Science.gov

Sample records for structural reactor components

  1. Impact of conversion to mixed-oxide fuels on reactor structural components

    SciTech Connect

    Yahr, G.T.

    1997-04-01

    The use of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel to replace conventional uranium fuel in commercial light-water power reactors will result in an increase in the neutron flux. The impact of the higher flux on the structural integrity of reactor structural components must be evaluated. This report briefly reviews the effects of radiation on the mechanical properties of metals. Aging degradation studies and reactor operating experience provide a basis for determining the areas where conversion to MOX fuels has the potential to impact the structural integrity of reactor components.

  2. Reactor component automatic grapple

    SciTech Connect

    Greenaway, P.R.

    1982-12-07

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  3. Reactor component automatic grapple

    DOEpatents

    Greenaway, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  4. Fundamental Understanding of Crack Growth in Structural Components of Generation IV Supercritical Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Iouri I. Balachov; Takao Kobayashi; Francis Tanzella; Indira Jayaweera; Palitha Jayaweera; Petri Kinnunen; Martin Bojinov; Timo Saario

    2004-11-17

    This work contributes to the design of safe and economical Generation-IV Super-Critical Water Reactors (SCWRs) by providing a basis for selecting structural materials to ensure the functionality of in-vessel components during the entire service life. During the second year of the project, we completed electrochemical characterization of the oxide film properties and investigation of crack initiation and propagation for candidate structural materials steels under supercritical conditions. We ranked candidate alloys against their susceptibility to environmentally assisted degradation based on the in situ data measure with an SRI-designed controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) arrangement. A correlation between measurable oxide film properties and susceptibility of austenitic steels to environmentally assisted degradation was observed experimentally. One of the major practical results of the present work is the experimentally proven ability of the economical CDE technique to supply in situ data for ranking candidate structural materials for Generation-IV SCRs. A potential use of the CDE arrangement developed ar SRI for building in situ sensors monitoring water chemistry in the heat transport circuit of Generation-IV SCWRs was evaluated and proved to be feasible.

  5. Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

    1989-10-01

    A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs.

  6. Energy deposition in STARFIRE reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Brooks, J.N.

    1985-04-01

    The energy deposition in the STARFIRE commercial tokamak reactor was calculated based on detailed models for the different reactor components. The heat deposition and the 14 MeV neutron flux poloidal distributions in the first wall were obtained. The poloidal surface heat load distribution in the first wall was calculated from the plasma radiation. The Monte Carlo method was used for the calculation to allow an accurate modeling for the reactor geometry.

  7. Protective structures on the surface of zirconium components of light water reactor cores: Formation, testing, and prototype equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Gordeev, A. A.; Evsin, A. E. Ivanova, S. V.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.

    2015-12-15

    The results of tests of plasma treatment of zirconium and deposition of protective yttrium coatings used as the methods of protection of zirconium components of light water reactor cores against hydrogenation are detailed. The amount of hydrogen in the treated sample exposed to superheated steam for 2500 h at temperature T = 400°C and pressure p = 1 atm was five times lower than the corresponding value for the untreated one. The amount of hydrogen in the sample coated with yttrium remained almost unchanged in 4000 h of exposure. A plasma method for rapid testing for hydrogen resistance is proposed. The hydrogenation rate provided by this method is 700 times higher than that in tests with superheated steam. The results of preliminary experiments confirm the possibility of constructing a unit for batch processing of the surfaces of fuel rod claddings.

  8. Mechanical cutting of irradiated reactor internal components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael G.

    2008-01-15

    Mechanical cutting methods to volume reduce and package reactor internal components are now a viable solution for stakeholders challenged with the retirement of first generation nuclear facilities. The recent completion of the removal of the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) from within the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant demonstrates that unlike previous methods, inclusive of plasma arc and abrasive water-jet cutting, mechanical cutting minimizes exposure to workers, costly water cleanup, and excessive secondary waste generation. Reactor internal components were segmented, packaged, and removed from the reactor building for shipment or storage, allowing the reactor cavity to be drained and follow-on reactor segmentation activities to proceed in the dry state. Area exposure rates at the work positions during the segmentation process were generally 1 mR per hr. Radiological exposure documented for the underwater segmentation processes totaled 13 person rem. The reactor internals weighing 343,000 pounds were segmented into over 200 pieces for maximum shipping package efficiency and produced 5,600 lb of stainless steel chips and shavings which were packaged in void spaces of existing disposal containers, therefore creating no additional disposal volume. Because no secondary waste was driven into suspension in the reactor cavity water, the water was free released after one pass through a charcoal bed and ion exchange filter system. Mechanical cutting techniques are capable of underwater segmentation of highly radioactive components on a large scale. This method minimized radiological exposure and costly water cleanup while creating no secondary waste.

  9. End-of-life examinations of Light Water Breeder Reactor grids and other module structural components (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.C.; Clayton, J.C.; Pitcairn, T.N.; Richardson, K.D.; Smith, B.C.; Wargo, J.E.

    1987-10-01

    End-of-Life examinations were performed on LWBR core structural components which had important influence on mechanical stability of fuel elements duing core performance. These components included: (1) AM-350 stainless steel grid sections to assess corrosion, stress relaxation, braze performance, and dimensional stability; (2) a 348 stainless steel flux thimble tube which failed in service; (3) various Inconel X-750, Inconel-600, 17-4 PH, and AM-350 bolts; (4) Zircaloy-4 module shells and screws; (5) Inconel-600 module cover plates and baseplates; (6) 304 stainless steel Bypass Inlet Flow Supply Tube; (7) 17-4 PH shear keys and Inconel-600 struts; (8) Zircaloy-4 module support posts; (9) seed module support shaft and balance piston. Examinations included visual inspection and, in some cases, dye penetrant and metallography. Threaded fasteners remained uncracked to end-of-life (EOL). Grid dimensions showed minor changes at EOL. Grid springs exhibited good stress relaxation characteristics. Corrosion resistance of core components was adequate, and components were relatively free from crud buildup.

  10. REACTOR MODERATOR STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Greenstreet, B.L.

    1963-12-31

    A system for maintaining the alignment of moderator block structures in reactors is presented. Integral restraining grids are placed between each layer of blocks in the moderator structure, at the top of the uppermost layer, and at the bottom of the lowermost layer. Slots are provided in the top and bottom surfaces of the moderator blocks so as to provide a keying action with the grids. The grids are maintained in alignment by vertical guiding members disposed about their peripheries. (AEC)

  11. Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2010-05-05

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these

  12. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons and methods for making such materials. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  13. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  14. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  15. HEAVY WATER COMPONENTS TEST REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2011-10-13

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2009 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Removal Action with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This paper summarizes the history prior to 2009, the major D&D activities, and final end state of the facility at completion of decommissioning in June 2011. The HWCTR facility was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. In 2009 the $1.6 billion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for site footprint reduction at SRS reopened the doors to HWCTR - this time for final decommissioning. Alternative studies concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning was to remove the reactor vessel, both steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. The transfer coffin, originally above grade, was to be placed in the cavity vacated by the reactor vessel and the remaining below grade spaces would be grouted. Once all above equipment

  16. REACTOR MODERATOR STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Tudor, J.J.

    1963-08-01

    An improved moderator structure for nuclear reactors consists of moderator blocks arranged in horizontal layers to form a multiplicity of vertically stacked columns of blocks. The blocks in each vertical column are keyed together, and a ceramic grid is disposed between each horizontal layer of blocks. Pressure plates cover- the lateral surface of the moderator structure in abutting relationship with the peripheral terminal lengths of the ceramic grids. Tubular springs are disposed between the pressure plates and a rigid external support. The tubular springs have their axes vertically disposed to facilitate passage of coolant gas through the springs and are spaced apart a selected distance such that at sonae preselected point of spring deflection, the sides of the springs will contact adjacent springs thereby causing a large increase in resistance to further spring deflection. (AEC)

  17. Scale modeling flow-induced vibrations of reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-06-01

    Similitude relationships currently employed in the design of flow-induced vibration scale-model tests of nuclear reactor components are reviewed. Emphasis is given to understanding the origins of the similitude parameters as a basis for discussion of the inevitable distortions which occur in design verification testing of entire reactor systems and in feature testing of individual component designs for the existence of detrimental flow-induced vibration mechanisms. Distortions of similitude parameters made in current test practice are enumerated and selected example tests are described. Also, limitations in the use of specific distortions in model designs are evaluated based on the current understanding of flow-induced vibration mechanisms and structural response.

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTOR STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1961-10-24

    A reactor core, comprised of vertical stacks of hexagonal blocks of beryllium oxide having axial cylindrical apertures extending therethrough and cylindrical rods of a sintered mixture of uranium dioxide and beryllium oxide, is described. (AEC)

  19. Repair welding of fusion reactor components. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, B.A.; Wang, C.A.

    1997-09-30

    The exposure of metallic materials, such as structural components of the first wall and blanket of a fusion reactor, to neutron irradiation will induce changes in both the material composition and microstructure. Along with these changes can come a corresponding deterioration in mechanical properties resulting in premature failure. It is, therefore, essential to expect that the repair and replacement of the degraded components will be necessary. Such repairs may require the joining of irradiated materials through the use of fusion welding processes. The present ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) conceptual design is anticipated to have about 5 km of longitudinal welds and ten thousand pipe butt welds in the blanket structure. A recent study by Buende et al. predict that a failure is most likely to occur in a weld. The study is based on data from other large structures, particularly nuclear reactors. The data used also appear to be consistent with the operating experience of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This reactor has a fuel pin area comparable with the area of the ITER first wall and has experienced one unanticipated fuel pin failure after two years of operation. The repair of irradiated structures using fusion welding will be difficult due to the entrapped helium. Due to its extremely low solubility in metals, helium will diffuse and agglomerate to form helium bubbles after being trapped at point defects, dislocations, and grain boundaries. Welding of neutron-irradiated type 304 stainless steels has been reported with varying degree of heat-affected zone cracking (HAZ). The objectives of this study were to determine the threshold helium concentrations required to cause HAZ cracking and to investigate techniques that might be used to eliminate the HAZ cracking in welding of helium-containing materials.

  20. Gap and impact of LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor) piping systems and reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    Because of high operation temperature, the LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor) plant is characterized by the thin-walled piping and components. Gaps are often present to allow free thermal expansion during normal plant operation. Under dynamic loadings, such as seismic excitation, if the relative displacement between the components exceeds the gap distance, impacts will occur. Since the components and piping become brittle over their design lifetime, impact is of important concern for it may lead to fractures of components and other serious effects. This paper deals with gap and impact problems in the LMR reactor components and piping systems. Emphasis is on the impacts due to seismic motion. Eight sections are contained in this paper. The gap and impact problems in LMR piping systems are described and a parametric study is performed on the effects of gap-induced support nonlinearity on the dynamics characteristics of the LMR piping systems. Gap and impact problems in the LMR reactor components are identified and their mathematical models are illustrated, and the gap and impact problems in the seismic reactor scram are discussed. The mathematical treatments of various impact models are also described. The uncertainties in the current seismic impact analyses of LMR components and structures are presented. An impact test on a 1/10-scale LMR thermal liner is described. The test results indicated that several clusters of natural modes can be excited by the impact force. The frequency content of the excited modes depends on the duration of the impact force; the shorter the duration, the higher the frequency content.

  1. Neutronic Reactor Structure

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H. C.; Weinberg, A. M.

    1961-05-30

    The neutronic reactor is comprised of a core consisting of natural uranium and heavy water with a K-factor greater than unity. The core is surrounded by a reflector consisting of natural uranium and ordinary water with a Kfactor less than unity. (AEC)

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTOR STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Weinberg, A.M.; Vernon, H.C.

    1961-05-30

    A neutronic reactor is described. It has a core consisting of natural uranium and heavy water and having a K-factor greater than unity which is surrounded by a reflector consisting of natural uranium and ordinary water having a Kfactor less than unity.

  3. Using fast reactor component evaluation to pressurized water reactor life extension.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. R.; Cole, J. I.; Kenik, E. A.; Tsai, H.; Ukai, S.; Mizuta, S.; Yoshitake, T.

    1999-10-01

    An understanding of the effects of long-term, low-dose-rate radiation on core components is critical to light-water reactor plant life extension. Following reactor shutdown, materials that had experienced long exposures to low-dose-rate irradiation were retrieved from the EBR-II research reactor for analysis. These components are being analyzed to provide insight into pressurized water reactor life extension. In this work, three examples of EBR-II materials analyses are highlighted: radiation-induced segregation in 304 stainless steel, stress relaxation in Inconel X750, and swelling in 316 stainless steel.;EVALUATION;FAST REACTORS;PWR TYPE REACTORS;

  4. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950's are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  5. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950`s are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  6. Using fast reactor component evaluation for pressurized water reactor life extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. R.; Cole, J. I.; Kenik, E. A.; Tsai, H.; Ukai, S.; Mizuta, S.; Yoshitake, T.

    1999-10-01

    An understanding of the effects of long-term, low-dose-rate radiation on core components is critical to light-water reactor plant life extension. Following reactor shutdown, materials that had experienced long exposures to low-dose-rate irradiation were retrieved from the EBR-II research reactor for analysis. These components are being analyzed to provide insight into pressurized water reactor life extension. In this work, three examples of EBR-II materials analyses are highlighted: radiation-induced segregation in 304 stainless steel, stress relaxation in Inconel X750, and swelling in 316 stainless steel.

  7. Regularized Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun

    2009-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) has been proposed as a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, GSCA may suffer from multi-collinearity, i.e., high correlations among exogenous variables. GSCA has yet no remedy for this problem. Thus, a regularized extension of GSCA is proposed that integrates a ridge…

  8. Austenitic alloy and reactor components made thereof

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John F.; Brager, Howard R.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1986-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy is disclosed, having excellent fast neutron irradiation swelling resistance and good post irradiation ductility, making it especially useful for liquid metal fast breeder reactor applications. The alloy contains: about 0.04 to 0.09 wt. % carbon; about 1.5 to 2.5 wt. % manganese; about 0.5 to 1.6 wt. % silicon; about 0.030 to 0.08 wt. % phosphorus; about 13.3 to 16.5 wt. % chromium; about 13.7 to 16.0 wt. % nickel; about 1.0 to 3.0 wt. % molybdenum; and about 0.10 to 0.35 wt. % titanium.

  9. Designed porosity materials in nuclear reactor components

    DOEpatents

    Yacout, A. M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stan, Marius

    2016-09-06

    A nuclear fuel pellet with a porous substrate, such as a carbon or tungsten aerogel, on which at least one layer of a fuel containing material is deposited via atomic layer deposition, and wherein the layer deposition is controlled to prevent agglomeration of defects. Further, a method of fabricating a nuclear fuel pellet, wherein the method features the steps of selecting a porous substrate, depositing at least one layer of a fuel containing material, and terminating the deposition when the desired porosity is achieved. Also provided is a nuclear reactor fuel cladding made of a porous substrate, such as silicon carbide aerogel or silicon carbide cloth, upon which layers of silicon carbide are deposited.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF RADIOACTIVITY IN THE REACTOR VESSEL OF THE HEAVY WATER COMPONENT TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, Dennis

    2010-06-01

    The Heavy Water Component Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility is a pressurized heavy water reactor that was used to test candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. The reactor operated at nominal power of 50 MW{sub th}. The reactor coolant loop operated at 1200 psig and 250 C. Two isolated test loop were designed into the reactor to provide special test conditions. Fig. 1 shows a cut-away view of the reactor. The two loops are contained in four inch diameter stainless steel piping. The HWCTR was operated for only a short duration, from March 1962 to December 1964 in order to test the viability of test fuel elements and other reactor components for use in a heavy water power reactor. The reactor achieved 13,882 MWd of total power while testing 36 different fuel assemblies. In the course of operation, HWCTR experienced the cladding failures of 10 separate test fuel assemblies. In each case, the cladding was breached with some release of fuel core material into the isolated test loop, causing fission product and actinide contamination in the main coolant loop and the liquid and boiling test loops. Despite the contribution of the contamination from the failed fuel, the primary source of radioactivity in the HWCTR vessel and internals is the activation products in the thermal shields, and to a lesser degree, activation products in the reactor vessel walls and liner. A detailed facility characterization report of the HWCTR facility was completed in 1996. Many of the inputs and assumptions in the 1996 characterization report were derived from the HWCTR decommissioning plan published in 1975. The current paper provides an updated assessment of the radioisotopic characteristics of the HWCTR vessel and internals to support decommissioning activities on the facility.

  11. Hydraulic balancing of a control component within a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Marinos, D.; Ripfel, H.C.F.

    1975-10-14

    A reactor control component includes an inner conduit, for instance containing neutron absorber elements, adapted for longitudinal movement within an outer guide duct. A transverse partition partially encloses one end of the conduit and meets a transverse wall within the guide duct when the conduit is fully inserted into the reactor core. A tube piece extends from the transverse partition and is coaxially aligned to be received within a tubular receptacle which extends from the transverse wall. The tube piece and receptacle cooperate in engagement to restrict the flow and pressure of coolant beneath the transverse partition and thereby minimize upward forces tending to expel the inner conduit.

  12. US fast reactor materials and structures program

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, W.O.; Purdy, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    Materials and structures problems are central to many critical issues concerning the economic competitiveness, reliable performance, and safety of liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) power plants. The US Department of Energy has sponsored for many years a national LMFBR materials and structures program. The objectives of the program are (1) to provide the technological basis for assuring that LMFBR components and systems will be free from significant structural failures during their design lifetimes and (2) to develop materials, design methods and criteria, materials property data, and procedures - all aimed at providing for broad flexibility in LMFBR component and system design and operation. Technology areas included in the program are high-temperature structural design; seismic design; mechanical properties design data; fabrication; tribology (friction, wear, and self-welding); coolant technology (sodium and steam/water); advanced structural alloys; and nondestructive testing. It is the purpose of this study to indicate briefly for each of the program's technology areas the objective, the scope, and some significant accomplishments. Future directions for the program are also discussed.

  13. Prognostics Health Management for Advanced Small Modular Reactor Passive Components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-10-18

    In the United States, sustainable nuclear power to promote energy security is a key national energy priority. Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMR), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts using non-light-water reactor (LWR) coolants such as liquid metal, helium, or liquid salt may provide a longer-term alternative to more conventional LWR-based concepts. The economics of AdvSMRs will be impacted by the reduced economy-of-scale savings when compared to traditional LWRs and the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance costs. Therefore, achieving the full benefits of AdvSMR deployment requires a new paradigm for plant design and management. In this context, prognostic health management of passive components in AdvSMRs can play a key role in enabling the economic deployment of AdvSMRs. In this paper, the background of AdvSMRs is discussed from which requirements for PHM systems are derived. The particle filter technique is proposed as a prognostics framework for AdvSMR passive components and the suitability of the particle filter technique is illustrated by using it to forecast thermal creep degradation using a physics-of-failure model and based on a combination of types of measurements conceived for passive AdvSMR components.

  14. Nuclear reactor spacer grid and ductless core component

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a nuclear reactor spacer grid member for use in a liquid cooled nuclear reactor and to a ductless core component employing a plurality of these spacer grid members. The spacer grid member is of the egg-shell type and is constructed so that the walls of the cell members of the grid member are formed of a single thickness of metal to avoid tolerance problems. Within each cell member is a hydraulic spring which laterally constrains the nuclear material bearing rod which passes through each cell member against a hardstop in response to coolant flow through the cell member. This hydraulic spring is also suitable for use in a water cooled nuclear reactor. A core component constructed of, among other components, a plurality of these spacer grid members, avoids the use of a full length duct by providing spacer sleeves about the sodium tubes passing through the spacer grid members at locations between the grid members, thereby maintaining a predetermined space between adjacent grid members.

  15. Structural materials issues for the next generation fission reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chant, I.; Murty, K. L.

    2010-09-01

    Generation-IV reactor design concepts envisioned thus far cater to a common goal of providing safer, longer lasting, proliferation-resistant, and economically viable nuclear power plants. The foremost consideration in the successful development and deployment of Gen-W reactor systems is the performance and reliability issues involving structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core applications. The structural materials need to endure much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses, and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. Materials under active consideration for use in different reactor components include various ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, ceramics, composites, etc. This article addresses the material requirements for these advanced fission reactor types, specifically addressing structural materials issues depending on the specific application areas.

  16. Inelastic behavior of structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N.; Khozeimeh, K.; Toridis, T. G.

    1980-01-01

    A more accurate procedure was developed for the determination of the inelastic behavior of structural components. The actual stress-strain curve for the mathematical of the structure was utilized to generate the force-deformation relationships for the structural elements, rather than using simplified models such as elastic-plastic, bilinear and trilinear approximations. relationships were generated for beam elements with various types of cross sections. In the generational of these curves, stress or load reversals, kinematic hardening and hysteretic behavior were taken into account. Intersections between loading and unloading branches were determined through an iterative process. Using the inelastic properties obtained, the plastic static response of some simple structural systems composed of beam elements was computed. Results were compared with known solutions, indicating a considerable improvement over response predictions obtained by means of simplified approximations used in previous investigations.

  17. Structural studies of ciliary components.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Naoko; Taschner, Michael; Engel, Benjamin D; Lorentzen, Esben

    2012-09-14

    Cilia are organelles found on most eukaryotic cells, where they serve important functions in motility, sensory reception, and signaling. Recent advances in electron tomography have facilitated a number of ultrastructural studies of ciliary components that have significantly improved our knowledge of cilium architecture. These studies have produced nanometer-resolution structures of axonemal dynein complexes, microtubule doublets and triplets, basal bodies, radial spokes, and nexin complexes. In addition to these electron tomography studies, several recently published crystal structures provide insights into the architecture and mechanism of dynein as well as the centriolar protein SAS-6, important for establishing the 9-fold symmetry of centrioles. Ciliary assembly requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process that moves macromolecules between the tip of the cilium and the cell body. IFT relies on a large 20-subunit protein complex that is thought to mediate the contacts between ciliary motor and cargo proteins. Structural investigations of IFT complexes are starting to emerge, including the first three-dimensional models of IFT material in situ, revealing how IFT particles organize into larger train-like arrays, and the high-resolution structure of the IFT25/27 subcomplex. In this review, we cover recent advances in the structural and mechanistic understanding of ciliary components and IFT complexes. PMID:22683354

  18. Structural Studies of Ciliary Components

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Naoko; Taschner, Michael; Engel, Benjamin D.; Lorentzen, Esben

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are organelles found on most eukaryotic cells, where they serve important functions in motility, sensory reception, and signaling. Recent advances in electron tomography have facilitated a number of ultrastructural studies of ciliary components that have significantly improved our knowledge of cilium architecture. These studies have produced nanometer‐resolution structures of axonemal dynein complexes, microtubule doublets and triplets, basal bodies, radial spokes, and nexin complexes. In addition to these electron tomography studies, several recently published crystal structures provide insights into the architecture and mechanism of dynein as well as the centriolar protein SAS-6, important for establishing the 9-fold symmetry of centrioles. Ciliary assembly requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process that moves macromolecules between the tip of the cilium and the cell body. IFT relies on a large 20-subunit protein complex that is thought to mediate the contacts between ciliary motor and cargo proteins. Structural investigations of IFT complexes are starting to emerge, including the first three‐dimensional models of IFT material in situ, revealing how IFT particles organize into larger train-like arrays, and the high-resolution structure of the IFT25/27 subcomplex. In this review, we cover recent advances in the structural and mechanistic understanding of ciliary components and IFT complexes. PMID:22683354

  19. Nuclear reactor heat transport system component low friction support system

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1980-01-01

    A support column for a heavy component of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor heat transport system which will deflect when the pipes leading coolant to and from the heavy component expand or contract due to temperature changes includes a vertically disposed pipe, the pipe being connected to the heavy component by two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles and the pipe being supported through two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles, each of the cylindrical surfaces bearing on a flat and horizontal surface.

  20. Passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1989-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  1. Natural circulating passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1990-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  2. An Assessment of Remote Visual Methods to Detect Cracking in Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Anderson, Michael T.; Doctor, Steven R.; Simonen, Fredric A.; Elliot, Anthony J.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the U.S. nuclear industry has proposed replacing current volumetric and/or surface examinations of certain components in commercial nuclear power plants, as required by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section XI, “Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components,” with a simpler visual testing (VT) method. The advantages of VT are that these tests generally involve much less radiation exposure and time to perform the examination than do volumetric examinations such as ultrasonic testing. The issues relative to the reliability of VT in determining the structural integrity of reactor components were examined. Some piping and pressure vessel components in a nuclear power station are examined using VT as they are either in high radiation fields or component geometry precludes the use of ultrasonic testing (UT) methodology. Remote VT with radiation-hardened video systems has been used by nuclear utilities to find cracks in pressure vessel cladding in pressurized water reactors, core shrouds in boiling water reactors, and to investigate leaks in piping and reactor components. These visual tests are performed using a wide variety of procedures and equipment. The techniques for remote VT use submersible closed-circuit video cameras to examine reactor components and welds. PNNL conducted a parametric study that examined the important variables influencing the effectiveness of a remote visual test. Tested variables included lighting techniques, camera resolution, camera movement, and magnification. PNNL also conducted a limited laboratory test using a commercial visual testing camera system to experimentally determine the ability of the camera system to detect cracks of various widths under ideal conditions. The results of these studies and their implications are presented in this paper.

  3. Work Breakdown Structure and Plant/Equipment Designation System Numbering Scheme for the High Temperature Gas- Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC)

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey D Bryan

    2009-09-01

    This white paper investigates the potential integration of the CTC work breakdown structure numbering scheme with a plant/equipment numbering system (PNS), or alternatively referred to in industry as a reference designation system (RDS). Ideally, the goal of such integration would be a single, common referencing system for the life cycle of the CTC that supports all the various processes (e.g., information, execution, and control) that necessitate plant and equipment numbers be assigned. This white paper focuses on discovering the full scope of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) processes to which this goal might be applied as well as the factors likely to affect decisions about implementation. Later, a procedure for assigning these numbers will be developed using this white paper as a starting point and that reflects the resolved scope and outcome of associated decisions.

  4. Method of detecting leakage of reactor core components of liquid metal cooled fast reactors

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Fred E.; Cash, Robert J.; Schenter, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of detecting the failure of a sealed non-fueled core component of a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor having an inert cover gas. A gas mixture is incorporated in the component which includes Xenon-124; under neutron irradiation, Xenon-124 is converted to radioactive Xenon-125. The cover gas is scanned by a radiation detector. The occurrence of 188 Kev gamma radiation and/or other identifying gamma radiation-energy level indicates the presence of Xenon-125 and therefore leakage of a component. Similarly, Xe-126, which transmutes to Xe-127 and Kr-84, which produces Kr-85.sup.m can be used for detection of leakage. Different components are charged with mixtures including different ratios of isotopes other than Xenon-124. On detection of the identifying radiation, the cover gas is subjected to mass spectroscopic analysis to locate the leaking component.

  5. Tritium retention in fusion reactor plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-03-01

    The IAEA has proposed a coordinated research program to address tritium retention and release in fusion reactor plasma facing components. This program will address materials which are mainly of interest to the design and construction of ITER, namely beryllium, carbon based materials and medium and high-Z metals, e.g. tungsten, vanadium and molybdenum, but will not be limited to these materials. Experimental data are needed for: recycling models, tritium inventory estimates, tritium permeation calculations and hydrogen embrittlement characterization. The ultimate use of the data would be to influence the formation of models for use by fusion reactor designers. Judicious material choices must be made by the designers and accurate predictive codes are required in order to make these choices. The proposed coordinated research program will provide a forum for discussions between experimentalists, theoreticians, modelers and reactor designers, provide financial support for relevant research projects and collect and evaluate experimental and theoretical data. This paper briefly reviews existing data, addresses the data gaps and points out experiments designed to obtain the needed data. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Measurement Of Flow Induced Vibration Of Reactor Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmaraju, N.; Meher, K. K.; Rao, A. Rama

    The effect of flow-induced vibration on class I components in the reactor is a very important design factor for its qualifications worthy of loading inside the core. In this regard, a clear definition of the flow excitation and the dynamic characteristics of the component are the two primary inputs required to make an estimation of vibration severity. Though there are general guidelines available, more often it has been seen that they only help in arriving at a first approximation. There are many instances wherein a component has failed to perform as per design in spite of sufficient margin provided in the calculations. There are also instances wherein some components have failed even after successful testing under close to simulated flow condition. The paper deals with qualification procedure followed to flow test an in core component in an out of pile facility. The adopted procedure is considered to be a best approach especially in this field where in there are many gray areas.

  7. MPP: A modular library of models of nuclear reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, M.A.; Guimaraes, L.; Ugolini, D. ); March-Leuba, C.; Nypaver, D.J. ); Ford, C.E. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the Modular Power Plant (MPP) library and its application to simulate the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor. The MPP library is being developed as part of the Advanced Controls Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The general purpose of the library is to provide a set of modular models of components needed to simulate nuclear power plants. To give the MPP models modularity characteristics, each model is developed as a stand-alone system. The MPP contains 28 models coded in either the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL), or the Generalized Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (GOOSE). The MPP development is parallel to the GOOSE development, and we are currently translating the MPP components from ACSL to GOOSE.

  8. MPP: A modular library of models of nuclear reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, M.A.; Guimaraes, L.; Ugolini, D.; March-Leuba, C.; Nypaver, D.J.; Ford, C.E.

    1992-05-01

    This paper presents the Modular Power Plant (MPP) library and its application to simulate the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor. The MPP library is being developed as part of the Advanced Controls Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The general purpose of the library is to provide a set of modular models of components needed to simulate nuclear power plants. To give the MPP models modularity characteristics, each model is developed as a stand-alone system. The MPP contains 28 models coded in either the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL), or the Generalized Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (GOOSE). The MPP development is parallel to the GOOSE development, and we are currently translating the MPP components from ACSL to GOOSE.

  9. Structural materials challenges for advanced reactor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvon, P.; Carré, F.

    2009-03-01

    Key technologies for advanced nuclear systems encompass high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistant core materials, and specific reactor and power conversion technologies (intermediate heat exchanger, turbo-machinery, high temperature electrolytic or thermo-chemical water splitting processes, etc.). The main requirements for the materials to be used in these reactor systems are dimensional stability under irradiation, whether under stress (irradiation creep or relaxation) or without stress (swelling, growth), an acceptable evolution under ageing of the mechanical properties (tensile strength, ductility, creep resistance, fracture toughness, resilience) and a good behavior in corrosive environments (reactor coolant or process fluid). Other criteria for the materials are their cost to fabricate and to assemble, and their composition could be optimized in order for instance to present low-activation (or rapid desactivation) features which facilitate maintenance and disposal. These requirements have to be met under normal operating conditions, as well as in incidental and accidental conditions. These challenging requirements imply that in most cases, the use of conventional nuclear materials is excluded, even after optimization and a new range of materials has to be developed and qualified for nuclear use. This paper gives a brief overview of various materials that are essential to establish advanced systems feasibility and performance for in pile and out of pile applications, such as ferritic/martensitic steels (9-12% Cr), nickel based alloys (Haynes 230, Inconel 617, etc.), oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels, and ceramics (SiC, TiC, etc.). This article gives also an insight into the various natures of R&D needed on advanced materials, including fundamental research to investigate basic physical and chemical phenomena occurring in normal and accidental operating conditions, lab-scale tests to characterize candidate materials

  10. 77 FR 39521 - Application for a License To Export Nuclear Reactor Major Components and Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Application for a License To Export Nuclear Reactor Major Components and Equipment Pursuant to 10... Reactor internals, Components and For use in Braka nuclear power Company LLC reactor coolant equipment...

  11. Preloading of bolted connections in nuclear reactor component supports

    SciTech Connect

    Yahr, G T

    1984-10-01

    A number of failures of threaded fasteners in nuclear reactor component supports have been reported. Many of those failures were attributed to stress corrosion cracking. This report discusses how stress corrosion cracking can be avoided in bolting by controlling the maximum bolt preloads so that the sustained stresses in the bolts are below the level required to cause stress corrosion cracking. This is a basic departure from ordinary bolted joint design where the only limits on preload are on the minimum preload. Emphasis is placed on the importance of detailed analysis to determine the acceptable range of preload and the selection of a method for measuring the preload that is sufficiently accurate to ensure that the preload is actually within the acceptable range. Procedures for determining acceptable preload range are given, and the accuracy of various methods of measuring preload is discussed.

  12. Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1992-03-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

  13. Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1992-03-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

  14. Boric-acid corrosion of ferritic reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.

    1982-07-01

    An increasing amount of nuclear industry reports have indicated corrosion of ferritic steel components by reactor primary coolant. A literature survey produced information regarding corrosion of AISI 4135 steel in both H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ and H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ + KOH solutions at 70/sup 0/F and 140/sup 0/F. Additional BNL work on both A193-B7 and AISI 4130 material at higher temperatures in both H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ and H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ + LiOH solutions is also presented. The report concludes that ferritic material is susceptible to corrosion attack by H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ solutions up to 600/sup 0/F, and in H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ + LiOH the corrosion rates range between 112 to 130 mils/year, while at 352/sup 0/F, the corrosion rate drops off to between 46 to 54 mils/year.

  15. Induced Radioactivity and Waste Classification of Reactor Zone Components of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 After Final Shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Bylkin, Boris K.; Davydova, Galina B.; Zverkov, Yuri A.; Krayushkin, Alexander V.; Neretin, Yuri A.; Nosovsky, Anatoly V.; Seyda, Valery A.; Short, Steven M.

    2001-10-15

    The dismantlement of the reactor core materials and surrounding structural components is a major technical concern for those planning closure and decontamination and decommissioning of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Specific issues include when and how dismantlement should be accomplished and what the radwaste classification of the dismantled system would be at the time it is disassembled. Whereas radiation levels and residual radiological characteristics of the majority of the plant systems are directly measured using standard radiation survey and radiochemical analysis techniques, actual measurements of reactor zone materials are not practical due to high radiation levels and inaccessibility. For these reasons, neutron transport analysis was used to estimate induced radioactivity and radiation levels in the Chernobyl NPP Unit 1 reactor core materials and structures.Analysis results suggest that the optimum period of safe storage is 90 to 100 yr for the Unit 1 reactor. For all of the reactor components except the fuel channel pipes (or pressure tubes), this will provide sufficient decay time to allow unlimited worker access during dismantlement, minimize the need for expensive remote dismantlement, and allow for the dismantled reactor components to be classified as low- or medium-level radioactive waste. The fuel channel pipes will remain classified as high-activity waste requiring remote dismantlement for hundreds of years due to the high concentration of induced {sup 63}Ni in the Zircaloy pipes.

  16. GENERIC, COMPONENT FAILURE DATA BASE FOR LIGHT WATER AND LIQUID SODIUM REACTOR PRAs

    SciTech Connect

    S. A. Eide; S. V. Chmielewski; T. D. Swantz

    1990-02-01

    A comprehensive generic component failure data base has been developed for light water and liquid sodium reactor probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) . The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) and the Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO) data bases were used to generate component failure rates . Using this approach, most of the failure rates are based on actual plant data rather than existing estimates .

  17. 78 FR 28896 - Design Limits and Loading Combinations for Metal Primary Reactor Containment System Components

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... COMMISSION Design Limits and Loading Combinations for Metal Primary Reactor Containment System Components... Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing Revision 2 to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.57, ``Design Limits and Loading Combinations for Metal Primary Reactor Containment System Components,'' in which there are no...

  18. Structured Functional Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Haochang; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Greven, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Summary Motivated by modern observational studies, we introduce a class of functional models that expand nested and crossed designs. These models account for the natural inheritance of the correlation structures from sampling designs in studies where the fundamental unit is a function or image. Inference is based on functional quadratics and their relationship with the underlying covariance structure of the latent processes. A computationally fast and scalable estimation procedure is developed for high-dimensional data. Methods are used in applications including high-frequency accelerometer data for daily activity, pitch linguistic data for phonetic analysis, and EEG data for studying electrical brain activity during sleep. PMID:25327216

  19. PIPING FOR COOLANT WATER IS INSTALLED INSIDE REACTOR STRUCTURE PRIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PIPING FOR COOLANT WATER IS INSTALLED INSIDE REACTOR STRUCTURE PRIOR TO EMBEDMENT IN CONCRETE. HIGHER PIPE IS INLET; THE OTHER, THE OUTLET LOOP. INLET PIPE WILL CONNECT TO TOP SECTION OF REACTOR VESSEL. INL NEGATIVE NO. 1287. Unknown Photographer, 1/18/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Generalized Structured Component Analysis with Latent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Lee, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) is a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, researchers may often be interested in examining the interaction effects of latent variables. However, GSCA has been geared only for the specification and testing of the main effects of variables. Thus, an extension of GSCA…

  1. Eddy current position indicating apparatus for measuring displacements of core components of a liquid metal nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Day, Clifford K.; Stringer, James L.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus for measuring displacements of core components of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor by means of an eddy current probe. The active portion of the probe is located within a dry thimble which is supported on a stationary portion of the reactor core support structure. Split rings of metal, having a resistivity significantly different than sodium, are fixedly mounted on the core component to be monitored. The split rings are slidably positioned around, concentric with the probe and symmetrically situated along the axis of the probe so that motion of the ring along the axis of the probe produces a proportional change in the probes electrical output.

  2. Fuzzy Clusterwise Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Desarbo, Wayne S.; Takane, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    Generalized Structured Component Analysis (GSCA) was recently introduced by Hwang and Takane (2004) as a component-based approach to path analysis with latent variables. The parameters of GSCA are estimated by pooling data across respondents under the implicit assumption that they all come from a single, homogenous group. However, as has been…

  3. Joining porous components to solid metal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, A.; Tulisiak, G.

    1972-01-01

    Process for joining porous metal material to solid metal structure without cracking or blockage of porous component is described. Procedures of electron beam welding and electroforming are discussed. Illustration of microstructure resulting from process is included.

  4. Overview of thermal-buoyancy-induced phenomena in reactor-plant components. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.E.; Kuzay, T.M.; Oras, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Studies related to delineating the influence of thermal-buoyancy forces on the thermal-hydraulics of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor plant components under low-flow thermal transient and steady state conditions have generated unique information which will aid design of these components. Various buoyancy force induced phenomena such as thermal stratification, flow recirculation, stagnation, and channeling are described and the importance to component performance are discussed. The water based studies have been conducted in the Mixing Components Test Facility, a large multi program facility capable of performing generic studies of fluid flow and heat transfer in reactor components under programmed transient and steady state conditions.

  5. Occupational radiation exposure during removal of radioactive reactor components from GRR-1 pool.

    PubMed

    Kontogeorgakos, D; Tzika, F; Valakis, S; Stamatelatos, I E

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to control occupational exposure during the removal of radioactive reactor components from a Greek research reactor pool. The method comprised the prediction of the radiation levels, the design of special shielding structures and the occupational dose assessment. Activation calculations were performed using the FISPACT code to predict the source term. Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP code were utilized to estimate the ambient dose equivalent rates. The results of the calculations were verified by measurements and were found to be in good agreement. Thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) and electronic personal dosemeter (EPD) were implemented to measure the radiation exposure of the workers. The total collective dose of 14 participating workers was 0.15 man mSv. The maximum individual effective dose was 0.02 mSv, and the maximum extremity equivalent dose was 0.09 mSv. The discussed method provides a useful tool enabling work planning during reactor decommissioning and renovation activities ensuring that exposures will be maintained ALARA. PMID:21051436

  6. Occupational radiation exposure during removal of radioactive reactor components from GRR-1 pool.

    PubMed

    Kontogeorgakos, D; Tzika, F; Valakis, S; Stamatelatos, I E

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to control occupational exposure during the removal of radioactive reactor components from a Greek research reactor pool. The method comprised the prediction of the radiation levels, the design of special shielding structures and the occupational dose assessment. Activation calculations were performed using the FISPACT code to predict the source term. Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP code were utilized to estimate the ambient dose equivalent rates. The results of the calculations were verified by measurements and were found to be in good agreement. Thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) and electronic personal dosemeter (EPD) were implemented to measure the radiation exposure of the workers. The total collective dose of 14 participating workers was 0.15 man mSv. The maximum individual effective dose was 0.02 mSv, and the maximum extremity equivalent dose was 0.09 mSv. The discussed method provides a useful tool enabling work planning during reactor decommissioning and renovation activities ensuring that exposures will be maintained ALARA.

  7. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  8. 78 FR 57904 - Request for a License To Export; Reactor Components

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ..., and 1000 (design) spare parts. nuclear reactors. Dated this 16th day of September 2013 in Rockville... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Request for a License To Export; Reactor Components Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70 (b) ``Public...

  9. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L.

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) and the

  10. Flow-induced vibration and instability of some nuclear-reactor-system components. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1983-01-01

    The high-velocity coolant flowing through a reactor system component is a source of energy that can induce component vibration and instability. In fact, many reactor components have suffered from excessive vibration and/or dynamic instability. The potential for detrimental flow-induced vibration makes it necessary that design engineers give detailed considerations to the flow-induced vibration problems. Flow-induced-vibration studies have been performed in many countries. Significant progress has been made in understanding the different phenomena and development of design guidelines to avoid damaging vibration. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the recent progress in several selected areas, to discuss some new results and to indentify future research needs. Specifically, the following areas will be presented: examples of flow-induced-vibration problems in reactor components; excitation mechanisms and component response characteristics; instability mechanisms and stability criteria; design considerations; and future research needs.

  11. Structural integrity of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, John F.

    2013-09-01

    The paper starts from concerns expressed by Sir Alan Cottrell, in the early 1970s, related to the safety of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) proposed at that time for the next phase of electrical power generation. It proceeds to describe the design and operation of nuclear generation plant and gives details of the manufacture of PWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Attention is paid to stress-relief cracking and under-clad cracking, experienced with early RPVs, explaining the mechanisms for these forms of cracking and the means taken to avoid them. Particular note is made of the contribution of non-destructive inspection to structural integrity. Factors affecting brittle fracture in RPV steels are described: in particular, effects of neutron irradiation. The use of fracture mechanics to assess defect tolerance is explained, together with the failure assessment diagram embodied in the R6 procedure. There is discussion of the Master Curve and how it incorporates effects of irradiation on fracture toughness. Dangers associated with extrapolation of data to low probabilities are illustrated. The treatment of fatigue-crack growth is described, in the context of transients that may be experienced in the operation of PWR plant. Detailed attention is paid to the thermal shock associated with a large loss-of-coolant accident. The final section reviews the arguments advanced to justify 'Incredibility of Failure' and how these are incorporated in assessments of the integrity of existing plant and proposed 'new build' PWR pressure vessels.

  12. Physical characteristics of non-fuel assembly reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, E.C.

    1994-09-01

    The primary objective of this report is to enhance the utility of the Characteristics Data Base (CDB). This has been accomplished by providing a pictorial representation of the principal non-fuel assembly (NFA) components along with a tabular summary of key information about each type of component. This report is intended for use as an adjunct to the CDB. Toward this end, the report may be used either as a complement to the detailed descriptions in the CDB, or as a stand-alone document that acts as an illustrated abstract of the CDB. Line drawings of major NFA components are included. Data not provided in the CDB are also included. Summary descriptions of each component are given in tabular format.

  13. An Analysis of Testing Requirements for Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Cetiner, Sacit M; Flanagan, George F; Peretz, Fred J; Yoder Jr, Graydon L

    2009-11-01

    This report provides guidance on the component testing necessary during the next phase of fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) development. In particular, the report identifies and describes the reactor component performance and reliability requirements, provides an overview of what information is necessary to provide assurance that components will adequately achieve the requirements, and then provides guidance on how the required performance information can efficiently be obtained. The report includes a system description of a representative test scale FHR reactor. The reactor parameters presented in this report should only be considered as placeholder values until an FHR test scale reactor design is completed. The report focus is bounded at the interface between and the reactor primary coolant salt and the fuel and the gas supply and return to the Brayton cycle power conversion system. The analysis is limited to component level testing and does not address system level testing issues. Further, the report is oriented as a bottom-up testing requirements analysis as opposed to a having a top-down facility description focus.

  14. 77 FR 16270 - Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... components exposed to treated borated water. DATES: Submit comments by May 21, 2012. Comments received after... COMMISSION Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water... availability was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35510). The NRC staff has...

  15. Compression Strength of Composite Primary Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1998-01-01

    Research conducted under NASA Grant NAG-1-537 focussed on the response and failure of advanced composite material structures for application to aircraft. Both experimental and analytical methods were utilized to study the fundamental mechanics of the response and failure of selected structural components subjected to quasi-static loads. Most of the structural components studied were thin-walled elements subject to compression, such that they exhibited buckling and postbuckling responses prior to catastrophic failure. Consequently, the analyses were geometrically nonlinear. Structural components studied were dropped-ply laminated plates, stiffener crippling, pressure pillowing of orthogonally stiffened cylindrical shells, axisymmetric response of pressure domes, and the static crush of semi-circular frames. Failure of these components motivated analytical studies on an interlaminar stress postprocessor for plate and shell finite element computer codes, and global/local modeling strategies in finite element modeling. These activities are summarized in the following section. References to literature published under the grant are listed on pages 5 to 10 by a letter followed by a number under the categories of journal publications, conference publications, presentations, and reports. These references are indicated in the text by their letter and number as a superscript.

  16. Influence of Natural Convection and Thermal Radiation Multi-Component Transport in MOCVD Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, S.; Krishnan, A.; Clark, I.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of Grashof and Reynolds number in Metal Organic Chemical Vapor (MOCVD) reactors is being investigated under a combined empirical/numerical study. As part of that research, the deposition of Indium Phosphide in an MOCVD reactor is modeled using the computational code CFD-ACE. The model includes the effects of convection, conduction, and radiation as well as multi-component diffusion and multi-step surface/gas phase chemistry. The results of the prediction are compared with experimental data for a commercial reactor and analyzed with respect to the model accuracy.

  17. Liquid metal systems development: reactor vessel support structure evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an evaluation of support structures for the reactor vessel are reported. The U ring, box ring, integral ring, tee ring and tangential beam supports were investigated. The U ring is the recommended vessel support structure configuration.

  18. The Capabilities and Limitation of Remote Visual Methods to Detect Service-Induced Cracks in Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2006-11-01

    Since 1977, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research has funded a multiyear program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques employed for inservice inspection (ISI). Recently, the U.S. nuclear industry proposed replacing current volumetric and/or surface examinations of certain components in commercial nuclear power plants, as required by ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section XI, with a simpler visual testing (VT) method. The advantages of VT are that these tests generally involve much less radiation exposure and examination times than do volumetric examinations such as ultrasonic testing (UT). However, for industry to justify supplamenting volumetric metods with VT, and analysis of pertinent issues is needed to support the reliability of VT in determining the structural intefrity of reactor components. As piping and pressure vessel compoents in a nuclear power station are generally underwater and in high radiation field, they need to be examined by VT from a distance with radiation-hardened video systems. Remote visual testing has been used by nuclear utilities to find cracks in pressure vessel cladding in pressurized water reactors, for shrouds in boiling water reactors, and to investigate leaks in piping and reactor components. These visual tests are performed using a wide variety of procedures and equipment. The techniques for remote visual testing use submersible closed-circuit video cameras to examine reactor components and welds. PNNL has conducted a parametric study that examines the important variables that affect the effectiveness of a remote visual test. Tested variables include lighting techniques, camera resolution, camera movement, and magnification. PNNL has also conductrd a laboratory test using a commercial visual testing camera system to experimentally determine the ability of the camera system to

  19. System for inspecting large size structural components

    DOEpatents

    Birks, Albert S.; Skorpik, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for inspecting large scale structural components such as concrete walls or the like. The system includes a mobile gamma radiation source and a mobile gamma radiation detector. The source and detector are constructed and arranged for simultaneous movement along parallel paths in alignment with one another on opposite sides of a structural component being inspected. A control system provides signals which coordinate the movements of the source and detector and receives and records the radiation level data developed by the detector as a function of source and detector positions. The radiation level data is then analyzed to identify areas containing defects corresponding to unexpected variations in the radiation levels detected.

  20. Greenstone belts: Their components and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vearncombe, J. R.; Barton, J. M., Jr.; Vanreenen, D. D.; Phillips, G. N.; Wilson, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Greenstone sucessions are defined as the nongranitoid component of granitoid-greenstone terrain and are linear to irregular in shape and where linear are termed belts. The chemical composition of greenstones is described. Also discussed are the continental environments of greenstone successions. The effects of contact with granitoids, geophysical properties, recumbent folds and late formation structures upon greenstones are examined. Large stratigraphy thicknesses are explained.

  1. Development of thermoplastic components for structural validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, John G.; Cassatt, Gary G.

    1990-01-01

    Recent activity directed toward advancing the development and validation of graphite reinforced thermoplastic primary and secondary structures is described. The efforts discussed include the design, manufacture and test of a highly-loaded multi-spar wing-box component, and the development of a flight-worthy article that is form, fit and functionally replaceable with the nose landing gear door of the V-22 Osprey.

  2. Service evaluation of aircraft composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, W. A., Jr.; Dow, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    The advantages of the use of composite materials in structural applications have been identified in numerous engineering studies. Technology development programs are underway to correct known deficiencies and to provide needed improvements. However, in the final analysis, flight service programs are necessary to develop broader acceptance of, and confidence in, any new class of materials such as composites. Such flight programs, initiated by NASA Langley Research Center, are reviewed. These programs which include the selectively reinforced metal and the all-composite concepts applied to both secondary and primary aircraft structural components, are described and current status is indicated.

  3. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-05-01

    The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported (via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)) to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers.

  4. Progress Towards Prognostic Health Management of Passive Components in Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Pardini, Allan F.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Prowant, Matthew S.

    2014-08-01

    Sustainable nuclear power to promote energy security and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are two key national energy priorities. The development of deployable small modular reactors (SMRs) is expected to support these objectives by developing technologies that improve the reliability, sustain safety, and improve affordability of new reactors. Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. Prognostic health management (PHM) systems can benefit both the safety and economics of deploying AdvSMRs and can play an essential role in managing the inspection and maintenance of passive components in AdvSMR systems. This paper describes progress on development of a prototypic PHM system for AdvSMR passive components, with thermal creep chosen as the target degradation mechanism.

  5. Structural reliability analysis of laminated CMC components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Palko, Joseph L.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1991-01-01

    For laminated ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials to realize their full potential in aerospace applications, design methods and protocols are a necessity. The time independent failure response of these materials is focussed on and a reliability analysis is presented associated with the initiation of matrix cracking. A public domain computer algorithm is highlighted that was coupled with the laminate analysis of a finite element code and which serves as a design aid to analyze structural components made from laminated CMC materials. Issues relevant to the effect of the size of the component are discussed, and a parameter estimation procedure is presented. The estimation procedure allows three parameters to be calculated from a failure population that has an underlying Weibull distribution.

  6. 76 FR 16842 - Request for a License To Export Reactor Components

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Request for a License To Export Reactor Components Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70 (b) ``Public Notice of Receipt of an Application,'' please take notice that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received the following request for an...

  7. 76 FR 68514 - Request for a License To Export Reactor Components

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Request for a License To Export Reactor Components Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70 (b) ``Public Notice of Receipt of an Application,'' please take notice that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received the following request for an...

  8. 10 CFR 110.26 - General license for the export of nuclear reactor components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General license for the export of nuclear reactor components. 110.26 Section 110.26 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Licenses § 110.26 General license for the export of nuclear...

  9. 10 CFR 110.26 - General license for the export of nuclear reactor components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General license for the export of nuclear reactor components. 110.26 Section 110.26 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Licenses § 110.26 General license for the export of nuclear...

  10. 10 CFR 110.26 - General license for the export of nuclear reactor components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General license for the export of nuclear reactor components. 110.26 Section 110.26 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Licenses § 110.26 General license for the export of nuclear...

  11. 10 CFR 110.26 - General license for the export of nuclear reactor components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General license for the export of nuclear reactor components. 110.26 Section 110.26 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Licenses § 110.26 General license for the export of nuclear...

  12. 10 CFR 110.26 - General license for the export of nuclear reactor components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General license for the export of nuclear reactor components. 110.26 Section 110.26 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Licenses § 110.26 General license for the export of nuclear...

  13. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R&D Roadmap for Concrete, "Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap", focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  14. Corrosion of structural materials by lead-based reactor coolants.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.; Leibowitz, L.; Maroni, V. A.; McDeavitt, S. M.; Raraz, A. G.

    2000-11-16

    Advanced nuclear reactor design has, in recent years, focused increasingly on the use of heavy-liquid-metal coolants, such as lead and lead-bismuth eutectic. Similarly, programs on accelerator-based transmutation systems have also considered the use of such coolants. Russian experience with heavy-metal coolants for nuclear reactors has lent credence to the validity of this approach. Of significant concern is the compatibility of structural materials with these coolants. We have used a thermal convection-based test method to allow exposure of candidate materials to molten lead and lead-bismuth flowing under a temperature gradient. The gradient was deemed essential in evaluating the behavior of the test materials in that should preferential dissolution of components of the test material occur we would expect dissolution in the hotter regions and deposition in the colder regions, thus promoting material transport. Results from the interactions of a Si-rich mild steel alloy, AISI S5, and a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel, HT-9, with the molten lead-bismuth are presented.

