn, are required to calculate the magnet settings of the U{_}line, that match the U{_}line into the W{_}line. Also by incorporating these R{_}matrices into the model of the AtR line, the G10 kicker and the H10 septum are included in the AtR model therefore one can investigate any 'jitter' of either the GlO{_}kicker or HlO{_}septum by looking at the trajectory of the beam in the AtR line.

  18. Transportability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-25

    psi). (g) Maximum axle load (pneumatic tires) - 2,268 kg (5,000 lb). (h) Maximum wheel load (pneumatic tires) - 1,134 kg (2,500 lb). (i...survivability following the shock or vibration environment induced. Vehicles not typically transported with payload such as wreckers, truck tractors ...combination weight rating (GCWR) means the value specified by the manufacturer as the loaded weight of the combination vehicle. (d) Gross axle weight

  19. Transportation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    International (cont.) European Commission – Directorate General for Energy and Transport, Brussels, Belgium Headquarters Netherlands Customs ...100,000 by 2014. As a result of these challenges and due to the increase in intermodal freight traffic, a customer /client relationship has...increase by 50% domestically and 110% internationally by 2016 (CRS, 2007). United Parcel Service (UPS), FedEx, and DHL currently control the package

  20. Status report on the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) /Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) and supporting research and development.

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J. J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Yang, W. S.; Wade, D. C.; Nikiforova, A.; Hanania, P.; Ryu, H. J.; Kulesza, K. P.; Kim, S. J.; Halsey, W. G.; Smith, C. F.; Brown, N. W.; Greenspan, E.; de Caro, M.; Li, N.; Hosemann, P.; Zhang, J.; Yu, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division; LLNL; LANL; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; Ecole des Mines de Paris; Oregon State Univ.; Univ.of California at Berkley

    2008-06-23

    This report provides an update on development of a pre-conceptual design for the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) plant concept and supporting research and development activities. SSTAR is a small, 20 MWe (45 MWt), natural circulation, fast reactor plant for international deployment concept incorporating proliferation resistance for deployment in non-fuel cycle states and developing nations, fissile self-sufficiency for efficient utilization of uranium resources, autonomous load following making it suitable for small or immature grid applications, and a high degree of passive safety further supporting deployment in developing nations. In FY 2006, improvements have been made at ANL to the pre-conceptual design of both the reactor system and the energy converter which incorporates a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle providing higher plant efficiency (44 %) and improved economic competitiveness. The supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle technology is also applicable to Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors providing the same benefits. One key accomplishment has been the development of a control strategy for automatic control of the supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle in principle enabling autonomous load following over the full power range between nominal and essentially zero power. Under autonomous load following operation, the reactor core power adjusts itself to equal the heat removal from the reactor system to the power converter through the large reactivity feedback of the fast spectrum core without the need for motion of control rods, while the automatic control of the power converter matches the heat removal from the reactor to the grid load. The report includes early calculations for an international benchmarking problem for a LBE-cooled, nitride-fueled fast reactor core organized by the IAEA as part of a Coordinated Research Project on Small Reactors without Onsite Refueling; the calculations use the same neutronics

  1. PHASE RETRIEVAL FROM TWO DEFOCUSED IMAGES BY THE TRANSPORT OF INTENSITY EQUATION FORMALISM WITH FAST FOURIER TRANSFORM.

    SciTech Connect

    VOLKOV,V.V.; ZHU,Y.

    2001-08-05

    The problem of phase retrieval from intensity measurements plays an important role in many fields of physical research, e.g. optics, electron and x-ray microscopy, crystallography, diffraction tomography and others. In practice the recorded images contain information only on the intensity distribution I(x,y) = {Psi}*{Psi} = {vert_bar}A{vert_bar}{sup 2} of the imaging wave function {Psi} = A*exp(-i{var_phi}) and the phase information {var_phi}(x,y) is usually lost. In general, the phase problem can be solved either by special holographic/interferometric methods, or by non-interferometric approaches based on intensity measurements in far Fraunhofer zone or in the Fresnel zone at two adjacent planes orthogonal to the optical axis. The latter approach uses the transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) formalism, introduced originally by Teague [1] and developed later in [2]. Applications of TIE to nonmagnetic materials and magnetic inductance mapping were successfully made in [3,4]. However, this approach still needs further improvement both in mathematics and in practical solutions, since the result is very sensitive to many experimental parameters.

  2. MO-A-BRD-10: A Fast and Accurate GPU-Based Proton Transport Monte Carlo Simulation for Validating Proton Therapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Chan Tseung, H; Ma, J; Beltran, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To build a GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of proton transport with detailed modeling of elastic and non-elastic (NE) protonnucleus interactions, for use in a very fast and cost-effective proton therapy treatment plan verification system. Methods: Using the CUDA framework, we implemented kernels for the following tasks: (1) Simulation of beam spots from our possible scanning nozzle configurations, (2) Proton propagation through CT geometry, taking into account nuclear elastic and multiple scattering, as well as energy straggling, (3) Bertini-style modeling of the intranuclear cascade stage of NE interactions, and (4) Simulation of nuclear evaporation. To validate our MC, we performed: (1) Secondary particle yield calculations in NE collisions with therapeutically-relevant nuclei, (2) Pencil-beam dose calculations in homogeneous phantoms, (3) A large number of treatment plan dose recalculations, and compared with Geant4.9.6p2/TOPAS. A workflow was devised for calculating plans from a commercially available treatment planning system, with scripts for reading DICOM files and generating inputs for our MC. Results: Yields, energy and angular distributions of secondaries from NE collisions on various nuclei are in good agreement with the Geant4.9.6p2 Bertini and Binary cascade models. The 3D-gamma pass rate at 2%–2mm for 70–230 MeV pencil-beam dose distributions in water, soft tissue, bone and Ti phantoms is 100%. The pass rate at 2%–2mm for treatment plan calculations is typically above 98%. The net computational time on a NVIDIA GTX680 card, including all CPU-GPU data transfers, is around 20s for 1×10{sup 7} proton histories. Conclusion: Our GPU-based proton transport MC is the first of its kind to include a detailed nuclear model to handle NE interactions on any nucleus. Dosimetric calculations demonstrate very good agreement with Geant4.9.6p2/TOPAS. Our MC is being integrated into a framework to perform fast routine clinical QA of pencil

  3. How Fast Is Fast?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korn, Abe

    1994-01-01

    Presents an activity that enables students to answer for themselves the question of how fast a body must travel before the nonrelativistic expression must be replaced with the correct relativistic expression by deciding on the accuracy required in describing the kinetic energy of a body. (ZWH)

  4. Radar echo sounding data driving a model for subglacial water transport from the Dome C Lakes to the onset(s) of fast glacier flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, S. P.; Blankenship, D. D.; Young, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    he distribution and evolution of subglacial water from Concordia Ridge to Adventure Trench and points beyond? The production of subglacial near the ice divides and the transport of that water from the interior to the onset of fast glacier flow is a critical yet poorly understood component of ice sheet dynamics and the response of the ice sheets to climate change. Using a strain inversion coupled with a temperature model we estimate a water budget for the upstream-most portions of the basins feeding Concordia Lake, Vincennes Lake and ultimately the Adventure Subglacial Trench water system. Using the water budget, the ice surface topography and ice bedrock topography we then test the viability of differing flow systems, and estimate residence time of water in the various subglacial lakes of the region. The strain inversion and temperature model indicates a basin wide average melt rate of 0.84 - 1.20 mm / yr for the Vincennes and Concordia Basins respectively, a figure in accord with other published order of-magnitude-estimates. Although most of the ice bed interface in the region is at or near the pressure melting point of water, the distribution of meltwater production is heterogeneous with melt rates over 2 mm/ yr in the central Vincennes Basin and shoreline of Lake Concordia. Indeed Lake Concordia sources over 25% of its water from within 20 km of its shoreline. The source region for Lake Vincennes is by contrast more distributed about the basin. Along the steepest topography furthest upstream a thin film on the order of a millimeter should be capable of transporting most of the water produced. Bedrock fractures, if present may also aide in the transport of subglacial water in this region. Along the major lake chains in this area, however a higher capacity system is required even when flow is steady state. Recent work on further downstream has demonstrated that the classic ice-walled semicircular Rothlisberger channel is not a viable system throughout much of

  5. Effects of fasting and refeeding on gene expression of slc15a1a, a gene encoding an oligopeptide transporter (PepT1), in the intestine of Mozambique tilapia.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Zenith Gaye A; Soma, Satoshi; Kaneko, Toyoji; Watanabe, Soichi

    2017-01-01

    The tissue distribution of slc15a1a, a gene that encodes an oligopeptide transporter, PepT1, and its response to fasting and refeeding were investigated in the intestinal epithelium of Mozambique tilapia for a better understanding of its role on nutrient absorption. The slc15a1a was predominantly expressed in the absorptive epithelia of the anterior part of the intestine, suggesting that digested oligopeptides are primarily absorbed in the anterior intestine. The response of slc15a1a to fasting was evaluated at 1, 2, 4, 7 and 14days after the last feeding. Fasting revealed a biphasic effect, where short-term fasting significantly upregulated slc15a1a expression and long-term fasting resulted in downregulation. The expression level continued to decrease and fell below the pre-fasted level from day 4 to 14. Proximal (the hepatic loop, HL) and distal parts (the proximal major coil, PMC) of the anterior intestine showed different magnitudes of responses to fasting; slc15a1a expression in the PMC showed greater upregulation and downregulation than that in the HL. Refeeding significantly stimulated slc15a1a expression at day 3, although the expression did not exceed the pre-fasted level. Observed responses of slc15a1a to fasting and refeeding suggest that the expression level of this gene can serve as a sensitive indicator of the changes that may occur in altering nutritional conditions. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the role of PepT1 in nutrition and of the complex mechanisms underlying the absorption of oligopeptides and amino acids in the intestine, and may lead to development of possible means to manipulate the absorption processes for the improvement of growth and other metabolic and physiological conditions in fish. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Intermodal Transportation: Current Fast Ship Designs Specify Propulsion Systems that Are about 20 Knots Faster than Ships in the Current Fleet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, Vincent W.

    2005-01-01

    Intermodal transportation is the moving of people or cargo using more than one mode of transportation. When a person drives to the airport, stands on a conveyor to move through the terminal, and flies to another city, then he or she is using intermodal transportation. Moving cargo in the first half of the twentieth century was a time-consuming and…

  7. Intermodal Transportation: Current Fast Ship Designs Specify Propulsion Systems that Are about 20 Knots Faster than Ships in the Current Fleet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, Vincent W.

    2005-01-01

    Intermodal transportation is the moving of people or cargo using more than one mode of transportation. When a person drives to the airport, stands on a conveyor to move through the terminal, and flies to another city, then he or she is using intermodal transportation. Moving cargo in the first half of the twentieth century was a time-consuming and…

  8. Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; Pisanti, O.

    The following sections are included: * Elementary Considerations * The Integral Equation to the Neutron Distribution * The Critical Size for a Fast Reactor * Supercritical Reactors * Problems and Exercises

  9. Fast Crystallization and Improved Stability of Perovskite Solar Cells with Zn2SnO4 Electron Transporting Layer: Interface Matters.

    PubMed

    Bera, Ashok; Sheikh, Arif D; Haque, Md Azimul; Bose, Riya; Alarousu, Erkki; Mohammed, Omar F; Wu, Tom

    2015-12-30

    Here we report that mesoporous ternary oxide Zn2SnO4 can significantly promotes the crystallization of hybrid perovskite layers and serves as an efficient electron transporting material in perovskite solar cells. Such devices exhibit an energy conversion efficiency of 13.34%, which is even higher than that achieved with the commonly used TiO2 in the similar experimental conditions (9.1%). Simple one-step spin coating of CH3NH3PbI3-xClx on Zn2SnO4 is found to lead to rapidly crystallized bilayer perovskite structure without any solvent engineering. Furthermore, ultrafast transient absorption measurement reveals efficient charge transfer at the Zn2SnO4/perovskite interface. Most importantly, solar cells with Zn2SnO4 as the electron-transporting material exhibit negligible electrical hysteresis and exceptionally high stability without encapsulation for over one month. Besides underscoring Zn2SnO4 as a highly promising electron transporting material for perovskite solar cells, our results demonstrate the significant role of interfaces on improving the perovskite crystallization and photovoltaic performance.

  10. Fast valve

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

  11. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, W.J.

    1992-04-07

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of the molten salt fast reactor fuel LiF-ThF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewan, Leslie C.; Simon, Christian; Madden, Paul A.; Hobbs, Linn W.; Salanne, Mathieu

    2013-03-01

    The local structure and transport properties of molten LiF-ThF4 at the eutectic composition have been studied at a range of temperatures, using molecular dynamics simulations that incorporate dipole polarization effects. This polarizable interaction potential was parameterized from first-principles calculations. We have calculated the density, self-diffusion coefficients, electrical conductivity, viscosity, and heat capacity at a range of temperatures from 850 K to 1273 K. We have also examined the changes in coordination number as a function of temperature. The simulation results were in good agreement with available experimental data, indicating that such simulations can fulfill a valuable role in augmenting existing experimental work.

  13. Project FAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essexville-Hampton Public Schools, MI.

    Described are components of Project FAST (Functional Analysis Systems Training) a nationally validated project to provide more effective educational and support services to learning disordered children and their regular elementary classroom teachers. The program is seen to be based on a series of modules of delivery systems ranging from mainstream…

  14. Fast CRCs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    or any other computing topic, please visit our Digital Library at www.computer.org/publications/ dlib . NGUYEN: FAST CRCS 1331 Authorized licensed use... Library at http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/ TC.2009.83. The notation ðk; l; dÞ denotes a systematic code with k ¼ the total bit length of

  15. Fast ignitor coupling physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Tabak, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Fast Ignitor is an alternate approach to ICF in which short pulse lasers are used to initiate burn at the surface of the compressed DT fuel. The aim is to avoid the need for careful central focusing of final shocks, and possibly to lower substantially the energy requirements for ignition. Ultimately, both goals may prove crucial to Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS). This will be the case should either emerging energetic needs, or funding difficulties render the presently planned radiative fusion approach to ignition with the NIF impractical. Ignition is a first step towards the achievement of substantial energy and neutron outputs for such Stewardship. For success with the Fast Ignitor, the laser energy must be efficiently deposited into megavolt electrons (suprathermal), which must, in turn, couple to the background ions within an alpha particle range. To understand the electron fuel coupling, we have used ANTHEM plasma simulation code to model the transport of hot electrons generated by an intense short pulse laser into plasma targets over a broad range of densities. Our study will spell out the acceleration and transport mechanisms active in the Fast Ignitor environment.

  16. A simple, fast and accurate in-situ method to measure the rate of transport of redox species through membranes for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meddings, Nina; Owen, John R.; Garcia-Araez, Nuria

    2017-10-01

    Lithium ion conducting membranes are important to protect the lithium metal electrode and act as a barrier to crossover species such as polysulphides in Li-S systems, redox mediators in Li-O2 cells or dissolved cathode species or electrolyte oxidation products in high voltage Li-ion batteries. We present an in-situ method for measuring permeability of membranes to crossover redox species. The method employs a 'Swagelok' cell design equipped with a glassy carbon working electrode, in which redox species are placed initially in the counter electrode compartment only. Permeability through the membrane, which separates working and counter electrodes, is determined using a square wave voltammetry technique that allows the concentration of crossover redox species to be evaluated over time with very high precision. We test the method using a model and well-behaved electrochemical system to demonstrate its sensitivity, reproducibility and reliability relative to alternative approaches. This new method offers advantages in terms of small electrolyte volume, and simple, fast, quantitative and in-situ measurement.

  17. Genetic changes during a laboratory adaptive evolution process that allowed fast growth in glucose to an Escherichia coli strain lacking the major glucose transport system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli strains lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS), which is the major bacterial component involved in glucose transport and its phosphorylation, accumulate high amounts of phosphoenolpyruvate that can be diverted to the synthesis of commercially relevant products. However, these strains grow slowly in glucose as sole carbon source due to its inefficient transport and metabolism. Strain PB12, with 400% increased growth rate, was isolated after a 120 hours adaptive laboratory evolution process for the selection of faster growing derivatives in glucose. Analysis of the genetic changes that occurred in the PB12 strain that lacks PTS will allow a better understanding of the basis of its growth adaptation and, therefore, in the design of improved metabolic engineering strategies for enhancing carbon diversion into the aromatic pathways. Results Whole genome analyses using two different sequencing methodologies: the Roche NimbleGen Inc. comparative genome sequencing technique, and high throughput sequencing with Illumina Inc. GAIIx, allowed the identification of the genetic changes that occurred in the PB12 strain. Both methods detected 23 non-synonymous and 22 synonymous point mutations. Several non-synonymous mutations mapped in regulatory genes (arcB, barA, rpoD, rna) and in other putative regulatory loci (yjjU, rssA and ypdA). In addition, a chromosomal deletion of 10,328 bp was detected that removed 12 genes, among them, the rppH, mutH and galR genes. Characterization of some of these mutated and deleted genes with their functions and possible functions, are presented. Conclusions The deletion of the contiguous rppH, mutH and galR genes that occurred simultaneously, is apparently the main reason for the faster growth of the evolved PB12 strain. In support of this interpretation is the fact that inactivation of the rppH gene in the parental PB11 strain substantially increased its growth rate, very

  18. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Electronic transport properties of charge-ordered Bi0.4Ca0.6MnO3 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Z.; Sun, J. R.; Wang, D. J.; Liang, S.; Wang, J. Z.; Han, Y. N.; Han, B. S.; Shen, B. G.

    2007-11-01

    The electronic transport properties of charge-ordered Bi0.4Ca0.6MnO3 films grown on a (110) SrTiO3 substrate are experimentally studied. Special attention has been paid to the Hall effect around the charge-ordering (CO) transition. The charge carriers are found to be electron-like, and the carrier density n exhibits a significant change upon the CO transition: it is nearly constant above the transition temperature Tco, ~0.36 electrons/Mn, and reduces with decrease of the temperature below Tco following the formula n \\propto \\exp (-E_{\\mathrm {H}}/k_{\\mathrm {B}}T) , with an activation energy EH of ~0.13 eV. In contrast, no obvious signatures of thermal activation for Hall mobility were observed. Meanwhile, it is revealed that magnetic field affects the resistivity by enhancing the carrier mobility of the film in the course of the CO transition.

  19. A PET imaging agent with fast kinetics: synthesis and in vivo evaluation of the serotonin transporter ligand [11C]2-[2-dimethylaminomethylphenylthio)]-5-fluorophenylamine ([11C]AFA).

    PubMed

    Huang, Yiyun; Narendran, Raj; Bae, Sung-A; Erritzoe, David; Guo, Ningning; Zhu, Zhihong; Hwang, Dah-Ren; Laruelle, Marc

    2004-08-01

    A new serotonin transporter (SERT) ligand, [11C]2-[2-(dimethylaminomethylphenylthio)]-5-fluorophenylamine (10, [11C]AFA), was synthesized and evaluated as a candidate PET radioligand in pharmacological and pharmacokinetic studies. As a PET radioligand, AFA (8) can be labeled with either C-11 or F-18. In vitro, AFA displayed high affinity for SERT (Ki 1.46 +/- 0.15 nM) and lower affinity for norepinephrine transporter (NET, Ki 141.7 +/- 47.4 nM) or dopamine transporter (DAT, Ki > 10,000 nM). [11C]AFA (10) was prepared from its monomethylamino precursor 9 by reaction with high specific activity [11C]methyl iodide. Radiochemical yield was 43 +/- 20% based on [11C]methyl iodide at end of bombardment (EOB, n = 10) and specific activity was 2,129 +/- 1,369 Ci/mmol at end of synthesis (EOS, n = 10). Biodistribution studies in rats indicated that [11C]AFA accumulated in brain regions known to contain high concentrations of SERT. Binding in SERT-rich brain regions was reduced significantly by pretreatment with either the cold compound 8 or with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram, but not by the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor nisoxetine, thus underlining its in vivo binding selectivity and specificity for SERT. Imaging experiments in baboons demonstrated that the uptake pattern of [11C]AFA in the baboon brain is consistent with the known distribution of SERT, with highest activity levels in the midbrain and thalamus, followed by striatum, hippocampus, and cortical regions. Activity levels in the baboon brain peaked at 15-40 min after radioligand injection, indicating a fast uptake kinetics for [11C]AFA. Pretreatment of the baboon with citalopram (4 mg/kg) significantly reduced the specific binding of [11C]AFA in all SERT-containing brain regions. Kinetic analysis revealed that the regional equilibrium specific to non-specific partition coefficients (V3") of [11C]AFA are similar to those of [11C]McN5652, but lower than those of [11C

  20. Solid phase transitions and fast ion transport in LiNaSO[sub 4]: LiCl: Na[sub 2]WO[sub 4] mixed systems

    SciTech Connect

    Prabaharan, S.R.S.; Muthusubramanian, P. ); Kulandainathan, M.A.; Kapali, V. )

    1993-10-01

    LiNaSO[sub 4]: LiCl: Na[sub 2]WO[sub 4] composites of a few different compositions have been prepared by quenching the melt and studied for the first time with a view to improve the ionic conductivity of LiNaSO[sub 4] at the lowest possible temperature. The phase formations of the composites have been analyzed by means of X-ray powder diffraction technique. The transport properties have been studied by DSC and complex ac impedance analysis (to extract the dc electrical conductivity, [sigma][sub dc]). The X-ray diffractograms show evidence for solid solutions (ss) as well as second dispersed phase due to indissolved excess compound (LiCl). The [sigma] enhancement may be attributed to the increase in interfacial conductivity due to the increase in concentration of the charge carriers (ions or vacancies) forming a diffuse space charge layer between the two ion conductors, i.e., the solid solution of LiNaSO[sub 4] with dissolved chloride and tungstate fractions and a chloride phase with dissolved sulfate fraction. DSC measurements show improved thermal properties with respect to [alpha]-LiNaSO[sub 4]. The present composite mixtures offer the choice of lower transition temperatures, but these are accompanied by lower transition enthalpies.

  1. Optically detected carrier transport in III/V semiconductor QW structures: experiments, model calculations and applications in fast 1.55 µm laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillmer, H.; Marcinkevičius, S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews optically detected carrier dynamics in III/V semiconductor quantum well (QW) heterostructures perpendicular to the interfaces. Photoluminescence emissions originating from different semiconductor layers are recorded in a time-resolved way to monitor the carrier dynamics between these layers. The experimental methods presented provide a very high spatial and temporal resolution, partly even in the nanometer and sub-picosecond ranges, respectively. Model calculations based on a self-consistent solution of the continuity equation, the Poisson equation and rate-equation(s) are used to evaluate the experimental data. It will be demonstrated that experiments using several specially tailored semiconductor heterostructures enable the following individual dynamic effects to be studied and separated: transport in extended unquantized layers, capture into the QWs, relaxation in the QWs, tunneling between the QWs and thermal re-emission from the QWs. It will be shown that several basic physical effects have to be studied and understood before modern high-speed semiconductor laser devices can be designed and implemented. By adding levels of increasing complexity, this review starts from simple basic structures to finally approach real laser structures in a sequence of consecutive steps. AlGaInAs and GaInAsP heterostructures are compared with respect to interwell transfer efficiencies and problems in technological implementation. This review proceeds from basic research on carrier dynamics to applications in high-speed laser devices. Throughout the review an overview of the experimental and theoretical literature is given.

  2. Ab initio prediction of fast non-equilibrium transport of nascent polarons in SrI2: a key to high-performance scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fei; Sadigh, Babak; Erhart, Paul; Åberg, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    The excellent light yield proportionality of europium-doped strontium iodide (SrI2:Eu) has resulted in state-of-the-art γ-ray detectors with remarkably high-energy resolution, far exceeding that of most halide compounds. In this class of materials, the formation of self-trapped hole polarons is very common. However, polaron formation is usually expected to limit carrier mobilities and has been associated with poor scintillator light-yield proportionality and resolution. Here using a recently developed first-principles method, we perform an unprecedented study of polaron transport in SrI2, both for equilibrium polarons, as well as nascent polarons immediately following a self-trapping event. We propose a rationale for the unexpected high-energy resolution of SrI2. We identify nine stable hole polaron configurations, which consist of dimerised iodine pairs with polaron-binding energies of up to 0.5 eV. They are connected by a complex potential energy landscape that comprises 66 unique nearest-neighbour migration paths. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations reveal that a large fraction of polarons is born into configurations that migrate practically barrier free at room temperature. Consequently, carriers created during γ-irradiation can quickly diffuse away reducing the chance for non-linear recombination, the primary culprit for non-proportionality and resolution reduction. We conclude that the flat, albeit complex, landscape for polaron migration in SrI2 is a key for understanding its outstanding performance. This insight provides important guidance not only for the future development of high-performance scintillators but also of other materials, for which large polaron mobilities are crucial such as batteries and solid-state ionic conductors.

  3. CONFERENCE REPORT: 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.; Fasoli, A.; Hidalgo, C.; Kirk, A.; Naulin, V.; Peeters, A. G.; Tala, T.

    2009-04-01

    This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, 1-4 September 2008. There were sessions on core heat and particle transport; core and edge momentum transport; edge and scrape-off-layer transport and MHD and fast particle interaction with transport.

  4. Fast ignitor coupling physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Tabak, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Fast Ignitor is an alternate approach to ICF in which short pulse lasers are used to initiate burn at the surface of the compressed DT fuel. The aim is to avoid the need for careful central focussing of final shocks, and possibly to lower substantially the energy requirements for ignition. Ultimately, both goals may prove crucial to Stockpile Stewardship. For success with the Fast Ignitor, the laser energy must be efficiently deposited into megavolt electrons, which must, in turn, couple to the background ions within an alpha particle range. To understand this coupling, we have used ANTHEM plasma simulation code to model the transport of hot electrons generated by an intense ({ge} 3 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse 1.06 {mu}m laser into plasma targets over a broad range of densities (0.35 to 10{sup 4} x n{sub crit}). Ponderomotive effects are included as a force on the cold background and hot emission electrons of the form, F{sub h,c} = -({omega}{sup 2}{sub Ph,c}/2{omega}{sup 2}){del}I, in which I is the laser intensity and {omega}{sub p}{sup 2} = 4{pi}e{sup 2}n/m{sub 0}{gamma} with m{sub 0} the electron rest mass.

