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Sample records for structural composition study

  1. Field-structured composite studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James Ellis; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2004-04-01

    Field-structured composites (FSCs) were produced by hosting micron-sized gold-coated nickel particles in a pre-polymer and allowing the mixture to cure in a magnetic field environment. The feasibility of controlling a composite's electrical conductivity using feedback control applied to the field coils was investigated. It was discovered that conductivity in FSCs is primarily determined by stresses in the polymer host matrix due to cure shrinkage. Thus, in cases where the structuring field was uniform and unidirectional so as to produce chainlike structures in the composite, no electrical conductivity was measured until well after the structuring field was turned off at the gel point. In situations where complex, rotating fields were used to generate complex, three-dimensional structures in a composite, very small, but measurable, conductivity was observed prior to the gel point. Responsive, sensitive prototype chemical sensors were developed based on this technology with initial tests showing very promising results.

  2. Study on voids of epoxy matrix composites sandwich structure parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Simin; Wen, Youyi; Yu, Wenjun; Liu, Hong; Yue, Cheng; Bao, Jing

    2017-03-01

    Void is the most common tiny defect of composite materials. Porosity is closely related to composite structure property. The voids forming behaviour in the composites sandwich structural parts with the carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins was researched by adjusting the manufacturing process parameters. The composites laminate with different porosities were prepared with the different process parameter. The ultrasonic non-destructive measurement method for the porosity was developed and verified through microscopic examination. The analysis results show that compaction pressure during the manufacturing process had influence on the porosity in the laminate area. Increasing the compaction pressure and compaction time will reduce the porosity of the laminates. The bond-line between honeycomb core and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins were also analyzed through microscopic examination. The mechanical properties of sandwich structure composites were studied. The optimization process parameters and porosity ultrasonic measurement method for composites sandwich structure have been applied to the production of the composite parts.

  3. Effects of Fluid-Structure Interaction on Dynamic Response of Composite Structures: Experimental and Numerical Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    composite structures in water and air to enhance the understanding of the effects of fluid-structure interaction on marine composite structural...naval structures are in continuous contact with a water medium. As a result, proper understanding of fluid-structure interaction is important for a...Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) is more critical for the former structures. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of water on

  4. Studies on structural properties of clay magnesium ferrite nano composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Mandeep; Jeet, Kiran; Kaur, Rajdeep

    2015-08-01

    Magnesium ferrite-bentonite clay composite was prepared by sol-gel combustion method employing citric acid as complexing agent and fuel. The effect of clay on the structural properties was studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM- Energy dispersive Spectroscope (EDS) and BET surface area analyzer. Decrease in particle size and density was observed on addition of bentonite clay. The BET surface area of nano composite containing just 5 percent clay was 74.86 m2/g. Whereas porosity increased from 40.5 per cent for the pure magnesium ferrite to 81.0 percent in the composite showing that nano-composite has potential application as an adsorbent.

  5. Studies on structural properties of clay magnesium ferrite nano composite

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manpreet Singh, Mandeep; Jeet, Kiran Kaur, Rajdeep

    2015-08-28

    Magnesium ferrite-bentonite clay composite was prepared by sol-gel combustion method employing citric acid as complexing agent and fuel. The effect of clay on the structural properties was studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM- Energy dispersive Spectroscope (EDS) and BET surface area analyzer. Decrease in particle size and density was observed on addition of bentonite clay. The BET surface area of nano composite containing just 5 percent clay was 74.86 m{sup 2}/g. Whereas porosity increased from 40.5 per cent for the pure magnesium ferrite to 81.0 percent in the composite showing that nano-composite has potential application as an adsorbent.

  6. A Study of Flexible Composites for Expandable Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Payload volume for launch vehicles is a critical constraint that impacts spacecraft design. Deployment mechanisms, such as those used for solar arrays and antennas, are approaches that have successfully accommodated this constraint, however, providing pressurized volumes that can be packaged compactly at launch and expanded in space is still a challenge. One approach that has been under development for many years is to utilize softgoods - woven fabric for straps, cloth, and with appropriate coatings, bladders - to provide this expandable pressure vessel capability. The mechanics of woven structure is complicated by a response that is nonlinear and often nonrepeatable due to the discrete nature of the woven fiber architecture. This complexity reduces engineering confidence to reliably design and certify these structures, which increases costs due to increased requirements for system testing. The present study explores flexible composite materials systems as an alternative to the heritage softgoods approach. Materials were obtained from vendors who utilize flexible composites for non-aerospace products to determine some initial physical and mechanical properties of the materials. Uniaxial mechanical testing was performed to obtain the stress-strain response of the flexible composites and the failure behavior. A failure criterion was developed from the data, and a space habitat application was used to provide an estimate of the relative performance of flexible composites compared to the heritage softgoods approach. Initial results are promising with a 25% mass savings estimated for the flexible composite solution.

  7. Selection process for trade study: Graphite Composite Primary Structure (GCPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This TA 2 document describes the selection process that will be used to identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 degree inclination. The most suitable unpressurized graphite composite structures and material selections is within this configuration and will be the prototype design for subsequent design and analysis and the basis for the design and fabrication of payload bay, wing, and thrust structure full scale test articles representing segments of the prototype structures. The selection process for this TA 2 trade study is the same as that for the TA 1 trade study. As the trade study progresses additional insight may result in modifications to the selection criteria within this process. Such modifications will result in an update of this document as appropriate.

  8. Trade study plan for Graphite Composite Primary Structure (GCPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This TA 2 document (with support from TA 1) describes the trade study plan that will identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 degree inclination For this most suitable configuration the structural attachment of the wing, and the most suitable GCPS composite materials for intertank, wing, tail and thrust structure are identified. This trade study analysis uses extensive information derived in the TA 1 trade study plan and is identified within the study plan. In view of this, for convenience, the TA 1 study plan is included as an appendix to this document.

  9. Material and structural studies of metal and polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.; Serafini, T. T.; Johns, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The application of fiber composites to aeronautical and space vehicle systems indicates the following: It appears quite probable that resin/fiber composites can be developed for service at 315 C for several thousand hours and at 370 C for a few hundred hours. The retention of resin/fiber strength at these high temperatures can be achieved by modifying the polymer molecular structure or by developing new processing techniques, or both. Carbon monofilament with attractive strength values has been produced and fabrication studies to reinforce aluminum with such monofilaments have been initiated. Refractory wire-superalloy composites have demonstrated sufficiently high strength and impact values to suggest that they have potential for application to turbine blades at temperatures to 1200 C and above.

  10. Health monitoring studies on composite structures for aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.; Roach, D.; Hansche, B.; Meza, R.; Robinson, N.

    1996-02-01

    This paper discusses ongoing work to develop structural health monitoring techniques for composite aerospace structures such as aircraft control surfaces, fuselage sections or repairs, and reusable launch vehicle fuel tanks. The overall project is divided into four tasks: Operational evaluation, diagnostic measurements, information condensation, and damage detection. Five composite plates were constructed to study delaminations, disbonds, and fluid retention issues as the initial step in creating an operational system. These four square feet plates were graphite-epoxy with nomex honeycomb cores. The diagnostic measurements are composed of modal tests with a scanning laser vibrometer at over 500 scan points per plate covering the frequency range up to 2000 Hz. This data has been reduced into experimental dynamics matrices using a generic, software package developed at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The continuing effort will entail performing a series of damage identification studies to detect, localize, and determine the extent of the damage. This work is providing understanding and algorithm development for a global NDE technique for composite aerospace structures.

  11. Structural arrangement trade study. Volume 3: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Addendum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the third of a 3 volume set that addresses the structural trade study plan that will identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The most suitable Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Tank System (GCPS) composite materials for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. Vehicle resizing charts, selection criteria and back-up charts, parametric costing approach and the finite element method analysis are discussed.

  12. Structural efficiency study of composite wing rib structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Gary D.; Gurdal, Zafer; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A series of short stiffened panel designs which may be applied to a preliminary design assessment of an aircraft wing rib is presented. The computer program PASCO is used as the primary design and analysis tool to assess the structural efficiency and geometry of a tailored corrugated panel, a corrugated panel with a continuous laminate, a hat stiffened panel, a blade stiffened panel, and an unstiffened flat plate. To correct some of the shortcomings in the PASCO analysis when shear is present, a two step iterative process using the computer program VICON is used. The loadings considered include combinations of axial compression, shear, and lateral pressure. The loading ranges considered are broad enough such that the designs presented may be applied to other stiffened panel applications. An assessment is made of laminate variations, increased spacing, and nonoptimum geometric variations, including a beaded panel, on the design of the panels.

  13. Structural Arrangement Trade Study. Volume 1: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the first of a three volume set that discusses the structural arrangement trade study plan that will identify the most suitable configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Primary Structures most suitable for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. This executive summary presents the trade study process, the selection process, requirements used, analysis performed and data generated. Conclusions and recommendations are also presented.

  14. Characterization of adhesive from oysters: A structural and compositional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberts, Erik

    The inability for man-made adhesives to set in wet or humid environments is an ongoing challenging the design of biomedical and marine adhesive materials. However, we see that nature has already overcome this challenge. Mussels, barnacles, oysters and sandcastle worms all have unique mechanisms by which they attach themselves to surfaces. By understanding what evolution has already spent millions of years perfecting, we can design novel adhesive materials inspired by nature's elegant designs. The well-studied mussel is currently the standard for design of marine inspired biomimetic polymers. In the work presented here, we aim to provide new insights into the adhesive produced by the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Unlike the mussel, which produces thread-like plaques comprised of DOPA containing-protein, the oyster secretes an organic-inorganic hybrid adhesive as it settles and grows onto a surface. This form of adhesion renders the oyster to be permanently fixed in place. Over time, hundreds of thousands of oyster grow and agglomerate to form extensive reef structures. These reefs are not only essential to survival of the oyster, but are also vital to intertidal ecosystems. While the shell of the oyster has been extensively studied, curiously, only a few conflicting insights have been made into the nature of the adhesive and contact zone between shell and substrate, and even lesfs information has been ascertained on organic and inorganic composition. In this work, we provide microscopy and histochemical studies to characterize the structure and composition of the adhesive, using oyster in the adult and juvenile stages of life. Preliminary work on extracting and characterizing organic components through collaborative help with solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and proteomics are also detailed here. We aim to provide a full, comprehensive characterization of oyster adhesive so that in the future, we may apply what we learn to the design of new materials.

  15. Material and structural studies of metal and polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.; Serafini, T. T.; Johns, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites and design analysis methods for these materials are being developed because of the vast potential of composites for decreasing weight and/or increasing use temperature capability in aerospace systems. These composites have potential for use in airbreathing engine components as well as aeronautical and space vehicle structures. Refractory wire-superalloy composites for use up to 2200 F or more and metal-matrix composites for lower temperature applications such as aerospace structures and turbojet fan and compressor blades are under investigation and are discussed. The development of a number of resin systems, including the polyimides and polyphenylquinoxalines, is described and their potential for use at temperatures approaching 315 C (600 F) is indicated. Various molecular modifications that improve processability and/or increase thermal and oxidative resistance of the resins are also described. Structural analysis methods are discussed for determining the stresses and deformations in complex composite systems. Consideration is also given to residual stresses resulting from the curing process and to the foreign object damage problem in fan blade applications.

  16. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in studies of constituent materials composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology, and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Topics discussed include: mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; fatigue in composite materials; experimental and theoretical studies of moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates and neat resins; numerical investigations of the micromechanics of composite fracture; delamination failures of composite laminates; effect of notch size on composite laminates; improved beam theory for anisotropic materials; variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; numerical analysis composite processing; heat treatment of metal matrix composites, and the RP-1 and RP2 gliders of the sailplane project.

  17. Studies of noise transmission in advanced composite material structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussos, L. A.; Mcgary, M. C.; Powell, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Noise characteristics of advanced composite material fuselages were discussed from the standpoints of applicable research programs and noise transmission theory. Experimental verification of the theory was also included.

  18. Lightweight Composite Intertank Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehle, Greg V.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents results of study for proposed lightweight composite material alternative to present semimonocoque aluminum intertank structure for advanced launch vehicles. Proposed structure integrated assembly of sandwich panels made of laminated epoxy-matrix/carbon-fiber skins, and aluminum honeycomb core.

  19. Studies of finite element analysis of composite material structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, D. O.; Holzmacher, D. E.; Lane, Z. C.; Thornton, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Research in the area of finite element analysis is summarized. Topics discussed include finite element analysis of a picture frame shear test, BANSAP (a bandwidth reduction program for SAP IV), FEMESH (a finite element mesh generation program based on isoparametric zones), and finite element analysis of a composite bolted joint specimens.

  20. SMARTS Studies of the Composition and Structure of Dwarf Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, David L.; Schaefer, B.; Tourtellotte, S.; Schaefer, M.

    2011-05-01

    SMARTS has been a great asset for solar system research, especially in tandem with the searches for distant bodies in our own solar system conducted at Palomar and now at La Silla, Chile with the Yale QUEST camera. We have used the SMARTS 1.3m telescope extensively to photometrically characterize the new dwarf planet population (including Eris and Sedna) discovered with the QUEST camera. Since these bodies are the remnant planetesimals from the time of planet formation, their discovery and characterization is fundamental to understanding the formation of our solar system. Here I summarize what the SMARTS observations tell use about the dwarf planet compositions and collisional history.

  1. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Various topics relating to composite structural materials for use in aircraft structures are discussed. The mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers, carbon fiber-epoxy interface bonds, composite fractures, residual stress in high modulus and high strength carbon fibers, fatigue in composite materials, and the mechanical properties of polymeric matrix composite laminates are among the topics discussed.

  2. A study on the utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the technology and data needed to support the introduction of advanced composite materials in the wing structure of future production aircraft. The study accomplished the following: (1) definition of acceptance factors, (2) identification of technology issues, (3) evaluation of six candidate wing structures, (4) evaluation of five program options, (5) definition of a composite wing technology development plan, (6) identification of full-scale tests, (7) estimation of program costs for the total development plan, (8) forecast of future utilization of composites in commercial transport aircraft and (9) identification of critical technologies for timely program planning.

  3. Repairs of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Hee Seok

    Repair on damaged composite panels was conducted. To better understand adhesively bonded repair, the study investigates the effect of design parameters on the joint strength. The design parameters include bondline length, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Adhesives considered in this study were tested to measure their tensile material properties. Three types of adhesively bonded joints, single strap, double strap, and single lap joint were considered under changing bondline lengths, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Based on lessons learned from bonded joints, a one-sided patch repair method for composite structures was conducted. The composite patch was bonded to the damaged panel by either film adhesive FM-73M or paste adhesive EA-9394 and the residual strengths of the repaired specimens were compared under varying patch sizes. A new repair method using attachments has been suggested to enhance the residual strength. Results obtained through experiments were analyzed using finite element analysis to provide a better repair design and explain the experimental results. It was observed that the residual strength of the repaired specimen was affected by patch length. Method for rapid repairs of damaged composite structures was investigated. The damage was represented by a circular hole in a composite laminated plate. Pre-cured composite patches were bonded with a quick-curing commercial adhesive near (rather than over) the hole. Tensile tests were conducted on specimens repaired with various patch geometries. The test results showed that, among the methods investigated, the best repair method restored over 90% of the original strength of an undamaged panel. The interfacial stresses in the adhesive zone for different patches were calculated in order to understand the efficiencies of the designs of these patch repairs. It was found that the composite patch that yielded the best strength had the lowest interfacial peel stress between the patch and

  4. Composite structural materials. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of filamentary composite materials in the design and construction of primary aircraft structures is considered with emphasis on efforts to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, and reliability and life prediction. The redesign of a main spar/rib region on the Boeing 727 elevator near its actuator attachment point is discussed. A composite fabrication and test facility is described as well as the use of minicomputers for computer aided design. Other topics covered include (1) advanced structural analysis methids for composites; (2) ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite structures; (3) optimum combination of hardeners in the cure of epoxy; (4) fatigue in composite materials; (5) resin matrix characterization and properties; (6) postbuckling analysis of curved laminate composite panels; and (7) acoustic emission testing of composite tensile specimens.

  5. Study of mould design and forming process on advanced polymer-matrix composite complex structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. J.; Zhan, L. H.; Bai, H. M.; Chen, X. P.; Zhou, Y. Q.

    2015-07-01

    Advanced carbon fibre-reinforced polymer-matrix composites are widely applied to aviation manufacturing field due to their outstanding performance. In this paper, the mould design and forming process of the complex composite structure were discussed in detail using the hat stiffened structure as an example. The key issues of the moulddesign were analyzed, and the corresponding solutions were also presented. The crucial control points of the forming process such as the determination of materials and stacking sequence, the temperature and pressure route of the co-curing process were introduced. In order to guarantee the forming quality of the composite hat stiffened structure, a mathematical model about the aperture of rubber mandrel was introduced. The study presented in this paper may provide some actual references for the design and manufacture of the important complex composite structures.

  6. A study on the utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structure: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The overall wing study objectives are to study and plan the effort by commercial transport aircraft manufacturers to accomplish the transition from current conventional materials and practices to extensive use of advanced composites in wings of aircraft that will enter service in the 1985-1990 time period. Specific wing study objectives are to define the technology and data needed to support an aircraft manufacturer's commitment to utilize composites primary wing structure in future production aircraft and to develop plans for a composite wing technology program which will provide the needed technology and data.

  7. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    A multifaceted program is described in which aeronautical, mechanical, and materials engineers interact to develop composite aircraft structures. Topics covered include: (1) the design of an advanced composite elevator and a proposed spar and rib assembly; (2) optimizing fiber orientation in the vicinity of heavily loaded joints; (3) failure mechanisms and delamination; (4) the construction of an ultralight sailplane; (5) computer-aided design; finite element analysis programs, preprocessor development, and array preprocessor for SPAR; (6) advanced analysis methods for composite structures; (7) ultrasonic nondestructive testing; (8) physical properties of epoxy resins and composites; (9) fatigue in composite materials, and (10) transverse thermal expansion of carbon/epoxy composites.

  8. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program has made significant progress in the development of technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Commercial airframe manufacturers have demonstrated technology readiness and cost effectiveness of advanced composites for secondary and medium primary components and have initiated a concerted program to develop the data base required for efficient application to safety-of-flight wing and fuselage structures. Oral presentations were compiled into five papers. Topics addressed include: damage tolerance and failsafe testing of composite vertical stabilizer; optimization of composite multi-row bolted joints; large wing joint demonstation components; and joints and cutouts in fuselage structure.

  9. A study on the crushing behavior of basalt fiber reinforced composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandian, A.; Veerasimman, A. P.; Vairavan, M.; Francisco, C.; Sultan, M. T. H.

    2016-10-01

    The crushing behavior and energy absorption capacity of basalt fiber reinforced hollow square structure composites are studied under axial compression. Using the hand layup technique, basalt fiber reinforced composites were fabricated using general purpose (GP) polyester resin with the help of wooden square shaped mould of varying height (100 mm, 150 mm and 200 mm). For comparison, similar specimens of glass fiber reinforced polymer composites were also fabricated and tested. Axial compression load is applied over the top end of the specimen with cross head speed as 2 mm/min using Universal Testing Machine (UTM). From the experimental results, the load-deformation characteristics of both glass fiber and basalt fiber composites were investigated. Crashworthiness and mode of collapse for the composites were determined from load-deformation curve, and they were then compared to each other in terms of their crushing behaviors.

  10. Composite chronicles: A study of the lessons learned in the development, production, and service of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vosteen, Louis F.; Hadcock, Richard N.

    1994-01-01

    A study of past composite aircraft structures programs was conducted to determine the lessons learned during the programs. The study focused on finding major underlying principles and practices that experience showed have significant effects on the development process and should be recognized and understood by those responsible for using of composites. Published information on programs was reviewed and interviews were conducted with personnel associated with current and past major development programs. In all, interviews were conducted with about 56 people representing 32 organizations. Most of the people interviewed have been involved in the engineering and manufacturing development of composites for the past 20 to 25 years. Although composites technology has made great advances over the past 30 years, the effective application of composites to aircraft is still a complex problem that requires experienced personnel with special knowledge. All disciplines involved in the development process must work together in real time to minimize risk and assure total product quality and performance at acceptable costs. The most successful programs have made effective use of integrated, collocated, concurrent engineering teams, and most often used well-planned, systematic development efforts wherein the design and manufacturing processes are validated in a step-by-step or 'building block' approach. Such approaches reduce program risk and are cost effective.

  11. Analytical and experimental study of structurally efficient composite hat-stiffened panels loaded in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Mikulus, M. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Structural efficiency studies were made to determine the weight saving potential of graphite/epoxy composite structures for compression panel applications. Minimum weight hat-stiffened and open corrugation configurations were synthesized using a nonlinear mathematical programming technique. Selected configurations were built and tested to study local and Euler buckling characteristics. Test results for 23 panels critical in local buckling and six panels critical in Euler buckling are compared with analytical results obtained using the BUCLASP-2 branched plate buckling program. A weight efficiency comparison is made between composite and aluminum compression panels using metal test data generated by the NACA. Theoretical studies indicate that potential weight savings of up to 50% are possible for composite hat-stiffened panels when compared with similar aluminum designs. Weight savings of 32% to 42% were experimentally achieved. Experience suggests that most of the theoretical weight saving potential is available if design deficiencies are eliminated and strict fabrication control is exercised.

  12. A Study of Phase Composition and Structure of Alloys of the Al - Mg - Si - Fe System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailybaeva, A. D.; Zolotorevskii, V. S.; Smagulov, D. U.; Islamkulov, K. M.

    2017-03-01

    The Thermo-Calc software is used to compute the phase transformations occurring during cooling of alloys. Polythermal and isothermal sections of the phase diagram of the Al - Mg - Si - Fe system are plotted. The phase composition and the structure of aluminum alloys in cast condition and after a heat treatment are studied experimentally.

  13. Optimization of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Structural optimization is introduced and examples which illustrate potential problems associated with optimized structures are presented. Optimized structures may have very low load carrying ability for an off design condition. They tend to have multiple modes of failure occurring simultaneously and can, therefore, be sensitive to imperfections. Because composite materials provide more design variables than do metals, they allow for more refined tailoring and more extensive optimization. As a result, optimized composite structures can be especially susceptible to these problems.

  14. The study of metal enhanced fluorescence property of Ag/ZnO composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingzuo; Chen, Zhuo; Zhao, Yue; Shen, Yue; Guo, Yun; Huang, Jian; Min, Jiahua; Wang, Linjun

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, Ag nanoparticles were successfully prepared by chemical reduction, and then Ag/ZnO composite particles were successfully prepared and deposited onto glass substrates to form Ag/ZnO thin films. Hereafter, the structure, the morphology and the metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) property of Ag nanoparticles and ZnO/Ag composite particles were studied by XRD, SEM, EDS, TEM, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence (FL) spectrometer. The results showed that the average size of Ag nanoparticles increased with the increase of prepared time. Moreover, ZnO layer consisted of polycrystalline structure and amorphous interface layer, but nano-Ag particle was polycrystalline structure. Annealing process was carried out to investigate the influence of annealing process parameters on MEF property of Ag/ZnO composite structure. Due to annealing treatment, the amorphous component of Ag/ZnO thin films was reduced, which might improve the density of Ag/ZnO thin films and the diameter of composite particles. Furthermore, FL enhancement phenomenon of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) molecules might be attributed to the joint influence of the roughness and the density of these films and the average diameter of composite particles.

  15. A Study of the Utilization of Advanced Composites in Fuselage Structures of Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, D. J.; Sumida, P. T.; Bunin, B. L.; Janicki, G. S.; Walker, J. V.; Fox, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the technology and data needed to support the introduction of advanced composites in the future production of fuselage structure in large transport aircraft. Fuselage structures of six candidate airplanes were evaluated for the baseline component. The MD-100 was selected on the basis of its representation of 1990s fuselage structure, an available data base, its impact on the schedule and cost of the development program, and its availability and suitability for flight service evaluation. Acceptance criteria were defined, technology issues were identified, and a composite fuselage technology development plan, including full-scale tests, was identified. The plan was based on composite materials to be available in the mid to late 1980s. Program resources required to develop composite fuselage technology are estimated at a rough order of magnitude to be 877 man-years exclusive of the bird strike and impact dynamic test components. A conceptual composite fuselage was designed, retaining the basic MD-100 structural arrangement for doors, windows, wing, wheel wells, cockpit enclosure, major bulkheads, etc., resulting in a 32 percent weight savings.

  16. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1987-01-01

    The development and application of composite materials to aerospace vehicle structures which began in the mid 1960's has now progressed to the point where what can be considered entire airframes are being designed and built using composites. Issues related to the fabrication of non-resin matrix composites and the micro, mezzo and macromechanics of thermoplastic and metal matrix composites are emphasized. Several research efforts are presented. They are entitled: (1) The effects of chemical vapor deposition and thermal treatments on the properties of pitch-based carbon fiber; (2) Inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; (3) Analysis of fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; (4) Delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; (5) Numerical investigation of the microhardness of composite fracture; and (6) General beam theory for composite structures.

  17. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The composite aircraft program component (CAPCOMP) is a graduate level project conducted in parallel with a composite structures program. The composite aircraft program glider (CAPGLIDE) is an undergraduate demonstration project which has as its objectives the design, fabrication, and testing of a foot launched ultralight glider using composite structures. The objective of the computer aided design (COMPAD) portion of the composites project is to provide computer tools for the analysis and design of composite structures. The major thrust of COMPAD is in the finite element area with effort directed at implementing finite element analysis capabilities and developing interactive graphics preprocessing and postprocessing capabilities. The criteria for selecting research projects to be conducted under the innovative and supporting research (INSURE) program are described.

  18. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  19. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    Overall emphasis is on basic long-term research in the following categories: constituent materials, composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology; and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Research in basic composition, characteristics, and processing science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to present and future problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of this comprehensive program are presented.

  20. Experimental Study of RC Rectangular Liquid Containing Structures Retrofitted with GFRP Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, R.; Ziari, A.; Kianoush, M. R.

    2010-04-01

    The continual functioning of Liquid Containing Structures “LCS” is necessary for the well being of a society. These structures are designed based on serviceability criteria such as cracking that leads to leakage. Cracks form in liquid containing structures (LCS) for different reasons such as restrained thermal and shrinkage deformations, applied external loads such as earthquake loads, etc. These cracks can create exposure condition to initiate the corrosion process in reinforcement. The effectiveness of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites in recovering the structural strength of damaged members is widely recognized by engineers. However, the effectiveness on the use of GFRP composites as a protecting layer to prevent the passage of liquid through the cracks has not yet been reported in the literature. This concept inspires the main purpose of the investigation in this experimental study. Cracked reinforced concrete specimens subjected to different conditions of loading such as direct tension and cyclic flexure are repaired externally using GFRP sheets. The specimens are then subjected to hydrostatic pressure using a water pressure chamber at the crack location. This study shows that the application of GFRP composites for crack remediation in liquid containing structures could be very effective under monotonic loading. However, the effectiveness under cyclic flexure especially under higher load levels is questionable.

  1. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    A decade long program to develop critical advanced composite technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concept and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life predictions is reviewed. Specific goals are discussed. The status of the chemical vapor deposition effects on carbon fiber properties; inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; and numerical analysis of composite micromechanical behavior are presented.

  2. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Research in the basic composition, characteristics, and processng science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of his program are presented.

  3. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the RPI composites program is to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability and life prediction. Concommitant goals are to educate engineers to design and use composite materials as normal or conventional materials. A multifaceted program was instituted to achieve these objectives.

  4. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    Topics addressed include: strength and hygrothermal response of L-1011 fin components; wing fuel containment and damage tolerance development; impact dynamics; acoustic transmission; fuselage structure; composite transport wing technology development; spar/assembly concepts.

  5. Bonded composite repair of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Mary A.

    Repair and maintenance cost drives a large percentage of the lifetime cost of aircraft structures. Understanding repair issues can lead to a structure that significantly lowers the lifetime cost. Advanced composite materials, while offering the potential to increase aircraft capabilities with minimum weight, are more susceptible to repairable damage than conventional aircraft materials. Improved inspection and repair methods are required to ensure structural integrity and aircraft readiness in the existing operational environment. Many of today's innovative composite designs may result in aircraft structures that are unreasonably difficult to repair. As a first step, technical issues associated with bonded composite repair of composite structures were investigated. An extensive literature review identified many areas where real world composite repairs are being used successfully. An electronic database was developed summarizing the publications found during the literature review. The database includes publication, experimental test results and analytical results of advanced composite bonded repairs. The current analysis of repair does not account for the variations that exist in repair. To facilitate the analysis, a finite element interface was developed to provide analysts with a tool that would create complete finite element models of repaired structures efficiently and in a 3-dimensional view. The finite element models created by the developed interface were successfully correlated to test data for accuracy of the results. Parametric studies were performed using the interface to evaluate effects of repair variables. Thermal impact of repair on the repair panel is one area lacking attention in the repair literature. To understand the impact of heat and thermal gradients of the repair, an analytical investigation was performed to evaluate. the parameters affected by heat. For a solid laminate, the temperature at the adhesive bondline was investigated. The primary

  6. Composite foam structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E. (Inventor); Brockmeyer, Jerry (Inventor); Tuffias, Robert H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A composite rigid foam structure that has a skin or coating on at least one of its surfaces. The skin is formed in situ by thermal spray techniques. The skin is bonded substantially throughout the surface of the porous substrate to the peripheries of the pores. The skin on the average does not penetrate the surface of the substrate by more than the depth of about 2 to 5 pores. Thus, thermal spraying the skin onto the rigid foam produces a composite that is tightly and uniformly bonded together without unduly increasing the weight of the composite structure. Both thermal conductivity and bonding are excellent.

  7. A KBE-enabled design framework for cost/weight optimization study of aircraft composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; La Rocca, G.; van Tooren, M. J. L.

    2014-10-01

    Traditionally, minimum weight is the objective when optimizing airframe structures. This optimization, however, does not consider the manufacturing cost which actually determines the profit of the airframe manufacturer. To this purpose, a design framework has been developed able to perform cost/weight multi-objective optimization of an aircraft component, including large topology variations of the structural configuration. The key element of the proposed framework is a dedicated knowledge based engineering (KBE) application, called multi-model generator, which enables modelling very different product configurations and variants and extract all data required to feed the weight and cost estimation modules, in a fully automated fashion. The weight estimation method developed in this research work uses Finite Element Analysis to calculate the internal stresses of the structural elements and an analytical composite plate sizing method to determine their minimum required thicknesses. The manufacturing cost estimation module was developed on the basis of a cost model available in literature. The capability of the framework was successfully demonstrated by designing and optimizing the composite structure of a business jet rudder. The study case indicates the design framework is able to find the Pareto optimal set for minimum structural weight and manufacturing costin a very quick way. Based on the Pareto set, the rudder manufacturer is in conditions to conduct both internal trade-off studies between minimum weight and minimum cost solutions, as well as to offer the OEM a full set of optimized options to choose, rather than one feasible design.

  8. Study of advanced composite structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. J.; Grande, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Based on estimated graphite and boron fiber properties, allowable stresses and strains were established for advanced composite materials. Stiffened panel and conventional sandwich panel concepts were designed and analyzed, using graphite/polyimide and boron/polyimide materials. The conventional sandwich panel was elected as the structural concept for the modified wing structure. Upper and lower surface panels of the arrow wing structure were then redesigned, using high strength graphite/polyimide sandwich panels, retaining the titanium spars and ribs from the prior study. The ATLAS integrated analysis and design system was used for stress analysis and automated resizing of surface panels. Flutter analysis of the hybrid structure showed a significant decrease in flutter speed relative to the titanium wing design. The flutter speed was increased to that of the titanium design by selective increase in laminate thickness and by using graphite fibers with properties intermediate between high strength and high modulus values.

  9. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of filamentary composite materials, whose development may be considered as entering its second generation, continues to generate intense interest and applications activity. Fiber reinforced composite materials offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been achieved since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. Rather limited applications to primary aircraft structure have been made, however, mainly in a material-substitution mode on military aircraft, except for a few experiments currently underway on large passenger airplanes in commercial operation. To fulfill the promise of composite materials completely requires a strong technology base. NASA and AFOSR recognize the present state of the art to be such that to fully exploit composites in sophisticated aerospace structures, the technology base must be improved. This, in turn, calls for expanding fundamental knowledge and the means by which it can be successfully applied in design and manufacture.

  10. Analytical and experimental study of structurally efficient composite hat-stiffened panels loaded in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Mikulas, M. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Structural efficiency studies were made to determine the weight-saving potential of graphite/epoxy composite structures for compression panel applications. Minimum-weight hat-stiffened and open-corrugation configurations were synthesized using a nonlinear mathematical programing technique. Selected configurations were built and tested to study local and Euler buckling characteristics. Test results for 23 panels critical in local buckling and six panels critical in Euler buckling are compared with analytical results obtained using the BUCLASP-2 branched plate buckling program. A weight efficiency comparison is made between composite and aluminum compression panels using metal test data generated by the NACA. Theoretical studies indicate that potential weight savings of up to 50% are possible for composite hat-stiffened panels when compared with similar aluminum designs. Weight savings of 32% to 42% were experimentally achieved. Experience to date suggests that most of the theoretical weight-saving potential is available if design deficiencies are eliminated and strict fabrication control is exercised.

  11. Composite Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    The development and application of filamentary composite materials, is considered. Such interest is based on the possibility of using relatively brittle materials with high modulus, high strength, but low density in composites with good durability and high tolerance to damage. Fiber reinforced composite materials of this kind offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been made since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. There were only limited applied to the primary structure of operational vehicles, mainly as aircrafts.

  12. Multifunctional Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    especially  for  composites  that  have  thermoplastic  polymer   matrix .  Experimental  evidence  suggests  that  electric  currents  passing  through...Overview Polymer   matrix  composites are widely used as a structural material in a variety of  aerospace  applications  including  commercials  jets...Chung, D. D. L., 2000, "Piezoresistivity in continuous carbon fiber polymer - matrix and cement- matrix composites," Journal of Materials Science, 35

  13. Study of advanced composite structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration, task 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A structural design study was conducted to assess the relative merits of structural concepts using advanced composite materials for an advanced supersonic aircraft cruising at Mach 2.7. The configuration and structural arrangement developed during Task I and II of the study, was used as the baseline configuration. Allowable stresses and strains were established for boron and advanced graphite fibers based on projected fiber properties available in the next decade. Structural concepts were designed and analyzed using graphite polyimide and boron polyimide, applied to stiffened panels and conventional sandwich panels. The conventional sandwich panels were selected as the structural concept to be used on the wing structure. The upper and lower surface panels of the Task I arrow wing were redesigned using high-strength graphite polyimide sandwich panels over the titanium spars and ribs. The ATLAS computer system was used as the basis for stress analysis and resizing the surface panels using the loads from the Task II study, without adjustment for change in aeroelastic deformation. The flutter analysis indicated a decrease in the flutter speed compared to the baseline titanium wing design. The flutter analysis indicated a decrease in the flutter speed compared to the baseline titanium wing design. The flutter speed was increased to that of the titanium wing, with a weight penalty less than that of the metallic airplane.

  14. Comparative Study of 3-Dimensional Woven Joint Architectures for Composite Spacecraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Justin S.; Polis, Daniel L.; Rowles, Russell R.; Segal, Kenneth N.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Systems Mission Directorate initiated an Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) Project through the Exploration Technology Development Program in order to support the polymer composite needs for future heavy lift launch architectures. As an example, the large composite structural applications on Ares V inspired the evaluation of advanced joining technologies, specifically 3D woven composite joints, which could be applied to segmented barrel structures needed for autoclave cured barrel segments due to autoclave size constraints. Implementation of these 3D woven joint technologies may offer enhancements in damage tolerance without sacrificing weight. However, baseline mechanical performance data is needed to properly analyze the joint stresses and subsequently design/down-select a preform architecture. Six different configurations were designed and prepared for this study; each consisting of a different combination of warp/fill fiber volume ratio and preform interlocking method (Z-fiber, fully interlocked, or hybrid). Tensile testing was performed for this study with the enhancement of a dual camera Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system which provides the capability to measure full-field strains and three dimensional displacements of objects under load. As expected, the ratio of warp/fill fiber has a direct influence on strength and modulus, with higher values measured in the direction of higher fiber volume bias. When comparing the Z-fiber weave to a fully interlocked weave with comparable fiber bias, the Z-fiber weave demonstrated the best performance in two different comparisons. We report the measured tensile strengths and moduli for test coupons from the 6 different weave configurations under study.

  15. Composite mechanics for engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1989-01-01

    Recent research activities and accomplishments at Lewis Research Center on composite mechanics for engine structures are summarized. The activities focused mainly on developing procedures for the computational simulation of composite intrinsic and structural behavior. The computational simulation encompasses all aspects of composite mechanics, advanced three-dimensional finite-element methods, damage tolerance, composite structural and dynamic response, and structural tailoring and optimization.

  16. Composite mechanics for engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent research activities and accomplishments at Lewis Research Center on composite mechanics for engine structures are summarized. The activities focused mainly on developing procedures for the computational simulation of composite intrinsic and structural behavior. The computational simulation encompasses all aspects of composite mechanics, advanced three-dimensional finite-element methods, damage tolerance, composite structural and dynamic response, and structural tailoring and optimization.

  17. Load Diffusion in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Simmonds, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    This research has been concerned with load diffusion in composite structures. Fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities provides a significant aid towards this process. The results are also amendable to parameter study with a large parameter space and should be useful in structural tailoring studies.

  18. Hybrid composite laminate structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An invention which relates to laminate structures and specifically to essentially anisotropic fiber composite laminates is described. Metal foils are selectively disposed within the laminate to produce increased resistance to high velocity impact, fracture, surface erosion, and other stresses within the laminate.

  19. Study on utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Thomson, L. W.; Wilson, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The potential for utilizing advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports was assessed. Six fuselage design concepts were selected and evaluated in terms of structural performance, weight, and manufacturing development and costs. Two concepts were selected that merit further consideration for composite fuselage application. These concepts are: (1) a full depth honeycomb design with no stringers, and (2) an I section stringer stiffened laminate skin design. Weight reductions due to applying composites to the fuselages of commercial and military transports were calculated. The benefits of applying composites to a fleet of military transports were determined. Significant technology issues pertinent to composite fuselage structures were identified and evaluated. Program plans for resolving the technology issues were developed.

  20. Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufer, Markus; Conger, Robert; Bauer, Thomas; Newman, John

    2013-01-01

    An integrated, generic unibody composite pressurized structure (UCPS) combined with a positive expulsion device (PED), consisting of an elastomeric bladder for monopropellant hydrazine, has been quasi-standardized for spacecraft use. The combination functions as an all-composite, non-metallic, propellant tank with bladder. The integrated UCPS combines several previous innovations - specifically, the linerless, all-composite cryogenic tank technology; all-composite boss; resin formulation; and integrated stringer system. The innovation combines the UCPS with an integrated propellant management device (PMD), the PED or bladder, to create an entirely unique system for in-space use. The UCPS is a pressure vessel that incorporates skirts, stringers, and other structures so that it is both an in-space hydrazine tank, and also a structural support system for a spacecraft in a single, all-composite unit. This innovation builds on the progress in the development of a previous SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) Phase I with Glenn Research Center and an SBIR III with Johnson Space Center that included the fabrication of two 42-in. (˜107-cm) diameter all-composite cryogenic (LOX and liquid methane) UCPS test tanks for a lunar lander. This Phase II provides hydra zine compatibility testing of the elastomeric bladder, a see-through PED to validate the expulsion process and model, and a complete UCPS-based PED with stringers and skirts that will be used to conduct initial qualification and expulsion tests. This extends the UCPS technology to include hydrazine-based, in-space pro - pulsion applications and can also be used for electric propulsion. This innovation creates a system that, in comparison to the traditional approach, is lower in weight, cost, volume, and production time; is stronger; and is capable of much higher pressures. It also has fewer failure modes, and is applicable to both chemical and electric propulsion systems.

  1. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Progress and plans are reported for investigations of: (1) the mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; (2) fatigue in composite materials; (3) moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates; (4) the theory of inhomogeneous swelling in epoxy resin; (5) numerical studies of the micromechanics of composite fracture; (6) free edge failures of composite laminates; (7) analysis of unbalanced laminates; (8) compact lug design; (9) quantification of Saint-Venant's principles for a general prismatic member; (10) variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; and (11) the wing fuselage ensemble of the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes.

  2. Study on utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structures, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Ostrom, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    A plan is defined for a composite wing development effort which will assist commercial transport manufacturers in reaching a level of technology readiness where the utilization of composite wing structure is a cost competitive option for a new aircraft production plan. The recommended development effort consists of two programs: a joint government/industry material development program and a wing structure development program. Both programs are described in detail.

  3. Optical study on the dependence of breast tissue composition and structure on subject anamnesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taroni, Paola; Quarto, Giovanna; Pifferi, Antonio; Abbate, Francesca; Balestreri, Nicola; Menna, Simona; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2015-07-01

    Time domain multi-wavelength (635 to 1060 nm) optical mammography was performed on 200 subjects to estimate their average breast tissue composition in terms of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, water, lipid and collagen, and structural information, as provided by scattering parameters (amplitude and power). Significant (and often marked) dependence of tissue composition and structure on age, menopausal status, body mass index, and use of oral contraceptives was demonstrated.

  4. Structural, compositional and Raman studies of ZnS: Ce, Cu co-doped nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harish, G. S.; Reddy, P. Sreedhara

    2013-06-01

    In this present work, Ce, Cu co-doped ZnS nanoparticles were prepared at room temperature using chemical precipitation method. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) and High Resolution Raman spectroscopic techniques. X-ray diffraction studies show that the diameter of the particles is 2-4 nm. Broadened XRD peaks confirmed the formation of nanoparticles with face centered cubic (FCC) structure. SEM attached with EDS gave the size, morphology and compositional analysis of as-prepared material. The Raman spectra of unplanted and Cu, Ce ions implanted samples of nano structured ZnS showed LO mode and TO mode. Compared with the Raman modes (276 and 351 cm-1) of undoped ZnS nanoparticles, the Raman modes of Ce, Cu co-doped ZnS nanoparticles are slightly shifted towards lower frequency side.

  5. Bioinspired engineering study of Plantae vascules for self-healing composite structures.

    PubMed

    Trask, R S; Bond, I P

    2010-06-06

    This paper presents the first conceptual study into creating a Plantae-inspired vascular network within a fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminate, which provides an ongoing self-healing functionality without incurring a mass penalty. Through the application of a 'lost-wax' technique, orthogonal hollow vascules, inspired by the 'ray cell' structures found in ring porous hardwoods, were successfully introduced within a carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy polymer composite laminate. The influence on fibre architecture and mechanical behaviour of single vascules (located on the laminate centreline) when aligned parallel and transverse to the local host ply was characterized experimentally using a compression-after-impact test methodology. Ultrasonic C-scanning and high-resolution micro-CT X-ray was undertaken to identify the influence of and interaction between the internal vasculature and impact damage. The results clearly show that damage morphology is influenced by vascule orientation and that a 10 J low-velocity impact damage event is sufficient to breach the vasculature; a prerequisite for any subsequent self-healing function. The residual compressive strength after a 10 J impact was found to be dependent upon vascule orientation. In general, residual compressive strength decreased to 70 per cent of undamaged strength when vasculature was aligned parallel to the local host ply and a value of 63 per cent when aligned transverse. This bioinspired engineering study has illustrated the potential that a vasculature concept has to offer in terms of providing a self-healing function with minimum mass penalty, without initiating premature failure within a composite structure.

  6. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  7. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  8. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-19

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  9. Honeycomb-laminate composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A honeycomb-laminate composite structure was comprised of: (1) a cellular core of a polyquinoxaline foam in a honeycomb structure, and (2) a layer of a noncombustible fibrous material impregnated with a polyimide resin laminated on the cellular core. A process for producing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure and articles containing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure is described.

  10. [The study on chemical composition and crystalline structure of hypoplastic primary dental enamel].

    PubMed

    Zheng, S; Deng, H; Gao, X

    1997-11-01

    The present study, firstly, analyzed chemical composition of hypoplastic primary teeth by electron probe analyzer and compared the hypoplastic part with the normal part in the same tooth; secondly, by X-ray diffraction analyzer, studied the hypoplastic dental enamel and the normal dental enamel, and compared the crystalline structure between different dental enamel and with that of the hydroxyapatite. The aim was to find out any change of crystalline structure. Two exfoliated hypoplastic deciduous anterior teeth were used for the electron probe study. The normal part of each tooth served as control. Determinations of weight percentage (wt%) were made for P, Al, Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn, Sr, Na, K and F. Four exfoliated hypoplastic deciduous anterior teeth and eight exfoliated normal deciduous anterior teeth were used for the X-ray diffraction study. We found by X-ray diffraction that the length of the alpha-axis of enamel crystallite and the distance of lattice plane (corresponding 300) were increased in defective enamel and could be associated with the increased content of magnesium detected by electron probe. Thus, the present study demonstrated that there were both quantity and quality changes in the enamel hypoplasia lesion, which may increase the susceptibility of the defective teeth to caries.

  11. Compositional and Structural Study of Gd Implanted ZnO Films

    SciTech Connect

    Murmu, Peter P.; Kennedy, John V.; Markwitz, Andreas; Ruck, Ben J.

    2009-07-23

    We report a compositional and structural study of ZnO films implanted with 30 keV Gd ions. The depth profile of the implanted ions, measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, matches predictions of DYNAMIC-TRIM calculations. However, after annealing at temperatures above 550 deg. C the Gd ions are observed to migrate towards the bulk, and at the same time atomic force microscope images of the film surfaces show significant roughening. Raman spectroscopy shows that the annealed films have a reduced number of crystalline defects. The overall results are useful for developing an implantation-annealing regime to produce well characterized samples to investigate magnetism in the ZnO:Gd system.

  12. Compositional and Structural Study of Gd Implanted ZnO Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmu, Peter P.; Kennedy, John V.; Markwitz, Andreas; Ruck, Ben J.

    2009-07-01

    We report a compositional and structural study of ZnO films implanted with 30 keV Gd ions. The depth profile of the implanted ions, measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, matches predictions of DYNAMIC-TRIM calculations. However, after annealing at temperatures above 550° C the Gd ions are observed to migrate towards the bulk, and at the same time atomic force microscope images of the film surfaces show significant roughening. Raman spectroscopy shows that the annealed films have a reduced number of crystalline defects. The overall results are useful for developing an implantation-annealing regime to produce well characterized samples to investigate magnetism in the ZnO:Gd system.

  13. Probabilistic Design of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2006-01-01

    A formal procedure for the probabilistic design evaluation of a composite structure is described. The uncertainties in all aspects of a composite structure (constituent material properties, fabrication variables, structural geometry, and service environments, etc.), which result in the uncertain behavior in the composite structural responses, are included in the evaluation. The probabilistic evaluation consists of: (1) design criteria, (2) modeling of composite structures and uncertainties, (3) simulation methods, and (4) the decision-making process. A sample case is presented to illustrate the formal procedure and to demonstrate that composite structural designs can be probabilistically evaluated with accuracy and efficiency.

  14. Bonded and Stitched Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalewski, Bart F. (Inventor); Dial, William B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of forming a composite structure can include providing a plurality of composite panels of material, each composite panel having a plurality of holes extending through the panel. An adhesive layer is applied to each composite panel and a adjoining layer is applied over the adhesive layer. The method also includes stitching the composite panels, adhesive layer, and adjoining layer together by passing a length of a flexible connecting element into the plurality of holes in the composite panels of material. At least the adhesive layer is cured to bond the composite panels together and thereby form the composite structure.

  15. Causality and Composite Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Joglekar, Satish D.

    2007-10-03

    In this talk, we discuss the question of whether a composite structure of elementary particles, with a length scale 1/{lambda}, can leave observable effects of non-locality and causality violation at higher energies (but {<=}{lambda}); employing a model-independent approach based on Bogoliubov-Shirkov formulation of causality. We formulate a condition which must be fulfilled for the derived theory to be causal, if the fundamental theory is so; and analyze it to exhibit possibilities which fulfil and which violate the condition. We comment on how causality violating amplitudes can arise.

  16. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2008-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells and the built-up composite structure global fracture are enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads.

  17. Permeability and flammability study of composite sandwich structures for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubacz, Monika

    Fiber reinforced plastics offer advantageous specific strength and stiffness compared to metals and has been identified as candidates for the reusable space transportation systems primary structures including cryogenic tanks. A number of carbon and aramid fiber reinforced plastics have been considered for the liquid hydrogen tanks. Materials selection is based upon mechanical properties and containment performance (long and short term) and upon manufacturing considerations. The liquid hydrogen tank carries shear, torque, end load, and bending moment due to gusts, maneuver, take-off, landing, lift, drag, and fuel sloshing. The tank is pressurized to about 1.5 atmosphere (14.6psi or 0.1 MPa) differential pressure and on ascent maintains the liquid hydrogen at a temperature of 20K. The objective of the research effort into lay the foundation for developing the technology required for reliable prediction of the effects of various design, manufacturing, and service parameters on the susceptibility of composite tanks to develop excessive permeability to cryogenic fuels. Efforts will be expended on developing the materials and structural concepts for the cryogenic tanks that can meet the functional requirements. This will include consideration for double wall composite sandwich structures, with inner wall to meet the cryogenic requirements. The structure will incorporate nanoparticles for properties modifications and developing barriers. The main effort will be extended to tank wall's internal skin design. The main requirements for internal composite stack are: (1) introduction of barrier film (e.g. honeycomb material paper sheet) to reduce the wall permeability to hydrogen, (2) introduction of nanoparticles into laminate resin to prevent micro-cracking or crack propagation. There is a need to characterize and analyze composite sandwich structural damage due to burning and explosion. Better understanding of the flammability and blast resistance of the composite structures

  18. Compositional and structural studies of nanoscale boron-doped nickel aluminide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulcer, Jarvis Dwayne

    This thesis presents a detailed investigation of the composition and microstructure of boron-doped nickel aluminide thin films fabricated via ion beam sputtering. Findings are related to film growth mode, fabrication conditions, and mechanical properties. Results from the characterization of the composition and structure of Ni3Al:B films having thicknesses ranging from ˜300 to ˜2600 A deposited on substrates of plastic, NaCl and Si at a temperature of ˜300 K by Kaufman-type ion beam sputtering of a Ni3Al:B compound target are reported. The bulk composition of the films was investigated using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). It was determined by INAA and RBS that the bulk Ni/Al atomic ratio of the target can be replicated in films fabricated on single crystal NaCl substrates. However, results from the measurement of the local composition by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) via scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) reveal that the local Ni/Al atomic ratio is higher. This is the result of preferential sputtering of Ni due to recoil implantation of Al in the compound Ni3Al:B target. The spatial distribution of boron in the films was determined via neutron depth profiling (NDP). Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction studies reveal that films grown on Si and NaCl are polycrystalline and show the (111) crystallographic plane. The absence of superlattice peaks at (100), (110), (210) and (211) in the diffraction spectra indicate that the films are also in a state of disorder. It was determined from annular dark field images produced via STEM of 300, 560 A, and 600 A thin films that the average size of grains was 30 +/- 3 A. This cluster size is characteristic of films that have a very fine-grain microstructure and yield stresses of hundreds of MPa since the yield stress increases with decreasing grain size. The coalescence of clusters as observed via BF and

  19. Composite materials for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.; Sykes, G. F.; Bowles, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The use of advanced composites for space structures is reviewed. Barriers likely to limit further applications of composites are discussed and highlights of research to improve composites are presented. Developments in composites technology which could impact spacecraft systems are reviewed to identify technology needs and opportunities.