  15. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus

    2014-02-18

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R and D Roadmap for Concrete, 'Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap', focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  16. Lightweight Thermoformed Structural Components and Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiders, Glenn W.; Bradford, Larry J.

    2004-01-01

    A technique that involves the use of thermoformed plastics has been developed to enable the design and fabrication of ultra-lightweight structural components and mirrors for use in outer space. The technique could also be used to produce items for special terrestrial uses in which minimization of weight is a primary design consideration. Although the inherent strengths of thermoplastics are clearly inferior to those of metals and composite materials, thermoplastics offer a distinct advantage in that they can be shaped, at elevated temperatures, to replicate surfaces (e.g., prescribed mirror surfaces) precisely. Furthermore, multiple elements can be bonded into structures of homogeneous design that display minimal thermal deformation aside from simple expansion. The design aspect of the present technique is based on the principle that the deflection of a plate that has internal structure depends far more on the overall thickness than on the internal details; thus, a very stiff, light structure can be made from thin plastic that is heatformed to produce a sufficiently high moment of inertia. General examples of such structures include I beams and eggcrates.

  17. CONUP: A code that calculates tag gas concentrations for reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Hammervold, D.J.; Siciliano, E.R.; Schmittroth, F.; Schenter, R.E.

    1991-11-01

    The CONUP code calculates the current tag isotopic concentrations for the Tag Gas Analysis Code, SMTAG. The combined codes, CONUP and SMTAG, represent the Tag Gas System. CONUP produces tag concentrations that are decayed and transmuted over specific reactor core cycles. The calculated concentrations are used, together with measured concentrations, as input for the SMTAG code, which identifies the failed reactor components that have released tag gas. The CONUP code has two modes for calculating isotopic concentrations: absolute and incremental. In the absolute mode, the CONUP code calculates concentrations from the beginning of the reactor startup through the current cycle. In the incremental mode, the CONUP code processes concentrations from the last reactor component cycle for each component. The incremental mode saves significant processing time because the concentrations are updated only for the current cycle. A description of the underlying physical model and method of solution are presented. A description of the code and a user`s guide are also given, along with example input and corresponding concentration output.

  18. Potential Application of Electrical Signature Analysis Methods for Monitoring Small Modular Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, Brian; Tucker Jr, Raymond W; Haynes, Howard D

    2010-01-01

    This paper will describe the technical basis behind ESA and why we consider it a viable SMR condition monitoring technology. Concepts are presented of how ESA could be applied to monitor two candidate small modular reactor components: the main coolant pumps and the control rod drives. We believe the general health of these two components can be monitored and trended over time, using ESA methods. Our optimism is based on over two decades of ESA development and testing on a wide variety of components and systems, many of which have similar operational features to the main coolant pumps and control rod drives.

  19. RELIABILITY MODELS OF AGING PASSIVE COMPONENTS INFORMED BY MATERIALS DEGRADATION METRICS TO SUPPORT LONG-TERM REACTOR OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Lowry, Peter P.; Toyooka, Michael Y.

    2012-05-01

    Paper describes a methodology for the synthesis of nuclear power plant service data with expert-elicited materials degradation information to estimate the future failure rates of passive components. This method should be an important resource to long-term plant operations and reactor life extension. Conventional probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) are not well suited to addressing long-term reactor operations. Since passive structures and components are among those for which replacement can be least practical, they might be expected to contribute increasingly to risk in an aging plant; yet, passives receive limited treatment in PRAs. Furthermore, PRAs produce only snapshots of risk based on the assumption of time-independent component failure rates. This assumption is unlikely to be valid in aging systems. The treatment of aging passive components in PRA presents challenges. Service data to quantify component reliability models are sparse, and this is exacerbated by the greater data demands of age-dependent reliability models. Another factor is that there can be numerous potential degradation mechanisms associated with the materials and operating environment of a given component. This deepens the data problem since risk-informed management of component aging will demand an understanding of the long-term risk significance of individual degradation mechanisms. In this paper we describe a Bayesian methodology that integrates metrics of materials degradation susceptibility with available plant service data to estimate age-dependent passive component reliabilities. Integration of these models into conventional PRA will provide a basis for materials degradation management informed by predicted long-term operational risk.

  20. Reactor Safety Gap Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Components and Severe Accident Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Mitchell T.; Bunt, R.; Corradini, M.; Ellison, Paul B.; Francis, M.; Gabor, John D.; Gauntt, R.; Henry, C.; Linthicum, R.; Luangdilok, W.; Lutz, R.; Paik, C.; Plys, M.; Rabiti, Cristian; Rempe, J.; Robb, K.; Wachowiak, R.

    2015-01-31

    The overall objective of this study was to conduct a technology gap evaluation on accident tolerant components and severe accident analysis methodologies with the goal of identifying any data and/or knowledge gaps that may exist, given the current state of light water reactor (LWR) severe accident research, and additionally augmented by insights obtained from the Fukushima accident. The ultimate benefit of this activity is that the results can be used to refine the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Reactor Safety Technology (RST) research and development (R&D) program plan to address key knowledge gaps in severe accident phenomena and analyses that affect reactor safety and that are not currently being addressed by the industry or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  1. Requirements for Prognostic Health Management of Passive Components in Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2013-08-01

    Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts, may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors and near term small modular reactors (SMRs), which are based on integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR) concepts. aSMRs are conceived for applications in remote locations and for diverse missions that include providing process or district heating, water desalination, and hydrogen production. Several challenges exist with respect to cost-effective operations and maintenance (O&M) of aSMRs, including the impacts of aggressive operating environments and modularity, and limiting these costs and staffing needs will be essential to ensuring the economic feasibility of aSMR deployment. In this regard, prognostic health management (PHM) systems have the potential to play a vital role in supporting the deployment of aSMR systems. This paper identifies requirements and technical gaps associated with implementation of PHM systems for passive aSMR components.

  2. Analysis of space reactor system components: Investigation through simulation and non-nuclear testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    The use of fission energy in space power and propulsion systems offers considerable advantages over chemical propulsion. Fission provides over six orders of magnitude higher energy density, which translates to higher vehicle specific impulse and lower specific mass. These characteristics enable ambitious space exploration missions. The natural space radiation environment provides an external source of protons and high energy, high Z particles that can result in the production of secondary neutrons through interactions in reactor structures. Applying the approximate proton source in geosynchronous orbit during a solar particle event, investigation using MCNPX 2.5.b for proton transport through the SAFE-400 heat pipe cooled reactor indicates an incoming secondary neutron current of (1.16 +/- 0.03) x 107 n/s at the core-reflector interface. This neutron current may affect reactor operation during low power maneuvers (e.g., start-up) and may provide a sufficient reactor start-up source. It is important that a reactor control system be designed to automatically adjust to changes in reactor power levels, maintaining nominal operation without user intervention. A robust, autonomous control system is developed and analyzed for application during reactor start-up, accounting for fluctuations in the radiation environment that result from changes in vehicle location or to temporal variations in the radiation field. Development of a nuclear reactor for space applications requires a significant amount of testing prior to deployment of a flight unit. High confidence in fission system performance can be obtained through relatively inexpensive non-nuclear tests performed in relevant environments, with the heat from nuclear fission simulated using electric resistance heaters. A series of non-nuclear experiments was performed to characterize various aspects of reactor operation. This work includes measurement of reactor core deformation due to material thermal expansion and

  3. Generic aging management programs for license renewal of BWR reactor coolant systems components.

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-02-15

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  4. Generic Aging Management Programs for License Renewal of BWR Reactor Coolant System Components

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-07-01

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  5. Embrittlement and Flow Localization in Reactor Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xianglin Wu; Xiao Pan; James Stubbins

    2006-10-06

    Many reactor components and structural members are made from metal alloys due, in large part, to their strength and ability to resist brittle fracture by plastic deformation. However, brittle fracture can occur when structural material cannot undergo extensive, or even limited, plastic deformation due to irradiation exposure. Certain irradiation conditions lead to the development of a damage microstructure where plastic flow is limited to very small volumes or regions of material, as opposed to the general plastic flow in unexposed materials. This process is referred to as flow localization or plastic instability. The true stress at the onset of necking is a constant regardless of the irradiation level. It is called 'critical stress' and this critical stress has strong temperature dependence. Interrupted tensile testes of 316L SS have been performed to investigate the microstructure evolution and competing mechanism between mechanic twinning and planar slip which are believed to be the controlling mechanism for flow localization. Deformation twinning is the major contribution of strain hardening and good ductility for low temperatures, and the activation of twinning system is determined by the critical twinning stress. Phases transform and texture analyses are also discussed in this study. Finite element analysis is carried out to complement the microstructural analysis and for the prediction of materaials performance with and without stress concentration and irradiation.

  6. Swelling in light water reactor internal components: Insights from computational modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E.; Barashev, Alexander V.; Golubov, Stanislav I.

    2015-08-01

    A modern cluster dynamics model has been used to investigate the materials and irradiation parameters that control microstructural evolution under the relatively low-temperature exposure conditions that are representative of the operating environment for in-core light water reactor components. The focus is on components fabricated from austenitic stainless steel. The model accounts for the synergistic interaction between radiation-produced vacancies and the helium that is produced by nuclear transmutation reactions. Cavity nucleation rates are shown to be relatively high in this temperature regime (275 to 325°C), but are sensitive to assumptions about the fine scale microstructure produced under low-temperature irradiation. The cavity nucleation rates observed run counter to the expectation that void swelling would not occur under these conditions. This expectation was based on previous research on void swelling in austenitic steels in fast reactors. This misleading impression arose primarily from an absence of relevant data. The results of the computational modeling are generally consistent with recent data obtained by examining ex-service components. However, it has been shown that the sensitivity of the model s predictions of low-temperature swelling behavior to assumptions about the primary damage source term and specification of the mean-field sink strengths is somewhat greater that that observed at higher temperatures. Further assessment of the mathematical model is underway to meet the long-term objective of this research, which is to provide a predictive model of void swelling at relevant lifetime exposures to support extended reactor operations.

  7. Software for Testing Electroactive Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Fox, Robert L.; Dimery, Archie D.; Bryant, Robert G.; Shams, Qamar

    2003-01-01

    A computer program generates a graphical user interface that, in combination with its other features, facilitates the acquisition and preprocessing of experimental data on the strain response, hysteresis, and power consumption of a multilayer composite-material structural component containing one or more built-in sensor(s) and/or actuator(s) based on piezoelectric materials. This program runs in conjunction with Lab-VIEW software in a computer-controlled instrumentation system. For a test, a specimen is instrumented with appliedvoltage and current sensors and with strain gauges. Once the computational connection to the test setup has been made via the LabVIEW software, this program causes the test instrumentation to step through specified configurations. If the user is satisfied with the test results as displayed by the software, the user activates an icon on a front-panel display, causing the raw current, voltage, and strain data to be digitized and saved. The data are also put into a spreadsheet and can be plotted on a graph. Graphical displays are saved in an image file for future reference. The program also computes and displays the power and the phase angle between voltage and current.

  8. Finite Element Based Stress Analysis of Graphite Component in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Core Using Linear and Nonlinear Irradiation Creep Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurindranath

    2015-01-01

    Irradiation creep plays a major role in the structural integrity of the graphite components in high temperature gas cooled reactors. Finite element procedures combined with a suitable irradiation creep model can be used to simulate the time-integrated structural integrity of complex shapes, such as the reactor core graphite reflector and fuel bricks. In the present work a comparative study was undertaken to understand the effect of linear and nonlinear irradiation creep on results of finite element based stress analysis. Numerical results were generated through finite element simulations of a typical graphite reflector.

  9. COMPONENT DEGRADATION SUSCEPTIBILITIES AS THE BASES FOR MODELING REACTOR AGING RISK

    SciTech Connect

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Lowry, Peter P.; Toyooka, Michael Y.

    2010-07-18

    The extension of nuclear power plant operating licenses beyond 60 years in the United States will be necessary if we are to meet national energy needs while addressing the issues of carbon and climate. Characterizing the operating risks associated with aging reactors is problematic because the principal tool for risk-informed decision-making, Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), is not ideally-suited to addressing aging systems. The components most likely to drive risk in an aging reactor - the passives - receive limited treatment in PRA, and furthermore, standard PRA methods are based on the assumption of stationary failure rates: a condition unlikely to be met in an aging system. A critical barrier to modeling passives aging on the wide scale required for a PRA is that there is seldom sufficient field data to populate parametric failure models, and nor is there the availability of practical physics models to predict out-year component reliability. The methodology described here circumvents some of these data and modeling needs by using materials degradation metrics, integrated with conventional PRA models, to produce risk importance measures for specific aging mechanisms and component types. We suggest that these measures have multiple applications, from the risk-screening of components to the prioritization of materials research.

  10. Treatment of irradiation effects in structural design criteria for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Smith, P.

    1997-03-01

    The irradiation environment experienced by the in-vessel components of fusion reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) presents structural design challenges not envisioned in the development of existing structural design criteria such as the ASME Code or RCC-MR. From the standpoint of structural design criteria, the most significant issues stem from the irradiation-induced changes in material properties, specifically the reduction of ductility, strain hardening capability, and fracture toughness with neutron irradiation. These effects call into question the basis of the design rules in existing structural design criteria which assume that only code-approved materials with high toughness, ductility and strain hardening capability will be used. The present paper reviews the basis of new rules that address these issues in Draft 5 of the interim ITER structural design criteria (ISDC) which was released recently for trial use by the ITER designers.

  11. Mechanical properties of thermally aged cast stainless steels from shippingport reactor components.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    1995-06-07

    Thermal embrittlement of static-cast CF-8 stainless steel components from the decommissioned Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Cast stainless steel materials were obtained from four cold-leg check valves, three hot-leg main shutoff valves, and two pump volutes. The actual time-at-temperature for the materials was {approx}13 y at {approx}281 C (538 F) for the hot-leg components and {approx}264 C (507 F) for the cold-leg components. Baseline mechanical properties for as-cast material were determined from tests on either recovery-annealed material, i.e., annealed for 1 h at 550 C and then water quenched, or material from the cooler region of the component. The Shippingport materials show modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength because of relatively low service temperatures and ferrite content of the steel. The procedure and correlations developed at Argonne National Laboratory for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly lower values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and JIC of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predicted the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y and the KRB reactor pump cover plate (CF-8) after {approx}8 y of service.

  12. Mechanical properties of thermally aged cast stainless steels from Shippingport reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-04-01

    Thermal embrittlement of static-cast CF-8 stainless steel components from the decommissioned Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Cast stainless steel materials were obtained from four cold-leg check valves, three hot-leg main shutoff valves, and two pump volutes. The actual time-at-temperature for the materials was {approximately}13 y at {approximately}281 C (538 F) for the hot-leg components and {approximately}264 C (507 F) for the cold-leg components. Baseline mechanical properties for as-cast material were determined from tests on either recovery-annealed material, i.e., annealed for 1 h at 550 C and then water quenched, or material from the cooler region of the component. The Shippingport materials show modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength because of relatively low service temperatures and ferrite content of the steel. The procedure and correlations developed at Argonne National Laboratory for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly lower values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predicted the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approximately} 15 y and the KRB reactor pump cover plate (CF-8) after {approximately} 8 y of service.

  13. Reactor pressure vessel structural integrity research

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Corwin, W.R.

    1995-04-01

    Development continues on the technology used to assess the safety of irradiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on RPV steel, coupled with detailed elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of the crack-tip stress fields, have shown that (1) constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallows surface flaws results in increased data scatter but no increase in the lower-bound fracture toughness, (2) the nil ductility temperature (NDT) performs better than the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RT{sub NDT}) as a normalizing parameter for shallow-flaw fracture toughness data, (3) biaxial loading can reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness, (4) stress-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlations cannot predict the effect of biaxial loading on a shallow-flaw fracture toughness because in-plane stresses at the crack tip are not influenced by biaxial loading, and (5) an implicit strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation can predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Experimental irradiation investigations have shown that (1) the irradiation-induced shift in Charpy V-notch vs temperature behavior may not be adequate to conservatively assess fracture toughness shifts due to embrittlement, and (2) the wide global variations of initial chemistry and fracture properties of a nominally uniform material within a pressure vessel may confound accurate integrity assessments that require baseline properties.

  14. Reactor pressure vessel structural integrity research

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Corwin, W.R.

    1994-12-31

    Development continues on the technology used to assess the safety of irradiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on RPV steel, coupled with detailed elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of the crack-tip stress fields, have shown that (1) constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallow surface flaws results in increased data scatter but no increase in the lower-bound fracture toughness, (2) the nil ductility temperature (NDT) performs better than the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RT{sub NDT}) as a normalizing parameter for shallow-flaw fracture toughness data, (3) biaxial loading can reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness, (4) stress-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlations cannot predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness because in-plane stresses at the crack tip are not influenced by biaxial loading, and (5) an implicit strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation can predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Experimental irradiation investigations have shown that (1) the irradiation-induced shift in Charpy V-notch vs temperature behavior may not be adequate to conservatively assess fracture toughness shifts due to embrittlement, and (2) the wide global variations of initial chemistry and fracture properties of a nominally uniform material within a pressure vessel may confound accurate integrity assessments that require baseline properties.

  15. Packaging, Transportation, and Disposal Logistics for Large Radioactively Contaminated Reactor Decommissioning Components

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mark S.

    2008-01-15

    The packaging, transportation and disposal of large, retired reactor components from operating or decommissioning nuclear plants pose unique challenges from a technical as well as regulatory compliance standpoint. In addition to the routine considerations associated with any radioactive waste disposition activity, such as characterization, ALARA, and manifesting, the technical challenges for large radioactively contaminated components, such as access, segmentation, removal, packaging, rigging, lifting, mode of transportation, conveyance compatibility, and load securing require significant planning and execution. In addition, the current regulatory framework, domestically in Titles 49 and 10 and internationally in TS-R-1, does not lend itself to the transport of these large radioactively contaminated components, such as reactor vessels, steam generators, reactor pressure vessel heads, and pressurizers, without application for a special permit or arrangement. This paper addresses the methods of overcoming the technical and regulatory challenges. The challenges and disposition decisions do differ during decommissioning versus component replacement during an outage at an operating plant. During decommissioning, there is less concern about critical path for restart and more concern about volume reduction and waste minimization. Segmentation on-site is an available option during decommissioning, since labor and equipment will be readily available and decontamination activities are routine. The reactor building removal path is also of less concern and there are more rigging/lifting options available. Radionuclide assessment is necessary for transportation and disposal characterization. Characterization will dictate the packaging methodology, transportation mode, need for intermediate processing, and the disposal location or availability. Characterization will also assist in determining if the large component can be transported in full compliance with the transportation

  16. 10. Photocopy of drawing, February 1958, NUCLEAR REACTOR FACILITY, STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of drawing, February 1958, NUCLEAR REACTOR FACILITY, STRUCTURAL CROSS SECTION. Giffals & Vallet, Inc., L. Rosetti, Associated Architects and Engineers, Detroit, Michigan; and U.S. Army Engineer Division, New England Corps of Engineers, Boston, Massachusetts. Drawing Number 35-84-04. (Original: AMTL Engineering Division, Watertown). - Watertown Arsenal, Building No. 100, Wooley Avenue, Watertown, Middlesex County, MA

  17. Decontamination of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor components for reuse; The French experience

    SciTech Connect

    Michaille, P. ); Moroni, J.C. ); Lambert, I. )

    1991-02-01

    Decontamination of stainless steel liquid-metal fast breeder reactor components for reuse in France began with the decontamination of Rapsodie components. At that time, dilute phosphoric acid was used. To cope with additional irradiated components after Phenix came into operation, an extensive study was performed, which led to the selection of a procedure involving two baths. The first bath, alkaline permanganate (AP), is applied for 3 h; the second bath, sulfo-phosphoric acid (SP), is applied for 6 h, both at 60{degrees}C. Up to three cycles are repeated until the residual dose rate is sufficiently low. Eight intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) and two primary pumps from Phenix were decontaminated using this method. This paper reports that because SP can pickle only a limited depth ({approximately} 3{mu}m), due to the passivation effect of phosphoric acid, and because of the waste treatment problems associated with phosphates, new solutions were explored. One possibility involves improvement of the AP-SP procedure: In the SPm procedure, the AP bath is omitted and the phosphoric concentration is reduced by a factor of 4. A second approach is the use of a new formula, called SECA, a mixture of maleic and citric acid used in reducing conditions (imposed by hydrazine). Since the Phenix and Superphenix waste treatment facilities are not designed to reprocess maleic-citric acid, only the SPm procedure has been used on reactor components. A low-contaminated IHX from Rapsodie served as a test benchmark, not only for the decontamination procedure, but also for the requalification criteria, before the SPm procedure was applied to a highly contaminated IHX from Phenix. Recent results are presented.

  18. Study of EAS neutron component temporal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromushkin, D. M.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Stenkin, Yu. V.; Yashin, I. I.

    2011-04-01

    The neutron component of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) carries information about the primary cosmic ray flux as well as about parameters of hadronic interactions at ultra-high energies. We present here the data obtained with the "Neutron" array which is a prototype of a novel type EAS array PRISMA (Stenkin, 2009). The prototype consists of 5 large area scintillator detectors (0.75 m2 each) placed in the corners and in the center of 5 m side square. The scintillator consisting of an alloy of ZnS(Ag) and 6LiF is shaped as a thin layer of grains covered with thin transparent plastic film.

  19. Components of microtubular structures in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Pillus, L; Solomon, F

    1986-01-01

    Most studies of cytoskeletal organelles have concentrated on molecular analyses of abundant and biochemically accessible structures. In many of the classical cases, however, the nature of the system chosen has precluded a concurrent genetic analysis. The mitotic spindle of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one example of an organelle that can be studied by both classical and molecular genetics. We show here that this microtubule structure also can be examined biochemically. The spindle can be isolated by selective extractions of yeast cells by using adaptations of methods successfully applied to animal cells. In this way, microtubule-associated proteins of the yeast spindle are identified. Images PMID:3517870

  20. Method for producing components with internal architectures, such as micro-channel reactors, via diffusion bonding sheets

    DOEpatents

    Alman, David E.; Wilson, Rick D.; Davis, Daniel L.

    2011-03-08

    This invention relates to a method for producing components with internal architectures, and more particularly, this invention relates to a method for producing structures with microchannels via the use of diffusion bonding of stacked laminates. Specifically, the method involves weakly bonding a stack of laminates forming internal voids and channels with a first generally low uniaxial pressure and first temperature such that bonding at least between the asperites of opposing laminates occurs and pores are isolated in interfacial contact areas, followed by a second generally higher isostatic pressure and second temperature for final bonding. The method thereby allows fabrication of micro-channel devices such as heat exchangers, recuperators, heat-pumps, chemical separators, chemical reactors, fuel processing units, and combustors without limitation on the fin aspect ratio.

  1. Structural materials for Gen-IV nuclear reactors: Challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murty, K. L.; Charit, I.

    2008-12-01

    Generation-IV reactor design concepts envisioned thus far cater toward a common goal of providing safer, longer lasting, proliferation-resistant and economically viable nuclear power plants. The foremost consideration in the successful development and deployment of Gen-IV reactor systems is the performance and reliability issues involving structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core applications. The structural materials need to endure much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. Materials under active consideration for use in different reactor components include various ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, ceramics, composites, etc. This paper presents a summary of various Gen-IV reactor concepts, with emphasis on the structural materials issues depending on the specific application areas. This paper also discusses the challenges involved in using the existing materials under both service and off-normal conditions. Tasks become increasingly complex due to the operation of various fundamental phenomena like radiation-induced segregation, radiation-enhanced diffusion, precipitation, interactions between impurity elements and radiation-produced defects, swelling, helium generation and so forth. Further, high temperature capability (e.g. creep properties) of these materials is a critical, performance-limiting factor. It is demonstrated that novel alloy and microstructural design approaches coupled with new materials processing and fabrication techniques may mitigate the challenges, and the optimum system performance may be achieved under much demanding conditions.

  2. 30 CFR 7.505 - Structural components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... loss of air pressure. (d) The refuge alternative structure shall provide a means— (1) To conduct a... for a refuge alternative capable of maintaining adequate positive pressure. (i) The airlock shall be... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. A copy may be obtained from the American Society for...

  3. 30 CFR 7.505 - Structural components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... loss of air pressure. (d) The refuge alternative structure shall provide a means— (1) To conduct a... for a refuge alternative capable of maintaining adequate positive pressure. (i) The airlock shall be... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. A copy may be obtained from the American Society for...

  4. 30 CFR 7.505 - Structural components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... loss of air pressure. (d) The refuge alternative structure shall provide a means— (1) To conduct a... for a refuge alternative capable of maintaining adequate positive pressure. (i) The airlock shall be... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. A copy may be obtained from the American Society for...

  5. 30 CFR 7.505 - Structural components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... loss of air pressure. (d) The refuge alternative structure shall provide a means— (1) To conduct a... for a refuge alternative capable of maintaining adequate positive pressure. (i) The airlock shall be... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. A copy may be obtained from the American Society for...

  6. 30 CFR 7.505 - Structural components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... loss of air pressure. (d) The refuge alternative structure shall provide a means— (1) To conduct a... for a refuge alternative capable of maintaining adequate positive pressure. (i) The airlock shall be... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. A copy may be obtained from the American Society for...

  7. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    -flow operation to natural circulation. Low-flow coolant events are the most difficult to design for because they involve the most complex thermal-hydraulic behavior induced by the dominance of thermal-buoyancy forces acting on the coolants. Such behavior can cause multiple-component flow interaction phenomena, which are not adequately understood or appreciated by reactor designers as to their impact on reactor performance and safety. Since the early 1990s, when DOE canceled the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program, little has been done experimentally to further understand the importance of the complex thermal-buoyancy phenomena and their impact on reactor design or to improve the ability of three-dimensional (3-D) transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structures codes to model the phenomena. An improved experimental data base and the associated improved validated codes would provide needed design tools to the reactor community. The improved codes would also facilitate scale-up from small-scale testing to prototype size and would facilitate comparing performance of one reactor/component design with another. The codes would also have relevance to the design and safety of water-cooled reactors. To accomplish the preceding, it is proposed to establish a national GNEP-LMR research and development center at Argonne having as its foundation state-of-art science-based infrastructure consisting of: (a) thermal-hydraulic experimental capabilities for conducting both water and sodium testing of individual reactor components and complete reactor in-vessel models and (b) a computational modeling development and validation capability that is strongly interfaced with the experimental facilities. The proposed center would greatly advance capabilities for reactor development by establishing the validity of high-fidelity (i.e., close to first principles) models and tools. Such tools could be used directly for reactor design or for qualifying/tuning of lower

  8. Residual radioactivity guidelines for the heavy water components test reactor at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, M.B. Smith, R.; McNeil, J.

    1997-04-01

    Guidelines were developed for acceptable levels of residual radioactivity in the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility at the conclusion of its decommissioning. Using source terms developed from data generated in a detailed characterization study, the RESRAD and RASRAD-BUILD computer codes were used to calculate derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for the radionuclides that will remain in the facility. The calculated DCGLs, when compared to existing concentrations of radionuclides measured during a 1996 characterization program, indicate that no decontamination of concrete surfaces will be necessary. Also, based on the results of the calculations, activated concrete in the reactor biological shield does not have to be removed, and imbedded radioactive piping in the facility can remain in place. Viewed in another way, the results of the calculations showed that the present inventory of residual radioactivity in the facility (not including that associated with the reactor vessel and steam generators) would produce less than one millirem per year above background to a hypothetical individual on the property. The residual radioactivity is estimated to be approximately 0.04 percent of the total inventory in the facility as of March, 1997. According to the results, the only radionuclides that would produce greater than 0.0.1-millirem per year are Am-241 (0.013 mrem/yr at 300 years), C-14 (0.022 mrem/yr at 1000 years) and U-238 (0.034 mrem/yr at 6000 years). Human exposure would occur only through the groundwater pathways, that is, from water drawn from, a well on the property. The maximum exposure would be approximately one percent of the 4 millirem per year ground water exposure limit established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 11 refs., 13 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. TAS measurements for reactor physics and nuclear structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algora, A.; Jordan, D.; Taín, J. L.; Rubio, B.; Agramunt, J.; Caballero, L.; Nácher, E.; Perez-Cerdan, A. B.; Molina, F.; Estevez, E.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Hunyadi, M. D.; Gulyás, J.; Vitéz, A.; Csatlós, M.; Csige, L.; ńysto, J.; Penttilä, H.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Moore, I.; Eronen, T.; Jokinen, A.; Nieminen, A.; Hakala, J.; Karvonen, P.; Kankainen, A.; Hager, U.; Sonoda, T.; Saastamoinen, A.; Rissanen, J.; Kessler, T.; Weber, C.; Ronkainen, J.; Rahaman, S.; Elomaa, V.; Burkard, K.; Hüller, W.; Batist, L.; Gelletly, W.; Nichols, A. L.; Yoshida, T.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Peräjärvi, K.

    2011-10-01

    In this contribution we will present recent total absorption measurements of the beta decay of neutron-rich nuclei performed at the IGISOL facility of the Univ. of Jyväskyla. In the measurements the JYFL Penning Trap was used as a high resolution isobaric separator. The total absorption technique will be described and the impact of recent results in the fields of reactor physics (decay heat calculations) and nuclear structure will be discussed.

  10. Mechanical-property degradation of cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1991-10-01

    The mechanical properties of cast stainless steels from the Shippingport reactor have been characterized. Baseline properties for unaged materials were obtained from tests on either recovery-annealed material or material from a cooler region of the component. The materials exhibited modest decrease in impact energy and fracture toughness and a small increase in tensile strength. The fracture toughness J-R curve, J{sub IC} value, tensile flow stress, and Charpy-impact energy of the materials showed very good agreement with estimations based on accelerated laboratory aging studies. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy that would be achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory at temperatures between 320 and 400{degrees}C. The results showed very good agreement with estimates; the activation energies ranged from 125 to 250 kJ/mole and the minimum room temperature impact energy was <75 J/cm{sup 2}. The estimated impact energy and fracture toughness J-R curve for materials from the Ringhals reactor hot and crossover-leg elbows are also presented.

  11. Use of laser flow visualization techniques in reactor component thermal-hydraulic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Oras, J.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    To properly design reactor components, an understanding of the various thermal hydraulic phenomena, i.e., thermal stratification flow channeling, recirculation regions, shear layers, etc., is necessary. In the liquid metal breeder reactor program, water is commonly used to replace sodium in experimental testing to facilitate the investigations, (i.e., reduce cost and allow fluid velocity measurement or flow pattern study). After water testing, limited sodium tests can be conducted to validate the extrapolation of the water results to sodium. This paper describes a novel laser flow visualization technique being utilized at ANL together with various examples of its use and plans for further development. A 3-watt argon-ion laser, in conjunction with a cylindrical opticallens, has been used to create a thin (approx. 1-mm) intense plane of laser light for the illuminiation of various flow tracers in precisely defined regions of interest within a test article having windows. Both fluorescing dyes tuned to the wavelength of the laser light (to maximize brightness and sharpness of flow image) and small (< 0.038-mm, 0.0015-in. dia.) opaque, nearly neutrally buoyant polystyrene spheres (to ensure that the particles trace out the fluid motion) have been used as flow tracers.

  12. Component evaluation for intersystem loss-of-coolant accidents in advanced light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.

    1994-07-01

    Using the methodology outlined in NUREG/CR-5603 this report evaluates (on a probabilistic basis) design rules for components in ALWRs that could be subjected to intersystem loss-of-coolant accidents (ISLOCAs). The methodology is intended for piping elements, flange connections, on-line pumps and valves, and heat exchangers. The NRC has directed that the design rules be evaluated for BWR pressures of 7.04 MPa (1025 psig), PWR pressures of 15.4 MPa (2235 psig), and 177{degrees}C (350{degrees}F), and has established a goal of 90% probability that system rupture will not occur during an ISLOCA event. The results of the calculations in this report show that components designed for a pressure of 0.4 of the reactor coolant system operating pressure will satisfy the NRC survival goal in most cases. Specific recommendations for component strengths for BWR and PWR applications are made in the report. A peer review panel of nationally recognized experts was selected to review and critique the initial results of this program.

  13. NUHOWS - Storage and Transportation of Irradiated Reactor Components in Large Packages - 13439

    SciTech Connect

    Rae, Glen A.

    2013-07-01

    Most irradiated reactor components (hardware such as Control Rod Blades, Fuel Channels, Poison Curtains, etc.) generated at reactors previously required significant processing for size reduction due to the available transportation casks not being physically capable of containing unprocessed material. As of July 1, 2008, disposal for this typical waste class (B and C) became inaccessible (for the major part of the nation) due to the Barnwell, SC disposal facility being closed to all but its three compact states (CT, NJ and SC). Currently in the United States, most facilities are storing their irradiated hardware on-site in the spent fuel pools. Until recently with the opening of the Waste Control Specialists' Texas disposal facility, utilities faced the challenges of spent fuel pool space and capacity management. However, even with WCS's disposal availability, the site currently has annual Curie limitations for disposal, which will continue to promote interim on-site storage until such time as disposal is available. In response, Transnuclear Inc., (TN) an AREVA company, proceeded with designing a new large Radioactive Waste Container (RWC) that can be used to package irradiated hardware without the need for significant processing. The design features of the RWC allows for intermittent loadings of the hardware for better packaging efficiency, higher packaging density, space savings and reduced cost. This RWC is also compatible with TN's on-site modular vault storage system. Once completely loaded, the RWC can be transported to an on-site storage facility, an off-site storage facility and/or an available disposal facility. To accommodate the transportation, TN has designed a large transportation cask, the MP197HB. As the original design was for transporting fuel, it contains the necessary shielding to allow for the transport of unprocessed irradiated reactor components, while significantly reducing the amount of irradiated hardware shipments required with the use of

  14. Relationships between chemical oxygen demand (COD) components and toxicity in a sequential anaerobic baffled reactor/aerobic completely stirred reactor system treating Kemicetine.

    PubMed

    Sponza, Delia Teresa; Demirden, Pinar

    2010-04-15

    In this study the interactions between toxicity removals and Kemicetine, COD removals, intermediate products of Kemicetine and COD components (CODs originating from slowly degradable organics, readily degradable organics, inert microbial products and from the inert compounds) were investigated in a sequential anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR)/aerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system with a real pharmaceutical wastewater. The total COD and Kemicetine removal efficiencies were 98% and 100%, respectively, in the sequential ABR/CSTR systems. 2-Amino-1 (p-nitrophenil)-1,3 propanediol, l-p-amino phenyl, p-amino phenol and phenol were detected in the ABR as the main readily degradable inter-metabolites. In the anaerobic ABR reactor, the Kemicetin was converted to corresponding inter-metabolites and a substantial part of the COD was removed. In the aerobic CSTR reactor the inter-metabolites produced in the anaerobic reactor were completely removed and the COD remaining from the anerobic reactor was biodegraded. It was found that the COD originating from the readily degradable organics did not limit the anaerobic degradation process, while the CODs originating from the slowly degradable organics and from the inert microbial products significantly decreased the anaerobic ABR reactor performance. The acute toxicity test results indicated that the toxicity decreased from the influent to the effluent of the aerobic CSTR reactor. The ANOVA test statistics showed that there was a strong linear correlation between acute toxicity, CODs originating from the slowly degradable organics and inert microbial products. A weak correlation between acute toxicity and CODs originating from the inert compounds was detected.

  15. Neutronic analysis of alternative structural materials for fusion reactor blankets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Raul dos

    1988-07-01

    The neutronic performance of the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) blanket was studied when several alternative structural materials were used instead of the INTOR reference structural material, type 316 stainless steel. The alternative structural materials included: ferritic-, vanadium-, titanium-, long range ordered-, manganese austenitic-, and nimonic-alloys. All were treated both with and without a first-wall coating of beryllium or graphite. The tritium breeding ratio, the nuclear heating, and the gas (hydrogen and helium) production rates in the structural materials were calculated for the possible combinations of structural material and first-wall coating. These parameters were compared with those obtained by using SS-316. The nimonic alloy was the only one with worse neutronic performance than the SS-316.

  16. Online stress corrosion crack and fatigue usages factor monitoring and prognostics in light water reactor components: Probabilistic modeling, system identification and data fusion based big data analytics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish M.; Jagielo, Bryan J.; Iverson, William I.; Bhan, Chi Bum; Soppet, William S.; Majumdar, Saurin M.; Natesan, Ken N.

    2014-12-10

    Nuclear reactors in the United States account for roughly 20% of the nation's total electric energy generation, and maintaining their safety in regards to key component structural integrity is critical not only for long term use of such plants but also for the safety of personnel and the public living around the plant. Early detection of damage signature such as of stress corrosion cracking, thermal-mechanical loading related material degradation in safety-critical components is a necessary requirement for long-term and safe operation of nuclear power plant systems.

  17. Technical Needs for Prototypic Prognostic Technique Demonstration for Advanced Small Modular Reactor Passive Components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-05-17

    This report identifies a number of requirements for prognostics health management of passive systems in AdvSMRs, documents technical gaps in establishing a prototypical prognostic methodology for this purpose, and describes a preliminary research plan for addressing these technical gaps. AdvSMRs span multiple concepts; therefore a technology- and design-neutral approach is taken, with the focus being on characteristics that are likely to be common to all or several AdvSMR concepts. An evaluation of available literature is used to identify proposed concepts for AdvSMRs along with likely operational characteristics. Available operating experience of advanced reactors is used in identifying passive components that may be subject to degradation, materials likely to be used for these components, and potential modes of degradation of these components. This information helps in assessing measurement needs for PHM systems, as well as defining functional requirements of PHM systems. An assessment of current state-of-the-art approaches to measurements, sensors and instrumentation, diagnostics and prognostics is also documented. This state-of-the-art evaluation, combined with the requirements, may be used to identify technical gaps and research needs in the development, evaluation, and deployment of PHM systems for AdvSMRs. A preliminary research plan to address high-priority research needs for the deployment of PHM systems to AdvSMRs is described, with the objective being the demonstration of prototypic prognostics technology for passive components in AdvSMRs. Greater efficiency in achieving this objective can be gained through judicious selection of materials and degradation modes that are relevant to proposed AdvSMR concepts, and for which significant knowledge already exists. These selections were made based on multiple constraints including the analysis performed in this document, ready access to laboratory-scale facilities for materials testing and measurement, and

  18. 54. ARAII. Structural steel framing for bottom SL1 reactor building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. ARA-II. Structural steel framing for bottom SL-1 reactor building. October 16, 1957. Ineel photo no. 57-5186. Photographer: Jack L. Anderson. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. 77 FR 23513 - Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft interim staff guidance; Request for public... Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001; telephone: 301-415-4029..., Division of License Renewal, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  20. Closeup view of Flume Bridge #4 showing structural components. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of Flume Bridge #4 showing structural components. Looking northeast - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Flume Bridge No. 4, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  1. Block-Krylov component synthesis method for structural model reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Hale, Arthur L.

    1988-01-01

    A new analytical method is presented for generating component shape vectors, or Ritz vectors, for use in component synthesis. Based on the concept of a block-Krylov subspace, easily derived recurrence relations generate blocks of Ritz vectors for each component. The subspace spanned by the Ritz vectors is called a block-Krylov subspace. The synthesis uses the new Ritz vectors rather than component normal modes to reduce the order of large, finite-element component models. An advantage of the Ritz vectors is that they involve significantly less computation than component normal modes. Both 'free-interface' and 'fixed-interface' component models are derived. They yield block-Krylov formulations paralleling the concepts of free-interface and fixed-interface component modal synthesis. Additionally, block-Krylov reduced-order component models are shown to have special disturbability/observability properties. Consequently, the method is attractive in active structural control applications, such as large space structures. The new fixed-interface methodology is demonstrated by a numerical example. The accuracy is found to be comparable to that of fixed-interface component modal synthesis.

  2. Grain boundary engineering for structure materials of nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Allen, T. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2013-10-01

    Grain boundary engineering (GBE), primarily implemented by thermomechanical processing, is an effective and economical method of enhancing the properties of polycrystalline materials. Among the factors affecting grain boundary character distribution, literature data showed definitive effect of grain size and texture. GBE is more effective for austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys compared to other structural materials of nuclear reactors, such as refractory metals, ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels, and Zr alloys. GBE has shown beneficial effects on improving the strength, creep strength, and resistance to stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys.

  3. Nuclear reactor containment structure with continuous ring tunnel at grade

    DOEpatents

    Seidensticker, Ralph W.; Knawa, Robert L.; Cerutti, Bernard C.; Snyder, Charles R.; Husen, William C.; Coyer, Robert G.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor containment structure which includes a reinforced concrete shell, a hemispherical top dome, a steel liner, and a reinforced-concrete base slab supporting the concrete shell is constructed with a substantial proportion thereof below grade in an excavation made in solid rock with the concrete poured in contact with the rock and also includes a continuous, hollow, reinforced-concrete ring tunnel surrounding the concrete shell with its top at grade level, with one wall integral with the reinforced concrete shell, and with at least the base of the ring tunnel poured in contact with the rock.

  4. Engine structures analysis software: Component Specific Modeling (COSMO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Schwartz, S.

    1994-08-01

    A component specific modeling software program has been developed for propulsion systems. This expert program is capable of formulating the component geometry as finite element meshes for structural analysis which, in the future, can be spun off as NURB geometry for manufacturing. COSMO currently has geometry recipes for combustors, turbine blades, vanes, and disks. Component geometry recipes for nozzles, inlets, frames, shafts, and ducts are being added. COSMO uses component recipes that work through neutral files with the Technology Benefit Estimator (T/BEST) program which provides the necessary base parameters and loadings. This report contains the users manual for combustors, turbine blades, vanes, and disks.

  5. Engine Structures Analysis Software: Component Specific Modeling (COSMO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Schwartz, S.

    1994-01-01

    A component specific modeling software program has been developed for propulsion systems. This expert program is capable of formulating the component geometry as finite element meshes for structural analysis which, in the future, can be spun off as NURB geometry for manufacturing. COSMO currently has geometry recipes for combustors, turbine blades, vanes, and disks. Component geometry recipes for nozzles, inlets, frames, shafts, and ducts are being added. COSMO uses component recipes that work through neutral files with the Technology Benefit Estimator (T/BEST) program which provides the necessary base parameters and loadings. This report contains the users manual for combustors, turbine blades, vanes, and disks.

  6. Physics-Based Multi-State Models of Passive Component Degradation for the R7 Reactor Simulation Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Layton, Robert F.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Lowry, Peter P.

    2012-06-25

    Abstract: The Next Generation Systems Analysis Code - referred to as R7 - is reactor systems simulation software being developed to support the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Pathway of the U.S. Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. It will provide an integrated multi-physics environment, implemented in an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework that can produce risk and other performance insights on long-term reactor operations. An element of this simulation environment will be the performance of passive components and materials. Conventional models of component reliability are largely parametric, relying on plant service data to estimate component lifetimes and failure rates. This type of model has limited usefulness in the R7 environment where the intent is to explicitly determine the influence of physical stressors on component degradation. In this paper, we describe a new class of multi-state physics-based component models designed to be R7-compatible. These models capture the physics of materials degradation while also incorporating the effects of interventions and component rejuvenation. The models are implemented in a cumulative damage framework that allows the impact of an evolving physical environment to be addressed without recourse to resampling within the Monte Carlo-based UQ framework. The paper describes an application to stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metal welds - a principal contributor to potential loss of coolant accidents. So while R7 will have the more conventional capability of reactor simulation codes to model the impact of degraded components and systems on plant performance, the methodology described here allows R7 to model the inverse effect; the impact of the physical environment on component degradation and performance.

  7. System Engineering Program Applicability for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC)

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Bryan

    2009-06-01

    This white paper identifies where the technical management and systems engineering processes and activities to be used in establishing the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC) should be addressed and presents specific considerations for these activities under each CTC alternative

  8. Simplified design procedures for fiber composite structural components/joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    Simplified step-by-step design procedures are summarized, which are suitable for the preliminary design of composite structural components such as panels (laminates) and composite built-up structures (box beams). Similar procedures are also summarized for the preliminary design of composite bolted and adhesively bonded joints. The summary is presented in terms of sample design cases complemented with typical results. Guidelines are provided which can be used in the design selection process of composite structural components/joints. Also, procedures to account for cyclic loads, hygrothermal effects and lamination residual stresses are included.

  9. Bulk-bronzied graphites for plasma-facing components in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Doerner, R.; Khandagle, M. . Inst. of Plasma and Fusion Research); Causey, R.; Wilson, K. ); Croessmann, D.; Whitley, J. ); Holland, D.; Smolik, G. ); Matsuda, T.; Sogabe, T. (Toyo Tanso Co. Ltd., O

    1990-06-01

    Newly developed bulk-boronized graphites and boronized C-C composites with a total boron concentration ranging from 1 wt % to 30 wt % have been evaluated as plasma-facing component materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Bulk-boronized graphites have been bombarded with high-flux deuterium plasmas at temperatures between 200 and 1600{degree}C. Plasma interaction induced erosion of bulk-boronized graphites is observed to be a factor of 2--3 smaller than that of pyrolytic graphite, in regimes of physical sputtering, chemical sputtering and radiation enhanced sublimation. Postbombardment thermal desorption spectroscopy indicates that bulk-boronized graphites enhance recombinative desorption of deuterium, which leads to a suppression of the formation of deuterocarbon due to chemical sputtering. The tritium inventory in graphite has been found to decrease by an order of magnitude due to 10 wt % bulk-boronization at temperatures above 1000{degree}C. The critical heat flux to induce cracking for bulk-boronized graphites has been found to be essentially the same as that for non-boronized graphites. Also, 10 wt % bulk-boronization of graphite hinders air oxidation nearly completely at 800{degree}C and reduces the steam oxidation rate by a factor of 2--3 at around 1100 and 1350{degree}C. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Catalytic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  11. Structural analysis of ultra-high speed aircraft structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenzen, K. H.; Siegel, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The buckling characteristics of a hypersonic beaded skin panel were investigated under pure compression with boundary conditions similar to those found in a wing mounted condition. The primary phases of analysis reported include: (1) experimental testing of the panel to failure; (2) finite element structural analysis of the beaded panel with the computer program NASTRAN; and (3) summary of the semiclassical buckling equations for the beaded panel under purely compressive loads. A comparison of each of the analysis methods is also included.

  12. Structural analysis methods development for turbine hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    The structural analysis technologies and activities of the NASA Lewis Research Center's gas turbine engine HOT Section Technoloogy (HOST) program are summarized. The technologies synergistically developed and validated include: time-varying thermal/mechanical load models; component-specific automated geometric modeling and solution strategy capabilities; advanced inelastic analysis methods; inelastic constitutive models; high-temperature experimental techniques and experiments; and nonlinear structural analysis codes. Features of the program that incorporate the new technologies and their application to hot section component analysis and design are described. Improved and, in some cases, first-time 3-D nonlinear structural analyses of hot section components of isotropic and anisotropic nickel-base superalloys are presented.

  13. VIPRE (Versatile Internals and Component Program for Reactors; EPRI)-01: A thermal-hydraulic code for reactor cores: Volume 4, Applications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cuta, J.M.; Stewart, C.W.; Koontz, A.S.; Montgomery, S.D.

    1987-04-01

    VIPRE (Versatile Internals and Component Program for Reactors; EPRI) has been developed for nuclear power utility thermal-hydraulic analysis applications. It is designed to help evaluate nuclear reactor core safety limits including minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio (MDNBR), critical power ratio (CPR), fuel and clad temperatures, and coolant state in normal operation and assumed accident conditions. This volume (Volume 4: Applications) contains extensive comparisons of VIPRE calculations to experimental data. There are also sensitivity studies and evaluations of code numerical and computational performance. In addition, calculations performed by member utilities using VIPRE for comparisons with transient CHF data, and FSAR plant analyses are presented. Comparisons are also presented of plant thermal-hydraulic calculations with VIPRE and other COBRA codes. These calculations demonstrate the suitability of VIPRE for PWR core thermal-hydraulic analysis.

  14. Final Report: Safety of Plasma Components and Aerosol Transport During Hard Disruptions and Accidental Energy Release in Fusion Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bourham, Mohamed A.; Gilligan, John G.

    1999-08-14

    Safety considerations in large future fusion reactors like ITER are important before licensing the reactor. Several scenarios are considered hazardous, which include safety of plasma-facing components during hard disruptions, high heat fluxes and thermal stresses during normal operation, accidental energy release, and aerosol formation and transport. Disruption events, in large tokamaks like ITER, are expected to produce local heat fluxes on plasma-facing components, which may exceed 100 GW/m{sup 2} over a period of about 0.1 ms. As a result, the surface temperature dramatically increases, which results in surface melting and vaporization, and produces thermal stresses and surface erosion. Plasma-facing components safety issues extends to cover a wide range of possible scenarios, including disruption severity and the impact of plasma-facing components on disruption parameters, accidental energy release and short/long term LOCA's, and formation of airborne particles by convective current transport during a LOVA (water/air ingress disruption) accident scenario. Study, and evaluation of, disruption-induced aerosol generation and mobilization is essential to characterize database on particulate formation and distribution for large future fusion tokamak reactor like ITER. In order to provide database relevant to ITER, the SIRENS electrothermal plasma facility at NCSU has been modified to closely simulate heat fluxes expected in ITER.

  15. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1961-07-25

    A means is described for co-relating the essential physical requirements of a fission chain reaction in order that practical, compact, and easily controllable reactors can be built. These objects are obtained by employing a composition of fissionsble isotope and moderator in fluid form in which the amount of fissionsble isotcpe present governs the reaction. The size of the reactor is no longer a critical factor, the new criterion being the concentration of the fissionable isotope.

  16. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1963-09-10

    A breeder reactor is described, including a mass of fissionable material that is less than critical with respect to unmoderated neutrons and greater than critical with respect to neutrons of average energies substantially greater than thermal, a coolant selected from sodium or sodium--potassium alloys, a control liquid selected from lead or lead--bismuth alloys, and means for varying the quantity of control liquid in the reactor. (AEC)

  17. DISMANTLING OF THE UPPER RPV COMPONENTS OF THE KARLSRUHE MULTI-PURPOSE RESEARCH REACTOR (MZFR), GERMANY

    SciTech Connect

    Prechtl, E.; Suessdorf, W.

    2003-02-27

    The Multi-purpose Research Reactor was a pressurized-water reactor cooled and moderated with heavy water. It was built from 1961 to 1966 and went critical for the first time on 29 September 1965. After nineteen years of successful operation, the reactor was de-activated on 3 May 1984. The reactor had a thermal output of 200 MW and an electrical output of 50 MW. The MZFR not only served to supply electrical power, but also as a test bed for: - research into various materials for reactor building (e. g. zirkaloy), - the manufacturing and operating industry to gain experience in erection and operation, - training scientific and technical reactor staff, and - power supply (first nuclear combined-heat-and-power system, 1979-1984). The experience gained in operating the MZFR was very helpful for the development and operation of power reactors. At first, safe containment and enclosure of the plant was planned, but then it was decided to dismantle the plant completely, step by step, in view o f the clear advantages of this approach. The decommissioning concept for the complete elimination of the plant down to a green-field site provides for eight steps. A separate decommissioning license is required for each step. As part of the dismantling, about 72,000 Mg [metric tons] of concrete and 7,200 Mg of metal (400 Mg RPV) must be removed. About 700 Mg of concrete (500 Mg biological shield) and 1300 Mg of metal must be classified as radioactive waste.

  18. Thermalhydraulic calculation for boiling water reactor and its natural circulation component

    SciTech Connect

    Trianti, Nuri Nurjanah,; Su’ud, Zaki; Arif, Idam; Permana, Sidik

    2015-09-30

    Thermalhydraulic of reactor core is the thermal study on fluids within the core reactor, i.e. analysis of the thermal energy transfer process produced by fission reaction from fuel to the reactor coolant. This study include of coolant temperature and reactor power density distribution. The purposes of this analysis in the design of nuclear power plant are to calculate the coolant temperature distribution and the chimney height so natural circulation could be occurred. This study was used boiling water reactor (BWR) with cylinder type reactor core. Several reactor core properties such as linear power density, mass flow rate, coolant density and inlet temperature has been took into account to obtain distribution of coolant density, flow rate and pressure drop. The results of calculation are as follows. Thermal hydraulic calculations provide the uniform pressure drop of 1.1 bar for each channels. The optimum mass flow rate to obtain the uniform pressure drop is 217g/s. Furthermore, from the calculation it could be known that outlet temperature is 288°C which is the saturated fluid’s temperature within the system. The optimum chimney height for natural circulation within the system is 14.88 m.