  5. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Travis J.; Kauffman, Kyle T.; Amrine, Katherine C. H.; Carper, Dana L.; Lee, Raymond S.; Becich, Peter J.; Canales, Claudia J.; Ardell, David H.

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought. PMID:26042145

  6. Enhanced Model for Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Rodney J.

    2010-10-12

    Laser Fusion is a prime candidate for alternate energy production, capable of serving a major portion of the nation's energy needs, once fusion fuel can be readily ignited. Fast Ignition may well speed achievement of this goal, by reducing net demands on laser pulse energy and timing precision. However, Fast Ignition has presented a major challenge to modeling. This project has enhanced the computer code ePLAS for the simulation of the many specialized phenomena, which arise with Fast Ignition. The improved code has helped researchers to understand better the consequences of laser absorption, energy transport, and laser target hydrodynamics. ePLAS uses efficient implicit methods to acquire solutions for the electromagnetic fields that govern the accelerations of electrons and ions in targets. In many cases, the code implements fluid modeling for these components. These combined features, "implicitness and fluid modeling," can greatly facilitate calculations, permitting the rapid scoping and evaluation of experiments. ePLAS can be used on PCs, Macs and Linux machines, providing researchers and students with rapid results. This project has improved the treatment of electromagnetics, hydrodynamics, and atomic physics in the code. It has simplified output graphics, and provided new input that avoids the need for source code access by users. The improved code can now aid university, business and national laboratory users in pursuit of an early path to success with Fast Ignition.

  7. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel-bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating value, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

  8. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy Q3 carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel—bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating values, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly Q4 limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

  9. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  10. Fast food (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Fast foods are quick, reasonably priced, and readily available alternatives to home cooking. While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated ...

  11. Is fast food addictive?

    PubMed

    Garber, Andrea K; Lustig, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    Studies of food addiction have focused on highly palatable foods. While fast food falls squarely into that category, it has several other attributes that may increase its salience. This review examines whether the nutrients present in fast food, the characteristics of fast food consumers or the presentation and packaging of fast food may encourage substance dependence, as defined by the American Psychiatric Association. The majority of fast food meals are accompanied by a soda, which increases the sugar content 10-fold. Sugar addiction, including tolerance and withdrawal, has been demonstrated in rodents but not humans. Caffeine is a "model" substance of dependence; coffee drinks are driving the recent increase in fast food sales. Limited evidence suggests that the high fat and salt content of fast food may increase addictive potential. Fast food restaurants cluster in poorer neighborhoods and obese adults eat more fast food than those who are normal weight. Obesity is characterized by resistance to insulin, leptin and other hormonal signals that would normally control appetite and limit reward. Neuroimaging studies in obese subjects provide evidence of altered reward and tolerance. Once obese, many individuals meet criteria for psychological dependence. Stress and dieting may sensitize an individual to reward. Finally, fast food advertisements, restaurants and menus all provide environmental cues that may trigger addictive overeating. While the concept of fast food addiction remains to be proven, these findings support the role of fast food as a potentially addictive substance that is most likely to create dependence in vulnerable populations.

  12. Fast-food environments and family fast-food intake in nonmetropolitan areas.

    PubMed

    Longacre, Meghan R; Drake, Keith M; MacKenzie, Todd A; Gibson, Lucinda; Owens, Peter; Titus, Linda J; Beach, Michael L; Dalton, Madeline A

    2012-06-01

    Little is known about the influence of in-town fast-food availability on family-level fast-food intake in nonmetropolitan areas. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether the presence of chain fast-food outlets was associated with fast-food intake among adolescents and parents, and to assess whether this relationship was moderated by family access to motor vehicles. Telephone surveys were conducted with 1547 adolescent-parent dyads in 32 New Hampshire and Vermont communities between 2007 and 2008. Fast-food intake in the past week was measured through self-report. In-town fast-food outlets were located and enumerated using an onsite audit. Family motor vehicle access was categorized based on the number of vehicles per licensed drivers in the household. Poisson regression was used to determine unadjusted and adjusted risk ratios (RRs). Analyses were conducted in 2011. About half (52.1%) of adolescents and 34.7% of parents consumed fast food at least once in the past week. Adolescents and parents who lived in towns with five or more fast-food outlets were about 30% more likely to eat fast food compared to those in towns with no fast-food outlets, even after adjusting for individual, family, and town characteristics (RR=1.29, 95% CI= 1.10, 1.51; RR=1.32, 95% CI=1.07, 1.62, respectively). Interaction models demonstrated that the influence of in-town fast-food outlets on fast-food intake was strongest among families with low motor vehicle access. In nonmetropolitan areas, household transportation should be considered as an important moderator of the relationship between in-town fast-food outlets and family intake. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fast-Food Environments and Family Fast-Food Intake in Nonmetropolitan Areas

    PubMed Central

    Longacre, Meghan R.; Drake, Keith M.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Gibson, Lucinda; Owens, Peter; Titus, Linda J.; Beach, Michael L.; Dalton, Madeline A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the influence of in-town fast-food availability on family-level fast-food intake in nonmetropolitan areas. Purpose The purpose of the current study was to determine whether the presence of chain fast-food outlets was associated with fast-food intake among adolescents and parents, and to assess whether this relationship was moderated by family access to motor vehicles. Methods Telephone surveys were conducted with 1547 adolescent–parent dyads in 32 New Hampshire and Vermont communities between 2007 and 2008. Fast-food intake in the past week was measured through self-report. In-town fast-food outlets were located and enumerated using an onsite audit. Family motor vehicle access was categorized based on the number of vehicles per licensed drivers in the household. Poisson regression was used to determine unadjusted and adjusted risk ratios (RRs). Analyses were conducted in 2011. Results About half (52.1%) of adolescents and 34.7% of parents consumed fast food at least once in the past week. Adolescents and parents who lived in towns with five or more fast-food outlets were about 30% more likely to eat fast food compared to those in towns with no fast-food outlets, even after adjusting for individual, family, and town characteristics (RR=1.29, 95% CI= 1.10, 1.51; RR=1.32, 95% CI=1.07,1.62, respectively). Interaction models demonstrated that the influence of in-town fast-food outlets on fast-food intake was strongest among families with low motor vehicle access. Conclusions In nonmetropolitan areas, household transportation should be considered as an important moderator of the relationship between in-town fast-food outlets and family intake. PMID:22608373

  14. Measuring Fast Ion Losses in a Reversed Field Pinch Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonofiglo, P. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Almagri, A. F.; Kim, J.; Clark, J.; Capecchi, W.; Sears, S. H.

    2015-11-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) provides a unique environment to study fast ion confinement and transport. The RFP's weak toroidal field, strong magnetic shear, and ability to enter a 3D state provide a wide range of dynamics to study fast ions. Core-localized, 25 keV fast ions are sourced into MST by a tangentially injected hydrogen/deuterium neutral beam. Neutral particle analysis and measured fusion neutron flux indicate enhanced fast ion transport in the plasma core. Past experiments point to a dynamic loss of fast ions associated with the RFP's transition to a 3D state and with beam-driven, bursting magnetic modes. Consequently, fast ion transport and losses in the RFP have garnered recent attention. Valuable information on fast-ion loss, such as energy and pitch distributions, are sought to provide a better understanding of the transport mechanisms at hand. We have constructed and implemented two fast ion loss detectors (FILDs) for use on MST. The FILDs have two, independent, design concepts: collecting particles as a function of v⊥ or with pitch greater than 0.8. In this work, we present our preliminary findings and results from our FILDs on MST. This research is supported by US DOE.

  15. A Vertical Organic Transistor Architecture for Fast Nonvolatile Memory.

    PubMed

    She, Xiao-Jian; Gustafsson, David; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2017-02-01

    A new device architecture for fast organic transistor memory is developed, based on a vertical organic transistor configuration incorporating high-performance ambipolar conjugated polymers and unipolar small molecules as the transport layers, to achieve reliable and fast programming and erasing of the threshold voltage shift in less than 200 ns.

  16. Diagnostics for Fast Ignition Science

    SciTech Connect

    MacPhee, A; Akli, K; Beg, F; Chen, C; Chen, H; Clarke, R; Hey, D; Freeman, R; Kemp, A; Key, M; King, J; LePape, S; Link, A; Ma, T; Nakamura, N; Offermann, D; Ovchinnikov, V; Patel, P; Phillips, T; Stephens, R; Town, R; Wei, M; VanWoerkom, L; Mackinnon, A

    2008-05-06

    The concept for Electron Fast Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion demands sufficient laser energy be transferred from the ignitor pulse to the assembled fuel core via {approx}MeV electrons. We have assembled a suite of diagnostics to characterize such transfer. Recent experiments have simultaneously fielded absolutely calibrated extreme ultraviolet multilayer imagers at 68 and 256eV; spherically bent crystal imagers at 4 and 8keV; multi-keV crystal spectrometers; MeV x-ray bremmstrahlung and electron and proton spectrometers (along the same line of sight); nuclear activation samples and a picosecond optical probe based interferometer. These diagnostics allow careful measurement of energy transport and deposition during and following laser-plasma interactions at extremely high intensities in both planar and conical targets. Augmented with accurate on-shot laser focal spot and pre-pulse characterization, these measurements are yielding new insight into energy coupling and are providing critical data for validating numerical PIC and hybrid PIC simulation codes in an area that is crucial for many applications, particularly fast ignition. Novel aspects of these diagnostics and how they are combined to extract quantitative data on ultra high intensity laser plasma interactions are discussed, together with implications for full-scale fast ignition experiments.

  17. fast-matmul

    SciTech Connect

    Grey Ballard, Austin Benson

    2014-11-26

    This software provides implementations of fast matrix multiplication algorithms. These algorithms perform fewer floating point operations than the classical cubic algorithm. The software uses code generation to automatically implement the fast algorithms based on high-level descriptions. The code serves two general purposes. The first is to demonstrate that these fast algorithms can out-perform vendor matrix multiplication algorithms for modest problem sizes on a single machine. The second is to rapidly prototype many variations of fast matrix multiplication algorithms to encourage future research in this area. The implementations target sequential and shared memory parallel execution.

  18. Fast wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Fast wave current drive is demonstrated in the Princeton ACT-I toroidal device. The fast Alfven wave, in the range of high ion-cyclotron harmonics, produced 40 A of current from 1 kW of rf power coupled into the plasma by fast wave loop antenna. This wave excites a steady current by damping on the energetic tail of the electron distribution function in the same way as lower-hybrid current drive, except that fast wave current drive is appropriate for higher plasma densities.

  19. Integrative Physiology of Fasting.

    PubMed

    Secor, Stephen M; Carey, Hannah V

    2016-03-15

    Extended bouts of fasting are ingrained in the ecology of many organisms, characterizing aspects of reproduction, development, hibernation, estivation, migration, and infrequent feeding habits. The challenge of long fasting episodes is the need to maintain physiological homeostasis while relying solely on endogenous resources. To meet that challenge, animals utilize an integrated repertoire of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical responses that reduce metabolic rates, maintain tissue structure and function, and thus enhance survival. We have synthesized in this review the integrative physiological, morphological, and biochemical responses, and their stages, that characterize natural fasting bouts. Underlying the capacity to survive extended fasts are behaviors and mechanisms that reduce metabolic expenditure and shift the dependency to lipid utilization. Hormonal regulation and immune capacity are altered by fasting; hormones that trigger digestion, elevate metabolism, and support immune performance become depressed, whereas hormones that enhance the utilization of endogenous substrates are elevated. The negative energy budget that accompanies fasting leads to the loss of body mass as fat stores are depleted and tissues undergo atrophy (i.e., loss of mass). Absolute rates of body mass loss scale allometrically among vertebrates. Tissues and organs vary in the degree of atrophy and downregulation of function, depending on the degree to which they are used during the fast. Fasting affects the population dynamics and activities of the gut microbiota, an interplay that impacts the host's fasting biology. Fasting-induced gene expression programs underlie the broad spectrum of integrated physiological mechanisms responsible for an animal's ability to survive long episodes of natural fasting. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Fast optical pyrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cezairliyan, Ared

    1988-01-01

    Design and operation of accurate millisecond and microsecond resolution optical pyrometers developed at the National Bureau of Standards during the last two decades are described. Results of tests are presented and estimates of uncertainties in temperature measurements are given. Calibration methods are discussed and examples of applications of fast pyrometry are given. Ongoing research in developing fast multiwavelength and spatial scanning pyrometers are summarized.

  1. fastKDE

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Travis A.; Kashinath, Karthik

    2015-05-22

    This software implements the fast, self-consistent probability density estimation described by O'Brien et al. (2014, doi: ). It uses a non-uniform fast Fourier transform technique to reduce the computational cost of an objective and self-consistent kernel density estimation method.

  2. Fast and effective?

    PubMed

    Trueland, Jennifer

    2013-12-18

    The 5.2 diet involves two days of fasting each week. It is being promoted as the key to sustained weight loss, as well as wider health benefits, despite the lack of evidence on the long-term effects. Nurses need to support patients who wish to try intermittent fasting.

  3. Fast protein folding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Fast-folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast-folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms, which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well <1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even 'slow' folding processes: fast folders are small; relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast-folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast-folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general, as well as some work that is left to do.

  4. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  5. Dual fluidized bed design for the fast pyrolysis of biomass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A mechanism for the transport of solids between fluidised beds in dual fluidised bed systems for the fast pyrolysis of biomass process was selected. This mechanism makes use of an overflow standpipe to transport solids from the fluidised bed used for the combustion reactions to a second fluidised be...

  6. Explicit lower bounds for the cost of fast controls for some 1-D parabolic or dispersive equations, and a new lower bound concerning the uniform controllability of the 1-D transport-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissy, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we prove explicit lower bounds for the cost of fast boundary controls for a class of linear equations of parabolic or dispersive type involving the spectral fractional Laplace operator. We notably deduce the following striking result: in the case of the heat equation controlled on the boundary, Miller's conjecture formulated in Miller (2004) [16] is not verified. Moreover, we also give a new lower bound for the minimal time needed to ensure the uniform controllability of the one-dimensional convection-diffusion equation with negative speed controlled on the left boundary, proving that the conjecture formulated in Coron and Guerrero (2005) [2] concerning this problem is also not verified at least for negative speeds. The proof is based on complex analysis, and more precisely on a representation formula for entire functions of exponential type, and is quite related to the moment method.

  7. FAST Construction Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, R. D.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Yang, L.; Cai, W. J.; Liu, N.; Xie, J. T.; Zhang, S. X.

    2016-11-01

    The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) is a Chinese mega-science project to build the largest single dish radio telescope in the world. A unique karst depression in Guizhou province has been selected as the site to build an active reflector radio telescope with a diameter of 500 m and three outstanding aspects, which enables FAST to have a large sky coverage and the ability of observing astronomical targets with a high precision. Chinese Academy of Sciences and Guizhou province are in charge of FAST construction. The first light of the telescope was expected on September 25, 2016.

  8. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, J.P.; Emin, D.

    1983-12-21

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and metallic states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  9. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, John P.; Emin, David

    1986-01-01

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and insulating states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  10. Fasting and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Pollitt, E; Lewis, N L; Garza, C; Shulman, R J

    The effects of short-term fasting (skipping breakfast) on the problem-solving performance of 9 to 11 yr old children were studied under the controlled conditions of a metabolic ward. The behavioral test battery included an assessment of IQ, the Matching Familiar Figure Test and Hagen Central Incidental Test. Glucose and insulin levels were measured in blood. All assessments were made under fasting and non-fasting conditions. Skipping breakfast was found to have adverse effects on the children's late morning problem-solving performance. These findings support observations that the timing and nutrient composition of meals have acute and demonstrable effects on behavior.

  11. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  12. Pneumococcal Disease Fast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About Pneumococcal Types of Infection Risk Factors & Transmission Symptoms & Complications Diagnosis & Treatment Prevention Photos Fast Facts Pneumococcal Vaccination For Clinicians Streptococcus pneumoniae Transmission Clinical Features Risk Factors Diagnosis & Management Prevention For ...

  13. FAST joins Breakthrough programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The 180m Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) - the world's largest single-aperture radio receiver - has become part of the Breakthrough Listen programme, which launched in July 2015 to look for intelligent life beyond Earth.

  14. Discovery with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, P.

    2016-02-01

    FAST offers "transformational" performance well-suited to finding new phenomena - one of which might be polarised spectral transients. But discoveries will only be made if "the system" provides its users with the necessary opportunities. In addition to designing in as much observational flexibility as possible, FAST should be operated with a philosophy which maximises its "human bandwidth". This band includes the astronomers of tomorrow - many of whom not have yet started school or even been born.

  15. FAST Maser Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    FAST, the Five-hundred meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope, will become the largest operating single-dish telescope in the coming years. It has many advantages: much better sensitivity for its largest collecting area; large sky coverage due to its innovative design of the active primary surface; extremely radio quiet from its unique location, etc. In this work, I will highlight the future capabilities of FAST to discover and observe both galactic and extragalactic masers.

  16. Status of Fast Ignition Program at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, P. K.; Bellei, C.; Chawla, S.; Chen, C.; Cohen, B.; Divol, L.; Higginson, D.; Kemp, A.; Kemp, G.; Key, M.; Larson, D.; Link, A.; Ma, T.; McLean, H.; Ping, Y.; Sawada, H.; Shay, H.; Strozzi, D.; Tabak, M.; Westover, B.; Wilks, S.

    2011-10-01

    The fast ignition (FI) approach to inertial confinement fusion offers the potential for achieving the high target gains required for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). This paper reports progress at LLNL on the development of a point design for an indirect-drive re-entrant-cone FI target. Integrated hohlraum and capsule designs are described that optimize the peak density, ρR and spatial uniformity of the fuel assembly around the cone tip. The interaction of the short-pulse ignitor beam in the cone is simulated with the PSC explicit particle-in-cell (PIC) code, and the subsequent transport of the electrons and core heating calculated with the Zuma hybrid transport code coupled to the Hydra radiation-hydrodynamics code. Progress will be described in the integrated modeling approach to fast ignition target design through the self-consistent treatment of the hohlraum radiation drive, capsule implosion, fast electron generation and transport, and core heating. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  18. Fast wave current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Experiments on the fast wave in the range of high ion cyclotron harmonics in the ACT-1 device show that current drive is possible with the fast wave just as it is for the lower hybrid wave, except that it is suitable for higher plasma densities. A 140° loop antenna launched the high ion cyclotron harmonic fast wave [ω/Ω=O(10)] into a He+ plasma with ne≂4×1012 cm-3 and B=4.5 kG. Probe and magnetic loop diagnostics and FIR laser scattering confirmed the presence of the fast wave, and the Rogowski loop indicated that the circulating plasma current increased by up to 40A with 1 kW of coupled power, which is comparable to lower hybrid current drive in the same device with the same unidirectional fast electron beam used as the target for the rf. A phased antenna array would be used for FWCD in a tokamak without the E-beam.

  19. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  20. A Fast Hermite Transform.

    PubMed

    Leibon, Gregory; Rockmore, Daniel N; Park, Wooram; Taintor, Robert; Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2008-12-17

    We present algorithms for fast and stable approximation of the Hermite transform of a compactly supported function on the real line, attainable via an application of a fast algebraic algorithm for computing sums associated with a three-term relation. Trade-offs between approximation in bandlimit (in the Hermite sense) and size of the support region are addressed. Numerical experiments are presented that show the feasibility and utility of our approach. Generalizations to any family of orthogonal polynomials are outlined. Applications to various problems in tomographic reconstruction, including the determination of protein structure, are discussed.

  1. Fast Overcurrent Tripping Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullender, Craig C.; Davies, Bryan L.; Osborn, Stephen H.

    1993-01-01

    Fast overcurrent tripping circuit designed for incorporation into power metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) switching circuit. Serves as fast electronic circuit breaker by sensing voltage across MOSFET's during conduction and switching MOSFET's off within 1 microsecond after voltage exceeds reference value corresponding to tripping current. Acts more quickly than Hall-effect current sensor and, in comparison with shunt current-measuring circuits, smaller and consumes less power. Also ignores initial transient overcurrents during first 5 microseconds of switching cycle.

  2. Fast current ramp experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.; Goldston, R.J.; Bell, M.; Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; Morris, A.W.; Stauffer, F.J.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1987-05-01

    Electron heat transport on TFTR and other tokamaks is several orders of magnitude larger than neoclassical calculations would predict. Despite considerable effort, there is still no clear theoretical understanding of this anomalous transport. The electron temperature profile T/sub e/(r), shape has shown a marked consistency on many machines, including TFTR, for a wide range of plasma parameters and heating profiles. This could be an important clue as to the process responsible for this enhanced thermal transport. In this paper 'profile consistency' in TFTR is described and an experiment which uses a fast current ramp to transiently decouple the current density profile J(r), and the T/sub e/(r) profiles is discussed. From this experiment the influence of J(r) on electron temperature profile consistency can be determined.

  3. Fast thermalization and Helmholtz oscillations of an ultracold Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Papoular, D J; Pitaevskii, L P; Stringari, S

    2014-10-24

    We analyze theoretically the transport properties of a weakly interacting ultracold Bose gas enclosed in two reservoirs connected by a constriction. We assume that the transport of the superfluid part is hydrodynamic, and we describe the ballistic transport of the normal part using the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Modeling the coupled evolution of the phase, atom number, and temperature mismatches between the reservoirs, we predict that Helmholtz (plasma) oscillations can be observed at nonzero temperatures below Tc. We show that, because of its strong compressibility, the Bose gas is characterized by a fast thermalization compared to the damping time for plasma oscillations, accompanied by a fast transfer of the normal component. This fast thermalization also affects the gas above Tc, where we present a comparison to the ideal fermionic case. Moreover, we outline the possible realization of a superleak through the inclusion of a disordered potential.

  4. Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stollar, Dewey H.

    The purpose of this NEFP satellite study is to provide an overview of pupil transportation. The first phase of the study discusses the early legal and financial bases for student transportation, the second the current status of student transportation, and the third the future status of student transportation needs and financing for 1980.…

  5. Ab initio prediction of fast non-equilibrium transport of nascent polarons in SrI2: a key to high-performance scintillation [First-principles study of hole polaron formation and migration in strontium iodide

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Fei; Sadigh, Babak; Aberg, Daniel; ...

    2016-08-12

    The excellent light yield proportionality of europium-doped strontium iodide (SrI2:Eu) has resulted in state-of-the-art γ-ray detectors with remarkably high-energy resolution, far exceeding that of most halide compounds. In this class of materials, the formation of self-trapped hole polarons is very common. However, polaron formation is usually expected to limit carrier mobilities and has been associated with poor scintillator light-yield proportionality and resolution. Here using a recently developed first-principles method, we perform an unprecedented study of polaron transport in SrI2, both for equilibrium polarons, as well as nascent polarons immediately following a self-trapping event. We propose a rationale for the unexpectedmore » high-energy resolution of SrI2. We identify nine stable hole polaron configurations, which consist of dimerised iodine pairs with polaron-binding energies of up to 0.5 eV. They are connected by a complex potential energy landscape that comprises 66 unique nearest-neighbour migration paths. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations reveal that a large fraction of polarons is born into configurations that migrate practically barrier free at room temperature. Consequently, carriers created during γ-irradiation can quickly diffuse away reducing the chance for nonlinear recombination, the primary culprit for non-proportionality and resolution reduction. We conclude that the flat, albeit complex, landscape for polaron migration in SrI2 is a key for understanding its outstanding performance. This insight provides important guidance not only for the future development of high-performance scintillators but also of other materials, for which large polaron mobilities are crucial such as batteries and solid-state ionic conductors.« less

  6. Ab initio prediction of fast non-equilibrium transport of nascent polarons in SrI2: a key to high-performance scintillation [First-principles study of hole polaron formation and migration in strontium iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Fei; Sadigh, Babak; Aberg, Daniel; Erhart, Paul

    2016-08-12

    The excellent light yield proportionality of europium-doped strontium iodide (SrI2:Eu) has resulted in state-of-the-art γ-ray detectors with remarkably high-energy resolution, far exceeding that of most halide compounds. In this class of materials, the formation of self-trapped hole polarons is very common. However, polaron formation is usually expected to limit carrier mobilities and has been associated with poor scintillator light-yield proportionality and resolution. Here using a recently developed first-principles method, we perform an unprecedented study of polaron transport in SrI2, both for equilibrium polarons, as well as nascent polarons immediately following a self-trapping event. We propose a rationale for the unexpected high-energy resolution of SrI2. We identify nine stable hole polaron configurations, which consist of dimerised iodine pairs with polaron-binding energies of up to 0.5 eV. They are connected by a complex potential energy landscape that comprises 66 unique nearest-neighbour migration paths. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations reveal that a large fraction of polarons is born into configurations that migrate practically barrier free at room temperature. Consequently, carriers created during γ-irradiation can quickly diffuse away reducing the chance for nonlinear recombination, the primary culprit for non-proportionality and resolution reduction. We conclude that the flat, albeit complex, landscape for polaron migration in SrI2 is a key for understanding its outstanding performance. This insight provides important guidance not only for the future development of high-performance scintillators but also of other materials, for which large polaron mobilities are crucial such as batteries and solid-state ionic conductors.

  7. Integral Fast Reactor concept

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative LMR concept, being developed at Argonne National Laboratory, that fully exploits the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel to achieve breakthroughs in economics and inherent safety. This paper describes key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, technology development status, fuel cycle economics potential, and future development path.