  20. Multiple size scale structures in silica/siloxane composites studied by small-angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Beaucage, G.; Schaefer, D.W.; Ulibarri, T.; Black, E.

    1993-12-31

    The physical properties of in-situ produced composites, such as the TEOS-polysiloxane based systems, are directly related to the complex interaction of structural features from the nano- to macro-scopic scales. The nature of these structural interactions are a key element in understanding and controlling mechanical properties in these systems. We believe that the smallest scale structures, in the nanometer range, correlate with properties such as the modulus while large-scale structures on the micron scale effect failure in these materials. This paper discusses techniques for analysis of structural features and interrelation of structural features over these wide ranges of size using small-angle light, x-ray and neutron scattering. Combination of data from different instruments allows for characterization of the interaction between these different size scale features.

  1. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Transverse properties of fiber constituents in composites, fatigue in composite materials, matrix dominated properties of high performance composites, numerical investigation of moisture effects, numerical investigation of the micromechanics of composite fracture, advanced analysis methods, compact lug design, and the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes projects are discussed.

  2. Study of utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Campion, M. C.; Pei, G.

    1984-01-01

    The effort required by the transport aircraft manufacturers to support the introduction of advanced composite materials into the fuselage structure of future commercial and military transport aircraft is investigated. Technology issues, potential benefits to military life cycle costs and commercial operating costs, and development plans are examined. The most urgent technology issues defined are impact dynamics, acoustic transmission, pressure containment and damage tolerance, post-buckling, cutouts, and joints and splices. A technology demonstration program is defined and a rough cost and schedule identified. The fabrication and test of a full-scale fuselage barrel section is presented. Commercial and military benefits are identified. Fuselage structure weight savings from use of advanced composites are 16.4 percent for the commercial and 21.8 percent for the military. For the all-composite airplanes the savings are 26 percent and 29 percent, respectively. Commercial/operating costs are reduced by 5 percent for the all-composite airplane and military life cycle costs by 10 percent.

  3. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinlivan, John T.; Wilson, Robert D.; Smith, Peter J.; Johnson, Ronald W.

    1984-01-01

    Toppics addressed include: advanced composites on Boeing commercial aircraft; composite wing durability; damage tolerance technology development; heavily loaded wing panel design; and pressure containment and damage tolerance in fuselages.

  4. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology utilization of fiber reinforced composite materials is discussed in the areas of physical properties, and life prediction. Programs related to the Composite Aircraft Program are described in detail.

  5. Impact analysis of composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, Allan B.; Kushner, Alan S.

    1993-01-01

    The impact analysis of composite aircraft structures is discussed. Topics discussed include: background remarks on aircraft crashworthiness; comments on modeling strategies for crashworthiness simulation; initial study of simulation of progressive failure of an aircraft component constructed of composite material; and research direction in composite characterization for impact analysis.

  6. Effect of stress concentrations in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, C. D.; Waas, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Composite structures have found wide use in many engineering fields and a sound understanding of their response under load is important to their utilization. An experimental program is being carried out to gain a fundamental understanding of the failure mechanics of multilayered composite structures at GALCIT. As a part of this continuing study, the performance of laminated composite plates in the presence of a stress gradient and the failure of composite structures at points of thickness discontinuity is assessed. In particular, the questions of initiation of failure and its subsequent growth to complete failure of the structure are addressed.

  7. Investigation of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, Michael W.

    2000-01-01

    This final report consists of a compilation of four separate written documents, three dealing with the response and failure of elliptical composite cylinders to an internal pressure load, and the fourth dealing with the influence of manufacturing imperfections in curved composite panels. The three focused on elliptical cylinders consist of the following: 1 - A paper entitled "Progressive Failure Analysis of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cylinders," 2 - A paper entitled "Influence of Geometric Nonlinearities on the Response and Failure of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cylinders," and 3 - A report entitled "Response and Failure of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cyclinders." The document which deals with the influence of manufacturing imperfections is a paper entitled "Manufacturing Distortions of Curved Composite Panels."

  8. Structural, compositional and morphological studies of thermally evaporated MoO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Senthilkumar, R. E-mail: gravicrc@gmail.com; Ravi, G. E-mail: gravicrc@gmail.com

    2014-04-24

    Molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 3}) nanostructures were grown on different substrates such as glass, indium tin oxide coated glass and fluorine doped glass by thermal evaporation of MoO{sub 3} powder at elevated temperature (750°C) using tube furnace without any catalyst and then by subsequent O{sub 2}/Ar flow rate. The morphology, composition and crystal structure were examined by using SEM, EDAX, Laser Raman and XRD. The films are polycrystalline with well-defined diffraction peaks and it consist of MoO{sub 3} with α-orthorhombic structure. The synthesized MoO{sub 3} belongs to different morphologies, generally nanobelt and nanohunk structures. The EDAX spectra confirm the films are composed only of Mo and O atoms. The O/Mo ratio is nearly equal to 3 that shows the stoichiometry of MoO{sub 3}.

  9. Precision Composite Space Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-15

    analysis of composite laminates with bolted joints under bending loads. J Compos Mater 1995;29(1):15-36. 283 [D.52]. Lee JD. Three dimensional...fiber reinforced composite bends . J Compos Mater 1986;20(1):30-45. [D.57]. Nagesh. Finite-element analysis of pressure vessels with progressive...composite cylinder subjected to three-point bending : Correlation of beam theory with experiment. Compos Struct 2004;63(3-4):439-445. [D.135]. Huang ZM

  10. Study on utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structures. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Ostrom, R. B.; Cardinale, S. V.

    1978-01-01

    The effort required by commercial transport manufacturers to accomplish the transition from current construction materials and practices to extensive use of composites in aircraft wings was investigated. The engineering and manufacturing disciplines which normally participate in the design, development, and production of an aircraft were employed to ensure that all of the factors that would enter a decision to commit to production of a composite wing structure were addressed. A conceptual design of an advanced technology reduced energy aircraft provided the framework for identifying and investigating unique design aspects. A plan development effort defined the essential technology needs and formulated approaches for effecting the required wing development. The wing development program plans, resource needs, and recommendations are summarized.

  11. An experimental and numerical study of 3-D braided structural textile composites

    SciTech Connect

    Abusafieh, A.; Kalidindi, S.R.; Franco, E.

    1994-12-31

    It has been reported in literature that isostrain models (also known as Fabric Geometry Models) provide good predictions of the elastic moduli of three-dimensional textile composites. This study reports a critical evaluation of the accuracy of the isostrain models by comparing the predictions against experimental measurements as well as finite element simulations of representative unit cells of the 3-D braided composites, over a range of braid angles and volume fractions. The accuracy of the isostrain model is found to be highly sensitive to the braid angles and the fraction of lay-in axial fibers in the composite system. Good correlations between isostrain model predictions of elastic moduli and measurements were observed when the loading direction is oriented along one of the fiber directions and is significantly away from the other fiber systems in the unit cell. In other situations, however, the isostrain model predictions were in significant errors. This study also reports on the influence of various modeling parameters in the development of finite element models for the simulation of the 3-D textile composite unit cells.

  12. Composite structures for magnetosphere imager spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin

    1994-01-01

    Results of a trade study addressing the issues and benefits in using carbon fiber reinforced composites for the Magnetosphere Imager (MI) spacecraft are presented. The MI mission is now part of the Sun/Earth Connection Program. To qualify for this category, new technology and innovative methods to reduce the cost and size have to be considered. Topics addressed cover: (1) what is a composite, including advantages and disadvantages of composites and carbon/graphite fibers; and (2) structural design for MI, including composite design configuration, material selection, and analysis of composite structures.

  13. Lessons learned for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Lessons learned for composite structures are presented in three technology areas: materials, manufacturing, and design. In addition, future challenges for composite structures are presented. Composite materials have long gestation periods from the developmental stage to fully matured production status. Many examples exist of unsuccessful attempts to accelerate this gestation period. Experience has shown that technology transition of a new material system to fully matured production status is time consuming, involves risk, is expensive and should not be undertaken lightly. The future challenges for composite materials require an intensification of the science based approach to material development, extension of the vendor/customer interaction process to include all engineering disciplines of the end user, reduced material costs because they are a significant factor in overall part cost, and improved batch-to-batch pre-preg physical property control. Historical manufacturing lessons learned are presented using current in-service production structure as examples. Most producibility problems for these structures can be traced to their sequential engineering design. This caused an excessive emphasis on design-to-weight and schedule at the expense of design-to-cost. This resulted in expensive performance originated designs, which required costly tooling and led to non-producible parts. Historically these problems have been allowed to persist throughout the production run. The current/future approach for the production of affordable composite structures mandates concurrent engineering design where equal emphasis is placed on product and process design. Design for simplified assembly is also emphasized, since assembly costs account for a major portion of total airframe costs. The future challenge for composite manufacturing is, therefore, to utilize concurrent engineering in conjunction with automated manufacturing techniques to build affordable composite structures

  14. Studies on Structure and Property of Polymer-based Nano-composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yun

    The mixing of polymers and nanoparticles makes it possible to give advantageous macroscopic material performance by tailoring the microstructure of composites. In this thesis, five combinations of nano inclusion and polymer matrix have been investigated. The first type of composites is titanium dioxide/ polyaniline combination. The effects of 4 different doping-acids on the microstructure, morphology, thermal stability and thermoelectric properties were discussed, showing that the sample with HCl and sulfosalicylic dual acids gave a better thermoelectric property. The second combination is titanium dioxide/polystyrene composite. Avrami equation was used to investigate the crystallization process. The best fit of the mass derivative dependence on temperature has been obtained using the double Gaussian dependence. The third combination is titanium dioxide/polyaniline/ polystyrene. In the titanium dioxide/polyaniline/ polystyrene ternary system, polystyrene provides the mechanical strength supporting the whole structure; TiO2 nanoparticles are the thermoelectric component; Polyaniline (PANI) gives the additional boost to the electrical conductivity. We also did some investigations on Polyethylene odide-TiO2 composite. The cubic anatase TiO2 with an average size of 13nm was mixed with Polyethylene-oxide using Nano Debee equipment from BEE international; Single wall carbon nanotubes were introduced into the vinyl acetate-ethylene copolymer (VAE) to form a connecting network, using high pressure homogenizer (HPH). The processing time has been reduced to 1/60 of sonication for HPH to give better sample quality. Theoretical percolation was derived according to the excluded volume theory, turning out the threshold (φ c) as a function of aspect ratio (A) to be fc=1-exp- 28+42A160+240A+60A2 .

  15. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  16. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D; Swank, William D.

    2011-08-30

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  17. Droplet infiltration and OM composition of intact soil structural surfaces for studying mass exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leue, Martin, ,, Dr.; Gerke, PD Horst H., ,, Dr.; Godow, Sophie Ch.; Ellerbrock, PD Ruth H., ,, Dr.

    2014-05-01

    During rapid percolation through macropores with local nonequilibrium conditions water and solute mass exchange with the porous matrix and sorption of reactive components is both taken place at the surface of preferential flow paths. Aggregate surfaces can be coated by illuviated clayey particles and biopores covered by plant residues or earthworm casts. By controlling wettability and sorption properties, the organic matter (OM) of surface coatings may also affect the transport properties of structured soils. Composition of OM in wall coatings was found spatially distributed at the mm-scale; thus, it remained unclear if water absorption by the soil matrix (i.e., mass exchange) was affected by locally-distributed OM. For samples with intact aggregate surfaces and biopore walls taken at clay-illuvial subsoil horizon of Luvisols developed from Loess and glacial till, the mm-scale spatial distribution of OM composition was measured using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT). Spectra were analysed with respect to alkyl and carboxyl functional groups in OM to obtain an estimate for its potential wettability. The infiltration dynamic of water droplets was evaluated using contact angle measurements and droplet penetration time. The potential wettability of OM differed for coatings and burrow walls and was generally lower for the Loess-derived than for the till-derived samples. The droplet infiltration times were significantly lower only for the Loess Luvisol samples. The results suggest that mass exchange between flow path and matrix can be affected by OM composition of structural surfaces among other factors such as texture, moisture, and chemical status (pH).

  18. Composite desiccant structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.; Schertz, William W.

    1987-01-01

    A composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  19. Composite desiccant structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, A.V.; Schertz, W.W.

    1984-06-06

    This patent discloses a composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  20. Probabilistic assessment of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael E.; Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    A general computational simulation methodology for an integrated probabilistic assessment of composite structures is discussed and demonstrated using aircraft fuselage (stiffened composite cylindrical shell) structures with rectangular cutouts. The computational simulation was performed for the probabilistic assessment of the structural behavior including buckling loads, vibration frequencies, global displacements, and local stresses. The scatter in the structural response is simulated based on the inherent uncertainties in the primitive (independent random) variables at the fiber matrix constituent, ply, laminate, and structural scales that describe the composite structures. The effect of uncertainties due to fabrication process variables such as fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply orientation, and ply thickness is also included. The methodology has been embedded in the computer code IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures). In addition to the simulated scatter, the IPACS code also calculates the sensitivity of the composite structural behavior to all the primitive variables that influence the structural behavior. This information is useful for assessing reliability and providing guidance for improvement. The results from the probabilistic assessment for the composite structure with rectangular cutouts indicate that the uncertainty in the longitudinal ply stress is mainly caused by the uncertainty in the laminate thickness, and the large overlap of the scatter in the first four buckling loads implies that the buckling mode shape for a specific buckling load can be either of the four modes.

  1. Mechanical and structure studies of Zr50Cu50 glass matrix composites during nano-indentation-a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashwani; Yedla, Natraj

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we report molecular dynamics simulations of nano-indentation on Zr50Cu50 metallic glass matrix composite (14% crystalline volume fraction) at various strain rates. The objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of strain rate on the deformation behaviour and understand the deformation mechanism during deformation. Structural analysis during deformation is done by centro-symmetry parameter (CSP) studies. The load- displacement plots are drawn for the loading portion of indentation to analyze the deformation behaviour. It is found that strain rate has significant effect on the nature of the load- displacement plot. With increasing strain rate serrations decreased and flat load-displacement regime is observed with progress of indentation (~10 Å) at strain rate of 1 × 1011s-1. This could be due to atoms getting less time to get rearranged themselves so as to bear further load. Also, the structure studies by CSP indicated that, at low strain rates (2 × 1010s-1 and 5 × 1010s-1) there is significant plastic deformation of the crystallite as compared to that at higher strain rate value of 1 × 1011s-1 at a particular indentation depth. This indicates that there is load transfer from the glassy matrix to the crystallite much earlier at low strain rates. However, at indentation depths of 20 Å at all the strain rates amorphization of the crystallite is observed.

  2. Hydrodynamic Forces on Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    the free surface and fluid-structure interaction. The comparable mass density between composite plates and water results in pronounced fluid...angles yields different free surface effects including vortices and the onset of cavitation . 14. SUBJECT TERMS Fluid structure interaction, FSI, finite...the effects of the free surface and fluid-structure interaction. The comparable mass density between composite plates and water results in pronounced

  3. Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Air Shower Structure with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the average depth of shower maximum and its fluctuations with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Study of the nuclear mass composition of UHECR with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Comparison of data from the Pierre Auger Observatory with predictions from air shower simulations: testing models of hadronic interactions; (4) A Monte Carlo exploration of methods to determine the UHECR composition with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) The delay of the start-time measured with the Pierre Auger Observatory for inclined showers and a comparison of its variance with models; (6) UHE neutrino signatures in the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory; and (7) The electromagnetic component of inclined air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  4. Composite structural materials. [aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The development of composite materials for aircraft applications is addressed with specific consideration of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life prediction. The design and flight testing of composite ultralight gliders is documented. Advances in computer aided design and methods for nondestructive testing are also discussed.

  5. Advanced technology composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Walker, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Work performed during the 25th month on NAS1-18889, Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures, is summarized. The main objective of this program is to develop an integrated technology and demonstrate a confidence level that permits the cost- and weight-effective use of advanced composite materials in primary structures of future aircraft with the emphasis on pressurized fuselages. The period from 1-31 May 1991 is covered.

  6. Additive technology of soluble mold tooling for embedded devices in composite structures: A study on manufactured tolerances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Madhuparna

    Composite textiles have found widespread use and advantages in various industries and applications. The constant demand for high quality products and services requires companies to minimize their manufacturing costs, and delivery time in order to compete in general and niche marketplaces. Advanced manufacturing methods aim to provide economical methods of mold production. Creation of molding and tooling options for advanced composites encompasses a large portion of the fabrication time, making it a costly process and restraining factor. This research discusses a preliminary investigation into the use of soluble polymer compounds and additive manufacturing to fabricate soluble molds. These molds suffer from dimensional errors due to several factors, which have also been characterized. The basic soluble mold of a composite is 3D printed to meet the desired dimensions and geometry of holistic structures or spliced components. The time taken to dissolve the mold depends on the rate of agitation of the solvent. This process is steered towards enabling the implantation of optoelectronic devices within the composite to provide sensing capability for structural health monitoring. The shape deviation of the 3D printed mold is also studied and compared to its original dimensions to optimize the dimensional quality to produce dimensionally accurate parts. Mechanical tests were performed on compact tension (CT) resin samples prepared from these 3D printed molds and revealed crack propagation towards an embedded intact optical fiber.

  7. Development of a Neural Network Simulator for Studying the Constitutive Behavior of Structural Composite Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Na, Hyuntae; Lee, Seung-Yub; Üstündag, Ersan; ...

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a recent development and application of a noncommercial artificial neural network (ANN) simulator with graphical user interface (GUI) to assist in rapid data modeling and analysis in the engineering diffraction field. The real-time network training/simulation monitoring tool has been customized for the study of constitutive behavior of engineering materials, and it has improved data mining and forecasting capabilities of neural networks. This software has been used to train and simulate the finite element modeling (FEM) data for a fiber composite system, both forward and inverse. The forward neural network simulation precisely reduplicates FEM results several orders ofmore » magnitude faster than the slow original FEM. The inverse simulation is more challenging; yet, material parameters can be meaningfully determined with the aid of parameter sensitivity information. The simulator GUI also reveals that output node size for materials parameter and input normalization method for strain data are critical train conditions in inverse network. The successful use of ANN modeling and simulator GUI has been validated through engineering neutron diffraction experimental data by determining constitutive laws of the real fiber composite materials via a mathematically rigorous and physically meaningful parameter search process, once the networks are successfully trained from the FEM database.« less

  8. Innovative design of composite structures: Further studies in the use of a curvilinear fiber format to improve structural efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, Michael W.; Charette, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Further studies to determine the potential for using a curvilinear fiber format in the design of composite laminates are reported. The curvilinear format is in contrast to the current practice of having the fibers aligned parallel to each other and in a straight line. The problem of a plate with a central circular hole is used as a candidate problem for this study. The study concludes that for inplane tensile loading the curvilinear format is superior. The limited results to date on compression buckling loads indicate that the curvilinear designs are poorer in resistant buckling. However, for the curvilinear design of interest, the reduction in buckling load is minimal and so overall there is a gain in considering the curvilinear design.

  9. Changes in composition, ecology and structure of high-mountain vegetation: a re-visitation study over 42 years.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Alberto; Frate, Ludovico; Carranza, Maria Laura; Attorre, Fabio; Pelino, Giovanni; Stanisci, Angela

    2016-01-27

    High-mountain ecosystems are increasingly threatened by climate change, causing biodiversity loss, habitat degradation and landscape modifications. However, very few detailed studies have focussed on plant biodiversity in the high mountains of the Mediterranean. In this study, we investigated the long-term changes that have occurred in the composition, structure and ecology of high-mountain vegetation in the central Apennines (Majella) over the last 42 years. We performed a re-visitation study, using historical and newly collected vegetation data to explore which ecological and structural features have been the most successful in coping with climatic changes. Vegetation changes were analysed by comparing geo-referenced phytosociological relevés collected in high-mountain habitats (dolines, gentle slopes and ridges) on the Majella massif in 1972 and in 2014. Composition analysis was performed by detrended correspondence analysis, followed by an analysis of similarities for statistical significance assessment and by similarity percentage procedure (SIMPER) for identifying which species indicate temporal changes. Changes in ecological and structural indicators were analysed by a permutational multivariate analysis of variance, followed by a post hoc comparison. Over the last 42 years, clear floristic changes and significant ecological and structural variations occurred. We observed a significant increase in the thermophilic and mesonitrophilic plant species and an increment in the frequencies of hemicryptophytes. This re-visitation study in the Apennines agrees with observations in other alpine ecosystems, providing new insights for a better understanding of the effects of global change on Mediterranean high-mountain biodiversity. The observed changes in floristic composition, the thermophilization process and the shift towards a more nutrient-demanding vegetation are likely attributable to the combined effect of higher temperatures and the increase in soil nutrients

  10. Changes in composition, ecology and structure of high-mountain vegetation: a re-visitation study over 42 years

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Alberto; Frate, Ludovico; Carranza, Maria Laura; Attorre, Fabio; Pelino, Giovanni; Stanisci, Angela

    2016-01-01

    High-mountain ecosystems are increasingly threatened by climate change, causing biodiversity loss, habitat degradation and landscape modifications. However, very few detailed studies have focussed on plant biodiversity in the high mountains of the Mediterranean. In this study, we investigated the long-term changes that have occurred in the composition, structure and ecology of high-mountain vegetation in the central Apennines (Majella) over the last 42 years. We performed a re-visitation study, using historical and newly collected vegetation data to explore which ecological and structural features have been the most successful in coping with climatic changes. Vegetation changes were analysed by comparing geo-referenced phytosociological relevés collected in high-mountain habitats (dolines, gentle slopes and ridges) on the Majella massif in 1972 and in 2014. Composition analysis was performed by detrended correspondence analysis, followed by an analysis of similarities for statistical significance assessment and by similarity percentage procedure (SIMPER) for identifying which species indicate temporal changes. Changes in ecological and structural indicators were analysed by a permutational multivariate analysis of variance, followed by a post hoc comparison. Over the last 42 years, clear floristic changes and significant ecological and structural variations occurred. We observed a significant increase in the thermophilic and mesonitrophilic plant species and an increment in the frequencies of hemicryptophytes. This re-visitation study in the Apennines agrees with observations in other alpine ecosystems, providing new insights for a better understanding of the effects of global change on Mediterranean high-mountain biodiversity. The observed changes in floristic composition, the thermophilization process and the shift towards a more nutrient-demanding vegetation are likely attributable to the combined effect of higher temperatures and the increase in soil nutrients

  11. Composition dependent multiple structural transformations of myoglobin in aqueous ethanol solution: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, R.; Samajdar, R. N.; Bhattacharyya, Aninda Jiban; Bagchi, B.

    2015-07-07

    Experimental studies (circular dichroism and ultra-violet (UV) absorption spectra) and large scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations (accompanied by order parameter analyses) are combined to establish a number of remarkable (and unforeseen) structural transformations of protein myoglobin in aqueous ethanol mixture at various ethanol concentrations. The following results are particularly striking. (1) Two well-defined structural regimes, one at x{sub EtOH} ∼ 0.05 and the other at x{sub EtOH} ∼ 0.25, characterized by formation of distinct partially folded conformations and separated by a unique partially unfolded intermediate state at x{sub EtOH} ∼ 0.15, are identified. (2) Existence of non-monotonic composition dependence of (i) radius of gyration, (ii) long range contact order, (iii) residue specific solvent accessible surface area of tryptophan, and (iv) circular dichroism spectra and UV-absorption peaks are observed. Interestingly at x{sub EtOH} ∼ 0.15, time averaged value of the contact order parameter of the protein reaches a minimum, implying that this conformational state can be identified as a molten globule state. Multiple structural transformations well known in water-ethanol binary mixture appear to have considerably stronger effects on conformation and dynamics of the protein. We compare the present results with studies in water-dimethyl sulfoxide mixture where also distinct structural transformations are observed along with variation of co-solvent composition.

  12. Structural Qualification of Composite Airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedward, Keith T.; McCarty, John E.

    1997-01-01

    The development of fundamental approaches for predicting failure and elongation characteristics of fibrous composites are summarized in this document. The research described includes a statistical formulation for individual fiber breakage and fragmentation and clustered fiber breakage, termed macrodefects wherein the aligned composite may represent a structural component such as a reinforcing bar element, a rebar. Experimental work conducted in support of the future exploitation of aligned composite rebar elements is also described. This work discusses the experimental challenges associated with rebar tensile test evaluation and describes initial numerical analyses performed in support of the experimental program.

  13. Advanced strategic interceptor composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, D.H.; Patty, C.E. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Launch mass reduction, stiffness increase, and primary bending mode frequency increase remain the prime focus of the US Army Strategic Defense Command (USASDC) advanced composite material development and testing program. The initial activity was directed toward fabrication of a demonstration structure consistent with the Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI) ERIS flight design. The objectives of this phase of the work were three-fold: selection of the optimum composite materials; concurrent bonding and joining technology development; evaluation of the performance of each test structure relative to its metal counterpart and relative to alternative composites. The effort exceeded model predictions. The resin matrix composite structure mass was 52% lower than the metal design. Modal testing demonstrated a 200% increase in stiffness and a 41% gain in first mode bending frequency. Given the demonstrated level of success, an additional element was added to the task focus: cost-effective, mass quantity fabrication techniques. Single step technology has been successfully applied to a relatively simple thermoset based bridge structure. Two step molding and assembly have been demonstrated for a GBI-X class thermoplastic structure. Preliminary testing has been completed to isolate and resolve problems associated with single step fabrication of the more complex GBI-X class structure. Fabrication of an appropriate test article as preparation for modal survey evaluation of the latter is in progress. Results are presented. Future program directions are summarized.

  14. Feasibility study of applying an advanced composite structure technique to the fabrication of helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleich, D.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of helicopter rotary wings from composite materials is discussed. Two composite spar specimens consisting of compressively prestressed stainless steel liner over-wrapped with pretensioned fiberglass were constructed. High liner strength and toughness together with the prescribed prestresses and final sizing of the part are achieved by means of cryogenic stretch forming of the fiber wrapped composite spar at minus 320 F, followed by release of the forming pressure and warm up to room temperature. The prestresses are chosen to provide residual compression in the metal liner under operating loads.

  15. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2001-01-01

    This report includes the results of a research in which the COmposite Durability STRuctural ANalysis (CODSTRAN) computational simulation capabilities were augmented and applied to various structures for demonstration of the new features and verification. The first chapter of this report provides an introduction to the computational simulation or virtual laboratory approach for the assessment of damage and fracture progression characteristics in composite structures. The second chapter outlines the details of the overall methodology used, including the failure criteria and the incremental/iterative loading procedure with the definitions of damage, fracture, and equilibrium states. The subsequent chapters each contain an augmented feature of the code and/or demonstration examples. All but one of the presented examples contains laminated composite structures with various fiber/matrix constituents. For each structure simulated, damage initiation and progression mechanisms are identified and the structural damage tolerance is quantified at various degradation stages. Many chapters contain the simulation of defective and defect free structures to evaluate the effects of existing defects on structural durability.

  16. Comparative study on composition, structure, and adsorption behavior of activated carbons derived from different synthetic waste polymers.

    PubMed

    Lian, Fei; Xing, Baoshan; Zhu, Lingyan

    2011-08-15

    The composition, structure, and adsorption behavior of activated carbons (ACs) derived from three different types of waste polymers, i.e., tire rubber (TR), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polyethyleneterephtalate (PET), by KOH activation were compared. The AC derived from PET exhibited the largest surface area (2831 m(2)/g) and pore volume (1.68 cm(3)/g) due to the homogenous aromatic composition of PET. The AC derived from PVC exhibited relatively lower surface area (2666 m(2)/g) but more narrowed pore size distribution (2-3 nm). The complex composition and high ash content of tire particles resulted in AC product with significantly lower surface area (398.5 m(2)/g) and heterogeneous pore width. Adsorption data of methylene blue (MB) were fitted well by Langmuir equation, indicating monolayer coverage on the ACs. The high oxygen content of PET-derived AC heavily affected its adsorption to MB and iodine. Due to the remarkable surface area and highly mesoporous structures, ACs based on both PET and PVC exhibited much higher adsorption capacities than that of TR and commercial coal-based AC (F400). This study demonstrates that the properties of ACs are highly dependent on their starting polymers and the potential of converting synthetic polymer waste into effective adsorbents for environmental remediation and cleanup.

  17. Mechanical Model Development for Composite Structural Supercapacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Trenton M.; Lacy, Thomas E., Jr.; Santiago, Diana; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    Novel composite structural supercapacitor concepts have recently been developed as a means both to store electrical charge and to provide modest mechanical load carrying capability. Double-layer composite supercapacitors are often fabricated by impregnating a woven carbon fiber fabric, which serves as the electrodes, with a structural polymer electrolyte. Polypropylene or a glass fabric is often used as the separator material. Recent research has been primarily limited to evaluating these composites experimentally. In this study, mechanical models based on the Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells (MSGMC) were developed and used to calculate the shear and tensile properties and response of two composite structural supercapacitors from the literature. The modeling approach was first validated against traditional composite laminate data. MSGMC models for composite supercapacitors were developed, and accurate elastic shear/tensile properties were obtained. It is envisioned that further development of the models presented in this work will facilitate the design of composite components for aerospace and automotive applications and can be used to screen candidate constituent materials for inclusion in future composite structural supercapacitor concepts.

  18. Textile composite fuselage structures development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Chu, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Phase 2 of the NASA ACT Contract (NAS1-18888), Advanced Composite Structural Concepts and Materials Technology for Transport Aircraft Structures, focuses on textile technology, with resin transfer molding or powder coated tows. The use of textiles has the potential for improving damage tolerance, reducing cost and saving weight. This program investigates resin transfer molding (RTM), as a maturing technology for high fiber volume primary structures and powder coated tows as an emerging technology with a high potential for significant cost savings and superior structural properties. Powder coated tow technology has promise for significantly improving the processibility of high temperature resins such as polyimides.

  19. Advanced textile structural composites -- status and outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Arendts, F.J.; Drechsler, K.; Brandt, J.

    1993-12-31

    Composites with 3D woven, braided or knitted fiber reinforcement offer a high potential for the cost-effective manufacturing of structures featuring an interesting mechanical performance, for example with regard to damage tolerance or energy absorption capability. In this paper, the properties of various textile structural composites with regard to stiffness, strength, damage tolerance, energy absorption capability as well as the respective manufacturing processes (RTM or thermoplastic hybrid-yarn technique) are presented in comparison to conventional ud tape based composites. The influence of the fiber architecture on the mechanical performance (tensile stiffness and strength, compression strength, interlaminar shear strength, compression strength after impact, fracture mechanical properties, through-penetration resistance) of monolithic and composite sandwich structures has been evaluated in an experimental study. It has been shown that composites involving new 3D weavings with minimum fiber crimp can compete with tape-based laminates as far as stiffness and strength are concerned. Using knittings makes it possible to manufacture composites having superior through-penetration resistance. The specific feature of the 3D braiding process is the ability to produce complex shaped structures having a high degree of freedom with regard to fiber geometry. Finally, the application of various textile structural composites will be presented on the basis of three demonstrator components (automotive engine mount, aircraft leading edge and motor cycle helmet), and the potential for further developments will be discussed.

  20. Composite Crew Module: Primary Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center to design, build, and test a full-scale crew module primary structure, using carbon fiber reinforced epoxy based composite materials. The overall goal of the Composite Crew Module project was to develop a team from the NASA family with hands-on experience in composite design, manufacturing, and testing in anticipation of future space exploration systems being made of composite materials. The CCM project was planned to run concurrently with the Orion project's baseline metallic design within the Constellation Program so that features could be compared and discussed without inducing risk to the overall Program. This report discusses the project management aspects of the project including team organization, decision making, independent technical reviews, and cost and schedule management approach.

  1. Composite material structures for tactical shelters - a cost/weight study

    SciTech Connect

    Fanucci, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    As part of an overall program sponsored by the U.S. Army Natick Research and Development Laboratories (NLABS) to develop a nuclear hardened, mobile, tactical shelter of minimum weight and cost, the application of three composite materials in future tactical shelters has been investigated. Nine shelter wall panels were designed using various combinations of material and panel cross sectional geometry. Acquisition cost and weight of the individual designs were estimated. The best of the graphite/epoxy configurations resulted in a 50% weight reduction from a baseline aluminum panel. The projected acquisition cost of this graphite panel was 3.3 times higher than the equivalent aluminum design. Predicted weight trends compared favorably with design experience reported by a variety of manufacturers. Aerospace industry pricing of composite versus metal production hardware suggests that predicted shelter panel acquisition costs have been substantially overestimated. Because composite technology is currently in a state of rapid growth and change, reliable cost information is relatively scarce. Evidence suggests that an expected reduction in composite shelter maintenance cost could result in a lower overall life cycle cost for the composite designs.

  2. Commercial transport aircraft composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    The role that analysis plays in the development, production, and substantiation of aircraft structures is discussed. The types, elements, and applications of failure that are used and needed; the current application of analysis methods to commercial aircraft advanced composite structures, along with a projection of future needs; and some personal thoughts on analysis development goals and the elements of an approach to analysis development are discussed.

  3. Structural evolution and strain induced mixing in Cu–Co composites studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bachmaier, A.; Aboulfadl, H.; Pfaff, M.; Mücklich, F.; Motz, C.

    2015-02-15

    A Cu–Co composite material is chosen as a model system to study structural evolution and phase formations during severe plastic deformation. The evolving microstructures as a function of the applied strain were characterized at the micro-, nano-, and atomic scale-levels by combining scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy including energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The amount of intermixing between the two phases at different strains was examined at the atomic scale using atom probe tomography as complimentary method. It is shown that Co particles are dissolved in the Cu matrix during severe plastic deformation to a remarkable extent and their size, number, and volume fraction were quantitatively determined during the deformation process. From the results, it can be concluded that supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in a fcc Cu–26 at.% Co alloy are obtained during deformation. However, the distribution of Co was found to be inhomogeneous even at the highest degree of investigated strain. - Highlights: • Structural evolution in a deformed Cu–Co composite is studied on all length scales. • Amount of intermixing is examined by atom-probe tomography. • Supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in Cu are observed.

  4. Structural study of nanometer-sized iron crystallites in single crystalline iron-MgO composite films.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Nagao, M; Yoshizaki, F; Mihama, K

    1989-07-01

    Single crystalline composite films of iron and MgO are prepared by a simultaneous vacuum deposition technique. The structures of the composite films, especially of the iron crystallites embedded, are studied by high-resolution electron microscopy and nanometer-area electron diffraction. The alpha-iron (b.c.c.) crystallites of 1 nm in size are epitaxially embedded in single crystalline MgO films, the orientation being (011)[100]Fe parallel (001)[100]MgO and (001)[110]Fe parallel (001)[100]MgO. A heat treatment of the as-grown films at 500-1,000 degrees C brings about a phase transformation of the crystallites from alpha-iron to gamma-iron (f.c.c.), followed by a grain growth of alpha-iron and finally the growth of the spinel, MgFe2O4. The gamma-iron crystallites transformed are circular plates and have strains at the periphery to accommodate the surrounding MgO-matrix. The magnetic property of the composite films is also reported.

  5. Numerical Study of Effects of Fluid-Structure Interaction on Dynamic Responses of Composite Plates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Strain ........................10 Figure 4. Normalized Displacement at Center of Top Skin Plate ...................................10 Figure 5...48 Figure 49. Experiment Strain Gage La yout on Underside of Composite Plate... skin plates, coupled through vertical stiffeners. Each skin plate is 0.3 m x 0.3 m and 0.002 m thick and is m odeled with e-glass com posite. The

  6. Infrared Spectroscopic Study on Structural Change and Interfacial Interaction in Rubber Composites Filled with Silica-Kaolin Hybrid Fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Guan, J.; Hu, H.; Gao, H.; Zhang, L.

    2016-07-01

    A series of natural rubber/styrene butadiene rubber/polybutadiene rubber composites was prepared with nanometer silica and micron kaolin by a dry modification process, mechanical compounding, and mold vulcanization. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the structural changes and interfacial interactions in composites. The results showed that the "seesaw" structure was formed particularly with the incorporation of silica particles in the preparation process, which would be beneficial to the dispersibility of fillers in the rubber matrix. The kaolinite platelets were generally arranged in directional alignment. Kaolinite with smaller particle size and low-defect structure was more stable in preparation, but kaolinite with larger particle size and high defect structure tended to change the crystal structure. The composite prepared in this research exhibited excellent mechanical and thermal properties.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Effects of Water Speciation on Interfacial Structure and Dynamics in Silica-Filled PDMS Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, R H; Maxwell, R S; Dinh, L N; Balazs, B

    2001-11-21

    Significant changes in materials properties of siloxane based polymers can be obtained by the addition of inorganic fillers. In silica-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based composites the mechanism of this reinforcing behavior is presumably hydrogen bonding between surface hydroxyls and backbone siloxane species. We have chosen to investigate in detail the effect of chemisorbed and physisorbed water on the interfacial structure and dynamics in silica-filled PDMS based composites. Toward this end, we have combined molecular dynamics simulations and experimental studies employing DMA and Nh4R analysis. Our results suggest that the polymer-silica contact distance and the mobility of interfacial polymer chains significantly decreased as the hydration level at the interface was reduced. The reduced mobility of the PDMS chains in the interfacial domain reduced the overall, bulk, motional properties of the polymer, thus causing an effective ''stiffening'' of the polymer matrix. The role of the long-ranged Coulombic interactions on the structural features and chain dynamics of the polymer were also examined. Both are found to be strongly influenced by the electrostatic interactions as identified by the bond orientation time correlation function and local density distribution functions. These results have important implications for the design of nanocomposite silica-siloxane materials.

  8. Electrical and Structural Properties Study of Layered Dielectric and Magnetic Composites and Blends Structures for RF and Microwave Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-12

    ceramic inclusions was fabricated in a polymer matrix. Magnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) and (SBN) powders were used to enhance the permittivity and...012-2428-4 16- Yttrium Iron Garnet: Properties and Applications Review 11 E. J. J.Mallmann, A.S.B.Sombra, J. C. Goes, P. B. A.Fechine Solid State...matrix. Magnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) and (SBN) powders were used to enhance the permittivity and permeability of the composites. This group of

  9. Creep of Structural Nuclear Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Will Windes; R.W. Lloyd

    2005-09-01

    A research program has been established to investigate fiber reinforced ceramic composites to be used as control rod components within a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. Two candidate systems have been identified, carbon fiber reinforced carbon (Cf/C) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites. One of the primary degradation mechanisms anticipated for these core components is high temperature thermal and irradiation enhanced creep. As a consequence, high temperature test equipment, testing methodologies, and test samples for very high temperature (up to 1600º C) tensile strength and long duration creep studies have been established. Actual testing of both tubular and flat, "dog-bone"-shaped tensile composite specimens will begin next year. Since there is no precedence for using ceramic composites within a nuclear reactor, ASTM standard test procedures are currently being established from these high temperature mechanical tests.

  10. Thermostructural tailoring of fiber composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    A significant area of interest in design of complex structures involves the study of multidisciplined problems. The coordination of several different intricate areas of study to obtain a particular design of a structure is a new and pressing area of research. In the past, each discipline would perform its task consecutively using the appropriate inputs from the other disciplines. This process usually required several time-consuming iterations to obtain a satisfactory design. The alternative pursued here is combining various participating disciplines and specified design requirements into a formal structural computer code. The main focus of this research is to develop a multidiscipline structural tailoring method for select composite structures and to demonstrate its application to specific areas. The development of an integrated computer program involves the coupling of three independent computer programs using an excutive module. This module will be the foundation for integrating a structural optimizer, a composites analyzer and a thermal analyzer. With the completion of the executive module, the first step was taken toward the evolution of multidiscipline software in the field of composite mechanics. Through the use of an array of cases involving a variety of objective functions/constraints and thermal-mechanical load conditions, it became evident that simple composite structures can be designed to a combined loads environment.

  11. A Study on the Structure and Adhesive Properties of Epoxy-Silicate Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantseva, T. V.; Ilyin, S. O.; Gorbunova, I. Yu.; Antonov, S. V.; Kerber, M. L.

    2014-11-01

    Compositions based on an ED-20 resin with three types of modifiers: natural montmorillonite (MMT) Cloisite Na +, organomodified MMT Cloisite 30B, and halloysite, were investigated. An optimum regime was chosen for preparation of the epoxy/modifier systems by employing the ultrasonic mixing. The rheological characteristics of suspensions were used to estimate the distribution of modifier in the epoxy oligomer. According to rheological data, the best dispersion of MMT in the epoxy oligomer after ultrasonic stirring was observed for the organomodified MMT Cloisite 30B. The maximum shear adhesion strength was also observed for the epoxy resin+Cloisite 30B systems. For the systems with 2 wt. % of Cloisite 30B, the increase in the adhesion strength was up to 65% as compared with that of the pristine epoxy oligomer.

  12. Structural behavior of composites with progressive fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1990-01-01

    Structural characteristics such as natural frequencies and buckling loads with corresponding mode shapes were investigated during progressive fracture of multilayer, angle-plied polymer matrix composites. A computer program was used to generate the numerical results for overall mechanical response of damaged composites. Variations in structural characteristics as a function of the previously applied loading were studied. Results indicate that most of the overall structural properties were preserved throughout a significant proportion of the ultimate fracture load. For the cases studied, changes in structural behavior began to occur after 70 percent of the ultimate fracture load was applied. However, the individual nature of the structural change was rather varied depending on the laminate configuration, fiber orientation, and the boundary conditions.

  13. Two-Dimensional Transport Studies for the Composition and Structure of the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Research efforts in the second quarter have been focused upon a preliminary exploration of the likely impact of Europs's local atmospheres and neutral clouds on the plasma torus and the initiation of an assessment of the basic nature of the radial structure of the electron density in the plasma torus during the JO encounter of the Galileo spacecraft with Jupiter.

  14. Structural Design of Ares V Interstage Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleigh, David W.; Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Martin, Robert A.; Johnson, Theodore F.

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary and detailed design studies were performed to mature composite structural design concepts for the Ares V Interstage structure as a part of NASA s Advanced Composite Technologies Project. Aluminum honeycomb sandwich and hat-stiffened composite panel structural concepts were considered. The structural design and analysis studies were performed using HyperSizer design sizing software and MSC Nastran finite element analysis software. System-level design trade studies were carried out to predict weight and margins of safety for composite honeycomb-core sandwich and composite hat-stiffened skin design concepts. Details of both preliminary and detailed design studies are presented in the paper. For the range of loads and geometry considered in this work, the hat-stiffened designs were found to be approximately 11-16 percent lighter than the sandwich designs. A down-select process was used to choose the most favorable structural concept based on a set of figures of merit, and the honeycomb sandwich design was selected as the best concept based on advantages in manufacturing cost.

  15. The Electromagnetic and Mechanical Properties of Structural Composites: A Theoretical and Experimental Design Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-22

    rigorous electromagnetic methods can be used for this purpose, including the finite element method (FEM), finite difference time domain (FDTD) and modal...architectures and to multilayered laminates. In this project, experimental validation from 4-50 GHz is provided for single layers of dry structural grade...originally presented by Moharam and Gaylord. 10 zi E" X \\ ’ As. p reflected \\ i / Figure 7. Solution domain used by the rigorous

  16. Structural stability and mechanical property of Ni(111)-graphene-Ni(111) layered composite: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Ximing; Chen, Jun; Li, Jing-Tian; Zhuang, Jun; Ning, Xi-Jing

    2015-12-01

    A first-principles calculation of the structural stability and mechanical property of Ni(111)-graphene-Ni(111) layered composite was presented. Three different structural models were considered, and the most stable interfacial structure had been determined with top-fcc structure in both sides of graphene. Stretching calculations demonstrate that the tensile stress of the composite can reach twice of that of pure Ni in the ranges of 0-0.2 strain. The Young’s modulus in triaxial directions are 384 (x), 362 (y), and 303 (z) GPa for the Ni(111)-graphene-Ni(111) structure, and 212 (x), 251 (y), and 273 (z) GPa for pure single-crystal Ni(111).

  17. Application of Composite Mechanics to Composites Enhanced Concrete Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Gotsis, Pascal K.

    2006-01-01

    A new and effective method is described to design composites to repair damage or enhance the overload strength of concrete infrastructures. The method is based on composite mechanics which is available in computer codes. It is used to simulate structural sections made from reinforced concrete which are typical in infrastructure as well as select reinforced concrete structures. The structural sections are represented by a number of layers through the thickness where different layers are used in concrete, and for the composite. The reinforced concrete structures are represented with finite elements where the element stiffness parameters are from the structural sections which are represented by composite mechanics. The load carrying capability of the structure is determined by progressive structural fracture. Results show up to 40 percent improvements for damage and for overload enhancement with relatively small laminate thickness for the structural sections and up to three times for the composite enhanced select structures (arches and domes).

  18. Characterization of Silver/Bovine Serum Albumin (Ag/BSA) nanoparticles structure: morphological, compositional, and interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Gebregeorgis, A; Bhan, C; Wilson, O; Raghavan, D

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to elucidate the structure of protein conjugated silver nanoparticles prepared by chemical reduction of AgNO(3) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) mixture. The role of BSA in the formation of Ag/BSA nanoparticles was established by UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The association of silver with BSA in Ag/BSA nanoparticles was studied by the decrease in the intensity of absorbance peak at 278 nm in UV-Vis spectra and shift in cathodic peak potential in cyclic voltammogram. The molar ratio of silver to BSA in the Ag/BSA nanoparticles is 27:1, as ascertained by thermogravimetric analysis and atomic absorption spectrometry. Based on atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements, the average particle size of nanoparticles was found to be range of 11-15 nm. TEM image showed that the nanoparticle has two distinct phases and selected area electron diffraction pattern of nanoparticles indicated that the silver phase in Ag/BSA is fcc. X-ray photo electron spectroscopy measurements of freshly prepared and argon sputtered nanoparticles provided evidence that the outer and inner region of nanoparticles are mainly composed of BSA and silver respectively. The structural and compositional findings of nanoparticles could have a strong bearing on the bioavailability and antimicrobial activity of nanoparticles.

  19. Composition and structure of mantle lithosphere in the Russian Far East according to xenolths study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikhodko, V.; Ashchepkov, I.; Ntaflos, T.; Barkar, A.; Vysotsky, S.; Esin, S.; Kutolin, V.; Prussevich, A.

    2012-04-01

    Lherzolitic mantle xenoliths from the Pliocene - basalts of Russian Primorie referred to the different volcanic regions (plateaus) show spatial -temporal variations of thee mineral chemistry determined for 550 xenoliths and TRE in IGM Novosibirsk but rather similar bulk rock compositions. In the N Eastern volcanic zone in Sovgavan plateau the xenoliths bearing basalts occur in late stages of the Miocen - Pleocene basalt plateau (Tuttochi), in the late extrusions (necks) and dykes and the post erosion enclosed valley flows (Sunku and Kamky) scoria cones (MountKurgan) where amphiboles occurred in hybrid websterites. In Southern Sikhote Alin in Shkotkov plteau Fe- lherzolites with amphiboles and mica dominate in the basement lavas. The Pliocene Pogelbanochny neck and lava flow contain y large xenoliths (to 1 m) (Scheka , 1981) sapphires and some other gems (Vysotsky et al ., 2009). The xenolith in the western volcanic zones - Lesozovoskaya, Medvezhy contains kelyphites after garnets and Phl veins The Cr- diopsides in Tuttochi are more (Na, Al , Ti) depleted and dispersed, in Kamky flow Fe-rich trends is found similar to relation for CPx in Sunku flow and Mount Kurgan. The early stage Nelma and Shkotov palateu Cr-Di show high dispersion and Fe-metasomatism. Mesozoic Anyui Cpx are less Na-Ti-Al riched. The Sp refer to most Al rich OSMA part with are Cr-picotites equilibrated with garnets (16-24% Cr2O3). Calculated PT geotherms ~90 mWm-2 everywhere starts near Gar stability at18kabrs. The Western fields show lower mantle thermal gradients. In basaltic plateau P-Fe# trends show percolation trends increasing P-Fe# with Cpx pressure lower then Opx. Those from latest scoria cones demonstrates sub adiabatic PT trajectories (MountKurgan) or Fe# rising to bottom (Medvezhy) formed by melt interaction. The basement plateau Shkotov xenolith reveal first thermal plum impact and subvertical magma channel trend TRE determined by LAMICP IGM for Sovgavan Cr- diopsides (Sanky

  20. ACEE Composite Structures Technology: Review of selected NASA research on composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program was designed to develop technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Research on composite materials, aircraft structures, and aircraft design is presented herein. The following parameters of composite materials were addressed: residual strength, damage tolerance, toughness, tensile strength, impact resistance, buckling, and noise transmission within composite materials structures.