  19. Thermalhydraulic calculation for boiling water reactor and its natural circulation component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trianti, Nuri; Nurjanah, Su'ud, Zaki; Arif, Idam; Permana, Sidik

    2015-09-01

    Thermalhydraulic of reactor core is the thermal study on fluids within the core reactor, i.e. analysis of the thermal energy transfer process produced by fission reaction from fuel to the reactor coolant. This study include of coolant temperature and reactor power density distribution. The purposes of this analysis in the design of nuclear power plant are to calculate the coolant temperature distribution and the chimney height so natural circulation could be occurred. This study was used boiling water reactor (BWR) with cylinder type reactor core. Several reactor core properties such as linear power density, mass flow rate, coolant density and inlet temperature has been took into account to obtain distribution of coolant density, flow rate and pressure drop. The results of calculation are as follows. Thermal hydraulic calculations provide the uniform pressure drop of 1.1 bar for each channels. The optimum mass flow rate to obtain the uniform pressure drop is 217g/s. Furthermore, from the calculation it could be known that outlet temperature is 288°C which is the saturated fluid's temperature within the system. The optimum chimney height for natural circulation within the system is 14.88 m.

  20. Identification of structural interface characteristics using component mode synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huckelbridge, A. A.; Lawrence, C.

    1987-01-01

    The inability to adequately model connections has limited the ability to predict overall system dynamic response. Connections between structural components are often mechanically complex and difficult to accurately model analytically. Improved analytical models for connections are needed to improve system dynamic predictions. This study explores combining Component Mode synthesis methods for coupling structural components with Parameter Identification procedures for improving the analytical modeling of the connections. Improvements in the connection properties are computed in terms of physical parameters so the physical characteristics of the connections can be better understood, in addition to providing improved input for the system model. Two sample problems, one utilizing simulated data, the other using experimental data from a rotor dynamic test rig are presented.

  1. Identification of structural interface characteristics using component mode synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huckelbridge, A. A.; Lawrence, C.

    1987-01-01

    The inability to adequately model connections has limited the ability to predict overall system dynamic response. Connections between structural components are often mechanically complex and difficult to accurately model analytically. Improved analytical models for connections are needed to improve system dynamic predictions. This study explores combining Component Mode synthesis methods for coupling structural components with Parameter Identification procedures for improving the analytical modeling of the connections. Improvements in the connection properties are computed in terms of physical parameters so the physical characteristics of the connections can be better understood, in addition to providing improved input for the system model. Two sample problems, one utilizing simulated data, the other using experimental data from a rotor dynamic test rig, are presented.

  2. Identification of structural interface characteristics using component mode synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huckelbridge, A. A.; Lawrence, C.

    1989-01-01

    The inability to adequately model connections has limited the ability to predict overall system dynamic response. Connections between structural components are often mechanically complex and difficult to accurately model analytically. Improved analytical models for connections are needed to improve system dynamic predictions. This study explores combining Component Mode synthesis methods for coupling structural components with Parameter Identification procedures for improving the analytical modeling of the connections. Improvements in the connection properties are computed in terms of physical parameters so the physical characteristics of the connections can be better understood, in addition to providing improved input for the system model. Two sample problems, one utilizing simulated data, the other using experimental data from a rotor dynamic test rig, are presented.

  3. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In much of the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover is the most abundant and widespread agricultural residue. Because of this abundance, stover has been targeted as feedstock for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Ethanol yield is linked to sugars, while structural compone...

  4. Component modes damping assignment methodology for articulated, multiflexible body structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.

    1993-01-01

    To simulate the dynamical motion of articulated, multiflexible body structures, one can use multibody simulation packages such as DISCOS. To this end, one must supply appropriate reduced-order models for all of the flexible components involved. The component modes projection and assembly model reduction (COMPARE) methodology is one way to construct these reduced-order component models, which when reassembled capture important system input-to-output mapping of the full-order model at multiple system configurations of interest. In conjunction, we must also supply component damping matrices which when reassembled generate a system damping matrix that has certain desirable properties. The problem of determining the damping factors of components' modes to achieve a given system damping matrix is addressed here. To this end, we must establish from first principles a matrix-algebraic relation between the system's modal damping matrix and the components' modal damping matrices. An unconstrained/constrained optimization problem can then be formulated to determine the component modes' damping factors that best satisfy that matrix-algebraic relation. The effectiveness of the developed methodology, called ModeDamp, has been successfully demonstrated on a high-order, finite element model of the Galileo spacecraft.

  5. Oxidation Damage Evaluation by Non-Destructive Method for Graphite Components in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Tada, Tatsuya; Sumita, Junya; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    To develop non-destructive evaluation methods for oxidation damage on graphite components in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), the applicability of ultrasonic wave and micro-indentation methods were investigated. Candidate graphites, IG-110 and IG-430, for core components of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) were used in this study. These graphites were oxidized uniformly by air at 500 °C. The following results were obtained from this study. (1) Ultrasonic wave velocities with 1 MHz can be expressed empirically by exponential formulas to burn-off, oxidation weight loss. (2) The porous condition of the oxidized graphite could be evaluated with wave propagation analysis with a wave-pore interaction model. It is important to consider the non-uniformity of oxidized porous condition. (3) Micro-indentation method is expected to determine the local oxidation damage. It is necessary to assess the variation of the test data.

  6. Proceedings of the 2000 International Conference on Fatigue of Reactor Components (MRP-46): PWR Materials Reliability Program (PWRMRP)

    SciTech Connect

    2001-05-01

    This report contains information presented at the First International Conference on Fatigue of Reactor Components held July 31-August 2, 2000, in Napa, California. The conference--sponsored by EPRI, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency/Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (OECD NEA/CSNI), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC)--provided a forum for the technical discussion of fatigue issues that affect the integrity and operation of light water reactor components. Approximately 90 fatigue experts, representing 12 countries, participated in the conference. Strong representation was shown by nuclear operators, vendors, regulatory agencies, research and development organizations, and other experts.

  7. Neutron Dosimetry on the Full-Core First Generation VVER-440 Aimed at Reactor Support Structure Load Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, P.; Borodkin, G.; Khrennikov, N.; Konheiser, J.; Noack, K.

    2009-08-01

    Reactor support structures (RSS), especially the ferritic steel wall of the water tank, of first-generation VVER-440 are non-restorable reactor equipment, and their lifetime may restrict plant-life. All operated Russian first generation VVER-440 have a reduced core with dummy assemblies except Unit 4 of Novovoronezh nuclear power plant (NPP). In comparison with other reactors, the full-core loading scheme of this reactor provides the highest neutron fluence on the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RSS accumulated over design service-life and its prolongation. The radiation load parameters on the RPV and RSS that have resulted from this core loading scheme should be evaluated by means of precise calculations and validated by ex-vessel neutron dosimetry to provide the reliable assessment of embrittlement parameters of these reactor components. The results of different types of calculations and their comparison with measured data have been analyzed in this paper. The calculational analysis of RSS fluence rate variation in dependence on the core loading scheme, including the standard and low leakage core as well as the introduction of dummy assemblies, is presented in this paper.

  8. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Roman, W.G.

    1961-06-27

    A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

  9. Improved Joining of Metal Components to Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmes, Edmund

    2009-01-01

    Systems requirements for complex spacecraft drive design requirements that lead to structures, components, and/or enclosures of a multi-material and multifunctional design. The varying physical properties of aluminum, tungsten, Invar, or other high-grade aerospace metals when utilized in conjunction with lightweight composites multiply system level solutions. These multi-material designs are largely dependent upon effective joining techAn improved method of joining metal components to matrix/fiber composite material structures has been invented. The method is particularly applicable to equipping such thin-wall polymer-matrix composite (PMC) structures as tanks with flanges, ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liners for high heat engine nozzles, and other metallic-to-composite attachments. The method is oriented toward new architectures and distributing mechanical loads as widely as possible in the vicinities of attachment locations to prevent excessive concentrations of stresses that could give rise to delaminations, debonds, leaks, and other failures. The method in its most basic form can be summarized as follows: A metal component is to be joined to a designated attachment area on a composite-material structure. In preparation for joining, the metal component is fabricated to include multiple studs projecting from the aforementioned face. Also in preparation for joining, holes just wide enough to accept the studs are molded into, drilled, or otherwise formed in the corresponding locations in the designated attachment area of the uncured ("wet') composite structure. The metal component is brought together with the uncured composite structure so that the studs become firmly seated in the holes, thereby causing the composite material to become intertwined with the metal component in the joining area. Alternately, it is proposed to utilize other mechanical attachment schemes whereby the uncured composite and metallic parts are joined with "z-direction" fasteners. The

  10. Crystal structure of the RNA component of bacterial ribonuclease P

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Swinger, Kerren K.; Krasilnikov, Andrey S.; Pan, Tao; Mondragon, Alfonso

    2010-03-08

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) is produced as a precursor molecule that needs to be processed at its 3' and 5' ends. Ribonuclease P is the sole endonuclease responsible for processing the 5' end of tRNA by cleaving the precursor and leading to tRNA maturation. It was one of the first catalytic RNA molecules identified and consists of a single RNA component in all organisms and only one protein component in bacteria. It is a true multi-turnover ribozyme and one of only two ribozymes (the other being the ribosome) that are conserved in all kingdoms of life. Here we show the crystal structure at 3.85 {angstrom} resolution of the RNA component of Thermotoga maritima ribonuclease P. The entire RNA catalytic component is revealed, as well as the arrangement of the two structural domains. The structure shows the general architecture of the RNA molecule, the inter- and intra-domain interactions, the location of the universally conserved regions, the regions involved in pre-tRNA recognition and the location of the active site. A model with bound tRNA is in agreement with all existing data and suggests the general basis for RNA-RNA recognition by this ribozyme.

  11. Multi-Scale Sizing of Lightweight Multifunctional Spacecraft Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2005-01-01

    This document is the final report for the project entitled, "Multi-Scale Sizing of Lightweight Multifunctional Spacecraft Structural Components," funded under the NRA entitled "Cross-Enterprise Technology Development Program" issued by the NASA Office of Space Science in 2000. The project was funded in 2001, and spanned a four year period from March, 2001 to February, 2005. Through enhancements to and synthesis of unique, state of the art structural mechanics and micromechanics analysis software, a new multi-scale tool has been developed that enables design, analysis, and sizing of advance lightweight composite and smart materials and structures from the full vehicle, to the stiffened structure, to the micro (fiber and matrix) scales. The new software tool has broad, cross-cutting value to current and future NASA missions that will rely on advanced composite and smart materials and structures.

  12. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a...

  13. Design Study of Small Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors Using SiC Cladding and Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Abu Khalid Rivai; Minoru Takahashi

    2006-07-01

    Effects of SiC cladding and structure on neutronics of reactor core for small lead-cooled fast reactors have been investigated analytically. The fuel of this reactor was uranium nitride with {sup 235}U enrichment of 11% in inner core and 13% in outer core. The reactors were designed by optimizing the use of natural uranium blanket and nitride fuel to prolong the fuel cycle. The fuels can be used without re-shuffling for 15 years. The coolant of this reactor was lead. A calculation was also conducted for steel cladding and structure type as comparison with SiC cladding and structure type. The results of calculation indicated that the neutron energy spectrum of the core using SiC was slightly softer than that using steel. The SiC type reactor was designed to have criticality at the beginning of cycle (BOC), although the steel type reactor could not have critical condition with the same size and geometry. In other words, the SiC type core can be designed smaller than the steel type core. The result of the design analysis showed that neutron flux distributions and power distribution was made flatter because the outer core enrichment was higher than inner core. The peak power densities could remain constant over the reactor operation. The consumption capability of uranium was quite high, i.e. 13% for 125 MWt reactor and 25% for 375 MWt reactor at EOC. (authors)

  14. Probabilistic structural analysis methods for select space propulsion system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H. R.; Cruse, T. A.

    1989-01-01

    The Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project developed at the Southwest Research Institute integrates state-of-the-art structural analysis techniques with probability theory for the design and analysis of complex large-scale engineering structures. An advanced efficient software system (NESSUS) capable of performing complex probabilistic analysis has been developed. NESSUS contains a number of software components to perform probabilistic analysis of structures. These components include: an expert system, a probabilistic finite element code, a probabilistic boundary element code and a fast probability integrator. The NESSUS software system is shown. An expert system is included to capture and utilize PSAM knowledge and experience. NESSUS/EXPERT is an interactive menu-driven expert system that provides information to assist in the use of the probabilistic finite element code NESSUS/FEM and the fast probability integrator (FPI). The expert system menu structure is summarized. The NESSUS system contains a state-of-the-art nonlinear probabilistic finite element code, NESSUS/FEM, to determine the structural response and sensitivities. A broad range of analysis capabilities and an extensive element library is present.

  15. Fabrication and nondestructive examination development for advanced components and materials for the SP-100 space reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, Peter J.; Dobrzynski, Walter J.

    1993-01-01

    Significant progress has now been made in the development of fabrication and Nondestructive Examination techniques for the SP-100 Space Reactor. All major fabrication challenges have been faced and overcome. Methods are in place for the fabrication and inspection of composite fuel cladding, the reactor honeycomb core, cold forging of the core support nozzle course, and electron beam welding of the auxiliary cooling loop system. Specifications and procedures have been developed and proven on actual hardware for electron beam welding, gas tungsten arc welding, heat treatment, solvent cleaning, chemical cleaning, ultrasonic inspection, helium leak testing, dye penetrant and microfocus rod anode radiography. Signicant work remains to be done but no problems have been identified which would prevent fabrication of the high temperature SP-100 Space Reactor.

  16. A life prediction model for laminated composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.

    1990-01-01

    A life prediction methodology for laminated continuous fiber composites subjected to fatigue loading conditions was developed. A summary is presented of research completed. A phenomenological damage evolution law was formulated for matrix cracking which is independent of stacking sequence. Mechanistic and physical support was developed for the phenomenological evolution law proposed above. The damage evolution law proposed above was implemented to a finite element computer program. And preliminary predictions were obtained for a structural component undergoing fatigue loading induced damage.

  17. Aircraft fatigue and crack growth considering loads by structural component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    The indisputable 1968 C-130 fatigue/crack growth data is reviewed to obtain additional useful information on fatigue and crack growth. The proven Load Environment Model concept derived empirically from F-105D multichannel recorder data is refined to a simpler method by going from 8 to 5 variables in the spectra without a decrease in accuracy. This approach provides the true fatigue/crack growth and load environment by structural component for both fatigue and strength design. Methods are presented for defining fatigue scatter and damage at crack initiation. These design tools and criteria may be used for both metal and composite aircraft structure.

  18. [Endothelial glycocalyx of blood circulation. I. Finding, components, structure organization].

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, A V; Turashev, A D

    2014-01-01

    In normal state, a complex multicomponent system called glycocalyx is present on the surface of endothelial vascular system. The structure of the glycocalyx is determined by a group ofproteoglycans, glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans, originating from endothelial cells and blood flow. Due to its complexity and location on the border of the system of blood circulation, glycocalyx participates in a number of functions supporting the metabolism of the vascular wall. Complete or partial loss of this structure in pathologicalconditions leads to inconsistencies in the vascular wall and changes in its functions. The first part of this review considers the history of detection and determination of endothelial glycocalyx structure, utilized methods and approaches. The molecular composition of the glycocalyx, properties of its components and glycocalyx structure organization are described. The English version of the paper: Russian Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry, see also http://www.maik.ru.

  19. Feasibility of underwater welding of highly irradiated in-vessel components of boiling-water reactors: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, A.L.

    1997-11-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), initiated a literature review to assess the state of underwater welding technology. In particular, the objective of this literature review was to evaluate the viability of underwater welding in-vessel components of boiling water reactor (BWR) in-vessel components, especially those components fabricated from stainless steels that are subjected to high neutron fluences. This assessment was requested because of the recent increased level of activity in the commercial nuclear industry to address generic issues concerning the reactor vessel and internals, especially those issues related to repair options. This literature review revealed a preponderance of general information about underwater welding technology, as a result of the active research in this field sponsored by the U.S. Navy and offshore oil and gas industry concerns. However, the literature search yielded only a limited amount of information about underwater welding of components in low-fluence areas of BWR in-vessel environments, and no information at all concerning underwater welding experiences in high-fluence environments. Research reported by the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and researchers from the DOE fusion reactor program proved more fruitful. This research documented relevant experience concerning welding of stainless steel materials in air environments exposed to high neutron fluences. It also addressed problems with welding highly irradiated materials, and primarily attributed those problems to helium-induced cracking in the material. (Helium is produced from the neutron irradiation of boron, an impurity, and nickel.) The researchers found that the amount of helium-induced cracking could be controlled, or even eliminated, by reducing the heat input into the weld and applying a compressive stress perpendicular to the weld path.

  20. Analytical Study of High Concentration PCB Paint at the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, N.J.

    1998-10-21

    This report provides results of an analytical study of high concentration PCB paint in a shutdown nuclear test reactor located at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). The study was designed to obtain data relevant for an evaluation of potential hazards associated with the use of and exposure to such paints.

  1. Modelling of advanced structural materials for GEN IV reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaras, M.; Hoffelner, W.; Victoria, M.

    2007-09-01

    The choice of suitable materials and the assessment of long-term materials damage are key issues that need to be addressed for the safe and reliable performance of nuclear power plants. Operating conditions such as high temperatures, irradiation and a corrosive environment degrade materials properties, posing the risk of very expensive or even catastrophic plant damage. Materials scientists are faced with the scientific challenge to determine the long-term damage evolution of materials under service exposure in advanced plants. A higher confidence in life-time assessments of these materials requires an understanding of the related physical phenomena on a range of scales from the microscopic level of single defect damage effects all the way up to macroscopic effects. To overcome lengthy and expensive trial-and-error experiments, the multiscale modelling of materials behaviour is a promising tool, bringing new insights into the fundamental understanding of basic mechanisms. This paper presents the multiscale modelling methodology which is taking root internationally to address the issues of advanced structural materials for Gen IV reactors.

  2. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Seismic Soil Structure Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bolisetti, Chandrakanth; Coleman, Justin Leigh

    2015-06-01

    Risk calculations should focus on providing best estimate results, and associated insights, for evaluation and decision-making. Specifically, seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) are intended to provide best estimates of the various combinations of structural and equipment failures that can lead to a seismic induced core damage event. However, in some instances the current SPRA approach has large uncertainties, and potentially masks other important events (for instance, it was not the seismic motions that caused the Fukushima core melt events, but the tsunami ingress into the facility). SPRA’s are performed by convolving the seismic hazard (this is the estimate of all likely damaging earthquakes at the site of interest) with the seismic fragility (the conditional probability of failure of a structure, system, or component given the occurrence of earthquake ground motion). In this calculation, there are three main pieces to seismic risk quantification, 1) seismic hazard and nuclear power plants (NPPs) response to the hazard, 2) fragility or capacity of structures, systems and components (SSC), and 3) systems analysis. Two areas where NLSSI effects may be important in SPRA calculations are, 1) when calculating in-structure response at the area of interest, and 2) calculation of seismic fragilities (current fragility calculations assume a lognormal distribution for probability of failure of components). Some important effects when using NLSSI in the SPRA calculation process include, 1) gapping and sliding, 2) inclined seismic waves coupled with gapping and sliding of foundations atop soil, 3) inclined seismic waves coupled with gapping and sliding of deeply embedded structures, 4) soil dilatancy, 5) soil liquefaction, 6) surface waves, 7) buoyancy, 8) concrete cracking and 9) seismic isolation The focus of the research task presented here-in is on implementation of NLSSI into the SPRA calculation process when calculating in-structure response at the area

  3. Computer-aided design of antenna structures and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses computer-aided design procedures for antenna reflector structures and related components. The primary design aid is a computer program that establishes cross sectional sizes of the structural members by an optimality criterion. Alternative types of deflection-dependent objectives can be selected for designs subject to constraints on structure weight. The computer program has a special-purpose formulation to design structures of the type frequently used for antenna construction. These structures, in common with many in other areas of application, are represented by analytical models that employ only the three translational degrees of freedom at each node. The special-purpose construction of the program, however, permits coding and data management simplifications that provide advantages in problem size and execution speed. Size and speed are essentially governed by the requirements of structural analysis and are relatively unaffected by the added requirements of design. Computation times to execute several design/analysis cycles are comparable to the times required by general-purpose programs for a single analysis cycle. Examples in the paper illustrate effective design improvement for structures with several thousand degrees of freedom and within reasonable computing times.

  4. Structure of the monooxygenase component of a two-component flavoprotein monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Alfieri, Andrea; Fersini, Francesco; Ruangchan, Nantidaporn; Prongjit, Methinee; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Mattevi, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    p-Hydroxyphenylacetate hydroxylase from Acinetobacter baumannii is a two-component system consisting of a NADH-dependent FMN reductase and a monooxygenase (C2) that uses reduced FMN as substrate. The crystal structures of C2 in the ligand-free and substrate-bound forms reveal a preorganized pocket that binds reduced FMN without large conformational changes. The Phe-266 side chain swings out to provide the space for binding p-hydroxyphenylacetate that is oriented orthogonal to the flavin ring. The geometry of the substrate-binding site of C2 is significantly different from that of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase, a single-component flavoenzyme that catalyzes a similar reaction. The C2 overall structure resembles the folding of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. An outstanding feature in the C2 structure is a cavity located in front of reduced FMN; it has a spherical shape with a 1.9-Å radius and a 29-Å3 volume and is interposed between the flavin C4a atom and the substrate atom to be hydroxylated. The shape and position of this cavity are perfectly fit for housing the oxygen atoms of the flavin C4a-hydroperoxide intermediate that is formed upon reaction of the C2-bound reduced flavin with molecular oxygen. The side chain of His-396 is predicted to act as a hydrogen-bond donor to the oxygen atoms of the intermediate. This architecture promotes the nucleophilic attack of the substrate onto the terminal oxygen of the hydroperoxyflavin. Comparative analysis with the structures of other flavoenzymes indicates that a distinctive feature of monooxygenases is the presence of specific cavities that encapsulate and stabilize the crucial hydroperoxyflavin intermediate. PMID:17227849

  5. Spectral structure of electron antineutrinos from nuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, D A; Langford, T J

    2015-01-01

    Recent measurements of the positron energy spectrum obtained from inverse beta decay interactions of reactor electron antineutrinos show an excess in the 4 to 6 MeV region relative to current predictions. First-principles calculations of fission and beta decay processes within a typical pressurized water reactor core identify prominent fission daughter isotopes as a possible origin for this excess. These calculations also predict percent-level substructures in the antineutrino spectrum due to Coulomb effects in beta decay. Precise measurement of these substructures can elucidate the nuclear processes occurring within reactors. These substructures can be a systematic issue for measurements utilizing the detailed spectral shape.

  6. Flow Components in a NaK Test Loop Designed to Simulate Conditions in a Nuclear Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    A test loop using NaK as the working fluid is presently in use to study material compatibility effects on various components that comprise a possible nuclear reactor design for use on the lunar surface. A DC electromagnetic (EM) pump has been designed and implemented as a means of actively controlling the NaK flow rate through the system and an EM flow sensor is employed to monitor the developed flow rate. These components allow for the matching of the flow rate conditions in test loops with those that would be found in a full-scale surface-power reactor. The design and operating characteristics of the EM pump and flow sensor are presented. In the EM pump, current is applied to a set of electrodes to produce a Lorentz body force in the fluid. A measurement of the induced voltage (back-EMF) in the flow sensor provides the means of monitoring flow rate. Both components are compact, employing high magnetic field strength neodymium magnets thermally coupled to a water-cooled housing. A vacuum gap limits the heat transferred from the high temperature NaK tube to the magnets and a magnetically-permeable material completes the magnetic circuit. The pump is designed to produce a pressure rise of 5 psi, and the flow sensor's predicted output is roughly 20 mV at the loop's nominal flow rate of 0.5 GPM.

  7. Flow Components in a NaK Test Loop Designed to Simulate Conditions in a Nuclear Surface Power Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2008-01-21

    A test loop using NaK as the working fluid is presently in use to study material compatibility effects on various components that comprise a possible nuclear reactor design for use on the lunar surface. A DC electromagnetic (EM) pump has been designed and implemented as a means of actively controlling the NaK flow rate through the system and an EM flow sensor is employed to monitor the developed flow rate. These components allow for the matching of the flow rate conditions in test loops with those that would be found in a full-scale surface-power reactor. The design and operating characteristics of the EM pump and flow sensor are presented. In the EM pump, current is applied to a set of electrodes to produce a Lorentz body force in the fluid. A measurement of the induced voltage (back-EMF) in the flow sensor provides the means of monitoring flow rate. Both components are compact, employing high magnetic field strength neodymium magnets thermally coupled to a water-cooled housing. A vacuum gap limits the heat transferred from the high temperature NaK tube to the magnets and a magnetically-permeable material completes the magnetic circuit. The pump is designed to produce a pressure rise of 34.5 kPa, and the flow sensor's predicted output is roughly 20 mV at the loop's nominal flow rate of 0.114 m{sup 3}/hr.

  8. The nuclear data, A key component for reactor studies, Overview of AREVA NP needs and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravaux, Simon; Demy, Pierre-Marie; Rechatin, Clément

    2016-03-01

    The quality of the nuclear data is essential for AREVA NP. Indeed, many AREVA NP activities such as reactor design, safety studies or reactor instrumentation use them as input data. So, the nuclear data can be considered as a key element for AREVA NP. REVA NP's contribution in the improvement of the nuclear data consists in a joint effort with the CEA. It means a financing and a sharing of information which can give an orientation to the future research axis. The aim of this article is to present the industrial point of view from AREVA NP on the research on nuclear data. Several examples of collaborations with the CEA which have resulted in an improvement of the nuclear data are presented.

  9. Composite Load Spectra for Select Space Propulsion Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Hing W.; Newell, James F.

    1994-01-01

    Generic load models are described with multiple levels of progressive sophistication to simulate the composite (combined) load spectra (CLS) that are induced in space propulsion system components, representative of Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), such as transfer ducts, turbine blades and liquid oxygen (LOX) posts. These generic (coupled) models combine the deterministic models for composite load dynamic, acoustic, high-pressure and high rotational speed, etc., load simulation using statistically varying coefficients. These coefficients are then determined using advanced probabilistic simulation methods with and without strategically selected experimental data. The entire simulation process is included in a CLS computer code. Applications of the computer code to various components in conjunction with the PSAM (Probabilistic Structural Analysis Method) to perform probabilistic load evaluation and life prediction evaluations are also described to illustrate the effectiveness of the coupled model approach.

  10. Assessment of current structural design methodology for high-temperature reactors based on failure tests

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; Sartory, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    A mature design methodology, consisting of inelastic analysis methods, provided in Department of Energy guidelines, and failure criteria, contained in ASME Code Case N-47, exists in the United States for high-temperature reactor components. The objective of this paper is to assess the adequacy of this overall methodology by comparing predicted inelastic deformations and lifetimes with observed results from structural failure tests and from an actual service failure. Comparisons are presented for three types of structural situations: (1) nozzle-to-spherical shell specimens, where stresses at structural discontinuities lead to cracking, (2) welded structures, where metallurgical discontinuities play a key role in failures, and (3) thermal shock loadings of cylinders and pipes, where thermal discontinuities can lead to failure. The comparison between predicted and measured inelastic responses are generally reasonalbly good; quantities are sometimes overpredicted somewhat, and, sometimes underpredicted. However, even seemingly small discrepancies can have a significant effect on structural life, and lifetimes are not always as closely predicted. For a few cases, the lifetimes are substantially overpredicted, which raises questions regarding the adequacy of existing design margins.

  11. Habitat, topographical, and geographical components structuring shrubsteppe bird communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knick, S.T.; Rotenberry, J.T.; Leu, M.

    2008-01-01

    Landscapes available to birds to select for breeding locations are arrayed along multiple dimensions. Identifying the primary gradients structuring shrubsteppe bird communities in the western United States is important because widespread habitat loss and alteration are shifting the environmental template on which these birds depend. We integrated field habitat surveys, GIS coverages, and bird counts from 61 Breeding Bird Survey routes located in shrubsteppe habitats across a >800 000 km2 region to determine the gradients of habitat, topography, and geography underlying bird communities. A small set of habitat features dominated the primary environmental gradients in a canonical ordination; the 13 species in the shrubsteppe bird community were closely packed along the first two axes. Using hierarchical variance partitioning, we identified habitat as the most important pure (31% explained variation) or shared component. Topography (9%) and geography (4%) were minor components but each shared a larger contribution with habitat (habitat-topography 21%; habitat-geography 22%) in explaining the organization of the bird community. In a second tier partition of habitat structure, pure composition (% land cover) was more important (45%) than configuration (patch size and edge) (7%); the two components shared 27% of the explained variation in the bird community axes. Local (9%), community (14%), and landscape (10%) levels contributed equally. Adjacent organizational levels had a larger shared contribution (local-community 26%; community-landscape 27%) than more separated local-landscape levels (21%). Extensive conversion of shrubsteppe habitats to agriculture, exotic annual grasslands, or pinyon (Pinus spp.)-juniper (Juniperus spp.) woodlands is occurring along the primary axes of habitat structure. Because the shrubsteppe bird community was organized along short gradients dominated by habitat features, relatively small shifts in their available environment will exert a

  12. Effect of sodium diclofenac loads on mesophase components and structure.

    PubMed

    Efrat, Rivka; Shalev, Deborah E; Hoffman, Roy E; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2008-07-15

    We studied the effect of a model electrolytic drug on intermolecular interactions, conformational changes, and phase transitions in structured discontinuous cubic QL lyotropic liquid crystals. These changes were due to competition with hydration of the lipid headgroups. Structural changes of the phase induced by solubilization loads of sodium diclofenac (Na-DFC) were investigated by directly observing the water, ethanol, and Na-DFC components of the resulting phases using 2H and 23Na NMR. Na-DFC interacted with the surfactant glycerol monoolein (GMO) at the interface while interfering with the mesophase curvature and also competed with hydration of the surfactant headgroups. Increasing quantities of solubilized Na-DFC promoted phase transitions from cubic phase (discontinuous (QL) and bicontinuous (Q)) into lamellar structures and subsequently into a disordered lamellar phase. Quadrupolar coupling of deuterated ethanol by 2H NMR showed that it is located near the headgroups of the lipid and apparently is hydrogen bonded to the GMO headgroups. A phase transition between two lamellar phases (L alpha to L alpha*) was seen by 23Na NMR of Na-DFC at a concentration where the characteristics of the drug change from kosmotropic to chaotropic. These findings show that loads of solubilized drug may affect the structure of its vehicle and, as a result, its transport across skin-blood barriers. The structural changes of the mesophase may also aid controlled drug delivery.

  13. Residual Strength Analysis Methodology: Laboratory Coupons to Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Starnes, J. H., Jr.; Rose, C. A.; Young, R. D.; Seshadri, B. R.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Structural Integrity (NASIP) and Airframe Airworthiness Assurance/Aging Aircraft (AAA/AA) Programs have developed a residual strength prediction methodology for aircraft fuselage structures. This methodology has been experimentally verified for structures ranging from laboratory coupons up to full-scale structural components. The methodology uses the critical crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion to characterize the fracture behavior and a material and a geometric nonlinear finite element shell analysis code to perform the structural analyses. The present paper presents the results of a study to evaluate the fracture behavior of 2024-T3 aluminum alloys with thickness of 0.04 inches to 0.09 inches. The critical CTOA and the corresponding plane strain core height necessary to simulate through-the-thickness effects at the crack tip in an otherwise plane stress analysis, were determined from small laboratory specimens. Using these parameters, the CTOA fracture criterion was used to predict the behavior of middle crack tension specimens that were up to 40 inches wide, flat panels with riveted stiffeners and multiple-site damage cracks, 18-inch diameter pressurized cylinders, and full scale curved stiffened panels subjected to internal pressure and mechanical loads.

  14. Improved performance of parallel surface/packed-bed discharge reactor for indoor VOCs decomposition: optimization of the reactor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Hui, Chun-Xue; Li, Jie; Lu, Na; Shang, Ke-Feng; Wu, Yan; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a high-efficiency air-cleaning system for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) existing in the workshop of a chemical factory. A novel parallel surface/packed-bed discharge (PSPBD) reactor, which utilized a combination of surface discharge (SD) plasma with packed-bed discharge (PBD) plasma, was designed and employed for VOCs removal in a closed vessel. In order to optimize the structure of the PSPBD reactor, the discharge characteristic, benzene removal efficiency, and energy yield were compared for different discharge lengths, quartz tube diameters, shapes of external high-voltage electrode, packed-bed discharge gaps, and packing pellet sizes, respectively. In the circulation test, 52.8% of benzene was removed and the energy yield achieved 0.79 mg kJ-1 after a 210 min discharge treatment in the PSPBD reactor, which was 10.3% and 0.18 mg kJ-1 higher, respectively, than in the SD reactor, 21.8% and 0.34 mg kJ-1 higher, respectively, than in the PBD reactor at 53 J l-1. The improved performance in benzene removal and energy yield can be attributed to the plasma chemistry effect of the sequential processing in the PSPBD reactor. The VOCs mineralization and organic intermediates generated during discharge treatment were followed by CO x selectivity and FT-IR analyses. The experimental results indicate that the PSPBD plasma process is an effective and energy-efficient approach for VOCs removal in an indoor environment.

  15. Fuel, Structural Material and Coolant for an Advanced Fast Micro-Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Nascimento, J. A.; Duimarães, L. N. F.; Ono, S.

    The use of nuclear reactors in space, seabed or other Earth hostile environment in the future is a vision that some Brazilian nuclear researchers share. Currently, the USA, a leader in space exploration, has as long-term objectives the establishment of a permanent Moon base and to launch a manned mission to Mars. A nuclear micro-reactor is the power source chosen to provide energy for life support, electricity for systems, in these missions. A strategy to develop an advanced micro-reactor technologies may consider the current fast reactor technologies as back-up and the development of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials. The next generation reactors (GEN-IV) for terrestrial applications will operate with high output temperature to allow advanced conversion cycle, such as Brayton, and hydrogen production, among others. The development of an advanced fast micro-reactor may create a synergy between the GEN-IV and space reactor technologies. Considering a set of basic requirements and materials properties this paper discusses the choice of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials for a fast micro-reactor. The chosen candidate materials are: nitride, oxide as back-up, for fuel, lead, tin and gallium for coolant, ferritic MA-ODS and Mo alloys for core structures. The next step will be the neutronic and burnup evaluation of core concepts with this set of materials.

  16. Structures and Components in Galaxy Clusters: Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Churazov, E. M.; Ferrari, C.; Forman, W. R.; Kaastra, J. S.; Klein, U.; Markevitch, M.; de Plaa, J.

    2015-05-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the largest gravitationally bounded structures in the Universe dominated by dark matter. We review the observational appearance and physical models of plasma structures in clusters of galaxies. Bubbles of relativistic plasma which are inflated by supermassive black holes of AGNs, cooling and heating of the gas, large scale plasma shocks, cold fronts, non-thermal halos and relics are observed in clusters. These constituents are reflecting both the formation history and the dynamical properties of clusters of galaxies. We discuss X-ray spectroscopy as a tool to study the metal enrichment in clusters and fine spectroscopy of Fe X-ray lines as a powerful diagnostics of both the turbulent plasma motions and the energetics of the non-thermal electron populations. The knowledge of the complex dynamical and feedback processes is necessary to understand the energy and matter balance as well as to constrain the role of the non-thermal components of clusters.

  17. Detection of Component Failures for Smart Structure Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Hiroshi

    Uncertainties in the dynamics model of a smart structure are often of significance due to model errors caused by parameter identification errors and reduced-order modeling of the system. Design of a model-based Failure Detection and Isolation (FDI) system for smart structures, therefore, needs careful consideration regarding robustness with respect to such model uncertainties. In this paper, we proposes a new method of robust fault detection that is insensitive to the disturbances caused by unknown modeling errors while it is highly sensitive to the component failures. The capability of the robust detection algorithm is examined for the sensor failure of a flexible smart beam control system. It is shown by numerical simulations that the proposed method suppresses the disturbances due to model errors and markedly improves the detection performance.

  18. Magnons in one-dimensional k-component Fibonacci structures

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, C. H.; Vasconcelos, M. S.

    2014-05-07

    We have studied the magnon transmission through of one-dimensional magnonic k-component Fibonacci structures, where k different materials are arranged in accordance with the following substitution rule: S{sub n}{sup (k)}=S{sub n−1}{sup (k)}S{sub n−k}{sup (k)} (n≥k=0,1,2,…), where S{sub n}{sup (k)} is the nth stage of the sequence. The calculations were carried out in exchange dominated regime within the framework of the Heisenberg model and taking into account the RPA approximation. We have considered multilayers composed of simple cubic spin-S Heisenberg ferromagnets, and, by using the powerful transfer-matrix method, the spin wave transmission is obtained. It is demonstrated that the transmission coefficient has a rich and interesting magnonic pass- and stop-bands structures, which depends on the frequency of magnons and the k values.

  19. Changing concepts of geologic structure and the problem of siting nuclear reactors: examples from Washington State

    SciTech Connect

    Tabor, R.W.

    1986-09-01

    The conflict between regulation and healthy evolution of geological science has contributed to the difficulties of siting nuclear reactors. On the Columbia Plateau in Washington, but for conservative design of the Hanford reactor facility, the recognition of the little-understood Olympic-Wallowa lineament as a major, possibly still active structural alignment might have jeopardized the acceptability of the site for nuclear reactors. On the Olympic Peninsula, evolving concepts of compressive structures and their possible recent activity and the current recognition of a subducting Juan de Fuca plate and its potential for generating great earthquakes - both concepts little-considered during initial site selection - may delay final acceptance of the Satsop site. Conflicts of this sort are inevitable but can be accommodated if they are anticipated in the reactor-licensing process. More important, society should be increasing its store of geologic knowledge now, during the current recess in nuclear reactor siting.

  20. Structural Sizing of the EDIN0620 Body Components Using the APAS Structural Synthesis Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    The use of a structural synthesis computer program to design components for a heavy lift launch vehicle is defined. A loads program was used to determine the vehicle shears, bending moments, and axial loads at two design loading conditions. A comparison was made between results from the structures program and the results of a weight estimating program which used historical data in determining component weights.

  1. Experimental study of thermal crisis in connection with Tokamak reactor high heat flux components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, D.; Giardina, M.; Castiglia, F.; Celata, G. P.; Mariani, A.; Zummo, G.; Cumo, M.

    2000-04-01

    The results of an experimental research on high heat flux thermal crisis in forced convective subcooled water flow, under operative conditions of interest to the thermal-hydraulic design of TOKAMAK fusion reactors, are here reported. These experiments, carried out in the framework of a collaboration between the Nuclear Engineering Department of Palermo University and the National Institute of Thermal - Fluid Dynamics of the ENEA - Casaccia (Rome), were performed on the STAF (Scambio Termico Alti Flussi) water loop and consisted, essentially, in a high speed photographic study which enabled focusing several information on bubble characteristics and flow patterns taking place during the burnout phenomenology.

  2. Experimental Study of Thermal Crisis in Connection with Tokamak Reactor High Heat Flux Components

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, D.; Giardina, M.; Castiglia, F.; Celata, G.P.; Mariani, A.; Zummo, G.; Cumo, M.

    2000-12-31

    The results of an experimental research on high heat flux thermal crisis in forced convective subcooled water flow, under operative conditions of interest to the thermal-hydraulic design of TOKAMAK fusion reactors, are here reported. These experiments, carried out in the framework of a collaboration between the Nuclear Engineering Department of Palermo University and the National Institute of Thermal - Fluid Dynamics of the ENEA - Casaccia (Rome), were performed on the STAF (Scambio Termico Alti Flussi) water loop and consisted, essentially, in a high speed photographic study which enabled focusing several information on bubble characteristics and flow patterns taking place during the burnout phenomenology.

  3. CdTe film structure formation in layerwise component sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Murashev, S.V.; Denisova, A.T.; Ezhovskii, Yu.K.

    1988-04-10

    Aleskovskii's insular hypothesis has been used in a new approach to film synthesis, where irreversible reactions occur at surfaces on sequential component treatment, where the components contain the compound units. One can synthesize a film of a strictly defined composition on the basis of the critical condensation temperatures T/sub A/ and T/sub B/ together with the compound decomposition temperature T/sub AB/, i.e., it is necessary to have T/sub A/, T/sub B/ < T/sub s/ < T/sub AB/, where T/sub s/ is substrate temperature. The authors used AGChT-23-17 single-crystal gallium arsenide substrates having (100) orientation. Films up to 15 nm thick were measured by ellipsometry, while thicker films were assessed with an interferometer. The cadmium telluride films were made by alternating treatment in cadmium and tellurium beams made by evaporation from Knudsen cells. The lower limit to monolayer growth is set by the onset of tellurium condensation, and the upper by the transition from irreversible chemisorption to reversible. The growth constant and the diffraction data indicate the mode of film formation, the growth direction, and the relationship to the structure, which is related to the temperature. Films with the best structure are made at substrate temperatures of 498-535 K.

  4. Acoustic Emission and Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Detection and Continuous Monitoring of Cracks in Light Water Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-06-28

    Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth where distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at 41 mm and 46 mm.

  5. Composite load spectra for select space propulsion structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Ho, H. W.; Kurth, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The work performed to develop composite load spectra (CLS) for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) using probabilistic methods. The three methods were implemented to be the engine system influence model. RASCAL was chosen to be the principal method as most component load models were implemented with the method. Validation of RASCAL was performed. High accuracy comparable to the Monte Carlo method can be obtained if a large enough bin size is used. Generic probabilistic models were developed and implemented for load calculations using the probabilistic methods discussed above. Each engine mission, either a real fighter or a test, has three mission phases: the engine start transient phase, the steady state phase, and the engine cut off transient phase. Power level and engine operating inlet conditions change during a mission. The load calculation module provides the steady-state and quasi-steady state calculation procedures with duty-cycle-data option. The quasi-steady state procedure is for engine transient phase calculations. In addition, a few generic probabilistic load models were also developed for specific conditions. These include the fixed transient spike model, the poison arrival transient spike model, and the rare event model. These generic probabilistic load models provide sufficient latitude for simulating loads with specific conditions. For SSME components, turbine blades, transfer ducts, LOX post, and the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) discharge duct were selected for application of the CLS program. They include static pressure loads and dynamic pressure loads for all four components, centrifugal force for the turbine blade, temperatures of thermal loads for all four components, and structural vibration loads for the ducts and LOX posts.

  6. Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  7. Analyses of fluid-structure interaction and structural response of reactor vessels to a postulated accident

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes fluid-structure-interaction and structure response analyses of a reactor vessel subjected to loadings associated with postulated accidents, using the improved hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALICE-II. The objective of the present analyses is to study the cover response and potential for missile generation in response to a fuel-coolant interaction in the core region. Three calculations were performed using the cover weight as a parameter. To study the effect of the cavity water outside the reactor vessel, vessel response calculations for both wet- and dry-cavity designs are compared. Results indicate that for all cases studied and for the design parameters assumed, the calculated cover displacements are all smaller than the bolts` ultimate displacement and no missile generation of the closure head is predicted. Also, solutions reveal that the cavity water of the wet-cavity design plays an important role of restraining the downward displacement of the bottom head. Based on these studies, the analyses predict that the structure integrity is maintained throughout the postulated accident for the wet-cavity design.

  8. X-Aerogels for Structural Components and High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Future NASA missions and space explorations rely on the use of materials that are strong ultra lightweight and able to withstand extreme temperatures. Aerogels are low density (0.01-0.5 g/cu cm) high porosity materials that contain a glass like structure formed through standard sol-gel chemistry. As a result of these structural properties, aerogels are excellent thermal insulators and are able to withstand temperatures in excess of l,000 C. The open structure of aerogels, however, renders these materials extremely fragile (fracturing at stress forces less than 0.5 N/sq cm). The goal of NASA Glenn Research Center is to increase the strength of these materials by templating polymers and metals onto the surface of an aerogel network facilitating the use of this material for practical applications such as structural components of space vehicles used in exploration. The work this past year focused on two areas; (1) the research and development of new templated aerogels materials and (2) process development for future manufacturing of structural components. Research and development occurred on the production and characterization of new templating materials onto the standard silica aerogel. Materials examined included polymers such as polyimides, fluorinated isocyanates and epoxies, and, metals such as silver, gold and platinum. The final properties indicated that the density of the material formed using an isocyanate is around 0.50 g/cc with a strength greater than that of steel and has low thermal conductivity. The process used to construct these materials is extremely time consuming and labor intensive. One aspect of the project involved investigating the feasibility of shortening the process time by preparing the aerogels in the templating solvent. Traditionally the polymerization used THF as the solvent and after several washes to remove any residual monomers and water, the solvent around the aerogels was changed to acetonitrile for the templating step. This process

  9. Structure of the basal components of a bacterial transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, Jeffrey; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; André, Ingemar; Dunham, Christine M.; Moran, Jr., Charles P.

    2012-12-10

    Proteins SpoIIQ and SpoIIIAH interact through two membranes to connect the forespore and the mother cell during endospore development in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis. SpoIIIAH consists of a transmembrane segment and an extracellular domain with similarity to YscJ proteins. YscJ proteins form large multimeric rings that are the structural scaffolds for the assembly of type III secretion systems in Gram-negative bacteria. The predicted ring-forming motif of SpoIIIAH and other evidence led to the model that SpoIIQ and SpoIIIAH form the core components of a channel or transporter through which the mother cell nurtures forespore development. Therefore, to understand the roles of SpoIIIAH and SpoIIQ in channel formation, it is critical to determine whether SpoIIIAH adopts a ring-forming structural motif, and whether interaction of SpoIIIAH with SpoIIQ would preclude ring formation. We report a 2.8-{angstrom} resolution structure of a complex of SpoIIQ and SpoIIIAH. SpoIIIAH folds into the ring-building structural motif, and modeling shows that the structure of the SpoIIQ-SpoIIIAH complex is compatible with forming a symmetrical oligomer that is similar to those in type III systems. The inner diameters of the two most likely ring models are large enough to accommodate several copies of other integral membrane proteins. SpoIIQ contains a LytM domain, which is found in metalloendopeptidases, but lacks residues important for metalloprotease activity. Other LytM domains appear to be involved in protein-protein interactions. We found that the LytM domain of SpoIIQ contains an accessory region that interacts with SpoIIIAH.

  10. Apparatus, components and operating methods for circulating fluidized bed transport gasifiers and reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, Wan Wang

    2015-02-24

    The improvements proposed in this invention provide a reliable apparatus and method to gasify low rank coals in a class of pressurized circulating fluidized bed reactors termed "transport gasifier." The embodiments overcome a number of operability and reliability problems with existing gasifiers. The systems and methods address issues related to distribution of gasification agent without the use of internals, management of heat release to avoid any agglomeration and clinker formation, specific design of bends to withstand the highly erosive environment due to high solid particles circulation rates, design of a standpipe cyclone to withstand high temperature gasification environment, compact design of seal-leg that can handle high mass solids flux, design of nozzles that eliminate plugging, uniform aeration of large diameter Standpipe, oxidant injection at the cyclone exits to effectively modulate gasifier exit temperature and reduction in overall height of the gasifier with a modified non-mechanical valve.

  11. EVALUATION OF THE DURABILITY OF THE STRUCTURAL CONCRETE OF REACTOR BUILDINGS AT SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.; Reigel, M.

    2011-02-28

    The Department of Energy (DOE) intends to close 100-150 facilities in the DOE complex using an in situ decommissioning (ISD) strategy that calls for grouting the below-grade interior volume of the structure and leaving the above-grade interior open or demolishing it and disposing of it in the slit trenches in E Area. These closures are expected to persist and remain stable for centuries, but there are neither facility-specific monitoring approaches nor studies on the rate of deterioration of the materials used in the original construction or on the ISD components added during closure (caps, sloped roofs, etc). This report will focus on the evaluation of the actual aging/degradation of the materials of construction used in the ISD structures at Savannah River Site (SRS) above grade, specifically P & R reactor buildings. Concrete blocks (six 2 to 5 ton blocks) removed from the outer wall of the P Reactor Building were turned over to SRNL as the first source for concrete cores. Larger cores were received as a result of grouting activities in P and R reactor facilities. The cores were sectioned and evaluated using microscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), ion chromatography (IC) and thermal analysis. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the aggregate and cement phases present in the concrete are consistent with the mix design and no degradation mechanisms are evident at the aggregate-cement interfaces. Samples of the cores were digested and analyzed for chloride ingress as well as sulfate attack. The concentrations of chloride and sulfate ions did not exceed the limits of the mix design and there is no indication of any degradation due to these mechanisms. Thermal analysis on samples taken along the longitudinal axis of the cores show that there is a 1 inch carbonation layer (i.e., no portlandite) present in the interior wall of the reactor building and a negligible carbonation layer in the exterior wall. A mixed layer of carbonate and portlandite extends deeper into the

  12. Induced radioactivity of LDEF materials and structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Laird, C. E.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Camp, D. C.; Frederick, C. E.; Hurley, D. L.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Moss, C. E.; Reedy, R. C.; Reeves, J. H.; Smith, A. R.; Winn, W. G.; Benton, E. V.

    1996-01-01

    We present an overview of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) induced activation measurements. The LDEF, which was gravity-gradient stabilized, was exposed to the low Earth orbit (LEO) radiation environment over a 5.8 year period. Retrieved activation samples and structural components from the spacecraft were analyzed with low and ultra-low background HPGe gamma spectrometry at several national facilities. This allowed a very sensitive measurement of long-lived radionuclides produced by proton- and neutron-induced reactions in the time-dependent, non-isotropic LEO environment. A summary of major findings from this study is given that consists of directionally dependent activation, depth profiles, thermal neutron activation, and surface beryllium-7 deposition from the upper atmosphere. We also describe a database of these measurements that has been prepared for use in testing radiation environmental models and spacecraft design.

  13. Performance categorization of structures, systems & components and related issues

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Q.A.

    1993-09-30

    Provisions of DOE-STD-1021-93 on performance categorization of structures, systems and components (SSCs) subjected to natural phenomena hazards (NPHs) are summarized. The interrelationship among safety classification of SSCs (per DOE 6430.1A and DOE 5480.30), facility hazard categorization/classification (per DOE 5481.1B and DOE 5480.23), and NPH performance categorization of SSCs (per DOE 5480.28 and DOE-STD-1021-93) is discussed. The compatibility between the safety goals in the Department of Energy Safety Policy, SEN-35-91, and the numerical NPH performance goals of DOE 5480.28, as presented in UCRL-ID-12612 (draft), is examined.

  14. 3D printed components with ultrasonically arranged microscale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn-Jones, Thomas M.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Trask, Richard S.

    2016-02-01

    This paper shows the first application of in situ manipulation of discontinuous fibrous structure mid-print, within a 3D printed polymeric composite architecture. Currently, rapid prototyping methods (fused filament fabrication, stereolithography) are gaining increasing popularity within the engineering commnity to build structural components. Unfortunately, the full potential of these components is limited by the mechanical properties of the materials used. The aim of this study is to create and demonstrate a novel method to instantaneously orient micro-scale glass fibres within a selectively cured photocurable resin system, using ultrasonic forces to align the fibres in the desired 3D architecture. To achieve this we have mounted a switchable, focused laser module on the carriage of a three-axis 3D printing stage, above an in-house ultrasonic alignment rig containing a mixture of photocurable resin and discontinuous 14 μm diameter glass fibre reinforcement(50 μm length). In our study, a suitable print speed of 20 mm s-1 was used, which is comparable to conventional additive layer techniques. We show the ability to construct in-plane orthogonally aligned sections printed side by side, where the precise orientation of the configurations is controlled by switching the ultrasonic standing wave profile mid-print. This approach permits the realisation of complex fibrous architectures within a 3D printed landscape. The versatile nature of the ultrasonic manipulation technique also permits a wide range of particle types (diameters, aspect ratios and functions) and architectures (in-plane, and out-plane) to be patterned, leading to the creation of a new generation of fibrous reinforced composites for 3D printing.