  8. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I. ); Lineberry, M.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Fast ForWord.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Fast ForWord, a CD-ROM and Internet-based training program for children (pre-K to grade 8) with language and reading problems that helps children rapidly build oral language comprehension and other critical skills necessary for learning to read or becoming a better reader. With the help of computers, speech…

  10. Interpretation of fast-ion signals during beam modulation experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Collins, C. S.; Stagner, L.; ...

    2016-07-22

    Fast-ion signals produced by a modulated neutral beam are used to infer fast-ion transport. The measured quantity is the divergence of perturbed fast-ion flux from the phase-space volume measured by the diagnostic, ∇•more » $$\\bar{Γ}$$. Since velocity-space transport often contributes to this divergence, the phase-space sensitivity of the diagnostic (or “weight function”) plays a crucial role in the interpretation of the signal. The source and sink make major contributions to the signal but their effects are accurately modeled by calculations that employ an exponential decay term for the sink. Recommendations for optimal design of a fast-ion transport experiment are given, illustrated by results from DIII-D measurements of fast-ion transport by Alfv´en eigenmodes. Finally, the signal-to-noise ratio of the diagnostic, systematic uncertainties in the modeling of the source and sink, and the non-linearity of the perturbation all contribute to the error in ∇•$$\\bar{Γ}$$.« less

  11. Interpretation of fast-ion signals during beam modulation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Collins, C. S.; Stagner, L.; Zhu, Y. B.; Petty, C. C.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2016-07-22

    Fast-ion signals produced by a modulated neutral beam are used to infer fast-ion transport. The measured quantity is the divergence of perturbed fast-ion flux from the phase-space volume measured by the diagnostic, ∇•$\\bar{Γ}$. Since velocity-space transport often contributes to this divergence, the phase-space sensitivity of the diagnostic (or “weight function”) plays a crucial role in the interpretation of the signal. The source and sink make major contributions to the signal but their effects are accurately modeled by calculations that employ an exponential decay term for the sink. Recommendations for optimal design of a fast-ion transport experiment are given, illustrated by results from DIII-D measurements of fast-ion transport by Alfv´en eigenmodes. Finally, the signal-to-noise ratio of the diagnostic, systematic uncertainties in the modeling of the source and sink, and the non-linearity of the perturbation all contribute to the error in ∇•$\\bar{Γ}$.

  12. FAST - FREEDOM ASSEMBLY SEQUENCING TOOL PROTOTYPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borden, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    FAST is a project management tool designed to optimize the assembly sequence of Space Station Freedom. An appropriate assembly sequence coordinates engineering, design, utilization, transportation availability, and operations requirements. Since complex designs tend to change frequently, FAST assesses the system level effects of detailed changes and produces output metrics that identify preferred assembly sequences. FAST incorporates Space Shuttle integration, Space Station hardware, on-orbit operations, and programmatic drivers as either precedence relations or numerical data. Hardware sequencing information can either be input directly and evaluated via the "specified" mode of operation or evaluated from the input precedence relations in the "flexible" mode. In the specified mode, FAST takes as its input a list of the cargo elements assigned to each flight. The program determines positions for the cargo elements that maximize the center of gravity (c.g.) margin. These positions are restricted by the geometry of the cargo elements and the location of attachment fittings both in the orbiter and on the cargo elements. FAST calculates every permutation of cargo element location according to its height, trunnion fitting locations, and required intercargo element spacing. Each cargo element is tested in both its normal and reversed orientation (rotated 180 degrees). The best solution is that which maximizes the c.g. margin for each flight. In the flexible mode, FAST begins with the first flight and determines all feasible combinations of cargo elements according to mass, volume, EVA, and precedence relation constraints. The program generates an assembly sequence that meets mass, volume, position, EVA, and precedence constraints while minimizing the total number of Shuttle flights required. Issues associated with ground operations, spacecraft performance, logistics requirements and user requirements will be addressed in future versions of the model. FAST is written in C

  13. Magnetically guided fast electrons in cylindrically compressed matter.

    PubMed

    Pérez, F; Debayle, A; Honrubia, J; Koenig, M; Batani, D; Baton, S D; Beg, F N; Benedetti, C; Brambrink, E; Chawla, S; Dorchies, F; Fourment, C; Galimberti, M; Gizzi, L A; Gremillet, L; Heathcote, R; Higginson, D P; Hulin, S; Jafer, R; Koester, P; Labate, L; Lancaster, K L; MacKinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Nazarov, W; Nicolai, P; Pasley, J; Ramis, R; Richetta, M; Santos, J J; Sgattoni, A; Spindloe, C; Vauzour, B; Vinci, T; Volpe, L

    2011-08-05

    Fast electrons produced by a 10 ps, 160 J laser pulse through laser-compressed plastic cylinders are studied experimentally and numerically in the context of fast ignition. K(α)-emission images reveal a collimated or scattered electron beam depending on the initial density and the compression timing. A numerical transport model shows that implosion-driven electrical resistivity gradients induce strong magnetic fields able to guide the electrons. The good agreement with measured beam sizes provides the first experimental evidence for fast-electron magnetic collimation in laser-compressed matter.

  14. Does Ramadan fasting affect sleep?

    PubMed

    Bahammam, A

    2006-12-01

    Experimental fasting has been shown to alter the sleep-wakefulness pattern in various species. As fasting during Ramadan is distinct from experimental fasting, the physiological and behavioural changes occurring during Ramadan fasting may differ from those occurring during experimental fasting. There has been increased interest in recent years in sleep changes and daytime sleepiness during Ramadan. Moreover, many of those who fast during Ramadan associate this fasting with increased daytime sleepiness and decreased performance. This raises the question of whether Ramadan fasting affects sleep. In this review, we discuss the findings of research conducted to assess changes in sleep pattern, chronobiology, circadian rhythms, daytime sleepiness and function and sleep architecture during the month of Ramadan. Where applicable, these findings are compared with those obtained during experimental fasting.

  15. Fast electrochemical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, I. V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lack of fast and strong microactuators is a well-recognized problem in MEMS community. Electrochemical actuators can develop high pressure but they are notoriously slow. Water electrolysis produced by short voltage pulses of alternating polarity can overcome the problem of slow gas termination. Here we demonstrate an actuation regime, for which the gas pressure is relaxed just for 10 μs or so. The actuator consists of a microchamber filled with the electrolyte and covered with a flexible membrane. The membrane bends outward when the pressure in the chamber increases. Fast termination of gas and high pressure developed in the chamber are related to a high density of nanobubbles in the chamber. The physical processes happening in the chamber are discussed so as problems that have to be resolved for practical applications of this actuation regime. The actuator can be used as a driving engine for microfluidics.

  16. A fast template periodogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, John; VanderPlas, Jake; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gáspár

    2017-09-01

    This proceedings contribution presents a novel, non-linear extension to the Lomb-Scargle periodogram that allows periodograms to be generated for arbitrary signal shapes. Such periodograms are already known as "template periodograms" or "periodic matched filters," but current implementations are computationally inefficient. The "fast template periodogram" presented here improves existing techniques by a factor of ˜a few for small test cases (O(10) observations), and over three orders of magnitude for lightcurves containing O(104) observations. The fast template periodogram scales asymptotically as O(HNf log HNf + H4Nf), where H denotes the number of harmonics required to adequately approximate the template and Nf is the number of trial frequencies. Existing implementations scale as O(NobsNf), where Nobs is the number of observations in the lightcurve. An open source Python implementation is available on GitHub.

  17. Fast tracking hospital construction.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Hospital leaders should consider four factors in determining whether to fast track a hospital construction project: Expectations of project length, quality, and cost. Whether decisions can be made quickly as issues arise. Their own time commitment to the project, as well as that of architects, engineers, construction managers, and others. The extent to which they are willing to share with the design and construction teams how and why decisions are being made.

  18. PHENIX Fast TOF

    SciTech Connect

    Soha, Aria; Chiu, Mickey; Mannel, Eric; Stoll, Sean; Lynch, Don; Boose, Steve; Northacker, Dave; Alfred, Marcus; Lindesay, James; Chujo, Tatsuya; Inaba, Motoi; Nonaka, Toshihiro; Sato, Wataru; Sakatani, Ikumi; Hirano, Masahiro; Choi, Ihnjea

    2014-01-15

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of PHENIX Fast TOF group who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the FY2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The goals for this test beam experiment are to verify the timing performance of the two types of time-of-flight detector prototypes.

  19. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rane, Akshaya; Lorimer, Duncan

    2017-09-01

    We summarize our current state of knowledge of fast radio bursts (FRBs) which were first discovered a decade ago. Following an introduction to radio transients in general, including pulsars and rotating radio transients, we discuss the discovery of FRBs. We then discuss FRB follow-up observations in the context of repeat bursts before moving on to review propagation effects on FRB signals, FRB progenitor models and an outlook on FRBs as potential cosmological tools.

  1. Fast Ion Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, Alan V.

    Fast ion conductors, sometimes referred to as superionic conductors or solid electrolytes, are solids with ionic conductivities that are comparable to those found in molten salts and aqueous solutions of strong electrolytes, i.e., 10-2-10 S cm-1. Such materials have been known of for a very long time and some typical examples of the conductivity are shown in Fig. 1, along with sodium chloride as the archetypal normal ionic solid. Faraday [1] first noted the high conductivity of solid lead fluoride (PbF2) and silver sulphide (Ag2S) in the 1830s and silver iodide was known to be unusually high ionic conductor to the German physicists early in the 1900s. However, the materials were regarded as anomalous until the mid 1960s when they became the focus of intense interest to academics and technologists and they have remained at the forefront of materials research [2-4]. The academic aim is to understand the fundamental origin of fast ion behaviour and the technological goal is to utilize the properties in applications, particularly in energy applications such as the electrolyte membranes in solid-state batteries and fuel cells, and in electrochemical sensors. The last four decades has seen an expansion of the types of material that exhibit fast ion behaviour that now extends beyond simple binary ionic crystals to complex solids and even polymeric materials. Over this same period computer simulations of solids has also developed (in fact these methods and the interest in fast ion conductors were almost coincidental in their time of origin) and the techniques have played a key role in this area of research.

  2. "Fast" Capitalism and "Fast" Schools: New Realities and New Truths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Susan L.

    This paper locates the phenomenon of self-managing schools within the framework of "fast capitalism" and identifies themes of organization central to fast capitalism, which are argued to also underpin the self-managing schools. "Fast capitalism" refers to the rapidly intensified integration of regionalized productive activities into the global…

  3. Fast Track Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Fast Track Study supports the efforts of a Special Study Group (SSG) made up of members of the Advanced Project Management Class number 23 (APM-23) that met at the Wallops Island Management Education Center from April 28 - May 8, 1996. Members of the Class expressed interest to Mr. Vem Weyers in having an input to the NASA Policy Document (NPD) 7120.4, that will replace NASA Management Institute (NMI) 7120.4, and the NASA Program/Project Management Guide. The APM-23 SSG was tasked with assisting in development of NASA policy on managing Fast Track Projects, defined as small projects under $150 million and completed within three years. 'Me approach of the APM-23 SSG was to gather data on successful projects working in a 'Better, Faster, Cheaper' environment, within and outside of NASA and develop the Fast Track Project section of the NASA Program/Project Management Guide. Fourteen interviews and four other data gathering efforts were conducted by the SSG, and 16 were conducted by Strategic Resources, Inc. (SRI), including five interviews at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and one at the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). The interviews were compiled and analyzed for techniques and approaches commonly used to meet severe cost and schedule constraints.

  4. Lipid metabolism during fasting.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M D; Ekberg, K; Landau, B R

    2001-10-01

    These studies were conducted to understand the relationship between measures of systemic free fatty acid (FFA) reesterification and regional FFA, glycerol, and triglyceride metabolism during fasting. Indirect calorimetry was used to measure fatty acid oxidation in six men after a 60-h fast. Systemic and regional (splanchnic, renal, and leg) FFA ([(3)H]palmitate) and glycerol ([(3)H]glycerol) kinetics, as well as splanchnic triglyceride release, were measured. The rate of systemic FFA reesterification was 366 +/- 93 micromol/min, which was greater (P < 0.05) than splanchnic triglyceride fatty acid output (64 +/- 6 micromol/min), a measure of VLDL triglyceride fatty acid export. The majority of glycerol uptake occurred in the splanchnic and renal beds, although some leg glycerol uptake was detected. Systemic FFA release was approximately double that usually present in overnight postabsorptive men, yet the regional FFA release rates were of the same proportions previously observed in overnight postabsorptive men. In conclusion, FFA reesterification at rest during fasting far exceeds splanchnic triglyceride fatty acid output. This indicates that nonhepatic sites of FFA reesterification are important, and that peripheral reesterification of FFA exceeds the rate of simultaneous intracellular triglyceride fatty acid oxidation.

  5. Fasting - the ultimate diet?

    PubMed

    Johnstone, A M

    2007-05-01

    Adult humans often undertake acute fasts for cosmetic, religious or medical reasons. For example, an estimated 14% of US adults have reported using fasting as a means to control body weight and this approach has long been advocated as an intermittent treatment for gross refractory obesity. There are unique historical data sets on extreme forms of food restriction that give insight into the consequences of starvation or semi-starvation in previously healthy, but usually non-obese subjects. These include documented medical reports on victims of hunger strike, famine and prisoners of war. Such data provide a detailed account on how the body adapts to prolonged starvation. It has previously been shown that fasting for the biblical period of 40 days and 40 nights is well within the overall physiological capabilities of a healthy adult. However, the specific effects on the human body and mind are less clearly documented, either in the short term (hours) or in the longer term (days). This review asks the following three questions, pertinent to any weight-loss therapy, (i) how effective is the regime in achieving weight loss, (ii) what impact does it have on psychology? and finally, (iii) does it work long-term?

  6. Fast Light Optical Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation space missions are currently constrained by existing spacecraft navigation systems which are not fully autonomous. These systems suffer from accumulated dead-reckoning errors and must therefore rely on periodic corrections provided by supplementary technologies that depend on line-of-sight signals from Earth, satellites, or other celestial bodies for absolute attitude and position determination, which can be spoofed, incorrectly identified, occluded, obscured, attenuated, or insufficiently available. These dead-reckoning errors originate in the ring laser gyros themselves, which constitute inertial measurement units. Increasing the time for standalone spacecraft navigation therefore requires fundamental improvements in gyroscope technologies. One promising solution to enhance gyro sensitivity is to place an anomalous dispersion or fast light material inside the gyro cavity. The fast light essentially provides a positive feedback to the gyro response, resulting in a larger measured beat frequency for a given rotation rate as shown in figure 1. Game Changing Development has been investing in this idea through the Fast Light Optical Gyros (FLOG) project, a collaborative effort which began in FY 2013 between NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), and Northwestern University. MSFC and AMRDEC are working on the development of a passive FLOG (PFLOG), while Northwestern is developing an active FLOG (AFLOG). The project has demonstrated new benchmarks in the state of the art for scale factor sensitivity enhancement. Recent results show cavity scale factor enhancements of approx.100 for passive cavities.

  7. Transport: Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, William; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1992-01-01

    Space transportation requirements for the NASA baseline scenario for future space missions are discussed. Spacecraft/propulsion technologies required for surface-to-orbit, orbit-to-orbit, and surface (lunar) transportation are addressed.

  8. Metabolic Effects of Intermittent Fasting.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Ruth E; Sears, Dorothy D

    2017-08-21

    The objective of this review is to provide an overview of intermittent fasting regimens, summarize the evidence on the health benefits of intermittent fasting, and discuss physiological mechanisms by which intermittent fasting might lead to improved health outcomes. A MEDLINE search was performed using PubMed and the terms "intermittent fasting," "fasting," "time-restricted feeding," and "food timing." Modified fasting regimens appear to promote weight loss and may improve metabolic health. Several lines of evidence also support the hypothesis that eating patterns that reduce or eliminate nighttime eating and prolong nightly fasting intervals may result in sustained improvements in human health. Intermittent fasting regimens are hypothesized to influence metabolic regulation via effects on (a) circadian biology, (b) the gut microbiome, and (c) modifiable lifestyle behaviors, such as sleep. If proven to be efficacious, these eating regimens offer promising nonpharmacological approaches to improving health at the population level, with multiple public health benefits.

  9. Neighborhood fast food availability and fast food consumption.

    PubMed

    Oexle, Nathalie; Barnes, Timothy L; Blake, Christine E; Bell, Bethany A; Liese, Angela D

    2015-09-01

    Recent nutritional and public health research has focused on how the availability of various types of food in a person's immediate area or neighborhood influences his or her food choices and eating habits. It has been theorized that people living in areas with a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options may show higher levels of fast-food consumption, a factor that often coincides with being overweight or obese. However, measuring food availability in a particular area is difficult to achieve consistently: there may be differences in the strict physical locations of food options as compared to how individuals perceive their personal food availability, and various studies may use either one or both of these measures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between weekly fast-food consumption and both a person's perceived availability of fast-food and an objective measure of fast-food presence - Geographic Information Systems (GIS) - within that person's neighborhood. A randomly selected population-based sample of eight counties in South Carolina was used to conduct a cross-sectional telephone survey assessing self-report fast-food consumption and perceived availability of fast food. GIS was used to determine the actual number of fast-food outlets within each participant's neighborhood. Using multinomial logistic regression analyses, we found that neither perceived availability nor GIS-based presence of fast-food was significantly associated with weekly fast-food consumption. Our findings indicate that availability might not be the dominant factor influencing fast-food consumption. We recommend using subjective availability measures and considering individual characteristics that could influence both perceived availability of fast food and its impact on fast-food consumption. If replicated, our findings suggest that interventions aimed at reducing fast-food consumption by limiting neighborhood fast-food availability might not be completely effective.

  10. Neighborhood fast food availability and fast food consumption

    PubMed Central

    Oexle, Nathalie; Barnes, Timothy L; Blake, Christine E; Bell, Bethany A; Liese, Angela D

    2015-01-01

    Recent nutritional and public health research has focused on how the availability of various types of food in a person’s immediate area or neighborhood influences his or her food choices and eating habits. It has been theorized that people living in areas with a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options may show higher levels of fast-food consumption, a factor that often coincides with being overweight or obese. However, measuring food availability in a particular area is difficult to achieve consistently: there may be differences in the strict physical locations of food options as compared to how individuals perceive their personal food availability, and various studies may use either one or both of these measures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between weekly fast-food consumption and both a person’s perceived availability of fast-food and an objective measure of fast-food presence—Geographic Information Systems (GIS)—within that person’s neighborhood. A randomly selected population-based sample of eight counties in South Carolina was used to conduct a cross-sectional telephone survey assessing self-report fast-food consumption and perceived availability of fast food. GIS was used to determine the actual number of fast-food outlets within each participant’s neighborhood. Using multinomial logistic regression analyses, we found that neither perceived availability nor GIS-based presence of fast-food was significantly associated with weekly fast-food consumption. Our findings indicate that availability might not be the dominant factor influencing fast-food consumption. We recommend using subjective availability measures and considering individual characteristics that could influence both perceived availability of fast food and its impact on fast-food consumption. If replicated, our findings suggest that interventions aimed at reducing fast-food consumption by limiting neighborhood fast-food availability might not be completely

  11. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  12. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  13. Compositional terranes on Mercury: Information from fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, David J.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Beck, Andrew W.; Feldman, William C.; Frank, Elizabeth A.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Nittler, Larry R.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2017-01-01

    We report measurements of the flux of fast neutrons at Mercury from 20ºS to the north pole. On the basis of neutron transport simulations and remotely sensed elemental compositions, cosmic-ray-induced fast neutrons are shown to provide a measure of average atomic mass, , a result consistent with earlier studies of the Moon and Vesta. The dynamic range of fast neutron flux at Mercury is 3%, which is smaller than the fast-neutron dynamic ranges of 30% and 6% at the Moon and Vesta, respectively. Fast-neutron data delineate compositional terranes on Mercury that are complementary to those identified with X-ray, gamma-ray, and slow-neutron data. Fast neutron measurements confirm the presence of a region with high , relative to the mean for the planet, that coincides with the previously identified high-Mg region and reveal the existence of at least two additional compositional terranes: a low- region within the northern smooth plains and a high- region near the equator centered near 90ºE longitude. Comparison of the fast-neutron map with elemental composition maps show that variations predicted from the combined element maps are not consistent with the measured variations in fast-neutron flux. This lack of consistency could be due to incomplete coverage for some elements or uncertainties in the interpretations of compositional and neutron data. Currently available data and analyses do not provide sufficient constraints to resolve these differences.

  14. Faster Heavy Ion Transport for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.

    2013-01-01

    The deterministic particle transport code HZETRN was developed to enable fast and accurate space radiation transport through materials. As more complex transport solutions are implemented for neutrons, light ions (Z < 2), mesons, and leptons, it is important to maintain overall computational efficiency. In this work, the heavy ion (Z > 2) transport algorithm in HZETRN is reviewed, and a simple modification is shown to provide an approximate 5x decrease in execution time for galactic cosmic ray transport. Convergence tests and other comparisons are carried out to verify that numerical accuracy is maintained in the new algorithm.

  15. Fast infrared response of YBCO thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballentine, P. H.; Kadin, A. M.; Donaldson, W. R.; Scofield, J. H.; Bajuk, L.

    1990-01-01

    The response to short infrared pulses of some epitaxial YBCO films prepared by sputter deposition and by electron-beam evaporation is reported. The response is found to be essentially bolometric on the ns timescale, with some indirect hints of nonequilibrium electron transport on the ps scale. Fast switching could be obtained either by biasing the switch close to the critical current or by cooling the film below about 20 K. These results are encouraging for potential application to a high-current optically-triggered opening switch.

  16. Bi-Directional Fast Charging Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler Gray

    2012-02-01

    This report details the hardware and software infrastructure needed to demonstrate the possibility of utilizing battery power in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) with a bi directional fast charger to support/offset peak building loads. This document fulfills deliverable requirements for Tasks 1.2.1.2, 1.2.1.3, and 1.2.1.4 of Statement of Work (SOW) No.5799 for Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, now ECOtality North America (NA) support for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  17. Fast ion profile stiffness due to the resonance overlap of multiple Alfvén eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todo, Y.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2016-11-01

    Fast ion pressure profiles flattened by multiple Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) are investigated for various neutral beam deposition powers in a multi-phase simulation, which is a combination of classical simulation and hybrid simulation for energetic particles interacting with a magnetohydrodynamic fluid. Monotonic degradation of fast ion confinement and fast ion profile stiffness is found with increasing beam deposition power. The confinement degradation and profile stiffness are caused by a sudden increase in fast ion transport flux brought about by AEs for fast ion pressure gradients above a critical value. The critical pressure gradient and the corresponding beam deposition power depend on the radial location. The fast ion pressure gradient stays moderately above the critical value, and the profiles of the fast ion pressure and fast ion transport flux spread radially outward from the inner region, where the beam is injected. It is found that the square root of the MHD fluctuation energy is proportional to the beam deposition power. Analysis of the time evolutions of the fast ion energy flux profiles reveals that intermittent avalanches take place with contributions from the multiple eigenmodes. Surface of section plots demonstrate that the resonance overlap of multiple eigenmodes accounts for the sudden increase in fast ion transport with increasing beam power. The critical gradient and critical beam power for the profile stiffness are substantially higher than the marginal stability threshold.

  18. Fast Ignitor coupling physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Tabak, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Fast Ignitor is an alternate approach to ICF in which short pulse lasers are used to initiate burn at the surface of the compressed DT fuel. The aim is to avoid the need for careful central focusing of final shocks, and possibly to lower substantially the energy requirements for ignition. Ultimately, both goals may prove crucial to Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS). This will be the case should either emerging energetic needs, or finding difficulties render the presently planned radiative fusion approach to ignition with the NIF impractical. Ignition is a first step towards the achievement of substantial energy and neutron outputs for such Stewardship.

  19. Simplified fast neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Sohrabi, Mehdi

    1979-01-01

    Direct fast-neutron-induced recoil and alpha particle tracks in polycarbonate films may be enlarged for direct visual observation and automated counting procedures employing electrochemical etching techniques. Electrochemical etching is, for example, carried out in a 28% KOH solution at room temperature by applying a 2000 V peak-to-peak voltage at 1 kHz frequency. Such recoil particle amplification can be used for the detection of wide neutron dose ranges from 1 mrad. to 1000 rads. or higher, if desired.

  20. Fast neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

  1. FAST NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Snell, A.H.

    1957-12-01

    This patent relates to a reactor and process for carrying out a controlled fast neutron chain reaction. A cubical reactive mass, weighing at least 920 metric tons, of uranium metal containing predominantly U/sup 238/ and having a U/sup 235/ content of at least 7.63% is assembled and the maximum neutron reproduction ratio is limited to not substantially over 1.01 by insertion and removal of a varying amount of boron, the reactive mass being substantially freed of moderator.

  2. Fast quench reactor method

    SciTech Connect

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.; Berry, R.A.

    1999-08-10

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream. 8 figs.

  3. The fast encryption package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Matt

    1988-01-01

    The organization of some tools to help improve passwork security at a UNIX-based site is described along with how to install and use them. These tools and their associated library enable a site to force users to pick reasonably safe passwords (safe being site configurable) and to enable site management to try to crack existing passworks. The library contains various versions of a very fast implementation of the Data Encryption Standard and of the one-way encryption functions used to encryp the password.

  4. Fast neutron nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrillat, M. Th.; Lions, N.

    1985-01-08

    The invention relates to a fast neutron nuclear reactor of the integrated type comprising a cylindrical inner vessel. The inner vessel comprises two concentric ferrules and the connection between the hot collector defined within this vessel and the inlet port of the exchangers is brought about by a hot structure forming a heat baffle and supported by the inner ferrule and by a cold structure surrounding the hot structure, supported by the outer ferrule and sealingly connected to the exchanger. Application to the generation of electric power in nuclear power stations.

  5. Fast quench reactor method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.; Berry, R.A.

    1999-08-10

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream. 8 figs.

  6. Fast quench reactor method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.; Berry, Ray A.

    1999-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream.