  1. Membrane plasmalogen composition and cellular cholesterol regulation: a structure activity study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Disrupted cholesterol regulation leading to increased circulating and membrane cholesterol levels is implicated in many age-related chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and cancer. In vitro and ex vivo cellular plasmalogen deficiency models have been shown to exhibit impaired intra- and extra-cellular processing of cholesterol. Furthermore, depleted brain plasmalogens have been implicated in AD and serum plasmalogen deficiencies have been linked to AD, CVD, and cancer. Results Using plasmalogen deficient (NRel-4) and plasmalogen sufficient (HEK293) cells we investigated the effect of species-dependent plasmalogen restoration/augmentation on membrane cholesterol processing. The results of these studies indicate that the esterification of cholesterol is dependent upon the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-containing ethanolamine plasmalogen (PlsEtn) present in the membrane. We further elucidate that the concentration-dependent increase in esterified cholesterol observed with PUFA-PlsEtn was due to a concentration-dependent increase in sterol-O-acyltransferase-1 (SOAT1) levels, an observation not reproduced by 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibition. Conclusion The present study describes a novel mechanism of cholesterol regulation that is consistent with clinical and epidemiological studies of cholesterol, aging and disease. Specifically, the present study describes how selective membrane PUFA-PlsEtn enhancement can be achieved using 1-alkyl-2-PUFA glycerols and through this action reduce levels of total and free cholesterol in cells. PMID:20546600

  2. Recent progress in Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy study of compositional, structural, and physical attributes of developmental cotton fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fibers are natural plant products and their end-use qualities depend on their stages of development. In general, the quantity of natural fiber cellulose I (ß 1'4 linked glucose residues) increases rapidly, thus it leads to compositional, structural, and physical attribute variations among the...

  3. Two-Dimensional Transport Studies for the Composition and Structure of the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.

    2003-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to investigate the roles of local and spatially extended plasma sources created by Io, plasma torus chemistry, and plasma convective and diffusive transport in producing the long-lived S(+), S(++) and O(+) radial ribbon structures of the plasma torus, their System III longitude and local-time asymmetries, their energy sources and their possible time variability. To accomplish this objective, two-dimensional [radial (L) and System III longitude] plasma transport equations for the flux-tube plasma content and energy content will be solved that include the convective motions for both the east-west electric field and co-rotational velocity-lag profile near Io s orbit, radial diffusion, and the spacetime dependent flux-tube production and loss created by both neutral-plasma and plasma-ion reaction chemistry in the plasma torus. For neutral-plasma chemistry, the project will for the first time undertake the calculation of realistic three-dimensional, spatially-extended, and time-varying contributions to the flux-tube ion-production and loss that are produced by Io's corona and extended neutral clouds. The unknown two-dimensional spatial nature of diffusion in the plasma transport will be isolated and better defined in the investigation by the collective consideration of the foregoing different physical processes. For energy transport, the energy flow from hot pickup ions (and a new electron source) to thermal ions and electrons will be included in investigating the System III longitude and local-time temperature asymmetries in the plasma torus. The research is central to the scope of the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Roadmap in Quest II Campaign 4 "Comparative Planetary Space Environments" by addressing key questions for understanding the magnetosphere of planets with high rotation rates and large internal plasma sources and, in addition, is of considerable importance to the NASA Solar System Exploration Science Theme. In this regard

  4. Desmosome structure, composition and function.

    PubMed

    Garrod, David; Chidgey, Martyn

    2008-03-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions of epithelia and cardiac muscle. They resist mechanical stress because they adopt a strongly adhesive state in which they are said to be hyper-adhesive and which distinguishes them from other intercellular junctions; desmosomes are specialised for strong adhesion and their failure can result in diseases of the skin and heart. They are also dynamic structures whose adhesiveness can switch between high and low affinity adhesive states during processes such as embryonic development and wound healing, the switching being signalled by protein kinase C. Desmosomes may also act as signalling centres, regulating the availability of signalling molecules and thereby participating in fundamental processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis. Here we consider the structure, composition and function of desmosomes, and their role in embryonic development and disease.

  5. Hybrid Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a hybrid structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the hybrid structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high strain to failure at cryogenic

  6. Structural and Surface Compatibility Study of Modified Electrospun Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) Composites for Skin Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Kajal; Manakhov, Anton; Zajíčková, Lenka; Thomas, Sabu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, biodegradable poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers (PCL-NF), collagen-coated PCL nanofibers (Col-c-PCL), and titanium dioxide-incorporated PCL (TiO2-i-PCL) nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning technique to study the surface and structural compatibility of these scaffolds for skin tisuue engineering. Collagen coating over the PCL nanofibers was done by electrospinning process. Morphology of PCL nanofibers in electrospinning was investigated at different voltages and at different concentrations of PCL. The morphology, interaction between different materials, surface property, and presence of TiO2 were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform IR spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angle measurement, energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). MTT assay and cell adhesion study were done to check biocompatibilty of these scaffolds. SEM study confirmed the formation of nanofibers without beads. FTIR proved presence of collagen on PCL scaffold, and contact angle study showed increment of hydrophilicity of Col-c-PCL and TiO2-i-PCL due to collagen coating and incorporation of TiO2, respectively. EDX and XPS studies revealed distribution of entrapped TiO2 at molecular level. MTT assay and cell adhesion study using L929 fibroblast cell line proved viability of cells with attachment of fibroblasts over the scaffold. Thus, in a nutshell, we can conclude from the outcomes of our investigational works that such composite can be considered as a tissue engineered construct for skin wound healing.

  7. Study of the structure of 3-D composites based on carbon nanotubes in bovine serum albumin matrix by X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatov, D.; Zhurbina, N.; Gerasimenko, A.

    2017-01-01

    3-D composites are widely used in tissue engineering. A comprehensive analysis by X-ray microtomography was conducted to study the structure of the 3-D composites. Comprehensive analysis of the structure of the 3-D composites consisted of scanning, image reconstruction of shadow projections, two-dimensional and three-dimensional visualization of the reconstructed images and quantitative analysis of the samples. Experimental samples of composites were formed by laser vaporization of the aqueous dispersion BSA and single-walled (SWCNTs) and multi-layer (MWCNTs) carbon nanotubes. The samples have a homogeneous structure over the entire volume, the percentage of porosity of 3-D composites based on SWCNTs and MWCNTs - 16.44%, 28.31%, respectively. An average pore diameter of 3-D composites based on SWCNTs and MWCNTs - 45 μm 93 μm. 3-D composites based on carbon nanotubes in bovine serum albumin matrix can be used in tissue engineering of bone and cartilage, providing cell proliferation and blood vessel sprouting.

  8. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of future propulsion systems utilizing advanced composite structures for the storage of cryogenic fuels, such as liquid hydrogen or oxygen, presents many challenges. Economic justification for these structures requires, light weight, reusable components with an infrastructure allowing periodic evaluation of structural integrity after enduring demanding stresses during operation. A major focus has been placed on the use of acoustic emission NDE to detect propagating defects, in service, necessitating an extensive study into characterizing the nature of acoustic signal propagation at very low temperatures and developing the methodology of applying AE sensors to monitor cryogenic components. This work addresses the question of sensor performance in the cryogenic environment. Problems involving sensor mounting, spectral response and durability are addressed. The results of this work provides a common point of measure from which sensor selection can be made when testing composite components at cryogenic temperatures.

  9. A Nonlinear Theory for Smart Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2002-01-01

    The paper discusses the following: (1) Development of a completely coupled thermo-piezoelectric-mechanical theory for the analysis of composite shells with segmented and distributed piezoelectric sensor/actuators and shape memory alloys. The higher order displacement theory will be used to capture the transverse shear effects in anisotropic composites. The original theory will be modified to satisfy the stress continuity at ply interfaces. (2) Development of a finite element technique to implement the mathematical model. (3) Investigation of the coupled structures/controls interaction problem to study the complex trade-offs associated with the coupled problem.

  10. Load Diffusion in Composite and Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Ambur, D. (Technical Monitor); Nemeth, M. P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The research carried out here builds on our previous NASA supported research on the general topic of edge effects and load diffusion in composite structures. Further fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for the multi-functional large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Some specific problems recently considered were those of end effects in smart materials and structures, study of the stress response of pressurized linear piezoelectric cylinders for both static and steady rotating configurations, an analysis of the effect of pre-stressing and pre-polarization on the decay of end effects in piezoelectric solids and investigation of constitutive models for hardening rubber-like materials. Our goal in the study of load diffusion is the development of readily applicable results for the decay lengths in terms of non-dimensional material and geometric parameters. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses.

  11. Multiscale Multifunctional Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    2012-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells. Global fracture is enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads. The old reference denotes that nothing has been added to this comprehensive report since then.

  12. Study of the Structure, Composition, and Stability of Yttrium-Ti-Oxygen nm-Scale Features in Nano-Structured Ferritic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Nicholas John

    This work advances the understanding of the Y-Ti-O nanofeatures (NFs) in nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs); a class of high temperature, oxide dispersion strengthened iron alloys with applications in both advanced fission and fusion reactors. NFAs exhibit high creep strength up to 800ºC and a remarkable radiation damage tolerance and He management. However, the NFs, which are responsible for these properties, are not fully understood. This work addresses key questions including: a) what is the NF structure and composition and how are they affected by alloy composition and processing; b) what is the NFA long-term thermal stability; c) and what alternative processing paths are available to reduce costs and produce more uniform NF distributions? A detailed study using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM-group member Y. Wu), and atom probe tomography (APT) evaluated the NF average size (), number density (N), volume fraction (f), composition, and structure in two heats of the commercial NFA MA957. The and N were ≈2.6 nm and ≈5x1023 m-3 , respectively, for both heats, with TEM indicating the NF are Y 2Ti2O7. However, SANS indicates a mixture of NF compositions or atomic densities with a difference between the heats, while APT shows compositions with ≈ 10% Cr and a Y/Ti ratio < 1. However, microscope artifacts such as preferential undercounting of Y and O or trajectory aberrations that prevent resolving Ti segregation to the NF-matrix interface could account for the discrepancy. The microstructure and NFs in MA957 were stable for long times at temperatures up to 900ºC. Notably, Ti in the matrix and some from the NFs migrates to large, Ti-rich phases. Aging at higher temperatures up to 1000ºC for 19.5 kh produced modest coarsening for ≈ 3.8 nm and ≈30% increase in grain size for a corresponding 13% reduction in microhardness. A coarsening model shows no significant NF coarsening will occur at temperatures less than

  13. Structural evolution and strain induced mixing in Cu-Co composites studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Bachmaier, A; Aboulfadl, H; Pfaff, M; Mücklich, F; Motz, C

    2015-02-01

    A Cu-Co composite material is chosen as a model system to study structural evolution and phase formations during severe plastic deformation. The evolving microstructures as a function of the applied strain were characterized at the micro-, nano-, and atomic scale-levels by combining scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy including energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The amount of intermixing between the two phases at different strains was examined at the atomic scale using atom probe tomography as complimentary method. It is shown that Co particles are dissolved in the Cu matrix during severe plastic deformation to a remarkable extent and their size, number, and volume fraction were quantitatively determined during the deformation process. From the results, it can be concluded that supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in a fcc Cu-26 at.% Co alloy are obtained during deformation. However, the distribution of Co was found to be inhomogeneous even at the highest degree of investigated strain.

  14. Health monitoring of a composite wingbox structure.

    PubMed

    Grondel, S; Assaad, J; Delebarre, C; Moulin, E

    2004-04-01

    This work was devoted to the development of a health monitoring system assigned to aerospace applications. Those applications concerned the detection of damaging impacts and debonding between stiffeners and composite skins, since they are the major causes of in-service damage of aircraft structures. The chosen health monitoring system was first based on the excitation and reception of Lamb waves along the structure by using thin piezoelectric transducers (active mode) and secondly on a continuous monitoring taking the same transducers used as acoustic emission sensors (passive mode). The composite specimen used was consistent with aircraft wingbox in terms of structure and loading. Several impacts with increasing energy increments were applied on the composite specimen. In passive mode, the study showed the ability of using the acoustic signature of an impact to detect possible damage. Moreover, the damage emergence in the case of damaging impact was confirmed in active mode. Further measurements during fatigue testing were performed. The aim was to demonstrate the ability of the system to monitor disbond growth between the stiffener and the composite skin. The sensitivity of the health monitoring system to the disbond growth was further demonstrated.

  15. Structural and dynamical studies of acid-mediated conversion in amorphous-calcium-phosphate based dental composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Allen, Andrew J.; Levine, Lyle E.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Skrtic, Drago; Antonucci, Joseph M.; Hoffman, Kathleen M.; Giuseppetti, Anthony A.; Ilavsky, Jan

    2014-07-28

    Our objective was to investigate the complex structural and dynamical conversion process of the amorphous-calcium-phosphate (ACP)-to-apatite transition in ACP based dental composite materials. Composite disks were prepared using zirconia hybridized ACP fillers (0.4 mass fraction) and photo-activated Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin (0.6 mass fraction). We performed an investigation of the solution-mediated ACP-to-apatite conversion mechanism in controlled acidic aqueous environment with in situ ultra-small angle X-ray scattering based coherent X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and ex situ X-ray diffraction, as well as other complementary techniques. We established that the ACP-to-apatite conversion in ACP composites is a two-step process, owing to the sensitivity to local structural changes provided by coherent X-rays. Initially, ACP undergoes a local microstructural rearrangement without losing its amorphous character. We established the catalytic role of the acid and found the time scale of this rearrangement strongly depends on the pH of the solution, which agrees with previous findings about ACP without the polymer matrix being present. In the second step, ACP is converted to an apatitic form with the crystallinity of the formed crystallites being poor. Separately, we also confirmed that in the regular Zr-modified ACP the rate of ACP conversion to hydroxyapatite is slowed significantly compared to unmodified ACP, which is beneficial for targeted slow release of functional calcium and phosphate ions from dental composite materials. Significantly, for the first time, we were able to follow the complete solution-mediated transition process from ACP to apatite in this class of dental composites in a controlled aqueous environment. A two-step process, suggested previously, was conclusively identified.

  16. Structural and dynamical studies of acid-mediated conversion in amorphous-calcium-phosphate based dental composites

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Fan; Allen, Andrew J.; Levine, Lyle E.; ...

    2014-07-28

    Our objective was to investigate the complex structural and dynamical conversion process of the amorphous-calcium-phosphate (ACP)-to-apatite transition in ACP based dental composite materials. Composite disks were prepared using zirconia hybridized ACP fillers (0.4 mass fraction) and photo-activated Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin (0.6 mass fraction). We performed an investigation of the solution-mediated ACP-to-apatite conversion mechanism in controlled acidic aqueous environment with in situ ultra-small angle X-ray scattering based coherent X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and ex situ X-ray diffraction, as well as other complementary techniques. We established that the ACP-to-apatite conversion in ACP composites is a two-step process, owing to the sensitivity to localmore » structural changes provided by coherent X-rays. Initially, ACP undergoes a local microstructural rearrangement without losing its amorphous character. We established the catalytic role of the acid and found the time scale of this rearrangement strongly depends on the pH of the solution, which agrees with previous findings about ACP without the polymer matrix being present. In the second step, ACP is converted to an apatitic form with the crystallinity of the formed crystallites being poor. Separately, we also confirmed that in the regular Zr-modified ACP the rate of ACP conversion to hydroxyapatite is slowed significantly compared to unmodified ACP, which is beneficial for targeted slow release of functional calcium and phosphate ions from dental composite materials. Significantly, for the first time, we were able to follow the complete solution-mediated transition process from ACP to apatite in this class of dental composites in a controlled aqueous environment. A two-step process, suggested previously, was conclusively identified.« less

  17. Composite structures for commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vosteen, L. F.

    1978-01-01

    The development of graphite-epoxy composite structures for use on commercial transport aircraft is considered. Six components, three secondary structures, and three primary structures, are presently under development. The six components are described along with some of the key features of the composite designs and their projected weight savings.

  18. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  19. Elastic waves in structurally chiral composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shiuhkuang.

    1990-01-01

    Elastic wave propagation through structurally chiral (handed) media was studied. The primary objectives are to construct structurally chiral composites and to characterize their properties. Structurally chiral composites are constructed by stacking identical uniaxial plates, whose consecutive symmetric axes describe either a right- or a left-handed spiral. A matrix representation method is used to solve the elastic wave propagation in such layered composites. Numerical computation of the plane wave reflection and transmission characteristics for chiral arrangements are compared with those for the non-chiral one. It is concluded that the co-polarized characteristics are unaffected by the structural chirality, while the cross-polarized reflected and transmitted fields are greatly influenced by it. Numerical modeling is also applied for the real samples. The polarization ellipse of the transmitted field of each sample is calculated. To verify the form chirality, four glass-reinforced chiral and non-chiral composite samples are made from helix tape, molded, debulked, and cured individually under identical temperature and pressure histories. The spiral composites are characterized using shear and longitudinal wave transducers in ultrasonic experiments. Both the material properties and the polarization ellipse of the transmitted field of each sample are measured. It is proved conclusively that left and right handedness in the microstructures of a material rotates the plane of polarization of a propagating shear wave in the opposite directions. Thus it is now possible to say that by reducing the length scale of the handed microstructures tone more appropriate to its propagating wavelength, a medium is obtained that gives rise to effects similar to optical radar and optical dichroism.

  20. Rapid Prototyping of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    1998-01-01

    This final report for the project Rapid Production of Composite Structures covers the period from July 14, 1997 to September 30, 1998. It will present a short overview of the project, followed by the results to date and plans for the future. The goal of this research is to provide a minimum 100x reduction in the time required to produce arbitrary, laminated products without the need for a separate mold or an autoclave. It will accomplish this by developing the science underlying the rapid production of composite structures, specifically those of carbon fiber-epoxy materials. This scientific understanding will be reduced to practice in a demonstration device that will produce a part on the order of 12in. by 12in. by 6in. Work in the past year has focussed on developing an understanding of the materials issues and of the machine design issues. Our initial goal was to use UV cureable resins to accomplish full cure on the machine. Therefore, we have centered our materials work around whether or not UV cureable resins will work. Currently, the answer seems to be that they will not work, because UV light cannot penetrate the carbon fibers, and because no "shadow" curing seems to occur. As a result, non-UV cureable resins are being investigated. This has resulted in a change in the machine design focus. We are now looking into a "dip and place" machine design, whereby a prepreg layer would have one side coated with a curing agent, and then would be placed onto the previous layer. This would lead to cure at the interface, but not to the top of the layer. The formulation of the resins to accomplish this task at room or slightly elevated temperatures is being investigated, as is the machine design needed to apply the curing agent and then cure or partially cure the part. A final, out-of-autoclave, post-cure may be needed with this strategy, as final cure on the machine may not be possible, as it was for the initial UV cure strategy. The remainder of this report details the

  1. Rapid Prototyping of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    1998-01-01

    This progress report for the project Rapid Production of Composite Structures covers the period from July 14, 1997 to June 30, 1998. It will present a short overview of the project, followed by the results to date and plans for the future. The goal of this research is to provide a minimum 100x reduction in the time required to produce arbitrary, laminated products without the need for a separate mold or an autoclave. It will accomplish this by developing the science underlying the rapid production of composite structures, specifically those of carbon fiber-epoxy materials. This scientific understanding will be reduced to practice in a demonstration device that will produce a part on the order of 12" by 12" by 6". Work in the past year has focussed on developing an understanding of the materials issues and of the machine design issues. Our initial goal was to use UV cureable resins to accomplish full cure on the machine. Therefore, we have centered our materials work around whether or not UV cureable resins will work. Currently, the answer seems to be that they will not work, because UV light cannot penetrate the carbon fibers, and because no "shadow" curing seems to occur. As a result, non-UV cureable resins are being investigated. This has resulted in a change in the machine design focus. We are now looking into a "dip and place" machine design, whereby a prepreg layer would have one side coated with a curing agent, and then would be placed onto the previous layer. This would lead to cure at the interface, but not to the top of the layer. The formulation of the resins to accomplish this task at room or slightly elevated temperatures is being investigated, as is the machine design needed to apply the curing agent and then cure or partially cure the part. A final, out-of-autoclave, post-cure may be needed with this strategy, as final cure on the machine may not be possible, as it was for the initial UV cure strategy. The remainder of this report details the progress

  2. Structural studies on carbon materials for advanced space technology. Part 1: Structure and oxidation behavior of some carbon/carbon composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, D. B.; Uptegrove, D. R.; Srinivasagopalan, S.

    1974-01-01

    The microstructure and some microstructural effects of oxidation have been investigated for laminar carbon fiber cloth/cloth binder matrix composite materials. It was found that cloth wave is important in determining the macrostructure of the composites X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the composites were more graphitic than the constituent fiber phases, indicating a graphitic binder matrix phase. Various tests which were conducted to investigate specific properties of the material are described. It was learned that under the moderate temperature and oxidant flow conditions studied, C-700, 730 materials exhibit superior oxidation resistance primarily because of the inhibiting influence of the graphitized binder matrix.

  3. Advanced composite combustor structural concepts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sattar, M. A.; Lohmann, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to assess the feasibility of and benefits derived from the use of high temperature composite materials in aircraft turbine engine combustor liners. The study included a survey and screening of the properties of three candidate composite materials including tungsten reinforced superalloys, carbon-carbon and silicon carbide (SiC) fibers reinforcing a ceramic matrix of lithium aluminosilicate (LAS). The SiC-LAS material was selected as offering the greatest near term potential primarily on the basis of high temperature capability. A limited experimental investigation was conducted to quantify some of the more critical mechanical properties of the SiC-LAS composite having a multidirection 0/45/-45/90 deg fiber orientation favored for the combustor linear application. Rigorous cyclic thermal tests demonstrated that SiC-LAS was extremely resistant to the thermal fatigue mechanisms that usually limit the life of metallic combustor liners. A thermal design study led to the definition of a composite liner concept that incorporated film cooled SiC-LAS shingles mounted on a Hastelloy X shell. With coolant fluxes consistent with the most advanced metallic liner technology, the calculated hot surface temperatures of the shingles were within the apparent near term capability of the material. Structural analyses indicated that the stresses in the composite panels were low, primarily because of the low coefficient of expansion of the material and it was concluded that the dominant failure mode of the liner would be an as yet unidentified deterioration of the composite from prolonged exposure to high temperature. An economic study, based on a medium thrust size commercial aircraft engine, indicated that the SiC-LAS combustor liner would weigh 22.8N (11.27 lb) less and cost less to manufacture than advanced metallic liner concepts intended for use in the late 1980's.

  4. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage-Structural Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. H.; Minguet, P. J.; Flynn, B. W.; Carbery, D. J.; Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.

    1997-01-01

    Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC). This report addresses the program activities related to structural performance of the selected concepts, including both the design development and subsequent detailed evaluation. Design criteria were developed to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and typical company objectives. Accurate analysis methods were selected and/or developed where practical, and conservative approaches were used where significant approximations were necessary. Design sizing activities supported subsequent development by providing representative design configurations for structural evaluation and by identifying the critical performance issues. Significant program efforts were directed towards assessing structural performance predictive capability. The structural database collected to perform this assessment was intimately linked to the manufacturing scale-up activities to ensure inclusion of manufacturing-induced performance traits. Mechanical tests were conducted to support the development and critical evaluation of analysis methods addressing internal loads, stability, ultimate strength, attachment and splice strength, and damage tolerance. Unresolved aspects of these performance issues were identified as part of the assessments, providing direction for future development.

  5. Structure and composition of the Southern Mariana Forearc: new observations and samples from Shinkai 6500 dive studies in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Y.; Reagan, M. K.; Ishizuka, O.; Stern, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    The 3000-km long Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) Arc system is an outstanding example of an intraoceanic convergent plate margin, and has become the particular focus of Japanese and US efforts to understand the operation of the “Subduction Factory”. In 2006 and 2008, twelve DSV Shinkai 6500 dives (973-977 and 1091-1097) were performed during YK06-12 and YK08-08 Leg 2 cruises along the landward slope of the southern Mariana Trench. The goal was to sample the remaining early arc crust associated with subduction initiation in the IBM system and upper mantle exposed in the forearc in order to gain a clearer understanding of the structure and evolution of Mariana forearc crust and upper mantle. The fruitful results include the recovery of the entire suite of rocks associated with what could be termed a “supra-subduction zone ophiolite” that formed during subduction initiation. An important discovery is that MORB-like tholeiitic basalts crop out over large areas. These “fore-arc basalts” (FAB) underlie boninites and overlie diabasic and gabbroic rocks. Potential origins include eruption at a spreading center before subduction began or eruption during near-trench spreading after subduction began (Reagan et al., 2010, G3). Another important discovery is a region of active forearc rifting at the southern end of the Mariana arc, named SE Mariana Forearc Rift (SEMFR). The SEMFR was firstly mapped with HMR-1 sonar (Martinez et al., 2000, JGR). Two dives at SEMFR recovered less-depleted backarc related peridotites (at Dive 973; Michibayashi et al., 2009, G3), and fresh basalts and basaltic andesites with petrographic characteristics like backarc basin lavas (at Dive 1096; see Ribeiro et al., AGU FM 2010). Although our previous studies have produced a number of important new observations about the geology of the southern Mariana forearc, our understanding of the region is still primitive. We will be conducting another cruise (YK10-12) during late September, 2010 to tackle

  6. Computational composite mechanics for aerospace propulsion structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1987-01-01

    Specialty methods are presented for the computational simulation of specific composite behavior. These methods encompass all aspects of composite mechanics, impact, progressive fracture and component specific simulation. Some of these methods are structured to computationally simulate, in parallel, the composite behavior and history from the initial frabrication through several missions and even to fracture. Select methods and typical results obtained from such simulations are described in detail in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of computationally simulating: (1) complex composite structural behavior in general, and (2) specific aerospace propulsion structural components in particular.

  7. Computational composite mechanics for aerospace propulsion structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Specialty methods are presented for the computational simulation of specific composite behavior. These methods encompass all aspects of composite mechanics, impact, progressive fracture and component specific simulation. Some of these methods are structured to computationally simulate, in parallel, the composite behavior and history from the initial fabrication through several missions and even to fracture. Select methods and typical results obtained from such simulations are described in detail in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of computationally simulating (1) complex composite structural behavior in general and (2) specific aerospace propulsion structural components in particular.

  8. A study of the oriented composites with the conductive segregated structure obtained via solid-phase processing of the UHMWPE reactor powder mixed with the carbon nanofillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Oleg V.; Kechek'yan, Alexander S.; Shevchenko, Vitaly G.; Kurkin, Tikhon S.; Golubev, Evgeny K.; Karpushkin, Evgeny A.; Sergeev, Vladimir G.; Ozerin, Alexander N.

    2016-05-01

    Electrically conductive oriented polymer nano-composites of different compositions, based on the reactor powder of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) with a special morphology, filled with particles of nanostructured graphite (NG), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and electrically conductive carbon black (CB), were investigated. Polymer composites were obtained via compaction of the mechanical mixture of the polymer and filler powder, followed by uniaxial deformation of the material under homogeneous shear (HS) conditions (all of the processing stages were conducted at room temperature). Resulted composites possess a high tensile strength, high level of the electrical conductivity and low percolation threshold, owing it to the formation of the segregated conductive structure, The influence of the type of nanosized carbon filler, degree of the deformation under HS condition, temperature and etc. on the electrical conductivity and mechanical properties of strengthened conductive composites oriented under homogeneous shear conditions was investigated. Changes in the electrical conductivity of oriented composite materials during reversible "tension-shrinkage" cycles along the orientation axis direction were studied. A theoretical approach, describing the process of transformation of the conductive system as a response on polymer phase deformation and volume change, was proposed, based on the data received from the analysis of the conductivity behavior during the uniaxial deformation and thermal treatment of composites.

  9. Structural dynamic analysis of composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, J. K.; Venkatesan, C.; Ramamurti, V.

    1990-12-01

    In the treatment of the structural dynamic problem of composite materials, two alternate types of formulations, based on the elastic modulus and compliance quantities, exist in the literature. The definitions of the various rigidities are observed to differ in these two approaches. Following these two types of formulation, the structural dynamic characteristics of a composite beam are analyzed. The results of the analysis are compared with those available in the literature. Based on the comparison, the influence of the warping function in defining the coupling terms in the modulus approach and also on the natural frequencies of the beam has been identified. It is found from the analysis that, in certain cases, the difference between the results of the two approaches is appreciable. These differences may be attributed to the constraints imposed on the deformation and flexibility of the beam by the choice of the description of the warping behaviour. Finally, the influence of material properties on the structural dynamic characteristics of the beam is studied for different composites for various angles of orthotropy.

  10. Development of thermoplastic composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renieri, Michael P.; Burpo, Steven J.; Roundy, Lance M.; Todd, Stephanie A.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    Efforts focused on the use of thermoplastic composite materials in the development of structural details associated with an advanced fighter fuselage section with applicability to transport design. In support of these designs, mechanics developments were conducted in two areas. First, a dissipative strain energy approach to material characterization and failure prediction, developed at the Naval Research Laboratory, was evaluated as a design/analysis tool. Second, a finite element formulation for thick composites was developed and incorporated into a lug analysis method which incorporates pin bending effects. Manufacturing concepts were developed for an upper fuel cell cover. A detailed trade study produced two promising concepts: fiber placement and single-step diaphragm forming. Based on the innovative design/manufacturing concepts for the fuselage section primary structure, elements were designed, fabricated, and structurally tested. These elements focused on key issues such as thick composite lugs and low cost forming of fastenerless, stiffener/moldine concepts. Manufacturing techniques included autoclave consolidation, single diaphragm consolidation (SDCC) and roll-forming.

  11. Durability of Composite Materials and Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-02

    Michigan State University Composite Materials and Structures Center 2100 Engineering Building , East Lansing, MI 48824-1226 6.1 Objectives The...DATES COVERED (From - To) February 7, 2005 - January 31. 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DURABILITY OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES 5a...Manager: Dr. Yapa D.S. Rajapakse Office of Naval Research 875 N. Randolph Street Arlington, VA 22203-1995 DURABILITY OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND

  12. The design of repairable advanced composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the repair of advanced composite structures by mechanical fasteners or by adhesive bonding. It is shown that many of today's composite designs are unreasonably difficult to repair. Conversely, the knowledge to design repairable structures is already available, if only it is applied during the initial design stage. Bolted or riveted repairs require only the avoidance of extremely orthotropic composite fiber patterns; those near the quasi-isotropic layup are the most suitable. Mildly orthotropic fiber patterns are appropriate for structures in which there is a dominant load direction. Thick composite structures are shown to require bolted or riveted repairs while thin structures favor adhesively bonded permanent repairs, although provisions can be easily made for temporary mechanical repairs. The reasons why integrally stiffened cocured composite designs are usually impractical to repair are explained and alternative repairable design concepts are presented.

  13. Assembly induced delaminations in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goering, J.; Bohlmann, R.; Wanthal, S.; Kautz, E.; Neri, Lawrence M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of the development of delaminations around fastener holes in composite structures are presented. This type of delamination is known to occur in composite skins that are mechanically fastened to a poorly mating substructure. Results of an experimental study to determine the resistance of laminates to the initiation of assembly induced delaminations and the residual strength of assembly damaged coupons are presented for AS4/3501-6, IM7/8551-7A, and AS4/PEEK material systems. A survey of existing analytical models for predicting the residual strength and stability of delaminations is presented, and the development of a new model for predicting the initiation of delaminations around a fastener hole is outlined. The fastener hole damage initiation model utilizes a finite element based Fourier series solution, and is validated through comparisons of analytical and experimental results.

  14. Synthesis, Surface Studies, Composition and Structural Characterization of CdSe, Core/Shell, and Biologically Active Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Sandra J.; McBride, James; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Feldman, Leonard C.

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructures, with their very large surface to volume ratio and their non-planar geometry, present an important challenge to surface scientists. New issues arise as to surface characterization, quantification and interface formation. This review summarizes the current state of the art in the synthesis, composition, surface and interface control of CdSe nanocrystal systems, one of the most studied and useful nanostructures. PMID:21479151

  15. Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Propulsion Structures Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Dickens, Kevin W.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program has successfully demonstrated cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) technology in a scramjet engine test. This demonstration represented the world s largest cooled nonmetallic matrix composite panel fabricated for a scramjet engine and the first cooled nonmetallic composite to be tested in a scramjet facility. Lightweight, high-temperature, actively cooled structures have been identified as a key technology for enabling reliable and low-cost space access. Tradeoff studies have shown this to be the case for a variety of launch platforms, including rockets and hypersonic cruise vehicles. Actively cooled carbon and CMC structures may meet high-performance goals at significantly lower weight, while improving safety by operating with a higher margin between the design temperature and material upper-use temperature. Studies have shown that using actively cooled CMCs can reduce the weight of the cooled flow-path component from 4.5 to 1.6 lb/sq ft and the weight of the propulsion system s cooled surface area by more than 50 percent. This weight savings enables advanced concepts, increased payload, and increased range. The ability of the cooled CMC flow-path components to operate over 1000 F hotter than the state-of-the-art metallic concept adds system design flexibility to space-access vehicle concepts. Other potential system-level benefits include smaller fuel pumps, lower part count, lower cost, and increased operating margin.

  16. Stable compositions and geometrical structures of titanium oxide cluster cations and anions studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohshimo, Keijiro; Norimasa, Naoya; Moriyama, Ryoichi; Misaizu, Fuminori

    2016-05-21

    Geometrical structures of titanium oxide cluster cations and anions have been investigated by ion mobility mass spectrometry and quantum chemical calculations based on density functional theory. Stable cluster compositions with respect to collision induced dissociation were also determined by changing ion injection energy to an ion drift cell for mobility measurements. The TinO2n-1 (+) cations and TinO2n (-) anions were predominantly observed at high injection energies, in addition to TinO2n (+) for cations and TinO2n+1 (-) for anions. Collision cross sections of TinO2n (+) and TinO2n+1 (-) for n = 1-7, determined by ion mobility mass spectrometry, were compared with those obtained theoretically as orientation-averaged cross sections for the optimized structures by quantum chemical calculations. All of the geometrical structures thus assigned have three-dimensional structures, which are in marked contrast with other oxides of late transition metals. One-oxygen atom dissociation processes from TinO2n (+) and TinO2n+1 (-) by collisions were also explained by analysis of spin density distributions.

  17. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 deg ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  18. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  19. Fluid Structure Interaction Effect on Sandwich Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    14. SUBJECT TERMS Fluid Structure Interaction, FSI, composite, balsa, low velocity impact, sandwich composites, VARTM , Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer...11 1. Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) ...................11 2. Procedure...required equipment for VARTM composite production. ..............10 Figure 4. VARTM Lay-up (From [8

  20. Multi-functional composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2004-10-19

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  1. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2010-04-27

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  2. Load Diffusion in Composite and Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, C. O.

    2003-01-01

    The research carried out here builds on our previous NASA supported research on the general topic of edge effects and load diffusion in composite structures. Further fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for the multi-functional large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Some specific problems recently considered were those of end effects in smart materials and structures, study of the stress response of pressurized linear piezoelectric cylinders for both static and steady rotating configurations, an analysis of the effect of pre-stressing and pre-polarization on the decay of end effects in piezoelectric solids and investigation of constitutive models for hardening rubber-like materials. Our goal in the study of load diffusion is the development of readily applicable results for the decay lengths in terms of non-dimensional material and geometric parameters. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities provides a significant aid towards this process. The analysis is also amenable to parameter study with a large parameter space and should be useful in structural tailoring studies. Special purpose analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and in assessing results from general purpose finite element analyses. For example, a rational basis is needed in choosing where to use three-dimensional to two-dimensional transition finite elements in analyzing stiffened plates and shells. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities furnished by

  3. Certification of damage tolerant composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapoff, Andrew J.; Dill, Harold D.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    A reliability based certification testing methodology for impact damage tolerant composite structure was developed. Cocured, adhesively bonded, and impact damaged composite static strength and fatigue life data were statistically analyzed to determine the influence of test parameters on the data scatter. The impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of various structural configurations were characterized through the analysis of an industry wide database of impact test results. Realistic impact damage certification requirements were proposed based on actual fleet aircraft data. The capabilities of available impact damage analysis methods were determined through correlation with experimental data. Probabilistic methods were developed to estimate the reliability of impact damaged composite structures.

  4. Structural Composites With Tuned EM Chirality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0018 STRUCTURAL COMPOSITES WITH TUNED EM CHIRALITY Siavouche Nemat Nasser UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN DIEGO Final Report 12/23...REPORT Grant/Contract  Title:        STRUCTURAL  COMPOSITES  WITH  TUNED  EM   CHIRALITY     Grant  No.:  FA9550-­‐09-­‐1...structural   composites  with   tunable   chiral   elements   has   produced   some   impressive   results   in   the

  5. Structure, Mobility, and Composition of Transition Metal Catalyst Surfaces. High-Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhongwei

    2013-12-06

    Surface structure, mobility, and composition of transition metal catalysts were studied by high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HP-STM) and ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) at high gas pressures. HP-STM makes it possible to determine the atomic or molecular rearrangement at catalyst surfaces, particularly at the low-coordinated active surface sites. AP-XPS monitors changes in elemental composition and chemical states of catalysts in response to variations in gas environments. Stepped Pt and Cu single crystals, the hexagonally reconstructed Pt(100) single crystal, and Pt-based bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size, shape and composition, were employed as the model catalysts for experiments in this thesis.

  6. Physical Chemical Studies on Molecular Composite Compositions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-20

    McCrone , L. B., Deity, J. G., Polarized Light Microscopy, McCrone Research Institute, Chicago (1987). 32. Wolfe, W. L., In Handbook of Optics, Optical...are discussed. The rheology of miscible blends of the rodlike chains with flexibie or semiflexible chains is discussed using a model accounting for...vii PHYSICAL- CHEMICAL STUDIES ON RODLIKE POLYMER COMPOSITIONS The following is a final report for work of AFOSR-89--0125, covering the period January

  7. Photospheric composition and structure in white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, M. A.

    1993-12-01

    One of the central mysteries of white dwarf studies has been the nature and abundance of trace elements in the atmospheres of these stars. It had been thought that the dominant trace element in otherwise pure hydrogen DA white dwarf atmospheres was helium. However, some spectroscopic and theoretical evidence suggested that, at least in some stars, heavier elements may be important. Prior to the launch of ROSAT the questions regarding the atmospheric composition of DA white dwarfs in general remained unresolved. The ROSAT mission has provided EUV and X-ray data for a large sample of DA white dwarfs with which we can study their photospheric composition and structure through the effect of trace opacity sources on the emergent fluxes. Contrary to expectations little (if any) helium is found and the main sources of opacity appear to be trace heavy elements. Support for these conclusions is found in recent EUV and far-UV spectra of several stars. However, photometric data do not allow us to determine the abundance of the individual elements and observations with the extreme ultraviolet explorer satellite (EUVE) spectrometers will be essential for detailed composition measurements.

  8. Delamination Assessment Tool for Spacecraft Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portela, Pedro; Preller, Fabian; Wittke, Henrik; Sinnema, Gerben; Camanho, Pedro; Turon, Albert

    2012-07-01

    Fortunately only few cases are known where failure of spacecraft structures due to undetected damage has resulted in a loss of spacecraft and launcher mission. However, several problems related to damage tolerance and in particular delamination of composite materials have been encountered during structure development of various ESA projects and qualification testing. To avoid such costly failures during development, launch or service of spacecraft, launcher and reusable launch vehicles structures a comprehensive damage tolerance verification approach is needed. In 2009, the European Space Agency (ESA) initiated an activity called “Delamination Assessment Tool” which is led by the Portuguese company HPS Lda and includes academic and industrial partners. The goal of this study is the development of a comprehensive damage tolerance verification approach for launcher and reusable launch vehicles (RLV) structures, addressing analytical and numerical methodologies, material-, subcomponent- and component testing, as well as non-destructive inspection. The study includes a comprehensive review of current industrial damage tolerance practice resulting from ECSS and NASA standards, the development of new Best Practice Guidelines for analysis, test and inspection methods and the validation of these with a real industrial case study. The paper describes the main findings of this activity so far and presents a first iteration of a Damage Tolerance Verification Approach, which includes the introduction of novel analytical and numerical tools at an industrial level. This new approach is being put to the test using real industrial case studies provided by the industrial partners, MT Aerospace, RUAG Space and INVENT GmbH

  9. Compression Strength of Composite Primary Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1998-01-01

    Research conducted under NASA Grant NAG-1-537 focussed on the response and failure of advanced composite material structures for application to aircraft. Both experimental and analytical methods were utilized to study the fundamental mechanics of the response and failure of selected structural components subjected to quasi-static loads. Most of the structural components studied were thin-walled elements subject to compression, such that they exhibited buckling and postbuckling responses prior to catastrophic failure. Consequently, the analyses were geometrically nonlinear. Structural components studied were dropped-ply laminated plates, stiffener crippling, pressure pillowing of orthogonally stiffened cylindrical shells, axisymmetric response of pressure domes, and the static crush of semi-circular frames. Failure of these components motivated analytical studies on an interlaminar stress postprocessor for plate and shell finite element computer codes, and global/local modeling strategies in finite element modeling. These activities are summarized in the following section. References to literature published under the grant are listed on pages 5 to 10 by a letter followed by a number under the categories of journal publications, conference publications, presentations, and reports. These references are indicated in the text by their letter and number as a superscript.

  10. Probabilistic assessment of smart composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Shiao, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    A composite wing with spars and bulkheads is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of probabilistic assessment of smart composite structures to control uncertainties in distortions and stresses. Results show that a smart composite wing can be controlled to minimize distortions and to have specified stress levels in the presence of defects. Structural responses such as changes in angle of attack, vertical displacements, and stress in the control and controlled plies are probabilistically assessed to quantify their respective uncertainties. Sensitivity factors are evaluated to identify those parameters that have the greatest influence on a specific structural response. Results show that smart composite structures can be configured to control both distortions and ply stresses to satisfy specified design requirements.

  11. A Design Tool for Robust Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    related goal is to compare the blast response of Dyneema® laminates with that of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer ( CFRP ) composite. (iii) To identify...embedded Dyneema® composite layers, both below and above the ballistic limit. 16 6. Hybrid Dyneema®/Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites...of Dyneema® fibers to carbon fiber reinforced polymer ( CFRP ) composites. The study focuses specifically on 3D orthogonal weaves with carbon employed

  12. Microstructure and Crystal Structure in TAGS Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A. J.; Sharp, J; Rawn, Claudia J

    2009-01-01

    GeTe, a small bandgap semiconductor that has native p-type defects due to Ge vacancies, is an important constituent in the thermoelectric material known as TAGS. TAGS is an acronym for alloys of GeTe with AgSbTe{sub 2}, and compositions are normally designated as TAGS-x, where x is the fraction of GeTe. TAGS-85 is the most important with regard to applications, and there is also commercial interest in TAGS-80. The crystal structure of GeTe{sub 1+{delta}} has a composition-dependent phase transformation at a temperature ranging from 430 C ({delta} = 0) to {approx}400 C ({delta} = 0.02). The high-temperature form is cubic. The low-temperature form is rhombohedral for {delta} < 0.01, as is the case for good thermoelectric performance. Addition of AgSbTe{sub 2} shifts the phase transformation to lower temperatures, and one of the goals of this work is a systematic study of the dependence of transformation temperature on the parameter x. We present results on phase transformations and associated instabilities in TAGS compositions in the range of 70 at.% to 85 at.% GeTe.

  13. On the structural analysis of textile composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovich, Alexander E.; Pastore, Christopher M.

    The local structural inhomogeneities which distinguish textile composites from laminated materials are discussed. Techniques for quantifying these inhomogeneities through three dimensional geometric modelling are introduced and methods of translating them into elastic properties are presented. Some basic ideas on application of spline functions to the stress field analysis in textile composites are proposed. The significance of internal continuity conditions for these materials is emphasized. Several analytical techniques based on the concept of a meso-volume are discussed. An example is presented to demonstrate the application of the method to structural analysis of textile composites.

  14. Composite blade structural analyzer (COBSTRAN) user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    The installation and use of a computer code, COBSTRAN (COmposite Blade STRuctrual ANalyzer), developed for the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades and also for composite wind turbine blades was described. This code combines composite mechanics and laminate theory with an internal data base of fiber and matrix properties. Inputs to the code are constituent fiber and matrix material properties, factors reflecting the fabrication process, composite geometry and blade geometry. COBSTRAN performs the micromechanics, macromechanics and laminate analyses of these fiber composites. COBSTRAN generates a NASTRAN model with equivalent anisotropic homogeneous material properties. Stress output from NASTRAN is used to calculate individual ply stresses, strains, interply stresses, thru-the-thickness stresses and failure margins. Curved panel structures may be modeled providing the curvature of a cross-section is defined by a single value function. COBSTRAN is written in FORTRAN 77.

  15. Compression Strength of Composite Primary Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.; Starnes, James H., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The focus of research activities under NASA Grant NAG-1-2035 was the response and failure of thin-walled structural components. The research is applicable to the primary load carrying structure of flight vehicles, with particular emphasis on fuselage and wing'structure. Analyses and tests were performed that are applicable to the following structural components an aft pressure bulkhead, or a composite pressure dome, pressure cabin damage containment, and fuselage frames subject to crash-type loads.

  16. Integrating electrostatic adhesion to composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2015-04-01

    Additional functionality within load bearing components holds potential for adding value to a structure, design or product. We consider the adaptation of an established technology, electrostatic adhesion or electroadhesion, for application in glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials. Electroadhesion uses high potential difference (~2-3 kV) between co-planar electrodes to generate temporary holding forces to both electrically conductive and nonconductive contact surfaces. Using a combination of established fabrication techniques, electroadhesive elements are co-cured within a composite host structure during manufacture. This provides an almost symbiotic relationship between the electroadhesive and the composite structure, with the electroadhesive providing an additional functionality, whilst the epoxy matrix material of the composite acts as a dielectric for the high voltage electrodes of the device. Silicone rubber coated devices have been shown to offer high shear load (85kPa) capability for GFRP components held together using this technique. Through careful control of the connection interface, we consider the incorporation of these devices within complete composite structures for additional functionality. The ability to vary the internal connectivity of structural elements could allow for incremental changes in connectivity between discrete sub-structures, potentially introducing variable stiffness to the global structure.

  17. Comparative study of the mechanical properties, micro-structure, and composition of the cranial and beak bones of the great spotted woodpecker and the lark bird.

    PubMed

    Wang, LiZhen; Zhang, HongQuan; Fan, YuBo

    2011-11-01

    Woodpeckers are well able to resist head injury during repeated high speed impacts at 6-7 m s⁻¹ with decelerations up to 1000 g. This study was designed to compare the mechanical properties, microstructures and compositions of cranial bone and beak bone of great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) and the Mongolian sky lark (Melanocorypha mongolica). Microstructures were observed using micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy and their compositions were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Under high stress, the cranial bone and the beak of the woodpecker exhibited distinctive mechanical features, which were associated with differences in micro-structure and composition, compared with those of the lark. Evolutionary optimization of bone micro-structure has enabled functional adaptation to the woodpecker's specific lifestyle. Its characteristic micro-structure efficiently avoids head impact injury and may provide potential clues to the prevention of brain injury using bio-inspired designs of shock-absorbing materials.

  18. Structure and Composition of the Lunar Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Hawke, B. R.

    1999-01-01

    Since the first return of lunar samples indicated that global differentiation of the Moon had occurred, numerous models of crustal structure have been proposed. With the completion of the first global reconnaissance mapping by Clementine and Lunar Prospector, we are now in position to re-evaluate crustal structure and composition at a global scale. Although this is a difficult and complex task, and one requiring significant study, some first-order results are apparent now and are quite telling. We here summarize our current view of crustal structure and identify some required knowledge to better understand the origin and evolution of the lunar crust. Wood et al. attempted to estimate the amount of plagioclase in the crust, based on the average elevation difference between mare and highlands and some simple assumptions about anorthosite and basalt as responsible for the principal lunar rock types. Later, more complex models emerged, involving layered crusts of feldspathic material over more basaltic material or a laterally variable crust, with Mg-suite plutons intruding a grossly anorthositic crust. Later models attempted to reconcile these contrasting styles by incorporating both features. In part, crustal structure was inferred by the envisioned mode of crustal formation. A decade-long debate on the reality of the lunar "magma ocean," stimulated by the provocative notion of Walker that the Moon never had a magma ocean, and the recognition that the anorthosites and Mg suite probably recorded different and unrelated magmatic events. Such a scenario leaves much about crustal structure an open question, but allows for both lateral and vertical heterogeneity, thus accommodating both principal crustal models. Global maps of Fe , Ti, and Th both confirm old ideas and create new problems. It is clear that vast areas of the lunar highlands are extremely low in Fe, consistent with a significant amount of anorthosite. Such a distribution supports the magma ocean. However

  19. Composite Payload Fairing Structural Architecture Assessment and Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivanek, Thomas M.; Yount, Bryan C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the structural architecture assessments conducted and a recommendation for an affordable high performance composite structural concept to use on the next generation heavy-lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch System (SLS). The Structural Concepts Element of the Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) project and its follow on the Lightweight Spacecraft Structures and Materials (LSSM) project was tasked with evaluating a number of composite construction technologies for specific Ares V components: the Payload Shroud, the Interstage, and the Core Stage Intertank. Team studies strived to address the structural challenges, risks and needs for each of these vehicle components. Leveraging off of this work, the subsequent Composites for Exploration (CoEx) effort is focused on providing a composite structural concept to support the Payload Fairing for SLS. This paper documents the evaluation and down selection of composite construction technologies and evolution to the SLS Payload Fairing. Development of the evaluation criteria (also referred to as Figures of Merit or FOMs), their relative importance, and association to vehicle requirements are presented. A summary of the evaluation results, and a recommendation of the composite concept to baseline in the Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project is presented. The recommendation for the SLS Fairing is a Honeycomb Sandwich architecture based primarily on affordability and performance with two promising alternatives, Hat stiffened and Fiber Reinforced Foam (FRF) identified for eventual program block upgrade.

