Science.gov

Sample records for structural genomics consortium

  1. Genome Structure Gallery from the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Structual Genomics Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer

    The TB Structural Genomics Consortium works with the structures of proteins from M. tuberculosis, analyzing these structures in the context of functional information that currently exists and that the Consortium generates. The database of linked structural and functional information constructed from this project will form a lasting basis for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and for structure-based drug design. The Consortium's structural and functional information is publicly available. The Structures Gallery makes more than 650 total structures available by PDB identifier. Some of these are not consortium targets, but all are viewable in 3D color and can be manipulated in various ways by Jmol, an open-source Java viewer for chemical structures in 3D from http://www.jmol.org/

  2. The TB Structural Genomics Consortium: A decade of progress

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Nicholas; Habel, Jeff E.; Johnston, Jodie M.; Krieger, Inna; Miallau, Linda; Sankaranarayanan, Ramasamy; Morse, Robert P.; Bruning, John; Swanson, Stephanie; Kim, Haelee; Kim, Chang-Yub; Li, Hongye; Bulloch, Esther M.; Payne, Richard J.; Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; Hung, Li-Wei; Baker, Edward N.; Lott, J. Shaun; James, Michael N.G.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Eisenberg, David S.; Sacchettini, James C.; Goulding, Celia W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The TB Structural Genomics Consortium is a worldwide organization of collaborators whose mission is the comprehensive structural determination and analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins to ultimately aid in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment. Congruent to the overall vision, Consortium members have additionally established an integrated facilities core to streamline M. tuberculosis structural biology and developed bioinformatics resources for data mining. This review aims to share the latest Consortium developments with the TB community, including recent structures of proteins that play significant roles within M. tuberculosis. Atomic resolution details may unravel mechanistic insights and reveal unique and novel protein features, as well as important protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, which ultimately leads to a better understanding of M. tuberculosis biology and may be exploited for rational, structure-based therapeutics design. PMID:21247804

  3. The High-Throughput Protein Sample Production Platform of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Rong; Anderson, Stephen; Aramini, James; Belote, Rachel; Buchwald, William A.; Ciccosanti, Colleen; Conover, Ken; Everett, John K.; Hamilton, Keith; Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Janjua, Haleema; Jiang, Mei; Kornhaber, Gregory J.; Lee, Dong Yup; Locke, Jessica Y.; Ma, Li-Chung; Maglaqui, Melissa; Mao, Lei; Mitra, Saheli; Patel, Dayaban; Rossi, Paolo; Sahdev, Seema; Sharma, Seema; Shastry, Ritu; Swapna, G.V.T.; Tong, Saichu N.; Wang, Dongyan; Wang, Huang; Zhao, Li; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Acton, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the core Protein Production Platform of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) and outline the strategies used for producing high-quality protein samples. The platform is centered on the cloning, expression and purification of 6X-His-tagged proteins using T7-based Escherichia coli systems. The 6X-His tag allows for similar purification procedures for most targets and implementation of high-throughput (HTP) parallel methods. In most cases, the 6X-His-tagged proteins are sufficiently purified (> 97% homogeneity) using a HTP two-step purification protocol for most structural studies. Using this platform, the open reading frames of over 16,000 different targeted proteins (or domains) have been cloned as > 26,000 constructs. Over the past nine years, more than 16,000 of these expressed protein, and more than 4,400 proteins (or domains) have been purified to homogeneity in tens of milligram quantities (see Summary Statistics, http://nesg.org/statistics.html). Using these samples, the NESG has deposited more than 900 new protein structures to the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The methods described here are effective in producing eukaryotic and prokaryotic protein samples in E. coli. This paper summarizes some of the updates made to the protein production pipeline in the last five years, corresponding to phase 2 of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI-2) project. The NESG Protein Production Platform is suitable for implementation in a large individual laboratory or by a small group of collaborating investigators. These advanced automated and/or parallel cloning, expression, purification, and biophysical screening technologies are of broad value to the structural biology, functional proteomics, and structural genomics communities. PMID:20688167

  4. The Global Cancer Genomics Consortium: interfacing genomics and cancer medicine.

    PubMed

    2012-08-01

    The Global Cancer Genomics Consortium (GCGC) is an international collaborative platform that amalgamates cancer biologists, cutting-edge genomics, and high-throughput expertise with medical oncologists and surgical oncologists; they address the most important translational questions that are central to cancer research and treatment. The annual GCGC symposium was held at the Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer, Mumbai, India, from November 9 to 11, 2011. The symposium showcased international next-generation sequencing efforts that explore cancer-specific transcriptomic changes, single-nucleotide polymorphism, and copy number variations in various types of cancers, as well as the structural genomics approach to develop new therapeutic targets and chemical probes. From the spectrum of studies presented at the symposium, it is evident that the translation of emerging cancer genomics knowledge into clinical applications can only be achieved through the integration of multidisciplinary expertise. In summary, the GCGC symposium provided practical knowledge on structural and cancer genomics approaches, as well as an exclusive platform for focused cancer genomics endeavors.

  5. The scientific impact of the Structural Genomics Consortium: a protein family and ligand-centered approach to medically-relevant human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Stefan; Lee, Wen Hwa; Marsden, Brian D.; Müller, Susanne; Niesen, Frank H.; Kavanagh, Kathryn L.; Ball, Linda J.; von Delft, Frank; Doyle, Declan A.; Oppermann, Udo C. T.; Sundström, Michael

    2007-01-01

    As many of the structural genomics centers have ended their first phase of operation, it is a good point to evaluate the scientific impact of this endeavour. The Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), operating from three centers across the Atlantic, investigates human proteins involved in disease processes and proteins from Plasmodium falciparum and related organisms. We present here some of the scientific output of the Oxford node of the SGC, where the target areas include protein kinases, phosphatases, oxidoreductases and other metabolic enzymes, as well as signal transduction proteins. The SGC has aimed to achieve extensive coverage of human gene families with a focus on protein–ligand interactions. The methods employed for effective protein expression, crystallization and structure determination by X-ray crystallography are summarized. In addition to the cumulative impact of accelerated delivery of protein structures, we demonstrate how family coverage, generic screening methodology, and the availability of abundant purified protein samples, allow a level of discovery that is difficult to achieve otherwise. The contribution of NMR to structure determination and protein characterization is discussed. To make this information available to a wide scientific audience, a new tool for disseminating annotated structural information was created that also represents an interactive platform allowing for a continuous update of the annotation by the scientific community. PMID:17932789

  6. Retirement Plan Consortium Structures for K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevin, John

    2012-01-01

    As school districts continue to seek administrative efficiencies and cost reductions in the wake of severe budget pressures, the resources they devote to creating or expanding retirement plan consortia is increasing. Understanding how to structure a retirement plan consortium is paramount to successfully achieving the many objectives of…

  7. Meeting Report from the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Workshop 9

    PubMed Central

    Davidsen, Tanja; Madupu, Ramana; Sterk, Peter; Field, Dawn; Garrity, George; Gilbert, Jack; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Kolker, Eugene; Kottmann, Renzo; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Morrison, Norman; Schriml, Lynn; Tatusova, Tatiana; Wooley, John

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 9th workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), held at the J. Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, MD, USA. It was the first GSC workshop to have open registration and attracted over 90 participants. This workshop featured sessions that provided overviews of the full range of ongoing GSC projects. It included sessions on Standards in Genomic Sciences, the open access journal of the GSC, building standards for genome annotation, the M5 platform for next-generation collaborative computational infrastructures, building ties with the biodiversity research community and two discussion panels with government and industry participants. Progress was made on all fronts, and major outcomes included the completion of the MIENS specification for publication and the formation of the Biodiversity working group. PMID:21304722

  8. Towards a Universal Clinical Genomics Database: the 2012 International Standards for Cytogenomic Arrays Consortium Meeting.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Erin Rooney; Wain, Karen E; Riethmaier, Darlene; Savage, Melissa; Smith-Packard, Bethanny; Kaminsky, Erin B; Rehm, Heidi L; Martin, Christa Lese; Ledbetter, David H; Faucett, W Andrew

    2013-06-01

    The 2012 International Standards for Cytogenomic Arrays (ISCA) Consortium Meeting, "Towards a Universal Clinical Genomic Database," was held in Bethesda, Maryland, May 21-22, 2012, and was attended by over 200 individuals from around the world representing clinical genetic testing laboratories, clinicians, academia, industry, research, and regulatory agencies. The scientific program centered on expanding the current focus of the ISCA Consortium to include the collection and curation of both structural and sequence-level variation into a unified clinical genomics database, available to the public through resources such as the National Center for Biotechnology Information's ClinVar database. Here, we provide an overview of the conference, with summaries of the topics presented for discussion by over 25 different speakers. Presentations are available online at www.iscaconsortium.org.

  9. Genome Analyses and Supplement Data from the International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    DOE Data Explorer

    International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    The sequencing of the first tree genome, that of Populus, was a project initiated by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE’s Office of Science. The International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC) was formed to help develop and guide post-sequence activities. The IPGC website, hosted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides draft sequence data as it is made available from DOE Joint Genome Institute, genome analyses for Populus, lists of related publications and resources, and the science plan. The data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ipgc/ssr_resource.htm.

  10. Effective electron-density map improvement and structure validation on a Linux multi-CPU web cluster: The TB Structural Genomics Consortium Bias Removal Web Service.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vinod; Swanson, Stanley M; Segelke, Brent; Kantardjieff, Katherine A; Sacchettini, James C; Rupp, Bernhard

    2003-12-01

    Anticipating a continuing increase in the number of structures solved by molecular replacement in high-throughput crystallography and drug-discovery programs, a user-friendly web service for automated molecular replacement, map improvement, bias removal and real-space correlation structure validation has been implemented. The service is based on an efficient bias-removal protocol, Shake&wARP, and implemented using EPMR and the CCP4 suite of programs, combined with various shell scripts and Fortran90 routines. The service returns improved maps, converted data files and real-space correlation and B-factor plots. User data are uploaded through a web interface and the CPU-intensive iteration cycles are executed on a low-cost Linux multi-CPU cluster using the Condor job-queuing package. Examples of map improvement at various resolutions are provided and include model completion and reconstruction of absent parts, sequence correction, and ligand validation in drug-target structures.

  11. The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium: Identification of ocular mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Monica M.; Wang, Xiaofei; Lu, Lu; Miller, Darla R; Rinchik, Eugene M; Williams, Robert; Goldowitz, Daniel

    2005-06-01

    The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium (TMGC) is in its fifth year of a ethylnitrosourea (ENU)-based mutagenesis screen to detect recessive mutations that affect the eye and brain. Each pedigree is tested by various phenotyping domains including the eye, neurohistology, behavior, aging, ethanol, drug, social behavior, auditory, and epilepsy domains. The utilization of a highly efficient breeding protocol and coordination of various universities across Tennessee makes it possible for mice with ENU-induced mutations to be evaluated by nine distinct phenotyping domains within this large-scale project known as the TMGC. Our goal is to create mutant lines that model human diseases and disease syndromes and to make the mutant mice available to the scientific research community. Within the eye domain, mice are screened for anterior and posterior segment abnormalities using slit-lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography, eye weight, histology, and immunohistochemistry. As of January 2005, we have screened 958 pedigrees and 4800 mice, excluding those used in mapping studies. We have thus far identified seven pedigrees with primary ocular abnormalities. Six of the mutant pedigrees have retinal or subretinal aberrations, while the remaining pedigree presents with an abnormal eye size. Continued characterization of these mutant mice should in most cases lead to the identification of the mutated gene, as well as provide insight into the function of each gene. Mice from each of these pedigrees of mutant mice are available for distribution to researchers for independent study.

  12. Structural genomics of pathogenic protozoa: an overview.

    PubMed

    Fan, Erkang; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Gelb, Michael H; Buckner, Frederick S; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Phizicky, Eric; Dumont, Mark; Mehlin, Christopher; Grayhack, Elizabeth; Sullivan, Mark; Verlinde, Christophe; Detitta, George; Meldrum, Deirdre R; Merritt, Ethan A; Earnest, Thomas; Soltis, Michael; Zucker, Frank; Myler, Peter J; Schoenfeld, Lori; Kim, David; Worthey, Liz; Lacount, Doug; Vignali, Marissa; Li, Jizhen; Mondal, Somnath; Massey, Archna; Carroll, Brian; Gulde, Stacey; Luft, Joseph; Desoto, Larry; Holl, Mark; Caruthers, Jonathan; Bosch, Jürgen; Robien, Mark; Arakaki, Tracy; Holmes, Margaret; Le Trong, Isolde; Hol, Wim G J

    2008-01-01

    The Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa (SGPP) Consortium aimed to determine crystal structures of proteins from trypanosomatid and malaria parasites in a high throughput manner. The pipeline of target selection, protein production, crystallization, and structure determination, is sketched. Special emphasis is given to a number of technology developments including domain prediction, the use of "co-crystallants," and capillary crystallization. "Fragment cocktail crystallography" for medical structural genomics is also described.

  13. The Teleprasenz Consortium: Structure and intentions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blauert, Jens

    1991-01-01

    The Teleprasenz-Consortium is an open group of currently 37 scientists of different disciplines who devote a major part of their research activities to the foundations of telepresence technology. Telepresence technology is basically understood as a means to bridge spatial and temporal gaps as well as certain kinds of concealment, inaccessibility and danger of exposure. The activities of the consortium are organized into three main branches: virtual environment, surveillance and control systems, and speech and language technology. A brief summary of the main activities in these areas is given.

  14. Enriching public descriptions of marine phages using the Genomic Standards Consortium MIGS standard.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Melissa Beth; Kottmann, Renzo; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2011-04-29

    In any sequencing project, the possible depth of comparative analysis is determined largely by the amount and quality of the accompanying contextual data. The structure, content, and storage of this contextual data should be standardized to ensure consistent coverage of all sequenced entities and facilitate comparisons. The Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) has developed the "Minimum Information about Genome/Metagenome Sequences (MIGS/MIMS)" checklist for the description of genomes and here we annotate all 30 publicly available marine bacteriophage sequences to the MIGS standard. These annotations build on existing International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC) records, and confirm, as expected that current submissions lack most MIGS fields. MIGS fields were manually curated from the literature and placed in XML format as specified by the Genomic Contextual Data Markup Language (GCDML). These "machine-readable" reports were then analyzed to highlight patterns describing this collection of genomes. Completed reports are provided in GCDML. This work represents one step towards the annotation of our complete collection of genome sequences and shows the utility of capturing richer metadata along with raw sequences.

  15. Enriching public descriptions of marine phages using the Genomic Standards Consortium MIGS standard

    PubMed Central

    Duhaime, Melissa Beth; Kottmann, Renzo; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2011-01-01

    In any sequencing project, the possible depth of comparative analysis is determined largely by the amount and quality of the accompanying contextual data. The structure, content, and storage of this contextual data should be standardized to ensure consistent coverage of all sequenced entities and facilitate comparisons. The Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) has developed the “Minimum Information about Genome/Metagenome Sequences (MIGS/MIMS)” checklist for the description of genomes and here we annotate all 30 publicly available marine bacteriophage sequences to the MIGS standard. These annotations build on existing International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC) records, and confirm, as expected that current submissions lack most MIGS fields. MIGS fields were manually curated from the literature and placed in XML format as specified by the Genomic Contextual Data Markup Language (GCDML). These “machine-readable” reports were then analyzed to highlight patterns describing this collection of genomes. Completed reports are provided in GCDML. This work represents one step towards the annotation of our complete collection of genome sequences and shows the utility of capturing richer metadata along with raw sequences. PMID:21677864

  16. Report of the 13(th) Genomic Standards Consortium Meeting, Shenzhen, China, March 4-7, 2012.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jack A; Bao, Yiming; Wang, Hui; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Edmunds, Scott C; Morrison, Norman; Meyer, Folker; Schriml, Lynn M; Davies, Neil; Sterk, Peter; Wilkening, Jared; Garrity, George M; Field, Dawn; Robbins, Robert; Smith, Daniel P; Mizrachi, Ilene; Moreau, Corrie

    2012-05-25

    This report details the outcome of the 13(th) Meeting of the Genomic Standards Consortium. The three-day conference was held at the Kingkey Palace Hotel, Shenzhen, China, on March 5-7, 2012, and was hosted by the Beijing Genomics Institute. The meeting, titled From Genomes to Interactions to Communities to Models, highlighted the role of data standards associated with genomic, metagenomic, and amplicon sequence data and the contextual information associated with the sample. To this end the meeting focused on genomic projects for animals, plants, fungi, and viruses; metagenomic studies in host-microbe interactions; and the dynamics of microbial communities. In addition, the meeting hosted a Genomic Observatories Network session, a Genomic Standards Consortium biodiversity working group session, and a Microbiology of the Built Environment session sponsored by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

  17. Genome Consortium for Active Teaching: Meeting the Goals of BIO2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, A. Malcolm; Ledbetter, Mary Lee S.; Hoopes, Laura L. M.; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Heyer, Laurie J.; Rosenwald, Anne; Fowlks, Edison; Tonidandel, Scott; Bucholtz, Brooke; Gottfried, Gail

    2007-01-01

    The Genome Consortium for Active Teaching (GCAT) facilitates the use of modern genomics methods in undergraduate education. Initially focused on microarray technology, but with an eye toward diversification, GCAT is a community working to improve the education of tomorrow's life science professionals. GCAT participants have access to affordable…

  18. 77 FR 43237 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Work Plan Review Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ..., reference methods, and reference data needed to assess confidence in human whole genome variant calls. A... confidence in human whole genome variant calls. A principal motivation for this consortium is to enable... out experiments to characterize the RMs using multiple sequencing methods, other methods,...

  19. Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium (SGSC): A Strategic Roadmap for Sequencing The Pig Genome

    PubMed Central

    Schook, Lawrence B.; Beever, Jonathan E.; Rogers, Jane; Humphray, Sean; Archibald, Alan; Chardon, Patrick; Milan, Denis; Rohrer, Gary; Eversole, Kellye

    2005-01-01

    The Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium (SGSC) was formed in September 2003 by academic, government and industry representatives to provide international coordination for sequencing the pig genome. The SGSC’s mission is to advance biomedical research for animal production and health by the development of DNAbased tools and products resulting from the sequencing of the swine genome. During the past 2 years, the SGSC has met bi-annually to develop a strategic roadmap for creating the required scientific resources, to integrate existing physical maps, and to create a sequencing strategy that captured international participation and a broad funding base. During the past year, SGSC members have integrated their respective physical mapping data with the goal of creating a minimal tiling path (MTP) that will be used as the sequencing template. During the recent Plant and Animal Genome meeting (January 16, 2005 San Diego, CA), presentations demonstrated that a human–pig comparative map has been completed, BAC fingerprint contigs (FPC) for each of the autosomes and X chromosome have been constructed and that BAC end-sequencing has permitted, through BLAST analysis and RH-mapping, anchoring of the contigs. Thus, significant progress has been made towards the creation of a MTP. In addition, whole-genome (WG) shotgun libraries have been constructed and are currently being sequenced in various laboratories around the globe. Thus, a hybrid sequencing approach in which 3x coverage of BACs comprising the MTP and 3x of the WG-shotgun libraries will be used to develop a draft 6x coverage of the pig genome. PMID:18629187

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Achromobacter sp. Strain AR476-2, Isolated from a Cellulolytic Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Daniel; Romero, Cintia M.; Fernandez, Pablo M.; Ferrero, Marcela A.

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter sp. AR476-2 is a noncellulolytic strain previously isolated from a cellulolytic consortium selected from samples of insect gut. Its genome sequence could contribute to the unraveling of the complex interaction of microorganisms and enzymes involved in the biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass in nature. PMID:27340069

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Achromobacter sp. Strain AR476-2, Isolated from a Cellulolytic Consortium.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Daniel; Romero, Cintia M; Fernandez, Pablo M; Ferrero, Marcela A; Martinez, M Alejandra

    2016-06-23

    Achromobacter sp. AR476-2 is a noncellulolytic strain previously isolated from a cellulolytic consortium selected from samples of insect gut. Its genome sequence could contribute to the unraveling of the complex interaction of microorganisms and enzymes involved in the biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass in nature.

  2. Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium: Accelerating Evidence-Based Practice of Genomic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Green, Robert C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Appelbaum, Paul S; Berg, Jonathan S; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Biswas, Sawona; Blout, Carrie L; Bowling, Kevin M; Brothers, Kyle B; Burke, Wylie; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen W; Cooper, Gregory M; East, Kelly; Evans, James P; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Garraway, Levi A; Garrett, Jeremy R; Gray, Stacy W; Henderson, Gail E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Holm, Ingrid A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Hutter, Carolyn M; Janne, Pasi A; Joffe, Steven; Kaufman, David; Knoppers, Bartha M; Koenig, Barbara A; Krantz, Ian D; Manolio, Teri A; McCullough, Laurence; McEwen, Jean; McGuire, Amy; Muzny, Donna; Myers, Richard M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ou, Jeffrey; Parsons, Donald W; Petersen, Gloria M; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi L; Roberts, J Scott; Robinson, Dan; Salama, Joseph S; Scollon, Sarah; Sharp, Richard R; Shirts, Brian; Spinner, Nancy B; Tabor, Holly K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Veenstra, David L; Wagle, Nikhil; Weck, Karen; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wolf, Susan M; Wynn, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2016-06-02

    Despite rapid technical progress and demonstrable effectiveness for some types of diagnosis and therapy, much remains to be learned about clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) and its role within the practice of medicine. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium includes 18 extramural research projects, one National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) intramural project, and a coordinating center funded by the NHGRI and National Cancer Institute. The consortium is exploring analytic and clinical validity and utility, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of sequencing via multidisciplinary approaches; it has thus far recruited 5,577 participants across a spectrum of symptomatic and healthy children and adults by utilizing both germline and cancer sequencing. The CSER consortium is analyzing data and creating publically available procedures and tools related to participant preferences and consent, variant classification, disclosure and management of primary and secondary findings, health outcomes, and integration with electronic health records. Future research directions will refine measures of clinical utility of CGES in both germline and somatic testing, evaluate the use of CGES for screening in healthy individuals, explore the penetrance of pathogenic variants through extensive phenotyping, reduce discordances in public databases of genes and variants, examine social and ethnic disparities in the provision of genomics services, explore regulatory issues, and estimate the value and downstream costs of sequencing. The CSER consortium has established a shared community of research sites by using diverse approaches to pursue the evidence-based development of best practices in genomic medicine.

  3. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  4. Personal Genome Sequencing in Ostensibly Healthy Individuals and the PeopleSeq Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Linderman, Michael D.; Nielsen, Daiva E.; Green, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of ostensibly healthy individuals have had their exome or genome sequenced, but a much smaller number of these individuals have received any personal genomic results from that sequencing. We term those projects in which ostensibly healthy participants can receive sequencing-derived genetic findings and may also have access to their genomic data as participatory predispositional personal genome sequencing (PPGS). Here we are focused on genome sequencing applied in a pre-symptomatic context and so define PPGS to exclude diagnostic genome sequencing intended to identify the molecular cause of suspected or diagnosed genetic disease. In this report we describe the design of completed and underway PPGS projects, briefly summarize the results reported to date and introduce the PeopleSeq Consortium, a newly formed collaboration of PPGS projects designed to collect much-needed longitudinal outcome data. PMID:27023617

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of a Chitinophaga Strain Isolated from a Lignocellulose Biomass-Degrading Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Luciano T.; Lopes, Erica M.; Fernandes, Camila C.; Fernandes, Gabriela C.; Sacco, Lais P.; Carareto Alves, Lucia M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chitinophaga comprises microorganisms capable of degrading plant-derived carbohydrates, serving as a source of new tools for the characterization and degradation of plant biomass. Here, we report the draft genome assembly of a Chitinophaga strain with 8.2 Mbp and 7,173 open reading frames (ORFs), isolated from a bacterial consortium that is able to degrade lignocellulose. PMID:28104646

  6. Clinical utilization of genomics data produced by the international Pseudomonas aeruginosa consortium

    PubMed Central

    Freschi, Luca; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Boyle, Brian; Dupont, Marie-Josée; Laroche, Jérôme; Larose, Stéphane; Maaroufi, Halim; Fothergill, Joanne L.; Moore, Matthew; Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Aaron, Shawn D.; Barbeau, Jean; Bell, Scott C.; Burns, Jane L.; Camara, Miguel; Cantin, André; Charette, Steve J.; Dewar, Ken; Déziel, Éric; Grimwood, Keith; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Harrison, Joe J.; Heeb, Stephan; Jelsbak, Lars; Jia, Baofeng; Kenna, Dervla T.; Kidd, Timothy J.; Klockgether, Jens; Lam, Joseph S.; Lamont, Iain L.; Lewenza, Shawn; Loman, Nick; Malouin, François; Manos, Jim; McArthur, Andrew G.; McKeown, Josie; Milot, Julie; Naghra, Hardeep; Nguyen, Dao; Pereira, Sheldon K.; Perron, Gabriel G.; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Rainey, Paul B.; Rousseau, Simon; Santos, Pedro M.; Stephenson, Anne; Taylor, Véronique; Turton, Jane F.; Waglechner, Nicholas; Williams, Paul; Thrane, Sandra W.; Wright, Gerard D.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Tucker, Nicholas P.; Tümmler, Burkhard; Winstanley, Craig; Levesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    The International Pseudomonas aeruginosa Consortium is sequencing over 1000 genomes and building an analysis pipeline for the study of Pseudomonas genome evolution, antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Metadata, including genomic and phenotypic data for each isolate of the collection, are available through the International Pseudomonas Consortium Database (http://ipcd.ibis.ulaval.ca/). Here, we present our strategy and the results that emerged from the analysis of the first 389 genomes. With as yet unmatched resolution, our results confirm that P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into three major groups that are further divided into subgroups, some not previously reported in the literature. We also provide the first snapshot of P. aeruginosa strain diversity with respect to antibiotic resistance. Our approach will allow us to draw potential links between environmental strains and those implicated in human and animal infections, understand how patients become infected and how the infection evolves over time as well as identify prognostic markers for better evidence-based decisions on patient care. PMID:26483767

  7. The EU FP6 EpiGenChlamydia Consortium: contribution of molecular epidemiology and host-pathogen genomics to understanding Chlamydia trachomatis-related disease.

    PubMed

    Morré, S A; Ouburg, S; Peña, A S; Brand, A

    2009-11-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infections are responsible for the world's leading cause of blindness (trachoma) and its most prevalent sexually transmitted disease, which is strongly associated with pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy and tubal infertility. Twin study-based findings of members of EpiGenChlamydia Consortium estimate that there is a 40% genetic predisposition to C. trachomatis infections. It is likely that the advances in human genomics will help to unravel the genetic predisposition at the gene level and will help to define a genetic fingerprint that can be used as a marker for this predisposition. The information gathered to date suggests that this predisposition and the factors contributing to prognosis are multifactorial. The EpiGenChlamydia Consortium aims to structure transnational research to such a degree that comparative genomics and genetic epidemiology can be performed in large numbers of unrelated individuals. Biobanking and data-warehouse building are the most central deliverables of the Coordination Action of the Consortium in Functional Genomics Research. In addition, the collective synergy acquired in this Coordination Action will allow for the generation of scientific knowledge on the C. trachomatis-host interaction, knowledge on the genetic predisposition to C. trachomatis infection and the development of tools for early detection of a predisposition to C. trachomatis infection and its complications. This review summarizes the consortium aims and progress, and future perspectives and directions.

  8. Genome Consortium for Active Teaching: Meeting the Goals of BIO2010

    PubMed Central

    Ledbetter, Mary Lee S.; Hoopes, Laura L.M.; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Heyer, Laurie J.; Rosenwald, Anne; Fowlks, Edison; Tonidandel, Scott; Bucholtz, Brooke; Gottfried, Gail

    2007-01-01

    The Genome Consortium for Active Teaching (GCAT) facilitates the use of modern genomics methods in undergraduate education. Initially focused on microarray technology, but with an eye toward diversification, GCAT is a community working to improve the education of tomorrow's life science professionals. GCAT participants have access to affordable microarrays, microarray scanners, free software for data analysis, and faculty workshops. Microarrays provided by GCAT have been used by 141 faculty on 134 campuses, including 21 faculty that serve large numbers of underrepresented minority students. An estimated 9480 undergraduates a year will have access to microarrays by 2009 as a direct result of GCAT faculty workshops. Gains for students include significantly improved comprehension of topics in functional genomics and increased interest in research. Faculty reported improved access to new technology and gains in understanding thanks to their involvement with GCAT. GCAT's network of supportive colleagues encourages faculty to explore genomics through student research and to learn a new and complex method with their undergraduates. GCAT is meeting important goals of BIO2010 by making research methods accessible to undergraduates, training faculty in genomics and bioinformatics, integrating mathematics into the biology curriculum, and increasing participation by underrepresented minority students. PMID:17548873

  9. LaGomiCs-Lagomorph Genomics Consortium: An International Collaborative Effort for Sequencing the Genomes of an Entire Mammalian Order.

    PubMed

    Fontanesi, Luca; Di Palma, Federica; Flicek, Paul; Smith, Andrew T; Thulin, Carl-Gustaf; Alves, Paulo C

    2016-07-01

    The order Lagomorpha comprises about 90 living species, divided in 2 families: the pikas (Family Ochotonidae), and the rabbits, hares, and jackrabbits (Family Leporidae). Lagomorphs are important economically and scientifically as major human food resources, valued game species, pests of agricultural significance, model laboratory animals, and key elements in food webs. A quarter of the lagomorph species are listed as threatened. They are native to all continents except Antarctica, and occur up to 5000 m above sea level, from the equator to the Arctic, spanning a wide range of environmental conditions. The order has notable taxonomic problems presenting significant difficulties for defining a species due to broad phenotypic variation, overlap of morphological characteristics, and relatively recent speciation events. At present, only the genomes of 2 species, the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and American pika (Ochotona princeps) have been sequenced and assembled. Starting from a paucity of genome information, the main scientific aim of the Lagomorph Genomics Consortium (LaGomiCs), born from a cooperative initiative of the European COST Action "A Collaborative European Network on Rabbit Genome Biology-RGB-Net" and the World Lagomorph Society (WLS), is to provide an international framework for the sequencing of the genome of all extant and selected extinct lagomorphs. Sequencing the genomes of an entire order will provide a large amount of information to address biological problems not only related to lagomorphs but also to all mammals. We present current and planned sequencing programs and outline the final objective of LaGomiCs possible through broad international collaboration.

  10. The peanut genome consortium and peanut genome sequence: Creating a better future through global food security

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The competitiveness of peanuts in domestic and global markets has been threatened by losses in productivity and quality that are attributed to diseases, pests, environmental stresses and allergy or food safety issues. The U.S. Peanut Genome Initiative (PGI) was launched in 2004, and expanded to a gl...

  11. EnigmaVis: online interactive visualization of genome-wide association studies of the Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) consortium.

    PubMed

    Novak, Nic M; Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E; Hibar, Derrek P; Thompson, Paul M; Toga, Arthur W

    2012-06-01

    In an attempt to increase power to detect genetic associations with brain phenotypes derived from human neuroimaging data, we recently conducted a large-scale, genome-wide association meta-analysis of hippocampal, brain, and intracranial volume through the Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) consortium. Here, we present a freely available online interactive tool, EnigmaVis, which makes it easy to visualize the association results generated by the consortium alongside allele frequency, genes, and functional annotations. EnigmaVis runs natively within the web browser, and generates plots that show the level of association between brain phenotypes at user-specified genomic positions. Uniquely, EnigmaVis is dynamic; users can interact with elements on the plot in real time. This software will be useful when exploring the effect on brain structure of particular genetic variants influencing neuropsychiatric illness and cognitive function. Future projects of the consortium and updates to EnigmaVis will also be displayed on the site. EnigmaVis is freely available online at http://enigma.loni.ucla.edu/enigma-vis/

  12. Report of the 14th Genomic Standards Consortium Meeting, Oxford, UK, September 17-21, 2012.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Barker, Katharine; Bicak, Mesude; Bourlat, Sarah; Coddington, Jonathan; Deck, John; Drummond, Alexei; Gilbert, Jack A.; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Kottmann, Renzo; Meyer, Chris; Morrison, Norman; Obst, Matthias; Robbins, Robert; Schriml, Lynn; Sterk, Peter; Stones-Havas, Steven

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 14th workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) held at the University of Oxford in September 2012. The primary goal of the workshop was to work towards the launch of the Genomic Observatories (GOs) Network under the GSC. For the first time, it brought together potential GOs sites, GSC members, and a range of interested partner organizations. It thus represented the first meeting of the GOs Network (GOs1). Key outcomes include the formation of a core group of “champions” ready to take the GOs Network forward, as well as the formation of working groups. The workshop also served as the first meeting of a wide range of participants in the Ocean Sampling Day (OSD) initiative, a first GOs action. Three projects with complementary interests – COST Action ES1103, MG4U and Micro B3 – organized joint sessions at the workshop. A two-day GSC Hackathon followed the main three days of meetings.

  13. Integrated Genomic Analysis of Diverse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from the Progenitor Cell Biology Consortium.

    PubMed

    Salomonis, Nathan; Dexheimer, Phillip J; Omberg, Larsson; Schroll, Robin; Bush, Stacy; Huo, Jeffrey; Schriml, Lynn; Ho Sui, Shannan; Keddache, Mehdi; Mayhew, Christopher; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Wells, James; Daily, Kenneth; Hubler, Shane; Wang, Yuliang; Zambidis, Elias; Margolin, Adam; Hide, Winston; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K; Malik, Punam; Cancelas, Jose A; Aronow, Bruce J; Lutzko, Carolyn

    2016-07-12

    The rigorous characterization of distinct induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) derived from multiple reprogramming technologies, somatic sources, and donors is required to understand potential sources of variability and downstream potential. To achieve this goal, the Progenitor Cell Biology Consortium performed comprehensive experimental and genomic analyses of 58 iPSC from ten laboratories generated using a variety of reprogramming genes, vectors, and cells. Associated global molecular characterization studies identified functionally informative correlations in gene expression, DNA methylation, and/or copy-number variation among key developmental and oncogenic regulators as a result of donor, sex, line stability, reprogramming technology, and cell of origin. Furthermore, X-chromosome inactivation in PSC produced highly correlated differences in teratoma-lineage staining and regulator expression upon differentiation. All experimental results, and raw, processed, and metadata from these analyses, including powerful tools, are interactively accessible from a new online portal at https://www.synapse.org to serve as a reusable resource for the stem cell community.

  14. Athlome Project Consortium: a concerted effort to discover genomic and other "omic" markers of athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Pitsiladis, Yannis P; Tanaka, Masashi; Eynon, Nir; Bouchard, Claude; North, Kathryn N; Williams, Alun G; Collins, Malcolm; Moran, Colin N; Britton, Steven L; Fuku, Noriyuki; Ashley, Euan A; Klissouras, Vassilis; Lucia, Alejandro; Ahmetov, Ildus I; de Geus, Eco; Alsayrafi, Mohammed

    2016-03-01

    Despite numerous attempts to discover genetic variants associated with elite athletic performance, injury predisposition, and elite/world-class athletic status, there has been limited progress to date. Past reliance on candidate gene studies predominantly focusing on genotyping a limited number of single nucleotide polymorphisms or the insertion/deletion variants in small, often heterogeneous cohorts (i.e., made up of athletes of quite different sport specialties) have not generated the kind of results that could offer solid opportunities to bridge the gap between basic research in exercise sciences and deliverables in biomedicine. A retrospective view of genetic association studies with complex disease traits indicates that transition to hypothesis-free genome-wide approaches will be more fruitful. In studies of complex disease, it is well recognized that the magnitude of genetic association is often smaller than initially anticipated, and, as such, large sample sizes are required to identify the gene effects robustly. A symposium was held in Athens and on the Greek island of Santorini from 14-17 May 2015 to review the main findings in exercise genetics and genomics and to explore promising trends and possibilities. The symposium also offered a forum for the development of a position stand (the Santorini Declaration). Among the participants, many were involved in ongoing collaborative studies (e.g., ELITE, GAMES, Gene SMART, GENESIS, and POWERGENE). A consensus emerged among participants that it would be advantageous to bring together all current studies and those recently launched into one new large collaborative initiative, which was subsequently named the Athlome Project Consortium.

  15. A genome-wide association study of upper aerodigestive tract cancers conducted within the INHANCE consortium.

    PubMed

    McKay, James D; Truong, Therese; Gaborieau, Valerie; Chabrier, Amelie; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Byrnes, Graham; Zaridze, David; Shangina, Oxana; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Bucur, Alexandru; Bencko, Vladimir; Holcatova, Ivana; Janout, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Benhamou, Simone; Bouchardy, Christine; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Talamini, Renato; Barzan, Luigi; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Macfarlane, Gary J; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Simonato, Lorenzo; Canova, Cristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Lowry, Ray; Conway, David I; McKinney, Patricia A; Healy, Claire M; Toner, Mary E; Znaor, Ariana; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Neto, José Eluf; Garrote, Leticia Fernández; Boccia, Stefania; Cadoni, Gabriella; Arzani, Dario; Olshan, Andrew F; Weissler, Mark C; Funkhouser, William K; Luo, Jingchun; Lubiński, Jan; Trubicka, Joanna; Lener, Marcin; Oszutowska, Dorota; Schwartz, Stephen M; Chen, Chu; Fish, Sherianne; Doody, David R; Muscat, Joshua E; Lazarus, Philip; Gallagher, Carla J; Chang, Shen-Chih; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M; Wang, Li-E; Franceschi, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Kelsey, Karl T; McClean, Michael D; Marsit, Carmen J; Nelson, Heather H; Romkes, Marjorie; Buch, Shama; Nukui, Tomoko; Zhong, Shilong; Lacko, Martin; Manni, Johannes J; Peters, Wilbert H M; Hung, Rayjean J; McLaughlin, John; Vatten, Lars; Njølstad, Inger; Goodman, Gary E; Field, John K; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Vineis, Paolo; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Krogh, Vittorio; Panico, Salvatore; González, Carlos A; Quirós, J Ramón; Martínez, Carmen; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Larrañaga, Nerea; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Key, Timothy; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Linseisen, Jakob; Boeing, Heiner; Hallmans, Göran; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Kumle, Merethe; Riboli, Elio; Välk, Kristjan; Vooder, Tõnu; Voodern, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Zelenika, Diana; Boland, Anne; Delepine, Marc; Foglio, Mario; Lechner, Doris; Blanché, Hélène; Gut, Ivo G; Galan, Pilar; Heath, Simon; Hashibe, Mia; Hayes, Richard B; Boffetta, Paolo; Lathrop, Mark; Brennan, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to etiologically complex disease. We conducted a GWAS to identify common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancers. Genome-wide genotyping was carried out using the Illumina HumanHap300 beadchips in 2,091 UADT cancer cases and 3,513 controls from two large European multi-centre UADT cancer studies, as well as 4,821 generic controls. The 19 top-ranked variants were investigated further in an additional 6,514 UADT cancer cases and 7,892 controls of European descent from an additional 13 UADT cancer studies participating in the INHANCE consortium. Five common variants presented evidence for significant association in the combined analysis (p ≤ 5 × 10⁻⁷). Two novel variants were identified, a 4q21 variant (rs1494961, p = 1×10⁻⁸) located near DNA repair related genes HEL308 and FAM175A (or Abraxas) and a 12q24 variant (rs4767364, p =2 × 10⁻⁸) located in an extended linkage disequilibrium region that contains multiple genes including the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene. Three remaining variants are located in the ADH gene cluster and were identified previously in a candidate gene study involving some of these samples. The association between these three variants and UADT cancers was independently replicated in 5,092 UADT cancer cases and 6,794 controls non-overlapping samples presented here (rs1573496-ADH7, p = 5 × 10⁻⁸); rs1229984-ADH1B, p = 7 × 10⁻⁹; and rs698-ADH1C, p = 0.02). These results implicate two variants at 4q21 and 12q24 and further highlight three ADH variants in UADT cancer susceptibility.

  16. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancers Conducted within the INHANCE Consortium

    PubMed Central

    McKay, James D.; Truong, Therese; Gaborieau, Valerie; Chabrier, Amelie; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Byrnes, Graham; Zaridze, David; Shangina, Oxana; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Bucur, Alexandru; Bencko, Vladimir; Holcatova, Ivana; Janout, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Benhamou, Simone; Bouchardy, Christine; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Talamini, Renato; Barzan, Luigi; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Macfarlane, Gary J.; Macfarlane, Tatiana V.; Simonato, Lorenzo; Canova, Cristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Lowry, Ray; Conway, David I.; McKinney, Patricia A.; Healy, Claire M.; Toner, Mary E.; Znaor, Ariana; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Neto, José Eluf; Garrote, Leticia Fernández; Boccia, Stefania; Cadoni, Gabriella; Arzani, Dario; Olshan, Andrew F.; Weissler, Mark C.; Funkhouser, William K.; Luo, Jingchun; Lubiński, Jan; Trubicka, Joanna; Lener, Marcin; Oszutowska, Dorota; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Chen, Chu; Fish, Sherianne; Doody, David R.; Muscat, Joshua E.; Lazarus, Philip; Gallagher, Carla J.; Chang, Shen-Chih; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M.; Wang, Li-E; Franceschi, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Kelsey, Karl T.; McClean, Michael D.; Marsit, Carmen J.; Nelson, Heather H.; Romkes, Marjorie; Buch, Shama; Nukui, Tomoko; Zhong, Shilong; Lacko, Martin; Manni, Johannes J.; Peters, Wilbert H. M.; Hung, Rayjean J.; McLaughlin, John; Vatten, Lars; Njølstad, Inger; Goodman, Gary E.; Field, John K.; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Vineis, Paolo; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Krogh, Vittorio; Panico, Salvatore; González, Carlos A.; Quirós, J. Ramón; Martínez, Carmen; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Larrañaga, Nerea; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Key, Timothy; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Linseisen, Jakob; Boeing, Heiner; Hallmans, Göran; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Kumle, Merethe; Riboli, Elio; Välk, Kristjan; Voodern, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Zelenika, Diana; Boland, Anne; Delepine, Marc; Foglio, Mario; Lechner, Doris; Blanché, Hélène; Gut, Ivo G.; Galan, Pilar; Heath, Simon; Hashibe, Mia; Hayes, Richard B.; Boffetta, Paolo; Lathrop, Mark; Brennan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to etiologically complex disease. We conducted a GWAS to identify common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancers. Genome-wide genotyping was carried out using the Illumina HumanHap300 beadchips in 2,091 UADT cancer cases and 3,513 controls from two large European multi-centre UADT cancer studies, as well as 4,821 generic controls. The 19 top-ranked variants were investigated further in an additional 6,514 UADT cancer cases and 7,892 controls of European descent from an additional 13 UADT cancer studies participating in the INHANCE consortium. Five common variants presented evidence for significant association in the combined analysis (p≤5×10−7). Two novel variants were identified, a 4q21 variant (rs1494961, p = 1×10−8) located near DNA repair related genes HEL308 and FAM175A (or Abraxas) and a 12q24 variant (rs4767364, p = 2×10−8) located in an extended linkage disequilibrium region that contains multiple genes including the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene. Three remaining variants are located in the ADH gene cluster and were identified previously in a candidate gene study involving some of these samples. The association between these three variants and UADT cancers was independently replicated in 5,092 UADT cancer cases and 6,794 controls non-overlapping samples presented here (rs1573496-ADH7, p = 5×10−8; rs1229984-ADH1B, p = 7×10−9; and rs698-ADH1C, p = 0.02). These results implicate two variants at 4q21 and 12q24 and further highlight three ADH variants in UADT cancer susceptibility. PMID:21437268

  17. Genomic analysis reveals key aspects of prokaryotic symbiosis in the phototrophic consortium “Chlorochromatium aggregatum”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ‘Chlorochromatium aggregatum’ is a phototrophic consortium, a symbiosis that may represent the highest degree of mutual interdependence between two unrelated bacteria not associated with a eukaryotic host. ‘Chlorochromatium aggregatum’ is a motile, barrel-shaped aggregate formed from a single cell of ‘Candidatus Symbiobacter mobilis”, a polarly flagellated, non-pigmented, heterotrophic bacterium, which is surrounded by approximately 15 epibiont cells of Chlorobium chlorochromatii, a non-motile photolithoautotrophic green sulfur bacterium. Results We analyzed the complete genome sequences of both organisms to understand the basis for this symbiosis. Chl. chlorochromatii has acquired relatively few symbiosis-specific genes; most acquired genes are predicted to modify the cell wall or function in cell-cell adhesion. In striking contrast, ‘Ca. S. mobilis’ appears to have undergone massive gene loss, is probably no longer capable of independent growth, and thus may only reproduce when consortia divide. A detailed model for the energetic and metabolic bases of the dependency of ‘Ca. S. mobilis’ on Chl. chlorochromatii is described. Conclusions Genomic analyses suggest that three types of interactions lead to a highly sophisticated relationship between these two organisms. Firstly, extensive metabolic exchange, involving carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur sources as well as vitamins, occurs from the epibiont to the central bacterium. Secondly, ‘Ca. S. mobilis’ can sense and move towards light and sulfide, resources that only directly benefit the epibiont. Thirdly, electron cycling mechanisms, particularly those mediated by quinones and potentially involving shared protonmotive force, could provide an important basis for energy exchange in this and other symbiotic relationships. PMID:24267588

  18. Heritability and Genome-Wide Association Analyses of Sleep Duration in Children: The EAGLE Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, Marcella; Pappa, Irene; Bustamante, Mariona; Bonilla, Carolina; Suarez, Anna; Tiesler, Carla M.; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Zafarmand, Mohammad Hadi; Alvarez-Pedrerol, Mar; Andersson, Sture; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Estivill, Xavier; Evans, David M.; Flexeder, Claudia; Forns, Joan; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Guxens, Monica; Huss, Anke; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Julvez, Jordi; Lahti, Jari; López-Vicente, Mónica; Lopez-Espinosa, Maria-Jose; Manz, Judith; Mileva-Seitz, Viara R.; Perola, Markus; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Salo, Perttu P.; Shahand, Shayan; Schulz, Holger; Standl, Marie; Thiering, Elisabeth; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Torrent, Maties; Uitterlinden, André G.; Smith, George Davey; Estarlich, Marisa; Heinrich, Joachim; Räikkönen, Katri; Vrijkotte, Tanja G.M.; Tiemeier, Henning; Sunyer, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    , Rivadeneira F, Salo PP, Shahand S, Schulz H, Standl M, Thiering E, Timpson NJ, Torrent M, Uitterlinden AG, Smith GD, Estarlich M, Heinrich J, Räikkönen K, Vrijkotte TG, Tiemeier H, Sunyer J. Heritability and genome-wide association analyses of sleep duration in children: the EAGLE consortium. SLEEP 2016;39(10):1859–1869. PMID:27568811

  19. DNA Methylation in Newborns and Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy: Genome-wide Consortium Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, Bonnie R.; Felix, Janine F.; Yousefi, Paul; Bakulski, Kelly M.; Just, Allan C.; Breton, Carrie; Reese, Sarah E.; Markunas, Christina A.; Richmond, Rebecca C.; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Küpers, Leanne K.; Oh, Sam S.; Hoyo, Cathrine; Gruzieva, Olena; Söderhäll, Cilla; Salas, Lucas A.; Baïz, Nour; Zhang, Hongmei; Lepeule, Johanna; Ruiz, Carlos; Ligthart, Symen; Wang, Tianyuan; Taylor, Jack A.; Duijts, Liesbeth; Sharp, Gemma C.; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A.; Nilsen, Roy M.; Vaez, Ahmad; Fallin, M. Daniele; Hu, Donglei; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Fuemmeler, Bernard F.; Huen, Karen; Kere, Juha; Kull, Inger; Munthe-Kaas, Monica Cheng; Gehring, Ulrike; Bustamante, Mariona; Saurel-Coubizolles, Marie José; Quraishi, Bilal M.; Ren, Jie; Tost, Jörg; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Peters, Marjolein J.; Håberg, Siri E.; Xu, Zongli; van Meurs, Joyce B.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Kerkhof, Marjan; Corpeleijn, Eva; Feinberg, Andrew P.; Eng, Celeste; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Benjamin Neelon, Sara E.; Bradman, Asa; Merid, Simon Kebede; Bergström, Anna; Herceg, Zdenko; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector; Brunekreef, Bert; Pinart, Mariona; Heude, Barbara; Ewart, Susan; Yao, Jin; Lemonnier, Nathanaël; Franco, Oscar H.; Wu, Michael C.; Hofman, Albert; McArdle, Wendy; Van der Vlies, Pieter; Falahi, Fahimeh; Gillman, Matthew W.; Barcellos, Lisa F.; Kumar, Ashish; Wickman, Magnus; Guerra, Stefano; Charles, Marie-Aline; Holloway, John; Auffray, Charles; Tiemeier, Henning W.; Smith, George Davey; Postma, Dirkje; Hivert, Marie-France; Eskenazi, Brenda; Vrijheid, Martine; Arshad, Hasan; Antó, Josep M.; Dehghan, Abbas; Karmaus, Wilfried; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Sunyer, Jordi; Ghantous, Akram; Pershagen, Göran; Holland, Nina; Murphy, Susan K.; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Ladd-Acosta, Christine; Snieder, Harold; Nystad, Wenche; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Relton, Caroline L.; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Wilcox, Allen; Melén, Erik; London, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, represent a potential mechanism for environmental impacts on human disease. Maternal smoking in pregnancy remains an important public health problem that impacts child health in a myriad of ways and has potential lifelong consequences. The mechanisms are largely unknown, but epigenetics most likely plays a role. We formed the Pregnancy And Childhood Epigenetics (PACE) consortium and meta-analyzed, across 13 cohorts (n = 6,685), the association between maternal smoking in pregnancy and newborn blood DNA methylation at over 450,000 CpG sites (CpGs) by using the Illumina 450K BeadChip. Over 6,000 CpGs were differentially methylated in relation to maternal smoking at genome-wide statistical significance (false discovery rate, 5%), including 2,965 CpGs corresponding to 2,017 genes not previously related to smoking and methylation in either newborns or adults. Several genes are relevant to diseases that can be caused by maternal smoking (e.g., orofacial clefts and asthma) or adult smoking (e.g., certain cancers). A number of differentially methylated CpGs were associated with gene expression. We observed enrichment in pathways and processes critical to development. In older children (5 cohorts, n = 3,187), 100% of CpGs gave at least nominal levels of significance, far more than expected by chance (p value < 2.2 × 10−16). Results were robust to different normalization methods used across studies and cell type adjustment. In this large scale meta-analysis of methylation data, we identified numerous loci involved in response to maternal smoking in pregnancy with persistence into later childhood and provide insights into mechanisms underlying effects of this important exposure. PMID:27040690

  20. Genome Clone Libraries and Data from the Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression (I.M.A.G.E.) Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer

    The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium was initiated in 1993 by four academic groups on a collaborative basis after informal discussions led to a common vision of how to achieve an important goal in the study of the human genome: the Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression Consortium's primary goal is to create arrayed cDNA libraries and associated bioinformatics tools, and make them publicly available to the research community. The primary organisms of interest include intensively studied mammalian species, including human, mouse, rat and non-human primate species. The Consortium has also focused on several commonly studied model organisms; as part of this effort it has arrayed cDNAs from zebrafish, and Fugu (pufferfish) as well as Xenopus laevis and X. tropicalis (frog). Utilizing high speed robotics, over nine million individual cDNA clones have been arrayed into 384-well microtiter plates, and sufficient replicas have been created to distribute copies both to sequencing centers and to a network of five distributors located worldwide. The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium represents the world's largest public cDNA collection, and works closely with the National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection(MGC) to help it achieve its goal of creating a full-length cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene. I.M.A.G.E. is also a member of the ORFeome Collaboration, working to generate a complete set of expression-ready open reading frame clones representing each human gene. Custom informatics tools have been developed in support of these projects to better allow the research community to select clones of interest and track and collect all data deposited into public databases about those clones and their related sequences. I.M.A.G.E. clones are publicly available, free of any royalties, and may be used by anyone agreeing with the Consortium's guidelines.

  1. Informational laws of genome structures

    PubMed Central

    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Manca, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the analysis of genomes by means of strings of length k occurring in the genomes, called k-mers, has provided important insights into the basic mechanisms and design principles of genome structures. In the present study, we focus on the proper choice of the value of k for applying information theoretic concepts that express intrinsic aspects of genomes. The value k = lg2(n), where n is the genome length, is determined to be the best choice in the definition of some genomic informational indexes that are studied and computed for seventy genomes. These indexes, which are based on information entropies and on suitable comparisons with random genomes, suggest five informational laws, to which all of the considered genomes obey. Moreover, an informational genome complexity measure is proposed, which is a generalized logistic map that balances entropic and anti-entropic components of genomes and is related to their evolutionary dynamics. Finally, applications to computational synthetic biology are briefly outlined. PMID:27354155

  2. Informational laws of genome structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Manca, Vincenzo

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the analysis of genomes by means of strings of length k occurring in the genomes, called k-mers, has provided important insights into the basic mechanisms and design principles of genome structures. In the present study, we focus on the proper choice of the value of k for applying information theoretic concepts that express intrinsic aspects of genomes. The value k = lg2(n), where n is the genome length, is determined to be the best choice in the definition of some genomic informational indexes that are studied and computed for seventy genomes. These indexes, which are based on information entropies and on suitable comparisons with random genomes, suggest five informational laws, to which all of the considered genomes obey. Moreover, an informational genome complexity measure is proposed, which is a generalized logistic map that balances entropic and anti-entropic components of genomes and is related to their evolutionary dynamics. Finally, applications to computational synthetic biology are briefly outlined.

  3. Vive la différence: naming structural variants in the human reference genome.

    PubMed

    Seal, Ruth L; Wright, Mathew W; Gray, Kristian A; Bruford, Elspeth A

    2013-05-01

    The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee has approved gene symbols for the majority of protein-coding genes on the human reference genome. To adequately represent regions of complex structural variation, the Genome Reference Consortium now includes alternative representations of some of these regions as part of the reference genome. Here, we describe examples of how we name novel genes in these regions and how this nomenclature is displayed on our website, http://genenames.org.

  4. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium Annual Report for 1987. Volume 7. Parallel, Structural, and Optimal Techniques in Vision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    RADC-TR-88-324, Vol VII (of nine), Part B Interim ReportMarch 1969 AD-A208 611 NORTHEAST ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONSORTIUM ANNUAL REPORT 1987...Northeast Artificial (If applicable) Rome Air Development Center (IRRE) Intelligence Consortium (NAIC) I 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b...62702F 4594 18 E2 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) NORTHEAST ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONSORTIUM ANNUAL REPORT,1987 Parallel, Structural, and

  5. Multivariate Analysis of Anthropometric Traits Using Summary Statistics of Genome-Wide Association Studies from GIANT Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analysis of single trait for multiple cohorts has been used for increasing statistical power in genome-wide association studies (GWASs). Although hundreds of variants have been identified by GWAS, these variants only explain a small fraction of phenotypic variation. Cross-phenotype association analysis (CPASSOC) can further improve statistical power by searching for variants that contribute to multiple traits, which is often relevant to pleiotropy. In this study, we performed CPASSOC analysis on the summary statistics from the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium using a novel method recently developed by our group. Sex-specific meta-analysis data for height, body mass index (BMI), and waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRadjBMI) from discovery phase of the GIANT consortium study were combined using CPASSOC for each trait as well as 3 traits together. The conventional meta-analysis results from the discovery phase data of GIANT consortium studies were used to compare with that from CPASSOC analysis. The CPASSOC analysis was able to identify 17 loci associated with anthropometric traits that were missed by conventional meta-analysis. Among these loci, 16 have been reported in literature by including additional samples and 1 is novel. We also demonstrated that CPASSOC is able to detect pleiotropic effects when analyzing multiple traits. PMID:27701450

  6. The discrepancies in the results of bioinformatics tools for genomic structural annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; Nowak, Robert; Osipowski, Paweł; Rymuszka, Jacek; Świerkula, Katarzyna; Wojcieszek, Michał; Przybecki, Zbigniew

    2014-11-01

    A major focus of sequencing project is to identify genes in genomes. However it is necessary to define the variety of genes and the criteria for identifying them. In this work we present discrepancies and dependencies from the application of different bioinformatic programs for structural annotation performed on the cucumber data set from Polish Consortium of Cucumber Genome Sequencing. We use Fgenesh, GenScan and GeneMark to automated structural annotation, the results have been compared to reference annotation.

  7. GCAT-SEEKquence: genome consortium for active teaching of undergraduates through increased faculty access to next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Buonaccorsi, Vincent P; Boyle, Michael D; Grove, Deborah; Praul, Craig; Sakk, Eric; Stuart, Ash; Tobin, Tammy; Hosler, Jay; Carney, Susan L; Engle, Michael J; Overton, Barry E; Newman, Jeffrey D; Pizzorno, Marie; Powell, Jennifer R; Trun, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    To transform undergraduate biology education, faculty need to provide opportunities for students to engage in the process of science. The rise of research approaches using next-generation (NextGen) sequencing has been impressive, but incorporation of such approaches into the undergraduate curriculum remains a major challenge. In this paper, we report proceedings of a National Science Foundation-funded workshop held July 11-14, 2011, at Juniata College. The purpose of the workshop was to develop a regional research coordination network for undergraduate biology education (RCN/UBE). The network is collaborating with a genome-sequencing core facility located at Pennsylvania State University (University Park) to enable undergraduate students and faculty at small colleges to access state-of-the-art sequencing technology. We aim to create a database of references, protocols, and raw data related to NextGen sequencing, and to find innovative ways to reduce costs related to sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. It was agreed that our regional network for NextGen sequencing could operate more effectively if it were partnered with the Genome Consortium for Active Teaching (GCAT) as a new arm of that consortium, entitled GCAT-SEEK(quence). This step would also permit the approach to be replicated elsewhere.

  8. Genome Sequence of Bacillus endophyticus and Analysis of Its Companion Mechanism in the Ketogulonigenium vulgare-Bacillus Strain Consortium.

    PubMed

    Jia, Nan; Du, Jin; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Gao, Feng; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus strains have been widely used as the companion strain of Ketogulonigenium vulgare in the process of vitamin C fermentation. Different Bacillus strains generate different effects on the growth of K. vulgare and ultimately influence the productivity. First, we identified that Bacillus endophyticus Hbe603 was an appropriate strain to cooperate with K. vulgare and the product conversion rate exceeded 90% in industrial vitamin C fermentation. Here, we report the genome sequencing of the B. endophyticus Hbe603 industrial companion strain and speculate its possible advantage in the consortium. The circular chromosome of B. endophyticus Hbe603 has a size of 4.87 Mb with GC content of 36.64% and has the highest similarity with that of Bacillus megaterium among all the bacteria with complete genomes. By comparing the distribution of COGs with that of Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus cereus and B. megaterium, B. endophyticus has less genes related to cell envelope biogenesis and signal transduction mechanisms, and more genes related to carbohydrate transport and metabolism, energy production and conversion, as well as lipid transport and metabolism. Genome-based functional studies revealed the specific capability of B. endophyticus in sporulation, transcription regulation, environmental resistance, membrane transportation, extracellular proteins and nutrients synthesis, which would be beneficial for K. vulgare. In particular, B. endophyticus lacks the Rap-Phr signal cascade system and, in part, spore coat related proteins. In addition, it has specific pathways for vitamin B12 synthesis and sorbitol metabolism. The genome analysis of the industrial B. endophyticus will help us understand its cooperative mechanism in the K. vulgare-Bacillus strain consortium to improve the fermentation of vitamin C.

  9. Comparative genetic mapping between clementine, pummelo and sweet orange and the interspecicic structure of the Clementine genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genetic mapping between clementine, pummelo and sweet orange and the interspecicic structure of the Clementine genome The availability of a saturated genetic map of Clementine was identified by the International Citrus Genome Consortium as an essential prerequisite to assist the assembly...

  10. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  11. Social and behavioral research in genomic sequencing: approaches from the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium Outcomes and Measures Working Group.

    PubMed

    Gray, Stacy W; Martins, Yolanda; Feuerman, Lindsay Z; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Barbara B; Christensen, Kurt D; Joffe, Steven; Rini, Christine; Veenstra, David; McGuire, Amy L

    2014-10-01

    The routine use of genomic sequencing in clinical medicine has the potential to dramatically alter patient care and medical outcomes. To fully understand the psychosocial and behavioral impact of sequencing integration into clinical practice, it is imperative that we identify the factors that influence sequencing-related decision making and patient outcomes. In an effort to develop a collaborative and conceptually grounded approach to studying sequencing adoption, members of the National Human Genome Research Institute's Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium formed the Outcomes and Measures Working Group. Here we highlight the priority areas of investigation and psychosocial and behavioral outcomes identified by the Working Group. We also review some of the anticipated challenges to measurement in social and behavioral research related to genomic sequencing; opportunities for instrument development; and the importance of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches. This work represents the early, shared efforts of multiple research teams as we strive to understand individuals' experiences with genomic sequencing. The resulting body of knowledge will guide recommendations for the optimal use of sequencing in clinical practice.

  12. Comparative genomics analysis of the companion mechanisms of Bacillus thuringiensis Bc601 and Bacillus endophyticus Hbe603 in bacterial consortium

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Nan; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Gao, Feng; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus endophyticus both act as the companion bacteria, which cooperate with Ketogulonigenium vulgare in vitamin C two-step fermentation. Two Bacillus species have different morphologies, swarming motility and 2-keto-L-gulonic acid productivities when they co-culture with K. vulgare. Here, we report the complete genome sequencing of B. thuringiensis Bc601 and eight plasmids of B. endophyticus Hbe603, and carry out the comparative genomics analysis. Consequently, B. thuringiensis Bc601, with greater ability of response to the external environment, has been found more two-component system, sporulation coat and peptidoglycan biosynthesis related proteins than B. endophyticus Hbe603, and B. endophyticus Hbe603, with greater ability of nutrients biosynthesis, has been found more alpha-galactosidase, propanoate, glutathione and inositol phosphate metabolism, and amino acid degradation related proteins than B. thuringiensis Bc601. Different ability of swarming motility, response to the external environment and nutrients biosynthesis may reflect different companion mechanisms of two Bacillus species. Comparative genomic analysis of B. endophyticus and B. thuringiensis enables us to further understand the cooperative mechanism with K. vulgare, and facilitate the optimization of bacterial consortium. PMID:27353048

  13. 78 FR 47674 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Progress and Planning Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ...: select appropriate sources for whole genome RMs and identify or design synthetic DNA constructs that... and synthetic DNA RMs along with the methods (documentary standards) and reference data necessary...

  14. Structural Genomics on the Web

    PubMed Central

    Wixon, Jo

    2001-01-01

    In this review we provide a brief guide to some of the resources and databases that can be used to locate information and aid research in the growing field of structural genomics. The review will provide examples, for less experienced users, of what can be achieved using a selection of the available sites. We hope that this will encourage you to use these sites to their full potential and whet your appetite to search for other related sites. PMID:18628900

  15. 2004 Structural, Function and Evolutionary Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas L. Brutlag Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    This Gordon conference will cover the areas of structural, functional and evolutionary genomics. It will take a systematic approach to genomics, examining the evolution of proteins, protein functional sites, protein-protein interactions, regulatory networks, and metabolic networks. Emphasis will be placed on what we can learn from comparative genomics and entire genomes and proteomes.