  7. Fasting and sport: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R J

    2010-06-01

    Most humans observe an overnight fast on a daily basis, and the human body copes well with short duration fasting. Periodic fasting is widely practised for cultural, religious or health reasons. Fasting may take many different forms. Prolonged restriction of food and fluid is harmful to health and performance, and it is often automatically assumed that intermittent fasting will lead to decrements in exercise performance. Athletes who choose to fast during training or competitions may therefore be at a disadvantage. The available evidence does not entirely support this view, but there is little or no information on the effects on elite athletes competing in challenging environments. Prolonged periods of training in the fasted state may not allow optimum adaptation of muscles and other tissues. Further research on a wide range of athletes with special nutrition needs is urgently required. In events where performance might be affected, other strategies to eliminate or minimise any effects must be sought.

  8. Fast-Acting Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojciechowski, Bogdan V. (Inventor); Pegg, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A fast-acting valve includes an annular valve seat that defines an annular valve orifice between the edges of the annular valve seat, an annular valve plug sized to cover the valve orifice when the valve is closed, and a valve-plug holder for moving the annular valve plug on and off the annular valve seat. The use of an annular orifice reduces the characteristic distance between the edges of the valve seat. Rather than this distance being equal to the diameter of the orifice, as it is for a conventional circular orifice, the characteristic distance equals the distance between the inner and outer radii (for a circular annulus). The reduced characteristic distance greatly reduces the gap required between the annular valve plug and the annular valve seat for the valve to be fully open, thereby greatly reducing the required stroke and corresponding speed and acceleration of the annular valve plug. The use of a valve-plug holder that is under independent control to move the annular valve plug between its open and closed positions is important for achieving controllable fast operation of the valve.

  9. Fast SCR Thyratron Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; /SLAC

    2007-06-18

    As part of an improvement project on the linear accelerator at SLAC, it was necessary to replace the original thyratron trigger generator, which consisted of two chassis, two vacuum tubes, and a small thyratron. All solid-state, fast rise, and high voltage thyratron drivers, therefore, have been developed and built for the 244 klystron modulators. The rack mounted, single chassis driver employs a unique way to control and generate pulses through the use of an asymmetric SCR, a PFN, a fast pulse transformer, and a saturable reactor. The resulting output pulse is 2 kV peak into 50 {Omega} load with pulse duration of 1.5 {mu}s FWHM at 180 Hz. The pulse risetime is less than 40 ns with less than 1 ns jitter. Various techniques are used to protect the SCR from being damaged by high voltage and current transients due to thyratron breakdowns. The end-of-line clipper (EOLC) detection circuit is also integrated into this chassis to interrupt the modulator triggering in the event a high percentage of line reflections occurred.

  10. Generalized fast multipole method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Létourneau, Pierre-David; Cecka, Cristopher; Darve, Eric

    2010-06-01

    The fast multipole method (FMM) is a technique allowing the fast calculation of long-range interactions between N points in O(N) or O(N ln N) steps with some prescribed error tolerance. The FMM has found many applications in the field of integral equations and boundary element methods, in particular by accelerating the solution of dense linear systems arising from such formulations. Original FMMs required analytical expansions of the kernel, for example using spherical harmonics or Taylor expansions. In recent years, the range of applicability and the ease of use of FMMs has been extended by the introduction of black box [1] or kernel independent techniques [2]. In these approaches, the user only provides a subroutine to numerically calculate the interaction kernel. This allows changing the definition of the kernel with minimal change to the computer program. In this talk we will present a novel kernel independent FMM, which leads to diagonal multipole-to-local operators. This results in a significant reduction in the computational cost [1], in particular when high accuracy is needed. The approach is based on Cauchy's integral formula and the Laplace transform. We will present a numerical analysis of the convergence, methods to choose the parameters in the FMM given some tolerance, and the steps required to build a multilevel scheme from the single level formulation. Numerical results are given for benchmark calculations to demonstrate the accuracy as a function of the number of multipole coefficients, and the computational cost of the different steps in the method.

  11. Fast Fourier transform telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Tegmark, Max; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2009-04-15

    We propose an all-digital telescope for 21 cm tomography, which combines key advantages of both single dishes and interferometers. The electric field is digitized by antennas on a rectangular grid, after which a series of fast Fourier transforms recovers simultaneous multifrequency images of up to half the sky. Thanks to Moore's law, the bandwidth up to which this is feasible has now reached about 1 GHz, and will likely continue doubling every couple of years. The main advantages over a single dish telescope are cost and orders of magnitude larger field-of-view, translating into dramatically better sensitivity for large-area surveys. The key advantages over traditional interferometers are cost (the correlator computational cost for an N-element array scales as Nlog{sub 2}N rather than N{sup 2}) and a compact synthesized beam. We argue that 21 cm tomography could be an ideal first application of a very large fast Fourier transform telescope, which would provide both massive sensitivity improvements per dollar and mitigate the off-beam point source foreground problem with its clean beam. Another potentially interesting application is cosmic microwave background polarization.

  12. Slow and fast light in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedgwick, Forrest Grant

    Slow and fast light are the propagation of optical signals at group velocities below and above the speed of light in a given medium. There has been great interest in the use of nonlinear optics to engineer slow and fast light dispersion for applications in optical communications and radio-frequency or microwave photonics. Early results in this field were primarily confined to dilute atomic systems. While these results were impressive, they had two major barriers to practical application. First, the wavelengths were not compatible with fiber optic telecommunications. More importantly, the bandwidth obtainable in these experiments was inherently low; 100 kHz or less. Within the last five years slow and fast light effects have been observed and engineered in a much wider variety of systems. In this work, we detail our efforts to realize slow and fast light in semiconductor systems. There are three primary advantages of semiconductor systems: fiber-compatible wavelengths, larger bandwidth, and simplification of integration with other optical components. In this work we will explore three different types of physical mechanisms for implementing slow and fast light. The first is electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). In transporting this process to semiconductors, we initially turn our attention to quantum dots or "artificial atoms". We present simulations of a quantum dot EIT-based device within the context of an optical communications link and we derive results which are generally applicable to a broad class of slow light devices. We then present experimental results realizing EIT in quantum wells by using long-lived electron spin coherence. The second mechanism we will explore is coherent population oscillations (CPO), also known as carrier density pulsations (CDP). We examine for the first time how both slow and fast light may be achieved in a quantum well semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) while operating in the gain regime. Again, we simulate the device

  13. Constructing Straight Polyionic Liquid Microchannels for Fast Anhydrous Proton Transport.

    PubMed

    Kallem, Parashuram; Eguizabal, Adela; Mallada, Reyes; Pina, Maria Pilar

    2016-12-28

    Polymeric ionic liquids (PILs) have triggered great interest as all solid-state flexible electrolytes because of safety and superior thermal, chemical, and electrochemical stability. It is of great importance to fabricate highly conductive electrolyte membranes capable to operate above 120 °C under anhydrous conditions and in the absence of mineral acids, without sacrificing the mechanical behavior. Herein, the diminished dimensional and mechanical stability of poly[1-(3H-imidazolium)ethylene]bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide has been improved thanks to its infiltration on a polybenzimidale (PBI) support with specific pore architecture. Our innovative solution is based on the synergic combination of an emerging class of materials and sustainable large-scale manufacturing techniques (UV polymerization and replication by microtransfer-molding). Following this approach, the PIL plays the proton conduction role, and the PBI microsieve (SPBI) mainly provides the mechanical reinforcement. Among the resulting electrolyte membranes, conductivity values above 50 mS·cm(-1) at 200 °C and 10.0 MPa as tensile stress are shown by straight microchannels of poly[1-(3H-imidazolium)ethylene]bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide cross-linked with 1% of dyvinylbenzene embedded in a PBI microsieve with well-defined porosity (36%) and pore diameter (17 μm).

  14. Mechanisms for fast flow in unsaturated fractured rock

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin

    1998-03-01

    Although fractures in rock are well-recognized as pathways for fast percolation of water, the possibility that fast flow could occur along unsaturated fracture pathways is commonly not considered in vadose zone hydrology. In this study, two mechanisms for fast flow along unsaturated fractures were investigated, film flow and surface zone flow. The importance of fracture surface roughness was demonstrated through experiments conducted on ceramic blocks having simple surface topographies. Those experiments showed that film flow on fracture surfaces is largely due to flow along continuous surface channels which become water-filled at near-zero matric (capillary) potentials. The second mechanism, surface zone flow, is important when the permeability of the rock along fractures (fracture skin) is significantly greater than that of the bulk rock matrix. Surface zone fast flow was demonstrated through water imbibition (sorptivity) experiments. These mechanisms help explain observations of rapid solute transport in unsaturated subsurface environments.

  15. Transport direction determines the kinetics of substrate transport by the glutamate transporter EAAC1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhou; Tao, Zhen; Gameiro, Armanda; Barcelona, Stephanie; Braams, Simona; Rauen, Thomas; Grewer, Christof

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate transport by the excitatory amino acid carrier EAAC1 is known to be reversible. Thus, glutamate can either be taken up into cells, or it can be released from cells through reverse transport, depending on the electrochemical gradient of the co- and countertransported ions. However, it is unknown how fast and by which reverse transport mechanism glutamate can be released from cells. Here, we determined the steady- and pre-steady-state kinetics of reverse glutamate transport with submillisecond time resolution. First, our results suggest that glutamate and Na+ dissociate from their cytoplasmic binding sites sequentially, with glutamate dissociating first, followed by the three cotransported Na+ ions. Second, the kinetics of glutamate transport depend strongly on transport direction, with reverse transport being faster but less voltage-dependent than forward transport. Third, electrogenicity is distributed over several reverse transport steps, including intracellular Na+ binding, reverse translocation, and reverse relocation of the K+-bound EAAC1. We propose a kinetic model, which is based on a “first-in-first-out” mechanism, suggesting that glutamate association, with its extracellular binding site as well as dissociation from its intracellular binding site, precedes association and dissociation of at least one Na+ ion. Our model can be used to predict rates of glutamate release from neurons under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:17991780

  16. Quantum Transport.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-15

    Notre Dame was concerned with a variety of quantum transport in mesoscopic structures. This research was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific...Research under Grant No. AFOSR-91-0211. The major issues examined included quantum transport in high magnetic fields and modulated channels, Coulomb...lifetimes in quasi-1D structures, quantum transport experiments in metals, the mesoscopic photovoltaic effect, and new techniques for fabricating quantum structures in semiconductors.

  17. Islamic fasting and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Month-long daytime Ramadan fasting pose s major challenges to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in Muslim countries. Physicians should have practical knowledge on the implications of fasting on MS. We present a summary of database searches (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PubMed) and a mini-symposium on Ramadan fasting and MS. In this symposium, we aimed to review the effect of fasting on MS and suggest practical guidelines on management. Discussion In general, fasting is possible for most stable patients. Appropriate amendment of drug regimens, careful monitoring of symptoms, as well as providing patients with available evidence on fasting and MS are important parts of management. Evidence from experimental studies suggests that calorie restriction before disease induction reduces inflammation and subsequent demyelination and attenuates disease severity. Fasting does not appear to have unfavorable effects on disease course in patients with mild disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score ≤3). Most experts believed that during fasting (especially in summer), some MS symptoms (fatigue, fatigue perception, dizziness, spasticity, cognitive problems, weakness, vision, balance, gait) might worsen but return to normal levels during feasting. There was a general consensus that fasting is not safe for patients: on high doses of anti-convulsants, anti-spastics, and corticosteroids; with coagulopathy or active disease; during attacks; with EDSS score ≥7. Summary These data suggest that MS patients should have tailored care. Fasting in MS patients is a challenge that is directly associated with the spiritual belief of the patient. PMID:24655543

  18. Fast Food Jobs. National Study of Fast Food Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charner, Ivan; Fraser, Bryna Shore

    A study examined employment in the fast-food industry. The national survey collected data from employees at 279 fast-food restaurants from seven companies. Female employees outnumbered males by two to one. The ages of those fast-food employees in the survey sample ranged from 14 to 71, with fully 70 percent being in the 16- to 20-year-old age…

  19. Fast approximate stochastic tractography.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Thompson, Paul M; Liu, Cheng-Yi; Tu, Zhuowen

    2012-01-01

    Many different probabilistic tractography methods have been proposed in the literature to overcome the limitations of classical deterministic tractography: (i) lack of quantitative connectivity information; and (ii) robustness to noise, partial volume effects and selection of seed region. However, these methods rely on Monte Carlo sampling techniques that are computationally very demanding. This study presents an approximate stochastic tractography algorithm (FAST) that can be used interactively, as opposed to having to wait several minutes to obtain the output after marking a seed region. In FAST, tractography is formulated as a Markov chain that relies on a transition tensor. The tensor is designed to mimic the features of a well-known probabilistic tractography method based on a random walk model and Monte-Carlo sampling, but can also accommodate other propagation rules. Compared to the baseline algorithm, our method circumvents the sampling process and provides a deterministic solution at the expense of partially sacrificing sub-voxel accuracy. Therefore, the method is strictly speaking not stochastic, but provides a probabilistic output in the spirit of stochastic tractography methods. FAST was compared with the random walk model using real data from 10 patients in two different ways: 1. the probability maps produced by the two methods on five well-known fiber tracts were directly compared using metrics from the image registration literature; and 2. the connectivity measurements between different regions of the brain given by the two methods were compared using the correlation coefficient ρ. The results show that the connectivity measures provided by the two algorithms are well-correlated (ρ = 0.83), and so are the probability maps (normalized cross correlation 0.818 ± 0.081). The maps are also qualitatively (i.e., visually) very similar. The proposed method achieves a 60x speed-up (7 s vs. 7 min) over the Monte Carlo sampling scheme, therefore

  20. Microstructure design for fast oxygen conduction

    DOE PAGES

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Weber, William J.

    2015-11-11

    Research from the last decade has shown that in designing fast oxygen conducting materials for electrochemical applications has largely shifted to microstructural features, in contrast to material-bulk. In particular, understanding oxygen energetics in heterointerface materials is currently at the forefront, where interfacial tensile strain is being considered as the key parameter in lowering oxygen migration barriers. Nanocrystalline materials with high densities of grain boundaries have also gathered interest that could possibly allow leverage over excess volume at grain boundaries, providing fast oxygen diffusion channels similar to those previously observed in metals. In addition, near-interface phase transformations and misfit dislocations aremore » other microstructural phenomenon/features that are being explored to provide faster diffusion. In this review, the current understanding on oxygen energetics, i.e., thermodynamics and kinetics, originating from these microstructural features is discussed. Moreover, our experimental observations, theoretical predictions and novel atomistic mechanisms relevant to oxygen transport are highlighted. In addition, the interaction of dopants with oxygen vacancies in the presence of these new microstructural features, and their future role in the design of future fast-ion conductors, is outlined.« less

  1. Microstructure design for fast oxygen conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Weber, William J.

    2015-11-11

    Research from the last decade has shown that in designing fast oxygen conducting materials for electrochemical applications has largely shifted to microstructural features, in contrast to material-bulk. In particular, understanding oxygen energetics in heterointerface materials is currently at the forefront, where interfacial tensile strain is being considered as the key parameter in lowering oxygen migration barriers. Nanocrystalline materials with high densities of grain boundaries have also gathered interest that could possibly allow leverage over excess volume at grain boundaries, providing fast oxygen diffusion channels similar to those previously observed in metals. In addition, near-interface phase transformations and misfit dislocations are other microstructural phenomenon/features that are being explored to provide faster diffusion. In this review, the current understanding on oxygen energetics, i.e., thermodynamics and kinetics, originating from these microstructural features is discussed. Moreover, our experimental observations, theoretical predictions and novel atomistic mechanisms relevant to oxygen transport are highlighted. In addition, the interaction of dopants with oxygen vacancies in the presence of these new microstructural features, and their future role in the design of future fast-ion conductors, is outlined.

  2. Interplay between fast ions and turbulence in magnetic fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, R. J.; Zarzoso, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Strugarek, A.; Abiteboul, J.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph; Girardo, J.-B.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Passeron, C.; Thomine, O.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence for the impact of energetic particles (EPs) on turbulence is given in this paper. Firstly, the excitation of electrostatic instabilities in linear gyrokinetic simulations performed with the global GYSELA code by introducing distribution functions typical of fast ions in tokamak plasmas is presented. The obtained mode is unambiguously characterized as an EGAM, i.e. a geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) excited by EPs. The influence of EGAMs on turbulence and associated transport is then analyzed by implementing a source adapted to the inclusion of fast particle populations in non-linear simulations. This source successfully excites EGAMs in the presence of turbulence, which leads to a drastic reduction of the turbulent transport. However, this reduction is only transient; it is followed by an increase of the turbulent activity, characterized by a complex interaction between the EGAMs and the turbulence. In the subsequent steady-state regime, turbulent transport appears to be modulated at the EGAM frequency.

  3. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Davis, F.J.; Hurst, G.S.; Reinhardt, P.W.

    1959-08-18

    An improved proton recoil spectrometer for determining the energy spectrum of a fast neutron beam is described. Instead of discriminating against and thereby"throwing away" the many recoil protons other than those traveling parallel to the neutron beam axis as do conventional spectrometers, this device utilizes protons scattered over a very wide solid angle. An ovoidal gas-filled recoil chamber is coated on the inside with a scintillator. The ovoidal shape of the sensitive portion of the wall defining the chamber conforms to the envelope of the range of the proton recoils from the radiator disposed within the chamber. A photomultiplier monitors the output of the scintillator, and a counter counts the pulses caused by protons of energy just sufficient to reach the scintillator.

  4. FAST OPENING SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Bender, M.; Bennett, F.K.; Kuckes, A.F.

    1963-09-17

    A fast-acting electric switch is described for rapidly opening a circuit carrying large amounts of electrical power. A thin, conducting foil bridges a gap in this circuit and means are provided for producing a magnetic field and eddy currents in the foil, whereby the foil is rapidly broken to open the circuit across the gap. Advantageously the foil has a hole forming two narrow portions in the foil and the means producing the magnetic field and eddy currents comprises an annular coil having its annulus coaxial with the hole in the foil and turns adjacent the narrow portions of the foil. An electrical current flows through the coil to produce the magnetic field and eddy currents in the foil. (AEC)

  5. Fast thyratron driver

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; Cassel, R.L.

    1991-04-01

    A fast solid-state pulse generator used as a thyratron grid driver for kicker pulsers, has been developed and built with power MOSFETs and a transmission line transformer. The MOSFET, pulsed on and off by a pair of P-N channel HEXFETs, switches charged capacitors into the transformer connected in parallel on one end and in series on the other end to step up the voltage. The resulting output pulse parameters are 2 kilovolts peak (into 50 Ohms), 13 nanoseconds risetime (10--90%), 250 nanoseconds duration, and less than 50 picoseconds pulse-to-pulse jitter. Various methods are employed to protect the MOSFETs from thyratron arc back, including the use of TransZorbs and a magnetic diode. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2017-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are a recently discovered phenomenon consisting of short (few ms) bursts of radio waves that have dispersion measures that strongly suggest an extragalactic and possibly cosmological origin. Current best estimates for the rate of FRBs is several thousand per sky per day at radio frequencies near 1.4 GHz. Even with so high a rate, to date, fewer than 20 FRBs have been reported, with one source showing repeated bursts. In this talk I will describe known FRB properties including what is known about the lone repeating source, as well as models for the origin of these mysterious events. I will also describe the CHIME radio telescope, currently under construction in Canada. Thanks to its great sensitivity and unprecedented field-of-view, CHIME promises major progress on FRBs.

  7. FAST ACTING CURRENT SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Cummings, D.B.; Ryan, J.F.

    1962-05-22

    A high-current, fast-acting switch is designed for utilization as a crowbar switch in a high-current circuit such as used to generate the magnetic confinement field of a plasma-confining and heat device, e.g., Pyrotron. The device particularly comprises a cylindrical housing containing two stationary, cylindrical contacts between which a movable contact is bridged to close the switch. The movable contact is actuated by a differential-pressure, airdriven piston assembly also within the housing. To absorb the acceleration (and the shock imparted to the device by the rapidly driven, movable contact), an adjustable air buffer assembly is provided, integrally connected to the movable contact and piston assembly. Various safety locks and circuit-synchronizing means are also provided to permit proper cooperation of the invention and the high-current circuit in which it is installed. (AEC)

  8. An Investigation of Fast Ion Transport in Solids Using Conductivity and N.M.R. (Fast Ion Transport in Solids).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-15

    A crystal grown from one batch of Rare Earth Products material. 3. A crystal grown from the same material as 2 plus 1000 p.p.m. SrF2 (Harshaw crystal...III. 2 C. Sr 2+ doped LaF3 Crystal 3 was doped with 1000 p.p.m. SrF2 and the conductivity plot is shown in Figures 8 and 12. As might have been... SRF2 -S2 - 111.2 D. Th4 doped LaF3 Crystal 4 was doped with 1000 p.p.m. ThF4 and the conductivity plot is shown in Figure 8 and 13. The conductivity

  9. School Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Executive Educator, 1989

    1989-01-01

    A special report on school transportation covers the following topics: (1) a school bus safety update; (2) equipping school buses with motion detectors; (3) state training requirements for school bus drivers; (4) recruiting and retaining drivers; (5) regulations covering underground fuel-storage tanks; and (6) a transportation directory. (MLF)

  10. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  11. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  12. Fast optical computerized topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinhasi, S. V.; Alimi, R.; Eliezer, S.; Perelmutter, L.

    2010-06-01

    The topography of samples is recovered from the phase reconstruction by solving the Transport Intensity Equation (TIE). The TIE is solved by expanding the equation into a series of Zernike polynomials, leading to a set of appropriate algebraic equations. In the experiments laser light was used and the illuminated region defined the boundary conditions on the target. The phase was uniquely reconstructed and the geometry of the target was calculated. The novel technique has been successfully tested on a transparent phase plate as well as on a gold coated one. Using this technique with illumination of a short laser pulse makes it well suited for reconstructing surfaces of moving objects.

  13. IPv6 transport experiment using the GMPLS-controlled network of JGN II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, S.; Otani, T.

    2005-11-01

    IPv6 transport over the GMPLS-controlled optical network of JGN II was experimentally investigated, and four FastEthernet IPv6 streams were successfully transported with OSPFv3 routing information exchange.

  14. Integrated simulation approach for laser-driven fast ignition.

    PubMed

    Wang, W-M; Gibbon, P; Sheng, Z-M; Li, Y-T

    2015-01-01

    An integrated simulation approach fully based on the particle-in-cell (PIC) model is proposed, which involves both fast-particle generation via laser solid-density plasma interaction and transport and energy deposition of the particles in extremely high-density plasma. It is realized by introducing two independent systems in a simulation, where the fast-particle generation is simulated by a full PIC system and the transport and energy deposition computed by a second PIC system with a reduced field solver. Data of the fast particles generated in the full PIC system are copied to the reduced PIC system in real time as the fast-particle source. Unlike a two-region approach, which takes a single PIC system and two field solvers in two plasma density regions, respectively, the present one need not match the field solvers since the reduced field solver and the full solver adopted respectively in the two systems are independent. A simulation case is presented, which demonstrates that this approach can be applied to integrated simulation of fast ignition with real target densities, e.g., 300 g/cm(3).

  15. Fast word reading in pure alexia: "fast, yet serial".

    PubMed

    Bormann, Tobias; Wolfer, Sascha; Hachmann, Wibke; Neubauer, Claudia; Konieczny, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Pure alexia is a severe impairment of word reading in which individuals process letters serially with a pronounced length effect. Yet, there is considerable variation in the performance of alexic readers with generally very slow, but also occasionally fast responses, an observation addressed rarely in previous reports. It has been suggested that "fast" responses in pure alexia reflect residual parallel letter processing or that they may even be subserved by an independent reading system. Four experiments assessed fast and slow reading in a participant (DN) with pure alexia. Two behavioral experiments investigated frequency, neighborhood, and length effects in forced fast reading. Two further experiments measured eye movements when DN was forced to read quickly, or could respond faster because words were easier to process. Taken together, there was little support for the proposal that "qualitatively different" mechanisms or reading strategies underlie both types of responses in DN. Instead, fast responses are argued to be generated by the same serial-reading strategy.

  16. Fast pitch softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Meyers, M C; Brown, B R; Bloom, J A

    2001-01-01

    The popularity of fast pitch softball in the US and throughout the world is well documented. Along with this popularity, there has been a concomitant increase in the number of injuries. Nearly 52% of cases qualify as major disabling injuries requiring 3 weeks or more of treatment and 2% require surgery. Interestingly, 75% of injuries occur during away games and approximately 31% of traumas occur during nonpositional and conditioning drills. Injuries range from contusions and tendinitis to ligamentous disorders and fractures. Although head and neck traumas account for 4 to 12% of cases, upper extremity traumas account for 23 to 47% of all injuries and up to 19% of cases involve the knee. Approximately 34 to 42% of injuries occur when the athlete collides with another individual or object. Other factors involved include the quality of playing surface, athlete's age and experience level, and the excessive physical demands associated with the sport. Nearly 24% of injuries involve base running and are due to poor judgement, sliding technique, current stationary base design, unorthodox joint and extremity position during ground impact and catching of cleats. The increasing prevalence of overtraining syndrome among athletes has been attributed to an unclear definition of an optimal training zone, poor communication between player and coach, and the limited ability of bone and connective tissue to quickly respond to match the demands of the sport. This has led routinely to arm, shoulder and lumbar instability, chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and time loss injuries in 45% of pitching staff during a single season. Specific attention to a safer playing environment, coaching and player education, and sport-specific training and conditioning would reduce the risk, rate and severity of fast pitch traumas. Padding of walls, backstops, rails and dugout areas, as well as minimising use of indoor facilities, is suggested to decrease the number of collision

  17. Obstetric Transport.

    PubMed

    Scott, Julie

    2016-12-01

    Obstetric transport is a specialized medical transport for maternal, fetal, and neonatal concerns. Perinatal regionalization of care provides a broader geographic availability of obstetric services with defined levels of maternal and neonatal care so that women can be transported to centers with increased resources and capabilities to reduce morbidity and mortality. The Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act provides regulatory guidance for care of laboring women who require transfer to a higher level of care. The Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation communication can identify key pieces of medical information with recommendations given for mutual expectations of next steps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fast foldable tent domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jägers, Aswin P. L.; Sliepen, Guus; Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; Hammerschlag, Robert H.