  20. A fishery-dependent based study of fish species composition and associated catch rates around oil and gas structures off Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, D.R.; Wilson, C.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The impact of oil and gas development on fish populations off Louisiana is presumed significant but poorly understood. This study was undertaken to determine the applicability of a logbook program in developing a long-term database of species composition and relative abundance of fish associated with oil and gas structures. A pilot logbook program involving 120 private vessel owners and 25 charterboat operators was conducted between March 1987 and December 1988. Participants recorded date, fishing time, fishing method, number of anglers, and catch composition at each structure fished. Logbooks from a total of 55 private vessel owners and 10 charterboat operators were used in the analysis. Data collected included 15,780 angler hours of fishing effort and 61,227 fish caught over the study period. A total of 1,719 trips were made to 589 different oil and gas structures with at least 46 different species of fish caught. Red snapper and spotted seatrout were the most commonly caught species and had the highest catch rates. Results differed from past logbook programs and creel surveys, possibly indicating a change in the community of fish associated with oil and gas structures.

  1. Quantitative NDE of Composite Structures at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Howell, Patricia A.; Johnston, Patrick H.; Burke, Eric R.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Winfree, William P.; Seebo, Jeffery P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of composite materials continues to increase in the aerospace community due to the potential benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and manufacturability. Ongoing work at NASA involves the use of the large-scale composite structures for spacecraft (payload shrouds, cryotanks, crew modules, etc). NASA is also working to enable the use and certification of composites in aircraft structures through the Advanced Composites Project (ACP). The rapid, in situ characterization of a wide range of the composite materials and structures has become a critical concern for the industry. In many applications it is necessary to monitor changes in these materials over a long time. The quantitative characterization of composite defects such as fiber waviness, reduced bond strength, delamination damage, and microcracking are of particular interest. The research approaches of NASA's Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch include investigation of conventional, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods, infrared thermography and x-ray computed tomography techniques. The use of simulation tools for optimizing and developing these methods is also an active area of research. This paper will focus on current research activities related to large area NDE for rapidly characterizing aerospace composites.

  2. Lithographically defined microporous carbon-composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Finnegan, Patrick Sean; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-12-06

    A microporous carbon scaffold is produced by lithographically patterning a carbon-containing photoresist, followed by pyrolysis of the developed resist structure. Prior to exposure, the photoresist is loaded with a nanoparticulate material. After pyrolysis, the nanonparticulate material is dispersed in, and intimately mixed with, the carbonaceous material of the scaffold, thereby yielding a carbon composite structure.

  3. Composite fuselage shell structures research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Fuselage structures for transport aircraft represent a significant percentage of both the weight and the cost of these aircraft primary structures. Composite materials offer the potential for reducing both the weight and the cost of transport fuselage structures, but only limited studies of the response and failure of composite fuselage structures have been conducted for transport aircraft. The behavior of these important primary structures must be understood, and the structural mechanics methodology for analyzing and designing these complex stiffened shell structures must be validated in the laboratory. The effects of local gradients and discontinuities on fuselage shell behavior and the effects of local damage on pressure containment must be thoroughly understood before composite fuselage structures can be used for commercial aircraft. This paper describes the research being conducted and planned at NASA LaRC to help understand the critical behavior or composite fuselage structures and to validate the structural mechanics methodology being developed for stiffened composite fuselage shell structure subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads. Stiffened shell and curved stiffened panel designs are currently being developed and analyzed, and these designs will be fabricated and then tested at Langley to study critical fuselage shell behavior and to validate structural analysis and design methodology. The research includes studies of the effects of combined internal pressure and mechanical loads on nonlinear stiffened panel and shell behavior, the effects of cutouts and other gradient-producing discontinuities on composite shell response, and the effects of local damage on pressure containment and residual strength. Scaling laws are being developed that relate full-scale and subscale behavior of composite fuselage shells. Failure mechanisms are being identified and advanced designs will be developed based on what is learned from early results from

  4. Hierarchical Simulation of Hot Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Computational procedures are described to simulate the thermal and mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) Behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via High Temperature Composite Analyzer (HITCAN). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as strength, stress-strain response, and cyclic life in HTMMC's; MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process for optimum performance such as that for in-service load carrying capacity of HT-MMC's; and HITCAN can be used to evaluate static fracture and fatigue life of hot pressurized metal matrix composite rings.

  5. Shock Wave Structure in Particulate Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauls, Michael; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2015-06-01

    Shock wave experiments are conducted on a particulate composite consisting of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix reinforced by glass beads. Such a composite with an impedance mismatch of 4.3 closely mimics heterogeneous solids of interest such as concrete and energetic materials. The composite samples are prepared using a compression molding process. The structure and particle velocity rise times of the shocks are examined using forward ballistic experiments. Reverse ballistic experiments are used to track how the interface density influences velocity overshoot above the steady state particle velocity. The effects of particle size (0.1 to 1 mm) and volume fraction of glass beads (30-40%) on the structure of the leading shock wave are investigated. It is observed that the rise time increases with increasing particle size and scales linearly for the range of particle sizes considered here. Results from numerical simulations using CTH are compared with experimental results to gain insights into wave propagation in heterogeneous particulate composites.

  6. Damage Tolerance Characterisitics of Composite Sandwich Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-01

    and very simplified modelling Unit of the EH-101 helicopter is made of a composite skeleton of the damage introduced by impact; second, the evaluation...the delamination boundary. The Multi Point Constraint If the delamination growth data from the teflon strip element of NASTRAN is used for modelling ...component level. These kinds of tests are composite sandwich structures used by the helicopter industry, carried out not only to verify load paths and

  7. GEOS 1 observations of low-energy ions in the earth's plasmasphere - A study on composition, and temperature and density structure under quiet geomagnetic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Geiss, J.; Balsiger, H.; Young, D. T.

    Data are presented on the composition and the temperature (T) and density (N) distributions of the earth's plasmasphere ionic population, obtained from GEOS 1 thermal-ion data. In deriving the N and T of the ions, a novel technique was employed, which is based on the modulation of the count rates by the spacecraft's spin. It was found that, for the major ion species H(+) and He(+), the relative density abundance He(+)/H(+) value of several percent was fairly common; the H(+) and He(+) ions are generally in thermal equilibrium, with temperatures varying between 4000 and 15,000 K, with a tendency to increase with L value. A comparison of the thermal structure obtained with those obtained by the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE and the Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer on DE 1 showed no systematic difference between the 'energy' techniques used in these studies and the present 'angular' technique.

  8. Effect of Hydrophobic Core Topology and Composition on the Structure and Kinetics of Star Polymers: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Carr, Amber C; Felberg, Lisa E; Piunova, Victoria A; Rice, Julia E; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Swope, William C

    2017-04-06

    We present a molecular dynamics study of the effect of core chemistry on star polymer structural and kinetic properties. This work serves to validate the choice of a model adamantane core used in previous simulations to represent larger star polymeric systems in an aqueous environment, as well as to explore how the choice of size and core chemistry using a dendrimer or nanogel core may affect these polymeric nanoparticle systems, particularly with respect to thermosensitivity and solvation properties that are relevant for applications in drug loading and delivery.

  9. Clues on the Structure and Composition of Galactic Disks from Studies of 'Superthin' Spirals: the Case of UGC3697

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lynn; Uson, Juan M.

    2004-12-01

    We summarize results from an H I+optical imaging study of the @ Integral Sign @ ] galaxy, UGC 3697. UGC 3697 is a low-mass, Sd spiral that exhibits a @ superthin @ ] disk morphology despite a prounced gasous and stee llar warp. Our new observations show evidence for a recent minor merger in this system that could account for its large-scale warp and a number of other properties of this galaxy. We speculate that UGC 3697 has been caught in a rather short-lived dynamical state, and may soon undergo significant structural and morphological changes.

  10. Composite electrode/electrolyte structure

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2004-01-27

    Provided is an electrode fabricated from highly electronically conductive materials such as metals, metal alloys, or electronically conductive ceramics. The electronic conductivity of the electrode substrate is maximized. Onto this electrode in the green state, a green ionic (e.g., electrolyte) film is deposited and the assembly is co-fired at a temperature suitable to fully densify the film while the substrate retains porosity. Subsequently, a catalytic material is added to the electrode structure by infiltration of a metal salt and subsequent low temperature firing. The invention allows for an electrode with high electronic conductivity and sufficient catalytic activity to achieve high power density in ionic (electrochemical) devices such as fuel cells and electrolytic gas separation systems.

  11. Annealing and structural properties of composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, L. N.; Ustyugov, V. A.; Vlasov, V. S.; Turkov, V. K.; Dianov, M. Yu; Antonets, I. V.; Kalinin, Yu E.; Sitnikov, A. V.; Golubev, E. A.

    2017-02-01

    The composite films were investigated by AFM methods before and after annealing. Topographic and phase-contrast AFM images of the composite films at different annealing temperature were obtained. The separate metal granules and larger-scale labyrinth-like formations were described. These formations appear by the process of the film growth, also by film annealing. Strong changes of the structural properties of the films are observed after the percolation transition. The significant changes of the structural properties are connected with nanostructural transformations in the metal granules topology and presence of metal crystal phase.

  12. Surface structure and composition of the missing-row reconstruction of VC 0.8(1 1 0): A LEED, GIXRD and photoemission study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Y.; Zasada, I.; De Santis, M.; Langlais, V.; Virojanadara, C.; Johansson, L. I.

    2007-08-01

    Low energy electron diffraction, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and photoemission were used to decipher the detailed structural arrangement and chemical composition of the surface region of a transition metal carbide, VC 0.8(1 1 0). In agreement with previous scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies, we find that the surface reconstructs with a ridge-and-valley grating structure along the [1 1¯ 0] direction resulting from {0 0 1} faceting for the (3 × 1) and the (4 × 1) phases. Both superstructures terminate on the vacuum side with a nearly stoïchiometric VC region due to C segregation, in contrast with the conclusions drawn from this previous STM study. However, the present experiments clearly show that these phases are metastable, and slow cooling results in a (1 × 1) surface, which is highly C depleted, similarly to the (1 0 0) face.

  13. Computational modeling and impact analysis of textile composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Hae-Kyu

    This study is devoted to the development of an integrated numerical modeling enabling one to investigate the static and the dynamic behaviors and failures of 2-D textile composite as well as 3-D orthogonal woven composite structures weakened by cracks and subjected to static-, impact- and ballistic-type loads. As more complicated modeling about textile composite structures is introduced, some of homogenization schemes, geometrical modeling and crack propagations become more difficult problems to solve. To overcome these problems, this study presents effective mesh-generation schemes, homogenization modeling based on a repeating unit cell and sinusoidal functions, and also a cohesive element to study micro-crack shapes. This proposed research has two: (1) studying behavior of textile composites under static loads, (2) studying dynamic responses of these textile composite structures subjected to the transient/ballistic loading. In the first part, efficient homogenization schemes are suggested to show the influence of textile architectures on mechanical characteristics considering the micro modeling of repeating unit cell. Furthermore, the structures of multi-layered or multi-phase composites combined with different laminar such as a sub-laminate, are considered to find the mechanical characteristics. A simple progressive failure mechanism for the textile composites is also presented. In the second part, this study focuses on three main phenomena to solve the dynamic problems: micro-crack shapes, textile architectures and textile effective moduli. To obtain a good solutions of the dynamic problems, this research attempts to use four approaches: (I) determination of governing equations via a three-level hierarchy: micro-mechanical unit cell analysis, layer-wise analysis accounting for transverse strains and stresses, and structural analysis based on anisotropic plate layers, (II) development of an efficient computational approach enabling one to perform transient

  14. On the Mechanical Behavior of Advanced Composite Material Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinson, Jack

    During the period between 1993 and 2004, the author, as well as some colleagues and graduate students, had the honor to be supported by the Office of Naval Research to conduct research in several aspects of the behavior of structures composed of composite materials. The topics involved in this research program were numerous, but all contributed to increasing the understanding of how various structures that are useful for marine applications behaved. More specifically, the research topics focused on the reaction of structures that were made of fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites when subjected to various loads and environmental conditions. This included the behavior of beam, plate/panel and shell structures. It involved studies that are applicable to fiberglass, graphite/carbon and Kevlar fibers imbedded in epoxy, polyester and other polymeric matrices. Unidirectional, cross-ply, angle ply, and woven composites were involved, both in laminated, monocoque as well as in sandwich constructions. Mid-plane symmetric as well as asymmetric laminates were studied, the latter involving bending-stretching coupling and other couplings that only can be achieved with advanced composite materials. The composite structures studied involved static loads, dynamic loading, shock loading as well as thermal and hygrothermal environments. One major consideration was determining the mechanical properties of composite materials subjected to high strain rates because the mechanical properties vary so significantly as the strain rate increases. A considerable number of references are cited for further reading and study for those interested.

  15. Benthic community and biological trait composition in respect to artificial coastal defence structures: a study case in the northern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Munari, Cristina

    2013-09-01

    Biological Traits Analysis (BTA) is a method for addressing ecological functioning based on traits exhibited by members of biological assemblages. This study explores and compares species and biological trait patterns on either side (landward and seaward) of coastal breakwater structures in northwestern Adriatic Sea (Italy), with the aim of giving insights and knowledge for management of sandy beach systems affected by coastal development. Eight ecological traits of 96 benthic species were considered. Taxon composition evidenced differences in benthic assemblages across time and exposure: landward and seaward communities shared less than 50% of the total number of species. BTA suggested a no-management effect in the functioning of benthic assemblages. Dominant traits modalities were deposit-feeding, short life, small body size, short life span, iteroparity, gonocorism, with plankto-planktotrophic larvae. The results of BTA highlighted similarities and stability in trait composition contrary to species composition, suggesting a possible persistence in benthic functioning despite the occurrence of species replacements. To best of my knowledge, this study is one of the first attempts to investigate the effects of a management measure (submerged shore-parallel barriers with groynes) in a shallow marine system by means of BTA.

  16. Enhanced Composites Integrity Through Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Soutis, Constantinos

    2012-10-01

    This paper discusses the topic of how the integrity of safety-critical structural composites can be enhanced by the use of structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques. The paper starts with a presentation of how the certification of flight-critical composite structures can be achieved within the framework of civil aviation safety authority requirements. Typical composites damage mechanisms, which make this process substantially different from that for metallic materials are discussed. The opportunities presented by the use of SHM techniques in future civil aircraft developments are explained. The paper then focuses on active SHM with piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS). After reviewing the PWAS-based SHM options, the paper follows with a discussion of the specifics of guided wave propagation in composites and PWAS-tuning effects. The paper presents a number of experimental results for damage detection in simple flat unidirectional and quasi-isotropic composite specimens. Calibrated through holes of increasing diameter and impact damage of various energies and velocities are considered. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

  17. Composites technology for transport primary structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Victor; Hawley, Arthur; Klotzsche, Max; Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    The ACT contract activity being performed by the McDonnell Douglas Corporation is divided into two separate activities: one effort by Douglas Aircraft in Long Beach, California with a focus on Transport Primary Wing and Fuselage Structure, and the other effort by McDonnell Aircraft in St. Louis, Missouri with a focus on Advanced Combat Aircraft Center Wing-Fuselage Structure. This presentation is on the Douglas Aircraft Transport Structure portion of the ACT program called ICAPS - Innovative Composite Aircraft Primary Structure.

  18. Empirical Studies on Television Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metallinos, Nikos

    A review of research on television's major compositional factors was undertaken to determine the status of such research and to note the major variables involved in the structure of television pictures. It was found that such research could be grouped in four categories--lighting and color, staging, editing, and sound--and that these areas covered…

  19. Study of thermal, structural and optical properties of tellurite glass with different TiO2 composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambouli, W.; Elhouichet, H.; Ferid, M.

    2012-11-01

    Tellurite glasses with different TiO2 composition are elaborated and characterized. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements show an improvement of the stability factor ΔT of the glass with the increase of TiO2 composition which can indicate a reinforcement of the network. Both Raman and FTIR results prove that the Te-O-Te inter-chain linkages are progressively substituted by stronger Te-O-Ti bridges that are at the origin of the increase of the thermal stability of the glass. However, for glasses with high TiO2 composition, some TiO4 polyhedron and crystalline phases of TiTe3O8 can be formed in the amorphous phase. It was found that TiO2 contributes in the highest extent to decrease the glass energy gap and to increase the refraction index due to Ti4+ that could have a role as network modifier. The Urbach energy Eu was found to decrease with TiO2 compositions which suggest the possibility of long range order locally arising from the formation of TiTe3O8 groups.

  20. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  1. Lightning Protection for Composite Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, G. O.

    1985-01-01

    Lightning protection system consisting of two layers of aluminum foil separated by layer of dielectric material protects graphite/epoxy composite structures on aircraft. Protective layer is secondarily applied lightning protection system, prime advantage of which is nullification of thermal and right angle effect of lightning arc attachment to graphite/epoxy laminate.

  2. Variable Complexity Optimization of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.

    2002-01-01

    The use of several levels of modeling in design has been dubbed variable complexity modeling. The work under the grant focused on developing variable complexity modeling strategies with emphasis on response surface techniques. Applications included design of stiffened composite plates for improved damage tolerance, the use of response surfaces for fitting weights obtained by structural optimization, and design against uncertainty using response surface techniques.

  3. Automated Tape Laying Machine for Composite Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The invention comprises an automated tape laying machine, for laying tape on a composite structure. The tape laying machine has a tape laying head...neatly cut. The automated tape laying device utilizes narrow width tape to increase machine flexibility and reduce wastage.

  4. Structure and Composition of the Grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a crop with a wide range of genetic diversity, sorghum grain composition and structure can vary widely. Such variability can be of great benefit in supplying a diversity of uses but can also be a negative when viewed from the standpoint of uniformity. Despite sharing similarities to other cereals...

  5. Installation of adhesively bonded composites to repair carbon steel structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Dunn, Dennis P.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2003-02-01

    In the past decade, an advanced composite repair technology has made great strides in commercial aviation use. Extensive testing and analysis, through joint programs between the Sandia Labs FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center and the aviation industry, have proven that composite materials can be used to repair damaged aluminum structure. Successful pilot programs have produced flight performance history to establish the viability and durability of bonded composite patches as a permanent repair on commercial aircraft structures. With this foundation in place, efforts are underway to adapt bonded composite repair technology to civil structures. This paper presents a study in the application of composite patches on large trucks and hydraulic shovels typically used in mining operations. Extreme fatigue, temperature, erosive, and corrosive environments induce an array of equipment damage. The current weld repair techniques for these structures provide a fatigue life that is inferior to that of the original plate. Subsequent cracking must be revisited on a regular basis. It is believed that the use of composite doublers, which do not have brittle fracture problems such as those inherent in welds, will help extend the structure's fatigue life and reduce the equipment downtime. Two of the main issues for adapting aircraft composite repairs to civil applications are developing an installation technique for carbon steel structure and accommodating large repairs on extremely thick structures. This paper will focus on the first phase of this study which evaluated the performance of different mechanical and chemical surface preparation techniques. The factors influencing the durability of composite patches in severe field environments will be discussed along with related laminate design and installation issues.

  6. Titanium-silicon carbide composite lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moongkhamklang, Pimsiree

    Sandwich panel structures with stiff, strong face sheets and lightweight cellular cores are widely used for weight sensitive, bending dominated loading applications. The flexural stiffness and strength of a sandwich panel is determined by the stiffness, strength, thickness, and separation of the face sheets, and by the compressive and shear stiffness and strength of the cellular core. Panel performance can be therefore optimized using cores with high specific stiffness and strength. The specific stiffness and strength of all cellular materials depends upon the specific elastic modulus and strength of the material used to make the structure. The stiffest and strongest cores for ambient temperature applications utilize carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) honeycombs and lattice structures. Few options exist for lightweight sandwich panels intended for high temperature uses. High temperature alloys such as Ti-6A1-4V can be applied to SiC monofilaments to create very high specific modulus and strength fibers. These are interesting candidates for the cores of elevated temperature sandwich structures such as the skins of hypersonic vehicles. This dissertation explores the potential of sandwich panel concepts that utilize millimeter scale titanium matrix composite (TMC) lattice structures. A method has been developed for fabricating millimeter cell size cellular lattice structures with the square or diamond collinear truss topologies from 240 mum diameter Ti-6A1-4V coated SiC monofilaments (TMC monofilaments). Lattices with relative densities in the range 10% to 20% were manufactured and tested in compression and shear. Given the very high compressive strength of the TMC monofilaments, the compressive strengths of both the square and diamond lattices were dominated by elastic buckling of the constituent struts. However, under shear loading, some of the constituent struts of the lattices are subjected to tensile stresses and failure is then set by tensile failure of the

  7. Structural characterization of high temperature composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, J. F.; Grande, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    Glass, ceramic, and carbon matrix composite materials have emerged in recent years with potential properties and temperature resistance which make them attractive for high temperature applications such as gas turbine engines. At the outset of this study, only flexural tests were available to evaluate brittle matrix composites at temperatures in the 600 to 1000 C range. The results are described of an ongoing effort to develop appropriate tensile, compression, and shear test methods for high temperature use. A tensile test for unidirectional composites was developed and used to evaluate the properties and behavior of ceramic fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites in air at temperatures up to 1000 C. The results indicate generally efficient fiber reinforcement and tolerance to matrix cracking similar to polymer matrix composites. Limiting properties in these materials may be an inherently very low transverse strain to failure, and high temperature embrittlement due to fiber/matrix interface oxidation.

  8. Structure analysis, fatigue testing, and lifetime prediction of composite steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolkin, Yu. V.; Chekalkin, A. A.; Babushkin, A. V.

    1998-05-01

    Composite steels prepared by technology of powder metallurgy are widely used as low cost parts with good resistance to wear, fracture, and corrosion. The development of powder composite steels is directly related to strength under vibration, fatigue stabilizing, and accurate lifetime prediction for actual composite topology. The fatigue behavior of powder steels was studied by experimental and numerical methods of composite mechanics and materials sciences. The chemical composition of composite steel is a pure iron powder as the base material and a handful of carbon, chromium, nickel, or phosphorus powders. The powder multi-component mixture is compacted by cold isostatic pressing to a rectangular form. The compactants are sintered in protective atmosphere. The microscale examination of the composite structure included an METAM-RV-21 metallographic optic microscope with a high-resolution ScanNexIIc scanner and an image processing package on the PC platform. The phase composition of powder steels has complex disordered topology with irregular ferrite/austenite grains, iron carbide inclusions, and pores. The microstructure images are treated according to the theory of stochastic processes as ergodic probability functions; statistical moments and a structural covariance function of the composite steels are given. The microscale stress-strain state of the composite steel is analyzed by finite element methods. The stiffness matrix of the composite steel is also presented together with stiffness matrices of ferrite/austenite grains, iron carbide inclusions, and pores as zero matrices. Endurance limits of the microstructural components are described by the Basquin or Coffin-Manson laws, respectively, as high and low cycle fatigue; cumulative microdamage in loading with a variable amplitude is taken from the Palmgren-Miner rule. Planar specimens were tested by console bending. Symmetric fatigue cycling was performed at a stable frequency of 20 Hz with endurance limits up

  9. Macroscopic Crosslinked Neat Carbon Nanotube Materials and CNT/Carbon Fiber Hybrid Composites: Supermolecular Structure and New Failure Mode Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    techniques to take advantage of electrical and thermal properties of aligned CNT sheets and CNT/ polymer composites,5 magnetic fields to induce...stretching a CNT/ polymer film using the polymer as a load transfer media before curing of a thermoset polymer or under heating for a thermoplastic polymer ...in its nanostructure, similar to carbon fiber and polymer molecules.8,9 1.2 Mechanical Stretching A random network of CNTs forces uniaxial

  10. An electron diffraction study on the structure and conformational composition of 1-bromo-3-methyl-2-butene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Quang

    1990-01-01

    The molecular structure of 1-bromo-3-methyl-2-butene has been studied at a nozzle-tip temperature of 306 K. The major component of the vapor, if not all, consists of the gauche conformer. Three theoretical models have been used to fit the data. A two-conformer model is found to fit the data slightly, but not significantly, better than the static and dynamic one-conformer models. The geometrical parameter values ( rg and ∠ α) obtained from least-squares analyses are: r(C-H) = 1.078(9)Å, r(C=C) = 1.360(9) Å, r(C-C) = 1.505(4) Å, r(C-Br) = 1.969(9) Å, ∠C 1C 2=C 3 = ∠C 4C 3=C 2=126° (5), ∠C 5C 3=C 2 = 122° (6), ∠BrCC = 110.7° (11), ∠HCC = 111.4° (34), and τ 0=98° (15).

  11. Multidisciplinary tailoring of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described for multidisciplinary analysis and tailoring of layered multi-material hot composite engine structural components subjected to simultaneous multiple discipline-specific thermal, structural, vibration, and acoustic loads. The effect of aggressive environments is also simulated. The simulation is based on a three-dimensional finite element analysis technique in conjunction with structural mechanics codes, thermal/acoustic analysis methods, and tailoring procedures. The integrated multidisciplinary simulation procedure is general-purpose including the coupled effects of nonlinearities in structure geometry, material, loading, and environmental complexities. The composite material behavior is assessed at all composite scales, i.e., laminate/ply/constituents (fiber/matrix), via a nonlinear material characterization hygro-thermo-mechanical model. Sample tailoring cases exhibiting nonlinear material/loading/environmental behavior of aircraft engine fan blades, are presented. The various multidisciplinary loads lead to different tailored designs, even those competing with each other, as in the case of minimum material cost versus minimum structure weight and in the case of minimum vibration frequency versus minimum acoustic noise.

  12. Multidisciplinary tailoring of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described for multidisciplinary analysis and tailoring of multilayered multimaterial hot composite engine structural components subjected to simultaneous multiple discipline-specific thermal, structural, vibration, and acoustic loadings including the effect of aggressive environments. The simulation is based on a 3D finite element analysis technique in conjunction with structural mechanics codes, thermal/acoustic analysis methods, and tailoring procedures. The integrated multidisciplinary simulation procedure is general-purpose including the coupled effects of nonlinearities in structure geometry, material, loading, and environmental complexities. The composite material behavior is assessed at all composite scales, i.e., the laminate/ply/constituents (fiber/matrix), via a nonlinear material characterization hygro-thermomechanical model. Sample tailoring cases exhibiting nonlinear material/loading/environmental behavior of aircraft engine fan blades, are presented. The various multidisciplinary loadings lead to different tailored designs, even those opposite of each other, as in the case of minimum material cost versus minimum structure weight and in the case of minimum vibration frequency versus minimum acoustic noise.

  13. Cost-efficient manufacturing of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, W. Tom; Davis, John G.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) program is seeking research breakthroughs that will allow structures made of graphite epoxy materials to replace metals in the wings and fuselages of future aircrafts. NASA's goals are to reduce acquisition cost by 20 to 25 percent, structural weight for a resized aircraft by 40 to 50 percent, and the number of parts by half compared to current production aluminum aircraft. The innovative structural concepts, materials, and fabrication techniques emerging from the ACT program are described, and the relationship between aerospace developments and industrial, commercial, and sporting goods applications are discussed.

  14. Fabrication of graphite/polyimide composite structures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varlas, M.

    1972-01-01

    Selection of graphite/polyimide composite as a prime candidate for high-temperature structural applications involving long-duration temperature environments of 400 to 600 F. A variety of complex graphite/polyimide components has been fabricated, using a match-metal die approach developed for making fiber-reinforced resin composites. Parts produced include sections of a missile adapter skin flange, skin frame section, and I-beam and hat-section stringers, as well as unidirectional (0 deg) and plus or minus 45 deg oriented graphite/polyimide tubes in one-, two-, and six-inch diameters.

  15. Structural health monitoring of composite repair patches in bridge rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhanjun; Ghosh, Kumar; Qing, Xinlin; Karbhari, Vistasp; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, there are many issues involving safety on old bridges, aircrafts and other structures, which threaten the lives of the people using those structures, as well as the structures themselves. To prevent future failure, various measures are being taken. Structure rehabilitations with carbon fiber reinforced composite patches have been adopted and demonstrated to be an excellent way to enhance/repair the structures and prolong the service life. However, there are still many problems residing in this kind of technology that remain unsolved, for example, the failure of the interface between composite repair patches and their host structures. This is a critical issue that must be addressed in order to show the viability of composite patches. In order to study debond occurring between composite repair patches and their host structures, a structure health monitoring scheme was demonstrated on a concrete bridge model in the laboratory. The system is based on active sensing with diagnostic lamb waves, in which piezoelectric transducers are used as both sensors and actuators. In the test, six SMART Layers, each having eight piezoelectirc transducers, were integrated with two composite repair strips on the deck slab of the concrete bridge model. For the three diagnostic layers with each composite repair patch, two layers were bonded on the top surface of the patch, and the other is embedded at the interface between the composite repair patch and the deck slab of the concrete bridge model. The loading procedure of the test included three phases. First, the bridge model was preloaded to initiate cracks on the deck slabs and the repair patches were then implemented. Second, the load was raised to reach the shear capacity of the girders of the bridge model and then the repair patches were implemented on those girders. Lastly, the structure was loaded to damage the deck slabs. During the test, the initiation and development of debond between composite repair patches

  16. A structural study of oxidation in an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fiber reinforced titanium aluminide composite

    SciTech Connect

    Nourbakhsh, S.; Sahin, O.; Margolin, H.

    1995-08-01

    A composite of titanium aluminide, reinforced with ZrO{sub 2} toughened Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fibers, has been produced by pressure casting. The stability of the microstructure during vacuum and air annealing was investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Processing resulted in partial dissolution of ZrO{sub 2} of the fiber into the molten metal which solidified into a two phase lamellar {alpha}{sub 2} + {gamma} matrix. Vacuum annealing caused dissolution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fiber into the matrix, transformation of the matrix into {gamma} and precipitation of ZrO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}Zr within {gamma}. During air annealing diffusion of O through the fiber resulted in the formation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coated ZrO{sub 2} nodules extending from the fiber surface into the matrix in some regions and in the other regions the growth of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} into the {gamma} of the lamellar matrix. An A15 phase with the metal composition, Ti{sub 3}Al{sub 2}, was found between the external oxide scale and the metal matrix.

  17. Composite Blade Structural Analyzer (COBSTRAN) demonstration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    The input deck setup is described for a computer code, composite blade structural analyzer (COBSTRAN) which was developed for the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades and also for composite wind turbine blades. This manual is intended for use in conjunction with the COBSTRAN user's manual. Seven demonstration problems are described with pre- and postprocessing input decks. Modeling of blades which are solid thru-the-thickness and also aircraft wing airfoils with internal spars is shown. Corresponding NASTRAN and databank input decks are also shown. Detail descriptions of each line of the pre- and post-processing decks is provided with reference to the Card Groups defined in the user's manual. A dictionary of all program variables and terms used in this manual may be found in Section 6 of the user's manual.

  18. Self Healing Composite for Aircraft's Structural Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teoh, S. H.; Chia, H. Y.; Lee, M. S.; Nasyitah, A. J. N.; Luqman, H. B. S. M.; Nurhidayah, S.; Tan, Willy. C. K.

    When one cuts himself, it is amazing to watch how quickly the body acts to mend the wound. Immediately, the body works to pull the skin around the cut back together. The concept of repair by bleeding of enclosed functional agents serves as the biomimetic inspiration of synthetic self repair systems. Such synthetic self repair systems are based on advancement in polymeric materials; the process of human thrombosis is the inspiration for the application of self healing fibres within the composite materials. Results based on flexural 3 point bend test on the prepared samples have shown that the doubled layer healed hollow fibre laminate subjected to a healing regime of 3 weeks has a healed strength increase of 27% compared to the damaged baseline laminate. These results gave us confidence that there is a great potential to adopt such self healing mechanism on actual composite parts like in aircraft's composite structures.

  19. From Homogeneous to Segregated Structure of Poly(dimethylsiloxane)/Cellulose Derivative Mixed Langmuir Films Depending on Composition: An in Situ Neutron Reflectivity Study.

    PubMed

    El Haitami, Alae; Goldmann, Michel; Cousin, Fabrice; Dosseh, Gilberte; Cantin, Sophie

    2015-06-16

    The mixing behavior of deuterated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSd) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) spread as Langmuir films at the air-water interface was studied by means of surface pressure-area isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) observations, and in situ neutron reflectivity. The contrast variation method was used with different D2O/H2O mixtures as subphase, allowing contrast matching to either CAB, PDMSd, or PDMSd/CAB mixed film if homogeneous. At PDMSd volume fractions Φ lower than 0.6, the mixed film is a homogeneous monolayer throughout the film compression, in agreement with the monophasic film observed by BAM and the attractive interactions between PDMSd and CAB evidenced from the isotherm measurements. In contrast, at PDMSd volume fractions Φ higher than 0.6, a vertically segregated structure of the mixed film is highlighted. Indeed, whatever the surface pressure, a bilayer structure is observed with a PDMSd layer in contact with the air over a thin CAB layer in contact with the subphase. These results show that the structure of the film is mainly driven by the PDMSd volume fraction which allows obtaining either a homogeneous membrane which composition can be tuned or a vertically segregated system. In contrast, only the thickness of the layers varies with the surface pressure while the structure of the film is not affected.

  20. Global Failure Modes in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.; Gonzalez, Luis

    2001-01-01

    Composite materials provide well-known advantages for space and aeronautical applications in terms of strength and rigidity to weight ratios and other mechanical properties. As a consequence, their use has experienced a constant increase in the past decades and it is anticipated that this trend will be maintained in the near future. At the same time, being these materials relatively new compared to metals, and having failure characteristics completely different from them, their damage growth and their failure mechanisms are not as well understood in a predictive sense. For example, while in metals fracture produces "clean" cracks with their well defined analytically stress fields at the crack tip, composite fracture is a more complex phenomenon. Instead of a crack, we confront a "damage zone" that may include fiber breakage, fiber microbuckling, fiber pullout, matrix cracking, delamination, debonding or any combination of all these different mechanisms. These phenomena are prevalent in any failure process through an aircraft structure, whether one addresses a global failure such as the ripping of a fuselage or wing section, or whether one is concerned with the failure initiation near a thickness change at stringers or other reinforcement. Thus the topic that has been under consideration has wide application in any real structure and is considered an essential contribution to the predictive failure analysis capability for aircraft containing composite components. The heterogeneity and the anisotropy of composites are not only advantageous but essential characteristics, yet these same features provide complex stress fields, especially in the presence of geometrical discontinuities such as notches, holes or cutouts or structural elements such as stiffeners, stringers, etc. To properly address the interaction between a damage/crack front and a hole with a stringer it is imperative that the stress and deformation fields of the former be (sufficiently well) characterized

  1. Ptah-socar fuel-cooled composite materials structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchez, M.; Beyer, S.

    2009-09-01

    One of the key points for the development of dual-mode ramjets operating up to Mach 8 or more is the mastery of fuel-cooled composite materials structures, which are needed, at least, for the combustion chamber. MBDA France and EADS ST have been working on the development of a particular technology for such structures taking advantage of the background of MBDA France in the field of dual-mode ramjet and fuel-cooled structures and of ASTRIUM-EADS ST in the field of high-temperature composite materials. They have developed an innovative technology for advanced monobloc cooled C/C/SiC structures. The paper gives an updated status of the development of Paroi Tissée Application Hypersonique - Simple Operational Composite for Advanced Ramjet (PTAH-SOCAR) technology, including test results, and presents some results obtained during system and demonstrator studies.

  2. Crashworthiness simulation of composite automotive structures

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, M E; Johnson, N L; Simunovic, S; Zywicz, E

    1998-06-01

    In 1990 the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) began the investigation of crash worthiness simulation methods for composite materials. A contract was given to Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC) to implement a new damage model in LS-DYNA3DTM specifically for composite structures. This model is in LS-DYNA3DTM and is in use by the ACC partners. In 1994 USCAR, a partnership of American auto companies, entered into a partnership called SCAAP (Super Computing Automotive Applications Partnership) for the express purpose of working with the National Labs on computational oriented research. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was signed with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory to work in three distinctly different technical areas, one of which was composites material modeling for crash worthiness. Each Laboratory was assigned a specific modeling task. The ACC was responsible for the technical direction of the composites project and provided all test data for code verification. All new models were to be implemented in DYNA3D and periodically distributed to all partners for testing. Several new models have been developed and implemented. Excellent agreement has been shown between tube crush simulation and experiments.

  3. Coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Huang, H.; Hartle, M.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the third years effort of a 5-year program to develop a methodology for coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures. These accomplishments include: (1) structural analysis capability specialized for graded composite structures including large deformation and deformation position eigenanalysis technologies; (2) a thermal analyzer specialized for graded composite structures; (3) absorption of electromagnetic waves by graded composite structures; and (4) coupled structural thermal/electromagnetic analysis of graded composite structures.

  4. The influence of metal-ion binding on the structure and surface composition of Sonic Hedgehog: a combined classical and hybrid QM/MM MD study.

    PubMed

    Hitzenberger, Manuel; Hofer, Thomas S

    2016-08-10

    In this work, the influence of the metal ions present in vertebrate Sonic Hedgehog was assessed by a series of molecular mechanics molecular dynamics simulations with differing ionic compositions. The obtained data suggest that Ca(ii) binding has a very distinct influence on the composition of the protein surface surrounding the binding site by shaping several ionic interactions with negatively charged sidechains that otherwise would be pointing towards the solvent, repelling potential ligands. Furthermore, the Ca(ii) ions play an important role in the stability of the loop regions where they are coordinated. In contrast, the removal of the Zn(ii) ion results in no noticeable destabilization of its chemical surrounding, however, it is shown that the destabilizing effect of removed Ca(ii) ions is amplified if Zn(ii) is absent as well. Furthermore, a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulation of Sonic Hedgehog with special focus on the Zn(ii) binding site has been conducted. The results indicate that QM/MM in contrast to pure MM accurately reproduces structural features also found by experimental studies and therefore is able to provide credible predictions not only of the dynamical properties of the studied system but also of protein-ligand interactions at the metal ion binding site.

  5. Thermal inspection of composite honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-05-01

    Composite honeycomb structures continue to be widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Pulsed thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Pulsed thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are presented. In addition, limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. Other NDE techniques, such as computed tomography X-ray and ultrasound, are used for comparison to the thermography results.

  6. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  7. Out of plane analysis for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, P. C.; Saff, C. R.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Mahler, M. A.; Kan, Han Pin; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    Simple two dimensional analysis techniques were developed to aid in the design of strong joints for integrally stiffened/bonded composite structures subjected to out of plane loads. It was found that most out of plane failures were due to induced stresses arising from rapid changes in load path direction or geometry, induced stresses due to changes in geometry caused by buckling, or direct stresses produced by fuel pressure or bearing loads. While the analysis techniques were developed to address a great variety of out of plane loading conditions, they were primarily derived to address the conditions described above. The methods were developed and verified using existing element test data. The methods were demonstrated using the data from a test failure of a high strain wingbox that was designed, built, and tested under a previous program. Subsequently, a set of design guidelines were assembled to assist in the design of safe, strong integral composite structures using the analysis techniques developed.

  8. Thermal Inspection of Composite Honeycomb Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Composite honeycomb structures continue to be widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Pulsed thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Pulsed thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are presented. In addition, limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. Other NDE techniques, such as computed tomography X-ray and ultrasound, are used for comparison to the thermography results.

  9. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2004-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  10. Failure Analysis of Composite Structure Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    listed in order of preference, based on applicability, reliability, cost , and sample requirements. Figure 5-4. Failure Analysis Technique...development of a methodology in which optical analysis is used to increase the time and cost effectiveness of analyzing failed composite material struc...regarding the integrity of the bond. Accurate bondline defect information was achieved in such structures utilizing a transportable californium -252 (2 5 2

  11. Bioinspired twisted composites based on Bouligand structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, F.; Iervolino, O.; Scarselli, G.; Ginzburg, D.; Meo, M.

    2016-04-01

    The coupling between structural support and protection makes biological systems an important source of inspiration for the development of advanced smart composite structures. In particular, some particular material configurations can be implemented into traditional composites in order to improve their impact resistance and the out-of-plane properties, which represents one of the major weakness of commercial carbon fibres reinforced polymers (CFRP) structures. Based on this premise, a three-dimensional twisted arrangement shown in a vast multitude of biological systems (such as the armoured cuticles of Scarabei, the scales of Arapaima Gigas and the smashing club of Odontodactylus Scyllarus) has been replicated to develop an improved structural material characterised by a high level of in-plane isotropy and a higher interfacial strength generated by the smooth stiffness transition between each layer of fibrils. Indeed, due to their intrinsic layered nature, interlaminar stresses are one of the major causes of failure of traditional CFRP and are generated by the mismatch of the elastic properties between plies in a traditional laminate. Since the energy required to open a crack or a delamination between two adjacent plies is due to the difference between their orientations, the gradual angle variation obtained by mimicking the Bouligand Structures could improve energy absorption and the residual properties of carbon laminates when they are subjected to low velocity impact event. Two different bioinspired laminates were manufactured following a double helicoidal approach and a rotational one and were subjected to a complete test campaign including low velocity impact loading and compared to a traditional quasi-isotropic panel. Fractography analysis via X-Ray tomography was used to understand the mechanical behaviour of the different laminates and the residual properties were evaluated via Compression After Impact (CAI) tests. Results confirmed that the biological

  12. Sensor devices comprising field-structured composites

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E.; Hughes, Robert C.; Anderson, Robert A.

    2001-02-27

    A new class of sensor devices comprising field-structured conducting composites comprising a textured distribution of conducting magnetic particles is disclosed. The conducting properties of such field-structured materials can be precisely controlled during fabrication so as to exhibit a large change in electrical conductivity when subject to any environmental influence which changes the relative volume fraction. Influences which can be so detected include stress, strain, shear, temperature change, humidity, magnetic field, electromagnetic radiation, and the presence or absence of certain chemicals. This behavior can be made the basis for a wide variety of sensor devices.

  13. New methods to study the composition and structure of the extracellular matrix in natural and bioengineered tissues.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Jürgen; Huster, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) comprises a gel of numerous biopolymers that occurs in a multitude of biological tissues. The ECM provides the basic support and mechanical strength of skeletal tissue and is responsible for shape retention. At the same time, the ECM is responsible for the viscoelastic properties and the elasticity of soft tissues. As expected, there are several important diseases that affect and degenerate the ECM with severe consequences for its properties. Bioengineering is a promising approach to support the regenerative capacity of the body. Unfortunately, the biomechanical properties of bioengineered ECM often only poorly meet the standards of their native counterparts. Many bioengineered tissues are characterized by an increased glycosaminoglycan (GAG) but decreased collagen content. This leads to an enhanced water content that strongly alters the viscoelastic and thus the biomechanical properties. Therefore, compositional analysis is important to estimate the tissue quality. We will show that nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and soft-ionization mass spectrometry (MS) represent useful techniques for ECM research both in natural and bioengineered tissues. Both methods are strongly complimentary: while MS techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization (MALDI) are excellent and very sensitive analytical tools to determine the collagen and the GAG contents of tissues, NMR spectroscopy provides insight into the molecular architecture of the ECM, its dynamics and other important parameters such as the water content of the tissue as well as the diffusion of molecules within the ECM.

  14. Structural evolution of chitosan-palygorskite composites and removal of aqueous lead by composite beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusmin, Ruhaida; Sarkar, Binoy; Liu, Yanju; McClure, Stuart; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the structural evolution of chitosan-palygorskite (CP) composites in relation to variable mass ratios of their individual components. The composite beads' performance in lead (Pb) adsorption from aqueous solution was also examined. The composite beads were prepared through direct dispersion of chitosan and palygorskite at 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 mass ratios (CP1, CP2 and C2P, respectively). Analyses by Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the dependence of the composites' structural characteristics on their composition mass ratio. The chitosan-palygorskite composite beads exhibited a better Pb adsorption performance than the pristine materials (201.5, 154.5, 147.1, 27.7 and 9.3 mg g-1 for CP1, C2P, CP2, chitosan and palygorskite, respectively). Adsorption of Pb by CP1 and CP2 followed Freundlich isothermal model, while C2P fitted to Langmuir model. Kinetic studies showed that adsorption by all the composites fitted to the pseudo-second order model with pore diffusion also acting as a major rate governing step. The surface properties and specific interaction between chitosan and palygorskite in the composites were the most critical factors that influenced their capabilities in removing toxic metals from water.

  15. Composition- and temperature-dependent liquid structures in Al-Cu alloys: an ab initio molecular dynamics and x-ray diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, L. H.; Wang, X. D.; Cao, Q. P.; Zhang, D. X.; Xie, H. L.; Xiao, T. Q.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2017-01-01

    The composition- and temperature-dependent liquid structures in eight Alrich-Cu binary alloys (from hypoeutectic Al93Cu7 to hypereutectic Al70Cu30) have been experimentally and computationally studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. The remarkable agreements of structure factors for all liquid Alrich-Cu alloys obtained from high-temperature high-energy XRD measurements and AIMD simulations have been achieved, which consolidates the analyses of structural evolutions in Alrich-Cu liquids during the cooling processing by AIMD simulations. The heat capacity of liquid Alrich-Cu alloys continuously increases and presents no abnormal peak when reducing the temperature, which differs from the reported prediction for 55-atom Alrich-Cu nanoliquids. The diffusivities of Al and Cu undergo an increasing deviation from Arrhenius behavior by tuning Cu concentration from 7 to 30 atomic percentages, correlated to the local ordering in these liquids by means of coordination number, bond-angle distribution, Honeycutt-Andersen index, bond-orientational order and Voronoi tessellation analyses. Upon cooling, the microstructure of the liquid Alrich-Cu alloys inclines to form Al2Cu crystal-like local atomic ordering, especially in the hypereutectic liquids. The favorable short-range ordering between Cu and Al atoms could cause the non-Arrhenius diffusion behavior.

  16. Thick-walled carbon composite multifunctional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haake, John M.; Jacobs, Jack H.; McIlroy, Bruce E.

    1997-06-01

    Satellite programs are moving in the direction of smaller and lighter structures. Technological advances have permitted more sophisticated equipment to be consolidated into compact spaces. Micro-satellites, between 10 and 100 kg, will incorporate micro-electric devices into the lay-up of the satellite structure. These structures will be designed to carry load, provide thermal control, enhance damping, and include integrated passive electronics. These multifunctional structures offer lighter weight, reduced volume, and a 'smarter' overall package for incorporation of sensors, electronics, fiber optics, powered appendages or active components. McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) has applied technology from the synthesis and processing of intelligent cost effective structures (SPICES) and independent research and development (IRAD) programs to the modular instrument support system (MISS) for multifunctional space structures and micro-satellites. The SPICES program was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop affordable manufacturing processes for smart materials to be used in vibration control, and the MISS program was funded by NASA-Langley. The MISS program was conceived to develop concepts and techniques to make connections between different multifunctional structures. MDA fabricated a trapezoidal carbon composite structure out of IM7/977-3 tape prepreg. Flex circuits, thermal and optical conduits were embedded to realize a utility modular connector. These provide electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical connections between micro- satellite components. A quick disconnect mount was also developed to accommodate a variety of devices such as solar arrays, power sources, thermal transfer and vibration control modules.

  17. Composition-dependent structure of polycrystalline magnetron-sputtered V-Al-C-N hard coatings studied by XRD, XPS, XANES and EXAFS.

    PubMed

    Krause, Bärbel; Darma, Susan; Kaufholz, Marthe; Mangold, Stefan; Doyle, Stephen; Ulrich, Sven; Leiste, Harald; Stüber, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2013-08-01

    V-Al-C-N hard coatings with high carbon content were deposited by reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering using an experimental combinatorial approach, deposition from a segmented sputter target. The composition-dependent coexisting phases within the coating were analysed using the complementary methods of X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). For the analysis of the X-ray absorption near-edge spectra, a new approach for evaluation of the pre-edge peak was developed, taking into account the self-absorption effects in thin films. Within the studied composition range, a mixed face-centred cubic (V,Al)(C,N) phase coexisting with a C-C-containing phase was observed. No indication of hexagonal (V,Al)(N,C) was found. The example of V-Al-C-N demonstrates how important a combination of complementary methods is for the detection of coexisting phases in complex multi-element coatings.

  18. Composition-dependent structure of polycrystalline magnetron-sputtered V–Al–C–N hard coatings studied by XRD, XPS, XANES and EXAFS

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Bärbel; Darma, Susan; Kaufholz, Marthe; Mangold, Stefan; Doyle, Stephen; Ulrich, Sven; Leiste, Harald; Stüber, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2013-01-01

    V–Al–C–N hard coatings with high carbon content were deposited by reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering using an experimental combinatorial approach, deposition from a segmented sputter target. The composition-dependent coexisting phases within the coating were analysed using the complementary methods of X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). For the analysis of the X-ray absorption near-edge spectra, a new approach for evaluation of the pre-edge peak was developed, taking into account the self-absorption effects in thin films. Within the studied composition range, a mixed face-centred cubic (V,Al)(C,N) phase coexisting with a C–C-containing phase was observed. No indication of hexagonal (V,Al)(N,C) was found. The example of V–Al–C–N demonstrates how important a combination of complementary methods is for the detection of coexisting phases in complex multi-element coatings. PMID:24046506

  19. Structural Ceramic Composites for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    William Windes; P.A. Lessing; Y. Katoh; L. L. Snead; E. Lara-Curzio; J. Klett; C. Henager, Jr.; R. J. Shinavski

    2005-08-01

    A research program has been established to investigate fiber reinforced ceramic composites to be used as control rod components within a Very High Temperature Reactor. Two candidate systems have been identified, carbon fiber reinforced carbon (Cf/C) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites. Initial irradiation stability studies to determine the maximum dose for each composite type have been initiated within the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Test samples exposed to 10 dpa irradiation dose have been completed with future samples to dose levels of 20 and 30 dpa scheduled for completion in following years. Mechanical and environmental testing is being conducted concurrently at the Idaho National Laboratory and at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. High temperature test equipment, testing methodologies, and test samples for high temperature (up to 1600º C) tensile strength and long duration creep studies have been established. Specific attention was paid to the architectural fiber preform design as well as the materials used in construction of the composites. Actual testing of both tubular and flat, "dog-bone" shaped tensile composite specimens will begin next year. Since there is no precedence for using ceramic composites within a nuclear reactor, ASTM standard test procedures will be established from these mechanical and environmental tests. Close collaborations between the U.S. national laboratories and international collaborators (i.e. France and Japan) are being forged to establish both national and international test standards to be used to qualify ceramic composites for nuclear reactor applications.