  16. A genome-wide approach to children's aggressive behavior: The EAGLE consortium.

    PubMed

    Pappa, Irene; St Pourcain, Beate; Benke, Kelly; Cavadino, Alana; Hakulinen, Christian; Nivard, Michel G; Nolte, Ilja M; Tiesler, Carla M T; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Davies, Gareth E; Evans, David M; Geoffroy, Marie-Claude; Grallert, Harald; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Hudziak, James J; Kemp, John P; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; McMahon, George; Mileva-Seitz, Viara R; Motazedi, Ehsan; Power, Christine; Raitakari, Olli T; Ring, Susan M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rodriguez, Alina; Scheet, Paul A; Seppälä, Ilkka; Snieder, Harold; Standl, Marie; Thiering, Elisabeth; Timpson, Nicholas J; Veenstra, René; Velders, Fleur P; Whitehouse, Andrew J O; Smith, George Davey; Heinrich, Joachim; Hypponen, Elina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Middeldorp, Christel M; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pennell, Craig E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Tiemeier, Henning

    2016-07-01

    Individual differences in aggressive behavior emerge in early childhood and predict persisting behavioral problems and disorders. Studies of antisocial and severe aggression in adulthood indicate substantial underlying biology. However, little attention has been given to genome-wide approaches of aggressive behavior in children. We analyzed data from nine population-based studies and assessed aggressive behavior using well-validated parent-reported questionnaires. This is the largest sample exploring children's aggressive behavior to date (N = 18,988), with measures in two developmental stages (N = 15,668 early childhood and N = 16,311 middle childhood/early adolescence). First, we estimated the additive genetic variance of children's aggressive behavior based on genome-wide SNP information, using genome-wide complex trait analysis (GCTA). Second, genetic associations within each study were assessed using a quasi-Poisson regression approach, capturing the highly right-skewed distribution of aggressive behavior. Third, we performed meta-analyses of genome-wide associations for both the total age-mixed sample and the two developmental stages. Finally, we performed a gene-based test using the summary statistics of the total sample. GCTA quantified variance tagged by common SNPs (10-54%). The meta-analysis of the total sample identified one region in chromosome 2 (2p12) at near genome-wide significance (top SNP rs11126630, P = 5.30 × 10(-8) ). The separate meta-analyses of the two developmental stages revealed suggestive evidence of association at the same locus. The gene-based analysis indicated association of variation within AVPR1A with aggressive behavior. We conclude that common variants at 2p12 show suggestive evidence for association with childhood aggression. Replication of these initial findings is needed, and further studies should clarify its biological meaning. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Genome-wide Studies of Verbal Declarative Memory in Nondemented Older People: The Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Debette, Stéphanie; Ibrahim Verbaas, Carla A.; Bressler, Jan; Schuur, Maaike; Smith, Albert; Bis, Joshua C.; Davies, Gail; Wolf, Christiane; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chibnik, Lori B.; Yang, Qiong; deStefano, Anita L.; de Quervain, Dominique J.F.; Srikanth, Velandai; Lahti, Jari; Grabe, Hans J.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Priebe, Lutz; Yu, Lei; Karbalai, Nazanin; Hayward, Caroline; Wilson, James F.; Campbell, Harry; Petrovic, Katja; Fornage, Myriam; Chauhan, Ganesh; Yeo, Robin; Boxall, Ruth; Becker, James; Stegle, Oliver; Mather, Karen A.; Chouraki, Vincent; Sun, Qi; Rose, Lynda M.; Resnick, Susan; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Kirin, Mirna; Wright, Alan F.; Jonsdottir, Maria K.; Au, Rhoda; Becker, Albert; Amin, Najaf; Nalls, Mike A.; Turner, Stephen T.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Oostra, Ben; Windham, Gwen; Coker, Laura H.; Zhao, Wei; Knopman, David S.; Heiss, Gerardo; Griswold, Michael E.; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Vitart, Veronique; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Zgaga, Lina; Rudan, Igor; Polasek, Ozren; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Schofield, Peter; Choi, Seung Hoan; Tanaka, Toshiko; An, Yang; Perry, Rodney T.; Kennedy, Richard E.; Sale, Michèle M.; Wang, Jing; Wadley, Virginia G.; Liewald, David C.; Ridker, Paul M.; Gow, Alan J.; Pattie, Alison; Starr, John M.; Porteous, David; Liu, Xuan; Thomson, Russell; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Assareh, Arezoo A.; Kochan, Nicole A.; Widen, Elisabeth; Palotie, Aarno; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Eriksson, Johan G.; Vogler, Christian; van Swieten, John C.; Shulman, Joshua M.; Beiser, Alexa; Rotter, Jerome; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Attia, John; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Amouyel, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Amieva, Hélène; Räikkönen, Katri; Garcia, Melissa; Wolf, Philip A.; Hofman, Albert; Longstreth, W.T.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; DeJager, Philip L.; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Breteler, Monique M.B.; Teumer, Alexander; Lopez, Oscar L.; Cichon, Sven; Chasman, Daniel I.; Grodstein, Francine; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Tzourio, Christophe; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Bennett, David A.; Ikram, Arfan M.; Deary, Ian J.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Launer, Lenore; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Seshadri, Sudha; Mosley, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Memory performance in older persons can reflect genetic influences on cognitive function and dementing processes. We aimed to identify genetic contributions to verbal declarative memory in a community setting. METHODS We conducted genome-wide association studies for paragraph or word list delayed recall in 19 cohorts from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium, comprising 29,076 dementia-and stroke-free individuals of European descent, aged ≥45 years. Replication of suggestive associations (p < 5 × 10−6) was sought in 10,617 participants of European descent, 3811 African-Americans, and 1561 young adults. RESULTS rs4420638, near APOE, was associated with poorer delayed recall performance in discovery (p = 5.57 × 10−10) and replication cohorts (p = 5.65 × 10−8). This association was stronger for paragraph than word list delayed recall and in the oldest persons. Two associations with specific tests, in subsets of the total sample, reached genome-wide significance in combined analyses of discovery and replication (rs11074779 [HS3ST4], p = 3.11 × 10−8, and rs6813517 [SPOCK3], p = 2.58 × 10−8) near genes involved in immune response. A genetic score combining 58 independent suggestive memory risk variants was associated with increasing Alzheimer disease pathology in 725 autopsy samples. Association of memory risk loci with gene expression in 138 human hippocampus samples showed cis-associations with WDR48 and CLDN5, both related to ubiquitin metabolism. CONCLUSIONS This largest study to date exploring the genetics of memory function in ~ 40,000 older individuals revealed genome-wide associations and suggested an involvement of immune and ubiquitin pathways. PMID:25648963

  18. Novel Loci Associated with Usual Sleep Duration: The CHARGE Consortium Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Hek, Karin; Chen, Ting-hsu; Watson, Nathaniel F.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Byrne, Enda M.; Cornelis, Marilyn; Warby, Simon C.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Cherkas, Lynn; Evans, Daniel S.; Grabe, Hans J.; Lahti, Jari; Li, Man; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lumley, Thomas; Marciante, Kristin D.; Pérusse, Louis; Psaty, Bruce M.; Robbins, John; Tranah, Gregory J.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Bellis, Claire; Biffar, Reiner; Bouchard, Claude; Cade, Brian; Curhan, Gary C.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ewert, Ralf; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fülöp, Tibor; Gehrman, Philip R.; Goodloe, Robert; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hernandez, Dena; Hofman, Albert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hunter, David J.; Jensen, Majken K.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Kähönen, Mika; Kao, Linda; Kraft, Peter; Larkin, Emma K.; Lauderdale, Diane S.; Luik, Annemarie I.; Medici, Marco; Montgomery, Grant W.; Palotie, Aarno; Patel, Sanjay R.; Pistis, Giorgio; Porcu, Eleonora; Quaye, Lydia; Raitakari, Olli; Redline, Susan; Rimm, Eric B.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Smith, Albert V.; Spector, Tim D.; Teumer, Alexander; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Young, Terry; Zhang, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hu, Frank; Mangino, Massimo; Martin, Nicholas G.; O’Connor, George T.; Stone, Katie L.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Viikari, Jorma; Gharib, Sina A.; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Räikkönen, Katri; Völzke, Henry; Mignot, Emmanuel; Tiemeier, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Usual sleep duration is a heritable trait correlated with psychiatric morbidity, cardiometabolic disease and mortality, although little is known about the genetic variants influencing this trait. A genome-wide association study of usual sleep duration was conducted using 18 population-based cohorts totaling 47,180 individuals of European ancestry. Genome-wide significant association was identified at two loci. The strongest is located on chromosome 2, in an intergenic region 35–80 kb upstream from the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 (lowest p=1.1 ×10−9). This finding was replicated in an African-American sample of 4771 individuals (lowest p=9.3 × 10−4). The strongest combined association was at rs1823125 (p=1.5 × 10−10, minor allele frequency 0.26 in the discovery sample, 0.12 in the replication sample), with each copy of the minor allele associated with a sleep duration 3.1 minutes longer per night. The alleles associated with longer sleep duration were associated in previous genome-wide association studies with a more favorable metabolic profile and a lower risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these associations may help elucidate biological mechanisms influencing sleep duration and its association with psychiatric, metabolic and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25469926

  19. Genome-wide high-density SNP linkage search for glioma susceptibility loci: results from the Gliogene Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Shete, Sanjay; Lau, Ching C; Houlston, Richard S; Claus, Elizabeth B; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Lai, Rose; Il’yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Bernstein, Jonine L; Olson, Sara H; Jenkins, Robert B; Yang, Ping; Vick, Nicholas A; Wrensch, Margaret; Davis, Faith G; McCarthy, Bridget J; Leung, Eastwood Hon-chiu; Davis, Caleb; Cheng, Rita; Hosking, Fay J; Armstrong, Georgina N; Liu, Yanhong; Yu, Robert K; Henriksson, Roger; Consortium, The Gliogene; Melin, Beatrice S; Bondy, Melissa L

    2011-01-01

    Gliomas, which generally have a poor prognosis, are the most common primary malignant brain tumors in adults. Recent genome-wide association studies have demonstrated that inherited susceptibility plays a role in the development of glioma. Although first-degree relatives of patients exhibit a two-fold increased risk of glioma, the search for susceptibility loci in familial forms of the disease has been challenging because the disease is relatively rare, fatal, and heterogeneous, making it difficult to collect sufficient biosamples from families for statistical power. To address this challenge, the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium (Gliogene) was formed to collect DNA samples from families with two or more cases of histologically confirmed glioma. In this study, we present results obtained from 46 U.S. families in which multipoint linkage analyses were undertaken using nonparametric (model-free) methods. After removal of high linkage disequilibrium SNPs, we obtained a maximum nonparametric linkage score (NPL) of 3.39 (P=0.0005) at 17q12–21.32 and the Z-score of 4.20 (P=0.000007). To replicate our findings, we genotyped 29 independent U.S. families and obtained a maximum NPL score of 1.26 (P=0.008) and the Z-score of 1.47 (P=0.035). Accounting for the genetic heterogeneity using the ordered subset analysis approach, the combined analyses of 75 families resulted in a maximum NPL score of 3.81 (P=0.00001). The genomic regions we have implicated in this study may offer novel insights into glioma susceptibility, focusing future work to identify genes that cause familial glioma. PMID:22037877

  20. Athlome Project Consortium: a concerted effort to discover genomic and other “omic” markers of athletic performance

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masashi; Eynon, Nir; Bouchard, Claude; North, Kathryn N.; Williams, Alun G.; Collins, Malcolm; Britton, Steven L.; Fuku, Noriyuki; Ashley, Euan A.; Klissouras, Vassilis; Lucia, Alejandro; Ahmetov, Ildus I.; de Geus, Eco; Alsayrafi, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous attempts to discover genetic variants associated with elite athletic performance, injury predisposition, and elite/world-class athletic status, there has been limited progress to date. Past reliance on candidate gene studies predominantly focusing on genotyping a limited number of single nucleotide polymorphisms or the insertion/deletion variants in small, often heterogeneous cohorts (i.e., made up of athletes of quite different sport specialties) have not generated the kind of results that could offer solid opportunities to bridge the gap between basic research in exercise sciences and deliverables in biomedicine. A retrospective view of genetic association studies with complex disease traits indicates that transition to hypothesis-free genome-wide approaches will be more fruitful. In studies of complex disease, it is well recognized that the magnitude of genetic association is often smaller than initially anticipated, and, as such, large sample sizes are required to identify the gene effects robustly. A symposium was held in Athens and on the Greek island of Santorini from 14–17 May 2015 to review the main findings in exercise genetics and genomics and to explore promising trends and possibilities. The symposium also offered a forum for the development of a position stand (the Santorini Declaration). Among the participants, many were involved in ongoing collaborative studies (e.g., ELITE, GAMES, Gene SMART, GENESIS, and POWERGENE). A consensus emerged among participants that it would be advantageous to bring together all current studies and those recently launched into one new large collaborative initiative, which was subsequently named the Athlome Project Consortium. PMID:26715623

  1. Novel loci associated with usual sleep duration: the CHARGE Consortium Genome-Wide Association Study.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, D J; Hek, K; Chen, T-H; Watson, N F; Eiriksdottir, G; Byrne, E M; Cornelis, M; Warby, S C; Bandinelli, S; Cherkas, L; Evans, D S; Grabe, H J; Lahti, J; Li, M; Lehtimäki, T; Lumley, T; Marciante, K D; Pérusse, L; Psaty, B M; Robbins, J; Tranah, G J; Vink, J M; Wilk, J B; Stafford, J M; Bellis, C; Biffar, R; Bouchard, C; Cade, B; Curhan, G C; Eriksson, J G; Ewert, R; Ferrucci, L; Fülöp, T; Gehrman, P R; Goodloe, R; Harris, T B; Heath, A C; Hernandez, D; Hofman, A; Hottenga, J-J; Hunter, D J; Jensen, M K; Johnson, A D; Kähönen, M; Kao, L; Kraft, P; Larkin, E K; Lauderdale, D S; Luik, A I; Medici, M; Montgomery, G W; Palotie, A; Patel, S R; Pistis, G; Porcu, E; Quaye, L; Raitakari, O; Redline, S; Rimm, E B; Rotter, J I; Smith, A V; Spector, T D; Teumer, A; Uitterlinden, A G; Vohl, M-C; Widen, E; Willemsen, G; Young, T; Zhang, X; Liu, Y; Blangero, J; Boomsma, D I; Gudnason, V; Hu, F; Mangino, M; Martin, N G; O'Connor, G T; Stone, K L; Tanaka, T; Viikari, J; Gharib, S A; Punjabi, N M; Räikkönen, K; Völzke, H; Mignot, E; Tiemeier, H

    2015-10-01

    Usual sleep duration is a heritable trait correlated with psychiatric morbidity, cardiometabolic disease and mortality, although little is known about the genetic variants influencing this trait. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of usual sleep duration was conducted using 18 population-based cohorts totaling 47 180 individuals of European ancestry. Genome-wide significant association was identified at two loci. The strongest is located on chromosome 2, in an intergenic region 35- to 80-kb upstream from the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 (lowest P=1.1 × 10(-9)). This finding was replicated in an African-American sample of 4771 individuals (lowest P=9.3 × 10(-4)). The strongest combined association was at rs1823125 (P=1.5 × 10(-10), minor allele frequency 0.26 in the discovery sample, 0.12 in the replication sample), with each copy of the minor allele associated with a sleep duration 3.1 min longer per night. The alleles associated with longer sleep duration were associated in previous GWAS with a more favorable metabolic profile and a lower risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these associations may help elucidate biological mechanisms influencing sleep duration and its association with psychiatric, metabolic and cardiovascular disease.

  2. One Thousand Genomes Imputation in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium Aggressive Prostate Cancer Genome-wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Chen, Constance; Liang, Liming; Diver, W. Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genotype imputation substantially increases available markers for analysis in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) by leveraging linkage disequilibrium from a reference panel. We sought to (i) investigate the performance of imputation from the August 2010 release of the 1000 Genomes Project (1000GP) in an existing GWAS of prostate cancer, (ii) look for novel associations with prostate cancer risk, (iii) fine-map known prostate cancer susceptibility regions using an approximate Bayesian framework and stepwise regression, and (iv) compare power and efficiency of imputation and de novo sequencing. METHODS We used 2,782 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4,458 controls from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium aggressive prostate cancer GWAS to infer 5.8 million well-imputed autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms. RESULTS Imputation quality, as measured by correlation between imputed and true allele counts, was higher among common variants than rare variants. We found no novel prostate cancer associations among a subset of 1.2 million well-imputed low-frequency variants. At a genome-wide sequencing cost of $2,500, imputation from SNP arrays is a more powerful strategy than sequencing for detecting disease associations of SNPs with minor allele frequencies above 1%. CONCLUSIONS 1000GP imputation provided dense coverage of previously-identified prostate cancer susceptibility regions, highlighting its potential as an inexpensive first-pass approach to fine-mapping in regions such as 5p15 and 8q24. Our study shows 1000GP imputation can accurately identify low-frequency variants and stresses the importance of large sample size when studying these variants. PMID:23255287

  3. Mitochondrial Genome Structure of Photosynthetic Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Yurina, N P; Odintsova, M S

    2016-02-01

    Current ideas of plant mitochondrial genome organization are presented. Data on the size and structural organization of mtDNA, gene content, and peculiarities are summarized. Special emphasis is given to characteristic features of the mitochondrial genomes of land plants and photosynthetic algae that distinguish them from the mitochondrial genomes of other eukaryotes. The data published before the end of 2014 are reviewed.

  4. Effect of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene on methane oxidation and community structure of methanotrophic consortium.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-01-01

    The methane oxidation rate and community structure of a methanotrophic consortium were analyzed to determine the effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) on methane oxidation. The maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax ) of the consortium was 326.8 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1), and it had a half-saturation constant (Km ) of 143.8 μM. The addition of TCE or PCE resulted in decreased methane oxidation rates, which were decreased from 101.73 to 5.47-24.64 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio, and to 61.95-67.43 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. TCE and PCE were non-competitive inhibitors for methane oxidation, and their inhibition constants (Ki ) were 33.4 and 132.0 μM, respectively. When the methanotrophic community was analyzed based on pmoA using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), the pmoA gene copy numbers were shown to decrease from 7.3 ± 0.7 × 10(8) to 2.1-5.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio and to 2.5-7.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. Community analysis by microarray demonstrated that Methylocystis (type II methanotrophs) were the most abundant in the methanotrophic community composition in the presence of TCE. These results suggest that toxic effects caused by TCE and PCE change not only methane oxidation rates but also the community structure of the methanotrophic consortium.

  5. An Integrated Functional Genomics Consortium to Increase Carbon Sequestration in Poplars: Optimizing Aboveground Carbon Gain

    SciTech Connect

    Karnosky, David F; Podila, G Krishna; Burton, Andrew J

    2009-02-17

    This project used gene expression patterns from two forest Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments (Aspen FACE in northern Wisconsin and POPFACE in Italy) to examine ways to increase the aboveground carbon sequestration potential of poplars (Populus). The aim was to use patterns of global gene expression to identify candidate genes for increased carbon sequestration. Gene expression studies were linked to physiological measurements in order to elucidate bottlenecks in carbon acquisition in trees grown in elevated CO2 conditions. Delayed senescence allowing additional carbon uptake late in the growing season, was also examined, and expression of target genes was tested in elite P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa hybrids. In Populus euramericana, gene expression was sensitive to elevated CO2, but the response depended on the developmental age of the leaves. Most differentially expressed genes were upregulated in elevated CO2 in young leaves, while most were downregulated in elevated CO2 in semi-mature leaves. In P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa hybrids, leaf development and leaf quality traits, including leaf area, leaf shape, epidermal cell area, stomatal number, specific leaf area, and canopy senescence were sensitive to elevated CO2. Significant increases under elevated CO2 occurred for both above- and belowground growth in the F-2 generation. Three areas of the genome played a role in determining aboveground growth response to elevated CO2, with three additional areas of the genome important in determining belowground growth responses to elevated CO2. In Populus tremuloides, CO2-responsive genes in leaves were found to differ between two aspen clones that showed different growth responses, despite similarity in many physiological parameters (photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and leaf area index). The CO2-responsive clone shunted C into pathways associated with active defense/response to stress, carbohydrate/starch biosynthesis and subsequent growth. The CO2

  6. The Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID)

    PubMed Central

    Myler, P.J.; Stacy, R.; Stewart, L.; Staker, B.L.; Van Voorhis, W.C.; Varani, G.; Buchko, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    The NIAID-funded Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) is a consortium established to apply structural genomics approaches to potential drug targets from NIAID priority organisms for biodefense and emerging and re-emerging diseases. The mission of the SSGCID is to determine ~400 protein structures over five years ending in 2012. In order to maximize biomedical impact, ligand-based drug-lead discovery campaigns will be pursued for a small number of high-impact targets. Here we review the center’s target selection processes, which include pro-active engagement of the infectious disease research and drug therapy communities to identify drug targets, essential enzymes, virulence factors and vaccine candidates of biomedical relevance to combat infectious diseases. This is followed by a brief overview of the SSGCID structure determination pipeline and ligand screening methodology. Finally, specifics of our resources available to the scientific community are presented. Physical materials and data produced by SSGCID will be made available to the scientific community, with the aim that they will provide essential groundwork benefiting future research and drug discovery. PMID:19594426

  7. The National Astronomy Consortium Summer Student Research Program at NRAO-Socorro: Year 2 structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Sheth, Kartik; Giles, Faye; Perez, Laura M.; Arancibia, Demian; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    I will present a summary of the program structure used for the second year of hosting a summer student research cohort of the National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM. The NAC is a program partnering physics and astronomy departments in majority and minority-serving institutions across the country. The primary aim of this program is to support traditionally underrepresented students interested in pursuing a career in STEM through a 9-10 week summer astronomy research project and a year of additional mentoring after they return to their home institution. I will describe the research, professional development, and inclusivity goals of the program, and show how these were used to create a weekly syllabus for the summer. I will also highlight several unique aspects of this program, including the recruitment of remote mentors for students to better balance the gender and racial diversity of available role models for the students, as well as the hosting of a contemporaneous series of visiting diversity speakers. Finally, I will discuss structures for continuing to engage, interact with, and mentor students in the academic year following the summer program. A goal of this work going forward is to be able to make instructional and organizational materials from this program available to other sites interested in joining the NAC or hosting similar programs at their own institution.

  8. Chapter 6: Structural variation and medical genomics.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Benjamin J

    2012-01-01

    Differences between individual human genomes, or between human and cancer genomes, range in scale from single nucleotide variants (SNVs) through intermediate and large-scale duplications, deletions, and rearrangements of genomic segments. The latter class, called structural variants (SVs), have received considerable attention in the past several years as they are a previously under appreciated source of variation in human genomes. Much of this recent attention is the result of the availability of higher-resolution technologies for measuring these variants, including both microarray-based techniques, and more recently, high-throughput DNA sequencing. We describe the genomic technologies and computational techniques currently used to measure SVs, focusing on applications in human and cancer genomics.

  9. Bacterial community structure and predicted alginate metabolic pathway in an alginate-degrading bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akihisa; Miura, Toyokazu; Kawata, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Methane fermentation is one of the effective approaches for utilization of brown algae; however, this process is limited by the microbial capability to degrade alginate, a main polysaccharide found in these algae. Despite its potential, little is known about anaerobic microbial degradation of alginate. Here we constructed a bacterial consortium able to anaerobically degrade alginate. Taxonomic classification of 16S rRNA gene, based on high-throughput sequencing data, revealed that this consortium included two dominant strains, designated HUA-1 and HUA-2; these strains were related to Clostridiaceae bacterium SK082 (99%) and Dysgonomonas capnocytophagoides (95%), respectively. Alginate lyase activity and metagenomic analyses, based on high-throughput sequencing data, revealed that this bacterial consortium possessed putative genes related to a predicted alginate metabolic pathway. However, HUA-1 and 2 did not grow on agar medium with alginate by using roll-tube method, suggesting the existence of bacterial interactions like symbiosis for anaerobic alginate degradation.

  10. Systematic Prioritization of Druggable Mutations in ∼5000 Genomes Across 16 Cancer Types Using a Structural Genomics-based Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junfei; Cheng, Feixiong; Wang, Yuanyuan; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    A massive amount of somatic mutations has been cataloged in large-scale projects such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the International Cancer Genome Consortium projects. The majority of the somatic mutations found in tumor genomes are neutral 'passenger' rather than damaging “driver” mutations. Now, understanding their biological consequences and prioritizing them for druggable targets are urgently needed. Thanks to the rapid advances in structural genomics technologies (e.g. X-ray), large-scale protein structural data has now been made available, providing critical information for deciphering functional roles of mutations in cancer and prioritizing those alterations that may mediate drug binding at the atom resolution and, as such, be druggable targets. We hypothesized that mutations at protein–ligand binding-site residues are likely to be druggable targets. Thus, to prioritize druggable mutations, we developed SGDriver, a structural genomics-based method incorporating the somatic missense mutations into protein–ligand binding-site residues using a Bayes inference statistical framework. We applied SGDriver to 746,631 missense mutations observed in 4997 tumor-normal pairs across 16 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas. SGDriver detected 14,471 potential druggable mutations in 2091 proteins (including 1,516 recurrently mutated proteins) across 3558 cancer genomes (71.2%), and further identified 298 proteins harboring mutations that were significantly enriched at protein–ligand binding-site residues (adjusted p value < 0.05). The identified proteins are significantly enriched in both oncoproteins and tumor suppressors. The follow-up drug-target network analysis suggested 98 known and 126 repurposed druggable anticancer targets (e.g. SPOP and NR3C1). Furthermore, our integrative analysis indicated that 13% of patients might benefit from current targeted therapy, and this –proportion would increase to 31% when considering drug repositioning

  11. Identification of structural variation in mouse genomes

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Thomas M.; Wong, Kim; Adams, David J.; Flint, Jonathan; Reymond, Alexandre; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2014-01-01

    Structural variation is variation in structure of DNA regions affecting DNA sequence length and/or orientation. It generally includes deletions, insertions, copy-number gains, inversions, and transposable elements. Traditionally, the identification of structural variation in genomes has been challenging. However, with the recent advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing and paired-end mapping (PEM) methods, the ability to identify structural variation and their respective association to human diseases has improved considerably. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of structural variation in the mouse, one of the prime model systems for studying human diseases and mammalian biology. We further present the evolutionary implications of structural variation on transposable elements. We conclude with future directions on the study of structural variation in mouse genomes that will increase our understanding of molecular architecture and functional consequences of structural variation. PMID:25071822

  12. The fractal structure of the mitochondrial genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oiwa, Nestor N.; Glazier, James A.

    2002-08-01

    The mitochondrial DNA genome has a definite multifractal structure. We show that loops, hairpins and inverted palindromes are responsible for this self-similarity. We can thus establish a definite relation between the function of subsequences and their fractal dimension. Intriguingly, protein coding DNAs also exhibit palindromic structures, although they do not appear in the sequence of amino acids. These structures may reflect the stabilization and transcriptional control of DNA or the control of posttranscriptional editing of mRNA.

  13. Functional coverage of the human genome by existing structures, structural genomics targets, and homology models.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Bourne, Philip E

    2005-08-01

    The bias in protein structure and function space resulting from experimental limitations and targeting of particular functional classes of proteins by structural biologists has long been recognized, but never continuously quantified. Using the Enzyme Commission and the Gene Ontology classifications as a reference frame, and integrating structure data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB), target sequences from the structural genomics projects, structure homology derived from the SUPERFAMILY database, and genome annotations from Ensembl and NCBI, we provide a quantified view, both at the domain and whole-protein levels, of the current and projected coverage of protein structure and function space relative to the human genome. Protein structures currently provide at least one domain that covers 37% of the functional classes identified in the genome; whole structure coverage exists for 25% of the genome. If all the structural genomics targets were solved (twice the current number of structures in the PDB), it is estimated that structures of one domain would cover 69% of the functional classes identified and complete structure coverage would be 44%. Homology models from existing experimental structures extend the 37% coverage to 56% of the genome as single domains and 25% to 31% for complete structures. Coverage from homology models is not evenly distributed by protein family, reflecting differing degrees of sequence and structure divergence within families. While these data provide coverage, conversely, they also systematically highlight functional classes of proteins for which structures should be determined. Current key functional families without structure representation are highlighted here; updated information on the "most wanted list" that should be solved is available on a weekly basis from http://function.rcsb.org:8080/pdb/function_distribution/index.html.

  14. An integrated approach to structural genomics.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, U; Frevert, J; Hofmann, K; Illing, G; Maurer, C; Oschkinat, H; Saenger, W

    2000-01-01

    Structural genomics aims at determining a set of protein structures that will represent all domain folds present in the biosphere. These structures can be used as the basis for the homology modelling of the majority of all remaining protein domains or, indeed, proteins. Structural genomics therefore promises to provide a comprehensive structural description of the protein universe. To achieve this, a broad scientific effort is required. The Berlin-based "Protein Structure Factory" (PSF) plans to contribute to this effort by setting up a local infrastructure for the low-cost, high-throughput analysis of soluble human proteins. In close collaboration with the German Human Genome Project (DHGP) protein-coding genes will be expressed in Escherichia coli or yeast. Affinity-tagged proteins will be purified semi-automatically for biophysical characterization and structure analysis by X-ray diffraction methods and NMR spectroscopy. In all steps of the structure analysis process, possibilities for automation, parallelization and standardization will be explored. Major new facilities that are created for the PSF include a robotic station for large-scale protein crystallization, an NMR center and an experimental station for protein crystallography at the synchrotron storage ring BESSY II in Berlin.

  15. Using Genomics for Natural Product Structure Elucidation.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Jonathan I; Mitchell, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are the most historically bountiful source of chemical matter for drug development-especially for anti-infectives. With insights gleaned from genome mining, interest in natural product discovery has been reinvigorated. An essential stage in NP discovery is structural elucidation, which sheds light not only on the chemical composition of a molecule but also its novelty, properties, and derivatization potential. The history of structure elucidation is replete with techniquebased revolutions: combustion analysis, crystallography, UV, IR, MS, and NMR have each provided game-changing advances; the latest such advance is genomics. All natural products have a genetic basis, and the ability to obtain and interpret genomic information for structure elucidation is increasingly available at low cost to non-specialists. In this review, we describe the value of genomics as a structural elucidation technique, especially from the perspective of the natural product chemist approaching an unknown metabolite. Herein we first introduce the databases and programs of interest to the natural products chemist, with an emphasis on those currently most suited for general usability. We describe strategies for linking observed natural product-linked phenotypes to their corresponding gene clusters. We then discuss techniques for extracting structural information from genes, illustrated with numerous case examples. We also provide an analysis of the biases and limitations of the field with recommendations for future development. Our overview is not only aimed at biologically-oriented researchers already at ease with bioinformatic techniques, but also, in particular, at natural product, organic, and/or medicinal chemists not previously familiar with genomic techniques.

  16. A data management system for structural genomics

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Stéphane; O'Toole, Nicholas; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2004-01-01

    Background Structural genomics (SG) projects aim to determine thousands of protein structures by the development of high-throughput techniques for all steps of the experimental structure determination pipeline. Crucial to the success of such endeavours is the careful tracking and archiving of experimental and external data on protein targets. Results We have developed a sophisticated data management system for structural genomics. Central to the system is an Oracle-based, SQL-interfaced database. The database schema deals with all facets of the structure determination process, from target selection to data deposition. Users access the database via any web browser. Experimental data is input by users with pre-defined web forms. Data can be displayed according to numerous criteria. A list of all current target proteins can be viewed, with links for each target to associated entries in external databases. To avoid unnecessary work on targets, our data management system matches protein sequences weekly using BLAST to entries in the Protein Data Bank and to targets of other SG centers worldwide. Conclusion Our system is a working, effective and user-friendly data management tool for structural genomics projects. In this report we present a detailed summary of the various capabilities of the system, using real target data as examples, and indicate our plans for future enhancements. PMID:15210054

  17. Variance component model to account for sample structure in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Min; Sul, Jae Hoon; Service, Susan K; Zaitlen, Noah A; Kong, Sit-Yee; Freimer, Nelson B; Sabatti, Chiara; Eskin, Eleazar

    2010-04-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified numerous loci associated with complex traits, imprecise modeling of the genetic relatedness within study samples may cause substantial inflation of test statistics and possibly spurious associations. Variance component approaches, such as efficient mixed-model association (EMMA), can correct for a wide range of sample structures by explicitly accounting for pairwise relatedness between individuals, using high-density markers to model the phenotype distribution; but such approaches are computationally impractical. We report here a variance component approach implemented in publicly available software, EMMA eXpedited (EMMAX), that reduces the computational time for analyzing large GWAS data sets from years to hours. We apply this method to two human GWAS data sets, performing association analysis for ten quantitative traits from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort and seven common diseases from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We find that EMMAX outperforms both principal component analysis and genomic control in correcting for sample structure.

  18. Interrogating the druggable genome with structural informatics.

    PubMed

    Hambly, Kevin; Danzer, Joseph; Muskal, Steven; Debe, Derek A

    2006-08-01

    Structural genomics projects are producing protein structure data at an unprecedented rate. In this paper, we present the Target Informatics Platform (TIP), a novel structural informatics approach for amplifying the rapidly expanding body of experimental protein structure information to enhance the discovery and optimization of small molecule protein modulators on a genomic scale. In TIP, existing experimental structure information is augmented using a homology modeling approach, and binding sites across multiple target families are compared using a clique detection algorithm. We report here a detailed analysis of the structural coverage for the set of druggable human targets, highlighting drug target families where the level of structural knowledge is currently quite high, as well as those areas where structural knowledge is sparse. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of TIP's intra- and inter-family binding site similarity analysis using a series of retrospective case studies. Our analysis underscores the utility of a structural informatics infrastructure for extracting drug discovery-relevant information from structural data, aiding researchers in the identification of lead discovery and optimization opportunities as well as potential "off-target" liabilities.

  19. Genome-Wide Views of Chromatin Structure

    PubMed Central

    Rando, Oliver J.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged into a nucleoprotein complex known as chromatin, which affects most processes that occur on DNA. Along with genetic and biochemical studies of resident chromatin proteins and their modifying enzymes, mapping of chromatin structure in vivo is one of the main pillars in our understanding of how chromatin relates to cellular processes. In this review, we discuss the use of genomic technologies to characterize chromatin structure in vivo, with a focus on data from budding yeast and humans. The picture emerging from these studies is the detailed chromatin structure of a typical gene, where the typical behavior gives insight into the mechanisms and deep rules that establish chromatin structure. Important deviation from the archetype is also observed, usually as a consequence of unique regulatory mechanisms at special genomic loci. Chromatin structure shows substantial conservation from yeast to humans, but mammalian chromatin has additional layers of complexity that likely relate to the requirements of multicellularity such as the need to establish faithful gene regulatory mechanisms for cell differentiation. PMID:19317649

  20. Genome-wide association study of lifetime cannabis use based on a large meta-analytic sample of 32 330 subjects from the International Cannabis Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, S; Minică, C C; Verweij, K J H; Mbarek, H; Bernard, M; Derringer, J; van Eijk, K R; Isen, J D; Loukola, A; Maciejewski, D F; Mihailov, E; van der Most, P J; Sánchez-Mora, C; Roos, L; Sherva, R; Walters, R; Ware, J J; Abdellaoui, A; Bigdeli, T B; Branje, S J T; Brown, S A; Bruinenberg, M; Casas, M; Esko, T; Garcia-Martinez, I; Gordon, S D; Harris, J M; Hartman, C A; Henders, A K; Heath, A C; Hickie, I B; Hickman, M; Hopfer, C J; Hottenga, J J; Huizink, A C; Irons, D E; Kahn, R S; Korhonen, T; Kranzler, H R; Krauter, K; van Lier, P A C; Lubke, G H; Madden, P A F; Mägi, R; McGue, M K; Medland, S E; Meeus, W H J; Miller, M B; Montgomery, G W; Nivard, M G; Nolte, I M; Oldehinkel, A J; Pausova, Z; Qaiser, B; Quaye, L; Ramos-Quiroga, J A; Richarte, V; Rose, R J; Shin, J; Stallings, M C; Stiby, A I; Wall, T L; Wright, M J; Koot, H M; Paus, T; Hewitt, J K; Ribasés, M; Kaprio, J; Boks, M P; Snieder, H; Spector, T; Munafò, M R; Metspalu, A; Gelernter, J; Boomsma, D I; Iacono, W G; Martin, N G; Gillespie, N A; Derks, E M; Vink, J M

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis is the most widely produced and consumed illicit psychoactive substance worldwide. Occasional cannabis use can progress to frequent use, abuse and dependence with all known adverse physical, psychological and social consequences. Individual differences in cannabis initiation are heritable (40–48%). The International Cannabis Consortium was established with the aim to identify genetic risk variants of cannabis use. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data of 13 cohorts (N=32 330) and four replication samples (N=5627). In addition, we performed a gene-based test of association, estimated single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based heritability and explored the genetic correlation between lifetime cannabis use and cigarette use using LD score regression. No individual SNPs reached genome-wide significance. Nonetheless, gene-based tests identified four genes significantly associated with lifetime cannabis use: NCAM1, CADM2, SCOC and KCNT2. Previous studies reported associations of NCAM1 with cigarette smoking and other substance use, and those of CADM2 with body mass index, processing speed and autism disorders, which are phenotypes previously reported to be associated with cannabis use. Furthermore, we showed that, combined across the genome, all common SNPs explained 13–20% (P<0.001) of the liability of lifetime cannabis use. Finally, there was a strong genetic correlation (rg=0.83; P=1.85 × 10−8) between lifetime cannabis use and lifetime cigarette smoking implying that the SNP effect sizes of the two traits are highly correlated. This is the largest meta-analysis of cannabis GWA studies to date, revealing important new insights into the genetic pathways of lifetime cannabis use. Future functional studies should explore the impact of the identified genes on the biological mechanisms of cannabis use. PMID:27023175

  1. Structural genomics reveals EVE as a new ASCH/PUA-related domain.

    PubMed

    Bertonati, Claudia; Punta, Marco; Fischer, Markus; Yachdav, Guy; Forouhar, Farhad; Zhou, Weihong; Kuzin, Alexander P; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Abashidze, Mariam; Ramelot, Theresa A; Kennedy, Michael A; Cort, John R; Belachew, Adam; Hunt, John F; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T; Rost, Burkhard

    2009-05-15

    We report on several proteins recently solved by structural genomics consortia, in particular by the Northeast Structural Genomics consortium (NESG). The proteins considered in this study differ substantially in their sequences but they share a similar structural core, characterized by a pseudobarrel five-stranded beta sheet. This core corresponds to the PUA domain-like architecture in the SCOP database. By connecting sequence information with structural knowledge, we characterize a new subgroup of these proteins that we propose to be distinctly different from previously described PUA domain-like domains such as PUA proper or ASCH. We refer to these newly defined domains as EVE. Although EVE may have retained the ability of PUA domains to bind RNA, the available experimental and computational data suggests that both the details of its molecular function and its cellular function differ from those of other PUA domain-like domains. This study of EVE and its relatives illustrates how the combination of structure and genomics creates new insights by connecting a cornucopia of structures that map to the same evolutionary potential. Primary sequence information alone would have not been sufficient to reveal these evolutionary links.

  2. Mechanisms underlying structural variant formation in genomic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Claudia M. B.; Lupski, James R.

    2016-01-01

    With the recent burst of technological developments in genomics, and the clinical implementation of genome-wide assays, our understanding of the molecular basis of genomic disorders, specifically the contribution of structural variation to disease burden, is evolving quickly. Ongoing studies have revealed a ubiquitous role for genome architecture in the formation of structural variants at a given locus, both in DNA recombination-based processes and in replication-based processes. These reports showcase the influence of repeat sequences on genomic stability and structural variant complexity and also highlight the tremendous plasticity and dynamic nature of our genome in evolution, health and disease susceptibility. PMID:26924765

  3. Meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Extraversion: Findings from the Genetics of Personality Consortium.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Stéphanie M; de Moor, Marleen H M; Verweij, Karin J H; Krueger, Robert F; Luciano, Michelle; Arias Vasquez, Alejandro; Matteson, Lindsay K; Derringer, Jaime; Esko, Tõnu; Amin, Najaf; Gordon, Scott D; Hansell, Narelle K; Hart, Amy B; Seppälä, Ilkka; Huffman, Jennifer E; Konte, Bettina; Lahti, Jari; Lee, Minyoung; Miller, Mike; Nutile, Teresa; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Viktorin, Alexander; Wedenoja, Juho; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Adkins, Daniel E; Agrawal, Arpana; Allik, Jüri; Appel, Katja; Bigdeli, Timothy B; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Costa, Paul T; Smith, George Davey; Davies, Gail; de Wit, Harriet; Ding, Jun; Engelhardt, Barbara E; Eriksson, Johan G; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franke, Barbara; Giegling, Ina; Grucza, Richard; Hartmann, Annette M; Heath, Andrew C; Heinonen, Kati; Henders, Anjali K; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Iacono, William G; Janzing, Joost; Jokela, Markus; Karlsson, Robert; Kemp, John P; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Latvala, Antti; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liewald, David C; Madden, Pamela A F; Magri, Chiara; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Marten, Jonathan; Maschio, Andrea; Mbarek, Hamdi; Medland, Sarah E; Mihailov, Evelin; Milaneschi, Yuri; Montgomery, Grant W; Nauck, Matthias; Nivard, Michel G; Ouwens, Klaasjan G; Palotie, Aarno; Pettersson, Erik; Polasek, Ozren; Qian, Yong; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Raitakari, Olli T; Realo, Anu; Rose, Richard J; Ruggiero, Daniela; Schmidt, Carsten O; Slutske, Wendy S; Sorice, Rossella; Starr, John M; St Pourcain, Beate; Sutin, Angelina R; Timpson, Nicholas J; Trochet, Holly; Vermeulen, Sita; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Widen, Elisabeth; Wouda, Jasper; Wright, Margaret J; Zgaga, Lina; Porteous, David; Minelli, Alessandra; Palmer, Abraham A; Rujescu, Dan; Ciullo, Marina; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Metspalu, Andres; Kaprio, Jaakko; Deary, Ian J; Räikkönen, Katri; Wilson, James F; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Bierut, Laura J; Hettema, John M; Grabe, Hans J; Penninx, Brenda W J H; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Evans, David M; Schlessinger, David; Pedersen, Nancy L; Terracciano, Antonio; McGue, Matt; Martin, Nicholas G; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2016-03-01

    Extraversion is a relatively stable and heritable personality trait associated with numerous psychosocial, lifestyle and health outcomes. Despite its substantial heritability, no genetic variants have been detected in previous genome-wide association (GWA) studies, which may be due to relatively small sample sizes of those studies. Here, we report on a large meta-analysis of GWA studies for extraversion in 63,030 subjects in 29 cohorts. Extraversion item data from multiple personality inventories were harmonized across inventories and cohorts. No genome-wide significant associations were found at the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) level but there was one significant hit at the gene level for a long non-coding RNA site (LOC101928162). Genome-wide complex trait analysis in two large cohorts showed that the additive variance explained by common SNPs was not significantly different from zero, but polygenic risk scores, weighted using linkage information, significantly predicted extraversion scores in an independent cohort. These results show that extraversion is a highly polygenic personality trait, with an architecture possibly different from other complex human traits, including other personality traits. Future studies are required to further determine which genetic variants, by what modes of gene action, constitute the heritable nature of extraversion.

  4. Genome instability mechanisms and the structure of cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Liam D; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2012-02-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer cells, and arises from the aberrations that these cells exhibit in the normal biological mechanisms that repair and replicate the genome, or ensure its accurate segregation during cell division. Increasingly detailed descriptions of cancer genomes have begun to emerge from next-generation sequencing (NGS), providing snapshots of their nature and heterogeneity in different cancers at different stages in their evolution. Here, we attempt to extract from these sequencing studies insights into the role of genome instability mechanisms in carcinogenesis, and to identify challenges impeding further progress.

  5. Chloroplast genome structure in Ilex (Aquifoliaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xin; Tan, Yun-Hong; Liu, Ying-Ying; Song, Yu; Yang, Jun-Bo; Corlett, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Aquifoliaceae is the largest family in the campanulid order Aquifoliales. It consists of a single genus, Ilex, the hollies, which is the largest woody dioecious genus in the angiosperms. Most species are in East Asia or South America. The taxonomy and evolutionary history remain unclear due to the lack of a robust species-level phylogeny. We produced the first complete chloroplast genomes in this family, including seven Ilex species, by Illumina sequencing of long-range PCR products and subsequent reference-guided de novo assembly. These genomes have a typical bicyclic structure with a conserved genome arrangement and moderate divergence. The total length is 157,741 bp and there is one large single-copy region (LSC) with 87,109 bp, one small single-copy with 18,436 bp, and a pair of inverted repeat regions (IR) with 52,196 bp. A total of 144 genes were identified, including 96 protein-coding genes, 40 tRNA and 8 rRNA. Thirty-four repetitive sequences were identified in Ilex pubescens, with lengths >14 bp and identity >90%, and 11 divergence hotspot regions that could be targeted for phylogenetic markers. This study will contribute to improved resolution of deep branches of the Ilex phylogeny and facilitate identification of Ilex species. PMID:27378489

  6. Simplified DGS procedure for large-scale genome structural study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Chul; Xu, Jia; Chen, Jun; Kim, Yeong; Winchester, David; Wang, San Ming

    2009-11-01

    Ditag genome scanning (DGS) uses next-generation DNA sequencing to sequence the ends of ditag fragments produced by restriction enzymes. These sequences are compared to known genome sequences to determine their structure. In order to use DGS for large-scale genome structural studies, we have substantially revised the original protocol by replacing the in vivo genomic DNA cloning with in vitro adaptor ligation, eliminating the ditag concatemerization steps, and replacing the 454 sequencer with Solexa or SOLiD sequencers for ditag sequence collection. This revised protocol further increases genome coverage and resolution and allows DGS to be used to analyze multiple genomes simultaneously.

  7. Biophysical characterization of recombinant proteins: A key to higher structural genomics success

    PubMed Central

    Vedadi, Masoud; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Wasney, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Hundreds of genomes have been successfully sequenced to date, and the data are publicly available. At the same time, the advances in large-scale expression and purification of recombinant proteins have paved the way for structural genomics efforts. Frequently, however, little is known about newly expressed proteins calling for large-scale protein characterization to better understand their biochemical roles and to enable structure–function relationship studies. In the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), we have established a platform to characterize large numbers of purified proteins. This includes screening for ligands, enzyme assays, peptide arrays and peptide displacement in a 384-well format. In this review, we describe this platform in more detail and report on how our approach significantly increases the success rate for structure determination. Coupled with high-resolution X-ray crystallography and structure-guided methods, this platform can also be used toward the development of chemical probes through screening families of proteins against a variety of chemical series and focused chemical libraries. PMID:20466062

  8. Epigenomics and the structure of the living genome.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Nir; Rando, Oliver J

    2015-10-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged into an extensively folded state known as chromatin. Analysis of the structure of eukaryotic chromosomes has been revolutionized by development of a suite of genome-wide measurement technologies, collectively termed "epigenomics." We review major advances in epigenomic analysis of eukaryotic genomes, covering aspects of genome folding at scales ranging from whole chromosome folding down to nucleotide-resolution assays that provide structural insights into protein-DNA interactions. We then briefly outline several challenges remaining and highlight new developments such as single-cell epigenomic assays that will help provide us with a high-resolution structural understanding of eukaryotic genomes.

  9. Target selection and annotation for the structural genomics of the amidohydrolase and enolase superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Ursula; Chiang, Ranyee; Seffernick, Jennifer J; Brown, Shoshana D; Glasner, Margaret E; Kelly, Libusha; Eswar, Narayanan; Sauder, J Michael; Bonanno, Jeffrey B; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Burley, Stephen K; Zheng, Xiaojing; Chance, Mark R; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A; Raushel, Frank M; Jacobson, Matthew P; Babbitt, Patricia C; Sali, Andrej

    2009-04-01

    To study the substrate specificity of enzymes, we use the amidohydrolase and enolase superfamilies as model systems; members of these superfamilies share a common TIM barrel fold and catalyze a wide range of chemical reactions. Here, we describe a collaboration between the Enzyme Specificity Consortium (ENSPEC) and the New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) that aims to maximize the structural coverage of the amidohydrolase and enolase superfamilies. Using sequence- and structure-based protein comparisons, we first selected 535 target proteins from a variety of genomes for high-throughput structure determination by X-ray crystallography; 63 of these targets were not previously annotated as superfamily members. To date, 20 unique amidohydrolase and 41 unique enolase structures have been determined, increasing the fraction of sequences in the two superfamilies that can be modeled based on at least 30% sequence identity from 45% to 73%. We present case studies of proteins related to uronate isomerase (an amidohydrolase superfamily member) and mandelate racemase (an enolase superfamily member), to illustrate how this structure-focused approach can be used to generate hypotheses about sequence-structure-function relationships.

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study for Incident Myocardial Infarction and Coronary Heart Disease in Prospective Cohort Studies: The CHARGE Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Cupples, L. Adrienne; Trompet, Stella; Chasman, Daniel I.; Lumley, Thomas; Völker, Uwe; Buckley, Brendan M.; Ding, Jingzhong; Jensen, Majken K.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Girman, Cynthia J.; Ford, Ian; Dörr, Marcus; Salomaa, Veikko; Uitterlinden, André G.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Franceschini, Nora; Carty, Cara L.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Demissie, Serkalem; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Heckbert, Susan R.; Ferrières, Jean; Ducimetière, Pierre; Smith, Nicholas L.; Wang, Ying A.; Siscovick, David S.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Wiklund, Per-Gunnar; Taylor, Kent D.; Evans, Alun; Kee, Frank; Rotter, Jerome I.; Karvanen, Juha; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Heiss, Gerardo; Kraft, Peter; Launer, Lenore J.; Hofman, Albert; Markus, Marcello R. P.; Rose, Lynda M.; Silander, Kaisa; Wagner, Peter; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Lohman, Kurt; Stott, David J.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Harris, Tamara B.; Levy, Daniel; Liu, Yongmei; Rimm, Eric B.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Völzke, Henry; Ridker, Paul M.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Franco, Oscar H.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Psaty, Bruce M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; O'Donnell, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Data are limited on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for incident coronary heart disease (CHD). Moreover, it is not known whether genetic variants identified to date also associate with risk of CHD in a prospective setting. Methods We performed a two-stage GWAS analysis of incident myocardial infarction (MI) and CHD in a total of 64,297 individuals (including 3898 MI cases, 5465 CHD cases). SNPs that passed an arbitrary threshold of 5×10−6 in Stage I were taken to Stage II for further discovery. Furthermore, in an analysis of prognosis, we studied whether known SNPs from former GWAS were associated with total mortality in individuals who experienced MI during follow-up. Results In Stage I 15 loci passed the threshold of 5×10−6; 8 loci for MI and 8 loci for CHD, for which one locus overlapped and none were reported in previous GWAS meta-analyses. We took 60 SNPs representing these 15 loci to Stage II of discovery. Four SNPs near QKI showed nominally significant association with MI (p-value<8.8×10−3) and three exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold when Stage I and Stage II results were combined (top SNP rs6941513: p = 6.2×10−9). Despite excellent power, the 9p21 locus SNP (rs1333049) was only modestly associated with MI (HR = 1.09, p-value = 0.02) and marginally with CHD (HR = 1.06, p-value = 0.08). Among an inception cohort of those who experienced MI during follow-up, the risk allele of rs1333049 was associated with a decreased risk of subsequent mortality (HR = 0.90, p-value = 3.2×10−3). Conclusions QKI represents a novel locus that may serve as a predictor of incident CHD in prospective studies. The association of the 9p21 locus both with increased risk of first myocardial infarction and longer survival after MI highlights the importance of study design in investigating genetic determinants of complex disorders. PMID:26950853

  11. Molecular Genetic Evidence for Genetic Overlap between General Cognitive Ability and Risk for Schizophrenia: A Report from the Cognitive Genomics Consortium (COGENT)

    PubMed Central

    Lencz, Todd; Knowles, Emma; Davies, Gail; Guha, Saurav; Liewald, David C; Starr, John M; Djurovic, Srdjan; Melle, Ingrid; Sundet, Kjetil; Christoforou, Andrea; Reinvang, Ivar; Mukherjee, Semanti; Lundervold, Astri; Steen, Vidar M.; John, Majnu; Espeseth, Thomas; Räikkönen, Katri; Widen, Elisabeth; Palotie, Aarno; Eriksson, Johan G; Giegling, Ina; Konte, Bettina; Ikeda, Masashi; Roussos, Panos; Giakoumaki, Stella; Burdick, Katherine E.; Payton, Antony; Ollier, William; Horan, Mike; Donohoe, Gary; Morris, Derek; Corvin, Aiden; Gill, Michael; Pendleton, Neil; Iwata, Nakao; Darvasi, Ariel; Bitsios, Panos; Rujescu, Dan; Lahti, Jari; Hellard, Stephanie Le; Keller, Matthew C.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Deary, Ian J; Glahn, David C.; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that generalized deficits in cognitive ability represent a core component of schizophrenia, evident prior to full illness onset and independent of medication. The possibility of genetic overlap between risk for schizophrenia and cognitive phenotypes has been suggested by the presence of cognitive deficits in first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia; however, until recently, molecular genetic approaches to test this overlap have been lacking. Within the last few years, large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia have demonstrated that a substantial proportion of the heritability of the disorder is explained by a polygenic component consisting of many common SNPs of extremely small effect. Similar results have been reported in GWAS of general cognitive ability. The primary aim of the present study is to provide the first molecular genetic test of the classic endophenotype hypothesis, which states that alleles associated with reduced cognitive ability should also serve to increase risk for schizophrenia. We tested the endophenotype hypothesis by applying polygenic SNP scores derived from a large-scale cognitive GWAS meta-analysis (~5000 individuals from 9 non-clinical cohorts comprising the COGENT consortium) to four schizophrenia case-control cohorts. As predicted, cases had significantly lower cognitive polygenic scores compared to controls. In parallel, polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia were associated with lower general cognitive ability. Additionally, using our large cognitive meta-analytic dataset, we identified nominally significant cognitive associations for several SNPs that have previously been robustly associated with schizophrenia susceptibility. Results provide molecular confirmation of the genetic overlap between schizophrenia and general cognitive ability, and may provide additional insight into pathophysiology of the disorder. PMID:24342994

  12. Genome-wide analysis identifies novel loci associated with ovarian cancer outcomes: findings from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Johnatty, Sharon E.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Kar, Siddhartha; Beesley, Jonathan; Lu, Yi; Gao, Bo; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Lambrechts, Diether; Nieuwenhuysen, Els Van; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Levine, Douglas A.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubiński, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Song, Honglin; Rhenius, Valerie; Campbell, Ian; Eccles, Diana; Sieh, Weiva; Whittemore, Alice S.; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Sutphen, Rebecca; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Gayther, Simon A.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J.; Pearce, Celeste L; Pike, Malcolm C; Stram, Daniel O.; Wu, Anna H.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Goodman, Marc T.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Carney, Michael E.; Thompson, Pamela J; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Pisterer, Jacobus; Hillemanns, Peter; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Winham, Stacey J; Earp, Madalene; Larson, Melissa C.; Fogarty, Zachary C.; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Fridley, Brooke L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Orlow, Irene; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Høgdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; McNeish, Ian; Paul, James; Carty, Karen; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Glasspool, Rosalind; Sellers, Thomas; Kennedy, Catherine; Chiew, Yoke-Eng; Berchuck, Andrew; MacGregor, Stuart; deFazio, Anna; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Goode, Ellen L.; deFazio, Anna; Webb, Penelope M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chemotherapy resistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of ovarian cancer. We hypothesize that germline polymorphisms might be associated with clinical outcome. Experimental Design We analyzed ~2.8 million genotyped and imputed SNPs from the iCOGS experiment for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in 2,901 European epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients who underwent firstline treatment of cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy regardless of regimen, and in a subset of 1,098 patients treated with ≥4 cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin at standard doses. We evaluated the top SNPs in 4,434 EOC patients including patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Additionally we conducted pathway analysis of all intragenic SNPs and tested their association with PFS and OS using gene set enrichment analysis. Results Five SNPs were significantly associated (p≤1.0x10−5) with poorer outcomes in at least one of the four analyses, three of which, rs4910232 (11p15.3), rs2549714 (16q23) and rs6674079 (1q22) were located in long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) RP11–179A10.1, RP11–314O13.1 and RP11–284F21.8 respectively (p≤7.1x10−6). ENCODE ChIP-seq data at 1q22 for normal ovary shows evidence of histone modification around RP11–284F21.8, and rs6674079 is perfectly correlated with another SNP within the super-enhancer MEF2D, expression levels of which were reportedly associated with prognosis in another solid tumor. YAP1- and WWTR1 (TAZ)-stimulated gene expression, and HDL-mediated lipid transport pathways were associated with PFS and OS, respectively, in the cohort who had standard chemotherapy (pGSEA≤6x10−3). Conclusion We have identified SNPs in three lncRNAs that might be important targets for novel EOC therapies. PMID:26152742

  13. Genomic hypomethylation in the human germline associates with selective structural mutability in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Harris, R Alan; Cheung, Sau Wai; Coarfa, Cristian; Jeong, Mira; Goodell, Margaret A; White, Lisa D; Patel, Ankita; Kang, Sung-Hae; Shaw, Chad; Chinault, A Craig; Gambin, Tomasz; Gambin, Anna; Lupski, James R; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    The hotspots of structural polymorphisms and structural mutability in the human genome remain to be explained mechanistically. We examine associations of structural mutability with germline DNA methylation and with non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) mediated by low-copy repeats (LCRs). Combined evidence from four human sperm methylome maps, human genome evolution, structural polymorphisms in the human population, and previous genomic and disease studies consistently points to a strong association of germline hypomethylation and genomic instability. Specifically, methylation deserts, the ~1% fraction of the human genome with the lowest methylation in the germline, show a tenfold enrichment for structural rearrangements that occurred in the human genome since the branching of chimpanzee and are highly enriched for fast-evolving loci that regulate tissue-specific gene expression. Analysis of copy number variants (CNVs) from 400 human samples identified using a custom-designed array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) chip, combined with publicly available structural variation data, indicates that association of structural mutability with germline hypomethylation is comparable in magnitude to the association of structural mutability with LCR-mediated NAHR. Moreover, rare CNVs occurring in the genomes of individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and developmental delay and de novo CNVs occurring in those diagnosed with autism are significantly more concentrated within hypomethylated regions. These findings suggest a new connection between the epigenome, selective mutability, evolution, and human disease.

  14. Graphic analysis of population structure on genome-wide rheumatoid arthritis data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Weng, Chunhua; Niyogi, Partha

    2009-12-15

    Principal-component analysis (PCA) has been used for decades to summarize the human genetic variation across geographic regions and to infer population migration history. Reduction of spurious associations due to population structure is crucial for the success of disease association studies. Recently, PCA has also become a popular method for detecting population structure and correction of population stratification in disease association studies. Inspired by manifold learning, we propose a novel method based on spectral graph theory. Regarding each study subject as a node with suitably defined weights for its edges to close neighbors, one can form a weighted graph. We suggest using the spectrum of the associated graph Laplacian operator, namely, Laplacian eigenfunctions, to infer population structures instead of principal components (PCs). For the whole genome-wide association data for the North American Rheumatoid Arthritis Consortium (NARAC) provided by Genetic Workshop Analysis 16, Laplacian eigenfunctions revealed more meaningful structures of the underlying population than PCA. The proposed method has connection to PCA, and it naturally includes PCA as a special case. Our simple method is computationally fast and is suitable for disease studies at the genome-wide scale.

  15. Child Development and Structural Variation in the Human Genome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Ying; Haraksingh, Rajini; Grubert, Fabian; Abyzov, Alexej; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Urban, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    Structural variation of the human genome sequence is the insertion, deletion, or rearrangement of stretches of DNA sequence sized from around 1,000 to millions of base pairs. Over the past few years, structural variation has been shown to be far more common in human genomes than previously thought. Very little is currently known about the effects…

  16. Structure of the germline genome of Tetrahymena thermophila and relationship to the massively rearranged somatic genome.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Eileen P; Kapusta, Aurélie; Huvos, Piroska E; Bidwell, Shelby L; Zafar, Nikhat; Tang, Haibao; Hadjithomas, Michalis; Krishnakumar, Vivek; Badger, Jonathan H; Caler, Elisabet V; Russ, Carsten; Zeng, Qiandong; Fan, Lin; Levin, Joshua Z; Shea, Terrance; Young, Sarah K; Hegarty, Ryan; Daza, Riza; Gujja, Sharvari; Wortman, Jennifer R; Birren, Bruce W; Nusbaum, Chad; Thomas, Jainy; Carey, Clayton M; Pritham, Ellen J; Feschotte, Cédric; Noto, Tomoko; Mochizuki, Kazufumi; Papazyan, Romeo; Taverna, Sean D; Dear, Paul H; Cassidy-Hanley, Donna M; Xiong, Jie; Miao, Wei; Orias, Eduardo; Coyne, Robert S

    2016-11-28

    The germline genome of the binucleated ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila undergoes programmed chromosome breakage and massive DNA elimination to generate the somatic genome. Here, we present a complete sequence assembly of the germline genome and analyze multiple features of its structure and its relationship to the somatic genome, shedding light on the mechanisms of genome rearrangement as well as the evolutionary history of this remarkable germline/soma differentiation. Our results strengthen the notion that a complex, dynamic, and ongoing interplay between mobile DNA elements and the host genome have shaped Tetrahymena chromosome structure, locally and globally. Non-standard outcomes of rearrangement events, including the generation of short-lived somatic chromosomes and excision of DNA interrupting protein-coding regions, may represent novel forms of developmental gene regulation. We also compare Tetrahymena's germline/soma differentiation to that of other characterized ciliates, illustrating the wide diversity of adaptations that have occurred within this phylum.

  17. Gorilla genome structural variation reveals evolutionary parallelisms with chimpanzee.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Mario; Catacchio, Claudia R; Alkan, Can; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Sajjadian, Saba; Graves, Tina A; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Navarro, Arcadi; Malig, Maika; Baker, Carl; Lee, Choli; Turner, Emily H; Chen, Lin; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Shendure, Jay; Wilson, Richard K; Eichler, Evan E

    2011-10-01

    Structural variation has played an important role in the evolutionary restructuring of human and great ape genomes. Recent analyses have suggested that the genomes of chimpanzee and human have been particularly enriched for this form of genetic variation. Here, we set out to assess the extent of structural variation in the gorilla lineage by generating 10-fold genomic sequence coverage from a western lowland gorilla and integrating these data into a physical and cytogenetic framework of structural variation. We discovered and validated over 7665 structural changes within the gorilla lineage, including sequence resolution of inversions, deletions, duplications, and mobile element insertions. A comparison with human and other ape genomes shows that the gorilla genome has been subjected to the highest rate of segmental duplication. We show that both the gorilla and chimpanzee genomes have experienced independent yet convergent patterns of structural mutation that have not occurred in humans, including the formation of subtelomeric heterochromatic caps, the hyperexpansion of segmental duplications, and bursts of retroviral integrations. Our analysis suggests that the chimpanzee and gorilla genomes are structurally more derived than either orangutan or human genomes.