  15. Recognizing genes and other components of genomic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, C. ); Myers, E. . Dept. of Computer Science); Stormo, G.D. . Dept. of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology)

    1991-01-01

    The Aspen Center for Physics (ACP) sponsored a three-week workshop, with 26 scientists participating, from 28 May to 15 June, 1990. The workshop, entitled Recognizing Genes and Other Components of Genomic Structure, focussed on discussion of current needs and future strategies for developing the ability to identify and predict the presence of complex functional units on sequenced, but otherwise uncharacterized, genomic DNA. We addressed the need for computationally-based, automatic tools for synthesizing available data about individual consensus sequences and local compositional patterns into the composite objects (e.g., genes) that are -- as composite entities -- the true object of interest when scanning DNA sequences. The workshop was structured to promote sustained informal contact and exchange of expertise between molecular biologists, computer scientists, and mathematicians. No participant stayed for less than one week, and most attended for two or three weeks. Computers, software, and databases were available for use as electronic blackboards'' and as the basis for collaborative exploration of ideas being discussed and developed at the workshop. 23 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Bonding and structure in dense multi-component molecular mixtures

    DOE PAGES

    Meyer, Edmund R.; Ticknor, Christopher; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Hamel, Sebastien; Redmer, Ronald; Kress, Joel D.; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-10-30

    We have performed finite-temperature density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations on dense methane, ammonia, and water mixtures (CH4:NH3:H2O) for various compositions and temperatures (2000 K ≤ T ≤ 10000 K) that span a set of possible conditions in the interiors of ice-giant exoplanets. The equation-of-state, pair distribution functions, and bond autocorrelation functions (BACF) were used to probe the structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. In particular, an improvement to the choice of the cutoff in the BACF was developed that allowed analysis refinements for density and temperature effects. We note the relative changes in the nature of these systemsmore » engendered by variations in the concentration ratios. As a result, a basic tenet emerges from all these comparisons that varying the relative amounts of the three heavy components (C,N,O) can effect considerable changes in the nature of the fluid and may in turn have ramifications for the structure and composition of various planetary layers.« less

  17. Bonding and structure in dense multi-component molecular mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Edmund R.; Ticknor, Christopher; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Hamel, Sebastien; Redmer, Ronald; Kress, Joel D.; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-10-30

    We have performed finite-temperature density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations on dense methane, ammonia, and water mixtures (CH4:NH3:H2O) for various compositions and temperatures (2000 K ≤ T ≤ 10000 K) that span a set of possible conditions in the interiors of ice-giant exoplanets. The equation-of-state, pair distribution functions, and bond autocorrelation functions (BACF) were used to probe the structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. In particular, an improvement to the choice of the cutoff in the BACF was developed that allowed analysis refinements for density and temperature effects. We note the relative changes in the nature of these systems engendered by variations in the concentration ratios. As a result, a basic tenet emerges from all these comparisons that varying the relative amounts of the three heavy components (C,N,O) can effect considerable changes in the nature of the fluid and may in turn have ramifications for the structure and composition of various planetary layers.

  18. Development and fabrication of structural components for a scramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.

    1990-01-01

    A program broadly directed toward design and development of long-life (100 hours and 1,000 cycles with a goal of 1,000 hours and 10,000 cycles) hydrogen-cooled structures for application to scramjets is presented. Previous phases of the program resulted in an overall engine design and analytical and experimental characterization of selected candidate materials and concepts. The latter efforts indicated that the basic life goals for the program can be reached with available means. The main objective of this effort was an integrated, experimental evaluation of the results of the previous program phases. The fuel injection strut was selected for this purpose, including fabrication development and fabrication of a full-scale strut. Testing of the completed strut was to be performed in a NASA-Langley wind tunnel. In addition, conceptual designs were formulated for a heat transfer test unit and a flat panel structural test unit. Tooling and fabrication procedures required to fabricate the strut were developed, and fabrication and delivery to NASA of all strut components, including major subassemblies, were completed.

  19. 75 FR 78777 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards; Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ...: The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards was established by Section 29 of the Atomic Energy Act... accident phenomena; design of nuclear power plant structures, systems and components; materials...

  20. Insights for aging management of light water reactor components: Metal containments. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.N.; Sinha, U.P.; Smith, S.K.

    1994-03-01

    This report evaluates the available technical information and field experience related to management of aging damage to light water reactor metal containments. A generic aging management approach is suggested for the effective and comprehensive aging management of metal containments to ensure their safe operation. The major concern is corrosion of the embedded portion of the containment vessel and detection of this damage. The electromagnetic acoustic transducer and half-cell potential measurement are potential techniques to detect corrosion damage in the embedded portion of the containment vessel. Other corrosion-related concerns include inspection of corrosion damage on the inaccessible side of BWR Mark I and Mark II containment vessels and corrosion of the BWR Mark I torus and emergency core cooling system piping that penetrates the torus, and transgranular stress corrosion cracking of the penetration bellows. Fatigue-related concerns include reduction in the fatigue life (a) of a vessel caused by roughness of the corroded vessel surface and (b) of bellows because of any physical damage. Maintenance of surface coatings and sealant at the metal-concrete interface is the best protection against corrosion of the vessel.

  1. Quantifying Ecosystem Structural Components with Highly Portable Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, C.; Paynter, I.; Peri, F.; Saenz, E. J.; Genest, D.; Strahler, A. H.; Li, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS), which utilize light detection and ranging (lidar) have demonstrated the ability to produce accurate reconstructions of ecosystems, including spatially complex systems such as forests. Reconstructions at the object or plot scale can be used to interpret or simulate satellite observations, particularly for lidar instruments such as those involved in the forthcoming GEDI and ICESat 2 missions. The Compact Biomass Lidar (CBL) is a TLS optimized for portability and scanning speed, developed and operated by University of Massachusetts Boston. This 905nm wavelength scanner achieves an angular resolution of 0.25 degrees at a rate of 33 seconds per scan. The rapid scanning of the CBL and similar highly portable TLS improve acquisition of 3D surfaces such as canopy height models and digital elevation models derived from point clouds. This is due to the ability to capture additional scanning points within the window of temporal stability for the ecosystem, mitigating the rapid loss of information density associated with distance and occlusion. Utilizing terrestrial lidar in tandem with airborne lidar profiles vertically distributed structural components of ecosystems, such as the canopy of forests. We will present 3D surfaces documenting the growth of vegetation species including the invasive Phragmites australis over the 2015 growing season at Plum Island Long Term Ecological Research sites, derived from CBL. Additionally we will show vertical structure profiles from voxelization analyses in tropical forest (La Selva, Costa Rica) and temperate forest (Harvard Forest, MA, USA). We will discuss and present results from emerging point cloud reconstruction methods, including the Quantitative Structure Model (QSM) for tree modeling, and their implications particularly for GEDI-related calibration and validation studies.

  2. Balance of Plant System Analysis and Component Design of Turbo-Machinery for High Temperature Gas Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Ronald G.; Wang, Chun Yun; Kadak, Andrew; Todreas, Neil; Mirick, Bradley; Demetri, Eli; Koronowski, Martin

    2004-08-30

    The Modular Pebble Bed Reactor system (MPBR) requires a gas turbine cycle (Brayton cycle) as the power conversion system for it to achieve economic competitiveness as a Generation IV nuclear system. The availability of controllable helium turbomachinery and compact heat exchangers are thus the critical enabling technology for the gas turbine cycle. The development of an initial reference design for an indirect helium cycle has been accomplished with the overriding constraint that this design could be built with existing technology and complies with all current codes and standards. Using the initial reference design, limiting features were identified. Finally, an optimized reference design was developed by identifying key advances in the technology that could reasonably be expected to be achieved with limited R&D. This final reference design is an indirect, intercooled and recuperated cycle consisting of a three-shaft arrangement for the turbomachinery system. A critical part of the design process involved the interaction between individual component design and overall plant performance. The helium cycle overall efficiency is significantly influenced by performance of individual components. Changes in the design of one component, a turbine for example, often required changes in other components. To allow for the optimization of the overall design with these interdependencies, a detailed steady state and transient control model was developed. The use of the steady state and transient models as a part of an iterative design process represents a key contribution of this work. A dynamic model, MPBRSim, has been developed. The model integrates the reactor core and the power conversion system simultaneously. Physical parameters such as the heat exchangers; weights and practical performance maps such as the turbine characteristics and compressor characteristics are incorporated into the model. The individual component models as well as the fully integrated model of the

  3. Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating

    DOEpatents

    Tutu, Narinder K.; Ginsberg, Theodore; Klages, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

  4. Designing a Component-Based Architecture for the Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Fuels and Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, Jay Jay; Elwasif, Wael R; Hively, Lee M; Bernholdt, David E; Hetrick III, John M; Bohn, Tim T

    2009-01-01

    Concerns over the environment and energy security have recently prompted renewed interest in the U.S. in nuclear energy. Recognizing this, the U.S. Dept. of Energy has launched an initiative to revamp and modernize the role that modeling and simulation plays in the development and operation of nuclear facilities. This Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program represents a major investment in the development of new software, with one or more large multi-scale multi-physics capabilities in each of four technical areas associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, as well as additional supporting developments. In conjunction with this, we are designing a software architecture, computational environment, and component framework to integrate the NEAMS technical capabilities and make them more accessible to users. In this report of work very much in progress, we lay out the 'problem' we are addressing, describe the model-driven system design approach we are using, and compare them with several large-scale technical software initiatives from the past. We discuss how component technology may be uniquely positioned to address the software integration challenges of the NEAMS program, outline the capabilities planned for the NEAMS computational environment and framework, and describe some initial prototyping activities.

  5. Flaw assessment guide for high-temperature reactor components subject to creep-fatigue loading

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, R.A. . Berkeley Nuclear Labs.); Ruggles, M.B. ); Takahashi, Y. . Komae Research Lab.)

    1990-10-01

    A high-temperature flaw assessment procedure is described. This procedure is a result of a collaborative effort between Electric Power Research Institute in the United States, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Japan, and Nuclear Electric plc in the United Kingdom. The procedure addresses preexisting defects subject to creep-fatigue loading conditions. Laws employed to calculate the crack growth per cycle are defined in terms of fracture mechanics parameters and constants related to the component material. The crack-growth laws can be integrated to calculate the remaining life of a component or to predict the amount of crack extension in a given period. Fatigue and creep crack growth per cycle are calculated separately, and the total crack extension is taken as the simple sum of the two contributions. An interaction between the two propagation modes is accounted for in the material properties in the separate calculations. In producing the procedure, limitations of the approach have been identified. 25 refs., 1 fig.

  6. 77 FR 27815 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... COMMISSION Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water AGENCY..., ``Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water.'' This LR-ISG... stainless steel structures and components exposed to treated borated water. The NRC published Revision 2...

  7. CHEMICAL STRUCTURES IN COAL: GEOCHEMICAL EVIDENCE FOR THE PRESENCE OF MIXED STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Breger, I.A.; Maciel, G.E.; Szeverenyi, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize work on the chemical structural components of coal, comparing them with their possible plant precursors in modern peat. Solid-state **1**3C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared spectroscopy (IR), elemental analysis and, in some cases, individual compound analyses formed the bases for these comparisons.

  8. Acoustic emission and guided ultrasonic waves for detection and continuous monitoring of cracks in light water reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R. M.; Coble, J.; Ramuhalli, P.; Watson, B.; Cumblidge, S. E.; Doctor, S. R.; Bond, L. J.

    2012-07-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth were distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at crack lengths of 41 mm and 46 mm. Coupling variability and shadowing by the electro-discharge machining (EDM) starter notch set the lower limit of detectability. (authors)

  9. Impact of inocula and operating conditions on the microbial community structure of two anammox reactors.

    PubMed

    Costa, Maria Cristina Monteiro S; Carvalho, Luciana; Leal, Cintia Dutra; Dias, Marcela França; Martins, Karoline L; Garcia, Guilherme Brugger; Mancuelo, Isabella Daldegan; Hipólito, Thais; Conell, Erika F Abreu Mac; Okada, Dagoberto; Etchebehere, Claudia; Chernicharo, Carlos Augusto L; Araujo, Juliana Calabria

    2014-08-01

    The microbial community structure of the biomass selected in two distinctly inoculated anaerobic oxidation of ammonium (anammox) reactors was investigated and compared with the help of data obtained from 454-pyrosequencing analyses. The anammox reactors were operated for 550 days and seeded with different sludges: sediment from a constructed wetland (reactor I) and biomass from an aerated lagoon part of the oil-refinery wastewater treatment plant (reactor II). The anammox diversity in the inocula was evaluated by 16S rRNA gene-cloning analysis. The diversity of anammox bacteria was greater in the sludge from the oil-refinery (three of the five known genera of anammox were detected) than in the wetland sludge, in which only Candidatus Brocadia was observed. Pyrosequencing analysis demonstrated that the community enriched in both reactors had differing compositions despite the nearly similar operational conditions applied. The dominant phyla detected in both reactors were Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, and Acidobacteria. The phylum Bacteroidetes, which is frequently observed in anammox reactors, was not detected. However, Acidobacteria and GN04 phyla were observed for the first time, suggesting their importance for this process. Our results suggest that, under similar operational conditions, anammox populations (Ca. Brocadia sinica and Ca. Brocadia sp. 40) were selected in both reactors despite the differences between the two initial inocula. Taken together, these results indicated that the type of inoculum and the culture conditions are key determinants of the general microbial composition of the biomass produced in the reactors. Operational conditions alone might play an important role in anammox selection. PMID:24956774

  10. The reactor-activator for gas-jet deposition of diamond structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebrov, A. K.; Andreev, M. N.; B'yadovskiy, T. T.; Kubrak, K. V.; Yudin, I. B.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a new method of deposition of diamond and diamond like structures by using the original reactor for activation of carbonaceous gas mixtures. One of the important characteristics of the described reactor is the power efficiency owing to low heat losses. The new method of gas flow formation opens new possibilities to get important trade-offs (wide range of background conditions and others). The principal possibility of diamond deposition is proved by experiments with the flow of hydrogen and methane mixture in tungsten resistively heating cylindrical channels. Electron microphotographs and Raman spectrum of deposited structures prove the fact that deposited samples are diamond structures. Numerical study of the mixture flow through the reactor was carried for optimization of gas flow conducted to a substrate.

  11. Structural alterations of erythrocyte membrane components induced by exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Brzeszczynska, Joanna; Pieniazek, Anna; Gwozdzinski, Lukasz; Gwozdzinski, Krzysztof; Jegier, Anna

    2008-12-01

    Physical exercise was used as a model of the physiological modulator of free radical production to examine the effects of exercise-induced oxidative modifications on the physico-biochemical properties of erythrocyte membrane. The aim of our work was to investigate conformational changes of erythrocyte membrane proteins, membrane fluidity, and membrane susceptibility to disintegration. Venous blood was taken before, immediately after, and 1 h after an exhaustive incremental cycling test (30 W.min-1 ramp), performed by 11 healthy untrained males on balanced diets (mean age, 22 +/- 2 years; mean body mass index, 25 +/- 4.5 kg.m-2). In response to this exercise, individual maximum heart rate was 195 +/- 12 beats.min-1 and maximum wattage was 292 +/- 27 W. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to investigate alterations in membrane proteins and membrane dynamics, and to measure production of radical species. The reducing potential of plasma (RPP) was measured using the reduction of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and the ferric-reducing ability of plasma. Exercise induced decreases in erythrocyte membrane fluidity in the polar region (p < 0.0001) and alterations in the conformational state of membrane proteins (p < 0.05). An increase in RPP was observed immediately after exercise (p < 0.001), with a further increase 1 h postexercise (p < 0.0001). Supporting measurements of lipid peroxidation showed an increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances immediately after exercise (p < 0.05) and at 1 h of recovery (p < 0.001); however, free radicals were not detected. Results indicate the existence of early postexercise mild oxidative stress after single-exercise performance, which induced structural changes in erythrocyte membrane components (protein aggregation) and in the membrane organization (lipids rigidization) that followed lipid peroxidation but did not lead to cellular hemolysis.

  12. Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a reactor with mechanical mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Lecheva, A.; Zheleva, I.

    2015-10-28

    Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a cylindrical reactor with mechanical mixing is studied and numerical results are presented in this article. The model area is complex because of the presence of convex corners of the mixer in the fluid flow. Proper boundary conditions for the vorticity calculated on the base of the stream function values near solid boundaries of the examined area are presented. The boundary value problem of motion of swirling incompressible viscous fluid in a vertical tank reactor with a mixer is solved numerically. The calculations are made by a computer code, written in MATLAB. The complex structure of the flow around the mixing disk is described and commented.

  13. Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a reactor with mechanical mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecheva, A.; Zheleva, I.

    2015-10-01

    Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a cylindrical reactor with mechanical mixing is studied and numerical results are presented in this article. The model area is complex because of the presence of convex corners of the mixer in the fluid flow. Proper boundary conditions for the vorticity calculated on the base of the stream function values near solid boundaries of the examined area are presented. The boundary value problem of motion of swirling incompressible viscous fluid in a vertical tank reactor with a mixer is solved numerically. The calculations are made by a computer code, written in MATLAB. The complex structure of the flow around the mixing disk is described and commented.

  14. Channel structures in aerobic biofilms of fixed-film reactors treating contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Massol-Deyá, A A; Whallon, J; Hickey, R F; Tiedje, J M

    1995-02-01

    Scanning electron microscopy, confocal scanning laser microscopy, and fatty acid methyl ester profiles were used to study the development, organization, and structure of aerobic multispecies biofilm communities in granular activated-carbon (GAC) fluidized-bed reactors treating petroleum-contaminated groundwaters. The sequential development of biofilm structure was studied in a laboratory reactor fed toluene-amended groundwater and colonized by the indigenous aquifer populations. During the early stages of colonization, microcolonies were observed primarily in crevices and other regions sheltered from hydraulic shear forces. Eventually, these microcolonies grew over the entire surface of the GAC. This growth led to the development of discrete discontinuous multilayer biofilm structures. Cell-free channel-like structures of variable sizes were observed to interconnect the surface film with the deep inner layers. These interconnections appeared to increase the biological surface area per unit volume ratio, which may facilitate transport of substrates into and waste products out of deep regions of the biofilm at rates greater than possible by diffusion alone. These architectural features were also observed in biofilms from four field-scale GAC reactors that were in commercial operation treating petroleum-contaminated groundwaters. These shared features suggest that formation of cell-free channel structures and their maintenance may be a general microbial strategy to deal with the problem of limiting diffusive transport in thick biofilms typical of fluidized-bed reactors. PMID:7574613

  15. Jacking mechanism for upper internals structure of a liquid metal nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E.; Wineman, Arthur L.

    1984-01-01

    A jacking mechanism for raising the upper internals structure of a liquid metal nuclear reactor which jacking mechanism uses a system of gears and drive shafts to transmit force from a single motor to four mechanically synchronized ball jacks to raise and lower support columns which support the upper internals structure. The support columns have a pin structure which rides up and down in a slot in a housing fixed to the reactor head. The pin has two locking plates which can be rotated around the pin to bring bolt holes through the locking plates into alignment with a set of bolt holes in the housing, there being a set of such housing bolt holes corresponding to both a raised and a lowered position of the support column. When the locking plate is so aligned, a surface of the locking plate mates with a surface in the housing such that the support column is then supported by the locking plate and not by the ball jacks. Since the locking plates are to be installed and bolted to the housing during periods of reactor operation, the ball jacks need not be sized to react the large forces which occur or potentially could occur on the upper internals structure of the reactor during operation. The locking plates react these loads. The ball jacks, used only during refueling, can be smaller, which enable conventionally available equipment to fulfill the precision requirements for the task within available space.

  16. Structure of multi-component/multi-Yukawa mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, L.; Arias, M.

    2006-09-01

    Recent small angle scattering experiments reveal new peaks in the structure function S(k) of colloidal systems (Liu et al 2005 J. Chem. Phys. 122 044507), in a region that was inaccessible with older instruments. It has been increasingly evident that a single (or double) Yukawa MSA-closure cannot account for these observations, and three or more terms are needed. On the other hand the MSA is not sufficiently accurate (Broccio et al 2005 Preprint); more accurate theories such as the HNC have been tried. But while the MSA is asymptotically exact at high densities (Rosenfield and Blum 1986 J. Chem. Phys. 85 1556), it does not satisfy the low density asymptotics. This has been corrected in the soft MSA (Blum et al 1972 J. Chem. Phys. 56 5197, Narten et al 1974 J. Chem. Phys. 60 3378) by adding exponential type terms. The results compared to experiment and simulation for liquid sodium by Rahman and Paskin (as shown in Blum et al 1972 J. Chem. Phys. 56 5197) are remarkably good. We use here a general closure of the Ornstein-Zernike equation, which is not necessarily the MSA closure (Blum and Hernando 2001 Condensed Matter Theories vol 16 ed Hernandez and Clark (New York: Nova) p 411). \\begin{equation} \\fl c_{ij}(r)=\\sum_{n=1}^{M}{\\cal{K}}_{ij}^{(n)}\\rme^{-z_{n}r}/r\\tqs {\\cal{K}}_{ij}^{(n)}=K^{(n)}\\delta_{i}^{(n)}\\delta_{j}^{(n)}\\tqs r\\geq \\sigma_{ij} \\label{eq1} \\end{equation} with the boundary condition for gij(r) = 0 for r<=σij. This general closure of the Ornstein-Zernike equation will go well beyond the MSA since it has been tested by Monte Carlo simulation for tetrahedral water (Blum et al 1999 Physica A 265 396), toroidal ion channels (Enriquez and Blum 2005 Mol. Phys. 103 3201) and polyelectrolytes (Blum and Bernard 2004 Proc. Int. School of Physics Enrico Fermi, Course CLV vol 155, ed Mallamace and Stanley (Amsterdam: IOS Press) p 335). For this closure we get for the Laplace transform of the pair correlation function an explicitly symmetric result

  17. Preliminary Measurements Supporting Reactor Vessel and Large Component Inspection Using X-Ray Backscatter Radiography by Selective Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Shedlock, Daniel; Dugan, Edward T.; Jacobs, Alan M.; Houssay, Laurent

    2006-07-01

    X-ray backscatter radiography by selective detection (RSD) is a field tested and innovative approach to non-destructive evaluation (NDE). RSD is an enhanced single-side x-ray Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) technique which selectively detects scatter components to improve image contrast and quality. Scatter component selection is accomplished through a set of specially designed detectors with fixed and movable collimators. Experimental results have shown that this NDE technique can be used to detect boric acid deposition on a metallic plate through steel foil reflective insulation commonly covering reactor pressure vessels. The current system is capable of detecting boric acid deposits with sub-millimeter resolution, through such insulating materials. Industrial systems have been built for Lockheed Martin Space Co. and NASA. Currently the x-ray backscatter RSD scanning systems developed by the University of Florida are being used to inspect the spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) used on the external tank of the space shuttle. RSD inspection techniques have found subsurface cracking in the SOFI thought to be responsible for the foam debris which separated from the external tank during the last shuttle launch. These industrial scanning systems can be customized for many applications, and a smaller, lighter, more compact unit design is being developed. The smaller design is approximately four inches wide, three inches high, and about 12 inches in length. This smaller RSD system can be used for NDE of areas that cannot be reached with larger equipment. X-ray backscatter RSD is a proven technology that has been tested on a wide variety of materials and applications. Currently the system has been used to inspect materials such as aluminum, plastics, honeycomb laminates, reinforced carbon composites, steel, and titanium. The focus of RSD is for one-sided detection for applications where conventional non-destructive examination methods either will not work or give poor

  18. Evaluation of induced radioactivity in structural material of Toshiba Training Reactor 'TTR1'.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Mikio; Kurosawa, Masahiko; Haruguchi, Yoshiko

    2005-01-01

    A decommissioning programme for the Toshiba Training Reactor (TTR1), a swimming pool type reactor used for reactor physics experiments and material irradiation, was started in August 2001. As a part of the programme, induced radioactivity in structural material was evaluated using neutron flux data obtained with the three-dimensional Sn code TORT. Induced activity was calculated with the isotope generation code ORIGEN-79 using activation cross section data created from multi-group library based on JENDL-3. The obtained results for radioactivities such as 60Co, 65Zn, 54Mn and 152Eu were compared with measured ones, and the present calculational method was confirmed to have enough accuracy. PMID:16604643

  19. Review of Recent Aging-Related Degradation Occurrences of Structures and Passive Components in U.S. Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Nie,J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y.-S.; Kim, M.K.; Choi, I.-K.

    2009-04-02

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are collaborating to develop seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and passive components (SPCs) under a multi-year research agreement. To better understand the status and characteristics of degradation of SPCs in nuclear power plants (NPPs), the first step in this multi-year research effort was to identify and evaluate degradation occurrences of SPCs in U.S. NPPs. This was performed by reviewing recent publicly available information sources to identify and evaluate the characteristics of degradation occurrences and then comparing the information to the observations in the past. Ten categories of SPCs that are applicable to Korean NPPs were identified, comprising of anchorage, concrete, containment, exchanger, filter, piping system, reactor pressure vessel, structural steel, tank, and vessel. Software tools were developed to expedite the review process. Results from this review effort were compared to previous data in the literature to characterize the overall degradation trends.

  20. Safety apparatus for nuclear reactor to prevent structural damage from overheating by core debris

    DOEpatents

    Gabor, John D.; Cassulo, John C.; Pedersen, Dean R.; Baker Jr., Louis

    1986-07-01

    The invention teaches safety apparatus that can be included in a nuclear reactor, either when newly fabricated or as a retrofit add-on, that will minimize proliferation of structural damage to the reactor in the event the reactor is experiencing an overheating malfunction whereby radioactive nuclear debris might break away from and be discharged from the reactor core. The invention provides a porous bed or sublayer on the lower surface of the reactor containment vessel so that the debris falls on and piles up on the bed. Vapor release elements upstand from the bed in some laterally spaced array. Thus should the high heat flux of the debris interior vaporize the coolant at that location, the vaporized coolant can be vented downwardly to and laterally through the bed to the vapor release elements and in turn via the release elements upwardly through the debris. This minimizes the pressure buildup in the debris and allows for continuing infiltration of the liquid coolant into the debris interior.

  1. Safety apparatus for nuclear reactor to prevent structural damage from overheating by core debris

    DOEpatents

    Gabor, J.D.; Cassulo, J.C.; Pedersen, D.R.; Baker, L. Jr.

    The invention teaches safety apparatus that can be included in a nuclear reactor, either when newly fabricated or as a retrofit add-on, that will minimize proliferation of structural damage to the reactor in the event the reactor is experiencing an overheating malfunction whereby radioactive nuclear debris might break away from and can be discharged from the reactor core. The invention provides a porous bed of sublayer on the lower surface of the reactor containment vessel so that the debris falls on and piles up on the bed. Vapor release elements upstand from the bed in some laterally spaced array. Thus should the high heat flux of the debris interior vaporize the coolant at that location, the vaporized coolant can be vented downwardly to and laterally through the bed to the vapor release elements and in turn via the release elements upwardly through the debris. This minimizes the pressure buildup in the debris and allows for continuing infiltration of the liquid coolant into the debris interior.

  2. Safety apparatus for nuclear reactor to prevent structural damage from overheating by core debris

    DOEpatents

    Gabor, John D.; Cassulo, John C.; Pedersen, Dean R.; Baker, Jr., Louis

    1986-01-01

    The invention teaches safety apparatus that can be included in a nuclear reactor, either when newly fabricated or as a retrofit add-on, that will minimize proliferation of structural damage to the reactor in the event the reactor is experiencing an overheating malfunction whereby radioactive nuclear debris might break away from and be discharged from the reactor core. The invention provides a porous bed or sublayer on the lower surface of the reactor containment vessel so that the debris falls on and piles up on the bed. Vapor release elements upstand from the bed in some laterally spaced array. Thus should the high heat flux of the debris interior vaporize the coolant at that location, the vaporized coolant can be vented downwardly to and laterally through the bed to the vapor release elements and in turn via the release elements upwardly through the debris. This minimizes the pressure buildup in the debris and allows for continuing infiltration of the liquid coolant into the debris interior.

  3. HWMA/RCRA CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE MATERIALS TEST REACTOR WING (TRA-604) LABORATORY COMPONENTS VOLUNTARY CONSENT ORDER ACTION PLAN VCO-5.8 D REVISION2

    SciTech Connect

    KIRK WINTERHOLLER

    2008-02-25

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the laboratory components of the Test Reactor Area Catch Tank System (TRA-630) that are located in the Materials Test Reactor Wing (TRA-604) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan VCO-5.8.d. The TRA-604 laboratory components addressed in this closure plan were deferred from the TRA-630 Catch Tank System closure plan due to ongoing laboratory operations in the areas requiring closure actions. The TRA-604 laboratory components include the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping, undersink drains, subheaders, and the east TRA-604 laboratory drain header. Potentially contaminated surfaces located beneath the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping and beneath the island sinks located in Laboratories 126 and 128 (located in TRA-661) are also addressed in this closure plan. The TRA-604 laboratory components will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, Subparts G and J. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards.

  4. Structural modeling for control design (articulated multibody component representation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugse, E. D.; Jones, R. E.; Salus, W. L.

    1989-01-01

    High gain, high frequency flexible responses in gimbaled multibody systems are discussed. Their origin and physical significance are described in terms of detailed mass and stiffness modeling at actuator/sensor interfaces. Guyan Reduction, Generalized Dynamic Reduction, inadequate mass modeling detail, as well as system mode truncation, are shown to suppress the high gain high frequency response and thereby lose system flexibility important for stability and performance predictions. Model validation by modal survey testing is shown to risk similar loss of accuracy. Difficulties caused by high frequency responses in component mode simulations, such as DISCOS, and also linearized system mode simulations, are described, and approaches for handling these difficulties are discussed.

  5. Components of School Capacity: Structures, Practices, and Perceptions. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachia Educational Laboratory at Edvantia (NJ1), 2005

    2005-01-01

    This brief defines school capacity as the presence of characteristics needed to support the development of a thriving learning community. The literature on school improvement suggests that a school's capacity for improvement can be supported by coherent structures, constructive teacher and leadership practices, and positive staff perceptions of…

  6. Release strategies for making transferable semiconductor structures, devices and device components

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, John A; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Meitl, Matthew; Ko, Heung Cho; Yoon, Jongseung; Menard, Etienne; Baca, Alfred J

    2014-11-25

    Provided are methods for making a device or device component by providing a multilayer structure having a plurality of functional layers and a plurality of release layers and releasing the functional layers from the multilayer structure by separating one or more of the release layers to generate a plurality of transferable structures. The transferable structures are printed onto a device substrate or device component supported by a device substrate. The methods and systems provide means for making high-quality and low-cost photovoltaic devices, transferable semiconductor structures, (opto-)electronic devices and device components.

  7. Release strategies for making transferable semiconductor structures, devices and device components

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Meitl, Matthew; Ko, Heung Cho; Yoon, Jongseung; Menard, Etienne; Baca, Alfred J.

    2011-04-26

    Provided are methods for making a device or device component by providing a multilayer structure having a plurality of functional layers and a plurality of release layers and releasing the functional layers from the multilayer structure by separating one or more of the release layers to generate a plurality of transferable structures. The transferable structures are printed onto a device substrate or device component supported by a device substrate. The methods and systems provide means for making high-quality and low-cost photovoltaic devices, transferable semiconductor structures, (opto-)electronic devices and device components.

  8. Release strategies for making transferable semiconductor structures, devices and device components

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Meitl, Matthew; Ko, Heung Cho; Yoon, Jongseung; Menard, Etienne; Baca, Alfred J.

    2016-05-24

    Provided are methods for making a device or device component by providing a multi layer structure having a plurality of functional layers and a plurality of release layers and releasing the functional layers from the multilayer structure by separating one or more of the release layers to generate a plurality of transferable structures. The transferable structures are printed onto a device substrate or device component supported by a device substrate. The methods and systems provide means for making high-quality and low-cost photovoltaic devices, transferable semiconductor structures, (opto-)electronic devices and device components.

  9. Composite load spectra for select space propulsion structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Kurth, R. E.; Ho, H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop generic load models with multiple levels of progressive sophistication to simulate the composite (combined) load spectra that are induced in space propulsion system components, representative of Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), such as transfer ducts, turbine blades, and liquid oxygen posts and system ducting. The first approach will consist of using state of the art probabilistic methods to describe the individual loading conditions and combinations of these loading conditions to synthesize the composite load spectra simulation. The second approach will consist of developing coupled models for composite load spectra simulation which combine the deterministic models for composite load dynamic, acoustic, high pressure, and high rotational speed, etc., load simulation using statistically varying coefficients. These coefficients will then be determined using advanced probabilistic simulation methods with and without strategically selected experimental data.

  10. Composite load spectra for select space propulsion structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Kurth, R. E.; Ho, H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop generic load models with multiple levels of progressive sophistication to simulate the composite load spectra that are induced in space propulsion system components, representative of Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), such as transfer ducts, turbine blades, and liquid oxygen (LOX) posts and system ducting. These models will be developed using two independent approaches. The first approach consists of using state-of-the-art probabilistic methods to describe the individual loading conditions and combinations of these loading conditions to synthesize the composite load spectra simulation. The methodology required to combine the various individual load simulation models (hot-gas dynamic, vibrations, instantaneous position, centrifugal field, etc.) into composite load spectra simulation models will be developed under this program. A computer code incorporating the various individual and composite load spectra models will be developed to construct the specific load model desired. The second approach, which is covered under the options portion of the contract, will consist of developing coupled models for composite load spectra simulation which combine the (deterministic) models for composite load dynamic, acoustic, high-pressure and high rotational speed, etc., load simulation using statistically varying coefficients. These coefficients will then be determined using advanced probabilistic simulation methods with and without strategically selected experimental data. This report covers the efforts of the third year of the contract. The overall program status is that the turbine blade loads have been completed and implemented. The transfer duct loads are defined and are being implemented. The thermal loads for all components are defined and coding is being developed. A dynamic pressure load model is under development. The parallel work on the probabilistic methodology is essentially completed. The overall effort is being

  11. Design-Load Basis for LANL Structures, Systems, and Components

    SciTech Connect

    I. Cuesta

    2004-09-01

    This document supports the recommendations in the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Engineering Standard Manual (ESM), Chapter 5--Structural providing the basis for the loads, analysis procedures, and codes to be used in the ESM. It also provides the justification for eliminating the loads to be considered in design, and evidence that the design basis loads are appropriate and consistent with the graded approach required by the Department of Energy (DOE) Code of Federal Regulation Nuclear Safety Management, 10, Part 830. This document focuses on (1) the primary and secondary natural phenomena hazards listed in DOE-G-420.1-2, Appendix C, (2) additional loads not related to natural phenomena hazards, and (3) the design loads on structures during construction.

  12. Optimal glass-ceramic structures: Components of giant mirror telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eschenauer, Hans A.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed investigations are carried out on optimal glass-ceramic mirror structures of terrestrial space technology (optical telescopes). In order to find an optimum design, a nonlinear multi-criteria optimization problem is formulated. 'Minimum deformation' at 'minimum weight' are selected as contradictory objectives, and a set of further constraints (quilting effect, optical faults etc.) is defined and included. A special result of the investigations is described.

  13. Structural Design Challenges in Design Certification Applications for New Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, M.; Braverman, J.; Wei, X.; Hofmayer, C.; Xu, J.

    2011-07-17

    The licensing framework established by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 52, “Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants,” provides requirements for standard design certifications (DCs) and combined license (COL) applications. The intent of this process is the early reso- lution of safety issues at the DC application stage. Subsequent COL applications may incorporate a DC by reference. Thus, the COL review will not reconsider safety issues resolved during the DC process. However, a COL application that incorporates a DC by reference must demonstrate that relevant site-specific de- sign parameters are confined within the bounds postulated by the DC, and any departures from the DC need to be justified. This paper provides an overview of structural design chal- lenges encountered in recent DC applications under the 10 CFR Part 52 process, in which the authors have participated as part of the safety review effort.

  14. Design component method for sensitivity analysis of built-up structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Kyung K.; Seong, Hwai G.

    1986-01-01

    A 'design component method' that provides a unified and systematic organization of design sensitivity analysis for built-up structures is developed and implemented. Both conventional design variables, such as thickness and cross-sectional area, and shape design variables of components of built-up structures are considered. It is shown that design of components of built-up structures can be characterized and system design sensitivity expressions obtained by simply adding contributions from each component. The method leads to a systematic organization of computations for design sensitivity analysis that is similar to the way in which computations are organized within a finite element code.

  15. 78 FR 19541 - Proposed Revision to Design of Structures, Components, Equipment and Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Revision to Design of Structures, Components, Equipment and Systems AGENCY: Nuclear... published in the Federal Register (FR) on March 1, 2013 (78 FR 13911), that announced the request for comments on the proposed revisions in Chapter 3, ``Design of Structures, Components, Equipment, and...

  16. 78 FR 48727 - Proposed Revisions to Design of Structures, Components, Equipment and Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Revisions to Design of Structures, Components, Equipment and Systems AGENCY: Nuclear... Chapter 3, ``Design of Structures, Components, Equipment, and Systems'' and soliciting public comment on NUREG-0800, ``Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power...

  17. 78 FR 15755 - Proposed Revision to Design of Structures, Components, Equipment and Systems; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... March 1, 2013 (41 FR 13911), that announced the solicitation for comments of the proposed revision in Chapter 3, ``Design of Structures, Components, Equipment, and Systems'' and is soliciting public comment... COMMISSION Proposed Revision to Design of Structures, Components, Equipment and Systems; Correction...

  18. Technical Letter Report, An Evaluation of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Reactor Piping System Components Containing Dissimilar Metal Welds, JCN N6398, Task 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2009-11-30

    Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light-water reactor components. The scope of this research encom¬passes primary system pressure boundary materials including dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, inlays and onlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in steel components that challenge standard and/or conventional inspection methodologies. This interim technical letter report provides a summary of a technical evaluation aimed at assessing the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of small-bore DMW components that exist in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience and events such as the circumferential cracking in the reactor vessel nozzle-to-RCS hot leg pipe at V.C. Summer nuclear power station, identified in 2000, show that in PWRs where primary coolant water (or steam) are present under normal operation, Alloy 82/182 materials are susceptible to pressurized water stress corrosion cracking. The extent and number of occurrences of DMW cracking in nuclear power plants (domestically and internationally) indicate the necessity for reliable and effective inspection techniques. The work described herein was performed to provide insights for evaluating the utility of advanced NDE approaches for the inspection of DMW components such as a pressurizer surge nozzle DMW, a shutdown cooling pipe DMW, and a ferritic (low-alloy carbon steel)-to-CASS pipe DMW configuration.

  19. Composite load spectra for select space propulsion structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Kurth, R. E.; Ho, H.

    1986-01-01

    A multiyear program is performed with the objective to develop generic load models with multiple levels of progressive sophistication to simulate the composite (combined) load spectra that are induced in space propulsion system components, representative of Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), such as transfer ducts, turbine blades, and liquid oxygen (LOX) posts. Progress of the first year's effort includes completion of a sufficient portion of each task -- probabilistic models, code development, validation, and an initial operational code. This code has from its inception an expert system philosophy that could be added to throughout the program and in the future. The initial operational code is only applicable to turbine blade type loadings. The probabilistic model included in the operational code has fitting routines for loads that utilize a modified Discrete Probabilistic Distribution termed RASCAL, a barrier crossing method and a Monte Carlo method. An initial load model was developed by Battelle that is currently used for the slowly varying duty cycle type loading. The intent is to use the model and related codes essentially in the current form for all loads that are based on measured or calculated data that have followed a slowly varying profile.

  20. STRUCTURAL DESIGN CRITERIA FOR TARGET/BLANKET SYSTEM COMPONENT MATERIALS FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    W. JOHNSON; R. RYDER; P. RITTENHOUSE

    2001-01-01

    The design of target/blanket system components for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) plant is dependent on the development of materials properties data specified by the designer. These data are needed to verify that component designs are adequate. The adequacy of the data will be related to safety, performance, and economic considerations, and to other requirements that may be deemed necessary by customers and regulatory bodies. The data required may already be in existence, as in the open technical literature, or may need to be generated, as is often the case for the design of new systems operating under relatively unique conditions. The designers' starting point for design data needs is generally some form of design criteria used in conjunction with a specified set of loading conditions and associated performance requirements. Most criteria are aimed at verifying the structural adequacy of the component, and often take the form of national or international standards such as the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME B and PV Code) or the French Nuclear Structural Requirements (RCC-MR). Whether or not there are specific design data needs associated with the use of these design criteria will largely depend on the uniqueness of the conditions of operation of the component. A component designed in accordance with the ASME B and PV Code, where no unusual environmental conditions exist, will utilize well-documented, statistically-evaluated developed in conjunction with the Code, and will not be likely to have any design data needs. On the other hand, a component to be designed to operate under unique APT conditions, is likely to have significant design data needs. Such a component is also likely to require special design criteria for verification of its structural adequacy, specifically accounting for changes in materials properties which may occur during exposure in the service environment. In such a situation it is common for the design criteria and

  1. Flight-service evaluation of composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. B.

    1973-01-01

    A review of programs aimed at flight-service evaluation of composite materials in various applications is presented. These flight-service programs are expected to continue for up to 5 years and include selective reinforcement of an airplane center wing box a helicopter tail cone, and composite replacements for commercial aircraft spoilers and fairings. These longtime flight-service programs will help provide the necessary information required by commercial airlines to commit advanced composites to aircraft structures with confidence. Results of these programs will provide information concerning the stability of composite materials when subjected to various flight environments.

  2. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) for select space propulsion system components, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The technical effort and computer code enhancements performed during the sixth year of the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods program are summarized. Various capabilities are described to probabilistically combine structural response and structural resistance to compute component reliability. A library of structural resistance models is implemented in the Numerical Evaluations of Stochastic Structures Under Stress (NESSUS) code that included fatigue, fracture, creep, multi-factor interaction, and other important effects. In addition, a user interface was developed for user-defined resistance models. An accurate and efficient reliability method was developed and was successfully implemented in the NESSUS code to compute component reliability based on user-selected response and resistance models. A risk module was developed to compute component risk with respect to cost, performance, or user-defined criteria. The new component risk assessment capabilities were validated and demonstrated using several examples. Various supporting methodologies were also developed in support of component risk assessment.

  3. DETERMINING THE EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON AGING CONCRETE STRUCTURES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M.

    2010-01-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) is responsible for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities throughout the DOE Complex. Some of these facilities will be completely dismantled, while others will be partially dismantled and the remaining structure will be stabilized with cementitious fill materials. The latter is a process known as In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD). The ISD decision process requires a detailed understanding of the existing facility conditions, and operational history. System information and material properties are need for aged nuclear facilities. This literature review investigated the properties of aged concrete structures affected by radiation. In particular, this review addresses the Savannah River Site (SRS) isotope production nuclear reactors. The concrete in the reactors at SRS was not seriously damaged by the levels of radiation exposure. Loss of composite compressive strength was the most common effect of radiation induced damage documented at nuclear power plants.

  4. Electron microscopic examination of wastewater biofilm formation and structural components.

    PubMed Central

    Eighmy, T T; Maratea, D; Bishop, P L

    1983-01-01

    This research documents in situ wastewater biofilm formation, structure, and physiochemical properties as revealed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Cationized ferritin was used to label anionic sites of the biofilm glycocalyx for viewing in thin section. Wastewater biofilm formation paralleled the processes involved in marine biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a dramatic increase in cell colonization and growth over a 144-h period. Constituents included a variety of actively dividing morphological types. Many of the colonizing bacteria were flagellated. Filaments were seen after primary colonization of the surface. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a dominant gram-negative cell wall structure in the biofilm constituents. At least three types of glycocalyces were observed. The predominant glycocalyx possessed interstices and was densely labeled with cationized ferritin. Two of the glycocalyces appeared to mediate biofilm adhesion to the substratum. The results suggest that the predominant glycocalyx of this thin wastewater biofilm serves, in part, to: (i) enclose the bacteria in a matrix and anchor the biofilm to the substratum and (ii) provide an extensive surface area with polyanionic properties. Images PMID:6881965

  5. Optimum Design of Aerospace Structural Components Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berke, L.; Patnaik, S. N.; Murthy, P. L. N.

    1993-01-01

    The application of artificial neural networks to capture structural design expertise is demonstrated. The principal advantage of a trained neural network is that it requires a trivial computational effort to produce an acceptable new design. For the class of problems addressed, the development of a conventional expert system would be extremely difficult. In the present effort, a structural optimization code with multiple nonlinear programming algorithms and an artificial neural network code NETS were used. A set of optimum designs for a ring and two aircraft wings for static and dynamic constraints were generated using the optimization codes. The optimum design data were processed to obtain input and output pairs, which were used to develop a trained artificial neural network using the code NETS. Optimum designs for new design conditions were predicted using the trained network. Neural net prediction of optimum designs was found to be satisfactory for the majority of the output design parameters. However, results from the present study indicate that caution must be exercised to ensure that all design variables are within selected error bounds.

  6. Reactor building

    SciTech Connect

    Hista, J. C.

    1984-09-18

    Reactor building comprising a vessel shaft anchored in a slab which is peripherally locked. This reactor building comprises a confinement enclosure within which are positioned internal structures constituted by an internal structure floor, a vessel shaft, a slab being positioned between the general floor and the internal structure floor, the vesse

  7. Summary of SMIRT20 Preconference Topical Workshop – Identifying Structural Issues in Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    William Richins; Stephen Novascone; Cheryl O'Brien

    2009-08-01

    Summary of SMIRT20 Preconference Topical Workshop – Identifying Structural Issues in Advanced Reactors William Richins1, Stephen Novascone1, and Cheryl O’Brien1 1Idaho National Laboratory, US Dept. of Energy, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA, e-mail: William.Richins@inl.gov The Idaho National Laboratory (INL, USA) and IASMiRT sponsored an international forum Nov 5-6, 2008 in Porvoo, Finland for nuclear industry, academic, and regulatory representatives to identify structural issues in current and future advanced reactor design, especially for extreme conditions and external threats. The purpose of this Topical Workshop was to articulate research, engineering, and regulatory Code development needs. The topics addressed by the Workshop were selected to address critical industry needs specific to advanced reactor structures that have long lead times and can be the subject of future SMiRT technical sessions. The topics were; 1) structural/materials needs for extreme conditions and external threats in contemporary (Gen. III) and future (Gen. IV and NGNP) advanced reactors and 2) calibrating simulation software and methods that address topic 1 The workshop discussions and research needs identified are presented. The Workshop successfully produced interactive discussion on the two topics resulting in a list of research and technology needs. It is recommended that IASMiRT communicate the results of the discussion to industry and researchers to encourage new ideas and projects. In addition, opportunities exist to retrieve research reports and information that currently exists, and encourage more international cooperation and collaboration. It is recommended that IASMiRT continue with an off-year workshop series on select topics.

  8. TEMPEST code simulations of hydrogen distribution in reactor containment structures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, D.S.; Eyler, L.L.

    1985-03-01

    The mass transport version of the TEMPEST computer code was used to simulate hydrogen distribution in geometric configurations relevant to reactor containment structures. Predicted results of Battelle-Frankfurt hydrogen distribution tests 1 to 6, and 12 are presented. Agreement between predictions and experimental data is good. Best agreement is obtained using the k-epsilon turbulence model in TEMPEST in flow cases where turbulent diffusion and stable stratification are dominant mechanisms affecting transport. The code's general analysis capabilities are summarized.

  9. Silicon carbide tritium permeation barrier for steel structural components.

    SciTech Connect

    Causey, Rion A.; Garde, Joseph Maurico; Buchenauer, Dean A.; Calderoni, Pattrick; Holschuh, Thomas, Jr.; Youchison, Dennis Lee; Wright, Matt; Kolasinski, Robert D.

    2010-09-01

    Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) has superior resistance to tritium permeation even after irradiation. Prior work has shown Ultrametfoam to be forgiving when bonded to substrates with large CTE differences. The technical objectives are: (1) Evaluate foams of vanadium, niobium and molybdenum metals and SiC for CTE mitigation between a dense SiC barrier and steel structure; (2) Thermostructural modeling of SiC TPB/Ultramet foam/ferritic steel architecture; (3) Evaluate deuterium permeation of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC; (4) D testing involved construction of a new higher temperature (> 1000 C) permeation testing system and development of improved sealing techniques; (5) Fabricate prototype tube similar to that shown with dimensions of 7cm {theta} and 35cm long; and (6) Tritium and hermeticity testing of prototype tube.

  10. Mitochondrial ATP synthasome: Expression and structural interaction of its components.

    PubMed

    Nůsková, Hana; Mráček, Tomáš; Mikulová, Tereza; Vrbacký, Marek; Kovářová, Nikola; Kovalčíková, Jana; Pecina, Petr; Houštěk, Josef

    2015-08-28

    Mitochondrial ATP synthase, ADP/ATP translocase (ANT), and inorganic phosphate carrier (PiC) are supposed to form a supercomplex called ATP synthasome. Our protein and transcript analysis of rat tissues indicates that the expression of ANT and PiC is transcriptionally controlled in accordance with the biogenesis of ATP synthase. In contrast, the content of ANT and PiC is increased in ATP synthase deficient patients' fibroblasts, likely due to a post-transcriptional adaptive mechanism. A structural analysis of rat heart mitochondria by immunoprecipitation, blue native/SDS electrophoresis, immunodetection and MS analysis revealed the presence of ATP synthasome. However, the majority of PiC and especially ANT did not associate with ATP synthase, suggesting that most of PiC, ANT and ATP synthase exist as separate entities.

  11. Stability and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria community structure in different high-rate CANON reactors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuhai; Li, Dong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Zeng, Huiping; Yang, Zhuo; Cui, Shaoming; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    In completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process, the bioactivity of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) should be effectively inhibited. In this study, the stability of four high-rate CANON reactors and the effect of free ammonia (FA) and organic material on NOB community structure were investigated using DGGE. Results suggested that with the increasing of FA, the ratio of total nitrogen removal to nitrate production went up gradually, while the biodiversity of Nitrobacter-like NOB and Nitrospira-like NOB both decreased. When the CANON reactor was transformed to simultaneous partial nitrification, anammox and denitrification (SNAD) reactor by introducing organic material, the denitrifiers and aerobic heterotrophic bacteria would compete nitrite or oxygen with NOB, which then led to the biodiversity decreasing of both Nitrobacter-like NOB and Nitrospira-like NOB. The distribution of Nitrobacter-like NOB and Nitrospira-like NOB were evaluated, and finally effective strategies for suppressing NOB in CANON reactors were proposed. PMID:25459821

  12. Fuel processing in integrated micro-structured heat-exchanger reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, G.; Schürer, J.; Tiemann, D.; Wichert, M.; Zapf, R.; Hessel, V.; Löwe, H.

    Micro-structured fuel processors are under development at IMM for different fuels such as methanol, ethanol, propane/butane (LPG), gasoline and diesel. The target application are mobile, portable and small scale stationary auxiliary power units (APU) based upon fuel cell technology. The key feature of the systems is an integrated plate heat-exchanger technology which allows for the thermal integration of several functions in a single device. Steam reforming may be coupled with catalytic combustion in separate flow paths of a heat-exchanger. Reactors and complete fuel processors are tested up to the size range of 5 kW power output of a corresponding fuel cell. On top of reactor and system prototyping and testing, catalyst coatings are under development at IMM for numerous reactions such as steam reforming of LPG, ethanol and methanol, catalytic combustion of LPG and methanol, and for CO clean-up reactions, namely water-gas shift, methanation and the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide. These catalysts are investigated in specially developed testing reactors. In selected cases 1000 h stability testing is performed on catalyst coatings at weight hourly space velocities, which are sufficiently high to meet the demands of future fuel processing reactors.

  13. Time variation of the fine structure constant α from realistic models of Oklo reactors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.; Lamoreaux, S. K.

    2006-11-01

    The topic of whether the fundamental constants of nature vary with time has been a subject of great interest since Dirac originally proposed the possibility that GN˜1/tuniverse. Recent observations of absorption spectra lines from distant quasars appeared to indicate a possible increase in the fine structure constant α over ten billion years. Contrarily, analyses of the time evolution of α from Oklo natural nuclear reactor data have yielded inconsistent results, some indicating a decrease over two billion years while others indicated no change. We have used known Oklo reactor epithermal spectral indices as criteria for selecting realistic reactor models. Reactors RZ2 and RZ10 were modeled with MCNP and the resulting neutron spectra were used to calculate the change in the ^149Sm capture cross section as a function of a possible shift in the energy of the 97.3-meV resonance. Our study resolves the contradictory situation with previous Oklo α-results. Our suggested 2 σ bound on a possible time variation of α over two billion years is stringent: -0.11 <=δαα <=0.24, in units of 10-7, but model dependent in that it assumes only α has varied over time.