  20. Open-Lattice Composite Design Strengthens Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Advanced composite materials and designs could eventually be applied as the framework for spacecraft or extraterrestrial constructions for long-term space habitation. One such structure in which NASA has made an investment is the IsoTruss grid structure, an extension of a two-dimensional "isogrid" concept originally developed at McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, under contract to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in the early 1970s. IsoTruss is a lightweight and efficient alternative to monocoque composite structures, and can be produced in a manner that involves fairly simple techniques. The technology was developed with support from NASA to explore space applications, and is garnering global attention because it is extremely lightweight; as much as 12 times stronger than steel; inexpensive to manufacture, transport, and install; low-maintenance; and is fully recyclable. IsoTruss is expected to see application as utility poles and meteorological towers, for the aforementioned reasons and because its design offers superior wind resistance and is less susceptible to breaking and woodpeckers. Other applications, such as reinforcement for concrete structures, stand-alone towers, sign supports, prostheses, irrigation equipment, and sporting goods are being explored

  1. Topologically ordered magnesium-biopolymer hybrid composite structures.

    PubMed

    Oosterbeek, Reece N; Seal, Christopher K; Staiger, Mark P; Hyland, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are intriguing as possible biodegradable biomaterials due to their unique combination of biodegradability and high specific mechanical properties. However, uncontrolled biodegradation of magnesium during implantation remains a major challenge in spite of the use of alloying and protective coatings. In this study, a hybrid composite structure of magnesium metal and a biopolymer was fabricated as an alternative approach to control the corrosion rate of magnesium. A multistep process that combines metal foam production and injection molding was developed to create a hybrid composite structure that is topologically ordered in all three dimensions. Preliminary investigations of the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior exhibited by the hybrid Mg-polymer composite structures suggest a new potential approach to the development of Mg-based biomedical devices.

  2. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Basement membrane of mouse bone marrow sinusoids shows distinctive structure and proteoglycan composition: a high resolution ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Osmond, D G

    2001-11-01

    Venous sinusoids in bone marrow are the site of a large-scale traffic of cells between the extravascular hemopoietic compartment and the blood stream. The wall of the sinusoids consists solely of a basement membrane interposed between a layer of endothelial cells and an incomplete covering of adventitial cells. To examine its possible structural specialization, the basement membrane of bone marrow sinusoids has now been examined by high resolution electron microscopy of perfusion-fixed mouse bone marrow. The basement membrane layer was discontinuous, consisting of irregular masses of amorphous material within a uniform 60-nm-wide space between apposing endothelial cells and adventitial cell processes. At maximal magnifications, the material was resolved as a random arrangement of components lacking the "cord network" formation seen in basement membranes elsewhere. Individual components exhibited distinctive ultrastructural features whose molecular identity has previously been established. By these morphological criteria, the basement membrane contained unusually abundant chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) revealed by 3-nm-wide "double tracks," and moderate amounts of both laminin as dense irregular coils and type IV collagen as 1-1.5-nm-wide filaments, together with less conspicuous amounts of amyloid P forming pentagonal frames. In contrast, 4.5-5-nm-wide "double tracks" characteristic of heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) were absent. The findings demonstrate that, in comparison with "typical" basement membranes in other tissues, the bone marrow sinusoidal basement membrane is uniquely specialized in several respects. Its discontinuous nature, lack of network organization, and absence of HSPG, a molecule that normally helps to maintain membrane integrity, may facilitate disassembly and reassembly of basement membrane material in concert with movements of adventitial cell processes as maturing hemopoietic cells pass through the sinusoidal wall: the

  4. Composite Structure Modeling and Analysis of Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Sorokach, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project and the Boeing Company are collabrating to advance the unitized damage arresting composite airframe technology with application to the Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft. The testing of a HWB fuselage section with Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) construction is presently being conducted at NASA Langley. Based on lessons learned from previous HWB structural design studies, improved finite-element models (FEM) of the HWB multi-bay and bulkhead assembly are developed to evaluate the performance of the PRSEUS construction. In order to assess the comparative weight reduction benefits of the PRSEUS technology, conventional cylindrical skin-stringer-frame models of a cylindrical and a double-bubble section fuselage concepts are developed. Stress analysis with design cabin-pressure load and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement in each case. Alternate analysis with stitched composite hat-stringers and C-frames are also presented, in addition to the foam-core sandwich frame and pultruded rod-stringer construction. The FEM structural stress, strain and weights are computed and compared for relative weight/strength benefit assessment. The structural analysis and specific weight comparison of these stitched composite advanced aircraft fuselage concepts demonstrated that the pressurized HWB fuselage section assembly can be structurally as efficient as the conventional cylindrical fuselage section with composite stringer-frame and PRSEUS construction, and significantly better than the conventional aluminum construction and the double-bubble section concept.

  5. Electrochemical in-situ dissolution study of structurally ordered, disordered and gold doped PtCu3 nanoparticles on carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovič, Primož; Šelih, Vid Simon; Šala, Martin; Hočevar, Samo B.; Pavlišič, Andraž; Gatalo, Matija; Bele, Marjan; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Čekada, Miha; Hodnik, Nejc; Gaberšček, Miran

    2016-09-01

    Commercial deployment of low-temperature-fuel cells is still hugely restricted by platinum alloy catalysts corrosion. Extensive research of the last years is focused on increasing stability of the catalyst composite, however a comprehensive understanding is still lacking. In pursuing this fundamentally and practically very important objective we present a comparative corrosion study of a PtCu3 nano-alloy system by investigating the effects of structural ordering and gold doping. For that purpose a recently developed electrochemical flow cell (EFC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) is employed. This approach provides potential- and time-resolved insight into dissolution process at extremely low concentrations (ppb level). Our results show a structure-dependent copper corrosion, where ordering and gold-doping significantly improve copper retention in the native alloy. Two assumptions can be drawn from the measured Pt dissolution profiles: (i) a better Pt re-deposition efficiency in catalysts with higher porosity and (ii) the beneficial effect of Au surface doping that lowers the amount of dissolved Pt amount and shifts the Pt cathodic dissolution to lower potentials. A 2.6 nm Pt/C standard catalyst with the same carbon loading shows a much lower stability which is due to the well-known particle size effect.

  6. Optimal design of a composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graesser, D. L.; Zabinsky, Z. B.; Tuttle, M. E.; Kim, G. I.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a design methodology for a laminated composite stiffened panel, subjected to multiple in-plane loads and bending moments. Design variables include the skin and stiffener ply orientation angles and stiffener geometry variables. Optimum designs are sought which minimize structural weight and satisfy mechanical performance requirements. Two types of mechanical performance requirements are placed on the panel, maximum strain and minimum strength. Minimum weight designs are presented which document that the choice of mechanical performance requirements cause changes in the optimum design. The effects of lay-up constraints which limit the ply angles to user specified values, such as symmetric or quasi-isotropic laminates, are also investigated.

  7. Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Alan L.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Guell, David C.

    1993-01-01

    High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic.

  8. Performance analysis of bonded composite doublers on aircraft structures

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.

    1995-08-01

    Researchers contend that composite repairs (or structural reinforcement doublers) offer numerous advantages over metallic patches including corrosion resistance, light weight, high strength, elimination of rivets, and time savings in installation. Their use in commercial aviation has been stifled by uncertainties surrounding their application, subsequent inspection and long-term endurance. The process of repairing or reinforcing airplane structures is time consuming and the design is dependent upon an accompanying stress and fatigue analysis. A repair that is too stiff may result in a loss of fatigue life, continued growth of the crack being repaired, and the initiation of a new flaw in the undesirable high stress field around the patch. Uncertainties in load spectrums used to design repairs exacerbates these problems as does the use of rivets to apply conventional doublers. Many of these repair or structural reinforcement difficulties can be addressed through the use of composite doublers. Primary among unknown entities are the effects of non-optimum installations and the certification of adequate inspection procedures. This paper presents on overview of a program intended to introduce composite doubler technology to the US commercial aircraft fleet. In this project, a specific composite application has been chosen on an L-1011 aircraft in order to focus the tasks on application and operation issues. Through the use of laboratory test structures and flight demonstrations on an in-service L-1011 airplane, this study is investigating composite doubler design, fabrication, installation, structural integrity, and non-destructive evaluation. In addition to providing an overview of the L-1011 project, this paper focuses on a series of fatigue and strength tests which have been conducted in order to study the damage tolerance of composite doublers. Test results to-date are presented.

  9. Dynamic Probabilistic Instability of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    A computationally effective method is described to evaluate the non-deterministic dynamic instability (probabilistic dynamic buckling) of thin composite shells. The method is a judicious combination of available computer codes for finite element, composite mechanics and probabilistic structural analysis. The solution method is incrementally updated Lagrangian. It is illustrated by applying it to thin composite cylindrical shell subjected to dynamic loads. Both deterministic and probabilistic buckling loads are evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. A universal plot is obtained for the specific shell that can be used to approximate buckling loads for different load rates and different probability levels. Results from this plot show that the faster the rate, the higher the buckling load and the shorter the time. The lower the probability, the lower is the buckling load for a specific time. Probabilistic sensitivity results show that the ply thickness, the fiber volume ratio and the fiber longitudinal modulus, dynamic load and loading rate are the dominant uncertainties in that order.

  10. Effect of processing on Polymer/Composite structure and properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in the vitality and economic health of the field of polymer forecasting are discussed. A consistent and rational point of view which considers processing as a participant in the underlying triad of relationships which comprise materials science and engineering is outlined. This triad includes processing as it influences material structure, and ultimately properties. Methods in processing structure properties, polymer science and engineering, polymer chemistry and synthesis, structure and modification and optimization through processing, and methods of melt flow modeling in processing structure property relations of polymer were developed. Mechanical properties of composites are considered, and biomedical materials research to include polymer processing effects are studied. An analysis of the design technology of advances graphite/epoxy composites is also reported.

  11. Critical joints in large composite aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, W. D.; Bunin, B. L.; Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    A program was conducted at Douglas Aircraft Company to develop the technology for critical structural joints of composite wing structure that meets design requirements for a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The prime objective of the program was to demonstrate the ability to reliably predict the strength of large bolted composite joints. Ancillary testing of 180 specimens generated data on strength and load-deflection characteristics which provided input to the joint analysis. Load-sharing between fasteners in multirow bolted joints was computed by the nonlinear analysis program A4EJ. This program was used to predict strengths of 20 additional large subcomponents representing strips from a wing root chordwise splice. In most cases, the predictions were accurate to within a few percent of the test results. In some cases, the observed mode of failure was different than anticipated. The highlight of the subcomponent testing was the consistent ability to achieve gross-section failure strains close to 0.005. That represents a considerable improvement over the state of the art.

  12. Chemical compositions, methods of making the chemical compositions, and structures made from the chemical compositions

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Lei; Cheng, Zhe; Liu, Ze; Liu, Meilin

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include chemical compositions, structures, anodes, cathodes, electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells, fuel cells, fuel cell membranes, separation membranes, catalytic membranes, sensors, coatings for electrolytes, electrodes, membranes, and catalysts, and the like, are disclosed.

  13. Local structure, composition, and crystallization mechanism of a model two-phase “composite nanoglass”

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Soma; Kelly, S. D.; Shibata, Tomohiro; Balasubramanian, M.; Srinivasan, S. G.; Du, Jincheng; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Ayyub, Pushan

    2016-02-14

    We report a detailed study of the local composition and structure of a model, bi-phasic nanoglass with nominal stoichiometry Cu55Nb45. Three dimensional atom probe data suggest a nanoscale-phase-separated glassy structure having well defined Cu-rich and Nb-rich regions with a characteristic length scale of ≈3 nm. However, extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicates subtle differences in the local environments of Cu and Nb. While the Cu atoms displayed a strong tendency to cluster and negligible structural order beyond the first coordination shell, the Nb atoms had a larger fraction of unlike neighbors (higher chemical order) and a distinctly better-ordered structural environment (higher topological order). This provides the first experimental indication that metallic glass formation may occur due to frustration arising from the competition between chemical ordering and clustering. These observations are complemented by classical as well as ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our study indicates that these nanoscale phase-separated glasses are quite distinct from the single phase nanoglasses (studied by Gleiter and others) in the following three respects: (i) they contain at least two structurally and compositionally distinct, nanodispersed, glassy phases, (ii) these phases are separated by comparatively sharp inter-phase boundaries, and (iii) thermally induced crystallization occurs via a complex, multi-step mechanism. Such materials, therefore, appear to constitute a new class of disordered systems that may be called a composite nanoglass.

  14. Local structure, composition, and crystallization mechanism of a model two-phase “composite nanoglass”

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro; Kelly, S. D.; Balasubramanian, M.; Srinivasan, S. G.; Du, Jincheng; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Ayyub, Pushan

    2016-02-14

    We report a detailed study of the local composition and structure of a model, bi-phasic nanoglass with nominal stoichiometry Cu{sub 55}Nb{sub 45}. Three dimensional atom probe data suggest a nanoscale-phase-separated glassy structure having well defined Cu-rich and Nb-rich regions with a characteristic length scale of ≈3 nm. However, extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicates subtle differences in the local environments of Cu and Nb. While the Cu atoms displayed a strong tendency to cluster and negligible structural order beyond the first coordination shell, the Nb atoms had a larger fraction of unlike neighbors (higher chemical order) and a distinctly better-ordered structural environment (higher topological order). This provides the first experimental indication that metallic glass formation may occur due to frustration arising from the competition between chemical ordering and clustering. These observations are complemented by classical as well as ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our study indicates that these nanoscale phase-separated glasses are quite distinct from the single phase nanoglasses (studied by Gleiter and others) in the following three respects: (i) they contain at least two structurally and compositionally distinct, nanodispersed, glassy phases, (ii) these phases are separated by comparatively sharp inter-phase boundaries, and (iii) thermally induced crystallization occurs via a complex, multi-step mechanism. Such materials, therefore, appear to constitute a new class of disordered systems that may be called a composite nanoglass.

  15. Graphene networks and their influence on free-volume properties of graphene-epoxidized natural rubber composites with a segregated structure: rheological and positron annihilation studies.

    PubMed

    He, Canzhong; She, Xiaodong; Peng, Zheng; Zhong, Jieping; Liao, Shuangquan; Gong, Wei; Liao, Jianhe; Kong, Lingxue

    2015-05-14

    Epoxidized natural rubber-graphene (ENR-GE) composites with segregated GE networks were successfully fabricated using the latex mixing combined in situ reduced technology. The rheological behavior and electrical conductivity of ENR-GE composites were investigated. At low frequencies, the storage modulus (G') became frequency-independent suggesting a solid-like rheological behavior and the formation of GE networks. According to the percolation theory, the rheological threshold of ENR-GE composites was calculated to be 0.17 vol%, which was lower than the electrical threshold of 0.23 vol%. Both percolation thresholds depended on the evolution of the GE networks in the composites. At low GE concentrations (<0.17 vol%), GE existed as individual units, while a "polymer-bridged GE network" was constructed in the composites when GE concentrations exceeded 0.17 vol%. Finally, a "three-dimensional GE network" with percolation conductive paths was formed with a GE concentration of 0.23 vol%, where a remarkable increase in the conductivity of ENR-GE composites was observed. The effect of GE on the atom scale free-volume properties of composites was further studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and positron age momentum correlation measurements. The motion of ENR chains was retarded by the geometric confinement of "GE networks", producing a high-density interfacial region in the vicinity of GE nanoplatelets, which led to a lower ortho-positronium lifetime intensity and smaller free-volume hole size.

  16. A Discipline's Composition: A Citation Analysis of Composition Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Daniel P.

    2006-01-01

    Citation patterns in the field of composition studies are analyzed and compared with patterns in other humanities fields. Results showed marked differences in citation patterns between composition studies and other humanities fields, including literary studies. Librarians can use this information to forge more productive relationships with…

  17. Structural Health Monitoring for Impact Damage in Composite Structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis P.; Raymond Bond; Doug Adams

    2014-08-01

    Composite structures are increasing in prevalence throughout the aerospace, wind, defense, and transportation industries, but the many advantages of these materials come with unique challenges, particularly in inspecting and repairing these structures. Because composites of- ten undergo sub-surface damage mechanisms which compromise the structure without a clear visual indication, inspection of these components is critical to safely deploying composite re- placements to traditionally metallic structures. Impact damage to composites presents one of the most signi fi cant challenges because the area which is vulnerable to impact damage is generally large and sometimes very dif fi cult to access. This work seeks to further evolve iden- ti fi cation technology by developing a system which can detect the impact load location and magnitude in real time, while giving an assessment of the con fi dence in that estimate. Fur- thermore, we identify ways by which impact damage could be more effectively identi fi ed by leveraging impact load identi fi cation information to better characterize damage. The impact load identi fi cation algorithm was applied to a commercial scale wind turbine blade, and results show the capability to detect impact magnitude and location using a single accelerometer, re- gardless of sensor location. A technique for better evaluating the uncertainty of the impact estimates was developed by quantifying how well the impact force estimate meets the assump- tions underlying the force estimation technique. This uncertainty quanti fi cation technique was found to reduce the 95% con fi dence interval by more than a factor of two for impact force estimates showing the least uncertainty, and widening the 95% con fi dence interval by a fac- tor of two for the most uncertain force estimates, avoiding the possibility of understating the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Linear vibration based damage detection tech- niques were investigated in the

  18. Noise transmission properties and control strategies for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Beyer, Todd B.; Lester, Harold C.

    1991-01-01

    A study of several component technologies required to apply active control techniques to reduce interior noise in composite aircraft structures is described. The mechanisms of noise transmission in an all composite, large-scale, fuselage model are studied in an experimental program and found similar to mechanisms found in conventional aircraft construction. Two primary conditions of structural acoustic response are found to account for the dominant interior acoustic response. A preliminary study of active noise control in cylinders used piezoceramic actuators as force inputs for a simple aluminum fuselage model. These actuators provided effective control for the same two conditions of noise transmission found in the composite fuselage structure. The use of piezoceramic actuators to apply force inputs overcomes the weight and structural requirements of conventional shaker actuators. Finally, in order to accurately simulate these types of actuators in a cylindrical shell, two analytical models are investigated that apply either in-plane forces or bending moments along the boundaries of a finite patch. It is shown that the bending model may not be as effective as the force model for exciting the low order azimuthal modes that typically dominate the structural acoustic response in these systems. This result will affect the arrangement and distribution of actuators required for effective active control systems.

  19. End Effects and Load Diffusion in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Ambur, D. (Technical Monitor); Nemeth, M. P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The research carried out here builds on our previous NASA supported research on the general topic of edge effects and load diffusion in composite structures. Further fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Specific problems recently considered were focussed on end effects in sandwich structures and for functionally graded materials. Both linear and nonlinear (geometric and material) problems have been addressed. Our goal is the development of readily applicable design formulas for the decay lengths in terms of non-dimensional material and geometric parameters. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities provides a significant aid towards this process. The analysis is also amenable to parameter study with a large parameter space and should be useful in structural tailoring studies.

  20. Compositional studies of primitive asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilas, F.

    1988-01-01

    The composition of primitive asteroids and their relationship to satellites in the solar system will be studied by analyzing existing narrowband charge coupled device (CCD) reflectance spectra, acquiring additional spectra of asteroids and small satellites in the 0.5 to 1.0 micrometer spectral range, and exploring possibilities for obtaining compositional information in the blue-UV spectral region. Comparison with laboratory spectra of terrestrial chlorites and serpentines (phyllosilicates) and the clay minerals found in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites will continue. During 1987, narrowband CCD reflectance spectra of 17 additional asteroids were acquired. These spectra and spectra of 34 other asteroids have been used primarily for two studies: weak absorption features similar to those due to Fe2(+) and Fe2(+) - Fe3(+) transitions in iron oxides f ound in terrestrial chlorites and serpentines and carbonaceous chondrites have been identified in some primitive asteroid spectra. There is a first indication that asteroids grouped by heliocentric distance show similar weak absorption features. Nonparametric statistics are being applied to test the hypothesis of discrete remnants of a gradation in composition of outer-belt asteroids.

  1. Development of a composite satellite structure for FORTE

    SciTech Connect

    Grastataro, C.I.; Butler, T.A.; Smith, B.G.; Thompson, T.C.

    1995-04-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) has advanced the development of low-cost, lightweight, composite technology for use in small satellite structures, in this case, for the Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite mission. The use of advanced composites in space applications is well developed, but the application of an all-composite satellite structure has not been achieved until now. This paper investigates the application of composite technology in the design of an all-composite spacecraft structure for small satellites. Engineering analysis and test results obtained from the development of the spacecraft engineering model are also presented.

  2. Composite Panel Postbuckling Behavior and General Model of Joints in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamula, G. N.; Kutinov, V. F.; Vasilyev, V. V.; Grishin, V. I.; Ierusalimsky, K. M.; Azikov, N. S.; Begeyev, T. K.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper is a final technical report on the research programme NCCW-73 accomplished within co-operation between NASA of the USA and GOSKOMOBORONPROM of Russia in the field of aeronautics. The report contains basic results of studies in two areas, 'Analysis of postbuckling behavior of composite panels' and 'Development of general model of joints in composite structures'; these results were obtained in conformity with requirements of NCCW-73. In addition, consideration is given to some related issues, and proposals for further studies are formulated.

  3. Status of geometry effects on structural nuclear composite properties

    SciTech Connect

    Will Windes; Y. Katoh; L.L. Snead; E. Lara-Curzio; C. Henagar, Jr.

    2005-09-01

    structural ceramic composites being considered for control rod applications within the VHTR design. While standard sized (i.e. 150-mm long or longer) test specimens can be used for baseline non-irradiated thermal creep studies, very small, compact, tensile specimens will be required for the irradiated creep studies. Traditionally, it is standard practice to use small, representative test samples in place of full-size components for an irradiated study. However, a real problem exists for scale-up of composite materials. Unlike monolithic materials, these composites are engineered from two distinct materials using complicated infiltration techniques to provide full density and maximum mechanical properties. The material properties may be significantly affected when the component geometry or size is changed. It must be demonstrated that the smaller test samples used in an irradiated study will adequately represent larger composite tubes used for control rod applications. To accomplish this, two different test programs are being implemented to establish that small, flat test specimens are representative of the mechanical response for large, cylindrical composite tubes: a size effect study and a geometry effect study.

  4. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  5. Probabilistic Assessment of Fracture Progression in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon; Mauget, Bertrand; Huang, Dade; Addi, Frank

    1999-01-01

    This report describes methods and corresponding computer codes that are used to evaluate progressive damage and fracture and to perform probabilistic assessment in built-up composite structures. Structural response is assessed probabilistically, during progressive fracture. The effects of design variable uncertainties on structural fracture progression are quantified. The fast probability integrator (FPI) is used to assess the response scatter in the composite structure at damage initiation. The sensitivity of the damage response to design variables is computed. The methods are general purpose and are applicable to stitched and unstitched composites in all types of structures and fracture processes starting from damage initiation to unstable propagation and to global structure collapse. The methods are demonstrated for a polymer matrix composite stiffened panel subjected to pressure. The results indicated that composite constituent properties, fabrication parameters, and respective uncertainties have a significant effect on structural durability and reliability. Design implications with regard to damage progression, damage tolerance, and reliability of composite structures are examined.

  6. Fuselage structure using advanced technology fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. K.; Tomlinson, H. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fuselage structure is described in which the skin is comprised of layers of a matrix fiber reinforced composite, with the stringers reinforced with the same composite material. The high strength to weight ratio of the composite, particularly at elevated temperatures, and its high modulus of elasticity, makes it desirable for use in airplane structures.

  7. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  8. Some Lower Valence Vanadium Fluorides: Their Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and Composition Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Y. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes some contemporary concepts unique to the structure of advanced solids, i.e., their crystal distortions, domain structures, modulated structures, ferrimagnetism, and composition dependence. (Author/CS)

  9. The Structure and Composition of Io's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, W. H.; Marconi, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Io's atmosphere is thought to be generated principally by sublimation on the dayside and by multiple volcanoes scattered throughout its surface and more concentrated near the equator. While SO2 seems to be the principle product of these sources, many other chemical species are placed into the atmosphere by these sources, including substantial amounts of SO and S2 as well as smaller but observationally significant amounts of Na bearing molecules. These species in turn interact strongly with the torus plasma generating additional species such as O2, S, O, and Na. The strong interaction of the torus plasma with the neutral atmosphere not only exerts a profound effect on the composition of Io's atmosphere but also strongly affects the dynamics and thermodynamics of Io's atmosphere, particularly at higher altitudes. In addition, as Io orbits Jupiter, the change in location of the sublimation region and the eclipse of Io as it passes through Jupiter's shadow result in substantial variation in the atmosphere. A complex time-dependent three-dimensional atmosphere with strong spatial compositional variation is created. Here we extend the two-dimensional multispecies Navier-Stokes model of Smyth and Wong (2004) to three-dimensions, include two volcanic sources similar to Pele and Loki, and include the effect of Io's movement around Jupiter on sublimation. The effects of the torus plasma are also included as in Smyth and Wong. We will present the overall composition and structure of the atmosphere, O to S ratios in the upper atmosphere, and discuss a potential issue with the O2 abundance. Smyth, W.H. and M.C. Wong, Icarus 171, 171-182, 2004.

  10. Self-healing sandwich composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugon, D.; Chen, C.; Peters, K.

    2012-04-01

    Previous research demonstrated that a thin self-healing layer is effective in recovering partial sandwich composite performance after an impact event. Many studies have been conducted that show the possibility of using Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors to monitor the cure of a resin through strain and temperature monitoring. For this experiment, FBG sensors were used to monitor the curing process of a self-healing layer within a twelve-layer fiberglass laminate after impact. First, five self-healing sandwich composite specimens were manufactured. FBG sensors were embedded between the fiberglass and foam core. Then the fiberglass laminate was impacted with the use of a drop tower and the curing process was monitored. The collected data was used to compare the cure of the resin and fiberglass alone to the cure of the resin from a self-healing specimen. For the low viscosity resin system tested, these changes were not sufficiently large to identify different polymerization states in the resin as it cured. These results indicate that applying different resin systems might increase the efficiency of the self-healing in the sandwich composites.

  11. Advanced fiber-composite hybrids--A new structural material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    Introduction of metal foil as part of matrix and fiber composite, or ""sandwich'', improves strength and stiffness for multidirectional loading, improves resistance to cyclic loading, and improves impact and erosion resistance of resultant fiber-composite hybrid structure.

  12. Progress in patch repair of aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weiguo; Zhang, Weifang; Tang, Qingyun

    2011-11-01

    With the rapid application of the composite structure in the aerospace industry, more load-bearing structures and components are used with composites instead of conventional engineering materials. However, the composite structures are inevitably suffered damages in the complex environment, the composites structures repair become more important in the airplane maintenance. This paper describes the composites patch repair progress. Firstly, the flaws and damages concerned to composite structures are concluded, and also the repair principles are presented. Secondly, the advantages and disadvantages for different repair methods are analyzed, as well as the different bonded repair and their applicability to different structures is discussed. According the recent research in theory and experiment, the scarf repair effects under different parameters are analyzed. Finally, the failure mechanisms of repair structure are discussed, and some prospects are put forward.

  13. Progress in patch repair of aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weiguo; Zhang, Weifang; Tang, Qingyun

    2012-04-01

    With the rapid application of the composite structure in the aerospace industry, more load-bearing structures and components are used with composites instead of conventional engineering materials. However, the composite structures are inevitably suffered damages in the complex environment, the composites structures repair become more important in the airplane maintenance. This paper describes the composites patch repair progress. Firstly, the flaws and damages concerned to composite structures are concluded, and also the repair principles are presented. Secondly, the advantages and disadvantages for different repair methods are analyzed, as well as the different bonded repair and their applicability to different structures is discussed. According the recent research in theory and experiment, the scarf repair effects under different parameters are analyzed. Finally, the failure mechanisms of repair structure are discussed, and some prospects are put forward.

  14. Photoluminescence structure, and composition of laterally anodized porous Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, K. H.; Shih, S.; Kwong, D. L.; George, T.; Lin, T. L.; Liu, H. Y.; Zavada, J.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the photoluminescence (PL), structure, and composition of laterally anodized porous Si. Broad PL peaks were observed centered between about 620-720 nm with strong intensities measured from 500 to 860 nm. Macroscopic variations in PL intensities and peak positions are explained in terms of the structure and anodization process. Structural studies suggest that the PL appears to originate from a multilayered porous Si structure in which the top two layers are amorphous. X-ray diffraction spectra also suggest the presence of a significant amorphous phase. In addition to high concentrations of B and N, we have measured extremely high concentrations much greater than 10 exp 20 cu cm of H, C, O, and F. Our results indicate that laterally anodized porous Si does not fit the crystalline Si quantum wire model prevalent in the literature suggesting that some other structure is responsible for the observed luminescence.

  15. Innovative Structural Materials and Sections with Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Vikram

    The motivation of this work is based on development of new construction products with strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) geared towards sustainable residential applications. The proposed research has three main objectives: automation of existing manufacturing systems for SHCC laminates; multi-level characterization of mechanical properties of fiber, matrix, interface and composites phases using servo-hydraulic and digital image correlation techniques. Structural behavior of these systems were predicted using ductility based design procedures using classical laminate theory and structural mechanics. SHCC sections are made up of thin sections of matrix with Portland cement based binder and fine aggregates impregnating continuous one-dimensional fibers in individual or bundle form or two/three dimensional woven, bonded or knitted textiles. Traditional fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) use random dispersed chopped fibers in the matrix at a low volume fractions, typically 1-2% to avoid to avoid fiber agglomeration and balling. In conventional FRC, fracture localization occurs immediately after the first crack, resulting in only minor improvement in toughness and tensile strength. However in SHCC systems, distribution of cracking throughout the specimen is facilitated by the fiber bridging mechanism. Influence of material properties of yarn, composition, geometry and weave patterns of textile in the behavior of laminated SHCC skin composites were investigated. Contribution of the cementitious matrix in the early age and long-term performance of laminated composites was studied with supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash, silica fume, and wollastonite. A closed form model with classical laminate theory and ply discount method, coupled with a damage evolution model was utilized to simulate the non-linear tensile response of these composite materials. A constitutive material model developed earlier in the group was utilized to characterize and

  16. Hybrid Composites for LH2 Fuel Tank Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Loos, Alfred C.; McMahon, William M.

    2001-01-01

    The application of lightweight carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) as structure for cryogenic fuel tanks is critical to the success of the next generation of Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV). The recent failure of the X-33 composite fuel tank occurred in part due to microcracking of the polymer matrix, which allowed cryogen to permeate through the inner skin to the honeycomb core. As part of an approach to solve these problems, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are working to develop and investigate polymer films that will act as a barrier to the permeation of LH2 through the composite laminate. In this study two commercially available films and eleven novel LaRC films were tested in an existing cryogenics laboratory at MSFC to determine the permeance of argon at room temperature. Several of these films were introduced as a layer in the composite to form an interleaved, or hybrid, composite to determine the effects on permeability. In addition, the effects of the interleaved layer thickness, number, and location on the mechanical properties of the composite laminate were investigated. In this initial screening process, several of the films were found to exhibit lower permeability to argon than the composite panels tested.

  17. Advanced composites wing study program, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, S. T.; Michaelson, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The study on utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structures was conducted as a part of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program to establish, by the mid-1980s, the technology for the design of a subsonic commercial transport aircraft leading to a 40% fuel savings. The study objective was to develop a plan to define the effort needed to support a production commitment for the extensive use of composite materials in wings of new generation aircraft that will enter service in the 1985-1990 time period. Identification and analysis of what was needed to meet the above plan requirements resulted in a program plan consisting of three key development areas: (1) technology development; (2) production capability development; and (3) integration and validation by designing, building, and testing major development hardware.

  18. Composition dependence of the optical properties and band structure of the zinc-blende ZnS1-xOx: a first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueddim, A.; Zerroug, S.; Bouarissa, N.

    2015-08-01

    We present first principles calculations of structural, electronic and optical properties of ZnS1-xOx in the zinc-blende phase. We employ the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the density functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation and Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation. Features such as the lattice constant, the bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are reported. The agreement between our calculated results and available experimental and theoretical data is generally good. Direct and indirect energy band gaps as a function of the oxygen composition in the material of interest are presented and discussed. The material under investigation is found to remain a direct band gap semiconductor over all the alloy composition range (0-1). Furthermore, the optical properties such as the dielectric function, the refractive index, the reflectivity and the electron loss energy have also been reported and analysed.

  19. Study of the phase composition of silicide coatings, based on layered Nb-Mo structures, obtained by vacuum-arc deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovan, A. A.; Betsofen, S. Ya; Lenkovets, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    A multilayer composite ∼1000 μm in thickness, formed by niobium and molybdenum layers (number of layers n = 230), is obtained by vacuum-arc deposition with subsequent siliconization of the surface layers at a temperature of 1200 °C. Layer-by-layer phase analysis is performed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that in the surface layers ∼130 μm in thickness, single-phase silicides (Nb x Mo1- x )Si2 are formed with the hexagonal C40 structure (Strukturbericht designations). Alternating layers of solid solutions based on niobium and molybdenum with a body-centered cubic (BCC) lattice are observed within the composite. The formation of solid solutions caused by heating of the coating leads to convergence of the values of the linear thermal expansion coefficient and Young's modulus at the interface between the layers.

  20. Doubly responsive polymer-microgel composites: rheology and structure.

    PubMed

    Monti, Fabrice; Fu, Shang-Yi; Iliopoulos, Ilias; Cloitre, Michel

    2008-10-21

    Mixtures of alkali swellable microgels and linear PNIPAm chains exhibit doubly responsive properties both with pH and temperature. Below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), the linear chains of PNIPAm are soluble and increase the osmotic pressure outside the microgels, which causes them to deswell. Above the LCST, the PNIPAm chains become insoluble and form spherical colloidal particles confined between the microgels that subsequently reswell. The swelling and deswelling of the microgels change the rheological properties of the composites, providing a unique way to tune the elasticity of the composites with temperature. The structure of the composites above the LCST is studied using multiple light scattering and fluorescence confocal microscopy. The phase separation of PNIPAm above the LCST is strongly affected by the confinement of the PNIPAm chains between the microgels.

  1. Braided Composite Technologies for Rotorcraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessie, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    A&P Technology has developed a braided material approach for fabricating lightweight, high-strength hybrid gears for aerospace drive systems. The conventional metallic web was replaced with a composite element made from A&P's quasi-isotropic braid. The 0deg, +/-60deg braid architecture was chosen so that inplane stiffness properties and strength would be nearly equal in all directions. The test results from the Phase I Small Spur Gear program demonstrated satisfactory endurance and strength while providing a 20 percent weight savings. (Greater weight savings is anticipated with structural optimization.) The hybrid gears were subjected to a proof-of-concept test of 1 billion cycles in a gearbox at 10,000 revolutions per minute and 490 in-lb torque with no detectable damage to the gears. After this test the maximum torque capability was also tested, and the static strength capability of the gears was 7x the maximum operating condition. Additional proof-of-concept tests are in progress using a higher oil temperature, and a loss-of-oil test is planned. The success of Phase I led to a Phase II program to develop, fabricate, and optimize full-scale gears, specifically Bull Gears. The design of these Bull Gears will be refined using topology optimization, and the full-scale Bull Gears will be tested in a full-scale gear rig. The testing will quantify benefits of weight savings, as well as noise and vibration reduction. The expectation is that vibration and noise will be reduced through the introduction of composite material in the vibration transmission path between the contacting gear teeth and the shaft-and-bearing system.

  2. Braided Composite Technologies for Rotorcraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessie, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    A&P Technology has developed a braided material approach for fabricating lightweight, high-strength hybrid gears for aerospace drive systems. The conventional metallic web was replaced with a composite element made from A&P's quasi-isotropic braid. The 0deg, plus or minus 60 deg braid architecture was chosen so that inplane stiffness properties and strength would be nearly equal in all directions. The test results from the Phase I Small Spur Gear program demonstrated satisfactory endurance and strength while providing a 20 percent weight savings. (Greater weight savings is anticipated with structural optimization.) The hybrid gears were subjected to a proof-of-concept test of 1 billion cycles in a gearbox at 10,000 revolutions per minute and 490 in-lb torque with no detectable damage to the gears. After this test the maximum torque capability was also tested, and the static strength capability of the gears was 7x the maximum operating condition. Additional proof-of-concept tests are in progress using a higher oil temperature, and a loss-of-oil test is planned. The success of Phase I led to a Phase II program to develop, fabricate, and optimize full-scale gears, specifically Bull Gears. The design of these Bull Gears will be refined using topology optimization, and the full-scale Bull Gears will be tested in a full-scale gear rig. The testing will quantify benefits of weight savings, as well as noise and vibration reduction. The expectation is that vibration and noise will be reduced through the introduction of composite material in the vibration transmission path between the contacting gear teeth and the shaft-and-bearing system.

  3. Development of Damped Metal Matrix Composites for Advanced Structural Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    DTIP FiLE COPY Applied Research Laboratory (Dto 00 CD Technical Report NO DEVELOPMENT OF DAMPED METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES FOR ADVANCED STRUCTURAL...DEVELOPMENT OF DAMPED METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES FOR ADVANCED STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS by Clark A. Updike Ram B. Bhagat Technical Report No. TR 90-004 April 1990... Metal Matrix Composites for Advanced Structural Applications 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) C.A. Updike, R. Bhagat 1 3a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14. DATE

  4. Structural Durability of Damaged Metallic Panel Repaired with Composite Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C.

    1997-01-01

    Structural durability/damage tolerance characteristics of an aluminum tension specimen possessing a short crack and repaired by applying a fiber composite surface patch is investigated via computational simulation. The composite patch is made of graphite/epoxy plies with various layups. An integrated computer code that accounts for all possible failure modes is utilized for the simulation of combined fiber-composite/aluminum structural degradation under loading. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to structural fracture are included in the simulation. Results show the structural degradation stages due to tensile loading and illustrate the use of computational simulation for the investigation of a composite patch repaired cracked metallic panel.

  5. Multi-material Preforming of Structural Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Robert E.; Eberle, Cliff C.; Pastore, Christopher M.; Sudbury, Thomas Z.; Xiong, Fue; Hartman, David

    2015-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites offer significant weight reduction potential, with glass fiber composites already widely adopted. Carbon fiber composites deliver the greatest performance benefits, but their high cost has inhibited widespread adoption. This project demonstrates that hybrid carbon-glass solutions can realize most of the benefits of carbon fiber composites at much lower cost. ORNL and Owens Corning Reinforcements along with program participants at the ORISE collaborated to demonstrate methods for produce hybrid composites along with techniques to predict performance and economic tradeoffs. These predictions were then verified in testing coupons and more complex demonstration articles.

  6. Advanced composites wing study program. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, S. T.; Michaelson, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The effort necessary to achieve a state of production readiness for the design and manufacturing of advanced composite wing structure is outlined. Technical assessment and program options are also reviewed for the wing study results.

  7. Cocured damped layers in composite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rotz, C.A. ); Barrett, D.J. )

    1992-01-01

    A study was made on the feasibility of laminating and cocuring graphite fiber-epoxy prepreg with plies of commercially available damping materials for form beams and hat-stiffened panels. Experiments showed that cocuring did not adversely affect the damping materials and that excellent structural damping properties could be obtained. The construction of the hat-stiffened panels proved that complex parts containing damping materials could be fabricated. Dynamic testing of these components showed that internal architectural features could be designed to promote damping in primary structure.

  8. Smart composite materials for non-invasive structural health monitoring and composites manufacturing process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Gaurav

    Self-sensing composite materials with nanoscale sensor networks can provide feedback about quality evolution during composites manufacturing as well as long-term structural health. Multi-scale composites spanning nano to macro scales involve the interaction between components of varying length scales. An example of such an interaction is the influence of hollow glass microspheres on the electrical conductivity and strain sensitivity of novel carbon nanotube-based syntactic foams. In addition to uniformly dispersed carbon nanotube networks, selective integration of carbon nanotubes has been studied in form of carbon nanotube sheets and carbon nanotube sizing agents. Both techniques enable one-step carbon nanotube integration. Carbon nanotube sheets have been found to be especially useful for prepreg composites. In addition to piezoresistive-based sensing, time domain reflectometry has been studied and the strain response of time domain reflectometry sensors has been modeled and validated. Carbon nanotubes have been found to increase the strain response and damage sensitivity of time domain reflectometry sensors due to breakage of carbon nanotube networks. Two-dimensional deformation mapping and damage sensing has been implemented on composite panels using both piezoresistivity and time domain reflectometry. For the first time, high accuracy cure monitoring has been achieved using non-invasive time domain reflectometry sensors.

  9. Composition, structure and chemistry of interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    1986-01-01

    The observational constraints on the composition of the interstellar dust are analyzed. The dust in the diffuse interstellar medium consists of a mixture of stardust (amorphous silicates, amorphous carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and graphite) and interstellar medium dust (organic refractory material). Stardust seems to dominate in the local diffuse interstellar medium. Inside molecular clouds, however, icy grain mantles are also important. The structural differences between crystalline and amorphous materials, which lead to differences in the optical properties, are discussed. The astrophysical consequences are briefly examined. The physical principles of grain surface chemistry are discussed and applied to the formation of molecular hydrogen and icy grain mantles inside dense molecular clouds. Transformation of these icy grain mantles into the organic refractory dust component observed in the diffuse interstellar medium requires ultraviolet sources inside molecular clouds as well as radical diffusion promoted by transient heating of the mantle. The latter process also returns a considerable fraction of the molecules in the grain mantle to the gas phase.

  10. Advanced Composite Structures At NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Eldred's presentation will discuss several NASA efforts to improve and expand the use of composite structures within aerospace vehicles. Topics will include an overview of NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP), Space Launch System (SLS) applications, and Langley's ISAAC robotic composites research tool.

  11. NDE of composite structures using microwave time reversal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Tamburrino, Antonello; Udpa, Lalita; Udpa, Satish

    2016-02-01

    Composite materials are being increasingly used to replace metals, partially or completely, in aerospace, shipping and automotive industries because of their light weight, corrosion resistance, and mechanical strength. Integrity of these materials may be compromised during manufacturing or due to impact damage during usage, resulting in defects such as porosity, delamination, cracks and disbonds. Microwave NDE techniques have the ability to propagate through composite materials, without suffering much attenuation. The scattered fields depend on the dielectric properties of the medium, and hence provide information about the structural integrity of these materials. Time Reversal focusing is based on the fact that when a wave solution is reversed in time and back propagated it refocuses back at the source. This paper presents a model based parametric study of time reversal principles with microwave data in composite materials. A two dimensional FDTD model is developed to implement the forward and time reversed electromagnetic wave propagation in a test geometry comprising metal-composite structures. Simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach to detect and characterize different defects.

  12. Computational Analysis of Effect of Transient Fluid Force on Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE A 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) This study investigated the peak pressure applied to a composite structure under...element and finite-volume analysis technique. The results showed that the peak pressure and the resultant stresses in the composite structures are...Aerospace Engineering iii iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT This study investigated the peak pressure applied to a composite

  13. Monitoring of Structural Integrity of Composite Structures by Embedded Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osei, Albert J.

    2002-01-01

    advanced structural materials expected to become the mainstay of the current and future generation space structures. Since carbon-epoxy composites are the materials of choice for the current space structures, the initial study is concentrated on this type of composite. The goals of this activity are to use embedded FBG sensors for measuring strain and temperature of composite structures, and to investigate the effects of various parameters such as composite fiber orientation with respect to the optical sensor, unidirectional fiber composite, fabrication process etc., on the optical performance of the sensor. This paper describes an experiment to demonstrate the use of an embedded FBG for measuring strain in a composite material. The performance of the fiber optic sensor is determined by direct comparison with results from more conventional instrumentation.

  14. Fire Response of Geopolymer Structural Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    The fire response of a potassium aluminosilicate matrix ( geopolymer ) carbon fiber composite was measured and the results compared to organic matrix...laminates ignited readily and released appreciable heat and smoke, while carbon-fiber reinforced geopolymer composites did not ignite, burn, or release...any smoke even after extended heat flux exposure. The geopolymer matrix carbon fiber composite retains sixty-three percent of its original 245 MPa flexural strength after a simulated large fire exposure. (MM)

  15. Composite Bus Structure for the SMEX/WIRE Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosanova, Giulio G.

    1998-01-01

    In an effort to reduce the weight and optimize the structural design of the Small Explorer (SMEX) Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) spacecraft, it has become desirable to change the material and construction from mechanically fastened aluminum structure to a fully bonded fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) structure. GSFC has developed the WIRE spacecraft structural bus design concept, including the instrument and launch vehicle requirements. The WIRE Satellite is the fifth of a series of SMEX satellites to be launched once per year. GSFC has chosen Composite Optics Inc. (COI) as the prime contractor for the development and procurement of the WIRE composite structure. The detailed design of the fully bonded FRC structure is based on COI's Short Notice Accelerated Production SATellite ("SNAPSAT") approach. SNAPSAT is a state of the art design and manufacturing technology for advanced composite materials which utilizes flat-stock detail parts bonded together to produce a final structural assembly. The structural design approach adopted for the WIRE structure provides a very viable alternative to both traditional aluminum construction as well as high tech. molded type composite structures. This approach to composite structure design is much less costly than molded or honeycomb sandwich type composite construction, but may cost slightly more than conventional aluminum construction on the subsystem level. However on the overall program level the weight saving achieved is very cost effective, since the primary objective is to allocate more mass for science payloads.

  16. Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites with Multifunctional and Hybrid Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are leading candidate materials for a number of applications in aeronautics, space, energy, and nuclear industries. Potential composite applications differ in their requirements for thickness. For example, many space applications such as "nozzle ramps" or "heat exchangers" require very thin (< 1 mm) structures whereas turbine blades would require very thick parts (> or = 1 cm). Little is known about the effect of thickness on stress-strain behavior or the elevated temperature tensile properties controlled by oxidation diffusion. In this study, composites consisting of woven Hi-Nicalon (trademark) fibers a carbon interphase and CVI SiC matrix were fabricated with different numbers of plies and thicknesses. The effect of thickness on matrix crack formation, matrix crack growth and diffusion kinetics will be discussed. In another approach, hybrid fiber-lay up concepts have been utilized to "alloy" desirable properties of different fiber types for mechanical properties, thermal stress management, and oxidation resistance. Such an approach has potential for the C(sub I)-SiC and SiC(sub f)-SiC composite systems. CVI SiC matrix composites with different stacking sequences of woven C fiber (T300) layers and woven SiC fiber (Hi-Nicalon (trademark)) layers were fabricated. The results will be compared to standard C fiber reinforced CVI SiC matrix and Hi-Nicalon reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites. In addition, shear properties of these composites at different temperatures will also be presented. Other design and implementation issues will be discussed along with advantages and benefits of using these materials for various components in high temperature applications.

  17. Preliminary study on nano- and micro-composite sol-gel based alumina coatings on structural components of lead-bismuth eutectic cooled fast breeder reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Peng; Kasada, Ryuta

    2011-02-01

    In order to protect the structural components of lead-bismuth eutectic cooled fast breeder reactors from liquid metal corrosion, Al 2O 3 nano- and micro-composite coatings were developed using an improved sol-gel process, which includes dipping specimens in a sol-gel solution dispersed with fine α-Al 2O 3 powders prepared by mechanical milling. Accelerated corrosion tests were conducted on coated specimens in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic at 500 °C under dynamic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses revealed that the coatings are composed of α-Al 2O 3 and they are about 10 μm thick. After the corrosion tests, no spallation occurred on the coatings, and neither Pb nor Bi penetrated into the coatings, which indicates that the coatings possess an enhanced dynamic LBE corrosion resistance to lead-bismuth eutectic corrosion. The nano-structured composite particles integrated into the coatings play an important role in achieving such superior lead-bismuth eutectic corrosion resistance.

  18. Composition-dependent structural and electronic properties of Mg(95-x)Zn(x)Ca5 metallic glasses: an ab initio molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Li, S N; Liu, J B; Li, J H; Wang, J; Liu, B X

    2015-02-26

    Recent progress in the synthesis of Mg-based metallic glasses (MGs) has allowed them to be considered as potential candidates for biodegradable and bioabsorbable implant materials. In this work, we use the Mg-Zn-Ca system as a representative to investigate the effect of composition on the atomic-level structure and local chemical environment in Mg-based MGs from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest that the short-range order of Mg(95-x)Zn(x)Ca5 (x = 21, 25, 29, and 33) MGs is characterized by Zn-centered icosahedral and icosahedral-like clusters, which show an increasing number and a rising tendency to interpenetrate each other with the enrichment of Zn constituents. A considerable degree of charge transfer between Zn and the surrounding Mg/Ca atoms is observed through electronic structure and bonding character analysis. At Zn-rich compositions, a percolated Zn-Zn network extended throughout the entire sample is formed, upon which the accumulated charges around Zn atoms are associated into a continuous conductivity path. Such results may shed light on the improved corrosion resistance of the Zn-rich Mg-Zn-Ca MGs.

  19. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, W.; Santos, João.; Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario.

    2015-05-01

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth.

  20. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, W.; Santos, João; Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario

    2015-05-22

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth.

  1. Advanced composite structural concepts and material technologies for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    Structural weight savings using advanced composites have been demonstrated for many years. Most military aircraft today use these materials extensively and Europe has taken the lead in their use in commercial aircraft primary structures. A major inhibiter to the use of advanced composites in the United States is cost. Material costs are high and will remain high relative to aluminum. The key therefore lies in the significant reduction in fabrication and assembly costs. The largest cost in most structures today is assembly. As part of the NASA Advanced Composite Technology Program, Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company has a contract to explore and develop advanced structural and manufacturing concepts using advanced composites for transport aircraft. Wing and fuselage concepts and related trade studies are discussed. These concepts are intended to lower cost and weight through the use of innovative material forms, processes, structural configurations and minimization of parts. The approach to the trade studies and the downselect to the primary wing and fuselage concepts is detailed. The expectations for the development of these concepts is reviewed.