  18. Gorilla genome structural variation reveals evolutionary parallelisms with chimpanzee

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Mario; Catacchio, Claudia R.; Alkan, Can; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Sajjadian, Saba; Graves, Tina A.; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Navarro, Arcadi; Malig, Maika; Baker, Carl; Lee, Choli; Turner, Emily H.; Chen, Lin; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Shendure, Jay; Wilson, Richard K.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2011-01-01

    Structural variation has played an important role in the evolutionary restructuring of human and great ape genomes. Recent analyses have suggested that the genomes of chimpanzee and human have been particularly enriched for this form of genetic variation. Here, we set out to assess the extent of structural variation in the gorilla lineage by generating 10-fold genomic sequence coverage from a western lowland gorilla and integrating these data into a physical and cytogenetic framework of structural variation. We discovered and validated over 7665 structural changes within the gorilla lineage, including sequence resolution of inversions, deletions, duplications, and mobile element insertions. A comparison with human and other ape genomes shows that the gorilla genome has been subjected to the highest rate of segmental duplication. We show that both the gorilla and chimpanzee genomes have experienced independent yet convergent patterns of structural mutation that have not occurred in humans, including the formation of subtelomeric heterochromatic caps, the hyperexpansion of segmental duplications, and bursts of retroviral integrations. Our analysis suggests that the chimpanzee and gorilla genomes are structurally more derived than either orangutan or human genomes. PMID:21685127

  19. Comparison of 6q25 Breast Cancer Hits from Asian and European Genome Wide Association Studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC)

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Rebecca; Maranian, Melanie; Hopper, John L.; Kapuscinski, Miroslaw K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Park, Daniel J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Bueno-de-Mesquit, H. Bas; Muir, Kenneth R.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rattanamongkongul, Suthee; Puttawibul, Puttisak; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Marmee, Frederick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Zamora, M. Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Clarke, Christina A.; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Rahman, Nazneen; Seal, Sheila; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Meindl, Alfons; Schott, Sarah; Bartram, Claus R.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Zalutsky, Iosif V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokovieva, Darya; Farahtdinova, Albina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Investigators, kConFab; Lambrechts, Diether; Zhao, Hui; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Figueroa, Jonine D.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Hooning, Maartje; Martens, John W. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Collée, Margriet; Hall, Per; Humpreys, Keith; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Ahmed, Shahana; Ghoussaini, Maya; Pharoah, Paul DP.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Hou, Ming-Feng; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A.; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Morrison, Jonathan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    The 6q25.1 locus was first identified via a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in Chinese women and marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2046210, approximately 180 Kb upstream of ESR1. There have been conflicting reports about the association of this locus with breast cancer in Europeans, and a GWAS in Europeans identified a different SNP, tagged here by rs12662670. We examined the associations of both SNPs in up to 61,689 cases and 58,822 controls from forty-four studies collaborating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, of which four studies were of Asian and 39 of European descent. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Case-only analyses were used to compare SNP effects in Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+) versus negative (ER−) tumours. Models including both SNPs were fitted to investigate whether the SNP effects were independent. Both SNPs are significantly associated with breast cancer risk in both ethnic groups. Per-allele ORs are higher in Asian than in European studies [rs2046210: OR (A/G) = 1.36 (95% CI 1.26–1.48), p = 7.6×10−14 in Asians and 1.09 (95% CI 1.07–1.11), p = 6.8×10−18 in Europeans. rs12662670: OR (G/T) = 1.29 (95% CI 1.19–1.41), p = 1.2×10−9 in Asians and 1.12 (95% CI 1.08–1.17), p = 3.8×10−9 in Europeans]. SNP rs2046210 is associated with a significantly greater risk of ER− than ER+ tumours in Europeans [OR (ER−) = 1.20 (95% CI 1.15–1.25), p = 1.8×10−17 versus OR (ER+) = 1.07 (95% CI 1.04–1.1), p = 1.3×10−7, pheterogeneity = 5.1×10−6]. In these Asian studies, by contrast, there is no clear evidence of a differential association by tumour receptor status. Each SNP is associated with risk after adjustment for the other SNP. These results suggest the presence of two variants at 6q25.1 each independently associated with breast cancer risk in Asians and in Europeans. Of these two, the one

  20. Comparison of 6q25 breast cancer hits from Asian and European Genome Wide Association Studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC).

    PubMed

    Hein, Rebecca; Maranian, Melanie; Hopper, John L; Kapuscinski, Miroslaw K; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Bueno-de-Mesquit, H Bas; Muir, Kenneth R; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rattanamongkongul, Suthee; Puttawibul, Puttisak; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Marmee, Frederick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Zamora, M Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Clarke, Christina A; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Rahman, Nazneen; Seal, Sheila; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Meindl, Alfons; Schott, Sarah; Bartram, Claus R; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Zalutsky, Iosif V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokovieva, Darya; Farahtdinova, Albina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Lambrechts, Diether; Zhao, Hui; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A; Severi, Gianluca; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Gaudet, Mia M; Vijai, Joseph; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; John, Esther M; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Figueroa, Jonine D; García-Closas, Montserrat; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E; Hooning, Maartje; Martens, John W M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Collée, Margriet; Hall, Per; Humpreys, Keith; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Ahmed, Shahana; Ghoussaini, Maya; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Hou, Ming-Feng; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Morrison, Jonathan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M

    2012-01-01

    The 6q25.1 locus was first identified via a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in Chinese women and marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2046210, approximately 180 Kb upstream of ESR1. There have been conflicting reports about the association of this locus with breast cancer in Europeans, and a GWAS in Europeans identified a different SNP, tagged here by rs12662670. We examined the associations of both SNPs in up to 61,689 cases and 58,822 controls from forty-four studies collaborating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, of which four studies were of Asian and 39 of European descent. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Case-only analyses were used to compare SNP effects in Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+) versus negative (ER-) tumours. Models including both SNPs were fitted to investigate whether the SNP effects were independent. Both SNPs are significantly associated with breast cancer risk in both ethnic groups. Per-allele ORs are higher in Asian than in European studies [rs2046210: OR (A/G) = 1.36 (95% CI 1.26-1.48), p = 7.6 × 10(-14) in Asians and 1.09 (95% CI 1.07-1.11), p = 6.8 × 10(-18) in Europeans. rs12662670: OR (G/T) = 1.29 (95% CI 1.19-1.41), p = 1.2 × 10(-9) in Asians and 1.12 (95% CI 1.08-1.17), p = 3.8 × 10(-9) in Europeans]. SNP rs2046210 is associated with a significantly greater risk of ER- than ER+ tumours in Europeans [OR (ER-) = 1.20 (95% CI 1.15-1.25), p = 1.8 × 10(-17) versus OR (ER+) = 1.07 (95% CI 1.04-1.1), p = 1.3 × 10(-7), p(heterogeneity) = 5.1 × 10(-6)]. In these Asian studies, by contrast, there is no clear evidence of a differential association by tumour receptor status. Each SNP is associated with risk after adjustment for the other SNP. These results suggest the presence of two variants at 6q25.1 each independently associated with breast cancer risk in Asians and in Europeans. Of these two, the one tagged by rs2046210 is associated with a greater

  1. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    I want to discuss both the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Consortium and the Human Genome Project. I am afraid most of my presentation will be thin on law and possibly too high on rhetoric. Having been engaged in a personal and direct way with these issues as a trained scientist, I find it quite difficult to be always as objective as I ought to be.

  2. Multiple genome alignment for identifying the core structure among moderately related microbial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Ikuo

    2008-01-01

    Background Identifying the set of intrinsically conserved genes, or the genomic core, among related genomes is crucial for understanding prokaryotic genomes where horizontal gene transfers are common. Although core genome identification appears to be obvious among very closely related genomes, it becomes more difficult when more distantly related genomes are compared. Here, we consider the core structure as a set of sufficiently long segments in which gene orders are conserved so that they are likely to have been inherited mainly through vertical transfer, and developed a method for identifying the core structure by finding the order of pre-identified orthologous groups (OGs) that maximally retains the conserved gene orders. Results The method was applied to genome comparisons of two well-characterized families, Bacillaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, and identified their core structures comprising 1438 and 2125 OGs, respectively. The core sets contained most of the essential genes and their related genes, which were primarily included in the intersection of the two core sets comprising around 700 OGs. The definition of the genomic core based on gene order conservation was demonstrated to be more robust than the simpler approach based only on gene conservation. We also investigated the core structures in terms of G+C content homogeneity and phylogenetic congruence, and found that the core genes primarily exhibited the expected characteristic, i.e., being indigenous and sharing the same history, more than the non-core genes. Conclusion The results demonstrate that our strategy of genome alignment based on gene order conservation can provide an effective approach to identify the genomic core among moderately related microbial genomes. PMID:18976470

  3. THE FEDERAL INTEGRATED BIOTREATMENT RESEARCH CONSORTIUM (FLASK TO FIELD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Federal Integrated Biotreatment Research Consortium (Flask to Field) represented a 7-year concerted effort by several research laboratories to develop bioremediation technologies for contaminated DoD sites. The consortium structure consisted of a director and four thrust are...

  4. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  5. Structural Genomics of Minimal Organisms: Pipeline and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong-Hae; Kim, Rosalind; Adams, Paul; Chandonia, John-Marc

    2007-09-14

    The initial objective of the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center was to obtain a near complete three-dimensional (3D) structural information of all soluble proteins of two minimal organisms, closely related pathogens Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae. The former has fewer than 500 genes and the latter has fewer than 700 genes. A semiautomated structural genomics pipeline was set up from target selection, cloning, expression, purification, and ultimately structural determination. At the time of this writing, structural information of more than 93percent of all soluble proteins of M. genitalium is avail able. This chapter summarizes the approaches taken by the authors' center.

  6. 3D genome structure modeling by Lorentzian objective function.

    PubMed

    Trieu, Tuan; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-11-29

    The 3D structure of the genome plays a vital role in biological processes such as gene interaction, gene regulation, DNA replication and genome methylation. Advanced chromosomal conformation capture techniques, such as Hi-C and tethered conformation capture, can generate chromosomal contact data that can be used to computationally reconstruct 3D structures of the genome. We developed a novel restraint-based method that is capable of reconstructing 3D genome structures utilizing both intra-and inter-chromosomal contact data. Our method was robust to noise and performed well in comparison with a panel of existing methods on a controlled simulated data set. On a real Hi-C data set of the human genome, our method produced chromosome and genome structures that are consistent with 3D FISH data and known knowledge about the human chromosome and genome, such as, chromosome territories and the cluster of small chromosomes in the nucleus center with the exception of the chromosome 18. The tool and experimental data are available at https://missouri.box.com/v/LorDG.

  7. The bioleaching potential of a bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Mauricio; Cortés, María Paz; Travisany, Dante; Di Genova, Alex; Budinich, Marko; Reyes-Jara, Angélica; Hödar, Christian; González, Mauricio; Parada, Pilar; Bobadilla-Fazzini, Roberto A; Cambiazo, Verónica; Maass, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    This work presents the molecular foundation of a consortium of five efficient bacteria strains isolated from copper mines currently used in state of the art industrial-scale biotechnology. The strains Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans Licanantay, Acidiphilium multivorum Yenapatur, Leptospirillum ferriphilum Pañiwe, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Wenelen and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans Cutipay were selected for genome sequencing based on metal tolerance, oxidation activity and bioleaching of copper efficiency. An integrated model of metabolic pathways representing the bioleaching capability of this consortium was generated. Results revealed that greater efficiency in copper recovery may be explained by the higher functional potential of L. ferriphilum Pañiwe and At. thiooxidans Licanantay to oxidize iron and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds. The consortium had a greater capacity to resist copper, arsenic and chloride ion compared to previously described biomining strains. Specialization and particular components in these bacteria provided the consortium a greater ability to bioleach copper sulfide ores.

  8. Structural and Operational Complexity of the Geobacter Sulfurreducens Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Yu; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Park, Young S.; Lovley, Derek R.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Zengler, Karsten

    2010-06-30

    Prokaryotic genomes can be annotated based on their structural, operational, and functional properties. These annotations provide the pivotal scaffold for understanding cellular functions on a genome-scale, such as metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Here, we describe a systems approach to simultaneously determine the structural and operational annotation of the Geobacter sulfurreducens genome. Integration of proteomics, transcriptomics, RNA polymerase, and sigma factor-binding information with deep-sequencing-based analysis of primary 59-end transcripts allowed for a most precise annotation. The structural annotation is comprised of numerous previously undetected genes, noncoding RNAs, prevalent leaderless mRNA transcripts, and antisense transcripts. When compared with other prokaryotes, we found that the number of antisense transcripts reversely correlated with genome size. The operational annotation consists of 1453 operons, 22% of which have multiple transcription start sites that use different RNA polymerase holoenzymes. Several operons with multiple transcription start sites encoded genes with essential functions, giving insight into the regulatory complexity of the genome. The experimentally determined structural and operational annotations can be combined with functional annotation, yielding a new three-level annotation that greatly expands our understanding of prokaryotic genomes.

  9. Structural and operational complexity of the Geobacter sulfurreducens genome

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yu; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Park, Young Seoub; Lovley, Derek; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Zengler, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Prokaryotic genomes can be annotated based on their structural, operational, and functional properties. These annotations provide the pivotal scaffold for understanding cellular functions on a genome-scale, such as metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Here, we describe a systems approach to simultaneously determine the structural and operational annotation of the Geobacter sulfurreducens genome. Integration of proteomics, transcriptomics, RNA polymerase, and sigma factor-binding information with deep-sequencing-based analysis of primary 5′-end transcripts allowed for a most precise annotation. The structural annotation is comprised of numerous previously undetected genes, noncoding RNAs, prevalent leaderless mRNA transcripts, and antisense transcripts. When compared with other prokaryotes, we found that the number of antisense transcripts reversely correlated with genome size. The operational annotation consists of 1453 operons, 22% of which have multiple transcription start sites that use different RNA polymerase holoenzymes. Several operons with multiple transcription start sites encoded genes with essential functions, giving insight into the regulatory complexity of the genome. The experimentally determined structural and operational annotations can be combined with functional annotation, yielding a new three-level annotation that greatly expands our understanding of prokaryotic genomes. PMID:20592237

  10. Spectral entropy criteria for structural segmentation in genomic DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechetkin, V. R.; Lobzin, V. V.

    2004-07-01

    The spectral entropy is calculated with Fourier structure factors and characterizes the level of structural ordering in a sequence of symbols. It may efficiently be applied to the assessment and reconstruction of the modular structure in genomic DNA sequences. We present the relevant spectral entropy criteria for the local and non-local structural segmentation in DNA sequences. The results are illustrated with the model examples and analysis of intervening exon-intron segments in the protein-coding regions.

  11. Population-based 3D genome structure analysis reveals driving forces in spatial genome organization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyuan; Kalhor, Reza; Dai, Chao; Hao, Shengli; Gong, Ke; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Haochen; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Le Gros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Chen, Lin; Alber, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Conformation capture technologies (e.g., Hi-C) chart physical interactions between chromatin regions on a genome-wide scale. However, the structural variability of the genome between cells poses a great challenge to interpreting ensemble-averaged Hi-C data, particularly for long-range and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we present a probabilistic approach for deconvoluting Hi-C data into a model population of distinct diploid 3D genome structures, which facilitates the detection of chromatin interactions likely to co-occur in individual cells. Our approach incorporates the stochastic nature of chromosome conformations and allows a detailed analysis of alternative chromatin structure states. For example, we predict and experimentally confirm the presence of large centromere clusters with distinct chromosome compositions varying between individual cells. The stability of these clusters varies greatly with their chromosome identities. We show that these chromosome-specific clusters can play a key role in the overall chromosome positioning in the nucleus and stabilizing specific chromatin interactions. By explicitly considering genome structural variability, our population-based method provides an important tool for revealing novel insights into the key factors shaping the spatial genome organization. PMID:26951677

  12. Terragenome: International Soil Metagenome Sequencing Consortium (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Jansson, Janet [LBNL

    2016-07-12

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Janet Jansson of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory discusses the Terragenome Initiative at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

  13. Structure of the germline genome of Tetrahymena thermophila and relationship to the massively rearranged somatic genome

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Eileen P; Kapusta, Aurélie; Huvos, Piroska E; Bidwell, Shelby L; Zafar, Nikhat; Tang, Haibao; Hadjithomas, Michalis; Krishnakumar, Vivek; Badger, Jonathan H; Caler, Elisabet V; Russ, Carsten; Zeng, Qiandong; Fan, Lin; Levin, Joshua Z; Shea, Terrance; Young, Sarah K; Hegarty, Ryan; Daza, Riza; Gujja, Sharvari; Wortman, Jennifer R; Birren, Bruce W; Nusbaum, Chad; Thomas, Jainy; Carey, Clayton M; Pritham, Ellen J; Feschotte, Cédric; Noto, Tomoko; Mochizuki, Kazufumi; Papazyan, Romeo; Taverna, Sean D; Dear, Paul H; Cassidy-Hanley, Donna M; Xiong, Jie; Miao, Wei; Orias, Eduardo; Coyne, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    The germline genome of the binucleated ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila undergoes programmed chromosome breakage and massive DNA elimination to generate the somatic genome. Here, we present a complete sequence assembly of the germline genome and analyze multiple features of its structure and its relationship to the somatic genome, shedding light on the mechanisms of genome rearrangement as well as the evolutionary history of this remarkable germline/soma differentiation. Our results strengthen the notion that a complex, dynamic, and ongoing interplay between mobile DNA elements and the host genome have shaped Tetrahymena chromosome structure, locally and globally. Non-standard outcomes of rearrangement events, including the generation of short-lived somatic chromosomes and excision of DNA interrupting protein-coding regions, may represent novel forms of developmental gene regulation. We also compare Tetrahymena’s germline/soma differentiation to that of other characterized ciliates, illustrating the wide diversity of adaptations that have occurred within this phylum. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19090.001 PMID:27892853

  14. Allelic genome structural variations in maize detected by array comparative genome hybridization.

    PubMed

    Beló, André; Beatty, Mary K; Hondred, David; Fengler, Kevin A; Li, Bailin; Rafalski, Antoni

    2010-01-01

    DNA polymorphisms such as insertion/deletions and duplications affecting genome segments larger than 1 kb are known as copy-number variations (CNVs) or structural variations (SVs). They have been recently studied in animals and humans by using array-comparative genome hybridization (aCGH), and have been associated with several human diseases. Their presence and phenotypic effects in plants have not been investigated on a genomic scale, although individual structural variations affecting traits have been described. We used aCGH to investigate the presence of CNVs in maize by comparing the genome of 13 maize inbred lines to B73. Analysis of hybridization signal ratios of 60,472 60-mer oligonucleotide probes between inbreds in relation to their location in the reference genome (B73) allowed us to identify clusters of probes that deviated from the ratio expected for equal copy-numbers. We found CNVs distributed along the maize genome in all chromosome arms. They occur with appreciable frequency in different germplasm subgroups, suggesting ancient origin. Validation of several CNV regions showed both insertion/deletions and copy-number differences. The nature of CNVs detected suggests CNVs might have a considerable impact on plant phenotypes, including disease response and heterosis.

  15. Structural Genomics and Drug Discovery for Infectious Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.F.

    2010-09-03

    The application of structural genomics methods and approaches to proteins from organisms causing infectious diseases is making available the three dimensional structures of many proteins that are potential drug targets and laying the groundwork for structure aided drug discovery efforts. There are a number of structural genomics projects with a focus on pathogens that have been initiated worldwide. The Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID) was recently established to apply state-of-the-art high throughput structural biology technologies to the characterization of proteins from the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) category A-C pathogens and organisms causing emerging, or re-emerging infectious diseases. The target selection process emphasizes potential biomedical benefits. Selected proteins include known drug targets and their homologs, essential enzymes, virulence factors and vaccine candidates. The Center also provides a structure determination service for the infectious disease scientific community. The ultimate goal is to generate a library of structures that are available to the scientific community and can serve as a starting point for further research and structure aided drug discovery for infectious diseases. To achieve this goal, the CSGID will determine protein crystal structures of 400 proteins and protein-ligand complexes using proven, rapid, highly integrated, and cost-effective methods for such determination, primarily by X-ray crystallography. High throughput crystallographic structure determination is greatly aided by frequent, convenient access to high-performance beamlines at third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources.

  16. Interaction of methylation-related genetic variants with circulating fatty acids on plasma lipids: a meta-analysis of 7 studies and methylation analysis of 3 studies in the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium12

    PubMed Central

    Follis, Jack L; Smith, Caren E; Tanaka, Toshiko; Manichaikul, Ani W; Chu, Audrey Y; Samieri, Cecilia; Zhou, Xia; Guan, Weihua; Wang, Lu; Biggs, Mary L; Chen, Yii-Der I; Hernandez, Dena G; Borecki, Ingrid; Chasman, Daniel I; Rich, Stephen S; Ferrucci, Luigi; Irvin, Marguerite Ryan; Aslibekyan, Stella; Zhi, Degui; Tiwari, Hemant K; Claas, Steven A; Sha, Jin; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Parnell, Laurence D; Lee, Yu-Chi; Amouyel, Philippe; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Psaty, Bruce M; King, Irena B; Mozaffarian, Dariush; McKnight, Barbara; Bandinelli, Stefania; Tsai, Michael Y; Ridker, Paul M; Ding, Jingzhong; Mstat, Kurt Lohmant; Liu, Yongmei; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Steffen, Lyn M; Siscovick, David S; Absher, Devin; Arnett, Donna K; Ordovás, José M; Lemaitre, Rozenn N

    2016-01-01

    Background: DNA methylation is influenced by diet and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and methylation modulates gene expression. Objective: We aimed to explore whether the gene-by-diet interactions on blood lipids act through DNA methylation. Design: We selected 7 SNPs on the basis of predicted relations in fatty acids, methylation, and lipids. We conducted a meta-analysis and a methylation and mediation analysis with the use of data from the CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology) consortium and the ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) consortium. Results: On the basis of the meta-analysis of 7 cohorts in the CHARGE consortium, higher plasma HDL cholesterol was associated with fewer C alleles at ATP-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 (ABCA1) rs2246293 (β = −0.6 mg/dL, P = 0.015) and higher circulating eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (β = 3.87 mg/dL, P = 5.62 × 1021). The difference in HDL cholesterol associated with higher circulating EPA was dependent on genotypes at rs2246293, and it was greater for each additional C allele (β = 1.69 mg/dL, P = 0.006). In the GOLDN (Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network) study, higher ABCA1 promoter cg14019050 methylation was associated with more C alleles at rs2246293 (β = 8.84%, P = 3.51 × 1018) and lower circulating EPA (β = −1.46%, P = 0.009), and the mean difference in methylation of cg14019050 that was associated with higher EPA was smaller with each additional C allele of rs2246293 (β = −2.83%, P = 0.007). Higher ABCA1 cg14019050 methylation was correlated with lower ABCA1 expression (r = −0.61, P = 0.009) in the ENCODE consortium and lower plasma HDL cholesterol in the GOLDN study (r = −0.12, P = 0.0002). An additional mediation analysis was meta-analyzed across the GOLDN study, Cardiovascular Health Study, and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Compared with the model without the adjustment of cg14019050 methylation, the model with such

  17. Community structure and PAH ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase genes of a marine pyrene-degrading microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Sara; Vila, Joaquim; Tauler, Margalida; Nieto, José María; Breugelmans, Philip; Springael, Dirk; Grifoll, Magdalena

    2014-07-01

    Marine microbial consortium UBF, enriched from a beach polluted by the Prestige oil spill and highly efficient in degrading this heavy fuel, was subcultured in pyrene minimal medium. The pyrene-degrading subpopulation (UBF-Py) mineralized 31 % of pyrene without accumulation of partially oxidized intermediates indicating the cooperation of different microbial components in substrate mineralization. The microbial community composition was characterized by culture dependent and PCR based methods (PCR-DGGE and clone libraries). Molecular analyses showed a highly stable community composed by Alphaproteobacteria (84 %, Breoghania, Thalassospira, Paracoccus, and Martelella) and Actinobacteria (16 %, Gordonia). The members of Thalasosspira and Gordonia were not recovered as pure cultures, but five additional strains, not detected in the molecular analysis, that classified within the genera Novosphingobium, Sphingopyxis, Aurantimonas (Alphaproteobacteria), Alcanivorax (Gammaproteobacteria) and Micrococcus (Actinobacteria), were isolated. None of the isolates degraded pyrene or other PAHs in pure culture. PCR amplification of Gram-positive and Gram-negative dioxygenase genes did not produce results with any of the cultured strains. However, sequences related to the NidA3 pyrene dioxygenase present in mycobacterial strains were detected in UBF-Py consortium, suggesting the representative of Gordonia as the key pyrene degrader, which is consistent with a preeminent role of actinobacteria in pyrene removal in coastal environments affected by marine oil spills.

  18. Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    Cancer.gov

    Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium collaborates with three genomic facilities, epidemiologists, population geneticists, and biostatisticians from multiple institutions to study hormone-related gene variants and environmental factors in breast and prostate cancers.

  19. Radiogenomics Consortium (RGC)

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiogenomics Consortium's hypothesis is that a cancer patient's likelihood of developing toxicity to radiation therapy is influenced by common genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

  20. Structural Determinants and Mechanism of HIV-1 Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kun; Heng, Xiao; Summers, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Like all retroviruses, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) selectively packages two copies of its unspliced RNA genome, both of which are utilized for strand-transfer mediated recombination during reverse transcription – a process that enables rapid evolution under environmental and chemotherapeutic pressures. The viral RNA appears to be selected for packaging as a dimer, and there is evidence that dimerization and packaging are mechanistically coupled. Both processes are mediated by interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domains of a small number of assembling viral Gag polyproteins and RNA elements within the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of the genome. A number of secondary structures have been predicted for regions of the genome that are responsible for packaging, and high-resolution structures have been determined for a few small RNA fragments and protein-RNA complexes. However, major questions remain open regarding the RNA structures, and potentially the structural changes, that are responsible for dimeric genome selection. Here we review efforts that have been made to identify the molecular determinants and mechanism of HIV-1 genome packaging. PMID:21762803

  1. Primary structure of the herpesvirus saimiri genome.

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, J C; Nicholas, J; Biller, D; Cameron, K R; Biesinger, B; Newman, C; Wittmann, S; Craxton, M A; Coleman, H; Fleckenstein, B

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the complete nucleotide sequence of the genome of herpesvirus saimiri, the prototype of gammaherpesvirus subgroup 2 (rhadinoviruses). The unique low-G + C-content DNA region has 112,930 bp with an average base composition of 34.5% G + C and is flanked by about 35 noncoding high-G + C-content DNA repeats of 1,444 bp (70.8% G + C) in tandem orientation. We identified 76 major open reading frames and a set of seven U-RNA genes for a total of 83 potential genes. The genes are closely arranged, with only a few regions of sizable noncoding sequences. For 60 of the predicted proteins, homologous sequences are found in other herpesviruses. Genes conserved between herpesvirus saimiri and Epstein-Barr virus (gammaherpesvirus subgroup 1) show that their genomes are generally collinear, although conserved gene blocks are separated by unique genes that appear to determine the particular phenotype of these viruses. Several deduced protein sequences of herpesvirus saimiri without counterparts in most of the other sequenced herpesviruses exhibited significant homology with cellular proteins of known function. These include thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase, complement control proteins, the cell surface antigen CD59, cyclins, and G protein-coupled receptors. Searching for functional protein motifs revealed that the virus may encode a cytosine-specific methylase and a tyrosine-specific protein kinase. Several herpesvirus saimiri genes are potential candidates to cooperate with the gene for saimiri transformation-associated protein of subgroup A (STP-A) in T-lymphocyte growth stimulation. PMID:1321287

  2. The Impact of Structural Genomics: Expectations and Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-12-21

    Structural Genomics (SG) projects aim to expand our structural knowledge of biological macromolecules, while lowering the average costs of structure determination. We quantitatively analyzed the novelty, cost, and impact of structures solved by SG centers, and contrast these results with traditional structural biology. The first structure from a protein family is particularly important to reveal the fold and ancient relationships to other proteins. In the last year, approximately half of such structures were solved at a SG center rather than in a traditional laboratory. Furthermore, the cost of solving a structure at the most efficient U.S. center has now dropped to one-quarter the estimated cost of solving a structure by traditional methods. However, top structural biology laboratories are much more efficient than the average, and comparable to SG centers despite working on very challenging structures. Moreover, traditional structural biology papers are cited significantly more often, suggesting greater current impact.

  3. Mitochondrial Genome of Palpitomonas bilix: Derived Genome Structure and Ancestral System for Cytochrome c Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yuki; Tanifuji, Goro; Kamikawa, Ryoma; Yabuki, Akinori; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Inagaki, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    We here reported the mitochondrial (mt) genome of one of the heterotrophic microeukaryotes related to cryptophytes, Palpitomonas bilix. The P. bilix mt genome was found to be a linear molecule composed of “single copy region” (∼16 kb) and repeat regions (∼30 kb) arranged in an inverse manner at both ends of the genome. Linear mt genomes with large inverted repeats are known for three distantly related eukaryotes (including P. bilix), suggesting that this particular mt genome structure has emerged at least three times in the eukaryotic tree of life. The P. bilix mt genome contains 47 protein-coding genes including ccmA, ccmB, ccmC, and ccmF, which encode protein subunits involved in the system for cytochrome c maturation inherited from a bacterium (System I). We present data indicating that the phylogenetic relatives of P. bilix, namely, cryptophytes, goniomonads, and kathablepharids, utilize an alternative system for cytochrome c maturation, which has most likely emerged during the evolution of eukaryotes (System III). To explain the distribution of Systems I and III in P. bilix and its phylogenetic relatives, two scenarios are possible: (i) System I was replaced by System III on the branch leading to the common ancestor of cryptophytes, goniomonads, and kathablepharids, and (ii) the two systems co-existed in their common ancestor, and lost differentially among the four descendants. PMID:27604877

  4. Structural Genomics of Bacterial Virulence Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    drug design . In this first year of funding we have focused our attention on plasmid annotation, target selection, protein expression, purification and crystallization of proteins encoded by the Bacillus anthracis pXOl plasmid. We have cloned and expressed a total of 35 new proteins, and structural analysis of several of these is underway. Currently, 3 new crystal structures are essentially complete, and 6 crystal structures of anthrax Lethal Factor in complex with small molecule inhibitors provided by our collaborators have been determined, and lodged in the public data

  5. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing

  6. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with

  7. Benefits of Structural Genomics for Drug Discovery Research

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, Marek; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Kirillova, Olga; Minor, Wladek

    2010-01-01

    While three dimensional structures have long been used to search for new drug targets, only a fraction of new drugs coming to the market has been developed with the use of a structure-based drug discovery approach. However, the recent years have brought not only an avalanche of new macromolecular structures, but also significant advances in the protein structure determination methodology only now making their way into structure-based drug discovery. In this paper, we review recent developments resulting from the Structural Genomics (SG) programs, focusing on the methods and results most likely to improve our understanding of the molecular foundation of human diseases. SG programs have been around for almost a decade, and in that time, have contributed a significant part of the structural coverage of both the genomes of pathogens causing infectious diseases and structurally uncharacterized biological processes in general. Perhaps most importantly, SG programs have developed new methodology at all steps of the structure determination process, not only to determine new structures highly efficiently, but also to screen protein/ligand interactions. We describe the methodologies, experience and technologies developed by SG, which range from improvements to cloning protocols to improved procedures for crystallographic structure solution that may be applied in “traditional” structural biology laboratories particularly those performing drug discovery. We also discuss the conditions that must be met to convert the present high-throughput structure determination pipeline into a high-output structure-based drug discovery system. PMID:19594422

  8. Benefits of Structural Genomics for Drug Discovery Research

    SciTech Connect

    Grabowski, M.; Chruszcz, M; Zimmerman, M; Kirillova, O; Minor, W

    2009-01-01

    While three dimensional structures have long been used to search for new drug targets, only a fraction of new drugs coming to the market has been developed with the use of a structure-based drug discovery approach. However, the recent years have brought not only an avalanche of new macromolecular structures, but also significant advances in the protein structure determination methodology only now making their way into structure-based drug discovery. In this paper, we review recent developments resulting from the Structural Genomics (SG) programs, focusing on the methods and results most likely to improve our understanding of the molecular foundation of human diseases. SG programs have been around for almost a decade, and in that time, have contributed a significant part of the structural coverage of both the genomes of pathogens causing infectious diseases and structurally uncharacterized biological processes in general. Perhaps most importantly, SG programs have developed new methodology at all steps of the structure determination process, not only to determine new structures highly efficiently, but also to screen protein/ligand interactions. We describe the methodologies, experience and technologies developed by SG, which range from improvements to cloning protocols to improved procedures for crystallographic structure solution that may be applied in 'traditional' structural biology laboratories particularly those performing drug discovery. We also discuss the conditions that must be met to convert the present high-throughput structure determination pipeline into a high-output structure-based drug discovery system.

  9. Coevolution of the Organization and Structure of Prokaryotic Genomes.

    PubMed

    Touchon, Marie; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2016-01-04

    The cytoplasm of prokaryotes contains many molecular machines interacting directly with the chromosome. These vital interactions depend on the chromosome structure, as a molecule, and on the genome organization, as a unit of genetic information. Strong selection for the organization of the genetic elements implicated in these interactions drives replicon ploidy, gene distribution, operon conservation, and the formation of replication-associated traits. The genomes of prokaryotes are also very plastic with high rates of horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. The evolutionary conflicts between plasticity and organization lead to the formation of regions with high genetic diversity whose impact on chromosome structure is poorly understood. Prokaryotic genomes are remarkable documents of natural history because they carry the imprint of all of these selective and mutational forces. Their study allows a better understanding of molecular mechanisms, their impact on microbial evolution, and how they can be tinkered in synthetic biology.

  10. Consortium Proves Adage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Kim

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Minnesota Preparatory Schools, a secondary-level consortium formed by Cotter High School, Saint Mary's University, the Minnesota Academy of Mathematics and Science, De La Salle Language Institute, and the Minnesota Conservatory for the Arts. Indicates that the consortium provides students with flexible schedules geared toward their…

  11. Consortium Directory, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baus, Frederick, Comp.; LaRocco, Teresa, Comp.

    Information on 133 higher education consortia is presented in this directory. Each consortium meets the following criteria: voluntary, formal organization; includes at least two member institutions; undertakes more than a single program; is administered by a professional director; and receives continuing membership support. For each consortium,…

  12. Symbolic extensions applied to multiscale structure of genomes.

    PubMed

    Downarowicz, Tomasz; Travisany, Dante; Montecino, Martin; Maass, Alejandro

    2014-06-01

    A genome of a living organism consists of a long string of symbols over a finite alphabet carrying critical information for the organism. This includes its ability to control post natal growth, homeostasis, adaptation to changes in the surrounding environment, or to biochemically respond at the cellular level to various specific regulatory signals. In this sense, a genome represents a symbolic encoding of a highly organized system of information whose functioning may be revealed as a natural multilayer structure in terms of complexity and prominence. In this paper we use the mathematical theory of symbolic extensions as a framework to shed light onto how this multilayer organization is reflected in the symbolic coding of the genome. The distribution of data in an element of a standard symbolic extension of a dynamical system has a specific form: the symbolic sequence is divided into several subsequences (which we call layers) encoding the dynamics on various "scales". We propose that a similar structure resides within the genomes, building our analogy on some of the most recent findings in the field of regulation of genomic DNA functioning.

  13. Structural Genomics of Bacterial Virulence Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    involved in65 these processes. The large G+ C content difference between66 orf6, orf7 and orf8 (35%), and other Bacteroides genes67 ( 42 %) suggests a...initiating assembly of the central spindle, a structure that has important roles in cytokinesis. In C . elegans embryos and other animal cells, central...D. Read, T. Popovic, and C . M. Fraser. 2004. Identification of anthrax toxin genes in a Bacillus cereus associated with an illness resembling

  14. Principal-component-based population structure adjustment in the North American Rheumatoid Arthritis Consortium data: impact of single-nucleotide polymorphism set and analysis method

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Population structure occurs when a sample is composed of individuals with different ancestries and can result in excess type I error in genome-wide association studies. Genome-wide principal-component analysis (PCA) has become a popular method for identifying and adjusting for subtle population structure in association studies. Using the Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 (GAW16) NARAC data, we explore two unresolved issues concerning the use of genome-wide PCA to account for population structure in genetic associations studies: the choice of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) subset and the choice of adjustment model. We computed PCs for subsets of genome-wide SNPs with varying levels of LD. The first two PCs were similar for all subsets and the first three PCs were associated with case status for all subsets. When the PCs associated with case status were included as covariates in an association model, the reduction in genomic inflation factor was similar for all SNP sets. Several models have been proposed to account for structure using PCs, but it is not yet clear whether the different methods will result in substantively different results for association studies with individuals of European descent. We compared genome-wide association p-values and results for two positive-control SNPs previously associated with rheumatoid arthritis using four PC adjustment methods as well as no adjustment and genomic control. We found that in this sample, adjusting for the continuous PCs or adjusting for discrete clusters identified using the PCs adequately accounts for the case-control population structure, but that a recently proposed randomization test performs poorly. PMID:20017972

  15. Structure and Functional Studies on Dengue-2 Virus Genome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    AD STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL STUDIES ON DENGUE -2 VIRUS GENOME FINAL Report Lfl C’) Radha Krishnan Padmanabhan, Ph.D. 0) March 1, 1986 Supported by U.S...and Functional Studies on Dengue -2 Virus Genome 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Radha Krishnan Padmanabhan 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF...3’-end of Dengue RNA in order to facilitate cDNA synthesis by oligo d(T) priming as proposed in the original research project. 2. We also showed that

  16. Structure and Functional Studies on Dengue-2 Virus Genome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    AD_ _ _ Lfl oSTRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL STUDIES ON DENGUE -2 VIRUS GENOME 0Annual Report Radha Krishnan Padmanabhan, Ph.D. March 1, 1986 Supported by...Studies on Dengue -2 Virus Genome 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Radha Krishnan Padmanabhan 13a TYPE OF REPORT 1 3b TIME COVERED 14 DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day...analysis of these clones totalling 06 01 14,586 nucleotides: Deduced amino acid sequences of dengue virI 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse of

  17. Microbial community structure of a heavy fuel oil-degrading marine consortium: linking microbial dynamics with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon utilization.

    PubMed

    Vila, Joaquim; María Nieto, José; Mertens, Jelle; Springael, Dirk; Grifoll, Magdalena

    2010-08-01

    A marine microbial consortium obtained from a beach contaminated by the Prestige oil spill proved highly efficient in removing the different hydrocarbon families present in this heavy fuel oil. Seawater cultures showed a complete removal of all the linear and branched alkanes, an extensive attack on three to five-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs; including anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene] (30-100%), and a considerable depletion of their alkyl derivatives. Community dynamics analysis revealed that Alcanivorax species, known alkane degraders, predominated in the initial stages. This was followed by an increase in Alphaproteobacteria (i.e. Maricaulis, Roseovarius), which coincided with the depletion of low molecular PAHs. Finally, these were succeeded by Gammaproteobacteria (mainly Marinobacter and Methylophaga), which were involved in the degradation of the high molecular-weight PAHs. The role of these populations in the removal of the specific components was confirmed by the analysis of subcultures established using the aliphatic or the aromatic fraction of the fuel oil, or single PAHs, as carbon sources. The genus Marinobacter seemed to play a major role in the degradation of a variety of hydrocarbons, as several members of this group were isolated from the different enrichment cultures and grew on plates with hexadecane or single PAHs as sole carbon sources.

  18. Structural analysis of hepatitis C RNA genome using DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Martell, María; Briones, Carlos; de Vicente, Aránzazu; Piron, María; Esteban, Juan I.; Esteban, Rafael; Guardia, Jaime; Gómez, Jordi

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have tried to identify specific nucleotide sequences in the quasispecies of hepatitis C virus (HCV) that determine resistance or sensitivity to interferon (IFN) therapy, unfortunately without conclusive results. Although viral proteins represent the most evident phenotype of the virus, genomic RNA sequences determine secondary and tertiary structures which are also part of the viral phenotype and can be involved in important biological roles. In this work, a method of RNA structure analysis has been developed based on the hybridization of labelled HCV transcripts to microarrays of complementary DNA oligonucleotides. Hybridizations were carried out at non-denaturing conditions, using appropriate temperature and buffer composition to allow binding to the immobilized probes of the RNA transcript without disturbing its secondary/tertiary structural motifs. Oligonucleotides printed onto the microarray covered the entire 5′ non-coding region (5′NCR), the first three-quarters of the core region, the E2–NS2 junction and the first 400 nt of the NS3 region. We document the use of this methodology to analyse the structural degree of a large region of HCV genomic RNA in two genotypes associated with different responses to IFN treatment. The results reported here show different structural degree along the genome regions analysed, and differential hybridization patterns for distinct genotypes in NS2 and NS3 HCV regions. PMID:15247323

  19. Mitochondrial Disease Sequence Data Resource (MSeqDR): a global grass-roots consortium to facilitate deposition, curation, annotation, and integrated analysis of genomic data for the mitochondrial disease clinical and research communities.

    PubMed

    Falk, Marni J; Shen, Lishuang; Gonzalez, Michael; Leipzig, Jeremy; Lott, Marie T; Stassen, Alphons P M; Diroma, Maria Angela; Navarro-Gomez, Daniel; Yeske, Philip; Bai, Renkui; Boles, Richard G; Brilhante, Virginia; Ralph, David; DaRe, Jeana T; Shelton, Robert; Terry, Sharon F; Zhang, Zhe; Copeland, William C; van Oven, Mannis; Prokisch, Holger; Wallace, Douglas C; Attimonelli, Marcella; Krotoski, Danuta; Zuchner, Stephan; Gai, Xiaowu

    2015-03-01

    Success rates for genomic analyses of highly heterogeneous disorders can be greatly improved if a large cohort of patient data is assembled to enhance collective capabilities for accurate sequence variant annotation, analysis, and interpretation. Indeed, molecular diagnostics requires the establishment of robust data resources to enable data sharing that informs accurate understanding of genes, variants, and phenotypes. The "Mitochondrial Disease Sequence Data Resource (MSeqDR) Consortium" is a grass-roots effort facilitated by the United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation to identify and prioritize specific genomic data analysis needs of the global mitochondrial disease clinical and research community. A central Web portal (https://mseqdr.org) facilitates the coherent compilation, organization, annotation, and analysis of sequence data from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of individuals and families with suspected mitochondrial disease. This Web portal provides users with a flexible and expandable suite of resources to enable variant-, gene-, and exome-level sequence analysis in a secure, Web-based, and user-friendly fashion. Users can also elect to share data with other MSeqDR Consortium members, or even the general public, either by custom annotation tracks or through the use of a convenient distributed annotation system (DAS) mechanism. A range of data visualization and analysis tools are provided to facilitate user interrogation and understanding of genomic, and ultimately phenotypic, data of relevance to mitochondrial biology and disease. Currently available tools for nuclear and mitochondrial gene analyses include an MSeqDR GBrowse instance that hosts optimized mitochondrial disease and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) specific annotation tracks, as well as an MSeqDR locus-specific database (LSDB) that curates variant data on more than 1300 genes that have been implicated in mitochondrial disease and/or encode mitochondria-localized proteins. MSeqDR is

  20. Unlocking the bovine genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The draft genome sequence of cattle (Bos taurus) has now been analyzed by the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium and the Bovine HapMap Consortium, which together represent an extensive collaboration involving more than 300 scientists from 25 different countries. ...

  1. A Genome Wide Survey of SNP Variation Reveals the Genetic Structure of Sheep Breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic structure of sheep reflects their domestication and subsequent formation into discrete breeds. Understanding genetic structure is essential for achieving genetic improvement through genome-wide association studies, genomic selection and the dissection of quantitative traits. After identi...

  2. NCI Cohort Consortium Membership

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium membership is international and includes investigators responsible for more than 40 high-quality cohorts who are studying large and diverse populations in more than 15 different countries.

  3. Assessing a Consortium's Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Lorna M.

    2002-01-01

    Using the example of the Five Colleges consortium, explores the measuring of benefits and costs involved in intercollegiate cooperation. Discusses how the benefits are often other than cost-savings, which is ostensibly why many institutions join such consortia. (EV)

  4. Genome databases

    SciTech Connect

    Courteau, J.

    1991-10-11

    Since the Genome Project began several years ago, a plethora of databases have been developed or are in the works. They range from the massive Genome Data Base at Johns Hopkins University, the central repository of all gene mapping information, to small databases focusing on single chromosomes or organisms. Some are publicly available, others are essentially private electronic lab notebooks. Still others limit access to a consortium of researchers working on, say, a single human chromosome. An increasing number incorporate sophisticated search and analytical software, while others operate as little more than data lists. In consultation with numerous experts in the field, a list has been compiled of some key genome-related databases. The list was not limited to map and sequence databases but also included the tools investigators use to interpret and elucidate genetic data, such as protein sequence and protein structure databases. Because a major goal of the Genome Project is to map and sequence the genomes of several experimental animals, including E. coli, yeast, fruit fly, nematode, and mouse, the available databases for those organisms are listed as well. The author also includes several databases that are still under development - including some ambitious efforts that go beyond data compilation to create what are being called electronic research communities, enabling many users, rather than just one or a few curators, to add or edit the data and tag it as raw or confirmed.

  5. Target selection and determination of function in structural genomics.

    PubMed

    Watson, James D; Todd, Annabel E; Bray, James; Laskowski, Roman A; Edwards, Aled; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Orengo, Christine A; Thornton, Janet M

    2003-01-01

    The first crucial step in any structural genomics project is the selection and prioritization of target proteins for structure determination. There may be a number of selection criteria to be satisfied, including that the proteins have novel folds, that they be representatives of large families for which no structure is known, and so on. The better the selection at this stage, the greater is the value of the structures obtained at the end of the experimental process. This value can be further enhanced once the protein structures have been solved if the functions of the given proteins can also be determined. Here we describe the methods used at either end of the experimental process: firstly, sensitive sequence comparison techniques for selecting a high-quality list of target proteins, and secondly the various computational methods that can be applied to the eventual 3D structures to determine the most likely biochemical function of the proteins in question.

  6. Gene3D: Structural Assignment for Whole Genes and Genomes Using the CATH Domain Structure Database

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, Daniel W.A.; Shepherd, Adrian J.; Lee, David; Pearl, Frances M.G.; Rison, Stuart C.G.; Thornton, Janet M.; Orengo, Christine A.

    2002-01-01

    We present a novel web-based resource, Gene3D, of precalculated structural assignments to gene sequences and whole genomes. This resource assigns structural domains from the CATH database to whole genes and links these to their curated functional and structural annotations within the CATH domain structure database, the functional Dictionary of Homologous Superfamilies (DHS) and PDBsum. Currently Gene3D provides annotation for 36 complete genomes (two eukaryotes, six archaea, and 28 bacteria). On average, between 30% and 40% of the genes of a given genome can be structurally annotated. Matches to structural domains are found using the profile-based method (PSI-BLAST). and a novel protocol, DRange, is used to resolve conflicts in matches involving different homologous superfamilies. PMID:11875040

  7. Sequence, structure, function, immunity: structural genomics of costimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Kausik; Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Yan, Qingrong; Rubinstein, Rotem; Zhan, Chenyang; Vigdorovich, Vladimir; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Bonanno, Jeffrey; Nathenson, Stanley G.; Almo, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Costimulatory receptors and ligands trigger the signaling pathways that are responsible for modulating the strength, course and duration of an immune response. High-resolution structures have provided invaluable mechanistic insights by defining the chemical and physical features underlying costimulatory receptor/ligand specificity, affinity, oligomeric state, and valency. Furthermore, these structures revealed general architectural features that are important for the integration of these interactions and their associated signaling pathways into overall cellular physiology. Recent technological advances in structural biology promise unprecedented opportunities for furthering our understanding of the structural features and mechanisms that govern costimulation. In this review we highlight unique insights that have been revealed by structures of costimulatory molecules from the immunoglobulin and tumor necrosis factor superfamilies, and describe a vision for future structural and mechanistic analysis of costimulation. This vision includes simple strategies for the selection of candidate molecules for structure determination and highlights the critical role of structure in the design of mutant costimulatory molecules for the generation of in vivo structure-function correlations in a mammalian model system. This integrated ‘atoms-to-animals’ paradigm provides a comprehensive approach for defining atomic and molecular mechanisms. PMID:19426233

  8. Elucidation of operon structures across closely related bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuan; Ma, Qin; Li, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    About half of the protein-coding genes in prokaryotic genomes are organized into operons to facilitate co-regulation during transcription. With the evolution of genomes, operon structures are undergoing changes which could coordinate diverse gene expression patterns in response to various stimuli during the life cycle of a bacterial cell. Here we developed a graph-based model to elucidate the diversity of operon structures across a set of closely related bacterial genomes. In the constructed graph, each node represents one orthologous gene group (OGG) and a pair of nodes will be connected if any two genes, from the corresponding two OGGs respectively, are located in the same operon as immediate neighbors in any of the considered genomes. Through identifying the connected components in the above graph, we found that genes in a connected component are likely to be functionally related and these identified components tend to form treelike topology, such as paths and stars, corresponding to different biological mechanisms in transcriptional regulation as follows. Specifically, (i) a path-structure component integrates genes encoding a protein complex, such as ribosome; and (ii) a star-structure component not only groups related genes together, but also reflects the key functional roles of the central node of this component, such as the ABC transporter with a transporter permease and substrate-binding proteins surrounding it. Most interestingly, the genes from organisms with highly diverse living environments, i.e., biomass degraders and animal pathogens of clostridia in our study, can be clearly classified into different topological groups on some connected components.

  9. Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2004-07-14

    The structural genomics project is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy which is medically and biologically relevant, of good value, and tractable. As an option to consider, we present the Pfam5000 strategy, which involves selecting the 5000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. We compare the Pfam5000 strategy to several other proposed strategies that would require similar numbers of targets. These include including complete solution of several small to moderately sized bacterial proteomes, partial coverage of the human proteome, and random selection of approximately 5000 targets from sequenced genomes. We measure the impact that successful implementation of these strategies would have upon structural interpretation of the proteins in Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and 131 complete proteomes (including 10 of eukaryotes) from the Proteome Analysis database at EBI. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 68 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 59 percent of residues) and 61 percent of eukaryotic proteins (40 percent of residues). More fine-grained coverage which would allow accurate modeling of these proteins would require an order of magnitude more targets. The Pfam5000 strategy may be modified in several ways, for example to focus on larger families, bacterial sequences, or eukaryotic sequences; as long as secondary consideration is given to large families within Pfam, coverage results vary only slightly. In contrast, focusing structural genomics on a single tractable genome would have only a limited impact in structural knowledge of other proteomes: a significant fraction (about 30-40 percent of the proteins, and 40-60 percent of the residues) of each proteome is classified in small

  10. Diverse mechanisms of somatic structural variations in human cancer genomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lixing; Luquette, Lovelace J.; Gehlenborg, Nils; Xi, Ruibin; Haseley, Psalm S.; Hsieh, Chih-Heng; Zhang, Chengsheng; Ren, Xiaojia; Protopopov, Alexei; Chin, Lynda; Kucherlapati, Raju; Lee, Charles; Park, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Identification of somatic rearrangements in cancer genomes has accelerated through analysis of high-throughput sequencing data. However, characterization of complex structural alterations and their underlying mechanisms remains inadequate. Here, applying an algorithm to predict structural variations from short reads, we report a comprehensive catalog of somatic structural variations and the mechanisms generating them, using high-coverage whole-genome sequencing data from 140 patients across ten tumor types. We characterize the relative contributions of different types of rearrangements and their mutational mechanisms, find that ~20% of the somatic deletions are complex deletions formed by replication errors, and describe the differences between the mutational mechanisms in somatic and germline alterations. Importantly, we provide detailed reconstructions of the events responsible for loss of CDKN2A/B and gain of EGFR in glioblastoma, revealing that these alterations can result from multiple mechanisms even in a single genome and that both DNA double-strand breaks and replication errors drive somatic rearrangements. PMID:23663786

  11. Iterative ACORN as a high throughput tool in structural genomics.

    PubMed

    Selvanayagam, S; Velmurugan, D; Yamane, T

    2006-08-01

    High throughput macromolecular structure determination is very essential in structural genomics as the available number of sequence information far exceeds the number of available 3D structures. ACORN, a freely available resource in the CCP4 suite of programs is a comprehensive and efficient program for phasing in the determination of protein structures, when atomic resolution data are available. ACORN with the automatic model-building program ARP/wARP and refinement program REFMAC is a suitable combination for the high throughput structural genomics. ACORN can also be run with secondary structural elements like helices and sheets as inputs with high resolution data. In situations, where ACORN phasing is not sufficient for building the protein model, the fragments (incomplete model/dummy atoms) can again be used as a starting input. Iterative ACORN is proved to work efficiently in the subsequent model building stages in congerin (PDB-ID: lis3) and catalase (PDB-ID: 1gwe) for which models are available.

  12. Structure and sequence of the saimiriine herpesvirus 1 genome.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Shaun; Severini, Alberto; Black, Darla; Walker, Matthew; Eberle, R

    2011-02-05

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the squirrel monkey α-herpesvirus saimiriine herpesvirus 1 (HVS1). Unlike the simplexviruses of other primate species, only the unique short region of the HVS1 genome is bounded by inverted repeats. While all Old World simian simplexviruses characterized to date lack the herpes simplex virus RL1 (γ34.5) gene, HVS1 has an RL1 gene. HVS1 lacks several genes that are present in other primate simplexviruses (US8.5, US10-12, UL43/43.5 and UL49A). Although the overall genome structure appears more like that of varicelloviruses, the encoded HVS1 proteins are most closely related to homologous proteins of the primate simplexviruses. Phylogenetic analyses confirm that HVS1 is a simplexvirus. Limited comparison of two HVS1 strains revealed a very low degree of sequence variation more typical of varicelloviruses. HVS1 is thus unique among the primate α-herpesviruses in that its genome has properties of both simplexviruses and varicelloviruses.

  13. Structural divergence between the human and chimpanzee genomes.

    PubMed

    Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Cooper, David N

    2007-02-01

    The structural microheterogeneity evident between the human and chimpanzee genomes is quite considerable and includes inversions and duplications as well as deletions, ranging in size from a few base-pairs up to several megabases (Mb). Insertions and deletions have together given rise to at least 150 Mb of genomic DNA sequence that is either present or absent in humans as compared to chimpanzees. Such regions often contain paralogous sequences and members of multigene families thereby ensuring that the human and chimpanzee genomes differ by a significant fraction of their gene content. There is as yet no evidence to suggest that the large chromosomal rearrangements which serve to distinguish the human and chimpanzee karyotypes have influenced either speciation or the evolution of lineage-specific traits. However, the myriad submicroscopic rearrangements in both genomes, particularly those involving copy number variation, are unlikely to represent exclusively neutral changes and hence promise to facilitate the identification of genes that have been important for human-specific evolution.

  14. Genetic contributions to variation in general cognitive function: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in the CHARGE consortium (N=53949).

    PubMed

    Davies, G; Armstrong, N; Bis, J C; Bressler, J; Chouraki, V; Giddaluru, S; Hofer, E; Ibrahim-Verbaas, C A; Kirin, M; Lahti, J; van der Lee, S J; Le Hellard, S; Liu, T; Marioni, R E; Oldmeadow, C; Postmus, I; Smith, A V; Smith, J A; Thalamuthu, A; Thomson, R; Vitart, V; Wang, J; Yu, L; Zgaga, L; Zhao, W; Boxall, R; Harris, S E; Hill, W D; Liewald, D C; Luciano, M; Adams, H; Ames, D; Amin, N; Amouyel, P; Assareh, A A; Au, R; Becker, J T; Beiser, A; Berr, C; Bertram, L; Boerwinkle, E; Buckley, B M; Campbell, H; Corley, J; De Jager, P L; Dufouil, C; Eriksson, J G; Espeseth, T; Faul, J D; Ford, I; Gottesman, R F; Griswold, M E; Gudnason, V; Harris, T B; Heiss, G; Hofman, A; Holliday, E G; Huffman, J; Kardia, S L R; Kochan, N; Knopman, D S; Kwok, J B; Lambert, J-C; Lee, T; Li, G; Li, S-C; Loitfelder, M; Lopez, O L; Lundervold, A J; Lundqvist, A; Mather, K A; Mirza, S S; Nyberg, L; Oostra, B A; Palotie, A; Papenberg, G; Pattie, A; Petrovic, K; Polasek, O; Psaty, B M; Redmond, P; Reppermund, S; Rotter, J I; Schmidt, H; Schuur, M; Schofield, P W; Scott, R J; Steen, V M; Stott, D J; van Swieten, J C; Taylor, K D; Trollor, J; Trompet, S; Uitterlinden, A G; Weinstein, G; Widen, E; Windham, B G; Jukema, J W; Wright, A F; Wright, M J; Yang, Q; Amieva, H; Attia, J R; Bennett, D A; Brodaty, H; de Craen, A J M; Hayward, C; Ikram, M A; Lindenberger, U; Nilsson, L-G; Porteous, D J; Räikkönen, K; Reinvang, I; Rudan, I; Sachdev, P S; Schmidt, R; Schofield, P R; Srikanth, V; Starr, J M; Turner, S T; Weir, D R; Wilson, J F; van Duijn, C; Launer, L; Fitzpatrick, A L; Seshadri, S; Mosley, T H; Deary, I J

    2015-02-01

    General cognitive function is substantially heritable across the human life course from adolescence to old age. We investigated the genetic contribution to variation in this important, health- and well-being-related trait in middle-aged and older adults. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of 31 cohorts (N=53,949) in which the participants had undertaken multiple, diverse cognitive tests. A general cognitive function phenotype was tested for, and created in each cohort by principal component analysis. We report 13 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations in three genomic regions, 6q16.1, 14q12 and 19q13.32 (best SNP and closest gene, respectively: rs10457441, P=3.93 × 10(-9), MIR2113; rs17522122, P=2.55 × 10(-8), AKAP6; rs10119, P=5.67 × 10(-9), APOE/TOMM40). We report one gene-based significant association with the HMGN1 gene located on chromosome 21 (P=1 × 10(-6)). These genes have previously been associated with neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Meta-analysis results are consistent with a polygenic model of inheritance. To estimate SNP-based heritability, the genome-wide complex trait analysis procedure was applied to two large cohorts, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (N=6617) and the Health and Retirement Study (N=5976). The proportion of phenotypic variation accounted for by all genotyped common SNPs was 29% (s.e.=5%) and 28% (s.e.=7%), respectively. Using polygenic prediction analysis, ~1.2% of the variance in general cognitive function was predicted in the Generation Scotland cohort (N=5487; P=1.5 × 10(-17)). In hypothesis-driven tests, there was significant association between general cognitive function and four genes previously associated with Alzheimer's disease: TOMM40, APOE, ABCG1 and MEF2C.

  15. Genetic contributions to variation in general cognitive function: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in the CHARGE consortium (N=53 949)

    PubMed Central

    Davies, G; Armstrong, N; Bis, J C; Bressler, J; Chouraki, V; Giddaluru, S; Hofer, E; Ibrahim-Verbaas, C A; Kirin, M; Lahti, J; van der Lee, S J; Le Hellard, S; Liu, T; Marioni, R E; Oldmeadow, C; Postmus, I; Smith, A V; Smith, J A; Thalamuthu, A; Thomson, R; Vitart, V; Wang, J; Yu, L; Zgaga, L; Zhao, W; Boxall, R; Harris, S E; Hill, W D; Liewald, D C; Luciano, M; Adams, H; Ames, D; Amin, N; Amouyel, P; Assareh, A A; Au, R; Becker, J T; Beiser, A; Berr, C; Bertram, L; Boerwinkle, E; Buckley, B M; Campbell, H; Corley, J; De Jager, P L; Dufouil, C; Eriksson, J G; Espeseth, T; Faul, J D; Ford, I; Scotland, Generation; Gottesman, R F; Griswold, M E; Gudnason, V; Harris, T B; Heiss, G; Hofman, A; Holliday, E G; Huffman, J; Kardia, S L R; Kochan, N; Knopman, D S; Kwok, J B; Lambert, J-C; Lee, T; Li, G; Li, S-C; Loitfelder, M; Lopez, O L; Lundervold, A J; Lundqvist, A; Mather, K A; Mirza, S S; Nyberg, L; Oostra, B A; Palotie, A; Papenberg, G; Pattie, A; Petrovic, K; Polasek, O; Psaty, B M; Redmond, P; Reppermund, S; Rotter, J I; Schmidt, H; Schuur, M; Schofield, P W; Scott, R J; Steen, V M; Stott, D J; van Swieten, J C; Taylor, K D; Trollor, J; Trompet, S; Uitterlinden, A G; Weinstein, G; Widen, E; Windham, B G; Jukema, J W; Wright, A F; Wright, M J; Yang, Q; Amieva, H; Attia, J R; Bennett, D A; Brodaty, H; de Craen, A J M; Hayward, C; Ikram, M A; Lindenberger, U; Nilsson, L-G; Porteous, D J; Räikkönen, K; Reinvang, I; Rudan, I; Sachdev, P S; Schmidt, R; Schofield, P R; Srikanth, V; Starr, J M; Turner, S T; Weir, D R; Wilson, J F; van Duijn, C; Launer, L; Fitzpatrick, A L; Seshadri, S; Mosley, T H; Deary, I J

    2015-01-01

    General cognitive function is substantially heritable across the human life course from adolescence to old age. We investigated the genetic contribution to variation in this important, health- and well-being-related trait in middle-aged and older adults. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of 31 cohorts (N=53 949) in which the participants had undertaken multiple, diverse cognitive tests. A general cognitive function phenotype was tested for, and created in each cohort by principal component analysis. We report 13 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations in three genomic regions, 6q16.1, 14q12 and 19q13.32 (best SNP and closest gene, respectively: rs10457441, P=3.93 × 10−9, MIR2113; rs17522122, P=2.55 × 10−8, AKAP6; rs10119, P=5.67 × 10−9, APOE/TOMM40). We report one gene-based significant association with the HMGN1 gene located on chromosome 21 (P=1 × 10−6). These genes have previously been associated with neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Meta-analysis results are consistent with a polygenic model of inheritance. To estimate SNP-based heritability, the genome-wide complex trait analysis procedure was applied to two large cohorts, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (N=6617) and the Health and Retirement Study (N=5976). The proportion of phenotypic variation accounted for by all genotyped common SNPs was 29% (s.e.=5%) and 28% (s.e.=7%), respectively. Using polygenic prediction analysis, ~1.2% of the variance in general cognitive function was predicted in the Generation Scotland cohort (N=5487; P=1.5 × 10−17). In hypothesis-driven tests, there was significant association between general cognitive function and four genes previously associated with Alzheimer's disease: TOMM40, APOE, ABCG1 and MEF2C. PMID:25644384

  16. Analysis of correlation structures in the Synechocystis PCC6803 genome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zuo-Bing

    2014-12-01

    Transfer of nucleotide strings in the Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 genome is investigated to exhibit periodic and non-periodic correlation structures by using the recurrence plot method and the phase space reconstruction technique. The periodic correlation structures are generated by periodic transfer of several substrings in long periodic or non-periodic nucleotide strings embedded in the coding regions of genes. The non-periodic correlation structures are generated by non-periodic transfer of several substrings covering or overlapping with the coding regions of genes. In the periodic and non-periodic transfer, some gaps divide the long nucleotide strings into the substrings and prevent their global transfer. Most of the gaps are either the replacement of one base or the insertion/reduction of one base. In the reconstructed phase space, the points generated from two or three steps for the continuous iterative transfer via the second maximal distance can be fitted by two lines. It partly reveals an intrinsic dynamics in the transfer of nucleotide strings. Due to the comparison of the relative positions and lengths, the substrings concerned with the non-periodic correlation structures are almost identical to the mobile elements annotated in the genome. The mobile elements are thus endowed with the basic results on the correlation structures.

  17. RNA structures, genomic organization and selection of recombinant HIV.

    PubMed

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Rossolillo, Paola; Negroni, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    Recombination is an evolutionary mechanism intrinsic to the evolution of many RNA viruses. In retroviruses and notably in the case of HIV, recombination is so frequent that it can be considered as part of its mode of replication. This process not only plays a central role in shaping HIV genetic diversity worldwide, but has also been involved in immune escape and development of resistance to antiviral treatments. Recombination does not create new mutations in the existing genetic repertoire of the virus, but creates new combinations of pre-existing polymorphisms. The simultaneous insertion of multiple substitutions in a single replication cycle leaves little room for the progressive coevolution of regions of proteins, RNA or, more in general, genomes, to accommodate these drastic sequence changes. Therefore, recombination, while allowing the virus to rapidly explore larger sequence space than the slow accumulation of point mutations, also runs the risk of generating non functional viruses. Recombination is the consequence of a switch in the template used during reverse transcription and is promoted by the presence of structured regions in the genomic RNA template. In this review, we discuss new observations suggesting that the distribution of RNA structures along the HIV genome may enhance recombination rates in regions where the resultant progeny is less likely to be impaired, and could therefore maximize the evolutionary value of this source of genetic diversity.