  14. Process Performance and Bacterial Community Structure Under Increasing Influent Disturbances in a Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hailong; Yan, Yingchun; Chen, Yuewen; Wu, Xiaolei; Li, Baoan

    2016-02-01

    The membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) is a promising municipal wastewater treatment process. In this study, two cross-flow MABRs were constructed to explore the carbon and nitrogen removal performance and bacterial succession, along with changes of influent loading shock comprising flow velocity, COD, and NH4-N concentrations. Redundancy analysis revealed that the function of high flow velocity was mainly embodied in facilitating contaminants diffusion and biosorption rather than the success of overall bacterial populations (p > 0.05). In contrast, the influent NH4-N concentration contributed most to the variance of reactor efficiency and community structure (p < 0.05). Pyrosequencing results showed that Anaerolineae, and Beta- and Alphaproteobacteria were the dominant groups in biofilms for COD and NH4-N removal. Among the identified genera, Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira were the main nitrifiers, and Hyphomicrobium, Hydrogenophaga, and Rhodobacter were the key denitrifiers. Meanwhile, principal component analysis indicated that bacterial shift in MABR was probably the combination of stochastic and deterministic processes. PMID:26528534

  15. Process Performance and Bacterial Community Structure Under Increasing Influent Disturbances in a Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hailong; Yan, Yingchun; Chen, Yuewen; Wu, Xiaolei; Li, Baoan

    2016-02-01

    The membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) is a promising municipal wastewater treatment process. In this study, two cross-flow MABRs were constructed to explore the carbon and nitrogen removal performance and bacterial succession, along with changes of influent loading shock comprising flow velocity, COD, and NH4-N concentrations. Redundancy analysis revealed that the function of high flow velocity was mainly embodied in facilitating contaminants diffusion and biosorption rather than the success of overall bacterial populations (p > 0.05). In contrast, the influent NH4-N concentration contributed most to the variance of reactor efficiency and community structure (p < 0.05). Pyrosequencing results showed that Anaerolineae, and Beta- and Alphaproteobacteria were the dominant groups in biofilms for COD and NH4-N removal. Among the identified genera, Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira were the main nitrifiers, and Hyphomicrobium, Hydrogenophaga, and Rhodobacter were the key denitrifiers. Meanwhile, principal component analysis indicated that bacterial shift in MABR was probably the combination of stochastic and deterministic processes.

  16. Grain-boundary component in W-Ga composites: A way towards skeleton structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, W.; Gleiter, H.

    1998-11-01

    Nanostructured materials consist of crystalline and grain-boundary components. In the simplest case, both components are chemically identical. Here, we present the results of a study of a system consisting of a crystalline component built by A atoms (tungsten) and a grain boundary component of B atoms (gallium). Within this system, component B is in a disordered state. Most likely, it exhibits an amorphouslike structure, and coats the tungsten crystals uniformly with a constant thickness, thus forming a Ga skeleton structure. The noncrystalline gallium seems to undergo no first-order structural phase transitions, e.g., no first-order melting transition was noted when the composite was below, at, or above the equilibrium melting point of Ga. The properties of gallium as a grain-boundary component differ significantly from those of crystalline and amorphous bulk gallium.

  17. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Jane M. F.; Karlen, Douglas L.; Gresham, Garold L.; Cantrell, Keri B.; Archer, David W.; Wienhold, Brian J.; Varvel, Gary E.; Laird, David A.; Baker, John; Ochsner, Tyson E.; et al

    2014-11-17

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the earmore » averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg⁻¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ⁻¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha⁻¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha⁻¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.« less

  18. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Jane M. F. Johnson; Douglas L. Karlen; Garold L. Gresham; Keri B. Cantrell; David W. Archer; Brian J. Wienhold; Gary E. Varvel; David A. Laird; John Baker; Tyson E. Ochsner; Jeff M. Novak; Ardell D. Halvorson; Francisco Arriaga; David T. Lightle; Amber Hoover; Rachel Emerson; Nancy W. Barbour

    2014-11-01

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the ear averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg?¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ?¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha?¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha?¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.

  19. Coherent states, vacuum structure and infinite component relativistic wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirilo-Lombardo, Diego Julio

    2016-11-01

    It is commonly claimed in the recent literature that certain solutions to wave equations of positive energy of Dirac-type with internal variables are characterized by a non-thermal spectrum. As part of that statement, it was said that the transformations and symmetries involved in equations of such type corresponded to a particular representation of the Lorentz group. In this paper, we give the general solution to this problem emphasizing the interplay between the group structure, the corresponding algebra and the physical spectrum. This analysis is completed with a strong discussion and proving that: (i) the physical states are represented by coherent states; (ii) the solutions in [Yu. P. Stepanovsky, Nucl. Phys. B (Proc. Suppl.) 102 (2001) 407-411; 103 (2001) 407-411] are not general, (iii) the symmetries of the considered physical system in [Yu. P. Stepanovsky, Nucl. Phys. B (Proc. Suppl.) 102 (2001) 407-411; 103 (2001) 407-411] (equations and geometry) do not correspond to the Lorentz group but to the fourth covering: the Metaplectic group Mp(n).

  20. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jane M. F.; Karlen, Douglas L.; Gresham, Garold L.; Cantrell, Keri B.; Archer, David W.; Wienhold, Brian J.; Varvel, Gary E.; Laird, David A.; Baker, John; Ochsner, Tyson E.; Novak, Jeff M.; Halvorson, Ardell D.; Arriaga, Francisco; Lightle, David T.; Hoover, Amber; Emerson, Rachel; Barbour, Nancy W.

    2014-11-17

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the ear averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg⁻¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ⁻¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha⁻¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha⁻¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.

  1. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Rouse, Carl A.; Simnad, Massoud T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  2. Method for coupled three-dimensional analysis of reactor vessel blowdowns with internal structures. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, S.A.; Gross, M.B.; Santee, G.E. Jr.; Chang, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    The STEALTH 3D and WHAMSE 3D computer codes have been combined to perform three-dimensional coupled fluid/structure calculations of the blowdown response of a pressure vessel with internal structures typical of a pressurized water reactor. The fluid/structure coupling, which is performed cycle by cycle during a calculation, is described. The coupled fluid/structure code, STEALTH/WHAMSE 3D, has been used to simulate the decompression of test V31.1 from the HDR blowdown test series. Calculations of fluid pressure, differential fluid pressure and hoop strain compare favorably with the experimental data from test V31.1. The computed peak axial stain compares less favorably with the experimental data, probably due to coarseness of the structural grid. 14 refs.

  3. Environmental and Genetic Effects on Pigment-Based vs. Structural Component of Yellow Feather Colouration

    PubMed Central

    Matrková, Jana; Remeš, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    Background Carotenoid plumage is of widespread use in bird communication. Carotenoid-based feather colouration has recently been shown to be dependent on both pigment concentration and feather structure. If these two components are determined differently, one plumage patch may potentially convey different aspects of individual quality. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the effects of genetic and environmental factors on carotenoid-based yellow breast colouration of Great Tit (Parus major) nestlings. By partial cross-fostering, we separated the genetic and pre-natal vs. post-natal parental effects on both the structural and the pigment-based component of carotenoid-based plumage colouration. We also simultaneously manipulated the post-hatching environment by brood size manipulation. The structural component of nestling colouration reflected features of female colouration. On the other hand, the pigment-based component was more affected by rearing conditions presumably representing food quality. While the structural component was related to both origin- and environment-related factors, the pigment-based component seemed to be environment-dependent only. These results support the notion that pigment-based and structural components of feather colouration are determined differently. Conclusions/Significance Chromatic and achromatic components of carotenoid-based feather colouration reflected different aspects of individual quality and history, and thus may potentially form a multicomponent signal. PMID:22590581

  4. Dynamic response of the High Flux Isotope Reactor structure caused by nearby heavy load drop

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.J.

    1995-12-01

    A heavy load of 50,000 lb is assumed to drop from 10 ft above the bottom of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pool at the loading station. The consequences of the dynamic impact to the bottom slab of the pool and to the nearby HFIR reactor vessel are analyzed by applying the ABAQUS computer code. The results show that both the HFIR vessel structure and its supporting legs are subjected to elastic disturbances only and, therefore, will not be damaged. The bottom slab of the pool, however, will be damaged to about half of the slab thickness. The velocity response spectrum at the concrete floor next to the HFIR vessel as a result of the vibration caused by the impact is obtained. It is concluded, that the damage caused by heavy load drop at the loading station is controlled by the slab damage and the nearby HFIR vessel and the supporting legs will not be damaged.

  5. Dynamic response of the high flux isotope reactor structure caused by nearby heavy load drop

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shih-Jung

    1995-09-01

    A heavy load of 50,000 lb is assumed to drop from 10 ft above the bottom of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pool at the loading station. The consequences of the dynamic impact to the bottom slab of the pool and to the nearby HFIR reactor vessel are analyzed by applying the ABAQUS computer code The results show that both the BM vessel structure and its supporting legs are subjected to elastic disturbances only and, therefore, will not be damaged. The bottom slab of the pool, however, will be damaged to about half of the slab thickness. The velocity response spectrum at the concrete floor next to the HFIR vessel as a result of the vibration caused by the impact is obtained. It is concluded, that the damage caused by heavy load drop at the loading station is controlled by the slab damage and the nearby HFIR vessel and the supporting legs will not be damaged.

  6. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) for Select Space Propulsion System Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) are described for the probabilistic structural analysis of engine components for current and future space propulsion systems. Components for these systems are subjected to stochastic thermomechanical launch loads. Uncertainties or randomness also occurs in material properties, structural geometry, and boundary conditions. Material property stochasticity, such as in modulus of elasticity or yield strength, exists in every structure and is a consequence of variations in material composition and manufacturing processes. Procedures are outlined for computing the probabilistic structural response or reliability of the structural components. The response variables include static or dynamic deflections, strains, and stresses at one or several locations, natural frequencies, fatigue or creep life, etc. Sample cases illustrates how the PSAM methods and codes simulate input uncertainties and compute probabilistic response or reliability using a finite element model with probabilistic methods.

  7. 78 FR 59732 - Revisions to Design of Structures, Components, Equipment, and Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... COMMISSION Revisions to Design of Structures, Components, Equipment, and Systems AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory..., Components, Equipment and Systems'' of NUREG-0800, ``Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR Edition,'' Section 3.7.2, ``Seismic System Analysis,'' Section...

  8. 76 FR 69292 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water AGENCY... Components in Treated Borated Water.'' This LR-ISG revises the guidance in the Standard Review Plan for... treated borated water. DATES: Submit comments by December 8, 2011. Comments received after this date...

  9. AGE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT STRUCTURES AND COMPONENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    BRAVERMAN,J.

    1999-03-29

    This paper summarizes and highlights the results of the initial phase of a research project on the assessment of aged and degraded structures and components important to the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). A review of age-related degradation of structures and passive components at NPPs was performed. Instances of age-related degradation have been collected and reviewed. Data were collected from plant generated documents such as Licensing Event Reports, NRC generic communications, NUREGs and industry reports. Applicable cases of degradation occurrences were reviewed and then entered into a computerized database. The results obtained from the review of degradation occurrences are summarized and discussed. Various trending analyses were performed to identify which structures and components are most affected, whether degradation occurrences are worsening, and what are the most common aging mechanisms. The paper also discusses potential aging issues and degradation-susceptible structures and passive components which would have the greatest impact on plant risk.

  10. Age-Related Degradation of Nuclear Power Plant Structures and Components

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, J.; Chang, T.-Y.; Chokshi, N.; Hofmayer, C.; Morante, R.; Shteyngart, S.

    1999-03-29

    This paper summarizes and highlights the results of the initial phase of a research project on the assessment of aged and degraded structures and components important to the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). A review of age-related degradation of structures and passive components at NPPs was performed. Instances of age-related degradation have been collected and reviewed. Data were collected from plant generated documents such as Licensing Event Reports, NRC generic communications, NUREGs and industry reports. Applicable cases of degradation occurrences were reviewed and then entered into a computerized database. The results obtained from the review of degradation occurrences are summarized and discussed. Various trending analyses were performed to identify which structures and components are most affected, whether degradation occurrences are worsening, and what was the most common aging mechanisms. The paper also discusses potential aging issues and degradation-susceptible structures and passive components which would have the greatest impact on plant risk.

  11. Extended Aging Theories for Predictions of Safe Operational Life of Critical Airborne Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Chen, Tony

    2006-01-01

    The previously developed Ko closed-form aging theory has been reformulated into a more compact mathematical form for easier application. A new equivalent loading theory and empirical loading theories have also been developed and incorporated into the revised Ko aging theory for the prediction of a safe operational life of airborne failure-critical structural components. The new set of aging and loading theories were applied to predict the safe number of flights for the B-52B aircraft to carry a launch vehicle, the structural life of critical components consumed by load excursion to proof load value, and the ground-sitting life of B-52B pylon failure-critical structural components. A special life prediction method was developed for the preflight predictions of operational life of failure-critical structural components of the B-52H pylon system, for which no flight data are available.

  12. Aging assessment and license renewals: Plant life management for the first stage boiling water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tezuka, Kenichi; Kawamura, Shinichi; Aoki, Masataka; Mori, Tsuguo

    1996-09-01

    The first stage Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) have been operating more than 25 years. Some components have potential of failure by aging. So, evaluations have been done for the main components such as Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV), Reactor Internals, Primary Coolant Piping, Reactor Recirculation Pump, Cable (Inside PCV), Primary Containment Vessel (PCV) and Concrete Structure. This evaluation has been done by joint study between electric utilities and manufacturers to confirm integrity and identify necessary development.

  13. Novel durable bio-photocatalyst purifiers, a non-heterogeneous mechanism: accelerated entrapped dye degradation into structural polysiloxane-shield nano-reactors.

    PubMed

    Dastjerdi, Roya; Montazer, Majid; Shahsavan, Shadi; Böttcher, Horst; Moghadam, M B; Sarsour, Jamal

    2013-01-01

    This research has designed innovative Ag/TiO(2) polysiloxane-shield nano-reactors on the PET fabric to develop novel durable bio-photocatalyst purifiers. To create these very fine nano-reactors, oppositely surface charged multiple size nanoparticles have been applied accompanied with a crosslinkable amino-functionalized polysiloxane (XPs) emulsion. Investigation of photocatalytic dye decolorization efficiency revealed a non-heterogeneous mechanism including an accelerated degradation of entrapped dye molecules into the structural polysiloxane-shield nano-reactors. In fact, dye molecules can be adsorbed by both Ag and XPs due to their electrostatic interactions and/or even via forming a complex with them especially with silver NPs. The absorbed dye and active oxygen species generated by TiO(2) were entrapped by polysiloxane shelter and the presence of silver nanoparticles further attract the negative oxygen species closer to the adsorbed dye molecules. In this way, the dye molecules are in close contact with concentrated active oxygen species into the created nano-reactors. This provides an accelerated degradation of dye molecules. This non-heterogeneous mechanism has been detected on the sample containing all of the three components. Increasing the concentration of Ag and XPs accelerated the second step beginning with an enhanced rate. Further, the treated samples also showed an excellent antibacterial activity.

  14. A structural evaluation of the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel for transport impact conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, M.C.; Chou, C.K.

    1989-03-24

    The Shippingport Atomic Power Station in Shippingport, Pennsylvania, is being decommissioned and dismantled. This government-leased property will be returned, in a radiologically safe condition, to its owner. All radioactive material is being removed from the Shippingport Station and transported for burial to the DOE Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) will be transported by barge to Hanford. This paper describes an evaluation of the structural response of the RPV to the normal and accident impact test conditions as required by the Code of Federal Regulations. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. The 5-kwe reactor thermoelectric system summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanosdol, J. H. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Design of the 5-kwe reactor thermoelectric system was initiated in February 1972 and extended through the conceptual design phase into the preliminary design phase. Design effort was terminated in January, 1973. This report documents the system and component requirements, design approaches, and performance and design characteristics for the 5-kwe system. Included is summary information on the reactor, radiation shields, power conversion systems, thermoelectric pump, radiator/structure, liquid metal components, and the control system.

  16. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K.

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  17. Vortex structures of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate for large anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Ran; Mueller, Erich

    2011-12-15

    We calculate the vortex structures of an elongated two-component Bose-Einstein condensate. We study how these structures depend on the intracomponent and intercomponent interaction strengths. We present analytical and numerical results respectively at weak and strong interactions; finding lattices with different interlocking geometries: triangular, square, rectangular, and double core.

  18. On bi-Hamiltonian structure of two-component Novikov equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nianhua; Liu, Q. P.

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter, we present a bi-Hamiltonian structure for the two-component Novikov equation. We also show that proper reduction of this bi-Hamiltonian structure leads to the Hamiltonian operators found by Hone and Wang for the Novikov equation.

  19. Crystal and molecular structure of a phospholipid component: L-alpha-glycerophosphorylcholine cadmium chloride trihydrate.

    PubMed

    Sundaralingam, M; Jensen, L H

    1965-11-19

    The structure of L-alpha-glycerophosphorylcholine cadmium chloride trihydrate has been determined by the conventional, single-crystal, x-ray diffraction technique. The phospholipid component displays the characteristic gauche conformation for the choline residue and the gauche-gauche conformation for the glycerol moiety. Therefore, a possible model for the structures of phospholipids is similar to that proposed by Finean.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  1. Potential of direct metal deposition technology for manufacturing thick functionally graded coatings and parts for reactors components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Laget, B.; Smurov, I.

    2009-03-01

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D deposition process arising from laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection to refine or refurbish parts. Recently DMD has been extended to manufacture large-size near-net-shape components. When applied for manufacturing new parts (or their refinement), DMD can provide tailored thermal properties, high corrosion resistance, tailored tribology, multifunctional performance and cost savings due to smart material combinations. In repair (refurbishment) operations, DMD can be applied for parts with a wide variety of geometries and sizes. In contrast to the current tool repair techniques such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), metal inert gas (MIG) and plasma welding, laser cladding technology by DMD offers a well-controlled heat-treated zone due to the high energy density of the laser beam. In addition, this technology may be used for preventative maintenance and design changes/up-grading. One of the advantages of DMD is the possibility to build functionally graded coatings (from 1 mm thickness and higher) and 3D multi-material objects (for example, 100 mm-sized monolithic rectangular) in a single-step manufacturing cycle by using up to 4-channel powder feeder. Approved materials are: Fe (including stainless steel), Ni and Co alloys, (Cu,Ni 10%), WC compounds, TiC compounds. The developed coatings/parts are characterized by low porosity (<1%), fine microstructure, and their microhardness is close to the benchmark value of wrought alloys after thermal treatment (Co-based alloy Stellite, Inox 316L, stainless steel 17-4PH). The intended applications concern cooling elements with complex geometry, friction joints under high temperature and load, light-weight mechanical support structures, hermetic joints, tubes with complex geometry, and tailored inside and outside surface properties, etc.

  2. Vlasov Simulation of Electrostatic Solitary Structures in Multi-Component Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Pickett, Jolene S.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic solitary structures have been observed in the Earth's magnetosheath by the Cluster spacecraft. Recent theoretical work has suggested that these solitary structures are modeled by electron acoustic solitary waves existing in a four-component plasma system consisting of core electrons, two counter-streaming electron beams, and one species of background ions. In this paper, the excitation of electron acoustic waves and the formation of solitary structures are studied by means of a one-dimensional electrostatic Vlasov simulation. The present result first shows that either electron acoustic solitary waves with negative potential or electron phase-space holes with positive potential are excited in four-component plasma systems. However, these electrostatic solitary structures have longer duration times and higher wave amplitudes than the solitary structures observed in the magnetosheath. The result indicates that a high-speed and small free energy source may be needed as a fifth component. An additional simulation of a five-component plasma consisting of a stable four-component plasma and a weak electron beam shows the generation of small and fast electron phase-space holes by the bump-on-tail instability. The physical properties of the small and fast electron phase-space holes are very similar to those obtained by the previous theoretical analysis. The amplitude and duration time of solitary structures in the simulation are also in agreement with the Cluster observation.

  3. Boron carbide: Consistency of components, lattice parameters, fine structure and chemical composition makes the complex structure reasonable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werheit, Helmut

    2016-10-01

    The complex, highly distorted structure of boron carbide is composed of B12 and B11C icosahedra and CBC, CBB and B□B linear elements, whose concentration depends on the chemical composition each. These concentrations are shown to be consistent with lattice parameters, fine structure data and chemical composition. The respective impacts on lattice parameters are estimated and discussed. Considering the contributions of the different structural components to the energy of the overall structure makes the structure and its variation within the homogeneity range reasonable; in particular that of B4.3C representing the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range. Replacing in B4.3C virtually the B□B components by CBC yields the hypothetical moderately distorted B4.0C (structure formula (B11C)CBC). The reduction of lattice parameters related is compatible with recently reported uncommonly prepared single crystals, whose compositions deviate from B4.3C.

  4. Structures for attaching or sealing a space between components having different coefficients or rates of thermal expansion

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Dean, Anthony John; Tognarelli, Leonardo; Pecchioli, Mario

    2005-06-28

    A structure for attaching together or sealing a space between a first component and a second component that have different rates or amounts of dimensional change upon being exposed to temperatures other than ambient temperature. The structure comprises a first attachment structure associated with the first component that slidably engages a second attachment structure associated with the second component, thereby allowing for an independent floating movement of the second component relative to the first component. The structure can comprise split rings, laminar rings, or multiple split rings.

  5. Steam Generator Component Model in a Combined Cycle of Power Conversion Unit for Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Chang H; Han, James; Barner, Robert; Sherman, Steven R

    2007-06-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. A combined cycle is considered as one of the power conversion units to be coupled to the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). The combined cycle configuration consists of a Brayton top cycle coupled to a Rankine bottoming cycle by means of a steam generator. A detailed sizing and pressure drop model of a steam generator is not available in the HYSYS processes code. Therefore a four region model was developed for implementation into HYSYS. The focus of this study was the validation of a HYSYS steam generator model of two phase flow correlations. The correlations calculated the size and heat exchange of the steam generator. To assess the model, those calculations were input into a RELAP5 model and its results were compared with HYSYS results. The comparison showed many differences in parameters such as the heat transfer coefficients and revealed the different methods used by the codes. Despite differences in approach, the overall results of heat transfer were in good agreement.

  6. Composite structure of vortices in two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashin, Anatoly P.; Poluektov, Yuri M.

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to one-component Bose-Einstein condensate case, the vortices in two-component condensate can have various complicated structures. The vortices in a space-homogeneous Bose-Einstein condensate have been studied in this paper. It is shown that the vortex structure is described by three dimensionless parameters. This is totally different from the usual one-component condensate case,where an isolated vortex is described by a parameterless dimensionless equation. The two-component vortex structure strongly depends on the sign of "interaction" constant of the components. A few types of vortices with different qualitative structure are explored. We show that the "super-density vortices" can exist, when the "interaction" constant is positive. The "super-density vortices" have the near-axis density greater than the equilibrium density of a homogeneous space Bose-Einstein condensate. We also show that the vortices with opposite direction of the condensate component rotation near the axis and far off the axis can exist.

  7. Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) Structural Component Successfully Tested Under Pseudo-Operating Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.

    1997-01-01

    A fabrication feasibility demonstration component for the Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) program was evaluated under prototypical engine loading conditions at the Structural Benchmark Test Facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The purpose for this test was to verify EPM casting, joining, coating, and life-prediction methods. Electron beam welding techniques developed in the EPM program were used to join two large superalloy cast sections of an exhaust nozzle flap to fabricate the demonstration component. After the joints were inspected, the component was coated with an oxidation-resistant barrier coating and was sent to Lewis for testing. The special test fixture shown in the photo (the Structural Benchmark Test Facility) was designed and built at Lewis to produce a biaxial bending condition similar to the loading condition this part would encounter during engine operation. Several finite element analyses were conducted to validate the mechanical test method. A floating furnace was then designed to provide prototypical thermal profiles in the component. An isothermal low-cycle fatigue test was used to evaluate the component at a cyclic load of 13 kN (maximum) to 1 kN (minimum) at a frequency of 1 Hz. Component failure was defined as a 30-percent increase in the component's compliance. On the basis of this definition, the low-cycle fatigue life of this component would be 35,000 cycles.

  8. Microbial community structure and dynamics in anaerobic fluidized‐bed and granular sludge‐bed reactors: influence of operational temperature and reactor configuration

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, Katarzyna; Kumar, Amit; Mahony, Thérèse; Lens, Piet N. L.; O' Flaherty, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Summary Methanogenic community structure and dynamics were investigated in two different, replicated anaerobic wastewater treatment reactor configurations [inverted fluidized bed (IFB) and expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB)] treating synthetic dairy wastewater, during operating temperature transitions from 37°C to 25°C, and from 25°C to 15°C, over a 430‐day trial. Non‐metric multidimensional scaling (NMS) and moving‐window analyses, based on quantitative real‐time PCR data, along with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiling, demonstrated that the methanogenic communities developed in a different manner in these reactor configurations. A comparable level of performance was recorded for both systems at 37°C and 25°C, but a more dynamic and diverse microbial community in the IFB reactors supported better stability and adaptative capacity towards low temperature operation. The emergence and maintenance of particular bacterial genotypes (phylum Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes) was associated with efficient protein hydrolysis in the IFB, while protein hydrolysis was inefficient in the EGSB. A significant community shift from a Methanobacteriales and Methanosaetaceae towards a Methanomicrobiales‐predominated community was demonstrated during operation at 15°C in both reactor configurations. PMID:22967313

  9. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    DOE PAGES

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitatesmore » that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.« less

  10. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitates that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.

  11. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  12. Structural behavior of a pool-type LMFBR reactor-vessel deck to beyond-design-basis loads

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Fiala, C.; Pan, Y.C.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the structural response of the reactor vessel deck to loads resulting from a hypothetical energetic accident for a conceptual design of a pool-type LMFBR was presented. The size of the reactor was in the 1000 MWe range with a 22m reactor vessel diameter and a vessel depth of 21 m. The vessel contains the entire primary system which includes the primary pumps, intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs), reactor core, core support structure, a cylindrical internal vessel, called a redan, and the sodium pool. The redan serves as a separator between the hot sodium emerging from the top of the reactor and the cooler bulk sodium. The deck structure provides support to the rotatable plug assembly, primary pumps and IHXs. In order to evaluate the structural integrity of this deck during a 1000 MJ excursion, a three-dimensional finite element model was developed for a 45 degree sector of the deck. The model included the main structural elements or the deck and the conical support skirt. The triple rotatable plug (TRP), pumps, and IHXs were represented by concentrated masses.

  13. TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, M.E.; Montoya, G.M.

    1991-06-01

    This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m{sup 3} of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m{sup 3} of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Structural dynamic and thermal stress analysis of nuclear reactor vessel support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi-Diango, J.

    1972-01-01

    A nuclear reactor vessel is supported by a Z-ring and a box ring girder. The two proposed structural configurations to transmit the loads from the Z-ring and the box ring girder to the foundation are shown. The cantilever concrete ledge transmitting the load from the Z-ring and the box girder via the cavity wall to the foundation is shown, along with the loads being transmitted through one of the six steel columns. Both of these two supporting systems were analyzed by using rigid format 9 of NASTRAN for dynamic loads, and the thermal stresses were analyzed by AXISOL. The six column configuration was modeled by a combination of plate and bar elements, and the concrete cantilever ledge configuration was modeled by plate elements. Both configurations were found structurally satisfactory; however, nonstructural considerations favored the concrete cantilever ledge.

  15. [Analysis of the Microbial Community Structure in Continuous Flow Reactor Enhanced by Heterotrophic Nitrification and Aerobic Denitrification Bacterium Burkholderia sp. YX02].

    PubMed

    Shao, Ji-lun; Cao, Gang; Li, Zi-hui; Huang, Zheng-zheng; Luo, Kai; Mo, Ce-hui

    2016-02-15

    To reveal the dynamic succession of microbial community structure along with time in bio-denitrification reactor, a continuous flow reactor containing immobilized heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium Burkholderia sp. YX02 was taken as a model. The microbial community structure in the bioreactor was analyzed by PCR-DCGE, and its correlations with environmental factors such as pH, NH4+ -N, NO2- -N, NO3- -N and COD were simultaneously investigated. The results showed that the microbial community was relatively rich during the early stage of 18 days. The similarity of community structure in different stages was not orderly declining with the operation. In addition, the structural similarity in adjacent stages firstly increased, then decreased, and eventually tended to be stable. Shannon-Wiener index firstly descended significantly, and then ascended with new microbial community emerging at the later stage. UPGMA clustering analysis roughly divided the process into three periods with certain relationship. Principal component analysis showed that during the operation of the bioreactor predominant bacterial community formed steadily and new microbial community dominated by Burkholderia sp. YX02 emerged at the later stage of the operation. Canonical correspondence analysis certificated that the structure of microbial community was most obviously affected by NO2- -N, followed by NO3- -N, NH4+ -N and COD, and pH had the least effect. PMID:27363154

  16. Fabrication of structural components from commercial aluminum alloys using superplastic forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, S. J.; Bales, T. T.; Shinn, J. M.; James, W. F.

    1990-01-01

    SPF technology was used to fabricate structural components from the 7475 Al and 8090 Al-Li commercial alloys. Gas-pressurization cycles were established for SPF three-hat stiffener configurations on the basis of uniaxial data and component-geometry considerations. It is established that higher forming rates than the optimum strain rates selected from the uniaxial data for each alloy could be used in the later stages of forming without reducing SPF components' dimensional conformity. Cavitation was precluded through the use of back pressure during forming.

  17. Nonlinear low frequency electrostatic structures in a magnetized two-component auroral plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufai, O. R.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2016-03-01

    Finite amplitude nonlinear ion-acoustic solitons, double layers, and supersolitons in a magnetized two-component plasma composed of adiabatic warm ions fluid and energetic nonthermal electrons are studied by employing the Sagdeev pseudopotential technique and assuming the charge neutrality condition at equilibrium. The model generates supersoliton structures at supersonic Mach numbers regime in addition to solitons and double layers, whereas in the unmagnetized two-component plasma case only, soliton and double layer solutions can be obtained. Further investigation revealed that wave obliqueness plays a critical role for the evolution of supersoliton structures in magnetized two-component plasmas. In addition, the effect of ion temperature and nonthermal energetic electron tends to decrease the speed of oscillation of the nonlinear electrostatic structures. The present theoretical results are compared with Viking satellite observations.

  18. Component-Based Syntheses of Trioxacarcin A, DC-45-A1, and Structural Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Magauer, Thomas; Smaltz, Daniel J.; Myers, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    The trioxacarcins are polyoxygenated, structurally complex natural products that potently inhibit the growth of cultured human cancer cells. Here we describe syntheses of trioxacarcin A, DC-45-A1, and structural analogs by latestage, stereoselective glycosylation reactions of fully functionalized, differentially protected aglycon substrates. Key issues addressed in this work include the identification of an appropriate means to activate and protect each of the two 2-deoxysugar components, trioxacarcinose A and trioxacarcinose B, as well as a viable sequencing of the glycosidic couplings. The convergent, component-based sequence we present allows for rapid construction of structurally diverse, synthetic analogs that would be inaccessible by any other means, in amounts required to support biological evaluation. Analogs arising from modification of four of five modular components are assembled in 11 steps or fewer. The majority of these are found to be active in antiproliferative assays using cultured human cancer cells. PMID:24056347

  19. Material specification for alloy X-750 for use in LWR (light water reactor) internal components (Revision 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, A.A.; Gennaro, M.S. )

    1990-11-01

    This report presents a review of the stress corrosion cracking behavior of alloy X-750, the alloy chemistry, metallurgy, and mechanical properties as well as an interim material specification developed from these data. The material specification addresses requirements for heat treating, metallurgy, mechanical tests, microstructure, and quality assurance to optimize the stress corrosion resistance of alloy X-750 in light water reactor environments. The specification can be used to effectively identify and screen stress corrosion cracking resistant material. A justification for these specification requirements also is included. This information will enable the utility industry to purchase alloy X-750 in a manner which optimizes its corrosion performance with no degradation of its other properties. 26 refs.

  20. Modeling of quantitative effects of water components on the photocatalytic degradation of 17α-ethynylestradiol in a modified flat plate serpentine reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dawei; Li, Yi; Li, Guoping; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Qing

    2013-06-15

    The effect of water components on the photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants was incompletely understood, especially in the case of hydroxyl radical (•OH) generation and scavenging. Previous studies have used various methods to determine the rate constants for the reactions between •OH and water components, but the interactions between water components were not taken into concern. In this study, a sequential relative rate technique was used to investigate the effects of water components on the rates of •OH generation and EE2 degradation in a modified flat plate serpentine reactor, including NO₃(-), H₂PO₄(-), SO₄(2-), CO₃(2-), Cl(-), Na(+), Fe(3+), dissolved organic matter (DOM) etc. The results reflected that NO₃(-) and DOM accelerated the photodegradation of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) (3.2% and 21.2%, respectively). Cl(-) and Fe(3+) inhibited that process (5.2% and 3.1%, respectively). Finally, a model for the photocatalytic degradation of EE2 was developed for the first time, taking the obtained rate constants, catalyst concentrations, flow velocities and light intensities into concern. A good agreement was observed between the model and experimental profiles.

  1. Prediction of service life of aircraft structural components using the half-cycle method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1987-01-01

    The service life of aircraft structural components undergoing random stress cycling was analyzed by the application of fracture mechanics. The initial crack sizes at the critical stress points for the fatigue-crack growth analysis were established through proof load tests. The fatigue-crack growth rates for random stress cycles were calculated using the half-cycle method. A new equation was developed for calculating the number of remaining flights for the structural components. The number of remaining flights predicted by the new equation is much lower than that predicted by the conventional equation.

  2. New parton structure functions and minijets in the two-component dual parton model

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, F.W.; Pertermann, D. ); Engel, R. ); Ranft, J. )

    1994-04-01

    We use new fits to parton structure functions, including structure functions with Lipatov behavior at small [ital x] values and discuss the minijet component in the two-component dual parton model with a supercritical Pomeron as demanded by the fits to cross-section data. We find that a consistent model can only be formulated with a [ital p][sub [perpendicular]hr] cutoff for the minijets increasing with energy. The implications for particle production in hadronic collisions at TeV energies are discussed.

  3. An Integrated Theory for Predicting the Hydrothermomechanical Response of Advanced Composite Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    An integrated theory is developed for predicting the hydrothermomechanical (HDTM) response of fiber composite components. The integrated theory is based on a combined theoretical and experimental investigation. In addition to predicting the HDTM response of components, the theory is structured to assess the combined hydrothermal effects on the mechanical properties of unidirectional composites loaded along the material axis and off-axis, and those of angleplied laminates. The theory developed predicts values which are in good agreement with measured data at the micromechanics, macromechanics, laminate analysis and structural analysis levels.

  4. Lie algebras and Hamiltonian structures of multi-component Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiao-ying; Zhang, Da-jun

    2013-05-01

    Isospectral and non-isospectral hierarchies of multi-component Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur (AKNS) are obtained from a matrix spectral problem, then by means of the zero curvature representations of the isospectral flows {Km} and non-isospectral flows {σn}, we construct the symmetries and their algebraic structures for isospectral multi-component AKNS hierarchies, demonstrate the recursive operator L is a strong and hereditary symmetry for the isospectral hierarchy. We also derive that there are implectic operator θ and symplectic operator J such that L = θJ, and discuss the multi-Hamiltonian structures and the Liouville integrability of the isospectral hierarchies.

  5. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Rowan, William J.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

  6. Virtual ultrasound sources for inspecting nuclear components of coarse-grained structure

    SciTech Connect

    Brizuela, J.; Katchadjian, P.; Desimone, C.; Garcia, A.

    2014-02-18

    This work describes an ultrasonic inspection procedure designed for verifying coarse-grained structure materials, which are commonly used on nuclear reactors. In this case, conventional phased array techniques cannot be used due to attenuating characteristics and backscattered noise from microstructures inside the material. Thus, synthetic aperture ultrasonic imaging (SAFT) is used for this approach in contact conditions. In order to increase energy transferred to the medium, synthetic transmit aperture is formed by several elements which generate a diverging wavefront equivalent to a virtual ultrasound source behind the transducer. On the other hand, the phase coherence technique has been applied to reduce more structural noise and improve the image quality. The beamforming process has been implemented over a GPU platform to reduce computing time.

  7. Microbial community structure and performance of an anaerobic reactor digesting cassava pulp and pig manure.

    PubMed

    Panichnumsin, P; Ahring, B; Nopharatana, A; Chaiprasert, P

    2012-01-01

    Microbial community dynamics in response to changes in substrate types (i.e. pig manure (PM), cassava pulp (CP) and mixtures of PM and CP) were investigated in an anaerobic continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Molecular identification of bacterial and archaeal domains were performed, using a 16S rDNA clone library with polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) screening and phylogenetic analysis. Analysis of bacterial clone libraries revealed that the differences in the community structure corresponded to the substrate types. However, the Bacteroidetes were the most abundant group in all substrates, followed by the Clostridia. With pure PM, the dominant bacterial groups were Bacteroidales, Clostridia and Paludibacter. With a co-substrate, at CP to PM (CP:PM) ratio of 50:50, the sequences analysis revealed the greatest diversity of bacterial communities at class level, and the sequences affiliated with Cytophaga sp. became an exclusive predominant. With CP alone, Bacteroides sp. was the dominant species and this reactor had the lowest diversity of bacteria. Archaea observed in the CSTR fed with all substrate types were Methanosaeta sp., Methanosaeta concilii and Methanospirillum hungatei. Among the Archaea, Methanosaeta sp. was the exclusive predominant. The relative distribution of Archaea also changed regarding to the substrate types.

  8. The effects of low dose rate irradiation and thermal aging on reactor structural alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. R.; Trybus, C. L.; Cole, J. I.

    As part of the EBR-II reactor materials surveillance program, test samples of fifteen different alloys were placed into EBR-II in 1965. The surveillance (SURV) program was intended to determine property changes in reactor structural materials caused by irradiation and thermal aging. In this work, the effect of low dose rate (approximately 2 × 10 -8 dpa/s) irradiation at 380-410°C and long term thermal aging at 371°C on the properties of 20% cold worked 304 stainless steel, 420 stainless steel, Inconel X750, 304/308 stainless weld material, and 17-4 PH steel are evaluated. Doses of up to 6.8 dpa and thermal aging to 2994 days did not significantly affect the density of these alloys. The strength of 304 SS, X750, 17-4 PH, and 304/308 weld material increased with irradiation. In contrast, the strength of 420 stainless steel decreased with irradiation. Irradiation decreased the impact energy in both Inconel X750 and 17-4 PH steel. Thermal aging decreased the impact energy in 17-4 PH steel and increased the impact energy in Inconel X750. Tensile property comparisons of 304 SURV samples with 304 samples irradiated in EBR-II at a higher dose rate show that the higher dose rate samples had greater increases in strength and greater losses in ductility.

  9. Delay between the Circularly Polarized Components in Fine Structures during Solar Type IV Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, G. P.; Zlobec, P.

    1995-08-01

    We analyzed intermediately polarized (20 80%) fine structures (pulsations, sudden reductions, fiber bursts and zebras) that were recorded in type IV events. The mean polarization degree was practically the same for all the fine structures recorded in an interval lasting a few minutes and it was similar to the polarization of the continuum. A detailed analysis during the evolution of single structures reveals changes in polarization (in particular an ‘undulation’ at flux density minima) even stronger than 20%. They were caused by a delay, up to 0.1 s, between the two circularly polarized components. The weaker polarimetric component was delayed in 2 sets and the stronger one in 1 set. In the event of April 24, 1985 different types of fine structures were sporadically detected in more than one hour long time interval. Short delays of the stronger or of the weaker component were sometimes observed. The events characterized by fine structures are generally totally polarized in the ordinary mode. We assume that this holds also for the phenomena studied here. The observed intermediate polarization therefore requires a depolarization due to propagation effects. We discuss the mode coupling and the reflection of the original radio signal that could also generate the delay of the weaker and the stronger component respectively. The possibility of polarization variation due to the change of the angle between the direction of the propagation and the magnetic field in a quasi-transversal region and in a low intensity magnetic field in a current sheet is also given.

  10. Size and shape of grain boundary network components and their atomic structures in polycrystalline nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tao; Li, Mo

    2015-10-28

    Microstructure in polycrystalline materials is composed of grain boundary plane, triple junction line, and vertex point. They are the integral parts of the grain boundary network structure and the foundation for the structure-property relations. In polycrystalline, especially nanocrystalline, materials, it becomes increasingly difficult to probe the atomistic structure of the microstructure components directly in experiment due to the size limitation. Here, we present a numerical approach using pair correlation function from atomistic simulation to obtain the detailed information for atomic order and disorder in the grain boundary network in nanocrystalline materials. We show that the atomic structures in the different microstructural components are related closely to their geometric size and shape, leading to unique signatures for atomic structure in microstructural characterization at nanoscales. The dependence varies systematically with the characteristic dimension of the microstructural component: liquid-like disorder is found in vertex points, but a certain order persists in triple junctions and grain boundaries along the extended dimensions of these microstructure components.

  11. Isolation and characterization of structural components of Aloe vera L. leaf pulp.

    PubMed

    Ni, Y; Turner, D; Yates, K M; Tizard, I

    2004-12-20

    The clear pulp, also known as inner gel, of Aloe vera L. leaf is widely used in various medical, cosmetic and nutraceutical applications. Many beneficial effects of this plant have been attributed to the polysaccharides present in the pulp. However, discrepancies exist regarding the composition of pulp polysaccharide species and an understanding of pulp structure in relation to its chemical composition has been lacking. Thus, we examined pulp structure, isolated structural components and determined their carbohydrate compositions along with analyzing a partially purified pulp-based product (Acemannan hydrogel) used to make Carrisyn hydrogel wound dressing. Light and electron microscopy showed that the pulp consisted of large clear mesophyll cells with a diameter as large as 1000 microm. These cells were composed of cell walls and cell membranes along with a very limited number of degenerated cellular organelles. No intact cellular organelles were found in mesophyll cells. Following disruption of pulp by homogenization, three components were isolated by sequential centrifugation. They were thin clear sheets, microparticles and a viscous liquid gel, which corresponded to cell wall, degenerated cellular organelles and liquid content of mesophyll cells based on morphological and chemical analysis. These three components accounted for 16.2% (+/-3.8), 0.70% (+/-0) and 83.1% of the pulp on a dry weight basis. The carbohydrate composition of each component was distinct; liquid gel contained mannan, microparticles contained galactose-rich polysaccharide(s) and cell walls contained an unusually high level of galacturonic acid (34%, w/w; Gal A). The same three components were also found in Acemannan Hydrogel with mannan as the predominant component. Thus, different pulp structural components are associated with different polysaccharides and thus may potentially be different functionally. These findings may help lay a basis for further studies and development of better

  12. Reactor Materials Program - Baseline Material Property Handbook - Mechanical Properties of 1950's Vintage Stainless Steel Weldment Components, Task Number 89-23-A-1

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, K.J.

    1999-11-05

    The Process Water System (primary coolant) piping of the nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950''s at Savannah River Site is comprised primarily of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. A program to measure the mechanical properties of archival PWS piping and weld materials (having approximately six years of service at temperatures between 25 and 100 degrees C) has been completed. The results from the mechanical testing has been synthesized to provide a mechanical properties database for structural analyses of the SRS piping.

  13. Seismic performance of non-structural components and contents in buildings: an overview of NZ research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Rajesh P.; Pourali, Atefeh; Tasligedik, Ali Sahin; Yeow, Trevor; Baird, Andrew; MacRae, Gregory; Pampanin, Stefano; Palermo, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    This paper summarizes the research on non-structural elements and building contents being conducted at University of Canterbury in New Zealand. Since the 2010-2011 series of Canterbury earthquakes, in which damage to non-structural components and contents contributed heavily to downtime and overall financial loss, attention to seismic performance and design of non-structural components and contents in buildings has increased exponentially in NZ. This has resulted in an increased allocation of resources to research leading to development of more resilient non-structural systems in buildings that would incur substantially less damage and cause little downtime during earthquakes. In the last few years, NZ researchers have made important developments in understanding and improving the seismic performance of secondary building elements such as partitions, facades, ceilings and contents.

  14. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods for select space propulsion system components (PSAM). Volume 2: Literature surveys of critical Space Shuttle main engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajagopal, K. R.

    1992-01-01

    The technical effort and computer code development is summarized. Several formulations for Probabilistic Finite Element Analysis (PFEA) are described with emphasis on the selected formulation. The strategies being implemented in the first-version computer code to perform linear, elastic PFEA is described. The results of a series of select Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) component surveys are presented. These results identify the critical components and provide the information necessary for probabilistic structural analysis. Volume 2 is a summary of critical SSME components.

  15. Radiological dose assessment for the dismantlement and decommissioning option for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor facility at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Faillace, E.R.; Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.; Chen, S.Y.

    1997-10-01

    Potential maximum radiation dose rates for a 10,000-year horizon were calculated for the dismantlement and decommissioning option for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor facility at the Savannah River Site. The residual radioactive material guidelines (RESRAD) computer code was used. The study will help determine if it is acceptable (in terms of DOE radiation dose limits) for activated and contaminated concrete to remain in the facility, along with embedded radioactive piping and radioactive equipment. Four cases were developed to evaluate potential doses; the cases vary with regard to the definitions of the sources. Case A considers the dose from the reactor biological shield; case B considers the dose from contaminated concrete rubble; case C considers the dose from contaminated concrete rubble, the reactor biological shield, and installed equipment; and case D considers the dose from contaminated cuttings brought to the surface following the perforation of a well through the contaminated zone in case C. Site-specific parameter values were used to estimate the radiation doses. The results indicate that neither the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem/yr nor the 15-mrem/yr dose constraint would be exceeded for any of the cases. The potential maximum dose rates for cases A, B, C, and D are 0.000028, 0.015, 0.018, and 0.17 mrem/yr, respectively. The drinking water pathway is the dominant contributor to the doses in cases A through C, and the external gamma pathway is the dominant contributor in case D. Carbon-14, uranium-234, uranium-238, and americium-241 are the principal radionuclides contributing to the doses in cases A through C. Cobalt-60, europium-152, and barium-133 are the important radionuclides in case D. A sensitivity analysis was performed to determine which parameters have the greatest impact on the estimated doses. 9 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Neutron induced damage in reactor pressure vessel steel: An X-ray absorption fine structure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuri, G.; Cammelli, S.; Degueldre, C.; Bertsch, J.; Gavillet, D.

    2009-03-01

    The radiation damage produced in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels during neutron irradiation is a long-standing problem of considerable practical interest. In this study, an extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has been applied at Cu, Ni and Mn K-edges to systematically investigate neutron induced radiation damage to the metal-site bcc structure of RPV steels, irradiated with neutrons in the fluence range from 0.85 to 5.0 × 1019 cm-2. An overall similarity of Cu, Ni and Mn atomic environment in the iron matrix is observed. The radial distribution functions (RDFs), derived from EXAFS data have been found to evolve continuously as a function of neutron fluence describing the atomic-scale structural modifications in RPVs by neutron irradiations. From the pristine data, long range order beyond the first- and second-shell is apparent in the RDF spectra. In the irradiated specimens, all near-neighbour peaks are greatly reduced in magnitude, typical of damaged material. Prolonged annealing leads annihilation of point defects to give rise to an increase in the coordination numbers of near-neighbour atomic shells approaching values close to that of non-irradiated material, but does not suppress the formation of nano-sized Cu and/or Ni-rich-precipitates. Total amount of radiation damage under a given irradiation condition has been determined. The average structural parameters estimated from the EXAFS data are presented and discussed.

  17. Elucidation of the molecular structures of components of the phycobilisome: reconstructing a giant.

    PubMed

    Adir, Noam

    2005-01-01

    The molecular architectures of photosynthetic complexes are rapidly becoming available through the power of X-ray crystallography. These complexes are comprised of antenna complexes, which absorb and transfer energy into photochemical reaction centers. Most reaction centers, found in both oxygenic and non-oxygenic species, are connected to transmembrane chlorophyll containing antennas, and the crystal structures of these antennas contain information on the structure of the entire complex as well as clear indications on their modes of functional association. In cyanobacteria and red alga, most of the Photosystem II associated light harvesting is performed by an enormous (3-7 MDa) membrane attached complex called the phycobilisome (PBS). While the crystal structures of many isolated components of different PBSs have been determined, the structure of the entire complex as well as its manner of association with Photosystem II can only be suggested. In this review, the structural information obtained on the isolated components will be described. The structural information obtained from the components provides the basis for the modeled reconstruction of this giant complex.

  18. An integrated approach to assessing the fracture safe margins of fusion reactor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G.R.

    1996-10-01

    Design and operation of fusion reactor structures will require an appropriate data base closely coupled to a reliable failure analysis method to safely manage irradiation embrittlement. However, ongoing irradiation programs will not provide the information on embrittlement necessary to accomplish these objectives. A new engineering approach is proposed based on the concept of a master toughness-temperature curve indexed on an absolute temperature scale using shifts to account for variables such as size scales, crack geometry and loading rates as well as embrittlement. While providing a simple practical engineering expedient, the proposed method can also be greatly enhanced by fundamental mechanism based models of fracture and embrittlement. Indeed, such understanding is required for the effective use of small specimen test methods, which is a integral element in developing the necessary data base.

  19. Evaluation of Nb-base alloys for the divertor structure in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, I.M.

    1996-04-01

    Niobium-base alloys are candidate materials for the divertor structure in fusion reactors. For this application, an alloy should resist aqueous corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, and radiation damage and should have high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion. Results of corrosion and embrittlement screening tests of several binary and ternary Nb alloys in high-temperature water indicated the Mb-1Zr, Nb-5MO-1Zr, and Nb-5V-1Z4 (wt %) showed sufficient promise for further investigation. These alloys, together with pure Nb and Zircaloy-4 have been exposed to high purity water containing a low concentration of dissolved oxygen (<12 ppb) at 170, 230, and 300{degrees}C for up to {approx}3200 h. Weight-change data, microstructural observations, and qualitative mechanical-property evaluation reveal that Nb-5V-1Zr is the most promising alloy at higher temperatures. Below {approx}200{degrees}C, the alloys exhibit similiar corrosion behavior.

  20. Structure and Mechanism of the S Component of a Bacterial ECF Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    P Zhang; J Wang; Y Shi

    2011-12-31

    The energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters, responsible for vitamin uptake in prokaryotes, are a unique family of membrane transporters. Each ECF transporter contains a membrane-embedded, substrate-binding protein (known as the S component), an energy-coupling module that comprises two ATP-binding proteins (known as the A and A' components) and a transmembrane protein (known as the T component). The structure and transport mechanism of the ECF family remain unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of RibU, the S component of the ECF-type riboflavin transporter from Staphylococcus aureus at 3.6-{angstrom} resolution. RibU contains six transmembrane segments, adopts a previously unreported transporter fold and contains a riboflavin molecule bound to the L1 loop and the periplasmic portion of transmembrane segments 4-6. Structural analysis reveals the essential ligand-binding residues, identifies the putative transport path and, with sequence alignment, uncovers conserved structural features and suggests potential mechanisms of action among the ECF transporters.

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Structures, Systems, and Components Safety Classification White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Pete Jordan

    2010-09-01

    This white paper outlines the relevant regulatory policy and guidance for a risk-informed approach for establishing the safety classification of Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and sets forth certain facts for review and discussion in order facilitate an effective submittal leading to an NGNP Combined Operating License application under 10 CFR 52.

  2. Professional Orientation and Structural Components of Early Childhood Programs: A Social-Ecological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorde-Bloom, Paula

    A 1987 study, which involved 26 male and 805 female early childhood workers from 85 center-based programs in 20 states, was conducted to develop a social-ecological perspective on professional orientation and job satisfaction and on structural components of early childhood programs. Professional orientation is characterized by a person's emphasis…

  3. X-ray Crystal Structure of the B Component of Hemolysin BL from Bacillus cereus

    SciTech Connect

    Madegowda,M.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2008-01-01

    Bacillus cereus Hemolysin BL enterotoxin, a ternary complex of three proteins, is the causative agent of food poisoning and requires all three components for virulence. The X-ray structure of the binding domain of HBL suggests that it may form a pore similar to other soluble channel forming proteins. A putative pathway of pore formation is discussed.

  4. Proceedings of 2001 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components

    SciTech Connect

    2001-12-01

    These proceedings provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and plant value. Results of applying life-cycle management (LCM) at four plants are summarized.

  5. [Method of Calculating the Distance Between the Classes of the Structural Components of the Forebrain Birds].

    PubMed

    Voronov, L N; Konstantinov, V Y

    2016-01-01

    The method of calculating the distance between the classes of the structural components of the brain of birds. Compared interclass distances of glia, neurons and neuroglial complexes in the forebrain hooded crow (Corvus cornix) (a bird with a highly rational activity) and common crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (birds with a medium level of rational activity). PMID:27263281

  6. An engineering approach for the application of textile composites to a structural component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Jack W.; Gracias, Brian K.; Clark, Steven R.

    1993-01-01

    An engineering approach for the application of textile composites to a structural component is addressed. The main objective is to improve impact resistance of composite blades by using some form of 3-D reinforcement. Project goals, results, and conclusions are discussed.