  2. Modeling and characterization of 2-D and 3-D textile structural composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    This dissertation studies the analytical modeling and experimental characterization of various two-dimensional and three-dimensional textile structure composites. In the analytical approach, various theoretical models were established to predict the stiffness, strength, nonlinear deformation, and failure behavior of triaxial woven-fabric composites, 3-D braided composites, and multilayer multidirectional warp knit fabric composites in polymer and metal matrices. The structure performance maps of various textile structural composites were also established, based upon these analytical methods. In the experimental approach, extensive mechanical testing and microstructural characterization were performed to investigate the thermomechanical properties and failure behavior of 3-D braided FP/Al composites. Results of this research will serve as the basis for assessing the potential of textile composites for structural applications.

  3. Probabilistic evaluation of fuselage-type composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology is developed to computationally simulate the uncertain behavior of composite structures. The uncertain behavior includes buckling loads, natural frequencies, displacements, stress/strain etc., which are the consequences of the random variation (scatter) of the primitive (independent random) variables in the constituent, ply, laminate and structural levels. This methodology is implemented in the IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures) computer code. A fuselage-type composite structure is analyzed to demonstrate the code's capability. The probability distribution functions of the buckling loads, natural frequency, displacement, strain and stress are computed. The sensitivity of each primitive (independent random) variable to a given structural response is also identified from the analyses.

  4. Simplified design procedures for fiber composite structural components/joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    Simplified step-by-step design procedures are summarized, which are suitable for the preliminary design of composite structural components such as panels (laminates) and composite built-up structures (box beams). Similar procedures are also summarized for the preliminary design of composite bolted and adhesively bonded joints. The summary is presented in terms of sample design cases complemented with typical results. Guidelines are provided which can be used in the design selection process of composite structural components/joints. Also, procedures to account for cyclic loads, hygrothermal effects and lamination residual stresses are included.

  5. Composite isogrid structures for parabolic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, Edward M. (Inventor); Boyd, Jr., William E. (Inventor); Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor); Dyer, Jack E. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to high stiffness parabolic structures utilizing integral reinforced grids. The parabolic structures implement the use of isogrid structures which incorporate unique and efficient orthotropic patterns for efficient stiffness and structural stability.

  6. Poling of PVDF matrix composites for integrated structural load sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh; Greminger, Michael A.; Zhao, Ping

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to create and evaluate a smart composite structure that can be used for integrated load sensing and structural health monitoring. In this structure, PVDF films are used as the matrix material instead of epoxy resin or other thermoplastics. The reinforcements are two layers of carbon fiber with one layer of Kevlar separating them. Due to the electrical conductivity properties of carbon fiber and the dielectric effect of Kevlar, the structure acts as a capacitor. Furthermore, the piezoelectric properties of the PVDF matrix can be used to monitor the response of the structure under applied loads. In order to exploit the piezoelectric properties of PVDF, the PVDF material must be polarized to align the dipole moments of its crystalline structure. The optimal condition for poling the structure was found by performing a 23 factorial design of experiment (DoE). The factors that were studied in DoE were temperature, voltage, and duration of poling. Finally, the response of the poled structure was monitored by exposing the samples to an applied load.

  7. In situ Barely Visible Impact Damage detection and localization for composite structures using surface mounted and embedded PZT transducers: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziendzikowski, M.; Kurnyta, A.; Dragan, K.; Klysz, S.; Leski, A.

    2016-10-01

    Application of guided waves excited by a network of PZT transducers integrated with a given structure is one of the promising approaches to Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). The performance of a SHM system based on PZT network is rooted in two distinct areas of the technology development, that is the hardware and the signal analysis. The first includes the type of transducers used to built a network and the way of their integration with a monitored structure. For composites, besides the possibility of the transducers attachment to a surface of an element, also embedding of PZTs into their internal structure is available. In the article Barely Visible Impact Damage (BVID) detection capabilities as well as selected physical properties of the embedded and surface mounted PZT transducers are compared in broad frequency range of the excitation. Among the compared parameters are the impedance and capacitance spectra up to 600 kHz. The damage detection capabilities are compared in the range 100-350 kHz. In addition to purely qualitative detection of damages a new algorithm of their localization is proposed and compared between the embedded and surface attached transducers for the frequency optimal to detect BVIDs.

  8. Validation of Design and Analysis Techniques of Tailored Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C. (Technical Monitor); Wijayratne, Dulnath D.

    2004-01-01

    Aeroelasticity is the relationship between the elasticity of an aircraft structure and its aerodynamics. This relationship can cause instabilities such as flutter in a wing. Engineers have long studied aeroelasticity to ensure such instabilities do not become a problem within normal operating conditions. In recent decades structural tailoring has been used to take advantage of aeroelasticity. It is possible to tailor an aircraft structure to respond favorably to multiple different flight regimes such as takeoff, landing, cruise, 2-g pull up, etc. Structures can be designed so that these responses provide an aerodynamic advantage. This research investigates the ability to design and analyze tailored structures made from filamentary composites. Specifically the accuracy of tailored composite analysis must be verified if this design technique is to become feasible. To pursue this idea, a validation experiment has been performed on a small-scale filamentary composite wing box. The box is tailored such that its cover panels induce a global bend-twist coupling under an applied load. Two types of analysis were chosen for the experiment. The first is a closed form analysis based on a theoretical model of a single cell tailored box beam and the second is a finite element analysis. The predicted results are compared with the measured data to validate the analyses. The comparison of results show that the finite element analysis is capable of predicting displacements and strains to within 10% on the small-scale structure. The closed form code is consistently able to predict the wing box bending to 25% of the measured value. This error is expected due to simplifying assumptions in the closed form analysis. Differences between the closed form code representation and the wing box specimen caused large errors in the twist prediction. The closed form analysis prediction of twist has not been validated from this test.

  9. Design considerations for composite fuselage structure of commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. W.; Sakata, I. F.

    1981-01-01

    The structural, manufacturing, and service and environmental considerations that could impact the design of composite fuselage structure for commercial transport aircraft application were explored. The severity of these considerations was assessed and the principal design drivers delineated. Technical issues and potential problem areas which must be resolved before sufficient confidence is established to commit to composite materials were defined. The key issues considered are: definition of composite fuselage design specifications, damage tolerance, and crashworthiness.

  10. Micromechanical models for textile structural composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrey, Ramesh V.; Sankar, Bhavani V.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is to develop micromechanical models for predicting the stiffness and strength properties of textile composite materials. Two models are presented to predict the homogeneous elastic constants and coefficients of thermal expansion of a textile composite. The first model is based on rigorous finite element analysis of the textile composite unit-cell. Periodic boundary conditions are enforced between opposite faces of the unit-cell to simulate deformations accurately. The second model implements the selective averaging method (SAM), which is based on a judicious combination of stiffness and compliance averaging. For thin textile composites, both models can predict the plate stiffness coefficients and plate thermal coefficients. The finite element procedure is extended to compute the thermal residual microstresses, and to estimate the initial failure envelope for textile composites.

  11. The Uses of Toulmin in Composition Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bizup, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the various uses to which Stephen Toulmin has been put in composition studies. It presents data on citations of Toulmin in nine journals, considers appeals to Toulmin in several strains of composition scholarship, and argues that composition scholars ought to attend more carefully to Toulmin's later works. (Contains 4 tables…

  12. Progressive fracture of polymer matrix composite structures: A new approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Minnetyan, L.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness parameters has been developed and is described for the computational simulation of progressive fracture of polymer matrix composite structures. The damage stages are quantified based on physics via composite mechanics while the degradation of the structural behavior is quantified via the finite element method. The approach account for all types of composite behavior, structures, load conditions, and fracture processes starting from damage initiation, to unstable propagation and to global structural collapse. Results of structural fracture in composite beams, panels, plates, and shells are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of this new approach. Parameters and guidelines are identified which can be used as criteria for structural fracture, inspection intervals, and retirement for cause. Generalization to structures made of monolithic metallic materials are outlined and lessons learned in undertaking the development of new approaches, in general, are summarized.

  13. Interaction of guided waves with delaminations in composite plate structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Saurabh; Yu, Xudong; Fan, Zheng; Rajagopal, Prabhu

    2017-02-01

    This paper addresses a gap in the literature on the 3-dimensional scattering of the fundamental symmetric Lamb mode S0 from delimitations in composite plates. We study the scattering of low-frequency S0 Lamb mode from a delamination in a stiffened 4-ply CFRP composite plate with [0/0]S ply orientation. Far field scattering coefficients for the S0 Lamb mode are plotted as a function of circumferential position around the delamination using 3D FE simulations. Results show that the delamination size has less influence on S0 Lamb wave scattering in the low-frequency regime where the S0 mode is non-dispersive. Further analysis was done using two-dimensional FE simulation for different ply-layup orientations with S0 Lamb mode. This study shows that ply-layup orientation and through-thickness delamination location in fiber composite laminate have a significant influence on S0 Lamb mode interaction. We also analyzed the interaction of A0 Lamb mode for a few cases. This work will be useful for practical Lamb wave based inspection of composite plate structures.

  14. The effects of embedded piezoelectric fiber composite sensors on the structural integrity of glass-fiber-epoxy composite laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konka, Hari P.; Wahab, M. A.; Lian, K.

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric fiber composite sensors (PFCSs) made from micro-sized lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers have many advantages over the traditional bulk PZT sensors for embedded sensor applications. PFCSs as embedded sensors will be an ideal choice to continuously monitor the stress/strain levels and health conditions of composite structures. PFCSs are highly flexible, easily embeddable, have high compatibility with composite structures, and also provides manufacturing flexibility. This research is focused on examining the effects of embedding PFCS sensors (macro-fiber composite (MFC) and piezoelectric fiber composite (PFC)) on the structural integrity of glass-fiber-epoxy composite laminates. The strengths of composite materials with embedded PFCSs and conventional PZT sensors were compared, and the advantages of PFCS sensors over PZTs were demonstrated. Initially a numerical simulation study is performed to understand the local stress/strain field near the embedded sensor region inside a composite specimen. High stress concentration regions were observed near the embedded sensor corner edge. Using PFCS leads to a reduction of 56% in longitudinal stress concentration and 38% in transverse stress concentration, when compared to using the conventional PZTs as embedded sensors. In-plane tensile, in-plane tension-tension fatigue, and short beam strength tests are performed to evaluate the strengths/behavior of the composite specimens containing embedded PFCS. From the tensile test it is observed that embedding PFCS and PZT sensors in the composite structures leads to a reduction in ultimate strength by 3 and 6% respectively. From the fatigue test results it is concluded that both embedded PFCS and PZT sensors do not have a significant effect on the fatigue behavior of the composite specimens. From the short beam strength test it is found that embedding PFCS and PZT sensors leads to a reduction in shear strength by 7 and 15% respectively. Overall the pure PZT sensors

  15. Damage Assessment of Composite Structures Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminero, M. A.; Lopez-Pedrosa, M.; Pinna, C.; Soutis, C.

    2014-02-01

    The steady increase of Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Structures in modern aircraft will reach a new dimension with the entry into service of the Boeing 787 and Airbus 350. Replacement of damaged parts will not be a preferable solution due to the high level of integration and the large size of the components involved. Consequently the need to develop repair techniques and processes for composite components is readily apparent. Bonded patch repair technologies provide an alternative to mechanically fastened repairs with significantly higher performance, especially for relatively thin skins. Carefully designed adhesively bonded patches can lead to cost effective and highly efficient repairs in comparison with conventional riveted patch repairs that cut fibers and introduce highly strained regions. In this work, the assessment of the damage process taking place in notched (open-hole) specimens under uniaxial tensile loading was studied. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Digital Image Correlation (DIC) techniques were employed to obtain full-field surface strain measurements in carbon-fiber/epoxy T700/M21 composite plates with different stacking sequences in the presence of an open circular hole. Penetrant enhanced X-ray radiographs were taken to identify damage location and extent after loading around the hole. DIC strain fields were compared to finite element predictions. In addition, DIC techniques were used to characterise damage and performance of adhesively bonded patch repairs in composite panels under tensile loading. This part of work relates to strength/stiffness restoration of damaged composite aircraft that becomes more important as composites are used more extensively in the construction of modern jet airliners. The behaviour of bonded patches under loading was monitored using DIC full-field strain measurements. Location and extent of damage identified by X-ray radiography correlates well with DIC strain results giving confidence to

  16. Experimental verification of tapping sound analysis for the inspection of laminated composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Joon S.; Kim, Seung J.

    2002-06-01

    In this paper, an experimental study was performed to investigate the possibility of a new NDE system - Tapping Sound Analysis (TSA). The tapping sound and contact force of healthy laminated composite structure and defective laminated composite structure were measured using tapping device. The feature extraction method based on the wavelet packet transform was used to extract features from the tapping sound. Comparing the feature of the tapping sound of healthy structure and defective structure, a feature index could be derived, which indicates the existence of defect inside the laminated composite structure. Using the feature index, the difference between the tapping sound data of the present specimens could be expressed as a single value.

  17. Fiber Reinforced Composites for Insulation and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broughton, Roy M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The work involves two areas: Composites, optimum fiber placement with initial construction of a pressure vessel, and the general subject of insulation, a continual concern in harsh thermal environments. Insulation

  18. Development of Biobased Composites of Structural Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher Alan

    Highly biobased composites with properties and costs rivaling those consisting of synthetic constituents are a goal of much current research. The obvious material choices, vegetable oil based resins and natural fibers, present the challenges of poor resin properties and weak fiber/matrix bonding, respectively. Conventional methods of overcoming poor resin quality involve the incorporation of additives, which dilutes the resulting composite's bio-content and increases cost. To overcome these limitations while maintaining high bio-content and low cost, epoxidized sucrose soyate is combined with surface-treated flax fiber to produce biocomposites. These composites are fabricated using methods emphasizing scalability and efficiency, for cost effectiveness of the final product. This approach resulted in the successful production of biocomposites having properties that meet or exceed those of conventional pultruded members. These properties, such as tensile and flexural strengths of 223 and 253 MPa, respectively, were achieved by composites having around 85% bio-content.

  19. Structural Composites Corrosive Management by Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2006-01-01

    A simulation of corrosive management on polymer composites durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured Ph factor and is represented by voids, temperature, and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure, and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply managed degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  20. High-resolution solid-state NMR study of the effect of composition on network connectivity and structural disorder in multi-component glasses in the diopside and jadeite join: Implications for structure of andesitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sun Young; Lee, Sung Keun

    2014-12-01

    The structural evolution of andesitic melts with varying compositions remains one of the unsolved questions in high-temperature geochemistry and petrology. In this article, we report the structural details of model andesitic glasses [CaO-MgO-Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMNAS)] in the diopside (CaMgSi2O6) and jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) join using high-resolution, multi-nuclear, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The 27Al NMR spectra of CMNAS glasses confirm that [4]Al is dominant. While a minor fraction of [5]Al is observed, its presence is only prevalent in the glasses with higher Ca-Mg content. Topological disorder in the glass network also tends to increase with Ca-Mg content as evidenced by the increase in the quadrupolar coupling constant (Cq) of [4]Al for glasses with increasing diopside contents (XDiopside). Despite the complex nature of the glasses studied here (with five oxide components), the 17O 3QMAS NMR spectra resolve diverse bridging oxygens (BOs) and non-bridging oxygens (NBOs), from which the degree of Al avoidance among framework cations (Si and Al) and preferential proximity among non-network cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) and each oxygen site can be estimated: presence of Al-O-Al in jadeite glass implies a violation of the Al-avoidance rule in the glasses and the decrease in the fraction of NBOs with increasing XDiopside is consistent with a decrease in their viscosity. Analysis of the peak position of {Ca, Mg}-mixed NBOs, along with the absence of Na-NBO peak, and the peak shape of Si-O-Al reveals preferential partitioning of Ca2+ and Mg2 into NBOs and the proximity of Na+ to BOs. The fraction of highly coordinated Al has been linked to thermodynamic and transport properties of the melts. Considering all the experimental Al coordination environments available in the literature, together with the current experimental studies, we attempt to establish the relationship between the fractions of highly coordinated Al and composition, particularly average

  1. Structure-performance maps of polymeric, metal, and ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tsu-Wei; Yang, Jenn-Ming

    1986-09-01

    This paper presents the results of extensive analytical studies of the thermo-elastic properties of unidirectional laminated composites, as well as two-dimensional and three-dimensional textile structural composites with polymeric, metal, and ceramic matrices. Some comparisons of the theoretical predictions with experimental data have been made. By the construction of the structure-performance maps, the effective composite properties based upon various reinforcement forms and fiber and matrix combinations can be easily assessed. The uniqueness of various textile structural reinforcements also has been demonstrated. These comprehensive performance maps can provide the data base necessary for material selections and guidance for future investigations of advanced composites.

  2. Evaluation of Advanced Composite Structures Technologies for Application to NASA's Vision for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.

    2008-01-01

    AS&M performed a broad assessment survey and study to establish the potential composite materials and structures applications and benefits to the Constellation Program Elements. Trade studies were performed on selected elements to determine the potential weight or performance payoff from use of composites. Weight predictions were made for liquid hydrogen and oxygen tanks, interstage cylindrical shell, lunar surface access module, ascent module liquid methane tank, and lunar surface manipulator. A key part of this study was the evaluation of 88 different composite technologies to establish their criticality to applications for the Constellation Program. The overall outcome of this study shows that composites are viable structural materials which offer from 20% to 40% weight savings for many of the structural components that make up the Major Elements of the Constellation Program. NASA investment in advancing composite technologies for space structural applications is an investment in America's Space Exploration Program.

  3. Nepheline structural and chemical dependence on melt composition

    SciTech Connect

    Marcial, José; Crum, Jarrod; Neill, Owen; McCloy, John

    2016-02-01

    Nepheline crystallizes upon slow-cooling in some melts concentrated in Na2O and Al2O3, which can result in a residual glass phase of low chemical durability. Nepheline can incorporate many components often found in high-level waste radioactive borosilicate glass, including glass network ions (e.g., Si, Al, Fe), alkali metals (e.g., Cs, K, Na, and possibly Li), alkaline-earth metals (e.g., Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg), and transition metals (e.g., Mn, and possibly Cr, Zn, Ni). When crystallized from melts of different compositions, nepheline chemistry varies as a function of starting glass composition. Five simulated high level nuclear waste borosilicate glasses shown to crystallize large fractions of nepheline on slow cooling, were selected for study. These melts constituted a range of Al2O3, B2O3, CaO, Na2O, K2O, Fe2O3, and SiO2 compositions. Compositional analyses of nepheline crystals in glass by electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) indicate that boron is unlikely to be present in any significant concentration, if at all, in nepheline. Also, several models are presented for calculating the fraction of vacancies in the nepheline structure.

  4. Food Composition Database Format and Structure: A User Focused Approach

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, Annabel K.; Woods, Kaitlyn; McMahon, Anne; Probst, Yasmine

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the needs of Australian food composition database user’s regarding database format and relate this to the format of databases available globally. Three semi structured synchronous online focus groups (M = 3, F = 11) and n = 6 female key informant interviews were recorded. Beliefs surrounding the use, training, understanding, benefits and limitations of food composition data and databases were explored. Verbatim transcriptions underwent preliminary coding followed by thematic analysis with NVivo qualitative analysis software to extract the final themes. Schematic analysis was applied to the final themes related to database format. Desktop analysis also examined the format of six key globally available databases. 24 dominant themes were established, of which five related to format; database use, food classification, framework, accessibility and availability, and data derivation. Desktop analysis revealed that food classification systems varied considerably between databases. Microsoft Excel was a common file format used in all databases, and available software varied between countries. User’s also recognised that food composition databases format should ideally be designed specifically for the intended use, have a user-friendly food classification system, incorporate accurate data with clear explanation of data derivation and feature user input. However, such databases are limited by data availability and resources. Further exploration of data sharing options should be considered. Furthermore, user’s understanding of food composition data and databases limitations is inherent to the correct application of non-specific databases. Therefore, further exploration of user FCDB training should also be considered. PMID:26554836

  5. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  6. Integrated mechanics for the passive damping of polymer-matrix composites and composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    Some recent developments on integrated damping mechanics for unidirectional composites, laminates, and composite structures are reviewed. Simplified damping micromechanics relate the damping of on-axis and off-axis composites to constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, fiber orientation, temperature, and moisture. Laminate and structural damping mechanics for thin composites are summarized. Discrete layer damping mechanics for thick laminates, including the effects of interlaminar shear damping, are developed and semianalytical predictions of modal damping in thick simply supported specialty composite plates are presented. Applications show the advantages of the unified mechanics, and illustrate the effect of fiber volume ratio, fiber orientation, structural geometry, and temperature on the damping. Additional damping properties for composite plates of various laminations, aspect ratios, fiber content, and temperature illustrate the merits and ranges of applicability of each theory (thin or thick laminates).

  7. Impact damage resistance of composite fuselage structure, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dost, E. F.; Avery, W. B.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Grande, D. H.; Coxon, B. R.

    1992-01-01

    The impact damage resistance of laminated composite transport aircraft fuselage structures was studied experimentally. A statistically based designed experiment was used to examine numerous material, laminate, structural, and extrinsic (e.g., impactor type) variables. The relative importance and quantitative measure of the effect of each variable and variable interactions on responses including impactor dynamic response, visibility, and internal damage state were determined. The study utilized 32 three-stiffener panels, each with a unique combination of material type, material forms, and structural geometry. Two manufacturing techniques, tow placement and tape lamination, were used to build panels representative of potential fuselage crown, keel, and lower side-panel designs. Various combinations of impactor variables representing various foreign-object-impact threats to the aircraft were examined. Impacts performed at different structural locations within each panel (e.g., skin midbay, stiffener attaching flange, etc.) were considered separate parallel experiments. The relationship between input variables, measured damage states, and structural response to this damage are presented including recommendations for materials and impact test methods for fuselage structure.

  8. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  9. First-principles study of structure, initial lattice expansion, and pressure-composition-temperature hysteresis for substituted LaNi5 and TiMn2 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, D. F.; Young, K.; Ng, K. Y. S.

    2016-12-01

    The c/a unit-cell aspect ratios of CaCu5-structured AB5 and C14 Laves phase AB2 metal hydride alloy families are generally correlated to pressure-concentration-temperature hysteresis and degree of alloy pulverization. Structures of substituted LaNi4 X and C14 Ti4Mn7 X compositions and their hydrides in the α-phase were calculated by first principles using density functional theory to look at the c/a ratio and its relationship to initial lattice expansion. Lattice expansion with respect to the lattice parameters and lattice volume in the α-phase hydrides were analyzed, and a general trend in lattice expansion in the direction of higher resistance to elastic deformation was observed to correlate well to the trends in hysteresis measured in AB5 and C14 AB2 type alloys. Lattice expansion is noted to induce microstrains within the crystal lattice, and the anisotropy in the LaNi4 X and Ti4Mn7 X alloys played a role in determining the direction of higher resistance to deformation. Lattice expansions both measured and calculated have been linked to capacity degradation measurements as well as to hysteresis (a measure of irreversible energy losses due to lattice plastic deformation), which may be related to the dislocations and defects formed during hydrogenation.

  10. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Studies of Electrospun Poly(dimethylsiloxane)/Poly (methyl methacrylate)/Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Composites

    PubMed Central

    Winter, A. Douglas; Larios, Eduardo; Alamgir, Faisal M.; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel; Campo, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the near conduction band edge structure of electrospun mats of MWCNT-PDMS-PMMA by near edge X-Ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Effects of adding nanofillers of different sizes were addressed. Despite observed morphological variations and inhomogeneous carbon nanotube distribution, spun mats appeared homogeneous under NEXAFS analysis. Spectra revealed differences in emissions from glancing and normal spectra; which may evidence phase separation within the bulk of the micron-size fibers. Further, dichroic ratios show polymer chains did not align, even in the presence of nanofillers. Addition of nanofillers affected emissions in the C-H, C=O and C-C regimes, suggesting their involvement in interfacial matrix-carbon nanotube bonding. Spectral differences at glancing angles between pristine and composite mats suggest that geometric conformational configurations are taking place between polymeric chains and carbon nanotubes. These differences appear to be carbon nanotube-dimension dependent, and are promoted upon room temperature mixing and shear flow during electrospinning. CH-π bonding between polymer chains and graphitic walls, as well as H-bonds between impurities in the as-grown CNTs and polymer pendant groups are proposed bonding mechanisms promoting matrix conformation. PMID:24308286

  11. Structural design criteria for filament-wound composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Jensen, D. W.; Claus, S. J.; Pai, S. P.; Hipp, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced composite cylinders, manufactured by filament winding, provide a cost effective solution to many present structural applications; however, the compressive performance of filament-wound cylinders is lower than comparable shells fabricated from unidirectional tape. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of this reduction in thin filament-wound cylinders by relating the manufacturing procedures to the quality of the cylinder and to its compressive performance. The experiments on cylinder buckling were complemented by eigenvalue buckling analysis using a detailed geometric model in a finite element analysis. The applicability of classical buckling analyses was also investigated as a design tool.

  12. Advanced ultrasonic testing of complex shaped composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolmatov, D.; Zhvyrblya, V.; Filippov, G.; Salchak, Y.; Sedanova, E.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the wide application of composite materials it is necessary to develop unconventional quality control techniques. One of the methods that can be used for this purpose is ultrasonic tomography. In this article an application of a robotic ultrasonic system is considered. Precise positioning of the robotic scanner and path generating are defined as ones of the most important aspects. This study proposes a non-contact calibration method of a robotic ultrasonic system. Path of the scanner requires a 3D model of controlled objects which are created in accordance with the proposed algorithm. The suggested techniques are based on implementation of structured light method.

  13. Flight service environmental effects on composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson; Baker, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Langley and the U.S. Army have jointly sponsored programs to assess the effects of realistic flight environments and ground-based exposure on advanced composite materials and structures. Composite secondary structural components were initially installed on commercial transport aircraft in 1973; secondary and primary structural components were installed on commercial helicopters in 1979; and primary structural components were installed on commercial aircraft in the mid-to-late 1980's. Service performance, maintenance characteristics, and residual strength of numerous components are reported. In addition to data on flight components, 10 year ground exposure test results on material coupons are reported. Comparison between ground and flight environmental effects for several composite material systems are also presented. Test results indicate excellent in-service performance with the composite components during the 15 year period. Good correlation between ground-based material performance and operational structural performance has been achieved.

  14. Design and Processing of Structural Composite Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    The woven fabric, e is 72wt% LiFePO4 , 8wt% acetylene lack, and 20wt% poly(ethylene oxide) 200k as a binder. Acetylene black ensures electrical will...2.1.3 Cathode The composite cathode material utilizes LiFePO4 chemistry. The composition of the cathode material film deposited onto the metal substrat... LiFePO4 chemistry (over a 2.8-4.0V range (8)) including stainless steel and titanium. Stainless steel was evaluated in this udy due to its high

  15. Repositioning Emotions in Composition Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Kia Jane

    2002-01-01

    Proposes that emotions should be regarded as important components of learning. Focuses on recent trends in composition relating to how the emotions have or have not been included in discussions emphasizing writing instruction. Suggests opportunities for further research that give attention to emotion. (PM)

  16. A Review of Crashworthiness of Composite Aircraft Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    CRASHWORTHINESS OF COMPOSITE AIRCRAFT STRUCTURES ETUDE SUR LA RESISTANCE A L’ECRASEMENT DES STRUCTURES D’AERONEF EN MATERIAUX COMPOSITES by/par C. Poon...menses en Am~rique du Nord sur la resistance A l16crasement des structures d’a~ronef en materiaux composites a 06 effectude dans le but d’identifier les...dimension des a~ro-efs sur les exigences de conception relatives A la resistance A l-cras( , e ,_: l’implantation du code KRASH au Canada pour uniformiser

  17. Advanced organic composite materials for aircraft structures: Future program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Revolutionary advances in structural materials have been responsible for revolutionary changes in all fields of engineering. These advances have had and are still having a significant impact on aircraft design and performance. Composites are engineered materials. Their properties are tailored through the use of a mix or blend of different constituents to maximize selected properties of strength and/or stiffness at reduced weights. More than 20 years have passed since the potentials of filamentary composite materials were identified. During the 1970s much lower cost carbon filaments became a reality and gradually designers turned from boron to carbon composites. Despite progress in this field, filamentary composites still have significant unfulfilled potential for increasing aircraft productivity; the rendering of advanced organic composite materials into production aircraft structures was disappointingly slow. Why this is and research and technology development actions that will assist in accelerating the application of advanced organic composites to production aircraft is discussed.

  18. Damage progression in mechanically fastened composite structural joints

    SciTech Connect

    Minnetyan, L.; Chamis, C.C.; Murthy, P.L.N.

    1994-12-31

    Progressive damage and fracture of a bolted graphite/epoxy composite laminate is evaluated via computational simulation. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate a new methodology that scales up constituent material properties, stress and strain limits to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for mechanically fastened composite structures. An integrated computer code is used for the simulation of structural degradation under loading. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in the simulation. Results show the damage progression sequence and structural fracture resistance during different degradation stages. The effect of fastener spacing is investigated with regard to the structural durability of a bolted joint.

  19. Composite Grids for Reinforcement of Concrete Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    composites has been the subject of investigation for a long time (Glaster et al. 1983, 1984; Budelman & Rostasy 1993). Tunik and Tomashevskii (1974...on Experimental Mechanics, Boston MA, pp 329-335. Budelman, H., and Rostasy , F.S., (1993). "Creep Rupture Behavior of FRP Elements for Prestressed

  20. Multifunctional Composite Nanofibers for Smart Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-13

    demonstration 4.1 Nanofiber based supercapacitor, Lithium Ion battery and transparent electrodes for solar cell (student – Nicole Lee; collaborator...compensating power deficiencies of batteries or fuel cells in hybrid vehicles. Reducing their cost and increasing energy density are major...challenge for enabling next generation solar cell devices. High performance fibrous composite materials based on a carrier polymer with embedded functional

  1. Nano-structured polymer composites and process for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Hillmyer, Marc; Chen, Liang

    2013-04-16

    A process for preparing a polymer composite that includes reacting (a) a multi-functional monomer and (b) a block copolymer comprising (i) a first block and (ii) a second block that includes a functional group capable of reacting with the multi-functional monomer, to form a crosslinked, nano-structured, bi-continuous composite. The composite includes a continuous matrix phase and a second continuous phase comprising the first block of the block copolymer.

  2. Stiff, Strong Splice For A Composite Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmaling, D.

    1991-01-01

    New type of splice for composite sandwich structure reduces peak shear stress in structure. Layers of alternating fiber orientation interposed between thin ears in adhesive joint. Developed for structural joint in spar of helicopter rotor blade, increases precision of control over thickness of adhesive at joint. Joint easy to make, requires no additional pieces, and adds little weight.

  3. Mechanical and structural property analysis of bacterial cellulose composites.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Manmeet Singh; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-25

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) exhibits unique properties including high mechanical strength and high crystallinity. Improvement in the mechanical properties of BC is sought for many applications ranging from food to structural composites to biomedical materials. In this study, different additives including carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), pectin, gelatin, cornstarch, and corn steep liquor were included in the fermentation media to alter the BC produced. Three different concentrations (1%, 3% and 5%) were chosen for each of the additives, with no additive (0%) as the control. The produced BC was then analyzed to determine tensile and compression modulus. Amongst the tested additives, BC produced in media containing 3% (w/v) pectin had the maximum compressive modulus (142kPa), and BC produced in media containing 1% (w/v) gelatin exhibited the maximum tensile modulus (21MPa). Structural characteristics of BC and BC-additive composites were compared using X-Ray diffraction (XRD). The crystal size and crystallinity of BC was reduced when grown in the presence of CMC and gelatin while pectin only decreased the crystallite size. This suggested that CMC and gelatin may be incorporated into the BC fibril structure. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images showed the increased micro-fibril aggregation in BC pellicles grown in the presence of additives to the culture media.

  4. Progressive failure analysis of fibrous composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahei-El-din, Yehia A.

    1990-01-01

    A brief description is given of the modifications implemented in the PAFAC finite element program for the simulation of progressive failure in fibrous composite materials and structures. Details of the memory allocation, input data, and the new subroutines are given. Also, built-in failure criteria for homogeneous and fibrous composite materials are described.

  5. Affordable, Lightweight, Highly Conductive Polymer Composite Electronic Packaging Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-01

    matrix composite materials and how various material designs can be utilized in various structural/thermal configurations to produce electronic housings and...conductive polymer composite electronic packaging (i.e., electronic housings and heat sinks). The research will center on predominately polymer

  6. Damage accumulation in closed cross-section, laminated, composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucinell, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    . Space structures typically have closed cross-sections, absent of free edges. As a result, composite material characterization data generated using finite width flat specimens does not accurately reflect the performance of the composite materials used in a closed cross-section structural configuration. Several investigators have recognized the need to develop characterization techniques for composite materials in closed cross-sectioned structures. In these investigations test methods were developed and cylindrical specimens were evaluated. The behavior of the cylindrical specimens were observed to depart from behavior typical of flat coupons. However, no attempts were made to identify and monitor the progression of damage in these cylindrical specimens during loading. The identification and monitoring of damage is fundamental to the characterization of composite materials in closed cross-section configurations. In the study reported here, a closed cross-sectioned test method was developed to monitor damage progression in 2 in. diameter cylindrical specimens and 1.5 in. finite width flat coupons subjected to quasi-static, tensile loading conditions. Damage in these specimen configurations was monitored using pulse echo ultrasonic, acoustic emission, and X-ray techniques.

  7. Optical and Structural Properties of Thin Film Composites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Ursula Jane

    This work describes the optical and structural characterization of metal-insulator and bimetallic composite films. Included are experimental details, theoretical descriptions of these systems, and a correlation of the optical response and microstructure of these thin film systems. The films were made by simultaneous or sequential evaporation of the constituents onto either amorphous or single crystal substrates. Two reflectance and one transmittance measurements were combined and inverted to determine the intrinsic optical constants of these materials over the wavelength range 0.2 to 3.0 microns. The metal insulator systems studied were Au-Al(,2)O(,3) and Au-MgO. The optical behavior and transport properties of these materials were measured, and correlated with their disparate microstructures. The optical behavior was compared to the predictions of three effective medium theories, labelled as the Maxwell-Garnett, Bruggeman Self-Consistent and Probabilistic Growth theories. The differing topological assumptions which form the bases of these theories were correlated with microscopic examination of the morphologies of the films, and it was found that the simple theories adequately predicted the optical response of the composites. Bimetallic systems were also studied, to investigate the extension of the Bruggeman theory to symmetric composites of immiscible metal constituents. It was found that the theory adequately predicts the behavior of films which display the symmetric morphology assumed by the theory. Studies of non-symmetric composites, and anisotropic systems (such as epitaxial layered materials (ELMs), showed that the symmetric morphology is necessary in order to model these systems with the Bruggeman theory.

  8. Embedded Sensor Array Development for Composite Structure Integrity Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Bryan, W. L.; Clonts, L. G.; Franks, S.

    2007-06-26

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the "Contractor") and Accellent Technologies, Inc. (the "Participant") was for the development of an embedded ultrasonic sensor system for composite structure integrity monitoring.

  9. Failure Analysis and Mechanisms of Failure of Fibrous Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K. (Compiler); Shuart, M. J. (Compiler); Starnes, J. H., Jr. (Compiler); Williams, J. G. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art of failure analysis and current design practices, especially as applied to the use of fibrous composite materials in aircraft structures is discussed. Deficiencies in these technologies are identified, as are directions for future research.

  10. Teaching Writing: The Underlying Structure of Composition Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Jeanne W.

    This paper identifies and describes the five components that underlie the structure of any advanced composition course: audience, purpose, voice, organization, and polish. Each component is illustrated with examples from technical writing, business writing, journalism, and academic writing. (FL)

  11. Synthesis and structural characterization of polyaniline/cobalt chloride composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asha, Goyal, Sneh Lata; Kishore, Nawal

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) and PANI /cobalt chloride composites were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline with CoCl2.6H2O using ammonium peroxidisulphate as an oxidant. These composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD study reveals that both PANI and composites are amorphous. The XRD and SEM results confirm the presence of cobalt chloride in the composites.

  12. Health Monitoring System for Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, S. S.; Riccardella, P. C.; Andrews, R. J.; Grady, J. E.; Mucciaradi, A. N.

    1996-01-01

    An automated system was developed to monitor the health status of composites. It uses the vibration characteristics of composites to identify a component's damage condition. The vibration responses are characterized by a set of signal features defined in the time, frequency and spatial domains. The identification of these changes in the vibration characteristics corresponding to different health conditions was performed using pattern recognition principles. This allows efficient data reduction and interpretation of vast amounts of information. Test components were manufactured from isogrid panels to evaluate performance of the monitoring system. The components were damaged by impact to simulate different health conditions. Free vibration response was induced by a tap test on the test components. The monitoring system was trained using these free vibration responses to identify three different health conditions. They are undamaged vs. damaged, damage location and damage zone size. High reliability in identifying the correct component health condition was achieved by the monitoring system.

  13. Fatigue Prediction for Composite Materials and Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    Eugenio OÑATE CIMNE (International Center for Numerical Methods in Engineering) Building C-1, Campus Nord UPC -C/ Gran Capitán s/n 08034 Barcelona...SPAIN * salomon@cimne.upc.edu ABSTRACT The objective of this paper is to present a new computational methodology for predicting the durability of... methodology is validated using experimental data from tests on CFRR composite material samples. 1.0 INTRODUCTION Fatigue is defined as "the process

  14. Composite Structures Damage Tolerance Analysis Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, James B.; Goyal, Vinay K.; Klug, John C.; Rome, Jacob I.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the results of a literature review as part of the development of composite hardware fracture control guidelines funded by NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) under contract NNL04AA09B. The objectives of the overall development tasks are to provide a broad information and database to the designers, analysts, and testing personnel who are engaged in space flight hardware production.

  15. Modeling the structure and composition of nanoparticles by extended X-Ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Yevick, Aaron; Cooper, Chana; Vasic, Relja

    2011-07-19

    Many metal clusters in the 1-nm size range are catalytically active, and their enhanced reactivity is often attributed to their size, structure, morphology, and details of alloying. Synchrotron sources provide a wide range of opportunities for studying catalysis. Among them, extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy is the premier method for investigating structure and composition of nanocatalysts. In this review, we summarize common methods of EXAFS analysis for geometric and compositional characterization of nanoparticles. We discuss several aspects of the experiments and analyses that are critical for reliably modeling EXAFS data. The most important are sample homogeneity, the width of the size and compositional distribution functions, and accounting for multiple-scattering contributions to EXAFS. We focus on the contribution of structural disorder and structural/compositional heterogeneity to the accuracy of three-dimensional modeling.

  16. Unit cell geometry of multiaxial preforms for structural composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Frank; Lei, Charles; Rahman, Anisur; Du, G. W.; Cai, Yun-Jia

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the yarn geometry of multiaxial preforms. The importance of multiaxial preforms for structural composites is well recognized by the industry but, to exploit their full potential, engineering design rules must be established. This study is a step in that direction. In this work the preform geometry for knitted and braided preforms was studied by making a range of well designed samples and studying them by photo microscopy. The structural geometry of the preforms is related to the processing parameters. Based on solid modeling and B-spline methodology a software package is developed. This computer code enables real time structural representations of complex fiber architecture based on the rule of preform manufacturing. The code has the capability of zooming and section plotting. These capabilities provide a powerful means to study the effect of processing variables on the preform geometry. the code also can be extended to an auto mesh generator for downstream structural analysis using finite element method. This report is organized into six sections. In the first section the scope and background of this work is elaborated. In section two the unit cell geometries of braided and multi-axial warp knitted preforms is discussed. The theoretical frame work of yarn path modeling and solid modeling is presented in section three. The thin section microscopy carried out to observe the structural geometry of the preforms is the subject in section four. The structural geometry is related to the processing parameters in section five. Section six documents the implementation of the modeling techniques into the computer code MP-CAD. A user manual for the software is also presented here. The source codes and published papers are listed in the Appendices.

  17. Factors Influencing Progressive Failure Analysis Predictions for Laminated Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Progressive failure material modeling methods used for structural analysis including failure initiation and material degradation are presented. Different failure initiation criteria and material degradation models are described that define progressive failure formulations. These progressive failure formulations are implemented in a user-defined material model for use with a nonlinear finite element analysis tool. The failure initiation criteria include the maximum stress criteria, maximum strain criteria, the Tsai-Wu failure polynomial, and the Hashin criteria. The material degradation model is based on the ply-discounting approach where the local material constitutive coefficients are degraded. Applications and extensions of the progressive failure analysis material model address two-dimensional plate and shell finite elements and three-dimensional solid finite elements. Implementation details are described in the present paper. Parametric studies for laminated composite structures are discussed to illustrate the features of the progressive failure modeling methods that have been implemented and to demonstrate their influence on progressive failure analysis predictions.

  18. Metallic layered composite materials produced by explosion welding: Structure, properties, and structure of the transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'tseva, L. A.; Tyushlyaeva, D. S.; Mal'tseva, T. V.; Pastukhov, M. V.; Lozhkin, N. N.; Inyakin, D. V.; Marshuk, L. A.

    2014-10-01

    The structure, morphology, and microhardness of the transition zone in multilayer metallic composite joints are studied, and the cohesion strength of the plates to be joined, the mechanical properties of the formed composite materials, and fracture surfaces are analyzed. The materials to be joined are plates (0.1-1 mm thick) made of D16 aluminum alloy, high-strength maraging ZI90-VI (03Kh12N9K4M2YuT) steel, BrB2 beryllium bronze, and OT4-1 titanium alloy. Composite materials made of different materials are shown to be produced by explosion welding. The dependence of the interface shape (smooth or wavelike) on the physicomechanical properties of the materials to be joined is found. The formation of a wavelike interface is shown to result in the formation of intense-mixing regions in transition zones. Possible mechanisms of layer adhesion are discussed.

  19. Flight-service evaluation of composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. B.

    1973-01-01

    A review of programs aimed at flight-service evaluation of composite materials in various applications is presented. These flight-service programs are expected to continue for up to 5 years and include selective reinforcement of an airplane center wing box a helicopter tail cone, and composite replacements for commercial aircraft spoilers and fairings. These longtime flight-service programs will help provide the necessary information required by commercial airlines to commit advanced composites to aircraft structures with confidence. Results of these programs will provide information concerning the stability of composite materials when subjected to various flight environments.

  20. Development of stitched/RTM composite primary structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kullerd, Susan M.; Dow, Marvin B.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program is to provide the technology required to gain the full benefit of weight savings and performance offered by composite primary structures. Achieving the goal is dependent on developing composite materials and structures which are damage tolerant and economical to manufacture. Researchers at NASA LaRC and Douglas Aircraft Company are investigating stitching reinforcement combined with resin transfer molding (RTM) to create structures meeting the ACT program goals. The Douglas work is being performed under a NASA contract entitled Innovative Composites Aircraft Primary Structures (ICAPS). The research is aimed at materials, processes and structural concepts for application in both transport wings and fuselages. Empirical guidelines are being established for stitching reinforcement in primary structures. New data are presented in this paper for evaluation tests of thick (90-ply) and thin (16-ply) stitched laminates, and from selection tests of RTM composite resins. Tension strength, compression strength and post-impact compression strength data are reported. Elements of a NASA LaRC program to expand the science base for stitched/RTM composites are discussed.

  1. Composite-flywheel burst-containment study

    SciTech Connect

    Sapowith, A D; Handy, W E

    1982-04-08

    A key component impacting total flywheel energy storage system weight is the containment structure. This report addresses the factors that shape this structure and define its design criteria. In addition, containment weight estimates are made for the several composite flywheel designs of interest so that judgements can be made as to the relative weights of their containment structure. The requirements set down for this program were that all containment weight estimates be based on a 1 kWh burst. It should be noted that typical flywheel requirements for regenerative braking of small automobiles call for deliverable energies of 0.25 kWh. This leads to expected maximum burst energies of 0.5 kWh. The flywheels studied are those considered most likely to be carried further for operational design. These area: The pseudo isotropic disk flywheel, sometimes called the alpha ply; the SMC molded disk; either disk with a carbon ring; the subcircular rim with cruciform hub; and Avco's bi-directional circular weave disk. The flywheel materials for the disk are S-glass; the subcircular rim is Kevlar over S-glass. Test data on flywheel bursts and containment failures were analyzed. Recommendations are made for further testing.

  2. Certification of Discontinuous Composite Material Forms for Aircraft Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Michael Roger

    New, high performance chopped, discontinuous, or short fiber composites (DFCs), DFCs, such as HexMC and Lytex, made by compression molding of randomly oriented pre-impregnated unidirectional tape, can be formed into complex geometry while retaining mechanical properties suitable for structural use. These DFCs provide the performance benefits of Continuous Fiber Composites (CFCs) in form factors that were previously unavailable. These materials demonstrate some notably different properties from continuous fiber composites, especially with respect to damage tolerance and failure behavior. These behaviors are not very well understood, and fundamental research efforts are ongoing to better characterize the material and to ease certification for future uses. Despite this, these new DFCs show such promise that they are already in service in the aerospace industry, for instance in the Boeing 787. Unfortunately, the relative novelty of these parts means that they needed to be certified by “point design”, an excess of physical testing, rather than by a mix of physical testing and finite element analysis, which would be the case for CFCs or metals. In this study, one particular approach to characterizing both linear-elastic and failure behaviors are considered. The Stochastic Laminate Analogy, which represents a novel approach to modeling DFCs, and its combination with a Ply Discount scheme. Owing to limited available computational resources, only preliminary results are available, but those results are quite promising and warrant further investigation.

  3. Inspection of composite structures using line scanning thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Obdulia; Butera, Manny; Godinez, Valery

    2012-06-01

    This work deals with the non destructive analysis of different composite parts and structures using Line Scanning Thermography (LST), a non-contact inspection method based in dynamic thermography. The LST technique provides a quick and efficient methodology to scan wide areas rapidly; the technique has been used on the inspection of composite propellers, sandwich panels, motor case tubes and wind turbine blades, among others. In LST a line heat source is used to thermally excite the surface under study while an infrared detector records the transient surface temperature variation of the heated region. Line Scanning Thermography (LST), has successfully been applied to determine the thickness of metallic plates and to assess boiler tube thinning. In this paper the LST protocols developed for the detection of sub-surface defects in different composite materials commonly used in aerospace applications, plates will be presented. In most cases the thermal images acquired using LST will be compared with ultrasonic c-scans. The fundamentals of LST will be discussed, as well as the limitations of this technique for NDT inspection.

  4. Supercapacitors based on carbon nanotube fuzzy fabric structural composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alresheedi, Bakheet Awad

    Supercapacitors used in conjunction with batteries offer a solution to energy storage and delivery problems in systems where high power output is required, such as in fully electric cars. This project aimed to enhance current supercapacitor technology by fabricating activated carbon on a substrate consisting of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on a carbon fiber fabric (fuzzy fabric). The fuzzy surface of CNTs lowers electrical resistance and increases porosity, resulting in a flexible fabric with high specific capacitance. Experimental results confirm that the capacitance of activated carbon fabricated on the fuzzy fiber composite is significantly higher than when activated carbon is formed simply on a bare carbon fiber substrate, indicating the usefulness of CNTs in supercapacitor technology. The fabrication of the fuzzy fiber based carbon electrode was fairly complex. The processing steps included composite curing, stabilization, carbonization and activation. Ratios of the three basic ingredients for the supercapacitor (fiber, CNT and polymer matrix) were investigated through experimentation and Grey relational analysis. The aim of Grey relational analysis was to examine factors that affect the overall performance of the supercapacitor. It is based on finding relationships in both independent and interrelated data series (parameters). Using this approach, it was determined that the amount of CNTs on the fiber surface plays a major role in the capacitor properties. An increased amount of CNTs increases the surface area and electrical conductivity of the substrate, while also reducing the required time of activation. Technical advances in the field of Materials and Structures are usually focused on attaining superior performance while reducing weight and cost. To achieve such combinations, multi-functionality has become essential; namely, to reduce weight by imparting additional functions simultaneously to a single material. In this study, a structural composite with

  5. Flexible ultrasonic array system for inspecting thick composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankle, Robert S.; Rose, Douglas N.

    1995-06-01

    Composite materials, which have commonly been used in recreational boats, are now being applied to more challenging marine applications. The high specific stiffness and strength of composites translates into increased range and payload. Composites offer the added benefits of corrosion and erosion resistance, fatigue and wear resistance, reduced signature, and reduced maintenance and life cycle costs as compared to traditional metallic structures. Although ultrasonic techniques are typically used to inspect composite structures, thick composites, such as those used in marine applications, are difficult to inspect with ordinary ultrasonic methods. An ultrasonic inspection system is being developed for the US Army to inspect thick composite materials for future armored vehicles. This system is an extension of the existing PARIS flexible array ultrasonic inspection system, which was originally developed for inspecting thin composite aircraft structures. The extension is designed to increase ultrasonic penetration by 1) fabricating an array that operates at lower frequency and higher voltage, and 2) employing a synthetic pulse technique. The flexible array can rapidly inspect large areas and produce images of the inspection results that are easy to interpret. This paper describes the ultrasonic inspection system and presents examples of inspection results from both thick and thin composite materials.

  6. Simulated orbital impact of multi-wall composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Eve J.; Schonberg, William P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation in which several different composite materials were tested for their ability to prevent the perforation of multiwall systems under hypervelocity projectile impact. The damage in the composite specimens is compared to the damage in aluminum specimens of similar geometry and weight caused by hypervelocity projectiles with similar impact energies. The analysis shows that using composite materials in combination with metallic materials in multiwall structures can increase the protection afforded a spacecraft against perforation by orbital debris over that provided by traditional, purely metallic multiwall structures.