  18. Overview | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The Human Cancer Model Initiative (HCMI) is an international consortium that is generating novel human tumor-derived culture models with associated genomic and clinical data. The HCMI consortium includes the US-National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, Cancer Research UK, foundation Hubrecht Organoid Technology, and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (more on the Consortium).

  19. Interactions Between Genome-wide Significant Genetic Variants and Circulating Concentrations of Insulin-like Growth Factor 1, Sex Hormones, and Binding Proteins in Relation to Prostate Cancer Risk in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Travis, Ruth C.; Appleby, Paul N.; Allen, Naomi E.; Lindstrom, Sara; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cox, David; Hsing, Ann W.; Ma, Jing; Severi, Gianluca; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Johansson, Mattias; Quirós, J. Ramón; Riboli, Elio; Siddiq, Afshan; Tjønneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Stampfer, Meir J.; Giles, Graham G.; Andriole, Gerald L.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hayes, Richard B.; Key, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with prostate cancer risk. There is limited information on the mechanistic basis of these associations, particularly about whether they interact with circulating concentrations of growth factors and sex hormones, which may be important in prostate cancer etiology. Using conditional logistic regression, the authors compared per-allele odds ratios for prostate cancer for 39 GWAS-identified SNPs across thirds (tertile groups) of circulating concentrations of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), testosterone, androstenedione, androstanediol glucuronide, estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) for 3,043 cases and 3,478 controls in the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium. After allowing for multiple testing, none of the SNPs examined were significantly associated with growth factor or hormone concentrations, and the SNP-prostate cancer associations did not differ by these concentrations, although 4 interactions were marginally significant (MSMB-rs10993994 with androstenedione (uncorrected P = 0.008); CTBP2-rs4962416 with IGFBP-3 (uncorrected P = 0.003); 11q13.2-rs12418451 with IGF-1 (uncorrected P = 0.006); and 11q13.2-rs10896449 with SHBG (uncorrected P = 0.005)). The authors found no strong evidence that associations between GWAS-identified SNPs and prostate cancer are modified by circulating concentrations of IGF-1, sex hormones, or their major binding proteins. PMID:22459122

  20. The PlaNet Consortium: A Network of European Plant Databases Connecting Plant Genome Data in an Integrated Biological Knowledge Resource

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, R.; Mayer, K. F. X.

    2004-01-01

    The completion of the Arabidopsis genome and the large collections of other plant sequences generated in recent years have sparked extensive functional genomics efforts. However, the utilization of this data is inefficient, as data sources are distributed and heterogeneous and efforts at data integration are lagging behind. PlaNet aims to overcome the limitations of individual efforts as well as the limitations of heterogeneous, independent data collections. PlaNet is a distributed effort among European bioinformatics groups and plant molecular biologists to establish a comprehensive integrated database in a collaborative network. Objectives are the implementation of infrastructure and data sources to capture plant genomic information into a comprehensive, integrated platform. This will facilitate the systematic exploration of Arabidopsis and other plants. New methods for data exchange, database integration and access are being developed to create a highly integrated, federated data resource for research. The connection between the individual resources is realized with BioMOBY. BioMOBY provides an architecture for the discovery and distribution of biological data through web services. While knowledge is centralized, data is maintained at its primary source without a need for warehousing. To standardize nomenclature and data representation, ontologies and generic data models are defined in interaction with the relevant communities.Minimal data models should make it simple to allow broad integration, while inheritance allows detail and depth to be added to more complex data objects without losing integration. To allow expert annotation and keep databases curated, local and remote annotation interfaces are provided. Easy and direct access to all data is key to the project. PMID:18629059

  1. The PlaNet Consortium: a network of European plant databases connecting plant genome data in an integrated biological knowledge resource.

    PubMed

    Schoof, H; Ernst, R; Mayer, K F X

    2004-01-01

    The completion of the Arabidopsis genome and the large collections of other plant sequences generated in recent years have sparked extensive functional genomics efforts. However, the utilization of this data is inefficient, as data sources are distributed and heterogeneous and efforts at data integration are lagging behind. PlaNet aims to overcome the limitations of individual efforts as well as the limitations of heterogeneous, independent data collections. PlaNet is a distributed effort among European bioinformatics groups and plant molecular biologists to establish a comprehensive integrated database in a collaborative network. Objectives are the implementation of infrastructure and data sources to capture plant genomic information into a comprehensive, integrated platform. This will facilitate the systematic exploration of Arabidopsis and other plants. New methods for data exchange, database integration and access are being developed to create a highly integrated, federated data resource for research. The connection between the individual resources is realized with BioMOBY. BioMOBY provides an architecture for the discovery and distribution of biological data through web services. While knowledge is centralized, data is maintained at its primary source without a need for warehousing. To standardize nomenclature and data representation, ontologies and generic data models are defined in interaction with the relevant communities.Minimal data models should make it simple to allow broad integration, while inheritance allows detail and depth to be added to more complex data objects without losing integration. To allow expert annotation and keep databases curated, local and remote annotation interfaces are provided. Easy and direct access to all data is key to the project.

  2. TSTMP: target selection for structural genomics of human transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Reményi, István; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2017-01-01

    The TSTMP database is designed to help the target selection of human transmembrane proteins for structural genomics projects and structure modeling studies. Currently, there are only 60 known 3D structures among the polytopic human transmembrane proteins and about a further 600 could be modeled using existing structures. Although there are a great number of human transmembrane protein structures left to be determined, surprisingly only a small fraction of these proteins have ‘selected’ (or above) status according to the current version the TargetDB/TargetTrack database. This figure is even worse regarding those transmembrane proteins that would contribute the most to the structural coverage of the human transmembrane proteome. The database was built by sorting out proteins from the human transmembrane proteome with known structure and searching for suitable model structures for the remaining proteins by combining the results of a state-of-the-art transmembrane specific fold recognition algorithm and a sequence similarity search algorithm. Proteins were searched for homologues among the human transmembrane proteins in order to select targets whose successful structure determination would lead to the best structural coverage of the human transmembrane proteome. The pipeline constructed for creating the TSTMP database guarantees to keep the database up-to-date. The database is available at http://tstmp.enzim.ttk.mta.hu. PMID:27924015

  3. Genome-wide association study for refractive astigmatism reveals genetic co-determination with spherical equivalent refractive error: the CREAM consortium.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Wojciechowski, Robert; Simpson, Claire L; Hysi, Pirro G; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Hewitt, Alex W; Oexle, Konrad; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; MacGregor, Stuart; Pirastu, Mario; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; St Pourcain, Beaté; McMahon, George; Kemp, John P; Northstone, Kate; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Cumberland, Phillippa M; Martin, Nicholas G; Sanfilippo, Paul G; Lu, Yi; Wang, Ya Xing; Hayward, Caroline; Polašek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Bencic, Goran; Wright, Alan F; Wedenoja, Juho; Zeller, Tanja; Schillert, Arne; Mirshahi, Alireza; Lackner, Karl; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Ried, Janina S; Gieger, Christian; Murgia, Federico; Wilson, James F; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Vingerling, Johannes R; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart; Oostra, Ben A; Zhou, Xin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Tai, E Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Barathi, Veluchamy; Zheng, Yingfeng; Siantar, Rosalynn Grace; Neelam, Kumari; Shin, Youchan; Lam, Janice; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Venturini, Cristina; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kähönen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Barbara; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Meitinger, Thomas; Jonas, Jost B; Baird, Paul N; Mackey, David A; Wong, Tien Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Pärssinen, Olavi; Stambolian, Dwight; Hammond, Christopher J; Klaver, Caroline C W; Williams, Cathy; Paterson, Andrew D; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Guggenheim, Jeremy A

    2015-02-01

    To identify genetic variants associated with refractive astigmatism in the general population, meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies were performed for: White Europeans aged at least 25 years (20 cohorts, N = 31,968); Asian subjects aged at least 25 years (7 cohorts, N = 9,295); White Europeans aged <25 years (4 cohorts, N = 5,640); and all independent individuals from the above three samples combined with a sample of Chinese subjects aged <25 years (N = 45,931). Participants were classified as cases with refractive astigmatism if the average cylinder power in their two eyes was at least 1.00 diopter and as controls otherwise. Genome-wide association analysis was carried out for each cohort separately using logistic regression. Meta-analysis was conducted using a fixed effects model. In the older European group the most strongly associated marker was downstream of the neurexin-1 (NRXN1) gene (rs1401327, P = 3.92E-8). No other region reached genome-wide significance, and association signals were lower for the younger European group and Asian group. In the meta-analysis of all cohorts, no marker reached genome-wide significance: The most strongly associated regions were, NRXN1 (rs1401327, P = 2.93E-07), TOX (rs7823467, P = 3.47E-07) and LINC00340 (rs12212674, P = 1.49E-06). For 34 markers identified in prior GWAS for spherical equivalent refractive error, the beta coefficients for genotype versus spherical equivalent, and genotype versus refractive astigmatism, were highly correlated (r = -0.59, P = 2.10E-04). This work revealed no consistent or strong genetic signals for refractive astigmatism; however, the TOX gene region previously identified in GWAS for spherical equivalent refractive error was the second most strongly associated region. Analysis of additional markers provided evidence supporting widespread genetic co-susceptibility for spherical and astigmatic refractive errors.

  4. Refolding strategies from inclusion bodies in a structural genomics project.

    PubMed

    Trésaugues, Lionel; Collinet, Bruno; Minard, Philippe; Henckes, Gilles; Aufrère, Robert; Blondeau, Karine; Liger, Dominique; Zhou, Cong-Zhao; Janin, Joël; Van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie

    2004-01-01

    The South-Paris Yeast Structural Genomics Project aims at systematically expressing, purifying and determining the structure of S. cerevisiae proteins with no detectable homology to proteins of known structure. We brought 250 yeast ORFs to expression in E. coli, but 37% of them form inclusion bodies. This important fraction of proteins that are well expressed but lost for structural studies prompted us to test methodologies to recover these proteins. Three different strategies were explored in parallel on a set of 20 proteins: (1) refolding from solubilized inclusion bodies using an original and fast 96-well plates screening test, (2) co-expression of the targets in E. coli with DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE and GroEL-GroES chaperones, and (3) use of the cell-free expression system. Most of the tested proteins (17/20) could be resolubilized at least by one approach, but the subsequent purification proved to be difficult for most of them.

  5. X-ray scattering data and structural genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doniach, Sebastian

    2003-03-01

    High throughput structural genomics has the ambitious goal of determining the structure of all, or a very large number of protein folds using the high-resolution techniques of protein crystallography and NMR. However, the program is facing significant bottlenecks in reaching this goal, which include problems of protein expression and crystallization. In this talk, some preliminary results on how the low-resolution technique of small-angle X-ray solution scattering (SAXS) can help ameliorate some of these bottlenecks will be presented. One of the most significant bottlenecks arises from the difficulty of crystallizing integral membrane proteins, where only a handful of structures are available compared to thousands of structures for soluble proteins. By 3-dimensional reconstruction from SAXS data, the size and shape of detergent-solubilized integral membrane proteins can be characterized. This information can then be used to classify membrane proteins which constitute some 25% of all genomes. SAXS may also be used to study the dependence of interparticle interference scattering on solvent conditions so that regions of the protein solution phase diagram which favor crystallization can be elucidated. As a further application, SAXS may be used to provide physical constraints on computational methods for protein structure prediction based on primary sequence information. This in turn can help in identifying structural homologs of a given protein, which can then give clues to its function. D. Walther, F. Cohen and S. Doniach. "Reconstruction of low resolution three-dimensional density maps from one-dimensional small angle x-ray scattering data for biomolecules." J. Appl. Cryst. 33(2):350-363 (2000). Protein structure prediction constrained by solution X-ray scattering data and structural homology identification Zheng WJ, Doniach S JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY , v. 316(#1) pp. 173-187 FEB 8, 2002

  6. Structural Genomics: From Genes to Structures With Valuable Materials And Many Questions in Between

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, B.G.; Goulding, C.; Malkowski, M.G.; Stewart, L.; Deacon, A.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    The Protein Structure Initiative (PSI), funded by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), provides a framework for the development and systematic evaluation of methods to solve protein structures. Although the PSI and other structural genomics efforts around the world have led to the solution of many new protein structures as well as the development of new methods, methodological bottlenecks still exist and are being addressed in this 'production phase' of PSI.

  7. The evolution of chloroplast genome structure in ferns.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Paul G; Roper, Jessie M; Duffy, Aaron M

    2010-09-01

    The plastid genome (plastome) is a rich source of phylogenetic and other comparative data in plants. Most land plants possess a plastome of similar structure. However, in a major group of plants, the ferns, a unique plastome structure has evolved. The gene order in ferns has been explained by a series of genomic inversions relative to the plastome organization of seed plants. Here, we examine for the first time the structure of the plastome across fern phylogeny. We used a PCR-based strategy to map and partially sequence plastomes. We found that a pair of partially overlapping inversions in the region of the inverted repeat occurred in the common ancestor of most ferns. However, the ancestral (seed plant) structure is still found in early diverging branches leading to the osmundoid and filmy fern lineages. We found that a second pair of overlapping inversions occurred on a branch leading to the core leptosporangiates. We also found that the unique placement of the gene matK in ferns (lacking a flanking intron) is not a result of a large-scale inversion, as previously thought. This is because the intron loss maps to an earlier point on the phylogeny than the nearby inversion. We speculate on why inversions may occur in pairs and what this may mean for the dynamics of plastome evolution.

  8. Target selection and deselection at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center.

    PubMed

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou; Brenner, Steven E

    2006-02-01

    At the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center (BSGC), our goal is to obtain a near-complete structural complement of proteins in the minimal organisms Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae, two closely related pathogens. Current targets for structure determination have been selected in six major stages, starting with those predicted to be most tractable to high throughput study and likely to yield new structural information. We report on the process used to select these proteins, as well as our target deselection procedure. Target deselection reduces experimental effort by eliminating targets similar to those recently solved by the structural biology community or other centers. We measure the impact of the 69 structures solved at the BSGC as of July 2004 on structure prediction coverage of the M. pneumoniae and M. genitalium proteomes. The number of Mycoplasma proteins for which the fold could first be reliably assigned based on structures solved at the BSGC (24 M. pneumoniae and 21 M. genitalium) is approximately 25% of the total resulting from work at all structural genomics centers and the worldwide structural biology community (94 M. pneumoniae and 86 M. genitalium) during the same period. As the number of structures contributed by the BSGC during that period is less than 1% of the total worldwide output, the benefits of a focused target selection strategy are apparent. If the structures of all current targets were solved, the percentage of M. pneumoniae proteins for which folds could be reliably assigned would increase from approximately 57% (391 of 687) at present to around 80% (550 of 687), and the percentage of the proteome that could be accurately modeled would increase from around 37% (254 of 687) to about 64% (438 of 687). In M. genitalium, the percentage of the proteome that could be structurally annotated based on structures of our remaining targets would rise from 72% (348 of 486) to around 76% (371 of 486), with the percentage of accurately modeled

  9. The Impact of Structural Genomics: the First Quindecennial

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, Marek; Niedzialkowska, Ewa; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Minor, Wladek

    2016-01-01

    The period 2000–2015 brought the advent of high-throughput approaches to protein structure determination. With the overall funding on the order of $2 billion (in 2010 dollars), the structural genomics (SG) consortia established worldwide have developed pipelines for target selection, protein production, sample preparation, crystallization, and structure determination by X-ray crystallography and NMR. These efforts resulted in the determination of over 13,500 protein structures, mostly from unique protein families, and increased the structural coverage of the expanding protein universe. SG programs contributed over 4,400 publications to the scientific literature. The NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiatives (PSI) alone have produced over 2,000 scientific publications, which to date have attracted more than 93,000 citations. Software and database developments that were necessary to handle high-throughput structure determination workflows have led to structures of better quality and improved integrity of the associated data. Organized and accessible data have a positive impact on the reproducibility of scientific experiments. Most of the experimental data generated by the SG centers are freely available to the community and has been utilized by scientists in various fields of research. SG projects have created, improved, streamlined, and validated many protocols for protein production and crystallization, data collection, and functional analysis, significantly benefiting biological and biomedical research. PMID:26935210

  10. The impact of structural genomics: the first quindecennial.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Marek; Niedzialkowska, Ewa; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Minor, Wladek

    2016-03-01

    The period 2000-2015 brought the advent of high-throughput approaches to protein structure determination. With the overall funding on the order of $2 billion (in 2010 dollars), the structural genomics (SG) consortia established worldwide have developed pipelines for target selection, protein production, sample preparation, crystallization, and structure determination by X-ray crystallography and NMR. These efforts resulted in the determination of over 13,500 protein structures, mostly from unique protein families, and increased the structural coverage of the expanding protein universe. SG programs contributed over 4400 publications to the scientific literature. The NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiatives alone have produced over 2000 scientific publications, which to date have attracted more than 93,000 citations. Software and database developments that were necessary to handle high-throughput structure determination workflows have led to structures of better quality and improved integrity of the associated data. Organized and accessible data have a positive impact on the reproducibility of scientific experiments. Most of the experimental data generated by the SG centers are freely available to the community and has been utilized by scientists in various fields of research. SG projects have created, improved, streamlined, and validated many protocols for protein production and crystallization, data collection, and functional analysis, significantly benefiting biological and biomedical research.

  11. A Roadmap for Functional Structural Variants in the Soybean Genome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Justin E.; Kantar, Michael B.; Kono, Thomas Y.; Fu, Fengli; Stec, Adrian O.; Song, Qijian; Cregan, Perry B.; Specht, James E.; Diers, Brian W.; Cannon, Steven B.; McHale, Leah K.; Stupar, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Gene structural variation (SV) has recently emerged as a key genetic mechanism underlying several important phenotypic traits in crop species. We screened a panel of 41 soybean (Glycine max) accessions serving as parents in a soybean nested association mapping population for deletions and duplications in more than 53,000 gene models. Array hybridization and whole genome resequencing methods were used as complementary technologies to identify SV in 1528 genes, or approximately 2.8%, of the soybean gene models. Although SV occurs throughout the genome, SV enrichment was noted in families of biotic defense response genes. Among accessions, SV was nearly eightfold less frequent for gene models that have retained paralogs since the last whole genome duplication event, compared with genes that have not retained paralogs. Increases in gene copy number, similar to that described at the Rhg1 resistance locus, account for approximately one-fourth of the genic SV events. This assessment of soybean SV occurrence presents a target list of genes potentially responsible for rapidly evolving and/or adaptive traits. PMID:24855315

  12. Corynebacterium diphtheriae: genome diversity, population structure and genotyping perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mokrousov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    The epidemic re-emergence of diphtheria in Russia and the Newly Independent States (NIS) of the former Soviet Union in the 1990s demonstrated the continued threat of this thought to be rare disease. The bacteriophage encoded toxin is a main virulence factor of Corynebacterium diphtheriae, however, an analysis of the first complete genome sequence of C. diphtheriae revealed a recent acquisition of other pathogenicity factors including iron-uptake systems, adhesins and fimbrial proteins as indeed this extracellular pathogen has more possibilities for lateral gene transfer than, e.g., its close relative, mainly intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis. C. diphtheriae appears to have a phylogeographical structure mainly represented by area-specific variants whose circulation is under strong influence of human host factors, including health control measures, first of all, vaccination, and social economic conditions. This framework core population structure may be challenged by importation of the endemic and eventually toxigenic strains from new areas thus leading to localized or large epidemics caused directly by imported strains or by bacteriophage-lysogenized indigenous strains converted into toxin production. A feature of C. diphtheriae co-existence with humans is its periodicity: following large epidemic in the 1990s, the present period is marked by increasing heterogeneity of the circulating populations whereas re-emergence of new toxigenic variants along with persistent circulation of invasive non-toxigenic strains appear alarming. To identify and rapidly monitor subtle changes in the genome structure at an infraclonal level during and between epidemics, portable and discriminatory typing methods of C. diphtheriae are still needed. In this view, CRISPRs and minisatellites are promising genomic markers for development of high-resolution typing schemes and databasing of C. diphtheriae.

  13. California Space Grant Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmatka, John; Berger, Wolfgang; Wiskerchen, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The organizational and administrative structure of the CaSGC has the Consortium Headquarters Office (Principal Investigator - Dr. John Kosmatka, California Statewide Director - Dr. Michael Wiskerchen) at UC San Diego. Each affiliate member institution has a campus director and an scholarship/fellowship selection committee. Each affiliate campus director also serves on the CaSGC Advisory Council and coordinates CMIS data collection and submission. The CaSGC strives to maintain a balance between expanded affiliate membership and continued high quality in targeted program areas of aerospace research, education, workforce development, and public outreach. Associate members are encouraged to participate on a project-by-project basis that meets the needs of California and the goals and objectives of the CaSGC. Associate members have responsibilities relating only to the CaSGC projects they are directly engaged in. Each year, as part of the CaSGC Improvement Plan, the CaSGC Advisory Council evaluates the performance of the affiliate and associate membership in terms of contributions to the CaSGC Strategic Plan, These CaSGC membership evaluations provide a constructive means for elevating productive members and removing non-performing members. This Program Improvement and Results (PIR) report will document CaSGC program improvement results and impacts that directly respond to the specific needs of California in the area of aerospace-related education and human capital development and the Congressional mandate to "increase the understanding, assessment, development and utilization of space resources by promoting a strong education base, responsive research and training activities, and broad and prompt dissemination of knowledge and technology".

  14. Population structure and minimum core genome typing of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Tian; Zhang, Wen; Liu, Wenbin; Zhou, Haijian; Ren, Hongyu; Shao, Zhujun; Lan, Ruiting; Xu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an important human pathogen causing Legionnaires’ disease. In this study, whole genome sequencing (WGS) was used to study the characteristics and population structure of L. pneumophila strains. We sequenced and compared 53 isolates of L. pneumophila covering different serogroups and sequence-based typing (SBT) types (STs). We found that 1,896 single-copy orthologous genes were shared by all isolates and were defined as the minimum core genome (MCG) of L. pneumophila. A total of 323,224 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified among the 53 strains. After excluding 314,059 SNPs which were likely to be results of recombination, the remaining 9,165 SNPs were referred to as MCG SNPs. Population Structure analysis based on MCG divided the 53 L. pneumophila into nine MCG groups. The within-group distances were much smaller than the between-group distances, indicating considerable divergence between MCG groups. MCG groups were also supplied by phylogenetic analysis and may be considered as robust taxonomic units within L. pneumophila. Among the nine MCG groups, eight showed high intracellular growth ability while one showed low intracellular growth ability. Furthermore, MCG typing also showed high resolution in subtyping ST1 strains. The results obtained in this study provided significant insights into the evolution, population structure and pathogenicity of L. pneumophila. PMID:26888563

  15. Structure and Functional Studies of DEN-2 Virus Genome.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Structure and Functional Studies on Dengue -2 Progress Report Virus Genome 1 Mar 82 - I Sep 82 6. PERFORMING ORO. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) 8. CONTRACT OR...Identify by block number) Complementdry DNA synthesis of Dengue -2 RNA by avian reverse transcriptase in vitro. The size of the DNA copy of Dengue RNA is in...Unannounced 0 Justification ............ By........... Di.A b-Aio: i Availability Codes S Avail and (or 2 Abstract 1. Dengue -2 RNA (DEN-2 RNA) was extracted

  16. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Podocarpus lambertii: Genome Structure, Evolutionary Aspects, Gene Content and SSR Detection

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Leila do Nascimento; Faoro, Helisson; Rogalski, Marcelo; Fraga, Hugo Pacheco de Freitas; Cardoso, Rodrigo Luis Alves; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Guerra, Miguel Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae) is a native conifer from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Biome, which is considered one of the 25 biodiversity hotspots in the world. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled the rapid acquisition of whole chloroplast (cp) genome sequences at low cost. Several studies have proven the potential of cp genomes as tools to understand enigmatic and basal phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels, as well as further probe the structural and functional evolution of plants. In this work, we present the complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii. Methodology/Principal Findings The P. lambertii cp genome is 133,734 bp in length, and similar to other sequenced cupressophytes, it lacks one of the large inverted repeat regions (IR). It contains 118 unique genes and one duplicated tRNA (trnN-GUU), which occurs as an inverted repeat sequence. The rps16 gene was not found, which was previously reported for the plastid genome of another Podocarpaceae (Nageia nagi) and Araucariaceae (Agathis dammara). Structurally, P. lambertii shows 4 inversions of a large DNA fragment ∼20,000 bp compared to the Podocarpus totara cp genome. These unexpected characteristics may be attributed to geographical distance and different adaptive needs. The P. lambertii cp genome presents a total of 28 tandem repeats and 156 SSRs, with homo- and dipolymers being the most common and tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexapolymers occurring with less frequency. Conclusion The complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii revealed significant structural changes, even in species from the same genus. These results reinforce the apparently loss of rps16 gene in Podocarpaceae cp genome. In addition, several SSRs in the P. lambertii cp genome are likely intraspecific polymorphism sites, which may allow highly sensitive phylogeographic and population structure studies, as well as phylogenetic studies of species of this genus. PMID

  17. High-resolution haplotype block structure in the cattle genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Bovine HapMap Consortium has generated assay panels to genotype ~30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 501 animals sampled from 19 worldwide taurine and indicine breeds, plus two outgroup species (Anoa and Water Buffalo). Within the larger set of SNPs we targeted 101 high density re...

  18. A genome-wide association study suggests that a locus within the ataxin 2 binding protein 1 gene is associated with hand osteoarthritis: the Treat-OA consortium

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, G; van Meurs, J B J; Livshits, G; Meulenbelt, I; Valdes, A M; Soranzo, N; Hart, D; Zhang, F; Kato, B S; Richards, J B; Williams, F M K; Inouye, M; Kloppenburg, M; Deloukas, P; Slagboom, E; Uitterlinden, A; Spector, T D

    2009-01-01

    To identify the susceptibility gene in hand osteoarthritis (OA) the authors used a two-stage approach genome-wide association study using two discovery samples (the TwinsUK cohort and the Rotterdam discovery subset; a total of 1804 subjects) and four replication samples (the Chingford Study, the Chuvasha Skeletal Aging Study, the Rotterdam replication subset and the Genetics, Arthrosis, and Progression (GARP) Study; a total of 3266 people). Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had a likelihood of association with hand OA in the discovery stage and one of them (rs716508), was successfully confirmed in the replication stage (meta-analysis p = 1.81×10−5). The C allele conferred a reduced risk of 33% to 41% using a case–control definition. The SNP is located in intron 1 of the A2BP1 gene. This study also found that the same allele of the SNP significantly reduced bone density at both the hip and spine (p<0.01), suggesting the potential mechanism of the gene in hand OA might be via effects on subchondral bone. The authors' findings provide a potential new insight into genetic mechanisms in the development of hand OA. PMID:19508968

  19. NCI Cohort Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium is an extramural-intramural partnership formed by the National Cancer Institute to address the need for large-scale collaborations to pool the large quantity of data and biospecimens necessary to conduct a wide range of cancer studies.

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome structure of snow leopard Panthera uncia.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lei; Wu, Xiaobing; Jiang, Zhigang

    2009-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) of snow leopard Panthera uncia was obtained by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique based on the PCR fragments of 30 primers we designed. The entire mtDNA sequence was 16 773 base pairs (bp) in length, and the base composition was: A-5,357 bp (31.9%); C-4,444 bp (26.5%); G-2,428 bp (14.5%); T-4,544 bp (27.1%). The structural characteristics [0] of the P. uncia mitochondrial genome were highly similar to these of Felis catus, Acinonyx jubatus, Neofelis nebulosa and other mammals. However, we found several distinctive features of the mitochondrial genome of Panthera unica. First, the termination codon of COIII was TAA, which differed from those of F. catus, A. jubatus and N. nebulosa. Second, tRNA(Ser) ((AGY)), which lacked the ''DHU'' arm, could not be folded into the typical cloverleaf-shaped structure. Third, in the control region, a long repetitive sequence in RS-2 (32 bp) region was found with 2 repeats while one short repetitive segment (9 bp) was found with 15 repeats in the RS-3 region. We performed phylogenetic analysis based on a 3 816 bp concatenated sequence of 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, ND2, ND4, ND5, Cyt b and ATP8 for P. uncia and other related species, the result indicated that P. uncia and P. leo were the sister species, which was different from the previous findings.

  1. Structural genomic variation in childhood epilepsies with complex phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Ingo; Swinkels, Marielle E M; Aten, Emmelien; Caliebe, Almuth; van 't Slot, Ruben; Boor, Rainer; von Spiczak, Sarah; Muhle, Hiltrud; Jähn, Johanna A; van Binsbergen, Ellen; van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno; Jansen, Floor E; Braun, Kees P J; de Haan, Gerrit-Jan; Tommerup, Niels; Stephani, Ulrich; Hjalgrim, Helle; Poot, Martin; Lindhout, Dick; Brilstra, Eva H; Møller, Rikke S; Koeleman, Bobby PC

    2014-01-01

    A genetic contribution to a broad range of epilepsies has been postulated, and particularly copy number variations (CNVs) have emerged as significant genetic risk factors. However, the role of CNVs in patients with epilepsies with complex phenotypes is not known. Therefore, we investigated the role of CNVs in patients with unclassified epilepsies and complex phenotypes. A total of 222 patients from three European countries, including patients with structural lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), dysmorphic features, and multiple congenital anomalies, were clinically evaluated and screened for CNVs. MRI findings including acquired or developmental lesions and patient characteristics were subdivided and analyzed in subgroups. MRI data were available for 88.3% of patients, of whom 41.6% had abnormal MRI findings. Eighty-eight rare CNVs were discovered in 71 out of 222 patients (31.9%). Segregation of all identified variants could be assessed in 42 patients, 11 of which were de novo. The frequency of all structural variants and de novo variants was not statistically different between patients with or without MRI abnormalities or MRI subcategories. Patients with dysmorphic features were more likely to carry a rare CNV. Genome-wide screening methods for rare CNVs may provide clues for the genetic etiology in patients with a broader range of epilepsies than previously anticipated, including in patients with various brain anomalies detectable by MRI. Performing genome-wide screens for rare CNVs can be a valuable contribution to the routine diagnostic workup in patients with a broad range of childhood epilepsies. PMID:24281369

  2. Patenting nonassociated polymeric structures (NAPS): implications for structural genomic data release.

    PubMed

    Sung, Lawrence M

    2003-01-01

    The intellectual property laws that govern patent rights should provide a reasonable balance between the competing concerns of open access and exclusivity. Open access can facilitate knowledge dissemination and collaboration in furthering science. On the other hand, exclusivity can ensure interest and financial investment in scientific research and development. In recent days, the appropriate balance between open access and exclusivity has been a focus of public debate, particularly with regard to genomic inventions and their applications. In seeking to reconcile the timing of structural genomic data release with certain efforts to secure intellectual property rights, the International Structural Genomics Organisation joins others confronting this controversy. This paper seeks to inform the discussion with an overview of the U.S. standards for patenting nonassociated polymeric structures (NAPS), which include polynucleotides or polypeptides of unknown biological significance, and their corresponding structural data. In the United States, the present ability to obtain patent rights to these discoveries appears problematic given the requirement of specific, substantial and credible utility, among other things. Without demonstrable utility, NAPS and NAPS-related data likely will not be entitled to patent protection, whether the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office rejects NAPS claims as unpatentable in the first instance, or the U.S. federal courts invalidate NAPS claims in later patent litigation. As such, the improbability of obtaining enforceable patent rights to NAPS might undermine the rationale for delaying structural genomic data release to allow for the filing of patent applications in this regard.

  3. Validation of prostate cancer risk-related loci identified from genome-wide association studies using family-based association analysis: evidence from the International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics (ICPCG).

    PubMed

    Jin, Guangfu; Lu, Lingyi; Cooney, Kathleen A; Ray, Anna M; Zuhlke, Kimberly A; Lange, Ethan M; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Camp, Nicola J; Teerlink, Craig C; Fitzgerald, Liesel M; Stanford, Janet L; Wiley, Kathleen E; Isaacs, Sarah D; Walsh, Patrick C; Foulkes, William D; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John L; Severi, Gianluca; Eeles, Ros; Easton, Doug; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Guy, Michelle; Rinckleb, Antje; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Egrot, Christophe; Cussenot, Olivier; Thibodeau, Stephen N; McDonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Emanuelsson, Monica; Whittemore, Alice S; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo; Schleutker, Johanna; Catalona, William J; Zheng, S Lilly; Ostrander, Elaine A; Isaacs, William B; Xu, Jianfeng

    2012-07-01

    Multiple prostate cancer (PCa) risk-related loci have been discovered by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) based on case-control designs. However, GWAS findings may be confounded by population stratification if cases and controls are inadvertently drawn from different genetic backgrounds. In addition, since these loci were identified in cases with predominantly sporadic disease, little is known about their relationships with hereditary prostate cancer (HPC). The association between seventeen reported PCa susceptibility loci was evaluated with a family-based association test using 1,979 hereditary PCa families of European descent collected by members of the International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics, with a total of 5,730 affected men. The risk alleles for 8 of the 17 loci were significantly over-transmitted from parents to affected offspring, including SNPs residing in 8q24 (regions 1, 2 and 3), 10q11, 11q13, 17q12 (region 1), 17q24 and Xp11. In subgroup analyses, three loci, at 8q24 (regions 1 and 2) plus 17q12, were significantly over-transmitted in hereditary PCa families with five or more affected members, while loci at 3p12, 8q24 (region 2), 11q13, 17q12 (region 1), 17q24 and Xp11 were significantly over-transmitted in HPC families with an average age of diagnosis at 65 years or less. Our results indicate that at least a subset of PCa risk-related loci identified by case-control GWAS are also associated with disease risk in HPC families.

  4. Consortium of institutes for decentralized wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, G.W.

    1998-07-01

    The Consortium of Institutes for Decentralized Wastewater Treatment is a group of thirteen (and expanding) North American colleges and universities that formed with the goal of helping to protect public health and maintain a sustainable environment. To accomplish this goal, academicians work closely with private sector partners from industry, manufacturing, consulting, regulatory agencies, and citizen/community groups to transfer research-based information into education and training programs for decentralized wastewater treatment. This document will focus on the mission, organizational structure, and recent grant activities of the Consortium.

  5. Studies on cattle genomic structural variation provide insights into ruminant speciation and adaptation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic structural variations, including segmental duplications (SD) and copy number variations (CNV), contribute significantly to individual health and disease in primates and rodents. As a part of the bovine genome annotation effort, we performed the first genome-wide analysis of SD in cattle usin...

  6. A physical map for the Amborella trichopoda genome sheds light on the evolution of angiosperm genome structure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent phylogenetic analyses have identified Amborella trichopoda, an understory tree species endemic to the forests of New Caledonia, as sister to a clade including all other known flowering plant species. The Amborella genome is a unique reference for understanding the evolution of angiosperm genomes because it can serve as an outgroup to root comparative analyses. A physical map, BAC end sequences and sample shotgun sequences provide a first view of the 870 Mbp Amborella genome. Results Analysis of Amborella BAC ends sequenced from each contig suggests that the density of long terminal repeat retrotransposons is negatively correlated with that of protein coding genes. Syntenic, presumably ancestral, gene blocks were identified in comparisons of the Amborella BAC contigs and the sequenced Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, Vitis vinifera and Oryza sativa genomes. Parsimony mapping of the loss of synteny corroborates previous analyses suggesting that the rate of structural change has been more rapid on lineages leading to Arabidopsis and Oryza compared with lineages leading to Populus and Vitis. The gamma paleohexiploidy event identified in the Arabidopsis, Populus and Vitis genomes is shown to have occurred after the divergence of all other known angiosperms from the lineage leading to Amborella. Conclusions When placed in the context of a physical map, BAC end sequences representing just 5.4% of the Amborella genome have facilitated reconstruction of gene blocks that existed in the last common ancestor of all flowering plants. The Amborella genome is an invaluable reference for inferences concerning the ancestral angiosperm and subsequent genome evolution. PMID:21619600

  7. Screening and degrading characteristics and community structure of a high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial consortium from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Run; Jin, Jinghua; Sun, Guangdong; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhipei

    2010-01-01

    Inoculation with efficient microbes had been proved to be the most important way for the bioremediation of polluted environments. For the treatment of abandoned site of Beijing Coking Chemical Plant contaminated with high level of high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs), a bacterial consortium capable of degrading HMW-PAHs, designated 1-18-1, was enriched and screened from HMW-PAHs contaminated soil. Its degrading ability was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the community structure was investigated by construction and analyses of the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (A, B and F) at different transfers. The results indicated that 1-18-1 was able to utilize pyrene, fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene as sole carbon and energy source for growth. The degradation rate of pyrene and fluoranthene reached 82.8% and 96.2% after incubation for 8 days at 30 degrees C, respectively; while the degradation rate of benzo[a]pyrene was only 65.1% after incubation for 28 days at 30 degrees C. Totally, 108, 100 and 100 valid clones were randomly selected and sequenced from the libraries A, B, and F. Phylogenetic analyses showed that all the clones could be divided into 5 groups, Bacteroidetes, alpha-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, beta-Proteobacteria and gamma-Proteobacteria. Sequence similarity analyses showed total 39 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the libraries. The predominant bacterial groups were alpha-Proteobacteria (19 OTUs, 48.7%), gamma-Proteobacteria (9 OTUs, 23.1%) and beta-Proteobacteria (8 OTUs, 20.5%). During the transfer process, the proportions of alpha-Proteobacteria and beta-Proteobacteria increased greatly (from 47% to 93%), while gamma-Proteobacteria decreased from 32% (library A) to 6% (library F); and Bacteroidetes group disappeared in libraries B and F.

  8. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenbacher, Don

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  9. Advanced Separation Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    2006-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

  10. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    21 ( DASS - 21 ): Further examination of dimensions, scale reliability, and correlates. Journal of Clinical Psychology. York, J., Lamis, D. A...Consortium will warehouse knowledge about suicidal behavior in general (e.g., from civilian and international sources as well as from military sources), so...reports (months 15, 18, 21 , 24) • The 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th quarter reports were prepared and distributed on time. Task 10. Continue to refine

  11. Genomic structure and expression of immunoglobulins in Squamata.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, David N; Garet, Elina; Estevez, Olivia; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The Squamata order represents a major evolutionary reptile lineage, yet the structure and expression of immunoglobulins in this order has been scarcely studied in detail. From the genome sequences of four Squamata species (Gekko japonicus, Ophisaurus gracilis, Pogona vitticeps and Ophiophagus hannah) and RNA-seq datasets from 18 other Squamata species, we identified the immunoglobulins present in these animals as well as the tissues in which they are found. All Squamata have at least three immunoglobulin classes; namely, the immunoglobulins M, D, and Y. Unlike mammals, however, we provide evidence that some Squamata lineages possess more than one Cμ gene which is located downstream from the Cδ gene. The existence of two evolutionary lineages of immunoglobulin Y is shown. Additionally, it is demonstrated that while all Squamata species possess the λ light chain, only Iguanidae species possess the κ light chain.

  12. Knowledge Mobilization across Boundaries with the Use of Novel Organizational Structures, Conferencing Strategies, and Technological Tools: The Ontario Consortium of Undergraduate Biology Educators (oCUBE) Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kajiura, Lovaye; Smit, Julie; Montpetit, Colin; Kelly, Tamara; Waugh, Jennifer; Rawle, Fiona; Clark, Julie; Neumann, Melody; French, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The Ontario Consortium of Undergraduate Biology Educators (oCUBE) brings together over 50 biology educators from 18 Ontario universities with the common goal to improve the biology undergraduate experience for both students and educators. This goal is achieved through an innovative mix of highly interactive face-to-face meetings, online…

  13. Integrated consensus map of cultivated peanut and wild relatives reveals structures of the A and B genomes of Arachis and divergence of the legume genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complex, tetraploid genome structure of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) has obstructed advances in genetics and genomics in the species. The aim of this study is to understand the genome structure of Arachis by developing a high-density integrated consensus map. Three recombinant inbred line populatio...

  14. Structural Variation Mutagenesis of the Human Genome: Impact on Disease and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Watson-Crick base-pair changes, or single-nucleotide variants (SNV), have long been known as a source of mutations. However, the extent to which DNA structural variation, including duplication and deletion copy number variants (CNV) and copy number neutral inversions and translocations, contribute to human genome variation and disease has been appreciated only recently. Moreover, the potential complexity of structural variants (SV) was not envisioned; thus, the frequency of complex genomic rearrangements (CGR) and how such events form remained a mystery. The concept of genomic disorders, diseases due to genomic rearrangements and not sequence-based changes for which genomic architecture incite genomic instability, delineated a new category of conditions distinct from chromosomal syndromes and single-gene Mendelian diseases. Nevertheless, it is the mechanistic understanding of CNV/SV formation that has promoted further understanding of human biology and disease and provided insights into human genome and gene evolution. PMID:25892534

  15. Genome3D: exploiting structure to help users understand their sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Tony E.; Sillitoe, Ian; Andreeva, Antonina; Blundell, Tom L.; Buchan, Daniel W.A.; Chothia, Cyrus; Cozzetto, Domenico; Dana, José M.; Filippis, Ioannis; Gough, Julian; Jones, David T.; Kelley, Lawrence A.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Minneci, Federico; Mistry, Jaina; Murzin, Alexey G.; Ochoa-Montaño, Bernardo; Oates, Matt E.; Punta, Marco; Rackham, Owen J.L.; Stahlhacke, Jonathan; Sternberg, Michael J.E.; Velankar, Sameer; Orengo, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Genome3D (http://www.genome3d.eu) is a collaborative resource that provides predicted domain annotations and structural models for key sequences. Since introducing Genome3D in a previous NAR paper, we have substantially extended and improved the resource. We have annotated representatives from Pfam families to improve coverage of diverse sequences and added a fast sequence search to the website to allow users to find Genome3D-annotated sequences similar to their own. We have improved and extended the Genome3D data, enlarging the source data set from three model organisms to 10, and adding VIVACE, a resource new to Genome3D. We have analysed and updated Genome3D's SCOP/CATH mapping. Finally, we have improved the superposition tools, which now give users a more powerful interface for investigating similarities and differences between structural models. PMID:25348407

  16. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  17. Integrated Consensus Map of Cultivated Peanut and Wild Relatives Reveals Structures of the A and B Genomes of Arachis and Divergence of the Legume Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Bertioli, David J.; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Moretzsohn, Marcio C.; Leal-Bertioli, Soraya C. M.; Thudi, Mahendar; Pandey, Manish K.; Rami, Jean-Francois; Foncéka, Daniel; Gowda, Makanahally V. C.; Qin, Hongde; Guo, Baozhu; Hong, Yanbin; Liang, Xuanqiang; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Isobe, Sachiko

    2013-01-01

    The complex, tetraploid genome structure of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) has obstructed advances in genetics and genomics in the species. The aim of this study is to understand the genome structure of Arachis by developing a high-density integrated consensus map. Three recombinant inbred line populations derived from crosses between the A genome diploid species, Arachis duranensis and Arachis stenosperma; the B genome diploid species, Arachis ipaënsis and Arachis magna; and between the AB genome tetraploids, A. hypogaea and an artificial amphidiploid (A. ipaënsis × A. duranensis)4×, were used to construct genetic linkage maps: 10 linkage groups (LGs) of 544 cM with 597 loci for the A genome; 10 LGs of 461 cM with 798 loci for the B genome; and 20 LGs of 1442 cM with 1469 loci for the AB genome. The resultant maps plus 13 published maps were integrated into a consensus map covering 2651 cM with 3693 marker loci which was anchored to 20 consensus LGs corresponding to the A and B genomes. The comparative genomics with genome sequences of Cajanus cajan, Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, and Medicago truncatula revealed that the Arachis genome has segmented synteny relationship to the other legumes. The comparative maps in legumes, integrated tetraploid consensus maps, and genome-specific diploid maps will increase the genetic and genomic understanding of Arachis and should facilitate molecular breeding. PMID:23315685

  18. Integrated consensus map of cultivated peanut and wild relatives reveals structures of the A and B genomes of Arachis and divergence of the legume genomes.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Bertioli, David J; Varshney, Rajeev K; Moretzsohn, Marcio C; Leal-Bertioli, Soraya C M; Thudi, Mahendar; Pandey, Manish K; Rami, Jean-Francois; Foncéka, Daniel; Gowda, Makanahally V C; Qin, Hongde; Guo, Baozhu; Hong, Yanbin; Liang, Xuanqiang; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Isobe, Sachiko

    2013-04-01

    The complex, tetraploid genome structure of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) has obstructed advances in genetics and genomics in the species. The aim of this study is to understand the genome structure of Arachis by developing a high-density integrated consensus map. Three recombinant inbred line populations derived from crosses between the A genome diploid species, Arachis duranensis and Arachis stenosperma; the B genome diploid species, Arachis ipaënsis and Arachis magna; and between the AB genome tetraploids, A. hypogaea and an artificial amphidiploid (A. ipaënsis × A. duranensis)(4×), were used to construct genetic linkage maps: 10 linkage groups (LGs) of 544 cM with 597 loci for the A genome; 10 LGs of 461 cM with 798 loci for the B genome; and 20 LGs of 1442 cM with 1469 loci for the AB genome. The resultant maps plus 13 published maps were integrated into a consensus map covering 2651 cM with 3693 marker loci which was anchored to 20 consensus LGs corresponding to the A and B genomes. The comparative genomics with genome sequences of Cajanus cajan, Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, and Medicago truncatula revealed that the Arachis genome has segmented synteny relationship to the other legumes. The comparative maps in legumes, integrated tetraploid consensus maps, and genome-specific diploid maps will increase the genetic and genomic understanding of Arachis and should facilitate molecular breeding.

  19. Portrait of a Consortium: ANKOS (Anatolian University Libraries Consortium)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Phyllis; Karasozen, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    The Anatolian University Libraries Consortium (ANKOS) was created in 2001 with only a few members subscribed to nine e-journal collections and bibliographic databases. This Turkish library consortium had developed from one state and three private universities joining together for the purchase of two databases in 1999. Over time, the numbers of…

  20. BreakDancer – Identification of Genomic Structural Variation from Paired-End Read Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xian; Abbott, Travis E.; Larson, David; Chen, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The advent of the next-generation sequencing data has made it possible to cost-effectively detect and characterize genomic variation in human genomes. Structural variation, including deletion, duplication, insertion, inversion and translocation, is of great importance to human genetics due to its association with many genetic diseases. BreakDancer is a bioinformatics tool that relates paired-end read alignments from a test genome to the reference genome for the purpose of comprehensively and accurately detecting various types of structural variation. PMID:25152801

  1. Birth of an 'Asian cool' reference genome: AK1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changhoon

    2016-12-01

    The human reference genome, maintained by the Genome Reference Consortium, is conceivably the most complete genome assembly ever, since its first construction. It has continually been improved by incorporating corrections made to the previous assemblies, thanks to various technological advances. Many currently-ongoing population sequencing projects have been based on this reference genome, heightening hopes of the development of useful medical applications of genomic information, thanks to the recent maturation of high-throughput sequencing technologies. However, just one reference genome does not fit all the populations across the globe, because of the large diversity in genomic structures and technical limitations inherent to short read sequencing methods. The recent success in de novo construction of the highly contiguous Asian diploid genome AK1, by combining single molecule technologies with routine sequencing data without resorting to traditional clone-by-clone sequencing and physical mapping, reveals the nature of genomic structure variation by detecting thousands of novel structural variations and by finally filling in some of the prior gaps which had persistently remained in the current human reference genome. Now it is expected that the AK1 genome, soon to be paired with more upcoming de novo assembled genomes, will provide a chance to explore what it is really like to use ancestry-specific reference genomes instead of hg19/hg38 for population genomics. This is a major step towards the furthering of genetically-based precision medicine. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(12): 653-654].

  2. Towards fully automated structure-based function prediction in structural genomics: a case study.

    PubMed

    Watson, James D; Sanderson, Steve; Ezersky, Alexandra; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Orengo, Christine; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Laskowski, Roman A; Thornton, Janet M

    2007-04-13

    As the global Structural Genomics projects have picked up pace, the number of structures annotated in the Protein Data Bank as hypothetical protein or unknown function has grown significantly. A major challenge now involves the development of computational methods to assign functions to these proteins accurately and automatically. As part of the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics (MCSG) we have developed a fully automated functional analysis server, ProFunc, which performs a battery of analyses on a submitted structure. The analyses combine a number of sequence-based and structure-based methods to identify functional clues. After the first stage of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI), we review the success of the pipeline and the importance of structure-based function prediction. As a dataset, we have chosen all structures solved by the MCSG during the 5 years of the first PSI. Our analysis suggests that two of the structure-based methods are particularly successful and provide examples of local similarity that is difficult to identify using current sequence-based methods. No one method is successful in all cases, so, through the use of a number of complementary sequence and structural approaches, the ProFunc server increases the chances that at least one method will find a significant hit that can help elucidate function. Manual assessment of the results is a time-consuming process and subject to individual interpretation and human error. We present a method based on the Gene Ontology (GO) schema using GO-slims that can allow the automated assessment of hits with a success rate approaching that of expert manual assessment.

  3. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  4. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-01

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  5. Comparative Genomics of Sibling Fungal Pathogenic Taxa Identifies Adaptive Evolution without Divergence in Pathogenicity Genes or Genomic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Sillo, Fabiano; Garbelotto, Matteo; Friedman, Maria; Gonthier, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    It has been estimated that the sister plant pathogenic fungal species Heterobasidion irregulare and Heterobasidion annosum may have been allopatrically isolated for 34–41 Myr. They are now sympatric due to the introduction of the first species from North America into Italy, where they freely hybridize. We used a comparative genomic approach to 1) confirm that the two species are distinct at the genomic level; 2) determine which gene groups have diverged the most and the least between species; 3) show that their overall genomic structures are similar, as predicted by the viability of hybrids, and identify genomic regions that instead are incongruent; and 4) test the previously formulated hypothesis that genes involved in pathogenicity may be less divergent between the two species than genes involved in saprobic decay and sporulation. Results based on the sequencing of three genomes per species identified a high level of interspecific similarity, but clearly confirmed the status of the two as distinct taxa. Genes involved in pathogenicity were more conserved between species than genes involved in saprobic growth and sporulation, corroborating at the genomic level that invasiveness may be determined by the two latter traits, as documented by field and inoculation studies. Additionally, the majority of genes under positive selection and the majority of genes bearing interspecific structural variations were involved either in transcriptional or in mitochondrial functions. This study provides genomic-level evidence that invasiveness of pathogenic microbes can be attained without the high levels of pathogenicity presumed to exist for pathogens challenging naïve hosts. PMID:26527650

  6. The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Clifford B; Maunsell, John HR

    2009-01-01

    As the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium (NPRC) ends its first year, it is worth looking back to see how the experiment has worked. In order to encourage dissemination of the details outlined in this Editorial, it will also be published in other journals in the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium. PMID:19284614

  7. Evolution of genomic structural variation and genomic architecture in the adaptive radiations of African cichlid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shaohua; Meyer, Axel

    2014-01-01

    African cichlid fishes are an ideal system for studying explosive rates of speciation and the origin of diversity in adaptive radiation. Within the last few million years, more than 2000 species have evolved in the Great Lakes of East Africa, the largest adaptive radiation in vertebrates. These young species show spectacular diversity in their coloration, morphology and behavior. However, little is known about the genomic basis of this astonishing diversity. Recently, five African cichlid genomes were sequenced, including that of the Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a basal and only relatively moderately diversified lineage, and the genomes of four representative endemic species of the adaptive radiations, Neolamprologus brichardi, Astatotilapia burtoni, Metriaclima zebra, and Pundamila nyererei. Using the Tilapia genome as a reference genome, we generated a high-resolution genomic variation map, consisting of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), short insertions and deletions (indels), inversions and deletions. In total, around 18.8, 17.7, 17.0, and 17.0 million SNPs, 2.3, 2.2, 1.4, and 1.9 million indels, 262, 306, 162, and 154 inversions, and 3509, 2705, 2710, and 2634 deletions were inferred to have evolved in N. brichardi, A. burtoni, P. nyererei, and M. zebra, respectively. Many of these variations affected the annotated gene regions in the genome. Different patterns of genetic variation were detected during the adaptive radiation of African cichlid fishes. For SNPs, the highest rate of evolution was detected in the common ancestor of N. brichardi, A. burtoni, P. nyererei, and M. zebra. However, for the evolution of inversions and deletions, we found that the rates at the terminal taxa are substantially higher than the rates at the ancestral lineages. The high-resolution map provides an ideal opportunity to understand the genomic bases of the adaptive radiation of African cichlid fishes. PMID:24917883

  8. Hawaii Space Grant Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Luke P.

    2005-01-01

    The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the University of Hawai'i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges spread over the 4 main Hawaiian islands. Geographic separation is not the only obstacle that we face as a Consortium. Hawai'i has been mired in an economic downturn due to a lack of tourism for almost all of the period (2001 - 2004) covered by this report, although hotel occupancy rates and real estate sales have sky-rocketed in the last year. Our challenges have been many including providing quality educational opportunities in the face of shrinking State and Federal budgets, encouraging science and technology course instruction at the K-12 level in a public school system that is becoming less focused on high technology and more focused on developing basic reading and math skills, and assembling community college programs with instructors who are expected to teach more classes for the same salary. Motivated people can overcome these problems. Fortunately, the Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium (HSGC) consists of a group of highly motivated and talented individuals who have not only overcome these obstacles, but have excelled with the Program. We fill a critical need within the State of Hawai'i to provide our children with opportunities to pursue their dreams of becoming the next generation of NASA astronauts, engineers, and explorers. Our strength lies not only in our diligent and creative HSGC advisory board, but also with Hawai'i's teachers, students, parents, and industry executives who are willing to invest their time, effort, and resources into Hawai'i's future. Our operational philosophy is to FACE the Future, meaning that we will facilitate, administer, catalyze, and educate in order to achieve our objective of creating a highly technically capable workforce both here in Hawai'i and for NASA. In addition to administering to programs and

  9. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  10. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  11. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  12. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  13. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  14. Micro and nanofluidic structures for cell sorting and genomic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Keith J.

    Microfluidic systems promise rapid analysis of small samples in a compact and inexpensive format. But direct scaling of lab bench protocols on-chip is challenging because laminar flows in typical microfluidic devices are characterized by non-mixing streamlines. Common microfluidic mixers and sorters work by diffusion, limiting application to objects that diffuse slowly such as cells and DNA. Recently Huang et.al. developed a passive microfluidic element to continuously separate bio-particles deterministically. In Deterministic Lateral Displacement (DLD), objects are sorted by size as they transit an asymmetric array of microfabricated posts. This thesis further develops DLD arrays with applications in three broad new areas. First the arrays are used, not simply to sort particles, but to move streams of cells through functional flows for chemical treatment---such as on-chip immunofluorescent labeling of blood cells with washing, and on-chip E.coli cell lysis with simultaneous chromosome extraction. Secondly, modular tiling of the basic DLD element is used to construct complex particle handling modes that include beam steering for jets of cells and beads. Thirdly, nanostructured DLD arrays are built using Nanoimprint Lithography (NIL) and continuous-flow separation of 100 nm and 200 nm size particles is demonstrated. Finally a number of ancillary nanofabrication techniques were developed in support of these overall goals, including methods to interface nanofluidic structures with standard microfluidic components such as inlet channels and reservoirs, precision etching of ultra-high aspect ratio (>50:1) silicon nanostructures, and fabrication of narrow (˜ 35 nm) channels used to stretch genomic length DNA.

  15. Genome structure and dynamics of the yeast pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Khadija M; Kokošar, Janez; Guo, Xiaoxian; Gu, Zhenglong; Ishchuk, Olena P; Piškur, Jure

    2014-01-01

    The yeast pathogen Candida glabrata is the second most frequent cause of Candida infections. However, from the phylogenetic point of view, C. glabrata is much closer to Saccharomyces cerevisiae than to Candida albicans. Apparently, this yeast has relatively recently changed its life style and become a successful opportunistic pathogen. Recently, several C. glabrata sister species, among them clinical and environmental isolates, have had their genomes characterized. Also, hundreds of C. glabrata clinical isolates have been characterized for their genomes. These isolates display enormous genomic plasticity. The number and size of chromosomes vary drastically, as well as intra- and interchromosomal segmental duplications occur frequently. The observed genome alterations could affect phenotypic properties and thus help to adapt to the highly variable and harsh habitats this yeast finds in different human patients and their tissues. Further genome sequencing of pathogenic isolates will provide a valuable tool to understand the mechanisms behind genome dynamics and help to elucidate the genes contributing to the virulence potential. PMID:24528571

  16. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain

    PubMed Central

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S.; Seemann, Stefan E.; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus. PMID:26476446

  17. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain.

    PubMed

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S; Seemann, Stefan E; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-12-02

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus.

  18. Reuse at the Software Productivity Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, David M.

    1989-01-01

    The Software Productivity Consortium is sponsored by 14 aerospace companies as a developer of software engineering methods and tools. Software reuse and prototyping are currently the major emphasis areas. The Methodology and Measurement Project in the Software Technology Exploration Division has developed some concepts for reuse which they intend to develop into a synthesis process. They have identified two approaches to software reuse: opportunistic and systematic. The assumptions underlying the systematic approach, phrased as hypotheses, are the following: the redevelopment hypothesis, i.e., software developers solve the same problems repeatedly; the oracle hypothesis, i.e., developers are able to predict variations from one redevelopment to others; and the organizational hypothesis, i.e., software must be organized according to behavior and structure to take advantage of the predictions that the developers make. The conceptual basis for reuse includes: program families, information hiding, abstract interfaces, uses and information hiding hierarchies, and process structure. The primary reusable software characteristics are black-box descriptions, structural descriptions, and composition and decomposition based on program families. Automated support can be provided for systematic reuse, and the Consortium is developing a prototype reuse library and guidebook. The software synthesis process that the Consortium is aiming toward includes modeling, refinement, prototyping, reuse, assessment, and new construction.

  19. Annotation inconsistencies beyond sequence similarity-based function prediction - phylogeny and genome structure.

    PubMed

    Promponas, Vasilis J; Iliopoulos, Ioannis; Ouzounis, Christos A

    2015-01-01

    The function annotation process in computational biology has increasingly shifted from the traditional characterization of individual biochemical roles of protein molecules to the system-wide detection of entire metabolic pathways and genomic structures. The so-called genome-aware methods broaden misannotation inconsistencies in genome sequences beyond protein function assignments, encompassing phylogenetic anomalies and artifactual genomic regions. We outline three categories of error propagation in databases by providing striking examples - at various levels of appreciation by the community from traditional to emerging, thus raising awareness for future solutions.

  20. The First Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences in Actinidiaceae: Genome Structure and Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiaohong; Tang, Ping; Li, Zuozhou; Li, Dawei; Liu, Yifei; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-01-01

    Actinidia chinensis is an important economic plant belonging to the basal lineage of the asterids. Availability of a complete Actinidia chloroplast genome sequence is crucial to understanding phylogenetic relationships among major lineages of angiosperms and facilitates kiwifruit genetic improvement. We report here the complete nucleotide sequences of the chloroplast genomes for Actinidia chinensis and A. chinensis var deliciosa obtained through de novo assembly of Illumina paired-end reads produced by total DNA sequencing. The total genome size ranges from 155,446 to 157,557 bp, with an inverted repeat (IR) of 24,013 to 24,391 bp, a large single copy region (LSC) of 87,984 to 88,337 bp and a small single copy region (SSC) of 20,332 to 20,336 bp. The genome encodes 113 different genes, including 79 unique protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 ribosomal RNA genes, with 16 duplicated in the inverted repeats, and a tRNA gene (trnfM-CAU) duplicated once in the LSC region. Comparisons of IR boundaries among four asterid species showed that IR/LSC borders were extended into the 5’ portion of the psbA gene and IR contraction occurred in Actinidia. The clap gene has been lost from the chloroplast genome in Actinidia, and may have been transferred to the nucleus during chloroplast evolution. Twenty-seven polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were identified in the Actinidia chloroplast genome. Maximum parsimony analyses of a 72-gene, 16 taxa angiosperm dataset strongly support the placement of Actinidiaceae in Ericales within the basal asterids. PMID:26046631

  1. A sequence-based survey of the complex structural organization of tumor genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Colin; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Volik, Stanislav; Yu, Peng; Wu, Chunxiao; Huang, Guiqing; Linardopoulou, Elena V.; Trask, Barbara J.; Waldman, Frederic; Costello, Joseph; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Mills, Gordon B.; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Sridharan, Shivaranjani; Paris, Pamela; Tao, Quanzhou; Aerni, Sarah J.; Brown, Raymond P.; Bashir, Ali; Gray, Joe W.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; de Jong, Pieter; Nefedov, Mikhail; Ried, Thomas; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Collins, Colin C.

    2008-04-03

    The genomes of many epithelial tumors exhibit extensive chromosomal rearrangements. All classes of genome rearrangements can be identified using End Sequencing Profiling (ESP), which relies on paired-end sequencing of cloned tumor genomes. In this study, brain, breast, ovary and prostate tumors along with three breast cancer cell lines were surveyed with ESP yielding the largest available collection of sequence-ready tumor genome breakpoints and providing evidence that some rearrangements may be recurrent. Sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed translocations and complex tumor genome structures that include coamplification and packaging of disparate genomic loci with associated molecular heterogeneity. Comparison of the tumor genomes suggests recurrent rearrangements. Some are likely to be novel structural polymorphisms, whereas others may be bona fide somatic rearrangements. A recurrent fusion transcript in breast tumors and a constitutional fusion transcript resulting from a segmental duplication were identified. Analysis of end sequences for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed candidate somatic mutations and an elevated rate of novel SNPs in an ovarian tumor. These results suggest that the genomes of many epithelial tumors may be far more dynamic and complex than previously appreciated and that genomic fusions including fusion transcripts and proteins may be common, possibly yielding tumor-specific biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  2. A new chicken genome assembly provides insight into avian genome structure.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of the Gallus gallus (chicken) as a model organism and agricultural animal merits a continuation of sequence assembly improvement efforts. We present a new version of the chicken genome assembly (Gallus_gallus-5.0; GCA_000002315.3) built from combined long single molecule sequencing t...

  3. From structure prediction to genomic screens for novel non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2011-08-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are receiving more and more attention not only as an abundant class of genes, but also as regulatory structural elements (some located in mRNAs). A key feature of RNA function is its structure. Computational methods were developed early for folding and prediction of RNA structure with the aim of assisting in functional analysis. With the discovery of more and more ncRNAs, it has become clear that a large fraction of these are highly structured. Interestingly, a large part of the structure is comprised of regular Watson-Crick and GU wobble base pairs. This and the increased amount of available genomes have made it possible to employ structure-based methods for genomic screens. The field has moved from folding prediction of single sequences to computational screens for ncRNAs in genomic sequence using the RNA structure as the main characteristic feature. Whereas early methods focused on energy-directed folding of single sequences, comparative analysis based on structure preserving changes of base pairs has been efficient in improving accuracy, and today this constitutes a key component in genomic screens. Here, we cover the basic principles of RNA folding and touch upon some of the concepts in current methods that have been applied in genomic screens for de novo RNA structures in searches for novel ncRNA genes and regulatory RNA structure on mRNAs. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different strategies and how they can complement each other.

  4. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Jamy C.

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  5. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host

  6. [Genomic structure and sex determination in squamate reptiles].

    PubMed

    Kichigin, I G; Trifonov, V A

    2013-01-01

    Squamata is the largest reptilian order including snakes and lizards which occupies a key position in phylogeny of amniotes. A variety of sex determination modes in lizards is one of the most interesting parts of the biology of this order. These mechanisms are genomic sex determination (both XY and ZW systems) and temperature-dependent sex determination. Studies of squamata sex chromosomes are pivotal for understanding evolution of other vertebrate sex chromosomes. Unfortunately, this clade has long been neglected by molecular geneticists. In this paper, we describe recent data on molecular cytogenetics and genomics of squamates, evolution of their sex chromosomes and sex determination mechanisms.

