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Sample records for structural plasticity controlled

  1. Structural Plasticity Controlled by Calcium Based Correlation Detection

    PubMed Central

    Helias, Moritz; Rotter, Stefan; Gewaltig, Marc-Oliver; Diesmann, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Hebbian learning in cortical networks during development and adulthood relies on the presence of a mechanism to detect correlation between the presynaptic and the postsynaptic spiking activity. Recently, the calcium concentration in spines was experimentally shown to be a correlation sensitive signal with the necessary properties: it is confined to the spine volume, it depends on the relative timing of pre- and postsynaptic action potentials, and it is independent of the spine's location along the dendrite. NMDA receptors are a candidate mediator for the correlation dependent calcium signal. Here, we present a quantitative model of correlation detection in synapses based on the calcium influx through NMDA receptors under realistic conditions of irregular pre- and postsynaptic spiking activity with pairwise correlation. Our analytical framework captures the interaction of the learning rule and the correlation dynamics of the neurons. We find that a simple thresholding mechanism can act as a sensitive and reliable correlation detector at physiological firing rates. Furthermore, the mechanism is sensitive to correlation among afferent synapses by cooperation and competition. In our model this mechanism controls synapse formation and elimination. We explain how synapse elimination leads to firing rate homeostasis and show that the connectivity structure is shaped by the correlations between neighboring inputs. PMID:19129936

  2. Translational control of auditory imprinting and structural plasticity by eIF2α

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Gervasio; Johnson, Jennifer Leigh; Dominguez, Elena; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Pena, Jose L

    2016-01-01

    The formation of imprinted memories during a critical period is crucial for vital behaviors, including filial attachment. Yet, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Using a combination of behavior, pharmacology, in vivo surface sensing of translation (SUnSET) and DiOlistic labeling we found that, translational control by the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) bidirectionally regulates auditory but not visual imprinting and related changes in structural plasticity in chickens. Increasing phosphorylation of eIF2α (p-eIF2α) reduces translation rates and spine plasticity, and selectively impairs auditory imprinting. By contrast, inhibition of an eIF2α kinase or blocking the translational program controlled by p-eIF2α enhances auditory imprinting. Importantly, these manipulations are able to reopen the critical period. Thus, we have identified a translational control mechanism that selectively underlies auditory imprinting. Restoring translational control of eIF2α holds the promise to rejuvenate adult brain plasticity and restore learning and memory in a variety of cognitive disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17197.001 PMID:28009255

  3. Extracellular matrix control of dendritic spine and synapse structure and plasticity in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Aaron D.; Omar, Mitchell H.; Koleske, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the receptive contacts at most excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. Spines are dynamic in the developing brain, changing shape as they mature as well as appearing and disappearing as they make and break connections. Spines become much more stable in adulthood, and spine structure must be actively maintained to support established circuit function. At the same time, adult spines must retain some plasticity so their structure can be modified by activity and experience. As such, the regulation of spine stability and remodeling in the adult animal is critical for normal function, and disruption of these processes is associated with a variety of late onset diseases including schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. The extracellular matrix (ECM), composed of a meshwork of proteins and proteoglycans, is a critical regulator of spine and synapse stability and plasticity. While the role of ECM receptors in spine regulation has been extensively studied, considerably less research has focused directly on the role of specific ECM ligands. Here, we review the evidence for a role of several brain ECM ligands and remodeling proteases in the regulation of dendritic spine and synapse formation, plasticity, and stability in adults. PMID:25368556

  4. Cocaine activates Rac1 to control structural and behavioral plasticity in caudate putamen.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Zhenzhong; Xie, Minjuan; Huang, Lu; Xue, Jinhua; Liu, Yutong; Liu, Nuyun; Guo, Fukun; Zheng, Yi; Kong, Jiming; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Lu

    2015-03-01

    Repeated exposure to cocaine was previously found to cause sensitized behavioral responses and structural remodeling on medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate putamen (CPu). Rac1 has emerged as a key integrator of environmental cues that regulates dendritic cytoskeletons. In this study, we investigated the role of Rac1 in cocaine-induced dendritic and behavioral plasticity in the CPu. We found that Rac1 activation was reduced in the NAc but increased in the CPu following repeated cocaine treatment. Inhibition of Rac1 activity by a Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766, overexpression of a dominant negative mutant of Rac1 (T17N-Rac1) or local knockout of Rac1 attenuated the cocaine-induced increase in dendrites and spine density in the CPu, whereas overexpression of a constitutively active Rac1 exert the opposite effect. Moreover, NSC23766 reversed the increased number of asymmetric spine synapses in the CPu following chronic cocaine exposure. Downregulation of Rac1 activity likewise attenuates behavioral reward responses to cocaine exposure, with activation of Rac1 producing the opposite effect. Thus, Rac1 signaling is differentially regulated in the NAc and CPu after repeated cocaine treatment, and induction of Rac1 activation in the CPu is important for cocaine exposure-induced dendritic remodeling and behavioral plasticity.

  5. Reinforced structural plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubowitz, H. R.; Kendrick, W. P.; Jones, J. F.; Thorpe, R. S.; Burns, E. A. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    Reinforced polyimide structures are described. Reinforcing materials are impregnated with a suspension of polyimide prepolymer and bonded together by heat and pressure to form a cured, hard-reinforced, polyimide structure.

  6. Plastics Pollution Control Technology Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    various machines, the plastics processor, the pulper, and the compactor, being developed to address the plastics problem firsthand. The Dialogue...incinerators themselves may not be a part of the Navy’s solution to the plastics problem , the space that the incinerators occupy will be useful. It is the... plastics problem although they believe that the Navy will not be in compliance by 1993. They suggested that a change in the law which will allow them to keep

  7. Damage Diagnosis for Elasto-Plastic Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    nonsta- tionary. The stiffness matrix is nonlinear to simulate the elasto-plastic behavior of a damaged structure. The stiffness matrix is also random...23 3.2 Small length cut from a beam .... ............... . 24 3.3 Stress-strain curve of elasto-plastic material ...... . 26...excitation. The stiffness matrix is nonlinear to simulate the elasto-plastic behavior of a damaged structure. The stiffness matrix is also random to

  8. Structural plasticity and reorganisation in chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kuner, Rohini; Flor, Herta

    2016-12-15

    Chronic pain is not simply a temporal continuum of acute pain. Studies on functional plasticity in neural circuits of pain have provided mechanistic insights and linked various modulatory factors to a change in perception and behaviour. However, plasticity also occurs in the context of structural remodelling and reorganisation of synapses, cells and circuits, potentially contributing to the long-term nature of chronic pain. This Review discusses maladaptive structural plasticity in neural circuits of pain, spanning multiple anatomical and spatial scales in animal models and human patients, and addresses key questions on structure-function relationships.

  9. Microwave interferometer controls cutting depth of plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.

    1969-01-01

    Microwave interferometer system controls the cutting of plastic materials to a prescribed depth. The interferometer is mounted on a carriage with a spindle and cutting tool. A cross slide, mounted on the carriage, allows the interferometer and cutter to move toward or away from the plastic workpiece.

  10. Interface controlled plastic flow modelled by strain gradient plasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoen, Thomas; Massart, Thierry J.

    The resistance to plastic flow in metals is often dominated by the presence of interfaces which interfere with dislocation nucleation and motion. Interfaces can be static such as grain and phase boundaries or dynamic such as new boundaries resulting from a phase transformation. The interface can be hard and fully impenetrable to dislocations, or soft and partly or fully transparent. The interactions between dislocations and interfaces constitute the main mechanism controlling the strength and strain hardening capacity of many metallic systems especially in very fine microstructures with a high density of interfaces. A phenomenological strain gradient plasticity theory is used to introduce, within a continuum framework, higher order boundary conditions which empirically represent the effect of interfaces on plastic flow. The strength of the interfaces can evolve during the loading in order to enrich the description of their response. The behaviour of single and dual phase steels, with possible TRIP effect, accounting for the interactions with static and dynamic boundaries, is addressed, with a specific focus on the size dependent strength and ductility balance. The size dependent response of weak precipitate free zones surrounding grain boundaries is treated as an example involving more than one microstructural length scale.

  11. Structure, function, and plasticity of GABA transporters

    PubMed Central

    Scimemi, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    GABA transporters belong to a large family of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters. They are widely expressed throughout the brain, with different levels of expression in different brain regions. GABA transporters are present in neurons and in astrocytes and their activity is crucial to regulate the extracellular concentration of GABA under basal conditions and during ongoing synaptic events. Numerous efforts have been devoted to determine the structural and functional properties of GABA transporters. There is also evidence that the expression of GABA transporters on the cell membrane and their lateral mobility can be modulated by different intracellular signaling cascades. The strength of individual synaptic contacts and the activity of entire neuronal networks may be finely tuned by altering the density, distribution and diffusion rate of GABA transporters within the cell membrane. These findings are intriguing because they suggest the existence of complex regulatory systems that control the plasticity of GABAergic transmission in the brain. Here we review the current knowledge on the structural and functional properties of GABA transporters and highlight the molecular mechanisms that alter the expression and mobility of GABA transporters at central synapses. PMID:24987330

  12. Nanoscale analysis of structural synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Jennifer N.; Harris, Kristen M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 1950’s, transmission electron microscopy was first used to reveal the diversity in synaptic structure and composition in the central nervous system [1;2]. Since then, visualization and reconstruction of serial thin sections have provided three-dimensional contexts in which to understand how synapses are modified with plasticity, learning, and sensory input [3–17]. Three-dimensional reconstruction from serial section electron microscopy (ssEM) has proven invaluable for the comprehensive analysis of structural synaptic plasticity. It has provided the needed nanometer resolution to localize and measure key subcellular structures, such as the postsynaptic density (PSD) and presynaptic vesicles which define a synapse, polyribosomes as sites of local protein synthesis, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) for local regulation of calcium and trafficking of membrane proteins, endosomes for recycling, and fine astroglial processes at the perimeter of some synapses. Thus, ssEM is an essential tool for nanoscale analysis of the cell biological and anatomical modifications that underlie changes in synaptic strength. Here we discuss several important issues associated with interpreting the functional significance of structural synaptic plasticity, especially during long-term potentiation, a widely studied cellular model of learning and memory. PMID:22088391

  13. Plastics as structural materials for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, G M

    1937-01-01

    The purpose here is to consider the mechanical characteristics of reinforced phenol-formaldehyde resin as related to its use as structural material for aircraft. Data and graphs that have appeared in the literature are reproduced to illustrate the comparative behavior of plastics and materials commonly used in aircraft construction. Materials are characterized as to density, static strength, modulus of elasticity, resistance to long-time loading, strength under repeated impact, energy absorption, corrosion resistance, and ease of fabrication.

  14. ECM receptors in neuronal structure, synaptic plasticity, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Kerrisk, Meghan E; Cingolani, Lorenzo A; Koleske, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    During central nervous system development, extracellular matrix (ECM) receptors and their ligands play key roles as guidance molecules, informing neurons where and when to send axonal and dendritic projections, establish connections, and form synapses between pre- and postsynaptic cells. Once stable synapses are formed, many ECM receptors transition in function to control the maintenance of stable connections between neurons and regulate synaptic plasticity. These receptors bind to and are activated by ECM ligands. In turn, ECM receptor activation modulates downstream signaling cascades that control cytoskeletal dynamics and synaptic activity to regulate neuronal structure and function and thereby impact animal behavior. The activities of cell adhesion receptors that mediate interactions between pre- and postsynaptic partners are also strongly influenced by ECM composition. This chapter highlights a number of ECM receptors, their roles in the control of synapse structure and function, and the impact of these receptors on synaptic plasticity and animal behavior.

  15. ECM receptors in neuronal structure, synaptic plasticity, and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kerrisk, Meghan E.; Cingolani, Lorenzo A.; Koleske, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    During central nervous system development, extracellular matrix (ECM) receptors and their ligands play key roles as guidance molecules, informing neurons where and when to send axonal and dendritic projections, establish connections, and form synapses between pre- and postsynaptic cells. Once stable synapses are formed, many ECM receptors transition in function to control the maintenance of stable connections between neurons and regulate synaptic plasticity. These receptors bind to and are activated by ECM ligands. In turn, ECM receptor activation modulates downstream signaling cascades that control cytoskeletal dynamics and synaptic activity to regulate neuronal structure and function and thereby impact animal behavior. The activities of cell adhesion receptors that mediate interactions between pre- and post-synaptic partners are also strongly influenced by ECM composition. This chapter highlights a number of ECM receptors, their roles in the control of synapse structure and function, and the impact of these receptors on synaptic plasticity and animal behavior. PMID:25410355

  16. Opposing Effects of Neuronal Activity on Structural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Fauth, Michael; Tetzlaff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The connectivity of the brain is continuously adjusted to new environmental influences by several activity-dependent adaptive processes. The most investigated adaptive mechanism is activity-dependent functional or synaptic plasticity regulating the transmission efficacy of existing synapses. Another important but less prominently discussed adaptive process is structural plasticity, which changes the connectivity by the formation and deletion of synapses. In this review, we show, based on experimental evidence, that structural plasticity can be classified similar to synaptic plasticity into two categories: (i) Hebbian structural plasticity, which leads to an increase (decrease) of the number of synapses during phases of high (low) neuronal activity and (ii) homeostatic structural plasticity, which balances these changes by removing and adding synapses. Furthermore, based on experimental and theoretical insights, we argue that each type of structural plasticity fulfills a different function. While Hebbian structural changes enhance memory lifetime, storage capacity, and memory robustness, homeostatic structural plasticity self-organizes the connectivity of the neural network to assure stability. However, the link between functional synaptic and structural plasticity as well as the detailed interactions between Hebbian and homeostatic structural plasticity are more complex. This implies even richer dynamics requiring further experimental and theoretical investigations. PMID:27445713

  17. Transcriptional control of cardiac fibroblast plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lighthouse, Janet K; Small, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts help maintain the normal architecture of the healthy heart and are responsible for scar formation and the healing response to pathological insults. Various genetic, biomechanical, or humoral factors stimulate fibroblasts to become contractile smooth muscle-like cells called myofibroblasts that secrete large amounts of extracellular matrix. Unfortunately, unchecked myofibroblast activation in heart disease leads to pathological fibrosis, which is a major risk factor for the development of cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control fibroblast plasticity and myofibroblast activation is essential to develop novel strategies to specifically target pathological cardiac fibrosis without disrupting the adaptive healing response. This review highlights the major transcriptional mediators of fibroblast origin and function in development and disease. The contribution of the fetal epicardial gene program will be discussed in the context of fibroblast origin in development and following injury, primarily focusing on Tcf21 and C/EBP. We will also highlight the major transcriptional regulatory axes that control fibroblast plasticity in the adult heart, including transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Smad signaling, the Rho/myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)/serum response factor (SRF) axis, and Calcineurin/transient receptor potential channel (TRP)/nuclear factor of activated T-Cell (NFAT) signaling. Finally, we will discuss recent strategies to divert the fibroblast transcriptional program in an effort to promote cardiomyocyte regeneration. This article is a part of a Special Issue entitled "Fibrosis and Myocardial Remodeling".

  18. 76 FR 175 - Continental Structural Plastics Including On-Site Leased Workers From Kelly Services and Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... Employment and Training Administration Continental Structural Plastics Including On-Site Leased Workers From... of Continental Structural Plastics, North Baltimore, Ohio. The notice was published in the Federal... Plastics. The Department has determined that these workers were sufficiently under the control of...

  19. Structural Plasticity Denoises Responses and Improves Learning Speed

    PubMed Central

    Spiess, Robin; George, Richard; Cook, Matthew; Diehl, Peter U.

    2016-01-01

    Despite an abundance of computational models for learning of synaptic weights, there has been relatively little research on structural plasticity, i.e., the creation and elimination of synapses. Especially, it is not clear how structural plasticity works in concert with spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) and what advantages their combination offers. Here we present a fairly large-scale functional model that uses leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, STDP, homeostasis, recurrent connections, and structural plasticity to learn the input encoding, the relation between inputs, and to infer missing inputs. Using this model, we compare the error and the amount of noise in the network's responses with and without structural plasticity and the influence of structural plasticity on the learning speed of the network. Using structural plasticity during learning shows good results for learning the representation of input values, i.e., structural plasticity strongly reduces the noise of the response by preventing spikes with a high error. For inferring missing inputs we see similar results, with responses having less noise if the network was trained using structural plasticity. Additionally, using structural plasticity with pruning significantly decreased the time to learn weights suitable for inference. Presumably, this is due to the clearer signal containing less spikes that misrepresent the desired value. Therefore, this work shows that structural plasticity is not only able to improve upon the performance using STDP without structural plasticity but also speeds up learning. Additionally, it addresses the practical problem of limited resources for connectivity that is not only apparent in the mammalian neocortex but also in computer hardware or neuromorphic (brain-inspired) hardware by efficiently pruning synapses without losing performance. PMID:27660610

  20. The molecular interfacial structure and plasticizer migration behavior of "green" plasticized poly(vinyl chloride).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Li, Yaoxin; Hankett, Jeanne M; Chen, Zhan

    2015-02-14

    Tributyl acetyl citrate (TBAC), a widely-used "green" plasticizer, has been extensively applied in products for daily use. In this paper, a variety of analytical tools including sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), contact angle goniometry (CA), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were applied together to investigate the molecular structures of TBAC plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and the migration behavior of TBAC from PVC-TBAC mixtures into water. We comprehensively examine the effects of oxygen and argon plasma treatments on the surface structures of PVC-TBAC thin films containing various bulk percentages of plasticizers and the leaching behavior of TBAC into water. It was found that TBAC is a relatively stable PVC plasticizer compared to traditional non-covalent plasticizers but is also surface active. Oxygen plasma treatment increased the hydrophilicity of TBAC-PVC surfaces, but did not enhance TBAC leaching. However, argon plasma treatment greatly enhanced the leaching of TBAC molecules from PVC plastics to water. Based on our observations, we believe that oxygen plasma treatment could be applied to TBAC plasticized PVC products to enhance surface hydrophilicity for improving the biocompatibility and antibacterial properties of PVC products. The structural information obtained in this study will ultimately facilitate a molecular level understanding of plasticized polymers, aiding in the design of PVC materials with improved properties.

  1. Structural and Functional Plasticity at the Axon Initial Segment

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Rei; Kuba, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is positioned between the axonal and somato-dendritic compartments and plays a pivotal role in triggering action potentials (APs) and determining neuronal output. It is now widely accepted that structural properties of the AIS, such as length and/or location relative to the soma, change in an activity-dependent manner. This structural plasticity of the AIS is known to be crucial for homeostatic control of neuronal excitability. However, it is obvious that the impact of the AIS on neuronal excitability is critically dependent on the biophysical properties of the AIS, which are primarily determined by the composition and characteristics of ion channels in this domain. Moreover, these properties can be altered via phosphorylation and/or redistribution of the channels. Recently, studies in auditory neurons showed that alterations in the composition of voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels at the AIS coincide with elongation of the AIS, thereby enhancing the neuronal excitability, suggesting that the interaction between structural and functional plasticities of the AIS is important in the control of neuronal excitability. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding structural and functional alterations of the AIS and discuss how they interact and contribute to regulating the neuronal output. PMID:27826229

  2. Experience-dependent structural synaptic plasticity in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Holtmaat, Anthony; Svoboda, Karel

    2009-09-01

    Synaptic plasticity in adult neural circuits may involve the strengthening or weakening of existing synapses as well as structural plasticity, including synapse formation and elimination. Indeed, long-term in vivo imaging studies are beginning to reveal the structural dynamics of neocortical neurons in the normal and injured adult brain. Although the overall cell-specific morphology of axons and dendrites, as well as of a subpopulation of small synaptic structures, are remarkably stable, there is increasing evidence that experience-dependent plasticity of specific circuits in the somatosensory and visual cortex involves cell type-specific structural plasticity: some boutons and dendritic spines appear and disappear, accompanied by synapse formation and elimination, respectively. This Review focuses on recent evidence for such structural forms of synaptic plasticity in the mammalian cortex and outlines open questions.

  3. Structural brain plasticity in Parkinson's disease induced by balance training.

    PubMed

    Sehm, Bernhard; Taubert, Marco; Conde, Virginia; Weise, David; Classen, Joseph; Dukart, Juergen; Draganski, Bogdan; Villringer, Arno; Ragert, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    We investigated morphometric brain changes in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) that are associated with balance training. A total of 20 patients and 16 healthy matched controls learned a balance task over a period of 6 weeks. Balance testing and structural magnetic resonance imaging were performed before and after 2, 4, and 6 training weeks. Balance performance was re-evaluated after ∼20 months. Balance training resulted in performance improvements in both groups. Voxel-based morphometry revealed learning-dependent gray matter changes in the left hippocampus in healthy controls. In PD patients, performance improvements were correlated with gray matter changes in the right anterior precuneus, left inferior parietal cortex, left ventral premotor cortex, bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, and left middle temporal gyrus. Furthermore, a TIME × GROUP interaction analysis revealed time-dependent gray matter changes in the right cerebellum. Our results highlight training-induced balance improvements in PD patients that may be associated with specific patterns of structural brain plasticity. In summary, we provide novel evidence for the capacity of the human brain to undergo learning-related structural plasticity even in a pathophysiological disease state such as in PD.

  4. Hebbian Wiring Plasticity Generates Efficient Network Structures for Robust Inference with Synaptic Weight Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hiratani, Naoki; Fukai, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    In the adult mammalian cortex, a small fraction of spines are created and eliminated every day, and the resultant synaptic connection structure is highly nonrandom, even in local circuits. However, it remains unknown whether a particular synaptic connection structure is functionally advantageous in local circuits, and why creation and elimination of synaptic connections is necessary in addition to rich synaptic weight plasticity. To answer these questions, we studied an inference task model through theoretical and numerical analyses. We demonstrate that a robustly beneficial network structure naturally emerges by combining Hebbian-type synaptic weight plasticity and wiring plasticity. Especially in a sparsely connected network, wiring plasticity achieves reliable computation by enabling efficient information transmission. Furthermore, the proposed rule reproduces experimental observed correlation between spine dynamics and task performance. PMID:27303271

  5. The genetics of phenotypic plasticity in nematode feeding structures

    PubMed Central

    Dardiry, Mohannad; Lenuzzi, Masa; Namdeo, Suryesh; Renahan, Tess; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Werner, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been proposed as an ecological and evolutionary concept. Ecologically, it can help study how genes and the environment interact to produce robust phenotypes. Evolutionarily, as a facilitator it might contribute to phenotypic novelty and diversification. However, the discussion of phenotypic plasticity remains contentious in parts due to the absence of model systems and rigorous genetic studies. Here, we summarize recent work on the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, which exhibits a feeding plasticity allowing predatory or bacteriovorous feeding. We show feeding plasticity to be controlled by developmental switch genes that are themselves under epigenetic control. Phylogenetic and comparative studies support phenotypic plasticity and its role as a facilitator of morphological novelty and diversity. PMID:28298309

  6. Structural features of plastic deformation in bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Scudino, S. Shakur Shahabi, H.; Stoica, M.; Kühn, U.; Kaban, I.; Escher, B.; Eckert, J.; Vaughan, G. B. M.

    2015-01-19

    Spatially resolved strain maps of a plastically deformed bulk metallic glass (BMG) have been created by using high-energy X-ray diffraction. The results reveal that plastic deformation creates a spatially heterogeneous atomic arrangement, consisting of strong compressive and tensile strain fields. In addition, significant shear strain is introduced in the samples. The analysis of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the strain tensor indicates that considerable structural anisotropy occurs in both the magnitude and direction of the strain. These features are in contrast to the behavior observed in elastically deformed BMGs and represent a distinctive structural sign of plastic deformation in metallic glasses.

  7. A computer program for cyclic plasticity and structural fatigue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalev, I.

    1980-01-01

    A computerized tool for the analysis of time independent cyclic plasticity structural response, life to crack initiation prediction, and crack growth rate prediction for metallic materials is described. Three analytical items are combined: the finite element method with its associated numerical techniques for idealization of the structural component, cyclic plasticity models for idealization of the material behavior, and damage accumulation criteria for the fatigue failure.

  8. PLASTIC SHRINKAGE CONTROLLING EFFECT BY POLYPROPYLENE SHORT FIBER WITH HYDROPHILY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoda, Akira; Sadatsuki, Yoshitomo; Oshima, Akihiro; Ishii, Akina; Tsubaki, Tatsuya

    The aim of this research is to clarify the mechanism of controlling plastic shrinkage crack by adding small amout of synthetic short fiber, and to propose optimum polypropylene short fiber to control plastic shrinkage crack. In this research, the effect of the hydrophily of polypropylene fiber was investigated in the amount of plastic shrinkage of mortar, total area of plastic shrinkage crack, and bond properties between fiber and mortar. The plastic shrinkage test of morar was conducted under high temperature, low relative humidity, and constant wind velocity. When polypropylene fiber had hydrophily, the amount of plastic shrinkage of mortar was restrained, which was because cement paste in morar was captured by hydrophilic fiber and then bleeding of mortar was restrained. With hydrophily, plastic shrinkage of mortar was restrained and bridging effect was improved due to better bond, which led to remarkable reduction of plastic shrinkage crack. Based on experimental results, the way of developing optimum polypropylene short fiber for actual construction was proposed. The fiber should have large hydrophily and small diameter, and should be used in as small amount as possible in order not to disturb workability of concrete.

  9. Cyclic plasticity and failure of structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalev, I.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical approach for low-cycle fatigue prediction is presented. The approach combines a cyclic plasticity model with the finite element method and a damage accumulation criterion for ductile metals. The cyclic plasticity model is based on the concept of the combination of several yield surfaces. The surfaces are related to the material uniaxial stress-strain curve idealized by piecewise linear segments. The damage criterion is based on the Coffin-Manson formulae modified for the mean stress variation effect. It is extended to the multiaxial varying stress-strain field and applied for both the crack initiation and the crack growth processes. The stable slow crack growth rate is approximated by the damage accumulation gradient computed from the cracked finite element models. This procedure requires fatigue testing data of only smooth specimens under constant strain amplitudes. The present approach is illustrated by numerical examples of an aircraft wing stiffened panel subjected to compression, which causes material yielding and residual tension.

  10. Structural and Functional Plasticity in the Maternal Brain Circuitry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Parenting recruits a distributed network of brain structures (and neuromodulators) that coordinates caregiving responses attuned to the young's affect, needs, and developmental stage. Many of these structures and connections undergo significant structural and functional plasticity, mediated by the interplay between maternal hormones and social…

  11. Structural plasticity and catalysis regulation of a thermosensor histidine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Albanesi, Daniela; Martín, Mariana; Trajtenberg, Felipe; Mansilla, María C.; Haouz, Ahmed; Alzari, Pedro M.; de Mendoza, Diego; Buschiazzo, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Temperature sensing is essential for the survival of living cells. A major challenge is to understand how a biological thermometer processes thermal information to optimize cellular functions. Using structural and biochemical approaches, we show that the thermosensitive histidine kinase, DesK, from Bacillus subtilis is cold-activated through specific interhelical rearrangements in its central four-helix bundle domain. As revealed by the crystal structures of DesK in different functional states, the plasticity of this helical domain influences the catalytic activities of the protein, either by modifying the mobility of the ATP-binding domains for autokinase activity or by modulating binding of the cognate response regulator to sustain the phosphotransferase and phosphatase activities. The structural and biochemical data suggest a model in which the transmembrane sensor domain of DesK promotes these structural changes through conformational signals transmitted by the membrane-connecting two-helical coiled-coil, ultimately controlling the alternation between output autokinase and phosphatase activities. The structural comparison of the different DesK variants indicates that incoming signals can take the form of helix rotations and asymmetric helical bends similar to those reported for other sensing systems, suggesting that a similar switching mechanism could be operational in a wide range of sensor histidine kinases. PMID:19805278

  12. Evaluation of engineering plastic for rollover protective structure (ROPS) mounting.

    PubMed

    Comer, R S; Ayers, P D; Liu, J

    2007-04-01

    Agriculture has one of the highest fatality rates of any industry in America. Tractor rollovers are a significant contributor to the high death rate. Rollover protective structures (ROPS) have helped lower these high fatality rates on full-size tractors. However, a large number of older tractors still do not use ROPS due to the difficulty of designing and creating a mounting structure. To help reduce this difficulty, engineering plastics were evaluated for use in a ROPS mounting structure on older tractors. The use of engineering plastics around axle housings could provide a uniform mounting configuration as well as lower costs for aftermarket ROPS. Various plastics were examined through shear testing, scale model testing, and compressive strength testing. Once a material was chosen based upon strength and cost, full-scale testing of the plastic's strength on axle housings was conducted. Finally, a mounting structure was tested in static ROPS tests, and field upset tests were performed in accordance with SAE Standard J2194. Initial tests revealed that the ROPS mounting structure and axle housing combination had higher torsional strength with less twisting than the axle housing alone. An engineering plastic ROPS mounting structure was easily successful in withstanding the forces applied during the static longitudinal and lateral ROPS tests. Field upset testing revealed that the mounting structure could withstand the impact loads seen during actual upsets without a failure. During both static testing and field upset testing, no permanent twisting of the mounting structure was found. Engineering plastic could therefore be a viable option for a universal ROPS mounting structure for older tractors.

  13. Structural Signature of Plastic Deformation in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, H. L.; Li, M. Z.; Wang, W. H.

    2011-04-01

    The structure feature of a model CuZr metallic glass during deformation is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. A spatially heterogeneous irreversible rearrangement is observed in terms of nonaffine displacement. We find that regions with smaller nonaffine displacement have more Voronoi pentagons, while in those with larger nonaffine displacement other types of faces are more populated. We use the degree of local fivefold symmetry (LFFS) as the structural indicator to predict plastic deformation of local structures and find that the plastic events prefer to be initiated in regions with a lower degree of LFFS and propagate toward regions with a higher degree of LFFS.

  14. Human Structural Plasticity at Record Speed

    PubMed Central

    Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Baptista, Cassandra Sampaio; Thomas, Adam G.

    2012-01-01

    How rapidly does learning shape our brains? A new study using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging in both humans and rats suggests that just two hours of spatial learning is sufficient to change brain structure. PMID:22445333

  15. Structural Plasticity, Effectual Connectivity, and Memory in Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Knoblauch, Andreas; Sommer, Friedrich T.

    2016-01-01

    Learning and memory is commonly attributed to the modification of synaptic strengths in neuronal networks. More recent experiments have also revealed a major role of structural plasticity including elimination and regeneration of synapses, growth and retraction of dendritic spines, and remodeling of axons and dendrites. Here we work out the idea that one likely function of structural plasticity is to increase “effectual connectivity” in order to improve the capacity of sparsely connected networks to store Hebbian cell assemblies that are supposed to represent memories. For this we define effectual connectivity as the fraction of synaptically linked neuron pairs within a cell assembly representing a memory. We show by theory and numerical simulation the close links between effectual connectivity and both information storage capacity of neural networks and effective connectivity as commonly employed in functional brain imaging and connectome analysis. Then, by applying our model to a recently proposed memory model, we can give improved estimates on the number of cell assemblies that can be stored in a cortical macrocolumn assuming realistic connectivity. Finally, we derive a simplified model of structural plasticity to enable large scale simulation of memory phenomena, and apply our model to link ongoing adult structural plasticity to recent behavioral data on the spacing effect of learning. PMID:27378861

  16. Solving fluid-flow control problems with porous plastics.

    PubMed

    Wolbrom, I M

    1993-01-01

    To tackle fluid-flow control problems, traditional porous materials, such as ceramics, glass, metal, fabric, paper, and fibres, are now being replaced by an increasing range of porous plastics. In this article, the author discusses some of those that are available, and outlines the advantages of using these materials to replace traditional ones.

  17. Unravelling the structural plasticity of stretched DNA under torsional constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Graeme A.; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Regions of the genome are often held under torsional constraint. Nevertheless, the influence of such constraint on DNA-protein interactions during genome metabolism is still poorly understood. Here using a combined optical tweezers and fluorescence microscope, we quantify and explain how torsional constraint influences the structural stability of DNA under applied tension. We provide direct evidence that concomitant basepair melting and helical unwinding can occur in torsionally constrained DNA at forces >~50 pN. This striking result indicates that local changes in linking number can be absorbed by the rest of the DNA duplex. We also present compelling new evidence that an overwound DNA structure (likely P-DNA) is created (alongside underwound structures) at forces >~110 pN. These findings substantiate previous theoretical predictions and highlight a remarkable structural plasticity of torsionally constrained DNA. Such plasticity may be required in vivo to absorb local changes in linking number in DNA held under torsional constraint.

  18. Paradoxical signaling regulates structural plasticity in dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Levy, Michael G.; Khan, Shahid; Oster, George

    2016-01-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3- to 5-min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium influx caused by NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key feature of this signaling network is the paradoxical signaling loop. Paradoxical components act bifunctionally in signaling networks, and their role is to control both the activation and the inhibition of a desired response function (protein activity or spine volume). Using ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based modeling, we show that the dynamics of different regulators of transient spine expansion, including calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), RhoA, and Cdc42, and the spine volume can be described using paradoxical signaling loops. Our model is able to capture the experimentally observed dynamics of transient spine volume. Furthermore, we show that actin remodeling events provide a robustness to spine volume dynamics. We also generate experimentally testable predictions about the role of different components and parameters of the network on spine dynamics. PMID:27551076

  19. GABAergic circuits control spike-timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Paille, Vincent; Fino, Elodie; Du, Kai; Morera-Herreras, Teresa; Perez, Sylvie; Kotaleski, Jeanette Hellgren; Venance, Laurent

    2013-05-29

    The spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), a synaptic learning rule for encoding learning and memory, relies on relative timing of neuronal activity on either side of the synapse. GABAergic signaling has been shown to control neuronal excitability and consequently the spike timing, but whether GABAergic circuits rule the STDP remained unknown. Here we show that GABAergic signaling governs the polarity of STDP, because blockade of GABAA receptors was able to completely reverse the temporal order of plasticity at corticostriatal synapses in rats and mice. GABA controls the polarity of STDP in both striatopallidal and striatonigral output neurons. Biophysical simulations and experimental investigations suggest that GABA controls STDP polarity through depolarizing effects at distal dendrites of striatal output neurons by modifying the balance of two calcium sources, NMDARs and voltage-sensitive calcium channels. These findings establish a central role for GABAergic circuits in shaping STDP and suggest that GABA could operate as a Hebbian/anti-Hebbian switch.

  20. Transferrin Receptor Controls AMPA Receptor Trafficking Efficiency and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Lei, Run; Li, Qiong; Wang, Xin-Xin; Wu, Qian; An, Peng; Zhang, Jianchao; Zhu, Minyan; Xu, Zhiheng; Hong, Yang; Wang, Fudi; Shen, Ying; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TFR) is an important iron transporter regulating iron homeostasis and has long been used as a marker for clathrin mediated endocytosis. However, little is known about its additional function other than iron transport in the development of central nervous system (CNS). Here we demonstrate that TFR functions as a regulator to control AMPA receptor trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. The conditional knockout (KO) of TFR in neural progenitor cells causes mice to develop progressive epileptic seizure, and dramatically reduces basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). We further demonstrate that TFR KO remarkably reduces the binding efficiency of GluR2 to AP2 and subsequently decreases AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling. Thus, our study reveals that TFR functions as a novel regulator to control AMPA trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. PMID:26880306

  1. Plastic optical fibre sensor for damage detection in offshore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, K. S. C.; Koh, C. G.

    2009-12-01

    It is important to ensure the safe and reliable use of massive engineering structures such as offshore platforms, including all aspects of safety and design code compliance. Although routine inspection is an integral part of the safety protocol in operating and maintaining these structures, regular assessment of the effectiveness and efficiency of existing safety evaluation methods is clearly desired in view of emerging technologies for structural health monitoring of engineering structures. The recent advancement in plastic optical fibre (POF) materials and processing render POF sensors an attractive alternative to glass-based optical fibre sensors as they offer much greater being flexibility, high resistance to fracture and hence the ease in their handling and installation. In this paper, some preliminary results demonstrating the use of plastic optical fibre sensors for damage detection and structural health monitoring for offshore and marine-related applications will be summarized. In this study, POF will be used for crack detection in tubular steel specimens in conjunction with a high-resolution photon-counting optical time-domain reflectrometry (v-OTDR). Although the use of OTDR technique is an established method in the telecommunication industry, this study is new in that it is now possible, with the availability of v-OTDR and graded-index perfluorinated POF, to detect and locate the crack position in the host structure to within 10 cm accuracy or better. It will also be shown that this technique could readily be configured to monitor crack growth in steel tubular members.

  2. Plastic optical fibre sensor for damage detection in offshore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, K. S. C.; Koh, C. G.

    2010-03-01

    It is important to ensure the safe and reliable use of massive engineering structures such as offshore platforms, including all aspects of safety and design code compliance. Although routine inspection is an integral part of the safety protocol in operating and maintaining these structures, regular assessment of the effectiveness and efficiency of existing safety evaluation methods is clearly desired in view of emerging technologies for structural health monitoring of engineering structures. The recent advancement in plastic optical fibre (POF) materials and processing render POF sensors an attractive alternative to glass-based optical fibre sensors as they offer much greater being flexibility, high resistance to fracture and hence the ease in their handling and installation. In this paper, some preliminary results demonstrating the use of plastic optical fibre sensors for damage detection and structural health monitoring for offshore and marine-related applications will be summarized. In this study, POF will be used for crack detection in tubular steel specimens in conjunction with a high-resolution photon-counting optical time-domain reflectrometry (v-OTDR). Although the use of OTDR technique is an established method in the telecommunication industry, this study is new in that it is now possible, with the availability of v-OTDR and graded-index perfluorinated POF, to detect and locate the crack position in the host structure to within 10 cm accuracy or better. It will also be shown that this technique could readily be configured to monitor crack growth in steel tubular members.

  3. A simplified method for elastic-plastic-creep structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified inelastic analysis computer program (ANSYPM) was developed for predicting the stress-strain history at the critical location of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a plasticity hardening model. Creep effects are calculated on the basis of stress relaxation at constant strain, creep at constant stress or a combination of stress relaxation and creep accumulation. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, dwell times at various points in the cycles, different materials and kinematic hardening. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite element analysis.

  4. A simplified method for elastic-plastic-creep structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1985-01-01

    A simplified inelastic analysis computer program (ANSYPM) was developed for predicting the stress-strain history at the critical location of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a plasticity hardening model. Creep effects are calculated on the basis of stress relaxation at constant strain, creep at constant stress or a combination of stress relaxation and creep accumulation. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, dwell times at various points in the cycles, different materials and kinematic hardening. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite element analysis.

  5. Technology and future prospects for lightweight plastic vehicle structures

    SciTech Connect

    Stodolsky, F.; Cuenca, R.M.; Bonsignore, P.V.

    1997-08-01

    The state of the technology and the materials and processing issues of using plastics in vehicle body applications (structural and semistructural) were assessed. Plastics are significantly lighter in weight, more easily fabricated into complex shapes, and more corrosion resistance than sheet steel, high-strength steel, or aluminum. However, at their current stage of development, plastics are deficient in one or more necessary properties: heat resistance and dimensional stability, stiffness and tensile strength, toughness, and impact resistance. To upgrade their physical properties for automotive chassis/body applications, plastics need to be compounds with suitable reinforcing fibers. As a short-term approach, the material of choice is a composite structure made with low-cost glass-fiber reinforcement, such as that made in the resin-transfer-molding (RTM) process and used in the body of the Dodge Viper. However, RTM technology based on thermosets requires a processing cycle time that is too long for large production runs. Adaptation of RTM to the formation of thermoplastic composite bodies could have a significant advantage over thermoset technology. Cyclic oligomers, which are precursors to thermoplastic matrix polymers, show promise for this application. Farther on the horizon are advanced composites compounds with the much more expensive (but stronger and stiffer) carbon-fiber reinforcement. However, significant price reductions of precursor materials and advances in processing and fabrication would be needed. Other materials holding promise are liquid crystal polymers (LCP) and LCP blends with other polymers (molecular composites). However, the cost of monomers and the subsequent polymerization technology also remains a considerable drawback to the widespread and increasing acceptance of LCPs.

  6. Induced sensorimotor brain plasticity controls pain in phantom limb patients

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Fukuma, Ryohei; Seymour, Ben; Hosomi, Koichi; Kishima, Haruhiko; Shimizu, Takeshi; Yokoi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Masayuki; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Kamitani, Yukiyasu; Saitoh, Youichi

    2016-01-01

    The cause of pain in a phantom limb after partial or complete deafferentation is an important problem. A popular but increasingly controversial theory is that it results from maladaptive reorganization of the sensorimotor cortex, suggesting that experimental induction of further reorganization should affect the pain, especially if it results in functional restoration. Here we use a brain–machine interface (BMI) based on real-time magnetoencephalography signals to reconstruct affected hand movements with a robotic hand. BMI training induces significant plasticity in the sensorimotor cortex, manifested as improved discriminability of movement information and enhanced prosthetic control. Contrary to our expectation that functional restoration would reduce pain, the BMI training with the phantom hand intensifies the pain. In contrast, BMI training designed to dissociate the prosthetic and phantom hands actually reduces pain. These results reveal a functional relevance between sensorimotor cortical plasticity and pain, and may provide a novel treatment with BMI neurofeedback. PMID:27807349

  7. Structural Transformations in Metallic Materials During Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasimchuk, E.; Turchak, T.; Baskova, A.; Chausov, N.; Hutsaylyuk, V.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the structure formation during the plastic deformation of polycrystalline nickel and aluminum based alloy 2024-T3 is investigated. The possibility of the relaxation and synergetic structure formation is examined. It is shown the deformation softening to be due to the crystallization of the amorphous structure of hydrodynamics flow channels (synergetic structure) HC as micrograins and their subsequent growth. The possible mechanism of micrograins' growth is proposed. The deformation processes change the phase composition of the multiphase alloy 2024-T3. It is shown by the quantitative analysis of the structures which were deformed in different regimes of the alloy samples. A method for increasing of the fatigue life through a dynamic pre-deformation is suggested.

  8. Structural Transformations in Metallic Materials During Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasimchuk, E.; Turchak, T.; Baskova, A.; Chausov, N.; Hutsaylyuk, V.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the structure formation during the plastic deformation of polycrystalline nickel and aluminum based alloy 2024-T3 is investigated. The possibility of the relaxation and synergetic structure formation is examined. It is shown the deformation softening to be due to the crystallization of the amorphous structure of hydrodynamics flow channels (synergetic structure) HC as micrograins and their subsequent growth. The possible mechanism of micrograins' growth is proposed. The deformation processes change the phase composition of the multiphase alloy 2024-T3. It is shown by the quantitative analysis of the structures which were deformed in different regimes of the alloy samples. A method for increasing of the fatigue life through a dynamic pre-deformation is suggested.

  9. Plasticity of the RNA Kink Turn Structural Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Antonioli, A.; Cochrane, J; Lipchock, S; Strobel, S

    2010-01-01

    The kink turn (K-turn) is an RNA structural motif found in many biologically significant RNAs. While most examples of the K-turn have a similar fold, the crystal structure of the Azoarcus group I intron revealed a novel RNA conformation, a reverse kink turn bent in the direction opposite that of a consensus K-turn. The reverse K-turn is bent toward the major grooves rather than the minor grooves of the flanking helices, yet the sequence differs from the K-turn consensus by only a single nucleotide. Here we demonstrate that the reverse bend direction is not solely defined by internal sequence elements, but is instead affected by structural elements external to the K-turn. It bends toward the major groove under the direction of a tetraloop-tetraloop receptor. The ability of one sequence to form two distinct structures demonstrates the inherent plasticity of the K-turn sequence. Such plasticity suggests that the K-turn is not a primary element in RNA folding, but instead is shaped by other structural elements within the RNA or ribonucleoprotein assembly.

  10. Unravelling the structural plasticity of stretched DNA under torsional constraint

    PubMed Central

    King, Graeme A.; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Regions of the genome are often held under torsional constraint. Nevertheless, the influence of such constraint on DNA–protein interactions during genome metabolism is still poorly understood. Here using a combined optical tweezers and fluorescence microscope, we quantify and explain how torsional constraint influences the structural stability of DNA under applied tension. We provide direct evidence that concomitant basepair melting and helical unwinding can occur in torsionally constrained DNA at forces >∼50 pN. This striking result indicates that local changes in linking number can be absorbed by the rest of the DNA duplex. We also present compelling new evidence that an overwound DNA structure (likely P-DNA) is created (alongside underwound structures) at forces >∼110 pN. These findings substantiate previous theoretical predictions and highlight a remarkable structural plasticity of torsionally constrained DNA. Such plasticity may be required in vivo to absorb local changes in linking number in DNA held under torsional constraint. PMID:27263853

  11. Determining biodegradability of plastic materials under controlled and natural composting environments.

    PubMed

    Mohee, R; Unmar, G

    2007-01-01

    With the advent of recently promulgated Government regulations on plastics in Mauritius, a study was initiated to examine the biodegradability of two different types of plastic, namely Willow Ridge Plastics - PDQ-H additive (Plastic A) and Ecosafe Plastic - TDPA additive (Plastic B) under controlled and natural composting environments. The results obtained from the controlled composting environment showed that the cumulative carbon dioxide evolution for Plastic A was much higher than that for Plastic B. Plastic A therefore showed a higher level of biodegradation in terms of CO2 evolution than Plastic B. However, from the regression analysis, it was found that the level of CO2 varying with time fitted the sigmoid type curves with very high correlation coefficients (R2 values: 0.9928, 0.9921 and 0.9816, for reference material, inoculum and Plastic A, respectively). The corresponding F-values obtained from the ANOVA analysis together with significance levels of p<0.05 indicated that the three treatments analysed in the biodegradability experiment were significant. The other experiment was undertaken to observe any physical change of Plastics A and B as compared to a reference plastic, namely, compostable plastic bag (Mater-Bi product-Plastic C), when exposed to a natural composting environment. Thermophilic temperatures were obtained for about 3-5 days of composting and the moisture content was in the range of 60-80% throughout the degradation process. It was observed that after 55 days of composting, Plastic C degraded completely while Plastic A and Plastic B did not undergo any significant degradation. It can be concluded that naturally based plastic made of starch would degrade completely in a time frame of 60 days, whereas plastics with biodegradable additive would require a longer time.

  12. Plastic optical fibre sensor for quality control in food industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novo, C.; Bilro, L.; Ferreira, R.; Alberto, N.; Antunes, P.; Leitão, C.; Nogueira, R.; Pinto, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    The present work addresses the need for new devices felt in the context of quality control, especially in the food industry. Due to the spectral dependence of the attenuation coefficient, a novel dual-parameter sensor for colour and refractive index was developed and tested. The sensor employs plastic optical fibres to measure the transmitted optical power in three measurement cells each with a different incident wavelength. The performance of the sensor was tested using several dyes at different concentrations and aqueous solutions of glycerine and ethanol. Results show that this technique allows the monitoring of refractive index and colour without cross-sensitivity.

  13. Adaptive plasticity in vestibular influences on cardiovascular control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, B. J.; Holmes, M. J.; Jian, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Data collected in both human subjects and animal models indicate that the vestibular system influences the control of blood pressure. In animals, peripheral vestibular lesions diminish the capacity to rapidly and accurately make cardiovascular adjustments to changes in posture. Thus, one role of vestibulo-cardiovascular influences is to elicit changes in blood distribution in the body so that stable blood pressure is maintained during movement. However, deficits in correcting blood pressure following vestibular lesions diminish over time, and are less severe when non-labyrinthine sensory cues regarding body position in space are provided. These observations show that pathways that mediate vestibulo-sympathetic reflexes can be subject to plastic changes. This review considers the adaptive plasticity in cardiovascular responses elicited by the central vestibular system. Recent data indicate that the posterior cerebellar vermis may play an important role in adaptation of these responses, such that ablation of the posterior vermis impairs recovery of orthostatic tolerance following subsequent vestibular lesions. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that non-labyrinthine inputs to the central vestibular system may be important in controlling blood pressure during movement, particularly following vestibular dysfunction. A number of sensory inputs appear to be integrated to produce cardiovascular adjustments during changes in posture. Although loss of any one of these inputs does not induce lability in blood pressure, it is likely that maximal blood pressure stability is achieved by the integration of a variety of sensory cues signaling body position in space.

  14. Using magnetic levitation for non-destructive quality control of plastic parts.

    PubMed

    Hennek, Jonathan W; Nemiroski, Alex; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Bwambok, David K; Yang, Dian; Harburg, Daniel V; Tricard, Simon; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Whitesides, George M

    2015-03-04

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) enables rapid and non-destructive quality control of plastic parts. The feasibility of MagLev as a method to: i) rapidly assess injection-molded plastic parts for defects during process optimization, ii) monitor the degradation of plastics after exposure to harsh environmental conditions, and iii) detect counterfeit polymers by density is demonstrated.

  15. Biodegradable kinetics of plastics under controlled composting conditions.

    PubMed

    Leejarkpai, Thanawadee; Suwanmanee, Unchalee; Rudeekit, Yosita; Mungcharoen, Thumrongrut

    2011-06-01

    This study models and evaluates the kinetics of C-CO(2) evolution during biodegradation of plastic materials including Polyethylene (PE), PE/starch blend (PE/starch), microcrystalline cellulose (MCE), and Polylactic acid (PLA). The aerobic biodegradation under controlled composting conditions was monitorated according to ISO 14855-1, 2004. The kinetics model was based on first order reaction in series with a flat lag phase. A non-linear regression technique was used to analyze the experimental data. SEM studies of the morphology of the samples before and after biodegradation testing were used to confirm the biodegradability of plastics and the accuracy of the model. The work showed that MCE and PLA produced the high amounts of C-CO(2) evolution, which gave readily hydrolysable carbon values of 55.49% and 40.17%, respectively with readily hydrolysis rates of 0.338 day(-1) and 0.025 day(-1), respectively. Whereas, a lower amount of C-CO(2) evolution was found in PE/starch, which had a high concentration of moderately hydrolysable carbon of 97.74% and a moderate hydrolysis rate of 0.00098 day(-1). The mineralization rate of PLA was 0.500 day(-1) as a lag phase was observed at the beginning of the biodegradability test. No lag phase was observed in the biodegradability testing of the PE/starch and MCE. The mineralization rates of the PE/starch and MCE were found to be 1.000 day(-1), and 1.234 day(-1), respectively. No C-CO(2) evolution was observed during biodegradability testing of PE, which was used for reference as a non-biodegradable plastics sample.

  16. Coregulator-mediated control of skeletal muscle plasticity - A mini-review.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, Svenia; Kupr, Barbara; Handschin, Christoph

    2017-01-03

    Skeletal muscle plasticity is a complex process entailing massive transcriptional programs. These changes are mediated by the action of nuclear receptors and other transcription factors. In addition, coregulator proteins have emerged as important players in this process by linking transcription factors to the RNA polymerase II complex and inducing changes in the chromatic structure. An accumulating body of work highlights the pleiotropic functions of coregulator proteins in the control of tissue-specific and whole body metabolism. In skeletal muscle, several coregulators have been identified as potent modulators of metabolic and myofibrillar plasticity. In this mini-review, we will discuss the control, function and physiological significance of these coregulators in skeletal muscle biology.

  17. Thermal and Structural Properties of Silk Biomaterials Plasticized by Glycerol.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joseph E; Davidowski, Stephen K; Xu, Dian; Cebe, Peggy; Onofrei, David; Holland, Gregory P; Kaplan, David L

    2016-12-12

    The molecular interactions of silk materials plasticized using glycerol were studied, as these materials provide options for biodegradable and flexible protein-based systems. Plasticizer interactions with silk were analyzed by thermal, spectroscopic, and solid-state NMR analyses. Spectroscopic analysis implied that glycerol was hydrogen bonded to the peptide matrix, but may be displaced with polar solvents. Solid-state NMR indicated that glycerol induced β-sheet formation in the dried silk materials, but not to the extent of methanol treatment. Fast scanning calorimetry suggested that β-sheet crystal formation in silk-glycerol films appeared to be less organized than in the methanol treated silk films. We propose that glycerol may be simultaneously inducing and interfering with β-sheet formation in silk materials, causing some improper folding that results in less-organized silk II structures even after the glycerol is removed. This difference, along with trace residual glycerol, allows glycerol extracted silk materials to retain more flexibility than methanol processed versions.

  18. Structural Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, M. S.; Hoffman, W. M.

    This manual is designed for those who seek certification as pesticide applicators for industrial, institutional, structural, and health-related pest control. It is divided into six sections covering general pest control, wood-destroying organisms, bird control, fumigation, rodent control, and industrial weed control. The manual gives information…

  19. Perceptual learning and sensomotor flexibility: cortical plasticity under attentional control?

    PubMed Central

    Fahle, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    Recent research reveals long-lasting cortical plasticity of early sensory cortices even in adults. Sensory signals could be modified under top-down control if necessary quite early in order to optimize their signal-to-noise ratio, leading to ‘low level’ or ‘early’ perceptual learning (PL). For easy tasks, such elaborate top-down influences are usually not required, and learning is restricted to late selection of the appropriate signals on higher cortical levels, which seems easier and faster to achieve. But to reach the absolute limits of sensory performance, PL seems to optimize the entire chain of sensory processing. Hence, improvement for these extreme perceptual abilities is quite specific for a number of stimulus parameters, such as the position in the visual field and sometimes even the trained eye, reflecting the specificity of receptive fields in early sensory cortices. Early PL may be just one example—even if a very extensive one—of the mechanisms of neuronal plasticity and sensomotor flexibility that are constantly updating our sensomotor representations as a result of experience. As an illustration, this review contains some new experimental results on PL and sensory flexibility in the context of adaptation to multifocal intraocular lenses. PMID:18977730

  20. Plasticity in respiratory motor neurons in response to reduced synaptic inputs: A form of homeostatic plasticity in respiratory control?

    PubMed

    Braegelmann, K M; Streeter, K A; Fields, D P; Baker, T L

    2017-01-01

    For most individuals, the respiratory control system produces a remarkably stable and coordinated motor output-recognizable as a breath-from birth until death. Very little is understood regarding the processes by which the respiratory control system maintains network stability in the presence of changing physiological demands and network properties that occur throughout life. An emerging principle of neuroscience is that neural activity is sensed and adjusted locally to assure that neurons continue to operate in an optimal range, yet to date, it is unknown whether such homeostatic plasticity is a feature of the neurons controlling breathing. Here, we review the evidence that local mechanisms sense and respond to perturbations in respiratory neural activity, with a focus on plasticity in respiratory motor neurons. We discuss whether these forms of plasticity represent homeostatic plasticity in respiratory control. We present new analyses demonstrating that reductions in synaptic inputs to phrenic motor neurons elicit a compensatory enhancement of phrenic inspiratory motor output, a form of plasticity termed inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF), that is proportional to the magnitude of activity deprivation. Although the physiological role of iPMF is not understood, we hypothesize that it has an important role in protecting the drive to breathe during conditions of prolonged or intermittent reductions in respiratory neural activity, such as following spinal cord injury or during central sleep apnea.

  1. Implementation of elastic-plastic structural analysis into NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, A.; Pifko, A. B.; Ogilvie, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    Elastic-plastic analytic capabilities were incorporated into the NASTRAN program. The present implementation includes a general rigid format and additional bulk data cards as well as to two new modules. The modules are specialized to include only perfect plasticity of the CTRMEN and CROD elements but can easily be expanded to include other plasticity theories and elements. The practical problem of an elastic-plastic analysis of a ship's bracket connection is demonstrated and compared to an equivalent analysis using Grumman's PLANS program. The present work demonstrates the feasibility of incorporating general elastic-plastic capabilities into NASTRAN.

  2. MicroRNA precursors are not structurally robust but plastic.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Elena, Santiago F

    2013-01-01

    Robustness is considered a ubiquitous property of living systems at all levels of organization, and small noncoding RNA (sncRNA) is a genuine model for its study at the molecular level. In this communication, we question whether microRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs) are actually structurally robust, as previously suggested. We found that natural pre-miRNAs are not more robust than expected under an appropriate null model. On the contrary, we found that eukaryotic pre-miRNAs show a significant enrichment in conformational flexibility at the thermal equilibrium of the molecule, that is, in their plasticity. Our results further support the selection for functional diversification and evolvability in sncRNAs.

  3. Development of recycled plastic composites for structural applications from CEA plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Agrim

    Plastic waste from consumer electronic appliances (CEAs) such as computer and printer parts including Polystyrene (PS), Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS), Polystyrene (PS) and PC/ABS were collected using handheld FTIR Spectrophotometer. The blends of these plastics with High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) are manufactured under special processing conditions in a single screw compounding injection molding machine. The blends are thermoplastics have high stiffness and strength, which may enhance the mechanical properties of HDPE like tensile modulus, ultimate tensile strength, tensile break and tensile yield. These composites have a potential to be used for the future application of recycled plastic lumber, thus replacing the traditional wood lumber.

  4. Membrane-Derived Phospholipids Control Synaptic Neurotransmission and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    García-Morales, Victoria; Montero, Fernando; González-Forero, David; Rodríguez-Bey, Guillermo; Gómez-Pérez, Laura; Medialdea-Wandossell, María Jesús; Domínguez-Vías, Germán; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic communication is a dynamic process that is key to the regulation of neuronal excitability and information processing in the brain. To date, however, the molecular signals controlling synaptic dynamics have been poorly understood. Membrane-derived bioactive phospholipids are potential candidates to control short-term tuning of synaptic signaling, a plastic event essential for information processing at both the cellular and neuronal network levels in the brain. Here, we showed that phospholipids affect excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission by different degrees, loci, and mechanisms of action. Signaling triggered by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) evoked rapid and reversible depression of excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. At excitatory synapses, LPA-induced depression depended on LPA1/Gαi/o-protein/phospholipase C/myosin light chain kinase cascade at the presynaptic site. LPA increased myosin light chain phosphorylation, which is known to trigger actomyosin contraction, and reduced the number of synaptic vesicles docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. At inhibitory synapses, postsynaptic LPA signaling led to dephosphorylation, and internalization of the GABAAγ2 subunit through the LPA1/Gα12/13-protein/RhoA/Rho kinase/calcineurin pathway. However, LPA-induced depression of GABAergic transmission was correlated with an endocytosis-independent reduction of GABAA receptors, possibly by GABAAγ2 dephosphorylation and subsequent increased lateral diffusion. Furthermore, endogenous LPA signaling, mainly via LPA1, mediated activity-dependent inhibitory depression in a model of experimental synaptic plasticity. Finally, LPA signaling, most likely restraining the excitatory drive incoming to motoneurons, regulated performance of motor output commands, a basic brain processing task. We propose that lysophospholipids serve as potential local messengers that tune synaptic strength to precedent activity of the neuron. PMID:25996636

  5. Epigenetic Control of Phenotypic Plasticity in the Filamentous Fungus Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Kronholm, Ilkka; Johannesson, Hanna; Ketola, Tarmo

    2016-12-07

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of a genotype to produce different phenotypes under different environmental or developmental conditions. Phenotypic plasticity is a ubiquitous feature of living organisms, and is typically based on variable patterns of gene expression. However, the mechanisms by which gene expression is influenced and regulated during plastic responses are poorly understood in most organisms. While modifications to DNA and histone proteins have been implicated as likely candidates for generating and regulating phenotypic plasticity, specific details of each modification and its mode of operation have remained largely unknown. In this study, we investigated how epigenetic mechanisms affect phenotypic plasticity in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa By measuring reaction norms of strains that are deficient in one of several key physiological processes, we show that epigenetic mechanisms play a role in homeostasis and phenotypic plasticity of the fungus across a range of controlled environments. In general, effects on plasticity are specific to an environment and mechanism, indicating that epigenetic regulation is context dependent and is not governed by general plasticity genes. Specifically, we found that, in Neurospora, histone methylation at H3K36 affected plastic response to high temperatures, H3K4 methylation affected plastic response to pH, but H3K27 methylation had no effect. Similarly, DNA methylation had only a small effect in response to sucrose. Histone deacetylation mainly decreased reaction norm elevation, as did genes involved in histone demethylation and acetylation. In contrast, the RNA interference pathway was involved in plastic responses to multiple environments.

  6. Epigenetic Control of Phenotypic Plasticity in the Filamentous Fungus Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Kronholm, Ilkka; Johannesson, Hanna; Ketola, Tarmo

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of a genotype to produce different phenotypes under different environmental or developmental conditions. Phenotypic plasticity is a ubiquitous feature of living organisms, and is typically based on variable patterns of gene expression. However, the mechanisms by which gene expression is influenced and regulated during plastic responses are poorly understood in most organisms. While modifications to DNA and histone proteins have been implicated as likely candidates for generating and regulating phenotypic plasticity, specific details of each modification and its mode of operation have remained largely unknown. In this study, we investigated how epigenetic mechanisms affect phenotypic plasticity in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. By measuring reaction norms of strains that are deficient in one of several key physiological processes, we show that epigenetic mechanisms play a role in homeostasis and phenotypic plasticity of the fungus across a range of controlled environments. In general, effects on plasticity are specific to an environment and mechanism, indicating that epigenetic regulation is context dependent and is not governed by general plasticity genes. Specifically, we found that, in Neurospora, histone methylation at H3K36 affected plastic response to high temperatures, H3K4 methylation affected plastic response to pH, but H3K27 methylation had no effect. Similarly, DNA methylation had only a small effect in response to sucrose. Histone deacetylation mainly decreased reaction norm elevation, as did genes involved in histone demethylation and acetylation. In contrast, the RNA interference pathway was involved in plastic responses to multiple environments. PMID:27694114

  7. Controls for space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balas, Mark

    1991-11-01

    Assembly and operation of large space structures (LSS) in orbit will require robot-assisted docking and berthing of partially-assembled structures. These operations require new solutions to the problems of controls. This is true because of large transient and persistent disturbances, controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, poorly known structure parameters, slow actuator/sensor dynamical behavior, and excitation of nonlinear structure vibrations during control and assembly. For on-orbit assembly, controllers must start with finite element models of LSS and adapt on line to the best operating points, without compromising stability. This is not easy to do, since there are often unmodeled dynamic interactions between the controller and the structure. The indirect adaptive controllers are based on parameter estimation. Due to the large number of modes in LSS, this approach leads to very high-order control schemes with consequent poor stability and performance. In contrast, direct model reference adaptive controllers operate to force the LSS to track the desirable behavior of a chosen model. These schemes produce simple control algorithms which are easy to implement on line. One problem with their use for LSS has been that the model must be the same dimension as the LSS - i.e., quite large. A control theory based on the command generator tracker (CGT) ideas of Sobel, Mabins, Kaufman and Wen, Balas to obtain very low-order models based on adaptive algorithms was developed. Closed-loop stability for both finite element models and distributed parameter models of LSS was proved. In addition, successful numerical simulations on several LSS databases were obtained. An adaptive controller based on our theory was also implemented on a flexible robotic manipulator at Martin Marietta Astronautics. Computation schemes for controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, the residual mode filters or RMF, were developed. The RMF theory was modified to compensate

  8. Controls for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Assembly and operation of large space structures (LSS) in orbit will require robot-assisted docking and berthing of partially-assembled structures. These operations require new solutions to the problems of controls. This is true because of large transient and persistent disturbances, controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, poorly known structure parameters, slow actuator/sensor dynamical behavior, and excitation of nonlinear structure vibrations during control and assembly. For on-orbit assembly, controllers must start with finite element models of LSS and adapt on line to the best operating points, without compromising stability. This is not easy to do, since there are often unmodeled dynamic interactions between the controller and the structure. The indirect adaptive controllers are based on parameter estimation. Due to the large number of modes in LSS, this approach leads to very high-order control schemes with consequent poor stability and performance. In contrast, direct model reference adaptive controllers operate to force the LSS to track the desirable behavior of a chosen model. These schemes produce simple control algorithms which are easy to implement on line. One problem with their use for LSS has been that the model must be the same dimension as the LSS - i.e., quite large. A control theory based on the command generator tracker (CGT) ideas of Sobel, Mabins, Kaufman and Wen, Balas to obtain very low-order models based on adaptive algorithms was developed. Closed-loop stability for both finite element models and distributed parameter models of LSS was proved. In addition, successful numerical simulations on several LSS databases were obtained. An adaptive controller based on our theory was also implemented on a flexible robotic manipulator at Martin Marietta Astronautics. Computation schemes for controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, the residual mode filters or RMF, were developed. The RMF theory was modified to compensate

  9. Computer simulation of model cohesive powders: Plastic consolidation, structural changes, and elasticity under isotropic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilabert, F. A.; Roux, J.-N.; Castellanos, A.