  7. Design and evaluation of experimental ceramic automobile thermal reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, P. L.; Blankenship, C. P.

    1974-01-01

    The paper summarizes the results obtained in an exploratory evaluation of ceramics for automobile thermal reactors. Candidate ceramic materials were evaluated in several reactor designs using both engine dynamometer and vehicle road tests. Silicon carbide contained in a corrugated metal support structure exhibited the best performance, lasting 1100 hours in engine dynamometer tests and for more than 38,600 kilimeters (24,000 miles) in vehicle road tests. Although reactors containing glass-ceramic components did not perform as well as silicon carbide, the glass-ceramics still offer good potential for reactor use with improved reactor designs.

  8. Exploratory evaluation of ceramics for automobile thermal reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, P. L.; Blankenship, C. P.

    1972-01-01

    An exploratory evaluation of ceramics for automobile thermal reactors was conducted. Potential ceramic materials were evaluated in several reactor designs using both engine dynamometer and vehicle road tests. Silicon carbide contained in a corrugated metal support structure exhibited the best performance lasting over 800 hours in engine dynamometer tests and over 15,000 miles (24,200 km) of vehicle road tests. Reactors containing glass-ceramic components did not perform as well as silicon carbide. But the glass-ceramics still offer good potential for reactor use. The results of this study are considered to be a reasonable demonstration of the potential use of ceramics in thermal reactors.

  9. Design and evaluation of experimental ceramic automobile thermal reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, P. L.; Blankenship, C. P.

    1974-01-01

    The results obtained in an exploratory evaluation of ceramics for automobile thermal reactors are summarized. Candidate ceramic materials were evaluated in several reactor designs by using both engine-dynamometer and vehicle road tests. Silicon carbide contained in a corrugated-metal support structure exhibited the best performance, lasting 1100 hr in engine-dynamometer tests and more than 38,600 km (24000 miles) in vehicle road tests. Although reactors containing glass-ceramic components did not perform as well as those containing silicon carbide, the glass-ceramics still offer good potential for reactor use with improved reactor designs.

  10. [Effects of photochemical smog from a flow reactor on bacteria. II. Determination of bactericidal components in photochemical smog].

    PubMed

    Nover, H; Botzenhart, K

    1983-04-01

    The mixture of substances in the photochemical smog could be detected by different reduction rates of exposed bacteria. Beside ozone other products of the ozone/olefine-reaction could reduce the survival of exposed bacteria. For Staph. epidermidis a toxic influence from the reaction products could be found only after UV-irradiation. The main components were aldehydes, hydrocarbons, radicals, peroxiradicals and radicaloxides. For peroxiacetylnitrate (PAN) no bactericidal effect could be found for bacteria adsorbed on membrane filters in concentrations of 300 ppb in the smog (UV-irradiation was put off for two hours) and even in concentrations of 1000 ppb prepared by gaschromatography. The influence on lipopolysaccharide (lps) defective mutants of Salmonella minnesota showed the protection of the lps-layer against e.g. relative humidity and ozone (500 ppb), but no specific protection against smog components.

  11. Reactor service life extension program

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R.; Sindelar, R.L.; Ondrejcin, R.S.; Baumann, E.W.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the Savannah River Site production reactor systems was initiated in 1980 and led to implementation of the Reactor Materials Program in 1984 to assess reactor safety and reactor service life. The program evaluated performance of the reactor tanks, primary coolant piping, and thermal shields, components of welded construction that were fabricated from Type 304 stainless steel. The structural integrity analysis of the primary coolant system has shown that the pressure boundary is not susceptible to gross rupture, including a double ended guillotine break or equivalent large area bank. Residual service life is potentially limited by two material degradation modes, irradiation damage and intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Analysis of the structural integrity of the tanks and piping has shown that continued safe operation of the reactors for several additional decades is not limited by the material performance of the primary coolant system. Although irradiation damage has not degraded material behavior to an unacceptable level, past experience has revealed serious difficulties with repair welding on irradiated stainless steel. Stress corrosion can be mitigated by newly identified limits on impurity concentrations in the coolant water and by stress mitigation of weld residual stresses. Work continues in several areas: the effects of helium on mechanical behavior of irradiated stainless steel; improved weld methods for piping and the reactor tanks; and a surveillance program to track irradiation effects on the tank walls.

  12. Reactor service life extension program

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R.; Sindelar, R.L.; Ondrejcin, R.S.; Baumann, E.W.

    1990-12-31

    A review of the Savannah River Site production reactor systems was initiated in 1980 and led to implementation of the Reactor Materials Program in 1984 to assess reactor safety and reactor service life. The program evaluated performance of the reactor tanks, primary coolant piping, and thermal shields, components of welded construction that were fabricated from Type 304 stainless steel. The structural integrity analysis of the primary coolant system has shown that the pressure boundary is not susceptible to gross rupture, including a double ended guillotine break or equivalent large area bank. Residual service life is potentially limited by two material degradation modes, irradiation damage and intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Analysis of the structural integrity of the tanks and piping has shown that continued safe operation of the reactors for several additional decades is not limited by the material performance of the primary coolant system. Although irradiation damage has not degraded material behavior to an unacceptable level, past experience has revealed serious difficulties with repair welding on irradiated stainless steel. Stress corrosion can be mitigated by newly identified limits on impurity concentrations in the coolant water and by stress mitigation of weld residual stresses. Work continues in several areas: the effects of helium on mechanical behavior of irradiated stainless steel; improved weld methods for piping and the reactor tanks; and a surveillance program to track irradiation effects on the tank walls.

  13. Two-Dimensional Crystal Structure Formed by Two Components of DNA Nanoparticles on a Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuno, Hiroyasu; Maegawa, Yuya; Sato, Masahide

    2016-07-01

    We study the two-dimensional crystal structure of two components of DNA nanoparticles on a substrate by Brownian dynamics simulation. We use the Lennard-Jones potential as the interaction potential between particles and assume that the interaction length between different types of particles, σAB, is smaller than that between the same types of particles, σ. Two types of particles form an alloy structure. With decreasing σAB/σ, the crystal structure changes from a triangular lattice, to a square lattice, a honeycomb lattice, a rectangular lattice, and a triangular lattice.

  14. Component mode synthesis and large deflection vibrations of complex structures. [beams and trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, C.

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of the NASTRAN modal synthesis analysis was assessed by comparing it with full structure NASTRAN and nine other modal synthesis results using a nine-bay truss. A NASTRAN component mode transient response analysis was also performed on the free-free truss structure. A finite element method was developed for nonlinear vibration of beam structures subjected to harmonic excitation. Longitudinal deformation and inertia are both included in the formula. Tables show the finite element free vibration results with and without considering the effects of longitudinal deformation and inertia as well as the frequency ratios for a simply supported and a clamped beam subjected to a uniform harmonic force.

  15. ROCOPT: A user friendly interactive code to optimize rocket structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, William K.

    1989-01-01

    ROCOPT is a user-friendly, graphically-interfaced, microcomputer-based computer program (IBM compatible) that optimizes rocket components by minimizing the structural weight. The rocket components considered are ring stiffened truncated cones and cylinders. The applied loading is static, and can consist of any combination of internal or external pressure, axial force, bending moment, and torque. Stress margins are calculated by means of simple closed form strength of material type equations. Stability margins are determined by approximate, orthotropic-shell, closed-form equations. A modified form of Powell's method, in conjunction with a modified form of the external penalty method, is used to determine the minimum weight of the structure subject to stress and stability margin constraints, as well as user input constraints on the structural dimensions. The graphical interface guides the user through the required data prompts, explains program options and graphically displays results for easy interpretation.

  16. A multi-structural single cell model of force-induced interactions of cytoskeletal components.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Sara; Clausen, Casper H; Perrault, Cecile M; Fletcher, Daniel A; Lacroix, Damien

    2013-08-01

    Several computational models based on experimental techniques and theories have been proposed to describe cytoskeleton (CSK) mechanics. Tensegrity is a prominent model for force generation, but it cannot predict mechanics of individual CSK components, nor explain the discrepancies from the different single cell stimulating techniques studies combined with cytoskeleton-disruptors. A new numerical concept that defines a multi-structural 3D finite element (FE) model of a single-adherent cell is proposed to investigate the biophysical and biochemical differences of the mechanical role of each cytoskeleton component under loading. The model includes prestressed actin bundles and microtubule within cytoplasm and nucleus surrounded by the actin cortex. We performed numerical simulations of atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments by subjecting the cell model to compressive loads. The numerical role of the CSK components was corroborated with AFM force measurements on U2OS-osteosarcoma cells and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts exposed to different cytoskeleton-disrupting drugs. Computational simulation showed that actin cortex and microtubules are the major components targeted in resisting compression. This is a new numerical tool that explains the specific role of the cortex and overcomes the difficulty of isolating this component from other networks in vitro. This illustrates that a combination of cytoskeletal structures with their own properties is necessary for a complete description of cellular mechanics. PMID:23702149

  17. Chitosan facilitates structure formation of the salivary gland by regulating the basement membrane components.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsung-Lin; Hsiao, Ya-Chuan

    2015-10-01

    Tissue structure is important for inherent physiological function and should be recapitulated during tissue engineering for regenerative purposes. The salivary gland is a branched organ that is responsible for saliva secretion and regulation. The salivary glands develop from epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, and depend on the support of the basement membrane (BM). Chitosan-based biomaterials have been demonstrated to be competent in facilitating the formation of salivary gland tissue structure. However, the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. In the developing submandibular gland (SMG), the chitosan effect was found to diminish when collagen and laminin were removed from cultured SMG explants. Chitosan increased the expression of BM components including collagen, laminin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, and also facilitated BM components and the corresponding receptors to be expressed in tissue-specific patterns beneficial for SMG branching. The chitosan effect decreased when either laminin components or receptors were inhibited, as well when the downstream signaling was blocked. Our results revealed that chitosan promotes salivary glands branching through the BM. By regulating BM components and receptors, chitosan efficiently stimulated downstream signaling to facilitate salivary gland branching. The present study revealed the underlying mechanism of the chitosan effect in engineering SMG structure formation.

  18. Seismic fragility of reinforced concrete structures and components for application to nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gergely, P.

    1984-09-01

    The failure and fragility analyses of reinforced concrete structures and elements in nuclear reactor facilities within the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are evaluated. Uncertainties in material modeling, behavior of low shear walls, and seismic risk assessment for nonlinear response receive special attention. Problems with ductility-based spectral deamplification and prediction of the stiffness of reinforced concrete walls at low stress levels are examined. It is recommended to use relatively low damping values in connection with ductility-based response reductions. The study of static nonlinear force-deflection curves is advocated for better nonlinear dynamic response predictions. Several details of the seismic risk analysis of the Zion plant are also evaluated. 73 references.

  19. Four- and five-component molecular solids: crystal engineering strategies based on structural inequivalence.

    PubMed

    Mir, Niyaz A; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2016-03-01

    A synthetic strategy is described for the co-crystallization of four- and five-component molecular crystals, based on the fact that if any particular chemical constituent of a lower cocrystal is found in two different structural environments, these differences may be exploited to increase the number of components in the solid. 2-Methylresorcinol and tetramethylpyrazine are basic template molecules that allow for further supramolecular homologation. Ten stoichiometric quaternary cocrystals and one quintinary cocrystal with some solid solution character are reported. Cocrystals that do not lend themselves to such homologation are termed synthetic dead ends.

  20. The influence of selected containment structures on debris dispersal and transport following high pressure melt ejection from the reactor vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.; Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1988-09-01

    High pressure expulsion of molten core debris from the reactor pressure vessel may result in dispersal of the debris from the reactor cavity. In most plants, the cavity exits into the containment such that the debris impinges on structures. Retention of the debris on the structures may affect the further transport of the debris throughout the containment. Two tests were done with scaled structural shapes placed at the exit of 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion cavity. The results show that the debris does not adhere significantly to structures. The lack of retention is attributed to splashing from the surface and reentrainment in the gas flowing over the surface. These processes are shown to be applicable to reactor scale. A third experiment was done to simulate the annular gap between the reactor vessel and cavity wall. Debris collection showed that the fraction of debris exiting through the gap was greater than the gap-to-total flow area ratio. Film records indicate that dispersal was primarily by entrainment of the molten debris in the cavity. 29 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Model updating of complex structures using the combination of component mode synthesis and Kriging predictor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Yan; Wang, Dejun; Zhang, Shaoyi

    2014-01-01

    Updating the structural model of complex structures is time-consuming due to the large size of the finite element model (FEM). Using conventional methods for these cases is computationally expensive or even impossible. A two-level method, which combined the Kriging predictor and the component mode synthesis (CMS) technique, was proposed to ensure the successful implementing of FEM updating of large-scale structures. In the first level, the CMS was applied to build a reasonable condensed FEM of complex structures. In the second level, the Kriging predictor that was deemed as a surrogate FEM in structural dynamics was generated based on the condensed FEM. Some key issues of the application of the metamodel (surrogate FEM) to FEM updating were also discussed. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method was demonstrated by updating the FEM of a real arch bridge with the measured modal parameters. PMID:24634612

  2. Model Updating of Complex Structures Using the Combination of Component Mode Synthesis and Kriging Predictor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Wang, Dejun; Zhang, Shaoyi

    2014-01-01

    Updating the structural model of complex structures is time-consuming due to the large size of the finite element model (FEM). Using conventional methods for these cases is computationally expensive or even impossible. A two-level method, which combined the Kriging predictor and the component mode synthesis (CMS) technique, was proposed to ensure the successful implementing of FEM updating of large-scale structures. In the first level, the CMS was applied to build a reasonable condensed FEM of complex structures. In the second level, the Kriging predictor that was deemed as a surrogate FEM in structural dynamics was generated based on the condensed FEM. Some key issues of the application of the metamodel (surrogate FEM) to FEM updating were also discussed. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method was demonstrated by updating the FEM of a real arch bridge with the measured modal parameters. PMID:24634612

  3. Multilevel Dynamic Generalized Structured Component Analysis for Brain Connectivity Analysis in Functional Neuroimaging Data.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwanghee; Takane, Yoshio; Hwang, Heungsun; Woodward, Todd S

    2016-06-01

    We extend dynamic generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) to enhance its data-analytic capability in structural equation modeling of multi-subject time series data. Time series data of multiple subjects are typically hierarchically structured, where time points are nested within subjects who are in turn nested within a group. The proposed approach, named multilevel dynamic GSCA, accommodates the nested structure in time series data. Explicitly taking the nested structure into account, the proposed method allows investigating subject-wise variability of the loadings and path coefficients by looking at the variance estimates of the corresponding random effects, as well as fixed loadings between observed and latent variables and fixed path coefficients between latent variables. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach by applying the method to the multi-subject functional neuroimaging data for brain connectivity analysis, where time series data-level measurements are nested within subjects.

  4. Evaluation of all dose components in the LVR-15 reactor epithermal neutron beam using Fricke gel dosimeter layers.

    PubMed

    Bartesaghi, G; Burian, J; Gambarini, G; Marek, M; Negri, A; Viererbl, L

    2009-07-01

    Fricke gel dosimeters in the form of layers are suitable to reconstruct bidimensional distributions of the absorbed dose; in accordance with their chemical composition and applying suitably developed algorithms, they can provide dose images of the different radiation components in a BNCT field. After the description of the applied method, this work presents the results obtained at the epithermal column of the BNCT facility at the NRI in Rez (CZ). The measured dose distributions are shown in comparison with data taken by means of other dosimeters thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) and with calculations carried out with the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. The agreement with the results obtained by means of the different techniques is satisfying.

  5. A structured approach to the integration of the clinical and didactic components of health career programs.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, N S; Feifer, I

    1980-02-01

    This paper presents a tested approach to a systematic progression of learning from the classroom to the clinical internship. The approach uses workbooks to integrate all facets of the training continuum. The basic model is training continuum. The basic model is called TAR. T refers to theory or teaching; A to application, which occurs during the clinical component; and R to reinforcement provided through seminars scheduled concurrently with fieldwork. The entire concept is introduced to students during a required weekly fieldwork preparation component scheduled prior to the first theory course. Clinicians and academicians participated in all phases of the three-year, HEW-funded project, which included development of interrelated performance objectives for the teaching, application and reinforcement components. Analysis of data from clinicians, students and faculty indicated that the TAR model provides a needed integrating structure.

  6. Nuclear reactor fuel structure containing uranium alloy wires embedded in a metallic matrix plate

    DOEpatents

    Travelli, Armando

    1988-01-01

    A flat or curved plate structure, to be used as fuel in a nuclear reactor, comprises elongated fissionable wires or strips embedded in a metallic continuous non-fissionable matrix plate. The wires or strips are made predominantly of a malleable uranium alloy, such as uranium silicide, uranium gallide or uranium germanide. The matrix plate is made predominantly of aluminum or an aluminum alloy. The wires or strips are located in a single row at the midsurface of the plate, parallel with one another and with the length dimension of the plate. The wires or strips are separated from each other, and from the surface of the plate, by sufficient thicknesses of matrix material, to provide structural integrity and effective fission product retention, under neutron irradiation. This construction makes it safely feasible to provide a high uranium density, so that the uranium enrichment with uranium 235 may be reduced below about 20%, to deter the reprocessing of the uranium for use in nuclear weapons.

  7. Nuclear reactor fuel structure containing uranium alloy wires embedded in a metallic matrix plate

    DOEpatents

    Travelli, A.

    1985-10-25

    A flat or curved plate structure, to be used as fuel in a nuclear reactor, comprises elongated fissionable wires or strips embedded in a metallic continuous non-fissionable matrix plate. The wires or strips are made predominantly of a malleable uranium alloy, such as uranium silicide, uranium gallide or uranium germanide. The matrix plate is made predominantly of aluminum or an aluminum alloy. The wires or strips are located in a single row at the midsurface of the plate, parallel with one another and with the length dimension of the plate. The wires or strips are separated from each other, and from the surface of the plate, by sufficient thicknesses of matrix material, to provide structural integrity and effective fission product retention, under neutron irradiation. This construction makes it safely feasible to provide a high uranium density, so that the uranium enrichment with uranium 235 may be reduced below about 20%, to deter the reprocessing of the uranium for use in nuclear weapons.

  8. Modelling and extraction procedure for gate insulator and fringing gate capacitance components of an MIS structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinoco, J. C.; Martinez-Lopez, A. G.; Lezama, G.; Mendoza-Barrera, C.; Cerdeira, A.; Estrada, M.

    2016-07-01

    CMOS technology has been guided by the continuous reduction of MOS transistors used to fabricate integrated circuits. Additionally, the use of high-k dielectrics as well as a metal gate electrode have promoted the development of nanometric MOS transistors. Under this scenario, the proper modelling of the gate capacitance, with the aim of adequately evaluating the dielectric film thickness, becomes challenging for nanometric metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures due to the presence of extrinsic fringing capacitance components which affect the total gate capacitance. In this contribution, a complete intrinsic-extrinsic model for gate capacitance under accumulation of an MIS structure, together with an extraction procedure in order to independently determine the different capacitance components, is presented. ATLAS finite element simulation has been used to validate the proposed methodology.

  9. Electric propulsion plasma plume interaction with “Phobos-Soil” spacecraft structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiradze, Andrey B.; Obukhov, Vladimir A.; Popov, Garri A.

    2009-05-01

    Assessment was made by calculations for the possible consequences of the effect of plasma plume injected by the solar electric propulsion system (SEPS) on the structural components of "Phobos-Soil" spacecraft (SC). Propulsion system comprises three SPT-140 thrusters, two of which should secure the required total thrust impulse during 8000 hours of operation approximately. Variation of the solar panel (SP) properties as a result of their surface contamination with the products of erosion of thruster and SC structural components is the primary negative consequence of plasma plume effect on the SC. Calculation study for the processes of erosion, particle flow distribution, and contaminating coating formation on the SP surface was made for different SEPS arrangements. It is shown that power reduction for the landing module SP sections, which are subjected to the contaminating coating deposition to the most extent, will not exceed 5% of the nominal level.

  10. Roles of NN-interaction components in shell-structure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeya, Atsushi; Muto, Kazuo

    2016-11-01

    Since the importance of the monopole interaction was first emphasized in 1960s, roles of monopole strengths of two-body nucleon-nucleon interaction in shell structure have been discussed. Through the monopole strengths, we study the roles in shell-structure evolution, starting from explicit forms of the interaction. For the tensor component of the interaction, we show the derivation of the relation, (2j> + 1)Vjj> + (2j< + 1)Vjj< = 0, with a detailed manipulation. We show that one-body spin-orbit term appears in the multipole expansion of two-body spin-orbit interaction. Only the spin-orbit components can affect the spin-orbit energy splitting between spin-orbit partners, when the spin-orbit partner orbits are fully occupied.

  11. Structural insight into partner specificity and phosphoryl transfer in two-component signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Casino, Patricia; Rubio, Vicente; Marina, Alberto

    2009-10-16

    The chief mechanism used by bacteria for sensing their environment is based on two conserved proteins: a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and an effector response regulator (RR). The signal transduction process involves highly conserved domains of both proteins that mediate autokinase, phosphotransfer, and phosphatase activities whose output is a finely tuned RR phosphorylation level. Here, we report the structure of the complex between the entire cytoplasmic portion of Thermotoga maritima class I HK853 and its cognate, RR468, as well as the structure of the isolated RR468, both free and BeF(3)(-) bound. Our results provide insight into partner specificity in two-component systems, recognition of the phosphorylation state of each partner, and the catalytic mechanism of the phosphatase reaction. Biochemical analysis shows that the HK853-catalyzed autokinase reaction proceeds by a cis autophosphorylation mechanism within the HK subunit. The results suggest a model for the signal transduction mechanism in two-component systems.

  12. Modelling and extraction procedure for gate insulator and fringing gate capacitance components of an MIS structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinoco, J. C.; Martinez-Lopez, A. G.; Lezama, G.; Mendoza-Barrera, C.; Cerdeira, A.; Estrada, M.

    2016-07-01

    CMOS technology has been guided by the continuous reduction of MOS transistors used to fabricate integrated circuits. Additionally, the use of high-k dielectrics as well as a metal gate electrode have promoted the development of nanometric MOS transistors. Under this scenario, the proper modelling of the gate capacitance, with the aim of adequately evaluating the dielectric film thickness, becomes challenging for nanometric metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures due to the presence of extrinsic fringing capacitance components which affect the total gate capacitance. In this contribution, a complete intrinsic–extrinsic model for gate capacitance under accumulation of an MIS structure, together with an extraction procedure in order to independently determine the different capacitance components, is presented. ATLAS finite element simulation has been used to validate the proposed methodology.

  13. Proceedings: 2002 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components

    SciTech Connect

    2002-10-01

    These proceedings provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and value in a market-driven industry. Results of applying life cycle management (LCM) at several plants are summarized.

  14. Proceedings: 2003 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components

    SciTech Connect

    2003-12-01

    These proceedings of the 2003 EPRI Life Cycle Management Workshop provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and value in a market-driven industry. The proceedings summarize the results of applying life cycle management at several plants.

  15. Bonding exterior grade structural panels with copolymer resins of biomass residue components, phenol, and formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.M.

    1993-12-31

    Components of various forest and agricultural residue biomass-including the polyphenolic compounds-were converted into aqueous solution and/or suspension by extraction and digestion. Some biomass components reacted vigorously under alkaline catalysis with formaldehyde and initially showed a high degree of exothermic reaction; however, other components did not react as vigorously under these conditions, indicating that different biomass materials require different methods to obtain optimum reactivity for the copolymerization with phenol. Our primary goal is to develop adhesives capable of producing acceptable bond quality, as determined by the wood products industries` standards, under a reasonable range of gluing conditions. Copolymer resins of phenol, formaldehyde, and biomass components were synthesized and evaluated for gluability of bonding exterior grade structural replaced with chemicals derived from peanut hulls, pecan shell flour, pecan pith, southern pine bark, and pine needle required shorter press times. These resins also tolerated a broader range of gluing conditions. In summary, it appears that the technology of the fast curing copolymer resins of biomass components as adhesives for wood products has been developed and is ready to be transferred to industrial practice.

  16. Analytical and experimental investigation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites. Phase 3: Major component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, L. L.; Mccarty, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations, performed to establish the feasibility of reinforcing metal aircraft structures with advanced filamentary composites, are reported. Aluminum-boron-epoxy and titanium-boron-epoxy were used in the design and manufacture of three major structural components. The components were representative of subsonic aircraft fuselage and window belt panels and supersonic aircraft compression panels. Both unidirectional and multidirectional reinforcement concepts were employed. Blade penetration, axial compression, and inplane shear tests were conducted. Composite reinforced structural components designed to realistic airframe structural criteria demonstrated the potential for significant weight savings while maintaining strength, stability, and damage containment properties of all metal components designed to meet the same criteria.

  17. Three's company: component structures bring a closer view of tripartite drug efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Koronakis, Eva; Higgins, Matthew K; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2004-12-01

    Bacterial multidrug resistance is a serious clinical problem and is commonly conferred by tripartite efflux 'pumps' in the prokaryotic cell envelope. Crystal structures of the three components of a drug efflux pump have now been solved: the outer membrane TolC exit duct in the year 2000, the inner membrane AcrB antiporter in 2002 and the periplasmic adaptor MexA in 2004. These structures have enhanced our understanding of the principles underlying pump assembly and operation, and present pumps as new drug targets.

  18. Variations of structural components: specific intercultural differences in facial morphology, skin type, and structures.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Aisha; Momoh, Adeyiza O; Bullocks, Jamal M

    2009-08-01

    Analysis of the differences in facial morphology and skin structure and tone among ethnic groups within the realm of plastic surgery is relevant due to the increasing number of ethnic individuals seeking cosmetic surgery. Previous classifications of ideal facial morphologic characteristics have been revised and challenged over the years to accurately reflect the differences in facial structure that are aesthetically pleasing to individuals of differing ethnic groups. The traditional neoclassic canons reflected the European Caucasian facial morphology and cannot be used to classify facial characteristics in ethnic groups due to drastic differences in measurement and proportion. In addition, differences in biophysiologic properties of ethnic skin types influence the progression of aging and the ability of skin to withstand environmental insults. Thickness of the stratum corneum, water content, and melanin composition are important factors that were analyzed in varying ethnic groups. Although it appears that Caucasian Americans are subject to earlier onset of skin wrinkling and sagging than are African Americans due to thinner stratum corneum layers and decreased water content, more research needs to be conducted to be inclusive of other ethnic groups. These data will enable plastic surgeons to treat these groups more effectively while preserving their unique characteristics. PMID:20676309

  19. Variations of structural components: specific intercultural differences in facial morphology, skin type, and structures.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Aisha; Momoh, Adeyiza O; Bullocks, Jamal M

    2009-08-01

    Analysis of the differences in facial morphology and skin structure and tone among ethnic groups within the realm of plastic surgery is relevant due to the increasing number of ethnic individuals seeking cosmetic surgery. Previous classifications of ideal facial morphologic characteristics have been revised and challenged over the years to accurately reflect the differences in facial structure that are aesthetically pleasing to individuals of differing ethnic groups. The traditional neoclassic canons reflected the European Caucasian facial morphology and cannot be used to classify facial characteristics in ethnic groups due to drastic differences in measurement and proportion. In addition, differences in biophysiologic properties of ethnic skin types influence the progression of aging and the ability of skin to withstand environmental insults. Thickness of the stratum corneum, water content, and melanin composition are important factors that were analyzed in varying ethnic groups. Although it appears that Caucasian Americans are subject to earlier onset of skin wrinkling and sagging than are African Americans due to thinner stratum corneum layers and decreased water content, more research needs to be conducted to be inclusive of other ethnic groups. These data will enable plastic surgeons to treat these groups more effectively while preserving their unique characteristics.

  20. Structural design principles for delivery of bioactive components in nutraceuticals and functional foods.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian; Decker, Eric Andrew; Park, Yeonhwa; Weiss, Jochen

    2009-06-01

    There have been major advances in the design and fabrication of structured delivery systems for the encapsulation of nutraceutical and functional food components. A wide variety of delivery systems is now available, each with its own advantages and disadvantages for particular applications. This review begins by discussing some of the major nutraceutical and functional food components that need to be delivered and highlights the main limitations to their current utilization within the food industry. It then discusses the principles underpinning the rational design of structured delivery systems: the structural characteristics of the building blocks; the nature of the forces holding these building blocks together; and, the different ways of assembling these building blocks into structured delivery systems. Finally, we review the major types of structured delivery systems that are currently available to food scientists: lipid-based (simple, multiple, multilayer, and solid lipid particle emulsions); surfactant-based (simple micelles, mixed micelles, vesicles, and microemulsions) and biopolymer-based (soluble complexes, coacervates, hydrogel droplets, and particles). For each type of delivery system we describe its preparation, properties, advantages, and limitations. PMID:19484636

  1. Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana: Geochemistry of impactites and target rocks, and search for a meteoritic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiongxin; Boamah, Daniel; Koeberl, Christian; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Irvine, Gordon; McDonald, Iain

    2005-10-01

    Major and trace element data, including platinum group element abundances, of representative impactites and target rocks from the crater rim and environs of the Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana, have been investigated for the possible presence of a meteoritic component in impact-related rocks. A comparison of chemical data for Bosumtwi target rocks and impactites with those for Ivory Coast tektites and microtektites supports the interpretation that the Bosumtwi structure and Ivory Coast tektites formed during the same impact event. High siderophile element contents (compared to average upper crustal abundances) were determined for target rocks as well as for impactites. Chondrite-normalized (and iron meteorite-normalized) abundances for target rocks and impactites are similar. They do not, however, allow the unambiguous detection of the presence, or identification of the type, of a meteoritic component in the impactites. The indigenous siderophile element contents are high and possibly related to regional gold mineralization, although mineralized samples from the general region show somewhat different platinum-group element abundance patterns compared to the rocks at Bosumtwi. The present data underline the necessity of extensive target rock analyses at Bosumtwi, and at impact structures in general, before making any conclusions regarding the presence of a meteoritic component in impactites.

  2. Principal component regression and linear mixed model in association analysis of structured samples: competitors or complements?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiwei; Pan, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been established as a major tool to identify genetic variants associated with complex traits, such as common diseases. However, GWAS may suffer from false positives and false negatives due to confounding population structures, including known or unknown relatedness. Another important issue is unmeasured environmental risk factors. Among many methods for adjusting for population structures, two approaches stand out: one is principal component regression (PCR) based on principal component analysis, which is perhaps the most popular due to its early appearance, simplicity, and general effectiveness; the other is based on a linear mixed model (LMM) that has emerged recently as perhaps the most flexible and effective, especially for samples with complex structures as in model organisms. As shown previously, the PCR approach can be regarded as an approximation to an LMM; such an approximation depends on the number of the top principal components (PCs) used, the choice of which is often difficult in practice. Hence, in the presence of population structure, the LMM appears to outperform the PCR method. However, due to the different treatments of fixed vs. random effects in the two approaches, we show an advantage of PCR over LMM: in the presence of an unknown but spatially confined environmental confounder (e.g., environmental pollution or lifestyle), the PCs may be able to implicitly and effectively adjust for the confounder whereas the LMM cannot. Accordingly, to adjust for both population structures and nongenetic confounders, we propose a hybrid method combining the use and, thus, strengths of PCR and LMM. We use real genotype data and simulated phenotypes to confirm the above points, and establish the superior performance of the hybrid method across all scenarios.

  3. Structure Measurements of Leaf and Woody Components of Forests with Dual-Wavelength Lidar Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahler, A. H.; Li, Z.; Schaaf, C.; Howe, G.; Martel, J.; Hewawasam, K.; Douglas, E. S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Paynter, I.; Saenz, E. J.; Wang, Z.; Woodcock, C. E.; Jupp, D. L. B.; Schaefer, M.; Newnham, G.

    2014-12-01

    Forest structure plays a critical role in the exchange of energy, carbon and water between land and atmosphere and nutrient cycle. We can provide detailed forest structure measurements of leaf and woody components with the Dual Wavelength Echidna® Lidar (DWEL), which acquires full-waveform scans at both near-infrared (NIR, 1064 nm) and shortwave infrared (SWIR, 1548 nm) wavelengths from simultaneous laser pulses. We collected DWEL scans at a broadleaf forest stand and a conifer forest stand at Harvard Forest in June 2014. Power returned from leaves is much lower than from woody materials such as trunks and branches at the SWIR wavelength due to the liquid water absorption by leaves, whereas returned power at the NIR wavelength is similar from both leaves and woody materials. We threshold a normalized difference index (NDI), defined as the difference between returned power at the two wavelengths divided by their sum, to classify each return pulse as a leaf or trunk/branch hit. We obtain leaf area index (LAI), woody area index (WAI) and vertical profiles of leaf and woody components directly from classified lidar hits without empirical wood-to-total ratios as are commonly used in optical methods of LAI estimation. Tree heights, diameter at breast height (DBH), and stem count density are the other forest structure parameters estimated from our DWEL scans. The separation of leaf and woody components in tandem with fine-scale forest structure measurements will benefit studies on carbon allocation of forest ecosystems and improve our understanding of the effects of forest structure on ecosystem functions. This research is supported by NSF grant, MRI-0923389

  4. Radiation facilities for fusion-reactor first-wall and blanket structural-materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1981-12-01

    Present and future irradiation facilities for the study of fusion reactor irradiation damage are reviewed. Present studies are centered on irradiation in accelerator-based neutron sources, fast- and mixed-spectrum fission reactors, and ion accelerators. The accelerator-based neutron sources are used to demonstrate damage equivalence between high-energy neutrons and fission reactor neutrons. Once equivalence is demonstrated, the large volume of test space available in fission reactors can be used to study displacement damage, and in some instances, the effects of high-helium concentrations and the interaction of displacement damage and helium on properties. Ion bombardment can be used to study the mechanisms of damage evolution and the interaction of displacement damage and helium. These techniques are reviewed, and typical results obtained from such studies are examined. Finally, future techniques and facilities for developing damage levels that more closely approach those expected in an operating fusion reactor are discussed.

  5. Structure borne noise analysis using Helmholtz equation least squares based forced vibro acoustic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Logesh Kumar

    This dissertation presents a structure-borne noise analysis technology that is focused on providing a cost-effective noise reduction strategy. Structure-borne sound is generated or transmitted through structural vibration; however, only a small portion of the vibration can effectively produce sound and radiate it to the far-field. Therefore, cost-effective noise reduction is reliant on identifying and suppressing the critical vibration components that are directly responsible for an undesired sound. However, current technologies cannot successfully identify these critical vibration components from the point of view of direct contribution to sound radiation and hence cannot guarantee the best cost-effective noise reduction. The technology developed here provides a strategy towards identifying the critical vibration components and methodically suppressing them to achieve a cost-effective noise reduction. The core of this technology is Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS) based nearfield acoustic holography method. In this study, the HELS formulations derived in spherical co-ordinates using spherical wave expansion functions utilize the input data of acoustic pressures measured in the nearfield of a vibrating object to reconstruct the vibro-acoustic responses on the source surface and acoustic quantities in the far field. Using these formulations, three steps were taken to achieve the goal. First, hybrid regularization techniques were developed to improve the reconstruction accuracy of normal surface velocity of the original HELS method. Second, correlations between the surface vibro-acoustic responses and acoustic radiation were factorized using singular value decomposition to obtain orthogonal basis known here as the forced vibro-acoustic components (F-VACs). The F-VACs enables one to identify the critical vibration components for sound radiation in a similar manner that modal decomposition identifies the critical natural modes in a structural vibration. Finally

  6. Investigation of structure in the modular light pipe component for LED automotive lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Zhou, Yang; Huang, Chien-Sheng; Jhong, Wan-Ling; Cheng, Bo-Wei; Jhang, Jhe-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) have the advantages of small length, long lifetime, fast response time (μs), low voltage, good mechanical properties and environmental protection. Furthermore, LEDs could replace the halogen lamps to avoid the mercury pollution and economize the use of energy. Therefore, the LEDs could instead of the traditional lamp in the future and became an important light source. The proposal of this study was to investigate the effects of the structure and length of the reflector component for a LED automotive lamp. The novel LED automotive lamp was assembled by several different modularization columnar. The optimized design of the different structure and the length to the reflector was simulated by software TracePro. The design result must met the vehicle regulation of United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) such as ECE-R19 etc. The structure of the light pipe could be designed by two steps structure. Then constitute the proper structure and choose different power LED to meet the luminous intensity of the vehicle regulation. The simulation result shows the proper structure and length has the best total luminous flux and a high luminous efficiency for the system. Also, the stray light could meet the vehicle regulation of ECE R19. Finally, the experimental result of the selected structure and length of the light pipe could match the simulation result above 80%.

  7. The structure and dynamics of secretory component and its interactions with polymeric immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Stadtmueller, Beth M; Huey-Tubman, Kathryn E; López, Carlos J; Yang, Zhongyu; Hubbell, Wayne L; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    As a first-line vertebrate immune defense, the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) transports polymeric IgA and IgM across epithelia to mucosal secretions, where the cleaved ectodomain (secretory component; SC) becomes a component of secretory antibodies, or when unliganded, binds and excludes bacteria. Here we report the 2.6Å crystal structure of unliganded human SC (hSC) and comparisons with a 1.7Å structure of teleost fish SC (tSC), an early pIgR ancestor. The hSC structure comprises five immunoglobulin-like domains (D1-D5) arranged as a triangle, with an interface between ligand-binding domains D1 and D5. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements confirmed the D1-D5 interface in solution and revealed that it breaks upon ligand binding. Together with binding studies of mutant and chimeric SCs, which revealed domain contributions to secretory antibody formation, these results provide detailed models for SC structure, address pIgR evolution, and demonstrate that SC uses multiple conformations to protect mammals from pathogens. PMID:26943617

  8. The structure and dynamics of secretory component and its interactions with polymeric immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Stadtmueller, Beth M; Huey-Tubman, Kathryn E; López, Carlos J; Yang, Zhongyu; Hubbell, Wayne L; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    As a first-line vertebrate immune defense, the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) transports polymeric IgA and IgM across epithelia to mucosal secretions, where the cleaved ectodomain (secretory component; SC) becomes a component of secretory antibodies, or when unliganded, binds and excludes bacteria. Here we report the 2.6Å crystal structure of unliganded human SC (hSC) and comparisons with a 1.7Å structure of teleost fish SC (tSC), an early pIgR ancestor. The hSC structure comprises five immunoglobulin-like domains (D1-D5) arranged as a triangle, with an interface between ligand-binding domains D1 and D5. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements confirmed the D1-D5 interface in solution and revealed that it breaks upon ligand binding. Together with binding studies of mutant and chimeric SCs, which revealed domain contributions to secretory antibody formation, these results provide detailed models for SC structure, address pIgR evolution, and demonstrate that SC uses multiple conformations to protect mammals from pathogens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10640.001 PMID:26943617

  9. Experimental shielding evaluation of the radiation protection provided by the structurally significant components of residential structures.

    PubMed

    Dickson, E D; Hamby, D M

    2014-03-01

    The human health and environmental effects following a postulated accidental release of radioactive material to the environment have been a public and regulatory concern since the early development of nuclear technology. These postulated releases have been researched extensively to better understand the potential risks for accident mitigation and emergency planning purposes. The objective of this investigation is to provide an updated technical basis for contemporary building shielding factors for the US housing stock. Building shielding factors quantify the protection from ionising radiation provided by a certain building type. Much of the current data used to determine the quality of shielding around nuclear facilities and urban environments is based on simplistic point-kernel calculations for 1950s era suburbia and is no longer applicable to the densely populated urban environments realised today. To analyse a building's radiation shielding properties, the ideal approach would be to subject a variety of building types to various radioactive sources and measure the radiation levels in and around the building. While this is not entirely practicable, this research analyses the shielding effectiveness of ten structurally significant US housing-stock models (walls and roofs) important for shielding against ionising radiation. The experimental data are used to benchmark computational models to calculate the shielding effectiveness of various building configurations under investigation from two types of realistic environmental source terms. Various combinations of these ten shielding models can be used to develop full-scale computational housing-unit models for building shielding factor calculations representing 69.6 million housing units (61.3%) in the United States. Results produced in this investigation provide a comparison between theory and experiment behind building shielding factor methodology. PMID:24487195

  10. Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analyses of a Deeply Embedded Model Reactor – SASSI Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Nie J.; Braverman J.; Costantino, M.

    2013-10-31

    This report summarizes the SASSI analyses of a deeply embedded reactor model performed by BNL and CJC and Associates, as part of the seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) simulation capability project for the NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) Program of the Department of Energy. The SASSI analyses included three cases: 0.2 g, 0.5 g, and 0.9g, all of which refer to nominal peak accelerations at the top of the bedrock. The analyses utilized the modified subtraction method (MSM) for performing the seismic SSI evaluations. Each case consisted of two analyses: input motion in one horizontal direction (X) and input motion in the vertical direction (Z), both of which utilized the same in-column input motion. Besides providing SASSI results for use in comparison with the time domain SSI results obtained using the DIABLO computer code, this study also leads to the recognition that the frequency-domain method should be modernized so that it can better serve its mission-critical role for analysis and design of nuclear power plants.

  11. Different substrates and starter inocula govern microbial community structures in biogas reactors.

    PubMed

    Satpathy, Preseela; Steinigeweg, Sven; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2016-01-01

    The influence of different starter inocula on the microbial communities in biogas batch reactors fed with fresh maize and maize silage as substrates was investigated. Molecular biological analysis by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA gene fragments showed that each inoculum bore specific microbial communities with varying predominant phylotypes. Both, bacterial and archaeal DGGE profiles displayed three distinct communities that developed depending on the type of inoculum. Although maize and silage are similar substrates, different communities dominated the lactate-rich silage compared to lactate-free fresh maize. Cluster analysis of DGGE gels showed the communities of the same substrates to be stable with their respective inoculum. Bacteria-specific DGGE analysis revealed a rich diversity with Firmicutes being predominant. The other abundant phylotypes were Bacteroidetes and Synergistetes. Archaea-specific DGGE analysis displayed less diverse community structures, identifying members of the Methanosarcinales as the dominant methanogens present in all the three biogas digesters. In general, the source of inoculum played a significant role in shaping microbial communities. Adaptability of the inoculum to the substrates fed also influenced community compositions which further impacted the rates of biogas production.

  12. A miniaturized test method for the mechanical characterization of structural materials for fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondi, P.; Donato, A.; Montanari, R.; Sili, A.

    1996-10-01

    This work deals with a non-destructive method for mechanical tests which is based on the indentation of materials at a constant rate by means of a cylinder with a small radius and penetrating flat surface. The load versus penetration depth curves obtained using this method have shown correspondences with those of tensile tests and have given indications about the mechanical properties on a reduced scale. In this work penetration tests have been carried out on various kinds of Cr martensitic steels (MANET-2, BATMAN and modified F82H) which are of interest for first wall and structural applications in future fusion reactors. The load versus penetration depth curves have been examined with reference to data obtained in tensile tests and to microhardness measurements. Penetration tests have been performed at various temperature (from -180 to 100°C). Conclusions, which can be drawn for the ductile to brittle transition, are discussed for MANET-2 steel. Preliminary results obtained on BATMAN and modified F82H steels are reported. The characteristics of the indenter imprints have been studied by scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Capturing multidimensionality in stroke aphasia: mapping principal behavioural components to neural structures

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke aphasia is a multidimensional disorder in which patient profiles reflect variation along multiple behavioural continua. We present a novel approach to separating the principal aspects of chronic aphasic performance and isolating their neural bases. Principal components analysis was used to extract core factors underlying performance of 31 participants with chronic stroke aphasia on a large, detailed battery of behavioural assessments. The rotated principle components analysis revealed three key factors, which we labelled as phonology, semantic and executive/cognition on the basis of the common elements in the tests that loaded most strongly on each component. The phonology factor explained the most variance, followed by the semantic factor and then the executive-cognition factor. The use of principle components analysis rendered participants’ scores on these three factors orthogonal and therefore ideal for use as simultaneous continuous predictors in a voxel-based correlational methodology analysis of high resolution structural scans. Phonological processing ability was uniquely related to left posterior perisylvian regions including Heschl’s gyrus, posterior middle and superior temporal gyri and superior temporal sulcus, as well as the white matter underlying the posterior superior temporal gyrus. The semantic factor was uniquely related to left anterior middle temporal gyrus and the underlying temporal stem. The executive-cognition factor was not correlated selectively with the structural integrity of any particular region, as might be expected in light of the widely-distributed and multi-functional nature of the regions that support executive functions. The identified phonological and semantic areas align well with those highlighted by other methodologies such as functional neuroimaging and neurostimulation. The use of principle components analysis allowed us to characterize the neural bases of participants’ behavioural performance more robustly and

  14. The paraflagellar rod of kinetoplastid parasites: from structure to components and function.

    PubMed

    Portman, Neil; Gull, Keith

    2010-02-01

    The role of the eukaryotic flagellum in cell motility is well established but its importance in many other aspects of cell biology, from cell signalling to developmental regulation, is becoming increasingly apparent. In addition to this diversity of function the core structure of the flagellum, which has been inherited from the earliest ancestor of all eukaryotes, is embellished with a range of extra-axonemal structures in many organisms. One of the best studied of these structures is the paraflagellar rod of kinetoplastid protozoa in which the morphological characteristics have been well defined and some of the major protein constituents have been identified. Here we discuss recent advances in the identification of further molecular components of the paraflagellar rod, how these impact on our understanding of its function and regulation and the implications for therapeutic intervention in a number of devastating human pathologies. PMID:19879876

  15. An interoperable, data-structure-neutral component for mesh query and manipulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Ollivier-Gooch, C.; Diachin, L.; Shephard, M. S.; Tautges, T.; Kraftcheck, J.; Leung, V.; Luo, X.; Miller, M.

    2010-01-01

    Much of the effort required to create a new simulation code goes into developing infrastructure for mesh data manipulation, adaptive refinement, design optimization, and so forth. This infrastructure is an obvious target for code reuse, except that implementations of these functionalities are typically tied to specific data structures. In this article, we describe a software component---an abstract data model and programming interface---designed to provide low-level mesh query and manipulation support for meshing and solution algorithms. The component's data model provides a data abstraction, completely hiding all details of how mesh data is stored, while its interface defines how applications can interact with that data. Because the component has been carefully designed to be general purpose and efficient, it provides a practical platform for implementing high-level mesh operations independently of the underlying mesh data structures. After describing the data model and interface, we provide several usage examples, each of which has been used successfully with multiple implementations of the interface functionality. The overhead due to accessing mesh data through the interface rather than directly accessing the underlying mesh data is shown to be acceptably small.

  16. Structural and Thermodynamic Factors of Suppressed Interdiffusion Kinetics in Multi-component High-entropy Materials

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shou-Yi; Li, Chen-En; Huang, Yi-Chung; Hsu, Hsun-Feng; Yeh, Jien-Wei; Lin, Su-Jien

    2014-01-01

    We report multi-component high-entropy materials as extraordinarily robust diffusion barriers and clarify the highly suppressed interdiffusion kinetics in the multi-component materials from structural and thermodynamic perspectives. The failures of six alloy barriers with different numbers of elements, from unitary Ti to senary TiTaCrZrAlRu, against the interdiffusion of Cu and Si were characterized, and experimental results indicated that, with more elements incorporated, the failure temperature of the barriers increased from 550 to 900°C. The activation energy of Cu diffusion through the alloy barriers was determined to increase from 110 to 163 kJ/mole. Mechanistic analyses suggest that, structurally, severe lattice distortion strains and a high packing density caused by different atom sizes, and, thermodynamically, a strengthened cohesion provide a total increase of 55 kJ/mole in the activation energy of substitutional Cu diffusion, and are believed to be the dominant factors of suppressed interdiffusion kinetics through the multi-component barrier materials. PMID:24561911

  17. 78 FR 41434 - Proposed Revisions to Design of Structures, Components, Equipment and Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... Effects of the Light-water Reactor Environment for New Reactors,'' (ADAMS Accession No. ML070380586). The... respect to those same subject matters. Issuance of this draft SRP, if finalized, would not constitute... approval in the form of licensing. Changes in internal staff guidance are not matters for which...

  18. Protective role of spore structural components in determining Bacillus subtilis spore resistance to simulated mars surface conditions.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Schuerger, Andrew C; Reitz, Günther; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2012-12-01

    Spores of wild-type and mutant Bacillus subtilis strains lacking various structural components were exposed to simulated Martian atmospheric and UV irradiation conditions. Spore survival and mutagenesis were strongly dependent on the functionality of all of the structural components, with small acid-soluble spore proteins, coat layers, and dipicolinic acid as key protectants.

  19. 77 FR 74883 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water; Revision 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... Treated Borated Water,'' in the Federal Register on May 11, 2012 (77 FR 27815). As issued, LR-ISG-2011-01... COMMISSION Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water; Revision 1... Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water,'' which was announced in the Federal Register on May...

  20. Protective Role of Spore Structural Components in Determining Bacillus subtilis Spore Resistance to Simulated Mars Surface Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Reitz, Günther; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2012-01-01

    Spores of wild-type and mutant Bacillus subtilis strains lacking various structural components were exposed to simulated Martian atmospheric and UV irradiation conditions. Spore survival and mutagenesis were strongly dependent on the functionality of all of the structural components, with small acid-soluble spore proteins, coat layers, and dipicolinic acid as key protectants. PMID:23064347

  1. Protective role of spore structural components in determining Bacillus subtilis spore resistance to simulated mars surface conditions.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Schuerger, Andrew C; Reitz, Günther; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2012-12-01

    Spores of wild-type and mutant Bacillus subtilis strains lacking various structural components were exposed to simulated Martian atmospheric and UV irradiation conditions. Spore survival and mutagenesis were strongly dependent on the functionality of all of the structural components, with small acid-soluble spore proteins, coat layers, and dipicolinic acid as key protectants. PMID:23064347

  2. Fluid-structure-interaction analyses of reactor vessel using improved hybrid Lagrangian Eulerian code ALICE-II

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes fluid-structure-interaction and structure response analyses of a reactor vessel subjected to loadings associated with postulated accidents, using the hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALICE-II. This code has been improved recently to accommodate many features associated with innovative designs of reactor vessels. Calculational capabilities have been developed to treat water in the reactor cavity outside the vessel, internal shield structures and internal thin shells. The objective of the present analyses is to study the cover response and potential for missile generation in response to a fuel-coolant interaction in the core region. Three calculations were performed using the cover weight as a parameter. To study the effect of the cavity water, vessel response calculations for both wet- and dry-cavity designs are compared. Results indicate that for all cases studied and for the design parameters assumed, the calculated cover displacements are all smaller than the bolts` ultimate displacement and no missile generation of the closure head is predicted. Also, solutions reveal that the cavity water of the wet-cavity design plays an important role of restraining the downward displacement of the bottom head. Based on these studies, the analyses predict that the structure integrity is maintained throughout the postulated accident for the wet-cavity design.

  3. Fluid-structure-interaction analyses of reactor vessel using improved hybrid Lagrangian Eulerian code ALICE-II

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes fluid-structure-interaction and structure response analyses of a reactor vessel subjected to loadings associated with postulated accidents, using the hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALICE-II. This code has been improved recently to accommodate many features associated with innovative designs of reactor vessels. Calculational capabilities have been developed to treat water in the reactor cavity outside the vessel, internal shield structures and internal thin shells. The objective of the present analyses is to study the cover response and potential for missile generation in response to a fuel-coolant interaction in the core region. Three calculations were performed using the cover weight as a parameter. To study the effect of the cavity water, vessel response calculations for both wet- and dry-cavity designs are compared. Results indicate that for all cases studied and for the design parameters assumed, the calculated cover displacements are all smaller than the bolts' ultimate displacement and no missile generation of the closure head is predicted. Also, solutions reveal that the cavity water of the wet-cavity design plays an important role of restraining the downward displacement of the bottom head. Based on these studies, the analyses predict that the structure integrity is maintained throughout the postulated accident for the wet-cavity design.

  4. Proteomic Analysis of a Novel Bacillus Jumbo Phage Revealing Glycoside Hydrolase As Structural Component.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yihui; Gao, Meiying

    2016-01-01

    Tailed phages with genomes of larger than 200 kbp are classified as Jumbo phages and exhibited extremely high uncharted diversity. The genomic annotation of Jumbo phage is often disappointing because most of the predicted proteins, including structural proteins, failed to make good hits to the sequences in the databases. In this study, 23 proteins of a novel Bacillus Jumbo phage, vB_BpuM_BpSp, were identified as phage structural proteins by the structural proteome analysis, including 14 proteins of unknown function, 5 proteins with predicted function as structural proteins, a glycoside hydrolase, a Holliday junction resolvase, a RNA-polymerase β-subunit, and a host-coding portal protein, which might be hijacked from the host strain during phage virion assembly. The glycoside hydrolase (Gp255) was identified as phage virion component and was found to interact with the phage baseplate protein. Gp255 shows specific lytic activity against the phage host strain GR8 and has high temperature tolerance. In situ peptidoglycan-hydrolyzing activities analysis revealed that the expressed Gp255 and phage structural proteome exhibited glycoside hydrolysis activity against the tested GR8 cell extracts. This study identified the first functional individual structural glycoside hydrolase in phage virion. The presence of activated glycoside hydrolase in phage virions might facilitate the injection of the phage genome during infection by forming pores on the bacterial cell wall. PMID:27242758

  5. "Structuration" by intellectual organization: the configuration of knowledge in relations among structural components in networks of science.