  7. Consortium-Based Genetic Studies of Kawasaki Disease in Korea: Korean Kawasaki Disease Genetics Consortium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Keuk; Hong, Young Mi; Jang, Gi Young; Yun, Sin Weon; Yu, Jeong Jin; Yoon, Kyung Lim; Lee, Kyung-Yil; Kil, Hong-Rang

    2015-11-01

    In order to perform large-scale genetic studies of Kawasaki disease (KD) in Korea, the Korean Kawasaki Disease Genetics Consortium (KKDGC) was formed in 2008 with 10 hospitals. Since the establishment of KKDGC, there has been a collection of clinical data from a total of 1198 patients, and approximately 5 mL of blood samples per patient (for genomic deoxyribonucleic acid and plasma isolation), using a standard clinical data collection form and a nation-wide networking system for blood sample pick-up. In the clinical risk factor analysis using the collected clinical data of 478 KD patients, it was found that incomplete KD type, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) non-responsiveness, and long febrile days are major risk factors for coronary artery lesions development, whereas low serum albumin concentration is an independent risk factor for IVIG non-responsiveness. In addition, we identified a KD susceptibility locus at 1p31, a coronary artery aneurysm locus (KCNN2 gene), and the causal variant in the C-reactive protein (CRP) promoter region, as determining the increased CRP levels in KD patients, by means of genome-wide association studies. Currently, this consortium is continually collecting more clinical data and genomic samples to identify the clinical and genetic risk factors via a single nucleotide polymorphism chip and exome sequencing, as well as collaborating with several international KD genetics teams. The consortium-based approach for genetic studies of KD in Korea will be a very effective way to understand the unknown etiology and causal mechanism of KD, which may be affected by multiple genes and environmental factors.

  8. COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS)

    Cancer.gov

    The COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS) is an extramural-intramural partnership that promotes collaboration among prospective cohort studies that follow participants for a range of outcomes and perform metabolomic profiling of individuals.

  9. Optoelectronic technology consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbs-Brenner, Mary

    1992-12-01

    The Optoelectronics Technology Consortium has been established to position U.S. industry as the world leader in optical interconnect technology by developing, fabricating, intergrating and demonstrating the producibility of optoelectronic components for high-density/high-data-rate processors and accelerating the insertion of this technology into military and commercial applications. This objective will be accomplished by a program focused in three areas. (1) Demonstrated performance: OETC will demonstrate an aggregate data transfer rate of 16 Gbit/s between single transmitter and receiver packages, as well as the expandability of this technology by combing four links in parallel to achieve a 64 Gbit/s link. (2) Accelerated development: By collaborating during precompetitive technology development stage, OTEC will advance the development of optical components and produce links for a multiboard processor testbed demonstration; and (3) Producibility: OETC's technology will achieve this performance by using components that are affordable, and reliable, with a line BER less than 10(exp -15) and MTTF greater than 10(exp 6) hours.

  10. Hickory Consortium 2001 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-02-01

    As with all Building America Program consortia, systems thinking is the key to understanding the processes that Hickory Consortium hopes to improve. The Hickory Consortium applies this thinking to more than the whole-building concept. Their systems thinking embraces the meta process of how housing construction takes place in America. By understanding the larger picture, they are able to identify areas where improvements can be made and how to implement them.

  11. Swiss Industrial Biocatalysis Consortium (SIBC).

    PubMed

    Wirz, Beat; Kittelmann, Matthias; Meyer, Hans-Peter; Wohlgemuth, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Taking up the common challenges in biocatalysis, a group of industrialists decided to react with a bottom-up solution, and created the Swiss Industrial Biocatalysis Consortium (SIBC). The Swiss Industrial Biocatalysis Consortium is a pre-competitive working group to better implement and utilize existing know-how and resources in biocatalysis, and to influence and shape the economic and educational political environment. Recent examples of activities are outlined.

  12. Training set optimization under population structure in genomic selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The optimization of the training set (TRS) in genomic selection (GS) has received much interest in both animal and plant breeding, because it is critical to the accuracy of the prediction models. In this study, five different TRS sampling algorithms, stratified sampling, mean of the Coefficient of D...

  13. Genomic structural variations for cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Nazarenko, Maria S.; Sleptcov, Aleksei A.; Lebedev, Igor N.; Skryabin, Nikolay A.; Markov, Anton V.; Golubenko, Maria V.; Koroleva, Iuliia A.; Kazancev, Anton N.; Barbarash, Olga L.; Puzyrev, Valery P.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify genes targeted by both copy number and copy-neutral changes in the right coronary arteries in the area of advanced atherosclerotic plaques and intact internal mammary arteries derived from the same individuals with comorbid coronary artery disease and metabolic syndrome. The artery samples from 10 patients were screened for genomic imbalances using array comparative genomic hybridization. Ninety high-confidence, identical copy number variations (CNVs) were detected. We also identified eight copy-neutral changes (cn-LOHs) > 1.5 Mb in paired arterial samples in 4 of 10 individuals. The frequencies of the two gains located in the 10q24.31 (ERLIN1) and 12q24.11 (UNG, ACACB) genomic regions were evaluated in 33 paired arteries and blood samples. Two patients contained the gain in 10q24.31 (ERLIN1) and one patient contained the gain in 12q24.11 (UNG, ACACB) that affected only the blood DNA. An additional two patients harboured these CNVs in both the arteries and blood. In conclusion, we discovered and confirmed a gain of the 10q24.31 (ERLIN1) and 12q24.11 (UNG, ACACB) genomic regions in patients with coronary artery disease and metabolic comorbidity. Analysis of DNA extracted from blood indicated a possible somatic origin for these CNVs. PMID:28120895

  14. Complete Chloroplast Genome of the Wollemi Pine (Wollemia nobilis): Structure and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Jia-Yee S.; Rohner, Thore; Greenfield, Abigail; Van Der Merwe, Marlien; McPherson, Hannah; Glenn, Wendy; Kornfeld, Geoff; Marendy, Elessa; Pan, Annie Y. H.; Wilkins, Marc R.; Rossetto, Maurizio; Delaney, Sven K.

    2015-01-01

    The Wollemi pine (Wollemia nobilis) is a rare Southern conifer with striking morphological similarity to fossil pines. A small population of W. nobilis was discovered in 1994 in a remote canyon system in the Wollemi National Park (near Sydney, Australia). This population contains fewer than 100 individuals and is critically endangered. Previous genetic studies of the Wollemi pine have investigated its evolutionary relationship with other pines in the family Araucariaceae, and have suggested that the Wollemi pine genome contains little or no variation. However, these studies were performed prior to the widespread use of genome sequencing, and their conclusions were based on a limited fraction of the Wollemi pine genome. In this study, we address this problem by determining the entire sequence of the W. nobilis chloroplast genome. A detailed analysis of the structure of the genome is presented, and the evolution of the genome is inferred by comparison with the chloroplast sequences of other members of the Araucariaceae and the related family Podocarpaceae. Pairwise alignments of whole genome sequences, and the presence of unique pseudogenes, gene duplications and insertions in W. nobilis and Araucariaceae, indicate that the W. nobilis chloroplast genome is most similar to that of its sister taxon Agathis. However, the W. nobilis genome contains an unusually high number of repetitive sequences, and these could be used in future studies to investigate and conserve any remnant genetic diversity in the Wollemi pine. PMID:26061691

  15. Coverage of whole proteome by structural genomics observed through protein homology modeling database

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Go, Mitiko

    2006-01-01

    We have been developing FAMSBASE, a protein homology-modeling database of whole ORFs predicted from genome sequences. The latest update of FAMSBASE (http://daisy.nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp/Famsbase/), which is based on the protein three-dimensional (3D) structures released by November 2003, contains modeled 3D structures for 368,724 open reading frames (ORFs) derived from genomes of 276 species, namely 17 archaebacterial, 130 eubacterial, 18 eukaryotic and 111 phage genomes. Those 276 genomes are predicted to have 734,193 ORFs in total and the current FAMSBASE contains protein 3D structure of approximately 50% of the ORF products. However, cases that a modeled 3D structure covers the whole part of an ORF product are rare. When portion of an ORF with 3D structure is compared in three kingdoms of life, in archaebacteria and eubacteria, approximately 60% of the ORFs have modeled 3D structures covering almost the entire amino acid sequences, however, the percentage falls to about 30% in eukaryotes. When annual differences in the number of ORFs with modeled 3D structure are calculated, the fraction of modeled 3D structures of soluble protein for archaebacteria is increased by 5%, and that for eubacteria by 7% in the last 3 years. Assuming that this rate would be maintained and that determination of 3D structures for predicted disordered regions is unattainable, whole soluble protein model structures of prokaryotes without the putative disordered regions will be in hand within 15 years. For eukaryotic proteins, they will be in hand within 25 years. The 3D structures we will have at those times are not the 3D structure of the entire proteins encoded in single ORFs, but the 3D structures of separate structural domains. Measuring or predicting spatial arrangements of structural domains in an ORF will then be a coming issue of structural genomics. PMID:17146617

  16. Deeper insight into the structure of the anaerobic digestion microbial community; the biogas microbiome database is expanded with 157 new genomes.

    PubMed

    Treu, Laura; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Campanaro, Stefano; Bassani, Ilaria; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-09-01

    This research aimed to better characterize the biogas microbiome by means of high throughput metagenomic sequencing and to elucidate the core microbial consortium existing in biogas reactors independently from the operational conditions. Assembly of shotgun reads followed by an established binning strategy resulted in the highest, up to now, extraction of microbial genomes involved in biogas producing systems. From the 236 extracted genome bins, it was remarkably found that the vast majority of them could only be characterized at high taxonomic levels. This result confirms that the biogas microbiome is comprised by a consortium of unknown species. A comparative analysis between the genome bins of the current study and those extracted from a previous metagenomic assembly demonstrated a similar phylogenetic distribution of the main taxa. Finally, this analysis led to the identification of a subset of common microbes that could be considered as the core essential group in biogas production.

  17. 3D structures of individual mammalian genomes studied by single-cell Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Tim J; Lando, David; Basu, Srinjan; Atkinson, Liam P; Cao, Yang; Lee, Steven F; Leeb, Martin; Wohlfahrt, Kai J; Boucher, Wayne; O'Shaughnessy-Kirwan, Aoife; Cramard, Julie; Faure, Andre J; Ralser, Meryem; Blanco, Enrique; Morey, Lluis; Sansó, Miriam; Palayret, Matthieu G S; Lehner, Ben; Di Croce, Luciano; Wutz, Anton; Hendrich, Brian; Klenerman, Dave; Laue, Ernest D

    2017-04-06

    The folding of genomic DNA from the beads-on-a-string-like structure of nucleosomes into higher-order assemblies is crucially linked to nuclear processes. Here we calculate 3D structures of entire mammalian genomes using data from a new chromosome conformation capture procedure that allows us to first image and then process single cells. The technique enables genome folding to be examined at a scale of less than 100 kb, and chromosome structures to be validated. The structures of individual topological-associated domains and loops vary substantially from cell to cell. By contrast, A and B compartments, lamina-associated domains and active enhancers and promoters are organized in a consistent way on a genome-wide basis in every cell, suggesting that they could drive chromosome and genome folding. By studying genes regulated by pluripotency factor and nucleosome remodelling deacetylase (NuRD), we illustrate how the determination of single-cell genome structure provides a new approach for investigating biological processes.

  18. Mining 3D genome structure populations identifies major factors governing the stability of regulatory communities

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chao; Li, Wenyuan; Tjong, Harianto; Hao, Shengli; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Qingjiao; Chen, Lin; Zhu, Bing; Alber, Frank; Jasmine Zhou, Xianghong

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) genome structures vary from cell to cell even in an isogenic sample. Unlike protein structures, genome structures are highly plastic, posing a significant challenge for structure-function mapping. Here we report an approach to comprehensively identify 3D chromatin clusters that each occurs frequently across a population of genome structures, either deconvoluted from ensemble-averaged Hi-C data or from a collection of single-cell Hi-C data. Applying our method to a population of genome structures (at the macrodomain resolution) of lymphoblastoid cells, we identify an atlas of stable inter-chromosomal chromatin clusters. A large number of these clusters are enriched in binding of specific regulatory factors and are therefore defined as ‘Regulatory Communities.' We reveal two major factors, centromere clustering and transcription factor binding, which significantly stabilize such communities. Finally, we show that the regulatory communities differ substantially from cell to cell, indicating that expression variability could be impacted by genome structures. PMID:27240697

  19. Hemipteran Mitochondrial Genomes: Features, Structures and Implications for Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Li-Yun; Qiao, Ge-Xia

    2015-01-01

    The study of Hemipteran mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) began with the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma dimidiata, in 2001. At present, 90 complete Hemipteran mitogenomes have been sequenced and annotated. This review examines the history of Hemipteran mitogenomes research and summarizes the main features of them including genome organization, nucleotide composition, protein-coding genes, tRNAs and rRNAs, and non-coding regions. Special attention is given to the comparative analysis of repeat regions. Gene rearrangements are an additional data type for a few families, and most mitogenomes are arranged in the same order to the proposed ancestral insect. We also discuss and provide insights on the phylogenetic analyses of a variety of taxonomic levels. This review is expected to further expand our understanding of research in this field and serve as a valuable reference resource. PMID:26039239

  20. Genome sequence, comparative analysis and haplotype structure of the domestic dog.

    PubMed

    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Wade, Claire M; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Karlsson, Elinor K; Jaffe, David B; Kamal, Michael; Clamp, Michele; Chang, Jean L; Kulbokas, Edward J; Zody, Michael C; Mauceli, Evan; Xie, Xiaohui; Breen, Matthew; Wayne, Robert K; Ostrander, Elaine A; Ponting, Chris P; Galibert, Francis; Smith, Douglas R; DeJong, Pieter J; Kirkness, Ewen; Alvarez, Pablo; Biagi, Tara; Brockman, William; Butler, Jonathan; Chin, Chee-Wye; Cook, April; Cuff, James; Daly, Mark J; DeCaprio, David; Gnerre, Sante; Grabherr, Manfred; Kellis, Manolis; Kleber, Michael; Bardeleben, Carolyne; Goodstadt, Leo; Heger, Andreas; Hitte, Christophe; Kim, Lisa; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Parker, Heidi G; Pollinger, John P; Searle, Stephen M J; Sutter, Nathan B; Thomas, Rachael; Webber, Caleb; Baldwin, Jennifer; Abebe, Adal; Abouelleil, Amr; Aftuck, Lynne; Ait-Zahra, Mostafa; Aldredge, Tyler; Allen, Nicole; An, Peter; Anderson, Scott; Antoine, Claudel; Arachchi, Harindra; Aslam, Ali; Ayotte, Laura; Bachantsang, Pasang; Barry, Andrew; Bayul, Tashi; Benamara, Mostafa; Berlin, Aaron; Bessette, Daniel; Blitshteyn, Berta; Bloom, Toby; Blye, Jason; Boguslavskiy, Leonid; Bonnet, Claude; Boukhgalter, Boris; Brown, Adam; Cahill, Patrick; Calixte, Nadia; Camarata, Jody; Cheshatsang, Yama; Chu, Jeffrey; Citroen, Mieke; Collymore, Alville; Cooke, Patrick; Dawoe, Tenzin; Daza, Riza; Decktor, Karin; DeGray, Stuart; Dhargay, Norbu; Dooley, Kimberly; Dooley, Kathleen; Dorje, Passang; Dorjee, Kunsang; Dorris, Lester; Duffey, Noah; Dupes, Alan; Egbiremolen, Osebhajajeme; Elong, Richard; Falk, Jill; Farina, Abderrahim; Faro, Susan; Ferguson, Diallo; Ferreira, Patricia; Fisher, Sheila; FitzGerald, Mike; Foley, Karen; Foley, Chelsea; Franke, Alicia; Friedrich, Dennis; Gage, Diane; Garber, Manuel; Gearin, Gary; Giannoukos, Georgia; Goode, Tina; Goyette, Audra; Graham, Joseph; Grandbois, Edward; Gyaltsen, Kunsang; Hafez, Nabil; Hagopian, Daniel; Hagos, Birhane; Hall, Jennifer; Healy, Claire; Hegarty, Ryan; Honan, Tracey; Horn, Andrea; Houde, Nathan; Hughes, Leanne; Hunnicutt, Leigh; Husby, M; Jester, Benjamin; Jones, Charlien; Kamat, Asha; Kanga, Ben; Kells, Cristyn; Khazanovich, Dmitry; Kieu, Alix Chinh; Kisner, Peter; Kumar, Mayank; Lance, Krista; Landers, Thomas; Lara, Marcia; Lee, William; Leger, Jean-Pierre; Lennon, Niall; Leuper, Lisa; LeVine, Sarah; Liu, Jinlei; Liu, Xiaohong; Lokyitsang, Yeshi; Lokyitsang, Tashi; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Jan; Major, John; Marabella, Richard; Maru, Kebede; Matthews, Charles; McDonough, Susan; Mehta, Teena; Meldrim, James; Melnikov, Alexandre; Meneus, Louis; Mihalev, Atanas; Mihova, Tanya; Miller, Karen; Mittelman, Rachel; Mlenga, Valentine; Mulrain, Leonidas; Munson, Glen; Navidi, Adam; Naylor, Jerome; Nguyen, Tuyen; Nguyen, Nga; Nguyen, Cindy; Nguyen, Thu; Nicol, Robert; Norbu, Nyima; Norbu, Choe; Novod, Nathaniel; Nyima, Tenchoe; Olandt, Peter; O'Neill, Barry; O'Neill, Keith; Osman, Sahal; Oyono, Lucien; Patti, Christopher; Perrin, Danielle; Phunkhang, Pema; Pierre, Fritz; Priest, Margaret; Rachupka, Anthony; Raghuraman, Sujaa; Rameau, Rayale; Ray, Verneda; Raymond, Christina; Rege, Filip; Rise, Cecil; Rogers, Julie; Rogov, Peter; Sahalie, Julie; Settipalli, Sampath; Sharpe, Theodore; Shea, Terrance; Sheehan, Mechele; Sherpa, Ngawang; Shi, Jianying; Shih, Diana; Sloan, Jessie; Smith, Cherylyn; Sparrow, Todd; Stalker, John; Stange-Thomann, Nicole; Stavropoulos, Sharon; Stone, Catherine; Stone, Sabrina; Sykes, Sean; Tchuinga, Pierre; Tenzing, Pema; Tesfaye, Senait; Thoulutsang, Dawa; Thoulutsang, Yama; Topham, Kerri; Topping, Ira; Tsamla, Tsamla; Vassiliev, Helen; Venkataraman, Vijay; Vo, Andy; Wangchuk, Tsering; Wangdi, Tsering; Weiand, Michael; Wilkinson, Jane; Wilson, Adam; Yadav, Shailendra; Yang, Shuli; Yang, Xiaoping; Young, Geneva; Yu, Qing; Zainoun, Joanne; Zembek, Lisa; Zimmer, Andrew; Lander, Eric S

    2005-12-08

    Here we report a high-quality draft genome sequence of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris), together with a dense map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across breeds. The dog is of particular interest because it provides important evolutionary information and because existing breeds show great phenotypic diversity for morphological, physiological and behavioural traits. We use sequence comparison with the primate and rodent lineages to shed light on the structure and evolution of genomes and genes. Notably, the majority of the most highly conserved non-coding sequences in mammalian genomes are clustered near a small subset of genes with important roles in development. Analysis of SNPs reveals long-range haplotypes across the entire dog genome, and defines the nature of genetic diversity within and across breeds. The current SNP map now makes it possible for genome-wide association studies to identify genes responsible for diseases and traits, with important consequences for human and companion animal health.

  1. The emerging biofuel crop Camelina sativa retains a highly undifferentiated hexaploid genome structure.

    PubMed

    Kagale, Sateesh; Koh, Chushin; Nixon, John; Bollina, Venkatesh; Clarke, Wayne E; Tuteja, Reetu; Spillane, Charles; Robinson, Stephen J; Links, Matthew G; Clarke, Carling; Higgins, Erin E; Huebert, Terry; Sharpe, Andrew G; Parkin, Isobel A P

    2014-04-23

    Camelina sativa is an oilseed with desirable agronomic and oil-quality attributes for a viable industrial oil platform crop. Here we generate the first chromosome-scale high-quality reference genome sequence for C. sativa and annotated 89,418 protein-coding genes, representing a whole-genome triplication event relative to the crucifer model Arabidopsis thaliana. C. sativa represents the first crop species to be sequenced from lineage I of the Brassicaceae. The well-preserved hexaploid genome structure of C. sativa surprisingly mirrors those of economically important amphidiploid Brassica crop species from lineage II as well as wheat and cotton. The three genomes of C. sativa show no evidence of fractionation bias and limited expression-level bias, both characteristics commonly associated with polyploid evolution. The highly undifferentiated polyploid genome of C. sativa presents significant consequences for breeding and genetic manipulation of this industrial oil crop.

  2. X:Map: annotation and visualization of genome structure for Affymetrix exon array analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Tim; Okoniewski, Michał J.; Miller, Crispin J.

    2008-01-01

    Affymetrix exon arrays aim to target every known and predicted exon in the human, mouse or rat genomes, and have reporters that extend beyond protein coding regions to other areas of the transcribed genome. This combination of increased coverage and precision is important because a substantial proportion of protein coding genes are predicted to be alternatively spliced, and because many non-coding genes are known also to be of biological significance. In order to fully exploit these arrays, it is necessary to associate each reporter on the array with the features of the genome it is targeting, and to relate these to gene and genome structure. X:Map is a genome annotation database that provides this information. Data can be browsed using a novel Google-maps based interface, and analysed and further visualized through an associated BioConductor package. The database can be found at http://xmap.picr.man.ac.uk. PMID:17932061

  3. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  4. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  5. Informational structure of two closely related eukaryotic genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehnert, Manuel; Helm, Werner E.; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2006-08-01

    Attempts to identify a species on the basis of its DNA sequence on purely statistical grounds have been formulated for more than a decade. The most prominent of such genome signatures relies on neighborhood correlations (i.e., dinucleotide frequencies) and, consequently, attributes species identification to mechanisms operating on the dinucleotide level (e.g., neighbor-dependent mutations). For the examples of Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus we analyze short- and intermediate-range statistical correlations in DNA sequences. These correlation profiles are computed for all chromosomes of the two species. We find that with increasing range of correlations the capacity to distinguish between the species on the basis of this correlation profile is getting better and requires ever shorter sequence segments for obtaining a full species separation. This finding suggests that distinctive traits within the sequence are situated beyond the level of few nucleotides. The large-scale statistical patterning of DNA sequences on which such genome signatures are based is thus substantially determined by mobile elements (e.g., transposons and retrotransposons). The study and interspecies comparison of such correlation profiles can, therefore, reveal features of retrotransposition, segmental duplications, and other processes of genome evolution.

  6. Primary structure of a genomic zein sequence of maize.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, N T; Peifer, M A; Heidecker, G; Messing, J; Rubenstein, I

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a genomic clone (termed Z4 ) of the zein multigene family was compared to the nucleotide sequence of related cDNA clones of zein mRNAs. A tandem duplication of a 96-bp sequence is found in the genomic clone that is not present in the related cDNA clones. When the duplication is disregarded, the nucleotide sequence homology between Z4 and its related cDNAs was approximately 97%. The nucleotide sequence is also compared to other isolated cDNAs. No introns in the coding region of the zein gene are detected. The first nucleotide of a putative TATA box, TATAAATA , was located 88 nucleotides upstream of the first nucleotide of the first ATG codon which initiated the open reading frame. The first nucleotide of a putative CCAAT box, CAAAAT , appeared 45 nucleotides upstream of the first nucleotide of the zein cDNA clones in the 3' non-coding region also appeared in the genomic sequence at the same locations. The amino acid composition of the polypeptide specified by the Z4 nucleotide sequence is similar to the known composition of zein proteins. PMID:6233138

  7. A New Chicken Genome Assembly Provides Insight into Avian Genome Structure.

    PubMed

    Warren, Wesley C; Hillier, LaDeana W; Tomlinson, Chad; Minx, Patrick; Kremitzki, Milinn; Graves, Tina; Markovic, Chris; Bouk, Nathan; Pruitt, Kim D; Thibaud-Nissen, Francoise; Schneider, Valerie; Mansour, Tamer A; Brown, C Titus; Zimin, Aleksey; Hawken, Rachel; Abrahamsen, Mitch; Pyrkosz, Alexis B; Morisson, Mireille; Fillon, Valerie; Vignal, Alain; Chow, William; Howe, Kerstin; Fulton, Janet E; Miller, Marcia M; Lovell, Peter; Mello, Claudio V; Wirthlin, Morgan; Mason, Andrew S; Kuo, Richard; Burt, David W; Dodgson, Jerry B; Cheng, Hans H

    2017-01-05

    The importance of the Gallus gallus (chicken) as a model organism and agricultural animal merits a continuation of sequence assembly improvement efforts. We present a new version of the chicken genome assembly (Gallus_gallus-5.0; GCA_000002315.3), built from combined long single molecule sequencing technology, finished BACs, and improved physical maps. In overall assembled bases, we see a gain of 183 Mb, including 16.4 Mb in placed chromosomes with a corresponding gain in the percentage of intact repeat elements characterized. Of the 1.21 Gb genome, we include three previously missing autosomes, GGA30, 31, and 33, and improve sequence contig length 10-fold over the previous Gallus_gallus-4.0. Despite the significant base representation improvements made, 138 Mb of sequence is not yet located to chromosomes. When annotated for gene content, Gallus_gallus-5.0 shows an increase of 4679 annotated genes (2768 noncoding and 1911 protein-coding) over those in Gallus_gallus-4.0. We also revisited the question of what genes are missing in the avian lineage, as assessed by the highest quality avian genome assembly to date, and found that a large fraction of the original set of missing genes are still absent in sequenced bird species. Finally, our new data support a detailed map of MHC-B, encompassing two segments: one with a highly stable gene copy number and another in which the gene copy number is highly variable. The chicken model has been a critical resource for many other fields of study, and this new reference assembly will substantially further these efforts.

  8. A New Chicken Genome Assembly Provides Insight into Avian Genome Structure

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Wesley C.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Tomlinson, Chad; Minx, Patrick; Kremitzki, Milinn; Graves, Tina; Markovic, Chris; Bouk, Nathan; Pruitt, Kim D.; Thibaud-Nissen, Francoise; Schneider, Valerie; Mansour, Tamer A.; Brown, C. Titus; Zimin, Aleksey; Hawken, Rachel; Abrahamsen, Mitch; Pyrkosz, Alexis B.; Morisson, Mireille; Fillon, Valerie; Vignal, Alain; Chow, William; Howe, Kerstin; Fulton, Janet E.; Miller, Marcia M.; Lovell, Peter; Mello, Claudio V.; Wirthlin, Morgan; Mason, Andrew S.; Kuo, Richard; Burt, David W.; Dodgson, Jerry B.; Cheng, Hans H.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of the Gallus gallus (chicken) as a model organism and agricultural animal merits a continuation of sequence assembly improvement efforts. We present a new version of the chicken genome assembly (Gallus_gallus-5.0; GCA_000002315.3), built from combined long single molecule sequencing technology, finished BACs, and improved physical maps. In overall assembled bases, we see a gain of 183 Mb, including 16.4 Mb in placed chromosomes with a corresponding gain in the percentage of intact repeat elements characterized. Of the 1.21 Gb genome, we include three previously missing autosomes, GGA30, 31, and 33, and improve sequence contig length 10-fold over the previous Gallus_gallus-4.0. Despite the significant base representation improvements made, 138 Mb of sequence is not yet located to chromosomes. When annotated for gene content, Gallus_gallus-5.0 shows an increase of 4679 annotated genes (2768 noncoding and 1911 protein-coding) over those in Gallus_gallus-4.0. We also revisited the question of what genes are missing in the avian lineage, as assessed by the highest quality avian genome assembly to date, and found that a large fraction of the original set of missing genes are still absent in sequenced bird species. Finally, our new data support a detailed map of MHC-B, encompassing two segments: one with a highly stable gene copy number and another in which the gene copy number is highly variable. The chicken model has been a critical resource for many other fields of study, and this new reference assembly will substantially further these efforts. PMID:27852011

  9. Statistical properties of potential cruciform structures in 37 complete genomes of prokaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo, Fabrizio; Basile, Salvatore; Mantegna, Rosario N.

    2001-03-01

    We investigate the statistical properties of n-tuples inverted repeats allowing the possible existence of cruciform structures in 37 recently sequenced complete genomes of prokaryotic organisms. Cruciform structures are non-B-DNA conformations. The biological role of these non-B-DNA structures is unknown. Our comparative analysis of their occurrence in complete genomes suggests that they should play a relevant biological role in most of prokaryotic organisms. In fact, we detect the presence of a large number of potential cruciform structures in the large majority of the investigated genomes. The number of observed potential cruciform structures cannot be explained with a Markovian model of DNA. Moreover, the large majority of investigated genomes has most of the potential cruciform structures localized in the non-coding regions of DNA. The presence of a so large number of potential cruciform structures in so many different organisms suggests that they must play some biological role. This conclusion is strongly supported by the empirical observation that the potential cruciform structures are preferentially found nearby the end of a coding region. In several bacteria the typical distance of the potential cruciform structures found in the non-coding regions nearby the end of a coding region is ranging from 50 to 75 bp. In the case of Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis a large number of the detected n-tuples occurring in potential cruciform structures coincides with known DNA uptake signal sequences.

  10. Three-dimensional Structure of a Viral Genome-delivery Portal Vertex

    SciTech Connect

    A Olia; P Prevelige Jr.; J Johnson; G Cingolani

    2011-12-31

    DNA viruses such as bacteriophages and herpesviruses deliver their genome into and out of the capsid through large proteinaceous assemblies, known as portal proteins. Here, we report two snapshots of the dodecameric portal protein of bacteriophage P22. The 3.25-{angstrom}-resolution structure of the portal-protein core bound to 12 copies of gene product 4 (gp4) reveals a {approx}1.1-MDa assembly formed by 24 proteins. Unexpectedly, a lower-resolution structure of the full-length portal protein unveils the unique topology of the C-terminal domain, which forms a {approx}200-{angstrom}-long {alpha}-helical barrel. This domain inserts deeply into the virion and is highly conserved in the Podoviridae family. We propose that the barrel domain facilitates genome spooling onto the interior surface of the capsid during genome packaging and, in analogy to a rifle barrel, increases the accuracy of genome ejection into the host cell.

  11. The Plasmodium apicoplast genome: conserved structure and close relationship of P. ovale to rodent malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Arisue, Nobuko; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Mitsui, Hideya; Palacpac, Nirianne M Q; Kaneko, Akira; Kawai, Satoru; Hasegawa, Masami; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Horii, Toshihiro

    2012-09-01

    Apicoplast, a nonphotosynthetic plastid derived from secondary symbiotic origin, is essential for the survival of malaria parasites of the genus Plasmodium. Elucidation of the evolution of the apicoplast genome in Plasmodium species is important to better understand the functions of the organelle. However, the complete apicoplast genome is available for only the most virulent human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Here, we obtained the near-complete apicoplast genome sequences from eight Plasmodium species that infect a wide variety of vertebrate hosts and performed structural and phylogenetic analyses. We found that gene repertoire, gene arrangement, and other structural attributes were highly conserved. Phylogenetic reconstruction using 30 protein-coding genes of the apicoplast genome inferred, for the first time, a close relationship between P. ovale and rodent parasites. This close relatedness was robustly supported using multiple evolutionary assumptions and models. The finding suggests that an ancestral host switch occurred between rodent and human Plasmodium parasites.

  12. Visualizing the global secondary structure of a viral RNA genome with cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Garmann, Rees F.; Gopal, Ajaykumar; Athavale, Shreyas S.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.; Harvey, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    The lifecycle, and therefore the virulence, of single-stranded (ss)-RNA viruses is regulated not only by their particular protein gene products, but also by the secondary and tertiary structure of their genomes. The secondary structure of the entire genomic RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was recently determined by selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE). The SHAPE analysis suggested a single highly extended secondary structure with much less branching than occurs in the ensemble of structures predicted by purely thermodynamic algorithms. Here we examine the solution-equilibrated STMV genome by direct visualization with cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), using an RNA of similar length transcribed from the yeast genome as a control. The cryo-EM data reveal an ensemble of branching patterns that are collectively consistent with the SHAPE-derived secondary structure model. Thus, our results both elucidate the statistical nature of the secondary structure of large ss-RNAs and give visual support for modern RNA structure determination methods. Additionally, this work introduces cryo-EM as a means to distinguish between competing secondary structure models if the models differ significantly in terms of the number and/or length of branches. Furthermore, with the latest advances in cryo-EM technology, we suggest the possibility of developing methods that incorporate restraints from cryo-EM into the next generation of algorithms for the determination of RNA secondary and tertiary structures. PMID:25752599

  13. Structure and Genome Organization of Cherry Virus A (Capillovirus, Betaflexiviridae) from China Using Small RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiawei; Zhai, Ying; Liu, Weizhen; Dhingra, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Cherry virus A (CVA) (Capillovirus, Betaflexiviridae) is widely present in cherry-growing areas. We obtained the complete genome of a CVA isolate (CVA-TA) using small RNA deep sequencing, followed by overlapping reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The newly identified 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) from CVA-TA may form additional hairpin and loop structures to stabilize the CVA genome. PMID:27174277

  14. Human insulin genome sequence map, biochemical structure of insulin for recombinant DNA insulin.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Mungantiwar, Ashish A

    2003-08-01

    Insulin is a essential molecule for type I diabetes that is marketed by very few companies. It is the first molecule, which was made by recombinant technology; but the commercialization process is very difficult. Knowledge about biochemical structure of insulin and human insulin genome sequence map is pivotal to large scale manufacturing of recombinant DNA Insulin. This paper reviews human insulin genome sequence map, the amino acid sequence of porcine insulin, crystal structure of porcine insulin, insulin monomer, aggregation surfaces of insulin, conformational variation in the insulin monomer, insulin X-ray structures for recombinant DNA technology in the synthesis of human insulin in Escherichia coli.

  15. Progression of Structural Change in the Breast Cancer Genome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    mutations),! NanoString !Copy!Number!Variation!beta!( NanoString !CNV;!targeted!copy!number),!bisulfite!converted! RainDance!targeted!amplification...process,!To!send=will!begin!in!~1!month.!! Patient Sample Type Site Tumor Type Affy6.0 AmpliSeq2.0 NanoString CNV RainDance Mate-Pair RJH-MET-1 Tumor...during# progression/metastasis.# In#addition#to#the#genomeHwide#copy#number#analysis,#a#targeted#approach#was#undertaken#using#the# NanoString # Copy

  16. The Isochores as a Fundamental Level of Genome Structure and Organization: A General Overview.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Maria; Musto, Héctor

    2017-02-27

    The recent availability of a number of fully sequenced genomes (including marine organisms) allowed to map very precisely the isochores, based on DNA sequences, confirming the results obtained before genome sequencing by the ultracentrifugation in CsCl. In fact, the analytical profile of human DNA showed that the vertebrate genome is a mosaic of isochores, typically megabase-size DNA segments that belong to a small number of families characterized by different GC levels. In this review, we will concentrate on some general genome features regarding the compositional organization from different organisms and their evolution, ranging from vertebrates to invertebrates until unicellular organisms. Since isochores are tightly linked to biological properties such as gene density, replication timing, and recombination, the new level of detail provided by the isochore map helped the understanding of genome structure, function, and evolution. All the findings reported here confirm the idea that the isochores can be considered as a "fundamental level of genome structure and organization." We stress that we do not discuss in this review the origin of isochores, which is still a matter of controversy, but we focus on well established structural and physiological aspects.

  17. Structural analysis of a carcinogen-induced genomic rearrangement event

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, F.G.; Davis, R.J.; Eichenfield, L.; Emanuel, B.S. Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia )

    1992-02-01

    The authors have explored the mechanism of genomic rearrangement in a hamster fibroblast cell culture system in which rearrangements are induced 5{prime} to the endogenous thymidine kinase gene by chemical carcinogen treatment. The wild-type region around one rearrangement breakpoint was cloned and sequenced. With this sequence information, the carcinogen-induced rearrangement was cloned from the corresponding rearranged cell line by the inverse polymerase chain reaction. After the breakpoint fragment was sequenced, the wild-type rearrangement partner (RP15) was isolated by a second inverse polymerase chain reaction of unrearranged DNA. Comparison of the sequence of the rearrangement breakpoint with the wild-type RP15 and 5{prime} thymidine kinase gene regions revealed short repeats directly at the breakpoint, as well as nearby A+T-rich regions in rearrangement partner. Therefore, these studies reveal interesting sequence and chromatin features near the rearrangement breakpoints and suggest a role for nuclear organization in the mechanism of carcinogen-induced genomic rearrangement.

  18. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Schill, Lyndele; Ivory, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) program is designed to increase the number of underrepresented minority students into STEM and STEM careers by providing unique summer research experiences followed by long-term mentoring and cohort support. Hallmarks of the NAC program include: research or internship opportunities at one of the NAC partner sites, a framework to continue research over the academic year, peer and faculty mentoring, monthly virtual hangouts, and much more. NAC students also participate in two professional travel opportunities each year: the annual NAC conference at Howard University and poster presentation at the annual AAS winter meeting following their summer internship.The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program led by the National Radio Astronomy Consortium (NRAO) and Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), in partnership with the National Society of Black Physicist (NSBP), along with a number of minority and majority universities.

  19. An integrated map of structural variation in 2,504 human genomes.

    PubMed

    Sudmant, Peter H; Rausch, Tobias; Gardner, Eugene J; Handsaker, Robert E; Abyzov, Alexej; Huddleston, John; Zhang, Yan; Ye, Kai; Jun, Goo; Hsi-Yang Fritz, Markus; Konkel, Miriam K; Malhotra, Ankit; Stütz, Adrian M; Shi, Xinghua; Paolo Casale, Francesco; Chen, Jieming; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Dayama, Gargi; Chen, Ken; Malig, Maika; Chaisson, Mark J P; Walter, Klaudia; Meiers, Sascha; Kashin, Seva; Garrison, Erik; Auton, Adam; Lam, Hugo Y K; Jasmine Mu, Xinmeng; Alkan, Can; Antaki, Danny; Bae, Taejeong; Cerveira, Eliza; Chines, Peter; Chong, Zechen; Clarke, Laura; Dal, Elif; Ding, Li; Emery, Sarah; Fan, Xian; Gujral, Madhusudan; Kahveci, Fatma; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Kong, Yu; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; McCarthy, Shane; Flicek, Paul; Gibbs, Richard A; Marth, Gabor; Mason, Christopher E; Menelaou, Androniki; Muzny, Donna M; Nelson, Bradley J; Noor, Amina; Parrish, Nicholas F; Pendleton, Matthew; Quitadamo, Andrew; Raeder, Benjamin; Schadt, Eric E; Romanovitch, Mallory; Schlattl, Andreas; Sebra, Robert; Shabalin, Andrey A; Untergasser, Andreas; Walker, Jerilyn A; Wang, Min; Yu, Fuli; Zhang, Chengsheng; Zhang, Jing; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Zhou, Wanding; Zichner, Thomas; Sebat, Jonathan; Batzer, Mark A; McCarroll, Steven A; Mills, Ryan E; Gerstein, Mark B; Bashir, Ali; Stegle, Oliver; Devine, Scott E; Lee, Charles; Eichler, Evan E; Korbel, Jan O

    2015-10-01

    Structural variants are implicated in numerous diseases and make up the majority of varying nucleotides among human genomes. Here we describe an integrated set of eight structural variant classes comprising both balanced and unbalanced variants, which we constructed using short-read DNA sequencing data and statistically phased onto haplotype blocks in 26 human populations. Analysing this set, we identify numerous gene-intersecting structural variants exhibiting population stratification and describe naturally occurring homozygous gene knockouts that suggest the dispensability of a variety of human genes. We demonstrate that structural variants are enriched on haplotypes identified by genome-wide association studies and exhibit enrichment for expression quantitative trait loci. Additionally, we uncover appreciable levels of structural variant complexity at different scales, including genic loci subject to clusters of repeated rearrangement and complex structural variants with multiple breakpoints likely to have formed through individual mutational events. Our catalogue will enhance future studies into structural variant demography, functional impact and disease association.

  20. Birth of an ‘Asian cool’ reference genome: AK1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changhoon

    2016-01-01

    The human reference genome, maintained by the Genome Reference Consortium, is conceivably the most complete genome assembly ever, since its first construction. It has continually been improved by incorporating corrections made to the previous assemblies, thanks to various technological advances. Many currently-ongoing population sequencing projects have been based on this reference genome, heightening hopes of the development of useful medical applications of genomic information, thanks to the recent maturation of high-throughput sequencing technologies. However, just one reference genome does not fit all the populations across the globe, because of the large diversity in genomic structures and technical limitations inherent to short read sequencing methods. The recent success in de novo construction of the highly contiguous Asian diploid genome AK1, by combining single molecule technologies with routine sequencing data without resorting to traditional clone-by-clone sequencing and physical mapping, reveals the nature of genomic structure variation by detecting thousands of novel structural variations and by finally filling in some of the prior gaps which had persistently remained in the current human reference genome. Now it is expected that the AK1 genome, soon to be paired with more upcoming de novo assembled genomes, will provide a chance to explore what it is really like to use ancestry-specific reference genomes instead of hg19/hg38 for population genomics. This is a major step towards the furthering of genetically-based precision medicine. PMID:27881215

  1. Genome3D: a UK collaborative project to annotate genomic sequences with predicted 3D structures based on SCOP and CATH domains

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Tony E.; Sillitoe, Ian; Andreeva, Antonina; Blundell, Tom L.; Buchan, Daniel W.A.; Chothia, Cyrus; Cuff, Alison; Dana, Jose M.; Filippis, Ioannis; Gough, Julian; Hunter, Sarah; Jones, David T.; Kelley, Lawrence A.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Minneci, Federico; Mitchell, Alex; Murzin, Alexey G.; Ochoa-Montaño, Bernardo; Rackham, Owen J. L.; Smith, James; Sternberg, Michael J. E.; Velankar, Sameer; Yeats, Corin; Orengo, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Genome3D, available at http://www.genome3d.eu, is a new collaborative project that integrates UK-based structural resources to provide a unique perspective on sequence–structure–function relationships. Leading structure prediction resources (DomSerf, FUGUE, Gene3D, pDomTHREADER, Phyre and SUPERFAMILY) provide annotations for UniProt sequences to indicate the locations of structural domains (structural annotations) and their 3D structures (structural models). Structural annotations and 3D model predictions are currently available for three model genomes (Homo sapiens, E. coli and baker’s yeast), and the project will extend to other genomes in the near future. As these resources exploit different strategies for predicting structures, the main aim of Genome3D is to enable comparisons between all the resources so that biologists can see where predictions agree and are therefore more trusted. Furthermore, as these methods differ in whether they build their predictions using CATH or SCOP, Genome3D also contains the first official mapping between these two databases. This has identified pairs of similar superfamilies from the two resources at various degrees of consensus (532 bronze pairs, 527 silver pairs and 370 gold pairs). PMID:23203986

  2. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z.; Sonnenschein, Eva C.; Cariou, Thierry; O’Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R.; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E.; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P.; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M.; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion M. F.; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C.; Kandil, Mahrous M.; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L’Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M.; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M.; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A. Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J.; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N.; Gasol, Josep M.; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S.; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M.; Collins, R. Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  3. The ocean sampling day consortium.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z; Sonnenschein, Eva C; Cariou, Thierry; O'Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion Mf; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C; Kandil, Mahrous M; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; Ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L'Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; Dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N; Gasol, Josep M; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M; Collins, R Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Gilbert, Jack A; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world's oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  4. The Twin Cities biomedical consortium.

    PubMed

    Bailey, A S

    1975-07-01

    Twenty-eight health science libraries in the St. Paul-Minneapolis area formed the Twin Cities Biomedical Consortium with the intention of developing a strong network of biomedical libraries in the Twin Cities area. Toward this end, programs were designed to strengthen lines of communication and increase cooperation among local health science libraries; improve access to biomedical information at the local level; and enable the Consortium, as a group, to meet an increasing proportion of its members' needs for biomedical information. Presently, the TCBC comprises libraries in twenty-two hospitals, two county medical societies, one school of nursing, one junior college, and two private corporations.

  5. Consortium for materials development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    During fiscal 1993, the Consortium for Materials Development in Space (CMDS) maintained the organizational structure and project orientation established in prior years. The commercial objectives are improved materials, biomedical applications, and infrastructure and support hardware. Projects include nonlinear optical materials; space materials (specifically polymer foam/films, atomic oxygen and high temperature superconductors); alloyed and blended materials: sintered and alloyed materials; polymer and carbonate blends; electrodeposition; organic separation; materials dispersion and biodynamics; space carriers: Consort, COMET support, Spacehab utilization; and flight services: accelerometers, CMIX, USEC, ORSEP, and Space Experiment Facility (SEF).

  6. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  7. Comparative Genome Structure, Secondary Metabolite, and Effector Coding Capacity across Cochliobolus Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Bushley, Kathryn E.; Ohm, Robin A.; Otillar, Robert; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Grimwood, Jane; MohdZainudin, NurAinIzzati; Xue, Chunsheng; Wang, Rui; Manning, Viola A.; Dhillon, Braham; Tu, Zheng Jin; Steffenson, Brian J.; Salamov, Asaf; Sun, Hui; Lowry, Steve; LaButti, Kurt; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Lindquist, Erika; Barry, Kerrie; Schmutz, Jeremy; Baker, Scott E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Zhong, Shaobin; Turgeon, B. Gillian

    2013-01-01

    The genomes of five Cochliobolus heterostrophus strains, two Cochliobolus sativus strains, three additional Cochliobolus species (Cochliobolus victoriae, Cochliobolus carbonum, Cochliobolus miyabeanus), and closely related Setosphaeria turcica were sequenced at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). The datasets were used to identify SNPs between strains and species, unique genomic regions, core secondary metabolism genes, and small secreted protein (SSP) candidate effector encoding genes with a view towards pinpointing structural elements and gene content associated with specificity of these closely related fungi to different cereal hosts. Whole-genome alignment shows that three to five percent of each genome differs between strains of the same species, while a quarter of each genome differs between species. On average, SNP counts among field isolates of the same C. heterostrophus species are more than 25× higher than those between inbred lines and 50× lower than SNPs between Cochliobolus species. The suites of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), polyketide synthase (PKS), and SSP–encoding genes are astoundingly diverse among species but remarkably conserved among isolates of the same species, whether inbred or field strains, except for defining examples that map to unique genomic regions. Functional analysis of several strain-unique PKSs and NRPSs reveal a strong correlation with a role in virulence. PMID:23357949

  8. Comparative Genome Structure, Secondary Metabolite, and Effector Coding Capacity across Cochliobolus Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Condon, Bradford J.; Leng, Yueqiang; Wu, Dongliang; Bushley, Kathryn E.; Ohm, Robin A.; Otillar, Robert; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Grimwood, Jane; MohdZainudin, NurAinlzzati; Xue, Chunsheng; Wang, Rui; Manning, Viola A.; Dhillon, Braham; Tu, Zheng Jin; Steffenson, Brian J.; Salamov, Asaf; Sun, Hui; Lowry, Steve; LaButti, Kurt; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Lindquist, Erika; Barry, Kerrie; Schmutz, Jeremy; Baker, Scott E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Zhong, Shaobin; Turgeon, B. Gillian

    2013-01-24

    The genomes of five Cochliobolus heterostrophus strains, two Cochliobolus sativus strains, three additional Cochliobolus species (Cochliobolus victoriae, Cochliobolus carbonum, Cochliobolus miyabeanus), and closely related Setosphaeria turcica were sequenced at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). The datasets were used to identify SNPs between strains and species, unique genomic regions, core secondary metabolism genes, and small secreted protein (SSP) candidate effector encoding genes with a view towards pinpointing structural elements and gene content associated with specificity of these closely related fungi to different cereal hosts. Whole-genome alignment shows that three to five of each genome differs between strains of the same species, while a quarter of each genome differs between species. On average, SNP counts among field isolates of the same C. heterostrophus species are more than 25 higher than those between inbred lines and 50 lower than SNPs between Cochliobolus species. The suites of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), polyketide synthase (PKS), and SSP encoding genes are astoundingly diverse among species but remarkably conserved among isolates of the same species, whether inbred or field strains, except for defining examples that map to unique genomic regions. Functional analysis of several strain-unique PKSs and NRPSs reveal a strong correlation with a role in virulence.

  9. Long-Range Order and Fractality in the Structure and Organization of Eukaryotic Genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polychronopoulos, Dimitris; Tsiagkas, Giannis; Athanasopoulou, Labrini; Sellis, Diamantis; Almirantis, Yannis

    2014-12-01

    The late Professor J.S. Nicolis always emphasized, both in his writings and in presentations and discussions with students and friends, the relevance of a dynamical systems approach to biology. In particular, viewing the genome as a "biological text" captures the dynamical character of both the evolution and function of the organisms in the form of correlations indicating the presence of a long-range order. This genomic structure can be expressed in forms reminiscent of natural languages and several temporal and spatial traces l by the functioning of dynamical systems: Zipf laws, self-similarity and fractality. Here we review several works of our group and recent unpublished results, focusing on the chromosomal distribution of biologically active genomic components: Genes and protein-coding segments, CpG islands, transposable elements belonging to all major classes and several types of conserved non-coding genomic elements. We report the systematic appearance of power-laws in the size distribution of the distances between elements belonging to each of these types of functional genomic elements. Moreover, fractality is also found in several cases, using box-counting and entropic scaling.We present here, for the first time in a unified way, an aggregative model of the genomic dynamics which can explain the observed patterns on the grounds of known phenomena accompanying genome evolution. Our results comply with recent findings about a "fractal globule" geometry of chromatin in the eukaryotic nucleus.

  10. Genomic structural variation contributes to phenotypic change of industrial bioethanol yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Li-Jie; Fang, Ya-Hong; Jin, Xin-Na; Qi, Lei; Wu, Xue-Chang; Zheng, Dao-Qiong

    2016-03-01

    Genomic structural variation (GSV) is a ubiquitous phenomenon observed in the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different genetic backgrounds; however, the physiological and phenotypic effects of GSV are not well understood. Here, we first revealed the genetic characteristics of a widely used industrial S. cerevisiae strain, ZTW1, by whole genome sequencing. ZTW1 was identified as an aneuploidy strain and a large-scale GSV was observed in the ZTW1 genome compared with the genome of a diploid strain YJS329. These GSV events led to copy number variations (CNVs) in many chromosomal segments as well as one whole chromosome in the ZTW1 genome. Changes in the DNA dosage of certain functional genes directly affected their expression levels and the resultant ZTW1 phenotypes. Moreover, CNVs of large chromosomal regions triggered an aneuploidy stress in ZTW1. This stress decreased the proliferation ability and tolerance of ZTW1 to various stresses, while aneuploidy response stress may also provide some benefits to the fermentation performance of the yeast, including increased fermentation rates and decreased byproduct generation. This work reveals genomic characters of the bioethanol S. cerevisiae strain ZTW1 and suggests that GSV is an important kind of mutation that changes the traits of industrial S. cerevisiae strains.

  11. Reference-based phasing using the Haplotype Reference Consortium panel.

    PubMed

    Loh, Po-Ru; Danecek, Petr; Palamara, Pier Francesco; Fuchsberger, Christian; A Reshef, Yakir; K Finucane, Hilary; Schoenherr, Sebastian; Forer, Lukas; McCarthy, Shane; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Durbin, Richard; L Price, Alkes

    2016-11-01

    Haplotype phasing is a fundamental problem in medical and population genetics. Phasing is generally performed via statistical phasing in a genotyped cohort, an approach that can yield high accuracy in very large cohorts but attains lower accuracy in smaller cohorts. Here we instead explore the paradigm of reference-based phasing. We introduce a new phasing algorithm, Eagle2, that attains high accuracy across a broad range of cohort sizes by efficiently leveraging information from large external reference panels (such as the Haplotype Reference Consortium; HRC) using a new data structure based on the positional Burrows-Wheeler transform. We demonstrate that Eagle2 attains a ∼20× speedup and ∼10% increase in accuracy compared to reference-based phasing using SHAPEIT2. On European-ancestry samples, Eagle2 with the HRC panel achieves >2× the accuracy of 1000 Genomes-based phasing. Eagle2 is open source and freely available for HRC-based phasing via the Sanger Imputation Service and the Michigan Imputation Server.

  12. Highly Conserved Elements and Chromosome Structure Evolution in Mitochondrial Genomes in Ciliates

    PubMed Central

    Gershgorin, Roman A.; Gorbunov, Konstantin Yu.; Zverkov, Oleg A.; Rubanov, Lev I.; Seliverstov, Alexandr V.; Lyubetsky, Vassily A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses are incorporating ultraconserved elements (UCEs) and highly conserved elements (HCEs). Models of evolution of the genome structure and HCEs initially faced considerable algorithmic challenges, which gave rise to (often unnatural) constraints on these models, even for conceptually simple tasks such as the calculation of distance between two structures or the identification of UCEs. In our recent works, these constraints have been addressed with fast and efficient solutions with no constraints on the underlying models. These approaches have led us to an unexpected result: for some organelles and taxa, the genome structure and HCE set, despite themselves containing relatively little information, still adequately resolve the evolution of species. We also used the HCE identification to search for promoters and regulatory elements that characterize the functional evolution of the genome. PMID:28264444

  13. Nematode phospholipid metabolism: an example of closing the genome-structure-function circle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soon Goo; Jez, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes that infect humans, animals, and plants cause health problems, livestock and agricultural losses, and economic damage worldwide and are important targets for drug development. The growing availability of nematode genomes supports the discovery of new pathways that differ from host organisms and are a starting point for structural and functional studies of novel antiparasitic targets. As an example of how genome data, structural biology, and biochemistry integrate into a research cycle targeting parasites, we summarize the discovery of the phosphobase methylation pathway for phospholipid synthesis in nematodes and compare the phosphoethanolamine methyltransferases from nematodes, plants, and Plasmodium. Crystallographic and biochemical studies of the phosphoethanolamine methyltransferases in this pathway provide a foundation that guides the next steps that close the genome-structure-function circle. PMID:24685202

  14. Toward a standard in structural genome annotation for prokaryotes

    DOE PAGES

    Tripp, H. James; Sutton, Granger; White, Owen; ...

    2015-07-25

    In an effort to identify the best practice for finding genes in prokaryotic genomes and propose it as a standard for automated annotation pipelines, we collected 1,004,576 peptides from various publicly available resources, and these were used as a basis to evaluate various gene-calling methods. The peptides came from 45 bacterial replicons with an average GC content from 31 % to 74 %, biased toward higher GC content genomes. Automated, manual, and semi-manual methods were used to tally errors in three widely used gene calling methods, as evidenced by peptides mapped outside the boundaries of called genes. We found thatmore » the consensus set of identical genes predicted by the three methods constitutes only about 70 % of the genes predicted by each individual method (with start and stop required to coincide). Peptide data was useful for evaluating some of the differences between gene callers, but not reliable enough to make the results conclusive, due to limitations inherent in any proteogenomic study. A single, unambiguous, unanimous best practice did not emerge from this analysis, since the available proteomics data were not adequate to provide an objective measurement of differences in the accuracy between these methods. However, as a result of this study, software, reference data, and procedures have been better matched among participants, representing a step toward a much-needed standard. In the absence of sufficient amount of experimental data to achieve a universal standard, our recommendation is that any of these methods can be used by the community, as long as a single method is employed across all datasets to be compared.« less

  15. Toward a standard in structural genome annotation for prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, H. James; Sutton, Granger; White, Owen; Wortman, Jennifer; Pati, Amrita; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Payne, Samuel H.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia

    2015-07-25

    In an effort to identify the best practice for finding genes in prokaryotic genomes and propose it as a standard for automated annotation pipelines, we collected 1,004,576 peptides from various publicly available resources, and these were used as a basis to evaluate various gene-calling methods. The peptides came from 45 bacterial replicons with an average GC content from 31 % to 74 %, biased toward higher GC content genomes. Automated, manual, and semi-manual methods were used to tally errors in three widely used gene calling methods, as evidenced by peptides mapped outside the boundaries of called genes. We found that the consensus set of identical genes predicted by the three methods constitutes only about 70 % of the genes predicted by each individual method (with start and stop required to coincide). Peptide data was useful for evaluating some of the differences between gene callers, but not reliable enough to make the results conclusive, due to limitations inherent in any proteogenomic study. A single, unambiguous, unanimous best practice did not emerge from this analysis, since the available proteomics data were not adequate to provide an objective measurement of differences in the accuracy between these methods. However, as a result of this study, software, reference data, and procedures have been better matched among participants, representing a step toward a much-needed standard. In the absence of sufficient amount of experimental data to achieve a universal standard, our recommendation is that any of these methods can be used by the community, as long as a single method is employed across all datasets to be compared.

  16. Enhancing Structural Annotation of Yeast Genomes with RNA-Seq Data.

    PubMed

    Devillers, Hugo; Morin, Nicolas; Neuvéglise, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    The number of fully sequenced genomes of yeasts is dramatically increasing but both structural and functional annotation quality are usually neglected, as most frequently based on automatic annotation transfer tools from reference genomes. RNA sequencing technologies offer the possibility to better characterize yeast transcriptomes and to correct or improve the prediction of mRNA, ncRNA, or miscellaneous RNA. We describe a computational approach to enhance structural annotation of yeast genomes based on RNA-Seq data exploitation. The proposed pipeline is primarily based on read mapping with TopHat2. Mapping outputs are then used for various applications such as: (1) validation of exon-exon junctions of predicted transcripts, (2) definition of new transcribed features, (3) prediction of 3' UTR, and (4) identification of extra features absent from the genome assembly. We strongly encourage curators to proceed to a manual validation and editing of the reference genome. Releasing genomes with high-quality annotation is an important issue, as they will be considered as references for further predictions.

  17. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    romantic relationships. Family Psychology , 22, 885-893. 25. Selby, E., & Joiner, T. (2008). Ethnic variations in the structure of Borderline...Schmidt, N.B., Lerew, D.R., Joiner, T.E., & Ialongo, N.S. (2005). Latent structure of anxiety: Taxometric exploration. Psychological Assessment, 17, 369...2004). Structure of anxiety and depression in urban youth: Examination of the tripartite model. Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology , 72, 719

  18. CFD Parametric Study of Consortium Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Garcia, Roberto; Williams, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    . Due to the complexity of blade geometries, the TANDEM blade configurations were analyzed with the multi-zone grid structure. Both the 7.5 deg- and the 22.5 deg-clocking TANDEM blade cases utilized a 80K mesh system. The numerical result of two TANDEM blade modifications indicates the efficiency and the head are worse than those of the baseline case due to larger flow distortion. The gap between the TANDEM blade and the full blade allows the flow passes through and heavily loads the pressure side of the partial blade such that flow reversal occurs near the suction side of the splitter. The flow split at the exit of impeller blades is very non-uniform for TANDEM blade cases, and this will greatly induce the side load on the diffuser. Therefore, the TANDEM blade modification in the present CFD analysis does not improve the performance of the consortium impeller.

  19. CFD parametric study of consortium impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Garcia, Roberto; Williams, Robert W.

    1993-07-01

    . Due to the complexity of blade geometries, the TANDEM blade configurations were analyzed with the multi-zone grid structure. Both the 7.5 deg- and the 22.5 deg-clocking TANDEM blade cases utilized a 80K mesh system. The numerical result of two TANDEM blade modifications indicates the efficiency and the head are worse than those of the baseline case due to larger flow distortion. The gap between the TANDEM blade and the full blade allows the flow passes through and heavily loads the pressure side of the partial blade such that flow reversal occurs near the suction side of the splitter. The flow split at the exit of impeller blades is very non-uniform for TANDEM blade cases, and this will greatly induce the side load on the diffuser. consortium impeller.

  20. Structure and Genome Release Mechanism of the Human Cardiovirus Saffold Virus 3

    PubMed Central

    Mullapudi, Edukondalu; Nováček, Jiří; Pálková, Lenka; Kulich, Pavel; Lindberg, A. Michael; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to initiate an infection, viruses need to deliver their genomes into cells. This involves uncoating the genome and transporting it to the cytoplasm. The process of genome delivery is not well understood for nonenveloped viruses. We address this gap in our current knowledge by studying the uncoating of the nonenveloped human cardiovirus Saffold virus 3 (SAFV-3) of the family Picornaviridae. SAFVs cause diseases ranging from gastrointestinal disorders to meningitis. We present a structure of a native SAFV-3 virion determined to 2.5 Å by X-ray crystallography and an 11-Å-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of an “altered” particle that is primed for genome release. The altered particles are expanded relative to the native virus and contain pores in the capsid that might serve as channels for the release of VP4 subunits, N termini of VP1, and the RNA genome. Unlike in the related enteroviruses, pores in SAFV-3 are located roughly between the icosahedral 3- and 5-fold axes at an interface formed by two VP1 and one VP3 subunit. Furthermore, in native conditions many cardioviruses contain a disulfide bond formed by cysteines that are separated by just one residue. The disulfide bond is located in a surface loop of VP3. We determined the structure of the SAFV-3 virion in which the disulfide bonds are reduced. Disruption of the bond had minimal effect on the structure of the loop, but it increased the stability and decreased the infectivity of the virus. Therefore, compounds specifically disrupting or binding to the disulfide bond might limit SAFV infection. IMPORTANCE A capsid assembled from viral proteins protects the virus genome during transmission from one cell to another. However, when a virus enters a cell the virus genome has to be released from the capsid in order to initiate infection. This process is not well understood for nonenveloped viruses. We address this gap in our current knowledge by studying the genome release of

  1. The Statewide Energy Consortium: A California Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, G. Cleve; Giacosie, Robert V.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the formation and organization of a statewide energy consortium consisting of faculty from 19 campuses of the California State University and Colleges system. Also describes three major consortium activities and reasons for its success. (SK)

  2. Population Structure Analysis of Bull Genomes of European and Western Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Neo Christopher; Szyda, Joanna; Frąszczak, Magdalena; Fries, Hans Rudolf; SandøLund, Mogens; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Boichard, Didier; Stothard, Paul; Veerkamp, Roel; Goddard, Michael; Van Tassell, Curtis P.; Hayes, Ben

    2017-01-01

    Since domestication, population bottlenecks, breed formation, and selective breeding have radically shaped the genealogy and genetics of Bos taurus. In turn, characterization of population structure among diverse bull (males of Bos taurus) genomes enables detailed assessment of genetic resources and origins. By analyzing 432 unrelated bull genomes from 13 breeds and 16 countries, we demonstrate genetic diversity and structural complexity among the European/Western cattle population. Importantly, we relaxed a strong assumption of discrete or admixed population, by adapting latent variable models for individual-specific allele frequencies that directly capture a wide range of complex structure from genome-wide genotypes. As measured by magnitude of differentiation, selection pressure on SNPs within genes is substantially greater than that on intergenic regions. Additionally, broad regions of chromosome 6 harboring largest genetic differentiation suggest positive selection underlying population structure. We carried out gene set analysis using SNP annotations to identify enriched functional categories such as energy-related processes and multiple development stages. Our population structure analysis of bull genomes can support genetic management strategies that capture structural complexity and promote sustainable genetic breadth. PMID:28084449

  3. Development of Structural Neurobiology and Genomics Programs in the Neurogenetic Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Brian E., M.D.

    2006-11-10

    The purpose of the DOE equipment-only grant was to purchase instrumentation in support of structural biology and genomics core facilities in the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute (ZNI). The ZNI, a new laboratory facility (125,000 GSF) and a center of excellence at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, was opened in 2003. The goal of the ZNI is to recruit upwards of 30 new faculty investigators engaged in interdisciplinary research programs that will add breadth and depth to existing school strengths in neuroscience, epidemiology and genetics. Many of these faculty, and other faculty researchers at the Keck School will access structural biology and genomics facilities developed in the ZNI.