  7. Nonlinear analyses of composite aerospace structures in sonic fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh

    1992-01-01

    The primary research effort of this project is the development of analytical methods for the prediction of nonlinear random response of composite aerospace structures subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads. The progress, accomplishments, and future plans of three random response research topics are discussed, namely acoustics-structure interactions using boundary/finite element methods, nonlinear vibrations of beams and composite plates under harmonic and random excitations, and numerical simulation of the nonlinear response of composite plates under combined thermal and acoustic loading.

  8. Composition Studies/English Education Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, W. Douglas; Brockman, Elizabeth; Bush, Jonathan; Richmond, Kia Jane

    2007-01-01

    This roundtable explores several different composition-related questions and topics. It raises two questions: (1) What theory from composition studies do you believe is important to include in classes for future elementary and/or secondary writing teachers? (2) What are the knowledge, background, traits, and abilities of a successful writing…

  9. VARTM Process Modeling of Aerospace Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Xiao-Lan; Grimsley, Brian W.; Hubert, Pascal; Cano, Roberto J.; Loos, Alfred C.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional model was developed to simulate the VARTM composite manufacturing process. The model considers the two important mechanisms that occur during the process: resin flow, and compaction and relaxation of the preform. The model was used to simulate infiltration of a carbon preform with an epoxy resin by the VARTM process. The model predicted flow patterns and preform thickness changes agreed qualitatively with the measured values. However, the predicted total infiltration times were much longer than measured most likely due to the inaccurate preform permeability values used in the simulation.

  10. In-service health monitoring of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, Gino A.; Ventres, C. S.; Ginty, Carol A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    The aerospace industry is witnessing a vast utilization of composites in critical structural applications and anticipates even more use of them in future aircraft. Therefore, a definite need exists for a composite health monitoring expert system to meet today's current needs and tomorrow's future demands. The primary goal for this conceptual health monitoring system is functional reliably for in-service operation in the environments of various composite structures. The underlying philosophy of this system is to utilize proven vibration techniques to assess the structural integrity of a fibrous composite. Statistical methods are used to determine if the variances in the measured data are acceptable for making a reliable decision on the health status of the composite. The flexible system allows for algorithms describing any composite fatigue or damage behavior characteristic to be provided as an input to the system. Alert thresholds and variances can also be provided as an input to this system and may be updated to allow for future changes/refinements in the composite's structural integrity behavior.

  11. Composite Blade Structural Analyzer (COBSTRAN) theoretical/programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1989-01-01

    This manual describes the organization and flow of data and analysis in the computer code, COBSTRAN (COmposite Blade STRuctural ANalyzer). This code combines composite mechanics and laminate theory with an internal data base of fiber and matrix properties and was developed for the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades and composite wind turbine blades. Inputs to the code are constituent fiber and matrix material properties, factors reflecting the fabrication process, composite geometry and blade geometry. COBSTRAN performs the micromechanics and laminate analyses of these fiber composites and generates a NASTRAN finite element model of the blade. This manual describes the equations formulated and solved in the code and the function of each of the seventy-two subroutines. COBSTRAN is written in FORTRAN 77.

  12. Jovian deep magnetotail composition and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, D. J.; Allegrini, F.; Bagenal, F.; Ebert, R. W.; Elliott, H. A.; Nicolaou, G.; Szalay, J. R.; Valek, P.; Weidner, S.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze plasma ion observations from the Solar Wind Around Pluto instrument on New Horizons as it traveled back through the dusk flank of the Jovian magnetotail from 600 to more than 2500 Jovian radii behind the planet. We find that at all distances, light ions (mostly protons) dominate the heavy ions (S++ and O+) that are far more abundant in the near Jupiter plasma disk and that were expected to be the primary ions filling the Jovian magnetotail. This key new observation might indicate that heavy ions are confined closer to the equator than the spacecraft trajectory or a substantial addition of light ions via reconnection and/or mixing along the magnetopause boundary. However, because we find no evidence for acceleration of the tail plasma with distance, a more likely explanation seems to be that the heavy ions are preferentially released down the dawn flank of the magnetotail. Perhaps, this occurs as a part of the process where flux tubes, after expanding as they rotate across the near-tail region, need to pull back inward in order to fit within the dawnside of the magnetopause. A second major finding of this study is that there are two dominant periods of the plasma structures in the Jovian magnetotail: 3.53 (0.18 full width at half maximum (FWHM)) and 5.35 (0.38 FWHM) days. Remarkably, the first of these is identical within the errors to Europa's orbital period (3.55 days). Both of these results should provide important new fodder for Jovian magnetospheric theories and lead to a better understanding of Jupiter's magnetosphere.

  13. Intrinsic manufacture of hollow thermoplastic composite/metal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfuss, Daniel; Grützner, Raik; Garthaus, Christian; Gude, Maik; Müller, Roland; Langrebe, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    In contrast to common and classical joining technologies for composite/metal hybrid structures such as bonding and riveting, profile and contour joints offer a promising potential for novel lightweight hybrid structures. First and foremost, joining systems with a form closure function enable to pass very high loads into rod- and tube-shaped fibre reinforced structures and achieve high degrees of material utilization for the composite part. This paper demonstrates the theoretical and technological principals for a resource efficient design and production of highly loaded thermoplastic composite profile structures with integrated metallic load introduction elements and a multi scale form closure. The hybrid structures are produced in an integral blow moulding process in which a braided tape-preform is simultaneously consolidated and formed into the metallic load introduction element. These metallic load introduction elements are manufactured in a two-stage process of external and internal hydroforming, after forming simulations have assured process stability for consistent quality.

  14. Quantification of uncertainties in the performance of smart composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    A composite wing with spars, bulkheads, and built-in control devices is evaluated using a method for the probabilistic assessment of smart composite structures. Structural responses (such as change in angle of attack, vertical displacements, and stresses in regular plies with traditional materials and in control plies with mixed traditional and actuation materials) are probabilistically assessed to quantify their respective scatter. Probabilistic sensitivity factors are computed to identify those parameters that have a significant influence on a specific structural response. Results show that the uncertainties in the responses of smart composite structures can be quantified. Responses such as structural deformation, ply stresses, frequencies, and buckling loads in the presence of defects can be reliably controlled to satisfy specified design requirements.

  15. Digitally focused array ultrasonic testing technique for carbon fiber composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salchak, Y.; Zhvyrblya, V.; Sednev, D.; Lider, A.

    2016-06-01

    Composite fiber reinforced polymers are highly promising structures. At present, they are widely used in different areas such as aeronautics and nuclear industries. There is a great number of advantages of composite structures such as design flexibility, low cost per cubic inch, resistance to corrosion, lower material costs, lighter weight and improved productivity. However, composites degradation may be caused by different mechanisms such as overload, impact, overheating, creep and fatigue. Comparing to inspection of other materials some unique consideration is required for testing and analysis. Ultrasound testing is the most common method for inspection of composite structures. Digitally Focused Array Technology is considered as novel approach which enables fast and effective quantitative automatic testing. In this study new methodology of quality assurance of composite structure components based on DFA is performed.

  16. Structural system identification of a composite shell

    SciTech Connect

    Red-Horse, J.R.; Carne, T.G.; James, G.H.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    Structural system identification is undergoing a period of renewed interest. Probabilistic approaches to physical parameter identification in analysis finite element models make uncertainty in test results an important issue. In this paper, we investigate this issue with a simple, though in many ways representative, structural system. The results of two modal parameter identification techniques are compared and uncertainty estimates, both through bias and random errors, are quantified. The importance of the interaction between test and analysis is also highlighted. 25 refs.

  17. Structural system identification of a composite shell

    SciTech Connect

    Red-Horse, J.R.; Carne, T.G.; James, G.H.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1991-12-31

    Structural system identification is undergoing a period of renewed interest. Probabilistic approaches to physical parameter identification in analysis finite element models make uncertainty in test results an important issue. In this paper, we investigate this issue with a simple, though in many ways representative, structural system. The results of two modal parameter identification techniques are compared and uncertainty estimates, both through bias and random errors, are quantified. The importance of the interaction between test and analysis is also highlighted. 25 refs.

  18. Active Structural Fibers for Multifunctional Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-06

    1. Lin, Y., Zhi, Z. and Sodano, 2012, “Barium Titanate and Barium Strontium Titanate Coated Carbon Fibers for Multifunctional Structural Capacitors...Multifunctional Structural Capacitors Consisting of Barium Titanate and Barium Strontium Titanate Coated Carbon Fibers, 18 th International Conference on... Strontium Titanate Coated SiC Fibers,” Electronic Materials and Applications 2011, Jan. 19 th –21 st Orlando, FL (Invited). 9. Lin, Y., Shaffer

  19. Large Composite Structures Processing Technologies for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Vickers, J. H.; McMahon, W. M.; Hulcher, A. B.; Johnston, N. J.; Cano, R. J.; Belvin, H. L.; McIver, K.; Franklin, W.; Sidwell, D.

    2001-01-01

    Significant efforts have been devoted to establishing the technology foundation to enable the progression to large scale composite structures fabrication. We are not capable today of fabricating many of the composite structures envisioned for the second generation reusable launch vehicle (RLV). Conventional 'aerospace' manufacturing and processing methodologies (fiber placement, autoclave, tooling) will require substantial investment and lead time to scale-up. Out-of-autoclave process techniques will require aggressive efforts to mature the selected technologies and to scale up. Focused composite processing technology development and demonstration programs utilizing the building block approach are required to enable envisioned second generation RLV large composite structures applications. Government/industry partnerships have demonstrated success in this area and represent best combination of skills and capabilities to achieve this goal.

  20. Self-healing structural composites with electromagnetic functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaisted, Thomas A.; Vakil Amirkhizi, Alireza; Arbelaez, Diego; Nemat-Nasser, Syrus C.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2003-08-01

    We have incorporated arrays of conductive electromagnetic scattering elements such as straight copper wires and copper coils into fiber-reinforced polymer composites, resulting in materials with required structural and further electromagnetic functionality. The scattering elements provide controlled electromagnetic response for tasks such as filtering and may be used to tune the overall index of refraction of the composite. Integration of these metallic elements into traditional fiber-reinforced polymer composites has introduced other opportunities for multifunctionality in terms of self-healing, thermal transport and perhaps sensing applications. Such functionalities are the result of fiber/wire integration through textile braiding and weaving, combined with a new polymer matrix that has the ability to heal internal cracking through thermo-reversible covalent bonds. Multifunctional composites of this kind enhance the role of structural materials from mere load-bearing systems to lightweight structures of good thermo-mechanical attributes that also have electromagnetic and other functionalities.

  1. Composite Interstage Structural Concept Down Select Process and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Thoma, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composites Technologies (ACT) project evaluated several composite construction options for the Ares V Interstage to support the Constellation Program's goal of reducing the mass of vehicle dry structures. In Phase 1 of the project, eight candidate construction concepts were evaluated for the Ares V Interstage design. Trade studies were performed using finite element analyses to determine weight estimates for the construction concepts. An evaluation process was then used to down select the construction concepts down to two concepts for further consideration in Phase 2 of the project. In Phase 2 of the project, additional trade studies were performed using detailed finite element analyses of the Interstage and a final down select process was used to choose the recommended Interstage construction concept. The results of the study showed that a honeycomb sandwich design was the most favorable Interstage construction concept based on advantages in manufacturing cost. Details of the Phase 1 and Phase 2 trade studies and down select process with final results are presented in the paper.

  2. Dynamic toughness of composite steel-concrete structure of sandwich system

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, Setsuo; Hattori, Yoichi

    1995-12-31

    Offshore structures should have a high degree of structural safety even under extreme environmental loadings. The authors have studied a composite steel-concrete structure of sandwich system for the strength members of huge offshore structures, where concrete is placed between steel plates. In the previous paper, the authors carried out both experimental and theoretical investigations into the strength of the composite structure. It was clarified that the composite structure has various excellent properties: the ultimate load-bearing capacity of the composite structure is very high and it can absorb a great deal of energy until failure under any type of loading conditions. In the present paper, the authors carried out both experimental and theoretical investigations into the dynamic toughness of the sandwich composite structures. Experiments were carried out using the two dimensional models of composite structure under high speed loading. A nonlinear analysis was developed to predict the toughness of sandwich beam under dynamic load. In the analysis, the material non linearities of both concrete and steel with strain rate. The nonlinear analysis accurately represented the behavior and toughness of the sandwich beam structure.

  3. Transition from glass to graphite in manufacture of composite aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, H. E.; Thompson, V. S.

    1978-01-01

    The transition from fiberglass reinforced plastic composites to graphite reinforced plastic composites is described. Structural fiberglass design and manufacturing background are summarized. How this experience provides a technology base for moving into graphite composite secondary structure and then to composite primary structure is considered. The technical requirements that must be fulfilled in the transition from glass to graphite composite structure are also included.

  4. Structure and antibacterial properties of polyethylene/organo-vermiculite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundáková, Marianna; Tokarský, Jonáš; Valášková, Marta; Slobodian, Petr; Pazdziora, Erich; Kimmer, Dušan

    2015-10-01

    Vermiculite (VER) was modified by cation exchange with hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA+) bromide in three concentrations and used as organo-VER clay mineral nanofillers (denoted as HDTMA+1-VER, HDTMA+2-VER, and HDTMA+3-VER) in polyethylene (PE). PE/organo-VER composites were prepared via a melt compounding technique and pressed into thin plates. The organo-VER nanofillers and composite plates were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis which in combination with molecular modeling confirmed the intercalation of HDTMA+ molecules. It was found that alkyl tails of HDTMA+ molecules create a non-polar, water-free area which may help the PE chains to enter the VER interlayer space. The nanocomposite structure was confirmed for PE/HDTMA+3-VER. PE/organo-VER composites were also studied by scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy and by creep testing. Antibacterial activity of powder organo-VER nanofillers was tested on Gram-positive (G+) (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram-negative (G-) (Escherichia coli) bacterial strains. The most sensitive G+ bacteria responded by stopping their bacterial growth after 24 h with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.014% (w/v) at all samples. Growth of G- bacteria was inhibited after 24 h with higher MIC value 0.041-10% (w/v) in relation to the content of HDTMA+ in samples. The surfaces of PE/organo-VER composites are very active against G+ bacterial strain E. faecalis. The number of bacterial colonies forming units (cfu) on surfaces of samples was reduced by approximately several orders. The number of bacterial colonies after 48 h was 0 cfu on the surface of PE/HDTMA+3-VER nanocomposite.

  5. Method for residual household waste composition studies.

    PubMed

    Sahimaa, Olli; Hupponen, Mari; Horttanainen, Mika; Sorvari, Jaana

    2015-12-01

    The rising awareness of decreasing natural resources has brought forward the idea of a circular economy and resource efficiency in Europe. As a part of this movement, European countries have identified the need to monitor residual waste flows in order to make recycling more efficient. In Finland, studies on the composition of residual household waste have mostly been conducted using different methods, which makes the comparison of the results difficult. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable method for residual household waste composition studies. First, a literature review on European study methods was performed. Also, 19 Finnish waste composition studies were compared in order to identify the shortcomings of the current Finnish residual household waste composition data. Moreover, the information needs of different waste management authorities concerning residual household waste were studied through a survey and personal interviews. Stratification, sampling, the classification of fractions and statistical analysis were identified as the key factors in a residual household waste composition study. The area studied should be divided into non-overlapping strata in order to decrease the heterogeneity of waste and enable comparisons between different waste producers. A minimum of six subsamples, each 100 kg, from each stratum should be sorted. Confidence intervals for each waste category should be determined in order to evaluate the applicability of the results. A new three-level classification system was created based on Finnish stakeholders' information needs and compared to four other European waste composition study classifications.

  6. Structural characteristics of high temperature composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A progress report is presented for research carried from March 1984 through February 1985. A tensile test method has been developed which should give tensile and simulated shear (+ or - 45 deg) data for fiber composites up to 1000 C. Longitudinal and some transverse stress-strain data have been obtained for a glass matrix/Nicalon fiber system up to the matrix limiting temperature of 600 C. This demonstrates the functioning of the test method and the high temperature test facility which has been established on this grant. Transverse and longitudinal compression tests have been run, mostly in an end loaded configuration. A more satisfactory compression test is still required, and is under development.

  7. Composite S-layer lipid structures

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2010-01-01

    Designing and utilization of biomimetic membrane systems generated by bottom-up processes is a rapidly growing scientific and engineering field. Elucidation of the supramolecular construction principle of archaeal cell envelopes composed of S-layer stabilized lipid membranes led to new strategies for generating highly stable functional lipid membranes at meso- and macroscopic scale. In this review, we provide a state of the art survey how S-layer proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides may be used as basic building blocks for the assembly of S-layer supported lipid membranes. These biomimetic membrane systems are distinguished by a nanopatterned fluidity, enhanced stability and longevity and thus, provide a dedicated reconstitution matrix for membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins. Exciting areas for application of composite S-layer membrane systems concern sensor systems involving specific membrane functions. PMID:19303933

  8. Free Vibration Response Comparison of Composite Beams with Fluid Structure Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    responses of the composites when subjected to these types of input forces including an array of FSI conditions surrounding marine composite structures...close to the density of water. Studies [6–9] of composites under low velocity impact have also shown that there is an increase in impact force with...Background The three dimensional (3-D) DIC technique is a noncontact , optical technique for obtaining full field deformation [12]. It utilizes a

  9. Structure of a composite material based on oxyfluoride glass and low-melting fluoroplast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat'eva, L. N.; Savchenko, N. N.; Lalayan, V. M.; Zverev, G. A.; Usol'tseva, T. I.; Ustinov, A. Yu.; Shaulov, A. Yu.; Berlin, A. A.; Buznik, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    Aspects of the fabrication of composites obtained via the extrusion formation of mixtures composed of a perfluorocarbon polymer (F2MB) and a thermoplastic inorganic glass of the composition 3B2O3-97(40SnF2-30SnO-30P2O5) are investigated by analyzing the results from studies of their morphology, molecular structure, and phase composition.

  10. Studies on frequency and gate voltage effects on the dielectric properties of Au/n-Si (110) structure with PVA-nickel acetate composite film interfacial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunç, T.; Gökçen, M.; Uslu, İ.

    2012-11-01

    The admittance technique was used in order to investigate the frequency dependence of dielectric constant ( ɛ'), dielectric loss ( ɛ″), dielectric loss tangent (tan δ), the ac electrical conductivity ( σ ac), and the electric modulus of PVA (Ni-doped) structure. Experimental results revealed that the values of ɛ' , ɛ″, (tan δ), σ ac and the electric modulus show fairly large frequency and gate bias dispersion due to the interface charges and polarization. The σ ac is found to increase with both increasing frequency and voltage. It can be concluded that the interface charges and interfacial polarization have strong influence on the dielectric properties of metal-polymer-semiconductor (MIS) structures especially at low frequencies and in depletion and accumulation regions. The results of this study indicate that the ɛ' values of Au/PVA/n-Si with Nickel-doped PVA interfacial layer are quite higher compared to those with pure and other dopant/mixture's of PVA.

  11. Probabilistic Evaluation of Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the deterministic and probabilistic structural evaluation results of two structures made with advanced ceramic composites (CMC): internally pressurized tube and uniformly loaded flange. The deterministic structural evaluation includes stress, displacement, and buckling analyses. It is carried out using the finite element code MHOST, developed for the 3-D inelastic analysis of structures that are made with advanced materials. The probabilistic evaluation is performed using the integrated probabilistic assessment of composite structures computer code IPACS. The affects of uncertainties in primitive variables related to the material, fabrication process, and loadings on the material property and structural response behavior are quantified. The primitive variables considered are: thermo-mechanical properties of fiber and matrix, fiber and void volume ratios, use temperature, and pressure. The probabilistic structural analysis and probabilistic strength results are used by IPACS to perform reliability and risk evaluation of the two structures. The results will show that the sensitivity information obtained for the two composite structures from the computational simulation can be used to alter the design process to meet desired service requirements. In addition to detailed probabilistic analysis of the two structures, the following were performed specifically on the CMC tube: (1) predicted the failure load and the buckling load, (2) performed coupled non-deterministic multi-disciplinary structural analysis, and (3) demonstrated that probabilistic sensitivities can be used to select a reduced set of design variables for optimization.

  12. Composite Cocured Modular Eggcrate-Core Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magurany, Charles J.

    1995-01-01

    Lightweight composite-material (e.g., graphite fiber/epoxy matrix) cocured sandwich panels with eggcratelike cores developed for use as principal components of optical benches and other structures that support precise optical instruments. Structures offer greater thermal and mechanical stability. Advantages include easier fabrication and better mechanical properties.

  13. Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure (UCPS) for In-Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Microcosm, Inc., in conjunction with the Scorpius Space Launch Company, is developing a UCPS (Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure )for in-space propulsion. This innovative approach constitutes a clean break from traditional spacecraft design by combining what were traditionally separate primary and secondary support structures and metal propellant tanks into a single unit.

  14. Improved Joining of Metal Components to Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmes, Edmund

    2009-01-01

    Systems requirements for complex spacecraft drive design requirements that lead to structures, components, and/or enclosures of a multi-material and multifunctional design. The varying physical properties of aluminum, tungsten, Invar, or other high-grade aerospace metals when utilized in conjunction with lightweight composites multiply system level solutions. These multi-material designs are largely dependent upon effective joining techAn improved method of joining metal components to matrix/fiber composite material structures has been invented. The method is particularly applicable to equipping such thin-wall polymer-matrix composite (PMC) structures as tanks with flanges, ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liners for high heat engine nozzles, and other metallic-to-composite attachments. The method is oriented toward new architectures and distributing mechanical loads as widely as possible in the vicinities of attachment locations to prevent excessive concentrations of stresses that could give rise to delaminations, debonds, leaks, and other failures. The method in its most basic form can be summarized as follows: A metal component is to be joined to a designated attachment area on a composite-material structure. In preparation for joining, the metal component is fabricated to include multiple studs projecting from the aforementioned face. Also in preparation for joining, holes just wide enough to accept the studs are molded into, drilled, or otherwise formed in the corresponding locations in the designated attachment area of the uncured ("wet') composite structure. The metal component is brought together with the uncured composite structure so that the studs become firmly seated in the holes, thereby causing the composite material to become intertwined with the metal component in the joining area. Alternately, it is proposed to utilize other mechanical attachment schemes whereby the uncured composite and metallic parts are joined with "z-direction" fasteners. The

  15. Ink composition for making a conductive silver structure

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Steven B.; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2016-10-18

    An ink composition for making a conductive silver structure comprises a silver salt and a complex of (a) a complexing agent and a short chain carboxylic acid or (b) a complexing agent and a salt of a short chain carboxylic acid, according to one embodiment. A method for making a silver structure entails combining a silver salt and a complexing agent, and then adding a short chain carboxylic acid or a salt of the short chain carboxylic acid to the combined silver salt and a complexing agent to form an ink composition. A concentration of the complexing agent in the ink composition is reduced to form a concentrated formulation, and the silver salt is reduced to form a conductive silver structure, where the concentrated formulation and the conductive silver structure are formed at a temperature of about 120.degree. C. or less.

  16. Chemical composition in relation with biomass ash structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holubcik, Michal; Jandacka, Jozef

    2014-08-01

    Biomass combustion can be more complicated like combustion of fossil fuels because it is necessary to solve problems with lower ash melting temperature. It can cause a lot of problems during combustion process. Chemical composition of biomass ash has great impact on sinters and slags creation in ash because it affects structure of heated ash. In this paper was solved relation between chemical composition and structure of heated ash from three types of biomass (spruce wood, miscanthus giganteus and wheat straw). Amount of SiO2, CaO, MgO, Al2O3 and K2O was determined. Structure of heated ash was optically determined after heating to 1000 °C or 1200 °C. Results demonstrated that chemical composition has strong effect on structure and color of heated ash.

  17. Progressive Failure Analysis Methodology for Laminated Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.

    1999-01-01

    A progressive failure analysis method has been developed for predicting the failure of laminated composite structures under geometrically nonlinear deformations. The progressive failure analysis uses C(exp 1) shell elements based on classical lamination theory to calculate the in-plane stresses. Several failure criteria, including the maximum strain criterion, Hashin's criterion, and Christensen's criterion, are used to predict the failure mechanisms and several options are available to degrade the material properties after failures. The progressive failure analysis method is implemented in the COMET finite element analysis code and can predict the damage and response of laminated composite structures from initial loading to final failure. The different failure criteria and material degradation methods are compared and assessed by performing analyses of several laminated composite structures. Results from the progressive failure method indicate good correlation with the existing test data except in structural applications where interlaminar stresses are important which may cause failure mechanisms such as debonding or delaminations.

  18. Interdiffusion and solid state structure of polyethylene microlayer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuman, Thomas Leo

    Chapter 1 describes how layer-multiplying devices permit two polymers to be combined into unique layered structures. These model microlayer structures are ideal for fundamental study of transport phenomena such as interdiffusion. In Chapter 2, kinetics of interdiffusion of a miscible polymer pair, HDPE and LLDPE, was studied experimentally to characterize conditions required to construct microlayer gradient morphologies. High specific interfacial area of microlayers offset low diffusion mobility of polymeric chains so the system approached compositional homogeneity on a laboratory time scale. These polydisperse polymer pairs formed isomorphic blends upon crystallization from the melt. Thermal analysis of quenched microlayered pairs indicated systematic changes in melting behavior with composition gradient, allowing quantification of progress of interdiffusion without chemical labeling. Analysis with a diffusion model formulated especially for a polydisperse system revealed the role of different fractions, and allowed extraction of diffusion coefficients for elementary chains from the net kinetics of interdiffusion. In Chapter 3, the compositional gradient was visualized by progressively melting the microlayer with increasing temperature, making it possible to monitor local kinetics of interdiffusion. Diffusion coefficients were obtained which correlated well with the data from bulk kinetics. The interlayer boundaries remained stationary during a characteristic time of interdiffusion of the component main fractions; the boundary moved at longer times as high molecular weight fractions became involved in interdiffusion. This moving boundary phenomenon was exploited in Chapter 4 to substantially increase concentration of inorganic particles in one component of LLDPE/LDPE microlayers. When taken to the melt, the diffusion rate mismatch between linear LLDPE chains and branched LDPE chains caused layer boundaries to move in the direction of the slower-diffusing chains

  19. Structure and Properties of High Symmetry Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-27

    utilizing a 4-directional reinforcement. Reducing the close-to-cubic symmetry concept into practice in our laboratory by a three-dimensional braiding...modelled by utilizing the different elastic strain energy expressions produced by different combinations of symmetry elements. Symmetry in Materials The...rings is insignmicant. Utilizing the above assumptions, numerous textile structures possess holosymmetric cubic symmetry. This symmetry state is found in

  20. Metal matrix composite structural panel construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcwithey, R. R.; Royster, D. M. (Inventor); Bales, T. T.

    1983-01-01

    Lightweight capped honeycomb stiffeners for use in fabricating metal or metal/matrix exterior structural panels on aerospace type vehicles and the process for fabricating same are disclosed. The stiffener stringers are formed in sheets, cut to the desired width and length and brazed in spaced relationship to a skin with the honeycomb material serving directly as the required lightweight stiffeners and not requiring separate metal encasement for the exposed honeycomb cells.

  1. An ideal reinforcement for structural composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kevorkijan, V.M.

    1997-12-01

    Different criteria and accumulated data lead to the conclusion that discontinuously reinforced metal-matrix composites (DR MMCs) will become an engineering material of general use. At the end of 1970s, the automobile and transport industries had a strong interest in and high expectations for DR-MMCs because of their superior specific strength and rigidity when compared with conventional aluminum alloys. After two decades of development, the first DR-MMC application, an engine connecting-rod, is ready to market. Major applications in the automobile industry, such as brake rotors and drive shafts, are now in the later stages of development, and other engineering applications are well advanced. DR-MMC technology is now recognized worldwide, and research groups are able to introduce remarkable applications of these materials to the market. Three main problems must be solved to facilitate the expanding application of DR-MMCs with light-metal-alloy matrices. They are: (1) superior cost performances; (2) active implementation of environmental concerns; (3) improved ductility. The immediate solution of these problems is impossible. However, many researchers and managers firmly believe that solutions will be found if the same amount of energy is devoted to solving these problems as has been expended during the past two decades of DR-MMCs R and D.

  2. Investigation of Buckling Behavior of Composite Shell Structures with Cutouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbelo, Mariano A.; Herrmann, Annemarie; Castro, Saullo G. P.; Khakimova, Regina; Zimmermann, Rolf; Degenhardt, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Thin-walled cylindrical composite shell structures can be applied in space applications, looking for lighter and cheaper launcher transport system. These structures are prone to buckling under axial compression and may exhibit sensitivity to geometrical imperfections. Today the design of such structures is based on NASA guidelines from the 1960's using a conservative lower bound curve generated from a database of experimental results. In this guideline the structural behavior of composite materials may not be appropriately considered since the imperfection sensitivity and the buckling load of shells made of such materials depend on the lay-up design. It is clear that with the evolution of the composite materials and fabrication processes this guideline must be updated and / or new design guidelines investigated. This need becomes even more relevant when cutouts are introduced to the structure, which are commonly necessary to account for access points and to provide clearance and attachment points for hydraulic and electric systems. Therefore, it is necessary to understand how a cutout with different dimensions affects the buckling load of a thin-walled cylindrical shell structure in combination with other initial geometric imperfections. In this context, this paper present some observations regarding the buckling load behavior vs. cutout size and radius over thickness ratio, of laminated composite curved panels and cylindrical shells, that could be applied in further recommendations, to allow identifying when the buckling of the structure is dominated by the presence of the cutout or by other initial imperfections.

  3. Nonlinear Analysis and Scaling Laws for Noncircular Composite Structures Subjected to Combined Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Results from an analytical study of the response of a built-up, multi-cell noncircular composite structure subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads are presented. Nondimensional parameters and scaling laws based on a first-order shear-deformation plate theory are derived for this noncircular composite structure. The scaling laws are used to design sub-scale structural models for predicting the structural response of a full-scale structure representative of a portion of a blended-wing-body transport aircraft. Because of the complexity of the full-scale structure, some of the similitude conditions are relaxed for the sub-scale structural models. Results from a systematic parametric study are used to determine the effects of relaxing selected similitude conditions on the sensitivity of the effectiveness of using the sub-scale structural model response characteristics for predicting the full-scale structure response characteristics.

  4. Seismic retrofitting of reinforced concrete frame structures using GFRP-tube-confined-concrete composite braces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddasi B., Nasim S.; Zhang, Yunfeng; Hu, Xiaobin

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a new type of structural bracing intended for seismic retrofitting use in framed structures. This special composite brace, termed glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer (GFRP)-tube-confined-concrete composite brace, is comprised of concrete confined by a GFRP tube and an inner steel core for energy dissipation. Together with a contribution from the GFRP-tube confined concrete, the composite brace shows a substantially increased stiffness to control story drift, which is often a preferred feature in seismic retrofitting. An analysis model is established and implemented in a general finite element analysis program — OpenSees, for simulating the load-displacement behavior of the composite brace. Using this model, a parametric study of the hysteretic behavior (energy dissipation, stiffness, ductility and strength) of the composite brace was conducted under static cyclic loading and it was found that the area ratio of steel core to concrete has the greatest influence among all the parameters considered. To demonstrate the application of the composite brace in seismic retrofitting, a three-story nonductile reinforced concrete (RC) frame structure was retrofitted with the composite braces. Pushover analysis and nonlinear time-history analyses of the retrofitted RC frame structure was performed by employing a suite of 20 strong ground motion earthquake records. The analysis results show that the composite braces can effectively reduce the peak seismic responses of the RC frame structure without significantly increasing the base shear demand.

  5. An integrated computer procedure for sizing composite airframe structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1979-01-01

    A computerized algorithm to generate cross-sectional dimensions and fiber orientations for composite airframe structures is described, and its application in a wing structural synthesis is established. The algorithm unifies computations of aeroelastic loads, stresses, and deflections, as well as optimal structural sizing and fiber orientations in an open-ended system of integrated computer programs. A finite-element analysis and a mathematical-optimization technique are discussed.

  6. Impact damage resistance of composite fuselage structure, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dost, Ernest F.; Finn, Scott R.; Murphy, Daniel P.; Huisken, Amy B.

    1993-01-01

    The strength of laminated composite materials may be significantly reduced by foreign object impact induced damage. An understanding of the damage state is required in order to predict the behavior of structure under operational loads or to optimize the structural configuration. Types of damage typically induced in laminated materials during an impact event include transverse matrix cracking, delamination, and/or fiber breakage. The details of the damage state and its influence on structural behavior depend on the location of the impact. Damage in the skin may act as a soft inclusion or affect panel stability, while damage occurring over a stiffener may include debonding of the stiffener flange from the skin. An experiment to characterize impact damage resistance of fuselage structure as a function of structural configuration and impact threat was performed. A wide range of variables associated with aircraft fuselage structure such as material type and stiffener geometry (termed, intrinsic variables) and variables related to the operating environment such as impactor mass and diameter (termed, extrinsic variables) were studied using a statistically based design-of-experiments technique. The experimental design resulted in thirty-two different 3-stiffener panels. These configured panels were impacted in various locations with a number of impactor configurations, weights, and energies. The results obtained from an examination of impacts in the skin midbay and hail simulation impacts are documented. The current discussion is a continuation of that work with a focus on nondiscrete characterization of the midbay hail simulation impacts and discrete characterization of impact damage for impacts over the stiffener.

  7. Starch synthesis in Arabidopsis. Granule synthesis, composition, and structure.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, Samuel C; Tiessen, Axel; Pilling, Emma; Kato, K Lisa; Donald, Athene M; Smith, Alison M

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize starch synthesis, composition, and granule structure in Arabidopsis leaves. First, the potential role of starch-degrading enzymes during starch accumulation was investigated. To discover whether simultaneous synthesis and degradation of starch occurred during net accumulation, starch was labeled by supplying (14)CO(2) to intact, photosynthesizing plants. Release of this label from starch was monitored during a chase period in air, using different light intensities to vary the net rate of starch synthesis. No release of label was detected unless there was net degradation of starch during the chase. Similar experiments were performed on a mutant line (dbe1) that accumulates the soluble polysaccharide, phytoglycogen. Label was not released from phytoglycogen during the chase indicating that, even when in a soluble form, glucan is not appreciably degraded during accumulation. Second, the effect on starch composition of growth conditions and mutations causing starch accumulation was studied. An increase in starch content correlated with an increased amylose content of the starch and with an increase in the ratio of granule-bound starch synthase to soluble starch synthase activity. Third, the structural organization and morphology of Arabidopsis starch granules was studied. The starch granules were birefringent, indicating a radial organization of the polymers, and x-ray scatter analyses revealed that granules contained alternating crystalline and amorphous lamellae with a periodicity of 9 nm. Granules from the wild type and the high-starch mutant sex1 were flattened and discoid, whereas those of the high-starch mutant sex4 were larger and more rounded. These larger granules contained "growth rings" with a periodicity of 200 to 300 nm. We conclude that leaf starch is synthesized without appreciable turnover and comprises similar polymers and contains similar levels of molecular organization to storage starches, making Arabidopsis

  8. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    The linear elastic response is determined for an internally pressurized, long circular cylindrical shell stiffened on the inside by a regular arrangement of identical stringers and identical rings. Periodicity of this configuration permits the analysis of a portion of the shell wall centered over a generic stringer-ring joint; i.e., a unit cell model. The stiffeners are modeled as discrete beams, and the stringer is assumed to have a symmetrical cross section and the ring an asymmetrical section. Asymmetery causes out-of-plane bending and torsion of the ring. Displacements are assumed as truncated double Fourier series plus simple terms in the axial coordinate to account for the closed and pressure vessel effect (a non-periodic effect). The interacting line loads between the stiffeners and the inside shell wall are Lagrange multipliers in the formulation, and they are also assumed as truncated Fourier series. Displacement continuity constraints between the stiffeners and shell along the contact lines are satisfied point-wise. Equilibrium is imposed by the principle of virtual work. A composite material crown panel from the fuselage of a large transport aircraft is the numerical example. The distributions of the interacting line loads, and the out-of-plane bending moment and torque in the ring, are strongly dependent on modeling the deformations due to transverse shear and cross-sectional warping of the ring in torsion. This paper contains the results from the semiannual report on research on 'Pressure Pillowing of an Orthogonally Stiffened Cylindrical Shell'. The results of the new work are illustrated in the included appendix.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Based Sensor to Monitor Crack Growth in Cracked Aluminum Structures Underneath Composite Patching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, T. M.; Kwon, Y. W.; Hart, D. C.; Loup, D. C.; Rasmussen, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    The paper investigates a carbon nanotube-based sensor to detect crack propagation in aluminum structures underneath composite patching. Initial tests are conducted to determine the correct procedure and materials to properly fabricate a carbon nanotube (CNT) based sensor, which is then placed in between a composite patch and the aluminum structure. The CNTs have been utilized as sensors in previous studies but only for sensing crack propagation within the composite itself. This study focuses on crack propagation in the base material and is not concerned with the composite. In this application, the composite is only a patch and can be replaced if damaged. The study conducts both tension and fatigue testing to determine the usefulness of the CNT sensor. The CNT sensor is shown to be effective in giving an indication of the crack propagation in the aluminum. Correlation is done between the crack propagation length and the increase in electrical resistance in the CNT sensor under tensile and cyclic loading, respectively.

  10. Design, Fabrication and Test of Composite Curved Frames for Helicopter Fuselage Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, D. W.; Krebs, N. E.; Dobyns, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of curved beam effects and their importance in designing composite frame structures are discussed. The curved beam effect induces radial flange loadings which in turn causes flange curling. This curling increases the axial flange stresses and induces transverse bending. These effects are more important in composite structures due to their general inability to redistribute stresses by general yielding, such as in metal structures. A detailed finite element analysis was conducted and used in the design of composite curved frame specimens. Five specimens were statically tested and compared with predicted and test strains. The curved frame effects must be accurately accounted for to avoid premature fracture; finite element methods can accurately predict most of the stresses and no elastic relief from curved beam effects occurred in the composite frames tested. Finite element studies are presented for comparative curved beam effects on composite and metal frames.

  11. Evaluation of Composite Structures Technologies for Application to NASA's Vision for Space Exploration (CoSTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deo, Ravi; Wang, Donny; Bohlen, Jim; Fukuda, Cliff

    2008-01-01

    A trade study was conducted to determine the suitability of composite structures for weight and life cycle cost savings in primary and secondary structural systems for crew exploration vehicles, crew and cargo launch vehicles, landers, rovers, and habitats. The results of the trade study were used to identify and rank order composite material technologies that can have a near-term impact on a broad range of exploration mission applications. This report recommends technologies that should be developed to enable usage of composites on Vision for Space Exploration vehicles towards mass and life-cycle cost savings.

  12. Material Distribution Optimization for the Shell Aircraft Composite Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsov, S.; Zhilyaev, I.; Oganesyan, P.; Axenov, V.

    2016-09-01

    One of the main goal in aircraft structures designing isweight decreasing and stiffness increasing. Composite structures recently became popular in aircraft because of their mechanical properties and wide range of optimization possibilities.Weight distribution and lay-up are keys to creating lightweight stiff strictures. In this paperwe discuss optimization of specific structure that undergoes the non-uniform air pressure at the different flight conditions and reduce a level of noise caused by the airflowinduced vibrations at the constrained weight of the part. Initial model was created with CAD tool Siemens NX, finite element analysis and post processing were performed with COMSOL Multiphysicsr and MATLABr. Numerical solutions of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations supplemented by k-w turbulence model provide the spatial distributions of air pressure applied to the shell surface. At the formulation of optimization problem the global strain energy calculated within the optimized shell was assumed as the objective. Wall thickness has been changed using parametric approach by an initiation of auxiliary sphere with varied radius and coordinates of the center, which were the design variables. To avoid a local stress concentration, wall thickness increment was defined as smooth function on the shell surface dependent of auxiliary sphere position and size. Our study consists of multiple steps: CAD/CAE transformation of the model, determining wind pressure for different flow angles, optimizing wall thickness distribution for specific flow angles, designing a lay-up for optimal material distribution. The studied structure was improved in terms of maximum and average strain energy at the constrained expense ofweight growth. Developed methods and tools can be applied to wide range of shell-like structures made of multilayered quasi-isotropic laminates.

  13. High performance fibers for structurally reliable metal and ceramic composites. [advanced gas turbine engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Very few of the commercially available high performance fibers with low densities, high Young's moduli, and high tensile strengths possess all the necessary property requirements for providing either metal matrix composites (MMC) or ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with high structural reliability. These requirements are discussed in general and examples are presented of how these property guidelines are influencing fiber evaluation and improvement studies at NASA aimed at developing structurally reliable MMC and CMC for advanced gas turbine engines.

  14. Development of knife- and bullet-impact-resistant composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinsky, A. A.; Sapozhnikov, S. B.; Grass, T. S.

    2012-09-01

    Two types of layered composite structures — based on an aramid fabric covered with alumina microparticles and on polycarbonate — have been considered. Experimental investigation of the mechanical properties and puncture resistance of the first material was carried out. The results of quasi-static, dynamic, and firearm tests of the composite plates are presented. The minimum distance from a first puncture where the stubbing protection is safe was found by using the digital image correlation method. A FEM analysis of bending and tension of composite plates with a defect of complex geometry was performed. The analytical results obtained are compared with test data.

  15. Structural applications of Avimid K3B LDF thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrella, Andrew P.

    Composite applications on advanced aircraft require lightweight, high performance, tough material systems which are capable of operating at high service temperatures. These composite systems must also be producible and cost effective. Avimid K3B composite materials and related process and part manufacturing technologies offers a unique solutions to these requirements. The objective of this paper is to describe selected Avimid K3B processing approaches such as Long Discontinuous Fiber thermoforming and fusion bonding. A review of the Avimid K3B F-16 Strake Door Joint Development Program is presented. This program successfully developed, built and structurally validated a flight demonstration component using these materials and manufacturing methods.

  16. Durability-based design criteria for an automotive structural composite

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Brinkman, C.R.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.; Yahr, G.T.

    1998-11-01

    Before composite structures can be widely used in automotive applications, their long-term durability must be assured. The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was established by the US Department of Energy to help provide that assurance. The project is closely coordinated with the Automotive Composites Consortium. The experimentally-based, durability-driven design criteria described in this paper are the result of the initial project thrust. The criteria address a single reference composite, which is an SRIM (Structural Reaction Injection Molded) polyurethane, reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. The durability issues addressed include the effects of cyclic and sustained loadings, temperature, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) on strength, stiffness, and deformation. The criteria provide design analysis guidance, a multiaxial strength criterion, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loading, and damage tolerance design guidance. Environmental degradation factors and the degrading effects of prior loadings are included. Efforts are currently underway to validate the criteria by application to a second random-glass-fiber composite. Carbon-fiber composites are also being addressed.

  17. Constraints on Composition, Structure and Evolution of the Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Gianluca; Bonadiman, Costanza; Aulbach, Sonja; Schutt, Derek

    2015-05-01

    The idea for this special issue was triggered at the Goldschmidt Conference held in Florence (August 25-30, 2013), where we convened a session titled "Integrated Geophysical-Geochemical Constraints on Composition and Structure of the Lithosphere". The invitation to contribute was extended not only to the session participants but also to a wider spectrum of colleagues working on related topics. Consequently, a diverse group of Earth scientists encompassing geophysicists, geodynamicists, geochemists and petrologists contributed to this Volume, providing a comprehensive overview on the nature and evolution of lithospheric mantle by combining studies that exploit different types of data and interpretative approaches. The integration of geochemical and geodynamic datasets and their interpretation represents the state of the art in our knowledge of the lithosphere and beyond, and could serve as a blueprint for future strategies in concept and methodology to advance our knowledge of this and other terrestrial reservoirs.

  18. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Design/manufacturing concept assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Robert L.; Bayha, Tom D.; Davis, HU; Ingram, J. ED; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Composite Wing and Fuselage Structural Design/Manufacturing Concepts have been developed and evaluated. Trade studies were performed to determine how well the concepts satisfy the program goals of 25 percent cost savings, 40 percent weight savings with aircraft resizing, and 50 percent part count reduction as compared to the aluminum Lockheed L-1011 baseline. The concepts developed using emerging technologies such as large scale resin transfer molding (RTM), automatic tow placed (ATP), braiding, out-of-autoclave and automated manufacturing processes for both thermoset and thermoplastic materials were evaluated for possible application in the design concepts. Trade studies were used to determine which concepts carry into the detailed design development subtask.

  19. Instability and Wave Propagation in Structured 3D Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynia, Narges; Fang, Nicholas X.; Boyce, Mary C.

    2014-03-01

    Many structured composites found in nature possess undulating and wrinkled interfacial layers that regulate mechanical, chemical, acoustic, adhesive, thermal, electrical and optical functions of the material. This research focused on the complex instability and wrinkling pattern arising in 3D structured composites and the effect of the buckling pattern on the overall structural response. The 3D structured composites consisted of stiffer plates supported by soft matrix on both sides. Compression beyond the critical strain led to complex buckling patterns in the initially straight plates. The motivation of our work is to elaborate the formation of a system of prescribed periodic scatterers (metamaterials) due to buckling, and their effect to interfere wave propagation through the metamaterial structures. Such metamaterials made from elastomers enable large reversible deformation and, as a result, significant changes of the wave propagation properties. We developed analytical and finite element models to capture various aspects of the instability mechanism. Mechanical experiments were designed to further explore the modeling results. The ability to actively alter the 3D composite structure can enable on-demand tunability of many different functions, such as active control of wave propagation to create band-gaps and waveguides.

  20. Use of lightweight composites for GAS payload structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Mark B.

    1987-01-01

    A key element in the design of a small self-contained payload is the supporting structure. This structure must support the experiments and other components while using as little space and weight as possible. Hence, the structure material must have characteristics of being both strong and light. Aluminum was used for the structure on the first Purdue University payload, but consumed a relatively large percentage of the total payload weight. The current payload has a larger power supply requirement than did the previous payload. To allow additional weight for the batteries, a composite material has been chosen for the structure which has the required strength while being considerably lighter than aluminum. A radial fin design has been chosen for ease of composite material lay-up and its overall strength of design. A composite plate will connect the free ends of the fins and add strength and reduce vibration. The physical characteristics of the composite material and the method of open lay-up construction is described. Also discussed are the testing, modifications, and problems encountered during assembly of the experiments to the structure.

  1. Shock Interaction Studies on Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. P. J.; Jagadeesh, G.; Jayaram, V.; Reddy, B. Harinath; Madhu, V.; Reddy, C. Jaya Rami

    Glass fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites are being extensively used for structural applications both in civil and defense sectors, owing to their high specific strength, stiffness and good energy absorbing capability. Understanding the dynamic response of these composites on shock loading is very essential for effective design of structures resistant to blast loads. In the present study, E- glass/epoxy composite laminate has been fabricated and evaluated for their mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS). Further, dynamic response of E-glass laminates is presently studied by shock loading. When E-glass composite subjected to peak shock reflected pressure of 7.2 MPa and estimated temperature of about 14000 K for short duration, it underwent surface discolorations and charring of epoxy matrix. Post test analysis of the composite sample was carried out to study the damage analysis using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), changes in thermal properties of composites using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) and Thermo-Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The results of these investigations are discussed in this paper.

  2. Self-assembled hierarchically structured organic-inorganic composite systems.

    PubMed

    Tritschler, Ulrich; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-05-13

    Designing bio-inspired, multifunctional organic-inorganic composite materials is one of the most popular current research objectives. Due to the high complexity of biocomposite structures found in nacre and bone, for example, a one-pot scalable and versatile synthesis approach addressing structural key features of biominerals and affording bio-inspired, multifunctional organic-inorganic composites with advanced physical properties is highly challenging. This article reviews recent progress in synthesizing organic-inorganic composite materials via various self-assembly techniques and in this context highlights a recently developed bio-inspired synthesis concept for the fabrication of hierarchically structured, organic-inorganic composite materials. This one-step self-organization concept based on simultaneous liquid crystal formation of anisotropic inorganic nanoparticles and a functional liquid crystalline polymer turned out to be simple, fast, scalable and versatile, leading to various (multi-)functional composite materials, which exhibit hierarchical structuring over several length scales. Consequently, this synthesis approach is relevant for further progress and scientific breakthrough in the research field of bio-inspired and biomimetic materials.

  3. Advanced aerospace composite material structural design using artificial intelligent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, S.H.; Chen, J.L.; Hwang, W.C.

    1993-12-31

    Due to the complexity in the prediction of property and behavior, composite material has not substituted for metal widely yet, though it has high specific-strength and high specific-modulus that are more important in the aerospace industry. In this paper two artificial intelligent techniques, the expert systems and neural network technology, were introduced to the structural design of composite material. Expert System which has good ability in symbolic processing can helps us to solve problem by saving experience and knowledge. It is, therefore, a reasonable way to combine expert system technology to tile composite structural design. The development of a prototype expert system to help designer during the process of composite structural design is presented. Neural network is a network similar to people`s brain that can simulate the thinking way of people and has the ability of learning from the training data by adapting the weights of network. Because of the bottleneck in knowledge acquisition processes, the application of neural network and its learning ability to strength design of composite structures are presented. Some examples are in this paper to demonstrate the idea.

  4. Composite, large spirochetes from microbial mats: spirochete structure review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Ashen, J. B.; Sole, M.; Guerrero, R.

    1993-01-01

    Phenomena previously unknown in free-living spirochetes are reported: large-sized cells with variable diameter (length to 100 microns, width between 0.4 and 3.0 microns), composite structure (smaller spirochetes inside larger ones), and positive phototropic behavior. These bacteria, Spirosymplokos, are compared with all other spirochete genera. The large spirochete, grown in mixed culture, was studied live and by transmission EM. The protoplasmic cylinder was replete with spherical granules 20-32 nm in diameter, and three to six periplasmic 26-nm flagella were inserted subterminally. Comparably granulated and flagellated small spirochetes were located inside the protoplasmic cylinder and in the periplasm of the large ones. When exposed to air, movement became erratic, protoplasmic cylinders retracted to lie folded inside the outer membrane, and refractile membranous structures formed. From one to four structures per still-moving spirochete were seen. Spirosymplokos was enriched from laboratory samples exposed to oxygen-rich and desiccating, but not dry, conditions for at least 4 mo after removal of microbial mat from the field.