    2008-09-01

    The quasistatic behavior of a simple two-dimensional model of a cohesive powder under isotropic loads is investigated by discrete element simulations. We ignore contact plasticity and focus on the effect of geometry and collective rearrangements on the material behavior. The loose packing states, as assembled and characterized in a previous numerical study [Gilabert, Roux, and Castellanos, Phys. Rev. E 75, 011303 (2007)], are observed, under growing confining pressure P , to undergo important structural changes, while solid fraction Φ irreversibly increases (typically, from 0.4-0.5 to 0.75-0.8). The system state goes through three stages, with different forms of the plastic consolidation curve, i.e., Φ as a function of the growing reduced pressure P*=Pa/F0 , defined with adhesion force F0 and grain diameter a . In the low-confinement regime (I), the system undergoes negligible plastic compaction, and its structure is influenced by the assembling process. In regime II the material state is independent of initial conditions, and the void ratio varies linearly with lnP [i.e., Δ(1/Φ)=λΔ(lnP*) ], as described in the engineering literature. Plasticity index λ is reduced in the presence of a small rolling resistance (RR). In the last stage of compaction (III), Φ approaches an asymptotic, maximum solid fraction Φmax , as a power law Φmax-Φ∝(P*)-α , with α≃1 , and properties of cohesionless granular packs are gradually retrieved. Under consolidation, while the range ξ of fractal density correlations decreases, force patterns reorganize from self-balanced clusters to force chains, with correlative evolutions of force distributions, and elastic moduli increase by a large amount. Plastic deformation events correspond to very small changes in the network topology, while the denser regions tend to move like rigid bodies. Elastic properties are dominated by the bending of thin junctions in loose systems. For growing RR those tend to form particle chains, the

  10. Dendritic structural plasticity in the basolateral amygdala after fear conditioning and its extinction in mice.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Stephen C; Leite-Morris, Kimberly A; Guy, Marsha D; Goldberg, Lisa R; Young, Angela J; Kaplan, Gary B

    2013-07-01

    Previous research suggests that morphology and arborization of dendritic spines change as a result of fear conditioning in cortical and subcortical brain regions. This study uniquely aims to delineate these structural changes in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) after both fear conditioning and fear extinction. C57BL/6 mice acquired robust conditioned fear responses (70-80% cued freezing behavior) after six pairings with a tone cue associated with footshock in comparison to unshocked controls. During fear acquisition, freezing behavior was significantly affected by both shock exposure and trial number. For fear extinction, mice were exposed to the conditioned stimulus tone in the absence of shock administration and behavioral responses significantly varied by shock treatment. In the retention tests over 3 weeks, the percentage time spent freezing varied with the factor of extinction training. In all treatment groups, alterations in dendritic plasticity were analyzed using Golgi-Cox staining of dendrites in the BLA. Spine density differed between the fear conditioned group and both the fear extinction and control groups on third order dendrites. Spine density was significantly increased in the fear conditioned group compared to the fear extinction group and controls. Similarly in Sholl analyses, fear conditioning significantly increased BLA spine numbers and dendritic intersections while subsequent extinction training reversed these effects. In summary, fear extinction produced enduring behavioral plasticity that is associated with a reversal of alterations in BLA dendritic plasticity produced by fear conditioning. These neuroplasticity findings can inform our understanding of structural mechanisms underlying stress-related pathology can inform treatment research into these disorders.

  11. Independent genetic control of maize (Zea mays L.) kernel weight determination and its phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Prado, Santiago; Sadras, Víctor O; Borrás, Lucas

    2014-08-01

    Maize kernel weight (KW) is associated with the duration of the grain-filling period (GFD) and the rate of kernel biomass accumulation (KGR). It is also related to the dynamics of water and hence is physiologically linked to the maximum kernel water content (MWC), kernel desiccation rate (KDR), and moisture concentration at physiological maturity (MCPM). This work proposed that principles of phenotypic plasticity can help to consolidated the understanding of the environmental modulation and genetic control of these traits. For that purpose, a maize population of 245 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was grown under different environmental conditions. Trait plasticity was calculated as the ratio of the variance of each RIL to the overall phenotypic variance of the population of RILs. This work found a hierarchy of plasticities: KDR ≈ GFD > MCPM > KGR > KW > MWC. There was no phenotypic and genetic correlation between traits per se and trait plasticities. MWC, the trait with the lowest plasticity, was the exception because common quantitative trait loci were found for the trait and its plasticity. Independent genetic control of a trait per se and genetic control of its plasticity is a condition for the independent evolution of traits and their plasticities. This allows breeders potentially to select for high or low plasticity in combination with high or low values of economically relevant traits.

  12. Aeroelastic structural acoustic control.

    PubMed

    Clark, R L; Frampton, K D

    1999-02-01

    Static, constant-gain, output-feedback control compensators were designed to increase the transmission loss across a panel subjected to mean flow on one surface and a stationary, acoustic half-space on the opposite surface. The multi-input, multi-output control system was based upon the use of an array of colocated transducer pairs. The performance of the static-gain, output-feedback controller was compared to that of the full state-feedback controller using the same control actuator arrays, and was found to yield comparable levels of performance for practical limitations on control effort. Additionally, the resulting static compensators proved to be dissipative in nature, and thus the design varied little as a function of the aeroelastic coupling induced by the fluid-structure interaction under subsonic flow conditions. Several parametric studies were performed, comparing the effects of control-effort penalty as well as the number of transducer pairs used in the control system.

  13. Multiscale Modeling of Structurally-Graded Materials Using Discrete Dislocation Plasticity Models and Continuum Crystal Plasticity Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, Erik; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    2012-01-01

    A multiscale modeling methodology that combines the predictive capability of discrete dislocation plasticity and the computational efficiency of continuum crystal plasticity is developed. Single crystal configurations of different grain sizes modeled with periodic boundary conditions are analyzed using discrete dislocation plasticity (DD) to obtain grain size-dependent stress-strain predictions. These relationships are mapped into crystal plasticity parameters to develop a multiscale DD/CP model for continuum level simulations. A polycrystal model of a structurally-graded microstructure is developed, analyzed and used as a benchmark for comparison between the multiscale DD/CP model and the DD predictions. The multiscale DD/CP model follows the DD predictions closely up to an initial peak stress and then follows a strain hardening path that is parallel but somewhat offset from the DD predictions. The difference is believed to be from a combination of the strain rate in the DD simulation and the inability of the DD/CP model to represent non-monotonic material response.

  14. Thin-walled compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R R; Schumann, D L

    1998-12-29

    Thin-walled, compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems were fabricated, tested and used to demonstrate valving, pumping, metering and mixing. These structures permit the isolation of actuators and sensors from the working fluid, thereby reducing chemical compatibility issues. The thin-walled, compliant plastic structures can be used in either a permanent, reusable system or as an inexpensive disposable for single-use assay systems. The implementation of valving, pumping, mixing and metering operations involve only an elastic change in the mechanical shape of various portions of the structure. Advantages provided by the thin-walled plastic structures include reduced dead volume and rapid mixing. Five different methods for fabricating the thin-walled plastic structures discussed including laser welding, molding, vacuum forming, thermal heat staking and photolithographic patterning techniques.

  15. Fundamental Study on Microstructure Control by Combination of Nano Plastic Forming and Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Masahiko; Kawanishi, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Akinori

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports experiments of static recrystallization using single crystal copper specimens. Single crystal copper specimens were used for the nano-plastic-forming and annealing test. Distortion of crystal lattice around indented grooves was studied by EBSD analysis. It was found that crystal rotation occurred around an indented groove, and that the crystal rotation zone extended obliquely downward from the grooves. TEM micrographs revealed that dislocation cell structures were generated in the vicinity of the grooves when the indentation load is large. After the nano-forming-test, the specimen was annealed under 973K. The specimen was also analyzed by EBSD and TEM. It was found that recrystallized grains were generated in the dislocation cell structures. It is considered that sub-grains in the dislocation cell structure grew up to recrystallized grains. Although more improvement of experimental technique and detailed investigation in the future work is necessary, possibility of accurate microstructure control is shown in the paper.

  16. 76 FR 13227 - Continental Structural Plastics, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Kelly Services and Doepker...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... Employment and Training Administration Continental Structural Plastics, Including On-Site Leased Workers From... 31, 2008, applicable to workers of Continental Structural Plastics, North Baltimore, Ohio. The... Continental Structural Plastics, including on- site leased workers from Kelly Services and Doepker Group,...

  17. Plasticity-Based Adaptive Cognitive Remediation (PACR) for OIF/OEF Veterans: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Randomized Controlled Trial PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Henry W. Mahncke, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Brain Plasticity, Inc...WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Brain Plasticity Inc. AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...TERMS traumatic brain injury, tbi, concussion, persistent post-concussive symptoms, cognition, cognitive function, cognitive rehabilitation

  18. Plasticity-Based Adaptive Cognitive Remediation (PACR) for OIF/OEF Veterans: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Veterans: A Randomized Controlled Trial PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Henry W. Mahncke, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Brain Plasticity...7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Brain Plasticity Inc., San Francisco, CA 94105 ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...SUBJECT TERMS traumatic brain injury, tbi, concussion, persistent post-concussive symptoms, cognition, cognitive function, cognitive rehabilitation

  19. Reliability of elasto-plastic structure using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Liu; Wilson H, Tang; Jiashou, Zhuo

    2002-02-01

    A solution of probabilistic FEM for elastic-plastic materials is presented based on the incremental theory of plasticity and a modified initial stress method. The formulations are deduced through a direct differentiation scheme. Partial differentiation of displacement, stress and the performance function can be iteratively performed with the computation of the mean values of displacement and stress. The presented method enjoys the efficiency of both the perturbation method and the finite difference method, but avoids the approximation during the partial differentiation calculation. In order to improve the efficiency, the adjoint vector method is introduced to calculate the differentiation of stress and displacement with respect to random variables. In addition, a time-saving computational method for reliability index of elastic-plastic materials is suggested based upon the advanced First Order Second Moment (FOSM) and by the usage of Taylor expansion for displacement. The suggested method is also applicable to 3-D cases.

  20. Structural Signature of Plasticity Unveiled by Nano-Scale Viscoelastic Contact in a Metallic Glass

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y. M.; Zeng, J. F.; Wang, S.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, Q.; Lu, J.; Gravier, S.; Bladin, J. J.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Room-temperature plasticity in metallic glasses (MGs) is commonly associated with local structural heterogeneity; however, direct observation of the subtle structural change caused by plasticity is vitally important but the data are extremely scarce. Based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (DAFM), here we show that plasticity-induced structural evolution in a Zr-Ni MG can be revealed via nano-scale viscoelastic contacts between an AFM tip and plastically deformed MG surface layers. Our experimental results clearly show a spatial amplification of the nano-scale structural heterogeneity caused by the distributed plastic flow, which can be linked to the limited growth, reorientation and agglomeration of some nano-scale energy-absorbing regions, which are reminiscent of the behavior of the defect-like regions with non-affine deformation as conceived in many theories and models. Furthermore, we are able to experimentally extract the thermodynamic properties of these nano-scale regions, which possess an energy barrier of 0.3–0.5 eV, about half of that for a typical shear transformation event that usually occurs at the onset of plasticity. The outcome of our current work sheds quantitative insights into the correlation between plasticity and structural heterogeneity in MGs. PMID:27383387

  1. Structural Signature of Plasticity Unveiled by Nano-Scale Viscoelastic Contact in a Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. M.; Zeng, J. F.; Wang, S.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, Q.; Lu, J.; Gravier, S.; Bladin, J. J.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Room-temperature plasticity in metallic glasses (MGs) is commonly associated with local structural heterogeneity; however, direct observation of the subtle structural change caused by plasticity is vitally important but the data are extremely scarce. Based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (DAFM), here we show that plasticity-induced structural evolution in a Zr-Ni MG can be revealed via nano-scale viscoelastic contacts between an AFM tip and plastically deformed MG surface layers. Our experimental results clearly show a spatial amplification of the nano-scale structural heterogeneity caused by the distributed plastic flow, which can be linked to the limited growth, reorientation and agglomeration of some nano-scale energy-absorbing regions, which are reminiscent of the behavior of the defect-like regions with non-affine deformation as conceived in many theories and models. Furthermore, we are able to experimentally extract the thermodynamic properties of these nano-scale regions, which possess an energy barrier of 0.3–0.5 eV, about half of that for a typical shear transformation event that usually occurs at the onset of plasticity. The outcome of our current work sheds quantitative insights into the correlation between plasticity and structural heterogeneity in MGs.

  2. Extracellular proteolysis in structural and functional plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wiera, Grzegorz; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2015-01-01

    Brain is continuously altered in response to experience and environmental changes. One of the underlying mechanisms is synaptic plasticity, which is manifested by modification of synapse structure and function. It is becoming clear that regulated extracellular proteolysis plays a pivotal role in the structural and functional remodeling of synapses during brain development, learning and memory formation. Clearly, plasticity mechanisms may substantially differ between projections. Mossy fiber synapses onto CA3 pyramidal cells display several unique functional features, including pronounced short-term facilitation, a presynaptically expressed long-term potentiation (LTP) that is independent of NMDAR activation, and NMDA-dependent metaplasticity. Moreover, structural plasticity at mossy fiber synapses ranges from the reorganization of projection topology after hippocampus-dependent learning, through intrinsically different dynamic properties of synaptic boutons to pre- and postsynaptic structural changes accompanying LTP induction. Although concomitant functional and structural plasticity in this pathway strongly suggests a role of extracellular proteolysis, its impact only starts to be investigated in this projection. In the present report, we review the role of extracellular proteolysis in various aspects of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that among perisynaptic proteases, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin system, β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and metalloproteinases play a crucial role in shaping plastic changes in this projection. We discuss recent advances and emerging hypotheses on the roles of proteases in mechanisms underlying mossy fiber target specific synaptic plasticity and memory formation. PMID:26582976

  3. Brain functional plasticity associated with the emergence of expertise in extreme language control.

    PubMed

    Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Moser-Mercer, Barbara; Golestani, Narly

    2015-07-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to longitudinally examine brain plasticity arising from long-term, intensive simultaneous interpretation training. Simultaneous interpretation is a bilingual task with heavy executive control demands. We compared brain responses observed during simultaneous interpretation with those observed during simultaneous speech repetition (shadowing) in a group of trainee simultaneous interpreters, at the beginning and at the end of their professional training program. Age, sex and language-proficiency matched controls were scanned at similar intervals. Using multivariate pattern classification, we found distributed patterns of changes in functional responses from the first to second scan that distinguished the interpreters from the controls. We also found reduced recruitment of the right caudate nucleus during simultaneous interpretation as a result of training. Such practice-related change is consistent with decreased demands on multilingual language control as the task becomes more automatized with practice. These results demonstrate the impact of simultaneous interpretation training on the brain functional response in a cerebral structure that is not specifically linguistic, but that is known to be involved in learning, in motor control, and in a variety of domain-general executive functions. Along with results of recent studies showing functional and structural adaptations in the caudate nuclei of experts in a broad range of domains, our results underline the importance of this structure as a central node in expertise-related networks.

  4. Structural-chemical modeling of transition of coals to the plastic state

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Gyul'maliev; S.G. Gagarin

    2007-02-15

    The structural-chemical simulation of the formation of plastic state during the thermal treatment (pyrolysis, coking) of coals is based on allowance for intermolecular interactions in the organic matter. The feasibility of transition of coals to the plastic state is determined by the ratio between the onset plastic state (softening) and runaway degradation temperatures, values that depend on the petrographic composition and the degree of metamorphism of coals and the distribution of structural and chemical characteristics of organic matter. 33 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Control Augmented Structural Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lust, Robert V.; Schmit, Lucien A.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for control augmented structural synthesis is proposed for a class of structures which can be modeled as an assemblage of frame and/or truss elements. It is assumed that both the plant (structure) and the active control system dynamics can be adequately represented with a linear model. The structural sizing variables, active control system feedback gains and nonstructural lumped masses are treated simultaneously as independent design variables. Design constraints are imposed on static and dynamic displacements, static stresses, actuator forces and natural frequencies to ensure acceptable system behavior. Multiple static and dynamic loading conditions are considered. Side constraints imposed on the design variables protect against the generation of unrealizable designs. While the proposed approach is fundamentally more general, here the methodology is developed and demonstrated for the case where: (1) the dynamic loading is harmonic and thus the steady state response is of primary interest; (2) direct output feedback is used for the control system model; and (3) the actuators and sensors are collocated.

  6. Control-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Joseph K.; Ianculescu, George D.; Kenney, Charles S.; Laub, Alan J.; Ly, Jason H. Q.; Papadopoulos, Philip M.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of using conventional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control and an alternative optimal control to perform the pointing and tracking functions of the Space Station solar dynamic power module is investigated. A very large state model of 6 rigid body modes and 272 flexible modes is used in conjunction with classical linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) optimal control to produce a full-order controller that satisfies the requirements. The results are compared with a classically designed PID controller that was implemented for a much smaller (6 rigid body, 40 flexible modes) model. The conventional control design approach is shown to be very much influenced by the order reduction of the plant model, i.e., the number of retained elastic modes from the full-order model, suggesting that for a complex, large space structure, such as the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic module, application of conventional control system design methods may not be adequate. The use of LQG control is recommended, and method for solving the large matrix. Riccati equation that arises from the optimal formulation is provided.

  7. Redistribution of Kv1 and Kv7 enhances neuronal excitability during structural axon initial segment plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kuba, Hiroshi; Yamada, Rei; Ishiguro, Go; Adachi, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    Structural plasticity of the axon initial segment (AIS), the trigger zone of neurons, is a powerful means for regulating neuronal activity. Here, we show that AIS plasticity is not limited to structural changes; it also occurs as changes in ion-channel expression, which substantially augments the efficacy of regulation. In the avian cochlear nucleus, depriving afferent inputs by removing cochlea elongated the AIS, and simultaneously switched the dominant Kv channels at the AIS from Kv1.1 to Kv7.2. Due to the slow activation kinetics of Kv7.2, the redistribution of the Kv channels reduced the shunting conductance at the elongated AIS during the initiation of action potentials and effectively enhanced the excitability of the deprived neurons. The results indicate that the functional plasticity of the AIS works cooperatively with the structural plasticity and compensates for the loss of afferent inputs to maintain the homeostasis of auditory circuits after hearing loss by cochlea removal. PMID:26581625

  8. Noradrenergic control of associative synaptic plasticity by selective modulation of instructive signals

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Megan R.; Regehr, Wade G.

    2010-01-01

    Synapses throughout the brain are modified through associative mechanisms in which one input provides an instructive signal for changes in the strength of a second co-activated input. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, climbing fiber synapses provide an instructive signal for plasticity at parallel fiber synapses. Here we show that noradrenaline activates α2-adrenergic receptors to control short-term and long-term associative plasticity of parallel fiber synapses. This regulation of plasticity does not reflect a conventional direct modulation of the postsynaptic Purkinje cell or presynaptic parallel fibers. Instead, noradrenaline reduces associative plasticity by selectively decreasing the probability of release at the climbing fiber synapse, which in turn decreases climbing fiber-evoked dendritic calcium signals. These findings raise the possibility that targeted presynaptic modulation of instructive synapses could provide a general mechanism for dynamic context-dependent modulation of associative plasticity. PMID:19376071

  9. Carbon Structure Hazard Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Tommy; Greene, Ben; Porter, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Carbon composite structures are widely used in virtually all advanced technology industries for a multitude of applications. The high strength-to-weight ratio and resistance to aggressive service environments make them highly desirable. Automotive, aerospace, and petroleum industries extensively use, and will continue to use, this enabling technology. As a result of this broad range of use, field and test personnel are increasingly exposed to hazards associated with these structures. No single published document exists to address the hazards and make recommendations for the hazard controls required for the different exposure possibilities from damaged structures including airborne fibers, fly, and dust. The potential for personnel exposure varies depending on the application or manipulation of the structure. The effect of exposure to carbon hazards is not limited to personnel, protection of electronics and mechanical equipment must be considered as well. The various exposure opportunities defined in this document include pre-manufacturing fly and dust, the cured structure, manufacturing/machining, post-event cleanup, and post-event test and/or evaluation. Hazard control is defined as it is applicable or applied for the specific exposure opportunity. The carbon exposure hazard includes fly, dust, fiber (cured/uncured), and matrix vapor/thermal decomposition products. By using the recommendations in this document, a high level of confidence can be assured for the protection of personnel and equipment.

  10. Studies on the effect of storage time and plasticizers on the structural variations in thermoplastic starch.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, H; Guidez, A; Prashantha, K; Soulestin, J; Lacrampe, M F; Krawczak, P

    2015-01-22

    Starch was combined with plasticizers such as glycerol, sorbitol, glycerol/sorbitol and urea/ethanolamine blends by means of high shear extrusion process to prepare thermoplastic starch (TPS). Effect of storage time and plasticizers on the structural stability of melt processed TPS was investigated. Morphological observation, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy reveal that melt extrusion process is efficient in transforming granular starch into a plasticized starch for all plasticizer compositions. XRD analysis highlights major changes in the microstructure of plasticized starch, and dependence of crystalline type and degree of crystallinity mainly on the plasticizer composition and storage time. Dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA) yields a decrease of the peak intensity of loss factor with aging time. The effect of ageing on tensile strength also appears to be highly dependent on the plasticizer composition. Thus, through different plasticizer combinations and ageing, starch-based materials with significant differences in tensile properties can be obtained, which may be tuned to meet the requirements of a wide range of applications.

  11. The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex contains many distinct inhibitory neuronal populations to balance excitatory neurotransmission. A correct excitation/inhibition equilibrium is crucial for normal brain development, functioning, and controlling lifelong cortical plasticity. Knowledge about how the inhibitory network contributes to brain plasticity however remains incomplete. Somatostatin- (SST-) interneurons constitute a large neocortical subpopulation of interneurons, next to parvalbumin- (PV-) and vasoactive intestinal peptide- (VIP-) interneurons. Unlike the extensively studied PV-interneurons, acknowledged as key components in guiding ocular dominance plasticity, the contribution of SST-interneurons is less understood. Nevertheless, SST-interneurons are ideally situated within cortical networks to integrate unimodal or cross-modal sensory information processing and therefore likely to be important mediators of experience-dependent plasticity. The lack of knowledge on SST-interneurons partially relates to the wide variety of distinct subpopulations present in the sensory neocortex. This review informs on those SST-subpopulations hitherto described based on anatomical, molecular, or electrophysiological characteristics and whose functional roles can be attributed based on specific cortical wiring patterns. A possible role for these subpopulations in experience-dependent plasticity will be discussed, emphasizing on learning-induced plasticity and on unimodal and cross-modal plasticity upon sensory loss. This knowledge will ultimately contribute to guide brain plasticity into well-defined directions to restore sensory function and promote lifelong learning. PMID:27403348

  12. Automated Remote Focusing, Drift Correction, and Photostimulation to Evaluate Structural Plasticity in Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Paul R.; Garrett, Tavita R.; Yan, Long; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2017-01-01

    Long-term structural plasticity of dendritic spines plays a key role in synaptic plasticity, the cellular basis for learning and memory. The biochemical step is mediated by a complex network of signaling proteins in spines. Two-photon imaging techniques combined with two-photon glutamate uncaging allows researchers to induce and quantify structural plasticity in single dendritic spines. However, this method is laborious and slow, making it unsuitable for high throughput screening of factors necessary for structural plasticity. Here we introduce a MATLAB-based module built for Scanimage to automatically track, image, and stimulate multiple dendritic spines. We implemented an electrically tunable lens in combination with a drift correction algorithm to rapidly and continuously track targeted spines and correct sample movements. With a straightforward user interface to design custom multi-position experiments, we were able to adequately image and produce targeted plasticity in multiple dendritic spines using glutamate uncaging. Our methods are inexpensive, open source, and provides up to a five-fold increase in throughput for quantifying structural plasticity of dendritic spines. PMID:28114380

  13. A new hyperspectral imaging based device for quality control in plastic recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, G.; D'Agostini, M.; Dall'Ava, A.; Serranti, S.; Turioni, F.

    2013-05-01

    The quality control of contamination level in the recycled plastics stream has been identified as an important key factor for increasing the value of the recycled material by both plastic recycling and compounder industries. Existing quality control methods for the detection of both plastics and non-plastics contaminants in the plastic waste streams at different stages of the industrial process (e.g. feed, intermediate and final products) are currently based on the manual collection from the stream of a sample and on the subsequent off-line laboratory analyses. The results of such analyses are usually available after some hours, or sometimes even some days, after the material has been processed. The laboratory analyses are time-consuming and expensive (both in terms of equipment cost and their maintenance and of labour cost).Therefore, a fast on-line assessment to monitor the plastic waste feed streams and to characterize the composition of the different plastic products, is fundamental to increase the value of secondary plastics. The paper is finalized to describe and evaluate the development of an HSI-based device and of the related software architectures and processing algorithms for quality assessment of plastics in recycling plants, with particular reference to polyolefins (PO). NIR-HSI sensing devices coupled with multivariate data analysis methods was demonstrated as an objective, rapid and non-destructive technique that can be used for on-line quality and process control in the recycling process of POs. In particular, the adoption of the previous mentioned HD&SW integrated architectures can provide a solution to one of the major problems of the recycling industry, which is the lack of an accurate quality certification of materials obtained by recycling processes. These results could therefore assist in developing strategies to certify the composition of recycled PO products.

  14. Crystal-plastic deformation and recrystallization of peridotite controlled by the seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matysiak, Agnes K.; Trepmann, Claudia A.

    2012-03-01

    Deformed peridotites from the Balmuccia complex, Northern Italy, have been investigated by light and electron microscopy (SEM/EBSD, TEM). The peridotites show a heterogeneous and partly recrystallized microfabric associated with cataclastic shear zones. Intracrystalline deformation microstructures (undulatory extinction, crinkly deformation lamellae, deformation bands, kink bands) and recrystallized grains along intragranular zones in large original grains record a sequence with an initial stage of inhomogeneous glide-controlled deformation in the low-temperature plasticity regime associated with brittle deformation and a subsequent stage of recovery and recrystallization. The microstructural evidence of deformation of olivine in the low-temperature field indicates high stresses on the order of several hundred MPa and accordingly high strain rates. Subsequent recovery and recrystallization requires decreasing stresses and strain rates, as there is no evidence for a complex thermal history with increasing temperatures. A locally occurring foam structure in aggregates of recrystallized olivine indicates grain growth at very low differential stresses at a late stage. Such a stress history with transiently high and then decaying stresses is characteristic for coseismic deformation and postseismic creep just below the base of the seismogenic zone. The associated occurrence of pseudotachylytes and microstructures generated by crystal-plastic mechanisms is explained by semi-brittle behavior at transient high stresses and strain rates during coseismic loading at depths, where during postseismic relaxation and in interseismic periods the rocks are behaving by crystal-plastic flow. The consideration of high-stress deformation and subsequent recrystallization processes at decaying stresses in peridotites is especially relevant for earthquake-driven deformation in the mantle.

  15. An upper bound on damage of elastic-plastic structures at shakedown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xi-Qiao; Yu, Shou-Wen

    1994-07-01

    In this paper, a shakedown theory for plastic-damaged structures is presented. Damage mechanics and shakedown theory are closely related to each other in some aspects. The damage of materials may change their mechanical properties and as well as the shakedown load domains of structures. Here the damage variable is proposed as the failure criterion of ductile structures at shakedown. Based on an elastic prefectly-plastic damage model, an upper bound on local damage of structures is given via a mathematical programming. The suggested method is illustrated by an example of thick-walled cylindrical tube.

  16. Functional and Structural Brain Plasticity Enhanced by Motor and Cognitive Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Prosperini, Luca; Piattella, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Rehabilitation is recognized to be important in ameliorating motor and cognitive functions, reducing disease burden, and improving quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In this systematic review, we summarize the existing evidences that motor and cognitive rehabilitation may enhance functional and structural brain plasticity in patients with MS, as assessed by means of the most advanced neuroimaging techniques, including diffusion tensor imaging and task-related and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases, the rehabilitation program was based on computer-assisted/video game exercises performed in either an outpatient or home setting. Despite their heterogeneity, all the included studies describe changes in white matter microarchitecture, in task-related activation, and/or in functional connectivity following both task-oriented and selective training. When explored, relevant correlation between improved function and MRI-detected brain changes was often found, supporting the hypothesis that training-induced brain plasticity is specifically linked to the trained domain. Small sample sizes, lack of randomization and/or an active control group, as well as missed relationship between MRI-detected changes and clinical performance, are the major drawbacks of the selected studies. Knowledge gaps in this field of research are also discussed to provide a framework for future investigations. PMID:26064692

  17. Hyperbolic Structure for a Simplified Model of Dynamical Perfect Plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadjian, Jean-François; Mifsud, Clément

    2017-02-01

    This paper is devoted to confronting two different approaches to the problem of dynamical perfect plasticity. Interpreting this model as a constrained boundary value Friedrichs' system enables one to derive admissible hyperbolic boundary conditions. Using variational methods, we show the well-posedness of this problem in a suitable weak measure theoretical setting. Thanks to the property of finite speed propagation, we establish a new regularity result for the solution in short time. Finally, we prove that this variational solution is actually a solution of the hyperbolic formulation in a suitable dissipative/entropic sense, and that a partial converse statement holds under an additional time regularity assumption for the dissipative solutions.

  18. Updating temporal expectancy of an aversive event engages striatal plasticity under amygdala control

    PubMed Central

    Dallérac, Glenn; Graupner, Michael; Knippenberg, Jeroen; Martinez, Raquel Chacon Ruiz; Tavares, Tatiane Ferreira; Tallot, Lucille; El Massioui, Nicole; Verschueren, Anna; Höhn, Sophie; Bertolus, Julie Boulanger; Reyes, Alex; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Schafe, Glenn E.; Diaz-Mataix, Lorenzo; Doyère, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    Pavlovian aversive conditioning requires learning of the association between a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an unconditioned, aversive stimulus (US) but also involves encoding the time interval between the two stimuli. The neurobiological bases of this time interval learning are unknown. Here, we show that in rats, the dorsal striatum and basal amygdala belong to a common functional network underlying temporal expectancy and learning of a CS–US interval. Importantly, changes in coherence between striatum and amygdala local field potentials (LFPs) were found to couple these structures during interval estimation within the lower range of the theta rhythm (3–6 Hz). Strikingly, we also show that a change to the CS–US time interval results in long-term changes in cortico-striatal synaptic efficacy under the control of the amygdala. Collectively, this study reveals physiological correlates of plasticity mechanisms of interval timing that take place in the striatum and are regulated by the amygdala. PMID:28067224

  19. Control of cultured human cells with femtosecond laser ablated patterns on steel and plastic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Tarmo; Silvennoinen, Martti; Päiväsaari, Kimmo; Vahimaa, Pasi

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explore topographical patterns produced with femtosecond laser pulses as a means of controlling the behaviour of living human cells (U2OS) on stainless steel surfaces and on negative plastic imprints (polycarbonate). The results show that the patterns on both types of material strongly affect cell behaviour and are particularly powerful in controlling cell spreading/elongation, localization and orientation. Analysis by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy shows that on periodic 1D grating structures, cells and cell nuclei are highly elongated and aligned, whereas on periodic 2D grid structures, cell spreading and shape is affected. The results also show that the density and morphology of the cells can be affected. This was observed particularly on pseudo-periodic, coral-like structures which clearly inhibited cell growth. The results suggest that these patterns could be used in a variety of applications among the fields of clinical research and implant design, as well as in diagnosis and in cell and drug research. Furthermore, this article highlights the noteworthy aspects and the unique strengths of the technique and proposes directions for further research.

  20. The Formation of Multi-synaptic Connections by the Interaction of Synaptic and Structural Plasticity and Their Functional Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Fauth, Michael; Wörgötter, Florentin; Tetzlaff, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Cortical connectivity emerges from the permanent interaction between neuronal activity and synaptic as well as structural plasticity. An important experimentally observed feature of this connectivity is the distribution of the number of synapses from one neuron to another, which has been measured in several cortical layers. All of these distributions are bimodal with one peak at zero and a second one at a small number (3–8) of synapses. In this study, using a probabilistic model of structural plasticity, which depends on the synaptic weights, we explore how these distributions can emerge and which functional consequences they have. We find that bimodal distributions arise generically from the interaction of structural plasticity with synaptic plasticity rules that fulfill the following biological realistic constraints: First, the synaptic weights have to grow with the postsynaptic activity. Second, this growth curve and/or the input-output relation of the postsynaptic neuron have to change sub-linearly (negative curvature). As most neurons show such input-output-relations, these constraints can be fulfilled by many biological reasonable systems. Given such a system, we show that the different activities, which can explain the layer-specific distributions, correspond to experimentally observed activities. Considering these activities as working point of the system and varying the pre- or postsynaptic stimulation reveals a hysteresis in the number of synapses. As a consequence of this, the connectivity between two neurons can be controlled by activity but is also safeguarded against overly fast changes. These results indicate that the complex dynamics between activity and plasticity will, already between a pair of neurons, induce a variety of possible stable synaptic distributions, which could support memory mechanisms. PMID:25590330

  1. Phosphorylation of Complexin by PKA Regulates Activity-dependent Spontaneous Neurotransmitter Release and Structural Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Richard W.; Buhl, Lauren K.; Volfson, Dina; Tran, Adrienne; Li, Feng; Akbergenova, Yulia; Littleton, J. Troy

    2016-01-01

    Summary Synaptic plasticity is a fundamental feature of the nervous system that allows adaptation to changing behavioral environments. Most studies of synaptic plasticity have examined the regulated trafficking of postsynaptic glutamate receptors that generates alterations in synaptic transmission. Whether and how changes in the presynaptic release machinery contribute to neuronal plasticity is less clear. The SNARE complex mediates neurotransmitter release in response to presynaptic Ca++ entry. Here we show that the SNARE fusion clamp Complexin undergoes activity-dependent phosphorylation that alters the basic properties of neurotransmission in Drosophila. Retrograde signaling following stimulation activates PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the Complexin C-terminus that selectively and transiently enhances spontaneous release. Enhanced spontaneous release is required for activity-dependent synaptic growth. These data indicate that SNARE-dependent fusion mechanisms can be regulated in an activity-dependent manner and highlight the key role of spontaneous neurotransmitter release as a mediator of functional and structural plasticity. PMID:26590346

  2. A Theory of Rate Coding Control by Intrinsic Plasticity Effects

    PubMed Central

    Naudé, J.; Paz, J. T.; Berry, H.; Delord, B.

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic plasticity (IP) is a ubiquitous activity-dependent process regulating neuronal excitability and a cellular correlate of behavioral learning and neuronal homeostasis. Because IP is induced rapidly and maintained long-term, it likely represents a major determinant of adaptive collective neuronal dynamics. However, assessing the exact impact of IP has remained elusive. Indeed, it is extremely difficult disentangling the complex non-linear interaction between IP effects, by which conductance changes alter neuronal activity, and IP rules, whereby activity modifies conductance via signaling pathways. Moreover, the two major IP effects on firing rate, threshold and gain modulation, remain unknown in their very mechanisms. Here, using extensive simulations and sensitivity analysis of Hodgkin-Huxley models, we show that threshold and gain modulation are accounted for by maximal conductance plasticity of conductance that situate in two separate domains of the parameter space corresponding to sub- and supra-threshold conductance (i.e. activating below or above the spike onset threshold potential). Analyzing equivalent integrate-and-fire models, we provide formal expressions of sensitivities relating to conductance parameters, unraveling unprecedented mechanisms governing IP effects. Our results generalize to the IP of other conductance parameters and allow strong inference for calcium-gated conductance, yielding a general picture that accounts for a large repertoire of experimental observations. The expressions we provide can be combined with IP rules in rate or spiking models, offering a general framework to systematically assess the computational consequences of IP of pharmacologically identified conductance with both fine grain description and mathematical tractability. We provide an example of such IP loop model addressing the important issue of the homeostatic regulation of spontaneous discharge. Because we do not formulate any assumptions on modification rules

  3. Structural Pain Compensating Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of control command and maneuver induced structural loads is an important aspect of any control system design. Designers must design the aircraft structure and the control architecture to achieve desired piloted control responses while limiting the imparted structural loads. The classical approach is to build the structure with high margins, restrict control surface commands to known good combinations, and train pilots to follow procedural maneuvering limitations. With recent advances in structural sensing and the continued desire to improve safety and vehicle fuel efficiency, it is both possible and desirable to develop control architectures that enable lighter vehicle weights while maintaining and improving protection against structural damage.

  4. Learning structure of sensory inputs with synaptic plasticity leads to interference

    PubMed Central

    Chrol-Cannon, Joseph; Jin, Yaochu

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is often explored as a form of unsupervised adaptation in cortical microcircuits to learn the structure of complex sensory inputs and thereby improve performance of classification and prediction. The question of whether the specific structure of the input patterns is encoded in the structure of neural networks has been largely neglected. Existing studies that have analyzed input-specific structural adaptation have used simplified, synthetic inputs in contrast to complex and noisy patterns found in real-world sensory data. In this work, input-specific structural changes are analyzed for three empirically derived models of plasticity applied to three temporal sensory classification tasks that include complex, real-world visual and auditory data. Two forms of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) and the Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM) plasticity rule are used to adapt the recurrent network structure during the training process before performance is tested on the pattern recognition tasks. It is shown that synaptic adaptation is highly sensitive to specific classes of input pattern. However, plasticity does not improve the performance on sensory pattern recognition tasks, partly due to synaptic interference between consecutively presented input samples. The changes in synaptic strength produced by one stimulus are reversed by the presentation of another, thus largely preventing input-specific synaptic changes from being retained in the structure of the network. To solve the problem of interference, we suggest that models of plasticity be extended to restrict neural activity and synaptic modification to a subset of the neural circuit, which is increasingly found to be the case in experimental neuroscience. PMID:26300769

  5. Plasticity of Hippocampal Excitatory-Inhibitory Balance: Missing the Synaptic Control in the Epileptic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bonansco, Christian; Fuenzalida, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is the capacity generated by experience to modify the neural function and, thereby, adapt our behaviour. Long-term plasticity of glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission occurs in a concerted manner, finely adjusting the excitatory-inhibitory (E/I) balance. Imbalances of E/I function are related to several neurological diseases including epilepsy. Several evidences have demonstrated that astrocytes are able to control the synaptic plasticity, with astrocytes being active partners in synaptic physiology and E/I balance. Here, we revise molecular evidences showing the epileptic stage as an abnormal form of long-term brain plasticity and propose the possible participation of astrocytes to the abnormal increase of glutamatergic and decrease of GABAergic neurotransmission in epileptic networks. PMID:27006834

  6. Chronic fluoxetine treatment alters the structure, connectivity and plasticity of cortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Guirado, Ramon; Perez-Rando, Marta; Sanchez-Matarredona, David; Castrén, Eero; Nacher, Juan

    2014-10-01

    Novel hypotheses suggest that antidepressants, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, induce neuronal structural plasticity, resembling that of the juvenile brain, although the underlying mechanisms of this reopening of the critical periods still remain unclear. However, recent studies suggest that inhibitory networks play an important role in this structural plasticity induced by fluoxetine. For this reason we have analysed the effects of a chronic fluoxetine treatment in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of transgenic mice displaying eGFP labelled interneurons. We have found an increase in the expression of molecules related to critical period plasticity, such as the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), GAD67/65 and synaptophysin, as well as a reduction in the number of parvalbumin expressing interneurons surrounded by perineuronal nets. We have also described a trend towards decrease in the perisomatic inhibitory puncta on pyramidal neurons in the mPFC and an increase in the density of inhibitory puncta on eGFP interneurons. Finally, we have found that chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the structure of interneurons in the mPFC, increasing their dendritic spine density. The present study provides evidence indicating that fluoxetine promotes structural changes in the inhibitory neurons of the adult cerebral cortex, probably through alterations in plasticity-related molecules of neurons or the extracellular matrix surrounding them, which are present in interneurons and are known to be crucial for the development of the critical periods of plasticity in the juvenile brain.

  7. Crystallographically controlled crystal-plastic deformation of zircon in shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Elizaveta; Klötzli, Urs

    2014-05-01

    Plastically-deformed zircons from various types of strained natural metamorphic rocks have been investigated in-situ by electron backscatter diffraction analysis (EBSD), allowing crystallographic orientation mapping at high spatial resolution. Plastic deformation often forms under the control of grain-internal heterogeneities. At the crystal structure scale deformation is controlled by the physical anisotropy of the lattice. Three most common slip systems in zircon are [100]{010}, [010]{001} and [001]{010} (Leroux et. al., 1999; Reddy et. al., 2007). They are genetically connected with the main zircon crystallographic directions: [001] (c-axis), [100] and [010] (a and b axes). Atomic models show weak planes normal to these directions that preferably evolve to glide planes in the deforming crystal. The visualization of seismic (elastic) properties of zircon with the MATLAB toolbox MTEX shows a similar pattern. The slowest S-wave velocities are observed in directions parallel to [100], [010] and [001] crystallographic directions. The highest Young's modulus values lie in the same directions. In natural zircon grains, the common slip systems are preferably activated when zircon is hosted by rheologically comparatively weaker phases or a fine-grained matrix. In these cases zircon behaves as a rigid clast. During progressive deformation high deviatoric stresses together with high strain rates concentrate at crystal tips, as shown by numerical modeling. Softer host phases allow more degrees of freedom for zircon to be deformed according to its crystallographic and internal properties. These conclusions are supported by the misorientation axes density distribution maps, derived with MTEX. Deformed zircon hosted by a relatively soft phase (mostly biotite) develops a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO), which has not been documented for zircon before. At the same time deformation of zircon hosted by a rheologically stronger matrix causes the activation of less

  8. Experimental febrile seizures induce age-dependent structural plasticity and improve memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, K; Ichikawa, J; Matsuki, N; Ikegaya, Y; Koyama, R

    2016-03-24

    Population-based studies have demonstrated that children with a history of febrile seizure (FS) perform better than age-matched controls at hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. Here, we report that FSs induce two distinct structural reorganizations in the hippocampus and bidirectionally modify future learning abilities in an age-dependent manner. Compared with age-matched controls, adult mice that had experienced experimental FSs induced by hyperthermia (HT) on postnatal day 14 (P14-HT) performed better in a cognitive task that requires dentate granule cells (DGCs). The enhanced memory performance correlated with an FS-induced persistent increase in the density of large mossy fiber terminals (LMTs) of the DGCs. The memory enhancement was not observed in mice that had experienced HT-induced seizures at P11 which exhibited abnormally located DGCs in addition to the increased LMT density. The ectopic DGCs of the P11-HT mice were abolished by the diuretic bumetanide, and this pharmacological treatment unveiled the masked memory enhancement. Thus, this work provides a novel basis for age-dependent structural plasticity in which FSs influence future brain function.

  9. Discussion on Applicability of Rigid Plastic Dynamic Deformation Analysis to Soil Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Takashi; Ohtsuka, Satoru; Isobe, Koichi

    This paper proposes a new analysis method to estimate a residual deformation of soil structure for external loads. It employs a rigid plastic constitutive equation for soil which needs a small number of soil constants in comparison with general elasto-plastic constitutive equations. The purpose of this method is to simulate a large amount of deformation caused by failure of soil structure based on finite deformation theory. The features of proposed method are (1) simulation for large deformation of soil structure, (2) no effect of initial stress distribution, and (3) application to dynamic load. This study expresses the formulation of rigid plastic dynamic finite element method based on finite deformation theory. It examines the applicability of proposed method by applying to Prandtl's limit bearing capacity of foundation for static monotonically increasing load. The result clearly shows the applicability of rigid plastic constitutive equation to deformation analysis. Both kinematical effect and time rate dependency on limit bearing capacity were clearly presented by employing Rigid Plastic Dynamic Deformation Analysis Method.

  10. Structural Synaptic Plasticity Has High Memory Capacity and Can Explain Graded Amnesia, Catastrophic Forgetting, and the Spacing Effect

    PubMed Central

    Knoblauch, Andreas; Körner, Edgar; Körner, Ursula; Sommer, Friedrich T.

    2014-01-01

    Although already William James and, more explicitly, Donald Hebb's theory of cell assemblies have suggested that activity-dependent rewiring of neuronal networks is the substrate of learning and memory, over the last six decades most theoretical work on memory has focused on plasticity of existing synapses in prewired networks. Research in the last decade has emphasized that structural modification of synaptic connectivity is common in the adult brain and tightly correlated with learning and memory. Here we present a parsimonious computational model for learning by structural plasticity. The basic modeling units are “potential synapses” defined as locations in the network where synapses can potentially grow to connect two neurons. This model generalizes well-known previous models for associative learning based on weight plasticity. Therefore, existing theory can be applied to analyze how many memories and how much information structural plasticity can store in a synapse. Surprisingly, we find that structural plasticity largely outperforms weight plasticity and can achieve a much higher storage capacity per synapse. The effect of structural plasticity on the structure of sparsely connected networks is quite intuitive: Structural plasticity increases the “effectual network connectivity”, that is, the network wiring that specifically supports storage and recall of the memories. Further, this model of structural plasticity produces gradients of effectual connectivity in the course of learning, thereby explaining various cognitive phenomena including graded amnesia, catastrophic forgetting, and the spacing effect. PMID:24858841

  11. Nonconserved Ca2+/Calmodulin Binding Sites in Munc13s Differentially Control Synaptic Short-Term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lipstein, Noa; Schaks, Sabine; Dimova, Kalina; Kalkhof, Stefan; Ihling, Christian; Kölbel, Knut; Ashery, Uri; Rhee, JeongSeop; Brose, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Munc13s are presynaptic proteins that mediate synaptic vesicle priming and thereby control the size of the readily releasable pool of vesicles. During high synaptic activity, Munc13-1 and its closely related homolog, ubMunc13-2, bind Ca2+/calmodulin, resulting in enhanced priming activity and in changes of short-term synaptic plasticity characteristics. Here, we studied whether bMunc13-2 and Munc13-3, two remote isoforms of Munc13-1 with a neuronal subtype-specific expression pattern, mediate synaptic vesicle priming and regulate short-term synaptic plasticity in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. We identified a single functional Ca2+/calmodulin binding site in these isoforms and provide structural evidence that all Munc13s employ a common mode of interaction with calmodulin despite the lack of sequence homology between their Ca2+/calmodulin binding sites. Electrophysiological analysis showed that, during high-frequency activity, Ca2+/calmodulin binding positively regulates the priming activity of bMunc13-2 and Munc13-3, resulting in an increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of vesicles and subsequently in strong short-term synaptic enhancement of neurotransmission. We conclude that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent regulation of priming activity is structurally and functionally conserved in all Munc13 proteins, and that the composition of Munc13 isoforms in a neuron differentially controls its short-term synaptic plasticity characteristics. PMID:22966208

  12. Finite deformation analysis of continuum structures with time dependent anisotropic elastic plastic material behavior (LWBR/AWBA Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutula, D.N.

    1980-03-01

    A finite element procedure is presented for finite deformation analysis of continuum structures with time-dependent anisotropic elastic-plastic material behavior. An updated Lagrangian formulation is used to describe the kinematics of deformation. Anisotropic constitutive relations are referred, at each material point, to a set of three mutually orthogonal axes which rotate as a unit with an angular velocity equal to the spin at the point. The time-history of the solution is generated by using a linear incremental procedure with residual force correction, along with an automatic time step control algorithm which chooses time step sizes to control the accuracy and numerical stability of the solution.

  13. Structural interaction with control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, R. B.; Zvara, J.

    1971-01-01

    A monograph which assesses the state of the art of space vehicle design and development is presented. The monograph presents criteria and recommended practices for determining the structural data and a mathematical structural model of the vehicle needed for accurate prediction of structure and control-system interaction; for design to minimize undesirable interactions between the structure and the control system; and for determining techniques to achieve the maximum desirable interactions and associated structural design benefits. All space vehicles are treated, including launch vehicles, spacecraft, and entry vehicles. Important structural characteristics which affect the structural model used for structural and control-system interaction analysis are given.

  14. Simultaneous imaging of structural plasticity and calcium dynamics in developing dendrites and axons.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Friederike; Lohmann, Christian

    2013-11-01

    During nervous system development, the formation of synapses between pre- and postsynaptic neurons is a remarkably specific process. Both structural and functional plasticity are critical for the selection of synaptic partners and for the establishment and maturation of synapses. To unravel the respective contributions of structural and functional mechanisms as well as their interactions during synaptogenesis, it is important to directly observe structural changes and functional signaling simultaneously. Here, we present an imaging approach to simultaneously follow changes in structure and function. Differential labeling of individual cells and the neuronal network with distinct dyes allows the study of structural plasticity and changes in calcium signaling associated with neural activity at the same time and with high resolution. This is achieved by bulk loading of neuronal populations with a calcium-sensitive indicator in combination with electroporation of individual cells with a calcium indicator and an additional noncalcium-sensitive dye with a different excitation spectrum. Recordings of the two differently labeled structures can be acquired simultaneously using confocal microscopy. Thus, structural plasticity and calcium dynamics of the individually labeled neuron and the surrounding network can be related to each other. This combined imaging approach can be applied to virtually all systems of neuronal networks to study structure and function. We provide a comprehensive description of the labeling procedure, the imaging parameters, and the important aspects of analysis for simultaneous recordings of structure and function in individual neurons.

  15. Exercise-induced neuronal plasticity in central autonomic networks: role in cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Michelini, Lisete C; Stern, Javier E

    2009-09-01

    It is now well established that brain plasticity is an inherent property not only of the developing but also of the adult brain. Numerous beneficial effects of exercise, including improved memory, cognitive function and neuroprotection, have been shown to involve an important neuroplastic component. However, whether major adaptive cardiovascular adjustments during exercise, needed to ensure proper blood perfusion of peripheral tissues, also require brain neuroplasticity, is presently unknown. This review will critically evaluate current knowledge on proposed mechanisms that are likely to underlie the continuous resetting of baroreflex control of heart rate during/after exercise and following exercise training. Accumulating evidence indicates that not only somatosensory afferents (conveyed by skeletal muscle receptors, baroreceptors and/or cardiopulmonary receptors) but also projections arising from central command neurons (in particular, peptidergic hypothalamic pre-autonomic neurons) converge into the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) in the dorsal brainstem, to co-ordinate complex cardiovascular adaptations during dynamic exercise. This review focuses in particular on a reciprocally interconnected network between the NTS and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), which is proposed to act as a pivotal anatomical and functional substrate underlying integrative feedforward and feedback cardiovascular adjustments during exercise. Recent findings supporting neuroplastic adaptive changes within the NTS-PVN reciprocal network (e.g. remodelling of afferent inputs, structural and functional neuronal plasticity and changes in neurotransmitter content) will be discussed within the context of their role as important underlying cellular mechanisms supporting the tonic activation and improved efficacy of these central pathways in response to circulatory demand at rest and during exercise, both in sedentary and in trained individuals. We hope this review will stimulate

  16. Enhanced controlled release of loratadine from the ethylene-vinyl acetate matrix containing plasticizer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Cheong-Weon; Kim, Seong-Jin; Yang, Kyu-Ho; Song, Jae-Haeng; Jeong, Hyun-Jon; Shin, Sang-Chul

    2008-09-01

    An ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) matrix containing plasticizer was prepared as a potential controlled release system for loratadine. The EVA matrix containing loratadine was prepared as the transdermal device using casting methods. The solubility of loratadine according to the volume fraction of PEG 400 was determined. The effects of the drug concentration, temperature, and plasticizers on the release of the drug were determined at 37 degrees C using 40% PEG 400 solution as the receptor medium using the modified Keshary-Chien cell. Some types of plasticizers. such as citrates and phthalates, were used to prepare the pores and increase the flexibility of the EVA matrix. The solubility test according to the PEG 400 volume fraction revealed the highest solubility in the 40% PEG 400 solution. The rate of drug released from the EVA matrix increased with increasing temperature and drug loading. There was a linear relationship between the release rate and the square root of the loading dose. The activation energy for drug release from the EVA matrix with a loading dose of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, and 5% was estimated to be 6.83, 6.80, 6.77, 6.71, and 6.65 kcal/mol, respectively Among the plasticizers used, diethyl phthalate showed the highest level of loratadine release. In conclusion, an EVA matrix containing plasticizer could be used to enhance the controlled release of loratadine.

  17. Hippocampal Structural Plasticity Accompanies the Resulting Contextual Fear Memory Following Stress and Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giachero, Marcelo; Calfa, Gaston D.; Molina, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The present research investigated the resulting contextual fear memory and structural plasticity changes in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) following stress and fear conditioning. This combination enhanced fear retention and increased the number of total and mature dendritic spines in DH. Intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) infusion of midazolam prior to…

  18. Learning to Perceive Structure from Motion and Neural Plasticity in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Nam-Gyoon; Park, Jong-Hee

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects the visual sensory pathways, producing a variety of visual deficits, including the capacity to perceive structure-from-motion (SFM). Because the sensory areas of the adult brain are known to retain a large degree of plasticity, the present study was conducted to explore whether…

  19. Effects of plasticization and shear stress on phase structure development and properties of soy protein blends.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Zhang, Jinwen

    2010-11-01

    In this study, soy protein concentrate (SPC) was used as a plastic component to blend with poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT). Effects of SPC plasticization and blend composition on its deformation during mixing were studied in detail. Influence of using water as the major plasticizer and glycerol as the co-plasticizer on the deformation of the SPC phase during mixing was explored. The effect of shear stress, as affected by SPC loading level, on the phase structure of SPC in the blends was also investigated. Quantitative analysis of the aspect ratio of SPC particles was conducted by using ImageJ software, and an empirical model predicting the formation of percolated structure was applied. The experimental results and the model prediction showed a fairly good agreement. The experimental results and statistic analysis suggest that both SPC loading level and its water content prior to compounding had significant influences on development of the SPC phase structure and were correlated in determining the morphological structures of the resulting blends. Consequently, physical and mechanical properties of the blends greatly depended on the phase morphology and PBAT/SPC ratio of the blends.

  20. Plasticity beyond peri-infarct cortex: spinal up regulation of structural plasticity, neurotrophins, and inflammatory cytokines during recovery from cortical stroke.

    PubMed

    Sist, Bernice; Fouad, Karim; Winship, Ian R

    2014-02-01

    Stroke induces pathophysiological and adaptive processes in regions proximal and distal to the infarct. Recent studies suggest that plasticity at the level of the spinal cord may contribute to sensorimotor recovery after cortical stroke. Here, we compare the time course of heightened structural plasticity in the spinal cord against the temporal profile of cortical plasticity and spontaneous behavioral recovery. To examine the relation between trophic and inflammatory effectors and spinal structural plasticity, spinal expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) was measured. Growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43), measured at 3, 7, 14, or 28 days after photothrombotic stroke of the forelimb sensorimotor cortex (FL-SMC) to provide an index of periods of heightened structural plasticity, varied as a function of lesion size and time after stroke in the cortical hemispheres and the spinal cord. Notably, GAP-43 levels in the cervical spinal cord were significantly increased after FL-SMC lesion, but the temporal window of elevated structural plasticity was more finite in spinal cord relative to ipsilesional cortical expression (returning to baseline levels by 28 post-stroke). Peak GAP-43 expression in spinal cord occurred during periods of accelerated spontaneous recovery, as measured on the Montoya Staircase reaching task, and returned to baseline as recovery plateaued. Interestingly, spinal GAP-43 levels were significantly correlated with spinal levels of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 as well as the neurotrophin NT-3, while a transient increase in BDNF levels preceded elevated GAP-43 expression. These data identify a significant but time-limited window of heightened structural plasticity in the spinal cord following stroke that correlates with spontaneous recovery and the spinal expression of inflammatory cytokines and neurotrophic factors.

  1. Experience-dependent plasticity in white matter microstructure: reasoning training alters structural connectivity.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Allyson P; Whitaker, Kirstie J; Bunge, Silvia A

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques have made it possible to investigate white matter plasticity in humans. Changes in DTI measures, principally increases in fractional anisotropy (FA), have been observed following training programs as diverse as juggling, meditation, and working memory. Here, we sought to test whether three months of reasoning training could alter white matter microstructure. We recruited participants (n = 23) who were enrolled in a course to prepare for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), a test that places strong demands on reasoning skills, as well as age- and IQ-matched controls planning to take the LSAT in the future (n = 22). DTI data were collected at two scan sessions scheduled three months apart. In trained participants but not controls, we observed decreases in radial diffusivity (RD) in white matter connecting frontal cortices, and in mean diffusivity (MD) within frontal and parietal lobe white matter. Further, participants exhibiting larger gains on the LSAT exhibited greater decreases in MD in the right internal capsule. In summary, reasoning training altered multiple measures of white matter structure in young adults. While the cellular underpinnings are unknown, these results provide evidence of experience-dependent white matter changes that may not be limited to myelination.

  2. Generation of electrospun nanofibers with controllable degrees of crimping through a simple, plasticizer-based treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenying; Lipner, Justin; Moran, Christine H; Feng, Liangzhu; Li, Xiyu; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Xia, Younan

    2015-04-24

    Electrospun nanofibers with controllable degrees of crimping are fabricated by simply exposing the samples to a plasticizer at preset shrinkage ratios. Compared with their straight counterparts, the crimped nanofibers are able to mechanically mimic native tendon tissue and better protect tendon fibroblasts under uniaxial strains.

  3. Factors influencing efficacy of plastic shelters for control of bacterial blight of lilac

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plastic shelters are thought to manage bacterial blight by protecting plants from rain and/or frost. In February to April 2008 and 2009, we studied the contribution of frost protection to efficacy of this cultural control practice. Lilacs in 1-gallon pots were exposed to four treatments: 1) plants...

  4. Translating Principles of Neural Plasticity into Research on Speech Motor Control Recovery and Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, Christy L.; Hoit, Jeannette; Kent, Raymond; Ramig, Lorraine O.; Shrivastav, Rahul; Strand, Edythe; Yorkston, Kathryn; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To review the principles of neural plasticity and make recommendations for research on the neural bases for rehabilitation of neurogenic speech disorders. Method: A working group in speech motor control and disorders developed this report, which examines the potential relevance of basic research on the brain mechanisms involved in neural…

  5. Self-organized origami structures via ion-induced plastic strain.

    PubMed

    Chalapat, Khattiya; Chekurov, Nikolai; Jiang, Hua; Li, Jian; Parviz, Babak; Paraoanu, G S

    2013-01-04

    Ion processing of the reactive surface of a free-standing polycrystalline metal film induces a flow of atoms into grain boundaries, resulting in plastic deformation. A thorough experimental and theoretical analysis of this process is presented, along with the demonstration of novel engineering concepts for precisely controlled 3D assembly at micro- and nanoscopic scales.

  6. Brain structural plasticity in survivors of a major earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Su; Chen, Long; Yao, Li; Xiao, Yuan; Wu, Qi-Zhu; Zhang, Jun-Ran; Huang, Xiao-Qi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yu-Qin; Chen, Hua-Fu; Chan, Raymond C.K.; Sweeney, John A.; Gong, Qi-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Background Stress responses have been studied extensively in animal models, but effects of major life stress on the human brain remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether survivors of a major earthquake, who were presumed to have experienced extreme emotional stress during the disaster, demonstrate differences in brain anatomy relative to individuals who have not experienced such stressors. Methods Healthy survivors living in an area devastated by a major earthquake and matched healthy controls underwent 3-dimentional high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Survivors were scanned 13–25 days after the earthquake; controls had undergone MRI for other studies not long before the earthquake. We used optimized voxel-based morphometry analysis to identify regional differences of grey matter volume between the survivors and controls. Results We included 44 survivors (17 female, mean age 37 [standard deviation (SD) 10.6] yr) and 38 controls (14 female, mean age 35.3 [SD 11.2] yr) in our analysis. Compared with controls, the survivors showed significantly lower grey matter volume in the bilateral insula, hippocampus, left caudate and putamen, and greater grey matter volume in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex and the parietal lobe (all p < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparison). Limitations Differences in the variance of survivor and control data could impact study findings. Conclusion Acute anatomic alterations could be observed in earthquake survivors in brain regions where functional alterations after stress have been described. Anatomic changes in the present study were observed earlier than previously reported and were seen in prefrontal–limbic, parietal and striatal brain systems. Together with the results of previous functional imaging studies, our observations suggest a complex pattern of human brain response to major life stress affecting brain systems that modulate and respond to heightened affective arousal. PMID

  7. Structurally Enhanced Self-Plasticization of Poly(vinyl chloride) via Click Grafting of Hyperbranched Polyglycerol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Won; Chung, Jae Woo; Kwak, Seung-Yeop

    2016-12-01

    A highly self-plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) is demonstrated for the first time via click grafting of hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG). The plasticizing effect of the grafted HPG on PVC is systematically investigated by various analytical methods. The amorphous and bulky dendritic structure of HPG efficiently increases the free volume of the grafted PVC, which leads to a remarkably lower glass transition temperature comparable to that of the conventional plasticized PVC. Viscoelastic analysis reveals that HPG considerably improves the softness of the grafted PVC at room temperature and promotes the segmental motion in the system. The HPG-grafted PVC films exhibit an exceptional stretchability unlike the mixture of PVC and HPG because the covalent attachment of HPG to PVC allows it to maintain its homogeneous and well-organized architecture under tensile stretching. The work provides valuable insights into the design of highly flexible and stretchable polymeric materials by means of introducing hyperbranched side chains.