  4. Geographic distribution and adaptive significance of genomic structural variants: an anthropological genetics perspective.

    PubMed

    Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Gokcumen, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Anthropological geneticists have successfully used single-nucleotide and short tandem repeat variations across human genomes to reconstruct human history. These markers have also been used extensively to identify adaptive and phenotypic variation. The recent advent of high-throughput genomic technologies revealed an overlooked type of genomic variation: structural variants (SVs). In fact, some SVs may contribute to human adaptation in substantial and previously unexplored ways. SVs include deletions, insertions, duplications, inversions, and translocations of genomic segments that vary among individuals from the same species. SVs are much less numerous than single-nucleotide variants but account for at least seven times more variable base pairs than do single-nucleotide variants when two human genomes are compared. Moreover, recent studies have shown that SVs have higher mutation rates than single-nucleotide variants when the affected base pairs are considered, especially in certain parts of the genome. The null hypothesis for the evolution of SVs, as for single-nucleotide variants, is neutrality. Hence, drift is the primary force that shapes the current allelic distribution of most SVs. However, due to their size, a larger proportion of SVs appear to evolve under nonneutral forces (mostly purifying selection) than do single-nucleotide variants. In fact, as exemplified by several groundbreaking studies, SVs contribute to anthropologically relevant phenotypic variation and local adaptation among humans. In this review, we argue that with the advent of affordable genomic technologies, anthropological scrutiny of genomic structural variation emerges as a fertile area of inquiry to better understand human phenotypic variation. To motivate potential studies, we discuss scenarios through which structural variants (SVs) affect phenotypic variation among humans within an anthropological context. We further provide a methodological workflow in which we analyzed 1000 Genomes

  5. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Cancer.gov

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  6. The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodkin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium (HVC) is a collaboration of public and private organizations which work to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of home visiting services throughout the state. The HVC identified service needs and gaps and has focused on increasing the interagency state and local partnerships so that resources are…

  7. Mitochondrial genome structure and evolution in the living fossil vampire squid, Vampyroteuthis infernalis, and extant cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Lindsay, Dhugal J; Yoshida, Mari; Tsuchiya, Kotaro; Yamagishi, Akihiko; Maruyama, Tadashi; Oshima, Tairo

    2007-08-01

    Complete nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial (mt) genomes of the "living fossil" cephalopod Vampyroteuthis infernalis (Vampyromorpha) and the cuttlefish Sepia esculenta (Sepiida) were determined. The V. infernalis mt genome structure is identical to the incirrate octopod Octopus vulgaris mt genome structure, and is therefore more similar to that of the polyplacophoran Katharina tunicata, than to that of the other "living fossil" cephalopod Nautilus macromphalus. The mt genome structure of S. esculenta is identical to that of Sepia officinalis. Molecular phylogenetic analyses based on the mt protein genes from the completely sequenced cephalopod mt genomes suggested the monophyletic relationship of two myopsid squids Loligo bleekeri and Sepiotheuthis lessoniana, and the monophyletic relationship of two oegopsid squids Watasenia scintillans, and Todarodes pacificus. Sepiida appeared as the sister group of Teuthida (Myopsida + Oegopsida). The phylogenetic position of Vampyromorpha appeared as the sister group of Octopoda, although the monophyly of Vampyromorpha and Decapodiformes cannot be rejected outright by our phylogenetic analyses. The hypothesis that Vampyromorpha is basal among the coleoid cephalopods can be rejected because of low statistical support. Therefore, it is reasonable to recognize three major groups in Coleoidea--Vampyromorpha, Octopoda, and Decapodiformes.

  8. Prioritisation of structural variant calls in cancer genomes

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Brad A.; Cingolani, Pablo; Hofmann, Oliver; Sidoruk, Aleksandr; Lai, Zhongwu; Zakharov, Gennadii; Rodichenko, Mikhail; Alperovich, Mikhail; Jenkins, David; Carr, T. Hedley; Stetson, Daniel; Dougherty, Brian; Barrett, J. Carl; Johnson, Justin H.

    2017-01-01

    Sensitivity of short read DNA-sequencing for gene fusion detection is improving, but is hampered by the significant amount of noise composed of uninteresting or false positive hits in the data. In this paper we describe a tiered prioritisation approach to extract high impact gene fusion events from existing structural variant calls. Using cell line and patient DNA sequence data we improve the annotation and interpretation of structural variant calls to best highlight likely cancer driving fusions. We also considerably improve on the automated visualisation of the high impact structural variants to highlight the effects of the variants on the resulting transcripts. The resulting framework greatly improves on readily detecting clinically actionable structural variants. PMID:28392986

  9. The genomic structure of the human UFO receptor.

    PubMed

    Schulz, A S; Schleithoff, L; Faust, M; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1993-02-01

    Using a DNA transfection-tumorigenicity assay we have recently identified the UFO oncogene. It encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor characterized by the juxtaposition of two immunoglobulin-like and two fibronectin type III repeats in its extracellular domain. Here we describe the genomic organization of the human UFO locus. The UFO receptor is encoded by 20 exons that are distributed over a region of 44 kb. Different isoforms of UFO mRNA are generated by alternative splicing of exon 10 and differential usage of two imperfect polyadenylation sites resulting in the presence or absence of 1.5-kb 3' untranslated sequences. Primer extension and S1 nuclease analyses revealed multiple transcriptional initiation sites including a major site 169 bp upstream of the translation start site. The promoter region is GC rich, lacks TATA and CAAT boxes, but contains potential recognition sites for a variety of trans-acting factors, including Sp1, AP-2 and the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. Proto-UFO and its oncogenic counterpart exhibit identical cDNA and promoter regions sequences. Possible modes of UFO activation are discussed.

  10. Genome structure and primitive sex chromosome revealed in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Yin, Tongming; Gunter, Lee E; Blaudez, D

    2008-01-01

    We constructed a comprehensive genetic map for Populus and ordered 332 Mb of sequence scaffolds along the 19 haploid chromosomes in order to compare chromosomal regions among diverse members of the genus. These efforts lead us to conclude that chromosome XIX in Populus is evolving into a sex chromosome. Consistent segregation distortion in favor of the sub-genera Tacamahaca alleles provided evidence of divergent selection among species, particularly at the proximal end of chromosome XIX. A large microsatellite marker (SSR) cluster was detected in the distorted region even though the genome-wide distribute SSR sites was uniform across the physical map. The differences between the genetic map and physical sequence data suggested recombination suppression was occurring in the distorted region. A gender-determination locus and an overabundance of NBS-LRR genes were also co-located to the distorted region and were put forth as the cause for divergent selection and recombination suppression. This hypothesis was verified by using fine-scale mapping of an integrated scaffold in the vicinity of the gender-determination locus. As such it appears that chromosome XIX in Populus is in the process of evolving from an autosome into a sex chromosome and that NBS-LRR genes may play important role in the chromosomal diversification process in Populus.

  11. Comparative genomic analysis of equilibrative nucleoside transporters suggests conserved protein structure despite limited sequence identity.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Narendra; Machado, Jerry; Abdulla, Parween; Hilliker, Arthur J; Coe, Imogen R

    2002-10-15

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) are a recently characterized and poorly understood group of membrane proteins that are important in the uptake of endogenous nucleosides required for nucleic acid and nucleoside triphosphate synthesis. Despite their central importance in cellular metabolism and nucleoside analog chemotherapy, no human ENT gene has been described and nothing is known about gene structure and function. To gain insight into the ENT gene family, we used experimental and in silico comparative genomic approaches to identify ENT genes in three evolutionarily diverse organisms with completely (or almost completely) sequenced genomes, Homo sapiens, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. We describe the chromosomal location, the predicted ENT gene structure and putative structural topologies of predicted ENT proteins derived from the open reading frames. Despite variations in genomic layout and limited ortholog protein sequence identity (< or =27.45%), predicted topologies of ENT proteins are strikingly similar, suggesting an evolutionary conservation of a prototypic structure. In addition, a similar distribution of protein domains on exons is apparent in all three taxa. These data demonstrate that comparative sequence analyses should be combined with other approaches (such as genomic and proteomic analyses) to fully understand structure, function and evolution of protein families.

  12. 3D-GNOME: an integrated web service for structural modeling of the 3D genome.

    PubMed

    Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Michalski, Paul J; Wróblewski, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Kadlof, Michal; Mazzocco, Giovanni; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-07-08

    Recent advances in high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, have demonstrated the importance of 3D genome organization in development, cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation. There is now a widespread need for computational tools to generate and analyze 3D structural models from 3C data. Here we introduce our 3D GeNOme Modeling Engine (3D-GNOME), a web service which generates 3D structures from 3C data and provides tools to visually inspect and annotate the resulting structures, in addition to a variety of statistical plots and heatmaps which characterize the selected genomic region. Users submit a bedpe (paired-end BED format) file containing the locations and strengths of long range contact points, and 3D-GNOME simulates the structure and provides a convenient user interface for further analysis. Alternatively, a user may generate structures using published ChIA-PET data for the GM12878 cell line by simply specifying a genomic region of interest. 3D-GNOME is freely available at http://3dgnome.cent.uw.edu.pl/.

  13. 3D-GNOME: an integrated web service for structural modeling of the 3D genome

    PubMed Central

    Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Michalski, Paul J.; Wróblewski, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Kadlof, Michal; Mazzocco, Giovanni; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, have demonstrated the importance of 3D genome organization in development, cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation. There is now a widespread need for computational tools to generate and analyze 3D structural models from 3C data. Here we introduce our 3D GeNOme Modeling Engine (3D-GNOME), a web service which generates 3D structures from 3C data and provides tools to visually inspect and annotate the resulting structures, in addition to a variety of statistical plots and heatmaps which characterize the selected genomic region. Users submit a bedpe (paired-end BED format) file containing the locations and strengths of long range contact points, and 3D-GNOME simulates the structure and provides a convenient user interface for further analysis. Alternatively, a user may generate structures using published ChIA-PET data for the GM12878 cell line by simply specifying a genomic region of interest. 3D-GNOME is freely available at http://3dgnome.cent.uw.edu.pl/. PMID:27185892

  14. Definition of a high-affinity Gag recognition structure mediating packaging of a retroviral RNA genome

    PubMed Central

    Gherghe, Cristina; Lombo, Tania; Leonard, Christopher W.; Datta, Siddhartha A. K.; Bess, Julian W.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rein, Alan; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    All retroviral genomic RNAs contain a cis-acting packaging signal by which dimeric genomes are selectively packaged into nascent virions. However, it is not understood how Gag (the viral structural protein) interacts with these signals to package the genome with high selectivity. We probed the structure of murine leukemia virus RNA inside virus particles using SHAPE, a high-throughput RNA structure analysis technology. These experiments showed that NC (the nucleic acid binding domain derived from Gag) binds within the virus to the sequence UCUG-UR-UCUG. Recombinant Gag and NC proteins bound to this same RNA sequence in dimeric RNA in vitro; in all cases, interactions were strongest with the first U and final G in each UCUG element. The RNA structural context is critical: High-affinity binding requires base-paired regions flanking this motif, and two UCUG-UR-UCUG motifs are specifically exposed in the viral RNA dimer. Mutating the guanosine residues in these two motifs—only four nucleotides per genomic RNA—reduced packaging 100-fold, comparable to the level of nonspecific packaging. These results thus explain the selective packaging of dimeric RNA. This paradigm has implications for RNA recognition in general, illustrating how local context and RNA structure can create information-rich recognition signals from simple single-stranded sequence elements in large RNAs. PMID:20974908

  15. Structure of Ljungan virus provides insight into genome packaging of this picornavirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ling; Wang, Xiangxi; Ren, Jingshan; Porta, Claudine; Wenham, Hannah; Ekström, Jens-Ola; Panjwani, Anusha; Knowles, Nick J.; Kotecha, Abhay; Siebert, C. Alistair; Lindberg, A. Michael; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Rao, Zihe; Tuthill, Tobias J.; Stuart, David I.

    2015-10-01

    Picornaviruses are responsible for a range of human and animal diseases, but how their RNA genome is packaged remains poorly understood. A particularly poorly studied group within this family are those that lack the internal coat protein, VP4. Here we report the atomic structure of one such virus, Ljungan virus, the type member of the genus Parechovirus B, which has been linked to diabetes and myocarditis in humans. The 3.78-Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure shows remarkable features, including an extended VP1 C terminus, forming a major protuberance on the outer surface of the virus, and a basic motif at the N terminus of VP3, binding to which orders some 12% of the viral genome. This apparently charge-driven RNA attachment suggests that this branch of the picornaviruses uses a different mechanism of genome encapsidation, perhaps explored early in the evolution of picornaviruses.

  16. Protein Production for Structural Genomics Using E. coli Expression

    PubMed Central

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Li, Hui; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The goal of structural biology is to reveal details of the molecular structure of proteins in order to understand their function and mechanism. X-ray crystallography and NMR are the two best methods for atomic level structure determination. However, these methods require milligram quantities of proteins. In this chapter a reproducible methodology for large-scale protein production applicable to a diverse set of proteins is described. The approach is based on protein expression in E. coli as a fusion with a cleavable affinity tag that was tested on over 20,000 proteins. Specifically, a protocol for fermentation of large quantities of native proteins in disposable culture vessels is presented. A modified protocol that allows for the production of selenium-labeled proteins in defined media is also offered. Finally, a method for the purification of His6-tagged proteins on immobilized metal affinity chromatography columns that generates high-purity material is described in detail. PMID:24590711

  17. Evolution of the Exon-Intron Structure in Ciliate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2016-01-01

    A typical eukaryotic gene is comprised of alternating stretches of regions, exons and introns, retained in and spliced out a mature mRNA, respectively. Although the length of introns may vary substantially among organisms, a large fraction of genes contains short introns in many species. Notably, some Ciliates (Paramecium and Nyctotherus) possess only ultra-short introns, around 25 bp long. In Paramecium, ultra-short introns with length divisible by three (3n) are under strong evolutionary pressure and have a high frequency of in-frame stop codons, which, in the case of intron retention, cause premature termination of mRNA translation and consequent degradation of the mis-spliced mRNA by the nonsense-mediated decay mechanism. Here, we analyzed introns in five genera of Ciliates, Paramecium, Tetrahymena, Ichthyophthirius, Oxytricha, and Stylonychia. Introns can be classified into two length classes in Tetrahymena and Ichthyophthirius (with means 48 bp, 69 bp, and 55 bp, 64 bp, respectively), but, surprisingly, comprise three distinct length classes in Oxytricha and Stylonychia (with means 33–35 bp, 47–51 bp, and 78–80 bp). In most ranges of the intron lengths, 3n introns are underrepresented and have a high frequency of in-frame stop codons in all studied species. Introns of Paramecium, Tetrahymena, and Ichthyophthirius are preferentially located at the 5' and 3' ends of genes, whereas introns of Oxytricha and Stylonychia are strongly skewed towards the 5' end. Analysis of evolutionary conservation shows that, in each studied genome, a significant fraction of intron positions is conserved between the orthologs, but intron lengths are not correlated between the species. In summary, our study provides a detailed characterization of introns in several genera of Ciliates and highlights some of their distinctive properties, which, together, indicate that splicing spellchecking is a universal and evolutionarily conserved process in the biogenesis of short introns in

  18. Phenotypic impact of genomic structural variation: insights from and for human disease.

    PubMed

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Symmons, Orsolya; Spitz, François; Korbel, Jan O

    2013-02-01

    Genomic structural variants have long been implicated in phenotypic diversity and human disease, but dissecting the mechanisms by which they exert their functional impact has proven elusive. Recently however, developments in high-throughput DNA sequencing and chromosomal engineering technology have facilitated the analysis of structural variants in human populations and model systems in unprecedented detail. In this Review, we describe how structural variants can affect molecular and cellular processes, leading to complex organismal phenotypes, including human disease. We further present advances in delineating disease-causing elements that are affected by structural variants, and we discuss future directions for research on the functional consequences of structural variants.

  19. Using reference-free compressed data structures to analyze sequencing reads from thousands of human genomes.

    PubMed

    Dolle, Dirk D; Liu, Zhicheng; Cotten, Matthew; Simpson, Jared T; Iqbal, Zamin; Durbin, Richard; McCarthy, Shane A; Keane, Thomas M

    2017-02-01

    We are rapidly approaching the point where we have sequenced millions of human genomes. There is a pressing need for new data structures to store raw sequencing data and efficient algorithms for population scale analysis. Current reference-based data formats do not fully exploit the redundancy in population sequencing nor take advantage of shared genetic variation. In recent years, the Burrows-Wheeler transform (BWT) and FM-index have been widely employed as a full-text searchable index for read alignment and de novo assembly. We introduce the concept of a population BWT and use it to store and index the sequencing reads of 2705 samples from the 1000 Genomes Project. A key feature is that, as more genomes are added, identical read sequences are increasingly observed, and compression becomes more efficient. We assess the support in the 1000 Genomes read data for every base position of two human reference assembly versions, identifying that 3.2 Mbp with population support was lost in the transition from GRCh37 with 13.7 Mbp added to GRCh38. We show that the vast majority of variant alleles can be uniquely described by overlapping 31-mers and show how rapid and accurate SNP and indel genotyping can be carried out across the genomes in the population BWT. We use the population BWT to carry out nonreference queries to search for the presence of all known viral genomes and discover human T-lymphotropic virus 1 integrations in six samples in a recognized epidemiological distribution.

  20. Coding exon-structure aware realigner (CESAR) utilizes genome alignments for accurate comparative gene annotation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Virag; Elghafari, Anas; Hiller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Identifying coding genes is an essential step in genome annotation. Here, we utilize existing whole genome alignments to detect conserved coding exons and then map gene annotations from one genome to many aligned genomes. We show that genome alignments contain thousands of spurious frameshifts and splice site mutations in exons that are truly conserved. To overcome these limitations, we have developed CESAR (Coding Exon-Structure Aware Realigner) that realigns coding exons, while considering reading frame and splice sites of each exon. CESAR effectively avoids spurious frameshifts in conserved genes and detects 91% of shifted splice sites. This results in the identification of thousands of additional conserved exons and 99% of the exons that lack inactivating mutations match real exons. Finally, to demonstrate the potential of using CESAR for comparative gene annotation, we applied it to 188 788 exons of 19 865 human genes to annotate human genes in 99 other vertebrates. These comparative gene annotations are available as a resource (http://bds.mpi-cbg.de/hillerlab/CESAR/). CESAR (https://github.com/hillerlab/CESAR/) can readily be applied to other alignments to accurately annotate coding genes in many other vertebrate and invertebrate genomes. PMID:27016733

  1. A roadmap for functional structural variants in the soybean genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene structural variation (SV) has recently emerged as a key genetic mechanism underlying several important phenotypic traits in crop species. We screened a panel of 41 soybean accessions serving as parents in a soybean nested association mapping population for deletions and duplications in over 53...

  2. Structural and functional comparative mapping between the Brassica A genomes in allotetraploid Brassica napus and diploid Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Congcong; Ramchiary, Nirala; Ma, Yongbiao; Jin, Mina; Feng, Ji; Li, Ruiyuan; Wang, Hao; Long, Yan; Choi, Su Ryun; Zhang, Chunyu; Cowling, Wallace A; Park, Beom Seok; Lim, Yong Pyo; Meng, Jinling

    2011-10-01

    Brassica napus (AACC genome) is an important oilseed crop that was formed by the fusion of the diploids B. rapa (AA) and B. oleracea (CC). The complete genomic sequence of the Brassica A genome will be available soon from the B. rapa genome sequencing project, but it is not clear how informative the A genome sequence in B. rapa (A(r)) will be for predicting the structure and function of the A subgenome in the allotetraploid Brassica species B. napus (A(n)). In this paper, we report the results of structural and functional comparative mapping between the A subgenomes of B. napus and B. rapa based on genetic maps that were anchored with bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs)-sequence of B. rapa. We identified segmental conservation that represented by syntenic blocks in over one third of the A genome; meanwhile, comparative mapping of quantitative trait loci for seed quality traits identified a dozen homologous regions with conserved function in the A genome of the two species. However, several genomic rearrangement events, such as inversions, intra- and inter-chromosomal translocations, were also observed, covering totally at least 5% of the A genome, between allotetraploid B. napus and diploid B. rapa. Based on these results, the A genomes of B. rapa and B. napus are mostly functionally conserved, but caution will be necessary in applying the full sequence data from B. rapa to the B. napus as a result of genomic rearrangements in the A genome between the two species.

  3. Detection of structural variants involving repetitive regions in the reference genome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heewook; Popodi, Ellen; Foster, Patricia L; Tang, Haixu

    2014-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques are now commonly used to characterize structural variations (SVs) in population genomics and elucidate their associations with phenotypes. Many of the computational tools developed for detecting structural variations work by mapping paired-end reads to a reference genome and identifying the discordant read-pairs whose mapped loci in the reference genome deviate from the expected insert size and orientation. However, repetitive regions in the reference genome represent a major challenge in SV detection, because the paired-end reads from these regions may be mapped to multiple loci in the reference genome, resulting in spuriously discordant read-pairs. To address this issue, we have developed an algorithmic approach for read mapping and SV detection based on the framework of A-Bruijn graphs. Instead of mapping reads to a linear sequence of the reference genome, we propose to map reads onto the A-Bruijn graph constructed from the reference genome in which all instances of the same repeat are collapsed into a single edge. As a result, any given read, either from repetitive regions or not, will be mapped to a unique location in the A-Bruijn graph, and each discordant read-pair in the A-Bruijn graph indicates a potentially true SV event. We also developed a simple clustering algorithm to derive valid clusters of these discordant read-pairs, each supporting a different SV event. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of this approach, compared to existing approaches, by identifying transposition events of insertion sequence (IS) elements, a class of simple mobile genetic elements (MGEs), in E. coli by using simulated and real paired-end sequence data acquired from E. coli mutation accumulation lines.

  4. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium - Final Progress Report October 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, Arden L.

    2001-10-23

    The basic mission of the Consortium was to advance the science and understanding of high-T{sub c} superconductivity and to promote the development of new materials and improved processing technology. Focused group efforts were the key element of the research program. One program area is the understanding of the layered structures involved in candidate materials and the factors that control their formation, stability and relationship superconductor properties. The other program area had a focus upon factors that limit or control the transport properties such as weak links, flux lattice behavior, and interfaces. Interactions among Consortium d with industrial armiates were an integral part of the program.

  5. Comparative 3D genome structure analysis of the fission and the budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ke; Tjong, Harianto; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Alber, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We studied the 3D structural organization of the fission yeast genome, which emerges from the tethering of heterochromatic regions in otherwise randomly configured chromosomes represented as flexible polymer chains in an nuclear environment. This model is sufficient to explain in a statistical manner many experimentally determined distinctive features of the fission yeast genome, including chromatin interaction patterns from Hi-C experiments and the co-locations of functionally related and co-expressed genes, such as genes expressed by Pol-III. Our findings demonstrate that some previously described structure-function correlations can be explained as a consequence of random chromatin collisions driven by a few geometric constraints (mainly due to centromere-SPB and telomere-NE tethering) combined with the specific gene locations in the chromosome sequence. We also performed a comparative analysis between the fission and budding yeast genome structures, for which we previously detected a similar organizing principle. However, due to the different chromosome sizes and numbers, substantial differences are observed in the 3D structural genome organization between the two species, most notably in the nuclear locations of orthologous genes, and the extent of nuclear territories for genes and chromosomes. However, despite those differences, remarkably, functional similarities are maintained, which is evident when comparing spatial clustering of functionally related genes in both yeasts. Functionally related genes show a similar spatial clustering behavior in both yeasts, even though their nuclear locations are largely different between the yeast species.

  6. Genomic structural analysis of porcine fatty acid desaturase cluster on chromosome 2.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masaaki; Arakawa, Aisaku; Motoyama, Michiyo; Nakajima, Ikuyo; Nii, Masahiro; Mikawa, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid composition is an economically important trait in meat-producing livestock. To gain insight into the molecular genetics of fatty acid desaturase (FADS) genes in pigs, we investigated the genomic structure of the porcine FADS gene family on chromosome 2. We also examined the tissue distribution of FADS gene expression. The genomic structure of FADS family in mammals consists of three isoforms FADS1, FADS2 and FADS3. However, porcine FADS cluster in the latest pig genome assembly (Sscrofa 10.2) containing some gaps is distinct from that in other mammals. We therefore sought to determine the genomic structure, including the FADS cluster in a 200-kbp range by sequencing gap regions. The structure we obtained was similar to that in other mammals. We then investigated the porcine FADS1 transcription start site and identified a novel isoform named FADS1b. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the three members of the FADS cluster were orthologous among mammals, whereas the various FADS1 isoforms identified in pigs, mice and cattle might be attributable to species-specific transcriptional regulation with alternative promoters. Porcine FADS1b and FADS3 isoforms were predominantly expressed in the inner layer of the subcutaneous adipose tissue. Additional analyses will reveal the effects of these functionally unknown isoforms on fatty acid composition in pig fat tissues.

  7. A graphical approach to tracking and reporting target status in structural genomics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaokang; Wesenberg, Gary E; Markley, John L; Fox, Brian G; Phillips, George N; Bingman, Craig A

    2007-12-01

    Determination of a protein structure requires a series of decisions and processes, starting with target selection, through cloning, expression, purification, and finally structure determination. Structural genomics projects may distribute these steps among several different groups of researchers. Although this division may achieve a lower cost per solved structure, it creates a unique set of challenges for integrating and passing information on the progress of a given target across several functional divisions. Laboratory information management systems (LIMS) are essential for gathering this information, but may not display the progress of a given target in an intuitive way. In addition, structural genomics projects funded by the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) are obliged to disseminate data regularly to the TargetDB and PepcDB data repositories, and this requires the creation of specialized views of the data. We report here how the flow of a target through a structural genomics pipeline and reports to TargetDB and PepcDB can be abstracted as directed acyclic graphs or trees. To implement this kind of display, we created software that tracks the flow of activity leading toward protein structure determination and prepares XML reports as input to TargetDB and PepcDB. The target tracing software consists of a set of Perl CGI scripts that integrate with the Graphviz visualization system to provide a graphical, user-friendly Web interface. The database reporting software, also coded in Perl, transfers large-scale genomics data from our LIMS into a PepcDB reportable XML file. This software package has facilitated inter-group communication, improved the quality and accuracy of information in our LIMS, and increased the efficiency and accuracy of our reports to PepcDB.

  8. High Density LD-Based Structural Variations Analysis in Cattle Genome

    PubMed Central

    Salomon-Torres, Ricardo; Matukumalli, Lakshmi K.; Van Tassell, Curtis P.; Villa-Angulo, Carlos; Gonzalez-Vizcarra, Víctor M.; Villa-Angulo, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Genomic structural variations represent an important source of genetic variation in mammal genomes, thus, they are commonly related to phenotypic expressions. In this work, ∼770,000 single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes from 506 animals from 19 cattle breeds were analyzed. A simple LD-based structural variation was defined, and a genome-wide analysis was performed. After applying some quality control filters, for each breed and each chromosome we calculated the linkage disequilibrium (r2) of short range (≤100 Kb). We sorted SNP pairs by distance and obtained a set of LD means (called the expected means) using bins of 5 Kb. We identified 15,246 segments of at least 1 Kb, among the 19 breeds, consisting of sets of at least 3 adjacent SNPs so that, for each SNP, r2 within its neighbors in a 100 Kb range, to the right side of that SNP, were all bigger than, or all smaller than, the corresponding expected mean, and their P-value were significant after a Benjamini-Hochberg multiple testing correction. In addition, to account just for homogeneously distributed regions we considered only SNPs having at least 15 SNP neighbors within 100 Kb. We defined such segments as structural variations. By grouping all variations across all animals in the sample we defined 9,146 regions, involving a total of 53,137 SNPs; representing the 6.40% (160.98 Mb) from the bovine genome. The identified structural variations covered 3,109 genes. Clustering analysis showed the relatedness of breeds given the geographic region in which they are evolving. In summary, we present an analysis of structural variations based on the deviation of the expected short range LD between SNPs in the bovine genome. With an intuitive and simple definition based only on SNPs data it was possible to discern closeness of breeds due to grouping by geographic region in which they are evolving. PMID:25050984

  9. Mapping the structure and dynamics of genomics-related MeSH terms complex networks.

    PubMed

    Siqueiros-García, Jesús M; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; García-Herrera, Rodrigo; Robina-Galatas, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that the history and evolution of scientific ideas may reflect certain aspects of the underlying socio-cognitive frameworks in which science itself is developing. Systematic analyses of the development of scientific knowledge may help us to construct models of the collective dynamics of science. Aiming at scientific rigor, these models should be built upon solid empirical evidence, analyzed with formal tools leading to ever-improving results that support the related conclusions. Along these lines we studied the dynamics and structure of the development of research in genomics as represented by the entire collection of genomics-related scientific papers contained in the PubMed database. The analyzed corpus consisted in more than 49,000 articles published in the years 1987 (first appearance of the term Genomics) to 2011, categorized by means of the Medical Subheadings (MeSH) content-descriptors. Complex networks were built where two MeSH terms were connected if they are descriptors of the same article(s). The analysis of such networks revealed a complex structure and dynamics that to certain extent resembled small-world networks. The evolution of such networks in time reflected interesting phenomena in the historical development of genomic research, including what seems to be a phase-transition in a period marked by the completion of the first draft of the Human Genome Project. We also found that different disciplinary areas have different dynamic evolution patterns in their MeSH connectivity networks. In the case of areas related to science, changes in topology were somewhat fast while retaining a certain core-structure, whereas in the humanities, the evolution was pretty slow and the structure resulted highly redundant and in the case of technology related issues, the evolution was very fast and the structure remained tree-like with almost no overlapping terms.

  10. The A-nucleotide preference of HIV-1 in the context of its structured RNA genome

    PubMed Central

    van Hemert, Formijn J.; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C.; Berkhout, Ben

    2013-01-01

    A bipartition of HIV-1 RNA genome sequences into single- and double-stranded nucleotides is possible based on the secondary structure model of a complete 9 kb genome. Subsequent analysis revealed that the well-known lentiviral property of A-accumulation is profoundly present in single-stranded domains, yet absent in double-stranded domains. Mutational rate analysis by means of an unrestricted model of nucleotide substitution suggests the presence of an evolutionary equilibrium to preserve this biased nucleotide distribution. PMID:23235488

  11. Large-insert genome analysis technology detects structural variation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Hillary S; Gillett, Will; Saenphimmachak, Channakhone; Lim, Regina; Zhou, Yang; Jacobs, Michael A; Chang, Jean; Rohmer, Laurence; D'Argenio, David A; Palmieri, Anthony; Levy, Ruth; Haugen, Eric; Wong, Gane K S; Brittnacher, Mitch J; Burns, Jane L; Miller, Samuel I; Olson, Maynard V; Kaul, Rajinder

    2008-06-01

    Large-insert genome analysis (LIGAN) is a broadly applicable, high-throughput technology designed to characterize genome-scale structural variation. Fosmid paired-end sequences and DNA fingerprints from a query genome are compared to a reference sequence using the Genomic Variation Analysis (GenVal) suite of software tools to pinpoint locations of insertions, deletions, and rearrangements. Fosmids spanning regions that contain new structural variants can then be sequenced. Clonal pairs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from four cystic fibrosis patients were used to validate the LIGAN technology. Approximately 1.5 Mb of inserted sequences were identified, including 743 kb containing 615 ORFs that are absent from published P. aeruginosa genomes. Six rearrangement breakpoints and 220 kb of deleted sequences were also identified. Our study expands the "genome universe" of P. aeruginosa and validates a technology that complements emerging, short-read sequencing methods that are better suited to characterizing single-nucleotide polymorphisms than structural variation.

  12. Structure and Functional Studies of DEN-2 Virus Genome.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    No. 3. RECIPIENT’S CAT ALO NUMBER 4. TI TL E (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED Structure and Functional Studies on Dengue -2 Progress... Dengue virus glycoprotein antigen E. . Cloning of complementary DNA (eDNA) copy of Dengue viral RNA into E. coli HB101/pBR322 host/vector system and...characterization of a alone that containe-a 400 bp insert complementary to Dengue RNA will be described. 2. Construction of a cDNA library using Dengue

  13. Insights into RNA structure and function from genome-wide studies.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Stefanie A; Kidwell, Mary Anne; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-07-01

    A comprehensive understanding of RNA structure will provide fundamental insights into the cellular function of both coding and non-coding RNAs. Although many RNA structures have been analysed by traditional biophysical and biochemical methods, the low-throughput nature of these approaches has prevented investigation of the vast majority of cellular transcripts. Triggered by advances in sequencing technology, genome-wide approaches for probing the transcriptome are beginning to reveal how RNA structure affects each step of protein expression and RNA stability. In this Review, we discuss the emerging relationships between RNA structure and the regulation of gene expression.

  14. The Drosophila Helicase MLE Targets Hairpin Structures in Genomic Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Cugusi, Simona; Li, Yujing; Jin, Peng; Lucchesi, John C.

    2016-01-01

    RNA hairpins are a common type of secondary structures that play a role in every aspect of RNA biochemistry including RNA editing, mRNA stability, localization and translation of transcripts, and in the activation of the RNA interference (RNAi) and microRNA (miRNA) pathways. Participation in these functions often requires restructuring the RNA molecules by the association of single-strand (ss) RNA-binding proteins or by the action of helicases. The Drosophila MLE helicase has long been identified as a member of the MSL complex responsible for dosage compensation. The complex includes one of two long non-coding RNAs and MLE was shown to remodel the roX RNA hairpin structures in order to initiate assembly of the complex. Here we report that this function of MLE may apply to the hairpins present in the primary RNA transcripts that generate the small molecules responsible for RNA interference. Using stocks from the Transgenic RNAi Project and the Vienna Drosophila Research Center, we show that MLE specifically targets hairpin RNAs at their site of transcription. The association of MLE at these sites is independent of sequence and chromosome location. We use two functional assays to test the biological relevance of this association and determine that MLE participates in the RNAi pathway. PMID:26752049

  15. 3D structures of membrane proteins from genomic sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Thomas A.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Sheridan, Robert; Rost, Burkhard; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We show that amino acid co-variation in proteins, extracted from the evolutionary sequence record, can be used to fold transmembrane proteins. We use this technique to predict previously unknown, 3D structures for 11 transmembrane proteins (with up to 14 helices) from their sequences alone. The prediction method (EVfold_membrane), applies a maximum entropy approach to infer evolutionary co-variation in pairs of sequence positions within a protein family and then generates all-atom models with the derived pairwise distance constraints. We benchmark the approach with blinded, de novo computation of known transmembrane protein structures from 23 families, demonstrating unprecedented accuracy of the method for large transmembrane proteins. We show how the method can predict oligomerization, functional sites, and conformational changes in transmembrane proteins. With the rapid rise in large-scale sequencing, more accurate and more comprehensive information on evolutionary constraints can be decoded from genetic variation, greatly expanding the repertoire of transmembrane proteins amenable to modelling by this method. PMID:22579045

  16. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE PAGES

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; ...

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore » embedded functional traits.« less

  17. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P.

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program is a collaborative University-Industry R&D Consortium that is managed and administered by the South Carolina Energy R&D Center. AGTSR is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry-defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. The consortium is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation and is sponsored by the U.S. DOE - Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The program is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. At present, there are 78 performing member universities representing 36 states, and six cost-sharing U.S. gas turbine corporations. Three RFP`s have been announced and the fourth RFP is expected to be released in December, 1995. There are 31 research subcontracts underway at performing member universities. AGTSR has also organized three workshops, two in combustion and one in heat transfer. A materials workshop is in planning and is scheduled for February, 1996. An industrial internship program was initiated this past summer, with one intern positioned at each of the sponsoring companies. The AGTSR consortium nurtures close industry-university-government collaboration to enhance synergism and the transition of research results, accelerate and promote evolutionary-revolutionary R&D, and strives to keep a prominent U.S. industry strong and on top well into the 21st century. This paper will present the objectives and benefits of the AGTSR program, progress achieved to date, and future planned activity in fiscal year 1996.

  18. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  19. Military Suicide Research Consortium (MSRC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Lozano, G. (2012). The Depression Anxiety Stress Scales— 21 ( DASS - 21 ): Further examination of dimensions, scale reliability, and correlates. Journal of...aspect of the Consortium warehouses knowledge about suicidal behavior in general (e.g., from civilian and international sources as well as from...reports (months 15, 18, 21 , 24) • The 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th quarter reports were prepared and distributed on time. Task 10. Continue to refine

  20. Wavelet Analysis of DNA Bending Profiles reveals Structural Constraints on the Evolution of Genomic Sequences.

    PubMed

    Audit, Benjamin; Vaillant, Cédric; Arnéodo, Alain; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude

    2004-03-01

    Analyses of genomic DNA sequences have shown in previous works that base pairs are correlated at large distances with scale-invariant statistical properties. We show in the present study that these correlations between nucleotides (letters) result in fact from long-range correlations (LRC) between sequence-dependent DNA structural elements (words) involved in the packaging of DNA in chromatin. Using the wavelet transform technique, we perform a comparative analysis of the DNA text and of the corresponding bending profiles generated with curvature tables based on nucleosome positioning data. This exploration through the optics of the so-called `wavelet transform microscope' reveals a characteristic scale of 100-200 bp that separates two regimes of different LRC. We focus here on the existence of LRC in the small-scale regime (≲ 200 bp). Analysis of genomes in the three kingdoms reveals that this regime is specifically associated to the presence of nucleosomes. Indeed, small scale LRC are observed in eukaryotic genomes and to a less extent in archaeal genomes, in contrast with their absence in eubacterial genomes. Similarly, this regime is observed in eukaryotic but not in bacterial viral DNA genomes. There is one exception for genomes of Poxviruses, the only animal DNA viruses that do not replicate in the cell nucleus and do not present small scale LRC. Furthermore, no small scale LRC are detected in the genomes of all examined RNA viruses, with one exception in the case of retroviruses. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that small-scale LRC are a signature of the nucleosomal structure. Finally, we discuss possible interpretations of these small-scale LRC in terms of the mechanisms that govern the positioning, the stability and the dynamics of the nucleosomes along the DNA chain. This paper is maily devoted to a pedagogical presentation of the theoretical concepts and physical methods which are well suited to perform a statistical analysis of genomic

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Achromobacter piechaudii GCS2, Agrobacterium sp. Strain SUL3, Microbacterium sp. Strain GCS4, Shinella sp. Strain GWS1, and Shinella sp. Strain SUS2 Isolated from Consortium with the Hydrocarbon-Producing Alga Botryococcus braunii.

    PubMed

    Jones, Katy J; Moore, Karen; Sambles, Christine; Love, John; Studholme, David J; Aves, Stephen J

    2016-01-14

    A variety of bacteria associate with the hydrocarbon-producing microalga Botryococcus braunii, some of which may influence its growth. We report here the genome sequences for Achromobacter piechaudii GCS2, Agrobacterium sp. strain SUL3, Microbacterium sp. strain GCS4, and Shinella sp. strains GWS1 and SUS2, isolated from a laboratory culture of B. braunii, race B, strain Guadeloupe.

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome structure of the jaguar (Panthera onca).

    PubMed

    Caragiulo, Anthony; Dougherty, Eric; Soto, Sofia; Rabinowitz, Salisa; Amato, George

    2016-01-01

    The jaguar (Panthera onca) is the largest felid in the Western hemisphere, and the only member of the Panthera genus in the New World. The jaguar inhabits most countries within Central and South America, and is considered near threatened by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. This study represents the first sequence of the entire jaguar mitogenome, which was the only Panthera mitogenome that had not been sequenced. The jaguar mitogenome is 17,049 bases and possesses the same molecular structure as other felid mitogenomes. Bayesian inference (BI) and maximum likelihood (ML) were used to determine the phylogenetic placement of the jaguar within the Panthera genus. Both BI and ML analyses revealed the jaguar to be sister to the tiger/leopard/snow leopard clade.

  3. High resolution genome-wide mapping of the primary structure of chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenhai; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2011-01-01

    The genomic organization of chromatin is increasingly recognized as a key regulator of cell behavior, but deciphering its regulation mechanisms requires detailed knowledge of chromatin’s primary structure - the assembly of nucleosomes throughout the genome. This Primer explains the principles for mapping and analyzing the primary organization of chromatin on a genomic scale. After introducing chromatin organization and its impact on gene regulation and human health, we then describe methods that detect nucleosome positioning and occupancy levels using chromatin-immunoprecipitation in combination with deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq), a strategy that is now straightforward and cost-efficient. We then explore current strategies for converting the sequence information into knowledge about chromatin, an exciting challenge for biologists and bioinformaticians. PMID:21241889

  4. A high-quality human reference panel reveals the complexity and distribution of genomic structural variants

    PubMed Central

    Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Marschall, Tobias; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Francioli, Laurent C.; Baaijens, Jasmijn A.; Dijkstra, Louis J.; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Koval, Vyacheslav; Thung, Djie Tjwan; Wardenaar, René; Renkens, Ivo; Coe, Bradley P.; Deelen, Patrick; de Ligt, Joep; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; van Dijk, Freerk; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Bovenberg, Jasper A.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Beekman, Marian; Hofman, Albert; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce; Platteel, Mathieu; Du, Yuanping; Chen, Ruoyan; Cao, Hongzhi; Cao, Rui; Sun, Yushen; Cao, Jeremy Sujie; Neerincx, Pieter B. T.; Dijkstra, Martijn; Byelas, George; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Bot, Jan; Vermaat, Martijn; Laros, Jeroen F. J.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; de Knijff, Peter; Karssen, Lennart C.; van Leeuwen, Elisa M.; Amin, Najaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Estrada, Karol; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kattenberg, V. Mathijs; van Enckevort, David; Mei, Hailiang; Santcroos, Mark; van Schaik, Barbera D. C.; Handsaker, Robert E.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Ko, Arthur; Sudmant, Peter; Nijman, Isaac J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eichler, Evan E.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Swertz, Morris A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Schönhuth, Alexander; Ye, Kai; Guryev, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Structural variation (SV) represents a major source of differences between individual human genomes and has been linked to disease phenotypes. However, the majority of studies provide neither a global view of the full spectrum of these variants nor integrate them into reference panels of genetic variation. Here, we analyse whole genome sequencing data of 769 individuals from 250 Dutch families, and provide a haplotype-resolved map of 1.9 million genome variants across 9 different variant classes, including novel forms of complex indels, and retrotransposition-mediated insertions of mobile elements and processed RNAs. A large proportion are previously under reported variants sized between 21 and 100 bp. We detect 4 megabases of novel sequence, encoding 11 new transcripts. Finally, we show 191 known, trait-associated SNPs to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with SVs and demonstrate that our panel facilitates accurate imputation of SVs in unrelated individuals. PMID:27708267

  5. The 4th Bologna Winter School: Hot Topics in Structural Genomics

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    The 4th Bologna Winter School on Biotechnologies was held on 9–15 February 2003 at the University of Bologna, Italy, with the specific aim of discussing recent developments in bioinformatics. The school provided an opportunity for students and scientists to debate current problems in computational biology and possible solutions. The course, co-supported (as last year) by the European Science Foundation program on Functional Genomics, focused mainly on hot topics in structural genomics, including recent CASP and CAPRI results, recent and promising genomewide predictions, protein–protein and protein–DNA interaction predictions and genome functional annotation. The topics were organized into four main sections (http://www.biocomp.unibo.it). PMID:18629078

  6. A high-quality human reference panel reveals the complexity and distribution of genomic structural variants.

    PubMed

    Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Marschall, Tobias; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Francioli, Laurent C; Baaijens, Jasmijn A; Dijkstra, Louis J; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Koval, Vyacheslav; Thung, Djie Tjwan; Wardenaar, René; Renkens, Ivo; Coe, Bradley P; Deelen, Patrick; de Ligt, Joep; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; van Dijk, Freerk; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eichler, Evan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Swertz, Morris A; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Slagboom, P Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I; Schönhuth, Alexander; Ye, Kai; Guryev, Victor

    2016-10-06

    Structural variation (SV) represents a major source of differences between individual human genomes and has been linked to disease phenotypes. However, the majority of studies provide neither a global view of the full spectrum of these variants nor integrate them into reference panels of genetic variation. Here, we analyse whole genome sequencing data of 769 individuals from 250 Dutch families, and provide a haplotype-resolved map of 1.9 million genome variants across 9 different variant classes, including novel forms of complex indels, and retrotransposition-mediated insertions of mobile elements and processed RNAs. A large proportion are previously under reported variants sized between 21 and 100 bp. We detect 4 megabases of novel sequence, encoding 11 new transcripts. Finally, we show 191 known, trait-associated SNPs to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with SVs and demonstrate that our panel facilitates accurate imputation of SVs in unrelated individuals.

  7. Heterogeneous genome divergence, differential introgression, and the origin and structure of hybrid zones

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Richard G; Larson, Erica L

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid zones have been promoted as windows on the evolutionary process and as laboratories for studying divergence and speciation. Patterns of divergence between hybridizing species can now be characterized on a genome-wide scale, and recent genome scans have focused on the presence of “islands” of divergence. Patterns of heterogeneous genomic divergence may reflect differential introgression following secondary contact and provide insights into which genome regions contribute to local adaptation, hybrid unfitness, and positive assortative mating. However, heterogeneous genome divergence can also arise in the absence of any gene flow, as a result of variation in selection and recombination across the genome. We suggest that to understand hybrid zone origins and dynamics, it is essential to distinguish between genome regions that are divergent between pure parental populations and regions that show restricted introgression where these populations interact in hybrid zones. The latter, more so than the former, reveal the likely genetic architecture of reproductive isolation. Mosaic hybrid zones, because of their complex structure and multiple contacts, are particularly good subjects for distinguishing primary intergradation from secondary contact. Comparisons among independent hybrid zones or transects that involve the “same” species pair can also help to distinguish between divergence with gene flow and secondary contact. However, data from replicate hybrid zones or replicate transects do not reveal consistent patterns; in a few cases, patterns of introgression are similar across independent transects, but for many taxa, there is distinct lack of concordance, presumably due to variation in environmental context and/or variation in the genetics of the interacting populations. PMID:26857437

  8. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    1995-11-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A&E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton`s initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force.

  9. Structure of the Acidianus Filamentous Virus 3 and Comparative Genomics of Related Archaeal Lipothrixviruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Gisle; Aramayo, Ricardo; Basta, Tamara; Häring, Monika; Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim; Chen, Lanming; Rachel, Reinhard; Boisset, Nicolas; Garrett, Roger A.; Prangishvili, David

    2008-01-01

    Four novel filamentous viruses with double-stranded DNA genomes, namely, Acidianus filamentous virus 3 (AFV3), AFV6, AFV7, and AFV8, have been characterized from the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Acidianus, and they are assigned to the Betalipothrixvirus genus of the family Lipothrixviridae. The structures of the approximately 2-μm-long virions are similar, and one of them, AFV3, was studied in detail. It consists of a cylindrical envelope containing globular subunits arranged in a helical formation that is unique for any known double-stranded DNA virus. The envelope is 3.1 nm thick and encases an inner core with two parallel rows of protein subunits arranged like a zipper. Each end of the virion is tapered and carries three short filaments. Two major structural proteins were identified as being common to all betalipothrixviruses. The viral genomes were sequenced and analyzed, and they reveal a high level of conservation in both gene content and gene order over large regions, with this similarity extending partly to the earlier described betalipothrixvirus Sulfolobus islandicus filamentous virus. A few predicted gene products of each virus, in addition to the structural proteins, could be assigned specific functions, including a putative helicase involved in Holliday junction branch migration, a nuclease, a protein phosphatase, transcriptional regulators, and glycosyltransferases. The AFV7 genome appears to have undergone intergenomic recombination with a large section of an AFV2-like viral genome, apparently resulting in phenotypic changes, as revealed by the presence of AFV2-like termini in the AFV7 virions. Shared features of the genomes include (i) large inverted terminal repeats exhibiting conserved, regularly spaced direct repeats; (ii) a highly conserved operon encoding the two major structural proteins; (iii) multiple overlapping open reading frames, which may be indicative of gene recoding; (iv) putative 12-bp genetic elements; and (v) partial gene

  10. Characterization of the Genome, Proteome, and Structure of Yersiniophage ϕR1-37

    PubMed Central

    Hyytiäinen, Heidi J.; Happonen, Lotta J.; Kiljunen, Saija; Datta, Neeta; Mattinen, Laura; Williamson, Kirsty; Kristo, Paula; Szeliga, Magdalena; Kalin-Mänttäri, Laura; Ahola-Iivarinen, Elina; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Butcher, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    The bacteriophage vB_YecM-ϕR1-37 (ϕR1-37) is a lytic yersiniophage that can propagate naturally in different Yersinia species carrying the correct lipopolysaccharide receptor. This large-tailed phage has deoxyuridine (dU) instead of thymidine in its DNA. In this study, we determined the genomic sequence of phage ϕR1-37, mapped parts of the phage transcriptome, characterized the phage particle proteome, and characterized the virion structure by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction. The 262,391-bp genome of ϕR1-37 is one of the largest sequenced phage genomes, and it contains 367 putative open reading frames (ORFs) and 5 tRNA genes. Mass-spectrometric analysis identified 69 phage particle structural proteins with the genes scattered throughout the genome. A total of 269 of the ORFs (73%) lack homologues in sequence databases. Based on terminator and promoter sequences identified from the intergenic regions, the phage genome was predicted to consist of 40 to 60 transcriptional units. Image reconstruction revealed that the ϕR1-37 capsid consists of hexameric capsomers arranged on a T=27 lattice similar to the bacteriophage ϕKZ. The tail of ϕR1-37 has a contractile sheath. We conclude that phage ϕR1-37 is a representative of a novel phage type that carries the dU-containing genome in a ϕKZ-like head. PMID:22973030

  11. Genome-wide patterns of population structure and admixture in West Africans and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Bryc, Katarzyna; Auton, Adam; Nelson, Matthew R; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Hauser, Stephen L; Williams, Scott; Froment, Alain; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Wambebe, Charles; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2010-01-12

    Quantifying patterns of population structure in Africans and African Americans illuminates the history of human populations and is critical for undertaking medical genomic studies on a global scale. To obtain a fine-scale genome-wide perspective of ancestry, we analyze Affymetrix GeneChip 500K genotype data from African Americans (n = 365) and individuals with ancestry from West Africa (n = 203 from 12 populations) and Europe (n = 400 from 42 countries). We find that population structure within the West African sample reflects primarily language and secondarily geographical distance, echoing the Bantu expansion. Among African Americans, analysis of genomic admixture by a principal component-based approach indicates that the median proportion of European ancestry is 18.5% (25th-75th percentiles: 11.6-27.7%), with very large variation among individuals. In the African-American sample as a whole, few autosomal regions showed exceptionally high or low mean African ancestry, but the X chromosome showed elevated levels of African ancestry, consistent with a sex-biased pattern of gene flow with an excess of European male and African female ancestry. We also find that genomic profiles of individual African Americans afford personalized ancestry reconstructions differentiating ancient vs. recent European and African ancestry. Finally, patterns of genetic similarity among inferred African segments of African-American genomes and genomes of contemporary African populations included in this study suggest African ancestry is most similar to non-Bantu Niger-Kordofanian-speaking populations, consistent with historical documents of the African Diaspora and trans-Atlantic slave trade.

  12. An Isochore-Like Structure in the Genome of the Flatworm Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Lamolle, Guillermo; Protasio, Anna V.; Iriarte, Andrés; Jara, Eugenio; Simón, Diego; Musto, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are compositionally heterogeneous, that is, composed by regions that differ in guanine–cytosine (GC) content (isochores). The most well documented case is that of vertebrates (mainly mammals) although it has been also noted among unicellular eukaryotes and invertebrates. In the human genome, regarded as a typical mammal, this heterogeneity is associated with several features. Specifically, genes located in GC-richest regions are the GC3-richest, display CpG islands and have shorter introns. Furthermore, these genes are more heavily expressed and tend to be located at the extremes of the chromosomes. Although the compositional heterogeneity seems to be widespread among eukaryotes, the associated properties noted in the human genome and other mammals have not been investigated in depth in other taxa. Here we provide evidence that the genome of the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni is compositionally heterogeneous and exhibits an isochore-like structure, displaying some features associated, until now, only with the human and other vertebrate genomes, with the exception of gene concentration. PMID:27435793

  13. A Sparse Structured Shrinkage Estimator for Nonparametric Varying-Coefficient Model with an Application in Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Daye, Z. John; Xie, Jichun; Li, Hongzhe

    2012-01-01

    Many problems in genomics are related to variable selection where high-dimensional genomic data are treated as covariates. Such genomic covariates often have certain structures and can be represented as vertices of an undirected graph. Biological processes also vary as functions depending upon some biological state, such as time. High-dimensional variable selection where covariates are graph-structured and underlying model is nonparametric presents an important but largely unaddressed statistical challenge. Motivated by the problem of regression-based motif discovery, we consider the problem of variable selection for high-dimensional nonparametric varying-coefficient models and introduce a sparse structured shrinkage (SSS) estimator based on basis function expansions and a novel smoothed penalty function. We present an efficient algorithm for computing the SSS estimator. Results on model selection consistency and estimation bounds are derived. Moreover, finite-sample performances are studied via simulations, and the effects of high-dimensionality and structural information of the covariates are especially highlighted. We apply our method to motif finding problem using a yeast cell-cycle gene expression dataset and word counts in genes’ promoter sequences. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method can result in better variable selection and prediction for high-dimensional regression when the underlying model is nonparametric and covariates are structured. Supplemental materials for the article are available online. PMID:22904608

  14. The structure and early evolution of recently arisen gene duplicates in the Caenorhabditis elegans genome.

    PubMed Central

    Katju, Vaishali; Lynch, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The significance of gene duplication in provisioning raw materials for the evolution of genomic diversity is widely recognized, but the early evolutionary dynamics of duplicate genes remain obscure. To elucidate the structural characteristics of newly arisen gene duplicates at infancy and their subsequent evolutionary properties, we analyzed gene pairs with < or =10% divergence at synonymous sites within the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans. Structural heterogeneity between duplicate copies is present very early in their evolutionary history and is maintained over longer evolutionary timescales, suggesting that duplications across gene boundaries in conjunction with shuffling events have at least as much potential to contribute to long-term evolution as do fully redundant (complete) duplicates. The median duplication span of 1.4 kb falls short of the average gene length in C. elegans (2.5 kb), suggesting that partial gene duplications are frequent. Most gene duplicates reside close to the parent copy at inception, often as tandem inverted loci, and appear to disperse in the genome as they age, as a result of reduced survivorship of duplicates located in proximity to the ancestral copy. We propose that illegitimate recombination events leading to inverted duplications play a disproportionately large role in gene duplication within this genome in comparison with other mechanisms. PMID:14704166

  15. The structure and early evolution of recently arisen gene duplicates in the Caenorhabditis elegans genome.

    PubMed

    Katju, Vaishali; Lynch, Michael

    2003-12-01

    The significance of gene duplication in provisioning raw materials for the evolution of genomic diversity is widely recognized, but the early evolutionary dynamics of duplicate genes remain obscure. To elucidate the structural characteristics of newly arisen gene duplicates at infancy and their subsequent evolutionary properties, we analyzed gene pairs with < or =10% divergence at synonymous sites within the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans. Structural heterogeneity between duplicate copies is present very early in their evolutionary history and is maintained over longer evolutionary timescales, suggesting that duplications across gene boundaries in conjunction with shuffling events have at least as much potential to contribute to long-term evolution as do fully redundant (complete) duplicates. The median duplication span of 1.4 kb falls short of the average gene length in C. elegans (2.5 kb), suggesting that partial gene duplications are frequent. Most gene duplicates reside close to the parent copy at inception, often as tandem inverted loci, and appear to disperse in the genome as they age, as a result of reduced survivorship of duplicates located in proximity to the ancestral copy. We propose that illegitimate recombination events leading to inverted duplications play a disproportionately large role in gene duplication within this genome in comparison with other mechanisms.

  16. Genomic structure and nucleotide sequence of the p55 gene of the puffer fish Fugu rubripes

    SciTech Connect

    Elgar, G.; Rattray, F.; Greystrong, J.; Brenner, S.

    1995-06-10

    The p55 gene, which codes for a 55-kDa erythrocyte membrane protein, has been cloned and sequenced from the genome of the Japanese puffer fish Fugu rubripes (Fugu). This organism has the smallest recorded vertebrate genome and therefore provides an efficient way to sequence genes at the genomic level. The gene encoding p55 covers 5.5 kb from the beginning to the end of the coding sequence, four to six times smaller than the estimated size of the human gene, and is encoded by 12 exons. The structure of this gene has not been previously elucidated, but from this and other data we would predict a similar or identical structure in mammals. The predicted amino acid sequence of this gene in Fugu, coding for a polypeptide of 467 amino acids, is very similar to that of the human gene with the exception of the first two exons, which differ considerably. The predicted Fugu protein has a molecular weight (52.6 kDa compared with 52.3 kDa) and an isoelectric point very similar to those of human p55. In human, the p55 gene lies in the gene-dense Xq28 region, just 30 kb 3{prime} to the Factor VIII gene, and is estimated to cover 20-30 kb. Its 5{prime} end is associated with a CpG island, although there is no evidence that this is the case in Fugu. The small size of genes in Fugu and the high coding homology that they share with their mammalian equivalents, both in structure and sequence, make this compact vertebrate genome an ideal model for genomic studies. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Achromobacter piechaudii GCS2, Agrobacterium sp. Strain SUL3, Microbacterium sp. Strain GCS4, Shinella sp. Strain GWS1, and Shinella sp. Strain SUS2 Isolated from Consortium with the Hydrocarbon-Producing Alga Botryococcus braunii

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Katy J.; Moore, Karen; Love, John

    2016-01-01

    A variety of bacteria associate with the hydrocarbon-producing microalga Botryococcus braunii, some of which may influence its growth. We report here the genome sequences for Achromobacter piechaudii GCS2, Agrobacterium sp. strain SUL3, Microbacterium sp. strain GCS4, and Shinella sp. strains GWS1 and SUS2, isolated from a laboratory culture of B. braunii, race B, strain Guadeloupe. PMID:26769927

  18. Adaptive potential of genomic structural variation in human and mammalian evolution.

    PubMed

    Radke, David W; Lee, Charles

    2015-09-01

    Because phenotypic innovations must be genetically heritable for biological evolution to proceed, it is natural to consider new mutation events as well as standing genetic variation as sources for their birth. Previous research has identified a number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms that underlie a subset of adaptive traits in organisms. However, another well-known class of variation, genomic structural variation, could have even greater potential to produce adaptive phenotypes, due to the variety of possible types of alterations (deletions, insertions, duplications, among others) at different genomic positions and with variable lengths. It is from these dramatic genomic alterations, and selection on their phenotypic consequences, that adaptations leading to biological diversification could be derived. In this review, using studies in humans and other mammals, we highlight examples of how phenotypic variation from structural variants might become adaptive in populations and potentially enable biological diversification. Phenotypic change arising from structural variants will be described according to their immediate effect on organismal metabolic processes, immunological response and physical features. Study of population dynamics of segregating structural variation can therefore provide a window into understanding current and historical biological diversification.

  19. Towards miniaturization of a structural genomics pipeline using micro-expression and microcoil NMR.

    PubMed

    Peti, Wolfgang; Page, Rebecca; Moy, Kin; O'Neil-Johnson, Mark; Wilson, Ian A; Stevens, Raymond C; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2005-12-01

    In structural genomics centers, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) screening is in increasing use as a tool to identify folded proteins that are promising targets for three-dimensional structure determination by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy. The use of 1D 1H NMR spectra or 2D [1H,15N]-correlation spectroscopy (COSY) typically requires milligram quantities of unlabeled or isotope-labeled protein, respectively. Here, we outline ways towards miniaturization of a structural genomics pipeline with NMR screening for folded globular proteins, using a high-density micro-fermentation device and a microcoil NMR probe. The proteins are micro-expressed in unlabeled or isotope-labeled media, purified, and then subjected to 1D 1H NMR and/or 2D [1H,15N]-COSY screening. To demonstrate that the miniaturization is functioning effectively, we processed nine mouse homologue protein targets and compared the results with those from the "macro-scale" Joint Center of Structural Genomics (JCSG) high-throughput pipeline. The results from the two pipelines were comparable, illustrating that the data were not compromised in the miniaturized approach.

  20. A genome wide survey of SNP variation reveals the genetic structure of sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Kijas, James W; Townley, David; Dalrymple, Brian P; Heaton, Michael P; Maddox, Jillian F; McGrath, Annette; Wilson, Peter; Ingersoll, Roxann G; McCulloch, Russell; McWilliam, Sean; Tang, Dave; McEwan, John; Cockett, Noelle; Oddy, V Hutton; Nicholas, Frank W; Raadsma, Herman

    2009-01-01

    The genetic structure of sheep reflects their domestication and subsequent formation into discrete breeds. Understanding genetic structure is essential for achieving genetic improvement through genome-wide association studies, genomic selection and the dissection of quantitative traits. After identifying the first genome-wide set of SNP for sheep, we report on levels of genetic variability both within and between a diverse sample of ovine populations. Then, using cluster analysis and the partitioning of genetic variation, we demonstrate sheep are characterised by weak phylogeographic structure, overlapping genetic similarity and generally low differentiation which is consistent with their short evolutionary history. The degree of population substructure was, however, sufficient to cluster individuals based on geographic origin and known breed history. Specifically, African and Asian populations clustered separately from breeds of European origin sampled from Australia, New Zealand, Europe and North America. Furthermore, we demonstrate the presence of stratification within some, but not all, ovine breeds. The results emphasize that careful documentation of genetic structure will be an essential prerequisite when mapping the genetic basis of complex traits. Furthermore, the identification of a subset of SNP able to assign individuals into broad groupings demonstrates even a small panel of markers may be suitable for applications such as traceability.

  1. Nonclinical and Clinical Enterococcus faecium Strains, but Not Enterococcus faecalis Strains, Have Distinct Structural and Functional Genomic Features

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Bae

    2014-01-01

    Certain strains of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis contribute beneficially to animal health and food production, while others are associated with nosocomial infections. To determine whether there are structural and functional genomic features that are distinct between nonclinical (NC) and clinical (CL) strains of those species, we analyzed the genomes of 31 E. faecium and 38 E. faecalis strains. Hierarchical clustering of 7,017 orthologs found in the E. faecium pangenome revealed that NC strains clustered into two clades and are distinct from CL strains. NC E. faecium genomes are significantly smaller than CL genomes, and this difference was partly explained by significantly fewer mobile genetic elements (ME), virulence factors (VF), and antibiotic resistance (AR) genes. E. faecium ortholog comparisons identified 68 and 153 genes that are enriched for NC and CL strains, respectively. Proximity analysis showed that CL-enriched loci, and not NC-enriched loci, are more frequently colocalized on the genome with ME. In CL genomes, AR genes are also colocalized with ME, and VF are more frequently associated with CL-enriched loci. Genes in 23 functional groups are also differentially enriched between NC and CL E. faecium genomes. In contrast, differences were not observed between NC and CL E. faecalis genomes despite their having larger genomes than E. faecium. Our findings show that unlike E. faecalis, NC and CL E. faecium strains are equipped with distinct structural and functional genomic features indicative of adaptation to different environments. PMID:24141120

  2. Chemical Methylation of RNA and DNA Viral Genomes as a Probe of In Situ Structure

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Minoru; Shatkin, Aaron J.; Furuichi, Yasuhiro

    1981-01-01

    We used [methyl-3H] dimethyl sulfate to probe the genome structures of several RNA and DNA viruses. We compared sites of modification in nucleic acids that were methylated chemically before and after extraction from purified virions. With both single-stranded and double-stranded substrates alkylation occurred mainly at the N7 position of guanine. However, adenine N1 atoms were differentially accessible in single-stranded RNA and DNA. For example, the ratios of 1-methyladenosine to 7-methylguanosine for reovirus mRNA and deproteinized genome RNA were 0.43 and 0.03, respectively. Members of the Reoviridae methylated in situ yielded RNAs with ratios of 0.04 to 0.08, indicating that the intravirion genomes were double stranded. We obtained ratios of 0.26 and 0.35 for the RNAs of dimethyl sulfate-treated brome mosaic and avian sarcoma virions, respectively, which was consistent with partial protection of adenine N1 sites by structural proteins or genome conformation or both. The ratios of 1-methyladenosine to 7-methylguanosine for vaccinia virus DNAs methylated in situ (0.10) and after phenol extraction (0.14) were less than the ratios for φX174 and M13 DNAs (0.39 to 0.64) but considerably greater than the ratio observed with adenovirus DNA (0.002 to 0.02). The presence of a single-stranded region(s) in the vaccinia virus genome was confirmed by S1 nuclease digestion of [methyl-3H] DNA; the released radiolabeled fraction had a ratio of 0.41, compared with 0.025 for the residual duplex DNA. In addition to the structure-dependent accessibility of adenine N1, methylation of adenine N3 was severalfold lower in the intravirion genomes of vaccinia virus, φX174, and adenovirus than in the corresponding extracted DNAs. Chemical methylation of virions and subviral particles should be useful for in situ analyses of specific regions of RNA and DNA genomes, such as the sites of protein binding during virus maturation. PMID:6172596

  3. The tomato genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tomato genome sequence was undertaken at a time when state-of-the-art sequencing methodologies were undergoing a transition to co-called next generation methodologies. The result was an international consortium undertaking a strategy merging both old and new approaches. Because biologists were...