    2008-07-01

    In the near future ELTs (Extreme Large Telescopes) will be built. Preferably these telescopes should operate without obstructions in the near surrounding to reach optimal seeing conditions and avoid large turbulences with wind-gust accelerations around large obstacles. This applies also to future large solar telescopes. At present two foldable dome prototypes have been built on the Canary Islands: the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT, La Palma) and the GREGOR Telescope (Tenerife), having a diameter of 7 and 9 meter, respectively. The domes are usually fully retracted during observations. The research consists of measurements on the two domes. New camera systems are developed and placed inside the domes for precise dome deformation measurements within 0.1 mm over the whole dome size. Simultaneously, a variety of wind-speed and -direction sensors measure the wind field around the dome. In addition, fast sensitive air-pressure sensors placed on the supporting bows measure the wind pressure. The aim is to predict accurately the expected forces and deformations on up-scaled, fully retractable domes to make their construction more economically. The dimensions of 7 and 9 meter are large enough for realistic on-site tests in gusty wind and will give much more information than wind tunnel experiments.

  19. Fast dual tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrion, Philip M.

    1990-09-01

    This paper can be considered as a continuation of the work by Carrion and Carneiro (1989), where a generalized approach to linearized inversion of geophysical data was developed. Their method allows one to incorporate virtually any constraints in the inversion and reformulate the problem in the dual space of Langrangian multipliers (see also Carrion, 1989a). The constrained tomography makes traveltime inversion robust: it automatically rejects “bad data” which correspond to solutions beyond the chosen constraints and allows one to start inversion with an arbitrary chosen initial model.In this paper, I will derive basic formulas for constrained tomographic imaging that can be used in such areas of geophysics as global mapping of the earth interior, exploration geophysics, etc. The method is fast: an example that will be shown in the paper took only 6 min. of VAX CPU time. Had the conventional least-squares matrix inversion been used it would have taken more than 10 hours of the CPU time to solve the same problem.

  20. Parallel fast gauss transform

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Rahul S; Sundar, Hari; Veerapaneni, Shravan

    2010-01-01

    We present fast adaptive parallel algorithms to compute the sum of N Gaussians at N points. Direct sequential computation of this sum would take O(N{sup 2}) time. The parallel time complexity estimates for our algorithms are O(N/n{sub p}) for uniform point distributions and O( (N/n{sub p}) log (N/n{sub p}) + n{sub p}log n{sub p}) for non-uniform distributions using n{sub p} CPUs. We incorporate a plane-wave representation of the Gaussian kernel which permits 'diagonal translation'. We use parallel octrees and a new scheme for translating the plane-waves to efficiently handle non-uniform distributions. Computing the transform to six-digit accuracy at 120 billion points took approximately 140 seconds using 4096 cores on the Jaguar supercomputer. Our implementation is 'kernel-independent' and can handle other 'Gaussian-type' kernels even when explicit analytic expression for the kernel is not known. These algorithms form a new class of core computational machinery for solving parabolic PDEs on massively parallel architectures.

  1. Fast Fuzzy Arithmetic Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Michael; Kosheleva, Olga

    1997-01-01

    In engineering applications of fuzzy logic, the main goal is not to simulate the way the experts really think, but to come up with a good engineering solution that would (ideally) be better than the expert's control, In such applications, it makes perfect sense to restrict ourselves to simplified approximate expressions for membership functions. If we need to perform arithmetic operations with the resulting fuzzy numbers, then we can use simple and fast algorithms that are known for operations with simple membership functions. In other applications, especially the ones that are related to humanities, simulating experts is one of the main goals. In such applications, we must use membership functions that capture every nuance of the expert's opinion; these functions are therefore complicated, and fuzzy arithmetic operations with the corresponding fuzzy numbers become a computational problem. In this paper, we design a new algorithm for performing such operations. This algorithm is applicable in the case when negative logarithms - log(u(x)) of membership functions u(x) are convex, and reduces computation time from O(n(exp 2))to O(n log(n)) (where n is the number of points x at which we know the membership functions u(x)).

  2. Radar system components to detect small and fast objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hülsmann, Axel; Zech, Christian; Klenner, Mathias; Tessmann, Axel; Leuther, Arnulf; Lopez-Diaz, Daniel; Schlechtweg, Michael; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Small and fast objects, for example bullets of caliber 5 to 10 mm, fired from guns like AK-47, can cause serious problems to aircrafts in asymmetric warfare. Especially slow and big aircrafts, like heavy transport helicopters are an easy mark of small caliber hand fire weapons. These aircrafts produce so much noise, that the crew is not able to recognize an attack unless serious problems occur and important systems of the aircraft fail. This is just one of many scenarios, where the detection of fast and small objects is desirable. Another scenario is the collision of space debris particles with satellites.

  3. Glycemic management during Jain fasts

    PubMed Central

    Julka, Sandeep; Sachan, Alok; Bajaj, Sarita; Sahay, Rakesh; Chawla, Rajeev; Agrawal, Navneet; Saboo, Banshi; Unnikrishnan, A. G.; Baruah, Manash P.; Parmar, Girish; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    This review describes the various fasts observed by adherents of the Jain religion. It attempts to classify them according to their suitability for people with diabetes and suggests appropriate regime and dose modification for those observing these fasts. The review is an endeavor to encourage rational and evidence-based management in this field of diabetology. PMID:28217525

  4. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a course designed to achieve a balance between exposing students to (1) advanced topics in transport phenomena, pointing out similarities and differences between three transfer processes and (2) common methods of solving differential equations. (JN)

  5. VIM2/13. Continuous Energy MC Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1984-04-01

    VIM solves the three-dimensional steady-state multiplication eigenvalue or fixed source neutron transport problem using continuous energy-dependent nuclear data. It was designed for the analysis of fast critical experiments.

  6. Optimal shortcuts for atomic transport in anharmonic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Muga, J. G.; Guéry-Odelin, D.; Chen, Xi

    2016-06-01

    We design fast trap trajectories to transport cold atoms in anharmonic traps, combining invariant-based inverse engineering, perturbation theory, and optimal control theory. Among the ideal trajectories for harmonic traps, we choose the ones that minimize the anharmonic energy.

  7. Fundamental Aspects of Ion Transport in Solid Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Narayanan, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    Solid electrolytes (also termed as superionic solids or fast ion conductors) are characterized by high electrical conductivity, comparable to concentrated liquid electrolytes or even molten salt electrolytes, made possible by rapid transport of ions in the crystalline lattice.

  8. Fast Ignition Experimental and Theoretical Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Akli, Kramer Ugerthen

    2006-01-01

    We are becoming dependent on energy more today than we were a century ago, and with increasing world population and booming economies, sooner or later our energy sources will be exhausted. Moreover, our economy and welfare strongly depends on foreign oil and in the shadow of political uncertainties, there is an urgent need for a reliable, safe, and cheap energy source. Thermonuclear fusion, if achieved, is that source of energy which not only will satisfy our demand for today but also for centuries to come. Today, there are two major approaches to achieve fusion: magnetic confinement fusion (MFE) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This dissertation explores the inertial confinement fusion using the fast ignition concept. Unlike the conventional approach where the same laser is used for compression and ignition, in fast ignition separate laser beams are used. This dissertation addresses three very important topics to fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. These are laser-to-electron coupling efficiency, laser-generated electron beam transport, and the associated isochoric heating. First, an integrated fast ignition experiment is carried out with 0.9 kJ of energy in the compression beam and 70 J in the ignition beam. Measurements of absolute Kα yield from the imploded core revealed that about 17% of the laser energy is coupled to the suprathermal electrons. Modeling of the transport of these electrons and the associated isochoric heating, with the previously determined laser-to-electron conversion efficiency, showed a maximum target temperature of 166 eV at the front where the electron flux is higher and the density is lower. The contribution of the potential, induced by charge separation, in opposing the motion of the electrons was moderate. Second, temperature sensitivity of Cu Kα imaging efficiency using a spherical Bragg reflecting crystal is investigated. It was found that due to the shifting and broadening of the K

  9. Investigation of time-resolved fast electron dynamics in ultra-intense laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James; Robinson, Alex; Rusby, Dean; Wilson, Lucy; Murphy, Chris; Dance, Rachel; Gray, Ross; MacLellan, David; McKenna, Paul; Ridgers, Chris

    2014-10-01

    The study of fast electron transport in laser-solid interactions is crucial for many key applications. Laser-accelerated particle beams will require compact laser systems operating at high repetition rates, hence experimental effort to characterise acceleration processes using femtosecond laser sources is crucial. A thorough understanding of fast-electron acceleration and transport underpins the development of most of these applications, necessitating both temporally and spatially-resolved measurements. Here an overview will be presented of unique fast electron transport results from the Astra Gemini laser (1021 Wcm-2, 40 fs). Using high resolution rear surface optical probing, together with complementary ion acceleration measurements, we have undertaken a study of the earliest stages of fast electron dynamics. How various target and laser parameters directly affected both the electron distribution and subsequent ion acceleration will be detailed, with computational modeling supporting the experimental observations.

  10. Transportation of medical isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, D.L.

    1997-11-19

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

  11. Anomalous flattening of the fast-ion profile during Alfvén-Eigenmode activity.

    PubMed

    Heidbrink, W W; Gorelenkov, N N; Luo, Y; Van Zeeland, M A; White, R B; Austin, M E; Burrell, K H; Kramer, G J; Makowski, M A; McKee, G R; Nazikian, R

    2007-12-14

    Neutral-beam injection into plasmas with negative central shear produces a rich spectrum of toroidicity-induced and reversed-shear Alfvén eigenmodes in the DIII-D tokamak. The first application of fast-ion D_{alpha} (FIDA) spectroscopy to Alfvén-eigenmode physics shows that the central fast-ion profile is anomalously flat in the inner half of the discharge. Neutron and equilibrium measurements corroborate the FIDA data. The current density driven by fast ions is also strongly modified. Calculations based on the measured mode amplitudes do not explain the observed fast-ion transport.

  12. An enhanced fast scanning algorithm for image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismael, Ahmed Naser; Yusof, Yuhanis binti

    2015-12-01

    Segmentation is an essential and important process that separates an image into regions that have similar characteristics or features. This will transform the image for a better image analysis and evaluation. An important benefit of segmentation is the identification of region of interest in a particular image. Various algorithms have been proposed for image segmentation and this includes the Fast Scanning algorithm which has been employed on food, sport and medical images. It scans all pixels in the image and cluster each pixel according to the upper and left neighbor pixels. The clustering process in Fast Scanning algorithm is performed by merging pixels with similar neighbor based on an identified threshold. Such an approach will lead to a weak reliability and shape matching of the produced segments. This paper proposes an adaptive threshold function to be used in the clustering process of the Fast Scanning algorithm. This function used the gray'value in the image's pixels and variance Also, the level of the image that is more the threshold are converted into intensity values between 0 and 1, and other values are converted into intensity values zero. The proposed enhanced Fast Scanning algorithm is realized on images of the public and private transportation in Iraq. Evaluation is later made by comparing the produced images of proposed algorithm and the standard Fast Scanning algorithm. The results showed that proposed algorithm is faster in terms the time from standard fast scanning.

  13. Fast food: unfriendly and unhealthy.

    PubMed

    Stender, S; Dyerberg, J; Astrup, A

    2007-06-01

    Although nutrition experts might be able to navigate the menus of fast-food restaurant chains, and based on the nutritional information, compose apparently 'healthy' meals, there are still many reasons why frequent fast-food consumption at most chains is unhealthy and contributes to weight gain, obesity, type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. Fast food generally has a high-energy density, which, together with large portion sizes, induces over consumption of calories. In addition, we have found it to be a myth that the typical fast-food meal is the same worldwide. Chemical analyses of 74 samples of fast-food menus consisting of French fries and fried chicken (nuggets/hot wings) bought in McDonalds and KFC outlets in 35 countries in 2005-2006 showed that the total fat content of the same menu varies from 41 to 65 g at McDonalds and from 42 to 74 g at KFC. In addition, fast food from major chains in most countries still contains unacceptably high levels of industrially produced trans-fatty acids (IP-TFA). IP-TFA have powerful biological effects and may contribute to increased weight gain, abdominal obesity, type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. The food quality and portion size need to be improved before it is safe to eat frequently at most fast-food chains.

  14. Fast ion beta limit measurements by collimated neutron detection in MST plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capecchi, William; Anderson, Jay; Bonofiglo, Phillip; Kim, Jungha; Sears, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Fast ion orbits in the reversed field pinch (RFP) are well ordered and classically confined despite magnetic field stochasticity generated by multiple tearing modes. Classical TRANSP modeling of a 1MW tangentially injected hydrogen neutral beam in MST deuterium plasmas predicts a core-localized fast ion density that can be up to 25% of the electron density and a fast ion beta of many times the local thermal beta. However, neutral particle analysis of an NBI-driven mode (presumably driven by a fast ion pressure gradient) shows mode-induced transport of core-localized fast ions and a saturated fast ion density. The TRANSP modeling is presumed valid until the onset of the beam-driven mode and gives an initial estimate of the volume-averaged fast ion beta of 1-2% (local core value up to 10%). A collimated neutron detector for fusion product profile measurements will be used to determine the spatial distribution of fast ions, allowing for a first measurement of the critical fast-ion pressure gradient required for mode destabilization. Testing/calibration data and initial fast-ion profiles will be presented. Characterization of both the local and global fast ion beta will be done for deuterium beam injection into deuterium plasmas for comparison to TRANSP predictions. Work supported by US DOE.

  15. FastID: Extremely Fast Forensic DNA Comparisons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-19

    FastID: Extremely Fast Forensic DNA Comparisons Darrell O. Ricke, PhD Bioengineering Systems & Technologies Massachusetts Institute of...Technology Lincoln Laboratory Lexington, MA USA Darrell.Ricke@ll.mit.edu Abstract—Rapid analysis of DNA forensic samples can have a critical impact on...time sensitive investigations. Analysis of forensic DNA samples by massively parallel sequencing is creating the next gold standard for DNA

  16. [Fast food promotes weight gain].

    PubMed

    Stender, Steen; Dyerberg, Jørn; Astrup, Arne V

    2007-05-07

    The total amounts of fat in a fast food menu consisting of French fries and fried Chicken Nuggets from McDonald's and KFC, respectively, bought in 35 different countries vary from 41 to 71 gram. In most countries the menu contained unacceptably high amounts of industrially-produced trans fat which contributes to an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease, weight gain, abdominal fat accumulation and type 2 diabetes. The quality of the ingredients in fast food ought to be better and the size of the portions smaller and less energy-dense so that frequent fast food meals do not increase the risk of obesity and diseases among customers.

  17. Long Range Fast Tool Servo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-31

    AD-A271 614 r, FINAL REPORT w to I OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH [I on * LONG RANGE FAST TOOL SERVO I ONR CONTRACT NO. N00014-92-J-4082-PII Covering the...n I I 1 INTRODUCTION The PEC’s MAC 100 Fast Tool Servo (FTS) System has demonstrated the efficacy of fabricating off-axis parabolic segments on axis...by utilizing a fast tool motion to machine non-rotationally symmetric surfaces [1]. The key to this technique was a servo for the tool motion that had

  18. Gas-cooled fast reactor fuel fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Randall; Meyer, Mitch; Jue, Jan-Fong; Gan, Jian

    2007-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor is a high temperature helium-cooled Generation IV reactor concept. Operating parameters for this type of reactor are well beyond those of current fuels so a novel fuel must be developed. One fuel concept calls for UC particles dispersed throughout an SiC matrix. This study examines a hybrid reaction bonding process as a possible fabrication route for this fuel. Processing parameters are also optimized. The process combines carbon and SiC powders and a carbon yielding polymer. In order to obtain dense reaction bonded SiC samples the porosity to carbon ratio in the preform must be large enough to accommodate SiC formation from the carbon present in the sample, however too much porosity reduces mechanical integrity which leads to poor infiltration properties. The porosity must also be of a suitable size to allow silicon transport throughout the sample but keep residual silicon to a minimum.

  19. Fast critical experiment data for space reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, P.J.; McFarlane, H.F.; Olsen, D.N.; Atkinson, C.A.; Ross, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Data from a number of previous critical experiments exist that are relevant to the design concepts being considered for SP-100 and MMW space reactors. Although substantial improvements in experiment techniques have since made some of the measured quantities somewhat suspect, the basic criticality data are still useful in most cases. However, the old experiments require recalculation with modern computational methods and nuclear cross section data before they can be applied to today's designs. Recently, we have calculated about 20 fast benchmark critical experiments with the latest ENDF/B data and modern transport codes. These calculations were undertaken as a part of the planning process for a new series of benchmark experiments aimed at supporting preliminary designs of SP-100 and MMW space reactors.

  20. Gas-Fast Reactor Fuel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Randall Fielding; Mitchell Meyer; Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Jim Miller; Sean McDeavitt

    2005-11-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor is a high temperature helium cooled Generation IV reactor concept. Operating parameters for this type of reactor are well beyond those of current fuels so a novel fuel must be developed. One fuel concept calls for UC particles dispersed throughout a SiC matrix. This study examines a hybrid reaction bonding process as a possible fabrication route for this fuel. Processing parameters are also optimized. The process combines carbon and SiC powders and a carbon yielding polymer. In order to obtain dense reaction bonded SiC samples the porosity to carbon ratio in the preform must be large enough to accommodate SiC formation from the carbon present in the sample, however too much porosity reduces mechanical integrity which leads to poor infiltration properties . The porosity must also be of a suitable size to allow silicon transport throughout the sample but keep residual silicon to a minimum.

  1. NASA AVOSS Fast-Time Wake Prediction Models: User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nash'at N.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Pruis, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing and testing fast-time wake transport and decay models to safely enhance the capacity of the National Airspace System (NAS). The fast-time wake models are empirical algorithms used for real-time predictions of wake transport and decay based on aircraft parameters and ambient weather conditions. The aircraft dependent parameters include the initial vortex descent velocity and the vortex pair separation distance. The atmospheric initial conditions include vertical profiles of temperature or potential temperature, eddy dissipation rate, and crosswind. The current distribution includes the latest versions of the APA (3.4) and the TDP (2.1) models. This User's Guide provides detailed information on the model inputs, file formats, and the model output. An example of a model run and a brief description of the Memphis 1995 Wake Vortex Dataset is also provided.

  2. Effect of endurance training on glucose transport capacity and glucose transporter expression in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ploug, T.; Stallknecht, B.M.; Pedersen, O.; Kahn, B.B.; Ohkuwa, T.; Vinten, J.; Galbo, H. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of 10 wk endurance swim training on 3-O-methylglucose (3-MG) uptake (at 40 mM 3-MG) in skeletal muscle was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Training resulted in an increase of approximately 33% for maximum insulin-stimulated 3-MG transport in fast-twitch red fibers and an increase of approximately 33% for contraction-stimulated transport in slow-twitch red fibers compared with nonexercised sedentary muscle. A fully additive effect of insulin and contractions was observed both in trained and untrained muscle. Compared with transport in control rats subjected to an almost exhaustive single exercise session the day before experiment both maximum insulin- and contraction-stimulated transport rates were increased in all muscle types in trained rats. Accordingly, the increased glucose transport capacity in trained muscle was not due to a residual effect of the last training session. Half-times for reversal of contraction-induced glucose transport were similar in trained and untrained muscles. The concentrations of mRNA for GLUT-1 (the erythrocyte-brain-Hep G2 glucose transporter) and GLUT-4 (the adipocyte-muscle glucose transporter) were increased approximately twofold by training in fast-twitch red muscle fibers. In parallel to this, Western blot demonstrated a approximately 47% increase in GLUT-1 protein and a approximately 31% increase in GLUT-4 protein. This indicates that the increases in maximum velocity for 3-MG transport in trained muscle is due to an increased number of glucose transporters.

  3. Dynamic Transportation Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Jidong

    Miniaturization of computing devices, and advances in wireless communication and sensor technology are some of the forces that are propagating computing from the stationary desktop to the mobile outdoors. Some important classes of new applications that will be enabled by this revolutionary development include intelligent traffic management, location-based services, tourist services, mobile electronic commerce, and digital battlefield. Some existing application classes that will benefit from the development include transportation and air traffic control, weather forecasting, emergency response, mobile resource management, and mobile workforce. Location management, i.e., the management of transient location information, is an enabling technology for all these applications. In this chapter, we present the applications of moving objects management and their functionalities, in particular, the application of dynamic traffic navigation, which is a challenge due to the highly variable traffic state and the requirement of fast, on-line computations.

  4. Diagnostics for fast ignition science (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    MacPhee, A. G.; Chen, C. D.; Chen, H.; Hey, D. S.; Kemp, A. J.; Key, M. H.; Le Pape, S.; Patel, P. K.; Phillips, T. W.; Town, R.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B.; Beg, F. N.; King, J. A.; Ma, T. Y.; Wei, M. S.; Clarke, R.; Freeman, R. R.; Link, A.

    2008-10-15

    The ignition concept for electron fast ignition inertial confinement fusion requires sufficient energy be transferred from an {approx}20 ps laser pulse to the compressed fuel via approximately MeV electrons. We have assembled a suite of diagnostics to characterize such transfer, simultaneously fielding absolutely calibrated extreme ultraviolet multilayer imagers at 68 and 256 eV; spherically bent crystal imagers at 4.5 and 8 keV; multi-keV crystal spectrometers; MeV x-ray bremmstrahlung, electron and proton spectrometers (along the same line of sight), and a picosecond optical probe interferometer. These diagnostics allow careful measurement of energy transport and deposition during and following the laser-plasma interactions at extremely high intensities in both planar and conical targets. Together with accurate on-shot laser focal spot and prepulse characterization, these measurements are yielding new insights into energy coupling and are providing critical data for validating numerical particle-in-cell (PIC) and hybrid PIC simulation codes in an area crucial for fast ignition and other applications. Novel aspects of these diagnostics and how they are combined to extract quantitative data on ultrahigh intensity laser-plasma interactions are discussed.

  5. Fast analysis of radionuclide decay chain migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. S.; Liang, C. P.; Liu, C. W.; Li, L.

    2014-12-01

    A novel tool for rapidly predicting the long-term plume behavior of an arbitrary length radionuclide decay chain is presented in this study. This fast tool is achieved based on generalized analytical solutions in compact format derived for a set of two-dimensional advection-dispersion equations coupled with sequential first-order decay reactions in groundwater system. The performance of the developed tool is evaluated by a numerical model using a Laplace transform finite difference scheme. The results of performance evaluation indicate that the developed model is robust and accurate. The developed model is then used to fast understand the transport behavior of a four-member radionuclide decay chain. Results show that the plume extents and concentration levels of any target radionuclide are very sensitive to longitudinal, transverse dispersion, decay rate constant and retardation factor. The developed model are useful tools for rapidly assessing the ecological and environmental impact of the accidental radionuclide releases such as the Fukushima nuclear disaster where multiple radionuclides leaked through the reactor, subsequently contaminating the local groundwater and ocean seawater in the vicinity of the nuclear plant.

  6. vysmaw: Fast visibility stream muncher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, Martin; Law, Casey J.

    2017-10-01

    The vysmaw client library facilitates the development of code for processes to tap into the fast visibility stream on the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array correlator back-end InfiniBand network.

  7. Fast Access Data Acquisition System

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Vladimir Katsman

    1998-03-17

    Our goal in this program is to develop Fast Access Data Acquisition System (FADAS) by combining the flexibility of Multilink's GaAs and InP electronics and electro-optics with an extremely high data rate for the efficient handling and transfer of collider experimental data. This novel solution is based on Multilink's and Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) unique components and technologies for extremely fast data transfer, storage, and processing.

  8. Fast Spectrometer Construction and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menke, John

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes the construction and operation of a medium resolution spectrometer used in the visual wavelength range. It is homebuilt, but has built in guiding and calibration, is fully remote operable, and operates at a resolution R=3000. It features a fast f3.5 system, which allows it to be used with a fast telescope (18 inch f3.5) with no Barlow or other optical matching devices.

  9. Fasting in paediatric ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Klemetti, Seija; Suominen, Tarja

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine how preoperative fasting and postoperative termination of the fast was experienced in ambulatory surgery by child patients and their mothers. The target group consisted of children (n = 12, age 2-10 years) who had undergone tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy, and their mothers. In the interviews, the mothers were asked to describe the problems connected with their child's preoperative fast and postoperative termination of the fast, as well as the things that went well in the process. Content analysis was carried out inductively. Preoperatively, the children were thirsty and anxious, but understood the fasting situation well. In some cases, there were conflicts between the child and his/her parent if fasting was prolonged. Parents also had doubts about their ability to implement the child's fast. Postoperatively, children had pains in their throats and stomachs, suffered from nausea, and had difficulty taking in nutrition and medication. Parents had worries about their child's home care, such as food intake and administration of pain medication. The possibility of postoperative bleeding and exacerbation of the child's condition was also worrying for the parents. The most evident result of the study was that parents need more information before their child's operation. Preparing the child for the operation by giving him/her nutrition as long as permitted enhances postoperative recovery and improves parents' control over the ambulatory surgical experience. Nurses should take a more active part in children's perioperative fasting and preoperative preparation of children and their parents. In further research, experimental studies should be designed in order to receive more evidence-based information for clinical practice.

  10. Electronic excitations in fast ion-solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    We review recent developments in the study of electronic excitation of projectiles in fast ion-solid collisions. Our focus will be primarily on theory but experimental advances will also be discussed. Topics include the evidence for velocity-dependent thresholds for the existence of bound states, wake-field effects on excited states, the electronic excitation of channeled projectiles, transport phenomena, and the interaction of highly charged ions with surfaces. 44 refs., 14 figs.