  8. Functional and structural plasticity in the primary somatosensory cortex associated with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woojin; Kim, Sun Kwang; Nabekura, Junichi

    2017-03-09

    Tissue or nerve injury induces widespread plastic changes from the periphery and spinal cord up to the cortex, resulting in chronic pain. Although many clinicians and researchers have extensively studied altered nociceptive signaling and neural circuit plasticity at the spinal cord level, effective treatments to ameliorate chronic pain are still insufficient. For about the last two decades, the rapid development in macroscopic brain imaging studies on humans and animal models have revealed maladaptive plastic changes in the 'pain matrix' brain regions, which may subsequently contribute to chronic pain. Among these brain regions, our group has concentrated for many years on the primary somatosensory (S1) cortex with a help of advanced imaging techniques and has found the functional and structural changes in neurons/glia as well as individual synapses in the S1 cortex during chronic pain. Taken together, it is now believed that such S1 plasticity is one of the causes for chronic pain, not a simple and passive epiphenomenon following tissue/nerve injury as previously thought. In this small review, we discuss the relation of plasticity in the S1 cortex with chronic pain, based on clinical trials and experimental studies conducted on this field. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Binocular vision in amblyopia: structure, suppression and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hess, Robert F; Thompson, Benjamin; Baker, Daniel H

    2014-03-01

    The amblyopic visual system was once considered to be structurally monocular. However, it now evident that the capacity for binocular vision is present in many observers with amblyopia. This has led to new techniques for quantifying suppression that have provided insights into the relationship between suppression and the monocular and binocular visual deficits experienced by amblyopes. Furthermore, new treatments are emerging that directly target suppressive interactions within the visual cortex and, on the basis of initial data, appear to improve both binocular and monocular visual function, even in adults with amblyopia. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of recent studies that have investigated the structure, measurement and treatment of binocular vision in observers with strabismic, anisometropic and mixed amblyopia.

  10. Autoregulatory and paracrine control of synaptic and behavioral plasticity by octopaminergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Koon, Alex C; Ashley, James; Barria, Romina; DasGupta, Shamik; Brain, Ruth; Waddell, Scott; Alkema, Mark J; Budnik, Vivian

    2011-02-01

    Adrenergic signaling has important roles in synaptic plasticity and metaplasticity. However, the underlying mechanisms of these functions remain poorly understood. We investigated the role of octopamine, the invertebrate counterpart of adrenaline and noradrenaline, in synaptic and behavioral plasticity in Drosophila. We found that an increase in locomotor speed induced by food deprivation was accompanied by an activity- and octopamine-dependent extension of octopaminergic arbors and that the formation and maintenance of these arbors required electrical activity. Growth of octopaminergic arbors was controlled by a cAMP- and CREB-dependent positive-feedback mechanism that required Octβ2R octopamine autoreceptors. Notably, this autoregulation was necessary for the locomotor response. In addition, octopamine neurons regulated the expansion of excitatory glutamatergic neuromuscular arbors through Octβ2Rs on glutamatergic motor neurons. Our results provide a mechanism for global regulation of excitatory synapses, presumably to maintain synaptic and behavioral plasticity in a dynamic range.

  11. Plastic-Based Structurally Programmable Microfluidic Biochips for Clinical Diagnostics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    oxidation and doping of the generated PANI. A novel approach along with a structure- property study for ZrO2 and TiO2 filled PDMS was performed. A...derive the expression for pressure needed to overcome the passive valve as: ⎥ ⎥ ⎦ ⎤ ⎢ ⎢ ⎣ ⎡ ⎟⎟ ⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜ ⎝ ⎛ +−⎟⎟ ⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜ ⎝ ⎛ +=∆ 2211 2 1111) cos ...21 2 11) cos (2 ww P cl θσ (III-3) The passive valve shown in Figure III-23 is not an optimum geometry for the biochip

  12. Structural Plasticity of Dentate Granule Cell Mossy Fibers During the Development of Limbic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Danzer, Steve C.; He, Xiaoping; Loepke, Andreas W.; McNamara, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Altered granule cell≫CA3 pyramidal cell synaptic connectivity may contribute to the development of limbic epilepsy. To explore this possibility, granule cell giant mossy fiber bouton plasticity was examined in the kindling and pilocarpine models of epilepsy using green fluorescent protein-expressing transgenic mice. These studies revealed significant increases in the frequency of giant boutons with satellite boutons 2 days and 1 month after pilocarpine status epilepticus, and increases in giant bouton area at 1 month. Similar increases in giant bouton area were observed shortly after kindling. Finally, both models exhibited plasticity of mossy fiber giant bouton filopodia, which contact GABAergic interneurons mediating feedforward inhibition of CA3 pyramids. In the kindling model, however, all changes were fleeting, having resolved by 1 month after the last evoked seizure. Together, these findings demonstrate striking structural plasticity of granule cell mossy fiber synaptic terminal structure in two distinct models of adult limbic epileptogenesis. We suggest that these plasticities modify local connectivities between individual mossy fiber terminals and their targets, inhibitory interneurons, and CA3 pyramidal cells potentially altering the balance of excitation and inhibition during the development of epilepsy. PMID:19294647

  13. Thermoelectric plastics: from design to synthesis, processing and structure-property relationships.

    PubMed

    Kroon, Renee; Mengistie, Desalegn Alemu; Kiefer, David; Hynynen, Jonna; Ryan, Jason D; Yu, Liyang; Müller, Christian

    2016-11-07

    Thermoelectric plastics are a class of polymer-based materials that combine the ability to directly convert heat to electricity, and vice versa, with ease of processing. Potential applications include waste heat recovery, spot cooling and miniature power sources for autonomous electronics. Recent progress has led to surging interest in organic thermoelectrics. This tutorial review discusses the current trends in the field with regard to the four main building blocks of thermoelectric plastics: (1) organic semiconductors and in particular conjugated polymers, (2) dopants and counterions, (3) insulating polymers, and (4) conductive fillers. The design and synthesis of conjugated polymers that promise to show good thermoelectric properties are explored, followed by an overview of relevant structure-property relationships. Doping of conjugated polymers is discussed and its interplay with processing as well as structure formation is elucidated. The use of insulating polymers as binders or matrices is proposed, which permit the adjustment of the rheological and mechanical properties of a thermoelectric plastic. Then, nanocomposites of conductive fillers such as carbon nanotubes, graphene and inorganic nanowires in a polymer matrix are introduced. A case study examines poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) based materials, which up to now have shown the most promising thermoelectric performance. Finally, a discussion of the advantages provided by bulk architectures e.g. for wearable applications highlights the unique advantages that thermoelectric plastics promise to offer.

  14. Integrated control-structure design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunziker, K. Scott; Kraft, Raymond H.; Bossi, Joseph A.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach for the design and control of flexible space structures is described. The approach integrates the structure and controller design processes thereby providing extra opportunities for avoiding some of the disastrous effects of control-structures interaction and for discovering new, unexpected avenues of future structural design. A control formulation based on Boyd's implementation of Youla parameterization is employed. Control design parameters are coupled with structural design variables to produce a set of integrated-design variables which are selected through optimization-based methodology. A performance index reflecting spacecraft mission goals and constraints is formulated and optimized with respect to the integrated design variables. Initial studies have been concerned with achieving mission requirements with a lighter, more flexible space structure. Details of the formulation of the integrated-design approach are presented and results are given from a study involving the integrated redesign of a flexible geostationary platform.

  15. Structure and Plasticity of Endophilin and Sorting Nexin 9

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qi; Kaan, Hung Yi Kristal; Hooda, Reshma Noordin; Goh, Shih Lin; Sondermann, Holger

    2009-06-17

    Endophilin and Sorting Nexin 9 (Snx9) play key roles in endocytosis by membrane curvature sensing and remodeling via their Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domains. BAR and the related F-BAR domains form dimeric, crescent-shaped units that occur N- or C-terminally to other lipid-binding, adaptor, or catalytic modules. In crystal structures, the PX-BAR unit of Snx9 (Snx9{sup PX-BAR}) adopts an overall compact, moderately curved conformation. SAXS-based solution studies revealed an alternative, more curved state of Snx9{sup PX-BAR} in which the PX domains are flexibly connected to the BAR domains, providing a model for how Snx9 exhibits lipid-dependent curvature preferences. In contrast, Endophilin appears to be rigid in solution, and the SH3 domains are located at the distal tips of a BAR domain dimer with fixed curvature. We also observed tip-to-tip interactions between the BAR domains in a trigonal crystal form of Snx9PX-BAR reminiscent of functionally important interactions described for F-BAR domains.

  16. TARP gamma-8 controls hippocampal AMPA receptor number, distribution and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Rouach, Nathalie; Byrd, Keith; Petralia, Ronald S; Elias, Guillermo M; Adesnik, Hillel; Tomita, Susumu; Karimzadegan, Siavash; Kealey, Colin; Bredt, David S; Nicoll, Roger A

    2005-11-01

    Synaptic plasticity involves activity-dependent trafficking of AMPA-type glutamate receptors. Numerous cytoplasmic scaffolding proteins are postulated to control AMPA receptor trafficking, but the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show that the transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein (TARP) gamma-8, which is preferentially expressed in the mouse hippocampus, is important for AMPA receptor protein levels and extrasynaptic surface expression. By controlling the number of AMPA receptors, gamma-8 is also important in long-term potentiation, but not long-term depression. This study establishes gamma-8 as a critical protein for basal AMPA receptor expression and localization at extrasynaptic sites in the hippocampus and raises the possibility that TARP-dependent control of AMPA receptors during synapse development and plasticity may be widespread.

  17. Cofilin1 Controls Transcolumnar Plasticity in Dendritic Spines in Adult Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tsubota, Tadashi; Okubo-Suzuki, Reiko; Ohashi, Yohei; Tamura, Keita; Ogata, Koshin; Yaguchi, Masae; Matsuyama, Makoto; Inokuchi, Kaoru; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    During sensory deprivation, the barrel cortex undergoes expansion of a functional column representing spared inputs (spared column), into the neighboring deprived columns (representing deprived inputs) which are in turn shrunk. As a result, the neurons in a deprived column simultaneously increase and decrease their responses to spared and deprived inputs, respectively. Previous studies revealed that dendritic spines are remodeled during this barrel map plasticity. Because cofilin1, a predominant regulator of actin filament turnover, governs both the expansion and shrinkage of the dendritic spine structure in vitro, it hypothetically regulates both responses in barrel map plasticity. However, this hypothesis remains untested. Using lentiviral vectors, we knocked down cofilin1 locally within layer 2/3 neurons in a deprived column. Cofilin1-knocked-down neurons were optogenetically labeled using channelrhodopsin-2, and electrophysiological recordings were targeted to these knocked-down neurons. We showed that cofilin1 knockdown impaired response increases to spared inputs but preserved response decreases to deprived inputs, indicating that cofilin1 dependency is dissociated in these two types of barrel map plasticity. To explore the structural basis of this dissociation, we then analyzed spine densities on deprived column dendritic branches, which were supposed to receive dense horizontal transcolumnar projections from the spared column. We found that spine number increased in a cofilin1-dependent manner selectively in the distal part of the supragranular layer, where most of the transcolumnar projections existed. Our findings suggest that cofilin1-mediated actin dynamics regulate functional map plasticity in an input-specific manner through the dendritic spine remodeling that occurs in the horizontal transcolumnar circuits. These new mechanistic insights into transcolumnar plasticity in adult rats may have a general significance for understanding reorganization of

  18. Control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gran, R.; Rossi, M.; Moyer, H. G.; Austin, F.

    1979-01-01

    The control of large space structures was studied to determine what, if any, limitations are imposed on the size of spacecraft which may be controlled using current control system design technology. Using a typical structure in the 35 to 70 meter size category, a control system design that used actuators that are currently available was designed. The amount of control power required to maintain the vehicle in a stabilized gravity gradient pointing orientation that also damped various structural motions was determined. The moment of inertia and mass properties of this structure were varied to verify that stability and performance were maintained. The study concludes that the structure's size is required to change by at least a factor of two before any stability problems arise. The stability margin that is lost is due to the scaling of the gravity gradient torques (the rigid body control) and as such can easily be corrected by changing the control gains associated with the rigid body control. A secondary conclusion from the study is that the control design that accommodates the structural motions (to damp them) is a little more sensitive than the design that works on attitude control of the rigid body only.

  19. Bidirectional Synaptic Structural Plasticity after Chronic Cocaine Administration Occurs through Rap1 Small GTPase Signaling.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Michael E; Bagot, Rosemary C; Gancarz, Amy M; Walker, Deena M; Sun, HaoSheng; Wang, Zi-Jun; Heller, Elizabeth A; Feng, Jian; Kennedy, Pamela J; Koo, Ja Wook; Cates, Hannah M; Neve, Rachael L; Shen, Li; Dietz, David M; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-02-03

    Dendritic spines are the sites of most excitatory synapses in the CNS, and opposing alterations in the synaptic structure of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a primary brain reward region, are seen at early versus late time points after cocaine administration. Here we investigate the time-dependent molecular and biochemical processes that regulate this bidirectional synaptic structural plasticity of NAc MSNs and associated changes in cocaine reward in response to chronic cocaine exposure. Our findings reveal key roles for the bidirectional synaptic expression of the Rap1b small GTPase and an associated local synaptic protein translation network in this process. The transcriptional mechanisms and pathway-specific inputs to NAc that regulate Rap1b expression are also characterized. Collectively, these findings provide a precise mechanism by which nuclear to synaptic interactions induce "metaplasticity" in NAc MSNs, and we reveal the specific effects of this plasticity on reward behavior in a brain circuit-specific manner.

  20. What is the structure of a polymer glass after plastic deformation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Helene; Lequeux, Francois; Alba-Simionesco, Christiane; Casas, Frederic

    2008-03-01

    We aim to study the effect of plastic deformation on the structure of a glassy polymer. Using neutrons scattering on a large range of length scales, and comparing samples deformed below and above Tg, we show that: 1) The deformation is extremely homogeneous (or affine) for length scales above the entanglement distance 2) The crossover length scale between affine and non affine deeformation is about half the one of the entanglements, and is independent of temperature below the glass transition 3) The arrangement of the polymer chain is distorded by plastic deformation at the atomic scale We then discuss these results and compare them to the results of the simulation of Hoy and Robbins (J. Polym. Sci., 44 (2006), 3487). As a conclusion we see that the entanglements are respopnsible for the very homogeneous deformations, forcing the individual plastic events to propagate in the sample following the tension of the chains. Thus we conclude that the physics of the plastic deformation of polymer glasses are very different from the one of other glasses.

  1. Smaller is Plastic: Polymorphic Structures and Mechanism of Deformation in Nanoscale hcp Metals.

    PubMed

    Bhogra, Meha; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, Umesh V

    2015-06-10

    Using first-principles calculations, we establish the existence of highly stable polymorphs of hcp metals (Ti, Mg, Be, La and Y) with nanoscale structural periodicity. They arise from heterogeneous deformation of the hcp structure occurring in response to large shear stresses localized at the basal planes separated by a few nanometers. Through Landau theoretical analysis, we show that their stability derives from nonlinear coupling between strains at different length scales. Such multiscale hyperelasticity and long-period structures constitute a new mechanism of size-dependent plasticity and its enhancement in nanoscale hcp metals.

  2. Structure and deformation behavior of Armco iron subjected to severe plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, R.Z. |; Rauch, E.F.; Baudelet, B.; Ivanisenko, Yu.V.

    1996-12-01

    Structural evolutions in an Armco iron subjected to severe plastic deformation by torsion under high pressure are analyzed with conventional and high resolution electron microscopes. The substructure observed at low strains appears to shrink with increasing deformation and transforms at very high strains into grain boundaries. The resulting grain size decreases down to a constant submicrometric value. Meanwhile, the material strength, as revealed by micro hardness measurements, levels out. Dislocation densities and internal stress levels are used to discuss the structural transformations. Hydrostatic pressure and deformation temperature are believed to modify the steady-state stress level and structural size by impeding the recovery processes involving diffusion.

  3. Homeostatic structural plasticity can account for topology changes following deafferentation and focal stroke.

    PubMed

    Butz, Markus; Steenbuck, Ines D; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2014-01-01

    After brain lesions caused by tumors or stroke, or after lasting loss of input (deafferentation), inter- and intra-regional brain networks respond with complex changes in topology. Not only areas directly affected by the lesion but also regions remote from the lesion may alter their connectivity-a phenomenon known as diaschisis. Changes in network topology after brain lesions can lead to cognitive decline and increasing functional disability. However, the principles governing changes in network topology are poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether homeostatic structural plasticity can account for changes in network topology after deafferentation and brain lesions. Homeostatic structural plasticity postulates that neurons aim to maintain a desired level of electrical activity by deleting synapses when neuronal activity is too high and by providing new synaptic contacts when activity is too low. Using our Model of Structural Plasticity, we explored how local changes in connectivity induced by a focal loss of input affected global network topology. In accordance with experimental and clinical data, we found that after partial deafferentation, the network as a whole became more random, although it maintained its small-world topology, while deafferentated neurons increased their betweenness centrality as they rewired and returned to the homeostatic range of activity. Furthermore, deafferentated neurons increased their global but decreased their local efficiency and got longer tailed degree distributions, indicating the emergence of hub neurons. Together, our results suggest that homeostatic structural plasticity may be an important driving force for lesion-induced network reorganization and that the increase in betweenness centrality of deafferentated areas may hold as a biomarker for brain repair.

  4. Ubiquitin ligase TRIM3 controls hippocampal plasticity and learning by regulating synaptic γ-actin levels

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Joerg; Végh, Marlene J.; Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Loos, Maarten; Labonté, Dorthe; Li, Ka Wan; Van Nierop, Pim; Van Diepen, Michiel T.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Kneussel, Matthias; Meredith, Rhiannon M.; Smit, August B.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity requires remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Although two actin isoforms, β- and γ-actin, are expressed in dendritic spines, the specific contribution of γ-actin in the expression of synaptic plasticity is unknown. We show that synaptic γ-actin levels are regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM3. TRIM3 protein and Actg1 transcript are colocalized in messenger ribonucleoprotein granules responsible for the dendritic targeting of messenger RNAs. TRIM3 polyubiquitylates γ-actin, most likely cotranslationally at synaptic sites. Trim3−/− mice consequently have increased levels of γ-actin at hippocampal synapses, resulting in higher spine densities, increased long-term potentiation, and enhanced short-term contextual fear memory consolidation. Interestingly, hippocampal deletion of Actg1 caused an increase in long-term fear memory. Collectively, our findings suggest that temporal control of γ-actin levels by TRIM3 is required to regulate the timing of hippocampal plasticity. We propose a model in which TRIM3 regulates synaptic γ-actin turnover and actin filament stability and thus forms a transient inhibitory constraint on the expression of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. PMID:26527743

  5. Evolutionary Design of Controlled Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, Brett P.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1997-01-01

    Basic physical concepts of structural delay and transmissibility are provided for simple rod and beam structures. Investigations show the sensitivity of these concepts to differing controlled-structures variables, and to rational system modeling effects. An evolutionary controls/structures design method is developed. The basis of the method is an accurate model formulation for dynamic compensator optimization and Genetic Algorithm based updating of sensor/actuator placement and structural attributes. One and three dimensional examples from the literature are used to validate the method. Frequency domain interpretation of these controlled structure systems provide physical insight as to how the objective is optimized and consequently what is important in the objective. Several disturbance rejection type controls-structures systems are optimized for a stellar interferometer spacecraft application. The interferometric designs include closed loop tracking optics. Designs are generated for differing structural aspect ratios, differing disturbance attributes, and differing sensor selections. Physical limitations in achieving performance are given in terms of average system transfer function gains and system phase loss. A spacecraft-like optical interferometry system is investigated experimentally over several different optimized controlled structures configurations. Configurations represent common and not-so-common approaches to mitigating pathlength errors induced by disturbances of two different spectra. Results show that an optimized controlled structure for low frequency broadband disturbances achieves modest performance gains over a mass equivalent regular structure, while an optimized structure for high frequency narrow band disturbances is four times better in terms of root-mean-square pathlength. These results are predictable given the nature of the physical system and the optimization design variables. Fundamental limits on controlled performance are discussed

  6. Trigeminothalamic barrelette neurons: natural structural side asymmetries and sensory input-dependent plasticity in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Negredo, P; Martin, Y B; Lagares, A; Castro, J; Villacorta, J A; Avendaño, C

    2009-11-10

    In the rodent trigeminal principal nucleus (Pr5) the barrelette thalamic-projecting neurons relay information from individual whiskers to corresponding contralateral thalamic barreloids. Here we investigated the presence of lateral asymmetries in the dendritic trees of these neurons, and the morphometric changes resulting from input-dependent plasticity in young adult rats. After retrograde labeling with dextran amines from the thalamus, neurons were digitally reconstructed with Neurolucida, and metrically and topologically analyzed with NeuroExplorer. The most unexpected and remarkable result was the observation of side-to-side asymmetries in the barrelette neurons of control rats. These asymmetries more significantly involved the number of low-grade trees and the total dendritic length, which were greater on the left side. Chronic global input loss resulting from infraorbital nerve (IoN) transection, or loss of active touch resulting from whisker clipping in the right neutralized, or even reversed, the observed lateral differences. While results after IoN transection have to be interpreted in the context of partial neuron death in this model, profound bilateral changes were found after haptic loss, which is achieved without inflicting any nerve damage. After whisker trimming, neurons on the left side closely resembled neurons on the right in controls, the natural dendritic length asymmetry being reversed mainly by a shortening of the left trees and a more moderate elongation of the right trees. These results demonstrate that dendritic morphometry is both side- and input-dependent, and that unilateral manipulation of the sensory periphery leads to bilateral morphometric changes in second order neurons of the whisker-barrel system. The presence of anatomical asymmetries in neural structures involved in early stages of somatosensory processing could help explain the expression of sensory input-dependent behavioral asymmetries.

  7. Elastic-Plastic Strain Acceptance Criteria for Structures Subject to Rapidly Applied Transient Dynamic Loading

    SciTech Connect

    W.R. Solonick

    2003-04-01

    Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on material ductility considerations only and are set as a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local , or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

  8. Elastic-plastic strain acceptance criterion for structures subject to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Solonick, W.

    1996-11-01

    Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local, or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

  9. ACTIVITY-DEPENDENT STRUCTURAL PLASTICITY AFTER AVERSIVE EXPERIENCES IN AMYGDALA AND AUDITORY CORTEX PYRAMIDAL NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Gruene, Tina; Flick, Katelyn; Rendall, Sam; Cho, Jin Hyung; Gray, Jesse; Shansky, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The brain is highly plastic and undergoes changes in response to many experiences. Learning especially can induce structural remodeling of dendritic spines, which is thought to relate to memory formation. Classical Pavlovian fear conditioning (FC) traditionally pairs an auditory cue with an aversive footshock, and has been widely used to study neural processes underlying associative learning and memory. Past research has found dendritic spine changes after FC in several structures. But, due to heterogeneity of cells within brain structures and limitations of traditional neuroanatomical techniques, it is unclear if all cells included in analyses were actually active during learning processes, even if known circuits are isolated. In this study, we employed a novel approach to analyze structural plasticity explicitly in neurons activated by exposure to either cued or uncued footshocks. We used male and female Arc-dVenus transgenic mice, which express the Venus fluorophore driven by the activity-related Arc promoter, to identify neurons that were active during either scenario. We then targeted fluorescent microinjections to Arc+ and neighboring Arc− neurons in the basolateral area of the amygdala (BLA) and auditory association cortex (TeA). In both BLA and TeA, Arc+ neurons had reduced thin and mushroom spine densities compared to Arc− neurons. This effect was present in males and females alike and also in both cued and uncued shock groups. Overall, this study adds to our understanding of how neuronal activity affects structural plasticity, and represents a methodological advance in the ways we can directly relate structural changes to experience-related neural activity. PMID:27155146

  10. Dislocation subgrain structures and modeling the plastic hardening of metallic single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B. L.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Ortiz, M.

    2010-07-01

    A single crystal plasticity theory for insertion into finite element simulation is formulated using sequential laminates to model subgrain dislocation structures. It is known that local models do not adequately account for latent hardening, as latent hardening is not only a material property, but a nonlocal property (e.g. grain size and shape). The addition of the nonlocal energy from the formation of subgrain structure dislocation walls and the boundary layer misfits provide both latent and self-hardening of a crystal slip. Latent hardening occurs as the formation of new dislocation walls limits motion of new mobile dislocations, thus hardening future slip systems. Self-hardening is accomplished by an evolution of the subgrain structure length scale. The substructure length scale is computed by minimizing the nonlocal energy. The minimization of the nonlocal energy is a competition between the dislocation wall energy and the boundary layer energies. The nonlocal terms are also directly minimized within the subgrain model as they affect deformation response. The geometrical relationship between the dislocation walls and slip planes affecting the dislocation mean free path is taken into account, giving a first-order approximation to shape effects. A coplanar slip model is developed due to requirements while modeling the subgrain structure. This subgrain structure plasticity model is noteworthy as all material parameters are experimentally determined rather than fit. The model also has an inherit path dependence due to the formation of the subgrain structures. Validation is accomplished by comparison with single crystal tension test results.

  11. Learning the structure of correlated synaptic subgroups using stable and competitive spike-timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Meffin, H; Besson, J; Burkitt, A N; Grayden, D B

    2006-04-01

    Synaptic plasticity must be both competitive and stable if ongoing learning of the structure of neural inputs is to occur. In this paper, a wide class of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) models is identified that have both of these desirable properties in the case in which the input consists of subgroups of synapses that are correlated within the subgroup through the occurrence of simultaneous input spikes. The process of synaptic structure formation is studied, illustrating one particular class of these models. When the learning rate is small, multiple alternative synaptic structures are possible given the same inputs, with the outcome depending on the initial weight configuration. For large learning rates, the synaptic structure does not stabilize, resulting in neurons without consistent response properties. For learning rates in between, a unique and stable synaptic structure typically forms. When this synaptic structure exhibits a bimodal distribution, the neuron will respond selectively to one or more of the subgroups. The robustness with which this selectivity develops during learning is largely determined by the ratio of the subgroup correlation strength to the number of subgroups. The fraction of potentiated subgroups is primarily determined by the balance between potentiation and depression.

  12. CD44: a novel synaptic cell adhesion molecule regulating structural and functional plasticity of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Roszkowska, Matylda; Skupien, Anna; Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Konopka, Anna; Gorlewicz, Adam; Kisiel, Magdalena; Bekisz, Marek; Ruszczycki, Blazej; Dolezyczek, Hubert; Rejmak, Emilia; Knapska, Ewelina; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.; Wlodarczyk, Jakub; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M.; Dzwonek, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic cell adhesion molecules regulate signal transduction, synaptic function, and plasticity. However, their role in neuronal interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) is not well understood. Here we report that the CD44, a transmembrane receptor for hyaluronan, modulates synaptic plasticity. High-resolution ultrastructural analysis showed that CD44 was localized at mature synapses in the adult brain. The reduced expression of CD44 affected the synaptic excitatory transmission of primary hippocampal neurons, simultaneously modifying dendritic spine shape. The frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents decreased, accompanied by dendritic spine elongation and thinning. These structural and functional alterations went along with a decrease in the number of presynaptic Bassoon puncta, together with a reduction of PSD-95 levels at dendritic spines, suggesting a reduced number of functional synapses. Lack of CD44 also abrogated spine head enlargement upon neuronal stimulation. Moreover, our results indicate that CD44 contributes to proper dendritic spine shape and function by modulating the activity of actin cytoskeleton regulators, that is, Rho GTPases (RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42). Thus CD44 appears to be a novel molecular player regulating functional and structural plasticity of dendritic spines. PMID:27798233

  13. Dietary cholesterol alters memory and synaptic structural plasticity in young rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ya, Bai-liu; Liu, Wen-yan; Ge, Feng; Zhang, Yan-xia; Zhu, Bao-liang; Bai, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. To better explore how dietary cholesterol contributes to learning and memory and the related changes in synaptic structural plasticity, rats were categorized into a regular diet (RD) group and a cholesterol-enriched diet (CD) group, and were fed with respective diet for 2 months. Dietary cholesterol impacts on learning and memory, hippocampal synaptic ultrastructure, expression levels of postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95), synaptophysin (SYP) and cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) were investigated. We found CD rats had better performances in learning and memory using Morris water maze and object recognition test than RD rats. The memory improvement was accompanied with alterations of synaptic ultrastructure in the CA1 area of the hippocampus evaluated by electron microscopy, enhanced immunoreactivity of SYP, a presynaptic marker in hippocampus detected by immunocytochemistry, as well as increased levels of PSD-95, SYP and decreased level of CB1R in brains of CD rats determined by Western blot. Taken together, the results suggest that the improvement of learning and memory abilities of the young adult rats induced by dietary cholesterol may be linked with changes in synaptic structural plasticity in the brain.

  14. On a numerical solution of the plastic buckling problem of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1978-01-01

    An automated digital computer procedure is presented for the accurate and efficient solution of the plastic buckling problem of structures. This is achieved by a Sturm sequence method employing a bisection strategy, which eliminates the need for having to solve the buckling eigenvalue problem at each incremental (decremental) loading stage that is associated with the usual solution techniques. The plastic buckling mode shape is determined by a simple inverse iteration process, once the buckling load has been established. Numerical results are presented for plate problems with various edge conditions. The resulting computer program written in FORTRAN V for the JPL UNIVAC 1108 machine proves to be most economical in comparison with other existing methods of such analysis.

  15. On the solution of elastic-plastic static and dynamic postbuckling collapse of general structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Tovichakchaikul, S.

    1983-01-01

    Many investigations have considered structural collapse from strictly the transient point of view. While such an approach is ideally correct, certain difficulties have to be overcome in its implementation. The present investigation is concerned with the development of self-adaptive algorithms which make it possible to conduct the analysis of both static elastic and elastic-plastic postbuckling, as well as static loading to the onset of buckling followed by subsequent dynamic postbuckling. The approach employed to solve the static portion of loading is to extend the constrained Incremental Newton-Raphson (INR) algorithm by incorporating elastic-plastic constitutive characterizations. Large deformation moderate strain theory is adopted to establish the overall strategy. Attention is given to governing field equations, aspects of algorithmic development, and numerical experiments conducted to illustrate the efficiency and stability of the developed schemes.

  16. miR302 regulates SNAI1 expression to control mesangial cell plasticity

    PubMed Central

    De Chiara, L.; Andrews, D.; Watson, A.; Oliviero, G.; Cagney, G.; Crean, J.

    2017-01-01

    Cell fate decisions are controlled by the interplay of transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers, which together determine cellular identity. Here we elaborate on the role of miR302 in the regulation of cell plasticity. Overexpression of miR302 effected silencing of the TGFβ type II receptor and facilitated plasticity in a manner distinct from pluripotency, characterized by increased expression of Snail. miR302 overexpressing mesangial cells also exhibited enhanced expression of EZH2 coincident with Snail upregulation. esiRNA silencing of each component suggest that Smad3 and EZH2 are part of a complex that regulates plasticity and that miR302 regulates EZH2 and Snail independently. Subsequent manipulation of miR302 overexpressing cells demonstrated the potential of using this approach for reprogramming as evidenced by de novo expression of the tight junction components ZO-1 and E-cadherin and the formation of ZO-1 containing tight junctions. Understanding the processes through which dynamic epigenetic silencing is controlled in adults cells will allow us to address the epigenetic state of acquired disease and whether original states, regenerative in nature, can be restored with therapy. PMID:28195240

  17. Layer-specific cholinergic control of human and mouse cortical synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Verhoog, Matthijs B.; Obermayer, Joshua; Kortleven, Christian A.; Wilbers, René; Wester, Jordi; Baayen, Johannes C.; De Kock, Christiaan P. J.; Meredith, Rhiannon M.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.

    2016-01-01

    Individual cortical layers have distinct roles in information processing. All layers receive cholinergic inputs from the basal forebrain (BF), which is crucial for cognition. Acetylcholinergic receptors are differentially distributed across cortical layers, and recent evidence suggests that different populations of BF cholinergic neurons may target specific prefrontal cortical (PFC) layers, raising the question of whether cholinergic control of the PFC is layer dependent. Here we address this issue and reveal dendritic mechanisms by which endogenous cholinergic modulation of synaptic plasticity is opposite in superficial and deep layers of both mouse and human neocortex. Our results show that in different cortical layers, spike timing-dependent plasticity is oppositely regulated by the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) either located on dendrites of principal neurons or on GABAergic interneurons. Thus, layer-specific nAChR expression allows functional layer-specific control of cortical processing and plasticity by the BF cholinergic system, which is evolutionarily conserved from mice to humans. PMID:27604129

  18. Control and Plasticity of the Presynaptic Action Potential Waveform at Small CNS Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Hoppa, Michael B.; Gouzer, Geraldine; Armbruster, Moritz; Ryan, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The steep dependence of exocytosis on Ca2+ entry at nerve terminals implies that voltage control of both Ca2+ channel opening and the driving force for Ca2+ entry are powerful levers in sculpting synaptic efficacy. Using fast, genetically encoded voltage indicators in dissociated primary neurons, we show that at small nerve terminals K+ channels constrain the peak voltage of the presynaptic action potential (APSYN) to values much lower than those at cell somas. This key APSYN property additionally shows adaptive plasticity: manipulations that increase presynaptic Ca2+ channel abundance and release probability result in a commensurate lowering of the APSYN peak and narrowing of the waveform, while manipulations that decrease presynaptic Ca2+ channel abundance do the opposite. This modulation is eliminated upon blockade of Kv3.1 and Kv1 channels. Our studies thus reveal that adaptive plasticity in the APSYN waveform serves as an important regulator of synaptic function. PMID:25447742

  19. Neuroendocrine control of seasonal plasticity in the auditory and vocal systems of fish

    PubMed Central

    Forlano, Paul M.; Sisneros, Joseph A.; Rohmann, Kevin N.; Bass, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal changes in reproductive-related vocal behavior are widespread among fishes. This review highlights recent studies of the vocal plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, a neuroethological model system used for the past two decades to explore neural and endocrine mechanisms of vocal-acoustic social behaviors shared with tetrapods. Integrative approaches combining behavior, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology, neuroanatomy, and gene expression methodologies have taken advantage of simple, stereotyped and easily quantifiable behaviors controlled by discrete neural networks in this model system to enable discoveries such as the first demonstration of adaptive seasonal plasticity in the auditory periphery of a vertebrate as well as rapid steroid and neuropeptide effects on vocal physiology and behavior. This simple model system has now revealed cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying seasonal and steroid-driven auditory and vocal plasticity in the vertebrate brain. PMID:25168757

  20. Posttranslational marks control architectural and functional plasticity of the nuclear pore complex basket

    PubMed Central

    Niño, Carlos A.; Guet, David; Gay, Alexandre; Brutus, Sergine; Jourquin, Frédéric; Mendiratta, Shweta; Salamero, Jean; Géli, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) serves as both the unique gate between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and a major platform that coordinates nucleocytoplasmic exchanges, gene expression, and genome integrity. To understand how the NPC integrates these functional constraints, we dissected here the posttranslational modifications of the nuclear basket protein Nup60 and analyzed how they intervene to control the plasticity of the NPC. Combined approaches highlight the role of monoubiquitylation in regulating the association dynamics of Nup60 and its partner, Nup2, with the NPC through an interaction with Nup84, a component of the Y complex. Although major nuclear transport routes are not regulated by Nup60 modifications, monoubiquitylation of Nup60 is stimulated upon genotoxic stress and regulates the DNA-damage response and telomere repair. Together, these data reveal an original mechanism contributing to the plasticity of the NPC at a molecular-organization and functional level. PMID:26783300

  1. Event Structure and Cognitive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Jason F.; Radvansky, Gabriel A.; Lorsbach, Thomas C.; Armendarez, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of research has demonstrated that although everyday experience is continuous in nature, it is parsed into separate events. The aim of the present study was to examine whether event structure can influence the effectiveness of cognitive control. Across 5 experiments we varied the structure of events within the AX-CPT by…

  2. Plasticity in protein-peptide recognition: crystal structures of two different peptides bound to concanavalin A.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, D; Kaur, K J; Salunke, D M

    2001-01-01

    The structures of concanavalin A (ConA) in complex with two carbohydrate-mimicking peptides, 10-mer (MYWYPYASGS) and 15-mer (RVWYPYGSYLTASGS) have been determined at 2.75 A resolution. In both crystal structures four independent peptide molecules bind to each of the crystallographically independent subunits of ConA tetramer. The peptides exhibit small but significant variability in conformations and interactions while binding to ConA. The crystal structure of another similar peptide, 12-mer (DVFYPYPYASGS), in complex with ConA has been determined (Jain, D., K. J. Kaur, B. Sundaravadivel, and D. M. Salunke. 2000. Structural and functional consequences of peptide-carbohydrate mimicry. J. Biol. Chem. 275:16098-16102). Comparison of the three complexes shows that the peptides bind to ConA at a common binding site, using different contacting residues and interactions depending on their sequence and the local environment at the binding site. The binding is also optimized by corresponding plasticity of the peptide binding site on ConA. The diversity in conformation and interactions observed here are in agreement with the structural leeway concerning plasticity of specific molecular recognition in biological processes. The adaptability of peptide-ConA interactions may also be correlated with the carbohydrate-mimicking property of these peptides. PMID:11371463

  3. Transition of Temporal Scaling Behavior in Percolation Assisted Shear-branching Structure during Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jingli; Chen, Cun; Wang, Gang; Liaw, Peter K.

    2017-03-01

    This paper explores the temporal scaling behavior induced shear-branching structure in response to variant temperatures and strain rates during plastic deformation of Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG). The data analysis based on the compression tests suggests that there are two states of shear-branching structures: the fractal structure with a long-range order at an intermediate temperature of 223 K and a larger strain rate of 2.5 × 10‑2 s‑1 the disordered structure dominated at other temperature and strain rate. It can be deduced from the percolation theory that the compressive ductility, ec, can reach the maximum value at the intermediate temperature. Furthermore, a dynamical model involving temperature is given for depicting the shear-sliding process, reflecting the plastic deformation has fractal structure at the temperature of 223 K and strain rate of 2.5 × 10‑2 s‑1.

  4. Transition of Temporal Scaling Behavior in Percolation Assisted Shear-branching Structure during Plastic Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jingli; Chen, Cun; Wang, Gang; Liaw, Peter K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the temporal scaling behavior induced shear-branching structure in response to variant temperatures and strain rates during plastic deformation of Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG). The data analysis based on the compression tests suggests that there are two states of shear-branching structures: the fractal structure with a long-range order at an intermediate temperature of 223 K and a larger strain rate of 2.5 × 10−2 s−1; the disordered structure dominated at other temperature and strain rate. It can be deduced from the percolation theory that the compressive ductility, ec, can reach the maximum value at the intermediate temperature. Furthermore, a dynamical model involving temperature is given for depicting the shear-sliding process, reflecting the plastic deformation has fractal structure at the temperature of 223 K and strain rate of 2.5 × 10−2 s−1. PMID:28327562

  5. Overexpression of Mineralocorticoid Receptors Partially Prevents Chronic Stress-Induced Reductions in Hippocampal Memory and Structural Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Fearey, Brenna C; Kuil, Laura E; Lucassen, Paul J; Harris, Anjanette P; Seckl, Jonathan R; Krugers, Harm; Joels, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chronic stress is a risk factor for cognitive decline and psychopathology in genetically predisposed individuals. Preliminary evidence in humans suggests that mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) may confer resilience to these stress-related changes. We specifically tested this idea using a well-controlled mouse model for chronic stress in combination with transgenic MR overexpression in the forebrain. Exposure to unpredictable stressors for 21 days in adulthood reduced learning and memory formation in a low arousing hippocampus-dependent contextual learning task, but enhanced stressful contextual fear learning. We found support for a moderating effect of MR background on chronic stress only for contextual memory formation under low arousing conditions. In an attempt to understand potentially contributing factors, we studied structural plasticity. Chronic stress altered dendritic morphology in the hippocampal CA3 area and reduced the total number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in the infrapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus. The latter reduction was absent in MR overexpressing mice. We therefore provide partial support for the idea that overexpression of MRs may confer resilience to the effects of chronic stress on hippocampus-dependent function and structural plasticity.

  6. Overexpression of Mineralocorticoid Receptors Partially Prevents Chronic Stress-Induced Reductions in Hippocampal Memory and Structural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Fearey, Brenna C.; Kuil, Laura E.; Lucassen, Paul J.; Harris, Anjanette P.; Seckl, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chronic stress is a risk factor for cognitive decline and psychopathology in genetically predisposed individuals. Preliminary evidence in humans suggests that mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) may confer resilience to these stress-related changes. We specifically tested this idea using a well-controlled mouse model for chronic stress in combination with transgenic MR overexpression in the forebrain. Exposure to unpredictable stressors for 21 days in adulthood reduced learning and memory formation in a low arousing hippocampus-dependent contextual learning task, but enhanced stressful contextual fear learning. We found support for a moderating effect of MR background on chronic stress only for contextual memory formation under low arousing conditions. In an attempt to understand potentially contributing factors, we studied structural plasticity. Chronic stress altered dendritic morphology in the hippocampal CA3 area and reduced the total number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in the infrapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus. The latter reduction was absent in MR overexpressing mice. We therefore provide partial support for the idea that overexpression of MRs may confer resilience to the effects of chronic stress on hippocampus-dependent function and structural plasticity. PMID:26600250

  7. Microtransfer printing of metal ink patterns onto plastic substrates utilizing an adhesion-controlled polymeric donor layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Sub; Choi, Jun-Chan; Park, Min-Kyu; Bae, Jeong Min; Bae, Jin-Hyuk; Kim, Hak-Rin

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method for transfer-printed electrode patterns onto flexible/plastic substrates, specifically intended for metal ink that requires a high sintering temperature. Typically, metal-ink-based electrodes cannot be picked up for microtransfer printing because the adhesion between the electrodes and the donor substrate greatly increases after the sintering process due to the binding materials. We introduced a polymeric donor layer between the printed electrodes and the donor substrate and effectively reduced the adhesion between the Ag pattern and the polymeric donor layer by controlling the interfacial contact area. After completing a wet-etching process for the polymeric donor layer, we obtained Ag patterns supported on the fine polymeric anchor structures; the Ag patterns could be picked up onto the stamp surface even after the sintering process by utilizing the viscoelastic properties of the elastomeric stamp with a pick-up velocity control. The proposed method enables highly conductive metal-ink-based electrode patterns to be applied on thermally weak plastic substrates via an all-solution process. Metal electrodes transferred onto a film showed superior electrical and mechanical stability under the bending stress test required for use in printed flexible electronics.

  8. Evaluating Tools for Live Imaging of Structural Plasticity at the Axon Initial Segment

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Adna S.; Evans, Mark D.; Grubb, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is a specialized neuronal compartment involved in the maintenance of axo-dendritic polarity and in the generation of action potentials. It is also a site of significant structural plasticity—manipulations of neuronal activity in vitro and in vivo can produce changes in AIS position and/or size that are associated with alterations in intrinsic excitability. However, to date all activity-dependent AIS changes have been observed in experiments carried out on fixed samples, offering only a snapshot, population-wide view of this form of plasticity. To extend these findings by following morphological changes at the AIS of individual neurons requires reliable means of labeling the structure in live preparations. Here, we assessed five different immunofluorescence-based and genetically-encoded tools for live-labeling the AIS of dentate granule cells (DGCs) in dissociated hippocampal cultures. We found that an antibody targeting the extracellular domain of neurofascin provided accurate live label of AIS structure at baseline, but could not follow rapid activity-dependent changes in AIS length. Three different fusion constructs of GFP with full-length AIS proteins also proved unsuitable: while neurofascin-186-GFP and NaVβ4-GFP did not localize to the AIS in our experimental conditions, overexpressing 270kDa-AnkyrinG-GFP produced abnormally elongated AISs in mature neurons. In contrast, a genetically-encoded construct consisting of a voltage-gated sodium channel intracellular domain fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP-NaVII–III) fulfilled all of our criteria for successful live AIS label: this construct specifically localized to the AIS, accurately revealed plastic changes at the structure within hours, and, crucially, did not alter normal cell firing properties. We therefore recommend this probe for future studies of live AIS plasticity in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27932952

  9. Structural plasticity: how intermetallics deform themselves in response to chemical pressure, and the complex structures that result.

    PubMed

    Berns, Veronica M; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2014-10-06

    Interfaces between periodic domains play a crucial role in the properties of metallic materials, as is vividly illustrated by the way in which the familiar malleability of many metals arises from the formation and migration of dislocations. In complex intermetallics, such interfaces can occur as an integral part of the ground-state crystal structure, rather than as defects, resulting in such marvels as the NaCd2 structure (whose giant cubic unit cell contains more than 1000 atoms). However, the sources of the periodic interfaces in intermetallics remain mysterious, unlike the dislocations in simple metals, which can be associated with the exertion of physical stresses. In this Article, we propose and explore the concept of structural plasticity, the hypothesis that interfaces in complex intermetallic structures similarly result from stresses, but ones that are inherent in a defect-free parent structure, rather than being externally applied. Using DFT-chemical pressure analysis, we show how the complex structures of Ca2Ag7 (Yb2Ag7 type), Ca14Cd51 (Gd14Ag51 type), and the 1/1 Tsai-type quasicrystal approximant CaCd6 (YCd6 type) can all be traced to large negative pressures around the Ca atoms of a common progenitor structure, the CaCu5 type with its simple hexagonal 6-atom unit cell. Two structural paths are found by which the compounds provide relief to the Ca atoms' negative pressures: a Ca-rich pathway, where lower coordination numbers are achieved through defects eliminating transition metal (TM) atoms from the structure; and a TM-rich path, along which the addition of spacer Cd atoms provides the Ca coordination environments greater independence from each other as they contract. The common origins of these structures in the presence of stresses within a single parent structure highlights the diverse paths by which intermetallics can cope with competing interactions, and the role that structural plasticity may play in navigating this diversity.

  10. Annual reversible plasticity of feeding structures: cyclical changes of jaw allometry in a sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Thomas A; Hernández, José Carlos; Clemente, Sabrina

    2014-03-22

    A wide variety of organisms show morphologically plastic responses to environmental stressors but in general these changes are not reversible. Though less common, reversible morphological structures are shown by a range of species in response to changes in predators, competitors or food. Theoretical analysis indicates that reversible plasticity increases fitness if organisms are long-lived relative to the frequency of changes in the stressor and morphological changes are rapid. Many sea urchin species show differences in the sizes of jaws (demi-pyramids) of the feeding apparatus, Aristotle's lantern, relative to overall body size, and these differences have been correlated with available food. The question addressed here is whether reversible changes of relative jaw size occur in the field as available food changes with season. Monthly samples of the North American Pacific coast sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus were collected from Gregory Point on the Oregon (USA) coast and showed an annual cycle of relative jaw size together with a linear trend from 2007 to 2009. Strongylocentrotus purpuratus is a long-lived species and under field conditions individuals experience multiple episodes of changes in food resources both seasonally and from year to year. Their rapid and reversible jaw plasticity fits well with theoretical expectations.

  11. Structuring policy problems for plastics, the environment and human health: reflections from the UK.

    PubMed

    Shaxson, Louise

    2009-07-27

    How can we strengthen the science-policy interface for plastics, the environment and human health? In a complex policy area with multiple stakeholders, it is important to clarify the nature of the particular plastics-related issue before trying to understand how to reconcile the supply and demand for evidence in policy. This article proposes a simple problem typology to assess the fundamental characteristics of a policy issue and thus identify appropriate processes for science-policy interactions. This is illustrated with two case studies from one UK Government Department, showing how policy and science meet over the environmental problems of plastics waste in the marine environment and on land. A problem-structuring methodology helps us understand why some policy issues can be addressed through relatively linear flows of science from experts to policymakers but why others demand a more reflexive approach to brokering the knowledge between science and policy. Suggestions are given at the end of the article for practical actions that can be taken on both sides.

  12. Structuring policy problems for plastics, the environment and human health: reflections from the UK

    PubMed Central

    Shaxson, Louise

    2009-01-01

    How can we strengthen the science–policy interface for plastics, the environment and human health? In a complex policy area with multiple stakeholders, it is important to clarify the nature of the particular plastics-related issue before trying to understand how to reconcile the supply and demand for evidence in policy. This article proposes a simple problem typology to assess the fundamental characteristics of a policy issue and thus identify appropriate processes for science–policy interactions. This is illustrated with two case studies from one UK Government Department, showing how policy and science meet over the environmental problems of plastics waste in the marine environment and on land. A problem-structuring methodology helps us understand why some policy issues can be addressed through relatively linear flows of science from experts to policymakers but why others demand a more reflexive approach to brokering the knowledge between science and policy. Suggestions are given at the end of the article for practical actions that can be taken on both sides. PMID:19528061

  13. Molecular surface structural changes of plasticized PVC materials after plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Chi; Hankett, Jeanne M; Chen, Zhan

    2013-03-26

    In this research, a variety of analytical techniques including sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been employed to investigate the surface and bulk structures of phthalate plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) at the molecular level. Two types of phthalate molecules with different chain lengths, diethyl phthalate (DEP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP), mixed with PVC in various weight ratios were examined to verify their different surface and bulk behaviors. The effects of oxygen and argon plasma treatment on PVC/DBP and PVC/DEP hybrid films were investigated on both the surface and bulk of films using SFG and CARS to evaluate the different plasticizer migration processes. Without plasma treatment, SFG results indicated that more plasticizers segregate to the surface at higher plasticizer bulk concentrations. SFG studies also demonstrated the presence of phthalates on the surface even at very low bulk concentration (5 wt %). Additionally, the results gathered from SFG, CARS, and XPS experiments suggested that the PVC/DEP system was unstable, and DEP molecules could leach out from the PVC under low vacuum after several minutes. In contrast, the PVC/DBP system was more stable; the migration process of DBP out of PVC could be effectively suppressed after oxygen plasma treatment. XPS results indicated the increase of C═O/C-O groups and decrease of C-Cl functionalities on the polymer surface after oxygen plasma treatment. The XPS results also suggested that exposure to argon plasma induced chemical bond breaking and formation of cross-linking or unsaturated groups with chain scission on the surface. Finally, our results indicate the potential risk of using DEP molecules in PVC since DEP can easily leach out from the polymeric bulk.

  14. mGluR7 is a metaplastic switch controlling bidirectional plasticity of feedforward inhibition.

    PubMed

    Pelkey, Kenneth A; Lavezzari, Gabriela; Racca, Claudia; Roche, Katherine W; McBain, Chris J

    2005-04-07

    Plasticity of feedforward inhibition in the hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) pathway can dramatically influence dentate gyrus-CA3 dialog. Interestingly, MF inputs to CA3 stratum lucidum interneurons (SLINs) undergo long-term depression (LTD) following high-frequency stimulation (HFS), in contrast to MF-pyramid (PYR) synapses, where long-term potentiation (LTP) occurs. Furthermore, activity-induced potentiation of MF-SLIN transmission has not previously been observed. Here we report that metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGluR7) is a metaplastic switch at MF-SLIN synapses, whose activation and surface expression governs the direction of plasticity. In naive slices, mGluR7 activation during HFS generates MF-SLIN LTD, depressing presynaptic release through a PKC-dependent mechanism. Following agonist exposure, mGluR7 undergoes internalization, unmasking the ability of MF-SLIN synapses to undergo presynaptic potentiation in response to the same HFS that induces LTD in naive slices. Thus, selective mGluR7 targeting to MF terminals contacting SLINs and not PYRs provides cell target-specific plasticity and bidirectional control of feedforward inhibition.

  15. Maternal Diet and Insulin-Like Signaling Control Intergenerational Plasticity of Progeny Size and Starvation Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Maternal effects of environmental conditions produce intergenerational phenotypic plasticity. Adaptive value of these effects depends on appropriate anticipation of environmental conditions in the next generation, and mismatch between conditions may contribute to disease. However, regulation of intergenerational plasticity is poorly understood. Dietary restriction (DR) delays aging but maternal effects have not been investigated. We demonstrate maternal effects of DR in the roundworm C. elegans. Worms cultured in DR produce fewer but larger progeny. Nutrient availability is assessed in late larvae and young adults, rather than affecting a set point in young larvae, and maternal age independently affects progeny size. Reduced signaling through the insulin-like receptor daf-2/InsR in the maternal soma causes constitutively large progeny, and its effector daf-16/FoxO is required for this effect. nhr-49/Hnf4, pha-4/FoxA, and skn-1/Nrf also regulate progeny-size plasticity. Genetic analysis suggests that insulin-like signaling controls progeny size in part through regulation of nhr-49/Hnf4, and that pha-4/FoxA and skn-1/Nrf function in parallel to insulin-like signaling and nhr-49/Hnf4. Furthermore, progeny of DR worms are buffered from adverse consequences of early-larval starvation, growing faster and producing more offspring than progeny of worms fed ad libitum. These results suggest a fitness advantage when mothers and their progeny experience nutrient stress, compared to an environmental mismatch where only progeny are stressed. This work reveals maternal provisioning as an organismal response to DR, demonstrates potentially adaptive intergenerational phenotypic plasticity, and identifies conserved pathways mediating these effects. PMID:27783623

  16. RBM3 mediates structural plasticity and protective effects of cooling in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peretti, Diego; Bastide, Amandine; Radford, Helois; Verity, Nicholas; Molloy, Colin; Martin, Maria Guerra; Moreno, Julie A.; Steinert, Joern R; Smith, Tim; Dinsdale, David; Willis, Anne E.; Mallucci, Giovanna R.

    2014-01-01

    In the healthy adult brain synapses are continuously remodelled through a process of elimination and formation known as structural plasticity1. Reduction in synapse number is a consistent early feature of neurodegenerative diseases2, 3, suggesting deficient compensatory mechanisms. While much is known about toxic processes leading to synaptic dysfunction and loss in these disorders2,3, how synaptic regeneration is affected is unknown. In hibernating mammals, cooling induces loss of synaptic contacts, which are reformed on rewarming, a form of structural plasticity4, 5. We have found that similar changes occur in artificially cooled laboratory rodents. Cooling and hibernation also induce a number cold-shock proteins in the brain, including the RNA binding protein, RBM36. The relationship of such proteins to structural plasticity is unknown. Here we show that synapse regeneration is impaired in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease, in association with the failure to induce RBM3. In both prion-infected and 5×FAD (Alzheimer-type) mice7, the capacity to regenerate synapses after cooling declined in parallel with the loss of induction of RBM3. Enhanced expression of RBM3 in the hippocampus prevented this deficit and restored the capacity for synapse reassembly after cooling. Further, RBM3 over-expression, achieved either by boosting endogenous levels through hypothermia prior to the loss of the RBM3 response, or by lentiviral delivery, resulted in sustained synaptic protection in 5×FAD mice and throughout the course of prion disease, preventing behavioural deficits and neuronal loss and significantly prolonging survival. In contrast, knockdown of RBM3 exacerbated synapse loss in both models and accelerated disease and prevented the neuroprotective effects of cooling. Thus, deficient synapse regeneration, mediated at least in part by failure of the RBM3 stress response, contributes to synapse loss throughout the course of neurodegenerative disease. The data support

  17. Predicting performance and plasticity in the development of respiratory structures and metabolic systems.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Kendra J; Montooth, Kristi L; Helm, Bryan R

    2014-07-01

    The scaling laws governing metabolism suggest that we can predict metabolic rates across taxonomic scales that span large differences in mass. Yet, scaling relationships can vary with development, body region, and environment. Within species, there is variation in metabolic rate that is independent of mass and which may be explained by genetic variation, the environment or their interaction (i.e., metabolic plasticity). Additionally, some structures, such as the insect tracheal respiratory system, change throughout development and in response to the environment to match the changing functional requirements of the organism. We discuss how study of the development of respiratory function meets multiple challenges set forth by the NSF Grand Challenges Workshop. Development of the structure and function of respiratory and metabolic systems (1) is inherently stable and yet can respond dynamically to change, (2) is plastic and exhibits sensitivity to environments, and (3) can be examined across multiple scales in time and space. Predicting respiratory performance and plasticity requires quantitative models that integrate information across scales of function from the expression of metabolic genes and mitochondrial biogenesis to the building of respiratory structures. We present insect models where data are available on the development of the tracheal respiratory system and of metabolic physiology and suggest what is needed to develop predictive models. Incorporating quantitative genetic data will enable mapping of genetic and genetic-by-environment variation onto phenotypes, which is necessary to understand the evolution of respiratory and metabolic systems and their ability to enable respiratory homeostasis as organisms walk the tightrope between stability and change.

  18. Predicting Performance and Plasticity in the Development of Respiratory Structures and Metabolic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Montooth, Kristi L.; Helm, Bryan R.

    2014-01-01

    The scaling laws governing metabolism suggest that we can predict metabolic rates across taxonomic scales that span large differences in mass. Yet, scaling relationships can vary with development, body region, and environment. Within species, there is variation in metabolic rate that is independent of mass and which may be explained by genetic variation, the environment or their interaction (i.e., metabolic plasticity). Additionally, some structures, such as the insect tracheal respiratory system, change throughout development and in response to the environment to match the changing functional requirements of the organism. We discuss how study of the development of respiratory function meets multiple challenges set forth by the NSF Grand Challenges Workshop. Development of the structure and function of respiratory and metabolic systems (1) is inherently stable and yet can respond dynamically to change, (2) is plastic and exhibits sensitivity to environments, and (3) can be examined across multiple scales in time and space. Predicting respiratory performance and plasticity requires quantitative models that integrate information across scales of function from the expression of metabolic genes and mitochondrial biogenesis to the building of respiratory structures. We present insect models where data are available on the development of the tracheal respiratory system and of metabolic physiology and suggest what is needed to develop predictive models. Incorporating quantitative genetic data will enable mapping of genetic and genetic-by-environment variation onto phenotypes, which is necessary to understand the evolution of respiratory and metabolic systems and their ability to enable respiratory homeostasis as organisms walk the tightrope between stability and change. PMID:24812329

  19. Structural and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline titanium processed by severe plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A.A.; Pyshmintsev, I.Y.; Demakov, S.L.; Illarionov, A.G.; Lowe, T.C.; Sergeyeva, A.V.; Valiev, R.Z.

    1997-10-01

    Recent investigations have demonstrated that materials with ultrafine grain (UFG) structure (nano- and submicron crystalline) can be processed by severe plastic deformation. One advantage of this method is that it can be applied to both pure metals and alloys. Moreover, it produces samples that have no residual porosity so that meaningful measurements of the physical and mechanical properties are possible. Investigations of ultrafine grain copper and aluminum alloys have revealed a number of specific features of their mechanical behavior, namely extremely high hardness and strength, the absence of strain hardening, and deviation form the Hall-Petch relationship. In this work the authors investigate the mechanical properties and thermal stability of UFG titanium.

  20. The calcium sensor Copine-6 regulates spine structural plasticity and learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Judith R.; Kriz, Alexander; Galic, Milos; Angliker, Nico; Rajalu, Mathieu; Vogt, Kaspar E.; Ruegg, Markus A.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) represents the cellular response of excitatory synapses to specific patterns of high neuronal activity and is required for learning and memory. Here we identify a mechanism that requires the calcium-binding protein Copine-6 to translate the initial calcium signals into changes in spine structure. We show that Copine-6 is recruited from the cytosol of dendrites to postsynaptic spine membranes by calcium transients that precede LTP. Cpne6 knockout mice are deficient in hippocampal LTP, learning and memory. Hippocampal neurons from Cpne6 knockouts lack spine structural plasticity as do wild-type neurons that express a Copine-6 calcium mutant. The function of Copine-6 is based on its binding, activating and recruiting the Rho GTPase Rac1 to cell membranes. Consistent with this function, the LTP deficit of Cpne6 knockout mice is rescued by the actin stabilizer jasplakinolide. These data show that Copine-6 links activity-triggered calcium signals to spine structural plasticity necessary for learning and memory. PMID:27194588

  1. Distributed cerebellar plasticity implements adaptable gain control in a manipulation task: a closed-loop robotic simulation

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Jesús A.; Luque, Niceto R.; D'Angelo, Egidio; Ros, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Adaptable gain regulation is at the core of the forward controller operation performed by the cerebro-cerebellar loops and it allows the intensity of motor acts to be finely tuned in a predictive manner. In order to learn and store information about body-object dynamics and to generate an internal model of movement, the cerebellum is thought to employ long-term synaptic plasticity. LTD at the PF-PC synapse has classically been assumed to subserve this function (Marr, 1969). However, this plasticity alone cannot account for the broad dynamic ranges and time scales of cerebellar adaptation. We therefore tested the role of plasticity distributed over multiple synaptic sites (Hansel et al., 2001; Gao et al., 2012) by generating an analog cerebellar model embedded into a control loop connected to a robotic simulator. The robot used a three-joint arm and performed repetitive fast manipulations with different masses along an 8-shape trajectory. In accordance with biological evidence, the cerebellum model was endowed with both LTD and LTP at the PF-PC, MF-DCN and PC-DCN synapses. This resulted in a network scheme whose effectiveness was extended considerably compared to one including just PF-PC synaptic plasticity. Indeed, the system including distributed plasticity reliably self-adapted to manipulate different masses and to learn the arm-object dynamics over a time course that included fast learning and consolidation, along the lines of what has been observed in behavioral tests. In particular, PF-PC plasticity operated as a time correlator between the actual input state and the system error, while MF-DCN and PC-DCN plasticity played a key role in generating the gain controller. This model suggests that distributed synaptic plasticity allows generation of the complex learning properties of the cerebellum. The incorporation of further plasticity mechanisms and of spiking signal processing will allow this concept to be extended in a more realistic computational scenario

  2. Analysis of a ceramic filled bio-plastic composite sandwich structure

    SciTech Connect

    Habib Ullah, M.; Islam, M. T.

    2013-11-25

    Design and analysis of a ceramic-filled bio-plastic composite sandwich structure is presented. This proposed high-dielectric structure is used as a substrate for patch antennas. A meandered-strip line-fed fractal-shape patch antenna is designed and fabricated on a copper-laminated sandwich-structured substrate. Measurement results of this antenna show 44% and 20% of bandwidths with maximum gains of 3.45 dBi and 5.87 dBi for the lower and upper bands, respectively. The half-power beam widths of 104° and 78° have been observed from the measured radiation pattern at the two resonance frequencies 0.9 GHz and 2.5 GHz.