    PubMed

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2011-08-01

    Using aggregated journal-journal citation networks, the measurement of the knowledge base in empirical systems is factor-analyzed in two cases of interdisciplinary developments during the period 1995-2005: (i) the development of nanotechnology in the natural sciences and (ii) the development of communication studies as an interdiscipline between social psychology and political science. The results are compared with a case of stable development: the citation networks of core journals in chemistry. These citation networks are intellectually organized by networks of expectations in the knowledge base at the specialty (that is, above-journal) level. The "structuration" of structural components (over time) can be measured as configurational information. The latter is compared with the Shannon-type information generated in the interactions among structural components: the difference between these two measures provides us with a measure for the redundancy generated by the specification of a model in the knowledge base of the system. This knowledge base incurs (against the entropy law) to variable extents on the knowledge infrastructures provided by the observable networks of relations.

  6. Local Laser Strengthening of Steel Sheets for Load Adapted Component Design in Car Body Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Axel; Heitmanek, Marco; Standfuss, Jens; Brenner, Berndt; Wunderlich, Gerd; Donat, Bernd

    The current trend in car body construction concerning light weight design and car safety improvement increasingly requires an adaption of the local material properties on the component load. Martensitic hardenable steels, which are typically used in car body components, show a significant hardening effect, for instance in laser welded seams. This effect can be purposefully used as a local strengthening method. For several steel grades the local strengthening, resulting from a laser remelting process was investigated. The strength in the treated zone was determined at crash relevant strain rates. A load adapted design of complex reinforcement structures was developed for compression and bending loaded tube samples, using numerical simulation of the deformation behavior. Especially for bending loaded parts, the crash energy absorption can be increased significantly by local laser strengthening.

  7. Structure-toxicity relationships of selected naphthalene derivatives. II. Principal Components Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.W.; Moulton, M.P.

    1985-01-01

    Currently the best method of quantitatively predicting biological activity is by regression analysis. Regression analysis assumes that biological activity is a function of physiochemical properties and chemical structure. There is, however, a problem associated with this methodoloy. The problem arises from the fact that substituent constants (SC) are often intercorrelated (i.e. nonorthogonal). Since the SC/sub i/ are not orthogonal, the order in which they enter the regression model is critically important. This problem becomes increasingly complex with the addition of independent variables. An alternative to this statistical quagmire is Principal Components Analysis (PCA). In PCA, the original variables are redefined by new variables (i.e. the principal components) which are linear combinations of the original variables. It is the purpose of this investigation to examine the interrelationship between seven substituent constants using PCA, and to attempt to predict toxicity of a series of napthalene derivates to the growth of tetrahymena.

  8. Magnonic band structure investigation of one-dimensional bi-component magnonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fu Sheng; Lim, Hock Siah; Zhang, Vanessa Li; Ng, Ser Choon; Kuok, Meng Hau

    2012-01-01

    The magnonic band structures for exchange spin waves propagating in one-dimensional magnonic crystal waveguides of different material combinations are investigated using micromagnetic simulations. The waveguides are periodic arrays of alternating nanostripes of different ferromagnetic materials. Our results show that the widths and center frequencies of the bandgaps are controllable by the component materials, the stripe widths, and the orientation of the applied magnetic field. One salient feature of the bandgap frequency plot against stripe width is that there are n-1 zero-width gaps for the nth bandgap for both transversely and longitudinally magnetized waveguides. Additionally, the largest bandgap widths are primarily dependent on the exchange constant contrast between the component materials of the nanostructured waveguides. PMID:22943207

  9. Calculating excess volumes of binary solutions with allowance for structural differences between mixed components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankina, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    Analytical dependences of a volume's properties on the differences between the geometric structures of initial monosystems are obtained for binary systems simulated by a grain medium. The effect of microstructural parameter k (the ratio of volumes of molecules of mixed components) on the concentration behavior of the relative excess molar volume of different types of real binary solutions is analyzed. It is established that the contribution due to differences between the volumes of molecules and coefficients of the packing density of mixed components is ~80-100% for mutual solutions of n-alkanes and ~55-80% of the experimental value of the relative excess molar volume for water solutions of n-alcohols.

  10. Stress Analysis of B-52B and B-52H Air-Launching Systems Failure-Critical Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2005-01-01

    The operational life analysis of any airborne failure-critical structural component requires the stress-load equation, which relates the applied load to the maximum tangential tensile stress at the critical stress point. The failure-critical structural components identified are the B-52B Pegasus pylon adapter shackles, B-52B Pegasus pylon hooks, B-52H airplane pylon hooks, B-52H airplane front fittings, B-52H airplane rear pylon fitting, and the B-52H airplane pylon lower sway brace. Finite-element stress analysis was performed on the said structural components, and the critical stress point was located and the stress-load equation was established for each failure-critical structural component. The ultimate load, yield load, and proof load needed for operational life analysis were established for each failure-critical structural component.

  11. Analysis of complex elastic structures by a Rayleigh-Ritz component modes method using Lagrange multipliers. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    The free vibrations of elastic structures of arbitrary complexity were analyzed in terms of their component modes. The method was based upon the use of the normal unconstrained modes of the components in a Rayleigh-Ritz analysis. The continuity conditions were enforced by means of Lagrange Multipliers. Examples of the structures considered are: (1) beams with nonuniform properties; (2) airplane structures with high or low aspect ratio lifting surface components; (3) the oblique wing airplane; and (4) plate structures. The method was also applied to the analysis of modal damping of linear elastic structures. Convergence of the method versus the number of modes per component and/or the number of components is discussed and compared to more conventional approaches, ad-hoc methods, and experimental results.

  12. Structural complexity and component type increase intertidal biodiversity independently of area.

    PubMed

    Loke, Lynette H L; Todd, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    Complexity is well accepted as one of the primary drivers of biodiversity, however, empirical support for such positive associations is often confounded with surface area and undermined by other potential explanatory factors, especially the type of structural component (e.g., pits, crevices, overhangs, etc.). In the present study, sample units (artificial substrates) of equal surface area (± 0.2%) were used to simultaneously examine the independent effects of complexity and different structural component types on species richness (S), abundance (N), and community composition. We created simple and complex concrete substrates of four different geometric designs using novel software. The substrates (n = 8) were mounted onto granite seawalls (at two tidal heights) on two islands south of Singapore Island. After 13 months of colonization, all 384 tiles were collected and their assemblages compared. A total of 53 744 individuals of 70 species/morphospecies were collected and identified. Our results show that greater complexity can support greater species richness and different communities that are independent of surface area. Furthermore, the type of structure (e.g., "pits," "grooves," "towers") can have an effect on richness and community composition that is independent of complexity. PMID:27145613

  13. Structural complexity and component type increase intertidal biodiversity independently of area.

    PubMed

    Loke, Lynette H L; Todd, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    Complexity is well accepted as one of the primary drivers of biodiversity, however, empirical support for such positive associations is often confounded with surface area and undermined by other potential explanatory factors, especially the type of structural component (e.g., pits, crevices, overhangs, etc.). In the present study, sample units (artificial substrates) of equal surface area (± 0.2%) were used to simultaneously examine the independent effects of complexity and different structural component types on species richness (S), abundance (N), and community composition. We created simple and complex concrete substrates of four different geometric designs using novel software. The substrates (n = 8) were mounted onto granite seawalls (at two tidal heights) on two islands south of Singapore Island. After 13 months of colonization, all 384 tiles were collected and their assemblages compared. A total of 53 744 individuals of 70 species/morphospecies were collected and identified. Our results show that greater complexity can support greater species richness and different communities that are independent of surface area. Furthermore, the type of structure (e.g., "pits," "grooves," "towers") can have an effect on richness and community composition that is independent of complexity.

  14. Structure and assembly of the essential RNA ring component of a viral DNA packaging motor

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Fang; Lu, Changrui; Zhao, Wei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Jardine, Paul J.; Grimes, Shelley; Ke, Ailong

    2011-07-25

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component in the assembly and operation of the powerful bacteriophage {psi}29 DNA packaging motor. The pRNA forms a multimeric ring via intermolecular base-pairing interactions between protomers that serves to guide the assembly of the ring ATPase that drives DNA packaging. Here we report the quaternary structure of this rare multimeric RNA at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution, crystallized as tetrameric rings. Strong quaternary interactions and the inherent flexibility helped rationalize how free pRNA is able to adopt multiple oligomerization states in solution. These characteristics also allowed excellent fitting of the crystallographic pRNA protomers into previous prohead/pRNA cryo-EM reconstructions, supporting the presence of a pentameric, but not hexameric, pRNA ring in the context of the DNA packaging motor. The pentameric pRNA ring anchors itself directly to the phage prohead by interacting specifically with the fivefold symmetric capsid structures that surround the head-tail connector portal. From these contacts, five RNA superhelices project from the pRNA ring, where they serve as scaffolds for binding and assembly of the ring ATPase, and possibly mediate communication between motor components. Construction of structure-based designer pRNAs with little sequence similarity to the wild-type pRNA were shown to fully support the packaging of {psi}29 DNA.

  15. On the vibrational conductivity approach to high frequency dynamics for two-dimensional structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, R. S.

    1995-05-01

    The vibrational conductivity approach to high frequency dynamics is applied here to the case of two-dimensional structural components: with this approach an equation which is analogous to the steady state heat conduction equation is used to model the spatial variation of the energy density of the structure. It is shown that the standard derivation of the method is incomplete, in the sense that the steady state heat conduction equation admits a class of solution which is not encompassed by the assumed form of response, and a revised derivation is presented. It is further shown that the associated boundary conditions for coupled structural components may be expressed in terms of the coupling loss factors which are used in statistical energy analysis. A variational principle for the differential equation and the associated boundary conditions is then derived which permits the application of the Rayleigh-Ritz technique to coupled problems, and it is shown that a one-term Rayleigh-Ritz solution leads to standard statistical energy analysis. The method is applied to a single plate and to two coupled plates, and it is found that the technique is unable to provide an accurate estimate of the direct field due to point loading. This difficulty is traced to the fact that the assumptions employed in the derivation become self-contradictory for this case. Finally, the usefulness or otherwise of the approach as an engineering tool is discussed.

  16. Annotating the structure and components of a nanoparticle formulation using computable string expressions.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dennis G; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Chappell, Alan R; Baker, Nathan A

    2012-12-31

    Nanoparticle formulations that are being developed and tested for various medical applications are typically multi-component systems that vary in their structure, chemical composition, and function. It is difficult to compare and understand the differences between the structural and chemical descriptions of hundreds and thousands of nanoparticle formulations found in text documents. We have developed a string nomenclature to create computable string expressions that identify and enumerate the different high-level types of material parts of a nanoparticle formulation and represent the spatial order of their connectivity to each other. The string expressions are intended to be used as IDs, along with terms that describe a nanoparticle formulation and its material parts, in data sharing documents and nanomaterial research databases. The strings can be parsed and represented as a directed acyclic graph. The nodes of the graph can be used to display the string ID, name and other text descriptions of the nanoparticle formulation or its material part, while the edges represent the connectivity between the material parts with respect to the whole nanoparticle formulation. The different patterns in the string expressions can be searched for and used to compare the structure and chemical components of different nanoparticle formulations. The proposed string nomenclature is extensible and can be applied along with ontology terms to annotate the complete description of nanoparticles formulations.

  17. Mining the physical infrastructure: Opportunities, barriers and interventions in promoting structural components reuse.

    PubMed

    Iacovidou, Eleni; Purnell, Phil

    2016-07-01

    Construction is the most resource intensive sector in the world. It consumes more than half of the total global resources; it is responsible for more than a third of the total global energy use and associated emissions; and generates the greatest and most voluminous waste stream globally. Reuse is considered to be a material and carbon saving practice highly recommended in the construction sector as it can address both waste and carbon emission regulatory targets. This practice offers the possibility to conserve resources through the reclamation of structural components and the carbon embedded in them, as well as opportunities for the development of new business models and the creation of environmental, economic, technical and social value. This paper focuses on the identification and analysis of existing interventions that can promote the reuse of construction components, and outlines the barriers and opportunities arising from this practice as depicted from the global literature. The main conclusions that derive from this study are that the combination of incentives that promote reuse of construction components and recycling of the rest of the construction materials with the provision of specialised education, skills and training would transform the way construction sector currently operates and create opportunities for new business development. Moreover, a typology system developed based on the properties and lifetime of construction components is required in order to provide transparency and guidance in the way construction components are used and reused, in order to make them readily available to designers and contractors. Smart technologies carry the potential to aid the development and uptake of this system by enabling efficient tracking, storage and archiving, while providing information relevant to the environmental and economic savings that can be regained, enabling also better decision-making during construction and deconstruction works. However, further

  18. Mining the physical infrastructure: Opportunities, barriers and interventions in promoting structural components reuse.

    PubMed

    Iacovidou, Eleni; Purnell, Phil

    2016-07-01

    Construction is the most resource intensive sector in the world. It consumes more than half of the total global resources; it is responsible for more than a third of the total global energy use and associated emissions; and generates the greatest and most voluminous waste stream globally. Reuse is considered to be a material and carbon saving practice highly recommended in the construction sector as it can address both waste and carbon emission regulatory targets. This practice offers the possibility to conserve resources through the reclamation of structural components and the carbon embedded in them, as well as opportunities for the development of new business models and the creation of environmental, economic, technical and social value. This paper focuses on the identification and analysis of existing interventions that can promote the reuse of construction components, and outlines the barriers and opportunities arising from this practice as depicted from the global literature. The main conclusions that derive from this study are that the combination of incentives that promote reuse of construction components and recycling of the rest of the construction materials with the provision of specialised education, skills and training would transform the way construction sector currently operates and create opportunities for new business development. Moreover, a typology system developed based on the properties and lifetime of construction components is required in order to provide transparency and guidance in the way construction components are used and reused, in order to make them readily available to designers and contractors. Smart technologies carry the potential to aid the development and uptake of this system by enabling efficient tracking, storage and archiving, while providing information relevant to the environmental and economic savings that can be regained, enabling also better decision-making during construction and deconstruction works. However, further

  19. Strategies To Discover the Structural Components of Cyst and Oocyst Walls

    PubMed Central

    Bushkin, G. Guy; Chatterjee, Aparajita; Robbins, Phillips W.

    2013-01-01

    Cysts of Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica and oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum are the infectious and sometimes diagnostic forms of these parasites. To discover the structural components of cyst and oocyst walls, we have developed strategies based upon a few simple assumptions. Briefly, the most abundant wall proteins are identified by monoclonal antibodies or mass spectrometry. Structural components include a sugar polysaccharide (chitin for Entamoeba, β-1,3-linked glucose for Toxoplasma, and β-1,3-linked GalNAc for Giardia) and/or acid-fast lipids (Toxoplasma and Cryptosporidium). Because Entamoeba cysts and Toxoplasma oocysts are difficult to obtain, studies of walls of nonhuman pathogens (E. invadens and Eimeria, respectively) accelerate discovery. Biochemical methods to dissect fungal walls work well for cyst and oocyst walls, although the results are often unexpected. For example, echinocandins, which inhibit glucan synthases and kill fungi, arrest the development of oocyst walls and block their release into the intestinal lumen. Candida walls are coated with mannans, while Entamoeba cysts are coated in a dextran-like glucose polymer. Models for cyst and oocyst walls derive from their structural components and organization within the wall. Cyst walls are composed of chitin fibrils and lectins that bind chitin (Entamoeba) or fibrils of the β-1,3-GalNAc polymer and lectins that bind the polymer (Giardia). Oocyst walls of Toxoplasma have two distinct layers that resemble those of fungi (β-1,3-glucan in the inner layer) or mycobacteria (acid-fast lipids in the outer layer). Oocyst walls of Cryptosporidium have a rigid bilayer of acid-fast lipids and inner layer of oocyst wall proteins. PMID:24096907

  20. Interactive buckling of thin-walled structural components under static and dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, S.; Benito, R.

    1984-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of interactive buckling of thin walled structural components achieved with the aid of finite strip technique used in conjunction with the theory of mode interaction are summarized. The interaction of the primary local mode with Euler buckling (in columns) and flexural torsional buckling (in columns and beams) is of primary interest. The interaction of two companion local modes with the overall mode is also considered briefly for the columns with doubly symmetric cross sections. The effect of dynamic loads in the form of suddenly applied and compression is also investigated.

  1. Natural phenomena hazards performance categorization guidelines for structures, systems, and components

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this standard is as follows: (a) To provide, for the purpose of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) design and evaluation, criteria for selecting performance categories (PCs) of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) in accordance with the requirements specified in DOE Order 420.1 and the NPH Implementation Guide to DOE Order 420.1. (b) To recommend general procedures for consistent application of the above performance categorization criteria so that the Department of Energy (DOE) review and approval process is simplified.

  2. Practical theories for service life prediction of critical aerospace structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Monaghan, Richard C.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    A new second-order theory was developed for predicting the service lives of aerospace structural components. The predictions based on this new theory were compared with those based on the Ko first-order theory and the classical theory of service life predictions. The new theory gives very accurate service life predictions. An equivalent constant-amplitude stress cycle method was proposed for representing the random load spectrum for crack growth calculations. This method predicts the most conservative service life. The proposed use of minimum detectable crack size, instead of proof load established crack size as an initial crack size for crack growth calculations, could give a more realistic service life.

  3. High-temperature combustor liner tests in structural component response test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Paul E.

    1988-01-01

    Jet engine combustor liners were tested in the structural component response facility at NASA Lewis. In this facility combustor liners were thermally cycled to simulate a flight envelope of takeoff, cruise, and return to idle. Temperatures were measured with both thermocouples and an infrared thermal imaging system. A conventional stacked-ring louvered combustor liner developed a crack at 1603 cycles. This test was discontinued after 1728 cycles because of distortion of the liner. A segmented or float wall combustor liner tested at the same heat flux showed no significant change after 1600 cycles. Changes are being made in the facility to allow higher temperatures.

  4. Experimental study of the effect of spacer grid on the flow structure in fuel assemblies of the AES 2006 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinskii, O. N.; Lobanov, P. D.; Pribaturin, N. A.; Kurdyumov, A. S.; Volkov, S. E.

    2013-01-01

    Results from an experimental study of the local hydrodynamic structure of liquid flow in a 37-cell model simulating a fuel assembly used in the AES-2006 reactor are presented. Special attention is paid to the effect of spacer grid on flow hydrodynamics. Data on variations of the local and integral values of the liquid axial velocity and friction stress on the fuel rod simulator's wall with distance from the grid are given.

  5. Structure, Dynamics, Evolution, and Function of a Major Scaffold Component in the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Upla, Paula; Rice, William J.; Phillips, Jeremy; Timney, Benjamin L.; Pieper, Ursula; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Ketaren, Natalia E.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M.; Stokes, David L.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.; Sali, Andrej; Rout, Michael P.; Almo, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The nuclear pore complex, composed of proteins termed nucleoporins (Nups), is responsible for nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotes. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) form an annular structure composed of the nuclear ring, cytoplasmic ring, a membrane ring, and two inner rings. Nup192 is a major component of the NPC’s inner ring. We report the crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup192 residues 2–960 [ScNup192(2–960)], which adopts an α-helical fold with three domains (i.e., D1, D2, and D3). Small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy (EM) studies reveal that ScNup192(2–960) could undergo long-range transition between “open” and “closed” conformations. We obtained a structural model of full-length ScNup192 based on EM, the structure of ScNup192(2–960), and homology modeling. Evolutionary analyses using the ScNup192(2–960) structure suggest that NPCs and vesicle-coating complexes are descended from a common membrane-coating ancestral complex. We show that suppression of Nup192 expression leads to compromised nuclear transport and hypothesize a role for Nup192 in modulating the permeability of the NPC central channel. PMID:23499021

  6. Structure, dynamics, evolution, and function of a major scaffold component in the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Upla, Paula; Rice, William J; Phillips, Jeremy; Timney, Benjamin L; Pieper, Ursula; Bonanno, Jeffrey B; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Ketaren, Natalia E; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Stokes, David L; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Sali, Andrej; Rout, Michael P; Almo, Steven C

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear pore complex, composed of proteins termed nucleoporins (Nups), is responsible for nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotes. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) form an annular structure composed of the nuclear ring, cytoplasmic ring, a membrane ring, and two inner rings. Nup192 is a major component of the NPC's inner ring. We report the crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup192 residues 2-960 [ScNup192(2-960)], which adopts an α-helical fold with three domains (i.e., D1, D2, and D3). Small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy (EM) studies reveal that ScNup192(2-960) could undergo long-range transition between "open" and "closed" conformations. We obtained a structural model of full-length ScNup192 based on EM, the structure of ScNup192(2-960), and homology modeling. Evolutionary analyses using the ScNup192(2-960) structure suggest that NPCs and vesicle-coating complexes are descended from a common membrane-coating ancestral complex. We show that suppression of Nup192 expression leads to compromised nuclear transport and hypothesize a role for Nup192 in modulating the permeability of the NPC central channel. PMID:23499021

  7. Effects of inulin on the structure and emulsifying properties of protein components in dough.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Luo, Denglin; Li, Xuan; Xu, Baocheng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Jianxue

    2016-11-01

    High-purity gliadin, glutenin and gluten fractions were extracted from wheat gluten flour. To investigate the effects of three types of inulin with different degrees of polymerization (DP) on the emulsifying properties, disulfide contents, secondary structures and microstructures of these fractions, Turbidimetry, spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used in this study. The results showed that the emulsifying activity of gliadin was higher than that of glutenin and gluten, but its emulsion stability was lower than that of glutenin. Adding inulin increased the emulsifying activity of the three protein fractions and emulsion stability of gliadin and gluten, but decreased the emulsion stability of glutenin and disulfide bond contents of glutenin and gluten. In the presence of inulin, the α-helical structure of the three proteins had no significant change, whereas the β-turn structure decreased and β-sheet structure increased. The SEM images showed that inulin had the most significant effect on the glutenin microstructure. In general, inulin with a higher DP had greater effects on the structure and emulsifying properties of protein components in dough.

  8. Structural molecular components of septate junctions in cnidarians point to the origin of epithelial junctions in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ganot, Philippe; Zoccola, Didier; Tambutté, Eric; Voolstra, Christian R; Aranda, Manuel; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Septate junctions (SJs) insure barrier properties and control paracellular diffusion of solutes across epithelia in invertebrates. However, the origin and evolution of their molecular constituents in Metazoa have not been firmly established. Here, we investigated the genomes of early branching metazoan representatives to reconstruct the phylogeny of the molecular components of SJs. Although Claudins and SJ cytoplasmic adaptor components appeared successively throughout metazoan evolution, the structural components of SJs arose at the time of Placozoa/Cnidaria/Bilateria radiation. We also show that in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata, the structural SJ component Neurexin IV colocalizes with the cortical actin network at the apical border of the cells, at the place of SJs. We propose a model for SJ components in Cnidaria. Moreover, our study reveals an unanticipated diversity of SJ structural component variants in cnidarians. This diversity correlates with gene-specific expression in calcifying and noncalcifying tissues, suggesting specific paracellular pathways across the cell layers of these diploblastic animals.

  9. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/epoxy metering truss structure components, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, materials, tooling, manufacturing processes, quality control, test procedures, and results associated with the fabrication and test of graphite/epoxy metering truss structure components exhibiting a near zero coefficient of thermal expansion are described. Analytical methods were utilized, with the aid of a computer program, to define the most efficient laminate configurations in terms of thermal behavior and structural requirements. This was followed by an extensive material characterization and selection program, conducted for several graphite/graphite/hybrid laminate systems to obtain experimental data in support of the analytical predictions. Mechanical property tests as well as the coefficient of thermal expansion tests were run on each laminate under study, the results of which were used as the selection criteria for the single most promising laminate. Further coefficient of thermal expansion measurement was successfully performed on three subcomponent tubes utilizing the selected laminate.

  10. Structural Design of Glass and Ceramic Components for Space System Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Karen S.

    2007-01-01

    Manned space flight programs will always have windows as part of the structural shell of the crew compartment. Astronauts and cosmonauts need to and enjoy looking out of the spacecraft windows at Earth, at approaching vehicles, at scientific objectives and at the stars. With few exceptions spacecraft windows have been made of glass, and the lessons learned over forty years of manned space flight have resulted in a well-defined approach for using this brittle, unforgiving material in NASA's vehicles, in windows and other structural applications. This chapter will outline the best practices that have developed at NASA for designing, verifying and accepting glass (and ceramic) windows and other components for safe and reliable use in any space system.

  11. Damage Assessment of Aerospace Structural Components by Impedance Based Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Martin, Richard E.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses recent efforts at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field relating to the set-up and assessment of electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance based structural health monitoring. The overall aim is the application of the impedance based technique to aeronautic and space based structural components. As initial steps, a laboratory was created, software written, and experiments conducted on aluminum plates in undamaged and damaged states. A simulated crack, in the form of a narrow notch at various locations, was analyzed using piezoelectric-ceramic (PZT: lead, zirconate, titarate) patches as impedance measuring transducers. Descriptions of the impedance quantifying hardware and software are provided as well as experimental results. In summary, an impedance based health monitoring system was assembled and tested. The preliminary data showed that the impedance based technique was successful in recognizing the damage state of notched aluminum plates.

  12. Achromatic flat optical components via compensation between structure and material dispersions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhao, Zeyu; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Chromatism causes great quality degradation of the imaging system, especially for diffraction imaging. The most commonly method to overcome chromatism is refractive/diffractive hybrid optical system which, however, sacrifices the light weight and integration property of diffraction elements. A method through compensation between the structure dispersion and material dispersion is proposed to overcome the chromatism in flat integrated optical components. This method is demonstrated by making use of silver nano-slits waveguides to supply structure dispersion of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide to compensate the material dispersion of metal. A broadband deflector and lens are designed to prove the achromatic property of this method. The method demonstrated here may serve as a solution of broadband light manipulation in flat integrated optical systems. PMID:26794855

  13. Sliding and Rocking of Unanchored Components and Structures: Chapter 7.6 ASCE 4 Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    S. R. Jensen

    2011-04-01

    Chapter 7.6 of ASCE 4-Rev 2, Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures: Standard and Commentary, provides updated guidance for analysis of rocking and sliding of unanchored structures and components subjected to seismic load. This guidance includes provisions both for simplified approximate energy-based approaches, and for detailed probabilistic time history analysis using nonlinear methods. Factors to be applied to the analytical results are also provided with the intent of ensuring achievement of the 80% non-exceedence probability target of the standard. The present paper surveys the published literature supporting these provisions. The results of available testing and analysis are compared to results produced by both simplified and probabilistic approaches. In addition, adequacy of the standard's provisions for analysis methods and factors is assessed. A comparison is made between the achieved level of conservatism and the standard's non-exceedence probability target.

  14. A methodology to model physical contact between structural components in NASTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Annappa A.

    1993-09-01

    Two components of a structure which are located side by side, will come in contact by certain force and will transfer the compressive force along the contact area. If the force acts in the opposite direction, the elements will separate and no force will be transferred. If this contact is modeled, the load path will be correctly represented, and the load redistribution results in more realistic stresses in the structure. This is accomplished by using different sets of rigid elements for different loading conditions, or by creating multipoint constraint sets. Comparison of these two procedures is presented for a 4 panel unit (PU) stowage drawer installed in an experiment rack in the Spacelab Life Sciences (SLS-2) payload.

  15. Carbohydrate components and crystalline structure of organosolv hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) bast fibers pulp.

    PubMed

    Gümüşkaya, Esat; Usta, Mustafa; Balaban, Mualla

    2007-02-01

    Changes in carbohydrate components and crystalline structure of hemp bast fibers during organosolv pulping were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, FT-IR spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The reasons for defibrillation and beating problems with organosolv hemp bast fiber pulp were investigated with reference to these properties of pulp samples. Hemp bast fibers and organosolv pulp samples had low hemicellulose contents and high cellulose contents. It was found that the disorder parameter of cellulose in hemp bast fibers was very low, when crystalline cellulose ratio was high and the crystalline structure of cellulose in hemp bast fibers was very stable. These properties affected defibrillation and beating of organosolv hemp bast fibers pulp negatively.

  16. Microchannel Reactors for ISRU Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, Susana; Makel, Darby B.; Blizman, Brandon; Ward, Benjamin J.

    2005-02-01

    Affordable planning and execution of prolonged manned space missions depend upon the utilization of local resources and the waste products which are formed in manned spacecraft and surface bases. Successful in-situ resources utilization (ISRU) will require component technologies which provide optimal size, weight, volume, and power efficiency. Microchannel reactors enable the efficient chemical processing of in situ resources. The reactors can be designed for the processes that generate the most benefit for each mission. For instance, propellants (methane) can be produced from carbon dioxide from the Mars atmosphere using the Sabatier reaction and ethylene can be produced from the partial oxidation of methane. A system that synthesizes ethylene could be the precursor for systems to synthesize ethanol and polyethylene. Ethanol can be used as a nutrient for Astrobiology experiments, as well as the production of nutrients for human crew (e.g. sugars). Polyethylene can be used in the construction of habitats, tools, and replacement parts. This paper will present recent developments in miniature chemical reactors using advanced Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and microchannel technology to support ISRU of Mars and lunar missions. Among other applications, the technology has been demonstrated for the Sabatier process and for the partial oxidation of methane. Microchannel reactors were developed based on ceramic substrates as well as metal substrates. In both types of reactors, multiple layers coated with catalytic material are bonded, forming a monolithic structure. Such reactors are readily scalable with the incorporation of extra layers. In addition, this reactor structure minimizes pressure drop and catalyst settling, which are common problems in conventional packed bed reactors.

  17. Structure of the poly-C9 component of the complement membrane attack complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkina, Natalya V.; Spicer, Bradley A.; Reboul, Cyril F.; Conroy, Paul J.; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Elmlund, Hans; Law, Ruby H. P.; Ekkel, Susan M.; Kondos, Stephanie C.; Goode, Robert J. A.; Ramm, Georg; Whisstock, James C.; Saibil, Helen R.; Dunstone, Michelle A.

    2016-02-01

    The membrane attack complex (MAC)/perforin-like protein complement component 9 (C9) is the major component of the MAC, a multi-protein complex that forms pores in the membrane of target pathogens. In contrast to homologous proteins such as perforin and the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), all of which require the membrane for oligomerisation, C9 assembles directly onto the nascent MAC from solution. However, the molecular mechanism of MAC assembly remains to be understood. Here we present the 8 Å cryo-EM structure of a soluble form of the poly-C9 component of the MAC. These data reveal a 22-fold symmetrical arrangement of C9 molecules that yield an 88-strand pore-forming β-barrel. The N-terminal thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) domain forms an unexpectedly extensive part of the oligomerisation interface, thus likely facilitating solution-based assembly. These TSP1 interactions may also explain how additional C9 subunits can be recruited to the growing MAC subsequent to membrane insertion.

  18. Sister cohesion and structural axis components mediate homolog bias of meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keun P.; Weiner, Beth M.; Zhang, Liangran; Jordan, Amy; Dekker, Job; Kleckner, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Meiotic recombination occurs between one chromatid of each maternal and paternal homolog (homolog bias) versus between sister chromatids (sister bias). Physical DNA analysis reveals that meiotic cohesin/axis component Rec8 promotes sister bias, likely via its cohesion activity. Two meiosis-specific axis components, Red1/Mek1kinase, counteract this effect. With this precondition satisfied, other molecules directly specify homolog bias per se. Rec8 also acts positively to maintain homolog bias during crossover recombination. These observations point to sequential release of double-strand break ends from association with their sister. Red1 and Rec8 are found to play distinct roles for sister cohesion, DSB formation and recombination progression kinetics. Also, the two components are enriched in spatially distinct domains of axial structure that develop prior to DSB formation. We propose that Red1 and Rec8 domains provide functionally complementary environments whereby inputs evolved from DSB repair and late-stage chromosome morphogenesis are integrated to give the complete meiotic chromosomal program. PMID:21145459

  19. Structural characterization of the lipid A component of pathogenic Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed Central

    Kulshin, V A; Zähringer, U; Lindner, B; Frasch, C E; Tsai, C M; Dmitriev, B A; Rietschel, E T

    1992-01-01

    The lipid A component of meningococcal lipopolysaccharide was structurally characterized by using chemical modification methods, methylation analysis, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance, and laser desorption mass spectroscopy. It was shown that Neisseria meningitidis lipid A consists of a 1,4'-bisphosphorylated beta(1'----6)-linked D-glucosamine disaccharide (lipid A backbone), both phosphate groups being largely replaced by O-phosphorylethanolamine. This disaccharide harbors two nonsubstituted hydroxyl groups at positions 4 and 6', the latter representing the attachment site of the oligosaccharide portion in lipopolysaccharide. In addition, it is substituted by up to six fatty acid residues. In the major lipid A component, representing a hexaacyl species, the hydroxyl groups at positions 3 and 3' carry (R)-3-hydroxydodecanoic acid [12:0(3-OH)], whereas the amino groups at positions 2 and 2' are substituted by (R)-3-(dodecanoyloxy)tetradecanoic acid [3-O(12:0)-14:0]. A minor portion was present as a tetraacyl lipid A component lacking either dodecanoic acid (12:0) or 12:0 and 12:0(3-OH). N. meningitidis lipid A, therefore, significantly differs from Escherichia coli lipid A by the nature and locations of fatty acids and the substitution of O-phosphorylethanolamine for the nonglycosyl (4'-P) and glycosyl phosphate. PMID:1548229

  20. Evidence for a Meteoritic Component in Impact Melt Rock from the Chicxulub Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeberl, Christian; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Schuraytz, Benjamin C.; Shirey, Steven B.; Blum, Joel D.; Marin, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    The Chicxulub structure in Yucatan, Mexico, has recently been recognized as a greater then 200-km-diameter multi-ring impact crater of K-T boundary age. Crystalline impact melt rocks and breccias from within the crater, which have compositions similar to those of normal continental crustal rocks and which show shock metamorphic effects, have been studied for trace element and Re-Os isotope compositions. Re-Os isotope systematics allow the sensitive and selective determination of an extraterrestrial component in impact-derived rocks. A melt rock sample shows elevated iridium concentrations, an osmium concentration of 25 ppb, and a low Os-187/Os-188 ratio of 0.113, which are incompatible with derivation from the continental crust. Even though the Os-187/Os-188 ratio is slightly lower than the range so far measured in meteorites, a mantle origin seems unlikely for mass balance reasons and because the cratering event is unlikely to have excavated mantle material. The data support the hypothesis of a heterogeneously distributed meteoritic component in the Chicxulub melt rock. A sample of impact glass from the Haitian K-T boundary at Beloc yielded about 0.1 ppb osmium and an Os-187/0s-188 ratio of 0.251, indicating the presence of a small meteoritic component in the impact ejecta as well.

  1. Structure of the poly-C9 component of the complement membrane attack complex

    PubMed Central

    Dudkina, Natalya V.; Spicer, Bradley A.; Reboul, Cyril F.; Conroy, Paul J.; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Elmlund, Hans; Law, Ruby H. P.; Ekkel, Susan M.; Kondos, Stephanie C.; Goode, Robert J. A.; Ramm, Georg; Whisstock, James C.; Saibil, Helen R.; Dunstone, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    The membrane attack complex (MAC)/perforin-like protein complement component 9 (C9) is the major component of the MAC, a multi-protein complex that forms pores in the membrane of target pathogens. In contrast to homologous proteins such as perforin and the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), all of which require the membrane for oligomerisation, C9 assembles directly onto the nascent MAC from solution. However, the molecular mechanism of MAC assembly remains to be understood. Here we present the 8 Å cryo-EM structure of a soluble form of the poly-C9 component of the MAC. These data reveal a 22-fold symmetrical arrangement of C9 molecules that yield an 88-strand pore-forming β-barrel. The N-terminal thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) domain forms an unexpectedly extensive part of the oligomerisation interface, thus likely facilitating solution-based assembly. These TSP1 interactions may also explain how additional C9 subunits can be recruited to the growing MAC subsequent to membrane insertion. PMID:26841934

  2. Implementation of Speed Variation in the Structural Dynamic Assessment of Turbomachinery Flow-Path Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Davis, R. Benjamin; DeHaye, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    During the design of turbomachinery flow path components, the assessment of possible structural resonant conditions is critical. Higher frequency modes of these structures are frequently found to be subject to resonance, and in these cases, design criteria require a forced response analysis of the structure with the assumption that the excitation speed exactly equals the resonant frequency. The design becomes problematic if the response analysis shows a violation of the HCF criteria. One possible solution is to perform "finite-life" analysis, where Miner's rule is used to calculate the actual life in seconds in comparison to the required life. In this situation, it is beneficial to incorporate the fact that, for a variety of turbomachinery control reasons, the speed of the rotor does not actually dwell at a single value but instead dithers about a nominal mean speed and during the time that the excitation frequency is not equal to the resonant frequency, the damage accumulated by the structure is diminished significantly. Building on previous investigations into this process, we show that a steady-state assumption of the response is extremely accurate for this typical case, resulting in the ability to quickly account for speed variation in the finite-life analysis of a component which has previously had its peak dynamic stress at resonance calculated. A technique using Monte Carlo simulation is also presented which can be used when specific speed time histories are not available. The implementation of these techniques can prove critical for successful turbopump design, as the improvement in life when speed variation is considered is shown to be greater than a factor of two.

  3. Free vibration analysis of civil engineering structures by component-wise models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Erasmo; Pagani, Alfonso

    2014-09-01

    Higher-order beam models are used in this paper to carry out free vibration analysis of civil engineering structures. Refined kinematic fields are developed using the Carrera Unified Formulation (CUF), which allows for the implementation of any-order theory without the need for ad hoc formulations. The principle of virtual displacements in conjunction with the finite element method (FEM) is used to formulate stiffness and mass matrices in terms of fundamental nuclei. The nuclei depend neither on the adopted class of beam theory nor on the FEM approximation along the beam axis. This paper focuses on a particular class of CUF models that makes use of Lagrange polynomials to discretize cross-sectional displacement variables. This class of models are referred to as component-wise (CW) in recent works. According to the CW approach, each structural component (e.g. columns, walls, frame members, and floors) can be modeled by means of the same 1D formulation. A number of typical civil engineering structures (e.g. simple beams, arches, truss structures, and complete industrial and civil buildings) are analyzed and CW results are compared to classical beam theories (Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko), refined beam models based on Taylor-like expansions of the displacements on the cross-section, and classical solid/shell FEM solutions from the commercial code MSC Nastran. The results highlight the enhanced capabilities of the proposed formulation. It is in fact demonstrated that CW models are able to replicate 3D solid results with very low computational efforts.

  4. Structure and Ligand Binding Properties of the Epoxidase Component of Styrene Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ukaegbu, Uchechi E.; Kantz, Auric; Beaton, Michelle; Gassner, George T.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-07-23

    Styrene monooxygenase (SMO) is a two-component flavoprotein monooxygenase that transforms styrene to styrene oxide in the first step of the styrene catabolic and detoxification pathway of Pseudomonas putida S12. The crystal structure of the N-terminally histidine-tagged epoxidase component of this system, NSMOA, determined to 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, indicates the enzyme exists as a homodimer in which each monomer forms two distinct domains. The overall architecture is most similar to that of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH), although there are some significant differences in secondary structure. Structural comparisons suggest that a large cavity open to the surface forms the FAD binding site. At the base of this pocket is another cavity that likely represents the styrene binding site. Flavin binding and redox equilibria are tightly coupled such that reduced FAD binds apo NSMOA {approx}8000 times more tightly than the oxidized coenzyme. Equilibrium fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry data using benzene as a substrate analogue indicate that the oxidized flavin and substrate analogue binding equilibria of NSMOA are linked such that the binding affinity of each is increased by 60-fold when the enzyme is saturated with the other. A much weaker {approx}2-fold positive cooperative interaction is observed for the linked binding equilibria of benzene and reduced FAD. The low affinity of the substrate analogue for the reduced FAD complex of NSMOA is consistent with a preferred reaction order in which flavin reduction and reaction with oxygen precede the binding of styrene, identifying the apoenzyme structure as the key catalytic resting state of NSMOA poised to bind reduced FAD and initiate the oxygen reaction.

  5. Implementation of Speed Variation in the Structural Dynamic Assessment of Turbomachinery Flow-Path Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Davis, R. Benjamin; DeHaye, Michael

    2013-01-01

    During the design of turbomachinery flow path components, the assessment of possible structural resonant conditions is critical. Higher frequency modes of these structures are frequently found to be subject to resonance, and in these cases, design criteria require a forced response analysis of the structure with the assumption that the excitation speed exactly equals the resonant frequency. The design becomes problematic if the response analysis shows a violation of the HCF criteria. One possible solution is to perform "finite-life" analysis, where Miner's rule is used to calculate the actual life in seconds in comparison to the required life. In this situation, it is beneficial to incorporate the fact that, for a variety of turbomachinery control reasons, the speed of the rotor does not actually dwell at a single value but instead dithers about a nominal mean speed and during the time that the excitation frequency is not equal to the resonant frequency, the damage accumulated by the structure is diminished significantly. Building on previous investigations into this process, we show that a steady-state assumption of the response is extremely accurate for this typical case, resulting in the ability to quickly account for speed variation in the finite-life analysis of a component which has previously had its peak dynamic stress at resonance calculated. A technique using Monte Carlo simulation is also presented which can be used when specific speed time histories are not available. The implementation of these techniques can prove critical for successful turbopump design, as the improvement in life when speed variation is considered is shown to be greater than a factor of two

  6. GP3 is a structural component of the PRRSV type II (US) virion

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, M. de; Ansari, I.H.; Das, P.B.; Ku, B.J.; Martinez-Lobo, F.J.; Pattnaik, A.K.; Osorio, F.A.

    2009-07-20

    Glycoprotein 3 (GP3) is a highly glycosylated PRRSV envelope protein which has been reported as being present in the virions of PRRSV type I, while missing in the type II PRRSV (US) virions. We herein present evidence that GP3 is indeed incorporated in the virus particles of a North American strain of PRRSV (FL12), at a density that is consistent with the minor structural role assigned to GP3 in members of the Arterivirus genus. Two 15aa peptides corresponding to two different immunodominant linear epitopes of GP3 derived from the North American strain of PRRSV (FL12) were used as antigen to generate a rabbit monospecific antiserum to this protein. The specificity of this anti-GP3 antiserum was confirmed by radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP) assay using BHK-21 cells transfected with GP3 expressing plasmid, MARC-145 cells infected with FL12 PRRSV, as well as by confocal microscopy on PRRSV-infected MARC-145 cells. To test if GP3 is a structural component of the virion, {sup 35}S-labelled PRRSV virions were pelleted through a 30% sucrose cushion, followed by a second round of purification on a sucrose gradient (20-60%). Virions were detected in specific gradient fractions by radioactive counts and further confirmed by viral infectivity assay in MARC 145 cells. The GP3 was detected in gradient fractions containing purified virions by RIP using anti-GP3 antiserum. Predictably, the GP3 was less abundant in purified virions than other major structural envelope proteins such as GP5 and M. Further evidence of the presence of GP3 at the level of PRRSV FL12 envelope was obtained by immunogold staining of purified virions from the supernatant of infected cells with anti-GP3 antiserum. Taken together, these results indicate that GP3 is a minor structural component of the PRRSV type II (FL12 strain) virion, as had been previously described for PRRSV type I.

  7. Structure of components of an intercellular channel complex in sporulating Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Blagova, Elena V.; McFeat, Amanda; Fogg, Mark J.; Wilson, Keith S.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Following asymmetric cell division during spore formation in Bacillus subtilis, a forespore expressed membrane protein SpoIIQ, interacts across an intercellular space with a mother cell-expressed membrane protein, SpoIIIAH. Their interaction can serve as a molecular “ratchet” contributing to the migration of the mother cell membrane around that of the forespore in a phagocytosis-like process termed engulfment. Upon completion of engulfment, SpoIIQ and SpoIIIAH are integral components of a recently proposed intercellular channel allowing passage from the mother cell into the forespore of factors required for late gene expression in this compartment. Here we show that the extracellular domains of SpoIIQ and SpoIIIAH form a heterodimeric complex in solution. The crystal structure of this complex reveals that SpoIIQ has a LytM-like zinc-metalloprotease fold but with an incomplete zinc coordination sphere and no metal. SpoIIIAH has an α-helical subdomain and a protruding β-sheet subdomain, which mediates interactions with SpoIIQ. SpoIIIAH has sequence and structural homology to EscJ, a type III secretion system protein that forms a 24-fold symmetric ring. Superposition of the structures of SpoIIIAH and EscJ reveals that the SpoIIIAH protomer overlaps with two adjacent protomers of EscJ, allowing us to generate a dodecameric SpoIIIAH ring by using structural homology. Following this superposition, the SpoIIQ chains also form a closed dodecameric ring abutting the SpoIIIAH ring, producing an assembly surrounding a 60 Å channel. The dimensions and organization of the proposed complex suggest it is a plausible model for the extracellular component of a gap junction-like intercellular channel. PMID:22431604

  8. Molecular manipulation of solid state structure: influences of organic components on vanadium oxide architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagrman, Pamela J.; Finn, Robert C.; Zubieta, Jon

    2001-11-01

    Among the inorganic materials enjoying widespread contemporary interest, the metal oxide based solid phases occupy a prominent position by virtue of their applications to catalysis, sorption, molecular electronics, energy storage, optical materials and ceramics. The diversity of properties associated with these materials reflects the chemical composition, which allows variations in covalency, geometry and oxidation states, and the crystalline architecture, which may provide different pore structures, coordination sites, or juxtapositions of functional groups. Despite such fundamental and practical significance, the design of the structure of such materials remains a challenge in solid state chemistry. While organic materials have been synthesized which self-assemble into ordered arrays at low temperature and which exhibit molecular recognition and biomimetic activity, the ability to synthesize inorganic materials by rational design remains elusive. Small, soluble molecular building blocks with well-defined reaction chemistries which allow their low-temperature assembly into crystalline solid state inorganic materials are not well known. However, the existence of naturally occurring, structurally complex minerals establishes that hydrothermal synthesis can provide a low temperature pathway to produce open-framework and layered metastable structures utilizing inorganic starting materials. Thus, hydrothermal conditions have been used to prepare microporous tetrahedral framework solids that are capable of shape-selective absorption, like zeolites and aluminophosphates, and more recently in the preparation of complex solid arrays of the M/O/PO 3-4 and M/O/RPO 2-3 systems (M=V and Mo). The hydrothermal technique may be combined with the introduction of organic components which may act as charge compensating groups, space-filling units, structure directing agents, templates, tethers between functional groups, or conventional ligands in the preparation of inorganic

  9. Structural/functional properties of a mammalian multi-component structure containing all major spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles.

    PubMed Central

    Moraitou, M; Patrinou-Georgoula, M; Guialis, A

    1998-01-01

    An approx. 40 S multi-component structure, consisting of all major spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNP) (U1, U2, U4/U6 and U5) in stable association with a large number of polypeptides, mainly in the range 50-210 kDa, has been reported to exist within rat liver nuclear extracts [Guialis, Moraitou, Patrinou-Georgoula and Dangli (1991) Nucleic Acids Res. 19, 287-296]. Using a new polyclonal antibody recognizing a 63 kDa protein component of the complex, this multi-snRNP assembly was detected within rat liver nuclear extracts as efficiently as with the antibody for the U2 snRNP-specific B' polypeptide. The 63 kDa protein was found to correspond to the 66 kDa subunit of the splicing factor SF3a, a known integral component of the HeLa 17 S U2 snRNP. Anti-2,2,7-trimethylguanosine affinity chromatography was an easy and efficient way of purifying the multi-snRNP complex from rat liver 40 S heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (hnRNP)-containing sucrose gradient fractions. By subsequent glycerol-gradient sedimentation, all known snRNP forms active in RNA splicing were identified among its constituents. A complex structurally similar to the rat multi-snRNP was also identified in HeLa nuclear extracts. Preservation of hnRNP-snRNP interactions was observed within HeLa 40 S fractions. Moreover, these fractions were capable of restoring splicing activity when applied in reconstitution studies to supplement a micrococcal nuclease-treated splicing extract. PMID:9576861

  10. Detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in diffusion bonding of steel hollow structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Li, H.; Li, M. Q.

    2016-05-01

    This study focused on the detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in similar diffusion bonding as well as on the fabrication of high quality martensitic stainless steel hollow structural components. A special surface with regular patterns was processed to be joined so as to observe the extent of surface asperity deformation under different bonding pressures. Results showed that an undamaged hollow structural component has been obtained with full interfacial contact and the same shear strength to that of base material. Fracture surface characteristic combined with surface roughness profiles distinctly revealed the enhanced surface asperity deformation as the applied pressure increases. The influence of surface asperity deformation mechanism on joint formation was analyzed: (a) surface asperity deformation not only directly expanded the interfacial contact areas, but also released deformation heat and caused defects, indirectly accelerating atomic diffusion, then benefits to void shrinkage; (b) surface asperity deformation readily introduced stored energy difference between two opposite sides of interface grain boundary, resulting in strain induced interface grain boundary migration. In addition, the influence of void on interface grain boundary migration was analyzed in detail.

  11. Damage prognosis of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles R; Gobbato, Maurizio; Conte, Joel; Kosmatke, John; Oliver, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    The extensive use of lightweight advanced composite materials in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) drastically increases the sensitivity to both fatigue- and impact-induced damage of their critical structural components (e.g., wings and tail stabilizers) during service life. The spar-to-skin adhesive joints are considered one of the most fatigue sensitive subcomponents of a lightweight UAV composite wing with damage progressively evolving from the wing root. This paper presents a comprehensive probabilistic methodology for predicting the remaining service life of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of UAVs. Non-destructive evaluation techniques and Bayesian inference are used to (i) assess the current state of damage of the system and, (ii) update the probability distribution of the damage extent at various locations. A probabilistic model for future loads and a mechanics-based damage model are then used to stochastically propagate damage through the joint. Combined local (e.g., exceedance of a critical damage size) and global (e.g.. flutter instability) failure criteria are finally used to compute the probability of component failure at future times. The applicability and the partial validation of the proposed methodology are then briefly discussed by analyzing the debonding propagation, along a pre-defined adhesive interface, in a simply supported laminated composite beam with solid rectangular cross section, subjected to a concentrated load applied at mid-span. A specially developed Eliler-Bernoulli beam finite element with interlaminar slip along the damageable interface is used in combination with a cohesive zone model to study the fatigue-induced degradation in the adhesive material. The preliminary numerical results presented are promising for the future validation of the methodology.

  12. Reconstruction of vascular structure with multicellular components using cell transfer printing methods.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Bin; Jun, Indong; Bak, Seongwoo; Shin, Young Min; Lim, Youn-Mook; Park, Hansoo; Shin, Heungsoo

    2014-09-01

    Natural vessel has three types of concentric cell layers that perform their specific functions. Here, the fabrication of vascular structure is reported by transfer printing of three different cell layers using thermosensitive hydrogels. Tetronic-tyramine and RGD peptide are co-crosslinked to prepare cell adhesive and thermosensitive hydrogels. The hydrogel increases its diameter by 1.26 times when the temperature reduces from 37 °C to 4 °C. At optimized seeding density, three types of cells form monolayers on the hydrogel, which is then transferred to the target surface within 3 min. Three monolayers are simultaneously transferred on one substrate with controlled shape and arrangement. The same approach is applied onto nanofiber scaffolds that are cultured for more than 5 d. Every type of monolayer shows proliferation and migration on nanofiber scaffolds, and the formation of robust cell-cell contact is revealed by CD31 staining in endothelial cell layer. A vascular structure with multicellular components is fabricated by transfer of three monolayers on nanofibers that are manually rolled with the diameter and length of the tube being approximately 3 mm and 12 mm, respectively. Collectively, it is concluded that the tissue transfer printing is a useful tool for constructing a vascular structure and mimicking natural structure of different types of tissues.