  11. Quantifying Cricket Fast Bowling Skill.

    PubMed

    Feros, Simon A; Young, Warren B; O'Brien, Brendan J

    2017-09-27

    To evaluate the current evidence regarding the quantification of cricket fast bowling skill. Studies that assessed fast bowling skill (bowling speed and accuracy) were identified from searches in SPORTDiscus (EBSCO) in June 2017. The reference lists of identified papers were also examined for relevant investigations. Sixteen papers matched the inclusion criteria, and discrepancies in assessment procedures were evident. Differences in: test environment, pitch and cricket ball characteristics, the warm-up prior to test, test familiarisation procedures, permitted run-up lengths, bowling spell length, delivery sequence, test instructions, collection of bowling speed data, collection and reportage of bowling accuracy data were apparent throughout the literature. The reliability and sensitivity of fast bowling skill measures has rarely been reported across the literature. Only one study has attempted to assess the construct validity of their skill measures. There are several discrepancies in how fast bowling skill has been assessed and subsequently quantified in the literature to date. This is a problem, as comparisons between studies are often difficult. Therefore, a strong rationale exists for the creation of match-specific standardised fast bowling assessments that offer greater ecological validity while maintaining acceptable reliability and sensitivity of the skill measures. If prospective research can act on the proposed recommendations from this review, then coaches will be able to make more informed decisions surrounding player selection, talent identification, return to skill following injury, and the efficacy of short- and long-term training interventions for fast bowlers.

  12. Fast-Tracking Colostomy Closures.

    PubMed

    Nanavati, Aditya J; Prabhakar, Subramaniam

    2015-12-01

    There have been very few studies on applying fast-track principles to colostomy closures. We believe that outcome may be significantly improved with multimodal interventions in the peri-operative care of patients undergoing this procedure. A retrospective study was carried out comparing patients who had undergone colostomy closures by the fast-track and traditional care protocols at our centre. We intended to analyse peri-operative period and recovery in colostomy closures to confirm that fast-track surgery principles improved outcomes. Twenty-six patients in the fast-track arm and 24 patients in the traditional care arm had undergone colostomy closures. Both groups were comparable in terms of their baseline parameters. Patients in the fast-track group were ambulatory and accepted oral feeding earlier. There was a significant reduction in the duration of stay (4.73 ± 1.43 days vs. 7.21 ± 1.38 days, p = 0.0000). We did not observe a rise in complications or 30-day re-admissions. Fast-track surgery can safely be applied to colostomy closures. It shows earlier ambulation and reduction in length of hospital stay.

  13. Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the opinions of four transportation experts on issues related to school buses. The experts respond to the following questions: will advertisements placed on buses be used to generate district revenue; will compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas become standard fuel for school buses; and will school bus seat belts be mandatory and…

  14. Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the opinions of four transportation experts on issues related to school buses. The experts respond to the following questions: will advertisements placed on buses be used to generate district revenue; will compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas become standard fuel for school buses; and will school bus seat belts be mandatory and…

  15. Air transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, F Handley

    1924-01-01

    I purpose (sic) in this paper to deal with the development in air transport which has taken place since civil aviation between England and the Continent first started at the end of August 1919. A great deal of attention has been paid in the press to air services of the future, to the detriment of the consideration of results obtained up to the present.

  16. Anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheverry, Christophe

    2017-02-01

    This article is concerned with the relativistic Vlasov equation, for collisionless axisymmetric plasmas immersed in a strong magnetic field, like in tokamaks. It provides a consistent kinetic treatment of the microscopic particle phase-space dynamics. It shows that the turbulent transport can be completely described through WKB expansions.

  17. The FAST-ED App: A Smartphone Platform for the Field Triage of Patients With Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Raul G; Silva, Gisele S; Lima, Fabricio O; Yeh, Yu-Chih; Fleming, Carol; Branco, Daniel; Yancey, Arthur H; Ratcliff, Jonathan J; Wages, Robert Keith; Doss, Earnest; Bouslama, Mehdi; Grossberg, Jonathan A; Haussen, Diogo C; Sakano, Teppei; Frankel, Michael R

    2017-05-01

    The Emergency Medical Services field triage to stroke centers has gained considerable complexity with the recent demonstration of clinical benefit of endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke. We sought to describe a new smartphone freeware application designed to assist Emergency Medical Services professionals with the field assessment and destination triage of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Review of the application's platform and its development as well as the different variables, assessments, algorithms, and assumptions involved. The FAST-ED (Field Assessment Stroke Triage for Emergency Destination) application is based on a built-in automated decision-making algorithm that relies on (1) a brief series of questions assessing patient's age, anticoagulant usage, time last known normal, motor weakness, gaze deviation, aphasia, and hemineglect; (2) a database of all regional stroke centers according to their capability to provide endovascular treatment; and (3) Global Positioning System technology with real-time traffic information to compute the patient's eligibility for intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator or endovascular treatment as well as the distances/transportation times to the different neighboring stroke centers in order to assist Emergency Medical Services professionals with the decision about the most suitable destination for any given patient with acute ischemic stroke. The FAST-ED smartphone application has great potential to improve the triage of patients with acute ischemic stroke, as it seems capable to optimize resources, reduce hospital arrivals times, and maximize the use of both intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator and endovascular treatment ultimately leading to better clinical outcomes. Future field studies are needed to properly evaluate the impact of this tool in stroke outcomes and resource utilization. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Fast Poisson, Fast Helmholtz and fast linear elastostatic solvers on rectangular parallelepipeds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegmann, A.

    1999-06-01

    FFT-based fast Poisson and fast Helmholtz solvers on rectangular parallelepipeds for periodic boundary conditions in one-, two and three space dimensions can also be used to solve Dirichlet and Neumann boundary value problems. For non-zero boundary conditions, this is the special, grid-aligned case of jump corrections used in the Explicit Jump Immersed Interface method. Fast elastostatic solvers for periodic boundary conditions in two and three dimensions can also be based on the FFT. From the periodic solvers we derive fast solvers for the new 'normal' boundary conditions and essential boundary conditions on rectangular parallelepipeds. The periodic case allows a simple proof of existence and uniqueness of the solutions to the discretization of normal boundary conditions. Numerical examples demonstrate the efficiency of the fast elastostatic solvers for non-periodic boundary conditions. More importantly, the fast solvers on rectangular parallelepipeds can be used together with the Immersed Interface Method to solve problems on non-rectangular domains with general boundary conditions. Details of this are reported in the preprint The Explicit Jump Immersed Interface Method for 2D Linear Elastostatics by the author.

  19. Fast molecular shocks. II - Emission from fast dissociative shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Dalgarno, A.

    1989-01-01

    The line radiations emitted in the cooling gas behind a fast dissociative shock are studied. The intensities emitted in high rotational transitions of the neutral molecules CO, SiO, HCN, CN, NO, and SO are estimated, as well as in rovibrational transitions of the molecular ions HeH(+) and OH(+) in radio recombination lines of atomic hydrogen and in fine-structure transitions of C, C(+), O, and Si(+). The predictions are compared with the observed intensities of line emission from the Orion-KL region. For Orion-KL the observations do not exclude, but probably do not require, the presence of a fast dissociative shock. Emission from SiO in high-J rotational states and from vibrationally excited OH(+), HeH(+), HeH(+), and SO(+) may be detectable from dissociative shocks under suitable conditions of preshock density and shock velocity; such emission may prove to be a useful diagnostic probe of fast shock activity.

  20. Studies of thunderstorm transport processes with aircraft using tracer techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Detwiler, A.G.; Smith, P.L.; Stith, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    Instrumented aircraft can provide in situ measurements of winds and turbulence useful for studying transport and dispersion in clouds. Using inert artificial gases as tracers, and fast response analyzers on aircraft, time-resolved observations of transport and dispersion have been obtained. Examples are shown of these types of observations in and around cumulus and cumulonimbus clouds. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Analysis of colloid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1985-12-31

    The population balance methodology is described and applied to the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. The transient model includes particle growth, capture, convective transport, and dispersion. We also follow the dynamic accumulation of captured colloids on the solids. The multidimensional parabolic partial differential equation was solved by a recently enhanced method of characteristics technique. This computational technique minimized numerical dispersion and is computationally very fast. The FORTRAN 77 code ran on a VAX-780 in less than a minute and also runs on an IBM-AT using the Professional FORTRAN compiler. The code was extensively tested against various simplified cases and against analytical models. The packed column experiments by Saltelli et al. were re-analyzed incorporating the experimentally reported size distribution of the colloid feed material. Colloid capture was modeled using a linear size dependent filtration function. The effects of a colloid size dependent filtration factor and various initial colloid size distributions on colloid migration and capture were investigated. Also, we followed the changing colloid size distribution as a function of position in the column. Some simple arguments are made to assess the likelihood of colloid migration at a potential NTS Yucca Mountain waste disposal site. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. [Diabetic patients in the Yom Kippur fast--who can fast and how to treat the fasting patients].

    PubMed

    Katz, Yisrael; Zangen, David; Leibowitz, Gil; Szalalt, Auryan

    2009-09-01

    Jews all over the world fast on Yom Kippur, a fast lasting 25 hours. For diabetic patients and their physicians the fast is a significant challenge. The Jewish law exempts patients from fasting if the fast endangers the patient's health. In order to know if they can fast safely, many diabetic patients consult their physicians. In this review, the authors summarize the potential risk for fasting in diabetic patients and propose treatment protocols for patients who intend to fast. The principle recommendations are based on data related to fasting diabetic patients during the Ramadan fast, which is shorter than Yom Kippur. Furthermore, practical suggestions are based on a recent Israeli study on type 1 diabetic patients fasting for 25 hours, taking into account the Jewish law. Every diabetic patient who intends to fast should consult his physician for assurance that fasting is safe. The physician should pay special attention to patients on intensive insulin treatment or on sulfonylureas. Some, but not all these patients, should avoid fasting. In case these patients decide to fast, intensive monitoring of blood glucose is required during the fast to prevent severe hypoglycemia.

  3. Smaller, Lower-Power Fast-Neutron Scintillation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Jagdish; Blaes, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors that are smaller and less power-hungry than mainstream scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors are undergoing development. There are numerous applications for such detectors in monitoring fast-neutron fluxes from nuclear reactors, nuclear materials, and natural sources, both on Earth and in outer space. A particularly important terrestrial application for small, low-power, portable fast-neutron detectors lies in the requirement to scan for nuclear materials in cargo and baggage arriving at international transportation facilities. The present development of miniature, low-power scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors exploits recent advances in the fabrication of avalanche photodiodes (APDs). Basically, such a detector includes a plastic scintillator, typically between 300 and 400 m thick with very thin silver mirror coating on all its faces except the one bonded to an APD. All photons generated from scintillation are thus internally reflected and eventually directed to the APD. This design affords not only compactness but also tight optical coupling for utilization of a relatively large proportion of the scintillation light. The combination of this tight coupling and the avalanche-multiplication gain (typically between 750 and 1,000) of the APD is expected to have enough sensitivity to enable monitoring of a fast-neutron flux as small as 1,000 cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). Moreover, pulse-height analysis can be expected to provide information on the kinetic energies of incident neutrons. It has been estimated that a complete, fully developed fast-neutron detector of this type, would be characterized by linear dimensions of the order of 10 cm or less, a mass of no more than about 0.5 kg, and a power demand of no more than a few watts.

  4. Morphogen transport

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Patrick; Rogers, Katherine W.; Yu, Shuizi R.; Brand, Michael; Schier, Alexander F.

    2013-01-01

    The graded distribution of morphogens underlies many of the tissue patterns that form during development. How morphogens disperse from a localized source and how gradients in the target tissue form has been under debate for decades. Recent imaging studies and biophysical measurements have provided evidence for various morphogen transport models ranging from passive mechanisms, such as free or hindered extracellular diffusion, to cell-based dispersal by transcytosis or cytonemes. Here, we analyze these transport models using the morphogens Nodal, fibroblast growth factor and Decapentaplegic as case studies. We propose that most of the available data support the idea that morphogen gradients form by diffusion that is hindered by tortuosity and binding to extracellular molecules. PMID:23533171

  5. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  6. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mengjiao Yu; Ramadan Ahmed; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Aimee Washington; Crystal Redden

    2003-09-30

    The Quarter began with installing the new drill pipe, hooking up the new hydraulic power unit, completing the pipe rotation system (Task 4 has been completed), and making the SWACO choke operational. Detailed design and procurement work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. The prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed by Temco and delivered. Work is currently underway to calibrate the system. Literature review and preliminary model development for cuttings transportation with polymer foam under EPET conditions are in progress. Preparations for preliminary cuttings transport experiments with polymer foam have been completed. Two nuclear densitometers were re-calibrated. Drill pipe rotation system was tested up to 250 RPM. Water flow tests were conducted while rotating the drill pipe up to 100 RPM. The accuracy of weight measurements for cuttings in the annulus was evaluated. Additional modifications of the cuttings collection system are being considered in order to obtain the desired accurate measurement of cuttings weight in the annular test section. Cutting transport experiments with aerated fluids are being conducted at EPET, and analyses of the collected data are in progress. The printed circuit board is functioning with acceptable noise level to measure cuttings concentration at static condition using ultrasonic method. We were able to conduct several tests using a standard low pass filter to eliminate high frequency noise. We tested to verify that we can distinguish between different depths of sand in a static bed of sand. We tested with water, air and a mix of the two mediums. Major modifications to the DTF have almost been completed. A stop-flow cell is being designed for the DTF, the ACTF and Foam Generator/Viscometer which will allow us to capture bubble images without the need for ultra fast shutter speeds or microsecond flash system.

  7. Kinetic transport simulation of energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, He; Waltz, R. E.

    2016-05-01

    A kinetic transport code (EPtran) is developed for the transport of the energetic particles (EPs). The EPtran code evolves the EP distribution function in radius, energy, and pitch angle phase space (r, E, λ) to steady state with classical slowing down, pitch angle scattering, as well as radial and energy transport of the injected EPs (neutral beam injection (NBI) or fusion alpha). The EPtran code is illustrated by treating the transport of NBI fast ions from high-n ITG/TEM micro-turbulence and EP driven unstable low-n Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) in a well-studied DIII-D NBI heated discharge with significant AE central core loss. The kinetic transport code results for this discharge are compared with previous study using a simple EP density moment transport code ALPHA (R.E. Waltz and E.M. Bass 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 104006). The dominant EP-AE transport is treated with a local stiff critical EP density (or equivalent pressure) gradient radial transport model modified to include energy-dependence and the nonlocal effects EP drift orbits. All previous EP transport models assume that the EP velocity space distribution function is not significantly distorted from the classical ‘no transport’ slowing down distribution. Important transport distortions away from the slowing down EP spectrum are illustrated by a focus on the coefficient of convection: EP energy flux divided by the product of EP average energy and EP particle flux.

  8. Fast reactors and nuclear nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Avrorin, E.N.; Rachkov, V.I.; Chebeskov, A.N.

    2013-07-01

    Problems are discussed with regard to nuclear fuel cycle resistance in fast reactors to nuclear proliferation risk due to the potential for use in military programs of the knowledge, technologies and materials gained from peaceful nuclear power applications. Advantages are addressed for fast reactors in the creation of a more reliable mode of nonproliferation in the closed nuclear fuel cycle in comparison with the existing fully open and partially closed fuel cycles of thermal reactors. Advantages and shortcomings are also discussed from the point of view of nonproliferation from the start with fast reactors using plutonium of thermal reactor spent fuel and enriched uranium fuel to the gradual transition using their own plutonium as fuel. (authors)

  9. Future Assets, Student Talent (FAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Future Assets, Student Talent (FAST) motivates and prepares talented students with disabilities to further their education and achieve High Tech and professional employment. The FAST program is managed by local professionals, business, and industry leaders; it is modeled after High School High Tech project TAKE CHARGE started in Los Angeles in 1983. Through cooperative efforts of Alabama Department of Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Adult and Children Services, and the President's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, north central Alabama was chosen as the second site for a High School High Tech project. In 1986 local business, industry, education, government agencies, and rehabilitation representatives started FAST. The program objectives and goals, results and accomplishments, and survey results are included.

  10. HI Intensity Mapping with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot-Sazy, M.-A.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Battye, R. A.; Browne, I. W. A.; Chen, T.; Dickinson, C.; Harper, S.; Maffei, B.; Olivari, L. C.; Wilkinsondagger, P. N.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the detectability of large-scale HI intensity fluctuations using the FAST telescope. We present forecasts for the accuracy of measuring the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations and constraining the properties of dark energy. The FAST 19-beam L-band receivers (1.05-1.45 GHz) can provide constraints on the matter power spectrum and dark energy equation of state parameters (w0,wa) that are comparable to the BINGO and CHIME experiments. For one year of integration time we find that the optimal survey area is 6000 deg2. However, observing with larger frequency coverage at higher redshift (0.95-1.35 GHz) improves the projected errorbars on the HI power spectrum by more than 2 σ confidence level. The combined constraints from FAST, CHIME, BINGO and Planck CMB observations can provide reliable, stringent constraints on the dark energy equation of state.

  11. Overview of TFTR transport studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Arunasalam, V.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Biglari, H.; Bitter, M.; Boivin, R.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chu, T.K.; Cohen, S.A.; Cowley, S.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fredrickson, E.; Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Greene, G.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R.A.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kieras-Phillips, C.; Kilpatrick, S

    1991-10-01

    A review of TFTR plasma transport studies is presented. Parallel transport and the confinement of suprathermal ions are found to be relatively well described by theory. Cross-field transport of the thermal plasma, however, is anomalous with the momentum diffusivity being comparable to the ion thermal diffusivity and larger than the electron thermal diffusivity in neutral beam heated discharges. Perturbative experiments have studied non-linear dependencies in the transport coefficients and examined the role of possible non-local phenomena. The underlying turbulence has been studied using microwave scattering, beam emission spectroscopy and microwave reflectometry over a much broader range in k{perpendicular} than previously possible. Results indicate the existence of large-wavelength fluctuations correlated with enhanced transport. MHD instabilities set important operational constraints. However, by modifying the current profile using current ramp-down techniques, it has been possible to extend the operating regime to higher values of both {var epsilon}{beta}{sub p} and normalized {beta}{sub T}. In addition, the interaction of MHD fluctuations with fast ions, of potential relevance to {alpha}-particle confinement in D-T plasmas, has been investigated. The installation of carbon-carbon composite tiles and improvements in wall conditioning, in particular the use of Li pellet injection to reduce the carbon recycling, continue to be important in the improvement of plasma performance. 96 refs., 16 figs.

  12. Fasting-induced changes in ECL cell gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Nils W G; Yakubov, Iskandar; Sachs, George

    2007-10-22

    Gastric enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells release histamine in response to food because of elevation of gastrin and neural release of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP). Acid secretion is at a basal level in the absence of food but is rapidly stimulated with feeding. Rats fasted for 24 h showed a significant decrease of mucosal histamine despite steady-state expression of the histamine-synthesizing enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC). Comparative transcriptomal analysis using gene expression oligonucleotide microarrays of 95% pure ECL cells from fed and 24-h fasted rats, thereby eliminating mRNA contamination from other gastric mucosal cell types, identified significantly increased gene expression of the enzymes histidase and urocanase catabolizing the HDC substrate L-histidine but significantly decreased expression of the cellular L-histidine uptake transporter SN2 and of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT-2) responsible for histamine uptake into secretory vesicles. This was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction of gastric fundic mucosal samples from fed and 24-h fasted rats. The decrease of VMAT-2 gene expression was also shown by a decrease in VMAT-2 protein content in protein extracts from fed and 24-h fasted rats compared with equal amounts of HDC protein and Na-K-ATPase alpha(1)-subunit protein content. These results indicate that rat gastric ECL cells regulate their histamine content during 24-h fasting not by a change in HDC gene or protein expression but by regulation of substrate concentration for HDC and a decreased histamine secretory pool.

  13. The Fast-Casual Conundrum: Fast-Casual Restaurant Entrées Are Higher in Calories than Fast Food.

    PubMed

    Schoffman, Danielle E; Davidson, Charis R; Hales, Sarah B; Crimarco, Anthony E; Dahl, Alicia A; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M

    2016-10-01

    Frequently eating fast food has been associated with consuming a diet high in calories, and there is a public perception that fast-casual restaurants (eg, Chipotle) are healthier than traditional fast food (eg, McDonald's). However, research has not examined whether fast-food entrées and fast-casual entrées differ in calorie content. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the caloric content of entrées at fast-food restaurants differed from that found at fast-casual restaurants. This study was a cross-sectional analysis of secondary data. Calorie information from 2014 for lunch and dinner entrées for fast-food and fast-casual restaurants was downloaded from the MenuStat database. Mean calories per entrée between fast-food restaurants and fast-casual restaurants and the proportion of restaurant entrées that fell into different calorie ranges were assessed. A t test was conducted to test the hypothesis that there was no difference between the average calories per entrée at fast-food and fast-casual restaurants. To examine the difference in distribution of entrées in different calorie ranges between fast-food and fast-casual restaurants, χ(2) tests were used. There were 34 fast-food and 28 fast-casual restaurants included in the analysis (n=3,193 entrées). Fast-casual entrées had significantly more calories per entrée (760±301 kcal) than fast-food entrées (561±268; P<0.0001). A greater proportion of fast-casual entrées compared with fast-food entrées exceeded the median of 640 kcal per entrée (P<0.0001). Although fast-casual entrées contained more calories than fast-food entrées in the study sample, future studies should compare actual purchasing patterns from these restaurants to determine whether the energy content or nutrient density of full meals (ie, entrées with sides and drinks) differs between fast-casual restaurants and fast-food restaurants. Calorie-conscious consumers should consider the calorie content of entrée items

  14. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Kenneth L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses reactions and characteristics of fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectroscopy in which samples are ionized in a condensed state by bombardment with xenon or argon atoms, yielding positive/negative secondary ions. Includes applications of FAB to structural problems and considers future developments using the technique. (Author/JN)

  15. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Kenneth L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses reactions and characteristics of fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectroscopy in which samples are ionized in a condensed state by bombardment with xenon or argon atoms, yielding positive/negative secondary ions. Includes applications of FAB to structural problems and considers future developments using the technique. (Author/JN)

  16. Fast, Massively Parallel Data Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Robert A.; Blevins, Donald W.; Davis, ED

    1994-01-01

    Proposed fast, massively parallel data processor contains 8x16 array of processing elements with efficient interconnection scheme and options for flexible local control. Processing elements communicate with each other on "X" interconnection grid with external memory via high-capacity input/output bus. This approach to conditional operation nearly doubles speed of various arithmetic operations.

  17. Fast Detector Simulation Using Lelaps

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, W

    2004-08-20

    Lelaps is a fast detector simulation program which reads StdHep generator files and produces SIO or LCIO output files. It swims particles through detectors taking into account magnetic fields, multiple scattering and dE/dx energy loss. It simulates parameterized showers in EM and hadronic calorimeters and supports gamma conversions and decays.

  18. Fast positive breakdown in lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M. G.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Lapierre, J.; Wu, T.; Stanley, M. A.; Edens, H. E.

    2017-08-01

    VHF radiation sources produced by positive breakdown during lightning discharges are generally considered to be both weak and slowly propagating. However, as VHF lightning mapping systems have become more sensitive, even this weak radiation can be mapped. In addition to being a faint process, positive breakdown often produces bursts of energetic activity. During the bursts, the VHF emission is extremely bright, and the breakdown propagates at much higher speeds. Here we present VHF interferometric and time-of-arrival measurements of such fast positive breakdown events produced during three example flashes. Electric field change measurements show that the fast breakdown process carries positive charge. The extent and velocity of the breakdown is estimated by converting the angular source locations provided by the interferometer into Cartesian coordinates using three-dimensional lightning mapping observations of the flash as a guide. Fast positive breakdown events are found to extend 100-2400 m into virgin air beyond the tip of the preceding positive leader, at speeds of 0.9-9 ×107 m s-1. The observations expand upon earlier observations of such breakdown and are similar to recently reported results that fast positive breakdown is the cause of high-power narrow bipolar events.

  19. Fast Computation of CMH Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; DellaTorre, Edward; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A fast differential equation approach for the DOK model has been extented to the CMH model. Also, a cobweb technique for calculating the CMH model is also presented. The two techniques are contrasted from the point of view of flexibility and computation time.

  20. Fast-response cloud chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Wall structure keeps chambers at constant, uniform temperature, yet allows them to be cooled rapidly if necessary. Wall structure, used in fast-response cloud chamber, has surface heater and coolant shell separated by foam insulation. It is lightweight and requires relatively little power.

  1. Fast excitation variable period wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    van Steenbergen, A.; Gallardo, J.; Romano, T.; Woodle, M.

    1991-01-01

    The design of an easily stackable, variable period length, fast excitation driven wiggler, making use of geometrically alternating substacks of Vanadium Permandur ferromagnetic laminations, interspaced with conductive, non magnetic, laminations which act as eddy current induced field reflectors,'' is discussed and experimental results obtained with short wiggler models are presented.

  2. Fast excitation variable period wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    van Steenbergen, A.; Gallardo, J.; Romano, T.; Woodle, M.

    1991-12-31

    The design of an easily stackable, variable period length, fast excitation driven wiggler, making use of geometrically alternating substacks of Vanadium Permandur ferromagnetic laminations, interspaced with conductive, non magnetic, laminations which act as eddy current induced ``field reflectors,`` is discussed and experimental results obtained with short wiggler models are presented.

  3. Fast and Easy Website Tuneups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisniewski, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    This article presents fast, easy and helpful hints for making web sites that people will want to use over and over again. These tips include: (1) Making sure that the website's copyright statement is up-to-date; (2) Adding "last updated" code to each webpage at the site; (3) Adding photos to the site's contact information; (4) Turning boring old…

  4. Maintenance of skeletal muscle energy homeostasis during prolonged wintertime fasting in the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides).