  3. The sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells controls organ size and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hudry, Bruno; Khadayate, Sanjay; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Sex differences in physiology and disease susceptibility are commonly attributed to developmental and/or hormonal factors, but there is increasing realisation that cell-intrinsic mechanisms play important and persistent roles1,2. Here we use the Drosophila melanogaster intestine to investigate the nature and significance of cellular sex in an adult somatic organ in vivo. We find that the adult intestinal epithelium is a cellular mosaic of different sex differentiation pathways, and displays extensive sex differences in expression of genes with roles in growth and metabolism. Cell-specific reversals of the sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells uncover its key roles in controlling organ size, its reproductive plasticity and its response to genetically induced tumours. Unlike previous examples of sexually dimorphic somatic stem cell activity, the sex differences in intestinal stem cell behaviour arise from intrinsic mechanisms, which control cell cycle duration and involve a new doublesex- and fruitless-independent branch of the sex differentiation pathway downstream of transformer. Together, our findings indicate that the plasticity of an adult somatic organ is reversibly controlled by its sexual identity, imparted by a new mechanism that may be active in more tissues than previously recognised. PMID:26887495

  4. The evolution of phenotypic plasticity in spatially structured environments: implications of intraspecific competition, plasticity costs and environmental characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ernande, B; Dieckmann, U

    2004-05-01

    We model the evolution of reaction norms focusing on three aspects: frequency-dependent selection arising from resource competition, maintenance and production costs of phenotypic plasticity, and three characteristics of environmental heterogeneity (frequency of environments, their intrinsic carrying capacity and the sensitivity to phenotypic maladaptation in these environments). We show that (i) reaction norms evolve so as to trade adaptation for acquiring resources against cost avoidance; (ii) maintenance costs cause reaction norms to better adapt to frequent rather than to infrequent environments, whereas production costs do not; and (iii) evolved reaction norms confer better adaptation to environments with low rather than with high intrinsic carrying capacity. The two previous findings contradict earlier theoretical results and originate from two previously unexplored features that are included in our model. First, production costs of phenotypic plasticity are only incurred when a given phenotype is actually produced. Therefore, they are proportional to the frequency of environments, and these frequencies thus affect the selection pressure to avoid costs just as much as the selection pressure to improve adaptation. This prevents the frequency of environments from affecting the evolving reaction norm. Secondly, our model describes the evolution of plasticity for a phenotype determining an individual's capability to acquire resources, and thus its realized carrying capacity. When individuals are distributed randomly across environments, they cannot avoid experiencing environments with intrinsically low carrying capacity. As selection pressures arising from the need to improve adaptation are stronger under such extreme conditions than under mild ones, better adaptation to environments with low rather than with high intrinsic carrying capacity results.

  5. Recent advances in Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation: Plastic MHC molecules and TAPBPR-mediated quality control

    PubMed Central

    van Hateren, Andy; Bailey, Alistair; Elliott, Tim

    2017-01-01

    We have known since the late 1980s that the function of classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is to bind peptides and display them at the cell surface to cytotoxic T cells. Recognition by these sentinels of the immune system can lead to the destruction of the presenting cell, thus protecting the host from pathogens and cancer. Classical MHC class I molecules (MHC I hereafter) are co-dominantly expressed, polygenic, and exceptionally polymorphic and have significant sequence diversity. Thus, in most species, there are many different MHC I allotypes expressed, each with different peptide-binding specificity, which can have a dramatic effect on disease outcome. Although MHC allotypes vary in their primary sequence, they share common tertiary and quaternary structures. Here, we review the evidence that, despite this commonality, polymorphic amino acid differences between allotypes alter the ability of MHC I molecules to change shape (that is, their conformational plasticity). We discuss how the peptide loading co-factor tapasin might modify this plasticity to augment peptide loading. Lastly, we consider recent findings concerning the functions of the non-classical MHC I molecule HLA-E as well as the tapasin-related protein TAPBPR (transporter associated with antigen presentation binding protein-related), which has been shown to act as a second quality-control stage in MHC I antigen presentation. PMID:28299193

  6. Lim kinase, a bi-functional effector in injury-induced structural plasticity of synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    The structural plasticity of synaptic terminals contributes to normal nervous system function but also to neural degeneration, in the form of terminal retraction, and regeneration, due to process growth. Synaptic morphological change is mediated through the actin cytoskeleton, which is enriched in axonal and dendritic terminals. Whereas the three RhoGTPases, RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac, function as upstream signaling nodes sensitive to extracellular stimuli, LIMK-cofilin activity serves as a common downstream effector to up-regulate actin turnover, which is necessary for both polymerization and depolymerization. The dual effects of LIMK activity make LIMK a potential target of therapeutic intervention for injury-induced synaptic plasticity, as LIMK inhibition can stabilize actin cytoskeleton and preserve existing structure. This therapeutic benefit of LIMK inhibition has been demonstrated in animal models of injury-induced axon retraction and neuritic sprouting by rod photoreceptors. A better understanding of the regulation of LIMK-cofilin activity and the interaction with the microtubular cytoskeleton may open new ways to promote synaptic regeneration that can benefit neuronal degenerative disease. PMID:27630670

  7. Structural recovery in plastic crystals by time-resolved non-linear dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Riechers, Birte; Samwer, Konrad; Richert, Ranko

    2015-04-21

    The dielectric relaxation of several different plastic crystals has been examined at high amplitudes of the ac electric fields, with the aim of exploring possible differences with respect to supercooled liquids. In all cases, the steady state high field loss spectrum appears to be widened, compared with its low field limit counterpart, whereas peak position and peak amplitude remain almost unchanged. This field induced change in the loss profile is explained on the basis of two distinct effects: an increased relaxation time due to reduced configurational entropy at high fields which affects the low frequency part of the spectrum, and accelerated dynamics at frequencies above the loss peak position resulting from the added energy that the sample absorbs from the external electric field. From the time-resolved assessment of the field induced changes in fictive temperatures at relatively high frequencies, we find that this structural recovery is slaved to the average rather than mode specific structural relaxation time. In other words, the very fast relaxation modes in the plastic crystal cannot adjust their fictive temperatures faster than the slower modes, the equivalent of time aging-time superposition. As a result, an explanation for this single fictive temperature must be consistent with positional order, i.e., translational motion or local density fluctuations do not govern the persistence time of local time constants.

  8. Event structure and cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Jason F; Radvansky, Gabriel A; Lorsbach, Thomas C; Armendarez, Joseph J

    2015-09-01

    Recently, a great deal of research has demonstrated that although everyday experience is continuous in nature, it is parsed into separate events. The aim of the present study was to examine whether event structure can influence the effectiveness of cognitive control. Across 5 experiments we varied the structure of events within the AX-CPT by shifting the spatial location of cues and probes on a computer screen. When location shifts were present, a pattern of AX-CPT performance consistent with enhanced cognitive control was found. To test whether the location shift effects were caused by the presence of event boundaries per se, other aspects of the AX-CPT were manipulated, such as the color of cues and probes and the inclusion of a distractor task during the cue-probe delay. Changes in cognitive control were not found under these conditions, suggesting that the location shift effects were specifically related to the formation of separate event models. Together, these results can be accounted for by the Event Horizon Model and a representation-based theory of cognitive control, and suggest that cognitive control can be influenced by the surrounding environmental structure.

  9. Causal measures of structure and plasticity in simulated and living neural networks.

    PubMed

    Cadotte, Alex J; DeMarse, Thomas B; He, Ping; Ding, Mingzhou

    2008-10-07

    A major goal of neuroscience is to understand the relationship between neural structures and their function. Recording of neural activity with arrays of electrodes is a primary tool employed toward this goal. However, the relationships among the neural activity recorded by these arrays are often highly complex making it problematic to accurately quantify a network's structural information and then relate that structure to its function. Current statistical methods including cross correlation and coherence have achieved only modest success in characterizing the structural connectivity. Over the last decade an alternative technique known as Granger causality is emerging within neuroscience. This technique, borrowed from the field of economics, provides a strong mathematical foundation based on linear auto-regression to detect and quantify "causal" relationships among different time series. This paper presents a combination of three Granger based analytical methods that can quickly provide a relatively complete representation of the causal structure within a neural network. These are a simple pairwise Granger causality metric, a conditional metric, and a little known computationally inexpensive subtractive conditional method. Each causal metric is first described and evaluated in a series of biologically plausible neural simulations. We then demonstrate how Granger causality can detect and quantify changes in the strength of those relationships during plasticity using 60 channel spike train data from an in vitro cortical network measured on a microelectrode array. We show that these metrics can not only detect the presence of causal relationships, they also provide crucial information about the strength and direction of that relationship, particularly when that relationship maybe changing during plasticity. Although we focus on the analysis of multichannel spike train data the metrics we describe are applicable to any stationary time series in which causal

  10. Structural Control of Metabolic Flux

    PubMed Central

    Sajitz-Hermstein, Max; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have to continuously adapt to changing environmental conditions or undergo developmental transitions. To meet the accompanying change in metabolic demands, the molecular mechanisms of adaptation involve concerted interactions which ultimately induce a modification of the metabolic state, which is characterized by reaction fluxes and metabolite concentrations. These state transitions are the effect of simultaneously manipulating fluxes through several reactions. While metabolic control analysis has provided a powerful framework for elucidating the principles governing this orchestrated action to understand metabolic control, its applications are restricted by the limited availability of kinetic information. Here, we introduce structural metabolic control as a framework to examine individual reactions' potential to control metabolic functions, such as biomass production, based on structural modeling. The capability to carry out a metabolic function is determined using flux balance analysis (FBA). We examine structural metabolic control on the example of the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli by the recently introduced framework of functional centrality (FC). This framework is based on the Shapley value from cooperative game theory and FBA, and we demonstrate its superior ability to assign “share of control” to individual reactions with respect to metabolic functions and environmental conditions. A comparative analysis of various scenarios illustrates the usefulness of FC and its relations to other structural approaches pertaining to metabolic control. We propose a Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate FCs for large networks, based on the enumeration of elementary flux modes. We further give detailed biological interpretation of FCs for production of lactate and ATP under various respiratory conditions. PMID:24367246

  11. Plasticity of CYP2B Enzymes: Structural and Solution Biophysical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wilderman, P. Ross; Halpert, James R.

    2013-01-01

    In the past three years, major advances in understanding cytochrome P450 2B (CYP2B) structure-function relationships have been made through determination of multiple ligand-bound and one ligand-free X-ray crystal structure of CYP2B4 and one ligand-bound X-ray crystal structure of CYP2B6. These structures have provided insight into the features that provide the high degree of plasticity of the enzymes. A combination of a phenylalanine cluster that allows for concerted movement of helices F through G and a conserved set of electrostatic interactions involving Arg262 facilitates movement of this region to accommodate binding of ligands of various sizes without perturbing most of the P450 fold. Integrating solution based techniques such as NMR or deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) with computational methods including molecular docking has provided further insight into enzyme behavior upon ligand binding. In addition, extended molecular dynamics simulations have provided a link between an open and a closed conformation of ligand-free CYP2B4 found in crystal structures. Other studies revealed the utility of rational engineering in improving stability of P450s to facilitate structural studies. The solution and computational results combined with the X-ray crystal structures yield a comprehensive picture of how these enzymes adopt different conformations to bind various ligands. PMID:22208531

  12. Imaging ERK and PKA Activation in Single Dendritic Spines during Structural Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shen; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2017-03-22

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase A (PKA) play important roles in LTP and spine structural plasticity. While fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensors for these kinases had previously been developed, they did not provide sufficient sensitivity for imaging small neuronal compartments, such as single dendritic spines in brain slices. Here we improved the sensitivity of FRET-based kinase sensors for monitoring kinase activity under two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2pFLIM). Using these improved sensors, we succeeded in imaging ERK and PKA activation in single dendritic spines during structural long-term potentiation (sLTP) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, revealing that the activation of these kinases spreads widely with length constants of more than 10 μm. The strategy for improvement of sensors used here should be applicable for developing highly sensitive biosensors for various protein kinases. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  13. Structural Plasticity Underpins Promiscuous Binding of the Prosurvival Protein A1

    SciTech Connect

    Smits,C.; Czabotar, P.; Hinds, M.; Day, C.

    2008-01-01

    Apoptotic pathways are regulated by protein-protein interactions. Interaction of the BH3 domains of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins with the hydrophobic groove of prosurvival proteins is critical. Whereas some BH3 domains bind in a promiscuous manner, others exhibit considerable selectivity and the sequence characteristics that distinguish these activities are unclear. In this study, crystal structures of complexes between the prosurvival protein A1 and the BH3 domains from Puma, Bmf, Bak, and Bid have been solved. The structure of A1 is similar to that of other prosurvival proteins, although features, such as an acidic patch in the binding groove, may allow specific therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. Significant conformational plasticity was observed in the intermolecular interactions and these differences explain some of the variation in affinity. This study, in combination with published data, suggests that interactions between conserved residues demarcate optimal binding.

  14. Design method for distillation columns filled with metallic, ceramic, or plastic structured packings

    SciTech Connect

    Gualito, J.J.; Cerino, F.J.; Cardenas, J.C.; Rocha, J.A.

    1997-05-01

    This work is a continuation and refinement of a general model developed at the Separations Research Program at The University of Texas at Austin (SRP II model) for the prediction of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate and pressure drop for distillation columns filled with metallic structured packings. It contains three parts. In the first part, the general model is briefly described and the participating equations are summarized. In the main part, the parameters needed for applying the general model for structured packings made of ceramic and plastic are presented and discussed. In the third part, the authors try to correct the model in order to get good predictions at low and high pressures.

  15. Controllability of structural brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shi; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Cieslak, Matthew; Telesford, Qawi K.; Yu, Alfred B.; Kahn, Ari E.; Medaglia, John D.; Vettel, Jean M.; Miller, Michael B.; Grafton, Scott T.; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive function is driven by dynamic interactions between large-scale neural circuits or networks, enabling behaviour. However, fundamental principles constraining these dynamic network processes have remained elusive. Here we use tools from control and network theories to offer a mechanistic explanation for how the brain moves between cognitive states drawn from the network organization of white matter microstructure. Our results suggest that densely connected areas, particularly in the default mode system, facilitate the movement of the brain to many easily reachable states. Weakly connected areas, particularly in cognitive control systems, facilitate the movement of the brain to difficult-to-reach states. Areas located on the boundary between network communities, particularly in attentional control systems, facilitate the integration or segregation of diverse cognitive systems. Our results suggest that structural network differences between cognitive circuits dictate their distinct roles in controlling trajectories of brain network function.

  16. Synaptic plasticity in a cerebellum-like structure depends on temporal order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Curtis C.; Han, Victor Z.; Sugawara, Yoshiko; Grant, Kirsty

    1997-05-01

    Cerebellum-like structures in fish appear to act as adaptive sensory processors, in which learned predictions about sensory input are generated and subtracted from actual sensory input, allowing unpredicted inputs to stand out1-3. Pairing sensory input with centrally originating predictive signals, such as corollary discharge signals linked to motor commands, results in neural responses to the predictive signals alone that are Negative images' of the previously paired sensory responses. Adding these 'negative images' to actual sensory inputs minimizes the neural response to predictable sensory features. At the cellular level, sensory input is relayed to the basal region of Purkinje-like cells, whereas predictive signals are relayed by parallel fibres to the apical dendrites of the same cells4. The generation of negative images could be explained by plasticity at parallel fibre synapses5-7. We show here that such plasticity exists in the electrosensory lobe of mormyrid electric fish and that it has the necessary properties for such a model: it is reversible, anti-hebbian (excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) are depressed after pairing with a postsynaptic spike) and tightly dependent on the sequence of pre- and postsynaptic events, with depression occurring only if the postsynaptic spike follows EPSP onset within 60 ms.

  17. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Martensitic Transformation During Hot Stamping of Complex Structure Auto Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuhan; Song, Yanli; Hua, Lin; Lu, Jue

    2017-02-01

    The ultra-high strength steel auto parts manufactured by hot stamping are widely applied for weight reduction and safety improvement. During the hot stamping process, hot forming and quenching are performed in one step wherein plastic deformation and phase transformation simultaneously take place and affect each other. Thereinto, the influence of deformation on martensitic transformation is of great importance. In the present paper, the influence of plastic deformation on martensitic transformation during hot stamping of complex structure auto parts was investigated. For this purpose, a B-pillar reinforced panel in B1500HS steel was manufactured by hot stamping, and the process was simulated by finite element software based on a thermo-mechanical-metallurgical coupled model. Considering various deformation degrees, the microstructures and mechanical properties at four typical locations of the hot stamped B-pillar reinforced panel were detected. The results show that the martensitic content and the microhardness increase with the increase in the deformation amount. There are two reasons causing this phenomenon: (1) the increase in mechanical driving force and (2) the increased probability of the martensitic nucleation at crystal defects. The x-ray diffraction analysis indicates the carbon enrichment in retained austenite which results from the carbon diffusion during the low-carbon martensite formation. Furthermore, the carbon content decreases with the increase in the deformation amount, because the deformation of austenite suppresses the carbon diffusion.

  18. Needle-based fluorescence endomicroscopy via structured illumination with a plastic, achromatic objective

    PubMed Central

    Kyrish, Matthew; Dobbs, Jessica; Jain, Shalini; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Dihua; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. In order to diagnose cancer, a sample must be removed, prepared, and examined under a microscope, which is expensive, invasive, and time consuming. Fiber optic fluorescence endomicroscopy, where an image guide is used to obtain high-resolution images of tissue in vivo, has shown promise as an alternative to conventional biopsies. However, the resolution of standard endomicroscopy is limited by the fiber bundle sampling frequency and out-of-focus light. A system is presented which incorporates a plastic, achromatic objective to increase the sampling and which provides optical sectioning via structured illumination to reject background light. An image is relayed from the sample by a fiber bundle with the custom 2.1-mm outer diameter objective lens integrated to the distal tip. The objective is corrected for the excitation and the emission wavelengths of proflavine (452 and 515 nm). It magnifies the object onto the fiber bundle to improve the system’s lateral resolution by increasing the sampling. The plastic lenses were fabricated via single-point diamond turning and assembled using a zero alignment technique. Ex vivo images of normal and neoplastic murine mammary tissues stained with proflavine are captured. The system achieves higher contrast and resolves smaller features than standard fluorescence endomicroscopy. PMID:24002190

  19. A Neural Circuit That Controls Cortical State, Plasticity, and the Gain of Sensory Responses in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the visual cortex were first found to be exquisitely selective for particular properties of visual stimuli in anesthetized animals, including mice. Studies of alert mice in an apparatus that allowed them to stand or run revealed that locomotion causes a change in cortical state that dramatically increases the magnitude of responses in neurons of the visual cortex without altering selectivity, effectively changing the gain of sensory responses. Locomotion also dramatically enhances adult plasticity in the recovery from long-term visual deprivation. We have studied the elements and operation of the neural circuit responsible for the enhancement of activity and shown that it enhances plasticity even in mice not free to run. The circuit consists of projections ascending from the midbrain locomotor region (MLR) to the basal forebrain, activating cholinergic and perhaps other projections to excite inhibitory interneurons expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the visual cortex. VIP cells activated by locomotion inhibit interneurons that express somatostatin (SST), thereby disinhibiting the excitatory principal neurons and allowing them to respond more strongly to effective visual stimuli. These findings reveal in alert animals how the ascending reticular activating system described in anesthetized animals 50 years ago operates to control cortical state.

  20. Histone deacetylases control module-specific phenotypic plasticity in beetle weapons

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Takane; Mizuhara, Tomoko; Arata, Masataka; Shimada, Masakazu; Niimi, Teruyuki; Okada, Kensuke; Okada, Yasukazu; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional conditions during early development influence the plastic expression of adult phenotypes. Among several body modules of animals, the development of sexually selected exaggerated traits exhibits striking nutrition sensitivity, resulting in positive allometry and hypervariability distinct from other traits. Using de novo RNA sequencing and comprehensive RNA interference (RNAi) for epigenetic modifying factors, we found that histone deacetylases (HDACs) and polycomb group (PcG) proteins preferentially influence the size of mandibles (exaggerated male weapon) and demonstrate nutrition-dependent hypervariability in the broad-horned flour beetle, Gnatocerus cornutus. RNAi-mediated HDAC1 knockdown (KD) in G. cornutus larvae caused specific curtailment of mandibles in adults, whereas HDAC3 KD led to hypertrophy. Notably, these KDs conferred opposite effects on wing size, but little effect on the size of the core body and genital modules. PcG RNAi also reduced adult mandible size. These results suggest that the plastic development of exaggerated traits is controlled in a module-specific manner by HDACs. PMID:27956627

  1. Rule learning enhances structural plasticity of long-range axons in frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carolyn M.; Peckler, Hannah; Tai, Lung-Hao; Wilbrecht, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Rules encompass cue-action-outcome associations used to guide decisions and strategies in a specific context. Subregions of the frontal cortex including the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) are implicated in rule learning, although changes in structural connectivity underlying rule learning are poorly understood. We imaged OFC axonal projections to dmPFC during training in a multiple choice foraging task and used a reinforcement learning model to quantify explore–exploit strategy use and prediction error magnitude. Here we show that rule training, but not experience of reward alone, enhances OFC bouton plasticity. Baseline bouton density and gains during training correlate with rule exploitation, while bouton loss correlates with exploration and scales with the magnitude of experienced prediction errors. We conclude that rule learning sculpts frontal cortex interconnectivity and adjusts a thermostat for the explore–exploit balance. PMID:26949122

  2. Evolution of the health of concrete structures by electrically conductive GFRP (glass fiber reinforced plastic) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Soon-Gi

    2002-02-01

    The function and performance of self-diagnostic composites embedded in concrete blocks and piles were investigated by bending tests and electrical resistance measurement. Carbon powder (CP) and carbon fiber (CF) were introduced into glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composites to provide electrical conductivity. The CPGFRP composite displays generally good performance in various bending tests of concrete block and piles compared to the CFGFRP composite. The electrical resistance of the CPGFRP composite increases remarkably at small strains in response to microcrack formation at about 200 μm strain, and can be used to detect smaller deformations before crack formation. The CPGFRP composite shows continuous change in resistance up to a large strain level just before the final fracture for concrete structures reinforced by steel bars. It is concluded that self-diagnostic composites can be used to predict damage and fracture in concrete blocks and piles.

  3. Structural plasticity of interneurons in the adult brain: role of PSA-NCAM and implications for psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Juan; Guirado, Ramon; Castillo-Gómez, Esther

    2013-06-01

    Neuronal structural plasticity is known to have a major role in cognitive processes and in the response of the CNS to aversive experiences. This type of plasticity involves processes ranging from neurite outgrowth/retraction or dendritic spine remodeling, to the incorporation of new neurons to the established circuitry. However, the study of how these structural changes take place has been focused mainly on excitatory neurons, while little attention has been paid to interneurons. The exploration of these plastic phenomena in interneurons is very important, not only for our knowledge of CNS physiology, but also for understanding better the etiology of different psychiatric and neurological disorders in which alterations in the structure and connectivity of inhibitory networks have been described. Here we review recent work on the structural remodeling of interneurons in the adult brain, both in basal conditions and after chronic stress or sensory deprivation. We also describe studies from our laboratory and others on the putative mediators of this interneuronal structural plasticity, focusing on the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM). This molecule is expressed by some interneurons in the adult CNS and, through its anti-adhesive and insulating properties, may participate in the remodeling of their structure. Finally, we review recent findings on the possible implication of PSA-NCAM on the remodeling of inhibitory neurons in certain psychiatric disorders and their treatments.

  4. A period of structural plasticity at the axon initial segment in developing visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gutzmann, Annika; Ergül, Nursah; Grossmann, Rebecca; Schultz, Christian; Wahle, Petra; Engelhardt, Maren

    2014-01-01

    Cortical networks are shaped by sensory experience and are most susceptible to modifications during critical periods characterized by enhanced plasticity at the structural and functional level. A system particularly well-studied in this context is the mammalian visual system. Plasticity has been documented for the somatodendritic compartment of neurons in detail. A neuronal microdomain not yet studied in this context is the axon initial segment (AIS) located at the proximal axon segment. It is a specific electrogenic axonal domain and the site of action potential (AP) generation. Recent studies showed that structure and function of the AIS can be dynamically regulated. Here we hypothesize that the AIS shows a dynamic regulation during maturation of the visual cortex. We therefore analyzed AIS length development from embryonic day (E) 12.5 to adulthood in mice. A tri-phasic time course of AIS length remodeling during development was observed. AIS first appeared at E14.5 and increased in length throughout the postnatal period to a peak between postnatal day (P) 10 to P15 (eyes open P13–14). Then, AIS length was reduced significantly around the beginning of the critical period for ocular dominance plasticity (CP, P21). Shortest AIS were observed at the peak of the CP (P28), followed by a moderate elongation toward the end of the CP (P35). To test if the dynamic maturation of the AIS is influenced by eye opening (onset of activity), animals were deprived of visual input before and during the CP. Deprivation for 1 week prior to eye opening did not affect AIS length development. However, deprivation from P0 to 28 and P14 to 28 resulted in AIS length distribution similar to the peak at P15. In other words, deprivation from birth prevents the transient shortening of the AIS and maintains an immature AIS length. These results are the first to suggest a dynamic maturation of the AIS in cortical neurons and point to novel mechanisms in the development of neuronal

  5. Structural plasticity in the language system related to increased second language proficiency.

    PubMed

    Stein, Maria; Federspiel, Andrea; Koenig, Thomas; Wirth, Miranka; Strik, Werner; Wiest, Roland; Brandeis, Daniel; Dierks, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    While functional changes linked to second language learning have been subject to extensive investigation, the issue of learning-dependent structural plasticity in the fields of bilingualism and language comprehension has so far received less notice. In the present study we used voxel-based morphometry to monitor structural changes occurring within five months of second language learning. Native English-speaking exchange students learning German in Switzerland were examined once at the beginning of their stay and once about five months later, when their German language skills had significantly increased. We show that structural changes in the left inferior frontal gyrus are correlated with the increase in second language proficiency as measured by a paper-and-pencil language test. Contrary to the increase in proficiency and grey matter, the absolute values of grey matter density and second language proficiency did not correlate (neither on first nor on second measurement). This indicates that the individual amount of learning is reflected in brain structure changes, regardless of absolute proficiency.

  6. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Carol F.; Ratliff, Michelle L.; Powell, Rebecca; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-08-07

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development.

  7. Plastic deformation of amorphous poly(L/DL-lactide): structure evolution and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Pluta, Miroslaw; Galeski, Andrzej

    2007-06-01

    Plastic deformation of amorphous, thermally noncrystallizable poly(L/DL-lactide) 70/30 (P(L/DL)LA) was induced by a plane-strain compression in a channel-die at different temperatures, above the glass transition (Tg) from 60 to 90 degrees C. Samples undeformed (reference) and deformed to different compression ratios, from 4.6 to 23.0, were studied by X-ray diffraction, thermally modulated differential scanning calorimetry, light microscopy, and mechanical methods-viscoelastic and tensile tests. The effects of the compression ratios and deformation temperatures on the final structure and properties of the P(L/DL)LA were evaluated. It was revealed that plastic deformation transformed an amorphous P(L/DL)LA (thermally noncrystallizable) to a crystalline fibrillar texture oriented in the flow direction. Fibrillar texture was formed in spite of the tendency of the plane-strain compression to form single-crystal-like texture. The crystallite size in the transverse direction was small, up to 90 angstroms at the highest compression ratio. No evidence of lamellar organization and features of supermolecular structure were detected by small-angle X-ray scattering and light microscopy, respectively. The oriented samples exhibited a low crystallinity degree at the level of 6-9% at the highest compression ratio. The main transformation mechanism was shear and orientation-induced crystallization. The crystalline phase was in the alpha crystallographic modification of poly(lactide) typically formed in more stereoregular poly(lactide) by thermal treatment. The glass transition increased with the increase of compression ratio reflecting the increase of orientation of the polymer chains. The tensile strength of deformed samples was improved considerably in comparison to that of the reference sample.

  8. Structured control for autonomous robots

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, R.G. . School of Computer Science)

    1994-02-01

    To operate in rich, dynamic environments, autonomous robots must be able to effectively utilize and coordinate their limited physical and occupational resources. As complexity increases, it becomes necessary to impose explicit constraints on the control of planning, perception, and action to ensure that unwanted interactions between behaviors do not occur. This paper advocates developing complex robot systems by layering reactive behaviors onto deliberative components. In this structured control approach, the deliberative components handle normal situations and the reactive behaviors, which are explicitly constrained as to when and how they are activated, handle exceptional situations. The Task Control Architecture (TCA) has been developed to support this approach. TCA provides an integrated set of control constructs useful for implementing deliberative and reactive behaviors. The control constructs facilitate modular and evolutionary system development: they are used to integrate and coordinate planning, perception, and execution, and to incrementally improve the efficiency and robustness of the robot systems. To date, TCA has been used in implementing a half-dozen mobile robot systems, including an autonomous six-legged rover and indoor mobile manipulator.

  9. POLYESTER GLASS PLASTICS FOR SHIPBUILDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    POLYESTER PLASTICS , SHIP HULLS), (*SHIP HULLS, POLYESTER PLASTICS ), GLASS TEXTILES, REINFORCING MATERIALS, SHIP STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS, COMPOSITE MATERIALS, PROCESSING, CHEMISTRY, HANDBOOKS, BINDERS, USSR

  10. Structural Dynamics and Control Interaction of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert S. (Editor); Scofield, Harold N. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A workshop on structural dynamics and control interaction of flexible structures was held to promote technical exchange between the structural dynamics and control disciplines, foster joint technology, and provide a forum for discussing and focusing critical issues in the separate and combined areas. Issues and areas of emphasis were identified in structure-control interaction for the next generation of flexible systems.

  11. Morphological alterations in the hippocampus of the Ts65Dn mouse model for Down Syndrome correlate with structural plasticity markers.

    PubMed

    Villarroya, Olga; Ballestín, Raúl; López-Hidalgo, Rosa; Mulet, Maria; Blasco-Ibáñez, José Miguel; Crespo, Carlos; Nacher, Juan; Gilabert-Juan, Javier; Varea, Emilio

    2017-04-04

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common chromosomal aneuploidy. Although trisomy on chromosome 21 can display variable phenotypes, there is a common feature among all DS individuals: the presence of intellectual disability. This condition is partially attributed to abnormalities found in the hippocampus of individuals with DS and in the murine model for DS, Ts65Dn. To check if all hippocampal areas were equally affected in 4-5 month adult Ts65Dn mice, we analysed the morphology of dentate gyrus granule cells and cornu ammonis pyramidal neurons using Sholl method on Golgi-Cox impregnated neurons. Structural plasticity has been analysed using immunohistochemistry for plasticity molecules followed by densitometric analysis (Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), Polysialylated form of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (PSA-NCAM) and the Growth Associated Protein 43 (GAP43)). We observed an impairment in the dendritic arborisation of granule cells, but not in the pyramidal neurons in the Ts65Dn mice. When we analysed the expression of molecules related to structural plasticity in trisomic mouse hippocampus, we observed a reduction in the expression of BDNF and PSA-NCAM, and an increment in the expression of GAP43. These alterations were restricted to the regions related to dentate granule cells suggesting an interrelation. Therefore the impairment in dendritic arborisation and molecular plasticity is not a general feature of all Down Syndrome principal neurons. Pharmacological manipulations of the levels of plasticity molecules could provide a way to restore granule cell morphology and function.

  12. The influences of soil and nearby structures on dispersion characteristics of wave propagating along buried plastic pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuyong; Jiang, J.; Parr, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Water loss in distribution systems is a global problem for the water industry and governments. According to the international water supply association (IWSA), as a result of leaks from distribution pipes, 20% to 30% of water is lost while in transit from treatment plants to consumers. Although governments have tried to push the water industry to reduce the water leaks, a lot of experts have pointed out that a wide use of plastic pipes instead of metal pipes in recent years has caused difficulties in the detection of leaks using current acoustic technology. Leaks from plastic pipes are much quieter than traditional metal pipes and comparing to metal pipes the plastic pipes have very different coupling characteristics with soil, water and surrounding structures, such as other pipes, road surface and building foundations. The dispersion characteristics of wave propagating along buried plastic pipes are investigated in this paper using finite element and boundary element based models. Both empty and water- filled pipes were considered. Influences from nearby pipes and building foundations were carefully studied. The results showed that soil condition and nearby structures have significant influences on the dispersion characteristics of wave propagating along buried plastic pipes.

  13. Physical exercise in overweight to obese individuals induces metabolic- and neurotrophic-related structural brain plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Karsten; Möller, Harald E.; Horstmann, Annette; Busse, Franziska; Lepsien, Jöran; Blüher, Matthias; Stumvoll, Michael; Villringer, Arno; Pleger, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Previous cross-sectional studies on body-weight-related alterations in brain structure revealed profound changes in the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) that resemble findings obtained from individuals with advancing age. This suggests that obesity may lead to structural brain changes that are comparable with brain aging. Here, we asked whether weight-loss-dependent improved metabolic and neurotrophic functioning parallels the reversal of obesity-related alterations in brain structure. To this end we applied magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) together with voxel-based morphometry and diffusion-tensor imaging in overweight to obese individuals who participated in a fitness course with intensive physical training twice a week over a period of 3 months. After the fitness course, participants presented, with inter-individual heterogeneity, a reduced body mass index (BMI), reduced serum leptin concentrations, elevated high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and alterations of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations suggesting changes of metabolic and neurotrophic function. Exercise-dependent changes in BMI and serum concentration of BDNF, leptin, and HDL-C were related to an increase in GM density in the left hippocampus, the insular cortex, and the left cerebellar lobule. We also observed exercise-dependent changes of diffusivity parameters in surrounding WM structures as well as in the corpus callosum. These findings suggest that weight-loss due to physical exercise in overweight to obese participants induces profound structural brain plasticity, not primarily of sensorimotor brain regions involved in physical exercise, but of regions previously reported to be structurally affected by an increased body weight and functionally implemented in gustation and cognitive processing. PMID:26190989

  14. Correlation between structural heterogeneity and plastic deformation for phase separating FeCu metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chuan-Xiao; Song, Kai-Kai; Wang, Li; Şopu, Daniel; Pauly, Simon; Eckert, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Unlike crystalline metals, the plastic deformation of metallic glasses (MGs) involves a competition between disordering and structural relaxation ordering, which is not well understood, yet. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate the evolutions of strain localizations, short-range order (SRO) as well as the free volume in the glass during compressive deformation of Fe50Cu50 MGs with different degrees of phase separation. Our findings indicate that the free volume in the phase separating MGs decreases while the shear strain localizations increase with increasing degree of phase separation. Cu-centered clusters show higher potential energies and Voronoi volumes, and bear larger local shear strains. On the other hand, Fe-centered pentagon-rich clusters in Cu-rich regions seem to play an important role to resist the shear transformation. The dilatation or annihilation of Voronoi volumes is due to the competition between ordering via structural relaxation and shear stress-induced deformation. The present study could provide a better understanding of the relationship between the structural inhomogeneity and the deformation of MGs. PMID:27681052

  15. Substructure-based control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babuska, Vit; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A decentralized procedure is presented for the design of controllers for flexible structures. Spatially significant components are created which approximate the response of a specific part of the complete structure. For each component, the controller and observer gain matrices which are used in a controller for the complete structure. The proposed method is illustrated on a model of NASA Langley's CSI testbed structure.

  16. Demonstrating the Effects of Processing on the Structure and Physical Properties of Plastic Using Disposable PETE Cups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erk, Kendra A.; Rhein, Morgan; Krafcik, Matthew J.; Ydstie, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    An educational activity is described in which the structure and physical properties of disposable plastic cups were directly related to the method of processing. The mechanical properties of specimens cut from the walls of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PETE) cups, oriented parallel and perpendicular to the thermoforming direction, were measured in…

  17. Learning Discloses Abnormal Structural and Functional Plasticity at Hippocampal Synapses in the APP23 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middei, Silvia; Roberto, Anna; Berretta, Nicola; Panico, Maria Beatrice; Lista, Simone; Bernardi, Giorgio; Mercuri, Nicola B.; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Nistico, Robert

    2010-01-01

    B6-Tg/Thy1APP23Sdz (APP23) mutant mice exhibit neurohistological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease but show intact basal hippocampal neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Here, we examine whether spatial learning differently modifies the structural and electrophysiological properties of hippocampal synapses in APP23 and wild-type mice. While…

  18. The long-term structural plasticity of cerebellar parallel fiber axons and its modulation by motor learning.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Jennifer; Cheng, Shao-Ying; Ko, Kwang Woo; Jones, Theresa A; Nishiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-05-08

    Presynaptic axonal varicosities, like postsynaptic spines, are dynamically added and eliminated even in mature neuronal circuitry. To study the role of this axonal structural plasticity in behavioral learning, we performed two-photon in vivo imaging of cerebellar parallel fibers (PFs) in adult mice. PFs make excitatory synapses on Purkinje cells (PCs) in the cerebellar cortex, and long-term potentiation and depression at PF-PC synapses are thought to play crucial roles in cerebellar-dependent learning. Time-lapse vital imaging of PFs revealed that, under a control condition (no behavioral training), ∼10% of PF varicosities appeared and disappeared over a period of 2 weeks without changing the total number of varicosities. The fraction of dynamic PF varicosities significantly diminished during training on an acrobatic motor skill learning task, largely because of reduced addition of new varicosities. Thus, this form of motor learning was associated with greater structural stability of PFs and a slight decrease in the total number of varicosities. Together with prior findings that the number of PF-PC synapses increases during similar training, our results suggest that acrobatic motor skill learning involves a reduction of some PF inputs and a strengthening of others, probably via the conversion of some preexisting PF varicosities into multisynaptic terminals.

  19. Integrated Control Using the SOFFT Control Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim

    1996-01-01

    The need for integrated/constrained control systems has become clearer as advanced aircraft introduced new coupled subsystems such as new propulsion subsystems with thrust vectoring and new aerodynamic designs. In this study, we develop an integrated control design methodology which accomodates constraints among subsystem variables while using the Stochastic Optimal Feedforward/Feedback Control Technique (SOFFT) thus maintaining all the advantages of the SOFFT approach. The Integrated SOFFT Control methodology uses a centralized feedforward control and a constrained feedback control law. The control thus takes advantage of the known coupling among the subsystems while maintaining the identity of subsystems for validation purposes and the simplicity of the feedback law to understand the system response in complicated nonlinear scenarios. The Variable-Gain Output Feedback Control methodology (including constant gain output feedback) is extended to accommodate equality constraints. A gain computation algorithm is developed. The designer can set the cross-gains between two variables or subsystems to zero or another value and optimize the remaining gains subject to the constraint. An integrated control law is designed for a modified F-15 SMTD aircraft model with coupled airframe and propulsion subsystems using the Integrated SOFFT Control methodology to produce a set of desired flying qualities.

  20. Curriculums in Industrial Technology. Plastics Technology. Industrial Maintenance. Computer Numerical Control. Teacher's Manuals and Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Paso Community Coll., TX.

    Curriculum guides are provided for plastics technology, industrial maintenance, and computer numerical control. Each curriculum is divided into a number of courses. For each course these instructor materials are presented in the official course outline: course description, course objectives, unit titles, texts and materials, instructor resources,…

  1. Structural Plasticity of Malaria Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Allows Selective Binding of Diverse Chemical Scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Gujjar, Ramesh; El Mazouni, Farah; Kaminsky, Werner; Malmquist, Nicholas A.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2010-01-20

    Malaria remains a major global health burden and current drug therapies are compromised by resistance. Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) was validated as a new drug target through the identification of potent and selective triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitors with anti-malarial activity in vivo. Here we report x-ray structure determination of PfDHODH bound to three inhibitors from this series, representing the first of the enzyme bound to malaria specific inhibitors. We demonstrate that conformational flexibility results in an unexpected binding mode identifying a new hydrophobic pocket on the enzyme. Importantly this plasticity allows PfDHODH to bind inhibitors from different chemical classes and to accommodate inhibitor modifications during lead optimization, increasing the value of PfDHODH as a drug target. A second discovery, based on small molecule crystallography, is that the triazolopyrimidines populate a resonance form that promotes charge separation. These intrinsic dipoles allow formation of energetically favorable H-bond interactions with the enzyme. The importance of delocalization to binding affinity was supported by site-directed mutagenesis and the demonstration that triazolopyrimidine analogs that lack this intrinsic dipole are inactive. Finally, the PfDHODH-triazolopyrimidine bound structures provide considerable new insight into species-selective inhibitor binding in this enzyme family. Together, these studies will directly impact efforts to exploit PfDHODH for the development of anti-malarial chemotherapy.

  2. Chronic Social Defeat Stress Modulates Dendritic Spines Structural Plasticity in Adult Mouse Frontal Association Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Chronic stress is associated with occurrence of many mental disorders. Previous studies have shown that dendrites and spines of pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex undergo drastic reorganization following chronic stress experience. So the prefrontal cortex is believed to play a key role in response of neural system to chronic stress. However, how stress induces dynamic structural changes in neural circuit of prefrontal cortex remains unknown. In the present study, we examined the effects of chronic social defeat stress on dendritic spine structural plasticity in the mouse frontal association (FrA) cortex in vivo using two-photon microscopy. We found that chronic stress altered spine dynamics in FrA and increased the connectivity in FrA neural circuits. We also found that the changes in spine dynamics in FrA are correlated with the deficit of sucrose preference in defeated mice. Our findings suggest that chronic stress experience leads to adaptive change in neural circuits that may be important for encoding stress experience related memory and anhedonia. PMID:28197343

  3. Insecticide-treated plastic tarpaulins for control of malaria vectors in refugee camps.

    PubMed

    Graham, K; Mohammad, N; Rehman, H; Nazari, A; Ahmad, M; Kamal, M; Skovmand, O; Guillet, P; Allan, R; Zaim, M; Yates, A; Lines, J; Rowland, M

    2002-12-01

    Spraying of canvas tents with residual pyrethroid insecticide is an established method of malaria vector control in tented refugee camps. In recent years, plastic sheeting (polythene tarpaulins) has replaced canvas as the utilitarian shelter material for displaced populations in complex emergencies. Advances in technology enable polythene sheeting to be impregnated with pyrethroid during manufacture. The efficacy of such material against mosquitoes when erected as shelters under typical refugee camp conditions is unknown. Tests were undertaken with free-flying mosquitoes on entomological study platforms in an Afghan refugee camp to compare the insecticidal efficacy of plastic tarpaulin sprayed with deltamethrin on its inner surface (target dose 30 mg/m2), tarpaulin impregnated with deltamethrin (initially > or = 30 mg/m2) during manufacture, and a tent made from the factory impregnated tarpaulin material. Preliminary tests done in the laboratory with Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae) showed that 1-min exposure to factory-impregnated tarpaulins would give 100% mortality even after outdoor weathering in a temperate climate for 12 weeks. Outdoor platform tests with the erected materials (baited with human subjects) produced mosquito mortality rates between 86-100% for sprayed or factory-impregnated tarpaulins and tents (average approximately 40 anophelines and approximately 200 culicines/per platform/night), whereas control mortality (with untreated tarpaulin) was no more than 5%. Fewer than 20% of mosquitoes blood-fed on human subjects under either insecticide-treated or non-treated shelters. The tarpaulin shelter was a poor barrier to host-seeking mosquitoes and treatment with insecticide did not reduce the proportion blood-feeding. Even so, the deployment of insecticide-impregnated tarpaulins in refugee camps, if used by the majority of refugees, has the potential to control malaria by killing high proportions of mosquitoes and so reducing the average

  4. Spatial and seasonal variation in diversity and structure of microbial biofilms on marine plastics in Northern European waters.

    PubMed

    Oberbeckmann, Sonja; Loeder, Martin G J; Gerdts, Gunnar; Osborn, A Mark

    2014-11-01

    Plastic pollution is now recognised as a major threat to marine environments and marine biota. Recent research highlights that diverse microbial species are found to colonise plastic surfaces (the plastisphere) within marine waters. Here, we investigate how the structure and diversity of marine plastisphere microbial community vary with respect to season, location and plastic substrate type. We performed a 6-week exposure experiment with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles in the North Sea (UK) as well as sea surface sampling of plastic polymers in Northern European waters. Scanning electron microscopy revealed diverse plastisphere communities comprising prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing analysis revealed that plastisphere microbial communities on PET fragments varied both with season and location and comprised of bacteria belonging to Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and members of the eukaryotes Bacillariophyceae and Phaeophyceae. Polymers sampled from the sea surface mainly comprised polyethylene, polystyrene and polypropylene particles. Variation within plastisphere communities on different polymer types was observed, but communities were primarily dominated by Cyanobacteria. This research reveals that the composition of plastisphere microbial communities in marine waters varies with season, geographical location and plastic substrate type.

  5. Plasticity-Based Adaptive Cognitive Remediation (PACR) for OIF/OEF Veterans: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Page 1 of 3 Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0231 TITLE: Plasticity-Based Adaptive Cognitive Remediation (PACR) for OIF/OEF Veterans: A Randomized...DATES COVERED 30Sep2014 - 29Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Plasticity-Based Adaptive Cognitive Remediation (PACR) for OIF/OEF Veterans: A Randomized

  6. A plastic-composite-plastic structure high performance flexible energy harvester based on PIN-PMN-PT single crystal/epoxy 2-2 composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhou; Gai, Linlin; Wang, Xian; Lin, Di; Wang, Sheng; Luo, Haosu; Wang, Dong

    2017-03-01

    We present a high performance flexible piezoelectric energy harvester constituted by a Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) single crystal/epoxy 2-2 composite flake, a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate, and a PET cover, which is capable of harvesting energy from biomechanical movements. Electrical properties of the device under different epoxy volume fractions, load resistances, and strains are studied systematically. Both theoretical and experimental results show that the plastic-composite-plastic structure contributes to the flexibility of the device, and a high performance bulk PIN-PMN-PT single crystal (a thickness of 50 μm) results in its high electrical output. At a low excitation frequency of 4.2 Hz, the optimal flexible energy harvester (with ve = 21%) can generate a peak voltage of 12.9 V and a maximum power density of 0.28 mW/cm3 under a bending radius of 10.5 mm, and maintain its performance after 40 000 bending-unbending cycles. High flexibility and excellent electrical output at low operational frequency demonstrate the promise of the device in biomechanical motion energy harvesting for wireless and portable low-power electronics.

  7. Structural load control during construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulas, Martin

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: examples of high transient loadings on large space structures; energy absorbing/load limiting strut research objectives; scope of research on energy absorbing struts to date; energy characteristics of cantilevered trusses with a tip load; ten bay long resilient truss example; stored energy characteristics of one meter deep truss; energy absorbing potential for 10-bay 5-meter deep truss; schematic of energy absorbing strut; linear load and motion control actuator; rigid body response of a solar array to the shuttle thruster pressure impingement; solar array piecewise linear response; solar array characteristics; solar array tip deflection and required actuator stroke; solar array response from finite element analysis; 12 bay energy absorbing test bed dynamics; and new AERO-Lab with 12-bay test beam.

  8. Characterization via atomic force microscopy of discrete plasticity in collagen fibrils from mechanically overloaded tendons: Nano-scale structural changes mimic rope failure.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Samuel J; Kreplak, Laurent; Lee, J Michael

    2016-07-01

    Tendons exposed to tensile overload show a structural alteration at the fibril scale termed discrete plasticity. Serial kinks appear along individual collagen fibrils that are susceptible to enzymatic digestion and are thermally unstable. Using atomic force microscopy we mapped the topography and mechanical properties in dehydrated and hydrated states of 25 control fibrils and 25 fibrils displaying periodic kinks, extracted from overloaded bovine tail tendons. Using the measured modulus of the hydrated fibrils as a probe of molecular density, we observed a non-linear negative correlation between molecular density and kink density of individual fibrils. This is accompanied by an increase in water uptake with kink density and a doubling of the coefficient of variation of the modulus between kinked, and control fibrils. The mechanical property maps of kinked collagen fibrils show radial heterogeneity that can be modeled as a high-density core surrounded by a low-density shell. The core of the fibril contains the kink structures characteristic of discrete plasticity; separated by inter-kink regions, which often retain the D-banding structure. We propose that the shell and kink structures mimic characteristic damage motifs observed in laid rope strands.

  9. REVERSING CYCLIC ELASTO-PLASTIC DEMANDS ON STRUCTURES DURING STRONG MOTION EARTHQUAKE EXCITATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perez, V.; Brady, A.G.; Safak, E.

    1986-01-01

    Using the horizontal components from El Centro 1940, Taft 1952, and 4 accelerograms from the San Fernando earthquake of 2/9/71, the time history of the elasto-plastic displacement response was calculated for oscillators having periods within the range of 1 to 6 s and ductility factors within the range of 3 to 6. The Nth largest peak of the elasto-plastic response (N equals 2,4,8,16), when expressed as a percentage of maximum response (that is, N equals 1), is fairly independent of period within our period range. When considering only plastic peaks occurring, sometimes in a one-directional group of peaks, in the reverse direction from the preceding plastic peak, the amplitude of the Nth reversing plastic peak is similar to the Nth elastic peak, regardless of the ductility factor.

  10. Cognitive-affective neural plasticity following active-controlled mindfulness intervention

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Micah; Dietz, Martin; Blair, Karina S.; van Beek, Martijn; Rees, Geraint; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Lutz, Antoine; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation is a set of attention-based, regulatory and self-inquiry training regimes. Although the impact of mindfulness meditation training (MT) on self-regulation is well established, the neural mechanisms supporting such plasticity are poorly understood. MT is thought to act on attention through interoceptive salience and attentional control mechanisms, but until now conflicting evidence from behavioral and neural measures has made it difficult to distinguish the role of these mechanisms. To resolve this question we conducted a fully randomized 6-week longitudinal trial of MT, explicitly controlling for cognitive and treatment effects with an active control group. We measured behavioral metacognition and whole-brain Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) signals using functional MRI during an affective Stroop task before and after intervention. Although both groups improved significantly on a response-inhibition task, only the MT group showed reduced affective Stroop conflict. Moreover, the MT group displayed greater dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) responses during executive processing, consistent with increased recruitment of top-down mechanisms to resolve conflict. In contrast, we did not observe overall group by time interactions on negative affect-related RTs or BOLD responses. However, only participants with the greatest amount of MT practice showed improvements in response-inhibition and increased recruitment of dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and right anterior insula during negative valence processing. Collectively our findings highlight the importance of active control in MT research, and indicate unique neural mechanisms for progressive stages of mindfulness training. PMID:23115195

  11. Cognitive-affective neural plasticity following active-controlled mindfulness intervention.

    PubMed

    Allen, Micah; Dietz, Martin; Blair, Karina S; van Beek, Martijn; Rees, Geraint; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Lutz, Antoine; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2012-10-31

    Mindfulness meditation is a set of attention-based, regulatory, and self-inquiry training regimes. Although the impact of mindfulness training (MT) on self-regulation is well established, the neural mechanisms supporting such plasticity are poorly understood. MT is thought to act through interoceptive salience and attentional control mechanisms, but until now conflicting evidence from behavioral and neural measures renders difficult distinguishing their respective roles. To resolve this question we conducted a fully randomized 6 week longitudinal trial of MT, explicitly controlling for cognitive and treatment effects with an active-control group. We measured behavioral metacognition and whole-brain blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals using functional MRI during an affective Stroop task before and after intervention in healthy human subjects. Although both groups improved significantly on a response-inhibition task, only the MT group showed reduced affective Stroop conflict. Moreover, the MT group displayed greater dorsolateral prefrontal cortex responses during executive processing, consistent with increased recruitment of top-down mechanisms to resolve conflict. In contrast, we did not observe overall group-by-time interactions on negative affect-related reaction times or BOLD responses. However, only participants with the greatest amount of MT practice showed improvements in response inhibition and increased recruitment of dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, and right anterior insula during negative valence processing. Our findings highlight the importance of active control in MT research, indicate unique neural mechanisms for progressive stages of mindfulness training, and suggest that optimal application of MT may differ depending on context, contrary to a one-size-fits-all approach.

  12. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold.

  13. Immunocytochemical evidence of plasticity in the nervous structures of the rat lower lip.

    PubMed

    Verzé, L; Paraninfo, A; Ramieri, G; Viglietti-Panzica, C; Panzica, G C

    1999-08-01

    In this immunocytochemical study we investigated the distribution of nervous structures in the lower lip of adult rats. The region is characterized by a rich cutaneous and mucosal sensory innervation originating from terminal branches of the trigeminal system. Lower lip innervation was investigated by detection of the general neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) and the growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43), a neurochemical marker of neuronal plasticity. The entire neural network of both cutaneous and mucosal aspects was stained by the antibody to PGP 9.5. In particular, nerve fibers were observed in the submucosal and the subepithelial plexuses. Thin immunoreactive fibers were observed within the epithelial layers ending as free fibers or as fibers associated with immunopositive Merkel cells. Well-identified anatomical structures receiving sensory or autonomic innervation were also surrounded by PGP 9.5-ir nerve fibers, in particular, hair follicles, vibrissae, glands, and blood vessels. GAP-43-immunostained nerve fibers were observed in all these structures; however, they were generally less numerous than the PGP 9.5-immunoreactive elements. An equal amount of PGP 9.5 and GAP-43 immunoreactivity occurred, in contrast, in the subepidermal and the submucosal plexuses, or in the epidermis and the mucosal epithelium. The present results show that GAP-43 is normally expressed in the mature trigeminal sensory system of the rat. Skin and oral mucosa are characterized by continuous remodeling that may also involve the sensory nervous apparatus. Continuous neural remodeling, regeneration and sprouting may be the reason for the observed expression of GAP-43.

  14. Orofacial Neuropathic Pain Leads to a Hyporesponsive Barrel Cortex with Enhanced Structural Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Karine; Rivière, Sébastien; Lenkei, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a long-lasting debilitating condition that is particularly difficult to treat due to the lack of identified underlying mechanisms. Although several key contributing processes have been described at the level of the spinal cord, very few studies have investigated the supraspinal mechanisms underlying chronic pain. Using a combination of approaches (cortical intrinsic imaging, immunohistochemical and behavioural analysis), our study aimed to decipher the nature of functional and structural changes in a mouse model of orofacial neuropathic pain, focusing on cortical areas involved in various pain components. Our results show that chronic neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with decreased haemodynamic responsiveness to whisker stimulation in the barrel field cortex. This reduced functional activation is likely due to the increased basal neuronal activity (measured indirectly using cFos and phospho-ERK immunoreactivity) observed in several cortical areas, including the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. In the same animals, immunohistochemical analysis of markers for active pre- or postsynaptic elements (Piccolo and phospho-Cofilin, respectively) revealed an increased immunofluorescence in deep cortical layers of the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. These results suggest that long-lasting orofacial neuropathic pain is associated with exacerbated neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity at the cortical level. PMID:27548330

  15. Circadian and homeostatic regulation of structural synaptic plasticity in hypocretin neurons.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Lior; Wang, Gordon; Yokogawa, Tohei; Skariah, Gemini M; Smith, Stephen J; Mourrain, Philippe; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2010-10-06

    Neurons exhibit rhythmic activity that ultimately affects behavior such as sleep. In living zebrafish larvae, we used time-lapse two-photon imaging of the presynaptic marker synaptophysin in hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) neurons to determine the dynamics of synaptic modifications during the day and night. We observed circadian rhythmicity in synapse number in HCRT axons. This rhythm is regulated primarily by the circadian clock but is also affected by sleep deprivation. Furthermore, NPTX2, a protein implicated in AMPA receptor clustering, modulates circadian synaptic changes. In zebrafish, nptx2b is a rhythmic gene that is mostly expressed in hypothalamic and pineal gland cells. Arrhythmic transgenic nptx2b overexpression (hcrt:NPTX2b) increases synapse number and abolishes rhythmicity in HCRT axons. Finally, hcrt:NPTX2b fish are resistant to the sleep-promoting effects of melatonin. This behavioral effect is consistent with NPTX2b-mediated increased activity of HCRT circuitry. These data provide real-time in vivo evidence of circadian and homeostatic regulation of structural synaptic plasticity.

  16. Parental influence on begging call structure in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata): evidence of early vocal plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Villain, Avelyne S.; Boucaud, Ingrid C. A.; Bouchut, Colette; Vignal, Clémentine

    2015-01-01

    Begging calls are signals of need used by young birds to elicit care from adults. Different theoretical frameworks have been proposed to understand this parent–offspring communication. But relationships between parental response and begging intensity, or between begging characteristics and proxies of a young’s need remain puzzling. Few studies have considered the adjustment of nestling begging features to previous experience as a possible explanation of these discrepancies. In this study, we tested the effect of a heterospecific rearing environment on individual developmental trajectories of the acoustic structure of nestling begging calls. Fifty-two zebra finch chicks were fostered either to Bengalese finch or to zebra finch parents, and begging calls were recorded at several stages of nestling development. Acoustic analyses revealed that the development of the spectral features of the begging calls differed between experimental conditions: chicks reared by Bengalese finches produced higher pitched and less broadband begging calls than chicks reared by conspecific parents. Differences were stronger in males than females and were not explained by differences in growth rate. We conclude that nestling begging calls can be plastic in response to social interactions with parents. PMID:26716009

  17. Playing Super Mario induces structural brain plasticity: gray matter changes resulting from training with a commercial video game.

    PubMed

    Kühn, S; Gleich, T; Lorenz, R C; Lindenberger, U; Gallinat, J

    2014-02-01

    Video gaming is a highly pervasive activity, providing a multitude of complex cognitive and motor demands. Gaming can be seen as an intense training of several skills. Associated cerebral structural plasticity induced has not been investigated so far. Comparing a control with a video gaming training group that was trained for 2 months for at least 30 min per day with a platformer game, we found significant gray matter (GM) increase in right hippocampal formation (HC), right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and bilateral cerebellum in the training group. The HC increase correlated with changes from egocentric to allocentric navigation strategy. GM increases in HC and DLPFC correlated with participants' desire for video gaming, evidence suggesting a predictive role of desire in volume change. Video game training augments GM in brain areas crucial for spatial navigation, strategic planning, working memory and motor performance going along with evidence for behavioral changes of navigation strategy. The presented video game training could therefore be used to counteract known risk factors for mental disease such as smaller hippocampus and prefrontal cortex volume in, for example, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia and neurodegenerative disease.

  18. Morphological and structural plasticity of grassland species in response to a gradient in saline-sodic soils.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Song, Y; Li, G; Drake, P L; Zheng, W; Li, Z; Zhou, D

    2015-11-01

    The abundance and distribution of species can be ascribed to both environmental heterogeneity and stress tolerance, with the latter measure sometimes associated with phenotypic plasticity. Although phenotypic plasticity varies predictably in response to common forms of stress, we lack a mechanistic understanding of the response of species to high saline-sodic soils. We compared the phenotypic plasticity of three pairs of high and low saline-sodic tolerant congeners from the families Poaceae (Leymus chinensis versus L. secalinus), Fabaceae (Lespedeza davurica versus L. bicolor) and Asteraceae (Artemisia mongolica versus A. sieversiana) in a controlled pot experiment in the Songnen grassland, China. The low tolerant species, L. secalinus and A. sieversiana exhibited higher plasticity in response to soil salinity and sodicity than their paired congeners. Highly tolerant species, L. chinensis and A. mongolica, had higher values for several important morphological traits, such as shoot length and total biomass under the high saline-sodic soil treatment than their paired congeners. In contrast, congeners from the family Fabaceae, L. davurica and L. bicolor, did not exhibit significantly different plasticity in response to soil salinity and sodicity. All species held a constant reproductive effort in response to saline-sodic soil stress. The different responses between low and high tolerant species offer an explanation for the distribution patterns of these species in the Songnen grassland. Highly tolerant species showed less morphological plasticity over a range of saline-sodic conditions than their paired congeners, which may manifest as an inability to compete with co-occurring species in locations where saline-sodic soils are absent.

  19. Automatic Generation of Connectivity for Large-Scale Neuronal Network Models through Structural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Pier, Sandra; Naveau, Mikaël; Butz-Ostendorf, Markus; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    With the emergence of new high performance computation technology in the last decade, the simulation of large scale neural networks which are able to reproduce the behavior and structure of the brain has finally become an achievable target of neuroscience. Due to the number of synaptic connections between neurons and the complexity of biological networks, most contemporary models have manually defined or static connectivity. However, it is expected that modeling the dynamic generation and deletion of the links among neurons, locally and between different regions of the brain, is crucial to unravel important mechanisms associated with learning, memory and healing. Moreover, for many neural circuits that could potentially be modeled, activity data is more readily and reliably available than connectivity data. Thus, a framework that enables networks to wire themselves on the basis of specified activity targets can be of great value in specifying network models where connectivity data is incomplete or has large error margins. To address these issues, in the present work we present an implementation of a model of structural plasticity in the neural network simulator NEST. In this model, synapses consist of two parts, a pre- and a post-synaptic element. Synapses are created and deleted during the execution of the simulation following local homeostatic rules until a mean level of electrical activity is reached in the network. We assess the scalability of the implementation in order to evaluate its potential usage in the self generation of connectivity of large scale networks. We show and discuss the results of simulations on simple two population networks and more complex models of the cortical microcircuit involving 8 populations and 4 layers using the new framework. PMID:27303272

  20. Structural and functional plasticity of subcellular tethering, targeting and processing of RPGRIP1 by RPGR isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Hemangi; Guruju, Mallikarjuna R.; Cho, Kyoung-in; Yi, Haiqing; Orry, Andrew; Kim, Hyesung; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mutations affecting the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator-interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1) interactome cause syndromic retinal dystrophies. RPGRIP1 interacts with the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) through a domain homologous to RCC1 (RHD), a nucleotide exchange factor of Ran GTPase. However, functional relationships between RPGR and RPGRIP1 and their subcellular roles are lacking. We show by molecular modeling and analyses of RPGR disease-mutations that the RPGR-interacting domain (RID) of RPGRIP1 embraces multivalently the shared RHD of RPGR1–19 and RPGRORF15 isoforms and the mutations are non-overlapping with the interface found between RCC1 and Ran GTPase. RPGR disease-mutations grouped into six classes based on their structural locations and differential impairment with RPGRIP1 interaction. RPGRIP1α1 expression alone causes its profuse self-aggregation, an effect suppressed by co-expression of either RPGR isoform before and after RPGRIP1α1 self-aggregation ensue. RPGR1–19 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas RPGRORF15 presents cytosolic distribution and they determine uniquely the subcellular co-localization of RPGRIP1α1. Disease mutations in RPGR1–19, RPGRORF15, or RID of RPGRIP1α1, singly or in combination, exert distinct effects on the subcellular targeting, co-localization or tethering of RPGRIP1α1 with RPGR1–19 or RPGRORF15 in kidney, photoreceptor and hepatocyte cell lines. Additionally, RPGRORF15, but not RPGR1–19, protects the RID of RPGRIP1α1 from limited proteolysis. These studies define RPGR- and cell-type-dependent targeting pathways with structural and functional plasticity modulating the expression of mutations in RPGR and RPGRIP1. Further, RPGR isoforms distinctively determine the subcellular targeting of RPGRIP1α1, with deficits in RPGRORF15-dependent intracellular localization of RPGRIP1α1 contributing to pathomechanisms shared by etiologically distinct syndromic retinal dystrophies. PMID

  1. Evaluation of drug release profile from patches based on styrene-isoprene-styrene block copolymer: the effect of block structure and plasticizer.