  4. RNATOPS-W: a web server for RNA structure searches of genomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingfeng; Huang, Zhibin; Wu, Yong; Malmberg, Russell L; Cai, Liming

    2009-04-15

    RNATOPS-W is a web server to search sequences for RNA secondary structures including pseudoknots. The server accepts an annotated RNA multiple structural alignment as a structural profile and genomic or other sequences to search. It is built upon RNATOPS, a command line C++ software package for the same purpose, in which filters to speed up search are manually selected. RNATOPS-W improves upon RNATOPS by adding the function of automatic selection of a hidden Markov model (HMM) filter and also a friendly user interface for selection of a substructure filter by the user. In addition, RNATOPS-W complements existing RNA secondary structure search web servers that either use built-in structure profiles or are not able to detect pseudoknots. RNATOPS-W inherits the efficiency of RNATOPS in detecting large, complex RNA structures.

  5. Enhanced genome annotation using structural profiles in the program 3D-PSSM.

    PubMed

    Kelley, L A; MacCallum, R M; Sternberg, M J

    2000-06-02

    A method (three-dimensional position-specific scoring matrix, 3D-PSSM) to recognise remote protein sequence homologues is described. The method combines the power of multiple sequence profiles with knowledge of protein structure to provide enhanced recognition and thus functional assignment of newly sequenced genomes. The method uses structural alignments of homologous proteins of similar three-dimensional structure in the structural classification of proteins (SCOP) database to obtain a structural equivalence of residues. These equivalences are used to extend multiply aligned sequences obtained by standard sequence searches. The resulting large superfamily-based multiple alignment is converted into a PSSM. Combined with secondary structure matching and solvation potentials, 3D-PSSM can recognise structural and functional relationships beyond state-of-the-art sequence methods. In a cross-validated benchmark on 136 homologous relationships unambiguously undetectable by position-specific iterated basic local alignment search tool (PSI-Blast), 3D-PSSM can confidently assign 18 %. The method was applied to the remaining unassigned regions of the Mycoplasma genitalium genome and an additional 13 regions were assigned with 95 % confidence. 3D-PSSM is available to the community as a web server: http://www.bmm.icnet.uk/servers/3dpssm

  6. Long-Range Correlations in Genomic DNA: A Signature of the Nucleosomal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audit, B.; Thermes, C.; Vaillant, C.; D'Aubenton-Carafa, Y.; Muzy, J. F.; Arneodo, A.

    2001-03-01

    We use the ``wavelet transform microscope'' to carry out a comparative statistical analysis of DNA bending profiles and of the corresponding DNA texts. In the three kingdoms, one reveals on both signals a characteristic scale of 100-200 bp that separates two different regimes of power-law correlations (PLC). In the small-scale regime, PLC are observed in eukaryotic, in double-strand DNA viral, and in archaeal genomes, which contrasts with their total absence in the genomes of eubacteria and their viruses. This strongly suggests that small-scale PLC are related to the mechanisms underlying the wrapping of DNA in the nucleosomal structure. We further speculate that the large scale PLC are the signature of the higher-order structure and dynamics of chromatin.

  7. PanScan, the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium, and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium consists of more than a dozen prospective epidemiologic cohort studies within the NCI Cohort Consortium, whose leaders work together to investigate the etiology and natural history of pancreatic cancer.

  8. Functional insights from structural predictions: analysis of the Escherichia coli genome.

    PubMed Central

    Rychlewski, L.; Zhang, B.; Godzik, A.

    1999-01-01

    Fold assignments for proteins from the Escherichia coli genome are carried out using BASIC, a profile-profile alignment algorithm, recently tested on fold recognition benchmarks and on the Mycoplasma genitalium genome and PSI BLAST, the newest generation of the de facto standard in homology search algorithms. The fold assignments are followed by automated modeling and the resulting three-dimensional models are analyzed for possible function prediction. Close to 30% of the proteins encoded in the E. coli genome can be recognized as homologous to a protein family with known structure. Most of these homologies (23% of the entire genome) can be recognized both by PSI BLAST and BASIC algorithms, but the latter recognizes an additional 260 homologies. Previous estimates suggested that only 10-15% of E. coli proteins can be characterized this way. This dramatic increase in the number of recognized homologies between E. coli proteins and structurally characterized protein families is partly due to the rapid increase of the database of known protein structures, but mostly it is due to the significant improvement in prediction algorithms. Knowing protein structure adds a new dimension to our understanding of its function and the predictions presented here can be used to predict function for uncharacterized proteins. Several examples, analyzed in more detail in this paper, include the DPS protein protecting DNA from oxidative damage (predicted to be homologous to ferritin with iron ion acting as a reducing agent) and the ahpC/tsa family of proteins, which provides resistance to various oxidating agents (predicted to be homologous to glutathione peroxidase). PMID:10091664

  9. Genome structure of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain widely used in bioethanol production

    PubMed Central

    Argueso, Juan Lucas; Carazzolle, Marcelo F.; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Duarte, Fabiana M.; Netto, Osmar V.C.; Missawa, Silvia K.; Galzerani, Felipe; Costa, Gustavo G.L.; Vidal, Ramon O.; Noronha, Melline F.; Dominska, Margaret; Andrietta, Maria G.S.; Andrietta, Sílvio R.; Cunha, Anderson F.; Gomes, Luiz H.; Tavares, Flavio C.A.; Alcarde, André R.; Dietrich, Fred S.; McCusker, John H.; Petes, Thomas D.; Pereira, Gonçalo A.G.

    2009-01-01

    Bioethanol is a biofuel produced mainly from the fermentation of carbohydrates derived from agricultural feedstocks by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One of the most widely adopted strains is PE-2, a heterothallic diploid naturally adapted to the sugar cane fermentation process used in Brazil. Here we report the molecular genetic analysis of a PE-2 derived diploid (JAY270), and the complete genome sequence of a haploid derivative (JAY291). The JAY270 genome is highly heterozygous (∼2 SNPs/kb) and has several structural polymorphisms between homologous chromosomes. These chromosomal rearrangements are confined to the peripheral regions of the chromosomes, with breakpoints within repetitive DNA sequences. Despite its complex karyotype, this diploid, when sporulated, had a high frequency of viable spores. Hybrid diploids formed by outcrossing with the laboratory strain S288c also displayed good spore viability. Thus, the rearrangements that exist near the ends of chromosomes do not impair meiosis, as they do not span regions that contain essential genes. This observation is consistent with a model in which the peripheral regions of chromosomes represent plastic domains of the genome that are free to recombine ectopically and experiment with alternative structures. We also explored features of the JAY270 and JAY291 genomes that help explain their high adaptation to industrial environments, exhibiting desirable phenotypes such as high ethanol and cell mass production and high temperature and oxidative stress tolerance. The genomic manipulation of such strains could enable the creation of a new generation of industrial organisms, ideally suited for use as delivery vehicles for future bioenergy technologies. PMID:19812109

  10. Genome structure of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain widely used in bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Argueso, Juan Lucas; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Duarte, Fabiana M; Netto, Osmar V C; Missawa, Silvia K; Galzerani, Felipe; Costa, Gustavo G L; Vidal, Ramon O; Noronha, Melline F; Dominska, Margaret; Andrietta, Maria G S; Andrietta, Sílvio R; Cunha, Anderson F; Gomes, Luiz H; Tavares, Flavio C A; Alcarde, André R; Dietrich, Fred S; McCusker, John H; Petes, Thomas D; Pereira, Gonçalo A G

    2009-12-01

    Bioethanol is a biofuel produced mainly from the fermentation of carbohydrates derived from agricultural feedstocks by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One of the most widely adopted strains is PE-2, a heterothallic diploid naturally adapted to the sugar cane fermentation process used in Brazil. Here we report the molecular genetic analysis of a PE-2 derived diploid (JAY270), and the complete genome sequence of a haploid derivative (JAY291). The JAY270 genome is highly heterozygous (approximately 2 SNPs/kb) and has several structural polymorphisms between homologous chromosomes. These chromosomal rearrangements are confined to the peripheral regions of the chromosomes, with breakpoints within repetitive DNA sequences. Despite its complex karyotype, this diploid, when sporulated, had a high frequency of viable spores. Hybrid diploids formed by outcrossing with the laboratory strain S288c also displayed good spore viability. Thus, the rearrangements that exist near the ends of chromosomes do not impair meiosis, as they do not span regions that contain essential genes. This observation is consistent with a model in which the peripheral regions of chromosomes represent plastic domains of the genome that are free to recombine ectopically and experiment with alternative structures. We also explored features of the JAY270 and JAY291 genomes that help explain their high adaptation to industrial environments, exhibiting desirable phenotypes such as high ethanol and cell mass production and high temperature and oxidative stress tolerance. The genomic manipulation of such strains could enable the creation of a new generation of industrial organisms, ideally suited for use as delivery vehicles for future bioenergy technologies.

  11. Global MLST of Salmonella Typhi Revisited in Post-genomic Era: Genetic Conservation, Population Structure, and Comparative Genomics of Rare Sequence Types

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Kien-Pong; Ho, Wing S.; Gan, Han M.; Chai, Lay C.; Thong, Kwai L.

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, remains an important public health burden in Southeast Asia and other endemic countries. Various genotyping methods have been applied to study the genetic variations of this human-restricted pathogen. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is one of the widely accepted methods, and recently, there is a growing interest in the re-application of MLST in the post-genomic era. In this study, we provide the global MLST distribution of S. Typhi utilizing both publicly available 1,826 S. Typhi genome sequences in addition to performing conventional MLST on S. Typhi strains isolated from various endemic regions spanning over a century. Our global MLST analysis confirms the predominance of two sequence types (ST1 and ST2) co-existing in the endemic regions. Interestingly, S. Typhi strains with ST8 are currently confined within the African continent. Comparative genomic analyses of ST8 and other rare STs with genomes of ST1/ST2 revealed unique mutations in important virulence genes such as flhB, sipC, and tviD that may explain the variations that differentiate between seemingly successful (widespread) and unsuccessful (poor dissemination) S. Typhi populations. Large scale whole-genome phylogeny demonstrated evidence of phylogeographical structuring and showed that ST8 may have diverged from the earlier ancestral population of ST1 and ST2, which later lost some of its fitness advantages, leading to poor worldwide dissemination. In response to the unprecedented increase in genomic data, this study demonstrates and highlights the utility of large-scale genome-based MLST as a quick and effective approach to narrow the scope of in-depth comparative genomic analysis and consequently provide new insights into the fine scale of pathogen evolution and population structure. PMID:26973639

  12. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master`s Degrees and 9 Doctor`s of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors.

  13. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium. Progress report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, A.L. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. Programmatic research focuses upon key materials-related problems; principally, synthesis and processing and properties limiting transport phenomena. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 113 publications. publications. Two Master`s Degrees and one Ph.D. were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved two MISCON group meetings (held in July and January), twenty external speakers, 36 collaborations, 10 exchanges of samples and/or measurements, and one (1) gift of equipment from industry. Research achievements this past year expanded our understanding of processing phenomena on structure property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  14. The psychiatric GWAS consortium: big science comes to psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Patrick F

    2010-10-21

    The Psychiatric GWAS Consortium was founded with the aim of conducting statistically rigorous and comprehensive GWAS meta-analyses for five major psychiatric disorders: ADHD, autism, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia. In the era of GWAS and high-throughput genomics, a major trend has been the emergence of collaborative, consortia approaches. Taking advantage of the scale that collaborative consortia approaches can bring to a problem, the PGC has been a major driver in psychiatric genetics and provides a model for how similar approaches may be applied to other disease communities.

  15. [Japan Spastic Paraplegia Research Consortium (JASPAC)].

    PubMed

    Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2014-10-01

    Japan Spastic Paraplegia Research Consortium (JASPAC), a nationwide clinical and genetic survey of patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), was started in 2006 as a project of the Research Committee for Ataxic Diseases of the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare, Japan. To date (April 4, 2014), 448 indexed patients with HSP have been registered from 46 prefectures in Japan. We are now performing molecular testing of the HSP patients using Sanger sequencing (SPG4, SPG11, SPG31, and ARSACS), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array (SPG1, 2, 3A, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, 20, 21, 31, 33, 39, 42, ABCD1, alsin, and ARSACS), and resequencing microarray (SPG1, 2, 3A, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 17, 20, 21, 31, 33, and ABCD1). In 206 Japanese families with autosomal dominant HSP, SPG4 was the most common form, accounting for 38%, followed by SPG3A (5%), SPG31 (5%), SPG10 (2%), and SPG8 (1%). In 88 patients with autosomal recessive HSP, although SPG11 was the most common form, accounting for 6%, most showed significant genetic heterogeneity. The results of molecular testing will be applicable to patients in terms of improved positive diagnosis, follow-up, and genetic counseling. JASPAC will contribute to elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying HSP, and will facilitate the development of better treatments for HSP.

  16. A Structural Model of the Genome Packaging Process in a Membrane-Containing Double Stranded DNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chuan; Oksanen, Hanna M.; Liu, Xiangan; Jakana, Joanita; Bamford, Dennis H.; Chiu, Wah

    2014-01-01

    Two crucial steps in the virus life cycle are genome encapsidation to form an infective virion and genome exit to infect the next host cell. In most icosahedral double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses, the viral genome enters and exits the capsid through a unique vertex. Internal membrane-containing viruses possess additional complexity as the genome must be translocated through the viral membrane bilayer. Here, we report the structure of the genome packaging complex with a membrane conduit essential for viral genome encapsidation in the tailless icosahedral membrane-containing bacteriophage PRD1. We utilize single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) and symmetry-free image reconstruction to determine structures of PRD1 virion, procapsid, and packaging deficient mutant particles. At the unique vertex of PRD1, the packaging complex replaces the regular 5-fold structure and crosses the lipid bilayer. These structures reveal that the packaging ATPase P9 and the packaging efficiency factor P6 form a dodecameric portal complex external to the membrane moiety, surrounded by ten major capsid protein P3 trimers. The viral transmembrane density at the special vertex is assigned to be a hexamer of heterodimer of proteins P20 and P22. The hexamer functions as a membrane conduit for the DNA and as a nucleating site for the unique vertex assembly. Our structures show a conformational alteration in the lipid membrane after the P9 and P6 are recruited to the virion. The P8-genome complex is then packaged into the procapsid through the unique vertex while the genome terminal protein P8 functions as a valve that closes the channel once the genome is inside. Comparing mature virion, procapsid, and mutant particle structures led us to propose an assembly pathway for the genome packaging apparatus in the PRD1 virion. PMID:25514469

  17. A structural model of the genome packaging process in a membrane-containing double stranded DNA virus.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chuan; Oksanen, Hanna M; Liu, Xiangan; Jakana, Joanita; Bamford, Dennis H; Chiu, Wah

    2014-12-01

    Two crucial steps in the virus life cycle are genome encapsidation to form an infective virion and genome exit to infect the next host cell. In most icosahedral double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses, the viral genome enters and exits the capsid through a unique vertex. Internal membrane-containing viruses possess additional complexity as the genome must be translocated through the viral membrane bilayer. Here, we report the structure of the genome packaging complex with a membrane conduit essential for viral genome encapsidation in the tailless icosahedral membrane-containing bacteriophage PRD1. We utilize single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) and symmetry-free image reconstruction to determine structures of PRD1 virion, procapsid, and packaging deficient mutant particles. At the unique vertex of PRD1, the packaging complex replaces the regular 5-fold structure and crosses the lipid bilayer. These structures reveal that the packaging ATPase P9 and the packaging efficiency factor P6 form a dodecameric portal complex external to the membrane moiety, surrounded by ten major capsid protein P3 trimers. The viral transmembrane density at the special vertex is assigned to be a hexamer of heterodimer of proteins P20 and P22. The hexamer functions as a membrane conduit for the DNA and as a nucleating site for the unique vertex assembly. Our structures show a conformational alteration in the lipid membrane after the P9 and P6 are recruited to the virion. The P8-genome complex is then packaged into the procapsid through the unique vertex while the genome terminal protein P8 functions as a valve that closes the channel once the genome is inside. Comparing mature virion, procapsid, and mutant particle structures led us to propose an assembly pathway for the genome packaging apparatus in the PRD1 virion.

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the tubeworm Lamellibrachia satsuma and structural conservation in the mitochondrial genome control regions of Order Sabellida.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ajit Kumar; Kwon, Yong Min; Kang, Sung Gyun; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The control region of the mitochondrial genomes shows high variation in conserved sequence organizations, which follow distinct evolutionary patterns in different species or taxa. In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Lamellibrachia satsuma from the cold-seep region of Kagoshima Bay, as a part of whole genome study and extensively studied the structural features and patterns of the control region sequences. We obtained 15,037 bp of mitochondrial genome using Illumina sequencing and identified the non-coding AT-rich region or control region (354 bp, AT=83.9%) located between trnH and trnR. We found 7 conserved sequence blocks (CSB), scattered throughout the control region of L. satsuma and other taxa of Annelida. The poly-TA stretches, which commonly form the stem of multiple stem-loop structures, are most conserved in the CSB-I and CSB-II regions. The mitochondrial genome of L. satsuma encodes a unique repetitive sequence in the control region, which forms a unique secondary structure in comparison to Lamellibrachia luymesi. Phylogenetic analyses of all protein-coding genes indicate that L. satsuma forms a monophyletic clade with L. luymesi along with other tubeworms found in cold-seep regions (genera: Lamellibrachia, Escarpia, and Seepiophila). In general, the control region sequences of Annelida could be aligned with certainty within each genus, and to some extent within the family, but with a higher rate of variation in conserved regions.

  19. Modeling and small-angle neutron scattering spectra of chromatin supernucleosomal structures at genome scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilatovskiy, Andrey V.; Lebedev, Dmitry V.; Filatov, Michael V.; Grigoriev, Mikhail; Petukhov, Michael G.; Isaev-Ivanov, Vladimir V.

    2011-11-01

    Eukaryotic genome is a highly compacted nucleoprotein complex organized in a hierarchical structure based on nucleosomes. Detailed organization of this structure remains unknown. In the present work we developed algorithms for geometry modeling of the supernucleosomal chromatin structure and for computing distance distribution functions and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) spectra of the genome-scale (˜106 nucleosomes) chromatin structure at residue resolution. Our physical nucleosome model was based on the mononucleosome crystal structure. A nucleosome was assumed to be rigid within a local coordinate system. Interface parameters between nucleosomes can be set for each nucleosome independently. Pair distance distributions were computed with Monte Carlo simulation. SANS spectra were calculated with Fourier transformation of weighted distance distribution; the concentration of heavy water in solvent and probability of H/D exchange were taken into account. Two main modes of supernucleosomal structure generation were used. In a free generation mode all interface parameters were chosen randomly, whereas nucleosome self-intersections were not allowed. The second generation mode (generation in volume) enabled spherical or cubical wall restrictions. It was shown that calculated SANS spectra for a number of our models were in general agreement with available experimental data.

  20. In silico prediction and screening of modular crystal structures via a high-throughput genomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Li, Xu; Liu, Jiancong; Duan, Fangzheng; Yu, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput computational methods capable of predicting, evaluating and identifying promising synthetic candidates with desired properties are highly appealing to today's scientists. Despite some successes, in silico design of crystalline materials with complex three-dimensionally extended structures remains challenging. Here we demonstrate the application of a new genomic approach to ABC-6 zeolites, a family of industrially important catalysts whose structures are built from the stacking of modular six-ring layers. The sequences of layer stacking, which we deem the genes of this family, determine the structures and the properties of ABC-6 zeolites. By enumerating these gene-like stacking sequences, we have identified 1,127 most realizable new ABC-6 structures out of 78 groups of 84,292 theoretical ones, and experimentally realized 2 of them. Our genomic approach can extract crucial structural information directly from these gene-like stacking sequences, enabling high-throughput identification of synthetic targets with desired properties among a large number of candidate structures. PMID:26395233

  1. Genomic organization of the crested ibis MHC provides new insight into ancestral avian MHC structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Cheng; Lan, Hong; Sun, Li; Deng, Yan-Li; Tang, Ke-Yi; Wan, Qiu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in immune response. Avian MHCs are not well characterized, only reporting highly compact Galliformes MHCs and extensively fragmented zebra finch MHC. We report the first genomic structure of an endangered Pelecaniformes (crested ibis) MHC containing 54 genes in three regions spanning ~500 kb. In contrast to the loose BG (26 loci within 265 kb) and Class I (11 within 150) genomic structures, the Core Region is condensed (17 within 85). Furthermore, this Region exhibits a COL11A2 gene, followed by four tandem MHC class II αβ dyads retaining two suites of anciently duplicated “αβ” lineages. Thus, the crested ibis MHC structure is entirely different from the known avian MHC architectures but similar to that of mammalian MHCs, suggesting that the fundamental structure of ancestral avian class II MHCs should be “COL11A2-IIαβ1-IIαβ2.” The gene structures, residue characteristics, and expression levels of the five class I genes reveal inter-locus functional divergence. However, phylogenetic analysis indicates that these five genes generate a well-supported intra-species clade, showing evidence for recent duplications. Our analyses suggest dramatic structural variation among avian MHC lineages, help elucidate avian MHC evolution, and provide a foundation for future conservation studies. PMID:25608659

  2. Genomic Structure of an Economically Important Cyanobacterium, Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis NIES-39

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Takatomo; Narikawa, Rei; Okamoto, Shinobu; Ehira, Shigeki; Yoshimura, Hidehisa; Suzuki, Iwane; Masuda, Tatsuru; Mochimaru, Mari; Takaichi, Shinichi; Awai, Koichiro; Sekine, Mitsuo; Horikawa, Hiroshi; Yashiro, Isao; Omata, Seiha; Takarada, Hiromi; Katano, Yoko; Kosugi, Hiroki; Tanikawa, Satoshi; Ohmori, Kazuko; Sato, Naoki; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Ohmori, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    A filamentous non-N2-fixing cyanobacterium, Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis, is an important organism for industrial applications and as a food supply. Almost the complete genome of A. platensis NIES-39 was determined in this study. The genome structure of A. platensis is estimated to be a single, circular chromosome of 6.8 Mb, based on optical mapping. Annotation of this 6.7 Mb sequence yielded 6630 protein-coding genes as well as two sets of rRNA genes and 40 tRNA genes. Of the protein-coding genes, 78% are similar to those of other organisms; the remaining 22% are currently unknown. A total 612 kb of the genome comprise group II introns, insertion sequences and some repetitive elements. Group I introns are located in a protein-coding region. Abundant restriction-modification systems were determined. Unique features in the gene composition were noted, particularly in a large number of genes for adenylate cyclase and haemolysin-like Ca2+-binding proteins and in chemotaxis proteins. Filament-specific genes were highlighted by comparative genomic analysis. PMID:20203057

  3. Protein production from the structural genomics perspective: achievements and future needs

    PubMed Central

    Almo, Steven C; Garforth, Scott J; Hillerich, Brandan S; Love, James D; Seidel, Ronald D; Burley, Stephen K

    2014-01-01

    Despite a multitude of recent technical breakthroughs speeding high-resolution structural analysis of biological macromolecules, production of sufficient quantities of well-behaved, active protein continues to represent the rate-limiting step in many structure determination efforts. These challenges are only amplified when considered in the context of ongoing structural genomics efforts, which are now contending with multi-domain eukaryotic proteins, secreted proteins, and ever-larger macromolecular assemblies. Exciting new developments in eukaryotic expression platforms, including insect and mammalian-based systems, promise enhanced opportunities for structural approaches to some of the most important biological problems. Development and implementation of automated eukaryotic expression techniques promises to significantly improve production of materials for structural, functional, and biomedical research applications. PMID:23642905

  4. Structural genomics: keeping up with expanding knowledge of the protein universe.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Marek; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Minor, Wladek

    2007-06-01

    Structural characterization of the protein universe is the main mission of Structural Genomics (SG) programs. However, progress in gene sequencing technology, set in motion in the 1990s, has resulted in rapid expansion of protein sequence space--a twelvefold increase in the past seven years. For the SG field, this creates new challenges and necessitates a re-assessment of its strategies. Nevertheless, despite the growth of sequence space, at present nearly half of the content of the Swiss-Prot database and over 40% of Pfam protein families can be structurally modeled based on structures determined so far, with SG projects making an increasingly significant contribution. The SG contribution of new Pfam structures nearly doubled from 27.2% in 2003 to 51.6% in 2006.

  5. Genome-Wide Probing of RNA Structures In Vitro Using Nucleases and Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yue; Qu, Kun; Ouyang, Zhengqing; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-01-01

    RNA structure probing is an important technique that studies the secondary and tertiary conformations of an RNA. While it was traditionally performed on one RNA at a time, recent advances in deep sequencing has enabled the secondary structure mapping of thousands of RNAs simultaneously. Here, we describe the method Parallel Analysis for RNA Structures (PARS), which couples double and single strand specific nuclease probing to high throughput sequencing. Upon cloning of the cleavage sites into a cDNA library, deep sequencing and mapping of reads to the transcriptome, the position of paired and unpaired bases along cellular RNAs can be identified. PARS can be performed under diverse solution conditions and on different organismal RNAs to provide genome-wide RNA structural information. This information can also be further used to constrain computational predictions to provide better RNA structure models under different conditions.

  6. Genomics and the Human Genome Project: implications for psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Kelsoe, John R

    2004-11-01

    In the past decade the Human Genome Project has made extraordinary strides in understanding of fundamental human genetics. The complete human genetic sequence has been determined, and the chromosomal location of almost all human genes identified. Presently, a large international consortium, the HapMap Project, is working to identify a large portion of genetic variation in different human populations and the structure and relationship of these variants to each other. The Human Genome Project has approached human genetics on a scale not previously seen in biology. This has been made possible by dramatic advances in high throughput technology and bio-informatics. Tools such as gene chips and micro-arrays have spawned an entirely new strategy to examine the function and expression of genes in a massively parallel fashion. Together these tools have dramatically advanced our knowledge about the human genome. They promise powerful new approaches to complex genetic traits such as psychiatric illness. The goals and progress of the Human Genome Project and the technology involved are reviewed. The implications of this science for psychiatric genetics are discussed.

  7. A close relationship between primary nucleotides sequence structure and the composition of functional genes in the genome of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Juan A L; Fernández-Guerra, Antoni; Casamayor, Emilio O

    2011-12-01

    Comparative genomics is an essential tool to unravel how genomes change over evolutionary time and to gain clues on the links between functional genomics and evolution. In prokaryotes, the large, good quality, genome sequences available in public databases and the recently developed large-scale computational methods, offer an unprecedent view on the ecology and evolution of microorganisms through comparative genomics. In this work, we examined the links among genome structure (i.e., the sequential distribution of nucleotides itself by detrended fluctuation analysis, DFA) and genomic diversity (i.e., gene functionality by Clusters of Orthologous Genes, COGs) in 828 full sequenced prokaryotic genomes from 548 different bacteria and archaea species. DFA scaling exponent α indicated persistent long-range correlations (fractality) in each genome analyzed. Higher resolution power was found when considering the sequential succession of purine (AG) vs. pyrimidine (CT) bases than either keto (GT) to amino (AC) forms or strongly (GC) vs. weakly (AT) bonded nucleotides. Interestingly, the phyla Aquificae, Fusobacteria, Dictyoglomi, Nitrospirae, and Thermotogae were closer to archaea than to their bacterial counterparts. A strong significant correlation was found between scaling exponent α and COGs distribution, and we consistently observed that the larger α the more heterogeneous was the gene distribution within each functional category, suggesting a close relationship between primary nucleotides sequence structure and functional genes composition.

  8. Population genomic structure and linkage disequilibrium analysis of South African goat breeds using genome-wide SNP data.

    PubMed

    Mdladla, K; Dzomba, E F; Huson, H J; Muchadeyi, F C

    2016-08-01

    The sustainability of goat farming in marginal areas of southern Africa depends on local breeds that are adapted to specific agro-ecological conditions. Unimproved non-descript goats are the main genetic resources used for the development of commercial meat-type breeds of South Africa. Little is known about genetic diversity and the genetics of adaptation of these indigenous goat populations. This study investigated the genetic diversity, population structure and breed relations, linkage disequilibrium, effective population size and persistence of gametic phase in goat populations of South Africa. Three locally developed meat-type breeds of the Boer (n = 33), Savanna (n = 31), Kalahari Red (n = 40), a feral breed of Tankwa (n = 25) and unimproved non-descript village ecotypes (n = 110) from four goat-producing provinces of the Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo and North West were assessed using the Illumina Goat 50K SNP Bead Chip assay. The proportion of SNPs with minor allele frequencies >0.05 ranged from 84.22% in the Tankwa to 97.58% in the Xhosa ecotype, with a mean of 0.32 ± 0.13 across populations. Principal components analysis, admixture and pairwise FST identified Tankwa as a genetically distinct population and supported clustering of the populations according to their historical origins. Genome-wide FST identified 101 markers potentially under positive selection in the Tankwa. Average linkage disequilibrium was highest in the Tankwa (r(2)  = 0.25 ± 0.26) and lowest in the village ecotypes (r(2) range = 0.09 ± 0.12 to 0.11 ± 0.14). We observed an effective population size of <150 for all populations 13 generations ago. The estimated correlations for all breed pairs were lower than 0.80 at marker distances >100 kb with the exception of those in Savanna and Tswana populations. This study highlights the high level of genetic diversity in South African indigenous goats as well as the utility of the genome-wide SNP marker panels in

  9. Evaluating robustness of a diesel-degrading bacterial consortium isolated from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Sydow, Mateusz; Owsianiak, Mikołaj; Szczepaniak, Zuzanna; Framski, Grzegorz; Smets, Barth F; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Lisiecki, Piotr; Szulc, Alicja; Cyplik, Paweł; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2016-12-25

    It is not known whether diesel-degrading bacterial communities are structurally and functionally robust when exposed to different hydrocarbon types. Here, we exposed a diesel-degrading consortium to model either alkanes, cycloalkanes or aromatic hydrocarbons as carbon sources to study its structural resistance. The structural resistance was low, with changes in relative abundances of up to four orders of magnitude, depending on hydrocarbon type and bacterial taxon. This low resistance is explained by the presence of hydrocarbon-degrading specialists in the consortium and differences in growth kinetics on individual hydrocarbons. However, despite this low resistance, structural and functional resilience were high, as verified by re-exposing the hydrocarbon-perturbed consortium to diesel fuel. The high resilience is either due to the short exposure time, insufficient for permanent changes in consortium structure and function, or the ability of some consortium members to be maintained during exposure on degradation intermediates produced by other members. Thus, the consortium is expected to cope with short-term exposures to narrow carbon feeds, while maintaining its structural and functional integrity, which remains an advantage over biodegradation approaches using single species cultures.

  10. Integrated view of genome structure and sequence of a single DNA molecule in a nanofluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Rodolphe; Pedersen, Jonas N.; Bauer, David L. V.; Rasmussen, Kristian H.; Yusuf, Mohammed; Volpi, Emanuela; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Kristensen, Anders; Mir, Kalim U.

    2013-01-01

    We show how a bird’s-eye view of genomic structure can be obtained at ∼1-kb resolution from long (∼2 Mb) DNA molecules extracted from whole chromosomes in a nanofluidic laboratory-on-a-chip. We use an improved single-molecule denaturation mapping approach to detect repetitive elements and known as well as unique structural variation. Following its mapping, a molecule of interest was rescued from the chip; amplified and localized to a chromosome by FISH; and interrogated down to 1-bp resolution with a commercial sequencer, thereby reconciling haplotype-phased chromosome substructure with sequence. PMID:23479649

  11. In Vitro Secondary Structure of the Genomic RNA of Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Jessica C.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean; Harvey, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) is a T = 1 icosahedral virus with a single-stranded RNA genome. It is widely accepted that the RNA genome plays an important structural role during assembly of the STMV virion. While the encapsidated form of the RNA has been extensively studied, less is known about the structure of the free RNA, aside from a purported tRNA-like structure at the 3′ end. Here we use selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) analysis to examine the secondary structure of in vitro transcribed STMV RNA. The predicted secondary structure is unusual in the sense that it is highly extended, which could be significant for protecting the RNA from degradation. The SHAPE data are also consistent with the previously predicted tRNA-like fold at the 3′ end of the molecule, which is also known to hinder degradation. Our data are not consistent with the secondary structure proposed for the encapsidated RNA by Schroeder et al., suggesting that, if the Schroeder structure is correct, either the RNA is packaged as it emerges from the replication complex, or the RNA undergoes extensive refolding upon encapsidation. We also consider the alternative, i.e., that the structure of the encapsidated STMV RNA might be the same as the in vitro structure presented here, and we examine how this structure might be organized in the virus. This possibility is not rigorously ruled out by the available data, so it remains open to examination by experiment. PMID:23349871

  12. Structure, evolution, and comparative genomics of tetraploid cotton based on a high-density genetic linkage map.

    PubMed

    Li, Ximei; Jin, Xin; Wang, Hantao; Zhang, Xianlong; Lin, Zhongxu

    2016-06-01

    A high-density linkage map was constructed using 1,885 newly obtained loci and 3,747 previously published loci, which included 5,152 loci with 4696.03 cM in total length and 0.91 cM in mean distance. Homology analysis in the cotton genome further confirmed the 13 expected homologous chromosome pairs and revealed an obvious inversion on Chr10 or Chr20 and repeated inversions on Chr07 or Chr16. In addition, two reciprocal translocations between Chr02 and Chr03 and between Chr04 and Chr05 were confirmed. Comparative genomics between the tetraploid cotton and the diploid cottons showed that no major structural changes exist between DT and D chromosomes but rather between AT and A chromosomes. Blast analysis between the tetraploid cotton genome and the mixed genome of two diploid cottons showed that most AD chromosomes, regardless of whether it is from the AT or DT genome, preferentially matched with the corresponding homologous chromosome in the diploid A genome, and then the corresponding homologous chromosome in the diploid D genome, indicating that the diploid D genome underwent converted evolution by the diploid A genome to form the DT genome during polyploidization. In addition, the results reflected that a series of chromosomal translocations occurred among Chr01/Chr15, Chr02/Chr14, Chr03/Chr17, Chr04/Chr22, and Chr05/Chr19.

  13. The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Clifford B; Maunsell, John HR; Sagvolden, Terje

    2009-01-01

    The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium (NPRC) was conceived in the summer of 2007 at a meeting of editors and publishers of neuroscience journals. One of the working groups addressed whether it was possible to construct a system for permitting authors whose manuscript received supportive reviews at one journal but was not accepted to send a revised manuscript together with its first round of reviews to a new journal for the second round. This would speed up the review process and reduce the work for reviewers and editors. The working group not only designed a framework for transferring reviews among journals, but also implemented it as the NPRC. By the fall of 2007, more than a dozen major journals had signed onto the NPRC, sufficient to launch the experiment in January, 2008. We invite authors who have not yet used the NPRC to try this method for appropriate manuscripts. In order to encourage dissemination of the details outlined in this Editorial, it will also be published in other journals in the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium. PMID:19149887

  14. Novel proteases from the genome of the carnivorous plant Drosera capensis: Structural prediction and comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Butts, Carter T; Bierma, Jan C; Martin, Rachel W

    2016-10-01

    In his 1875 monograph on insectivorous plants, Darwin described the feeding reactions of Drosera flypaper traps and predicted that their secretions contained a "ferment" similar to mammalian pepsin, an aspartic protease. Here we report a high-quality draft genome sequence for the cape sundew, Drosera capensis, the first genome of a carnivorous plant from order Caryophyllales, which also includes the Venus flytrap (Dionaea) and the tropical pitcher plants (Nepenthes). This species was selected in part for its hardiness and ease of cultivation, making it an excellent model organism for further investigations of plant carnivory. Analysis of predicted protein sequences yields genes encoding proteases homologous to those found in other plants, some of which display sequence and structural features that suggest novel functionalities. Because the sequence similarity to proteins of known structure is in most cases too low for traditional homology modeling, 3D structures of representative proteases are predicted using comparative modeling with all-atom refinement. Although the overall folds and active residues for these proteins are conserved, we find structural and sequence differences consistent with a diversity of substrate recognition patterns. Finally, we predict differences in substrate specificities using in silico experiments, providing targets for structure/function studies of novel enzymes with biological and technological significance. Proteins 2016; 84:1517-1533. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Defined chromosome structure in the genome-reduced bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Trussart, Marie; Yus, Eva; Martinez, Sira; Baù, Davide; Tahara, Yuhei O.; Pengo, Thomas; Widjaja, Michael; Kretschmer, Simon; Swoger, Jim; Djordjevic, Steven; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia; Miyata, Makoto; Marti-Renom, Marc A.; Lluch-Senar, Maria; Serrano, Luís

    2017-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins are central regulators of chromosome organization; however, in genome-reduced bacteria their diversity is largely diminished. Whether the chromosomes of such bacteria adopt defined three-dimensional structures remains unexplored. Here we combine Hi-C and super-resolution microscopy to determine the structure of the Mycoplasma pneumoniae chromosome at a 10 kb resolution. We find a defined structure, with a global symmetry between two arms that connect opposite poles, one bearing the chromosomal Ori and the other the midpoint. Analysis of local structures at a 3 kb resolution indicates that the chromosome is organized into domains ranging from 15 to 33 kb. We provide evidence that genes within the same domain tend to be co-regulated, suggesting that chromosome organization influences transcriptional regulation, and that supercoiling regulates local organization. This study extends the current understanding of bacterial genome organization and demonstrates that a defined chromosomal structure is a universal feature of living systems. PMID:28272414

  16. GW-SEM: A Statistical Package to Conduct Genome-Wide Structural Equation Modeling.

    PubMed

    Verhulst, Brad; Maes, Hermine H; Neale, Michael C

    2017-03-15

    Improving the accuracy of phenotyping through the use of advanced psychometric tools will increase the power to find significant associations with genetic variants and expand the range of possible hypotheses that can be tested on a genome-wide scale. Multivariate methods, such as structural equation modeling (SEM), are valuable in the phenotypic analysis of psychiatric and substance use phenotypes, but these methods have not been integrated into standard genome-wide association analyses because fitting a SEM at each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) along the genome was hitherto considered to be too computationally demanding. By developing a method that can efficiently fit SEMs, it is possible to expand the set of models that can be tested. This is particularly necessary in psychiatric and behavioral genetics, where the statistical methods are often handicapped by phenotypes with large components of stochastic variance. Due to the enormous amount of data that genome-wide scans produce, the statistical methods used to analyze the data are relatively elementary and do not directly correspond with the rich theoretical development, and lack the potential to test more complex hypotheses about the measurement of, and interaction between, comorbid traits. In this paper, we present a method to test the association of a SNP with multiple phenotypes or a latent construct on a genome-wide basis using a diagonally weighted least squares (DWLS) estimator for four common SEMs: a one-factor model, a one-factor residuals model, a two-factor model, and a latent growth model. We demonstrate that the DWLS parameters and p-values strongly correspond with the more traditional full information maximum likelihood parameters and p-values. We also present the timing of simulations and power analyses and a comparison with and existing multivariate GWAS software package.

  17. Structure and genome release of Twort-like Myoviridae phage with a double-layered baseplate

    PubMed Central

    Nováček, Jiří; Šiborová, Marta; Benešík, Martin; Pantůček, Roman; Doškař, Jiří; Plevka, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages from the family Myoviridae use double-layered contractile tails to infect bacteria. Contraction of the tail sheath enables the tail tube to penetrate through the bacterial cell wall and serve as a channel for the transport of the phage genome into the cytoplasm. However, the mechanisms controlling the tail contraction and genome release of phages with “double-layered” baseplates were unknown. We used cryo-electron microscopy to show that the binding of the Twort-like phage phi812 to the Staphylococcus aureus cell wall requires a 210° rotation of the heterohexameric receptor-binding and tripod protein complexes within its baseplate about an axis perpendicular to the sixfold axis of the tail. This rotation reorients the receptor-binding proteins to point away from the phage head, and also results in disruption of the interaction of the tripod proteins with the tail sheath, hence triggering its contraction. However, the tail sheath contraction of Myoviridae phages is not sufficient to induce genome ejection. We show that the end of the phi812 double-stranded DNA genome is bound to one protein subunit from a connector complex that also forms an interface between the phage head and tail. The tail sheath contraction induces conformational changes of the neck and connector that result in disruption of the DNA binding. The genome penetrates into the neck, but is stopped at a bottleneck before the tail tube. A subsequent structural change of the tail tube induced by its interaction with the S. aureus cell is required for the genome’s release. PMID:27469164

  18. Whole-Genome Sequencing Reveals Diverse Models of Structural Variations in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Caixia; Zhou, Yong; Li, Hongyi; Xiong, Teng; Li, Shuaicheng; Bi, Yanghui; Kong, Pengzhou; Wang, Fang; Cui, Heyang; Li, Yaoping; Fang, Xiaodong; Yan, Ting; Li, Yike; Wang, Juan; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Ling; Jia, Zhiwu; Song, Bin; Hu, Xiaoling; Yang, Jie; Qiu, Haile; Zhang, Gehong; Liu, Jing; Xu, Enwei; Shi, Ruyi; Zhang, Yanyan; Liu, Haiyan; He, Chanting; Zhao, Zhenxiang; Qian, Yu; Rong, Ruizhou; Han, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yanlin; Luo, Wen; Wang, Jiaqian; Peng, Shaoliang; Yang, Xukui; Li, Xiangchun; Li, Lin; Fang, Hu; Liu, Xingmin; Ma, Li; Chen, Yunqing; Guo, Shiping; Chen, Xing; Xi, Yanfeng; Li, Guodong; Liang, Jianfang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Guo, Jiansheng; Jia, JunMei; Li, Qingshan; Cheng, Xiaolong; Zhan, Qimin; Cui, Yongping

    2016-02-04

    Comprehensive identification of somatic structural variations (SVs) and understanding their mutational mechanisms in cancer might contribute to understanding biological differences and help to identify new therapeutic targets. Unfortunately, characterization of complex SVs across the whole genome and the mutational mechanisms underlying esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is largely unclear. To define a comprehensive catalog of somatic SVs, affected target genes, and their underlying mechanisms in ESCC, we re-analyzed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data from 31 ESCCs using Meerkat algorithm to predict somatic SVs and Patchwork to determine copy-number changes. We found deletions and translocations with NHEJ and alt-EJ signature as the dominant SV types, and 16% of deletions were complex deletions. SVs frequently led to disruption of cancer-associated genes (e.g., CDKN2A and NOTCH1) with different mutational mechanisms. Moreover, chromothripsis, kataegis, and breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) were identified as contributing to locally mis-arranged chromosomes that occurred in 55% of ESCCs. These genomic catastrophes led to amplification of oncogene through chromothripsis-derived double-minute chromosome formation (e.g., FGFR1 and LETM2) or BFB-affected chromosomes (e.g., CCND1, EGFR, ERBB2, MMPs, and MYC), with approximately 30% of ESCCs harboring BFB-derived CCND1 amplification. Furthermore, analyses of copy-number alterations reveal high frequency of whole-genome duplication (WGD) and recurrent focal amplification of CDCA7 that might act as a potential oncogene in ESCC. Our findings reveal molecular defects such as chromothripsis and BFB in malignant transformation of ESCCs and demonstrate diverse models of SVs-derived target genes in ESCCs. These genome-wide SV profiles and their underlying mechanisms provide preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications for ESCCs.

  19. Whole-Genome Sequencing Reveals Diverse Models of Structural Variations in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Caixia; Zhou, Yong; Li, Hongyi; Xiong, Teng; Li, Shuaicheng; Bi, Yanghui; Kong, Pengzhou; Wang, Fang; Cui, Heyang; Li, Yaoping; Fang, Xiaodong; Yan, Ting; Li, Yike; Wang, Juan; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Ling; Jia, Zhiwu; Song, Bin; Hu, Xiaoling; Yang, Jie; Qiu, Haile; Zhang, Gehong; Liu, Jing; Xu, Enwei; Shi, Ruyi; Zhang, Yanyan; Liu, Haiyan; He, Chanting; Zhao, Zhenxiang; Qian, Yu; Rong, Ruizhou; Han, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yanlin; Luo, Wen; Wang, Jiaqian; Peng, Shaoliang; Yang, Xukui; Li, Xiangchun; Li, Lin; Fang, Hu; Liu, Xingmin; Ma, Li; Chen, Yunqing; Guo, Shiping; Chen, Xing; Xi, Yanfeng; Li, Guodong; Liang, Jianfang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Guo, Jiansheng; Jia, JunMei; Li, Qingshan; Cheng, Xiaolong; Zhan, Qimin; Cui, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive identification of somatic structural variations (SVs) and understanding their mutational mechanisms in cancer might contribute to understanding biological differences and help to identify new therapeutic targets. Unfortunately, characterization of complex SVs across the whole genome and the mutational mechanisms underlying esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is largely unclear. To define a comprehensive catalog of somatic SVs, affected target genes, and their underlying mechanisms in ESCC, we re-analyzed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data from 31 ESCCs using Meerkat algorithm to predict somatic SVs and Patchwork to determine copy-number changes. We found deletions and translocations with NHEJ and alt-EJ signature as the dominant SV types, and 16% of deletions were complex deletions. SVs frequently led to disruption of cancer-associated genes (e.g., CDKN2A and NOTCH1) with different mutational mechanisms. Moreover, chromothripsis, kataegis, and breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) were identified as contributing to locally mis-arranged chromosomes that occurred in 55% of ESCCs. These genomic catastrophes led to amplification of oncogene through chromothripsis-derived double-minute chromosome formation (e.g., FGFR1 and LETM2) or BFB-affected chromosomes (e.g., CCND1, EGFR, ERBB2, MMPs, and MYC), with approximately 30% of ESCCs harboring BFB-derived CCND1 amplification. Furthermore, analyses of copy-number alterations reveal high frequency of whole-genome duplication (WGD) and recurrent focal amplification of CDCA7 that might act as a potential oncogene in ESCC. Our findings reveal molecular defects such as chromothripsis and BFB in malignant transformation of ESCCs and demonstrate diverse models of SVs-derived target genes in ESCCs. These genome-wide SV profiles and their underlying mechanisms provide preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications for ESCCs. PMID:26833333

  20. High resolution genetic mapping by genome sequencing reveals genome duplication and tetraploid genetic structure of the diploid Miscanthus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Feng; Jensen, Elaine; Alexandrov, Nickolai; Troukhan, Maxim; Zhang, Liping; Thomas-Jones, Sian; Farrar, Kerrie; Clifton-Brown, John; Donnison, Iain; Swaller, Timothy; Flavell, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have created a high-resolution linkage map of Miscanthus sinensis, using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), identifying all 19 linkage groups for the first time. The result is technically significant since Miscanthus has a very large and highly heterozygous genome, but has no or limited genomics information to date. The composite linkage map containing markers from both parental linkage maps is composed of 3,745 SNP markers spanning 2,396 cM on 19 linkage groups with a 0.64 cM average resolution. Comparative genomics analyses of the M. sinensis composite linkage map to the genomes of sorghum, maize, rice, and Brachypodium distachyon indicate that sorghum has the closest syntenic relationship to Miscanthus compared to other species. The comparative results revealed that each pair of the 19 M. sinensis linkages aligned to one sorghum chromosome, except for LG8, which mapped to two sorghum chromosomes (4 and 7), presumably due to a chromosome fusion event after genome duplication. The data also revealed several other chromosome rearrangements relative to sorghum, including two telomere-centromere inversions of the sorghum syntenic chromosome 7 in LG8 of M. sinensis and two paracentric inversions of sorghum syntenic chromosome 4 in LG7 and LG8 of M. sinensis. The results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that the diploid M. sinensis is tetraploid origin consisting of two sub-genomes. This complete and high resolution composite linkage map will not only serve as a useful resource for novel QTL discoveries, but also enable informed deployment of the wealth of existing genomics resources of other species to the improvement of Miscanthus as a high biomass energy crop. In addition, it has utility as a reference for genome sequence assembly for the forthcoming whole genome sequencing of the Miscanthus genus.

  1. Aphis Glycines Virus 2, a Novel Insect Virus with a Unique Genome Structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sijun; Vijayendran, Diveena; Chen, Yuting; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2016-01-01

    The invasive soybean aphid, Aphis glycines, is a major pest in soybeans, resulting in substantial economic loss. We analyzed the A. glycines transcriptome to identify sequences derived from viruses of A. glycines. We identified sequences derived from a novel virus named Aphis glycines virus 2 (ApGlV2). The assembled virus genome sequence was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Sanger sequencing, conserved domains were characterized, and distribution, and transmission examined. This virus has a positive sense, single-stranded RNA genome of ~4850 nt that encodes three proteins. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of ApGlV2 is a permuted RdRp similar to those of some tetraviruses, while the capsid protein is structurally similar to the capsid proteins of plant sobemoviruses. ApGlV2 also encodes a larger minor capsid protein, which is translated by a readthrough mechanism. ApGlV2 appears to be widespread in A. glycines populations and to persistently infect aphids with a 100% vertical transmission rate. ApGlV2 is susceptible to the antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. This virus, with its unique genome structure with both plant- and insect-virus characteristics, is of particular interest from an evolutionary standpoint. PMID:27869772

  2. Anti-infectious drug repurposing using an integrated chemical genomics and structural systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Ng, Clara; Hauptman, Ruth; Zhang, Yinliang; Bourne, Philip E; Xie, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multi-drug and extensive drug resistance of microbes to antibiotics poses a great threat to human health. Although drug repurposing is a promising solution for accelerating the drug development process, its application to anti-infectious drug discovery is limited by the scope of existing phenotype-, ligand-, or target-based methods. In this paper we introduce a new computational strategy to determine the genome-wide molecular targets of bioactive compounds in both human and bacterial genomes. Our method is based on the use of a novel algorithm, ligand Enrichment of Network Topological Similarity (ligENTS), to map the chemical universe to its global pharmacological space. ligENTS outperforms the state-of-the-art algorithms in identifying novel drug-target relationships. Furthermore, we integrate ligENTS with our structural systems biology platform to identify drug repurposing opportunities via target similarity profiling. Using this integrated strategy, we have identified novel P. falciparum targets of drug-like active compounds from the Malaria Box, and suggest that a number of approved drugs may be active against malaria. This study demonstrates the potential of an integrative chemical genomics and structural systems biology approach to drug repurposing.

  3. FANCJ is essential to maintain microsatellite structure genome-wide during replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Barthelemy, Joanna; Hanenberg, Helmut; Leffak, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellite DNAs that form non-B structures are implicated in replication fork stalling, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and human disease. Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited disorder in which mutations in at least nineteen genes are responsible for the phenotypes of genome instability and cancer predisposition. FA pathway proteins are active in the resolution of non-B DNA structures including interstrand crosslinks, G quadruplexes and DNA triplexes. In FANCJ helicase depleted cells, we show that hydroxyurea or aphidicolin treatment leads to loss of microsatellite polymerase chain reaction signals and to chromosome recombination at an ectopic hairpin forming CTG/CAG repeat in the HeLa genome. Moreover, diverse endogenous microsatellite signals were also lost upon replication stress after FANCJ depletion, and in FANCJ null patient cells. The phenotype of microsatellite signal instability is specific for FANCJ apart from the intact FA pathway, and is consistent with DSBs at microsatellites genome-wide in FANCJ depleted cells following replication stress. PMID:27179029

  4. Aphis Glycines Virus 2, a Novel Insect Virus with a Unique Genome Structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sijun; Vijayendran, Diveena; Chen, Yuting; Bonning, Bryony C

    2016-11-19

    The invasive soybean aphid, Aphis glycines, is a major pest in soybeans, resulting in substantial economic loss. We analyzed the A. glycines transcriptome to identify sequences derived from viruses of A. glycines. We identified sequences derived from a novel virus named Aphis glycines virus 2 (ApGlV2). The assembled virus genome sequence was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Sanger sequencing, conserved domains were characterized, and distribution, and transmission examined. This virus has a positive sense, single-stranded RNA genome of ~4850 nt that encodes three proteins. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of ApGlV2 is a permuted RdRp similar to those of some tetraviruses, while the capsid protein is structurally similar to the capsid proteins of plant sobemoviruses. ApGlV2 also encodes a larger minor capsid protein, which is translated by a readthrough mechanism. ApGlV2 appears to be widespread in A. glycines populations and to persistently infect aphids with a 100% vertical transmission rate. ApGlV2 is susceptible to the antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. This virus, with its unique genome structure with both plant- and insect-virus characteristics, is of particular interest from an evolutionary standpoint.

  5. Overview of PSB track on gene structure identification in large-scale genomic sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Uberbacher, E.C.; Xu, Y.

    1998-12-31

    The recent funding of more than a dozen major genome centers to begin community-wide high-throughput sequencing of the human genome has created a significant new challenge for the computational analysis of DNA sequence and the prediction of gene structure and function. It has been estimated that on average from 1996 to 2003, approximately 2 million bases of newly finished DNA sequence will be produced every day and be made available on the Internet and in central databases. The finished (fully assembled) sequence generated each day will represent approximately 75 new genes (and their respective proteins), and many times this number will be represented in partially completed sequences. The information contained in these is of immeasurable value to medical research, biotechnology, the pharmaceutical industry and researchers in a host of fields ranging from microorganism metabolism, to structural biology, to bioremediation. Sequencing of microorganisms and other model organisms is also ramping up at a very rapid rate. The genomes for yeast and several microorganisms such as H. influenza have recently been fully sequenced, although the significance of many genes remains to be determined.

  6. Detroit MEDLINE Consortium; An Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSchryver, Victor; And Others

    The Detroit MEDLINE Consortium is an experimental pilot project which is intended to extend use of the on line retrieval system to the hospital environment. The consortium was initiated to increase the capacity for bibliographic information retrieval supportive of the delivery of patient care in the hospital environment. Secondarily, it addresses…

  7. Increasing Sales by Developing Production Consortiums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher A.; Russo, Robert

    Intended to help rehabilitation facility administrators increase organizational income from manufacturing and/or contracted service sources, this document provides a decision-making model for the development of a production consortium. The document consists of five chapters and two appendices. Chapter 1 defines the consortium concept, explains…

  8. 32 CFR 37.1255 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Consortium. 37.1255 Section 37.1255 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1255 Consortium. A group...

  9. 10 CFR 603.1235 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consortium. 603.1235 Section 603.1235 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in this Part § 603.1235 Consortium. A group of RD&D-performing organizations that either is...

  10. 32 CFR 37.1255 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Consortium. 37.1255 Section 37.1255 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1255 Consortium. A group...

  11. 10 CFR 603.1235 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Consortium. 603.1235 Section 603.1235 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in this Part § 603.1235 Consortium. A group of RD&D-performing organizations that either is...

  12. 10 CFR 603.1235 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Consortium. 603.1235 Section 603.1235 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in this Part § 603.1235 Consortium. A group of RD&D-performing organizations that either is...

  13. 10 CFR 603.1235 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Consortium. 603.1235 Section 603.1235 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in this Part § 603.1235 Consortium. A group of RD&D-performing organizations that either is...

  14. 10 CFR 603.1235 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Consortium. 603.1235 Section 603.1235 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in this Part § 603.1235 Consortium. A group of RD&D-performing organizations that either is...

  15. The Salix Consortium in New York

    SciTech Connect

    Wulf, T.; Jones, J.

    1998-09-28

    Energy crops for electrical production are being given a boost by the Salix Consortium, an association of 20 corporations and industrial, government, farming, and research organizations. The consortium supports commercial development of willows for generating electricity, which are being grown for utilities across the Northeast region of the U.S. for use in cofiring with coal in existing power plants.

  16. An integrated map of structural variation in 2,504 human genomes

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Goo; Fritz, Markus Hsi-Yang; Konkel, Miriam K.; Malhotra, Ankit; Stütz, Adrian M.; Shi, Xinghua; Casale, Francesco Paolo; Chen, Jieming; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Dayama, Gargi; Chen, Ken; Malig, Maika; Chaisson, Mark J.P.; Walter, Klaudia; Meiers, Sascha; Kashin, Seva; Garrison, Erik; Auton, Adam; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Alkan, Can; Antaki, Danny; Bae, Taejeong; Cerveira, Eliza; Chines, Peter; Chong, Zechen; Clarke, Laura; Dal, Elif; Ding, Li; Emery, Sarah; Fan, Xian; Gujral, Madhusudan; Kahveci, Fatma; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Kong, Yu; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; McCarthy, Shane; Flicek, Paul; Gibbs, Richard A.; Marth, Gabor; Mason, Christopher E.; Menelaou, Androniki; Muzny, Donna M.; Nelson, Bradley J.; Noor, Amina; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Pendleton, Matthew; Quitadamo, Andrew; Raeder, Benjamin; Schadt, Eric E.; Romanovitch, Mallory; Schlattl, Andreas; Sebra, Robert; Shabalin, Andrey A.; Untergasser, Andreas; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Wang, Min; Yu, Fuli; Zhang, Chengsheng; Zhang, Jing; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Zhou, Wanding; Zichner, Thomas; Sebat, Jonathan; Batzer, Mark A.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Mills, Ryan E.; Gerstein, Mark B.; Bashir, Ali; Stegle, Oliver; Devine, Scott E.; Lee, Charles; Eichler, Evan E.; Korbel, Jan O.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Structural variants (SVs) are implicated in numerous diseases and make up the majority of varying nucleotides among human genomes. Here we describe an integrated set of eight SV classes comprising both balanced and unbalanced variants, which we constructed using short-read DNA sequencing data and statistically phased onto haplotype-blocks in 26 human populations. Analyzing this set, we identify numerous gene-intersecting SVs exhibiting population stratification and describe naturally occurring homozygous gene knockouts suggesting the dispensability of a variety of human genes. We demonstrate that SVs are enriched on haplotypes identified by genome-wide association studies and exhibit enrichment for expression quantitative trait loci. Additionally, we uncover appreciable levels of SV complexity at different scales, including genic loci subject to clusters of repeated rearrangement and complex SVs with multiple breakpoints likely formed through individual mutational events. Our catalog will enhance future studies into SV demography, functional impact and disease association. PMID:26432246

  17. The genome-wide structure of two economically important indigenous Sicilian cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Mastrangelo, S; Saura, M; Tolone, M; Salces-Ortiz, J; Di Gerlando, R; Bertolini, F; Fontanesi, L; Sardina, M T; Serrano, M; Portolano, B

    2014-11-01

    Genomic technologies, such as high-throughput genotyping based on SNP arrays, provided background information concerning genome structure in domestic animals. The aim of this work was to investigate the genetic structure, the genome-wide estimates of inbreeding, coancestry, effective population size (Ne), and the patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in 2 economically important Sicilian local cattle breeds, Cinisara (CIN) and Modicana (MOD), using the Illumina Bovine SNP50K v2 BeadChip. To understand the genetic relationship and to place both Sicilian breeds in a global context, genotypes from 134 other domesticated bovid breeds were used. Principal component analysis showed that the Sicilian cattle breeds were closer to individuals of Bos taurus taurus from Eurasia and formed nonoverlapping clusters with other breeds. Between the Sicilian cattle breeds, MOD was the most differentiated, whereas the animals belonging to the CIN breed showed a lower value of assignment, the presence of substructure, and genetic links with the MOD breed. The average molecular inbreeding and coancestry coefficients were moderately high, and the current estimates of Ne were low in both breeds. These values indicated a low genetic variability. Considering levels of LD between adjacent markers, the average r(2) in the MOD breed was comparable to those reported for others cattle breeds, whereas CIN showed a lower value. Therefore, these results support the need of more dense SNP arrays for a high-power association mapping and genomic selection efficiency, particularly for the CIN cattle breed. Controlling molecular inbreeding and coancestry would restrict inbreeding depression, the probability of losing beneficial rare alleles, and therefore the risk of extinction. The results generated from this study have important implications for the development of conservation and/or selection breeding programs in these 2 local cattle breeds.

  18. Consortium for military LCD display procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echols, Gregg

    2002-08-01

    International Display Consortium (IDC) is the joining together of display companies to combined their buying power and obtained favorable terms with a major LCD manufacturer. Consolidating the buying power and grouping the demand enables the rugged display industry of avionics, ground vehicles, and ship based display manufacturers to have unencumbered access to high performance AMLCDs while greatly reducing risk and lowering cost. With an unrestricted supply of AMLCD displays, the consortium members have total control of their risk, cost, deliveries and added value partners. Every display manufacturer desires a very close relationship with a display vender. With IDC each consortium member achieves a close relationship. Consortium members enjoy cost effective access to high performance, industry standard sized LCD panels, and modified commercial displays with 100 degree C clearing points and portrait configurations. Consortium members also enjoy proposal support, technical support and long-term support.

  19. Improving safety of aircraft engines: a consortium approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasche, Lisa J. H.

    1996-11-01

    With over seven million departures per year, air transportation has become not a luxury, but a standard mode of transportation for the United States. A critical aspect of modern air transport is the jet engine, a complex engineered component that has enabled the rapid travel to which we have all become accustomed. One of the enabling technologies for safe air travel is nondestructive evaluation, or NDE, which includes various inspection techniques used to assess the health or integrity of a structure, component, or material. The Engine Titanium Consortium (ETC) was established in 1993 to respond to recommendations made by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Titanium Rotating Components Review Team (TRCRT) for improvements in inspection of engine titanium. Several recent accomplishments of the ETC are detailed in this paper. The objective of the Engine Titanium Consortium is to provide the FAAand the manufacturers with reliable and costeffective new methods and/or improvements in mature methods for detecting cracks, inclusions, and imperfections in titanium. The consortium consists of a team of researchers from academia and industry-namely, Iowa State University, Allied Signal Propulsion Engines, General Electric Aircraft Engines, and Pratt & Whitney Engines-who work together to develop program priorities, organize a program plan, conduct the research, and implement the solutions. The true advantage of the consortium approach is that it brings together the research talents of academia and the engineering talents of industry to tackle a technology-base problem. In bringing industrial competitors together, the consortium ensures that the research results, which have safety implications and result from FAA funds, are shared and become part of the public domain.