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Sanni; Mänttäri, Satu; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Saarela, Seppo

    2015-05-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is a canid species with autumnal fattening and prolonged wintertime fasting. Nonpathological body weight cycling and the ability to tolerate food deficiency make this species a unique subject for studying physiological mechanisms in energy metabolism. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor regulating energy homeostasis. During acute fasting, AMPK promotes fatty acid oxidation and enhances glucose uptake. We evaluated the effects of prolonged fasting on muscle energy metabolism in farm-bred raccoon dogs. Total and phosphorylated AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), glucose transporter 4 (GLUT 4), insulin receptor and protein kinase B (Akt) protein expressions of hind limb muscles were determined by Western blot after 10 weeks of fasting. Plasma insulin, leptin, ghrelin, glucose and free fatty acid levels were measured, and muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition analyzed. Fasting had no effects on AMPK phosphorylation, but total AMPK expression decreased in m. rectus femoris, m. tibialis anterior and m. extensor digitorum longus resulting in a higher phosphorylation ratio. Decreased total expression was also observed for ACC. Fasting did not influence GLUT 4, insulin receptor or Akt expression, but Akt phosphorylation was lower in m. flexor digitorum superficialis and m. extensor digitorum longus. Three MHC isoforms (I, IIa and IIx) were detected without differences in composition between the fasted and control animals. The studied muscles were resistant to prolonged fasting indicating that raccoon dogs have an effective molecular regulatory system for preserving skeletal muscle function during wintertime immobility and fasting.

  5. Time-resolved measurements of fast electron-sourced sheath dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. S.; Murphy, C. D.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Dance, R. J.; Ridgers, C. P.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L.

    2013-10-01

    Here we present unique fast electron generation and transport results from a recent experimental campaign on the Astra Gemini laser facility. Using complementary diagnostics a unique picture is presented of the evolution of electron sheath dynamics, and thus electron transport, in the interaction of an ultra-intense, short pulse (40 fs) laser with a solid target. Targets were irradiated at up to (1021W cm - 2), with a chirped optical probe used to spatially and temporally resolve the rear surface target reflectivity. Clear snapshots of rapid ionisation and fast electron transport at the target rear surface were observed for a range of target and laser parameters. As well as providing a valuable insight into fast electron transport at the rear surface the role of fast electron refluxing inside thin targets was also investigated through the use of thin foils and novel targetry. These studies aim to see how the very earliest stages of the fast electron dynamics directly affect both the sheath evolution and ion acceleration at the rear surface.

  6. Fast Neutron Sensitivity with HPGe

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Allen; Hensley, Walter K.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Pitts, W. K.

    2008-01-22

    In addition to being excellent gamma-ray detectors, germanium detectors are also sensitive to fast neutrons. Incident neutrons undergo inelastic scattering {Ge(n,n')Ge*} off germanium nuclei and the resulting excited states emit gamma rays or conversion electrons. The response of a standard 140% high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a bismuth germanate (BGO) anti-coincidence shield was measured for several neutron sources to characterize the ability of the HPGe detector to detect fast neutrons. For a sensitivity calculation performed using the characteristic fast neutron response peak that occurs at 692 keV, the 140% germanium detector system exhibited a sensitivity of ~175 counts / kg of WGPumetal in 1000 seconds at a source-detector distance of 1 meter with 4 in. of lead shielding between source and detector. Theoretical work also indicates that it might be possible to use the shape of the fast-neutron inelastic scattering signatures (specifically, the end-point energy of the long high energy tail of the resulting asymmetric peak) to gain additional information about the energy distribution of the incident neutron spectrum. However, the experimentally observed end-point energies appear to be almost identical for each of the fast neutron sources counted. Detailed MCNP calculations show that the neutron energy distributions impingent on the detector for these sources are very similar in this experimental configuration, due to neutron scattering in a lead shield (placed between the neutron source and HPGe detector to reduce the gamma ray flux), the BGO anti-coincidence detector, and the concrete floor.

  7. -----SPACE TRANSPORTATION

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-07

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine prototype in the test bay at the General Applied Science Lab facility in Ronkonkoma, New York. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  8. Mobile Transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis, STS-110 mission, deployed this railcar, called the Mobile Transporter, and an initial 43-foot section of track, the S0 (S-zero) truss, preparing the International Space Station (ISS) for future spacewalks. The first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The 27,000-pound S0 truss is the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002. STS-110's Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station.

  9. Investigation of fast ion pressure effects in ASDEX Upgrade by spectral MSE measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, René; Dinklage, Andreas; Wolf, Robert; Dunne, Mike; Geiger, Benedikt; Hobirk, Jörg; Reich, Matthias; ASDEX Upgrade Team; McCarthy, Patrick J.

    2017-04-01

    High precision measurements of fast ion effects on the magnetic equilibrium in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak have been conducted in a high-power (10 MW) neutral-beam injection discharge. An improved analysis of the spectral motional Stark effect data based on forward-modeling, including the Zeeman effect, fine-structure and non-statistical sub-level distribution, revealed changes in the order of 1% in |B| . The results were found to be consistent with results from the equilibrium solver CLISTE. The measurements allowed us to derive the fast ion pressure fraction to be Δ {{p}\\text{FI}}/{{p}\\text{mhd}}≈ 10 % and variations of the fast ion pressure are consistent with calculations of the transport code TRANSP. The results advance the understanding of fast ion confinement and magneto-hydrodynamic stability in the presence of fast ions.

  10. Fast electron beam measurements from relativistically intense, frequency-doubled laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R. H. H.; Pérez, F.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Clark, E. L.; Davies, J. R.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Santos, J. J.; Hulin, S.; Lancaster, K. L.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Vauzour, B.; Soloviev, A. A.; Baton, S. D.; Rose, S. J.; Norreys, P. A.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental measurements of the fast electron beam created by the interaction of relativistically intense, frequency-doubled laser light with planar solid targets and its subsequent transport within the target are presented and compared with those of a similar experiment using the laser fundamental frequency. Using frequency-doubled laser light, the fast electron source size is significantly reduced, while evidence suggests the divergence angle may be reduced. Pyrometric measurements of the target rear surface temperature and the Cu Kα imager data indicate the laser to fast electron absorption fraction is reduced using frequency doubled laser light. Bremsstrahlung measurements indicate the fast electron temperature is 125 keV, while the laser energy absorbed into forward-going fast electrons was found to be 16 ± 4% for frequency doubled light at a mean laser intensity of 5 ± 3 × 1018 W cm-2.

  11. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  12. Fast-reactor-data testing of ENDF/B-V at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.Q.; Ford, W.E. III; Lucius, J.L.; Webster, C.C.; Marable, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is coordinating a program to assess the adequacy of ENDF/B-V cross sections for both fast- and thermal-reactor design applications. A secondary goal is to evaluate cross-section processing codes, cross-section libraries, and radiation-transport codes. Fast reactor data testing (FRDT) goals are accomplished, in part, by comparison of calculated results with documented performance parameters of CSEWG fast reactor benchmarks and with results obtained by other data testers. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of FRDT at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  13. Linear induction accelerator requirements for ion fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, G.

    1998-01-26

    induction linacs, the purpose of this memo is to explore possible new features and characteristic parameters that induction linacs would need to meet the stringent requirements for beam quality and compression (sufficiently low longitudinal and transverse thermal spread) for ion driven fast ignition. Separately, Ed Lee at LBNL is looking at heavy-ion synchrotrons to meet similar fast ignition requirements. Parameters relating to cost (e.g, total beam-line length and transport quads, total core volt-seconds and power switching) have to be considered in addition to meeting the challenging beam quality requirements for fast ignition compared to conventional HIF. The aim of this preliminary study is to motivate, after critical debate, taking a next step to do more detailed designs, particle simulations, and experimental tests of the most critical accelerator elements and focusing optics, to further assess the feasibility of ion-driven fast ignition.

  14. Two-dimensional fast marching for geometrical optics.

    PubMed

    Capozzoli, Amedeo; Curcio, Claudio; Liseno, Angelo; Savarese, Salvatore

    2014-11-03

    We develop an approach for the fast and accurate determination of geometrical optics solutions to Maxwell's equations in inhomogeneous 2D media and for TM polarized electric fields. The eikonal equation is solved by the fast marching method. Particular attention is paid to consistently discretizing the scatterers' boundaries and matching the discretization to that of the computational domain. The ray tracing is performed, in a direct and inverse way, by using a technique introduced in computer graphics for the fast and accurate generation of textured images from vector fields. The transport equation is solved by resorting only to its integral form, the transport of polarization being trivial for the considered geometry and polarization. Numerical results for the plane wave scattering of two perfectly conducting circular cylinders and for a Luneburg lens prove the accuracy of the algorithm. In particular, it is shown how the approach is capable of properly accounting for the multiple scattering occurring between the two metallic cylinders and how inverse ray tracing should be preferred to direct ray tracing in the case of the Luneburg lens.

  15. Nondiffusive plasma transport at tokamak edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2000-10-01

    Recent findings show that cross field edge plasma transport at tokamak edge does not necessarily obey a simple diffusive law [1], the only type of a transport model applied so far in the macroscopic modeling of edge plasma transport. Cross field edge transport is more likely due to plasma filamentation with a ballistic motion of the filaments towards the first wall. Moreover, it so fast that plasma recycles on the main chamber first wall rather than to flow into divertor as conventional picture of edge plasma fluxes suggests. Crudely speaking particle recycling wise diverted tokamak operates in a limiter regime due to fast anomalous non-diffusive cross field plasma transport. Obviously that this newly found feature of edge plasma anomalous transport can significantly alter a design of any future reactor relevant tokamaks. Here we present a simple model describing the motion of the filaments in the scrape off layer and discuss it implications for experimental observations. [1] M. Umansky, S. I. Krasheninnikov, B. LaBombard, B. Lipschultz, and J. L. Terry, Phys. Plasmas 6 (1999) 2791; M. Umansky, S. I. Krasheninnikov, B. LaBombard and J. L. Terry, Phys. Plasmas 5 (1998) 3373.

  16. FAST Deployment Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Bennett, Robert F. [R-UT

    2010-12-17

    Senate - 12/17/2010 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. FAST Redress Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Clarke, Yvette D. [D-NY-11

    2009-01-15

    02/04/2009 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. FAST Redress Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Clarke, Yvette D. [D-NY-11

    2009-01-15

    02/04/2009 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Direct Energy Conversion for Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.; Cooper, J.; Vogt, D.; Chapline, G.; Turchi, P.; Barbee Jr., T.; Farmer, J.

    2000-07-01

    Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), should improve the speed and decrease the cost of developing new TEGs. The system concept to be evaluated is shown in Figure 1. Liquid metal is used to transport heat away from the nuclear heat source and to the TEG. Air or liquid (water or a liquid metal) is used to transport heat away from the cold side of the TEG. Typical reactor coolants include sodium or eutectic mixtures of lead-bismuth. These are coolants that have been used to cool fast neutron reactors. Heat from the liquid metal coolant is rejected through the thermal electric materials, thereby producing electrical power directly. The temperature gradient could extend from as high as 1300 K to 300 K, although fast reactor structural materials (including those used to clad the fuel) currently used limit the high temperature to about 825K.

  20. Observation and modelling of fast ion loss in JET and ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinches, S. D.; Kiptily, V. G.; Sharapov, S. E.; Darrow, D. S.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; García-Muñoz, M.; Reich, M.; Strumberger, E.; Werner, A.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2006-10-01

    The confinement of fast particles is of crucial importance for the success of future burning plasma experiments. On JET, the confinement of ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) accelerated fast hydrogen ions with energies exceeding 5 MeV has been measured using the characteristic γ-rays emitted through their inelastic scattering with carbon impurities, 12C(p,p'γ)12C. Recent experiments have shown a significant decrease in this γ-ray emission (by a factor of 2) during so-called tornado mode activity (core-localized toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) within the q = 1 surface) in sawtoothing plasmas. This is indicative of a significant loss or extensive re-distribution of these (>5 MeV) particles from the plasma core. In this paper, mechanisms responsible for the radial transport and loss of these fast ions are investigated and identified using the HAGIS code, which describes the interaction of the fast ions and the TAE observed. The calculations show that the overlap of wave-particle resonances in phase-space leads to an enhanced radial transport and loss. On both JET and ASDEX Upgrade, new fast ion loss detectors have been installed to further investigate the loss of such particles. On JET, fast ion loss detectors based around an array of Faraday cups and a scintillator probe have been installed as part of a suite of diagnostic enhancements. On ASDEX Upgrade, a new fast ion loss detector has been mounted on the mid-plane manipulator allowing high resolution measurements in pitch angle, energy and time. This has enabled the direct observation of fast ion losses during various magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) phenomena to be studied in detail. Edge localised mode (ELM) induced fast ion losses have been directly observed along with the enhancement of fast ion losses from specific areas of phase-space in the presence of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) and TAEs.

  1. Comparison of model results transporting the odd nitrogen family with results transporting separate odd nitrogen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Jackman, Charles H.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    A fast two-dimensional residual circulation stratospheric family transport model, designed to minimize computer requirements, is developed. The model was used to calculate the ambient and perturbed atmospheres in which odd nitrogen species are transported as a family, and the results were compared with calculations in which HNO3, N2O5, ClONO2, and HO2NO2 are transported separately. It was found that ozone distributions computed by the two models for a present-day atmosphere are nearly identical. Good agreement was also found between calculated species concentrations and the ozone response, indicating the general applicability of the odd-nitrogen family approximations.

  2. Fast ignition integrated experiments and high-gain point design

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraga, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Theobald, W.; Solodov, A. A.; Tabak, M.

    2014-04-17

    Here, integrated fast ignition experiments were performed at ILE, Osaka, and LLE, Rochester, in which a nanosecond driver laser implodes a deuterated plastic shell in front of the tip of a hollow metal cone and an intense ultrashort-pulse laser is injected through the cone to heat the compressed plasma. Based on the initial successful results of fast electron heating of cone-in-shell targets, large-energy short-pulse laser beam lines were constructed and became operational: OMEGA-EP at Rochester and LFEX at Osaka. Neutron enhancement due to heating with a ~kJ short-pulse laser has been demonstrated in the integrated experiments at Osaka and Rochester. The neutron yields are being analyzed by comparing the experimental results with simulations. Details of the fast electron beam transport and the electron energy deposition in the imploded fuel plasma are complicated and further studies are imperative. The hydrodynamics of the implosion was studied including the interaction of the imploded core plasma with the cone tip. Theory and simulation studies are presented on the hydrodynamics of a high-gain target for a fast ignition point design.

  3. -----SPACE TRANSPORTATION

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine that completed an hour or 3,600 seconds of testing at the General Applied Sciences Laboratory in Ronkonkoma, New York. Referred to as ARGO by its design team, the engine is named after the mythological Greek ship that bore Jason and the Argonauts on their epic voyage of discovery. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced SpaceTransportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  4. Why are idioms recognized fast?

    PubMed

    Tabossi, Patrizia; Fanari, Rachele; Wolf, Kinou

    2009-06-01

    It is an established fact that idiomatic expressions are fast to process. However, the explanation of the phenomenon is controversial. Using a semantic judgment paradigm, where people decide whether a string is meaningful or not, the present experiment tested the predictions deriving from the three main theories of idiom recognition-the lexical representation hypothesis, the idiom decomposition hypothesis, and the configuration hypothesis. Participants were faster at judging decomposable idioms, nondecomposable idioms, and clichés than at judging their matched controls. The effect was comparable for all conventional expressions. The results were interpreted as suggesting that, as posited by the configuration hypothesis, the fact that they are known expressions, rather than idiomaticity, explains their fast recognition.

  5. A fast meteor detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gural, P.

    2016-01-01

    A low latency meteor detection algorithm for use with fast steering mirrors had been previously developed to track and telescopically follow meteors in real-time (Gural, 2007). It has been rewritten as a generic clustering and tracking software module for meteor detection that meets both the demanding throughput requirements of a Raspberry Pi while also maintaining a high probability of detection. The software interface is generalized to work with various forms of front-end video pre-processing approaches and provides a rich product set of parameterized line detection metrics. Discussion will include the Maximum Temporal Pixel (MTP) compression technique as a fast thresholding option for feeding the detection module, the detection algorithm trade for maximum processing throughput, details on the clustering and tracking methodology, processing products, performance metrics, and a general interface description.

  6. [Preoperative fasting guidelines: an update].

    PubMed

    López Muñoz, A C; Busto Aguirreurreta, N; Tomás Braulio, J

    2015-03-01

    Anesthesiology societies have issued various guidelines on preoperative fasting since 1990, not only to decrease the incidence of lung aspiration and anesthetic morbidity, but also to increase patient comfort prior to anesthesia. Some of these societies have been updating their guidelines, as such that, since 2010, we now have 2 evidence-based preoperative fasting guidelines available. In this article, an attempt is made to review these updated guidelines, as well as the current instructions for more controversial patients such as infants, the obese, and a particular type of ophthalmic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Causes of Extremely Fast CMEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Ruzmaikin, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    We study CMEs observed by LASCO to have plane of the sky velocities exceeding 1500 km/sec. We find that these extremely fast CMEs are typically associated with flares accompanied by erupting prominences. Our results are consistent with a single CME initiation process that consists of three stages. The initial stage is brought about by the emergence of new magnetic flux, which interacts with the pre-existing magnetic configuration and results in a slow rise of the magnetic structure. The second stage is a fast reconnection phase with flaring, filament eruption and a sudden increase of the rise velocity of the magnetic structure (CME). The third stage consists of propagation in the corona. We discuss the sources of these CMEs and the need for improved understanding of the first and third stages.

  8. Fast Moreau envelope computation I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucet, Yves

    2006-11-01

    The present article summarizes the state of the art algorithms to compute the discrete Moreau envelope, and presents a new linear-time algorithm, named NEP for NonExpansive Proximal mapping. Numerical comparisons between the NEP and two existing algorithms: The Linear-time Legendre Transform (LLT) and the Parabolic Envelope (PE) algorithms are performed. Worst-case time complexity, convergence results, and examples are included. The fast Moreau envelope algorithms first factor the Moreau envelope as several one-dimensional transforms and then reduce the brute force quadratic worst-case time complexity to linear time by using either the equivalence with Fast Legendre Transform algorithms, the computation of a lower envelope of parabolas, or, in the convex case, the non expansiveness of the proximal mapping.

  9. Techniques for Fast Stereoscopic MRI

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Michael A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    Stereoscopic MRI can impart 3D perception with only two image acquisitions. This economy over standard multiplanar 3D volume renderings allows faster frame rates, which are needed for real-time imaging applications. Real-time 3D perception may enhance the appreciation of complex anatomical structures, and may improve hand-eye coordination while manipulating a medical device during an image-guided interventional procedure. To this goal, a system is being developed to acquire and display stereoscopic MR images in real-time. A clinically used, fast gradient-recalled echo-train sequence has been modified to produce stereo image pairs. Features have been added for depth cueing, view sharing, and bulk signal suppression. A workstation was attached to a clinical MR scanner for fast data extraction, image reconstruction and stereoscopic image display. PMID:11477636

  10. Spherical demons: fast surface registration.

    PubMed

    Yeo, B T Thomas; Sabuncu, Mert; Vercauteren, Tom; Ayache, Nicholas; Fischl, Bruce; Golland, Polina

    2008-01-01

    We present the fast Spherical Demons algorithm for registering two spherical images. By exploiting spherical vector spline interpolation theory, we show that a large class of regularizers for the modified demons objective function can be efficiently implemented on the sphere using convolution. Based on the one parameter subgroups of diffeomorphisms, the resulting registration is diffeomorphic and fast - registration of two cortical mesh models with more than 100k nodes takes less than 5 minutes, comparable to the fastest surface registration algorithms. Moreover, the accuracy of our method compares favorably to the popular FreeSurfer registration algorithm. We validate the technique in two different settings: (1) parcellation in a set of in-vivo cortical surfaces and (2) Brodmann area localization in ex-vivo cortical surfaces.

  11. Spherical Demons: Fast Surface Registration

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, B.T. Thomas; Sabuncu, Mert; Vercauteren, Tom; Ayache, Nicholas; Fischl, Bruce; Golland, Polina

    2009-01-01

    We present the fast Spherical Demons algorithm for registering two spherical images. By exploiting spherical vector spline interpolation theory, we show that a large class of regularizers for the modified demons objective function can be efficiently implemented on the sphere using convolution. Based on the one parameter subgroups of diffeomorphisms, the resulting registration is diffeomorphic and fast – registration of two cortical mesh models with more than 100k nodes takes less than 5 minutes, comparable to the fastest surface registration algorithms. Moreover, the accuracy of our method compares favorably to the popular FreeSurfer registration algorithm. We validate the technique in two different settings: (1) parcellation in a set of in-vivo cortical surfaces and (2) Brodmann area localization in ex-vivo cortical surfaces. PMID:18979813

  12. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  13. Fast Setting Cement - Literature Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-01-01

    DACA -39-70-C-0022 Miscellaneous Paper C-73-1b. PROJECT NO. TISSA 02/07 TISA 02/07 . Sb. OTNER REPORT NO(S) (An , ether nu aLbL thel Mirn be...G. M. Hart ib letter of 13 May 1970, subject: Literature Survey Re Air Mobility Fast Setting Cement - Contract No. DACA -39-70-C- 0022. WES personnel

  14. Fast track to 340B.

    PubMed

    Gricius, Robert F; Wong, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals that are newly qualified for the 340B Drug Pricing Program may have an opportunity for fast-track approval to participate in the program. Three steps are required to seize this opportunity: Use data analytics to assess current and future percentages of Medicaid utilization and eligibility for federal SSI cash benefits. Determine the feasibility of early cost report filing. Prepare appropriate documentation and undertake the initial enrollment process.

  15. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  16. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-09-24

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  17. Fast Anomaly Discovery Given Duplicates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    skipping the computations for duplicate points in SN(ui) that have ci larger than k, the runtime complexity is enhanced significantly. That is, in...Fast anomaly discovery given duplicates Jay-Yoon Lee, U Kang, Danai Koutra, Christos Faloutsos Dec 2012 CMU-CS-12-146 School of Computer Science...ES) Carnegie Mellon University,School of Computer Science,Pittsburgh,PA,15213 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING

  18. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.

    1998-05-12

    A fast quench reactor includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This ``freezes`` the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage. 7 figs.

  19. FAST20XX: Achievements On European Suborbital Space Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, A.; Steelant, J.; Adirim, H.; Lentsch, A.; Marini, M.; Pilz, N.

    2011-05-01

    In Europe, the EC co-funded project FAST20XX aims at exploring the borderline between aviation and space by investigating suborbital vehicles. The main focus is the identification and mastering of critical technologies for such vehicles rather than the vehicle development itself. Besides the objectives and overall layout of the project, the paper addresses also the progress made during the first period of the project. Two vehicle concepts are considered. A first one is a space vehicle launched from an airplane providing a low-energy ballistic flight experience using hybrid propulsion. The second is a vertically starting two-stage rocket space vehicle system concept taken as a basis to identify the conditions and constraints experienced during high- energy suborbital ultra-fast transport. The paper mainly discusses the two actual reference vehicles and the technical aspects of prerequisites for commercial operation including safety, human spaceflight, business cases, environmental and legal issues.

  20. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  1. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  2. [Fasting and physical endurance capacity].

    PubMed

    Schürch, P M

    1993-03-01

    Fasting, or zero calorie diets are used not only by overweight people as a means of losing weight, but by athletes too. Their use is then explained on philosophical grounds, with the aim of even enhancing sports performance. The purpose of this investigation consisted of quantifying the effects of a 10-day fast on maximum performance capacity and endurance (as measured on a bicycle ergometer) of 12 female students of physical education of normal weight. The measurements included resting and exercise metabolism determinants, as well as weight and lean body mass. The main results show that after the diet period the maximum ergometric performance was lower in absolute terms as well as in relation to weight or lean body mass. Performance capacity for submaximal exercise was also reduced. Fat combustion was enhanced both at rest and during exercise. The reduction of maximum performance and endurance capacity may be explained by an enhanced muscle breakdown, an efficiency drop of muscular work, and an inadequate glycogen content of the acting muscles. Shorter fasting periods of 24-36 hours also lead to a lower performance level for exercise bouts extending from several minutes to 1-3 hours. An enhancement of fat combustion was always conspicuous. One may conclude that optimal physical performance is dependent on full hepatic and muscle glycogen stores. Glycogen concentration in the liver decreases sharply as a matter of fact after merely one day of carbohydrate shortage. Zero calorie or low carbohydrate diets are thus at variance with an optimal physical work capacity.

  3. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  4. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  5. Heterogeneous Transmutation Sodium Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Bays

    2007-09-01

    The threshold-fission (fertile) nature of Am-241 is used to destroy this minor actinide by capitalizing upon neutron capture instead of fission within a sodium fast reactor. This neutron-capture and its subsequent decay chain leads to the breeding of even neutron number plutonium isotopes. A slightly moderated target design is proposed for breeding plutonium in an axial blanket located above the active “fast reactor” driver fuel region. A parametric study on the core height and fuel pin diameter-to-pitch ratio is used to explore the reactor and fuel cycle aspects of this design. This study resulted in both non-flattened and flattened core geometries. Both of these designs demonstrated a high capacity for removing americium from the fuel cycle. A reactivity coefficient analysis revealed that this heterogeneous design will have comparable safety aspects to a homogeneous reactor of comparable size. A mass balance analysis revealed that the heterogeneous design may reduce the number of fast reactors needed to close the current once-through light water reactor fuel cycle.

  6. Quantification of the impact of large and small-scale instabilities on the fast-ion confinement in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, B.; Weiland, M.; Mlynek, A.; Reich, M.; Bock, A.; Dunne, M.; Dux, R.; Fable, E.; Fischer, R.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Hobirk, J.; Hopf, C.; Nielsen, S.; Odstrcil, T.; Rapson, C.; Rittich, D.; Ryter, F.; Salewski, M.; Schneider, P. A.; Tardini, G.; Willensdorfer, M.