    PubMed

    Wang, ChengXiao; Han, Wei; Tang, XiuZhen; Zhang, Hao

    2012-06-01

    We prepared pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) patches based on styrene-isoprene-styrene (SIS) thermoplastic elastomer using hot-melt coating method. The liquid paraffine is added in the PSA matrices as a plasticizer to moderate the PSA properties. Three drugs, methyl salicylate, capsaicin, and diphenhydramine hydrochloride are selected as model drugs. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry test, and wide-angle X-ray diffraction test indicate a good compatibility between drugs and matrices. Peppas equation is used to describe drug release profile. Different drug-matrix absorption, as indicative of drug-matrix interaction, accounts for the variation in release profiles of different drugs. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy and rheological studies of the PSA samples are performed to investigate the effect of SIS structure and plasticizer of PSA on drug release behaviors. For methyl salicylate and capsaicin, drug diffusion in the PSA matrices is the main factor controlled by the release kinetic constant k. The high [SI] diblock content and high plasticizer amount in matrix provide the PSA with a homogeneous and soften microstructure, resulting in a high diffusion rate. But for water-soluble drugs such as diphenhydramine hydrochloride, the release rate is governed by water penetration with the competition from diffusion mechanisms.

  2. Environmental controls on the phenology of moths: predicting plasticity and constraint under climate change.

    PubMed

    Valtonen, Anu; Ayres, Matthew P; Roininen, Heikki; Pöyry, Juha; Leinonen, Reima

    2011-01-01

    Ecological systems have naturally high interannual variance in phenology. Component species have presumably evolved to maintain appropriate phenologies under historical climates, but cases of inappropriate phenology can be expected with climate change. Understanding controls on phenology permits predictions of ecological responses to climate change. We studied phenological control systems in Lepidoptera by analyzing flight times recorded at a network of sites in Finland. We evaluated the strength and form of controls from temperature and photoperiod, and tested for geographic variation within species. Temperature controls on phenology were evident in 51% of 112 study species and for a third of those thermal controls appear to be modified by photoperiodic cues. For 24% of the total, photoperiod by itself emerged as the most likely control system. Species with thermal control alone should be most immediately responsive in phenology to climate warming, but variably so depending upon the minimum temperature at which appreciable development occurs and the thermal responsiveness of development rate. Photoperiodic modification of thermal controls constrains phenotypic responses in phenologies to climate change, but can evolve to permit local adaptation. Our results suggest that climate change will alter the phenological structure of the Finnish Lepidoptera community in ways that are predictable with knowledge of the proximate physiological controls. Understanding how phenological controls in Lepidoptera compare to that of their host plants and enemies could permit general inferences regarding climatic effects on mid- to high-latitude ecosystems.

  3. Psychological change after aesthetic plastic surgery: a prospective controlled outcome study.

    PubMed

    Moss, Timothy P; Harris, David L

    2009-10-01

    Aesthetic plastic surgery has been long practiced for primarily psychological rather than physical benefit to patients. However, evaluation of the psychological impact of aesthetic plastic surgery has often been of limited methodological rigor in both study design and appropriate measurement. This study is intended to evaluate the psychological impact of aesthetic surgery on patients seeking such intervention in regard to concerns about breasts, nose or upper limbs using standardised psychometric instruments. Participants were recruited through the Plastic Surgery Unit (Patients) and general surgery, ENT surgery and Maxillo-facial surgery (Comparisons) at a UK General Hospital. Outcome measures included the Crown-Crisp Experiential Inventory anxiety scale, Beck Depression Inventory and Derriford Appearance Scale-24, a valid and reliable measure of distress and dysfunction in relation to self-consciousness of appearance. Data were collected pre-operatively (T1) and 3 months post-operatively (T2) for both groups. Longitudinal appearance adjustment for the plastic surgery group was also assessed at 12 months (T3). Both groups were less depressed and anxious post-operatively. The improvement in anxiety was significantly greater in the plastic surgery group. Body site specific appearance distress was significantly improved for the plastics group only, and the level of improvement was related to the body site affected.

  4. RAD sequencing resolves fine-scale population structure in a benthic invertebrate: implications for understanding phenotypic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Hannah; Weiss, Martina; Fawcett, Katie; Lehman, Katrin; Clark, M. S.; Leese, Florian; McMinn, Carrie; Moore, Heather; Hoffman, Joseph I.

    2017-01-01

    The field of molecular ecology is transitioning from the use of small panels of classical genetic markers such as microsatellites to much larger panels of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) generated by approaches like RAD sequencing. However, few empirical studies have directly compared the ability of these methods to resolve population structure. This could have implications for understanding phenotypic plasticity, as many previous studies of natural populations may have lacked the power to detect genetic differences, especially over micro-geographic scales. We therefore compared the ability of microsatellites and RAD sequencing to resolve fine-scale population structure in a commercially important benthic invertebrate by genotyping great scallops (Pecten maximus) from nine populations around Northern Ireland at 13 microsatellites and 10 539 SNPs. The shells were then subjected to morphometric and colour analysis in order to compare patterns of phenotypic and genetic variation. We found that RAD sequencing was superior at resolving population structure, yielding higher Fst values and support for two distinct genetic clusters, whereas only one cluster could be detected in a Bayesian analysis of the microsatellite dataset. Furthermore, appreciable phenotypic variation was observed in size-independent shell shape and coloration, including among localities that could not be distinguished from one another genetically, providing support for the notion that these traits are phenotypically plastic. Taken together, our results suggest that RAD sequencing is a powerful approach for studying population structure and phenotypic plasticity in natural populations. PMID:28386419

  5. Plasticity to simulated shade is associated with altitude in structured populations of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Botto, Javier F

    2015-07-01

    Plants compete for photosynthesis light and induce a shade avoidance syndrome (SAS) that confers an important advantage in asymmetric competition for light at high canopy densities. Shade plasticity was studied in a greenhouse experiment cultivating Arabidopsis thaliana plants from 15 populations spread across an altitudinal gradient in the northeast area of Spain that contain a high genetic variation into a reduced geographical range. Plants were exposed to sunlight or simulated shade to identify the range of shade plasticity. Fourteen vegetative, flowering and reproductive traits were measured throughout the life cycle. Shade plasticity in flowering time and dry mass was significantly associated with the altitude of population origin. Plants from coastal populations showed higher shade plasticity indexes than those from mountains. The altitudinal variation in flowering leaf plasticity adjusted negatively with average and minimum temperatures, whereas dry mass plasticity was better explained by negative regressions with the average, maximum and minimum temperatures, and by a positive regression with average precipitation of the population origin. The lack of an altitudinal gradient for the widest number of traits suggests that shade light could be a driver explaining the distribution pattern of individuals in smaller geographical scales than those explored here.

  6. Structural modifications induced by compressive plastic deformation in single-step and sequentially irradiated UHMWPE for hip joint components.

    PubMed

    Puppulin, Leonardo; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Zhu, Wenliang; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Structural modifications were studied at the molecular scale in two highly crosslinked UHMWPE materials for hip-joint acetabular components, as induced upon application of (uniaxial) compressive strain to the as-manufactured microstructures. The two materials, quite different in their starting resins and belonging to different manufacturing generations, were a single-step irradiated and a sequentially irradiated polyethylene. The latter material represents the most recently launched gamma-ray-irradiated polyethylene material in the global hip implant market. Confocal/polarized Raman spectroscopy was systematically applied to characterize the initial microstructures and the microstructural response of the materials to plastic deformation. Crystallinity fractions and preferential orientation of molecular chains have been followed up during in vitro deformation tests on unused cups and correlated to plastic strain magnitude and to the recovery capacity of the material. Moreover, analyses of the in vivo deformation behavior of two short-term retrieved hip cups are also presented. Trends of preferential orientation of molecular chains as a function of residual strain were similar for both materials, but distinctly different in their extents. The sequentially irradiated material was more resistant to plastic deformation and, for the same magnitude of residual plastic strain, possessed a higher capacity of recovery as compared to the single-step irradiated one.

  7. Optimization for efficient structure-control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oz, Hayrani; Khot, Narendra S.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of a structure-control system is a nondimensional parameter which indicates the fraction of the total control power expended usefully in controlling a finite-dimensional system. The balance of control power is wasted on the truncated dynamics serving no useful purpose towards the control objectives. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the concept of efficiency can be used to address a number of control issues encountered in the control of dynamic systems such as the spillover effects, selection of a good input configuration and obtaining reduced order control models. Reference (1) introduced the concept and presented analyses of several Linear Quadratic Regulator designs on the basis of their efficiencies. Encouraged by the results of Ref. (1), Ref. (2) introduces an efficiency modal analysis of a structure-control system which gives an internal characterization of the controller design and establishes the link between the control design and the initial disturbances to affect efficient structure-control system designs. The efficiency modal analysis leads to identification of principal controller directions (or controller modes) distinct from the structural natural modes. Thus ultimately, many issues of the structure-control system revolve around the idea of insuring compatibility of the structural modes and the controller modes with each other, the better the match the higher the efficiency. A key feature in controlling a reduced order model of a high dimensional (or infinity-dimensional distributed parameter system) structural dynamic system must be to achieve high efficiency of the control system while satisfying the control objectives and/or constraints. Formally, this can be achieved by designing the control system and structural parameters simultaneously within an optimization framework. The subject of this paper is to present such a design procedure.

  8. Flexible crossbar-structured resistive memory arrays on plastic substrates via inorganic-based laser lift-off.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungjun; Son, Jung Hwan; Lee, Seung Hyun; You, Byoung Kuk; Park, Kwi-Il; Lee, Hwan Keon; Byun, Myunghwan; Lee, Keon Jae

    2014-11-26

    Crossbar-structured memory comprising 32 × 32 arrays with one selector-one resistor (1S-1R) components are initially fabricated on a rigid substrate. They are transferred without mechanical damage via an inorganic-based laser lift-off (ILLO) process as a result of laser-material interaction. Addressing tests of the transferred memory arrays are successfully performed to verify mitigation of cross-talk on a plastic substrate.

  9. Vibration Control of Large Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    Vibration Control of a Beam with a Proof-Mass Actuator," AIAA Guidance, Navigation and Control Conference, Monterey, CA, August, 19S7. Haviland , J. K...Conference, Monterey, CA, August, 1987. Haviland , J. K., Politansky, H., Lim, T. W., and Pilkey, W. D., "The Control of Linear Proof-Mass Dampers," Sixth

  10. Control of the annual cycle in birds: endocrine constraints and plasticity in response to ecological variability.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Alistair

    2008-05-12

    This paper reviews information from ecological and physiological studies to assess how extrinsic factors can modulate intrinsic physiological processes. The annual cycle of birds is made up of a sequence of life-history stages: breeding, moult and migration. Each stage has evolved to occur at the optimum time and to last for the whole duration of time available. Some species have predictable breeding seasons, others are more flexible and some breed opportunistically in response to unpredictable food availability. Photoperiod is the principal environmental cue used to time each stage, allowing birds to adapt their physiology in advance of predictable environmental changes. Physiological (neuroendocrine and endocrine) plasticity allows non-photoperiodic cues to modulate timing to enable individuals to cope with, and benefit from, short-term environmental variability. Although the timing and duration of the period of full gonadal maturation is principally controlled by photoperiod, non-photoperiodic cues, such as temperature, rainfall or food availability, could potentially modulate the exact time of breeding either by fine-tuning the time of egg-laying within the period of full gonadal maturity or, more fundamentally, by modulating gonadal maturation and/or regression. The timing of gonadal regression affects the time of the start of moult, which in turn may affect the duration of the moult. There are many areas of uncertainty. Future integrated studies are required to assess the scope for flexibility in life-history strategies as this will have a critical bearing on whether birds can adapt sufficiently rapidly to anthropogenic environmental changes, in particular climate change.

  11. Real time digital control and controlled structures experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, Michael J.; Knowles, Gareth J.; Rauch, Frank

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs covering the following topics are given: controlled structures technology at Grumman Corporate Research Center, active and passive control technology, experiment plans, and vacuum chamber test experiment objectives and setup.

  12. Controlled catalystic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polycarbonate and plastic waste to recover monomers

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert J.; Chum, Helena L.

    1994-01-01

    A process of using fast pyrolysis to convert a plastic waste feed stream containing polycarbonate and ABS to high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituents prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting an acid or base catalysts and an oxide or carbonate support for treating the feed stream to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of the high value monomeric constituents of polycarbonate and ABS in the first temperature program range; differentially heating the feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis or other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents from the polycarbonate to cause pyrolysis to a different high value monomeric constituent of the plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of different high value monomeric constituents; and separating the different high value monomeric constituents.

  13. Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polycarbonate and plastic waste to recover monomers

    DOEpatents

    Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

    1994-06-14

    A process is described using fast pyrolysis to convert a plastic waste feed stream containing polycarbonate and ABS to high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituents prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting an acid or base catalysts and an oxide or carbonate support for treating the feed stream to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of the high value monomeric constituents of polycarbonate and ABS in the first temperature program range; differentially heating the feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis or other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents from the polycarbonate to cause pyrolysis to a different high value monomeric constituent of the plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of different high value monomeric constituents; and separating the different high value monomeric constituents. 68 figs.

  14. Mechanical properties and structural features of novel Fe-based bulk metallic glasses with unprecedented plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weiming; Liu, Haishun; Zhao, Yucheng; Inoue, Akihisa; Jiang, Kemin; Huo, Juntao; Ling, Haibo; Li, Qiang; Shen, Baolong

    2014-08-01

    Fe-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have attracted great attention due to their unique magnetic and mechanical properties, but few applications have been materialized because of their brittleness at room temperature. Here we report a new Fe50Ni30P13C7 BMG which exhibits unprecedented compressive plasticity (>20%) at room temperature without final fracture. The mechanism of unprecedented plasticity for this new Fe-based BMG was also investigated. It was discovered that the ductile Fe50Ni30P13C7 BMG is composed of unique clusters mainly linked by less directional metal-metal bonds which are inclined to accommodate shear strain and absorbed energy in the front of crack tip. This conclusion was further verified by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy experiments of Fe80-xNixP13C7 (x = 0, 10, 20, 30) and Fe72-xNixB20Si4Nb4 (x = 0, 7.2, 14.4, 21.6, 28.8) glassy systems. The results also indicate a strong correlation between the p-d hybridization and plasticity, verifying that the transition from brittle to ductile induced by Ni addition is due to the change of bonding characteristics in atomic configurations. Thus, we can design the plasticity of Fe-based BMGs and open up a new possible pathway for manufacturing BMGs with high strength and plasticity.

  15. Mechanical properties and structural features of novel Fe-based bulk metallic glasses with unprecedented plasticity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiming; Liu, Haishun; Zhao, Yucheng; Inoue, Akihisa; Jiang, Kemin; Huo, Juntao; Ling, Haibo; Li, Qiang; Shen, Baolong

    2014-08-29

    Fe-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have attracted great attention due to their unique magnetic and mechanical properties, but few applications have been materialized because of their brittleness at room temperature. Here we report a new Fe(50)Ni(30)P(13)C(7) BMG which exhibits unprecedented compressive plasticity (>20%) at room temperature without final fracture. The mechanism of unprecedented plasticity for this new Fe-based BMG was also investigated. It was discovered that the ductile Fe(50)Ni(30)P(13)C(7) BMG is composed of unique clusters mainly linked by less directional metal-metal bonds which are inclined to accommodate shear strain and absorbed energy in the front of crack tip. This conclusion was further verified by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy experiments of Fe(80-x)Ni(x)P(13)C(7) (x = 0, 10, 20, 30) and Fe(72-x)Ni(x)B(20)Si(4)Nb(4) (x = 0, 7.2, 14.4, 21.6, 28.8) glassy systems. The results also indicate a strong correlation between the p-d hybridization and plasticity, verifying that the transition from brittle to ductile induced by Ni addition is due to the change of bonding characteristics in atomic configurations. Thus, we can design the plasticity of Fe-based BMGs and open up a new possible pathway for manufacturing BMGs with high strength and plasticity.

  16. Robust control with structured perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, Leehyun

    1988-01-01

    Two important problems in the area of control systems design and analysis are discussed. The first is the robust stability using characteristic polynomial, which is treated first in characteristic polynomial coefficient space with respect to perturbations in the coefficients of the characteristic polynomial, and then for a control system containing perturbed parameters in the transfer function description of the plant. In coefficient space, a simple expression is first given for the l(sup 2) stability margin for both monic and non-monic cases. Following this, a method is extended to reveal much larger stability region. This result has been extended to the parameter space so that one can determine the stability margin, in terms of ranges of parameter variations, of the closed loop system when the nominal stabilizing controller is given. The stability margin can be enlarged by a choice of better stabilizing controller. The second problem describes the lower order stabilization problem, the motivation of the problem is as follows. Even though the wide range of stabilizing controller design methodologies is available in both the state space and transfer function domains, all of these methods produce unnecessarily high order controllers. In practice, the stabilization is only one of many requirements to be satisfied. Therefore, if the order of a stabilizing controller is excessively high, one can normally expect to have a even higher order controller on the completion of design such as inclusion of dynamic response requirements, etc. Therefore, it is reasonable to have a lowest possible order stabilizing controller first and then adjust the controller to meet additional requirements. The algorithm for designing a lower order stabilizing controller is given. The algorithm does not necessarily produce the minimum order controller; however, the algorithm is theoretically logical and some simulation results show that the algorithm works in general.

  17. Brain-Controlled Neuromuscular Stimulation to Drive Neural Plasticity and Functional Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Ethier, C.; Gallego, J.A.; Miller, L.E.

    2015-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that appropriately timed neuromuscular stimulation can induce neural plasticity and generate functional recovery from motor disorders. This review addresses the idea that coordinating stimulation with a patient’s voluntary effort might further enhance neurorehabilitation. Studies in cell cultures and behaving animals have delineated the rules underlying neural plasticity when single neurons are used as triggers. However, the rules governing more complex stimuli and larger networks are less well understood. We argue that functional recovery might be optimized if stimulation were modulated by a brain machine interface, to matched the details of the patient’s voluntary intent. The potential of this novel approach highlights the need for a better understanding of the complex rules underlying this form of plasticity. PMID:25827275

  18. Dynamics and control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurre, G. S.; Ryan, R. S.; Scofield, H. N.; Sims, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt is made to gather data useful to investigators in the fields of large space structure dynamics and control modeling, design and testing. Attention is given to structural dynamics and its relationship to such allied engineering fields as flutter analysis, as well as to problems in the prediction of atmospheric density at orbital altitude. The first challenge posed by large space structure control is the design of control systems with natural frequencies above several major structural frequencies. The establishment of a sufficiently accurate structural model, plant excitation, and shape maintenance, are noted to be additional problems.

  19. Thermal control structure and garment

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W [Knoxville, TN; Cameron, Christopher Stan [Sanford, NC

    2012-03-13

    A flexible thermally conductive structure. The structure generally includes a plurality of thermally conductive yarns, at least some of which are at least partially disposed adjacent to an elastomeric material. Typically, at least a portion of the plurality of thermally conductive yarns is configured as a sheet. The yarns may be constructed from graphite, metal, or similar materials. The elastomeric material may be formed from urethane or silicone foam that is at least partially collapsed, or from a similar material. A thermal management garment is provided, the garment incorporating a flexible thermally conductive structure.

  20. Integrated structural control design of large space structures

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Lauffer, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Active control of structures has been under intensive development for the last ten years. Reference 2 reviews much of the identification and control technology for structural control developed during this time. The technology was initially focused on space structure and weapon applications; however, recently the technology is also being directed toward applications in manufacturing and transportation. Much of this technology focused on multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) identification and control methodology because many of the applications require a coordinated control involving multiple disturbances and control objectives where multiple actuators and sensors are necessary for high performance. There have been many optimal robust control methods developed for the design of MIMO robust control laws; however, there appears to be a significant gap between the theoretical development and experimental evaluation of control and identification methods to address structural control applications. Many methods have been developed for MIMO identification and control of structures, such as the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA), Q-Markov Covariance Equivalent Realization (Q-Markov COVER) for identification; and, Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG), Frequency Weighted LQG and H-/ii-synthesis methods for control. Upon implementation, many of the identification and control methods have shown limitations such as the excitation of unmodelled dynamics and sensitivity to system parameter variations. As a result, research on methods which address these problems have been conducted.

  1. System Identification Tools for Control Structure Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    DT! FILE COPY AL-TR-89-054 AD: 00 Final Report System Identification Tools for O for the period - September 1988 to Control Structure Interaction May...Classification) System Identification Tools for Control Structure Interaction (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kosut, Robert L.; Kabuli, Guntekin M. 13a. TYPE OF...identification, dynamics, 22 01 system identification , robustness, dynamic modeling, robust 22 02 control design, control design procedure 19. ABSTRACT

  2. Biodegradability of Plastics

    PubMed Central

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P.; Ugwu, Charles U.; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed. PMID:19865515

  3. Biodegradability of plastics.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P; Ugwu, Charles U; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-08-26

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed.

  4. Substructure-based control of flexible structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babuska, Vit

    The desire to build large space structures has motivated research into the problem of flexible structure control. In general, the controllers for these structures can be designed using a centralized strategy or a decentralized strategy. In the centralized approach, the controller is based on a model of the complete structure. In the decentralized approach, the structure model is decomposed into subsystems for which controllers are designed, and then these subsystem controllers are combined to control the complete structure. The subsystems can be mathematical constructs such as groups of modes, or physical subsystems like substructures. This dissertation examines substructure-based decentralized design of controllers for flexible structures. Three different, but related, topics are discussed in this work. First, a relationship is shown to exist between the substructural controller synthesis (SCS) method of designing active controllers for flexible structures and decentralized control using overlapping information sets. It is shown that, in the case of full-state feedback, the SCS method is a specific case of decentralized control using overlapping subsystems. In the case of dynamic output feedback (e.g., LQG controllers), the SCS method departs from standard decentralized control techniques. The controllers are 'assembled' by extending the concept of substructural assembly to general linear systems. Next, a new design method is proposed which combines the concept of component mode synthesis (CMS) with control theory in a decentralized method for the design of controllers for flexible structures. This method, called the augmented physical component synthesis (APCS) method, creates augmented substructural components. These components are substructures whose boundaries are loaded with some dynamics of the adjacent substructures. This allows global control objectives such as line-of-sight error minimization to be met with a substructure-based design strategy. Finally

  5. Core-shell structured titanium-nitrogen alloys with high strength, high thermal stability and good plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y S; Zhao, Y H; Zhang, W; Lu, J W; Hu, J J; Huo, W T; Zhang, P X

    2017-01-06

    Multifunctional materials with more than two good properties are widely required in modern industries. However, some properties are often trade-off with each other by single microstructural designation. For example, nanostructured materials have high strength, but low ductility and thermal stability. Here by means of spark plasma sintering (SPS) of nitrided Ti particles, we synthesized bulk core-shell structured Ti alloys with isolated soft coarse-grained Ti cores and hard Ti-N solid solution shells. The core-shell Ti alloys exhibit a high yield strength (~1.4 GPa) comparable to that of nanostructured states and high thermal stability (over 1100 °C, 0.71 of melting temperature), contributed by the hard Ti-N shells, as well as a good plasticity (fracture plasticity of 12%) due to the soft Ti cores. Our results demonstrate that this core-shell structure offers a design pathway towards an advanced material with enhancing strength-plasticity-thermal stability synergy.

  6. Onset of plasticity and its relation to structure in CuZr metallic glasses: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Gonzalo; Sepulveda, Matias; Amigo, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    The plastic behavior of crystalline metals is well understood. It is known that this regime is mainly mediated by the nucleation and propagation of dislocations as well as by grain boundary sliding. In metallic glasses (MGs), the plastic behavior is quite different from their crystalline counterparts. It is well known that bulk metallic glasses, in addition to the high yield strength and a elastic deformation to a strain limit about 2 % (i.e., more than an order of magnitude greater than conventional crystalline metals), are brittle at room temperature. Interestingly, MG nanowires present an important degree of ductillity, and is an ideal system to study the onset of plasticity in MG. Here we present a computational tensile test which shows the evolution of the atomic structure of a Cu50Zr50 metallic glass nanowire at 300 K according to the applied strain increased. The system consists of a million atoms CuZr nanowire metallic glass. Local structure of atoms is analyzed by means of the Voronoi polyhedral technique and the nucleation and propagation of SBs by monitoring the atomic strain. Supported by grant Fondecyt-Chile 1120603.

  7. Core-shell structured titanium-nitrogen alloys with high strength, high thermal stability and good plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. S.; Zhao, Y. H.; Zhang, W.; Lu, J. W.; Hu, J. J.; Huo, W. T.; Zhang, P. X.

    2017-01-01

    Multifunctional materials with more than two good properties are widely required in modern industries. However, some properties are often trade-off with each other by single microstructural designation. For example, nanostructured materials have high strength, but low ductility and thermal stability. Here by means of spark plasma sintering (SPS) of nitrided Ti particles, we synthesized bulk core-shell structured Ti alloys with isolated soft coarse-grained Ti cores and hard Ti-N solid solution shells. The core-shell Ti alloys exhibit a high yield strength (~1.4 GPa) comparable to that of nanostructured states and high thermal stability (over 1100 °C, 0.71 of melting temperature), contributed by the hard Ti-N shells, as well as a good plasticity (fracture plasticity of 12%) due to the soft Ti cores. Our results demonstrate that this core-shell structure offers a design pathway towards an advanced material with enhancing strength-plasticity-thermal stability synergy.

  8. Core-shell structured titanium-nitrogen alloys with high strength, high thermal stability and good plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y. S.; Zhao, Y. H.; Zhang, W.; Lu, J. W.; Hu, J. J.; Huo, W. T.; Zhang, P. X.

    2017-01-01

    Multifunctional materials with more than two good properties are widely required in modern industries. However, some properties are often trade-off with each other by single microstructural designation. For example, nanostructured materials have high strength, but low ductility and thermal stability. Here by means of spark plasma sintering (SPS) of nitrided Ti particles, we synthesized bulk core-shell structured Ti alloys with isolated soft coarse-grained Ti cores and hard Ti-N solid solution shells. The core-shell Ti alloys exhibit a high yield strength (~1.4 GPa) comparable to that of nanostructured states and high thermal stability (over 1100 °C, 0.71 of melting temperature), contributed by the hard Ti-N shells, as well as a good plasticity (fracture plasticity of 12%) due to the soft Ti cores. Our results demonstrate that this core-shell structure offers a design pathway towards an advanced material with enhancing strength-plasticity-thermal stability synergy. PMID:28059150

  9. Evaluation of the thermal efficiency of a high-temperature heat-insulation structure based on honeycomb plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhenkov, A. V.; Lapin, E. E.; Loginova, N. A.; Sitdikov, D. R.; Grigor'ev, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    Highly efficient heat-insulation materials are needed in order to reduce the heat losses in operation of heat-power equipment at temperatures up to 700°C. A review of the available solutions showed that the development of a high-temperature heat-insulation structure of a new type is needed. The basic features of application of honeycomb plastics in heat insulation of heat-power equipment are discussed, the known techniques for evaluating the heat conductance of such materials are reviewed, and the results of calculation-parametric studies on determining the optimum honeycomb design for heat-insulation structures are reported.

  10. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) influences spatial cognition and modulates hippocampal structural synaptic plasticity in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Zhanchi; Kang, Lin; Geng, Dandan; Wang, Yanyong; Wang, Mingwei; Cui, Huixian

    2014-10-01

    Normal aging is characteristic with the gradual decline in cognitive function associated with the progressive reduction of structural and functional plasticity in the hippocampus. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has developed into a novel neurological and psychiatric tool that can be used to investigate the neurobiology of cognitive function. Recent studies have demonstrated that low-frequency rTMS (≤1Hz) affects synaptic plasticity in rats with vascular dementia (VaD), and it ameliorates the spatial cognitive ability in mice with Aβ1-42-mediated memory deficits, but there are little concerns about the effects of rTMS on normal aging related cognition and synaptic plasticity changes. Thus, the current study investigated the effects of rTMS on spatial memory behavior, neuron and synapse morphology in the hippocampus, and synaptic protein markers and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in normal aging mice, to illustrate the mechanisms of rTMS in regulating cognitive capacity. Relative to adult animals, aging caused hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairment, simultaneously inhibited the activation of the BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway, reduced the transcription and expression of synaptic protein markers: synaptophysin (SYN), growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) and post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), as well as decreased synapse density and PSD (post-synaptic density) thickness. Interestingly, rTMS with low intensity (110% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1Hz, LIMS) triggered the activation of BDNF and TrkB, upregulated the level of synaptic protein markers, and increased synapse density and thickened PSD, and further reversed the spatial cognition dysfunction in aging mice. Conversely, high-intensity magnetic stimulation (150% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1Hz, HIMS) appeared to be detrimental, inducing thinning of PSDs, disordered synaptic structure, and a large number of

  11. Chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of the developmental switch gene eud-1 control predatory feeding plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Serobyan, Vahan; Xiao, Hua; Namdeo, Suryesh; Rödelsperger, Christian; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Witte, Hanh; Röseler, Waltraud; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been suggested to act through developmental switches, but little is known about associated molecular mechanisms. In the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, the sulfatase eud-1 was identified as part of a developmental switch controlling mouth-form plasticity governing a predatory versus bacteriovorous mouth-form decision. Here we show that mutations in the conserved histone-acetyltransferase Ppa-lsy-12 and the methyl-binding-protein Ppa-mbd-2 mimic the eud-1 phenotype, resulting in the absence of one mouth-form. Mutations in both genes cause histone modification defects and reduced eud-1 expression. Surprisingly, Ppa-lsy-12 mutants also result in the down-regulation of an antisense-eud-1 RNA. eud-1 and antisense-eud-1 are co-expressed and further experiments suggest that antisense-eud-1 acts through eud-1 itself. Indeed, overexpression of the antisense-eud-1 RNA increases the eud-1-sensitive mouth-form and extends eud-1 expression. In contrast, this effect is absent in eud-1 mutants indicating that antisense-eud-1 positively regulates eud-1. Thus, chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of eud-1 control feeding plasticity in Pristionchus. PMID:27487725

  12. Dual structural-control optimization of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messac, A.; Turner, J.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach is proposed for solving dual structural-control optimization problems for high-order flexible space structures where reduced-order structural models are employed. For a given initial structural dessign, a quadratic control cost is minimized subject to a constant-mass constraint. The sensitivity of the optimal control cost with respect to the stuctural design variables is then determined and used to obtain successive structural redesigns using a contrained gradient optimization algorithm. This process is repeated until the constrained control cost sensitivity becomes negligible. A numerical example is presented which demonstrates that this new approach effectively addresses the problem of dual optimization for potentially very high-order structures.

  13. New disordering mode for TFSI- anions: the nonequilibrium, plastic crystalline structure of Et4NTFSI.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Wesley A; Herstedt, Marie; Young, Victor G; Passerini, Stefano; De Long, Hugh C; Trulove, Paul C

    2006-02-20

    A new TFSI- anion disordering mode has been discovered in a supercooled plastic crystalline phase of Et4NTFSI, which may, in part, account for the low melting points of TFSI- salts with organic cations, thereby forming ionic liquids, and the intriguing properties of LiTFSI for lithium battery applications.

  14. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  15. Determination of the structural changes by Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers

    SciTech Connect

    Cozar, O.; Filip, C.; Tripon, C.; Cioica, N.; Coţa, C.; Nagy, E. M.

    2013-11-13

    The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra.

  16. Plastic Injection Quality Controlling Using the Lean Six Sigma and FMEA Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansur, A.; Mu'alim; Sunaryo

    2016-01-01

    PT. Yogya Presisi Teknikatama Industri (PT. YPTI) is a mold, precision part, and plastic injection maker company. One of the obstacles faced by the company is the high level of nonconformity on its production results. The waste on production process can be identified and classified into four types, i.e.: a). during the process of injection molding machines, b). finishing and cutting processes, c). quality control process and d). the packaging process. The objectives of this research are minimizing the defective goods and reducing the waste using Lean Six Sigma and FMEA approaches, especially for Bush product. From the analysis result, defective types on Bush product can be classified into bubble, speckle, short shoot, sunken, sink mark, over-cut, flashing, and discolor. Based on the attributes data on Bush product, the DPMO score is 988.42 or the sigma level is 4.6, While the DPMO score on the variable data on each dimension i.e.: a). Slit width on the bottom side has DPMO score of 30119 (sigma level 3.37), b). Diameter of the circle on the top side has DPMO score of 392294 (sigma level 1.77), c). Product thickness on the top side has DPMO score of 70474 (sigma level 2.97), d). Product height has DPMO score of 82107 (sigma level 2.89), product thickness on the bottom side has DPMO score of 24448 (sigma level 3.47), and f). Diameter of the circle on the bottom side has DPMO score of 24448 (sigma level 3.47). The highest RPN score on the dominant types of product defects which needs improvement are the defective goods of bubble type has RPN score of 729, flashing and the molten material out on the heating channel has RPN score of 384, over cutting has RPN score of 324 and sink mark has RPN score of 270. The recommendations for improvement that can be given from this research are making checklist for maintenance and production monitoring, enhancing work supervision and inspection, as well as improving the environment and work stations.

  17. Adaptive Control Of Large Vibrating, Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.

    1991-01-01

    Globally convergent theoretical method provides for adaptive set-point control of orientation of, along with suppression of the vibrations of, large structure. Method utilizes inherent passivity properties of structure to attain mathematical condition essential to adaptive convergence on commanded set point. Maintains stability and convergence in presence of errors in mathematical model of dynamics of structure and actuators. Developed for controlling attitudes of large, somewhat flexible spacecraft, also useful in such terrestrial applications as controlling movable bridges or suppressing earthquake vibrations in bridges, buildings, and other large structures.

  18. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  19. Hunger States Control the Directions of Synaptic Plasticity via Switching Cell Type-Specific Subunits of NMDA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yong; Yang, Yunlei

    2015-09-23

    It remains largely unknown whether and how hunger states control activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). We here report that both LTP and LTD of excitatory synaptic strength within the appetite control circuits residing in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) behave in a manner of hunger states dependence and cell type specificity. For instance, we find that tetanic stimulation induces LTP at orexigenic agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons in ad libitum fed mice, whereas it induces LTD in food-deprived mice. In an opposite direction, the same induction protocol induces LTD at anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in fed mice but weak LTP in deprived mice. Mechanistically, we also find that food deprivation increases the expressions of NR2C/NR2D/NR3-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) at AgRP neurons that contribute to the inductions of LTD, whereas it decreases their expressions at POMC neurons. Collectively, our data reveal that hunger states control the directions of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity by switching NMDA receptor subpopulations in a cell type-specific manner, providing insights into NMDAR-mediated interactions between energy states and associative memory. Significance statement: Based on the experiments performed in this study, we demonstrate that activity-dependent synaptic plasticity is also under the control of energy states by regulating NMDAR subpopulations in a cell type-specific manner. We thus propose a reversible memory configuration constructed from energy states-dependent cell type-specific bidirectional conversions of LTP and LTD. Together with the distinct functional roles played by NMDAR signaling in the control of food intake and energy states, these findings reveal a new reciprocal interaction between energy states and associative memory, one that might serve as a target for therapeutic treatments of the energy-related memory disorders or vice versa.

  20. Structural Dynamics and Control of Large Space Structures, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brumfield, M. L. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Basic research in the control of large space structures is discussed. Active damping and control of flexible beams, active stabilization of flexible antenna feed towers, spacecraft docking, and robust pointing control of large space platform payloads are among the topics discussed.

  1. A Possible Role of Prolonged Whirling Episodes on Structural Plasticity of the Cortical Networks and Altered Vertigo Perception: The Cortex of Sufi Whirling Dervishes

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Yusuf O.; Ekinci, Gazanfer; Heinecke, Armin; Çavdar, Safiye

    2017-01-01

    Although minutes of a spinning episode may induce vertigo in the healthy human, as a result of a possible perceptional plasticity, Sufi Whirling Dervishes (SWDs) can spin continuously for an hour without a vertigo perception.This unique long term vestibular system stimulation presents a potential human model to clarify the cortical networks underlying the resistance against vertigo. This study, therefore, aimed to investigate the potential structural cortical plasticity in SWDs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 10 SWDs and 10 controls were obtained, using a 3T scanner. Cortical thickness in the whole cortex was calculated. Results demonstrated significantly thinner cortical areas for SWD subjects compared with the control group in the hubs of the default mode network (DMN), as well as in the motion perception and discrimination areas including the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), the right lingual gyrus and the left visual area 5 (V5)/middle temporal (MT) and the left fusiform gyrus. In conclusion, this is the first report that warrants the potential relationship of the motion/body perception related cortical networks and the prolonged term of whirling ability without vertigo or dizziness. PMID:28167905

  2. Parametric Stiffness Control of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, F. C.; Rand, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    An unconventional method for control of flexible space structures using feedback control of certain elements of the stiffness matrix is discussed. The advantage of using this method of configuration control is that it can be accomplished in practical structures by changing the initial stress state in the structure. The initial stress state can be controlled hydraulically or by cables. The method leads, however, to nonlinear control equations. In particular, a long slender truss structure under cable induced initial compression is examined. both analytical and numerical analyses are presented. Nonlinear analysis using center manifold theory and normal form theory is used to determine criteria on the nonlinear control gains for stable or unstable operation. The analysis is made possible by the use of the exact computer algebra system MACSYMA.

  3. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Grover, William H.; Skelley, Alison; Lagally, Eric; Liu, Chung N.

    2008-11-04

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  4. Assessment and control of structural damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, G. D.; Stubbs, N.; Yao, J. T. P.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to summarize and review several investigations on the assessment and control of structural damage in civil engineering. Specifically, the definition of structural damage is discussed. A candidate method for the evaluation of damage is then reviewed and demonstrated. Various ways of implementing passive and active control of civil engineering structures are next summarized. Finally, the possibility of applying expert systems is discussed.

  5. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathies, Richard A. (Inventor); Grover, William H. (Inventor); Skelley, Alison (Inventor); Lagally, Eric (Inventor); Liu, Chung N. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  6. Robust controls with structured perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, Leehyun

    1993-01-01

    This final report summarizes the recent results obtained by the principal investigator and his coworkers on the robust stability and control of systems containing parametric uncertainty. The starting point is a generalization of Kharitonov's theorem obtained in 1989, and its generalization to the multilinear case, the singling out of extremal stability subsets, and other ramifications now constitutes an extensive and coherent theory of robust parametric stability that is summarized in the results contained here.

  7. Experimental Robust Control of Structural Acoustic Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Clark, Robert L.; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    1998-01-01

    This work addresses the design and application of robust controllers for structural acoustic control. Both simulation and experimental results are presented. H(infinity) and mu-synthesis design methods were used to design feedback controllers which minimize power radiated from a panel while avoiding instability due to unmodeled dynamics. Specifically, high order structural modes which couple strongly to the actuator-sensor path were poorly modeled. This model error was analytically bounded with an uncertainty model, which allowed controllers to be designed without artificial limits on control effort. It is found that robust control methods provide the control designer with physically meaningful parameters with which to tune control designs and can be very useful in determining limits of performance. Experimental results also showed, however, poor robustness properties for control designs with ad-hoc uncertainty models. The importance of quantifying and bounding model errors is discussed.

  8. Advanced control evaluation for structures (ACES) programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Jerome; Waites, Henry

    1988-01-01

    The ACES programs are a series of past, present, and future activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Ground facility for Large Space Structure Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The main objectives of the ACES programs are to implement control techniques on a series of complex dynamical systems, to determine the control/structure interaction for the control techniques, and to provide a national facility in which dynamics and control verification can be effected. The focus is on these objectives and how they are implemented under various engineering and economic constraints. Future plans that will be effected in upcoming ACES programs are considered.

  9. Multiplicity Control in Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cribbie, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Researchers conducting structural equation modeling analyses rarely, if ever, control for the inflated probability of Type I errors when evaluating the statistical significance of multiple parameters in a model. In this study, the Type I error control, power and true model rates of famsilywise and false discovery rate controlling procedures were…

  10. Generation and control of acoustic cavitation structure.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lixin; Xu, Weilin; Deng, Jingjun; Li, Chao; Xu, Delong; Gao, Yandong

    2014-09-01

    The generation and control of acoustic cavitation structure are a prerequisite for application of cavitation in the field of ultrasonic sonochemistry and ultrasonic cleaning. The generation and control of several typical acoustic cavitation structures (conical bubble structure, smoker, acoustic Lichtenberg figure, tailing bubble structure, jet-induced bubble structures) in a 20-50 kHz ultrasonic field are investigated. Cavitation bubbles tend to move along the direction of pressure drop in the region in front of radiating surface, which are the premise and the foundation of some strong acoustic cavitation structure formation. The nuclei source of above-mentioned acoustic cavitation structures is analyzed. The relationship and mutual transformation of these acoustic cavitation structures are discussed.

  11. Transcriptional Control of Synaptic Plasticity by Transcription Factor NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Christian; Haenold, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factors is required for the induction of synaptic plasticity and memory formation. All components of this signaling pathway are localized at synapses, and transcriptionally active NF-κB dimers move to the nucleus to translate synaptic signals into altered gene expression. Neuron-specific inhibition results in altered connectivity of excitatory and inhibitory synapses and functionally in selective learning deficits. Recent research on transgenic mice with impaired or hyperactivated NF-κB gave important insights into plasticity-related target gene expression that is regulated by NF-κB. In this minireview, we update the available data on the role of this transcription factor for learning and memory formation and comment on cross-sectional activation of NF-κB in the aged and diseased brain that may directly or indirectly affect κB-dependent transcription of synaptic genes.

  12. Towards ultra-high ductility TRIP-assisted multiphase steels controlled by strain gradient plasticity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatami, M. K.; Pardoen, T.; Lacroix, G.; Berke, P.; Jacques, P. J.; Massart, T. J.

    2017-01-01

    TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) is a very effective mechanism to increase the strain hardening capacity of multiphase steels containing a fraction of metastable austenite, leading to both high strength and large uniform elongation. Excellent performances have been reached in the past 20 years, with recent renewed interest through the development of the 3rd generation of high strength steels often involving a TRIP effect. The microstructure and composition optimization is complex due to the interplay of coupled effects on the transformation kinetics and work hardening such as phase stability, size of retained austenite grains, temperature and loading path. In particular, recent studies have shown that the TRIP effect can only be quantitatively captured for realistic microstructures if strain gradient plasticity effects are taken into account, although direct experimental validation of this claim is missing. Here, an original computational averaging scheme is developed for predicting the elastoplastic response of TRIP aided multiphase steels based on a strain gradient plasticity model. The microstructure is represented by an aggregate of many elementary unit cells involving each a fraction of retained austenite with a specified stability. The model parameters, involving the transformation kinetics, are identified based on experimental tensile tests performed at different temperatures. The model is further assessed towards original experiments, involving temperature changes during deformation. A classical size independent plasticity model is shown unable to capture the TRIP effect on the mechanical response. Conversely, the strain gradient formulation properly predicts substantial variations of the strain hardening with deformation and temperature, hence of the uniform elongation in good agreement with the experiments. A parametric study is performed to get more insight on the effect of the material length scale as well as to determine optimum transformation

  13. Requirement for Plk2 in orchestrated ras and rap signaling, homeostatic structural plasticity, and memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kea Joo; Lee, Yeunkum; Rozeboom, Aaron; Lee, Ji-Yun; Udagawa, Noriko; Hoe, Hyang-Sook; Pak, Daniel T S

    2011-03-10

    Ras and Rap small GTPases are important for synaptic plasticity and memory. However, their roles in homeostatic plasticity are unknown. Here, we report that polo-like kinase 2 (Plk2), a homeostatic suppressor of overexcitation, governs the activity of Ras and Rap via coordination of their regulatory proteins. Plk2 directs elimination of Ras activator RasGRF1 and Rap inhibitor SPAR via phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. Conversely, Plk2 phosphorylation stimulates Ras inhibitor SynGAP and Rap activator PDZGEF1. These Ras/Rap regulators perform complementary functions to downregulate dendritic spines and AMPA receptors following elevated activity, and their collective regulation by Plk2 profoundly stimulates Rap and suppresses Ras. Furthermore, perturbation of Plk2 disrupts Ras and Rap signaling, prevents homeostatic shrinkage and loss of dendritic spines, and impairs proper memory formation. Our study demonstrates a critical role of Plk2 in the synchronized tuning of Ras and Rap and underscores the functional importance of this regulation in homeostatic synaptic plasticity.

  14. PDEMOD: Software for control/structures optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Zimmerman, David

    1991-01-01

    Because of the possibility of adverse interaction between the control system and the structural dynamics of large, flexible spacecraft, great care must be taken to ensure stability and system performance. Because of the high cost of insertion of mass into low earth orbit, it is prudent to optimize the roles of structure and control systems simultaneously. Because of the difficulty and the computational burden in modeling and analyzing the control structure system dynamics, the total problem is often split and treated iteratively. It would aid design if the control structure system dynamics could be represented in a single system of equations. With the use of the software PDEMOD (Partial Differential Equation Model), it is now possible to optimize structure and control systems simultaneously. The distributed parameter modeling approach enables embedding the control system dynamics into the same equations for the structural dynamics model. By doing this, the current difficulties involved in model order reduction are avoided. The NASA Mini-MAST truss is used an an example for studying integrated control structure design.

  15. Improved approximations for control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. L.; Schmit, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology for control-augmented structural synthesis is presented for structure-control systems which can be modeled as an assemblage of beam, truss, and nonstructural mass elements augmented by a noncollocated direct output feedback control system. Truss areas, beam cross sectional dimensions, nonstructural masses and rotary inertias, and controller position and velocity gains are treated simultaneously as design variables. The structural mass and a control-system performance index can be minimized simultaneously, with design constraints placed on static stresses and displacements, dynamic harmonic displacements and forces, structural frequencies, and closed-loop eigenvalues and damping ratios. Intermediate design-variable and response-quantity concepts are used to generate new approximations for displacements and actuator forces under harmonic dynamic loads and for system complex eigenvalues. This improves the overall efficiency of the procedure by reducing the number of complete analyses required for convergence. Numerical results which illustrate the effectiveness of the method are given.

  16. Parallel computations and control of adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alvin, Kenneth F.; Belvin, W. Keith; Chong, K. P. (Editor); Liu, S. C. (Editor); Li, J. C. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The equations of motion for structures with adaptive elements for vibration control are presented for parallel computations to be used as a software package for real-time control of flexible space structures. A brief introduction of the state-of-the-art parallel computational capability is also presented. Time marching strategies are developed for an effective use of massive parallel mapping, partitioning, and the necessary arithmetic operations. An example is offered for the simulation of control-structure interaction on a parallel computer and the impact of the approach presented for applications in other disciplines than aerospace industry is assessed.

  17. Design of Breakup Ice Control Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    ER D C/ CR R EL T R -0 6 -7 Design of Breakup Ice Control Structures Andrew M. Tuthill and James H. Lever March 2006 C ol d R eg...March 2006 Design of Breakup Ice Control Structures Andrew M. Tuthill and James H. Lever Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory U.S. Army...ice control structure (ICS) is to retain a breakup ice run upstream of a traditional ice jam problem area and thereby miti- gate ice-jam flooding

  18. Structure of aging Al-Li-Cu-Zr-Sc-Ag alloy after severe plastic deformation and long-term storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaigorodova, L. I.; Rasposienko, D. Yu.; Pushin, V. G.; Pilyugin, V. P.; Smirnov, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    Structural and phase transformations in commercial aging aluminum-lithium Al-1.2 Li-3.2 Cu-0.09 Zr-0.11 Sc-0.4 Ag-0.3 Mg alloy have been studied after severe plastic deformation by high-pressure torsion (at a pressure of 4 GPa with 1, 5, and 10 revolutions of the anvil) and natural aging (roomtemperature storage) for 1 week and 2 years. It has been found that, in this case, the process of static recrystallization is achieved in the alloy, the degree of which increases with an increasing degree of deformation and time of storage.

  19. Integrated controls-structures optimization of a large space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Walsh, Joanne L.; Sandridge, Chris A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for the simultaneous optimization of structural and control elements of a large space structure is developed and demonstrated for a test problem, the NASA COFS-I Mast Flight System. General-purpose control and structural-analysis codes are applied directly to a large detailed model, with realistic objective and constraint functions. The steps in the process (structural optimization, control optimization, and system coordination) are described and illustrated with diagrams; the numerical implementation (using different computers for different steps) is discussed; and results showing significant design improvements in three COFS-I configurations are presented in graphs. When the weights of both structure and power-generating equipment are taken into account, a 40-bay truss design is found to be better than designs with 42 or 44 bays.

  20. A slewing control experiment for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J.-N.; Horta, L. G.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    A hardware set-up has been developed to study slewing control for flexible structures including a steel beam and a solar panel. The linear optimal terminal control law is used to design active controllers which are implemented in an analog computer. The objective of this experiment is to demonstrate and verify the dynamics and optimal terminal control laws as applied to flexible structures for large angle maneuver. Actuation is provided by an electric motor while sensing is given by strain gages and angle potentiometer. Experimental measurements are compared with analytical predictions in terms of modal parameters of the system stability matrix and sufficient agreement is achieved to validate the theory.

  1. Plasticity of Attentional Functions in Older Adults after Non-Action Video Game Training: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mayas, Julia; Parmentier, Fabrice B. R.; Andrés, Pilar; Ballesteros, Soledad

    2014-01-01

    A major goal of recent research in aging has been to examine cognitive plasticity in older adults and its capacity to counteract cognitive decline. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether older adults could benefit from brain training with video games in a cross-modal oddball task designed to assess distraction and alertness. Twenty-seven healthy older adults participated in the study (15 in the experimental group, 12 in the control group. The experimental group received 20 1-hr video game training sessions using a commercially available brain-training package (Lumosity) involving problem solving, mental calculation, working memory and attention tasks. The control group did not practice this package and, instead, attended meetings with the other members of the study several times along the course of the study. Both groups were evaluated before and after the intervention using a cross-modal oddball task measuring alertness and distraction. The results showed a significant reduction of distraction and an increase of alertness in the experimental group and no variation in the control group. These results suggest neurocognitive plasticity in the old human brain as training enhanced cognitive performance on attentional functions. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02007616 PMID:24647551

  2. Controlling the Electronic Structure of Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Taisuke; Bostwick, Aaron; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2006-08-01

    We describe the synthesis of bilayer graphene thin films deposited on insulating silicon carbide and report the characterization of their electronic band structure using angle-resolved photoemission. By selectively adjusting the carrier concentration in each layer, changes in the Coulomb potential led to control of the gap between valence and conduction bands. This control over the band structure suggests the potential application of bilayer graphene to switching functions in atomic-scale electronic devices.

  3. A dynamic model of plant growth with interactions between development and functional mechanisms to study plant structural plasticity related to trophic competition

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, A.; Cournède, P. H.; Letort, V.; Barthélémy, D.; de Reffye, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The strong influence of environment and functioning on plant organogenesis has been well documented by botanists but is poorly reproduced in most functional–structural models. In this context, a model of interactions is proposed between plant organogenesis and plant functional mechanisms. Methods The GreenLab model derived from AMAP models was used. Organogenetic rules give the plant architecture, which defines an interconnected network of organs. The plant is considered as a collection of interacting ‘sinks’ that compete for the allocation of photosynthates coming from ‘sources’. A single variable characteristic of the balance between sources and sinks during plant growth controls different events in plant development, such as the number of branches or the fruit load. Key Results Variations in the environmental parameters related to light and density induce changes in plant morphogenesis. Architecture appears as the dynamic result of this balance, and plant plasticity expresses itself very simply at different levels: appearance of branches and reiteration, number of organs, fructification and adaptation of ecophysiological characteristics. Conclusions The modelling framework serves as a tool for theoretical botany to explore the emergence of specific morphological and architectural patterns and can help to understand plant phenotypic plasticity and its strategy in response to environmental changes. PMID:19297366

  4. Texture Control of Aluminum, Iron, and Magnesium Alloy Sheets to Increase Their Plastic Strain Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Nyung; Han, Heung Nam

    2011-08-01

    It is known that the limiting drawing ratio of sheet metals is proportional to their plastic strain ratios, and the plastic strain ratios of fcc and bcc metal sheets increase with increasing <111>//ND component in their textures. Conventional cold rolling and subsequent annealing of fcc metals cannot give rise to the <111>//ND component. Specifically, the cold rolling texture of polycrystalline fcc metals is characterized by the fiber connecting the {112}<111>, {123}<634>, and {011}<211> orientations in the Euler space, which is often called the β-fiber. The density of each component in the fiber depends on the stacking fault energy of metals. The {112}<111> and {123}<634> textured Al alloy sheets evolve the {001}<100> texture, when recrystallized. The low plastic strain ratios of the Al alloy sheets are attributed to the {001}<100> texture. The <111>//ND texture can be obtained in shear deformed fcc sheets. Bcc steels develop the <111>//ND texture when cold rolled and recrystallized. However, the density of <111>//ND depends on the content of dissolved interstitial elements such as carbon and nitrogen. The density of the <111>//ND component decreases with increasing concentration of the dissolved interstitial elements. For a given steel, the density of the <111>//ND component can vary with varying thermomechanical treatment. Magnesium alloy sheets are subjected to sheet forming processes at temperatures of 200 °C or higher because of their basal plane texture, or the <0002>//ND orientation. Many studies have been made to alleviate the component so that the magnesium alloy sheets can have better formability. In this article, the above issues are briefly reviewed and discussed.

  5. Plasticity of cerebellar Purkinje cells in behavioral training of body balance control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ray X.; Huang, Jian-Jia; Huang, Chiming; Tsai, Meng-Li; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Neural responses to sensory inputs caused by self-generated movements (reafference) and external passive stimulation (exafference) differ in various brain regions. The ability to differentiate such sensory information can lead to movement execution with better accuracy. However, how sensory responses are adjusted in regard to this distinguishability during motor learning is still poorly understood. The cerebellum has been hypothesized to analyze the functional significance of sensory information during motor learning, and is thought to be a key region of reafference computation in the vestibular system. In this study, we investigated Purkinje cell (PC) spike trains as cerebellar cortical output when rats learned to balance on a suspended dowel. Rats progressively reduced the amplitude of body swing and made fewer foot slips during a 5-min balancing task. Both PC simple (SSs; 17 of 26) and complex spikes (CSs; 7 of 12) were found to code initially on the angle of the heads with respect to a fixed reference. Using periods with comparable degrees of movement, we found that such SS coding of information in most PCs (10 of 17) decreased rapidly during balance learning. In response to unexpected perturbations and under anesthesia, SS coding capability of these PCs recovered. By plotting SS and CS firing frequencies over 15-s time windows in double-logarithmic plots, a negative correlation between SS and CS was found in awake, but not anesthetized, rats. PCs with prominent SS coding attenuation during motor learning showed weaker SS-CS correlation. Hence, we demonstrate that neural plasticity for filtering out sensory reafference from active motion occurs in the cerebellar cortex in rats during balance learning. SS-CS interaction may contribute to this rapid plasticity as a form of receptive field plasticity in the cerebellar cortex between two receptive maps of sensory inputs from the external world and of efference copies from the will center for volitional movements

  6. Structure-property relation in HPMC polymer films plasticized with Sorbitol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Y.; Somashekarappa, H.; Mahadevaiah, Somashekar, R.

    2013-06-01

    A correlation study on physical and mechanical properties of Hydroxy propyl-methylcellulose (HPMC) polymer films plasticized with different weight ratio of Sorbitol, prepared using solution casting method, was carried out using wide angle X-ray technique and universal testing machine. It is found that the crystallanity decreases as the concentration of Sorbitol increases up to a certain concentration and there afterwards increases. Measured Physical Properties like tensile strength decreases and elongation (%) increases indicating increase in the flexibility of the films. These observations confirm the correlation between microstructal parameters and mechanical properties of films. These films are suitable for packaging food products.

  7. Effect of synaptic plasticity on the structure and dynamics of disordered networks of coupled neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, M.; Valizadeh, A.

    2012-07-01

    In an all-to-all network of integrate-and-fire neurons in which there is a disorder in the intrinsic oscillatory frequencies of the neurons, we show that through spike-timing-dependent plasticity the synapses which have the high-frequency neurons as presynaptic tend to be potentiated while the links originated from the low-frequency neurons are weakened. The emergent effective flow of directed connections introduces the high-frequency neurons as the more influential elements in the network and facilitates synchronization by decreasing the synaptic cost for onset of synchronization.

  8. Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meric de Bellefon, G.; van Duysen, J. C.

    2016-07-01

    AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels were invented in the early 1900s and are still trusted by materials and mechanical engineers in numerous sectors because of their good combination of strength, ductility, and corrosion resistance, and thanks to decades of experience and data. This article is part of an effort focusing on tailoring the plasticity of both types of steels to nuclear applications. It provides a synthetic and comprehensive review of the plasticity mechanisms in austenitic steels during tensile tests below 400 °C. In particular, formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, as well as irradiation effects and grain rotation are discussed in details.

  9. Effect of Severe Plastic Deformation on Structure and Properties of Al-Sc-Ta and Al-Sc-Ti Alloys.

    PubMed

    Berezina, Alla; Monastyrska, Tetiana; Davydenko, Olexandr; Molebny, Oleh; Polishchuk, Sergey

    2017-12-01

    The comparative analysis of the effect of monotonous and non-monotonous severe plastic deformations (SPD) on the structure and properties of aluminum alloys has been carried out. Conventional hydrostatic extrusion (HE) with a constant deformation direction and equal-channel angular hydroextrusion (ECAH) with an abrupt change in the deformation direction were chosen for the cases of monotonous and non-monotonous SPD, respectively. Model cast hypoeutectic Al-0.3%Sc alloys and hypereutectic Al-0.6%Sc alloys with Ta and Ti additives were chosen for studying. It was demonstrated that SPD of the alloys resulted in the segregation of the material into active and inactive zones which formed a banded structure. The active zones were shown to be bands of localized plastic deformation. The distance between zones was found to be independent of the accumulated strain degree and was in the range of 0.6-1 μm. Dynamic recrystallization in the active zones was observed using TEM. The dynamic recrystallization was accompanied by the formation of disclinations, deformation bands, low-angle, and high-angle boundaries, i.e., rotational deformation modes developed. The dynamic recrystallization was more intense during the non-monotonous deformation as compared with the monotonous one, which was confirmed by the reduction of texture degree in the materials after ECAH.

  10. Dynamic rupture simulations on complex fault zone structures with off-fault plasticity using the ADER-DG method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollherr, Stephanie; Gabriel, Alice-Agnes; Igel, Heiner

    2015-04-01

    In dynamic rupture models, high stress concentrations at rupture fronts have to to be accommodated by off-fault inelastic processes such as plastic deformation. As presented in (Roten et al., 2014), incorporating plastic yielding can significantly reduce earlier predictions of ground motions in the Los Angeles Basin. Further, an inelastic response of materials surrounding a fault potentially has a strong impact on surface displacement and is therefore a key aspect in understanding the triggering of tsunamis through floor uplifting. We present an implementation of off-fault-plasticity and its verification for the software package SeisSol, an arbitrary high-order derivative discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method. The software recently reached multi-petaflop/s performance on some of the largest supercomputers worldwide and was a Gordon Bell prize finalist application in 2014 (Heinecke et al., 2014). For the nonelastic calculations we impose a Drucker-Prager yield criterion in shear stress with a viscous regularization following (Andrews, 2005). It permits the smooth relaxation of high stress concentrations induced in the dynamic rupture process. We verify the implementation by comparison to the SCEC/USGS Spontaneous Rupture Code Verification Benchmarks. The results of test problem TPV13 with a 60-degree dipping normal fault show that SeisSol is in good accordance with other codes. Additionally we aim to explore the numerical characteristics of the off-fault plasticity implementation by performing convergence tests for the 2D code. The ADER-DG method is especially suited for complex geometries by using unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Local adaptation of the mesh resolution enables a fine sampling of the cohesive zone on the fault while simultaneously satisfying the dispersion requirements of wave propagation away from the fault. In this context we will investigate the influence of off-fault-plasticity on geometrically complex fault zone structures like subduction

  11. Modeling and Control of Flexible Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-16

    amount of viscous damping then stabilizing control can be computed. Since viscous effects will not be present in space applications one is faced with a...which involve the correctors and the data of the problem. f, - 4.3 Homogenization and Stabilizing Control of Lat- - tice Structures In this subsection we

  12. Microbial Control of Structural Insect Pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three major pest groups affecting urban structures, ants, termites, and peridomestic cockroaches, are potentially the most amenable for the development of microbial controls. It is not only because of their economic importance, but their biology and ecology make them more susceptible to control by e...

  13. Gene control of synaptic plasticity and memory formation: implications for diseases and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Vaillend, C; Rampon, C; Davis, S; Laroche, S

    2002-11-01

    There has been nearly a century of interest in the idea that information is stored in the brain as changes in the efficacy of synaptic connections between neurons that are activated during learning. The discovery and detailed report of the phenomenon generally known as long-term potentiation opened a new chapter in the study of synaptic plasticity in the vertebrate brain, and this form of synaptic plasticity has now become the dominant model in the search for the cellular and molecular bases of learning and memory. Accumulating evidence suggests that the rapid activation of the genetic machinery is a key mechanism underlying the enduring modification of neural networks required for the laying down of memory. Here we briefly review these mechanisms and illustrate with a few examples of animal models of neurological disorders how new knowledge about these mechanisms can provide valuable insights into identifying the mechanisms that go awry when memory is deficient, and how, in turn, characterisation of the dysfunctional mechanisms offers prospects to design and evaluate molecular and biobehavioural strategies for therapeutic prevention and rescue.