  5. Characterization of the structure and composition of gecko adhesive setae

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, N.W; Gardner, K.H; Walls, D.J; Keiper-Hrynko, N.M; Ganzke, T.S; Hallahan, D.L

    2005-01-01

    The ability of certain reptiles to adhere to vertical (and hang from horizontal) surfaces has been attributed to the presence of specialized adhesive setae on their feet. Structural and compositional studies of such adhesive setae will contribute significantly towards the design of biomimetic fibrillar adhesive materials. The results of electron microscopy analyses of the structure of such setae are presented, indicating their formation from aggregates of proteinaceous fibrils held together by a matrix and potentially surrounded by a limiting proteinaceous sheath. Microbeam X-ray diffraction analysis has shown conclusively that the only ordered protein constituent in these structures exhibits a diffraction pattern characteristic of β-keratin. Raman microscopy of individual setae, however, clearly shows the presence of additional protein constituents, some of which may be identified as α-keratins. Electrophoretic analysis of solubilized setal proteins supports these conclusions, indicating the presence of a group of low-molecular-weight β-keratins (14–20 kDa), together with α-keratins, and this interpretation is supported by immunological analyses. PMID:16849272

  6. Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Structures Using Fiber Optic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Charles Phillip Michael

    In an aircraft engine at high altitude, the low-pressure turbine (LPT) section can experience low-Reynolds number (Re) flows making the turbine blades susceptible to large separation losses. These losses are detrimental to the performance of the turbine and lead to a roadblock for "higher-lift" blade designs. Accurate prediction of the separation characteristics and an understanding of mitigation techniques are of the utmost importance. The current study conducts simulations of flow control techniques for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) L2A turbine blade at low-Re of 10,000 based on inlet velocity and blade axial chord. This blade was selected for its "high-lift" characteristics coupled with massive separation on the blade at low-Re which provides an excellent test blade for flow control techniques. Flow control techniques involved various configurations of vortex generator jets (VGJs) using momentum injection (i.e. jet blowing). All computations were executed on dual-topology, multi-block, structured meshes and incorporated the use of a parallel computing platform using the message passing interface (MPI) communications. A high-order implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) approach was used in the simulations allowing for a seamless transition between laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow without changing flow solver parameters. A validation study was conducted involving an AFRL L1A turbine blade which showed good agreement with experimental trends for cases which controlled separation in the experiments. The same cases showed good agreement between different grid sizes. The differences between experimental and numerical results are largely attributed to differences in the setup. That is, the simulation did not include freestream turbulence or wind-tunnel wall effects. The flow control study conducted for the L2A blade showed a small degree of separation control for jets placed just downstream (DS) of the separation point. A limited study was conducted

  7. Health monitoring of composite structures throughout the life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilles, James; Croxford, Anthony; Bond, Ian

    2016-04-01

    This study demonstrates the capability of inductively coupled piezoelectric sensors to monitor the state of health throughout the lifetime of composite structures. A single sensor which generated guided elastic waves was embedded into the stacking sequence of a large glass fiber reinforced plastic plate. The progress of cure was monitored by measuring variations in the amplitude and velocity of the waveforms reflected from the plate's edges. Baseline subtraction techniques were then implemented to detect barely visible impact damage (BVID) created by a 10 Joule impact, at a distance of 350 mm from the sensor embedded in the cured plate. To investigate the influence of mechanical loading on sensor performance, a single sensor was embedded within a glass fiber panel and subjected to tensile load. The panel was loaded up to a maximum strain of 1%, in increments of 0.1% strain. Guided wave measurements were recorded by the embedded sensor before testing, when the panel was under load, and after testing. The ultrasonic measurements showed a strong dependence on the applied load. Upon removal of the mechanical load the guided wave measurements returned to their original values recorded before testing. The results in this work show that embedded piezoelectric sensors can be used to monitor the state of health throughout the life-cycle of composite parts, even when subjected to relatively large strains. However the influence of load on guided wave measurements has implications for online monitoring using embedded piezoelectric transducers.

  8. Mechanistic Effects of Porosity on Structural Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siver, Andrew

    As fiber reinforced composites continue to gain popularity as primary structures in aerospace, automotive, and powersports industries, quality control becomes an extremely important aspect of materials and mechanical engineering. The ability to recognize and control manufacturing induced defects can greatly reduce the likelihood of unexpected catastrophic failure. Porosity is the result of trapped volatiles or air bubbles during the layup process and can significantly compromise the strength of fiber reinforced composites. A comprehensive study was performed on an AS4C-UF3352 TCR carbon fiber-epoxy prepreg system to determine the effect of porosity on flexural, shear, low-velocity impact, and damage residual strength properties. Autoclave cure pressure was controlled to induce varying levels of porosity to construct six laminates with porosity concentrations between 0-40%. Porosity concentrations were measured using several destructive and nondestructive techniques including resin burnoff, sectioning and optical analysis, and X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning. Ultrasonic transmission, thermography, and CT scanning provided nondestructive imaging to evaluate impact damage. A bilinear relationship accurately characterizes the change in mechanical properties with increasing porosity. Strength properties are relatively unaffected when porosity concentrations are below approximately 2.25% and decrease linearly by up to 40% in high porosity specimens.

  9. Towards a damage tolerance philosophy for composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin

    1988-01-01

    A damage-threshold/fail-safe approach is proposed to ensure that composite structures are both sufficiently durable for economy of operation, as well as adequately fail-safe or damage tolerant for flight safety. Matrix cracks are assumed to exist throughout the off-axis plies. Delamination onset is predicted using a strain energy release rate characterization. Delamination growth is accounted for in one of three ways: either analytically, using delamination growth laws in conjunction with strain energy release rate analyses incorporating delamination resistance curves; experimentally, using measured stiffness loss; or conservatively, assuming delamination onset corresponds to catastrophic delamination growth. Fail-safety is assessed by accounting for the accumulation of delaminations through the thickness. A tension fatigue life prediction for composite laminates is presented as a case study to illustrate how this approach may be implemented. Suggestions are made for applying the damage-threshold/fail-safe approach to compression fatigue, tension/compression fatigue, and compression strength following low velocity impact.

  10. Towards a damage tolerance philosophy for composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin

    1990-01-01

    A damage-threshold/fail-safe approach is proposed to ensure that composite structures are both sufficiently durable for economy of operation, as well as adequately fail-safe or damage tolerant for flight safety. Matrix cracks are assumed to exist throughout the off-axis plies. Delamination onset is predicted using a strain energy release rate characterization. Delamination growth is accounted for in one of three ways: either analytically, using delamination growth laws in conjunction with strain energy release rate analyses incorporating delamination resistance curves; experimentally, using measured stiffness loss; or conservatively, assuming delamination onset corresponds to catastrophic delamination growth. Fail-safety is assessed by accounting for the accumulation of delaminations through the thickness. A tension fatigue life prediction for composite laminates is presented as a case study to illustrate how this approach may be implemented. Suggestions are made for applying the damage-threshold/fail-safe approach to compression fatigue, tension/compression fatigue, and compression strength following low velocity impact.

  11. High efficiency tantalum-based ceramic composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A. (Inventor); Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); DiFiore, Robert R. (Inventor); Katvala, Victor W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Tantalum-based ceramics are suitable for use in thermal protection systems. These composite structures have high efficiency surfaces (low catalytic efficiency and high emittance), thereby reducing heat flux to a spacecraft during planetary re-entry. These ceramics contain tantalum disilicide, molybdenum disilicide and borosilicate glass. The components are milled, along with a processing aid, then applied to a surface of a porous substrate, such as a fibrous silica or carbon substrate. Following application, the coating is then sintered on the substrate. The composite structure is substantially impervious to hot gas penetration and capable of surviving high heat fluxes at temperatures approaching 3000.degree. F. and above.

  12. Structural health monitoring of co-cured composite structures using FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Ramesh; Kamath, G. M.; Gupta, Nitesh; Rao, M. Subba

    2005-05-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of aircraft structures, especially composite structures, has assumed increased significance on considerations of safety and costs. With the advent of co-cured structures, wherein bonded joints are replacing bolted joints there is a concern regarding skin-stiffener separation, which might not be detected unless a rigorous non-destructive testing (NDT) is done. It would hence be necessary to be able to detect and assess skin-stiffener separation in composite structures before it reaches the critical size. One of the health monitoring strategies is through strain monitoring using fibre optic strain sensors such as Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors. The first aspect that needs to be addressed is the characterization of the FBG sensors. Issues of embedment in composites have also to be addressed. Before evolving a damage detection strategy, the sensitivity of the structural strain to skin-stiffener separations must be clearly understood and quantified. This paper presents the analysis and experiments done with a composite test box to study the effect of skin-stiffener separation on the strain behaviour. The box consists of two skins stiffened with spars made of Bi-Directional (BD) glass-epoxy prepreg material. The spars are bolted to the skins and removing suitable number of bolts simulates 'de-bonds'. The strains of the healthy box are compared with the unhealthy box. The strains in the experiments are monitored using both strain gauges and Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors. The experimental results show that there is significant change in the measured strain near and away from the debond location. The finite element analysis of the box is done using ABAQUS and the analysis is validated with the experimental results. A neural network based methodology is developed here to detect skin-stiffener debonds in structures. A multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network with a feed forward back propagation algorithm is used to determine the

  13. Development of Textile Reinforced Composites for Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson

    1998-01-01

    NASA has been a leader in development of composite materials for aircraft applications during the past 25 years. In the early 1980's NASA and others conducted research to improve damage tolerance of composite structures through the use of toughened resins but these resins were not cost-effective. The aircraft industry wanted affordable, robust structures that could withstand the rigors of flight service with minimal damage. The cost and damage tolerance barriers of conventional laminated composites led NASA to focus on new concepts in composites which would incorporate the automated manufacturing methods of the textiles industry and which would incorporate through-the-thickness reinforcements. The NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program provided the resources to extensively investigate the application of textile processes to next generation aircraft wing and fuselage structures. This paper discusses advanced textile material forms that have been developed, innovative machine concepts and key technology advancements required for future application of textile reinforced composites in commercial transport aircraft. Multiaxial warp knitting, triaxial braiding and through-the-thickness stitching are the three textile processes that have surfaced as the most promising for further development. Textile reinforced composite structural elements that have been developed in the NASA ACT Program are discussed. Included are braided fuselage frames and window-belt reinforcements, woven/stitched lower fuselage side panels, stitched multiaxial warp knit wing skins, and braided wing stiffeners. In addition, low-cost processing concepts such as resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI), and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are discussed. Process modeling concepts to predict resin flow and cure in textile preforms are also discussed.

  14. Research on Composite Materials for Structural Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    from the intrinsic much closer to a constant . If the volume occupied by the viscosity. They used light scattering to standardize this chains in a random...torsion spring (with a length-independent spring constant ) can be used to predict stiffness and energy release rate as a function of length. I An...approximate analytical prediction of the mode I spring constant agrees well with finite element solutions. In a limited analytical study of mode II

  15. Composites based on cellulose fiber nonwovens and a water soluble polymer 1. Structure and strength-deformation characteristics of cellulose fiber nonwovens and structural characteristics of the composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerpakovska, D.; Kalnins, M.

    2012-03-01

    The results of a study on the strength-deformation characteristics (tensile elastic modulus, ultimate strength, elongation at break, and punching and tearing strengths) of two kinds of cellulose fiber nonwovens (CFNs) with dissimilar void content and different geometrical parameters of cellulose fibers are discussed. The structural characteristics of composites prepared by impregnation with poly(vinyl alcohol) water solutions are analyzed, too. Composites with volume fractions of polymer up to 0.4% and volume fractions of voids up to 0.3% were prepared. Filling of voids by the polymer occurred without significant changes in the structure of CFNs. The fraction of closed voids increased with polymer content.

  16. Global Failure Modes in High Temperature Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.

    1998-01-01

    Composite materials have been considered for many years as the major advance in the construction of energy efficient aerospace structures. Notable advances have been made in understanding the special design considerations that set composites apart from the usual "isotropic" engineering materials such as the metals. As a result, a number of significant engineering designs have been accomplished. However, one shortcoming of the currently favored composites is their relatively unforgiving behavior with respect to failure (brittleness) under seemingly mild impact conditions and large efforts are underway to rectify that situation, much along the lines of introducing thermoplastic matrix materials. Because of their relatively more pronounced (thermo) viscoelastic behavior these materials respond with "toughness" in fracture situations. From the point of view of applications requiring material strength, this property is highly desirable. This feature impacts several important and distinct engineering problems which have been' considered under this grant and cover the 1) effect of impact damage on structural (buckling) stability of composite panels, the 2) effect of time dependence on the progression of buckling instabilities, and the 3) evolution of damage and fracture at generic thickness discontinuities in structures. The latter topic has serious implications for structural stability problems (buckling failure in reinforced shell structures) as well as failure progression in stringer-reinforced shell structures. This grant has dealt with these issues. Polymer "toughness" is usually associated with uncrosslinked or thermo-plastic polymers. But, by comparison with their thermoset counterparts they tend to exhibit more pronounced time dependent material behavior; also, that time dependence can occur at lower temperatures which places restriction in the high temperature use of these "newer and tougher" materials that are not quite so serious with the thermoset matrix

  17. Characterization, Modeling, and Failure Analysis of Composite Structure Materials under Static and Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Brian Thomas

    Composite structures have long been used in many industries where it is advantageous to reduce weight while maintaining high stiffness and strength. Composites can now be found in an ever broadening range of applications: sporting equipment, automobiles, marine and aerospace structures, and energy production. These structures are typically sandwich panels composed of fiber reinforced polymer composite (FRPC) facesheets which provide the stiffness and the strength and a low density polymeric foam core that adds bending rigidity with little additional weight. The expanding use of composite structures exposes them to high energy, high velocity dynamic loadings which produce multi-axial dynamic states of stress. This circumstance can present quite a challenge to designers, as composite structures are highly anisotropic and display properties that are sensitive to loading rates. Computer codes are continually in development to assist designers in the creation of safe, efficient structures. While the design of an optimal composite structure is more complex, engineers can take advantage of the effect of enhanced energy dissipation displayed by a composite when loaded at high strain rates. In order to build and verify effective computer codes, the underlying assumptions must be verified by laboratory experiments. Many of these codes look to use a micromechanical approach to determine the response of the structure. For this, the material properties of the constituent materials must be verified, three-dimensional constitutive laws must be developed, and failure of these materials must be investigated under static and dynamic loading conditions. In this study, simple models are sought not only to ease their implementation into such codes, but to allow for efficient characterization of new materials that may be developed. Characterization of composite materials and sandwich structures is a costly, time intensive process. A constituent based design approach evaluates potential

  18. Structural and electrical properties of polystyrene carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, M. A.; Costa, L. C.; Mendiratta, S. K.; Henry, F.; Ramanitra, L.

    1999-09-01

    Conducting polymer composites are of great interest from the practical point of view, because their electrical properties can be tailored by properly choosing the components and their relative concentration. In this paper we report the unusual aspects of the behaviour of d.c. conductivity of a polystyrene (PS) matrix doped with carbon particles (C) and, in another case, carbon particles encapsulated (C enc) by a thin layer of another polymer. We study samples with different concentrations of carbon and try to relate the observed behaviour with the structure. A percolation threshold in the conductivity, as the concentration of carbon particles is varied, was observed in both C and C enc systems. Additionally, a sort of ageing effect was observed when the samples were submitted to temperature cycles during the measurement. The ageing effect is, however, observed only in the samples whose carbon concentration is less than the percolation threshold and there is a difference in the behaviour of C and C enc system, which we discuss in the paper. For all the samples, the presence of a percolation threshold indicates that the polystyrene does not cover the carbon particles uniformly. We study the structure of both the systems by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The d.c. conductivity was measured, in the temperature range 80-300 K, with applied fields of up to 100 kV m -1. A tentative model is provided to explain some of the unusual features observed.

  19. Diffuse reflectance spectra of orthopyroxene, olivine, and plagioclase as a function of composition and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Le, L.; Galindo, C.; Morris, R.; Lauer, V.; Vilas, F.

    1993-01-01

    Although many similarities exist between meteorite spectra and 'primitive' asteroids, there are unexplained discrepancies. These discrepancies do not appear to arise from grain size effects. Assuming that primitive meteorites did in fact originate from the 'primitive' asteroids, we believe that there are two testable explanations for the observed spectral discrepancies: compositional or structural differences. We have begun to synthesize and collect reflectance and Mossbauer spectra of pertinent materials, beginning with olivine, pyroxene, and plagioclase (all found in primitive meteorites), and to assess the possible effects composition may have on spectral features. Our study focuses on the combination of composition and structural effects.

  20. Dynamics and Aeroelasticity of Composite Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    VE OF F N SOSO NC S rT PA CE E S *AO, 19 PQC REEN:S7R m -- DENT F 𔃿-A O N’YE: 5 P 4 N A - 7.’ PQ -. A V1336--’ SKA K _ ,2&-,P Or ana0R -3e~e c 7 :1E...Freedom Flutter of a 1/2 Scale Forward-Swept-Wing Model, An Experimetnal and Analytical Study", NASA CR 172-324, Grumman Aerospace Corporation, April

  1. Low-Cost Composite Materials and Structures for Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deo, Ravi B.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Holzwarth, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of current applications of composite materials and structures in military, transport and General Aviation aircraft is presented to assess the maturity of composites technology, and the payoffs realized. The results of the survey show that performance requirements and the potential to reduce life cycle costs for military aircraft and direct operating costs for transport aircraft are the main reasons for the selection of composite materials for current aircraft applications. Initial acquisition costs of composite airframe components are affected by high material costs and complex certification tests which appear to discourage the widespread use of composite materials for aircraft applications. Material suppliers have performed very well to date in developing resin matrix and fiber systems for improved mechanical, durability and damage tolerance performance. The next challenge for material suppliers is to reduce material costs and to develop materials that are suitable for simplified and inexpensive manufacturing processes. The focus of airframe manufacturers should be on the development of structural designs that reduce assembly costs by the use of large-scale integration of airframe components with unitized structures and manufacturing processes that minimize excessive manual labor.

  2. Sensitivity and optimization of composite structures using MSC/NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Fleury, Claude

    1987-01-01

    Design sensitivity analysis for composites will soon be available in MSC/NASTRAN. The design variables for composites can be lamina thicknesses, orientation angles, material properties or a combination of all three. With the increasing use of composites in aerospace and automotive industries, this general capability can be used in its own right for carrying out sensitivity analysis of complicated real-life structures. As part of a research effort, the sensitivity analysis was coupled with a general purpose optimizer. This preliminary version of the optimizer is capable of dealing with minimum weight structural design with a rather general design variable linking capability at the element level or system level. Only sizing type of design variables (i.e., lamina thicknesses) can be handled by the optimizer. Test cases were run and validated by comparison with independent finite element packages. The linking of design sensitivity capability for composites in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful automated tool to carry out practical opitmization design of real-life complicated composite structures.

  3. The eggshell: structure, composition and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Hincke, Maxwell T; Nys, Yves; Gautron, Joel; Mann, Karlheinz; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro B; McKee, Marc D

    2012-01-01

    The calcareous egg is produced by all birds and most reptiles. Current understanding of eggshell formation and mineralization is mainly based on intensive studies of one species - the domesticated chicken Gallus gallus. The majority of constituents of the chicken eggshell have been identified. In this article we review eggshell microstructure and ultrastructure, and the results of recent genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the chicken eggshell matrix to draw attention to areas of current uncertainty such as the potential role of amorphous calcium carbonate and the specific nature of the molecules that initiate (nucleate) mammillary cone formation and terminate palisade layer calcification. Comparative avian genomics and proteomics have only recently become possible with the publication of the Taeniopygia guttata (zebra finch) genome. Further rapid progress is highly anticipated with the soon-to-be-released genomes of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) and duck (Anas platyrhynchos). These resources will allow rapid advances in comparative studies of the organic constituents of avian eggshell and their functional implications.

  4. Application of the self-diagnosis composite into concrete structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Hideaki; Shin, Soon-Gi; Okuhara, Yoshiki; Nomura, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Hiroaki

    2001-04-01

    The function and performance of the self-diagnosis composites embedded in mortar/concrete blocks and concrete piles were investigated by bending tests and electrical resistance measurements. Carbon powder (CP) and carbon fiber (CF) were introduced in glass fiber reinforced plastics composites to obtain electrical conductivity. The CP composite has commonly good performances in various bending tests of block and pile specimens, comparing to the CF composite. The electrical resistance of the CP composite increases in a small strain to response remarkably micro-crack formation at about 200 (mu) strain and to detect well to smaller deformations before the crack formation. The CP composite possesses a continuous resistance change up to a large strain level near the final fracture of concrete structures reinforced by steel bars. The cyclic bending tests showed that the micro crack closed at unloading state was able to be evaluated from the measurement of residual resistance. It has been concluded that the self- diagnosis composite is fairly useful for the measurement of damage and fracture in concrete blocks and piles.

  5. Automated web service composition supporting conditional branch structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengwei; Ding, Zhijun; Jiang, Changjun; Zhou, Mengchu

    2014-01-01

    The creation of value-added services by automatic composition of existing ones is gaining a significant momentum as the potential silver bullet in service-oriented architecture. However, service composition faces two aspects of difficulties. First, users' needs present such characteristics as diversity, uncertainty and personalisation; second, the existing services run in a real-world environment that is highly complex and dynamically changing. These difficulties may cause the emergence of nondeterministic choices in the process of service composition, which has gone beyond what the existing automated service composition techniques can handle. According to most of the existing methods, the process model of composite service includes sequence constructs only. This article presents a method to introduce conditional branch structures into the process model of composite service when needed, in order to satisfy users' diverse and personalised needs and adapt to the dynamic changes of real-world environment. UML activity diagrams are used to represent dependencies in composite service. Two types of user preferences are considered in this article, which have been ignored by the previous work and a simple programming language style expression is adopted to describe them. Two different algorithms are presented to deal with different situations. A real-life case is provided to illustrate the proposed concepts and methods.

  6. Structural Analysis of Novel Lignin-derived Carbon Composite Anodes

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, Nicholas W; Rios, Orlando; Feygenson, Mikhail; Proffen, Thomas E; Keffer, David J

    2014-01-01

    The development of novel lignin-based carbon composite anodes consisting of nanocrystalline and amorphous domains motivates the understanding of a relationship of the structural properties characterizing these materials, such as crystallite size, intracrystallite dspacing, crystalline volume fraction and composite density, with their pair distribution functions (PDF), obtained from both molecular dynamics simulation and neutron scattering. A model for these composite materials is developed as a function of experimentally measurable parameters and realized in fifteen composite systems, three of which directly match all parameters of their experimental counterparts. The accurate reproduction of the experimental PDFs using the model systems validates the model. The decomposition of the simulated PDFs provides an understanding of each feature in the PDF and allows for the development of a mapping between the defining characteristics of the PDF and the material properties of interest.

  7. Carbon fiber epoxy composites for both strengthening and health monitoring of structures.

    PubMed

    Salvado, Rita; Lopes, Catarina; Szojda, Leszek; Araújo, Pedro; Gorski, Marcin; Velez, Fernando José; Castro-Gomes, João; Krzywon, Rafal

    2015-05-06

    This paper presents a study of the electrical and mechanical behavior of several continuous carbon fibers epoxy composites for both strengthening and monitoring of structures. In these composites, the arrangement of fibers was deliberately diversified to test and understand the ability of the composites for self-sensing low strains. Composites with different arrangements of fibers and textile weaves, mainly unidirectional continuous carbon reinforced composites, were tested at the dynamometer. A two-probe method was considered to measure the relative electrical resistance of these composites during loading. The measured relative electrical resistance includes volume and contact electrical resistances. For all tested specimens, it increases with an increase in tensile strain, at low strain values. This is explained by the improved alignment of fibers and resulting reduction of the number of possible contacts between fibers during loading, increasing as a consequence the contact electrical resistance of the composite. Laboratory tests on strengthening of structural elements were also performed, making hand-made composites by the "wet process", which is commonly used in civil engineering for the strengthening of all types of structures in-situ. Results show that the woven epoxy composite, used for strengthening of concrete elements is also able to sense low deformations, below 1%. Moreover, results clearly show that this textile sensor also improves the mechanical work of the strengthened structural elements, increasing their bearing capacity. Finally, the set of obtained results supports the concept of a textile fabric capable of both structural upgrade and self-monitoring of structures, especially large structures of difficult access and needing constant, sometimes very expensive, health monitoring.

  8. Carbon Fiber Epoxy Composites for Both Strengthening and Health Monitoring of Structures

    PubMed Central

    Salvado, Rita; Lopes, Catarina; Szojda, Leszek; Araújo, Pedro; Gorski, Marcin; Velez, Fernando José; Castro-Gomes, João; Krzywon, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the electrical and mechanical behavior of several continuous carbon fibers epoxy composites for both strengthening and monitoring of structures. In these composites, the arrangement of fibers was deliberately diversified to test and understand the ability of the composites for self-sensing low strains. Composites with different arrangements of fibers and textile weaves, mainly unidirectional continuous carbon reinforced composites, were tested at the dynamometer. A two-probe method was considered to measure the relative electrical resistance of these composites during loading. The measured relative electrical resistance includes volume and contact electrical resistances. For all tested specimens, it increases with an increase in tensile strain, at low strain values. This is explained by the improved alignment of fibers and resulting reduction of the number of possible contacts between fibers during loading, increasing as a consequence the contact electrical resistance of the composite. Laboratory tests on strengthening of structural elements were also performed, making hand-made composites by the “wet process”, which is commonly used in civil engineering for the strengthening of all types of structures in-situ. Results show that the woven epoxy composite, used for strengthening of concrete elements is also able to sense low deformations, below 1%. Moreover, results clearly show that this textile sensor also improves the mechanical work of the strengthened structural elements, increasing their bearing capacity. Finally, the set of obtained results supports the concept of a textile fabric capable of both structural upgrade and self-monitoring of structures, especially large structures of difficult access and needing constant, sometimes very expensive, health monitoring. PMID:25954955

  9. THERMAL SHADOWS AND COMPOSITIONAL STRUCTURE IN COMET NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie; Jewitt, David E-mail: jewitt@ucla.edu

    2011-12-10

    We use a fully three-dimensional thermal evolution model to examine the effects of a non-uniform surface albedo on the subsurface thermal structure of comets. Surface albedo markings cast 'thermal shadows' with strong lateral thermal gradients. Corresponding compositional gradients can be strong, especially if the crystallization of amorphous water ice is triggered in the hottest regions. We show that the spatial extent of the structure depends mainly on the obliquity, thermal conductivity, and heliocentric distance. In some circumstances, subsurface structure caused by the thermal shadows of surface features can be maintained for more than 10 Myr, the median transport time from the Kuiper Belt to the inner solar system. Non-uniform compositional structure can be an evolutionary product and does not necessarily imply that comets consist of building blocks accumulated in different regions of the protoplanetary disk.

  10. Design optimization of composite structures operating in acoustic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chronopoulos, D.

    2015-10-01

    The optimal mechanical and geometric characteristics for layered composite structures subject to vibroacoustic excitations are derived. A Finite Element description coupled to Periodic Structure Theory is employed for the considered layered panel. Structures of arbitrary anisotropy as well as geometric complexity can thus be modelled by the presented approach. Damping can also be incorporated in the calculations. Initially, a numerical continuum-discrete approach for computing the sensitivity of the acoustic wave characteristics propagating within the modelled periodic composite structure is exhibited. The first- and second-order sensitivities of the acoustic transmission coefficient expressed within a Statistical Energy Analysis context are subsequently derived as a function of the computed acoustic wave characteristics. Having formulated the gradient vector as well as the Hessian matrix, the optimal mechanical and geometric characteristics satisfying the considered mass, stiffness and vibroacoustic performance criteria are sought by employing Newton's optimization method.

  11. Design study of fiber-composite penetrator cases

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.; Groves, S.E.; Lyon, R.E.

    1993-10-22

    A design study was conducted to demonstrate the viability of carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy composites as structural case materials for penetrating warheads. The objective was to conduct well-instrumented experimental studies of composite-body penetrators perforating mild steel plates and quantitatively model these plate penetrations using two- and three-dimensional finite element codes over a wide range of velocities and impact conditions in order to develop predictive capability for composite design and for use in tradeoff studies with existing case materials. Understanding of the failure of composite-body penetrators would be demonstrated by a rational design iteration which significantly improved performance. Initial studies utilized existing 1-degree tapered cylindrical carbon fiber/epoxy composite cases fabricated by wet-filament winding. These sharp-tipped, steel-nose, composite penetrators were strain-gaged, piggy-backed with 57 kilograms, and impacted into steel plates in a velocity-boosted droptower at impact velocities ranging from 3 to 18 meters per second. Load, time, and position data were recorded during the impact event as well as the axial and hoop strains in the composite case. Monolithic 4340 hardened steel penetrators with both sharp- and flat-tip 3-caliber ogive noses were also impacted into mild steel plates. Data from the composite-case and steel penetrators were used to calibrate a multiaxial, rate-dependent, flow and failure model for the mild steel plates in NIKE2D. The authors were then able to successfully predict survival and failure of the composite-case penetrators in normal-incidence droptower tests for different target thickness and velocity combinations.

  12. A critical review of nanotechnologies for composite aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, Vassilis; Masouras, Athanasios; Baltopoulos, Athanasios; Vavouliotis, Antonios; Sotiriadis, George; Pambaguian, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The past decade extensive efforts have been invested in understanding the nano-scale and revealing the capabilities offered by nanotechnology products to structural materials. Integration of nano-particles into fiber composites concludes to multi-scale reinforced composites and has opened a new wide range of multi-functional materials in industry. In this direction, a variety of carbon based nano-fillers has been proposed and employed, individually or in combination in hybrid forms, to approach the desired performance. Nevertheless, a major issue faced lately more seriously due to the interest of industry is on how to incorporate these nano-species into the final composite structure through existing manufacturing processes and infrastructure. This interest originates from several industrial applications needs that request the development of new multi-functional materials which combine enhanced mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. In this work, an attempt is performed to review the most representative processes and related performances reported in literature and the experience obtained on nano-enabling technologies of fiber composite materials. This review focuses on the two main composite manufacturing technologies used by the aerospace industry; Prepreg/Autoclave and Resin Transfer technologies. It addresses several approaches for nano-enabling of composites for these two routes and reports latest achieved results focusing on performance of nano-enabled fiber reinforced composites extracted from literature. Finally, this review work identifies the gap between available nano-technology integration routes and the established industrial composite manufacturing techniques and the challenges to increase the Technology Readiness Level to reach the demands for aerospace industry applications.

  13. A critical review of nanotechnologies for composite aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, Vassilis; Masouras, Athanasios; Baltopoulos, Athanasios; Vavouliotis, Antonios; Sotiriadis, George; Pambaguian, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    The past decade extensive efforts have been invested in understanding the nano-scale and revealing the capabilities offered by nanotechnology products to structural materials. Integration of nano-particles into fiber composites concludes to multi-scale reinforced composites and has opened a new wide range of multi-functional materials in industry. In this direction, a variety of carbon based nano-fillers has been proposed and employed, individually or in combination in hybrid forms, to approach the desired performance. Nevertheless, a major issue faced lately more seriously due to the interest of industry is on how to incorporate these nano-species into the final composite structure through existing manufacturing processes and infrastructure. This interest originates from several industrial applications needs that request the development of new multi-functional materials which combine enhanced mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. In this work, an attempt is performed to review the most representative processes and related performances reported in literature and the experience obtained on nano-enabling technologies of fiber composite materials. This review focuses on the two main composite manufacturing technologies used by the aerospace industry; Prepreg/Autoclave and Resin Transfer technologies. It addresses several approaches for nano-enabling of composites for these two routes and reports latest achieved results focusing on performance of nano-enabled fiber reinforced composites extracted from literature. Finally, this review work identifies the gap between available nano-technology integration routes and the established industrial composite manufacturing techniques and the challenges to increase the Technology Readiness Level to reach the demands for aerospace industry applications.

  14. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, Roberto J.

    2001-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI) Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  15. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, roberto J.

    2003-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI), Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  16. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) for Inspection of Composite Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Composite honeycomb structures are widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Flash thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Flash thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are discussed. Limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. In addition to flash thermography, X-ray computed tomography is used. The aluminum honeycomb core provides excellent X-ray contrast compared to the composite face sheet. The X-ray CT technique was used to detect impact damage, core crushing, and skin to core disbonds. Additionally, the X-ray CT technique is used to validate the thermography results.

  17. Better Finite-Element Analysis of Composite Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements a finite-element-based method of predicting the deformations of thin aerospace structures made of isotropic materials or anisotropic fiber-reinforced composite materials. The technique and corresponding software are applicable to thin shell structures in general and are particularly useful for analysis of thin beamlike members having open cross-sections (e.g. I-beams and C-channels) in which significant warping can occur.

  18. Rapid detection and quantification of impact damage in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that a multidisciplinary nondestructive evaluation approach for impact damage detection in composite structures can be used to produce a more efficient inspection. The multidisciplinary NDE approach relies on fast large area thermographic inspections along with detailed ultrasonic volumetric imaging. The thermal inspection technique rapidly identifies the impact damage. The ultrasonic volumetric imaging quantifies the impact generated delaminations through the volume of the structure.

  19. Rapid detection and quantification of impact damage in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Farley, Gary; Smith, Barry T.

    1991-01-01

    NDE results from thermographic and volumetric ultrasonic techniques are presented to illustrate the multidisciplinary NDE approach to impact-damage detection in such composite structures as are increasingly prevalent in helicopters. Attention is given to both flat-panel and 'y-stiffened' panel specimens; these were fabricated either with kevlar or carbon fiber through-the-thickness reinforcements. While thermal inspection identifies impact damage, volumetric imaging quantifies the impact-generated delaminations through the volume of the structure.

  20. The crustacean cuticle: structure, composition and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2012-01-01

    Crustaceans have a rigid exoskeleton, which is made of a layered cuticle, covering the soft body parts for protection from conspecific competitors and/or interspecific predators. Calcium carbonate adds rigidity to the crustacean cuticle, which consequently means that growth only occur at each molt. The current study presents a review of existing literature on crustacean exoskeleton cuticle physiology and biochemistry in relation to the molting process with special reference to calcification. As a result, research matter where knowledge remains limited has been identified during the molting process, including 1) whether the same or different epithelial cells are responsible for the decomposition and/or reconstruction of chitin and proteins, 2) how calcium carbonate levels are regulated at the cellular level during transfer between the cuticle and body organs, and 3) what factors maintain the amorphous state of calcium carbonate following deposition in the exoskeleton and temporary storage organs. The identification of these areas of focus provides a basis on which targeted future research may be developed, and potentially applied to other invertebrate or even vertebrate processes.

  1. Solar Coronal Structure Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Marilyn E.; Saba, Julia; Strong, Keith; Nitta, Nariaki; Harvey, Karen

    1997-01-01

    The subject of this investigation is the study the physics of the solar corona through the analysis of the EUV and UV data produced by two flights (12 May 1992 and 25 April 1994) of the Lockheed Solar Plasma Diagnostics Experiment (SPDE) sounding rocket payload, in combination with Yohkoh and groundbased data. These joint datasets are useful for understanding the physical state of the solar atmosphere from the photosphere to the corona at the time of the rocket flights. Each rocket flight produced both spectral and imaging data. Highlights of this initial year of the contract included compilation, scaling and co-alignment of image sets, substantial progress on the Bright Point study, initial work on the Active Region and Large Scale Structure studies, DRSC slit-aspect determination work and calibration activities. One paper was presented at the 1997 Annual Meeting of the AAS/SPD in Bozeman, Montana. An initial set of calibrated spectra were placed into the public domain via the World Wide Web. Three Quarterly Progress Reports have been submitted; progress for the fourth quarter of the contract is summarized in this Final Contract Report. The intent of the investigation is to compare the physics of small- and medium-scale structure with that of large-scale structures with weak fields. A study has been identified in each size domain. The calibration of the rocket data forms an important element of the work. Of equal importance is the slit-aspect solution, which determines the correspondence between locations along the spectrograph slit and points on the solar disk.

  2. Novel concepts in weld metal science: Role of gradients and composite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties are being investigated. Crack propagation is solidified alloy structures is being characterized as to solidification orientation and the profile of the compositional variations. The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a compositional gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Special techniques to produce laboratory samples with microstructures which simulate the composition and microstructure gradients in solidified weld metal are used, along with appropriate mathematical models, to evaluate the properties of the composite weld metals. The composite modeling techniques are being applied to describe the effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties in Ni-Cu alloys. The development of metal matrix composition weld deposits on austenitic stainless steels has been studied. The particulate metal matrix composites were produced with ceramic or refractory metal powder filled cored wire, which was gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welded.

  3. Resin transfer molding for advanced composite primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) has been identified by Douglas Aircraft Company (DAC) and industry to be one of the promising processes being developed today which can break the cost barrier of implementing composite primary structures into a commercial aircraft production environment. The RTM process developments and scale-up plans Douglas Aircrart will be conducting under the NASA ACT contract are discussed.

  4. ALL NATURAL COMPOSITE SANDWICH BEAMS FOR STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS. (R829576)

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of developing an all natural composite roof for housing application,
    structural panels and unit beams were manufactured out of soybean oil based resin
    and natural fibers (flax, cellulose, pulp, recycled paper, chicken feathers)
    using vacuum assisted resin tran...

  5. Design of a robust SHM system for composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Shawn; Liu, Ching-Chao; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2007-04-01

    Composites are becoming increasingly popular materials used in a wide range of applications on large-scale structures such as windmill blades, rocket motor cases, and aircraft fuselage and wings. For these large structures, using composites greatly enhances the operation and performance of the application, but also introduces extraordinary inspection challenges that push the limits of traditional NDE in terms of time and cost. Recent advances in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technologies offer a promising solution to these inspection challenges. But efficient design methodologies and implementation procedures are needed to ensure the reliability and robustness of SHM technologies for use in real-world applications. This paper introduces the essential elements of the design and implementation process by way of example. State-of-the-art techniques to optimize sensor placement, perform self-diagnostics, compensate for environmental conditions, and generate probability of detection (POD) curves for any application are discussed. The techniques are presented in relation to Acellent's recently developed SmartComposite System that is used to monitor the integrity of large composite structures. The system builds on the active sensor network technology of Acellent that is analogous to a built-in acousto-ultrasonic NDE system. Key features of the system include new miniaturized lightweight hardware, self-diagnostics and adaptive algorithm to automatically compensate for damaged sensors, reliable damage detection under different environmental conditions, and generation of POD curves. This paper will provide an overview of the system and demonstrate its key features.

  6. Composition, structure, physicochemical properties, and modifications of cassava starch.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan

    2015-05-20

    Cassava is highly tolerant to harsh climatic conditions and has great productivity on marginal lands. The supply of cassava starch, the major component of the root, is thus sustainable and cheap. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the composition, physical and chemical structures, physicochemical properties, nutritional quality, and modifications of cassava starch. Research opportunities to better understand this starch are provided.

  7. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  8. Application of Pi Preform Composite Joints in Fabrication of NASA Composite Crew Module Demonstration Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, John E.; Pelham, Larry

    2008-01-01

    This paper will describe unique and extensive use of pre-woven and impregnated pi cross-sections in fabrication of a carbon composite demonstration structure for the Composite Crew Module (CCM) Program. The program is managed by the NASA Safety and Engineering Center with participants from ten NASA Centers and AFRL. Multiple aerospace contractors are participating in the design development, tooling and fabrication effort as well. The goal of the program is to develop an agency wide design team for composite habitable spacecraft. The specific goals for this development project are: a) To gain hands on experience in design, building and testing a composite crew module. b) To validate key assumptions by resolving composite spacecraft design details through fabrication and testing of hardware. This paper will focus on the design and fabrication issues supporting selection of the Lockheed Martin patented Pi pre-form to provide sound composite joints a numerous locations in the structure. This abstract is based on Preliminary Design data. The final design will continue to evolve through the fall of 2007 with fabrication mostly completed by conference date.

  9. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that the

  10. Enhancement of Structural fluctuation in the region connecting two kinds of critical points in temperature-pressure-composition three-dimensional phase diagram: Raman studies of benzene/CO2 binary systems up to supercritical region.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hideyuki; Murai, Miki; Tono-oka, Mariko; Masuda, Kumiko; Ishii, Kikujiro

    2007-03-01

    Pressure dependence of Raman spectra of benzene/CO2 two-component systems was systematically studied at different temperatures and compositions. We estimated the magnitude of inhomogeneous component in Raman bandwidth to get information on the structural fluctuation in the system. It was found that the inhomogeneous bandwidth attains a maximum on an isothermal plane in the temperature-pressure-composition three-dimensional phase diagram when the state point crosses the line connecting the region where the density fluctuation is large (the vicinity of the critical point of neat CO2) and the region where the concentration fluctuation in a binary system is enhanced (the vicinity of the critical solution point). By accumulating such data, we found that the points of large structural fluctuation comprise a sheet that includes the extension line of the gas-liquid equilibrium line in the phase diagram of neat CO2 and the line connecting critical solution points of the two-component system at different temperatures. Interaction between benzene and CO2 molecules in the supercritical region is briefly discussed.

  11. Structure and thermophysical properties of aluminum-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, N. B.; Michurov, N. S.; Senaeva, E. I.; Bykova, T. M.

    2016-11-01

    The microstructure and thermophysical properties of aluminum-matrix composites have been studied, in which a granulated Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy has been used as the matrix, and SiC particles taken in the amounts of 10, 20, and 30 vol % have bee used as the filler. It has been shown that, with an increase in the amount of the filler, the temperatures of the solidus and liquidus of the composites and the values of the thermal expansion coefficient and density increase, whereas the heat capacity, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity decrease. The heat capacity of the composite depends on the amount of the filler: upon heating from 25 to 500°C, the heat capacity of the composite with 10 vol % SiC increases by only 16%, while that of the composite with 20 vol % SiC increases by 19%; and, at 39 vol % SiC, it increases by 36%.

  12. Structural features of ZnxOy/nanosilica composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gun'ko, V. M.; Bogatyrov, V. M.; Oranska, O. I.; Borysenko, L. I.; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J.; Książek, A.; Leboda, R.

    2013-07-01

    Nanocomposites with nanosilica A380 (SBET = 378 m2/g) and grafted ZnO or/and zinc silicate were prepared using zinc acetate adsorbed onto nanosilica and then treated at 600-900 °C. The samples studied using a variety of methods demonstrated the dependences of the textural and structural characteristics and phase transformations on the amounts of adsorbed precursor and treatment conditions. Thermodestruction of zinc acetate Zn(ac)2 at 600 °C results in the formation of ZnO which is amorphous according to XRD data. However, HRTEM images show the presence of a small amount of ZnO crystallites of 2-5 nm in size. A portion of surface silanols interacts with adsorbed Zn-containing compounds to form Sisbnd Osbnd Zn bonds, a number of which increases with increasing Zn(ac)2 content and heating temperature. Heating at 800-900 °C leads to transformation of ZnO and other structures into crystalline zinc silicate β-Zn2SiO4 with larger particles more strongly packed in aggregates. The specific surface area of the composites decreases with increasing zinc content and heating temperature.

  13. Improved Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Properties of MWCNT–PMMA Composites Using Layered Structures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of multi-walled carbon nanotubes–polymethyl methacrylate (MWCNT–PMMA) composites prepared by two different techniques was measured. EMI SE up to 40 dB in the frequency range 8.2–12.4 GHz (X-band) was achieved by stacking seven layers of 0.3-mm thick MWCNT–PMMA composite films compared with 30 dB achieved by stacking two layers of 1.1-mm thick MWCNT–PMMA bulk composite. The characteristic EMI SE graphs of the composites and the mechanism of shielding have been discussed. SE in this frequency range is found to be dominated by absorption. The mechanical properties (tensile, flexural strength and modulus) of the composites were found to be comparable or better than the pure polymer. The studies therefore show that the composite can be used as structurally strong EMI shielding material. PMID:20596500

  14. Study of Boundary Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE .......... 11 - 4 TRANSITIONS AND PHASE EQUILIBRIA AMONG GRAIN BOUNDARY STRUCTURES...19 B THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE .......... 37 C TRANSITIONS AND PHASE EQUILIBRIA AMONG GRAIN BOUNDARY...layer structure. 10 SECTION 3 THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE The (111) planes of the fcc structure is stacked as ABCABC... as

  15. Fabrication of a smart air intake structure using shape memory alloy wire embedded composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Beom-Seok; Kim, Min-Saeng; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Yun-Mi; Lee, Woo-Yong; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2010-05-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have been actively studied in many fields utilizing their high energy density. Applying SMA wire-embedded composite to aerospace structures, such as air intake of jet engines and guided missiles, is attracting significant attention because it could generate a comparatively large actuating force. In this research, a scaled structure of SMA wire-embedded composite was fabricated for the air intake of aircraft. The structure was composed of several prestrained Nitinol (Ni-Ti) SMA wires embedded in ∩-shape glass fabric reinforced plastic (GFRP), and it was cured at room temperature for 72 h. The SMA wire-embedded GFRP could be actuated by applying electric current through the embedded SMA wires. The activation angle generated from the composite structure was large enough to make a smart air intake structure.

  16. Spiral Passive Electromagnetic Sensor (SPES) for composite structural changes in aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iervolino, Onorio; Meo, Michele

    2016-04-01

    A major goal of structural health monitoring (SHM) is to provide accurate and responsive detection and monitoring of flaws. This research work reports an investigation of SPES sensors for damage detection, investigating different sensor sizes and how they affect the sensor's signal. A sensor able to monitor structural change that can be remotely interrogated and does not need a power supply is presented in this work. The SPES-sensor presents the great advantage of monitoring conductive and non-conductive structures such as fiberglass-reinforced composites (FRC) and carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP). Any phenomena that affect the magnetic field of the SPES can be detected and monitored. A study was conducted to investigate the capability of sensor to give information on structural changes, simulated by the presence of an external mass placed in the proximity of sensor. Effect of different positions of the SPES within the sample, and how to extend the area of inspection using multiple sensors was investigated. The sensor was tested embedded in the samples, simulating the structural change on both sides of the sample. In both configurations the sensor described herein demonstrated a great potential to monitor structural changes.

  17. Characterization and manufacture of braided composites for large commercial aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedro, Mark J.; Willden, Kurtis

    1992-01-01

    Braided composite materials has been recognized as a potential cost effective material form for fuselage structural elements. Consequently, there is a strong need for more knowledge in the design, manufacture, test, and analysis of textile structural composites. Advance braided composite technology is advanced towards applications to a large commercial transport fuselage. The mechanics are summarized of materials and manufacturing demonstration results which were obtained in order to acquire an understanding of how braided composites can be applied to a commercial fuselage. Textile composites consisting of 2-D, 2-D triaxial, and 3-D braid patterns with thermoplastic and two resin transfer molding resin systems were studied. The structural performance of braided composites was evaluated through an extensive mechanical test program. Analytical methods were also developed and applied to predict the following: internal fiber architecture; stiffness; fiber stresses; failure mechanisms; notch effects; and the history of failure of the braided composite specimens. The applicability of braided composites to a commercial transport fuselage was further assessed through a manufacturing demonstration.

  18. An Efficient Analysis Methodology for Fluted-Core Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremont, Leonard; Schultz, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    The primary loading condition in launch-vehicle barrel sections is axial compression, and it is therefore important to understand the compression behavior of any structures, structural concepts, and materials considered in launch-vehicle designs. This understanding will necessarily come from a combination of test and analysis. However, certain potentially beneficial structures and structural concepts do not lend themselves to commonly used simplified analysis methods, and therefore innovative analysis methodologies must be developed if these structures and structural concepts are to be considered. This paper discusses such an analysis technique for the fluted-core sandwich composite structural concept. The presented technique is based on commercially available finite-element codes, and uses shell elements to capture behavior that would normally require solid elements to capture the detailed mechanical response of the structure. The shell thicknesses and offsets using this analysis technique are parameterized, and the parameters are adjusted through a heuristic procedure until this model matches the mechanical behavior of a more detailed shell-and-solid model. Additionally, the detailed shell-and-solid model can be strategically placed in a larger, global shell-only model to capture important local behavior. Comparisons between shell-only models, experiments, and more detailed shell-and-solid models show excellent agreement. The discussed analysis methodology, though only discussed in the context of fluted-core composites, is widely applicable to other concepts.

  19. Comparison of Requirements for Composite Structures for Aircraft and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Hampton, Roy W.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Aggarwal, Pravin; Engelstad, Stephen P.; Chang, James B.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the aircraft and space vehicle requirements for composite structures are compared. It is a valuable exercise to study composite structural design approaches used in the airframe industry, and to adopt methodology that is applicable for space vehicles. The missions, environments, analysis methods, analysis validation approaches, testing programs, build quantities, inspection, and maintenance procedures used by the airframe industry, in general, are not transferable to spaceflight hardware. Therefore, while the application of composite design approaches from other industries is appealing, many aspects cannot be directly utilized. Nevertheless, experiences and research for composite aircraft structures may be of use in unexpected arenas as space exploration technology develops, and so continued technology exchanges are encouraged.

  20. Comparison of Requirements for Composite Structures for Aircraft and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Elliot, Kenny B.; Hampton, Roy W.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Aggarwal, Pravin; Engelstad, Stephen P.; Chang, James B.

    2010-01-01

    In this report, the aircraft and space vehicle requirements for composite structures are compared. It is a valuable exercise to study composite structural design approaches used in the airframe industry and to adopt methodology that is applicable for space vehicles. The missions, environments, analysis methods, analysis validation approaches, testing programs, build quantities, inspection, and maintenance procedures used by the airframe industry, in general, are not transferable to spaceflight hardware. Therefore, while the application of composite design approaches from aircraft and other industries is appealing, many aspects cannot be directly utilized. Nevertheless, experiences and research for composite aircraft structures may be of use in unexpected arenas as space exploration technology develops, and so continued technology exchanges are encouraged.