    2015-01-01

    The confinement fast ions, generated by neutral beam injection (NBI), has been investigated at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. In plasmas that exhibit strong sawtooth crashes, a significant sawtooth-induced internal redistribution of mainly passing fast ions is observed, which is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the Kadomtsev model. Between the sawtooth crashes, the fishbone modes are excited which, however, do not cause measurable changes in the global fast-ion population. During experiments with on- and off-axis NBI and without strong magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes, the fast-ion measurements agree very well with the neo-classical predictions. This shows that the MHD-induced (large-scale), as well as a possible turbulence-induced (small-scale) fast-ion transport is negligible under these conditions. However, in discharges performed to study the off-axis NBI current drive efficiency with up to 10 MW of heating power, the fast-ion measurements agree best with the theoretical predictions that assume a weak level anomalous fast-ion transport. This is also in agreement with measurements of the internal inductance, a Motional Stark Effect diagnostic and a novel polarimetry diagnostic: the fast-ion driven current profile is clearly modified when changing the NBI injection geometry and the measurements agree best with the predictions that assume weak anomalous fast-ion diffusion.

  7. Fast ion absorption of the high harmonic fast wave in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, A. L.; Menard, J. E.; Wilson, J. R.; Medley, S. S.; Andre, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Darrow, D. S.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Redi, M. H.; Fisch, N. J.; NSTX Team, Harvey, R. W.; Mau, T. K.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P. M.; Swain, D. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Egedal, J.

    2004-05-01

    Ion absorption of the high harmonic fast wave in a spherical torus [Y.-K. M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 26, 769 (1986)] is of critical importance to assessing the viability of the wave as a means of heating and driving current. Analysis of recent National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] shots has revealed that under some conditions when neutral beam and rf power are injected into the plasma simultaneously, a fast ion population with energy above the beam injection energy is sustained by the wave. In agreement with modeling, these experiments find the rf-induced fast ion tail strength and neutron rate at lower B-fields to be less enhanced, likely due to a larger β profile, which promotes greater off-axis absorption where the fast ion population is small. Ion loss codes find the increased loss fraction with decreased B insufficient to account for the changes in tail strength, providing further evidence that this is a rf interaction effect. Though greater ion absorption is predicted with lower k∥, surprisingly little variation in the tail was observed, along with a neutron rate enhancement with higher k∥. Data from the neutral particle analyzer, neutron detectors, x-ray crystal spectrometer, and Thomson scattering are presented, along with results from the TRANSP [R. J. Hawryluk, Physics of Plasmas Close to Thermonuclear Conditions 1, 19 (1981); J. P. H. E. Ongena et al., Fusion Technol. 33, 181 (1998)] transport analysis code, ray-tracing codes HPRT [J. Menard et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2002 (1999)], and CURRAY [T. K. Mau et al., RF Power in Plasmas: 13th Topical Conference (1999), p. 148], full-wave code AORSA [E. F. Jaeger et al., RF Power in Plasmas: 14th Topical Conference, 2001, p. 369], quasilinear code CQL3D [R. W. Harvey et al., in Proceedings of the IAEA TCM on Advances in Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, 1992], and ion loss codes EIGOL [D. S. Darrow et al., in Proceedings of the 6th IAEA TCM on

  8. Energy transport velocity in bidispersed magnetic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Hem; Patel, Rajesh; Mehta, R. V.

    2012-07-01

    Study of energy transport velocity of light is an effective background for slow, fast, and diffuse light and exhibits the photonic property of the material. We report a theoretical analysis of magnetic field dependent resonant behavior in forward-backward anisotropy factor, light diffusion constant, and energy transport velocity for bidispersed magnetic colloids. A bidispersed magnetic colloid is composed of micrometer size magnetic spheres dispersed in a magnetic nanofluid consisting of magnetic nanoparticles in a nonmagnetic liquid carrier. Magnetic Mie resonances and reduction in energy transport velocity accounts for the possible delay (longer dwell time) by field dependent resonant light transport. This resonant behavior of light in bidispersed magnetic colloids suggests a novel magnetophotonic material.

  9. Glycolate transporter of the pea chloroplast envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Howitz, K.T.

    1985-01-01

    The discovery of a glycolate transporter in the pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplast envelope is described. Several novel silicone oil centrifugation methods were developed to resolve the initial rate kinetics of (/sup 14/C)glycolate transport by isolated, intact pea chloroplasts. Chloroplast glycolate transport was found to be carrier mediated. Transport rates saturated with increasing glycolate concentration. N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) pretreatment of chloroplasts inhibited transport, an inhibition prevented by glycolate. Glycolate distributed across the envelope in a way which equalized stromal and medium glycolic acid concentrations, limiting possible transport mechanisms to facilitated glycolic acid diffusion, proton symport or hydroxyl antiport. The effects of stomal and medium pH's on the K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ fit the predictions of mobile carrier kinetic models of hydroxyl antiport or proton symport (H/sup +/ binds first). The carrier mediated transport was fast enough to be consistent with in vivo rates of photorespiration. The 2-hydroxymonocarboxylates, glycerate, lactate and glyoxylate are competitive inhibitors of chloroplast glycolate uptake. Glyoxylate, D-lactate and D-glycerate cause glycolate counterflow, indicating that they are also substrates of the glycolate carrier. This finding was confirmed for D-glycerate by studies on glycolate effects on (1-/sup 14/C)D-glycerate transport.

  10. Robotic transportation.

    PubMed

    Lob, W S

    1990-09-01

    Mobile robots perform fetch-and-carry tasks autonomously. An intelligent, sensor-equipped mobile robot does not require dedicated pathways or extensive facility modification. In the hospital, mobile robots can be used to carry specimens, pharmaceuticals, meals, etc. between supply centers, patient areas, and laboratories. The HelpMate (Transitions Research Corp.) mobile robot was developed specifically for hospital environments. To reach a desired destination, Help-Mate navigates with an on-board computer that continuously polls a suite of sensors, matches the sensor data against a pre-programmed map of the environment, and issues drive commands and path corrections. A sender operates the robot with a user-friendly menu that prompts for payload insertion and desired destination(s). Upon arrival at its selected destination, the robot prompts the recipient for a security code or physical key and awaits acknowledgement of payload removal. In the future, the integration of HelpMate with robot manipulators, test equipment, and central institutional information systems will open new applications in more localized areas and should help overcome difficulties in filling transport staff positions.

  11. Maritime Intelligent Transport Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzykowski, Zbigniew

    The concept of intelligent transport systems, developed since 1980s, includes all modes of transport. Relevant developments in road transport are the most advanced. Recently water transport, particularly maritime transport, has gained more attention in this respect, in connection with building and further developments of maritime intelligent transport systems. The present state and directions of development of telematic systems in maritime transport will be discussed, with a focus on marine navigation.

  12. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  13. Fast Foods, Organic Foods, Fad Diets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is no standard definition of fast food. Generally, fast food is eaten without cutlery, and fast-food restaurants have no wait staff. Failure to have a standardized definition makes it difficult to compare studies. Foods available outside the home tend to be high in energy and fat compared w...

  14. Fast two-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Douglass, Anne R.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Guthrie, Paul D.; Thompson, A. M.

    1990-01-01

    A two dimensional (altitude and latitude) model of the atmosphere is used to investigate problems relating to the variability of the dynamics and temperature of the atmosphere on the ozone distribution, solar cycle variations of atmospheric constituents, the sensitivity of model results to tropospheric trace gas sources, and assessment computations of changes in ozone related to manmade influences. In a comparison between two dimensional model results in which the odd nitrogen family was transported together and model results in which the odd nitrogen species was transported separately, it was found that the family approximations are adequate for perturbation scenario calculations.

  15. LFR "Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor"

    SciTech Connect

    Cinotti, L; Fazio, C; Knebel, J; Monti, S; Abderrahim, H A; Smith, C; Suh, K

    2006-05-11

    The main purpose of this paper is to present the current status of development of the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) in Generation IV (GEN IV), including the European contribution, to identify needed R&D and to present the corresponding GEN IV International Forum (GIF) R&D plan [1] to support the future development and deployment of lead-cooled fast reactors. The approach of the GIF plan is to consider the research priorities of each member country in proposing an integrated, coordinated R&D program to achieve common objectives, while avoiding duplication of effort. The integrated plan recognizes two principal technology tracks: (1) a small, transportable system of 10-100 MWe size that features a very long refuelling interval, and (2) a larger-sized system rated at about 600 MWe, intended for central station power generation. This paper provides some details of the important European contributions to the development of the LFR. Sixteen European organizations have, in fact, taken the initiative to present to the European Commission the proposal for a Specific Targeted Research and Training Project (STREP) devoted to the development of a European Lead-cooled System, known as the ELSY project; two additional organizations from the US and Korea have joined the project. Consequently, ELSY will constitute the reference system for the large lead-cooled reactor of GEN IV. The ELSY project aims to demonstrate the feasibility of designing a competitive and safe fast power reactor based on simple technical engineered features that achieves all of the GEN IV goals and gives assurance of investment protection. As far as new technology development is concerned, only a limited amount of R&D will be conducted in the initial phase of the ELSY project since the first priority is to define the design guidelines before launching a larger and expensive specific R&D program. In addition, the ELSY project is expected to benefit greatly from ongoing lead and lead-alloy technology

  16. Features of a point design for fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Tabak, M; Clark, D; Town, R J; Key, M H; Amendt, P; Ho, D; Meeker, D J; Shay, H D; Lasinski, B F; Kemp, A; Divol, L; Mackinnon, A J; Patel, P; Strozzi, D; Grote, D P

    2009-10-26

    Fast Ignition is an inertial fusion scheme in which fuel is first assembled and then heated to the ignition temperature with an external heating source. In this note we consider cone and shell implosions where the energy supplied by short pulse lasers is transported to the fuel by electrons. We describe possible failure modes for this scheme and how to overcome them. In particular, we describe two sources of cone tip failure, an axis jet driven from the compressed fuel mass and hard photon preheat leaking through the implosion shell, and laser prepulse that can change the position of laser absorption and the angular distribution of the emitted electrons.

  17. Overview of recent progress in US fast ignition research

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R R; Akli, K; Beg, F; Betti, R; Chen, S; Clark, D J; Gu, P; Gregori, G; Hatchett, S P; Hey, D; Highbarger, K; Hill, J M; Izumi, N; Key, M H; King, J A; Koch, J A; Lasinski, B; Langdon, B; Mackinnon, A J; Meyerhofer, D; Patel, N; Patel, P; Pasley, J; Park, H; Ren, C; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R B; Stoeckl, C; Tabak, M; Town, R; Van Woerkom, L; Weber, R; Wilks, S C; Zhang, B

    2005-09-28

    The Fast Ignition Program in the United States has enjoyed increased funding in various forms from the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy. The program encompasses experiments on large laser facilities at various world-wide locations, and benefits enormously from collaborations with many international scientists. The program includes exploratory work in cone-target design and implosion dynamics, high electron current transport measurements in normal density materials, development of diagnostics for heating measurements, generation of protons from shaped targets, theoretical work on high gain target designs, and extensive modeling development using PIC and hybrid codes.

  18. Collisionally induced stochastic dynamics of fast ions in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of excited state formation in collisions of fast highly charged ions with solids are reviewed. We discuss a classical transport theory employing Monte-Carlo sampling of solutions of a microscopic Langevin equation. Dynamical screening by the dielectric medium as well as multiple collisions are incorporated through the drift and stochastic forces in the Langevin equation. The close relationship between the extrinsically stochastic dynamics described by the Langevin and the intrinsic stochasticity in chaotic nonlinear dynamical systems is stressed. Comparison with experimental data and possible modification by quantum corrections are discussed. 49 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Modeling electronic quantum transport with machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2014-06-01

    We present a machine learning approach to solve electronic quantum transport equations of one-dimensional nanostructures. The transmission coefficients of disordered systems were computed to provide training and test data sets to the machine. The system's representation encodes energetic as well as geometrical information to characterize similarities between disordered configurations, while the Euclidean norm is used as a measure of similarity. Errors for out-of-sample predictions systematically decrease with training set size, enabling the accurate and fast prediction of new transmission coefficients. The remarkable performance of our model to capture the complexity of interference phenomena lends further support to its viability in dealing with transport problems of undulatory nature.

  20. Nonequilibrium Interlayer Transport in Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Eres, Gyula; Larson, Ben C; Rouleau, Christopher M; Zschack, P.; Lowndes, Douglas H

    2006-01-01

    We use time-resolved surface x-ray diffraction measurements with microsecond range resolution to study the growth kinetics of pulsed laser deposited SrTiO3. Time-dependent surface coverages corresponding to single laser shots were determined directly from crystal truncation rod intensity transients. Analysis of surface coverage evolution shows that extremely fast nonequilibrium interlayer transport, which occurs concurrently with the arrival of the laser plume, dominates the deposition process. A much smaller fraction of material, which is governed by the dwell time between successive laser shots, is transferred by slow, thermally driven interlayer transport processes.

  1. Transporting particulate material

    DOEpatents

    Aldred, Derek Leslie [North Hollywood, CA; Rader, Jeffrey A [North Hollywood, CA; Saunders, Timothy W [North Hollywood, CA

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  2. Comparison of Fast-Food and Non-Fast-Food Children's Menu Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, Elena L.; Jedda, Virginia B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Compare the macronutrient content of children's meals sold by fast-food restaurants (FFR) and non-fast-food restaurants (NFF). Design: All restaurants within the designated city limits were surveyed. Non-fast-food children's meals were purchased, weighed, and analyzed using nutrition software. All fast-food children's meals were…

  3. Comparison of Fast-Food and Non-Fast-Food Children's Menu Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, Elena L.; Jedda, Virginia B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Compare the macronutrient content of children's meals sold by fast-food restaurants (FFR) and non-fast-food restaurants (NFF). Design: All restaurants within the designated city limits were surveyed. Non-fast-food children's meals were purchased, weighed, and analyzed using nutrition software. All fast-food children's meals were…

  4. FAST Redress Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Clarke, Yvette D. [D-NY-11

    2009-01-15

    Senate - 02/04/2009 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Transporting Handicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Dayton Ray

    The book presents guidelines for adaptive transportation measures for handicapped students. Part 1 considers the transportation cycle as a means to evaluate individual student competencies at all logical points during the transportation experience. The transportation cycle is reviewed from deciding to transport the student to gaining access to…

  6. Review of Fast Monte Carlo Codes for Dose Calculation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan

    2011-01-01

    An important requirement in radiation therapy is a fast and accurate treatment planning system. This system, using computed tomography (CT) data, direction, and characteristics of the beam, calculates the dose at all points of the patient's volume. The two main factors in treatment planning system are accuracy and speed. According to these factors, various generations of treatment planning systems are developed. This article is a review of the Fast Monte Carlo treatment planning algorithms, which are accurate and fast at the same time. The Monte Carlo techniques are based on the transport of each individual particle (e.g., photon or electron) in the tissue. The transport of the particle is done using the physics of the interaction of the particles with matter. Other techniques transport the particles as a group. For a typical dose calculation in radiation therapy the code has to transport several millions particles, which take a few hours, therefore, the Monte Carlo techniques are accurate, but slow for clinical use. In recent years, with the development of the ‘fast’ Monte Carlo systems, one is able to perform dose calculation in a reasonable time for clinical use. The acceptable time for dose calculation is in the range of one minute. There is currently a growing interest in the fast Monte Carlo treatment planning systems and there are many commercial treatment planning systems that perform dose calculation in radiation therapy based on the Monte Carlo technique. PMID:22606661

  7. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  8. Isochoric implosions for fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D S; Tabak, M

    2006-06-05

    Fast Ignition (FI) exploits the ignition of a dense, uniform fuel assembly by an external energy source to achieve high gain. In conventional ICF implosions, however, the fuel assembles as a dense shell surrounding a low density, high-pressure hotspot. Such configurations are far from optimal for FI. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942).] may be employed to implode a dense, quasi-uniform fuel assembly with minimal energy wastage in forming a hotspot. A scheme for realizing these specialized implosions in a practical ICF target is also described.

  9. Fast, efficient lossless data compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents lossless data compression and decompression algorithms which can be easily implemented in software. The algorithms can be partitioned into their fundamental parts which can be implemented at various stages within a data acquisition system. This allows for efficient integration of these functions into systems at the stage where they are most applicable. The algorithms were coded in Forth to run on a Silicon Composers Single Board Computer (SBC) using the Harris RTX2000 Forth processor. The algorithms require very few system resources and operate very fast. The performance of the algorithms with the RTX enables real time data compression and decompression to be implemented for a wide range of applications.

  10. Fast, efficient lossless data compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents lossless data compression and decompression algorithms which can be easily implemented in software. The algorithms can be partitioned into their fundamental parts which can be implemented at various stages within a data acquisition system. This allows for efficient integration of these functions into systems at the stage where they are most applicable. The algorithms were coded in Forth to run on a Silicon Composers Single Board Computer (SBC) using the Harris RTX2000 Forth processor. The algorithms require very few system resources and operate very fast. The performance of the algorithms with the RTX enables real time data compression and decompression to be implemented for a wide range of applications.

  11. Searches for Fast Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; McLaughlin, M. A.

    2003-10-01

    We discuss optimal detection of fast radio transients from astrophysical objects while taking into account the effects of propagation through intervening ionized media, including dispersion, scattering, and scintillation. Our analysis applies to the giant-pulse phenomenon exhibited by some pulsars, for which we show examples, and to radio pulses from other astrophysical sources, such as prompt radio emission from gamma-ray burst sources and modulated signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. We estimate scintillation parameters for extragalactic sources that take into account scattering both in the host galaxy and in foreground Galactic plasma.

  12. Fast pulse nonthermal plasma reactor

    DOEpatents

    Rosocha, Louis A.

    2005-06-14

    A fast pulsed nonthermal plasma reactor includes a discharge cell and a charging assembly electrically connected thereto. The charging assembly provides plural high voltage pulses to the discharge cell. Each pulse has a rise time between one and ten nanoseconds and a duration of three to twenty nanoseconds. The pulses create nonthermal plasma discharge within the discharge cell. Accordingly, the nonthermal plasma discharge can be used to remove pollutants from gases or break the gases into smaller molecules so that they can be more efficiently combusted.

  13. Mechanisms for fast flare reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhoven, G.; Deeds, D.; Tachi, T.

    1988-01-01

    Normal collisional-resistivity mechanisms of magnetic reconnection have the drawback that they are too slow to explain the fast rise of solar flares. Two methods are examined which are proposed for the speed-up of the magnetic tearing instability: the anomalous enhancement of resistivity by the injection of MHD turbulence and the increase of Coulomb resistivity by radiative cooling. The results are described for nonlinear numerical simulations of these processes which show that the first does not provide the claimed effects, while the second yields impressive rates of reconnection, but low saturated energy outputs.

  14. Ultra-fast silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Petersen, B.; Seiden, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Marchetto, F.; Bruzzi, M.; Mori, R.; Scaringella, M.; Vinattieri, A.

    2013-12-01

    We propose to develop a fast, thin silicon sensor with gain capable to concurrently measure with high precision the space (∼10 μm) and time (∼10 ps) coordinates of a particle. This will open up new application of silicon detector systems in many fields. Our analysis of detector properties indicates that it is possible to improve the timing characteristics of silicon-based tracking sensors, which already have sufficient position resolution, to achieve four-dimensional high-precision measurements. The basic sensor characteristics and the expected performance are listed, the wide field of applications are mentioned and the required R&D topics are discussed.

  15. Fast-acting valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Nakwon

    1980-01-01

    A fast-acting valve actuator utilizes a spring driven pneumatically loaded piston to drive a valve gate. Rapid exhaust of pressurized gas from the pneumatically loaded side of the piston facilitates an extremely rapid piston stroke. A flexible selector diaphragm opens and closes an exhaust port in response to pressure differentials created by energizing and de-energizing a solenoid which controls the pneumatic input to the actuator as well as selectively providing a venting action to one side of the selector diaphragm.

  16. Proximity to Fast Food Outlets and Supermarkets as Predictors of Fast Food Dining Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Dustin T.; Elbel, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background This study used cross-sectional data to test the independent relationship of (1) proximity to chain fast food outlets and (2) proximity to full-service supermarkets on the frequency of meal-time dining at fast food outlets in two major urban areas, using three approaches to define “access.” Interactions between presence of a supermarket and presence of fast food outlets as predictors of fast food dining were also tested. Methods Residential intersections for respondents in point-of-purchase and random-digit-dial telephone surveys of adults in Philadelphia and Baltimore were geocoded. The count of fast food outlets and supermarkets within quarter-mile, half-mile, and one-mile street network buffers around each respondent’s intersection was calculated, as well as distance to the nearest fast food outlet and supermarket. These variables were regressed on weekly fast-food dining frequency to determine if proximity to fast food and supermarkets had independent and joint effects on fast-food dining. Results The effect of access to supermarkets and chain fast food outlets varied by study population. Among telephone survey respondents, supermarket access was the only significant predictor of fast food dining frequency. Point-of-purchase respondents were generally unaffected by proximity to either supermarkets or fast food outlets. However, ≥1 fast food outlet within a 1-mile buffer was an independent predictor of more fast food meals among point-of-purchase respondents. At ¼-mile distance, ≥1 supermarket was predictive of fewer fast food meals. Conclusions Supermarket access was associated with less fast food dining among telephone respondents while access to fast food outlets were associated with more fast food visits among survey respondents identified at point-of-purchase. This study adds to the existing literature on geographic determinants of fast food dining behavior among urban adults in the general population and those who regularly consume

  17. Cytoplasmic dynein is associated with slow axonal transport.

    PubMed Central

    Dillman, J F; Dabney, L P; Pfister, K K

    1996-01-01

    Neuronal function is dependent on the transport of materials from the cell body to the synapse via anterograde axonal transport. Anterograde axonal transport consists of several components that differ in both rate and protein composition. In fast transport, membranous organelles are moved along microtubules by the motor protein kinesin. The cytoskeleton and the cytomatrix proteins move in the two components of slow transport. While the mechanisms underlying slow transport are unknown, it has been hypothesized that the movement of microtubules in slow transport is generated by sliding. To determine whether dynein, a motor protein that causes microtubule sliding in flagella, may play a role in slow axonal transport, we identified the transport rate components with which cytoplasmic dynein is associated in rat optic nerve. Nearly 80% of the anterogradely moving dynein was associated with slow transport, whereas only approximately 15% of the dynein was associated with the membranous organelles of anterograde fast axonal transport. A segmental analysis of the transport of dynein through contiguous regions of the optic nerve and tract showed that dynein is associated with the microfilaments and other proteins of slow component b. Dynein from this transport component has the capacity to bind microtubules in vitro. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that cytoplasmic dynein generates the movement of microtubules in slow axonal transport. A model is presented to illustrate how dynein attached to the slow component b complex of proteins is appropriately positioned to generate force of the correct polarity to slide microtubules down the axon. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8552592

  18. GRIFFIN's Fast-Timing Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaizola, Bruno; Griffin Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei (GRIFFIN) is the new β-decay spectrometer facility at TRIUMF-ISAC. Consists of an array of 16 large-volume HPGe clover detectors with an unparalleled efficiency of 19% at 1.33 MeV. Its strongest advantage is the versatility of the ancillary detectors that can be coupled to the main array to tag on β particles, neutrons or precisely measure conversion electron spectra. An ancillary array of 8 LaBr3(Ce) detectors for γ-rays and a fast plastic scintillator for β-particles has been optimized for fast-timing experiments with GRIFFIN. The 51 mm x 51 mm cylindrical LaBr3(Ce) crystals are coupled to Hamamatsu R2083 photomultipliers. Timing resolutions as good as FWHM 200 ps and time-walks below +/- 30 ps have been obtained for individual crystals using analog electronics. There is also an ongoing project to develop an active BGO shield for the LaBr3(Ce) crystals. The LaBr3(Ce) array commissioning experiment to measure the 145,146Cs decay to 145,146Ba will test its capabilities over a wide range of lifetimes. Preliminary results on the lifetimes of some of the low-laying states will be presented.

  19. Fast generic polar harmonic transforms.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thai V; Tabbone, Salvatore

    2014-07-01

    Generic polar harmonic transforms have recently been proposed to extract rotation-invariant features from images and their usefulness has been demonstrated in a number of pattern recognition problems. However, direct computation of these transforms from their definition is inefficient and is usually slower than some efficient computation strategies that have been proposed for other methods. This paper presents a number of novel computation strategies to compute these transforms rapidly. The proposed methods are based on the inherent recurrence relations among complex exponential and trigonometric functions used in the definition of the radial and angular kernels of these transforms. The employment of these relations leads to recursive and addition chain-based strategies for fast computation of harmonic function-based kernels. Experimental results show that the proposed method is about 10× faster than direct computation and 5× faster than fast computation of Zernike moments using the q-recursive strategy. Thus, among all existing rotation-invariant feature extraction methods, polar harmonic transforms are the fastest.

  20. The Ignitor Fast Pellet Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattolillo, A.; Migliori, S.; Bombarda, F.; Milora, S. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.

    2004-11-01

    A collaboration between the ENEA Laboratory at Frascati and the Fusion Technology Group of Oak Ridge for the development of a fast pellet injector for the Ignitor ignition experiment has been established. The program aims at the construction of a 4 barrel, double stage gun able to reach speeds up to 4 km/s and thus penetrate to the core of the plasma column. The compact size of the Ignitor machine favors the injection from the low field side, for which very positive results have been obtained on the FTU machine [1], in terms of density profile peaking and good energy confinement. The ongoing activities include the procurement of all the hardware for the criocooler, diagnostics and control electronics, from the ORNL side, and the design and construction of the gun by ENEA. A new fast valve has been developed that considerably reduces the requirements on the expansion volumes necessary to prevent the propulsion gas to reach the plasma chamber. [1] D. Frigione, et al., Nuclear Fusion 41, 1613 (2001).