  14. Plasticity of Decision-Making Abilities Among Maltreated Adolescents: Evidence From a Random Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Joshua A.; Leve, Leslie D.; Kim, Hyoun K.; Bhimji, Jabeene; Fisher, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood maltreatment has lasting negative effects throughout the lifespan. Early intervention research has demonstrated that these effects can be remediated through skill-based, family-centered interventions. However, less is known about plasticity during adolescence, and whether interventions are effective many years after children experience maltreatment. This study investigated this question by examining adolescent girls’ ability to make advantageous decisions in the face of risk using a validated decision-making task; performance on this task has been associated with key neural regions involved in affective processing and executive functioning. Maltreated foster girls (n = 92), randomly assigned at age 11 to either an intervention designed to prevent risk-taking behaviors or services as usual (SAU), and non-maltreated age and SES-matched girls living with their biological parent(s) (n = 80), completed a decision-making task (at age 15–17) that assessed risk-taking and sensitivity to expected value, an index of advantageous decision-making. Girls in the SAU condition demonstrated the greatest decision-making difficulties, primarily for risks to avoid losses. In the SAU group, frequency of neglect was related to greater difficulties in this area. Girls in the intervention condition with less neglect performed similarly to non-maltreated peers. This research suggests that early maltreatment may impact decision-making abilities into adolescence and that enriched environments during early adolescence provide a window of plasticity that may ameliorate these negative effects. PMID:25997770

  15. Chemical regulators of epithelial plasticity reveal a nuclear receptor pathway controlling myofibroblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Carthy, Jon M.; Stöter, Martin; Bellomo, Claudia; Vanlandewijck, Michael; Heldin, Angelos; Morén, Anita; Kardassis, Dimitris; Gahman, Timothy C.; Shiau, Andrew K.; Bickle, Marc; Zerial, Marino; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity in epithelial tissues relates to processes of embryonic development, tissue fibrosis and cancer progression. Pharmacological modulation of epithelial transitions during disease progression may thus be clinically useful. Using human keratinocytes and a robotic high-content imaging platform, we screened for chemical compounds that reverse transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In addition to TGF-β receptor kinase inhibitors, we identified small molecule epithelial plasticity modulators including a naturally occurring hydroxysterol agonist of the liver X receptors (LXRs), members of the nuclear receptor transcription factor family. Endogenous and synthetic LXR agonists tested in diverse cell models blocked α-smooth muscle actin expression, myofibroblast differentiation and function. Agonist-dependent LXR activity or LXR overexpression in the absence of ligand counteracted TGF-β-mediated myofibroblast terminal differentiation and collagen contraction. The protective effect of LXR agonists against TGF-β-induced pro-fibrotic activity raises the possibility that anti-lipidogenic therapy may be relevant in fibrotic disorders and advanced cancer. PMID:27430378

  16. UBE3A regulates synaptic plasticity and learning and memory by controlling SK2 channel endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiandong; Zhu, Guoqi; Liu, Yan; Standley, Steve; Ji, Angela; Tunuguntla, Rashmi; Wang, Yubin; Claus, Chad; Luo, Lyna; Baudry, Michel; Bi, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gated solely by activity-induced changes in intracellular calcium, small conductance potassium channels (SKs) are critical for a variety of functions in the CNS, from learning and memory to rhythmic activity and sleep. While there is a wealth of information on SK2 gating, kinetics and Ca2+ sensitivity, little is known regarding the regulation of SK2 subcellular localization. We report here that synaptic SK2 levels are regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase UBE3A, whose deficiency results in Angelman syndrome and over-expression in increased risk of autistic spectrum disorder. UBE3A directly ubiquitinates SK2 in the C-terminal domain, which facilitates endocytosis. In UBE3A-deficient mice, increased postsynaptic SK2 levels result in decreased NMDA receptor activation, thereby impairing hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. Impairments in both synaptic plasticity and fear conditioning memory in UBE3A-deficient mice are significantly ameliorated by blocking SK2. These results elucidate a mechanism by which UBE3A directly influences cognitive function. PMID:26166566

  17. Application of fiber-reinforced plastic rods as prestressing tendons in concrete structures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mattock, A.H.; Babaei, K.

    1989-08-01

    The study is concerned with the possibility of utilizing fiber-reinforced plastic rods as prestressing tendons, in place of traditional steel tendons, in elements of prestressed-concrete bridges exposed to corrosive environments. A survey was made of available information on the behavior characteristics of fiber-reinforced plastic tension elements and, in particular, those of glass-fiber-reinforced (GFR) tension elements. Also, an analytical study was made of the flexural behavior of concrete elements prestressed by GFR tendons. Based on the analytical study and on the survey of available information, an assessment is made of the impact on the design of prestressed-concrete members if GFR tendons are used. Some preliminary design recommendations are made, together with proposals for research needed before GFR prestressing tendons should be used in practice. Four GFR tendons with Con-Tech Systems anchorages were tested, the primary variable being the embedded length of the GFR rods in the anchorages. All the tendons failed by the rods pulling out of the anchorages. For embedded lengths of 15.2 in or greater, the failure loads were 90% of the advertised tendon strength of 220 ksi, or about 100% of the guaranteed tensile strength of 197 ksi (60 kN/rod).

  18. Identification and control of structures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, L.

    1985-01-01

    Work during the period January 1 to June 30, 1985 has concentrated on the completion of the derivation of the equations of motion for the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) as well on the development of a control scheme for the maneuvering of the spacecraft. The report consists of a paper presented at the Fifth Symposium on Dynamics and Control of Large Structures, June 12 to 14, 1985 at Blacksburg, VA.

  19. Ras and Rab interactor 1 controls neuronal plasticity by coordinating dendritic filopodial motility and AMPA receptor turnover

    PubMed Central

    Szíber, Zsófia; Liliom, Hanna; Morales, Carlos O. Oueslati; Ignácz, Attila; Rátkai, Anikó Erika; Ellwanger, Kornelia; Link, Gisela; Szűcs, Attila; Hausser, Angelika; Schlett, Katalin

    2017-01-01

    Ras and Rab interactor 1 (RIN1) is predominantly expressed in the nervous system. RIN1-knockout animals have deficits in latent inhibition and fear extinction in the amygdala, suggesting a critical role for RIN1 in preventing the persistence of unpleasant memories. At the molecular level, RIN1 signals through Rab5 GTPases that control endocytosis of cell-surface receptors and Abl nonreceptor tyrosine kinases that participate in actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Here we report that RIN1 controls the plasticity of cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. Our results show that RIN1 affects the morphology of dendritic protrusions and accelerates dendritic filopodial motility through an Abl kinase–dependent pathway. Lack of RIN1 results in enhanced mEPSC amplitudes, indicating an increase in surface AMPA receptor levels compared with wild-type neurons. We further provide evidence that the Rab5 GEF activity of RIN1 regulates surface GluA1 subunit endocytosis. Consequently loss of RIN1 blocks surface AMPA receptor down-regulation evoked by chemically induced long-term depression. Our findings indicate that RIN1 destabilizes synaptic connections and is a key player in postsynaptic AMPA receptor endocytosis, providing multiple ways of negatively regulating memory stabilization during neuronal plasticity. PMID:27852895

  20. Complex Coordination of Cell Plasticity by a PGC-1α-controlled Transcriptional Network in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kupr, Barbara; Handschin, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle cells exhibit an enormous plastic capacity in order to adapt to external stimuli. Even though our overall understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic changes in skeletal muscle cells remains poor, several factors involved in the regulation and coordination of relevant transcriptional programs have been identified in recent years. For example, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is a central regulatory nexus in the adaptation of muscle to endurance training. Intriguingly, PGC-1α integrates numerous signaling pathways and translates their activity into various transcriptional programs. This selectivity is in part controlled by differential expression of PGC-1α variants and post-translational modifications of the PGC-1α protein. PGC-1α-controlled activation of transcriptional networks subsequently enables a spatio-temporal specification and hence allows a complex coordination of changes in metabolic and contractile properties, protein synthesis and degradation rates and other features of trained muscle. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of PGC-1α-regulated skeletal muscle cell plasticity in health and disease.

  1. Integrated aerodynamic-structural-control wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, M.; Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Unger, E. R.

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic-structural-control design of a forward-swept composite wing for a high subsonic transport aircraft is considered. The structural analysis is based on a finite-element method. The aerodynamic calculations are based on a vortex-lattice method, and the control calculations are based on an output feedback control. The wing is designed for minimum weight subject to structural, performance/aerodynamic and control constraints. Efficient methods are used to calculate the control-deflection and control-effectiveness sensitivities which appear as second-order derivatives in the control constraint equations. To suppress the aeroelastic divergence of the forward-swept wing, and to reduce the gross weight of the design aircraft, two separate cases are studied: (1) combined application of aeroelastic tailoring and active controls; and (2) aeroelastic tailoring alone. The results of this study indicated that, for this particular example, aeroelastic tailoring is sufficient for suppressing the aeroelastic divergence, and the use of active controls was not necessary.

  2. Control theoretics for large structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The areas of research addressed include modeling identification for both the purposes of analysis and controls, design of structural control systems actuator sensor placement, and distributed sensing and actuation as opposed to co-located sensor and actuators. Also investigated are adaptive/learning processes that could more specifically be referred to as inflight testing procedures where a structure is tested during its deployment or assembly and during its orbital life at specific points where the characteristics of the structure for the purpose of tuning the control system are identified. Another area is redundancy management techniques for structural systems. This is important because of the reliability issue for managing multiple very large numbers of sensors and actuators.

  3. Structural Damage Detection Using Virtual Passive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun; Juang, Jer-Nan

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents novel approaches for structural damage detection which uses the virtual passive controllers attached to structures, where passive controllers are energy dissipative devices and thus guarantee the closed-loop stability. The use of the identified parameters of various closed-loop systems can solve the problem that reliable identified parameters, such as natural frequencies of the open-loop system may not provide enough information for damage detection. Only a small number of sensors are required for the proposed approaches. The identified natural frequencies, which are generally much less sensitive to noise and more reliable than the identified natural frequencies, are used for damage detection. Two damage detection techniques are presented. One technique is based on the structures with direct output feedback controllers while the other technique uses the second-order dynamic feedback controllers. A least-squares technique, which is based on the sensitivity of natural frequencies to damage variables, is used for accurately identifying the damage variables.

  4. Structure and microhardness of Al-Si-Cu-Ni alloy after severe plastic deformation and high-temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Karina; Khalikova, Gulnara; Korznikova, Elena; Trifonov, Vadim

    2015-10-01

    The effect of severe plastic deformation by high-pressure torsion (HPT) and subsequent annealing on the microstructure and microhardness of squeeze casting Al-22%Si-3%Cu-1.7%Ni alloy was investigated. HPT was performed at room temperature with 5 rotations under the pressure of 4 GPa. Annealing temperature range varied from 300 to 500°C for 5 min. HPT resulted in refinement and partial dissolution of the primary silicon and intermetallic particles in aluminum matrix and structure fragmentation that caused the microhardness increase. Subsequent annealing lead to the decomposition of the supersaturated solid solution that took place simultaneously with recovery and recrystallization of the fragmented structure. Increase of annealing temperature resulted in decrease of microhardness values.

  5. Structural plasticity of histones H3-H4 facilitates their allosteric exchange between RbAp48 and ASF1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Tyl, Marek; Ward, Richard; Sobott, Frank; Maman, Joseph; Murthy, Andal S.; Watson, Aleksandra A.; Fedorov, Oleg; Bowman, Andrew; Owen-Hughes, Tom; EL-Mkami, Hassane; Murzina, Natalia V.; Norman, David; Laue, Ernest D.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which histones are disassembled and reassembled into nucleosomes and chromatin structure during DNA replication, repair and transcription are poorly understood. A better understanding of the processes involved is, however, crucial if we are to understand whether and how histone variants and post-translationally modified histones are inherited in an epigenetic manner. To this end we have studied the interaction of histones H3–H4 with the human retinoblastoma-associated protein RbAp48 and their exchange with a second histone chaperone, anti-silencing function protein 1 (ASF1). Exchange of histones H3–H4 between these two histone chaperones plays a central role in the assembly of new nucleosomes and we show here that the H3–H4 complex has a surprising structural plasticity, which is important for this exchange. PMID:23178455

  6. When Music and Long-Term Memory Interact: Effects of Musical Expertise on Functional and Structural Plasticity in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Groussard, Mathilde; La Joie, Renaud; Rauchs, Géraldine; Landeau, Brigitte; Chételat, Gaël; Viader, Fausto; Desgranges, Béatrice; Eustache, Francis; Platel, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    The development of musical skills by musicians results in specific structural and functional modifications in the brain. Surprisingly, no functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study has investigated the impact of musical training on brain function during long-term memory retrieval, a faculty particularly important in music. Thus, using fMRI, we examined for the first time this process during a musical familiarity task (i.e., semantic memory for music). Musical expertise induced supplementary activations in the hippocampus, medial frontal gyrus, and superior temporal areas on both sides, suggesting a constant interaction between episodic and semantic memory during this task in musicians. In addition, a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) investigation was performed within these areas and revealed that gray matter density of the hippocampus was higher in musicians than in nonmusicians. Our data indicate that musical expertise critically modifies long-term memory processes and induces structural and functional plasticity in the hippocampus. PMID:20957158

  7. Structural plasticity of histones H3-H4 facilitates their allosteric exchange between RbAp48 and ASF1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Tyl, Marek; Ward, Richard; Sobott, Frank; Maman, Joseph; Murthy, Andal S; Watson, Aleksandra A; Fedorov, Oleg; Bowman, Andrew; Owen-Hughes, Tom; El Mkami, Hassane; Murzina, Natalia V; Norman, David G; Laue, Ernest D

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which histones are disassembled and reassembled into nucleosomes and chromatin structure during DNA replication, repair and transcription are poorly understood. A better understanding of the processes involved is, however, crucial if we are to understand whether and how histone variants and post-translationally modified histones are inherited in an epigenetic manner. To this end we have studied the interaction of the histone H3-H4 complex with the human retinoblastoma-associated protein RbAp48 and their exchange with a second histone chaperone, anti-silencing function protein 1 (ASF1). Exchange of histones H3-H4 between these two histone chaperones has a central role in the assembly of new nucleosomes, and we show here that the H3-H4 complex has an unexpected structural plasticity, which is important for this exchange.

  8. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  9. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed

    Deanin, R D

    1975-06-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products.

  10. Design, optimization, and control of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko

    The contributions of this dissertation may be divided into four categories. The first category involves developing a systematic form-finding method for general and symmetric tensegrity structures. As an extension of the available results, different shape constraints are incorporated in the problem. Methods for treatment of these constraints are considered and proposed. A systematic formulation of the form-finding problem for symmetric tensegrity structures is introduced, and it uses the symmetry to reduce both the number of equations and the number of variables in the problem. The equilibrium analysis of modular tensegrities exploits their peculiar symmetry. The tensegrity similarity transformation completes the contributions in the area of enabling tools for tensegrity form-finding. The second group of contributions develops the methods for optimal mass-to-stiffness-ratio design of tensegrity structures. This technique represents the state-of-the-art for the static design of tensegrity structures. It is an extension of the results available for the topology optimization of truss structures. Besides guaranteeing that the final design satisfies the tensegrity paradigm, the problem constrains the structure from different modes of failure, which makes it very general. The open-loop control of the shape of modular tensegrities is the third contribution of the dissertation. This analytical result offers a closed form solution for the control of the reconfiguration of modular structures. Applications range from the deployment and stowing of large-scale space structures to the locomotion-inducing control for biologically inspired structures. The control algorithm is applicable regardless of the size of the structures, and it represents a very general result for a large class of tensegrities. Controlled deployments of large-scale tensegrity plates and tensegrity towers are shown as examples that demonstrate the full potential of this reconfiguration strategy. The last

  11. Knowledge implementation - structures of intelligent control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saridis, G.N.

    1988-08-01

    Results of research concerning the definitions and structure of intelligent control systems are outlined. Intelligent control systems are founded on the principle of precision with decreasing intelligence. This principle establishes a hierarchy in the distribution of intelligence in an intelligent control system and simply says that where intelligence is high, precision is less required, and vice versa. The resulting multilevel structure and its implementation, based on ideas from knowledge systems, are presented. Probabilistic models to express the uncertainty of reasoning, planning decision making at the organization level, and the control activities at the execution level entropies are used as measures of the execution of various commands by the intelligent machine, and they serve for optimal decision making. This method provides an efficient approach to implement autonomous intelligent control systems suitable for the demanding needs of modern industry, space exploration, nuclear handling, and medicine. 19 references.

  12. Structural evaluation of a mimicry-recognizing paratope: plasticity in antigen-antibody interactions manifests in molecular mimicry.

    PubMed

    Tapryal, Suman; Gaur, Vineet; Kaur, Kanwal J; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2013-07-01

    Molecular mimicry manifests antagonistically with respect to the specificity of immune recognition. However, it often occurs because different Ags share surface topologies in terms of shape or chemical nature. It also occurs when a flexible paratope accommodates dissimilar Ags by adjusting structural features according to the antigenic epitopes or differential positioning in the Ag combining site. Toward deciphering the structural basis of molecular mimicry, mAb 2D10 was isolated from a maturing immune response elicited against methyl α-d-mannopyranoside and also bound equivalently to a dodecapeptide. The physicochemical evidence of this carbohydrate-peptide mimicry in the case of mAb 2D10 had been established earlier. These studies had strongly suggested direct involvement of a flexible paratope in the observed mimicry. Surprisingly, comparison of the Ag-free structure of single-chain variable fragment 2D10 with those bound to sugar and peptide Ags revealed a conformationally invariant state of the Ab while binding to chemically and structurally disparate Ags. This equivalent binding of the two dissimilar Ags was through mutually independent interactions, demonstrating functional equivalence in the absence of structural correlation. Thus, existence of a multispecific, mature Ab in the secondary immune response was evident, as was the plasticity in the interactions while accommodating topologically diverse Ags. Although our data highlight the structural basis of receptor multispecificity, they also illustrate mechanisms adopted by the immune system to neutralize the escape mutants generated during pathogenic insult.

  13. The TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 controls the onset of developmental plasticity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Tocchini, Cristina; Keusch, Jeremy J; Miller, Sarah B; Finger, Susanne; Gut, Heinz; Stadler, Michael B; Ciosk, Rafal

    2014-08-01

    The mechanisms controlling cell fate determination and reprogramming are fundamental for development. A profound reprogramming, allowing the production of pluripotent cells in early embryos, takes place during the oocyte-to-embryo transition. To understand how the oocyte reprogramming potential is controlled, we sought Caenorhabditis elegans mutants in which embryonic transcription is initiated precociously in germ cells. This screen identified LIN-41, a TRIM-NHL protein and a component of the somatic heterochronic pathway, as a temporal regulator of pluripotency in the germline. We found that LIN-41 is expressed in the cytoplasm of developing oocytes, which, in lin-41 mutants, acquire pluripotent characteristics of embryonic cells and form teratomas. To understand LIN-41 function in the germline, we conducted structure-function studies. In contrast to other TRIM-NHL proteins, we found that LIN-41 is unlikely to function as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Similar to other TRIM-NHL proteins, the somatic function of LIN-41 is thought to involve mRNA regulation. Surprisingly, we found that mutations predicted to disrupt the association of LIN-41 with mRNA, which otherwise compromise LIN-41 function in the heterochronic pathway in the soma, have only minor effects in the germline. Similarly, LIN-41-mediated repression of a key somatic mRNA target is dispensable for the germline function. Thus, LIN-41 appears to function in the germline and the soma via different molecular mechanisms. These studies provide the first insight into the mechanism inhibiting the onset of embryonic differentiation in developing oocytes, which is required to ensure a successful transition between generations.

  14. Plasticity and modular control of locomotor patterns in neurological disorders with motor deficits

    PubMed Central

    Ivanenko, Y. P.; Cappellini, G.; Solopova, I. A.; Grishin, A. A.; MacLellan, M. J.; Poppele, R. E.; Lacquaniti, F.

    2013-01-01

    Human locomotor movements exhibit considerable variability and are highly complex in terms of both neural activation and biomechanical output. The building blocks with which the central nervous system constructs these motor patterns can be preserved in patients with various sensory-motor disorders. In particular, several studies highlighted a modular burst-like organization of the muscle activity. Here we review and discuss this issue with a particular emphasis on the various examples of adaptation of locomotor patterns in patients (with large fiber neuropathy, amputees, stroke and spinal cord injury). The results highlight plasticity and different solutions to reorganize muscle patterns in both peripheral and central nervous system lesions. The findings are discussed in a general context of compensatory gait mechanisms, spatiotemporal architecture and modularity of the locomotor program. PMID:24032016

  15. The importance of material structure in the laser cutting of glass fiber reinforced plastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Caprino, G. . Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione); Tagliaferri, V. . Istituto di Ingegneria Meccanica); Covelli, L. )

    1995-01-01

    A previously proposed micromechanical formula, aiming to predict the vaporization energy Q[sub v] of composite materials as a function of fiber and matrix properties and fiber volume ratio, was assessed. The experimental data, obtained on glass fiber reinforced plastic panels with different fiber contents cut by a medium power CO[sub 2] cw laser, were treated according to a procedure previously suggested, in order to evaluate Q[sub v]. An excellent agreement was found between experimental and theoretical Q[sub v] values. Theory was then used to predict the response to laser cutting of a composite material with a fiber content varying along the thickness. The theoretical predictions indicated that, in this case, the interpretation of the experimental results may be misleading, bringing to errors in the evaluation of the material thermal properties, or in the prediction of the kerf depth. Some experimental data were obtained, confirming the theoretical findings.

  16. Mouse Social Network Dynamics and Community Structure are Associated with Plasticity-Related Brain Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Cait M.; Franks, Becca; Curley, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory studies of social behavior have typically focused on dyadic interactions occurring within a limited spatiotemporal context. However, this strategy prevents analyses of the dynamics of group social behavior and constrains identification of the biological pathways mediating individual differences in behavior. In the current study, we aimed to identify the spatiotemporal dynamics and hierarchical organization of a large social network of male mice. We also sought to determine if standard assays of social and exploratory behavior are predictive of social behavior in this social network and whether individual network position was associated with the mRNA expression of two plasticity-related genes, DNA methyltransferase 1 and 3a. Mice were observed to form a hierarchically organized social network and self-organized into two separate social network communities. Members of both communities exhibited distinct patterns of socio-spatial organization within the vivaria that was not limited to only agonistic interactions. We further established that exploratory and social behaviors in standard behavioral assays conducted prior to placing the mice into the large group was predictive of initial network position and behavior but were not associated with final social network position. Finally, we determined that social network position is associated with variation in mRNA levels of two neural plasticity genes, DNMT1 and DNMT3a, in the hippocampus but not the mPOA. This work demonstrates the importance of understanding the role of social context and complex social dynamics in determining the relationship between individual differences in social behavior and brain gene expression. PMID:27540359

  17. Mouse Social Network Dynamics and Community Structure are Associated with Plasticity-Related Brain Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Cait M; Franks, Becca; Curley, James P

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory studies of social behavior have typically focused on dyadic interactions occurring within a limited spatiotemporal context. However, this strategy prevents analyses of the dynamics of group social behavior and constrains identification of the biological pathways mediating individual differences in behavior. In the current study, we aimed to identify the spatiotemporal dynamics and hierarchical organization of a large social network of male mice. We also sought to determine if standard assays of social and exploratory behavior are predictive of social behavior in this social network and whether individual network position was associated with the mRNA expression of two plasticity-related genes, DNA methyltransferase 1 and 3a. Mice were observed to form a hierarchically organized social network and self-organized into two separate social network communities. Members of both communities exhibited distinct patterns of socio-spatial organization within the vivaria that was not limited to only agonistic interactions. We further established that exploratory and social behaviors in standard behavioral assays conducted prior to placing the mice into the large group was predictive of initial network position and behavior but were not associated with final social network position. Finally, we determined that social network position is associated with variation in mRNA levels of two neural plasticity genes, DNMT1 and DNMT3a, in the hippocampus but not the mPOA. This work demonstrates the importance of understanding the role of social context and complex social dynamics in determining the relationship between individual differences in social behavior and brain gene expression.

  18. Crystal Structure of the Nephila clavipes Major Ampullate Spidroin 1A N-terminal Domain Reveals Plasticity at the Dimer Interface.

    PubMed

    Atkison, James H; Parnham, Stuart; Marcotte, William R; Olsen, Shaun K

    2016-09-02

    Spider dragline silk is a natural polymer harboring unique physical and biochemical properties that make it an ideal biomaterial. Artificial silk production requires an understanding of the in vivo mechanisms spiders use to convert soluble proteins, called spidroins, into insoluble fibers. Controlled dimerization of the spidroin N-terminal domain (NTD) is crucial to this process. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Nephila clavipes major ampullate spidroin NTD dimer. Comparison of our N. clavipes NTD structure with previously determined Euprosthenops australis NTD structures reveals subtle conformational alterations that lead to differences in how the subunits are arranged at the dimer interface. We observe a subset of contacts that are specific to each ortholog, as well as a substantial increase in asymmetry in the interactions observed at the N. clavipes NTD dimer interface. These asymmetric interactions include novel intermolecular salt bridges that provide new insights into the mechanism of NTD dimerization. We also observe a unique intramolecular "handshake" interaction between two conserved acidic residues that our data suggest adds an additional layer of complexity to the pH-sensitive relay mechanism for NTD dimerization. The results of a panel of tryptophan fluorescence dimerization assays probing the importance of these interactions support our structural observations. Based on our findings, we propose that conformational selectivity and plasticity at the NTD dimer interface play a role in the pH-dependent transition of the NTD from monomer to stably associated dimer as the spidroin progresses through the silk extrusion duct.

  19. Generation of Electrospun Nanofibers with Controllable Degrees of Crimping through a Simple, Plasticizer-based Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenying; Lipner, Justin; Moran, Christine H.; Feng, Liangzhu; Li, Xiyu

    2015-01-01

    A method was developed for generating crimped features in uniaxially aligned electrospun nanofibers to mimic the anatomic structure of collagen fibrils in tendon tissues. We demonstrated that nanofibers comprised of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and its copolymers or blends would shrink to generate crimped features along the fiber axis when the sample was treated with ethanol. The degree of crimping could be readily controlled by pre-setting the extent of shrinkage allowed for the fibers. As indicated by results from both Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, the crimping was a result of the energy released from the residual stress contained in the electrospun nanofibers. Tensile testing indicates that the crimped nanofibers had a non-linear stiffening behavior with increasing strain, resembling the mechanical behavior of native tendon. In addition, the crimped nanofibers were able to provide better protection to the attached tendon fibroblasts under uniaxial strains when compared to their straight counterparts. Taken together, the crimped nanofibers present a promising new platform for tendon tissue engineering. PMID:25758008

  20. Low among-provenance differences in structural and functional plasticity in response to nutrients in saplings of the circum-Mediterranean tree Arbutus unedo L.

    PubMed

    Santiso, Xabier; Retuerto, Rubén

    2015-10-01

    The Mediterranean region is an area of special interest for conservation where the incidence of multiple drivers of global change is expected to increase. One of the factors predicted to change is soil-nutrient availability, an essential factor for plant growth. Thus, study of the effects of variation in this parameter is especially relevant in species with a circum-Mediterranean distribution, such as Arbutus unedo L., in which the different provenances grow in different habitats, which must differ in nutritional conditions. We aimed to determine the effect of provenance on plasticity, to establish whether structural and morphological traits differ in the level of plasticity and to assess how nutrients affect the photosynthetic light response. In a common garden experiment, we studied seven provenances from the circum-Mediterranean range of A. unedo and established two nutrient treatments (low and high nutrient availability). We measured physiological and structural traits in 1-year-old sapling and determined a phenotypic plasticity index (PPI) to quantify the level of plasticity, whereas the radiation effects were tested by construction and analysis of light response curves. Interestingly, provenance did not explain a significant amount of variance, but the plasticity was four times higher for the structural traits than for the physiological traits. Therefore, the plasticity to nutrient availability will not favour or prevent the expansion or contraction of the range of any of these provenances of A. unedo. Furthermore, the structural plasticity demonstrated the ability of the strawberry tree to optimize resource allocation, whereas the physiology remained stable, thus avoiding extra expenditure. The study findings also suggest that increased availability of nutrients would improve the performance of the species during the Mediterranean summer, characterized by high irradiance. These abilities will be key to the survival of saplings of the species under the future

  1. Reconciling species-level vs plastic responses of evergreen leaf structure to light gradients: shade leaves punch above their weight.

    PubMed

    Lusk, Christopher H; Onoda, Yusuke; Kooyman, Robert; Gutiérrez-Girón, Alba

    2010-04-01

    *When grown in a common light environment, the leaves of shade-tolerant evergreen trees have a larger leaf mass per unit area (LMA) than their light-demanding counterparts, associated with differences in lifespan. Yet plastic responses of LMA run counter to this pattern: shade leaves have smaller LMA than sun leaves, despite often living longer. *We measured LMA and cell wall content, and conducted punch and shear tests, on sun and shade leaves of 13 rainforest evergreens of differing shade tolerance, in order to understand adaptation vs plastic responses of leaf structure and biomechanics to shade. *Species shade tolerance and leaf mechanical properties correlated better with cell wall mass per unit area than with LMA. Growth light environment had less effect on leaf mechanics than on LMA: shade leaves had, on average, 40% lower LMA than sun leaves, but differences in work-to-shear, and especially force-to-punch, were smaller. This was associated with a slightly larger cell wall fraction in shade leaves. *The persistence of shade leaves might reflect unattractiveness to herbivores because they yield smaller benefits (cell contents per area) per unit fracture force than sun leaves. In forest trees, cell wall fraction and force-to-punch are more robust correlates of species light requirements than LMA.

  2. Structurally dissimilar antimanic agents modulate synaptic plasticity by regulating AMPA glutamate receptor subunit GluR1 synaptic expression.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Gray, Neil A; Falke, Cynthia; Yuan, Peixiong; Szabo, Steven; Manji, Husseini K

    2003-11-01

    A growing body of data from clinical and preclinical studies suggests that the glutamatergic system may represent a novel therapeutic target for severe recurrent mood disorders. Since synapse-specific glutamate receptor expression/localization is known to play critical roles in synaptic plasticity, we investigated the effects of mood stabilizers on AMPA receptor expression. Rats were treated chronically with lithium or valproate, hippocampal synaptosomes were isolated, and GluR1 levels were determined. Additionally, hippocampal neurons were prepared from E18 rat embryos and treated with lithium or valproate. Surface expression of GluR1 was determined using a biotinylation assay, and double-immunostaining with anti-GluR1 and anti-synaptotagmin antibodies was used to determine synaptic GluR1 levels. The AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 expression in hippocampal synaptosomes was significantly reduced by both chronic lithium and valproate. Overall, these studies show that AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 is a common target for two structurally highly dissimilar, but highly efficacious, mood stabilizers, lithium and valproate. These studies suggest that regulation of glutamatergically mediated synaptic plasticity may play a role in the treatment of mood disorders, and raise the possibility that agents more directly affecting synaptic GluR1 may represent novel therapies for this devastating illness.

  3. Plasticity in PYD assembly revealed by cryo-EM structure of the PYD filament of AIM2.

    PubMed

    Lu, Alvin; Li, Yang; Yin, Qian; Ruan, Jianbin; Yu, Xiong; Egelman, Edward; Wu, Hao

    Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is an essential cytosolic double-stranded DNA receptor that assembles with the adaptor, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), and caspase-1 to form the AIM2 inflammasome, which leads to proteolytic maturation of cytokines and pyroptotic cell death. AIM2 contains an N-terminal Pyrin domain (PYD) that interacts with ASC through PYD/PYD interactions and nucleates ASC(PYD) filament formation. To elucidate the molecular basis of AIM2-induced ASC(PYD) polymerization, we generated AIM2(PYD) filaments fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and determined its cryo-electron microscopic (cryo-EM) structure. The map showed distinct definition of helices, allowing fitting of the crystal structure. Surprisingly, the GFP-AIM2(PYD) filament is a 1-start helix with helical parameters distinct from those of the 3-start ASC(PYD) filament. However, despite the apparent symmetry difference, helical net and detailed interface analyses reveal minimal changes in subunit packing. GFP-AIM2(PYD) nucleated ASC(PYD) filament formation in comparable efficiency as untagged AIM2(PYD), suggesting assembly plasticity in both AIM2(PYD) and ASC(PYD). The DNA-binding domain of AIM2 is able to form AIM2/DNA filaments, within which the AIM2(PYD) is brought into proximity to template ASC(PYD) filament assembly. Because ASC is able to interact with many PYD-containing receptors for the formation of inflammasomes, the observed structural plasticity may be critically important for this versatility in the PYD/PYD interactions.

  4. Plasticity in PYD assembly revealed by cryo-EM structure of the PYD filament of AIM2

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Alvin; Li, Yang; Yin, Qian; Ruan, Jianbin; Yu, Xiong; Egelman, Edward; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is an essential cytosolic double-stranded DNA receptor that assembles with the adaptor, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), and caspase-1 to form the AIM2 inflammasome, which leads to proteolytic maturation of cytokines and pyroptotic cell death. AIM2 contains an N-terminal Pyrin domain (PYD) that interacts with ASC through PYD/PYD interactions and nucleates ASCPYD filament formation. To elucidate the molecular basis of AIM2-induced ASCPYD polymerization, we generated AIM2PYD filaments fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and determined its cryo-electron microscopic (cryo-EM) structure. The map showed distinct definition of helices, allowing fitting of the crystal structure. Surprisingly, the GFP-AIM2PYD filament is a 1-start helix with helical parameters distinct from those of the 3-start ASCPYD filament. However, despite the apparent symmetry difference, helical net and detailed interface analyses reveal minimal changes in subunit packing. GFP-AIM2PYD nucleated ASCPYD filament formation in comparable efficiency as untagged AIM2PYD, suggesting assembly plasticity in both AIM2PYD and ASCPYD. The DNA-binding domain of AIM2 is able to form AIM2/DNA filaments, within which the AIM2PYD is brought into proximity to template ASCPYD filament assembly. Because ASC is able to interact with many PYD-containing receptors for the formation of inflammasomes, the observed structural plasticity may be critically important for this versatility in the PYD/PYD interactions. PMID:26583071

  5. Compact Radiative Control Structures for Millimeter Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari D.; Chuss, David T.; Chervenak, James A.; Henry, Ross M.; Moseley, s. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested compact radiative control structures, including antireflection coatings and resonant absorbers, for millimeter through submillimeter wave astronomy. The antireflection coatings consist of micromachined single crystal silicon dielectric sub-wavelength honeycombs. The effective dielectric constant of the structures is set by the honeycomb cell geometry. The resonant absorbers consist of pieces of solid single crystal silicon substrate and thin phosphorus implanted regions whose sheet resistance is tailored to maximize absorption by the structure. We present an implantation model that can be used to predict the ion energy and dose required for obtaining a target implant layer sheet resistance. A neutral density filter, a hybrid of a silicon dielectric honeycomb with an implanted region, has also been fabricated with this basic approach. These radiative control structures are scalable and compatible for use large focal plane detector arrays.

  6. Optimization of structure and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khot, N. S.; Grandhi, Ramana V.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this study is the simultaneous design of the structural and control system for space structures. This study is focused on considering the effect of the number and the location of the actuators on the minimum weight of the structure, and the total work done by the actuators for specified constraints and disturbance. The controls approach used is the linear quadratic regulator theory with constant feedback. At the beginning collocated actuators and sensors are provided in all the elements. The actuator doing the least work is removed one at a time, and the structure is optimized for the specified constraints on the closed-loop eigenvalues and the damping parameters. The procedure of eliminating an actuator is continued until an acceptable design satisfying the constraints is obtained. The study draws some conclusions on the trade between the total work done by the actuators, and the optimum weight and the number of actuators.

  7. Plastic Jellyfish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Presents an environmental science activity designed to enhance students' awareness of the hazards of plastic waste for wildlife in aquatic environments. Discusses how students can take steps to reduce the effects of plastic waste. (WRM)

  8. Attempts to control clothes-borne infection in a burn unit, 3. An open-roofed plastic isolator or plastic aprons to prevent contact transfer of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Ransjö, U.

    1979-01-01

    An open-roofed plastic isolator was built in a single patient isolation room in a burn unit. It was designed to prevent contact contamination only, as this had been shown to be the important route of cross-colonization in the unit. To exclude any possible effect on airborne transfer of bacteria, the isolator was first examined by means of an airborne particle tracer of the same size as bacteria-carrying particles. Such experiments indicated that the isolator might prevent some transfer out of but not into the isolator. This was not confirmed in simulated nursing experiments nor in a patient study, where the air counts of bacteria were practically the same inside and outside the isolator wall. Two patients only were nursed in the isolator. Both patients acquired exogenous colonizations from other patients, one with Ps. aeruginosa and the other with S. aureus. Nursing in the isolator was difficult and staff-demanding. In simulated nursing experiments, plastic aprons and gauntlets as the only protective measures against contact contamination gave as much protection to a mock patient as did the isolator. S. aureus were released from nurses' clothes more easily during work with the isolator than in open nursing with aprons and gauntlets. In conclusion, the isolator did not seem to be a realistic alternative to impermeable clothes such as plastic aprons as a means of preventing clothes-borne cross-contamination between burn patients. Images Plate 2 Plate 1 PMID:109499

  9. How plastic can phenotypic plasticity be? The branching coral Stylophora pistillata as a model system.

    PubMed

    Shaish, Lee; Abelson, Avigdor; Rinkevich, Baruch

    2007-07-25

    Phenotypic plasticity enables multicellular organisms to adjust morphologies and various life history traits to variable environmental challenges. Here, we elucidate fixed and plastic architectural rules for colony astogeny in multiple types of colonial ramets, propagated by cutting from genets of the branching coral Stylophora pistillata from Eilat, the Red Sea. We examined 16 morphometric parameters on 136 one-year old S. pistillata colonies (of seven genotypes), originating from small fragments belonging, each, to one of three single-branch types (single tips, start-up, and advanced bifurcating tips) or to structural preparative manipulations (representing a single or two growth axes). Experiments were guided by the rationale that in colonial forms, complexity of evolving phenotypic plasticity can be associated with a degree of structural modularity, where shapes are approached by erecting iterative growth patterns at different levels of coral-colony organization. Analyses revealed plastic morphometric characters at branch level, and predetermined morphometric traits at colony level (only single trait exhibited plasticity under extreme manipulation state). Therefore, under the experimental manipulations of this study, phenotypic plasticity in S. pistillata appears to be related to branch level of organization, whereas colony traits are controlled by predetermined genetic architectural rules. Each level of organization undergoes its own mode of astogeny. However, depending on the original ramet structure, the spherical 3-D colonial architecture in this species is orchestrated and assembled by both developmental trajectories at the branch level, and traits at the colony level of organization. In nature, branching colonial forms are often subjected to harsh environmental conditions that cause fragmentation of colony into ramets of different sizes and structures. Developmental traits that are plastic, responding to fragment structure and are not predetermine in

  10. Control/structure interaction design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Layman, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The Control Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts (such as active structure) and new tools (such as a combined structure and control optimization algorithm) and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. The new CSI design methodology is centered around interdisciplinary engineers using new tools that closely integrate structures and controls. Verification is an important CSI theme and analysts will be closely integrated to the CSI Test Bed laboratory. Components, concepts, tools and algorithms will be developed and tested in the lab and in future Shuttle-based flight experiments. The design methodology is summarized in block diagrams depicting the evolution of a spacecraft design and descriptions of analytical capabilities used in the process. The multiyear JPL CSI implementation plan is described along with the essentials of several new tools. A distributed network of computation servers and workstations was designed that will provide a state-of-the-art development base for the CSI technologies.

  11. Active vibration control of civil structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.; Baker, W.; Fales, J.; Shevitz, D.

    1996-11-01

    This is a final report of a one year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Active vibration control (AVC) of structural and mechanical systems is one of the rapidly advancing areas of engineering research. The multifaceted nature of AVC covers many disciplines, such as sensors and instrumentation, numerical modeling, experimental mechanics, and advanced power systems. This work encompassed a review of the literature on active control of structures focusing both on active control hardware and on control algorithms, a design of an isolation systems using magneto-rheological fluid-filled (MRF) dampers and numerical simulations to study the enhanced vibration mitigation effects of this technology.

  12. Variable structure control of spacecraft reorientation maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sira-Ramirez, H.; Dwyer, T. A. W., III

    1986-01-01

    A Variable Structure Control (VSC) approach is presented for multi-axial spacecraft reorientation maneuvers. A nonlinear sliding surface is proposed which results in an asymptotically stable, ideal linear sliding motion of Cayley-Rodriques attitude parameters. By imposing a desired equivalent dynamics on the attitude parameters, the approach is devoid of optimal control considerations. The single axis case provides a design scheme for the multiple axes design problem. Illustrative examples are presented.

  13. Structural Dynamics and Control Interaction of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert S. (Editor); Scofield, Harold N. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A Workshop was held to promote technical exchange between the structural dynamic and control disciplines, foster joint technology, and provide a forum for discussing and focusing critical issues in the separate and combined areas. The workshop was closed by a panel meeting. Panel members' viewpoints and their responses to questions are included.

  14. On the structure and strength of ultrafine-grained copper produced by severe plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, V.Y. |; Birringer, R.; Gleiter, H.; Valiev, R.Z.

    1994-01-15

    In the last few years materials with ultrafine-grained (UFG) structures having grain size in the range of nanometers or submicrometers have attracted considerable attention of researchers in various areas. However, there are still many open questions concerning the structure of UFG materials, because direct structural studies are difficult in the case of very fine grains. The behavior of submicrometer-grained materials is similar in many aspects to that of nanostructured materials. Due to the coarser grains they are more suitable for structural investigation. This paper deals with the annealing temperature dependence of the structure and room-temperature yield stress of submicrometer-grained copper.

  15. Micro-structural Evolution in Metals Subjected to Simple Shear by a Particular Severe Plastic Deformation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinghui; Li, Fuguo; Li, Pan; Ma, Zhanchao; Wang, Chengpeng; Wang, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Simple shear (SS) has been considered an optimal deformation method of severe plastic deformation (SPD). To achieve SS, a particular SPD method known as mutative channel torsion extrusion (MCTE) was designed based on the geometric equivalence of SS, and the cavity parameters of a die were calculated according to strain equivalence. To investigate the characteristics of micro-structural evolution subjected to MCTE, simulated and experimental investigations were conducted. The simulated results indicate that equivalent strain distribution on the cross section is relatively uniform, and the metallographic observations confirm the simulated phenomenon. Transmission electron microscopy investigations show that the process of grain refinement undergoes the formation of shear bands, dislocation cells, dislocation forests, large-angle grain boundaries, and recrystallization nuclei. Two types of mechanisms are proposed in view of the different effects of SS on grain refinement. Eventually, MCTE is ensured as an effective method for grain refinement.

  16. New approach to the boundary-parallel plastic / viscous diapiric flow patterns in the curvilinear boundary zones: an implication for structural geology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil

    2010-05-01

    New approach to the boundary-parallel plastic / viscous diapiric flow patterns in the curvilinear boundary zones: an implication for structural geology studies Khalil Sarkarinejad and Abdolreza Partabian Department of Earth Sciences, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran (Sarkarinejad@geology.susc.ac.ir). In the oceanic diverging away plates, the asthenospheric flow at solidus high-temperature conditions typically produces mineral foliations and lineations in peridotites. Foliation and lineation of mantle are defined by preferred flattening and alignment of olivine, pyroxene and spinel. In the areas with steep foliations trajectories which are associated with the steeply plunging stretching lineation trajectories, reflecting localized vertical flow and has been related to mantle diapir. The mantle flow patterns are well documented through detail structural mapping of the Neyriz ophiolite along the Zagros inclined dextral transpression and Oman ophiolite. Such models of the diverging asthenaspheric mantle flow and formation of mantle diapir are rarely discussed and paid any attention in the mathematical models of transpressional deformation in converging continental crusts. Systematic measurements of the mineral preferred orientations and construction of the foliation and lineation trajectories of the Zagros high-strain zone reveal two diapers with the shape of the inclined NW-SE boundary-parallel semi-ellipses shape and one rotated asymmetric diapir. These diapers made of quartzo-feldspathic gneiss and garnet amphibolite core with phyllite, phyllonite, muscovite schist and deformed conglomerate as a cover sequences. These boundary-parallel and rotated diapirs are formed by the interaction of Afro-Arabian lower to middle continental detachment and hot subdacting Tethyan oceanic crust, due to increasing effective pressure and temperature. The plastic/viscous gneissic diapers were squeezed between in Zagros transpression curvilinear boundary zones in an

  17. Physics in Plastics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ken

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the increasing role of the physicist in plastics technology. Relationships of molecular structure to material behavior, design which is related to the material, and the practical problems of fabricating a material into an article are included. (HM)

  18. Synapse-Specific Control of Experience-Dependent Plasticity by Presynaptic NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Rylan S.; Smith, Ikuko T.; Miriyala, Jayalakshmi; Han, Ji Eun; Corlew, Rebekah J.; Smith, Spencer L.; Philpot, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Sensory experience orchestrates the development of cortical circuitry by adaptively modifying neuro-transmission and synaptic connectivity. However, the mechanisms underlying these experience-dependent modifications remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that visual experience suppresses a presynaptic NMDA receptor (preNMDAR)-mediated form of timing-dependent long-term depression (tLTD) at visual cortex layer (L) 4-2/3 synapses. This tLTD can be maintained during development, or reinstated in adulthood, by sensory deprivation. The changes in tLTD are mirrored by changes in glutamate release; visual deprivation enhances both tLTD and glutamate release. These effects require the GluN3A NMDAR subunit, the levels of which are increased by visual deprivation. Further, by coupling the pathway-specific optogenetic induction of tLTD with cell-type-specific NMDAR deletion, we find that visual experience modifies preNMDAR-mediated plasticity specifically at L4-L2/3 synapses. PMID:25144876

  19. Dendritic and Axonal Propagation Delays Determine Emergent Structures of Neuronal Networks with Plastic Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Madadi Asl, Mojtaba; Valizadeh, Alireza; Tass, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) modifies synaptic strengths based on the relative timing of pre- and postsynaptic spikes. The temporal order of spikes turned out to be crucial. We here take into account how propagation delays, composed of dendritic and axonal delay times, may affect the temporal order of spikes. In a minimal setting, characterized by neglecting dendritic and axonal propagation delays, STDP eliminates bidirectional connections between two coupled neurons and turns them into unidirectional connections. In this paper, however, we show that depending on the dendritic and axonal propagation delays, the temporal order of spikes at the synapses can be different from those in the cell bodies and, consequently, qualitatively different connectivity patterns emerge. In particular, we show that for a system of two coupled oscillatory neurons, bidirectional synapses can be preserved and potentiated. Intriguingly, this finding also translates to large networks of type-II phase oscillators and, hence, crucially impacts on the overall hierarchical connectivity patterns of oscillatory neuronal networks. PMID:28045109

  20. Basal tissue structure in the earliest euconodonts: Testing hypotheses of developmental plasticity in euconodont phylogeny

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dong, X.-P.; Donoghue, P.C.J.; Repetski, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    The hypothesis that conodonts are vertebrates rests solely on evidence of soft tissue anatomy. This has been corroborated by microstructural, topological and developmental evidence of homology between conodont and vertebrate hard tissues. However, these conclusions have been reached on the basis of evidence from highly derived euconodont taxa and the degree to which they are representative of plesiomorphic euconodonts remains an open question. Furthermore, the range of variation in tissue types comprising the euconodont basal body has been used to establish a hypothesis of developmental plasticity early in the phylogeny of the clade, and a model of diminishing potentiality in the evolution of development systems. The microstructural fabrics of the basal tissues of the earliest euconodonts (presumed to be the most plesiomorphic) are examined to test these two hypotheses. It is found that the range of microstructural variation observed hitherto was already apparent among plesiomorphic euconodonts. Thus, established histological data are representative of the most plesiomorphic euconodonts. However, although there is evidence of a range in microstructural fabrics, these are compatible with the dentine tissue system alone, and the degree of variation is compatible with that seen in clades of comparable diversity. ?? The Palaeontological Association.

  1. Dendritic and Axonal Propagation Delays Determine Emergent Structures of Neuronal Networks with Plastic Synapses.

    PubMed

    Madadi Asl, Mojtaba; Valizadeh, Alireza; Tass, Peter A

    2017-01-03

    Spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) modifies synaptic strengths based on the relative timing of pre- and postsynaptic spikes. The temporal order of spikes turned out to be crucial. We here take into account how propagation delays, composed of dendritic and axonal delay times, may affect the temporal order of spikes. In a minimal setting, characterized by neglecting dendritic and axonal propagation delays, STDP eliminates bidirectional connections between two coupled neurons and turns them into unidirectional connections. In this paper, however, we show that depending on the dendritic and axonal propagation delays, the temporal order of spikes at the synapses can be different from those in the cell bodies and, consequently, qualitatively different connectivity patterns emerge. In particular, we show that for a system of two coupled oscillatory neurons, bidirectional synapses can be preserved and potentiated. Intriguingly, this finding also translates to large networks of type-II phase oscillators and, hence, crucially impacts on the overall hierarchical connectivity patterns of oscillatory neuronal networks.

  2. Alternative binding proteins: anticalins - harnessing the structural plasticity of the lipocalin ligand pocket to engineer novel binding activities.

    PubMed

    Skerra, Arne

    2008-06-01

    Antibodies are the paradigm for binding proteins, with their hypervariable loop region supported by a structurally rigid framework, thus providing the vast repertoire of antigen-binding sites in the immune system. Lipocalins are another family of proteins that exhibit a binding site with high structural plasticity, which is composed of four peptide loops mounted on a stable beta-barrel scaffold. Using site-directed random mutagenesis and selection via phage display against prescribed molecular targets, it is possible to generate artificial lipocalins with novel ligand specificities, so-called anticalins. Anticalins have been successfully selected both against small hapten-like compounds and against large protein antigens and they usually possess high target affinity and specificity. Their structural analysis has yielded interesting insights into the phenomenon of molecular recognition. Compared with antibodies, they are much smaller, have a simpler molecular architecture (comprising just one polypeptide chain) and they do not require post-translational modification. In addition, anticalins exhibit robust biophysical properties and can easily be produced in microbial expression systems. As their structure-function relationships are well understood, rational engineering of additional features such as site-directed pegylation or fusion with functional effector domains, dimerization modules or even with another anticalin, can be readily achieved. Thus, anticalins offer many applications, not only as reagents for biochemical research but also as a new class of potential drugs for medical therapy.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF PLASTICALLY-INDUCED STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN A Zr-BASED BULK METALLIC GLASS USING POSITRON ANNIHILATION SPECTROCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, K M; Kanungo, B P; Glade, S C; Asoka-Kumar, P

    2005-09-16

    Flow in metallic glasses is associated with stress-induced cooperative rearrangements of small groups of atoms involving the surrounding free volume. Understanding the details of these rearrangements therefore requires knowledge of the amount and distribution of the free volume and how that distribution evolves with deformation. The present study employs positron annihilation spectroscopy to investigate the free volume change in Zr{sub 58.5}Cu{sub 15.6}Ni{sub 12.8}Al{sub 10.3}Nb{sub 2.8} bulk metallic glass after inhomogeneous plastic deformation by cold rolling and structural relaxation by annealing. Results indicate that the size distribution of open volume sites is at least bimodal. The size and concentration of the larger group, identified as flow defects, changes with processing. Following initial plastic deformation the size of the flow defects increases, consistent with the free volume theory for flow. Following more extensive deformation, however, the size distribution of the positron traps shifts, with much larger open volume sites forming at the expense of the flow defects. This suggests that a critical strain is required for flow defects to coalesce and form more stable nanovoids, which have been observed elsewhere by high resolution TEM. Although these results suggest the presence of three distinct open volume size groups, further analysis indicates that all groups have the same line shape parameter. This is in contrast to the distinctly different interactions observed in crystalline materials with multiple defect types. This similarity may be due to the disordered structure of the glass and positron affinity to particular atoms surrounding open-volume regions.

  4. Plasticity of surface structures and β2-adrenergic receptor localization in failing ventricular cardiomyocytes during recovery from heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Alexander R.; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Miragoli, Michele; Sikkel, Markus B.; Paur, Helen; Benard, Ludovic; Hulot, Jean-Sebastien; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Hajjar, Roger J.; Peters, Nicholas S.; Korchev, Yuri E.; Macleod, Ken T.; Harding, Sian E.; Gorelik, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiomyocyte surface morphology and T-tubular structure are significantly disrupted in chronic heart failure with important functional sequelae, including redistribution of sarcolemmal beta2adrenergic receptors (β2AR) and localized secondary messenger signaling. Plasticity of these changes in the reverse remodeled failing ventricle is unknown. We used AAV9.SERCA2a gene therapy to rescue failing rat hearts, and measured z-groove index, T-tubule density and compartmentalized β2AR-mediated cAMP signals using a combined nanoscale scanning ion conductance microscopy-Förster resonance energy transfer technique. Methods and Results Cardiomyocyte surface morphology, quantified by z-groove index and T-tubule density, was normalized in reverse remodeled hearts following SERCA2a gene therapy. Recovery of sarcolemmal microstructure correlated with functional β2AR redistribution back into the z-groove and T-tubular network, whereas minimal cAMP responses were initiated following local β2AR stimulation of crest membrane, as observed in failing cardiomyocytes. Improvement of β2AR localization was associated with recovery of βAR-stimulated contractile responses in rescued cardiomyocytes. Retubulation was associated with reduced spatial heterogeneity of electrically-stimulated calcium transients, and recovery of myocardial BIN-1 and TCAP protein expression, but not junctophilin-2. Conclusions In summary, abnormalities of sarcolemmal structure in heart failure show plasticity with reappearance of z-grooves and T-tubules in reverse remodeled hearts. Recovery of surface topology is necessary for normalization of β2AR location and signaling responses. PMID:22456061

  5. NF-KappaB in Long-Term Memory and Structural Plasticity in the Adult Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Kaltschmidt, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) is a well-known regulator of inflammation, stress, and immune responses as well as cell survival. In the nervous system, NF-κB is one of the crucial components in the molecular switch that converts short- to long-term memory—a process that requires de novo gene expression. Here, the researches published on NF-κB and downstream target genes in mammals will be reviewed, which are necessary for structural plasticity and long-term memory, both under normal and pathological conditions in the brain. Genetic evidence has revealed that NF-κB regulates neuroprotection, neuronal transmission, and long-term memory. In addition, after genetic ablation of all NF-κB subunits, a severe defect in hippocampal adult neurogenesis was observed during aging. Proliferation of neural precursors is increased; however, axon outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and tissue homeostasis of the dentate gyrus are hampered. In this process, the NF-κB target gene PKAcat and other downstream target genes such as Igf2 are critically involved. Therefore, NF-κB activity seems to be crucial in regulating structural plasticity and replenishment of granule cells within the hippocampus throughout the life. In addition to the function of NF-κB in neurons, we will discuss on a neuroinflammatory role of the transcription factor in glia. Finally, a model for NF-κB homeostasis on the molecular level is presented, in order to explain seemingly the contradictory, the friend or foe, role of NF-κB in the nervous system. PMID:26635522

  6. Structurally robust control of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, Jose C.; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Robust control theory has been successfully applied to numerous real-world problems using a small set of devices called controllers. However, the real systems represented by networks contain unreliable components and modern robust control engineering has not addressed the problem of structural changes on complex networks including scale-free topologies. Here, we introduce the concept of structurally robust control of complex networks and provide a concrete example using an algorithmic framework that is widely applied in engineering. The developed analytical tools, computer simulations, and real network analyses lead herein to the discovery that robust control can be achieved in scale-free networks with exactly the same order of controllers required in a standard nonrobust configuration by adjusting only the minimum degree. The presented methodology also addresses the probabilistic failure of links in real systems, such as neural synaptic unreliability in Caenorhabditis elegans, and suggests a new direction to pursue in studies of complex networks in which control theory has a role.

  7. Pneumatic system structure for circulation control aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss, Timothy A. (Inventor); Roman, Stephan (Inventor); Beurer, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A plenum for a circulation control rotor aircraft which surrounds the rotor drive shaft (18) and is so constructed that the top (32), outer (38) and bottom (36) walls through compressed air is admitted are fixed to aircraft structure and the inner wall (34) through which air passes to rotor blades (14) rotates with the drive shaft and rotor blades.

  8. High-resolution crystal structures reveal plasticity in the metal binding site of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease I.

    PubMed

    He, Hongzhen; Chen, Qiujia; Georgiadis, Millie M

    2014-10-21

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease I (APE1) is an essential base excision repair enzyme that catalyzes a Mg²⁺-dependent reaction in which the phosphodiester backbone is cleaved 5' of an abasic site in duplex DNA. This reaction has been proposed to involve either one or two metal ions bound to the active site. In the present study, we report crystal structures of Mg²⁺, Mn²⁺, and apo-APE1 determined at 1.4, 2.2, and 1.65 Å, respectively, representing two of the highest resolution structures yet reported for APE1. In our structures, a single well-ordered Mn²⁺ ion was observed coordinated by D70 and E96; the Mg²⁺ site exhibited disorder modeled as two closely positioned sites coordinated by D70 and E96 or E96 alone. Direct metal binding analysis of wild-type, D70A, and E96A APE1, as assessed by differential scanning fluorimetry, indicated a role for D70 and E96 in binding of Mg²⁺ or Mn²⁺ to APE1. Consistent with the disorder exhibited by Mg²⁺ bound to the active site, two different conformations of E96 were observed coordinated to Mg²⁺. A third conformation for E96 in the apo structure is similar to that observed in the APE1-DNA-Mg²⁺ complex structure. Thus, binding of Mg²⁺ in three different positions within the active site of APE1 in these crystal structures corresponds directly with three different conformations of E96. Taken together, our results are consistent with the initial capture of metal by D70 and E96 and repositioning of Mg²⁺ facilitated by the structural plasticity of E96 in the active site.

  9. Cardiac reflexes in a warming world: thermal plasticity of barostatic control and autonomic tones in a temperate fish.

    PubMed

    Sandblom, Erik; Ekström, Andreas; Brijs, Jeroen; Sundström, L Fredrik; Jutfelt, Fredrik; Clark, Timothy D; Adill, Anders; Aho, Teija; Gräns, Albin

    2016-09-15

    Thermal plasticity of cardiorespiratory function allows ectotherms like fish to cope with seasonal temperature changes and is critical for resilience to climate change. Yet, the chronic thermal effects on cardiovascular homeostatic reflexes in fish are little understood although this may have important implications for physiological performance and overall resilience to climate warming. We compared cardiac autonomic control and baroreflex regulation of heart rate in perch (Perca fluviatilis L.) from a reference area in the Baltic Sea at 18-19°C with conspecifics from the Biotest enclosure, a chronically heated ecosystem receiving warmed effluent water (24-25°C) from a nuclear power plant. Resting heart rate of Biotest fish displayed clear thermal compensation and was 58.3±2.3 beats min(-1) compared with 52.4±2.6 beats min(-1) in reference fish at their respective environmental temperatures (Q10=1.2). The thermally compensated heart rate of Biotest fish was a combined effect of elevated inhibitory cholinergic tone (105% in Biotest fish versus 70% in reference fish) and reduced intrinsic cardiac pacemaker rate. A barostatic response was evident in both groups, as pharmacologically induced increases and decreases in blood pressure resulted in atropine-sensitive bradycardia and tachycardia, respectively. Yet, the tachycardia in Biotest fish was significantly greater, presumably due to the larger scope for vagal release. Acclimation of Biotest fish to 18°C for 3 weeks abolished differences in intrinsic heart rate and autonomic tone, suggesting considerable short-term thermal plasticity of cardiovascular control in this species. The heightened hypotensive tachycardia in Biotest perch may represent an important mechanism of ectothermic vertebrates that safeguards tissue perfusion pressure when tissue oxygen demand is elevated by environmental warming.

  10. Progress on control experiments of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    1990-01-01

    Progress at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of control experiments for flexible structures is described. First the author presents the experimental results for a linear model which represents slewing maneuvers of a generic space station solar panel carried out to evaluate experimentally some control technologies. Then the status of the rotational/translational maneuvering experiment of a flexible steel panel carried by a translation cart is presented. Finally, experimental results of the NASA minimast testbed using velocity command stepper motors as reaction mass reactors are shown. All the test configurations are briefly described, including actuator and sensor, test setup, and test software. The status of some research activities oriented primarily to the experimental methods for control of flexible structures is presented.