  20. Probing Retroviral and Retrotransposon Genome Structures: The “SHAPE” of Things to Come

    PubMed Central

    Sztuba-Solinska, Joanna; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the nuances of RNA structure as they pertain to biological function remains a formidable challenge for retrovirus research and development of RNA-based therapeutics, an area of particular importance with respect to combating HIV infection. Although a variety of chemical and enzymatic RNA probing techniques have been successfully employed for more than 30 years, they primarily interrogate small (100–500 nt) RNAs that have been removed from their biological context, potentially eliminating long-range tertiary interactions (such as kissing loops and pseudoknots) that may play a critical regulatory role. Selective 2′ hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE), pioneered recently by Merino and colleagues, represents a facile, user-friendly technology capable of interrogating RNA structure with a single reagent and, combined with automated capillary electrophoresis, can analyze an entire 10,000-nucleotide RNA genome in a matter of weeks. Despite these obvious advantages, SHAPE essentially provides a nucleotide “connectivity map,” conversion of which into a 3-D structure requires a variety of complementary approaches. This paper summarizes contributions from SHAPE towards our understanding of the structure of retroviral genomes, modifications to which technology that have been developed to address some of its limitations, and future challenges. PMID:22685659

  1. Structural genomics of highly conserved microbial genes of unknown function in search of new antibacterial targets.

    PubMed

    Abergel, Chantal; Coutard, Bruno; Byrne, Deborah; Chenivesse, Sabine; Claude, Jean-Baptiste; Deregnaucourt, Céline; Fricaux, Thierry; Gianesini-Boutreux, Celine; Jeudy, Sandra; Lebrun, Régine; Maza, Caroline; Notredame, Cédric; Poirot, Olivier; Suhre, Karsten; Varagnol, Majorie; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    With more than 100 antibacterial drugs at our disposal in the 1980's, the problem of bacterial infection was considered solved. Today, however, most hospital infections are insensitive to several classes of antibacterial drugs, and deadly strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to vancomycin--the last resort antibiotic--have recently begin to appear. Other life-threatening microbes, such as Enterococcus faecalis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are already able to resist every available antibiotic. There is thus an urgent, and continuous need for new, preferably large-spectrum, antibacterial molecules, ideally targeting new biochemical pathways. Here we report on the progress of our structural genomics program aiming at the discovery of new antibacterial gene targets among evolutionary conserved genes of uncharacterized function. A series of bioinformatic and comparative genomics analyses were used to identify a set of 221 candidate genes common to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These genes were split between two laboratories. They are now submitted to a systematic 3-D structure determination protocol including cloning, protein expression and purification, crystallization, X-ray diffraction, structure interpretation, and function prediction. We describe here our strategies for the 111 genes processed in our laboratory. Bioinformatics is used at most stages of the production process and out of 111 genes processed--and 17 months into the project--108 have been successfully cloned, 103 have exhibited detectable expression, 84 have led to the production of soluble protein, 46 have been purified, 12 have led to usable crystals, and 7 structures have been determined.

  2. Sponge OAS has a distinct genomic structure within the 2-5A synthetase family.

    PubMed

    Reintamm, Tõnu; Kuusksalu, Anne; Metsis, Madis; Päri, Mailis; Vallmann, Kerli; Lopp, Annika; Justesen, Just; Kelve, Merike

    2008-11-01

    2',5'-Oligoadenylate synthetases (2-5A synthetases, OAS) are enzymes that play an important role in the interferon-induced antiviral defense mechanisms in mammals. Sponges, the evolutionarily lowest multicellular animals, also possess OAS; however, their function is presently unclear. Low homology between primary structures of 2-5A synthetases from vertebrates and sponges renders their evolutionary relationship obscure. The genomic structure of vertebrate OASs has been thoroughly examined, making it possible to elucidate molecular evolution and expansion of this gene family. Until now, no OAS gene structure was available from sponges to compare it with the corresponding genes from higher organisms. In the present work, we determined the exon/intron structure of the OAS gene from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium and found it to be completely different from the strictly conserved exon/intron pattern of the OAS genes from vertebrates. This finding was corroborated by the analysis of OAS genes from another sponge, Amphimedon queenslandica, whose genome was recently sequenced. Our data suggest that vertebrate and sponge OAS genes have no direct common intron-containing ancestor and two (sub)types of OAS may be discriminated. This study opens new perspectives for understanding the phylogenesis and evolution of 2-5A synthetases as well as functional aspects of this multigene family.

  3. Hymenoptera Genome Database: integrating genome annotations in HymenopteraMine

    PubMed Central

    Elsik, Christine G.; Tayal, Aditi; Diesh, Colin M.; Unni, Deepak R.; Emery, Marianne L.; Nguyen, Hung N.; Hagen, Darren E.

    2016-01-01

    We report an update of the Hymenoptera Genome Database (HGD) (http://HymenopteraGenome.org), a model organism database for insect species of the order Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). HGD maintains genomic data for 9 bee species, 10 ant species and 1 wasp, including the versions of genome and annotation data sets published by the genome sequencing consortiums and those provided by NCBI. A new data-mining warehouse, HymenopteraMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, integrates the genome data with data from external sources and facilitates cross-species analyses based on orthology. New genome browsers and annotation tools based on JBrowse/WebApollo provide easy genome navigation, and viewing of high throughput sequence data sets and can be used for collaborative genome annotation. All of the genomes and annotation data sets are combined into a single BLAST server that allows users to select and combine sequence data sets to search. PMID:26578564

  4. Hymenoptera Genome Database: integrating genome annotations in HymenopteraMine.

    PubMed

    Elsik, Christine G; Tayal, Aditi; Diesh, Colin M; Unni, Deepak R; Emery, Marianne L; Nguyen, Hung N; Hagen, Darren E

    2016-01-04

    We report an update of the Hymenoptera Genome Database (HGD) (http://HymenopteraGenome.org), a model organism database for insect species of the order Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). HGD maintains genomic data for 9 bee species, 10 ant species and 1 wasp, including the versions of genome and annotation data sets published by the genome sequencing consortiums and those provided by NCBI. A new data-mining warehouse, HymenopteraMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, integrates the genome data with data from external sources and facilitates cross-species analyses based on orthology. New genome browsers and annotation tools based on JBrowse/WebApollo provide easy genome navigation, and viewing of high throughput sequence data sets and can be used for collaborative genome annotation. All of the genomes and annotation data sets are combined into a single BLAST server that allows users to select and combine sequence data sets to search.

  5. Multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering enhanced by Drosha-mediated sgRNA-shRNA structure.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qiang; Xu, Kun; Xing, Jiani; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Xin; Wei, Zehui; Ren, Chonghua; Liu, Zhongtian; Shao, Simin; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-12-12

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has recently been developed into a powerful genome-editing technology, as it requires only two key components (Cas9 protein and sgRNA) to function and further enables multiplex genome targeting and homology-directed repair (HDR) based precise genome editing in a wide variety of organisms. Here, we report a novel and interesting strategy by using the Drosha-mediated sgRNA-shRNA structure to direct Cas9 for multiplex genome targeting and precise genome editing. For multiplex genome targeting assay, we achieved more than 9% simultaneous mutant efficiency for 3 genomic loci among the puromycin-selected cell clones. By introducing the shRNA against DNA ligase IV gene (LIG4) into the sgRNA-shRNA construct, the HDR-based precise genome editing efficiency was improved as more than 2-fold. Our works provide a useful tool for multiplex and precise genome modifying in mammalian cells.

  6. Multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering enhanced by Drosha-mediated sgRNA-shRNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qiang; Xu, Kun; Xing, Jiani; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Xin; Wei, Zehui; Ren, Chonghua; Liu, Zhongtian; Shao, Simin; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has recently been developed into a powerful genome-editing technology, as it requires only two key components (Cas9 protein and sgRNA) to function and further enables multiplex genome targeting and homology-directed repair (HDR) based precise genome editing in a wide variety of organisms. Here, we report a novel and interesting strategy by using the Drosha-mediated sgRNA-shRNA structure to direct Cas9 for multiplex genome targeting and precise genome editing. For multiplex genome targeting assay, we achieved more than 9% simultaneous mutant efficiency for 3 genomic loci among the puromycin-selected cell clones. By introducing the shRNA against DNA ligase IV gene (LIG4) into the sgRNA-shRNA construct, the HDR-based precise genome editing efficiency was improved as more than 2-fold. Our works provide a useful tool for multiplex and precise genome modifying in mammalian cells. PMID:27941919

  7. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research program is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry- defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. It is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation; it is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. This update reviews the AGTSR triad, which consists of university/industry R&D activities, technology transfer programs, and trial student programs.

  8. Engineering the ligninolytic enzyme consortium.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    The ligninolytic enzyme consortium is one of the most-efficient oxidative systems found in nature, playing a pivotal role during wood decay and coal formation. Typically formed by high redox-potential oxidoreductases, this array of enzymes can be used within the emerging lignocellulose biorefineries in processes that range from the production of bioenergy to that of biomaterials. To ensure that these versatile enzymes meet industry standards and needs, they have been subjected to directed evolution and hybrid approaches that surpass the limits imposed by nature. This Opinion article analyzes recent achievements in this field, including the incipient groundbreaking research into the evolution of resurrected enzymes, and the engineering of ligninolytic secretomes to create consolidated bioprocessing microbes with synthetic biology applications.

  9. The genomic structure of the gene encoding the human transforming growth factor {beta} type II receptor (TGF-{beta} RII)

    SciTech Connect

    Takenoshita, Seiichi; Hagiwara, Koichi; Nagashima, Makoto; Gemma, Akihiko

    1996-09-01

    The genomic structure of the human transforming growth factor-{beta} type II receptor gene (TGF-{beta} RII) was determined by two PCR-based methods, the {open_quotes}long distance sequencer{close_quotes} method and the {open_quotes}promoter finder{close_quotes} method. Genomic fragments containing exons and adjacent introns were amplified by PCR, and the nucleotide sequences were determined by direct sequencing and subcloning sequencing. The TGF-{beta} RII protein is encoded by 567 codons in 7 exons. This is the first report about the genomic structure of a gene that belongs to the serine/threonine kinase type II receptor subfamily. Knowledge of the genomic structure of the TGF-{beta} RII gene will facilitate investigation of the TGF-{beta} RII gene will facilitate investigation of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in normal human cells and of the aberrations occurring during carcinogenesis. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Genomic organization and genomic structural rearrangements of Sphingobium japonicum UT26, an archetypal γ-hexachlorocyclohexane-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuji; Natsui, Shunsuke; Endo, Ryo; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Ichikawa, Natsuko; Ankai, Akiho; Oguchi, Akio; Fukui, Shigehiro; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Tsuda, Masataka

    2011-12-10

    The complete genome sequencing of a γ-hexachlorocyclohexane-degrading strain, Sphingobium japonicum UT26, revealed that the genome consists of two circular chromosomes [with sizes of 3.5 Mb (Chr1) and 682kb (Chr2)], a 191-kb large plasmid (pCHQ1), and two small plasmids with sizes of 32 and 5kb. The lin genes are dispersed on Chr1, Chr2, and pCHQ1. Comparison of the UT26 genome with those of other sphingomonad strains demonstrated that the "specific"lin genes for conversion of γ-HCH to β-ketoadipate (linA, linB, linC, linRED, and linF) are located on the DNA regions unique to the UT26 genome, suggesting the acquisition of these lin genes by horizontal transfer events. On the other hand, linGHIJ and linKLMN are located on the regions conserved in the genomes of sphingomonads, suggesting that the linGHIJ-encoded β-ketoadipate pathway and the LinKLMN-type ABC transporter system are involved in core functions of sphingomonads. Based on these results, we propose a hypothesis that UT26 was created by recruiting the specific lin genes into a strain having core functions of sphingomonads. Most of the specific lin genes in UT26 are associated with IS6100. Our analysis of spontaneous linA-, linC-, and linRED-deletion mutants of UT26 revealed the involvement of IS6100 in their deduced genome rearrangements. These facts strongly suggest that IS6100 plays important roles both in the dissemination of the specific lin genes and in the genome rearrangements.

  11. Structural Relationships between Highly Conserved Elements and Genes in Vertebrate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Skogerbø, Geir; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Wei; Li, Yixue

    2008-01-01

    Large numbers of sequence elements have been identified to be highly conserved among vertebrate genomes. These highly conserved elements (HCEs) are often located in or around genes that are involved in transcription regulation and early development. They have been shown to be involved in cis-regulatory activities through both in vivo and additional computational studies. We have investigated the structural relationships between such elements and genes in six vertebrate genomes human, mouse, rat, chicken, zebrafish and tetraodon and detected several thousand cases of conserved HCE-gene associations, and also cases of HCEs with no common target genes. A few examples underscore the potential significance of our findings about several individual genes. We found that the conserved association between HCE/HCEs and gene/genes are not restricted to elements by their absolute distance on the genome. Notably, long-range associations were identified and the molecular functions of the associated genes do not show any particular overrepresentation of the functional categories previously reported. HCEs in close proximity are found to be linked with different set of gene/genes. The results reflect the highly complex correlation between HCEs and their putative target genes. PMID:19008958

  12. Primary structure of the human follistatin precursor and its genomic organization

    SciTech Connect

    Shimasaki, Shunichi; Koga, Makoto; Esch, F.; Cooksey, K.; Mercado, M.; Koba, A.; Ueno, Naoto; Ying, Shaoyao; Ling, N.; Guillemin, R. )

    1988-06-01

    Follistatin is a single-chain gonadal protein that specifically inhibits follicle-stimulating hormone release. By use of the recently characterized porcine follistatin cDNA as a probe to screen a human testis cDNA library and a genomic library, the structure of the complete human follistatin precursor as well as its genomic organization have been determined. Three of eight cDNA clones that were sequenced predicted a precursor with 344 amino acids, whereas the remaining five cDNA clones encoded a 317 amino acid precursor, resulting from alternative splicing of the precursor mRNA. Mature follistatins contain four contiguous domains that are encoded by precisely separated exons; three of the domains are highly similar to each other, as well as to human epidermal growth factor and human pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor. The genomic organization of the human follistatin is similar to that of the human epidermal growth factor gene and thus supports the notion of exon shuffling during evolution.

  13. Genomic diversity, population structure, and migration following rapid range expansion in the Balsam poplar, Populus balsamifera.

    PubMed

    Keller, Stephen R; Olson, Matthew S; Silim, Salim; Schroeder, William; Tiffin, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Rapid range expansions can cause pervasive changes in the genetic diversity and structure of populations. The postglacial history of the Balsam Poplar, Populus balsamifera, involved the colonization of most of northern North America, an area largely covered by continental ice sheets during the last glacial maximum. To characterize how this expansion shaped genomic diversity within and among populations, we developed 412 SNP markers that we assayed for a range-wide sample of 474 individuals sampled from 34 populations. We complemented the SNP data set with DNA sequence data from 11 nuclear loci from 94 individuals, and used coalescent analyses to estimate historical population size, demographic growth, and patterns of migration. Bayesian clustering identified three geographically separated demes found in the Northern, Central, and Eastern portions of the species' range. These demes varied significantly in nucleotide diversity, the abundance of private polymorphisms, and population substructure. Most measures supported the Central deme as descended from the primary refuge of diversity. Both SNPs and sequence data suggested recent population growth, and coalescent analyses of historical migration suggested a massive expansion from the Centre to the North and East. Collectively, these data demonstrate the strong influence that range expansions exert on genomic diversity, both within local populations and across the range. Our results suggest that an in-depth knowledge of nucleotide diversity following expansion requires sampling within multiple populations, and highlight the utility of combining insights from different data types in population genomic studies.

  14. Viral genome structures, charge, and sequences are optimal for capsid assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Michael

    2014-03-01

    For many viruses, the spontaneous assembly of a capsid shell around the nu-cleic acid (NA) genome is an essential step in the viral life cycle. Capsid formation is a multicomponent, out-of-equilibrium assembly process for which kinetic effects and thermodynamic constraints compete to determine the outcome. Understand-ing how viral components drive highly efficient assembly under these constraints could promote biomedical efforts to block viral propagation, and would elucidate the factors controlling assembly in a wide range of systems containing proteins and polyelectrolytes. This talk will describe coarse-grained models of capsid proteins and NAs with which we investigate the dynamics and thermodynamics of virus assembly. In con-trast to recent theoretical models, we find that capsids spontaneously `overcharge' that is, the NA length which is kinetically and thermodynamically optimal possess-es a negative charge greater than the positive charge of the capsid. When applied to specific virus capsids, the calculated optimal NA lengths closely correspond to the natural viral genome lengths. These results suggest that the features included in this model (i.e. electrostatics, excluded volume, and NA tertiary structure) play key roles in determining assembly thermodynamics and consequently exert selec-tive pressure on viral evolution. I will then discuss mechanisms by which se-quence-specific interactions between NAs and capsid proteins promote selective encapsidation of the viral genome. This work was supported by NIH R01GM108021 and the Brandeis MRSEC NSF-MRSEC-0820492.

  15. Genome-wide genetic diversity, population structure and admixture analysis in African and Asian cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Edea, Z; Bhuiyan, M S A; Dessie, T; Rothschild, M F; Dadi, H; Kim, K S

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge about genetic diversity and population structure is useful for designing effective strategies to improve the production, management and conservation of farm animal genetic resources. Here, we present a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of genetic diversity, population structure and admixture based on 244 animals sampled from 10 cattle populations in Asia and Africa and genotyped for 69,903 autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mainly derived from the indicine breed. Principal component analysis, STRUCTURE and distance analysis from high-density SNP data clearly revealed that the largest genetic difference occurred between the two domestic lineages (taurine and indicine), whereas Ethiopian cattle populations represent a mosaic of the humped zebu and taurine. Estimation of the genetic influence of zebu and taurine revealed that Ethiopian cattle were characterized by considerable levels of introgression from South Asian zebu, whereas Bangladeshi populations shared very low taurine ancestry. The relationships among Ethiopian cattle populations reflect their history of origin and admixture rather than phenotype-based distinctions. The high within-individual genetic variability observed in Ethiopian cattle represents an untapped opportunity for adaptation to changing environments and for implementation of within-breed genetic improvement schemes. Our results provide a basis for future applications of genome-wide SNP data to exploit the unique genetic makeup of indigenous cattle breeds and to facilitate their improvement and conservation.

  16. Evolutionary genomics reveals conserved structural determinants of signaling and adaptation in microbial chemoreceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Roger P; Jouline, Igor B

    2007-01-01

    As an important model for transmembrane signaling, methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) have been extensively studied by using genetic, biochemical, and structural techniques. However, details of the molecular mechanism of signaling are still not well understood. The availability of genomic information for hundreds of species enables the identification of features in protein sequences that are conserved over long evolutionary distances and thus are critically important for function. We carried out a large-scale comparative genomic analysis of the MCP signaling and adaptation domain family and identified features that appear to be critical for receptor structure and function. Based on domain length and sequence conservation, we identified seven major MCP classes and three distinct structural regions within the cytoplasmic domain: signaling, methylation, and flexible bundle subdomains. The flexible bundle subdomain, not previously recognized in MCPs, is a conserved element that appears to be important for signal transduction. Remarkably, the N- and C-terminal helical arms of the cytoplasmic domain maintain symmetry in length and register despite dramatic variation, from 24 to 64 7-aa heptads in overall domain length. Loss of symmetry is observed in some MCPs, where it is concomitant with specific changes in the sensory module. Each major MCP class has a distinct pattern of predicted methylation sites that is well supported by experimental data. Our findings indicate that signaling and adaptation functions within the MCP cytoplasmic domain are tightly coupled, and that their coevolution has contributed to the significant diversity in chemotaxis mechanisms among different organisms.

  17. Genome analysis: Assigning protein coding regions to three-dimensional structures.

    PubMed Central

    Salamov, A. A.; Suwa, M.; Orengo, C. A.; Swindells, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the results of a procedure for maximizing the number of sequences that can be reliably linked to a protein of known three-dimensional structure. Unlike other methods, which try to increase sensitivity through the use of fold recognition software, we only use conventional sequence alignment tools, but apply them in a manner that significantly increases the number of relationships detected. We analyzed 11 genomes and found that, depending on the genome, between 23 and 32% of the ORFs had significant matches to proteins of known structure. In all cases, the aligned region consisted of either >100 residues or >50% of the smaller sequence. Slightly higher percentages could be attained if smaller motifs were also included. This is significantly higher than most previously reported methods, even those that have a fold-recognition component. We survey the biochemical and structural characteristics of the most frequently occurring proteins, and discuss the extent to which alignment methods can realistically assign function to gene products. PMID:10211823

  18. Inferring gene structures in genomic sequences using pattern recognition and expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Mural, R J; Uberbacher, E C

    1997-01-01

    Computational methods for gene identification in genomic sequences typically have two phases: coding region prediction and gene parsing. While there are many effective methods for predicting coding regions (exons), parsing the predicted exons into proper gene structures, to a large extent, remains an unsolved problem. This paper presents an algorithm for inferring gene structures from predicted exon candidates, based on Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) and biological intuition/rules. The algorithm first finds all the related ESTs in the EST database (dbEST) for each predicted exon, and infers the boundaries of one or a series of genes based on the available EST information and biological rules. Then it constructs gene models within each pair of gene boundaries, that are most consistent with the EST information. By exploiting EST information and biological rules, the algorithm can (1) model complicated multiple gene structures, including embedded genes, (2) identify falsely-predicted exons and locate missed exons, and (3) make more accurate exon boundary predictions. The algorithm has been implemented and tested on long genomic sequences with a number of genes. Test results show that very accurate (predicted) gene models can be expected when related ESTs exist for the predicted exons.

  19. Update on the Pfam5000 Strategy for Selection of StructuralGenomics Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-06-27

    Structural Genomics is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy that is medically and biologically relevant, of good financial value, and tractable. In 2003, we presented the ''Pfam5000'' strategy, which involves selecting the 5,000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. In this update, we show that although both the Pfam database and the number of sequenced genomes have increased in size, the expected benefits of the Pfam5000 strategy have not changed substantially. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5,000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 65 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 54 percent of residues) and 63 percent of eukaryotic proteins (42 percent of residues). Fewer than 2,300 of the largest families on this list remain to be solved, making the project feasible in the next five years given the expected throughput to be achieved in the production phase of the Protein Structure Initiative.

  20. Inferring gene structures in genomic sequences using pattern recognition and expressed sequence tags

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Mural, R.; Uberbacher, E.

    1997-02-01

    Computational methods for gene identification in genomic sequences typically have two phases: coding region prediction and gene parsing. While there are many effective methods for predicting coding regions (exons), parsing the predicted exons into proper gene structures, to a large extent, remains an unsolved problem. This paper presents an algorithm for inferring gene structures from predicted exon candidates, based on Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) and biological intuition/rules. The algorithm first finds all the related ESTs in the EST database (dbEST) for each predicted exon, and infers the boundaries of one or a series of genes based on the available EST information and biological rules. Then it constructs gene models within each pair of gene boundaries, that are most consistent with the EST information. By exploiting EST information and biological rules, the algorithm can (1) model complicated multiple gene structures, including embedded genes, (2) identify falsely-predicted exons and locate missed exons, and (3) make more accurate exon boundary predictions. The algorithm has been implemented and tested on long genomic sequences with a number of genes. Test results show that very accurate (predicted) gene models can be expected when related ESTs exist for the predicted exons.

  1. Structure of Aichi Virus 1 and Its Empty Particle: Clues to Kobuvirus Genome Release Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sabin, Charles; Füzik, Tibor; Škubník, Karel; Pálková, Lenka; Lindberg, A. Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aichi virus 1 (AiV-1) is a human pathogen from the Kobuvirus genus of the Picornaviridae family. Worldwide, 80 to 95% of adults have antibodies against the virus. AiV-1 infections are associated with nausea, gastroenteritis, and fever. Unlike most picornaviruses, kobuvirus capsids are composed of only three types of subunits: VP0, VP1, and VP3. We present here the structure of the AiV-1 virion determined to a resolution of 2.1 Å using X-ray crystallography. The surface loop puff of VP0 and knob of VP3 in AiV-1 are shorter than those in other picornaviruses. Instead, the 42-residue BC loop of VP0 forms the most prominent surface feature of the AiV-1 virion. We determined the structure of AiV-1 empty particle to a resolution of 4.2 Å using cryo-electron microscopy. The empty capsids are expanded relative to the native virus. The N-terminal arms of capsid proteins VP0, which mediate contacts between the pentamers of capsid protein protomers in the native AiV-1 virion, are disordered in the empty capsid. Nevertheless, the empty particles are stable, at least in vitro, and do not contain pores that might serve as channels for genome release. Therefore, extensive and probably reversible local reorganization of AiV-1 capsid is required for its genome release. IMPORTANCE Aichi virus 1 (AiV-1) is a human pathogen that can cause diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and fever. AiV-1 is identified in environmental screening studies with higher frequency and greater abundance than other human enteric viruses. Accordingly, 80 to 95% of adults worldwide have suffered from AiV-1 infections. We determined the structure of the AiV-1 virion. Based on the structure, we show that antiviral compounds that were developed against related enteroviruses are unlikely to be effective against AiV-1. The surface of the AiV-1 virion has a unique topology distinct from other related viruses from the Picornaviridae family. We also determined that AiV-1 capsids form compact shells

  2. Mitochondrial Genome Sequences and Structures Aid in the Resolution of Piroplasmida phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Marr, Henry S.; Tarigo, Jaime L.; Cohn, Leah A.; Bird, David M.; Scholl, Elizabeth H.; Levy, Michael G.; Wiegmann, Brian M.; Birkenheuer, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    The taxonomy of the order Piroplasmida, which includes a number of clinically and economically relevant organisms, is a hotly debated topic amongst parasitologists. Three genera (Babesia, Theileria, and Cytauxzoon) are recognized based on parasite life cycle characteristics, but molecular phylogenetic analyses of 18S sequences have suggested the presence of five or more distinct Piroplasmida lineages. Despite these important advancements, a few studies have been unable to define the taxonomic relationships of some organisms (e.g. C. felis and T. equi) with respect to other Piroplasmida. Additional evidence from mitochondrial genome sequences and synteny should aid in the inference of Piroplasmida phylogeny and resolution of taxonomic uncertainties. In this study, we have amplified, sequenced, and annotated seven previously uncharacterized mitochondrial genomes (Babesia canis, Babesia vogeli, Babesia rossi, Babesia sp. Coco, Babesia conradae, Babesia microti-like sp., and Cytauxzoon felis) and identified additional ribosomal fragments in ten previously characterized mitochondrial genomes. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated mitochondrial and 18S sequences as well as cox1 amino acid sequence identified five distinct Piroplasmida groups, each of which possesses a unique mitochondrial genome structure. Specifically, our results confirm the existence of four previously identified clades (B. microti group, Babesia sensu stricto, Theileria equi, and a Babesia sensu latu group that includes B. conradae) while supporting the integration of Theileria and Cytauxzoon species into a single fifth taxon. Although known biological characteristics of Piroplasmida corroborate the proposed phylogeny, more investigation into parasite life cycles is warranted to further understand the evolution of the Piroplasmida. Our results provide an evolutionary framework for comparative biology of these important animal and human pathogens and help focus renewed efforts toward understanding the

  3. Target Selection and Deselection at the Berkeley StructuralGenomics Center

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-03-22

    At the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center (BSGC), our goalis to obtain a near-complete structural complement of proteins in theminimal organisms Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae, two closelyrelated pathogens. Current targets for structure determination have beenselected in six major stages, starting with those predicted to be mosttractable to high throughput study and likely to yield new structuralinformation. We report on the process used to select these proteins, aswell as our target deselection procedure. Target deselection reducesexperimental effort by eliminating targets similar to those recentlysolved by the structural biology community or other centers. We measurethe impact of the 69 structures solved at the BSGC as of July 2004 onstructure prediction coverage of the M. pneumoniae and M. genitaliumproteomes. The number of Mycoplasma proteins for which thefold couldfirst be reliably assigned based on structures solved at the BSGC (24 M.pneumoniae and 21 M. genitalium) is approximately 25 percent of the totalresulting from work at all structural genomics centers and the worldwidestructural biology community (94 M. pneumoniae and 86M. genitalium)during the same period. As the number of structures contributed by theBSGC during that period is less than 1 percent of the total worldwideoutput, the benefits of a focused target selection strategy are apparent.If the structures of all current targets were solved, the percentage ofM. pneumoniae proteins for which folds could be reliably assigned wouldincrease from approximately 57 percent (391 of 687) at present to around80 percent (550 of 687), and the percentage of the proteome that could beaccurately modeled would increase from around 37 percent (254 of 687) toabout 64 percent (438 of 687). In M. genitalium, the percentage of theproteome that could be structurally annotated based on structures of ourremaining targets would rise from 72 percent (348 of 486) to around 76percent (371 of 486), with the

  4. Probing viral genomic structure: alternative viewpoints and alternative structures for satellite tobacco mosaic virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Susan J

    2014-11-04

    Viral RNA structure prediction is a valuable tool for development of drugs against viral disease. This work discusses different approaches to predicting encapsidated viral RNA and highlights satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) RNA as a model system with excellent crystallography data. Fundamentally important issues for debate include thermodynamic versus kinetic control of virus assembly and the possible consequences of quasi-species in the primary structure on RNA secondary structure prediction of a single structure or an ensemble of structures. Multiple computational tools and chemical reagents are now available for improved viral RNA structure prediction. Two different predicted structures for encapsidated STMV RNA result from differences in three main areas: a different approach and philosophy to studying encapsidated viral RNA, an emphasis on different RNA motifs, and technical differences in computational methods and chemical reagents. The experiments with traditional chemical probing and SHAPE reagents are compared in terms of chemistry, results, and interpretation for STMV RNA as well as other RNA protein assemblies, such as the 5'UTR of HIV and the ribosome. This discussion of the challenges of viral RNA structure prediction will lead to new experiments and improved future predictions for viral RNA.

  5. LDRD Report FY 03: Structure and Function of Regulatory DNA: A Next Major Challenge in Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, L

    2003-02-18

    With the human genome sequence now available and high quality draft sequences of mouse, rat and many other creatures recently or soon to be released, the field of Genomics has entered an especially exciting phase. The raw materials for locating the {approx}30-40,000 human genes and understanding their basic structure are now online; next, the research community must begin to unravel the mechanisms through which those genes create the complexity of life. Laboratories around the world are already beginning to focus on cataloguing the times, sites and conditions under which each gene is active; others are racing to predict, and then experimentally analyze, the structures of proteins that human genes encode. These activities are extremely important, but they will not reveal the mechanisms through which the correct proteins are activated precisely in the specific cells and at the particular time that is required for normal developmental, health, and in response to the environment. Although we understand well the three-letter code through which genes dictate the production of proteins, the codes through which genes are turned on and off in precise, cell-specific patterns remain a mystery. Unraveling these codes are essential to understanding the functions of genes and the role of human genetic diversity in disease and environmental susceptibility. This problem also represents one of the most exciting challenges in modern biology, drawing in scientists from every discipline to develop the needed biological datasets, measurement technologies and algorithms. The LDRD effort that is the subject of this report was focused on establishing the basic technical and scientific foundations of a well-rounded program in gene regulatory biology at LLNL. The motivation for building these foundations was based on several drivers. First, with the sea-change in genomics, we sought to develop a new, exciting and foreward-thinking research focus for the LLNL genomics team, which could

  6. Assessment of Genetic Heterogeneity in Structured Plant Populations Using Multivariate Whole-Genome Regression Models

    PubMed Central

    Lehermeier, Christina; Schön, Chris-Carolin; de los Campos, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Plant breeding populations exhibit varying levels of structure and admixture; these features are likely to induce heterogeneity of marker effects across subpopulations. Traditionally, structure has been dealt with as a potential confounder, and various methods exist to “correct” for population stratification. However, these methods induce a mean correction that does not account for heterogeneity of marker effects. The animal breeding literature offers a few recent studies that consider modeling genetic heterogeneity in multibreed data, using multivariate models. However, these methods have received little attention in plant breeding where population structure can have different forms. In this article we address the problem of analyzing data from heterogeneous plant breeding populations, using three approaches: (a) a model that ignores population structure [A-genome-based best linear unbiased prediction (A-GBLUP)], (b) a stratified (i.e., within-group) analysis (W-GBLUP), and (c) a multivariate approach that uses multigroup data and accounts for heterogeneity (MG-GBLUP). The performance of the three models was assessed on three different data sets: a diversity panel of rice (Oryza sativa), a maize (Zea mays L.) half-sib panel, and a wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) data set that originated from plant breeding programs. The estimated genomic correlations between subpopulations varied from null to moderate, depending on the genetic distance between subpopulations and traits. Our assessment of prediction accuracy features cases where ignoring population structure leads to a parsimonious more powerful model as well as others where the multivariate and stratified approaches have higher predictive power. In general, the multivariate approach appeared slightly more robust than either the A- or the W-GBLUP. PMID:26122758

  7. Discovery of new enzymes and metabolic pathways by using structure and genome context.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Suwen; Kumar, Ritesh; Sakai, Ayano; Vetting, Matthew W; Wood, B McKay; Brown, Shoshana; Bonanno, Jeffery B; Hillerich, Brandan S; Seidel, Ronald D; Babbitt, Patricia C; Almo, Steven C; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Gerlt, John A; Cronan, John E; Jacobson, Matthew P

    2013-10-31

    Assigning valid functions to proteins identified in genome projects is challenging: overprediction and database annotation errors are the principal concerns. We and others are developing computation-guided strategies for functional discovery with 'metabolite docking' to experimentally derived or homology-based three-dimensional structures. Bacterial metabolic pathways often are encoded by 'genome neighbourhoods' (gene clusters and/or operons), which can provide important clues for functional assignment. We recently demonstrated the synergy of docking and pathway context by 'predicting' the intermediates in the glycolytic pathway in Escherichia coli. Metabolite docking to multiple binding proteins and enzymes in the same pathway increases the reliability of in silico predictions of substrate specificities because the pathway intermediates are structurally similar. Here we report that structure-guided approaches for predicting the substrate specificities of several enzymes encoded by a bacterial gene cluster allowed the correct prediction of the in vitro activity of a structurally characterized enzyme of unknown function (PDB 2PMQ), 2-epimerization of trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline betaine (tHyp-B) and cis-4-hydroxy-D-proline betaine (cHyp-B), and also the correct identification of the catabolic pathway in which Hyp-B 2-epimerase participates. The substrate-liganded pose predicted by virtual library screening (docking) was confirmed experimentally. The enzymatic activities in the predicted pathway were confirmed by in vitro assays and genetic analyses; the intermediates were identified by metabolomics; and repression of the genes encoding the pathway by high salt concentrations was established by transcriptomics, confirming the osmolyte role of tHyp-B. This study establishes the utility of structure-guided functional predictions to enable the discovery of new metabolic pathways.

  8. Whole genome comparison of a large collection of mycobacteriophages reveals a continuum of phage genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Pope, Welkin H; Bowman, Charles A; Russell, Daniel A; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Asai, David J; Cresawn, Steven G; Jacobs, William R; Hendrix, Roger W; Lawrence, Jeffrey G; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-04-28

    The bacteriophage population is large, dynamic, ancient, and genetically diverse. Limited genomic information shows that phage genomes are mosaic, and the genetic architecture of phage populations remains ill-defined. To understand the population structure of phages infecting a single host strain, we isolated, sequenced, and compared 627 phages of Mycobacterium smegmatis. Their genetic diversity is considerable, and there are 28 distinct genomic types (clusters) with related nucleotide sequences. However, amino acid sequence comparisons show pervasive genomic mosaicism, and quantification of inter-cluster and intra-cluster relatedness reveals a continuum of genetic diversity, albeit with uneven representation of different phages. Furthermore, rarefaction analysis shows that the mycobacteriophage population is not closed, and there is a constant influx of genes from other sources. Phage isolation and analysis was performed by a large consortium of academic institutions, illustrating the substantial benefits of a disseminated, structured program involving large numbers of freshman undergraduates in scientific discovery.

  9. The Aspergillus Genome Database: multispecies curation and incorporation of RNA-Seq data to improve structural gene annotations

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Gustavo C.; Arnaud, Martha B.; Inglis, Diane O.; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Binkley, Gail; Simison, Matt; Miyasato, Stuart R.; Binkley, Jonathan; Orvis, Joshua; Shah, Prachi; Wymore, Farrell; Sherlock, Gavin; Wortman, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    The Aspergillus Genome Database (AspGD; http://www.aspgd.org) is a freely available web-based resource that was designed for Aspergillus researchers and is also a valuable source of information for the entire fungal research community. In addition to being a repository and central point of access to genome, transcriptome and polymorphism data, AspGD hosts a comprehensive comparative genomics toolbox that facilitates the exploration of precomputed orthologs among the 20 currently available Aspergillus genomes. AspGD curators perform gene product annotation based on review of the literature for four key Aspergillus species: Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger. We have iteratively improved the structural annotation of Aspergillus genomes through the analysis of publicly available transcription data, mostly expressed sequenced tags, as described in a previous NAR Database article (Arnaud et al. 2012). In this update, we report substantive structural annotation improvements for A. nidulans, A. oryzae and A. fumigatus genomes based on recently available RNA-Seq data. Over 26 000 loci were updated across these species; although those primarily comprise the addition and extension of untranslated regions (UTRs), the new analysis also enabled over 1000 modifications affecting the coding sequence of genes in each target genome. PMID:24194595

  10. Mutational and structural analysis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using whole genome sequencing | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Abstract: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a genetically heterogeneous cancer comprising at least two molecular subtypes that differ in gene expression and distribution of mutations. Recently, application of genome/exome sequencing and RNA-seq to DLBCL has revealed numerous genes that are recurrent targets of somatic point mutation in this disease.

  11. From Genome to Structure and Back Again: A Family Portrait of the Transcarbamylases

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dashuang; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes in the transcarbamylase family catalyze the transfer of a carbamyl group from carbamyl phosphate (CP) to an amino group of a second substrate. The two best-characterized members, aspartate transcarbamylase (ATCase) and ornithine transcarbamylase (OTCase), are present in most organisms from bacteria to humans. Recently, structures of four new transcarbamylase members, N-acetyl-l-ornithine transcarbamylase (AOTCase), N-succinyl-l-ornithine transcarbamylase (SOTCase), ygeW encoded transcarbamylase (YTCase) and putrescine transcarbamylase (PTCase) have also been determined. Crystal structures of these enzymes have shown that they have a common overall fold with a trimer as their basic biological unit. The monomer structures share a common CP binding site in their N-terminal domain, but have different second substrate binding sites in their C-terminal domain. The discovery of three new transcarbamylases, l-2,3-diaminopropionate transcarbamylase (DPTCase), l-2,4-diaminobutyrate transcarbamylase (DBTCase) and ureidoglycine transcarbamylase (UGTCase), demonstrates that our knowledge and understanding of the spectrum of the transcarbamylase family is still incomplete. In this review, we summarize studies on the structures and function of transcarbamylases demonstrating how structural information helps to define biological function and how small structural differences govern enzyme specificity. Such information is important for correctly annotating transcarbamylase sequences in the genome databases and for identifying new members of the transcarbamylase family. PMID:26274952

  12. Deciphering the fine-structure of tribal admixture in the Bedouin population using genomic data.

    PubMed

    Markus, B; Alshafee, I; Birk, O S

    2014-02-01

    The Bedouin Israeli population is highly inbred and structured with a very high prevalence of recessive diseases. Many studies in the past two decades focused on linkage analysis in large, multiple consanguineous pedigrees of this population. The advent of high-throughput technologies motivated researchers to search for rare variants shared between smaller pedigrees, integrating data from clinically similar yet seemingly non-related sporadic cases. However, such analyses are challenging because, without pedigree data, there is no prior knowledge regarding possible relatedness between the sporadic cases. Here, we describe models and techniques for the study of relationships between pedigrees and use them for the inference of tribal co-ancestry, delineating the complex social interactions between different tribes in the Negev Bedouins of southern Israel. Through our analysis, we differentiate between tribes that share many yet small genomic segments because of co-ancestry versus tribes that share larger segments because of recent admixture. The emergent pattern is well correlated with the prevalence of rare mutations in the different tribes. Tribes that do not intermarry, mostly because of social restrictions, hold private mutations, whereas tribes that do intermarry demonstrate a genetic flow of mutations between them. Thus, social structure within an inbred community can be delineated through genomic data, with implications to genetic counseling and genetic mapping.

  13. Deciphering the fine-structure of tribal admixture in the Bedouin population using genomic data

    PubMed Central

    Markus, B; Alshafee, I; Birk, O S

    2014-01-01

    The Bedouin Israeli population is highly inbred and structured with a very high prevalence of recessive diseases. Many studies in the past two decades focused on linkage analysis in large, multiple consanguineous pedigrees of this population. The advent of high-throughput technologies motivated researchers to search for rare variants shared between smaller pedigrees, integrating data from clinically similar yet seemingly non-related sporadic cases. However, such analyses are challenging because, without pedigree data, there is no prior knowledge regarding possible relatedness between the sporadic cases. Here, we describe models and techniques for the study of relationships between pedigrees and use them for the inference of tribal co-ancestry, delineating the complex social interactions between different tribes in the Negev Bedouins of southern Israel. Through our analysis, we differentiate between tribes that share many yet small genomic segments because of co-ancestry versus tribes that share larger segments because of recent admixture. The emergent pattern is well correlated with the prevalence of rare mutations in the different tribes. Tribes that do not intermarry, mostly because of social restrictions, hold private mutations, whereas tribes that do intermarry demonstrate a genetic flow of mutations between them. Thus, social structure within an inbred community can be delineated through genomic data, with implications to genetic counseling and genetic mapping. PMID:24084643

  14. Structure of linkage disequilibrium and phenotypic associations in the maize genome

    PubMed Central

    Remington, David L.; Thornsberry, Jeffry M.; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Wilson, Larissa M.; Whitt, Sherry R.; Doebley, John; Kresovich, Stephen; Goodman, Major M.; Buckler, Edward S.

    2001-01-01

    Association studies based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) can provide high resolution for identifying genes that may contribute to phenotypic variation. We report patterns of local and genome-wide LD in 102 maize inbred lines representing much of the worldwide genetic diversity used in maize breeding, and address its implications for association studies in maize. In a survey of six genes, we found that intragenic LD generally declined rapidly with distance (r2 < 0.1 within 1500 bp), but rates of decline were highly variable among genes. This rapid decline probably reflects large effective population sizes in maize during its evolution and high levels of recombination within genes. A set of 47 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci showed stronger evidence of genome-wide LD than did single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes. LD was greatly reduced but not eliminated by grouping lines into three empirically determined subpopulations. SSR data also supplied evidence that divergent artificial selection on flowering time may have played a role in generating population structure. Provided the effects of population structure are effectively controlled, this research suggests that association studies show great promise for identifying the genetic basis of important traits in maize with very high resolution. PMID:11562485

  15. The International Pea Genome Sequencing Project: Sequencing and Assembly Progresses Updates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Consortium for the Pea Genome Sequencing (ICPG) includes scientists from six countries around the world. Its aim is to provide a high quality reference of the pea genome to the scientific community as well as to the pea breeder community. The consortium proposed a strategy that int...

  16. GO-FAANG meeting: A gathering on functional annotation of animal genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The FAANG (Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes) Consortium recently held a Gathering On FAANG (GO-FAANG) Workshop in Washington, DC on October 7-8, 2015. This consortium is a grass-roots organization formed to advance the annotation of newly assembled genomes of non-model organisms (www.faang.or...

  17. 40 CFR 35.504 - Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Consortium. 35.504 Section 35.504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER... § 35.504 Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium. (a) An Intertribal Consortium is eligible to receive grants under the authorities listed in § 35.501 only if the Consortium demonstrates that all members...

  18. 40 CFR 35.504 - Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Consortium. 35.504 Section 35.504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER... § 35.504 Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium. (a) An Intertribal Consortium is eligible to receive grants under the authorities listed in § 35.501 only if the Consortium demonstrates that all members...

  19. 24 CFR 943.122 - How is a consortium organized?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How is a consortium organized? 943... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.122 How is a consortium organized? (a) PHAs that elect to form a consortium enter into a consortium agreement among...

  20. 24 CFR 943.122 - How is a consortium organized?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How is a consortium organized? 943... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.122 How is a consortium organized? (a) PHAs that elect to form a consortium enter into a consortium agreement among...

  1. 24 CFR 943.122 - How is a consortium organized?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How is a consortium organized? 943... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.122 How is a consortium organized? (a) PHAs that elect to form a consortium enter into a consortium agreement among...

  2. 40 CFR 35.504 - Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Consortium. 35.504 Section 35.504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER... § 35.504 Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium. (a) An Intertribal Consortium is eligible to receive grants under the authorities listed in § 35.501 only if the Consortium demonstrates that all members...

  3. 24 CFR 943.122 - How is a consortium organized?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How is a consortium organized? 943... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.122 How is a consortium organized? (a) PHAs that elect to form a consortium enter into a consortium agreement among...

  4. Establishing an International Soil Modelling Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Soil is one of the most critical life-supporting compartments of the Biosphere. Soil provides numerous ecosystem services such as a habitat for biodiversity, water and nutrients, as well as producing food, feed, fiber and energy. To feed the rapidly growing world population in 2050, agricultural food production must be doubled using the same land resources footprint. At the same time, soil resources are threatened due to improper management and climate change. Soil is not only essential for establishing a sustainable bio-economy, but also plays a key role also in a broad range of societal challenges including 1) climate change mitigation and adaptation, 2) land use change 3) water resource protection, 4) biotechnology for human health, 5) biodiversity and ecological sustainability, and 6) combating desertification. Soils regulate and support water, mass and energy fluxes between the land surface, the vegetation, the atmosphere and the deep subsurface and control storage and release of organic matter affecting climate regulation and biogeochemical cycles. Despite the many important functions of soil, many fundamental knowledge gaps remain, regarding the role of soil biota and biodiversity on ecosystem services, the structure and dynamics of soil communities, the interplay between hydrologic and biotic processes, the quantification of soil biogeochemical processes and soil structural processes, the resilience and recovery of soils from stress, as well as the prediction of soil development and the evolution of soils in the landscape, to name a few. Soil models have long played an important role in quantifying and predicting soil processes and related ecosystem services. However, a new generation of soil models based on a whole systems approach comprising all physical, mechanical, chemical and biological processes is now required to address these critical knowledge gaps and thus contribute to the preservation of ecosystem services, improve our understanding of climate

  5. MPE-seq, a new method for the genome-wide analysis of chromatin structure

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Haruhiko; Kadonaga, James T.; Ren, Bing

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of chromatin structure is essential for the understanding of transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes. Here we describe methidiumpropyl-EDTA sequencing (MPE-seq), a method for the genome-wide characterization of chromatin that involves the digestion of nuclei withMPE-Fe(II) followed by massively parallel sequencing. Like micrococcal nuclease (MNase), MPE-Fe(II) preferentially cleaves the linker DNA between nucleosomes. However, there are differences in the cleavage of nuclear chromatin by MPE-Fe(II) relative to MNase. Most notably, immediately upstream of the transcription start site of active promoters, we frequently observed nucleosome-sized (141–190 bp) and subnucleosome-sized (such as 101–140 bp) peaks of digested chromatin fragments with MPE-seq but not with MNase-seq. These peaks also correlate with the presence of core histones and could thus be due, at least in part, to noncanonical chromatin structures such as labile nucleosome-like particles that have been observed in other contexts. The subnucleosome-sized MPE-seq peaks exhibit a particularly distinct association with active promoters. In addition, unlike MNase, MPE-Fe(II) cleaves nuclear DNA with little sequence bias. In this regard, we found that DNA sequences at RNA splice sites are hypersensitive to digestion by MNase but not by MPE-Fe(II). This phenomenon may have affected the analysis of nucleosome occupancy over exons. These findings collectively indicate that MPE-seq provides a unique and straightforward means for the genome-wide analysis of chromatin structure with minimal DNA sequence bias. In particular, the combined use of MPE-seq and MNase-seq enables the identification of noncanonical chromatin structures that are likely to be important for the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26080409

  6. Population genomics of dengue virus serotype 4: insights into genetic structure and evolution.

    PubMed

    Waman, Vaishali P; Kasibhatla, Sunitha Manjari; Kale, Mohan M; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila

    2016-08-01

    The spread of dengue disease has become a global public health concern. Dengue is caused by dengue virus, which is a mosquito-borne arbovirus of the genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae. There are four dengue virus serotypes (1-4), each of which is known to trigger mild to severe disease. Dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4) has four genotypes and is increasingly being reported to be re-emerging in various parts of the world. Therefore, the population structure and factors shaping the evolution of DENV-4 strains across the world were studied using genome-based population genetic, phylogenetic and selection pressure analysis methods. The population genomics study helped to reveal the spatiotemporal structure of the DENV-4 population and its primary division into two spatially distinct clusters: American and Asian. These spatial clusters show further time-dependent subdivisions within genotypes I and II. Thus, the DENV-4 population is observed to be stratified into eight genetically distinct lineages, two of which are formed by American strains and six of which are formed by Asian strains. Episodic positive selection was observed in the structural (E) and non-structural (NS2A and NS3) genes, which appears to be responsible for diversification of Asian lineages in general and that of modern lineages of genotype I and II in particular. In summary, the global DENV-4 population is stratified into eight genetically distinct lineages, in a spatiotemporal manner with limited recombination. The significant role of adaptive evolution in causing diversification of DENV-4 lineages is discussed. The evolution of DENV-4 appears to be governed by interplay between spatiotemporal distribution, episodic positive selection and intra/inter-genotype recombination.

  7. Age-Related Somatic Structural Changes in the Nuclear Genome of Human Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Lars A.; Rasi, Chiara; Razzaghian, Hamid R.; Pakalapati, Geeta; Waite, Lindsay; Thilbeault, Krista Stanton; Ronowicz, Anna; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Boomsma, Dorret; Westerman, Maxwell P.; Harris, Jennifer R.; Lyle, Robert; Essand, Magnus; Eriksson, Fredrik; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Iribarren, Carlos; Strachan, Eric; O'Hanlon, Terrance P.; Rider, Lisa G.; Miller, Frederick W.; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Lannfelt, Lars; Ingelsson, Martin; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Absher, Devin; Dumanski, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Structural variations are among the most frequent interindividual genetic differences in the human genome. The frequency and distribution of de novo somatic structural variants in normal cells is, however, poorly explored. Using age-stratified cohorts of 318 monozygotic (MZ) twins and 296 single-born subjects, we describe age-related accumulation of copy-number variation in the nuclear genomes in vivo and frequency changes for both megabase- and kilobase-range variants. Megabase-range aberrations were found in 3.4% (9 of 264) of subjects ≥60 years old; these subjects included 78 MZ twin pairs and 108 single-born individuals. No such findings were observed in 81 MZ pairs or 180 single-born subjects who were ≤55 years old. Recurrent region- and gene-specific mutations, mostly deletions, were observed. Longitudinal analyses of 43 subjects whose data were collected 7–19 years apart suggest considerable variation in the rate of accumulation of clones carrying structural changes. Furthermore, the longitudinal analysis of individuals with structural aberrations suggests that there is a natural self-removal of aberrant cell clones from peripheral blood. In three healthy subjects, we detected somatic aberrations characteristic of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. The recurrent rearrangements uncovered here are candidates for common age-related defects in human blood cells. We anticipate that extension of these results will allow determination of the genetic age of different somatic-cell lineages and estimation of possible individual differences between genetic and chronological age. Our work might also help to explain the cause of an age-related reduction in the number of cell clones in the blood; such a reduction is one of the hallmarks of immunosenescence. PMID:22305530

  8. Niches, Population Structure and Genome Reduction in Ochrobactrum intermedium: Clues to Technology-Driven Emergence of Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Aujoulat, Fabien; Romano-Bertrand, Sara; Masnou, Agnès; Marchandin, Hélène; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle

    2014-01-01

    Ochrobactrum intermedium is considered as an emerging human environmental opportunistic pathogen with mild virulence. The distribution of isolates and sequences described in literature and databases showed frequent association with human beings and polluted environments. As population structures are related to bacterial lifestyles, we investigated by multi-locus approach the genetic structure of a population of 65 isolates representative of the known natural distribution of O. intermedium. The population was further surveyed for genome dynamics using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and genomics. The population displayed a clonal epidemic structure with events of recombination that occurred mainly in clonal complexes. Concerning biogeography, clones were shared by human and environments and were both cosmopolitan and local. The main cosmopolitan clone was genetically and genomically stable, and grouped isolates that all harbored an atypical insertion in the rrs. Ubiquitism and stability of this major clone suggested a clonal succes in a particular niche. Events of genomic reduction were detected in the population and the deleted genomic content was described for one isolate. O. intermedium displayed allopatric characters associated to a tendancy of genome reduction suggesting a specialization process. Considering its relatedness with Brucella, this specialization might be a commitment toward pathogenic life-style that could be driven by technological selective pressure related medical and industrial technologies. PMID:24465379

  9. The LBNL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses the 11 year of accomplishments of the science consortium of minority graduates from Jackson State University and Ana G. Mendez University at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  10. CORAL DISEASE & HEALTH CONSORTIUM: FINDING SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Department of Interior (DOI) developed the framework for a Coral Disease and Health Consortium (CDHC) for the United States Coral Reef Task Force (USCRTF) through an interag...

  11. The international serious adverse events consortium.

    PubMed

    Holden, Arthur L; Contreras, Jorge L; John, Sally; Nelson, Matthew R

    2014-11-01

    The International Serious Adverse Events Consortium is generating novel insights into the genetics and biology of drug-induced serious adverse events, and thereby improving pharmaceutical product development and decision-making.

  12. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

    Cancer.gov

    A consortium designed to enhance collaboration among epidemiologists studying lymphoma, to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas, and to create a framework for collaborating on analyses that pool data from multiple studies

  13. NASA Space Radiation Transport Code Development Consortium.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Lawrence W

    2005-01-01

    Recently, NASA established a consortium involving the University of Tennessee (lead institution), the University of Houston, Roanoke College and various government and national laboratories, to accelerate the development of a standard set of radiation transport computer codes for NASA human exploration applications. This effort involves further improvements of the Monte Carlo codes HETC and FLUKA and the deterministic code HZETRN, including developing nuclear reaction databases necessary to extend the Monte Carlo codes to carry out heavy ion transport, and extending HZETRN to three dimensions. The improved codes will be validated by comparing predictions with measured laboratory transport data, provided by an experimental measurements consortium, and measurements in the upper atmosphere on the balloon-borne Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB). In this paper, we present an overview of the consortium members and the current status and future plans of consortium efforts to meet the research goals and objectives of this extensive undertaking.

  14. Genome-Wide Study of Structural Variants in Bovine Holstein, Montbéliarde and Normande Dairy Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Boussaha, Mekki; Esquerré, Diane; Barbieri, Johanna; Djari, Anis; Pinton, Alain; Letaief, Rabia; Salin, Gérald; Escudié, Frédéric; Roulet, Alain; Fritz, Sébastien; Samson, Franck; Grohs, Cécile; Bernard, Maria; Klopp, Christophe; Boichard, Didier; Rocha, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have offered in recent years new opportunities to study genome variations. These studies have mostly focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms, small insertions or deletions and on copy number variants. Other structural variants, such as large insertions or deletions, tandem duplications, translocations, and inversions are less well-studied, despite that some have an important impact on phenotypes. In the present study, we performed a large-scale survey of structural variants in cattle. We report the identification of 6,426 putative structural variants in cattle extracted from whole-genome sequence data of 62 bulls representing the three major French dairy breeds. These genomic variants affect DNA segments greater than 50 base pairs and correspond to deletions, inversions and tandem duplications. Out of these, we identified a total of 547 deletions and 410 tandem duplications which could potentially code for CNVs. Experimental validation was carried out on 331 structural variants using a novel high-throughput genotyping method. Out of these, 255 structural variants (77%) generated good quality genotypes and 191 (75%) of them were validated. Gene content analyses in structural variant regions revealed 941 large deletions removing completely one or several genes, including 10 single-copy genes. In addition, some of the structural variants are located within quantitative trait loci for dairy traits. This study is a pan-genome assessment of genomic variations in cattle and may provide a new glimpse into the bovine genome architecture. Our results may also help to study the effects of structural variants on gene expression and consequently their effect on certain phenotypes of interest. PMID:26317361

  15. Genome-Wide Study of Structural Variants in Bovine Holstein, Montbéliarde and Normande Dairy Breeds.

    PubMed

    Boussaha, Mekki; Esquerré, Diane; Barbieri, Johanna; Djari, Anis; Pinton, Alain; Letaief, Rabia; Salin, Gérald; Escudié, Frédéric; Roulet, Alain; Fritz, Sébastien; Samson, Franck; Grohs, Cécile; Bernard, Maria; Klopp, Christophe; Boichard, Didier; Rocha, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have offered in recent years new opportunities to study genome variations. These studies have mostly focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms, small insertions or deletions and on copy number variants. Other structural variants, such as large insertions or deletions, tandem duplications, translocations, and inversions are less well-studied, despite that some have an important impact on phenotypes. In the present study, we performed a large-scale survey of structural variants in cattle. We report the identification of 6,426 putative structural variants in cattle extracted from whole-genome sequence data of 62 bulls representing the three major French dairy breeds. These genomic variants affect DNA segments greater than 50 base pairs and correspond to deletions, inversions and tandem duplications. Out of these, we identified a total of 547 deletions and 410 tandem duplications which could potentially code for CNVs. Experimental validation was carried out on 331 structural variants using a novel high-throughput genotyping method. Out of these, 255 structural variants (77%) generated good quality genotypes and 191 (75%) of them were validated. Gene content analyses in structural variant regions revealed 941 large deletions removing completely one or several genes, including 10 single-copy genes. In addition, some of the structural variants are located within quantitative trait loci for dairy traits. This study is a pan-genome assessment of genomic variations in cattle and may provide a new glimpse into the bovine genome architecture. Our results may also help to study the effects of structural variants on gene expression and consequently their effect on certain phenotypes of interest.

  16. Population structure and linkage disequilibrium in oat (Avena sativa L.): implications for genome-wide association studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The level of population structure and the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) can have large impacts on the power, resolution, and design of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in plants. Until recently, the topics of LD and population structure have not been explored in oat due to the lack of...

  17. Report on three Genomes to Life Workshops: Data Infrastructure, Modeling and Simulation, and Protein Structure Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, GA

    2003-09-16

    On July 22, 23, 24, 2003, three one day workshops were held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Each was attended by about 30 computational biologists, mathematicians, and computer scientists who were experts in the respective workshop areas The first workshop discussed the data infrastructure needs for the Genomes to Life (GTL) program with the objective to identify gaps in the present GTL data infrastructure and define the GTL data infrastructure required for the success of the proposed GTL facilities. The second workshop discussed the modeling and simulation needs for the next phase of the GTL program and defined how these relate to the experimental data generated by genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. The third workshop identified emerging technical challenges in computational protein structure prediction for DOE missions and outlining specific goals for the next phase of GTL. The workshops were attended by representatives from both OBER and OASCR. The invited experts at each of the workshops made short presentations on what they perceived as the key needs in the GTL data infrastructure, modeling and simulation, and structure prediction respectively. Each presentation was followed by a lively discussion by all the workshop attendees. The following findings and recommendations were derived from the three workshops. A seamless integration of GTL data spanning the entire range of genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics will be extremely challenging but it has to be treated as the first-class component of the GTL program to assure GTL's chances for success. High-throughput GTL facilities and ultrascale computing will make it possible to address the ultimate goal of modern biology: to achieve a fundamental, comprehensive, and systematic understanding of life. But first the GTL community needs to address the problem of the massive quantities and increased complexity of biological data produced by experiments and computations. Genome-scale collection, analysis

  18. Fast and accurate search for non-coding RNA pseudoknot structures in genomes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhibin; Wu, Yong; Robertson, Joseph; Feng, Liang; Malmberg, Russell L.; Cai, Liming

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Searching genomes for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) by their secondary structure has become an important goal for bioinformatics. For pseudoknot-free structures, ncRNA search can be effective based on the covariance model and CYK-type dynamic programming. However, the computational difficulty in aligning an RNA sequence to a pseudoknot has prohibited fast and accurate search of arbitrary RNA structures. Our previous work introduced a graph model for RNA pseudoknots and proposed to solve the structure–sequence alignment by graph optimization. Given k candidate regions in the target sequence for each of the n stems in the structure, we could compute a best alignment in time O(ktn) based upon a tree width t decomposition of the structure graph. However, to implement this method to programs that can routinely perform fast yet accurate RNA pseudoknot searches, we need novel heuristics to ensure that, without degrading the accuracy, only a small number of stem candidates need to be examined and a tree decomposition of a small tree width can always be found for the structure graph. Results: The current work builds on the previous one with newly developed preprocessing algorithms to reduce the values for parameters k and t and to implement the search method into a practical program, called RNATOPS, for RNA pseudoknot search. In particular, we introduce techniques, based on probabilistic profiling and distance penalty functions, which can identify for every stem just a small number k (e.g. k ≤ 10) of plausible regions in the target sequence to which the stem needs to align. We also devised a specialized tree decomposition algorithm that can yield tree decomposition of small tree width t (e.g. t ≤ 4) for almost all RNA structure graphs. Our experiments show that with RNATOPS it is possible to routinely search prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes for specific RNA structures of medium to large sizes, including pseudoknots, with high sensitivity and high

  19. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. PMID:25428369

  20. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology.

  1. Population Genomic Analysis of Ancient and Modern Genomes Yields New Insights into the Genetic Ancestry of the Tyrolean Iceman and the Genetic Structure of Europe

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Martin; Carpenter, Meredith L.; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Henn, Brenna M.; Underhill, Peter A.; Sánchez-Quinto, Federico; Zara, Ilenia; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Busonero, Fabio; Maschio, Andrea; Angius, Andrea; Jones, Chris; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Nekhrizov, Georgi; Dimitrova, Diana; Theodossiev, Nikola; Harkins, Timothy T.; Keller, Andreas; Maixner, Frank; Zink, Albert; Abecasis, Goncalo; Sanna, Serena; Cucca, Francesco; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing of the 5,300-year-old mummy of the Tyrolean Iceman, found in 1991 on a glacier near the border of Italy and Austria, has yielded new insights into his origin and relationship to modern European populations. A key finding of that study was an apparent recent common ancestry with individuals from Sardinia, based largely on the Y chromosome haplogroup and common autosomal SNP variation. Here, we compiled and analyzed genomic datasets from both modern and ancient Europeans, including genome sequence data from over 400 Sardinians and two ancient Thracians from Bulgaria, to investigate this result in greater detail and determine its implications for the genetic structure of Neolithic Europe. Using whole-genome sequencing data, we confirm that the Iceman is, indeed, most closely related to Sardinians. Furthermore, we show that this relationship extends to other individuals from cultural contexts associated with the spread of agriculture during the Neolithic transition, in contrast to individuals from a hunter-gatherer context. We hypothesize that this genetic affinity of ancient samples from different parts of Europe with Sardinians represents a common genetic component that was geographically widespread across Europe during the Neolithic, likely related to migrations and population expansions associated with the spread of agriculture. PMID:24809476

  2. The mitochondrial genome of the red alga Kappaphycus striatus ("Green Sacol" variety): complete nucleotide sequence, genome structure and organization, and comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Tablizo, Francis A; Lluisma, Arturo O

    2014-12-01

    The complete mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequence of the rhodophyte Kappaphycus striatus ("Green Sacol" variety) was determined. The mtDNA is circular, 25,242 bases long (A+T content: 69.94%), and contains 50 densely packed genes comprising 93.22% of the mitochondrial genome, with genes encoded on both strands. Through comparative analysis, the overall sequence, genome structure, and organization of K. striatus mtDNA were seen to be highly similar with other fully sequenced mitochondrial genomes of the class Florideophyceae. On the other hand, certain degrees of genome rearrangements and greater sequence dissimilarities were observed for the mtDNAs of other evolutionarily distant red algae, such as those from the class Bangiophyceae and Cyanidiophyceae, compared to that of K. striatus. Furthermore, a trend was observed wherein the red algal mtDNAs tend to encode lesser number of protein-coding genes, albeit not necessarily s