  11. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  12. Structural Vibration Modeling and Validation. Modeling Uncertainty and Stochastic Control for Structural Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-30

    decade or so, there has been increasing interest in probabilistic, or stochastic, robust control theory . Monte Carlo simulations methods have been...AFRL-VS-PS- AFRL-VS-PS- TR-2005 -1174 TR-2005-1174 STRUCTURAL VIBRATION MODELING & VALIDATION Modeling Uncertainty and Stochastic Control ...for Structural Control Dr. Vít Babuška, Dr. Delano Carter, and Dr. Steven Lane 30 December 2005 Final Report

  13. Transcriptional control of muscle plasticity: differential regulation of troponin I genes by electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Calvo, S; Stauffer, J; Nakayama, M; Buonanno, A

    1996-01-01

    Plasticity of the skeletal muscle phenotype can result from the selective repression and activation of gene expression in response to innervation patterns. Motoneurons, eliciting different patterns of depolarization, regulate the contractile properties of the myofibers they innervate by selectively activating expression of genes encoding fiber-type-specific (fast vs. slow) contractile proteins. We have analyzed the regulation of the troponin I slow (TnIs) and fast (TnIf) genes as a model to study the molecular mechanisms regulating fiber-type plasticity. We found that expression of the two TnI isoforms is downregulated by denervation. Moreover, TnI expression is upregulated by specific patterns of electrical activity [10 Hz vs. 100 Hz] used to depolarize muscle. We previously isolated the rat TnIs gene and demonstrated that regulatory sequences reside in its upstream region and second intron [Banerjee-Basu S, Buonanno A (1993), Mol Cell Biol 12:5024-5032]. Using transgenic mice, we show that the upstream region of the TnIs gene extending from -949 to +50 is sufficient to confer transcription specifically in slowtwitch muscles. Serial deletions of the TnIs upstream and intronic regions were generated in a CAT reporter vector to delineate transcriptional regulatory elements in transiently transfected Sol8 myotubes. Sequences necessary to confer the highest levels of TnIs transcription mapped to the upstream region between -0.95 and -0.72 kb, and to a 56 bp sequence located in the second intron. Comparison of the at sequence between -0.95 and -0.72 to the human TnIs gene identified a highly homologous region of 128 bp that we named the TnI SURE (slow upstream regulatory element). Alignment of these two SURE sequences with the quail TnI fast intronic regulatory element identified common motifs, namely, two A/T-rich sequences (A/T1 and A/T2) with homology to homeotic protein and MEF2 binding sites, a CACC box, an E box, and a novel motif (GCAGGCA) that we denoted the

  14. Phosphorylation of synaptotagmin-1 controls a post-priming step in PKC-dependent presynaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Arthur P. H.; Meijer, Marieke; Saarloos, Ingrid; Cornelisse, Lennart Niels; Toonen, Ruud F. G.; Sørensen, Jakob B.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2016-01-01

    Presynaptic activation of the diacylglycerol (DAG)/protein kinase C (PKC) pathway is a central event in short-term synaptic plasticity. Two substrates, Munc13-1 and Munc18-1, are essential for DAG-induced potentiation of vesicle priming, but the role of most presynaptic PKC substrates is not understood. Here, we show that a mutation in synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1T112A), which prevents its PKC-dependent phosphorylation, abolishes DAG-induced potentiation of synaptic transmission in hippocampal neurons. This mutant also reduces potentiation of spontaneous release, but only if alternative Ca2+ sensors, Doc2A/B proteins, are absent. However, unlike mutations in Munc13-1 or Munc18-1 that prevent DAG-induced potentiation, the synaptotagmin-1 mutation does not affect paired-pulse facilitation. Furthermore, experiments to probe vesicle priming (recovery after train stimulation and dual application of hypertonic solutions) also reveal no abnormalities. Expression of synaptotagmin-2, which lacks a seven amino acid sequence that contains the phosphorylation site in synaptotagmin-1, or a synaptotagmin-1 variant with these seven residues removed (Syt1Δ109–116), supports normal DAG-induced potentiation. These data suggest that this seven residue sequence in synaptotagmin-1 situated in the linker between the transmembrane and C2A domains is inhibitory in the unphosphorylated state and becomes permissive of potentiation upon phosphorylation. We conclude that synaptotagmin-1 phosphorylation is an essential step in PKC-dependent potentiation of synaptic transmission, acting downstream of the two other essential DAG/PKC substrates, Munc13-1 and Munc18-1. PMID:27091977

  15. Phosphorylation of synaptotagmin-1 controls a post-priming step in PKC-dependent presynaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Arthur P H; Meijer, Marieke; Saarloos, Ingrid; Cornelisse, Lennart Niels; Toonen, Ruud F G; Sørensen, Jakob B; Verhage, Matthijs

    2016-05-03

    Presynaptic activation of the diacylglycerol (DAG)/protein kinase C (PKC) pathway is a central event in short-term synaptic plasticity. Two substrates, Munc13-1 and Munc18-1, are essential for DAG-induced potentiation of vesicle priming, but the role of most presynaptic PKC substrates is not understood. Here, we show that a mutation in synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1(T112A)), which prevents its PKC-dependent phosphorylation, abolishes DAG-induced potentiation of synaptic transmission in hippocampal neurons. This mutant also reduces potentiation of spontaneous release, but only if alternative Ca(2+) sensors, Doc2A/B proteins, are absent. However, unlike mutations in Munc13-1 or Munc18-1 that prevent DAG-induced potentiation, the synaptotagmin-1 mutation does not affect paired-pulse facilitation. Furthermore, experiments to probe vesicle priming (recovery after train stimulation and dual application of hypertonic solutions) also reveal no abnormalities. Expression of synaptotagmin-2, which lacks a seven amino acid sequence that contains the phosphorylation site in synaptotagmin-1, or a synaptotagmin-1 variant with these seven residues removed (Syt1(Δ109-116)), supports normal DAG-induced potentiation. These data suggest that this seven residue sequence in synaptotagmin-1 situated in the linker between the transmembrane and C2A domains is inhibitory in the unphosphorylated state and becomes permissive of potentiation upon phosphorylation. We conclude that synaptotagmin-1 phosphorylation is an essential step in PKC-dependent potentiation of synaptic transmission, acting downstream of the two other essential DAG/PKC substrates, Munc13-1 and Munc18-1.

  16. Taurine content in different brain structures during ageing: effect on hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Luz M; Muñoz, María-Dolores; Martín Del Río, Rafael; Solís, José M

    2016-05-01

    A reduction in taurine content accompanies the ageing process in many tissues. In fact, the decline of brain taurine levels has been associated with cognitive deficits whereas chronic administration of taurine seems to ameliorate age-related deficits such as memory acquisition and retention. In the present study, using rats of three age groups (young, adult and aged) we determined whether the content of taurine and other amino acids (glutamate, serine, glutamine, glycine, alanine and GABA) was altered during ageing in different brain areas (cerebellum, cortex and hippocampus) as well non-brain tissues (heart, kidney, liver and plasma). Moreover, using hippocampal slices we tested whether ageing affects synaptic function and plasticity. These parameters were also determined in aged rats fed with either taurine-devoid or taurine-supplemented diets. With age, we found heterogeneous changes in amino acid content depending on the amino acid type and the tissue. In the case of taurine, its content was reduced in the cerebellum of adult and aged rats, but it remained unchanged in the hippocampus, cortex, heart and liver. The synaptic response amplitude decreased in aged rats, although the late phase of long-term synaptic potentiation (late-LTP), a taurine-dependent process, was not altered. Our study highlights the stability of taurine content in the hippocampus during ageing regardless of whether taurine was present in the diet, which is consistent with the lack of changes detected in late-LTP. These results indicate that the beneficial effects of taurine supplementation might be independent of the replenishment of taurine stores.

  17. Structural control of reaction-diffusion networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Qi; Du, Fang; Dong, Hui; Yu, Li; Chen, Guanrong

    2011-09-01

    Recent studies revealed that reaction-diffusion (RD) dynamics can be significantly influenced by the structure of the underlying network. In this paper, a framework is established to study a closely related problem, i.e., to control the proportion of active particles in an RD process by adjusting the structure of the underlying diffusion network. Both distributed and centralized rewiring and reweighting control schemes are proposed for unweighted and weighted networks, respectively. Simulations show that the proportion of active particles can indeed be controlled to a certain extent even when the distributed control mechanism is totally random, while quite high precision can be achieved by centralized control schemes. More interestingly, it is found that the reactants in heterogeneous networks have wider controllable ranges than those in homogeneous networks with similar numbers of nodes and links, if only the weights of links are changed with a fixed bound. Therefore, it is believed that heterogeneous networks fit the changeable environment better, which provides another explanation for some common observations on many heterogeneous real-world networks.

  18. Dynamic and structural control utilizing smart materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of several novel 'smart material' structural control concepts that are currently under development. The thrust of these investigations is the evolution of intelligent materials and structures superceding the recently defined variable-geometry trusses and shape memory alloy-reinforced composites; the substances envisioned will be able to autonomously evaluate emergent environmental conditions and adapt to them, and even change their operational objectives. While until now the primary objective of the developmental efforts presently discussed has been materials that mimic biological functions, entirely novel concepts may be formulated in due course.

  19. Conformational Plasticity and Structure/Function Relationships in Cytochromes P450

    PubMed Central

    Kazanis, Sophia; Dang, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The cytochrome P450s are a superfamily of enzymes that are found in all kingdoms of living organisms, and typically catalyze the oxidative addition of atomic oxygen to an unactivated C-C or C-H bond. Over 8000 nonredundant sequences of putative and confirmed P450 enzymes have been identified, but three-dimensional structures have been determined for only a small fraction of these. While all P450 enzymes for which structures have been determined share a common global fold, the flexibility and modularity of structure around the active site account for the ability of P450 enzymes to accommodate a vast number of structurally dissimilar substrates and support a wide range of selective oxidations. In this review, known P450 structures are compared, and some structural criteria for prediction of substrate selectivity and reaction type are suggested. The importance of dynamic processes such as redox-dependent and effector-induced conformational changes in determining catalytic competence and regio- and stereoselectivity is discussed, and noncrystallographic methods for characterizing P450 structures and dynamics, in particular, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 1273–1296. PMID:20446763

  20. Control/structure interaction conceptual design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1990-01-01

    The JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program is developing new analytical methods for designing micro-precision spacecraft with controlled structures. One of these, the Conceptual Design Tool, will illustrate innovative new approaches to the integration of multi-disciplinary analysis and design methods. The tool will be used to demonstrate homogeneity of presentation, uniform data representation across analytical methods, and integrated systems modeling. The tool differs from current 'integrated systems' that support design teams most notably in its support for the new CSI multi-disciplinary engineer. The design tool will utilize a three dimensional solid model of the spacecraft under design as the central data organization metaphor. Various analytical methods, such as finite element structural analysis, control system analysis, and mechanical configuration layout, will store and retrieve data from a hierarchical, object oriented data structure that supports assemblies of components with associated data and algorithms. In addition to managing numerical model data, the tool will assist the designer in organizing, stating, and tracking system requirements.

  1. Controlling Proton Delivery through Catalyst Structural Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Allan Jay P; Ginovska, Bojana; Kumar, Neeraj; Hou, Jianbo; Raugei, Simone; Helm, Monte L; Appel, Aaron M; Bullock, R Morris; O'Hagan, Molly

    2016-10-17

    The fastest synthetic molecular catalysts for H2 production and oxidation emulate components of the active site of hydrogenases. The critical role of controlled structural dynamics is recognized for many enzymes, including hydrogenases, but is largely neglected in designing synthetic catalysts. Our results demonstrate the impact of controlling structural dynamics on H2 production rates for [Ni(P(Ph)2 N(C6H4R)2 )2 ](2+) catalysts (R=n-hexyl, n-decyl, n-tetradecyl, n-octadecyl, phenyl, or cyclohexyl). The turnover frequencies correlate inversely with the rates of chair-boat ring inversion of the ligand, since this dynamic process governs protonation at either catalytically productive or non-productive sites. These results demonstrate that the dynamic processes involved in proton delivery can be controlled through modification of the outer coordination sphere, in a manner similar to the role of the protein architecture in many enzymes. As a design parameter, controlling structural dynamics can increase H2 production rates by three orders of magnitude with a minimal increase in overpotential.

  2. Piezoelectric control of structures prone to instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunjung

    Thin-walled structures such as stiffened panels fabricated out of high strength materials are ubiquitous in aerospace structures. These are prone to buckle in a variety of modes with strong possibility of adverse interaction under axial compression and/or bending. Optimally designed stiffened panels, at an appropriate combination of axial compression and suddenly applied lateral pressure undergo large amplitude oscillations and may experience divergence. Under aerodynamic loading, they can experience flutter instability with the amplitudes of oscillations attaining a limit (LCO) or escalating without any limit. Control of structures prone to these forms of instability using piezo-electric actuators is the theme of this dissertation. Issues involved in the control of stiffened panels under axial compression and liable to buckle simultaneously in local and overall modes are studied. The analytical approach employs finite elements in which are embedded periodic components of local buckling including the second order effects. It is shown that the adverse effects of mode interaction can be counteracted by simply controlling the overall bending of the stiffener by piezo-electric actuators attached its tips. Control is exercised by self-sensing actuators by direct negative feedback voltages proportional to the bending strains of the stiffener. In a dynamic loading environment, where vibrations are triggered by suddenly applied lateral pressure, negative velocity feedback is employed with voltages proportional to the bending strain-rate. The local plate oscillations are effectively controlled by a piezo-electric actuators placed along the longitudinal center line of the panel. The problem of flutter under aerodynamic pressure of stiffened panels in the linear and post-critical regimes is studied using modal analysis and finite strips. The analysis, control and interpretation of the response are facilitated by identification of two families of characteristic modes of

  3. Modeling of Inelastic Behavior of Structures Using Plastic and Metal Laminates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    One notes from Figure 5 that locating the concentrated reinforcement at y = d/4 appears to provide the best overall representation of the elastoplastic ...modeling into the inelastic range currently exists. The basic criteria to be satisfied when modeling an isotropic metallic structure elastoplastically ...model a mild steel parent material. This composite material was then shown to satisfy the basic criteria needed to elastoplastically model a structure

  4. Interactions between mitochondria and the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) regulate neuronal structural and functional plasticity and metaplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Brusco, Janaina; Haas, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    The classical view of mitochondria as housekeeping organelles acting in the background to simply maintain cellular energy demands has been challenged by mounting evidence of their direct and active participation in synaptic plasticity in neurons. Time-lapse imaging has revealed that mitochondria are motile in dendrites, with their localization and fusion and fission events regulated by synaptic activity. The positioning of mitochondria directly influences function of nearby synapses through multiple pathways including control over local concentrations of ATP, Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species. Recent studies have also shown that mitochondrial protein cascades, classically associated with apoptosis, are involved in neural plasticity in healthy cells. These findings link mitochondria to the plasticity- and metaplasticity-associated activity-dependent transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), further repositioning mitochondria as potential command centres for regulation of synaptic plasticity. Intriguingly, MEF2 and mitochondrial functions appear to be intricately intertwined, as MEF2 is a target of mitochondrial apoptotic caspases and, in turn, MEF2 regulates mitochondrial genome transcription essential for production of superoxidase and hydrogen peroxidase. Here, we review evidence supporting mitochondria as central organelles controlling the spatiotemporal expression of neuronal plasticity, and attempt to disentangle the MEF2–mitochondria relationship mediating these functions. PMID:25581818

  5. Excitatory synaptic activity is associated with a rapid structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Lushnikova, Irina; Skibo, Galina; Muller, Dominique; Nikonenko, Irina

    2011-04-01

    Synaptic activity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP), has been shown to induce morphological plasticity of excitatory synapses on dendritic spines through the spine head and postsynaptic density (PSD) enlargement and reorganization. Much less, however, is known about activity-induced morphological modifications of inhibitory synapses. Using an in vitro model of rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and electron microscopy, we studied activity-related morphological changes of somatic inhibitory inputs triggered by a brief oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) episode, a condition associated with a synaptic enhancement referred to as anoxic LTP and a structural remodeling of excitatory synapses. Three-dimensional reconstruction of inhibitory axo-somatic synapses at different times before and after brief OGD revealed important morphological changes. The PSD area significantly and markedly increased at synapses with large and complex PSDs, but not at synapses with simple, macular PSDs. Activity-related changes of PSD size and presynaptic bouton volume developed in a strongly correlated manner. Analyses of single and serial sections further showed that the density of inhibitory synaptic contacts on the cell soma did not change within 1 h after OGD. In contrast, the proportion of the cell surface covered with inhibitory PSDs, as well as the complexity of these PSDs significantly increased, with less macular PSDs and more complex, segmented shapes. Together, these data reveal a rapid activity-related restructuring of somatic inhibitory synapses characterized by an enlargement and increased complexity of inhibitory PSDs, providing a new mechanism for a quick adjustment of the excitatory-inhibitory balance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Synaptic Plasticity & Interneurons'.

  6. Structural dynamics and control of large space structures. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightner, E. B. (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was the basic research program assembled by LaRC to address the fundamental technology deficiencies that were identified in several studies on large space systems (LSS) conducted by NASA in the last several years. The staffs of the respective participants were assembled at the workshop to review the current state of research in the control technology for large structural systems and to plan the efforts that would be pursued by their respective organizations.

  7. [Effect of controlled release fertilizer on nitrous oxide emission from paddy field under plastic film mulching cultivation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Lü, Shi-Hua; Ma, Jing; Xu, Hua; Yuan, Jiang; Dong, Yu-Jiao

    2014-03-01

    A field experiment was conducted to assess the effect of controlled release fertilizer on N2O emission in paddy field under plastic film mulching cultivation (PM) with water-saving irrigation. Results showed that in the rice growing season, cumulative N2O emissions from the plots applied with urea (PM+U) and with controlled release fertilizer (PM+CRF) were (38.2 +/- 4.4) and (21.5 +/- 5.2) mg N x m(-2), respectively. The N2O emission factors were 0.25% and 0.14% in the treatments PM+U and PM+CRF, respectively. The controlled release fertilizer decreased the total N2O emission by 43.6% compared with urea, of which 49.6% was reduced before the drying period. It also reduced the peak of N2O emission by 52.6%. However, it did not affect soil microbial biomass N and soil NH(4+)-N content at any rice growing stage, and grain yield either. No significant correlation was observed between N2O flux and soil Eh or soil temperature at the depth of 5 cm.

  8. Neuromodulation and Synaptic Plasticity for the Control of Fast Periodic Movement: Energy Efficiency in Coupled Compliant Joints via PCA

    PubMed Central

    Stratmann, Philipp; Lakatos, Dominic; Albu-Schäffer, Alin

    2016-01-01

    There are multiple indications that the nervous system of animals tunes muscle output to exploit natural dynamics of the elastic locomotor system and the environment. This is an advantageous strategy especially in fast periodic movements, since the elastic elements store energy and increase energy efficiency and movement speed. Experimental evidence suggests that coordination among joints involves proprioceptive input and neuromodulatory influence originating in the brain stem. However, the neural strategies underlying the coordination of fast periodic movements remain poorly understood. Based on robotics control theory, we suggest that the nervous system implements a mechanism to accomplish coordination between joints by a linear coordinate transformation from the multi-dimensional space representing proprioceptive input at the joint level into a one-dimensional controller space. In this one-dimensional subspace, the movements of a whole limb can be driven by a single oscillating unit as simple as a reflex interneuron. The output of the oscillating unit is transformed back to joint space via the same transformation. The transformation weights correspond to the dominant principal component of the movement. In this study, we propose a biologically plausible neural network to exemplify that the central nervous system (CNS) may encode our controller design. Using theoretical considerations and computer simulations, we demonstrate that spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) for the input mapping and serotonergic neuromodulation for the output mapping can extract the dominant principal component of sensory signals. Our simulations show that our network can reliably control mechanical systems of different complexity and increase the energy efficiency of ongoing cyclic movements. The proposed network is simple and consistent with previous biologic experiments. Thus, our controller could serve as a candidate to describe the neural control of fast, energy

  9. Structure and conformational plasticity of the U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein core.

    PubMed

    Montemayor, Eric J; Didychuk, Allison L; Liao, Honghong; Hu, Panzhou; Brow, David A; Butcher, Samuel E

    2017-01-01

    U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is a key component of the active site of the spliceosome, a large ribonucleoprotein complex that catalyzes the splicing of precursor messenger RNA. Prior to its incorporation into the spliceosome, U6 is bound by the protein Prp24, which facilitates unwinding of the U6 internal stem-loop (ISL) so that it can pair with U4 snRNA. A previously reported crystal structure of the `core' of the U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) contained an ISL-stabilized A62G mutant of U6 bound to all four RNA-recognition motif (RRM) domains of Prp24 [Montemayor et al. (2014), Nature Struct. Mol. Biol. 21, 544-551]. The structure revealed a novel topology containing interlocked rings of protein and RNA that was not predicted by prior biochemical and genetic data. Here, the crystal structure of the U6 snRNP core with a wild-type ISL is reported. This complex crystallized in a new space group, apparently owing in part to the presence of an intramolecular cross-link in RRM1 that was not observed in the previously reported U6-A62G structure. The structure exhibits the same protein-RNA interface and maintains the unique interlocked topology. However, the orientation of the wild-type ISL is altered relative to the A62G mutant structure, suggesting inherent structural dynamics that may facilitate its pairing with U4. Consistent with their similar architectures in the crystalline state, the wild-type and A62G variants of U6 exhibit similar Prp24-binding affinities and electrophoretic mobilities when analyzed by gel-shift assay.

  10. Evaluation of three types of structured floating plastic media in moving bed biofilters for total ammonia nitrogen removal in a low salinity hatchery recirculating aquaculture system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three different commercially available structural plastic media were evaluated in triplicate in moving bed toriod filters under low salinity (11-12 ppt) warm water culture conditions and two different feed loading rates. The culture system consisted of nine separate modules that include a double dra...

  11. Digital control system for space structural dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Digital control systems for space structural dampers, also referred to as inertia or proof-mass dampers are investigated. A damper concept is improved by adding a small taper to the proof-mass, and using a proximeter to determine position. Another damper using a three inch stroke rather than the standard one inch stroke is described. Provisions are made for a relative velocity feedback. In one approach, the digital controller is modified to accept the signal from a linear velocity transducer. In the other, the velocity feedback is included in the digital program. An overall system concept for the use of the dampers is presented.

  12. A QSPR for the plasticization efficiency of polyvinylchloride plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Chandola, Mridula; Marathe, Sujata

    2008-01-01

    A simple quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) for correlating the plasticization efficiency of 25 polyvinylchloride (PVC) plasticizers was obtained using molecular modeling. The plasticizers studied were-aromatic esters (phthalate, terephthalate, benzoate, trimellitate), aliphatic esters (adipate, sebacate, azelate), citrates and a phosphate. The low temperature flex point, Tf, of plasticized polyvinylchloride resins was considered as an indicator of plasticization efficiency. Initially, we attempted to predict plasticization efficiency of PVC plasticizers from physical and structural descriptors derived from the plasticizer molecule alone. However, the correlation of these descriptors with Tf was not very good with R=0.78 and r2=0.613. This implied that the selected descriptors were unable to predict all the interactions between PVC and plasticizer. Hence, to account for these interactions, a model containing two polyvinylchloride (PVC) chain segments along with a plasticizer molecule in a simulation box was constructed, using molecular mechanics. A good QSPR equation correlating physical and structural descriptors derived from the model to Tf of the plasticized resins was obtained with R=0.954 and r2=0.909.

  13. Structural control sensors for the CASES GTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Hugh W.; Bukley, Angelia P.

    1993-01-01

    CASES (Controls, Astrophysics and Structures Experiment in Space) is a proposed space experiment to collect x-ray images of the galactic center and solar disk with unprecedented resolution. This requires precision pointing and suppression of vibrations in the long flexible structure that comprises the 32-m x-ray telescope optical bench. Two separate electro-optical sensor systems are provided for the ground test facility (GTF). The Boom Motion Tracker (BMT) measures eigenvector data for post-mission use in system identification. The Tip Displacement Sensor (TDS) measures boom tip position and is used as feedback for the closed-loop control system that stabilizes the boom. Both the BMT and the TDS have met acceptance specifications and were delivered to MSFC in February 1992. This paper describes the sensor concept, the sensor configuration as implemented in the GTF, and the results of characterization and performance testing.

  14. Static shape control for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Scheid, R. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An integrated methodology is described for defining static shape control laws for large flexible structures. The techniques include modeling, identifying and estimating the control laws of distributed systems characterized in terms of infinite dimensional state and parameter spaces. The models are expressed as interconnected elliptic partial differential equations governing a range of static loads, with the capability of analyzing electromagnetic fields around antenna systems. A second-order analysis is carried out for statistical errors, and model parameters are determined by maximizing an appropriate defined likelihood functional which adjusts the model to observational data. The parameter estimates are derived from the conditional mean of the observational data, resulting in a least squares superposition of shape functions obtained from the structural model.

  15. Survey of long-term durability of fiberglass reinforced plastic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieblein, S.

    1981-01-01

    Included are fluid containment vessels, marine structures, and aircraft components with up to 19 years of service. Correlations were obtained for the variation of static fatigue strength, cyclic fatigue strength, and residual burst strength for pressure vessels. In addition, data are presented for the effects of moisture on strength retention. Data variations were analyzed, and relationships and implications for testing are discussed. Change in strength properties for complete structures was examined for indications of the effects of environmental conditions such as moisture and outdoor exposure (ultraviolet radiation, weathering) on long term durability.

  16. Integrated design of structures, controls, and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    In this talk we shall discuss algorithms and CAD tools for the design and analysis of structures for high performance applications using advanced composite materials. An extensive mathematical theory for optimal structural (e.g., shape) design was developed over the past thirty years. Aspects of this theory have been used in the design of components for hypersonic vehicles and thermal diffusion systems based on homogeneous materials. Enhancement of the design methods to include optimization of the microstructure of the component is a significant innovation which can lead to major enhancements in component performance. Our work is focused on the adaptation of existing theories of optimal structural design (e.g., optimal shape design) to treat the design of structures using advanced composite materials (e.g., fiber reinforced, resin matrix materials). In this talk we shall discuss models and algorithms for the design of simple structures from composite materials, focussing on a problem in thermal management. We shall also discuss methods for the integration of active structural controls into the design process.

  17. Controlling Structure in Sulfonated Block Copolymer Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Phuc; Stein, Gila; Strzalka, Joe

    2015-03-01

    In many ionic block copolymer systems, the strong incompatibility between ionic and non-ionic segments will trap non-equilibrium structures in the film, making it difficult to engineer the optimal domain sizes and transport pathways. The goal of this work is to establish a framework for controlling the solid-state structure of sulfonated pentablock copolymer membranes. They have ABCBA block sequence, where A is poly(t-butyl styrene), B is poly(hydrogenated isoprene), and C is poly(styrene sulfonate). To process into films, the polymer is dissolved in toluene/n-propanol solvent mixtures, where the solvent proportions and the polymer loading were both varied. Solution-state structure was measured with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). We detected micelles with radii that depend on the solvent composition and polymer loading. Film structure was measured with grazing-incidence SAXS, which shows (i) domain periodicity is constant throughout film thickness; (ii) domain periodicity depends on solvent composition and polymer loading, and approximately matches the micelle radii in solutions. The solid-state packing is consistent with a hard sphere structure factor. Results suggest that solid-state structure can be tuned by manipulating the solution-state self-assembly.

  18. Distributed structural control using multilayered piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cudney, Harley H.; Inman, Daniel J.; Oshman, Yaakov

    1990-01-01

    A method of segmenting piezoelectric sensors and actuators is proposed which can preclude the currently experienced cancelation of sensor signals, or the reduction of actuator effectiveness, due to the integration of the property undergoing measurement or control. The segmentation method is demonstrated by a model developed for beam structures, to which multiple layers of piezoelectric materials are attached. A numerical study is undertaken of increasing active and passive damping of a beam using the segmented sensors and actuators over unsegmented sensors and actuators.

  19. Space structure (dynamics and control) theme development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard A.; Gates, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was made to define the long-range technical objectives and goals for the Space Structure (Dynamics and Control) theme area. The approach was to evaluate ongoing and proposed technology activities such that the technology gaps and voids could be identified. After the technology needs were identified, a set of recommended experimental activities was defined including the technical objectives of each and their relationship.

  20. Controls for orbital assembly of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark J.; Davidson, Roger; Gooyabadi, Ali A.; Quan, Ralph; Reisenauer, Brian; Robertson, L.; Mohl, James; Good, Philip; Vredevoogd, Loren; Galvez, Jose

    1991-01-01

    The topics covered are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: flexible structure control; decentralized control for flexible multi-body systems; control of structures during assembly; decentralized control using structural partitioning; reduced-orded model-based controller design; ROM/residual mode filters (RMF) control of large flexible structures;RMF in a distributed parameter system (DPS); LSS active control simulation; 3-D truss beam; mobile transporter with RMS; and flexible robot manipulator.

  1. Re-evaluation of all-plastic organic dye laser with DFB structure fabricated using photoresists

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Naoto; Nagi, Saori; Kinashi, Kenji; Sakai, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Organic solid-state lasers (OSSLs) with distributed feedback structures can detect nanoscale materials and therefore offer an attractive sensing platform for biological and medical applications. Here we investigate the lasing characteristics, i.e., the threshold and slope efficiency, as a function of the grating depth in OSSL devices with distributed feedback (DFB) structure fabricated using photoresists. Two types of photoresists were used for the DFB structures: a negative photoresist, SU-8 2002, and a positive photoresist, ma-P 1275. The DFB structure was fabricated using a Lloyd-mirror configuration. The active layer was a rhodamine 6G-doped cellulose acetate waveguide. The threshold for the first order mode (m  = 1) was lower than that for the second and third order modes (m = 2, and 3). A low threshold of 27 μJ cm−2 pulse−1 (58 nJ) was obtained using SU-8 2002, with m = 1. The slope efficiency was evaluated as a function of grating depth for each mode and increased as the grating depth increased. PMID:27703217

  2. Re-evaluation of all-plastic organic dye laser with DFB structure fabricated using photoresists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Naoto; Nagi, Saori; Kinashi, Kenji; Sakai, Wataru

    2016-10-01

    Organic solid-state lasers (OSSLs) with distributed feedback structures can detect nanoscale materials and therefore offer an attractive sensing platform for biological and medical applications. Here we investigate the lasing characteristics, i.e., the threshold and slope efficiency, as a function of the grating depth in OSSL devices with distributed feedback (DFB) structure fabricated using photoresists. Two types of photoresists were used for the DFB structures: a negative photoresist, SU-8 2002, and a positive photoresist, ma-P 1275. The DFB structure was fabricated using a Lloyd-mirror configuration. The active layer was a rhodamine 6G-doped cellulose acetate waveguide. The threshold for the first order mode (m  = 1) was lower than that for the second and third order modes (m = 2, and 3). A low threshold of 27 μJ cm‑2 pulse‑1 (58 nJ) was obtained using SU-8 2002, with m = 1. The slope efficiency was evaluated as a function of grating depth for each mode and increased as the grating depth increased.

  3. The Structural Plasticity of White Matter Networks Following Anterior Temporal Lobe Resection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yogarajah, Mahinda; Focke, Niels K.; Bonelli, Silvia B.; Thompson, Pamela; Vollmar, Christian; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Alexander, Daniel C.; Symms, Mark R.; Koepp, Matthias J.; Duncan, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior temporal lobe resection is an effective treatment for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. The structural consequences of such surgery in the white matter, and how these relate to language function after surgery remain unknown. We carried out a longitudinal study with diffusion tensor imaging in 26 left and 20 right temporal lobe epilepsy…

  4. Multiscale Analysis of Structurally-Graded Microstructures Using Molecular Dynamics, Discrete Dislocation Dynamics and Continuum Crystal Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, Erik; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Mishin, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    A multiscale modeling methodology is developed for structurally-graded material microstructures. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations are performed at the nanoscale to determine fundamental failure mechanisms and quantify material constitutive parameters. These parameters are used to calibrate material processes at the mesoscale using discrete dislocation dynamics (DD). Different grain boundary interactions with dislocations are analyzed using DD to predict grain-size dependent stress-strain behavior. These relationships are mapped into crystal plasticity (CP) parameters to develop a computationally efficient finite element-based DD/CP model for continuum-level simulations and complete the multiscale analysis by predicting the behavior of macroscopic physical specimens. The present analysis is focused on simulating the behavior of a graded microstructure in which grain sizes are on the order of nanometers in the exterior region and transition to larger, multi-micron size in the interior domain. This microstructural configuration has been shown to offer improved mechanical properties over homogeneous coarse-grained materials by increasing yield stress while maintaining ductility. Various mesoscopic polycrystal models of structurally-graded microstructures are generated, analyzed and used as a benchmark for comparison between multiscale DD/CP model and DD predictions. A final series of simulations utilize the DD/CP analysis method exclusively to study macroscopic models that cannot be analyzed by MD or DD methods alone due to the model size.

  5. Structural plasticity in hippocampal cells related to the facilitative effect of intracranial self-stimulation on a spatial memory task.

    PubMed

    Chamorro-López, Jacobo; Miguéns, Miguel; Morgado-Bernal, Ignacio; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Selvas, Abraham; Cabané-Cucurella, Alberto; Aldavert-Vera, Laura; DeFelipe, Javier; Segura-Torres, Pilar

    2015-12-01

    Posttraining intracranial self-stimulation (SS) in the lateral hypothalamus facilitates the acquisition and retention of several implicit and explicit memory tasks. Here, intracellular injections of Lucifer yellow were used to assess morphological changes in hippocampal neurons that might be specifically related to the facilitative posttraining SS effect upon the acquisition and retention of a distributed spatial task in the Morris water maze. We examined the structure, size and branching complexity of cornus ammonis 1 (CA1) cells, and the spine density of CA1 pyramidal neurons and granular cells of the dentate gyrus (DG). Animals that received SS after each acquisition session performed faster and better than Sham ones--an improvement that was also evident in a probe trial 3 days after the last training session. The neuromorphological analysis revealed an increment in the size and branching complexity in apical CA1 dendritic arborization in SS-treated subjects as compared with Sham animals. Furthermore, increased spine density was observed in the CA1 field in SS animals, whereas no effects were observed in DG cells. Our results support the hypothesis that the facilitating effect of SS on the acquisition and retention of a spatial memory task could be related to structural plasticity in CA1 hippocampal cells.

  6. Structural plasticity and in vivo activity of Cas1 from the type I-F CRISPR-Cas system.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Max E; Nakatani, Yoshio; Staals, Raymond H J; Kieper, Sebastian N; Opel-Reading, Helen K; McKenzie, Rebecca E; Fineran, Peter C; Krause, Kurt L

    2016-04-15

    CRISPR-Cas systems are adaptive immune systems in prokaryotes that provide protection against viruses and other foreign DNA. In the adaptation stage, foreign DNA is integrated into CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) arrays as new spacers. These spacers are used in the interference stage to guide effector CRISPR associated (Cas) protein(s) to target complementary foreign invading DNA. Cas1 is the integrase enzyme that is central to the catalysis of spacer integration. There are many diverse types of CRISPR-Cas systems, including type I-F systems, which are typified by a unique Cas1-Cas2-3 adaptation complex. In the present study we characterize the Cas1 protein of the potato phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum, an important model organism for understanding spacer acquisition in type I-F CRISPR-Cas systems. We demonstrate by mutagenesis that Cas1 is essential for adaptation in vivo and requires a conserved aspartic acid residue. By X-ray crystallography, we show that although P. atrosepticum Cas1 adopts a fold conserved among other Cas1 proteins, it possesses remarkable asymmetry as a result of structural plasticity. In particular, we resolve for the first time a flexible, asymmetric loop that may be unique to type I-F Cas1 proteins, and we discuss the implications of these structural features for DNA binding and enzymatic activity.

  7. CaMKII requirement for the persistence of in vivo hippocampal mossy fiber synaptic plasticity and structural reorganization.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Muñoz, Yectivani; Rivera-Olvera, Alejandro; Ramos-Languren, Laura E; Escobar, Martha L

    2017-03-01

    CaMKII has been proposed as a molecular substrate for long-term memory storage due to its capacity to maintain an active autophosporylated state even after the decay of the external stimuli. The hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 pathway (MF-CA3) is considered as a relevant area for acquisition and storage of different learning tasks. MF-CA3 pathway exhibits a form of LTP characterized by a slow initial increase in the EPSP slope that is independent of NMDA receptors activation. Our previous studies show that application of high frequency stimulation sufficient to elicit MF-CA3 LTP produces structural reorganization, in a manner independent of LTP induction, at the stratum oriens of hippocampal CA3 area 7days after stimulation. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the maintenance of MF-CA3 LTP as well as the concomitant structural reorganization in this area remain to be elucidated. Here we show that acute microinfusion of myr-CaMKIINtide, a noncompetitive inhibitor of CaMKII, in the hippocampal CA3 area of adult rats during the late-phase of in vivo MF-CA3 LTP blocked its maintenance and prevented the accompanying morphological reorganization in CA3 area. These findings support the idea that CaMKII is a key molecular substrate for the long-term hippocampal synaptic plasticity maintenance.

  8. Smart structures for rotorcraft control (SSRC) II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacot, A. Dean; Dadone, Leo

    1998-06-01

    The Smart Structures for Rotor Control (SSRC) is a consortium under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Smart Structures program. Phase I of the program was administered by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, with Boeing Seattle as the consortium administrator, and MIT, PSU and Boeing Helicopters as the other principal consortium members. Phase II, renamed Smart Materials and Structures Demonstration Consortium (SMSDC), is a combination of the proposed Phase II efforts of SSRC and the Boeing MESA Smart Materials Actuated Rotor Technology (SMART) program. This paper summarizes the SSRC efforts, introduces the SMSDC program, and provides a framework for the relationships between specific SSRC technical papers in this conference. The SSRC objectives were to research smart structure methods to achieve reduced rotorcraft vibration, reduce acoustic noise, and increased performance. The SSRC program includes dynamic piezoelectric actuation of flaps on the rotor blades, distributed dynamic piezo actuation of the rotor twist, and quasi-steady rotor twist control using shape memory alloys. The objective of Phase II is then to fly a rotorcraft to demonstrate such a system.

  9. Average-cost based robust structural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagood, Nesbitt W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented for the synthesis of robust controllers for linear time invariant structural systems with parameterized uncertainty. The method involves minimizing quantities related to the quadratic cost (H2-norm) averaged over a set of systems described by real parameters such as natural frequencies and modal residues. Bounded average cost is shown to imply stability over the set of systems. Approximations for the exact average are derived and proposed as cost functionals. The properties of these approximate average cost functionals are established. The exact average and approximate average cost functionals are used to derive dynamic controllers which can provide stability robustness. The robustness properties of these controllers are demonstrated in illustrative numerical examples and tested in a simple SISO experiment on the MIT multi-point alignment testbed.

  10. Structural integrated sensor and actuator systems for active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Christian; Schwerter, Martin; Leester-Schädel, Monika; Wierach, Peter; Dietzel, Andreas; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive flow separation control system is designed and implemented as an essential part of a novel high-lift device for future aircraft. The system consists of MEMS pressure sensors to determine the flow conditions and adaptive lips to regulate the mass flow and the velocity of a wall near stream over the internally blown Coanda flap. By the oscillating lip the mass flow in the blowing slot changes dynamically, consequently the momentum exchange of the boundary layer over a high lift flap required mass flow can be reduced. These new compact and highly integrated systems provide a real-time monitoring and manipulation of the flow conditions. In this context the integration of pressure sensors into flow sensing airfoils of composite material is investigated. Mechanical and electrical properties of the integrated sensors are investigated under mechanical loads during tensile tests. The sensors contain a reference pressure chamber isolated to the ambient by a deformable membrane with integrated piezoresistors connected as a Wheatstone bridge, which outputs voltage signals depending on the ambient pressure. The composite material in which the sensors are embedded consists of 22 individual layers of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) prepreg. The results of the experiments are used for adapting the design of the sensors and the layout of the laminate to ensure an optimized flux of force in highly loaded structures primarily for future aeronautical applications. It can be shown that the pressure sensor withstands the embedding process into fiber composites with full functional capability and predictable behavior under stress.

  11. Effects of organic selenium on lead-induced impairments of spatial learning and memory as well as synaptic structural plasticity in rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao-jie; Xiao, Yong-mei; Ai, Bao-min; Hu, Xiao-xia; Wei, Qing; Hu, Qian-sheng

    2014-01-01

    To study the effect of organic Se on spatial learning and memory deficits induced by Pb exposure at different developmental stages, and its relationship with alterations of synaptic structural plasticity, postnatal rat pups were randomly divided into five groups: Control; Pb (Weaned pups were exposed to Pb at postnatal day (PND) 21-42); Pb-Se (Weaned pups were exposed to Se at PND 43-63 after Pb exposure); maternal Pb (mPb) (Parents were exposed to Pb from 3 weeks before mating to the weaning of pups); mPb-Se (Parents were exposed to Pb and weaned pups were exposed to Se at PND 43-63). The spatial learning and memory of rat pups was measured by Morris water maze (MWM) on PND 63. We found that rat pups in Pb-Se group performed significantly better than those in Pb group (p<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the ability of spatial learning and memory between the groups of mPb and mPb-Se (p>0.05). We also found that, before MWM, the numbers of neurons and synapses significantly decreased in mPb group, but not in Pb group. After MWM, the number of synapses, the thickness of postsynaptic density (PSD), the length of synaptic active zone and the synaptic curvature increased significantly in Pb-Se and mPb-Se group; while the width of synaptic cleft decreased significantly (p<0.05), compared to Pb group and mPb group, respectively. However, the number of synapses in mPb-Se group was still significantly lower than that in the control group (p<0.05). Our data demonstrated that organic Se had protective effects on the impairments of spatial learning and memory as well as synaptic structural plasticity induced by Pb exposure in rats after weaning, but not by the maternal Pb exposure which reduced the numbers of neurons and synapses in the early neural development.

  12. Plasticity of gene-regulatory networks controlling sex determination: of masters, slaves, usual suspects, newcomers, and usurpators.

    PubMed

    Herpin, Amaury; Schartl, Manfred

    2015-10-01

    Sexual dimorphism is one of the most pervasive and diverse features of animal morphology, physiology, and behavior. Despite the generality of the phenomenon itself, the mechanisms controlling how sex is determined differ considerably among various organismic groups, have evolved repeatedly and independently, and the underlying molecular pathways can change quickly during evolution. Even within closely related groups of organisms for which the development of gonads on the morphological, histological, and cell biological level is undistinguishable, the molecular control and the regulation of the factors involved in sex determination and gonad differentiation can be substantially different. The biological meaning of the high molecular plasticity of an otherwise common developmental program is unknown. While comparative studies suggest that the downstream effectors of sex-determining pathways tend to be more stable than the triggering mechanisms at the top, it is still unclear how conserved the downstream networks are and how all components work together. After many years of stasis, when the molecular basis of sex determination was amenable only in the few classical model organisms (fly, worm, mouse), recently, sex-determining genes from several animal species have been identified and new studies have elucidated some novel regulatory interactions and biological functions of the downstream network, particularly in vertebrates. These data have considerably changed our classical perception of a simple linear developmental cascade that makes the decision for the embryo to develop as male or female, and how it evolves.

  13. [Structural-metabolic plasticity of mammalian skeletal muscles in hypokinesis and weightlessness].

    PubMed

    Shenkman, B S

    2002-01-01

    Under review are investigations of the contractile structure of skeletal muscles of humans and animals (rats and primates) following space flight, long-term hypokinesia, immersion (human subjects) and head-down suspension (rats). Close consideration is given to experimental testing of hypotheses concerning neuronal, humoral and cell processes leading to atrophy. Described are consistencies and mechanisms of changes in the myosin phenotype and electromechanic coupling in muscular fibers as well as their capillarization and energy potential.

  14. Structural plasticity in the human cytosolic sulfotransferase dimer and its role in substrate selectivity and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Tibbs, Zachary E; Rohn-Glowacki, Katie Jo; Crittenden, Frank; Guidry, Amber L; Falany, Charles N

    2015-02-01

    The cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) are dimeric enzymes that help maintain homeostasis through the modulation of hormone and drug activity by catalyzing their transformation into hydrophilic sulfate esters and increasing their excretion. Each of the thirteen active human SULT isoforms displays a unique substrate specificity pattern that underlies its individual role in our bodies. These specificities have proven to be complex, in some cases masking the biological role of specific isoforms. The first part of this review offers a short summary of historical underpinnings of human SULTs, primarily centered on the characterization of each isoform's kinetic and structural properties. Recent structural investigations have revealed each SULT has an active site "lid" that undergoes restructuring once the cofactor/sulfonate donor, 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS), binds to the enzyme. This structural rearrangement can alter substrate-binding profiles, therefore complicating enzyme/substrate interactions and making substrate/cosubstrate concentrations and binding order important considerations in enzyme functionality. Molecular dynamic simulations have recently been employed to describe this restructuring in an attempt to offer insight to its effects on substrate selectivity. In addition to reviewing new data on SULT molecular dynamics, we will discuss the contribution of PAPS concentrations and SULT dimerization in the regulation of SULT activity within the human body.

  15. Structural Plasticity of the Phage P22 Tail Needle gp26 Probed with Xenon Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Olia, A.; Casjens, S; Cingolani, G

    2009-01-01

    The tail needle, gp26, is a highly stable homo-trimeric fiber found in the tail apparatus of bacteriophage P22. In the mature virion, gp26 is responsible for plugging the DNA exit channel, and likely plays an important role in penetrating the host cell envelope. In this article, we have determined the 1.98 A resolution crystal structure of gp26 bound to xenon gas. The structure led us to identify a calcium and a chloride ion intimately bound at the interior of alpha-helical core, as well as seven small cavities occupied by xenon atoms. The two ions engage in buried polar interactions with gp26 side chains that provide specificity and register to gp26 helical core, thus enhancing its stability. Conversely, the distribution of xenon accessible cavities correlates well with the flexibility of the fiber observed in solution and in the crystal structure. We suggest that small internal cavities in gp26 between the helical core and the C-terminal tip allow for flexible swinging of the latter, without affecting the overall stability of the protein. The C-terminal tip may be important in scanning the bacterial surface in search of a cell-envelope penetration site, or for recognition of a yet unidentified receptor on the surface of the host.

  16. Structural Plasticity in Globins: Role of Protein Dynamics in Defining Ligand Migration Pathways.

    PubMed

    Estarellas, C; Capece, L; Seira, C; Bidon-Chanal, A; Estrin, D A; Luque, F J

    2016-01-01

    Globins are a family of proteins characterized by the presence of the heme prosthetic group and involved in variety of biological functions in the cell. Due to their biological relevance and widespread distribution in all kingdoms of life, intense research efforts have been devoted to disclosing the relationships between structural features, protein dynamics, and function. Particular attention has been paid to the impact of differences in amino acid sequence on the topological features of docking sites and cavities and to the influence of conformational flexibility in facilitating the migration of small ligands through these cavities. Often, tunnels are carved in the interior of globins, and ligand exchange is regulated by gating residues. Understanding the subtle intricacies that relate the differences in sequence with the structural and dynamical features of globins with the ultimate aim of rationalizing the thermodynamics and kinetics of ligand binding continues to be a major challenge in the field. Due to the evolution of computational techniques, significant advances into our understanding of these questions have been made. In this review we focus our attention on the analysis of the ligand migration pathways as well as the function of the structural cavities and tunnels in a series of representative globins, emphasizing the synergy between experimental and theoretical approaches to gain a comprehensive knowledge into the molecular mechanisms of this diverse family of proteins.

  17. Nonisothermal elasto-visco-plastic response of shell-type structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, G. J.; Carlson, R. L.; Riff, R.

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing structural response of thin, metallic shell-type structures under large transient, cyclic or static thermomechanical loads is disussed. Among the system responses, which are associated with these load conditions, are thermal buckling and creep buckling. Thus, geometric as well as material-type nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and have been considered in the development of the mathematical model. Furthermore, this was accommodated in the solution procedures. A complete true ab-inito rate theory of kinematics and kinetics for continuum and curved thin structures, without any restriction on the magnitude of the strains or the deformation, was formulated. The time dependence and large strain behavior are incorporated through the introduction of the time rates of the metric and curvature in two coordinate systems, a fixed (spatial) one and a convected (material) coordinate system. The relations between the time derivative and the covariant derivatives (gradients) have been developed for curved space and motion, so that the velocity components supply the connection between the equations of motion and the time rate of change of the metric and curvature tensors.

  18. Structural plasticity of PAM recognition by engineered variants of the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Carolin; Bargsten, Katja; Jinek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary The RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) forms the core of a powerful genome editing technology. DNA cleavage by SpCas9 is dependent on the presence of a 5’-NGG-3’ protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) in the target DNA, restricting the choice of targetable sequences. To address this limitation, artificial SpCas9 variants with altered PAM specificities have recently been developed. Here we report crystal structures of the VQR, EQR, and VRER SpCas9 variants bound to target DNAs containing their preferred PAM sequences. The structures reveal that the non-canonical PAMs are recognized by an induced fit mechanism. Besides mediating sequence-specific base recognition, the amino acid substitutions introduced in the SpCas9 variants facilitate conformational remodeling of the PAM region of the bound DNA. Guided by the structural data, we developed a SpCas9 variant that specifically recognizes NAAG PAMs. Taken together, these studies inform further development of Cas9-based genome editing tools. PMID:26990992

  19. Structural and functional plasticity specific to musical training with wind instruments.

    PubMed

    Choi, Uk-Su; Sung, Yul-Wan; Hong, Sujin; Chung, Jun-Young; Ogawa, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Numerous neuroimaging studies have shown structural and functional changes resulting from musical training. Among these studies, changes in primary sensory areas are mostly related to motor functions. In this study, we looked for some similar functional and structural changes in other functional modalities, such as somatosensory function, by examining the effects of musical training with wind instruments. We found significant changes in two aspects of neuroplasticity, cortical thickness, and resting-state neuronal networks. A group of subjects with several years of continuous musical training and who are currently playing in university wind ensembles showed differences in cortical thickness in lip- and tongue-related brain areas vs. non-music playing subjects. Cortical thickness in lip-related brain areas was significantly thicker and that in tongue-related areas was significantly thinner in the music playing group compared with that in the non-music playing group. Association analysis of lip-related areas in the music playing group showed that the increase in cortical thickness was caused by musical training. In addition, seed-based correlation analysis showed differential activation in the precentral gyrus and supplementary motor areas (SMA) between the music and non-music playing groups. These results suggest that high-intensity training with specific musical instruments could induce structural changes in related anatomical areas and could also generate a new functional neuronal network in the brain.

  20. Structural and functional plasticity specific to musical training with wind instruments

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Uk-Su; Sung, Yul-Wan; Hong, Sujin; Chung, Jun-Young; Ogawa, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Numerous neuroimaging studies have shown structural and functional changes resulting from musical training. Among these studies, changes in primary sensory areas are mostly related to motor functions. In this study, we looked for some similar functional and structural changes in other functional modalities, such as somatosensory function, by examining the effects of musical training with wind instruments. We found significant changes in two aspects of neuroplasticity, cortical thickness, and resting-state neuronal networks. A group of subjects with several years of continuous musical training and who are currently playing in university wind ensembles showed differences in cortical thickness in lip- and tongue-related brain areas vs. non-music playing subjects. Cortical thickness in lip-related brain areas was significantly thicker and that in tongue-related areas was significantly thinner in the music playing group compared with that in the non-music playing group. Association analysis of lip-related areas in the music playing group showed that the increase in cortical thickness was caused by musical training. In addition, seed-based correlation analysis showed differential activation in the precentral gyrus and supplementary motor areas (SMA) between the music and non-music playing groups. These results suggest that high-intensity training with specific musical instruments could induce structural changes in related anatomical areas and could also generate a new functional neuronal network in the brain. PMID:26578939

  1. The Interplay Between Strategic And Adaptive Control Mechanisms In Plastic Recalibration Of Locomotor Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, J. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that viewing simulated rotary self-motion during treadmill locomotion causes immediate strategic modifications (Richards et al. 2004) as well as an after effect reflecting adaptive modification of the control of position and trajectory during over-ground locomotion (Mulavara et al. 2005). The process of sensorimotor adaptation is comprised of both strategic and adaptive control mechanisms. Strategic control involves cognitive, on-line corrections to limb movements once one is aware of a sensory discordance. Over an extended period of exposure to the sensory discordance, new strategic sensorimotor coordination patterns are reinforced until they become more automatic, and therefore adaptive, in nature. The objective of this study was to investigate how strategic changes in trunk control during exposure to simulated rotary self-motion during treadmill walking influences adaptive modification of locomotor heading direction during over-ground stepping. Subjects (n = 10) walked on a motorized linear treadmill while viewing a wide field-of-view virtual scene for 24 minutes. The scene was static for the first 4 minutes and then, for the last 20 minutes, depicted constant rate self-motion equivalent to walking in a counter-clockwise, circular path around the perimeter of a room. Subjects performed five stepping trials both before and after the exposure period to assess after effects. Results from our previous study showed a significant change in heading direction (HD) during post-exposure step tests that was opposite the direction in which the scene rotated during the adaptation period. For the present study, we quantified strategic modifications in trunk movement control during scene exposure using normalized root mean square (R(sub p)) variation of the subject's 3D trunk positions and normalized sum of standard deviations (R(sub o)) variation of 3D trunk orientations during scene rotation relative to that during static scene presentation

  2. The 3rd Annual Controlled Structures Technology Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of presentations at the Controlled Structures Technology (CST) MIT Space Engineering Research Center 3rd Annual Symposium are included. Topics covered include optical interferometer testbed; active impedence matching of complex structural systems; application of CST to adaptive optics; middeck 0-G dynamics Experiment (MODE); inhibiting multiple mode vibration in controlled flexible systems; the middeck active control experiment (MACE); robust control for uncertain structures; cost averaging techniques for robust structural control; and intelligent structures technology.

  3. Dynamic response of Cu4Zr54 metallic glass to high strain rate shock loading: plasticity, spall and atomic-level structures

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shengnian; Arman, Bedri; Germann, Timothy C; Cagin, Tahir

    2009-01-01

    We investigate dynamic response of Cu{sub 46}Zr{sub 54} metallic glass under adiabatic planar shock wave loading (one-dimensional strain) wjth molecular dynamics simulations, including Hugoniot (shock) states, shock-induced plasticity and spallation. The Hugoniot states are obtained up to 60 CPa along with the von Mises shear flow strengths, and the dynamic spall strength, at different strain rates and temperatures. The spall strengths likely represent the limiting values achievable in experiments such as laser ablation. For the steady shock states, a clear elastic-plastic transition is identified (e.g., in the shock velocity-particle velocity curve), and the shear strength shows strain-softening. However, the elastic-plastic transition across the shock front displays transient stress overshoot (hardening) above the Hugoniot elastic limit followed by a relatively sluggish relaxation to the steady shock state, and the plastic shock front steepens with increasing shock strength. The local von Mises shear strain analysis is used to characterize local deformation, and the Voronoi tessellation analysis, the corresponding short-range structures at various stages of shock, release, tension and spallation. The plasticity in this glass is manifested as localized shear transformation zones and of local structure rather than thermal origin, and void nucleation occurs preferentially at the highly shear-deformed regions. The Voronoi and shear strain analyses show that the atoms with different local structures are of different shear resistances that lead to shear localization (e.g., the atoms indexed with (0,0,12,0) are most shear-resistant, and those with (0,2,8,1) are highly prone to shear flow). The dynamic changes in local structures are consistent with the observed deformation dynamics.

  4. Abnormal Cortical Plasticity in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Case–Control Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Donald L.; Erickson, Craig A.; Horn, Paul S.; Shaffer, Rebecca C.; Wink, Logan K.; Laue, Cameron S.; Wu, Steve W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This case–control study investigated the use of a low-intensity repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) protocol to measure motor cortex (M1) plasticity in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared with typically developing children (TDC). We hypothesized that impairments in long-term potentiation-like properties represent a neurophysiological biomarker of abnormal cortical function in ASD. Methods: We studied youth with ASD aged 11–18 years and matched controls (TDC). Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) was delivered to the dominant M1 at an intensity of 70% of resting motor threshold. Suprathreshold single-pulse TMS was performed to compare amplitudes of motor-evoked potentials (MEP) measured from surface electromyography electrodes on a target muscle before (20 pulses) and after (10 pulses/time point) iTBS at predefined timepoints (up to 30 minutes) to measure any potentiation effects. A linear mixed model was used to examine group differences in MEP amplitudes over time following iTBS. Results: Nine youth with ASD (mean age 15.6; 7 males; 6 right-hand dominant) and 9 TDC (mean age 14.5; 5 males; 9 right-hand dominant) participated. All subjects tolerated the procedure well. Both groups had a mean increase in excitability after iTBS for 30 minutes; however, the time course of excitability changes differed (F9,144 = 2.05; p = 0.038). Post-hoc testing identified a significant decrease in amplitude of the ASD group at 20 minutes following iTBS compared with the TDC after correcting for multiple comparisons. Conclusion: In this study, we demonstrate early evidence for a potential physiological biomarker of cortical plasticity in youth with ASD using a rapid low-intensity rTMS protocol with a discriminate measure at 20 minutes following stimulation. The procedure was well tolerated by all 18 participants. Future work will include modification of the protocol to improve the ability to distinguish subtypes of

  5. Spatial organization of plastic deformation in single crystals with different structure of slip dislocation

    SciTech Connect

    Kunitsyna, T. S.; Teplyakova, L. A. Koneva, N. A.; Poltaranin, M. A.

    2015-10-27

    It is established that different structure of slip dislocation at the end of the linear hardening stage results in different distribution of dislocation charges in the volume of a single crystal. In the alloy with a near atomic order the slip of single dislocations leads to formation of planar structures—layers with the excess density of dislocations. In the alloy with long-range atomic order the slip of superdislocations brings the formation of the system of parallel rod-like charged dislocation linking.

  6. Modeling and control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Mingori, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    This monograph presents integrated modeling and controller design methods for flexible structures. The controllers, or compensators, developed are optimal in the linear-quadratic-Gaussian sense. The performance objectives, sensor and actuator locations and external disturbances influence both the construction of the model and the design of the finite dimensional compensator. The modeling and controller design procedures are carried out in parallel to ensure compatibility of these two aspects of the design problem. Model reduction techniques are introduced to keep both the model order and the controller order as small as possible. A linear distributed, or infinite dimensional, model is the theoretical basis for most of the text, but finite dimensional models arising from both lumped-mass and finite element approximations also play an important role. A central purpose of the approach here is to approximate an optimal infinite dimensional controller with an implementable finite dimensional compensator. Both convergence theory and numerical approximation methods are given. Simple examples are used to illustrate the theory.

  7. Controlling the Electronic Structure of Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Taisuke; Bostwick, Aaron; McChesney, Jessica; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2007-03-01

    Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphite intercalation compounds, fullerenes, and ultrathin graphite films exhibit many exotic phenomena such as superconductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect. These findings have caused renewed interest in the electronic structure of ultrathin layers of graphene: a single honeycomb carbon layer that is the building block for these materials. There is a strong motivation to incorporate graphene multilayers into atomic-scale devices, spurred on by rapid progress in their fabrication and manipulation. We have synthesized bilayer graphene thin films deposited on insulating silicon carbide and characterized their electronic band structure using angle-resolved photoemission. By selectively adjusting the carrier concentration in each layer, changes in the Coulomb potential led to control of the gap between valence and conduction bands [1]. This control over the band structure suggests the potential application of bilayer graphene to switching functions in atomic scale electronic devices. [1] T. Ohta, A. Bostwick, T. Seyller, K. Horn, E. Rotenberg, Science, 313, 951 (2006).

  8. Hierarchical fiber-optic delamination detection system for carbon fiber reinforced plastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Banshoya, Hidehiko; Shingo, Ii; Takeda, Nobuo

    2012-10-01

    This study develops a delamination detection system by extending our previous approach for monitoring surface cracks in a large-scale composite structure. In the new system, numerous thin glass capillaries are embedded into a composite structure, and internal pressure in the built-in capillary sensors, based on comparative vacuum monitoring (CVM), is maintained as a vacuum. When delamination is induced, the capillary sensors located within the delaminated area are breached, and atmospheric air flows into the capillaries. The consequent pressure change within the capillaries is then converted into axial strain in a surface-mounted optical fiber through a transducing mechanism, which is connected to the capillaries. By monitoring the strain distribution along the optical fiber, it is possible to identify a transducing mechanism in which the pressure change occurred and thus to specify the location of the delamination. This study begins by establishing a novel sensor embedding/extracting method. The airflow characteristic in the capillary sensors is then comprehensively evaluated, determining the basic performance of the new system. The proposed detection technique is validated by taking a step-by-step approach, and finally the hierarchical fiber-optic delamination detection system is demonstrated. A further advance to be combined with a self-healing concept is also discussed.

  9. A synaptically controlled, associative signal for Hebbian plasticity in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Magee, J C; Johnston, D

    1997-01-10

    The role of back-propagating dendritic action potentials in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) was investigated in CA1 neurons by means of dendritic patch recordings and simultaneous calcium imaging. Pairing of subthreshold excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) with back-propagating action potentials resulted in an amplification of dendritic action potentials and evoked calcium influx near the site of synaptic input. This pairing also induced a robust LTP, which was reduced when EPSPs were paired with non-back-propagating action potentials or when stimuli were unpaired. Action potentials thus provide a synaptically controlled, associative signal to the dendrites for Hebbian modifications of synaptic strength.

  10. Plastics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Tommy G.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist junior high schools industrial arts teachers in planning new courses and revising existing courses in plastics technology. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: introduction to production technology; history and development of plastics; safety; youth leadership,…

  11. The structural plasticity of white matter networks following anterior temporal lobe resection

    PubMed Central

    Yogarajah, Mahinda; Focke, Niels K.; Bonelli, Silvia B.; Thompson, Pamela; Vollmar, Christian; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Alexander, Daniel C.; Symms, Mark R.; Koepp, Matthias J.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior temporal lobe resection is an effective treatment for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. The structural consequences of such surgery in the white matter, and how these relate to language function after surgery remain unknown. We carried out a longitudinal study with diffusion tensor imaging in 26 left and 20 right temporal lobe epilepsy patients before and a mean of 4.5 months after anterior temporal lobe resection. The whole-brain analysis technique tract-based spatial statistics was used to compare pre- and postoperative data in the left and right temporal lobe epilepsy groups separately. We observed widespread, significant, mean 7%, decreases in fractional anisotropy in white matter networks connected to the area of resection, following both left and right temporal lobe resections. However, we also observed a widespread, mean 8%, increase in fractional anisotropy after left anterior temporal lobe resection in the ipsilateral external capsule and posterior limb of the internal capsule, and corona radiata. These findings were confirmed on analysis of the native clusters and hand drawn regions of interest. Postoperative tractography seeded from this area suggests that this cluster is part of the ventro-medial language network. The mean pre- and postoperative fractional anisotropy and parallel diffusivity in this cluster were significantly correlated with postoperative verbal fluency and naming test scores. In addition, the percentage change in parallel diffusivity in this cluster was correlated with the percentage change in verbal fluency after anterior temporal lobe resection, such that the bigger the increase in parallel diffusivity, the smaller the fall in language proficiency after surgery. We suggest that the findings of increased fractional anisotropy in this ventro-medial language network represent structural reorganization in response to the anterior temporal lobe resection, which may damage the more susceptible dorso-lateral language pathway

  12. Controlling photonic structures using optical forces.

    PubMed

    Wiederhecker, Gustavo S; Chen, Long; Gondarenko, Alexander; Lipson, Michal

    2009-12-03

    The use of optical forces to manipulate small objects is well known. Applications include the manipulation of living cells by optical tweezers and optical cooling in atomic physics. The miniaturization of optical systems (to the micro and nanoscale) has resulted in very compliant systems with masses of the order of nanograms, rendering them susceptible to optical forces. Optical forces have been exploited to demonstrate chaotic quivering of microcavities, optical cooling of mechanical modes, actuation of a tapered-fibre waveguide and excitation of the mechanical modes of silicon nano-beams. Despite recent progress in this field, it is challenging to manipulate the optical response of photonic structures using optical forces; this is because of the large forces that are required to induce appreciable changes in the geometry of the structure. Here we implement a resonant structure whose optical response can be efficiently statically controlled using relatively weak attractive and repulsive optical forces. We demonstrate a static mechanical deformation of up to 20 nanometres in a silicon nitride structure, using three milliwatts of continuous optical power. Because of the sensitivity of the optical response to this deformation, such optically induced static displacement introduces resonance shifts spanning 80 times the intrinsic resonance linewidth.

  13. Methods for combined control-structure optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, M.; Scheid, R. E.; Salama, M.; Bruno, R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of methods for the combined control-structure optimization of physical systems encountered in the technology of large space structures. The objective of the approach taken in this paper is not to produce the 'best' optimized design, but rather to efficiently produce a family of design options so as to asist in early trade studies, typically before hard design constraints are imposed. The philosophy is that these are candidate designs to be passed on for further consideration, and their function is more to guide the development of the system design rather than to represent the ultimate product. A homotopy approach involving multi-objective functions is developed for this purpose, and a numerical example is presented.

  14. Activity-dependent signaling: influence on plasticity in circuits controlling fear-related behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Julia L; Martinowich, Keri

    2015-01-01

    Fear regulation is impaired in anxiety and trauma-related disorders. Patients experience heightened fear expression and reduced ability to extinguish fear memories. Because fear regulation is abnormal in these disorders and extinction recapitulates current treatment strategies, understanding the underlying mechanisms is vital for developing new treatments. This is critical because although extinction-based exposure therapy is a mainstay of treatment, relapse is common. We examine recent findings describing changes in network activity and functional connectivity within limbic circuits during fear regulation, and explore how activity-dependent signaling contributes to the neural activity patterns that control fear and anxiety. We review the role of the prototypical activity-dependent molecule, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), whose signaling has been critically linked to regulation of fear behavior. PMID:26485574

  15. Homodimerization of RBPMS2 through a new RRM-interaction motif is necessary to control smooth muscle plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sagnol, Sébastien; Yang, Yinshan; Bessin, Yannick; Allemand, Fréderic; Hapkova, Ilona; Notarnicola, Cécile; Guichou, Jean-François; Faure, Sandrine; Labesse, Gilles; de Santa Barbara, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    In vertebrates, smooth muscle cells (SMCs) can reversibly switch between contractile and proliferative phenotypes. This involves various molecular mechanisms to reactivate developmental signaling pathways and induce cell dedifferentiation. The protein RBPMS2 regulates early development and plasticity of digestive SMCs by inhibiting the bone morphogenetic protein pathway through its interaction with NOGGIN mRNA. RBPMS2 contains only one RNA recognition motif (RRM) while this motif is often repeated in tandem or associated with other functional domains in RRM-containing proteins. Herein, we show using an extensive combination of structure/function analyses that RBPMS2 homodimerizes through a particular sequence motif (D-x-K-x-R-E-L-Y-L-L-F: residues 39–51) located in its RRM domain. We also show that this specific motif is conserved among its homologs and paralogs in vertebrates and in its insect and worm orthologs (CPO and MEC-8, respectively) suggesting a conserved molecular mechanism of action. Inhibition of the dimerization process through targeting a conserved leucine inside of this motif abolishes the capacity of RBPMS2 to interact with the translational elongation eEF2 protein, to upregulate NOGGIN mRNA in vivo and to drive SMC dedifferentiation. Our study demonstrates that RBPMS2 possesses an RRM domain harboring both RNA-binding and protein-binding properties and that the newly identified RRM-homodimerization motif is crucial for the function of RBPMS2 at the cell and tissue levels. PMID:25064856

  16. Homodimerization of RBPMS2 through a new RRM-interaction motif is necessary to control smooth muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Sagnol, Sébastien; Yang, Yinshan; Bessin, Yannick; Allemand, Fréderic; Hapkova, Ilona; Notarnicola, Cécile; Guichou, Jean-François; Faure, Sandrine; Labesse, Gilles; de Santa Barbara, Pascal

    2014-09-01

    In vertebrates, smooth muscle cells (SMCs) can reversibly switch between contractile and proliferative phenotypes. This involves various molecular mechanisms to reactivate developmental signaling pathways and induce cell dedifferentiation. The protein RBPMS2 regulates early development and plasticity of digestive SMCs by inhibiting the bone morphogenetic protein pathway through its interaction with NOGGIN mRNA. RBPMS2 contains only one RNA recognition motif (RRM) while this motif is often repeated in tandem or associated with other functional domains in RRM-containing proteins. Herein, we show using an extensive combination of structure/function analyses that RBPMS2 homodimerizes through a particular sequence motif (D-x-K-x-R-E-L-Y-L-L-F: residues 39-51) located in its RRM domain. We also show that this specific motif is conserved among its homologs and paralogs in vertebrates and in its insect and worm orthologs (CPO and MEC-8, respectively) suggesting a conserved molecular mechanism of action. Inhibition of the dimerization process through targeting a conserved leucine inside of this motif abolishes the capacity of RBPMS2 to interact with the translational elongation eEF2 protein, to upregulate NOGGIN mRNA in vivo and to drive SMC dedifferentiation. Our study demonstrates that RBPMS2 possesses an RRM domain harboring both RNA-binding and protein-binding properties and that the newly identified RRM-homodimerization motif is crucial for the function of RBPMS2 at the cell and tissue levels.

  17. Modeling and Control of Large Flexible Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-31

    frequencies induced by the 4th spatial mode.) The meaning of the plot titles is as follows: "Beam at x, yth mode," t means that the beam is initially...structures, represented here by an Euler beam model. The results of . this algorithm provide a means for assessing effects of controller/observer...define T - - r-i E), T- - (60) +- 1 then .L. 0 t>O 0 > 7 𔄀) -1 (61 C: t𔃾) 0 0J -. This means that T +(respectively T ) is the projection of T onto the

  18. Controlling Proton Delivery through Catalyst Structural Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Allan Jay P.; Ginovska, Bojana; Kumar, Neeraj; Hou, Jianbo; Raugei, Simone; Helm, Monte L.; Appel, Aaron M.; Bullock, R. Morris; O'Hagan, Molly

    2016-09-27

    The fastest synthetic molecular catalysts for production and oxidation of H2 emulate components of the active site of natural hydrogenases. The role of controlled structural dynamics is recognized as a critical component in the catalytic performance of many enzymes, including hydrogenases, but is largely neglected in the design of synthetic molecular cata-lysts. In this work, the impact of controlling structural dynamics on the rate of production of H2 was studied for a series of [Ni(PPh2NC6H4-R2)2]2+ catalysts including R = n-hexyl, n-decyl, n-tetradecyl, n-octadecyl, phenyl, or cyclohexyl. A strong correlation was observed between the ligand structural dynamics and the rates of electrocatalytic hydrogen production in acetonitrile, acetonitrile-water, and protic ionic liquid-water mixtures. Specifically, the turnover frequencies correlate inversely with the rates of ring inversion of the amine-containing ligand, as this dynamic process dictates the positioning of the proton relay in the second coordination sphere and therefore governs protonation at either catalytically productive or non-productive sites. This study demonstrates that the dynamic processes involved in proton delivery can be controlled through modifications of the outer coordination sphere of the catalyst, similar to the role of the protein architecture in many enzymes. The present work provides new mechanistic insight into the large rate enhancements observed in aqueous protic ionic liquid media for the [Ni(PPh2NR2)]2+ family of catalysts. The incorporation of controlled structural dynamics as a design parameter to modulate proton delivery in molecular catalysts has enabled H2 production rates that are up to three orders of magnitude faster than the [Ni(PPh2NPh2)]2+complex. The observed turnover frequencies are up to 106 s-1 in acetonitrile-water, and over 107 s-1 in protic ionic liquid-water mixtures, with a minimal increase in overpotential. This material is based upon work supported as part of

  19. Controlled clinical comparison of plastic versus glass bottles of BacT/ALERT PF medium for culturing blood from children.

    PubMed

    Petti, Cathy A; Mirrett, Stanley; Woods, Christopher W; Reller, L Barth

    2005-01-01

    The plastic pediatric BacT/ALERT (bioMérieux, Durham, N.C.) PF (PPF) is a new nonvented aerobic culture medium in a clear plastic bottle designed to prevent breakage. We compared the performance of the new PPF bottle to that of the present glass BacT/ALERT PF bottle for the recovery of microorganisms as well as for the time to detection of growth in samples of blood obtained for culture from children. We found that the PPF and PF bottles were comparable for recovery of microorganisms and that the safety advantage of plastic bottles can be achieved without compromising performance.

  20. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  1. Oma1 Links Mitochondrial Protein Quality Control and TOR Signaling To Modulate Physiological Plasticity and Cellular Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Bohovych, Iryna; Kastora, Stavroula; Christianson, Sara; Topil, Danelle; Kim, Heejeong; Fangman, Teresa; Zhou, You J; Barrientos, Antoni; Lee, Jaekwon; Brown, Alistair J P; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2016-09-01

    A network of conserved proteases known as the intramitochondrial quality control (IMQC) system is central to mitochondrial protein homeostasis and cellular health. IMQC proteases also appear to participate in establishment of signaling cues for mitochondrion-to-nucleus communication. However, little is known about this process. Here, we show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inactivation of the membrane-bound IMQC protease Oma1 interferes with oxidative-stress responses through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during logarithmic growth and reduced stress signaling via the TORC1-Rim15-Msn2/Msn4 axis. Pharmacological or genetic prevention of ROS accumulation in Oma1-deficient cells restores this defective TOR signaling. Additionally, inactivation of the Oma1 ortholog in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans also alters TOR signaling and, unexpectedly, leads to increased resistance to neutrophil killing and virulence in the invertebrate animal model Galleria mellonella Our findings reveal a novel and evolutionarily conserved link between IMQC and TOR-mediated signaling that regulates physiological plasticity and pancellular oxidative-stress responses.

  2. Independent Control of Organogenesis and Shoot Tip Abortion are Key Factors to Developmental Plasticity in Kiwifruit (Actinidia)

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Toshi M.; Seleznyova, Alla N.; Barnett, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims In kiwifruit (Actinidia), the number of nodes per shoot is highly variable and is influenced by genotype and environmental conditions. To understand this developmental plasticity, three key processes were studied: organogenesis by the shoot apical meristem during shoot growth; expansion of phytomers; and shoot tip abortion. Methods Studies were made of organogenesis and shoot tip abortion using light and scanning electron microscopy. The effect of temperature on shoot growth cessation was investigated using temperature indices over the budbreak period, and patterns of shoot tip abortion were quantified using stochastic modelling. Key Results All growing buds began organogenesis before budbreak. During shoot development, the number of phytomers initiated by the shoot apical meristem is correlated with the number of expanding phytomers and the mean internode length. Shoot tip abortion is preceded by growth cessation and is not brought about by the death of the shoot apical meristem, but occurs by tissue necrosis in the sub-apical zone. For most genotypes studied, the probability of shoot tip abortion is higher during expansion of the preformed part of the shoot. Lower temperatures during early growth result in a higher probability of shoot tip abortion. Conclusions Organogenesis and shoot tip abortion are controlled independently. All buds have the potential to become long shoots. Conditions that increase early growth rate postpone shoot tip abortion. PMID:17650513

  3. Tumor-Specific Chromosome Mis-Segregation Controls Cancer Plasticity by Maintaining Tumor Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuanjie; Ru, Ning; Xiao, Huasheng; Chaturbedi, Abhishek; Hoa, Neil T.; Tian, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Hang; Ke, Chao; Yan, Fengrong; Nelson, Jodi; Li, Zhenzhi; Gramer, Robert; Yu, Liping; Siegel, Eric; Zhang, Xiaona; Jia, Zhenyu; Jadus, Martin R.; Limoli, Charles L.; Linskey, Mark E.; Xing, Jianhua; Zhou, Yi-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Aneuploidy with chromosome instability is a cancer hallmark. We studied chromosome 7 (Chr7) copy number variation (CNV) in gliomas and in primary cultures derived from them. We found tumor heterogeneity with cells having Chr7-CNV commonly occurs in gliomas, with a higher percentage of cells in high-grade gliomas carrying more than 2 copies of Chr7, as compared to low-grade gliomas. Interestingly, all Chr7-aneuploid cell types in the parental culture of established glioma cell lines reappeared in single-cell-derived subcultures. We then characterized the biology of three syngeneic glioma cultures dominated by different Chr7-aneuploid cell types. We found phenotypic divergence for cells following Chr7 mis-segregation, which benefited overall tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Mathematical modeling suggested the involvement of chromosome instability and interactions among cell subpopulations in restoring the optimal equilibrium of tumor cell types. Both our experimental data and mathematical modeling demonstrated that the complexity of tumor heterogeneity could be enhanced by the existence of chromosomes with structural abnormality, in addition to their mis-segregations. Overall, our findings show, for the first time, the involvement of chromosome instability in maintaining tumor heterogeneity, which underlies the enhanced growth, persistence and treatment resistance of cancers. PMID:24282558

  4. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma regulates synapse structure, function and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Horn, Katherine E; Xu, Bin; Gobert, Delphine; Hamam, Bassam N; Thompson, Katherine M; Wu, Chia-Lun; Bouchard, Jean-François; Uetani, Noriko; Racine, Ronald J; Tremblay, Michel L; Ruthazer, Edward S; Chapman, C Andrew; Kennedy, Timothy E

    2012-07-01

    The mechanisms that regulate synapse formation and maintenance are incompletely understood. In particular, relatively few inhibitors of synapse formation have been identified. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase σ (RPTPσ), a transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase, is widely expressed by neurons in developing and mature mammalian brain, and functions as a receptor for chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that inhibits axon regeneration following injury. In this study, we address RPTPσ function in the mature brain. We demonstrate increased axon collateral branching in the hippocampus of RPTPσ null mice during normal aging or following chemically induced seizure, indicating that RPTPσ maintains neural circuitry by inhibiting axonal branching. Previous studies demonstrated a role for pre-synaptic RPTPσ promoting synaptic differentiation during development; however, subcellular fractionation revealed enrichment of RPTPσ in post-synaptic densities. We report that neurons lacking RPTPσ have an increased density of pre-synaptic varicosities in vitro and increased dendritic spine density and length in vivo. RPTPσ knockouts exhibit an increased frequency of miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents, and greater paired-pulse facilitation, consistent with increased synapse density but reduced synaptic efficiency. Furthermore, RPTPσ nulls exhibit reduced long-term potentiation and enhanced novel object recognition memory. We conclude that RPTPσ limits synapse number and regulates synapse structure and function in the mature CNS.

  5. Structural plasticity in the topology of the membrane-interacting domain of HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Freites, J Alfredo; He, Jing; Tobias, Douglas J; Wimley, William C; Ladokhin, Alexey S

    2014-02-04

    We use a number of computational and experimental approaches to investigate the membrane topology of the membrane-interacting C-terminal domain of the HIV-1 gp41 fusion protein. Several putative transmembrane regions are identified using hydrophobicity analysis based on the Wimley-White scales, including the membrane-proximal external region (MPER). The MPER region is an important target for neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibodies and is believed to have an interfacial topology in the membrane. To assess the possibility of a transmembrane topology of MPER, we examined the membrane interactions of a peptide corresponding to a 22-residue stretch of the MPER sequence (residues 662-683) using fluorescence spectroscopy and oriented circular dichroism. In addition to the previously reported interfacial location, we identify a stable transmembrane conformation of the peptide in synthetic lipid bilayers. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the MPER-derived peptide in a lipid bilayer demonstrate a stable helical structure with an average tilt of 24 degrees, with the five tryptophan residues sampling different environments inside the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayer, consistent with the observed spectral properties of intrinsic fluorescence. The degree of lipid bilayer penetration obtained by computer simulation was verified using depth-dependent fluorescence quenching of a selectively attached fluorescence probe. Overall, our data indicate that the MPER sequence can have at least two stable conformations in the lipid bilayer, interfacial and transmembrane, and suggest a possibility that external perturbations can switch the topology during physiological functioning.

  6. Structural plasticity and dynamic selectivity of acid-sensing ion channel-spider toxin complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Baconguis, Isabelle; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-07-29

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-independent, amiloride-sensitive channels involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from nociception to taste. Despite the importance of ASICs in physiology, we know little about the mechanism of channel activation. Here we show that psalmotoxin activates non-selective and Na+-selective currents in chicken ASIC1a at pH7.25 and 5.5, respectively. Crystal structures of ASIC1a–psalmotoxin complexes map the toxin binding site to the extracellular domain and show how toxin binding triggers an expansion of the extracellular vestibule and stabilization of the open channel pore. At pH7.25 the pore is approximately 10Å in diameter, whereas at pH5.5 the pore is largely hydrophobic and elliptical in cross-section with dimensions of approximately 5 by 7Å, consistent with a barrier mechanism for ion selectivity. These studies define mechanisms for activation of ASICs, illuminate the basis for dynamic ion selectivity and provide the blueprints for new therapeutic agents.

  7. Multiple keys for a single lock: the unusual structural plasticity of the nucleotidyltransferase (4')/kanamycin complex.

    PubMed

    Matesanz, Ruth; Diaz, José Fernando; Corzana, Francisco; Santana, Andrés G; Bastida, Agatha; Asensio, Juan Luis

    2012-03-05

    The most common mode of bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is the enzyme-catalysed chemical modification of the drug. Over the last two decades, significant efforts in medicinal chemistry have been focused on the design of non- inactivable antibiotics. Unfortunately, this strategy has met with limited success on account of the remarkably wide substrate specificity of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. To understand the mechanisms behind substrate promiscuity, we have performed a comprehensive experimental and theoretical analysis of the molecular-recognition processes that lead to antibiotic inactivation by Staphylococcus aureus nucleotidyltransferase 4'(ANT(4')), a clinically relevant protein. According to our results, the ability of this enzyme to inactivate structurally diverse polycationic molecules relies on three specific features of the catalytic region. First, the dominant role of electrostatics in aminoglycoside recognition, in combination with the significant extension of the enzyme anionic regions, confers to the protein/antibiotic complex a highly dynamic character. The motion deduced for the bound antibiotic seem to be essential for the enzyme action and probably provide a mechanism to explore alternative drug inactivation modes. Second, the nucleotide recognition is exclusively mediated by the inorganic fragment. In fact, even inorganic triphosphate can be employed as a substrate. Third, ANT(4') seems to be equipped with a duplicated basic catalyst that is able to promote drug inactivation through different reactive geometries. This particular combination of features explains the enzyme versatility and renders the design of non-inactivable derivatives a challenging task.

  8. Obesity-Induced Structural and Neuronal Plasticity in the Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jennifer L; Drysdale, Michael; Baimel, Corey; Kaur, Manpreet; MacGowan, Taigan; Pitman, Kimberley A; Borgland, Stephanie L

    2017-01-18

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) integrates sensory information with the current value of foods and updates actions based on this information. Obese humans and rats fed a cafeteria diet have impaired devaluation of food rewards, implicating a potential obesity-induced dysfunction of the OFC. We hypothesized that obesity alters OFC pyramidal neuronal structure and function and reduces conditioned suppression of feeding. Rats were given restricted (1 h/day), extended (23 h/day) or no (chow only) access to a cafeteria diet and tested for a conditioned suppression of feeding. Golgi-cox impregnation and whole-cell patch clamp experiments were performed in lateral OFC pyramidal neurons of rats from the 3 feeding groups. Rats with 40 days of extended, but not restricted, access to a cafeteria diet became obese and continued to feed during foot shock-predicting cues. Access to a cafeteria diet induced morphological changes in basilar dendrites of lateral OFC pyramidal neurons. While there were no alterations in excitatory synaptic transmission underlying altered spine density, we observed a more depolarized resting membrane potential. This was accompanied by decreased inhibitory synaptic transmission onto lateral OFC pyramidal neurons due to decreased release probability at GABAergic inputs. These changes could underlie the inability of the OFC to encode changes in the motivation value of food that is observed in obese rodents and humans.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 18 January 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2016.284.

  9. Structural plasticity and dynamic selectivity of acid-sensing ion channel-spider toxin complexes.

    PubMed

    Baconguis, Isabelle; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-09-20

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-independent, amiloride-sensitive channels involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from nociception to taste. Despite the importance of ASICs in physiology, we know little about the mechanism of channel activation. Here we show that psalmotoxin activates non-selective and Na(+)-selective currents in chicken ASIC1a at pH 7.25 and 5.5, respectively. Crystal structures of ASIC1a-psalmotoxin complexes map the toxin binding site to the extracellular domain and show how toxin binding triggers an expansion of the extracellular vestibule and stabilization of the open channel pore. At pH 7.25 the pore is approximately 10 Å in diameter, whereas at pH 5.5 the pore is largely hydrophobic and elliptical in cross-section with dimensions of approximately 5 by 7 Å, consistent with a barrier mechanism for ion selectivity. These studies define mechanisms for activation of ASICs, illuminate the basis for dynamic ion selectivity and provide the blueprints for new therapeutic agents.

  10. Accelerated design and quality control of impact modifiers for plastics through atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Gunter

    2011-03-01

    Standard polymer resins are often too brittle or do not meet other mechanical property requirements for typical polymer applications. To achieve desired properties it is common to disperse so called ``impact modifiers'', which are spherical latex particles with diameters of much less than one micrometer, into the pure resin. Understanding and control of the entire process from latex particle formation to subsequent dispersion into polymer resins are necessary to accelerate the development of new materials that meet specific application requirements. In this work AFM imaging and nanoindentation techniques in combination with AFM-based spectroscopic techniques were applied to assess latex formation and dispersion. The size and size distribution of the latex particles can be measured based on AFM amplitude modulation images. AFM phase images provide information about the chemical homogeneity of individual particles. Nanoindentation may be used to estimate their elastic and viscoelastic properties. Proprietary creep and nanoscale Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) tests that we have developed were used to measure these mechanical properties. The small size of dispersed latex inclusions requires local mechanical and spectroscopic analysis techniques with high lateral and spatial resolution. We applied the CRAVE AFM method, developed at NIST, to perform mechanical analysis of individual latex inclusions and compared results with those obtained using nanoscale DMA. NanoIR, developed by Anasys Inc., and principal component confocal Raman were used for spectroscopic analysis and results from both techniques compared.

  11. Environmental control of microRNAs in the nervous system: Implications in plasticity and behavior.

    PubMed

    Codocedo, Juan F; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) a little over 20 years ago was revolutionary given that miRNAs are essential to numerous physiological and physiopathological processes. Currently, several aspects of the biogenic process of miRNAs and of the translational repression mechanism exerted on their targets mRNAs are known in detail. In fact, the development of bioinformatics tools for predicting miRNA targets has established that miRNAs have the potential to regulate almost all known biological processes. Therefore, the identification of the signals and molecular mechanisms that regulate miRNA function is relevant to understanding the role of miRNAs in both pathological and adaptive processes. Recently, a series of studies has focused on miRNA expression in the brain, establishing that their levels are altered in response to various environmental factors (EFs), such as light, sound, odorants, nutrients, drugs and stress. In this review, we discuss how exposure to various EFs modulates the expression and function of several miRNAs in the nervous system and how this control determines adaptation to their environment, behavior and disease state.

  12. Constraint therapy versus intensive training: implications for motor control and brain plasticity after stroke.

    PubMed

    Medée, Béatrice; Bellaiche, Soline; Revol, Patrice; Jacquin-Courtois, Sophie; Arsenault, Lisette; Guichard-Mayel, Audrey; Delporte, Ludovic; Rode, Gilles; Rossetti, Yves; Boisson, Dominique; Luauté, Jacques

    2010-12-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that constraint induced movement therapy (CIMT) improves upper limb motor impairment following stroke. This rehabilitation method combines constraint of the less-affected upperlimb with intensive training of the paretic limb. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in a single case study, the respective effects of each of these two therapeutic interventions. The patient selected was a 32-year-old right-handed woman. Three and a half years prior to inclusion, she suffered a left capsular infarct responsible for a right hemiparesis. Several assessments were carried out before and after constraint therapy and then after intensive training. Each assessment included measures of hand function as well as a three-dimensional (3D) analysis of prehension. Results showed a significant improvement of motor performance after the constraint period and an additional amelioration after the intensive training period. Kinematic analysis showed that the transport phase of movement (movement time and velocity peaks) was improved after the constraint period, whereas the grasping phase (maximum grip aperture) was modified after intensive training. These data could reflect a specific effect of treatment on each phase of the prehension task, or a more general proximal-to-distal gradient of recovery. Although firm conclusions are not warranted on the basis of this single case study, we confirm the utility of 3D motion analysis to evaluate objectively the effectiveness of a therapeutic intervention. We also discuss the implications of our findings for understanding processes of motor control reorganisation.

  13. The serotonin receptor 7 and the structural plasticity of brain circuits

    PubMed Central

    Volpicelli, Floriana; Speranza, Luisa; di Porzio, Umberto; Crispino, Marianna; Perrone-Capano, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) modulates numerous physiological processes in the nervous system. Together with its function as neurotransmitter, 5-HT regulates neurite outgrowth, dendritic spine shape and density, growth cone motility and synapse formation during development. In the mammalian brain 5-HT innervation is virtually ubiquitous and the diversity and specificity of its signaling and function arise from at least 20 different receptors, grouped in 7 classes. Here we will focus on the role 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7R) in the correct establishment of neuronal cytoarchitecture during development, as also suggested by its involvement in several neurodevelopmental disorders. The emerging picture shows that this receptor is a key player contributing not only to shape brain networks during development but also to remodel neuronal wiring in the mature brain, thus controlling cognitive and emotional responses. The activation of 5-HT7R might be one of the mechanisms underlying the ability of the CNS to respond to different stimuli by modulation of its circuit configuration. PMID:25309369

  14. Structural plasticity of calmodulin on the surface of CaF2 nanoparticles preserves its biological function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astegno, Alessandra; Maresi, Elena; Marino, Valerio; Dominici, Paola; Pedroni, Marco; Piccinelli, Fabio; Dell'Orco, Daniele

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly used in biomedical applications and are especially attractive as biocompatible and biodegradable protein delivery systems. Herein, the interaction between biocompatible 25 nm CaF2 nanoparticles and the ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin has been investigated in order to assess the potential of these particles to serve as suitable surface protein carriers. Calmodulin is a multifunctional messenger protein that activates a wide variety of signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells by changing its conformation in a calcium-dependent manner. Isothermal titration calorimetry and circular dichroism studies have shown that the interaction between calmodulin and CaF2 nanoparticles occurs with physiologically relevant affinity and that the binding process is fully reversible, occurring without significant alterations in protein secondary and tertiary structures. Experiments performed with a mutant form of calmodulin having an impaired Ca2+-binding ability in the C-terminal lobe suggest that the EF-hand Ca2+-binding motifs are directly involved in the binding of calmodulin to the CaF2 matrix. The residual capability of nanoparticle-bound calmodulin to function as a calcium sensor protein, binding to and altering the activity of a target protein, was successfully probed by biochemical assays. Even if efficiently carried by CaF2 nanoparticles, calmodulin may dissociate, thus retaining the ability to bind the peptide encompassing the putative C-terminal calmodulin-binding domain of glutamate decarboxylase and activate the enzyme. We conclude that the high flexibility and structural plasticity of calmodulin are responsible for the preservation of its function when bound in high amounts to a nanoparticle surface.Nanoparticles are increasingly used in biomedical applications and are especially attractive as biocompatible and biodegradable protein delivery systems. Herein, the interaction between biocompatible 25 nm CaF2 nanoparticles and the ubiquitous

  15. Identifying Structure-Property Relationships Through DREAM.3D Representative Volume Elements and DAMASK Crystal Plasticity Simulations: An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Martin; Groeber, Michael; Haase, Christian; Molodov, Dmitri A.; Roters, Franz; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-03-01

    Predicting, understanding, and controlling the mechanical behavior is the most important task when designing structural materials. Modern alloy systems—in which multiple deformation mechanisms, phases, and defects are introduced to overcome the inverse strength-ductility relationship—give raise to multiple possibilities for modifying the deformation behavior, rendering traditional, exclusively experimentally-based alloy development workflows inappropriate. For fast and efficient alloy design, it is therefore desirable to predict the mechanical performance of candidate alloys by simulation studies to replace time- and resource-consuming mechanical tests. Simulation tools suitable for this task need to correctly predict the mechanical behavior in dependence of alloy composition, microstructure, texture, phase fractions, and processing history. Here, an integrated computational materials engineering approach based on the open source software packages DREAM.3D and DAMASK (Düsseldorf Advanced Materials Simulation Kit) that enables such virtual material development is presented. More specific, our approach consists of the following three steps: (1) acquire statistical quantities that describe a microstructure, (2) build a representative volume element based on these quantities employing DREAM.3D, and (3) evaluate the representative volume using a predictive crystal plasticity material model provided by DAMASK. Exemplarily, these steps are here conducted for a high-manganese steel.

  16. Multiclass Classification by Adaptive Network of Dendritic Neurons with Binary Synapses Using Structural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Shaista; Basu, Arindam

    2016-01-01

    The development of power-efficient neuromorphic devices presents the challenge of designing spike pattern classification algorithms which can be implemented on low-precision hardware and can also achieve state-of-the-art performance. In our pursuit of meeting this challenge, we present a pattern classification model which uses a sparse connection matrix and exploits the mechanism of nonlinear dendritic processing to achieve high classification accuracy. A rate-based structural learning rule for multiclass classification is proposed which modifies a connectivity matrix of binary synaptic connections by choosing the best “k” out of “d” inputs to make connections on every dendritic branch (k < < d). Because learning only modifies connectivity, the model is well suited for implementation in neuromorphic systems using address-event representation (AER). We develop an ensemble method which combines several dendritic classifiers to achieve enhanced generalization over individual classifiers. We have two major findings: (1) Our results demonstrate that an ensemble created with classifiers comprising moderate number of dendrites performs better than both ensembles of perceptrons and of complex dendritic trees. (2) In order to determine the moderate number of dendrites required for a specific classification problem, a two-step solution is proposed. First, an adaptive approach is proposed which scales the relative size of the dendritic trees of neurons for each class. It works by progressively adding dendrites with fixed number of synapses to the network, thereby allocating synaptic resources as per the complexity of the given problem. As a second step, theoretical capacity calculations are used to convert each neuronal dendritic tree to its optimal topology where dendrites of each class are assigned different number of synapses. The performance of the model is evaluated on classification of handwritten digits from the benchmark MNIST dataset and compared with other

  17. Multiclass Classification by Adaptive Network of Dendritic Neurons with Binary Synapses Using Structural Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shaista; Basu, Arindam

    2016-01-01

    The development of power-efficient neuromorphic devices presents the challenge of designing spike pattern classification algorithms which can be implemented on low-precision hardware and can also achieve state-of-the-art performance. In our pursuit of meeting this challenge, we present a pattern classification model which uses a sparse connection matrix and exploits the mechanism of nonlinear dendritic processing to achieve high classification accuracy. A rate-based structural learning rule for multiclass classification is proposed which modifies a connectivity matrix of binary synaptic connections by choosing the best "k" out of "d" inputs to make connections on every dendritic branch (k < < d). Because learning only modifies connectivity, the model is well suited for implementation in neuromorphic systems using address-event representation (AER). We develop an ensemble method which combines several dendritic classifiers to achieve enhanced generalization over individual classifiers. We have two major findings: (1) Our results demonstrate that an ensemble created with classifiers comprising moderate number of dendrites performs better than both ensembles of perceptrons and of complex dendritic trees. (2) In order to determine the moderate number of dendrites required for a specific classification problem, a two-step solution is proposed. First, an adaptive approach is proposed which scales the relative size of the dendritic trees of neurons for each class. It works by progressively adding dendrites with fixed number of synapses to the network, thereby allocating synaptic resources as per the complexity of the given problem. As a second step, theoretical capacity calculations are used to convert each neuronal dendritic tree to its optimal topology where dendrites of each class are assigned different number of synapses. The performance of the model is evaluated on classification of handwritten digits from the benchmark MNIST dataset and compared with other spike

  18. NASA/DOD Control/Structures Interaction Technology, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Robert L. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Control/structures interactions, deployment dynamics and system performance of large flexible spacecraft are discussed. Spacecraft active controls, deployable truss structures, deployable antennas, solar power systems for space stations, pointing control systems for space station gimballed payloads, computer-aided design for large space structures, and passive damping for flexible structures are among the topics covered.

  19. System identification and control of the JPL active structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J. L.; Lurie, B. J.; O'Brien, J. F.; Chu, C.-C.; Smith, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent advances in structural quieting technology as applied to active truss structures intended for high precision space based optics applications. Collocated active damping control loops are designed in order to impedance match piezoelectric active members to the structure. Noncollocated control loops are also studied in relation to controlling lightly damped structures.

  20. Masticatory loading, function, and plasticity: a microanatomical analysis of mammalian circumorbital soft-tissue structures.

    PubMed

    Jasarević, Eldin; Ning, Jie; Daniel, Ashley N; Menegaz, Rachel A; Johnson, Jeffrey J; Stack, M Sharon; Ravosa, Matthew J

    2010-04-01

    In contrast to experimental evidence regarding the postorbital bar, postorbital septum, and browridge, there is exceedingly little evidence regarding the load-bearing nature of soft-tissue structures of the mammalian circumorbital region. This hinders our understanding of pronounced transformations during primate origins, in which euprimates evolved a postorbital bar from an ancestor with the primitive mammalian condition where only soft tissues spanned the lateral orbital margin between frontal bone and zygomatic arch. To address this significant gap, we investigated the postorbital microanatomy of rabbits subjected to long-term variation in diet-induced masticatory stresses. Rabbits exhibit a masticatory complex and feeding behaviors similar to primates, yet retain a more primitive mammalian circumorbital region. Three cohorts were obtained as weanlings and raised on different diets until adult. Following euthanasia, postorbital soft tissues were dissected away, fixed, and decalcified. These soft tissues were divided into inferior, intermediate, and superior units and then dehydrated, embedded, and sectioned. H&E staining was used to characterize overall architecture. Collagen orientation and complexity were evaluated via picrosirius-red staining. Safranin-O identified proteoglycan content with additional immunostaining performed to assess Type-II collagen expression. Surprisingly, the ligament along the lateral orbital wall was composed of elastic fibrocartilage. A more degraded organization of collagen fibers in this postorbital fibrocartilage is correlated with increased masticatory forces due to a more fracture-resistant diet. Furthermore, the lack of marked changes in the extracellular composition of the lateral orbital wall related to tissue viscoelasticity suggests it is unlikely that long-term exposure to elevated masticatory stresses underlies the development of a bony postorbital bar.

  1. Sleep-Dependent Structural Synaptic Plasticity of Inhibitory Synapses in the Dendrites of Hypocretin/Orexin Neurons.

    PubMed

    Elbaz, Idan; Zada, David; Tovin, Adi; Braun, Tslil; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Wang, Gordon; Mourrain, Philippe; Appelbaum, Lior

    2016-10-12

    Sleep is tightly regulated by the circadian clock and homeostatic mechanisms. Although the sleep/wake cycle is known to be associated with structural and physiological synaptic changes that benefit the brain, the function of sleep is still debated. The hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) neurons regulate various functions including feeding, reward, sleep, and wake. Continuous imaging of single neuronal circuits in live animals is vital to understanding the role of sleep in regulating synaptic dynamics, and the transparency of the zebrafish model enables time-lapse imaging of single synapses during both day and night. Here, we use the gephyrin (Gphnb) protein, a central inhibitory synapse organizer, as a fluorescent post-synaptic marker of inhibitory synapses. Double labeling showed that Gphnb-tagRFP and collybistin-EGFP clusters co-localized in dendritic inhibitory synapses. Using a transgenic hcrt:Gphnb-EGFP zebrafish, we showed that the number of inhibitory synapses in the dendrites of Hcrt neurons was increased during development. To determine the effect of sleep on the inhibitory synapses, we performed two-photon live imaging of Gphnb-EGFP in Hcrt neurons during day and night, under light/dark and constant light and dark conditions, and following sleep deprivation (SD). We found that synapse number increased during the night under light/dark conditions but that these changes were eliminated under constant light or dark conditions. SD reduced synapse number during the night, and the number increased during post-deprivation daytime sleep rebound. These results suggest that rhythmic structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses in Hcrt dendrites is independent of the circadian clock and is modulated by consolidated wake and sleep.

  2. Investigation on environmental factors of waste plastics into oil and its emulsion to control the emission in DI diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P Senthil; Sankaranarayanan, G

    2016-12-01

    Rapid depletion of conventional fossil fuel resources, their rising prices and environmental issues are the major concern of alternative fuels. On the other hand waste plastics cause a very serious environmental dispute because of their disposal problems. Waste plastics are one of the promising factors for fuel production because of their high heat of combustion and their increasing availability in local communities. In this study, waste plastic oil (WPO) is tested in DI diesel engine to evaluate its performance and emission characteristics. Results showed that oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission get increased with WPO when compared to diesel oil. Further, the three phase (O/W/O) plastic oil emulsion is prepared with an aid of ultrasonicater according to the %v (10, 20 & 30). Results expose that brake thermal efficiency (BTE) is found to be increased. NOx and smoke emissions were reduced up to 247ppm and 41% respectively, when compared to diesel at full load condition with use of 30% emulsified WPO.

  3. Neuronal plasticity and seasonal reproduction in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Michael N.; Ladha, Zamin; Coolen, Lique M.; Hileman, Stanley M.; Connors, John M.; Goodman, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Seasonal reproduction represents a naturally occurring example of functional plasticity in the adult brain since it reflects changes in neuroendocrine pathways controlling GnRH secretion and, in particular, the responsiveness of GnRH neurons to estradiol negative feedback. Structural plasticity within this neural circuitry may, in part, be responsible for seasonal switches in the negative feedback control of GnRH secretion that underlies annual reproductive transitions. In this paper, we review evidence for structural changes in the circuitry responsible for seasonal inhibition of GnRH secretion in sheep. These include changes in synaptic inputs onto GnRH neurons, as well as onto dopamine neurons in the A15 cell group, a nucleus that play a key role in estradiol negative feedback. We also present preliminary data suggesting a role for neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors as an early mechanistic step in the plasticity that accompanies seasonal reproductive transitions in the sheep. Finally, we review recent evidence suggesting that kisspeptin cells of the arcuate nucleus constitute a critical intermediary in the control of seasonal reproduction. While a majority of the data for a role of neuronal plasticity in seasonal reproduction has come from the sheep model, the players and principles are likely to have relevance for reproduction in a wide variety of vertebrates, including humans, and in both health and disease. PMID:21143669

  4. Neuronal plasticity and seasonal reproduction in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Michael N; Ladha, Zamin; Coolen, Lique M; Hileman, Stanley M; Connors, John M; Goodman, Robert L

    2010-12-01

    Seasonal reproduction represents a naturally occurring example of functional plasticity in the adult brain as it reflects changes in neuroendocrine pathways controlling gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and, in particular, the responsiveness of GnRH neurons to estradiol negative feedback. Structural plasticity within this neural circuitry may, in part, be responsible for seasonal switches in the negative feedback control of GnRH secretion that underlie annual reproductive transitions. We review evidence for structural changes in the circuitry responsible for seasonal inhibition of GnRH secretion in sheep. These include changes in synaptic inputs onto GnRH neurons, as well as onto dopamine neurons in the A15 cell group, a nucleus that plays a key role in estradiol negative feedback. We also present preliminary data suggesting a role for neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors as an early mechanistic step in the plasticity that accompanies seasonal reproductive transitions in sheep. Finally, we review recent evidence suggesting that kisspeptin cells of the arcuate nucleus constitute a critical intermediary in the control of seasonal reproduction. Although a majority of the data for a role of neuronal plasticity in seasonal reproduction has come from the sheep model, the players and principles are likely to have relevance for reproduction in a wide variety of vertebrates, including humans, and in both health and disease.

  5. Deformation mechanisms of plasticized starch materials.

    PubMed

    Mikus, P-Y; Alix, S; Soulestin, J; Lacrampe, M F; Krawczak, P; Coqueret, X; Dole, P

    2014-12-19

    The aim of this paper is to understand the influence of plasticizer and plasticizer amount on the mechanical and deformation behaviors of plasticized starch. Glycerol, sorbitol and mannitol have been used as plasticizers. After extrusion of the various samples, dynamic mechanical analyses and video-controlled tensile tests have been performed. It was found that the nature of plasticizer, its amount as well as the aging of the material has an impact on the involved deformation mechanism. The variations of volume deformation could be explained by an antiplasticization effect (low plasticizer amount), a phase-separation phenomenon (excess of plasticizer) and/or by the retrogradation of starch.

  6. Integrated Control with Structural Feedback to Enable Lightweight Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation for the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Technical Conference covers the benefits of active structural control, related research areas, and focuses on the use of optimal control allocation for the prevention of critical loads. Active control of lightweight structures has the potential to reduce aircraft weight and fuel burn. Sensor, control law, materials, control effector, and system level research will be necessary to enable active control of lightweight structures. Optimal control allocation with structural feedback has been shown in simulation to be feasible in preventing critical loads and is one example of a control law to enable future lightweight aircraft.

  7. Plasticity of the β-trefoil protein fold in the recognition and control of invertebrate predators and parasites by a fungal defence system.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Mario; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Butschi, Alex; Wälti, Martin A; Egloff, Pascal; Stutz, Katrin; Yan, Shi; Collot, Mayeul; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Wilson, Iain B H; Hengartner, Michael O; Aebi, Markus; Allain, Frédéric H-T; Künzler, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Discrimination between self and non-self is a prerequisite for any defence mechanism; in innate defence, this discrimination is often mediated by lectins recognizing non-self carbohydrate structures and so relies on an arsenal of host lectins with different specificities towards target organism carbohydrate structures. Recently, cytoplasmic lectins isolated from fungal fruiting bodies have been shown to play a role in the defence of multicellular fungi against predators and parasites. Here, we present a novel fruiting body lectin, CCL2, from the ink cap mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea. We demonstrate the toxicity of the lectin towards Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster and present its NMR solution structure in complex with the trisaccharide, GlcNAcβ1,4[Fucα1,3]GlcNAc, to which it binds with high specificity and affinity in vitro. The structure reveals that the monomeric CCL2 adopts a β-trefoil fold and recognizes the trisaccharide by a single, topologically novel carbohydrate-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of CCL2 and identification of C. elegans mutants resistant to this lectin show that its nematotoxicity is mediated by binding to α1,3-fucosylated N-glycan core structures of nematode glycoproteins; feeding with fluorescently labeled CCL2 demonstrates that these target glycoproteins localize to the C. elegans intestine. Since the identified glycoepitope is characteristic for invertebrates but absent from fungi, our data show that the defence function of fruiting body lectins is based on the specific recognition of non-self carbohydrate structures. The trisaccharide specifically recognized by CCL2 is a key carbohydrate determinant of pollen and insect venom allergens implying this particular glycoepitope is targeted by both fungal defence and mammalian immune systems. In summary, our results demonstrate how the plasticity of a common protein fold can contribute to the recognition and control of antagonists by an innate defence mechanism

  8. Emergence of network structure due to spike-timing-dependent plasticity in recurrent neuronal networks IV: structuring synaptic pathways among recurrent connections.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Matthieu; Burkitt, Anthony N; Grayden, David B; Thomas, Doreen A; van Hemmen, J Leo

    2009-12-01

    In neuronal networks, the changes of synaptic strength (or weight) performed by spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) are hypothesized to give rise to functional network structure. This article investigates how this phenomenon occurs for the excitatory recurrent connections of a network with fixed input weights that is stimulated by external spike trains. We develop a theoretical framework based on the Poisson neuron model to analyze the interplay between the neuronal activity (firing rates and the spike-time correlations) and the learning dynamics, when the network is stimulated by correlated pools of homogeneous Poisson spike trains. STDP can lead to both a stabilization of all the neuron firing rates (homeostatic equilibrium) and a robust weight specialization. The pattern of specialization for the recurrent weights is determined by a relationship between the input firing-rate and correlation structures, the network topology, the STDP parameters and the synaptic response properties. We find conditions for feed-forward pathways or areas with strengthened self-feedback to emerge in an initially homogeneous recurrent network.

  9. Attenuation of stress waves in single and multi-layered structures. [mitigation of elastic and plastic stress waves during spacecraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. C. S.; Tsui, C. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were made of the attenuation of the stress waves during passage through single and multilayer structures. The investigation included studies on elastic and plastic stress wave propagation in the composites and those on shock mitigating material characteristics such as dynamic stress-strain relations and energy absorbing properties. The results of the studies are applied to methods for reducing the stresses imposed on a spacecraft during planetary or ocean landings.

  10. Impact of Sox9 Dosage and Hes1-mediated Notch Signaling in Controlling the Plasticity of Adult Pancreatic Duct Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hosokawa, Shinichi; Furuyama, Kenichiro; Horiguchi, Masashi; Aoyama, Yoshiki; Tsuboi, Kunihiko; Sakikubo, Morito; Goto, Toshihiko; Hirata, Koji; Tanabe, Wataru; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Uemoto, Shinji; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    In the adult pancreas, there has been a long-standing dispute as to whether stem/precursor populations that retain plasticity to differentiate into endocrine or acinar cell types exist in ducts. We previously reported that adult Sox9-expressing duct cells are sufficiently plastic to supply new acinar cells in Sox9-IRES-CreERT2 knock-in mice. In the present study, using Sox9-IRES-CreERT2 knock-in mice as a model, we aimed to analyze how plasticity is controlled in adult ducts. Adult duct cells in these mice express less Sox9 than do wild-type mice but Hes1 equally. Acinar cell differentiation was accelerated by Hes1 inactivation, but suppressed by NICD induction in adult Sox9-expressing cells. Quantitative analyses showed that Sox9 expression increased with the induction of NICD but did not change with Hes1 inactivation, suggesting that Notch regulates Hes1 and Sox9 in parallel. Taken together, these findings suggest that Hes1-mediated Notch activity determines the plasticity of adult pancreatic duct cells and that there may exist a dosage requirement of Sox9 for keeping the duct cell identity in the adult pancreas. In contrast to the extended capability of acinar cell differentiation by Hes1 inactivation, we obtained no evidence of islet neogenesis from Hes1-depleted duct cells in physiological or PDL-induced injured conditions. PMID:25687338

  11. Control structures for high speed processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, G. K.; Mankin, R.; Owsley, P. A.; Kim, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    A special processor was designed to function as a Reed Solomon decoder with throughput data rate in the Mhz range. This data rate is significantly greater than is possible with conventional digital architectures. To achieve this rate, the processor design includes sequential, pipelined, distributed, and parallel processing. The processor was designed using a high level language register transfer language. The RTL can be used to describe how the different processes are implemented by the hardware. One problem of special interest was the development of dependent processes which are analogous to software subroutines. For greater flexibility, the RTL control structure was implemented in ROM. The special purpose hardware required approximately 1000 SSI and MSI components. The data rate throughput is 2.5 megabits/second. This data rate is achieved through the use of pipelined and distributed processing. This data rate can be compared with 800 kilobits/second in a recently proposed very large scale integration design of a Reed Solomon encoder.

  12. Plastic Surgery Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... PRS GO PSN PSEN GRAFT Contact Us News Plastic Surgery Statistics Plastic surgery procedural statistics from the ... Plastic Surgery Statistics 2005 Plastic Surgery Statistics 2016 Plastic Surgery Statistics Stats Report 2016 National Clearinghouse of ...

  13. A multidisciplinary approach to optimization of controlled space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Padula, Sharon L.; Graves, Philip C.; James, Benjamin B.

    1990-01-01

    A fundamental problem facing controls-structures analysts is a means of determining the trade-offs between structural design parameters and control design parameters in meeting some particular performance criteria. Developing a general optimization-based design methodology integrating the disciplines of structural dynamics and controls is a logical approach. The objective of this study is to develop such a method. Classical design methodology involves three phases. The first is structural optimization, wherein structural member sizes are varied to minimize structural mass, subject to open-loop frequency constraints. The next phase integrates control and structure design with control gains as additional design variables. The final phase is analysis of the 'optimal' integrated design phase considering 'real' actuators and 'standard' member sizes. The control gains could be further optimized for fixed structure, and actuator saturation constraints could be imposed. However, such an approach does not take full advantage of opportunities to tailor the structure and control system design as one system.

  14. ‘White revolution’ to ‘white pollution’—agricultural plastic film mulch in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, E. K.; He, W. Q.; Yan, C. R.

    2014-09-01

    Plastic film mulching has played an important role in Chinese agriculture due to its soil warming and moisture conservation effects. With the help of plastic film mulch technology, grain and cash crop yields have increased by 20-35% and 20-60%, respectively. The area of plastic film coverage in China reached approximately 20 million hectares, and the amount of plastic film used reached 1.25 million tons in 2011. While producing huge benefits, plastic film mulch technology has also brought on a series of pollution hazards. Large amounts of residual plastic film have detrimental effects on soil structure, water and nutrient transport and crop growth, thereby disrupting the agricultural environment and reducing crop production. To control pollution, the Chinese government urgently needs to elevate plastic film standards. Meanwhile, research and development of biodegradable mulch film and multi-functional mulch recovery machinery will help promote effective control and management of residual mulch pollution.

  15. Distributed control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical developments and the results of laboratory experiments are treated as they apply to active attitude and vibration control, as well as static shape control. Modern control theory was employed throughout as the method for obtaining estimation and control laws.

  16. Controller reduction for effective interdisciplinary design of active structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark J.; Quan, Ralph

    1989-01-01

    Control problems of large aerospace structures are intrinsically interdisciplinary and require strategies which address the complete interaction between flexible structures, electromechanical actuators and sensors, and feedback control algorithms. Current research and future directions which will require an interdisciplinary team effort in dynamics, control and optimization of such structures are being surveyed. It is generally agreed that the dynamics of space structures require large scale discrete modeling, resulting in thousands of discrete unknowns. Proven control strategies, on the other hand, employ a low order controller that is based on a reduced order model of structures. Integration of such low order controllers and large scale dynamics models often leads to serious deterioration of the closed loop stability margin and even instability. To alleviate this stability deterioration while low order controllers remain effective, the following approach was investigated: (1) retain low order controllers based on reduced order models of structures as the basic control strategy; (2) introduce a compensator that will directly account for the deterioration of stability margin due to controller-structure integration; and (3) assess overall performance of the integrated control structure system by developing measures of suboptimality in the combination of (1) and (2). The benefits include: simplicity in the design of basic controllers, thus facilitating the optimization of structure control interactions; increased understanding of the roles of the compensator so as to modify the structure as well as the basic controller, if necessary, for improved performance; and adaptability to localize controllers by viewing the compensator as a systems integration filter.

  17. Operation and plasticity of hippocampal CA3 circuits: implications for memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Rebola, Nelson; Carta, Mario; Mulle, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    The CA3 region of the hippocampus is important for rapid encoding of memory. Computational theories have proposed specific roles in hippocampal function and memory for the sparse inputs from the dentate gyrus to CA3 and for the extended local recurrent connectivity that gives rise to the CA3 autoassociative network. Recently, we have gained considerable new insight into the operation and plasticity of CA3 circuits, including the identification of novel forms of synaptic plasticity and their underlying mechanisms, and structural plasticity in the GABAergic control of CA3 circuits. In addition, experimental links between synaptic plasticity of CA3 circuits and memory are starting to emerge.

  18. Anion exchange resins: Structure, formulation, and applications. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the formulation and synthesis of anion exchange resins based on such resins as amides, polyethylenes, and styrenes. Osmotic, sorption, and electrical properties; exchange kinetics behavior; structure studies; and temperature related performance effects on anion exchange resins are considered. Anion exchange chromatography of liquids, and applications in water purification, pollution control, and protein and metallic ion separation are included. (Contains a minimum of 222 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Structure of the iSH2 domain of Human phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p85 beta Subunit Reveals Conformational Plasticity in the Interhelical Turn Region

    SciTech Connect

    C Schauder; L Ma; R Krug; G Montelione; R Guan

    2011-12-31

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) proteins actively trigger signaling pathways leading to cell growth, proliferation and survival. These proteins have multiple isoforms and consist of a catalytic p110 subunit and a regulatory p85 subunit. The iSH2 domain of the p85 {beta} isoform has been implicated in the binding of nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A viruses. Here, the crystal structure of human p85 {beta} iSH2 determined to 3.3 {angstrom} resolution is reported. The structure reveals that this domain mainly consists of a coiled-coil motif. Comparison with the published structure of the bovine p85 {beta} iSH2 domain bound to the influenza A virus nonstructural protein 1 indicates that little or no structural change occurs upon complex formation. By comparing this human p85 {beta} iSH2 structure with the bovine p85 {beta} iSH2 domain, which shares 99% sequence identity, and by comparing the multiple conformations observed within the asymmetric unit of the bovine iSH2 structure, it was found that this coiled-coil domain exhibits a certain degree of conformational variability or 'plasticity' in the interhelical turn region. It is speculated that this plasticity of p85 {beta} iSH2 may play a role in regulating its functional and molecular-recognition properties.

  20. Structural plasticity within highly specific neuronal populations identifies a unique parcellation of motor learning in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Conner, James M.; Rickert, Jessica; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    Cortical networks undergo adaptations during learning, including increases in dendritic complexity and spines. We hypothesized that structural elaborations during learning are restricted to discrete subsets of cells preferentially activated by, and relevant to, novel experience. Accordingly, we examined corticospinal motor neurons segregated on the basis of their distinct descending projection patterns, and their contribution to specific aspects of motor control during a forelimb skilled grasping task in adult rats. Learning-mediated structural adaptations, including extensive expansions of spine density and dendritic complexity, were restricted solely to neurons associated with control of distal forelimb musculature required for skilled grasping; neurons associated with control of proximal musculature were unchanged by the experience. We further found that distal forelimb-projecting and proximal forelimb-projecting neurons are intermingled within motor cortex, and that this distribution does not change as a function of skill acquisition. These findings indicate that representations of novel experience in the adult motor cortex are associated with selective structural expansion in networks of functionally related, active neurons that are distributed across a single cortical domain. These results identify a distinct parcellation of cortical resources in support of learning. PMID:21257908

  1. Crystal Structures and Phase Sequences of Metallocenium Salts with Fluorinated Anions: Effects of Molecular Size and Symmetry on Phase Transitions to Ionic Plastic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Tomoyuki; Funasako, Yusuke; Ishida, Mai; Saruta, Shingo; Kosone, Takashi; Kitazawa, Takafumi

    2016-10-24

    Sandwich compounds often exhibit various phase transitions, including those to plastic phases. To elucidate the general features of the phase transitions in metallocenium salts, the thermal properties and crystal structures of [Fe(C5 Me5 )2 ]X ([1]X), [Co(C5 Me5 )2 ]X ([2]X), and [Fe(C5 Me4 H)2 ]X ([3]X) have been investigated, where the counter anions (X) are Tf2 N (=(CF3 SO2 )2 N(-) ), OTf (=CF3 SO3(-) ), PF6 , and BF4 . The Tf2 N salts commonly undergo phase transitions from an ordered phase at low temperatures to an anion-disordered phase, followed by a plastic phase and finally melt at high temperatures. All these salts exhibit a phase transition to a plastic phase, and the transition temperature generally decreases with decreasing cation size and increasing anion size. The crystal structures of these salts comprise an alternating arrangement of cations and anions. About half of these salts exhibit phase transitions at low temperatures, which are mostly correlated with the order-disorder of the anion.

  2. Polysialic Acid Acute Depletion Induces Structural Plasticity in Interneurons and Impairs the Excitation/Inhibition Balance in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Organotypic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Gómez, Esther; Pérez-Rando, Marta; Vidueira, Sandra; Nacher, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The structure and function of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is affected in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and major depression. Recent studies suggest that imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory activity (E/I) may be responsible for this cortical dysfunction and therefore, may underlie the core symptoms of these diseases. This E/I imbalance seems to be correlated with alterations in the plasticity of interneurons but there is still scarce information on the mechanisms that may link these phenomena. The polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) is a good candidate, because it modulates the neuronal plasticity of interneurons and its expression is altered in schizophrenia and major depression. To address this question, we have developed an in vitro model using mPFC organotypic cultures of transgenic mice displaying fluorescent spiny interneurons. After enzymatic depletion of PSA, the spine density of interneurons, the number of synaptic puncta surrounding pyramidal neuron somata and the E/I ratio were strongly affected. These results point to the polysialylation of NCAM as an important factor in the maintenance of E/I balance and the structural plasticity of interneurons. This may be particularly relevant for better understanding the etiology of schizophrenia and major depression. PMID:27445697

  3. Computer program: Jet 3 to calculate the large elastic plastic dynamically induced deformations of free and restrained, partial and/or complete structural rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, R. W.; Witmer, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    A user-oriented FORTRAN 4 computer program, called JET 3, is presented. The JET 3 program, which employs the spatial finite-element and timewise finite-difference method, can be used to predict the large two-dimensional elastic-plastic transient Kirchhoff-type deformations of a complete or partial structural ring, with various support conditions and restraints, subjected to a variety of initial velocity distributions and externally-applied transient forcing functions. The geometric shapes of the structural ring can be circular or arbitrarily curved and with variable thickness. Strain-hardening and strain-rate effects of the material are taken into account.

  4. Peatland Structural Controls on Spring Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, D. K.; Boutt, D. F.; Hackman, A. M.; Davenport, G.

    2013-12-01

    The species richness of wetland ecosystems' are sustained by the presence of discrete groundwater discharge, or springs. Springs provide thermal refugia and a source of fresh water inflow crucial for survival of many wetland species. The subsurface drivers that control the spatial distribution of surficial springs throughout peatland complexes are poorly understood due to the many challenges peatlands pose for hydrologic characterization, such as the internal heterogeneities, soft, dynamic substrate, and low gradient of peat drainage. This has previously made it difficult to collect spatial data required for restoration projects that seek to support spring obligate and thermally stressed species such as trout. Tidmarsh Farms is a 577-acre site in Southeastern Massachusetts where 100+ years of cranberry farming has significantly altered the original peatland hydrodynamics and ecology. Farming practices such as the regular application of sand, straightening of the main channel, and addition of drainage ditches has strongly degraded this peatland ecosystem. Our research has overlain non-invasive geophysical, thermal, and water isotopic data from the Tidmarsh Farms peatland to provide a detailed visualization of how subsurface peat structure and spring patterns correlate. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has proven particularly useful in characterizing internal peat structure and the mineral soil interface beneath peatlands, we interpolate the peatland basin at a large scale (1 km2) and compare this 3-D surface to the locations of springs on the peat platform. Springs, expressed as cold anomalies in summer and warm anomalies in winter, were specifically located by combining fiber-optic and infrared thermal surveys, utilizing the numerous relic agricultural drainage ditches as a sampling advantage. Isotopic signatures of the spring locations are used to distinguish local and regional discharge, differences that can be explained in part by the peat basin structure

  5. Finite element analysis of large transient elastic-plastic deformations of simple structures, with application to the engine rotor fragment containment/deflection problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, R. W.; Witmer, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Assumed-displacement versions of the finite-element method are developed to predict large-deformation elastic-plastic transient deformations of structures. Both the conventional and a new improved finite-element variational formulation are derived. These formulations are then developed in detail for straight-beam and curved-beam elements undergoing (1) Bernoulli-Euler-Kirchhoff or (2) Timoshenko deformation behavior, in one plane. For each of these categories, several types of assumed-displacement finite elements are developed, and transient response predictions are compared with available exact solutions for small-deflection, linear-elastic transient responses. The present finite-element predictions for large-deflection elastic-plastic transient responses are evaluated via several beam and ring examples for which experimental measurements of transient strains and large transient deformations and independent finite-difference predictions are available.

  6. Structure and mechanical properties of aging Al-Li-Cu-Zr-Sc-Ag alloy after severe plastic deformation by high-pressure torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaigorodova, L. I.; Rasposienko, D. Yu.; Pushin, V. G.; Pilyugin, V. P.; Smirnov, S. V.

    2015-04-01

    The structural and phase transformations have been studied in aging commercial aluminum-lithium alloy Al-1.2 Li-3.2 Cu-0.09 Zr-0.11 Sc-0.4 Ag-0.3 Mg in the as-delivered state and after severe plastic deformation by torsion for 1, 5 and 10 revolutions under a high pressure of 4 GPa. Deformation-induced nanofragmentation and dynamic recrystallization have been found to occur in the alloy. The degree of recrystallization increases with deformation. Nanofragmentation and recrystallization processes are accompanied by the deformation-induced decomposition of solid solution and changes in both the nucleation mechanism of precipitation and the phase composition of the alloy. The influence of a nanostructured nanophase state of the alloy on its mechanical properties (microhardness, plasticity, elastic modulus, and stiffness) is discussed.

  7. Robust Fixed-Structure Controller Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrado, Joseph R.; Haddad, Wassim M.; Gupta, Kajal (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The ability to develop an integrated control system design methodology for robust high performance controllers satisfying multiple design criteria and real world hardware constraints constitutes a challenging task. The increasingly stringent performance specifications required for controlling such systems necessitates a trade-off between controller complexity and robustness. The principle challenge of the minimal complexity robust control design is to arrive at a tractable control design formulation in spite of the extreme complexity of such systems. Hence, design of minimal complexitY robust controllers for systems in the face of modeling errors has been a major preoccupation of system and control theorists and practitioners for the past several decades.

  8. Control Of Flexible Structures-2 (COFS-2) flight control, structure and gimbal system interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, Stanley; Gates, Stephen; Henderson, Timothy; Sackett, Lester; Kirchwey, Kim; Stoddard, Isaac; Storch, Joel

    1988-01-01

    The second Control Of Flexible Structures Flight Experiment (COFS-2) includes a long mast as in the first flight experiment, but with the Langley 15-m hoop column antenna attached via a gimbal system to the top of the mast. The mast is to be mounted in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. The servo-driven gimbal system could be used to point the antenna relative to the mast. The dynamic interaction of the Shuttle Orbiter/COFS-2 system with the Orbiter on-orbit Flight Control System (FCS) and the gimbal pointing control system has been studied using analysis and simulation. The Orbiter pointing requirements have been assessed for their impact on allowable free drift time for COFS experiments. Three fixed antenna configurations were investigated. Also simulated was Orbiter attitude control behavior with active vernier jets during antenna slewing. The effect of experiment mast dampers was included. Control system stability and performance and loads on various portions of the COFS-2 structure were investigated. The study indicates possible undesirable interaction between the Orbiter FCS and the flexible, articulated COFS-2 mast/antenna system, even when restricted to vernier reaction jets.

  9. Structural tailoring and feedback control synthesis - An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Park, K. C.

    1988-01-01

    Structural tailoring provides an attractive method to optimize the performance of actively controlled space structures. However, the simultaneous optimization of control gains and structural properties often becomes prohibitively expensive for large systems and physical insight is often lost in the resulting control law. This paper presents a method for optimization of the closed loop structural system using only structural tailoring. Optimal Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) control theory is used with weighting matrices chosen based on physical considerations. The LQR control law depends only on two scalar gains and the structural properties. Hence, the closed loop-performance can be expressed in terms of the structural parameters. Results are given for a beam and a truss-beam to show the simplicity of the method and the importance of structural tailoring to increase dynamic performance and to reduce the control effort.

  10. ANTEC '86: Plastic-value through technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 23 sections, each containing several papers. There are also papers under a general category and a student category. The section titles are: Plastics in Automotive Division; Thermoplastic Materials and Foams Division; Injection Molding Division; Mold Making and Mold Design Division; Electrical and Electronic Division; Plastics Analysis Division and Electrical and Electronic Division Joint Sessions; Plastics Analysis Division and Engineering Properties and Structure Division; Plastics Analysis Division; Engineering Properties and Structure Division and Plastics Analysis Division Joint Session; Engineering Properties and Structure Division; Blow Molding Division; Extrusion Division and Thermoforming Division Joint Session; Extrusion Division; Thermoforming Division; Plastics Education and Training; Marketing Division; Medical Pla