  13. Insights into Bacteriophage T5 Structure from Analysis of Its Morphogenesis Genes and Protein Components

    PubMed Central

    Zivanovic, Yvan; Confalonieri, Fabrice; Ponchon, Luc; Lurz, Rudi; Chami, Mohamed; Flayhan, Ali; Renouard, Madalena; Huet, Alexis; Decottignies, Paulette; Davidson, Alan R.; Breyton, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5 represents a large family of lytic Siphoviridae infecting Gram-negative bacteria. The low-resolution structure of T5 showed the T=13 geometry of the capsid and the unusual trimeric organization of the tail tube, and the assembly pathway of the capsid was established. Although major structural proteins of T5 have been identified in these studies, most of the genes encoding the morphogenesis proteins remained to be identified. Here, we combine a proteomic analysis of T5 particles with a bioinformatic study and electron microscopic immunolocalization to assign function to the genes encoding the structural proteins, the packaging proteins, and other nonstructural components required for T5 assembly. A head maturation protease that likely accounts for the cleavage of the different capsid proteins is identified. Two other proteins involved in capsid maturation add originality to the T5 capsid assembly mechanism: the single head-to-tail joining protein, which closes the T5 capsid after DNA packaging, and the nicking endonuclease responsible for the single-strand interruptions in the T5 genome. We localize most of the tail proteins that were hitherto uncharacterized and provide a detailed description of the tail tip composition. Our findings highlight novel variations of viral assembly strategies and of virion particle architecture. They further recommend T5 for exploring phage structure and assembly and for deciphering conformational rearrangements that accompany DNA transfer from the capsid to the host cytoplasm. PMID:24198424

  14. Crystal structures of the components of the Staphylococcus aureus leukotoxin ED

    PubMed Central

    Nocadello, S.; Minasov, G.; Shuvalova, L.; Dubrovska, I.; Sabini, E.; Bagnoli, F.; Grandi, G.; Anderson, W. F.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal leukotoxins are a family of β-barrel, bicomponent, pore-forming toxins with membrane-damaging functions. These bacterial exotoxins share sequence and structural homology and target several host-cell types. Leukotoxin ED (LukED) is one of these bicomponent pore-forming toxins that Staphylococcus aureus produces in order to suppress the ability of the host to contain the infection. The recent delineation of the important role that LukED plays in S. aureus pathogenesis and the identification of its protein receptors, combined with its presence in S. aureus methicillin-resistant epidemic strains, establish this leukocidin as a possible target for the development of novel therapeutics. Here, the crystal structures of the water-soluble LukE and LukD components of LukED have been determined. The two structures illustrate the tertiary-structural variability with respect to the other leukotoxins while retaining the conservation of the residues involved in the interaction of the protomers in the bipartite leukotoxin in the pore complex. PMID:26894539

  15. Analytical Approach for Estimating Preliminary Mass of ARES I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Pravin

    2007-01-01

    electrical power functions to other Elements of the CLV, is included as secondary structure. The MSFC has an overall responsibility for the integrated US element as well as structural design an thermal control of the fuel tanks, intertank, interstage, avionics, main propulsion system, Reaction Control System (RCS) for both the Upper Stage and the First Stage. MSFC's Spacecraft and Vehicle Department, Structural and Analysis Design Division is developing a set of predicted mass of these elements. This paper details the methodology, criterion and tools used for the preliminary mass predictions of the upper stage structural assembly components. In general, weight of the cylindrical barrel sections are estimated using the commercial code Hypersizer, whereas, weight of the domes are developed using classical solutions. HyperSizer is software that performs automated structural analysis and sizing optimization based on aerospace methods for strength, stability, and stiffness. Analysis methods range from closed form, traditional hand calculations repeated every day in industry to more advanced panel buckling algorithms. Margin-of-safety reporting for every potential failure provides the engineer with a powerful insight into the structural problem. Optimization capabilities include finding minimum weight panel or beam concepts, material selections, cross sectional dimensions, thicknesses, and lay-ups from a library of 40 different stiffened and sandwich designs and a database of composite, metallic, honeycomb, and foam materials. Multiple different concepts (orthogrid, isogrid, and skin stiffener) were run for multiple loading combinations of ascent design load with and with out tank pressure as well as proof pressure condition. Subsequently, selected optimized concept obtained from Hypersizer runs was translated into a computer aid design (CAD) model to account for the wall thickness tolerance, weld land etc for developing the most probable weight of the components. The flow diram

  16. Characterization of Structural Conditions of AISI 316 Analog Stainless Steel Irradiated in the BN-350 Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimkin, O. P.; Tsai, K V.; Turubarova, L. G.; Doronina, T. A.; Garner, Francis A.

    2004-08-24

    In several recently published studies conducted on a Soviet analog of AISI 321 stainless steel irradiated in either fast reactors or light water reactors, it was shown that the void swelling phenomenon extended to temperatures as low as {approx} 300 C, when produced by neutron irradiation at dpa rates in the range 10(-7 power) to 10(-8 power) dpa/sec. Other studies yielded similar results for AISI 316. In the current study a blanket duct assembly from BN-350, constructed from the Soviet analog of AISI 316, also exhibits swelling at dpa rates on the order of 10(-8 power) dpa/sec, with voids seen as low as 281 C and only 1.3 dpa. It appears that low-temperature swelling at low dpa rates occurs in 300 series stainless steels in general, and during irradiations conducted in either fast or mixed spectrum reactors.

  17. Computational modeling to enhance NDE experimental assessment of high temperature corrosion damage of near surface furnace/reactor structural material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, W.; Meegan, G. D.; Mishra, B.; Olson, D. L.

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on the use of finite element modeling, COMSOL, to investigate ultrasonic methods to detect early stages of corrosion where the indications are limited to much more subtle changes in material lattice conditions such as carburization or internal oxidation. These subtle defects do not include any cracking or pitting but, rather, are characterized by a relatively slight change in material density and elasticity. The propagation and scattering of ultrasonic guided waves in a 2-D geometry was modeled to study the signal produced by near surface second phase growth from high temperature chemical reactions in reactor/furnace structural materials. The simulation results indicate that it is indeed possible to detect these types of subtle defects using a guided wave approach. The modeling is used to allow for better experimental design to achieve NDE data of mechanistic interpretation of the microstructure-mechanical behavior of reactor/furnace material during service.

  18. Structures of the autoproteolytic domain from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear pore complex component, Nup145

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Ozyurt, Sinem A.; Do, Johnny; Bain, Kevin T.; Dickey, Mark; Rodgers, Logan A.; Gheyi, Tarun; Sali, Andrej; Kim, Seung Joong; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Martel, Anne; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-04-30

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large, octagonally symmetric dynamic macromolecular assemblies responsible for exchange of proteins and RNAs between the nucleus and cytoplasm. NPCs are made up of at least 456 polypeptides from {approx}30 distinct nucleoporins. Several of these components, sharing similar structural motifs, form stable subcomplexes that form a coaxial structure containing two outer rings (the nuclear and cytoplasmic rings), two inner rings, and a membrane ring. The yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Nup145 and its human counterpart are unique among the nucleoporins, in that they undergo autoproteolysis to generate functionally distinct proteins. The human counterpart of Nup145 is expressed as two alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts. The larger 190 kDa precursor undergoes post-translational autoproteolysis at the Phe863-Ser864 peptide bond yielding the 92 kDa Nup98 and the 96 kDa Nup96. The smaller 98 kDa precursor is also autoproteolysed at an analogous site giving 92 kDa Nup98-N and a 6 kDa C-terminal fragment, which may form a noncovalent complex. The yeast Nup145 precursor [Fig. 1(A)] contains twelve repeats of a 'GLFG' peptide motif (FG repeats) at its N-terminus, an internal autoproteolytic domain (a region of high conservation with the homologous yeast nucleoporins Nup110 and Nup116, neither of which undergo autoproteolysis), followed by the C-terminal domain. Various forms of the FG repeats are present in nearly half of all nucleoporins; they form intrinsically disordered regions implicated in gating mechanisms that control passage of macromolecules through NPCs. Nup145 undergoes autoproteolysis at the Phe605-Ser606 peptide bond to generate two functionally distinct proteins, Nup145N and Nup145C. Subsequently, Nup145C associates with six other proteins to form the heptameric Y-complex, a component of the outer rings of the NPC. Nup145N, on the other hand, can shuttle between the NPC and the nuclear interior. It has been suggested that Nup

  19. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator: MSFC-Langley joint test of large space structures component assembly:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA and MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  20. Microfluidic structures and methods for integrating a functional component into a microfluidic device

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Blake; Domeier, Linda; Woo, Noble; Shepodd, Timothy; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2008-04-01

    Injection molding is used to form microfluidic devices with integrated functional components. One or more functional components are placed in a mold cavity which is then closed. Molten thermoplastic resin is injected into the mold and then cooled, thereby forming a solid substrate including the functional component(s). The solid substrate including the functional component(s) is then bonded to a second substrate which may include microchannels or other features.

  1. Proceedings of the Office of Fusion Energy/DOE workshop on ceramic matrix composites for structural applications in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H. ); Lucas, G.E. )

    1990-11-01

    A workshop to assess the potential application of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for structural applications in fusion reactors was held on May 21--22, 1990, at University of California, Santa Barbara. Participants included individuals familiar with materials and design requirements in fusion reactors, ceramic composite processing and properties and radiation effects. The primary focus was to list the feasibility issues that might limit the application of these materials in fusion reactors. Clear advantages for the use of CMCs are high-temperature operation, which would allow a high-efficiency Rankine cycle, and low activation. Limitations to their use are material costs, fabrication complexity and costs, lack of familiarity with these materials in design, and the lack of data on radiation stability at relevant temperatures and fluences. Fusion-relevant feasibility issues identified at this workshop include: hermetic and vacuum properties related to effects of matrix porosity and matrix microcracking; chemical compatibility with coolant, tritium, and breeder and multiplier materials, radiation effects on compatibility; radiation stability and integrity; and ability to join CMCs in the shop and at the reactor site, radiation stability and integrity of joints. A summary of ongoing CMC radiation programs is also given. It was suggested that a true feasibility assessment of CMCs for fusion structural applications could not be completed without evaluation of a material tailored'' to fusion conditions or at least to radiation stability. It was suggested that a follow-up workshop be held to design a tailored composite after the results of CMC radiation studies are available and the critical feasibility issues are addressed.

  2. Emergency heat removal system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Dunckel, Thomas L.

    1976-01-01

    A heat removal system for nuclear reactors serving as a supplement to an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) comprises a plurality of heat pipes having one end in heat transfer relationship with either the reactor pressure vessel, the core support grid structure or other in-core components and the opposite end located in heat transfer relationship with a heat exchanger having heat transfer fluid therein. The heat exchanger is located external to the pressure vessel whereby excessive core heat is transferred from the above reactor components and dissipated within the heat exchanger fluid.

  3. Intermolecular interactions in multi-component crystals of acridinone/thioacridinone derivatives: Structural and energetics investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wera, Michał; Storoniak, Piotr; Trzybiński, Damian; Zadykowicz, Beata

    2016-12-01

    A single crystal X-ray analysis of two multi-component crystals consisting of an acridinone/thioacridinone moiety and a solvent moiety - water and ammonia (1 and 2), respectively, was carried out to determine the crystal structures of obtained crystals. A theoretical approach was undertaken - using the DFT method, lattice energies calculations and Hirshfeld surfaces (HS) - to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the intermolecular interactions within the crystal. HS analysis was showed that the H⋯H, C⋯H/H⋯C and C⋯C contacts for both structures (altogether 81.6% of total Hirshfeld surface area for 1 and 79.3% for 2) and the O⋯H/H⋯O (14.3%) for 1 and the S⋯H/H⋯S (15.2%) contacts for 2 were the characteristic intermolecular contacts in the related crystal structures. Using a computational methods were confirmed that the main contribution to the stabilization of the crystal lattice of compound 1 comes from the Coulombic interactions, whereas in compound 2 electrostatic and van der Waals appear to have similar contribution to the crystal lattice energy. Theoretical calculations of the investigated compounds have also allowed to determine the energy of a single specific intermolecular interaction.

  4. Structure of the transmembrane domain of human nicastrin-a component of γ-secretase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Liew, Lynette Sin Yee; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2016-01-01

    Nicastrin is the largest component of γ-secretase that is an intramembrane protease important in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Nicastrin contains a large extracellular domain, a single transmembrane (TM) domain, and a short C-terminus. Its TM domain is important for the γ-secretase complex formation. Here we report nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of the TM and C-terminal regions of human nicastrin in both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles. Structural study and dynamic analysis reveal that the TM domain is largely helical and stable under both SDS and DPC micelles with its N-terminal region undergoing intermediate time scale motion. The TM helix contains a hydrophilic patch that is important for TM-TM interactions. The short C-terminus is not structured in solution and a region formed by residues V697-A702 interacts with the membrane, suggesting that these residues may play a role in the γ-secretase complex formation. Our study provides structural insight into the function of the nicastrin TM domain and the C-terminus in γ-secretase complex. PMID:26776682

  5. Phylogenetic, functional, and structural components of variation in bone growth rate of amniotes.

    PubMed

    Cubo, Jorge; Legendre, Pierre; de Ricqlès, Armand; Montes, Laëtitia; de Margerie, Emmanuel; Castanet, Jacques; Desdevises, Yves

    2008-01-01

    The biological features observed in every living organism are the outcome of three sets of factors: historical (inherited by homology), functional (biological adaptation), and structural (properties inherent to the materials with which organs are constructed, and the morphogenetic rules by which they grow). Integrating them should bring satisfactory causal explanations of empirical data. However, little progress has been accomplished in practice toward this goal, because a methodologically efficient tool was lacking. Here we use a new statistical method of variation partitioning to analyze bone growth in amniotes. (1) Historical component. The variation of bone growth rates contains a significant phylogenetic signal, suggesting that the observed patterns are partly the outcome of shared ancestry. (2) Functional causation. High growth rates, although energy costly, may be adaptive (i.e., they may increase survival rates) in taxa showing short growth periods (e.g., birds). In ectothermic amniotes, low resting metabolic rates may limit the maximum possible growth rates. (3) Structural constraint. Whereas soft tissues grow through a multiplicative process, growth of mineralized tissues is accretionary (additive, i.e., mineralization fronts occur only at free surfaces). Bone growth of many amniotes partially circumvents this constraint: it is achieved not only at the external surface of the bone shaft, but also within cavities included in the bone cortex as it grows centrifugally. Our approach contributes to the unification of historicism, functionalism, and structuralism toward a more integrated evolutionary biology.

  6. Three-component layer double hydroxides by urea precipitation: structural stability and electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavis, Bora; Akinc, Mufit

    Three-component layer double hydroxides (LDHs) with varying compositions were produced by urea precipitation, and tested for their stability and electrochemical performance. Optimum initial metal ion concentrations in the starting solutions were established. Initial Al 3+ concentration in the solution needs to be at least 0.015 M for the LDH formation. From the solutions with initial Al 3+ concentration of 0.025 M, higher fractions of Ni 2+ and Co 2+ could be recovered. Co 2+ could be incorporated at various levels without disturbing the LDH structure. LDH structure proved stable once it formed. Cyanate in the LDHs was dominantly N-bonded which contributed to the stability of the structure. Highest specific discharge capacity delivered by a LDH was 336 mAh/g, which was about 30% higher than that by β-Ni(OH) 2. LDHs reached their stable capacities at a lower rate than either β-Ni(OH) 2 or the interstratified-Ni(OH) 2 (α+β). The interstratified sample delivered the highest capacity compared to any of the tested compositions.

  7. Structure of the transmembrane domain of human nicastrin-a component of γ-secretase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Liew, Lynette Sin Yee; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2016-01-01

    Nicastrin is the largest component of γ-secretase that is an intramembrane protease important in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Nicastrin contains a large extracellular domain, a single transmembrane (TM) domain, and a short C-terminus. Its TM domain is important for the γ-secretase complex formation. Here we report nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of the TM and C-terminal regions of human nicastrin in both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles. Structural study and dynamic analysis reveal that the TM domain is largely helical and stable under both SDS and DPC micelles with its N-terminal region undergoing intermediate time scale motion. The TM helix contains a hydrophilic patch that is important for TM-TM interactions. The short C-terminus is not structured in solution and a region formed by residues V697-A702 interacts with the membrane, suggesting that these residues may play a role in the γ-secretase complex formation. Our study provides structural insight into the function of the nicastrin TM domain and the C-terminus in γ-secretase complex. PMID:26776682

  8. Underdetermined blind modal identification of structures by earthquake and ambient vibration measurements via sparse component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Fereidoun; Hedayati, Yousef

    2016-03-01

    Sparse component analysis (SCA) approach was adopted to handle underdetermined blind modal identification of structures, where the number of sensors is less than the number of active modes. To exploit the sparsity of structural responses in time-frequency domain, Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) was used in this study. The proposed SCA-based approach has two main stages: modal matrix estimation and modal displacement estimation. In the first stage, hierarchical clustering algorithm was used to estimate the modal matrix. The clustering algorithm was preceded by a preprocessing step to select the points in time-frequency domain that only one mode makes contribution in the responses. These points were fed to the clustering algorithm as an input. Performing this analysis enhanced the modal matrix estimation accuracy and reduced the computational cost while conducting clustering analysis. Having estimated mixing matrix, the complex-valued modal responses in the transformed domain were recovered via Smoothed zero-norm (SL-0) algorithm. In a broad sense, using the SL-0 algorithm permits researchers to use any kind of transform in seeking sparsity, regardless of obtaining real-valued or complex-valued signals in transformed domain. Natural frequencies and damping ratios were extracted from the recovered modal responses. Performance of the proposed method was investigated using a synthetic example and a benchmark structure with earthquake and ambient excitation, respectively.

  9. THE CARNEGIE-IRVINE GALAXY SURVEY. III. THE THREE-COMPONENT STRUCTURE OF NEARBY ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Song; Ho, Luis C.; Peng, Chien Y.; Li, Zhao-Yu; Barth, Aaron J.

    2013-03-20

    Motivated by recent developments in our understanding of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies, we explore the detailed photometric structure of a representative sample of 94 bright, nearby elliptical galaxies, using high-quality optical images from the Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey. The sample spans a range of environments and stellar masses, from M{sub *} = 10{sup 10.2} to 10{sup 12.0} M{sub Sun }. We exploit the unique capabilities of two-dimensional image decomposition to explore the possibility that local elliptical galaxies may contain photometrically distinct substructure that can shed light on their evolutionary history. Compared with the traditional one-dimensional approach, these two-dimensional models are capable of consistently recovering the surface brightness distribution and the systematic radial variation of geometric information at the same time. Contrary to conventional perception, we find that the global light distribution of the majority ({approx}>75%) of elliptical galaxies is not well described by a single Sersic function. Instead, we propose that local elliptical galaxies generically contain three subcomponents: a compact (R{sub e} {approx}< 1 kpc) inner component with luminosity fraction f Almost-Equal-To 0.1-0.15; an intermediate-scale (R{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 2.5 kpc) middle component with f Almost-Equal-To 0.2-0.25; and a dominant (f = 0.6), extended (R{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 10 kpc) outer envelope. All subcomponents have average Sersic indices n Almost-Equal-To 1-2, significantly lower than the values typically obtained from single-component fits. The individual subcomponents follow well-defined photometric scaling relations and the stellar mass-size relation. We discuss the physical nature of the substructures and their implications for the formation of massive elliptical galaxies.

  10. Structural studies on the major component of Gladiolus style mucilage, an arabinogalactan-protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, P A; Clarke, A E

    1979-01-01

    The major component of the Gladiolus style mucilage was shown to be an arabinogalactan-protein. The arabinogalactan-protein was isolated from the style extract by affinity chromatography with tridacnin (the galactose-binding lectin from the clam Tridacna maxima) coupled to Sepharose 4B. The isolated arabinogalactan-protein represents 40% of the soluble style extract; it contains 90% (w/w) carbohydrate and 3% protein. The major monosaccharides of the carbohydrate component are galactose and arabinose, in the proportions 6:1. A component with a similar composition was also isolated from the crude extract by precipitation with the beta-glucosyl artifical carbohydrate antigen. The protein moiety of the arabinogalactan-protein remained associated with the carbohydrate after chromatography in urea, and has high contents of serine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, glycine and alanine. The arabinogalactan-protein is apparently chemically homogeneous; it eluted as a single symmetrical peak from Sepharose 4B, and three fractions collected across the peak were structurally similar. Ultracentrifugal studies showed it to be polydisperse in the mol.wt. range 150 000--400 000. The information obtained from methylation analyses, oxalic acid and enzymic hydrolyses is consistent with a model having a beta 1 leads to 3 galactan backbone, branched through C(O)6 to beta 1 leads to 6 galactan side chains. The arabinose is exclusively present as terminal alpha-L-arabinofuranosyl residues. Enzymic removal of the arabinose residues resulted in a marked decrease in solubility of the molecule. The localization of the arabinogalactan-protein in the mucilage of the style canal was demonstrated cytochemically. The possible roles of the arabinogalactan-protein in relation to recognition of compatible pollen and pollen-tube growth are discussed. Images PLATE 1 PMID:518543

  11. Nano-casted Metal Oxide Aerogels as Dual Purpose Structural Components for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilaras, Plousia E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA missions and space exploration rely on strong, ultra lightweight materials. Such materials are needed for building up past and present space vehicles such as the Sojourner Rover (1997) or the two MERs (2003), but also for a number of components and/or systems including thermal insulators, Solar Sails, Rigid Aeroshells, and Ballutes. The purpose of my internship here at Glenn Research Center is to make dual purpose materials; materials that in addition to being lightweight have electronic, photophysical and magnetic properties and, therefore, act as electronic components and sensors as well as structural components. One type of ultra lightweight material of great interest is aerogels, which have densities ranging from 0.003 g/cc to 0.8 g/cc . However, aerogels are extremely fragile and, as a result, have limited practical applications. Recently, Glenn Research Center has developed a process of nano-casting polymers onto the inorganic network of silica-based aerogels increasing the strength 300 fold while only increasing the density 3 fold. By combining the process of nano-casting polymers with inorganic oxide networks other than silica, we are actively pursuing lightweight dual purpose materials. To date, thirty different inorganic oxide aerogels have been prepared using either standard sol-gel chemistry or a non-alkoxide method involving metal chloride precursors and an epoxide; epichlorohydrin, propylene oxide or trimethylene oxide, as proton scavengers. More importantly, preliminary investigations show that the residual surface hydroxyl groups on each of these inorganic oxide aerogels can be successfully crosslinked with urethane. In addition to characterizing physical and mechanical properties such as density, strength and flexibility, each of these metal oxide aerogels are being characterized for thermal and electronic conductivity and magnetic and optical properties.

  12. Establishing components of community satisfaction with recycled water use through a structural equation model.

    PubMed

    Hurlimann, Anna; Hemphill, Elizabeth; McKay, Jennifer; Geursen, Gus

    2008-09-01

    The use of recycled water is being promoted through policy in many parts of the world with the aim of achieving sustainable water management. However there are some major barriers to the success of recycled water use policies and their instruments, in particular for potable reuse schemes. One of these barriers can be a lack of community support. Despite the critical nature of community attitudes to recycled water to the success of projects, they are often little understood. Further information is required to ensure the successful implementation of recycled water policy and to ensure sustainable management of water resources is achieved. The aim of this paper is to establish the key components of community satisfaction with recycled water. This was investigated through a case study of the Mawson Lakes population in South Australia, where recycled water is used for non-potable purposes through a dual water supply system (the 'recycled water system'). This paper reports results from a survey of 162 Mawson Lakes residents. A structural equation model (SEM) was developed and tested to explain and predict components of community satisfaction with recycled water use (for non-potable use) through the dual water supply system. Results indicate the components of satisfaction with recycled water use were an individual's positive perception of: the Water Authority's communication, trust in the Water Authority, fairness in the recycled water system's implementation, quality of the recycled water, financial value of the recycled water system, and risk associated with recycled water use (negative relationship). The results of this study have positive implications for the future management and implementation of recycled water projects in particular through dual water supply systems. The results indicate to water authorities and water policy developers guiding principles for community consultation with regards to the management of recycled water projects.

  13. Constitutive material model for the prediction of stresses in irradiated anisotropic graphite components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Derek K. L.; Marsden, Barry J.

    2008-10-01

    As well as acting as a moderator and reflector, graphite is used as a structural component in many gas-cooled fission nuclear reactors. Therefore the ability to predict the structural integrity of the many graphite components which make up a graphite reactor core is important in safety case assessments and reactor core life prediction. This involves the prediction of the service life stresses in the individual graphite components. In this paper a material model for the prediction of stresses in anisotropic graphite is presented. The time-integrated non-linear irradiated graphite material model can be used for stress analysis of graphite components subject to both fast neutron irradiation and radiolytic oxidation. As an example a simple stress analysis of a typical reactor graphite component is presented along with a series of sensitivity studies aimed at investigating the importance of the various material property changes involved in graphite component stress prediction.

  14. The electron temperature and optical emission structure of the central component of CTB 80

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, William P.; Fesen, Robert A.; Becker, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    Optical spectra on the central component of the galactic supernova remnant CTB 80 are presented. Long slit CCD spectra reveal relative line-intensity variations among individual filaments, the presence of Balmer-dominated emission in the core's east and west optical lobes, and no radial velocities in excess of 300 km/s. Aperture spectrophotometry of the temperature-sensitive forbiddden O III lines suggests Te = 25,000 K, thus favoring a shock-heated interpretation for the remnant's optical core emission. These results indicate that fundamental differences exist betweem the optical emission of CTB 80's central core component and the Crab Nebula, despite similarities in these remnants' radio and X-ray properties. The optical emission from CTB 80's core is likely to be a direct result of the interaction of an active pulsar with its adjacent partially neutral interstellar medium. The size of CTB 80's outer structure and the absence of either high velocity or enhanced abundances in the region local to CTB 80's pulsar argue for a considerably larger age for CTB 80 than the Crab Nebula's 1000 yr. A qualitative picture for CTB 80 that can plausibly explain many of the core's properties is proposed.

  15. Turbulence descriptors for scaling fatigue loading spectra of wind turbine structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, N. D.

    1994-07-01

    The challenge for the designer in developing a new wind turbine is to incorporate sufficient strength in its components to safely achieve a 20- or 30-year service life. To accomplish this, the designer must understand the load and stress distributions (in a statistical sense at least) that the turbine is likely to encounter during its operating life. Sources of loads found in the normal operating environment include start/stop cycles, emergency shutdowns, the turbulence environment associated with the specific site and turbine location, and extreme or 'rare' events that can challenge the turbine short-term survivability. Extreme events can result from an operational problem (e.g., controller failure) or violent atmospheric phenomena (tornadic circulations, strong gust fronts). For the majority of the operating time, however, the character of the turbulent inflow is the dominant source of the alternating stress distributions experienced by the structural components. Methods of characterizing or scaling the severity of the loading spectra (or the rate of fatigue damage accumulation) must be applicable to a wide range of turbulent inflow environments - from solitary isolation to the complex flows associated with multi-row wind farms. The metrics chosen must be related to the properties of the turbulent inflow and independent of the nature of local terrain features.

  16. Development of HVOF Sprayed Erosion/Oxidation Resistant Coatings for Composite Structural Components in Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, R.; Ivosevic, M.; Twardowski, T. E.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Sutter, James K.; Kim, D. Y.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are being studied and developed as methods of enabling lightweight composites to be used more extensively as structural components in propulsion applications in order to reduce costs and improve efficiency through weight reductions. The primary goal of this work is the development of functionally graded material [FGM] polymer/metal matrix composite coatings to provide improved erosion/oxidation resistance to polyimide-based polymer matrix composite [PMC] substrates. The goal is to grade the coating composition from pure polyimide, similar to the PMC substrate matrix on one side, to 100 % WC-Co on the other. Both step-wise and continuous gradation of the loading of the WC-Co reinforcing phase are being investigated. Details of the coating parameter development will be presented, specifically the high velocity oxy-fuel [HVOF] combustion spraying of pure PMR-11 matrix material and layers of various composition PMR-II/WC-Co blends onto steel and PMR-15 composite substrates. Results of the HVOF process optimization, microstructural characterization, and analysis will be presented. The sprayed coatings were evaluated using standard metallographic techniques - optical and scanning electron microscopy [SEM]. An SEM + electron dispersive spectroscopy [EDS] technique has also been used to confirm retention of the PMR-II component. Results of peel/butt adhesion testing to determine adhesion will also be presented.

  17. Development of HVOF Sprayed Erosion/Oxidation Resistant Coatings for Composite Structural Components in Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivosevic, M.; Twardowski, T.; Kalidindi, S.; Knight, R.; Sutter, J.; Kim, D. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are being studied and developed as methods of enabling lightweight composites to be used more extensively as structural components in propulsion applications in order to reduce costs and improve efficiency through weight reductions. The primary goal of this work is the development of functionally graded material [FGM] polymer/metal matrix composite coatings to provide improved erosion/oxidation resistance to polyimide-based polymer matrix composite [PMC] substrates. The goal is to grade the coating composition from pure polyimide, similar to the PMC substrate matrix on one side, to 100% WC-Co on the other. Both step-wise and continuous gradation of the loading of the WC-Co reinforcing phase are being investigated, Details of the coating parameter development will be presented, specifically the high velocity oxy-fuel [HVOF] combustion spraying of pure PMR-I1 matrix material and layers of various composition PMR-II/WC-Co blends onto steel and PMR-15 composite substrates. Results of the HVOF process optimization, microstructural characterization, and analysis will be presented. The sprayed coatings were evaluated using standard metallographic techniques - optical and scanning electron microscopy [SEMI. An SEM + electron dispersive spectroscopy [EDS] technique has also been used to confirm retention of the PMR-I1 component. Results of peel/butt adhesion testing to determine adhesion will also be presented.

  18. Atomistic modeling of the structural components of the blood-brain barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Grishina, O. A.; Slepchenkov, M. M.

    2015-03-01

    Blood-brain barrier, which is a barrage system between the brain and blood vessels, plays a key role in the "isolation" of the brain of unnecessary information, and reduce the "noise" in the interneuron communication. It is known that the barrier function of the BBB strictly depends on the initial state of the organism and changes significantly with age and, especially in developing the "vascular accidents". Disclosure mechanisms of regulation of the barrier function will develop new ways to deliver neurotrophic drugs to the brain in the newborn. The aim of this work is the construction of atomistic models of structural components of the blood-brain barrier to reveal the mechanisms of regulation of the barrier function.

  19. Structural and Thermodynamic Analysis of a Three-Component Assembly Forming ortho-Iminophenylboronate Esters.

    PubMed

    Chapin, Brette M; Metola, Pedro; Lynch, Vincent M; Stanton, John F; James, Tony D; Anslyn, Eric V

    2016-09-16

    Structural studies of a three-component assembly-a host and two distinct guests-were carried out using a combination of (11)B and (1)H NMR. In aprotic solvent, the imino group that forms ortho to the boronic acid or boronate ester group can form a dative N-B bond. In protic solvent, a molecule of solvent inserts between the nitrogen and boron atoms, partially ionizing the solvent molecule. Additionally, (11)B NMR was used in combination with a seventh-order polynomial to calculate five binding constants for each of the individual steps in protic solvent. Comparison of these binding constants was used to establish positive cooperativity in the binding of the two guests. PMID:27588921

  20. Enantiospecific Synthesis and Biological Investigations of a Nuphar Alkaloid: Proposed Structure of a Castoreum Component

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Hajime; Georg, Gunda I.

    2014-01-01

    An enantiospecific synthesis of a Nuphar alkaloid was achieved in 9 steps from N-Boc-(L)-proline. The alkaloid is a minor component of castoreum, the dried scent glands of the beaver. During the course of our study, the stereochemistry of three synthetic intermediates was verified by X-ray analysis, which contributes to resolving existing discrepancies among the literature reports regarding the synthesis of this particular compound. Based on our synthesis, we propose the structure of the natural product. Also, intrigued by castoreum’s therapeutic effect, which was used in ancient Greece and Rome for gynecological and other purposes, biological screening was conducted. We found that the alkaloid has affinity for the oxytocin receptor. PMID:25395879

  1. Lipid Transfer Proteins As Components of the Plant Innate Immune System: Structure, Functions, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Finkina, E. I.; Melnikova, D. N.; Bogdanov, I. V.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of molecular factors of the plant innate immune system, small proteins that transfer lipids and exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities are of particular interest. These are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are interesting to researchers for three main features. The first feature is the ability of plant LTPs to bind and transfer lipids, whereby these proteins got their name and were combined into one class. The second feature is that LTPs are defense proteins that are components of plant innate immunity. The third feature is that LTPs constitute one of the most clinically important classes of plant allergens. In this review, we summarize the available data on the plant LTP structure, biological properties, diversity of functions, mechanisms of action, and practical applications, emphasizing their role in plant physiology and their significance in human life. PMID:27437139

  2. Isosorbide as the structural component of bio-based unsaturated polyesters for use as thermosetting resins.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Joshua M; Toulan, Faye R; Nguyen, Anh-Phuong T; Kayea, Ronald V; Ziaee, Saeed; Palmese, Giuseppe R; La Scala, John J

    2014-01-16

    In recent years, the development of renewable bio-based resins has gained interest as potential replacements for petroleum based resins. Modified carbohydrate-based derivatives have favorable structural features such as fused bicyclic rings that offer promising candidates for the development of novel renewable polymers with improved thermomechanical properties when compared to early bio-based resins. Isosorbide is one such compound and has been utilized as the stiffness component for the synthesis of novel unsaturated polyesters (UPE) resins. Resin blends of BioUPE systems with styrene were shown to possess viscosities (120-2200 cP) amenable to a variety of liquid molding techniques, and after cure had Tgs (53-107 °C) and storage moduli (430-1650 MPa) that are in the desired range for composite materials. These investigations show that BioUPEs containing isosorbide can be tailored during synthesis of the prepolymer to meet the needs of different property profiles. PMID:24188843

  3. Analysis of fatigue, fatique-crack propagation, and fracture data. [design of metallic aerospace structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaske, C. E.; Feddersen, C. E.; Davies, K. B.; Rice, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for consolidation of fatigue, fatigue-crack propagation, and fracture data for use in design of metallic aerospace structural components. To evaluate these methods, a comprehensive file of data on 2024 and 7075 aluminums, Ti-6A1-4V, and 300M and D6Ac steels was established. Data were obtained from both published literature and unpublished reports furnished by aerospace companies. Fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation analyses were restricted to information obtained from constant-amplitude load or strain cycling of specimens in air at room temperature. Fracture toughness data were from tests of center-cracked tension panels, part-through crack specimens, and compact-tension specimens.

  4. DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE INNER CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Saar, S. H. E-mail: jzhang7@gmu.edu

    2012-12-10

    In this paper, we study the temperature and density properties of multiple structural components of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using differential emission measure (DEM) analysis. The DEM analysis is based on the six-passband EUV observations of solar corona from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The structural components studied include the hot channel in the core region (presumably the magnetic flux rope of the CME), the bright loop-like leading front (LF), and coronal dimming in the wake of the CME. We find that the presumed flux rope has the highest average temperature (>8 MK) and density ({approx}1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}), resulting in an enhanced emission measure over a broad temperature range (3 {<=} T(MK) {<=} 20). On the other hand, the CME LF has a relatively cool temperature ({approx}2 MK) and a narrow temperature distribution similar to the pre-eruption coronal temperature (1 {<=} T(MK) {<=} 3). The density in the LF, however, is increased by 2%-32% compared with that of the pre-eruption corona, depending on the event and location. In coronal dimmings, the temperature is more broadly distributed (1 {<=} T(MK) {<=} 4), but the density decreases by {approx}35%-{approx}40%. These observational results show that: (1) CME core regions are significantly heated, presumably through magnetic reconnection; (2) CME LFs are a consequence of compression of ambient plasma caused by the expansion of the CME core region; and (3) the dimmings are largely caused by the plasma rarefaction associated with the eruption.

  5. Effect of environmental variables and stand structure on ecosystem respiration components in a Mediterranean beech forest.

    PubMed

    Guidolotti, Gabriele; Rey, Ana; D'Andrea, Ettore; Matteucci, Giorgio; De Angelis, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    The temporal variability of ecosystem respiration (RECO) has been reported to have important effects on the temporal variability of net ecosystem exchange, the net amount of carbon exchanged between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. However, our understanding of ecosystem respiration is rather limited compared with photosynthesis or gross primary productivity, particularly in Mediterranean montane ecosystems. In order to investigate how environmental variables and forest structure (tree classes) affect different respiration components and RECO in a Mediterranean beech forest, we measured soil, stem and leaf CO2 efflux rates with dynamic chambers and RECO by the eddy-covariance technique over 1 year (2007-2008). Ecosystem respiration showed marked seasonal variation, with the highest rates in spring and autumn and the lowest in summer. We found that the soil respiration (SR) was mainly controlled by soil water content below a threshold value of 0.2 m(3) m(-3), above which the soil temperature explained temporal variation in SR. Stem CO2 effluxes were influenced by air temperature and difference between tree classes with higher rates measured in dominant trees than in co-dominant ones. Leaf respiration (LR) varied significantly between the two canopy layers considered. Non-structural carbohydrates were a very good predictor of LR variability. We used these measurements to scale up respiration components to ecosystem respiration for the whole canopy and obtained cumulative amounts of carbon losses over the year. Based on the up-scaled chamber measurements, the relative contributions of soil, stem and leaves to the total annual CO2 efflux were: 56, 8 and 36%, respectively. These results confirm that SR is the main contributor of ecosystem respiration and provided an insight on the driving factors of respiration in Mediterranean montane beech forests. PMID:24044943

  6. Structure elucidation and chromatographic identification of anthraquinone components of cochineal (Dactylopius coccus) detected in historical objects.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulou, Konstantina; Valianou, Lemonia; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Karapanagiotis, Ioannis; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2013-12-01

    Cochineal is one of the most well known organic red dyes. Dactylopius coccus Costa (Dactylopiidae) is a scale insect that is used as the source of the dye known as Mexican cochineal. Although cochineal is today a natural food colorant (E120) and although it has been used in art objects (textiles and paintings) for centuries, its exact chemical consistency is not well clarified except for carminic acid which is the major component and kermesic and flavokermesic acids. Several minor components (typically less than 5% of the colouring material) remained unknown or partially studied, although their presence has been reported in numerous analytical works related to art objects. Chemical investigation of the methanol extract of the dried insects, after subsequent HPLC chromatographic separations, led to the isolation and structure elucidation of six new anthraquinones, along with the known compounds carminic acid, kermesic acid and flavokermesic acid. The new compounds formerly described as DCII and DCIII, were found to be the 2-C-glucoside of flavokermesic acid and 4-aminocarminic acid, respectively, while DCIV and DCVII were found to be the α/β C-glucofuranosides of kermesic acid, and were studied as a mixture due to equilibrium. In addition, 3-O-glucoside of flavokermesic acid (DCOFK), and 3,4-dideoxycarminic acid (DDCA) were identified. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of their NMR and MS data. Finally, the new compounds were detected in silk dyed with cochineal, lake pigment and, furthermore, in historical objects of the cultural heritage (icon and textile) using LC-DAD and LC-MS. PMID:24267092

  7. Fast plasma sintering delivers functional graded materials components with macroporous structures and osseointegration properties.

    PubMed

    Godoy, R F; Coathup, M J; Blunn, G W; Alves, A L; Robotti, P; Goodship, A E

    2016-04-13

    We explored the osseointegration potential of two macroporous titanium surfaces obtained using fast plasma sintering (FPS): Ti macroporous structures with 400-600 µmØ pores (TiMac400) and 850-1000 µmØ pores (TiMac850). They were compared against two surfaces currently in clinical use: Ti-Growth® and air plasma spray (Ti-Y367). Each surface was tested, once placed over a Ti-alloy and once onto a CoCr bulk substrate. Implants were placed in medial femoral condyles in 24 sheep. Samples were explanted at four and eight weeks after surgery. Push-out loads were measured using a material-testing system. Bone contact and ingrowth were assessed by histomorphometry and SEM and EDX analyses. Histology showed early osseointegration for all the surfaces tested. At 8 weeks, TiMac400, TiMac850 and Ti-Growth® showed deep bone ingrowth and extended colonisation with newly formed bone. The mechanical push-out force was equal in all tested surfaces. Plasma spray surfaces showed greater bone-implant contact and higher level of pores colonisation with new bone than FPS produced surfaces. However, the void pore area in FPS specimens was significantly higher, yet the FPS porous surfaces allowed a deeper osseointegration of bone to implant. FPS manufactured specimens showed similar osseointegration potential to the plasma spray surfaces for orthopaedic implants. FPS is a useful technology for manufacturing macroporous titanium surfaces. Furthermore, its capability to combine two implantable materials, using bulk CoCr with macroporous titanium surfaces, could be of interest as it enables designers to conceive and manufacture innovative components. FPS delivers functional graded materials components with macroporous structures optimised for osseointegration.

  8. Crystal Structure of Prunin-1, a Major Component of the Almond (Prunus dulcis) Allergen Amandin

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Tengchuan; Albillos, Silvia M.; Guo, Feng; Howard, Andrew; Fu, Tong-Jen; Kothary, Mahendra H.; Zhang, Yu-Zhu

    2010-10-28

    Seed storage proteins are accumulated during seed development and act as a reserve of nutrition for seed germination and young sprout growth. Plant seeds play an important role in human nutrition by providing a relatively inexpensive source of protein. However, many plant foods contain allergenic proteins, and the number of people suffering from food allergies has increased rapidly in recent years. The 11S globulins are the most widespread seed storage proteins, present in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous seeds as well as in gymnosperms (conifers) and other spermatophytes. This family of proteins accounts for a number of known major food allergens. They are of interest to both the public and industry due to food safety concerns. Because of the interests in the structural basis of the allergenicity of food allergens, we sought to determine the crystal structure of Pru1, the major component of the 11 S storage protein from almonds. The structure was refined to 2.4 {angstrom}, and the R/Rfree for the final refined structure is 17.2/22.9. Pru1 is a hexamer made of two trimers. Most of the back-to-back trimer-trimer association was contributed by monomer-monomer interactions. An {alpha} helix (helix 6) at the C-terminal end of the acidic domain of one of the interacting monomers lies at the cleft of the two protomers. The residues in this helix correspond to a flexible region in the peanut allergen Ara h 3 that encompasses a previously defined linear IgE epitope.

  9. Crystal structure of prunin-1, a major component of the almond (Prunus dulcis) allergen amandin.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tengchuan; Albillos, Silvia M; Guo, Feng; Howard, Andrew; Fu, Tong-Jen; Kothary, Mahendra H; Zhang, Yu-Zhu

    2009-09-23

    Seed storage proteins are accumulated during seed development and act as a reserve of nutrition for seed germination and young sprout growth. Plant seeds play an important role in human nutrition by providing a relatively inexpensive source of protein. However, many plant foods contain allergenic proteins, and the number of people suffering from food allergies has increased rapidly in recent years. The 11S globulins are the most widespread seed storage proteins, present in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous seeds as well as in gymnosperms (conifers) and other spermatophytes. This family of proteins accounts for a number of known major food allergens. They are of interest to both the public and industry due to food safety concerns. Because of the interests in the structural basis of the allergenicity of food allergens, we sought to determine the crystal structure of Pru1, the major component of the 11 S storage protein from almonds. The structure was refined to 2.4 A, and the R/Rfree for the final refined structure is 17.2/22.9. Pru1 is a hexamer made of two trimers. Most of the back-to-back trimer-trimer association was contributed by monomer-monomer interactions. An alpha helix (helix 6) at the C-terminal end of the acidic domain of one of the interacting monomers lies at the cleft of the two protomers. The residues in this helix correspond to a flexible region in the peanut allergen Ara h 3 that encompasses a previously defined linear IgE epitope.

  10. Structural studies of the activation of the two component receiver domain NTRC by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Nohaile, M J

    1996-05-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the N-terminal domain of the transcriptional enhancer NTRC (NiTrogen Regulatory protein C). This domain belongs to the family of receiver domains of two-component regulatory systems involved in signal transduction. Phosphorylation of NTRC at D54 leads to an activated form of the molecule which stimulates transcription of genes involved in nitrogen regulation. Three and four dimensional NMR techniques were used to determine an intermediate resolution structure of the unphosphorylated, inactive form of the N-terminal domain of NTRC. The structure is comprised of five {alpha}-helices and a five-stranded {beta}-sheet in a ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 5} topology. Analysis of the backbone dynamics of NTRC indicate that helix 4 and strand 5 are significantly more flexible than the rest of the secondary structure of the protein and that the loops making up the active site are flexible. The short lifetime of phospho-NTRC hampers the study of this form. However, conditions for determining the resonance assignments and, possibly, the three dimensional structure of phosphorylated NTRC have been obtained. Tentative assignments of the phosphorylated form indicate that the majority of the changes that NTRC experiences upon phosphorylation occur in helix 3, strand 4, helix 4, strand 5, and the loop between strand 5 and helix 5 (the 3445 face of NTRC) as well as near the site of phosphorylation. In order to examine a stable, activated form of the protein, constitutively active mutants of NTRC were investigated.

  11. Component Structure of Individual Differences in True and False Recognition of Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, James C.; Shastri, Kalyan K.; Abdi, Herve; Neville-Smith, Marsha

    2009-01-01

    Principal-component analyses of 4 face-recognition studies uncovered 2 independent components. The first component was strongly related to false-alarm errors with new faces as well as to facial "conjunctions" that recombine features of previously studied faces. The second component was strongly related to hits as well as to the conjunction/new…

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  13. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor including two rotatable plugs and a positive top core holddown structure. The top core holddown structure is divided into two parts: a small core cover, and a large core cover. The small core cover, and the upper internals associated therewith, are attached to the small rotating plug, and the large core cover, with its associated upper internals, is attached to the large rotating plug. By so splitting the core holddown structures, under-the-plug refueling is accomplished without the necessity of enlarging the reactor pressure vessel to provide a storage space for the core holddown structure during refueling. Additionally, the small and large rotating plugs, and their associated core covers, are arranged such that the separation of the two core covers to permit rotation is accomplished without the installation of complex lifting mechanisms.

  14. Transient heat and mass transfer analysis in a porous ceria structure of a novel solar redox reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, RB; Bader, R; Lipinski, W

    2015-06-01

    Thermal transport processes are numerically analyzed for a porous ceria structure undergoing reduction in a novel redox reactor for solar thermochemical fuel production. The cylindrical reactor cavity is formed by an array of annular reactive elements comprising the porous ceria monolith integrated with gas inlet and outlet channels. Two configurations are considered, with the reactor cavity consisting of 10 and 20 reactive elements, respectively. Temperature dependent boundary heat fluxes are obtained on the irradiated cavity wall by solving for the surface radiative exchange using the net radiation method coupled to the heat and mass transfer model of the reactive element. Predicted oxygen production rates are in the range 40-60 mu mol s(-1) for the geometries considered. After an initial rise, the average temperature of the reactive element levels off at 1660 and 1680 K for the two geometries, respectively. For the chosen reduction reaction rate model, oxygen release continues after the temperature has leveled off which indicates that the oxygen release reaction is limited by chemical kinetics and/or mass transfer rather than by the heating rate. For a fixed total mass of ceria, the peak oxygen release rate is doubled for the cavity with 20 reactive elements due to lower local oxygen partial pressure. (C) 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. High-throughput profiling of microbial community structures in an ANAMMOX-UASB reactor treating high-strength wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shenbin; Du, Rui; Li, Baikun; Ren, Nanqi; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the microbial community structure was assessed in an anaerobic ammonium oxidation-upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (ANAMMOX-UASB) reactor treating high-strength wastewater (approximately 700 mg N L(-1) in total nitrogen) by employing Illumina high-throughput sequencing analysis. The reactor was started up and reached a steady state in 26 days by seeding mature ANAMMOX granules, and a high nitrogen removal rate (NRR) of 2.96 kg N m(-3) day(-1) was obtained at 13.2∼17.6 °C. Results revealed that the abundance of ANAMMOX bacteria increased during the operation, though it occupied a low proportion in the system. The phylum Planctomycetes was only 8.39 % on day 148 and Candidatus Brocadia was identified as the dominant ANAMMOX species with a percentage of 2.70 %. The phylum of Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria constituted a percentage up to 70 % in the community, of which the Chloroflexi and Bacteroidetes were likely to be related to the sludge granulation. In addition, it was found that heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria of Denitratisoma belonging to Proteobacteria phylum occupied a large proportion (22.1∼23.58 %), which was likely caused by the bacteria lysis and decay with the internal carbon source production. The SEM images also showed that plenty of other microorganisms existed in the ANAMMOX-UASB reactor. PMID:27020296

  16. Structure and function of the microbial community in an in situ reactor to treat an acidic mine pit lake.

    PubMed

    Koschorreck, Matthias; Geller, Walter; Neu, Thomas; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Kunze, Tobias; Trosiener, Annegret; Wendt-Potthoff, Katrin

    2010-08-01

    Sulfate-reducing bioreactors are a promising option for the treatment of acid mine drainage. We studied the structure and function of a biofilm in a methanol-fed fixed-bed in-lake reactor for the treatment of an acidic pit lake by a combination of laboratory incubations, chemical and molecular analyses and confocal laser scanning microscopy to determine whether competition by different groups of microorganisms as well as the precipitation of minerals affect reactor performance negatively. The biofilm growing on the surface of a synthetic carrier material consisted of dense microbial colonies covered by iron-sulfide precipitates. The microorganisms continuously had to overgrow this mineral coating, resulting in a high biomass turnover. About one third of the added methanol was used by sulfate reduction, and the rest by competing reactions. Sulfate-reducing bacteria as well as methanogens and acetogens were involved in methanol consumption. Six different groups of Deltaproteobacteria, dominated by the genera Desulfomonile, Desulfobacterium and a phylotype related to Geobacter, Gram-positive sulfate reducers of the genus Desulfosporosinus, acetogenic Acetobacteria, different fermenting bacteria as well as methylotrophic methanogens were identified. The versatility of the microbial food web is probably an important factor stabilizing the biofilm function under fluctuating and partly oxidizing conditions in the reactor.

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1961-01-24

    A core structure for neutronic reactors adapted for the propulsion of aircraft and rockets is offered. The core is designed for cooling by gaseous media, and comprises a plurality of hollow tapered tubular segments of a porous moderating material impregniated with fissionable fuel nested about a common axis. Alternate ends of the segments are joined. In operation a coolant gas passes through the porous structure and is heated.

  18. Effect of Cholesterol on the Structure of a Five-Component Mitochondria-Like Phospholipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cathcart, Kelly; Patel, Amit; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.; Fradin, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes have a complex phospholipid composition that varies greatly depending on the organism, cell type and function. In spite of this complexity, most structural data available for phospholipid bilayers concern model systems containing only one or two different phospholipids. Here, we examine the effect of cholesterol on the structure of a complex membrane reflecting the lipid composition of mitochondrial membranes, with five different types of headgroups (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylserine (PS) and cardiolipin (CL)) and a variety of hydrocarbon tails. This particular system was chosen because elevated cholesterol contents in mitochondrial membranes have been linked to a breaking down of Bax-mediated membrane permeabilization and resistance to cancer treatments. High resolution electron density profiles were determined by X-ray reflectivity, while the area per phospholipid chain, Apc, and the chain order parameter, SX-ray, were determined by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). We show that chain order increases upon the addition of cholesterol, resulting in both a thickening of the lipid bilayer and a reduction in the average surface area per phospholipid chain. This effect, well known as cholesterol’s condensation effect, is similar, but not as pronounced as for single-component phospholipid membranes. We conclude by discussing the relevance of these findings for the insertion of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax in mitochondrial membranes with elevated cholesterol content. PMID:26529029

  19. A simple iterative independent component analysis algorithm for vibration source signal identification of complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Sup; Cho, Dae-Seung; Kim, Kookhyun; Jeon, Jae-Jin; Jung, Woo-Jin; Kang, Myeng-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Independent Component Analysis (ICA), one of the blind source separation methods, can be applied for extracting unknown source signals only from received signals. This is accomplished by finding statistical independence of signal mixtures and has been successfully applied to myriad fields such as medical science, image processing, and numerous others. Nevertheless, there are inherent problems that have been reported when using this technique: instability and invalid ordering of separated signals, particularly when using a conventional ICA technique in vibratory source signal identification of complex structures. In this study, a simple iterative algorithm of the conventional ICA has been proposed to mitigate these problems. The proposed method to extract more stable source signals having valid order includes an iterative and reordering process of extracted mixing matrix to reconstruct finally converged source signals, referring to the magnitudes of correlation coefficients between the intermediately separated signals and the signals measured on or nearby sources. In order to review the problems of the conventional ICA technique and to validate the proposed method, numerical analyses have been carried out for a virtual response model and a 30 m class submarine model. Moreover, in order to investigate applicability of the proposed method to real problem of complex structure, an experiment has been carried out for a scaled submarine mockup. The results show that the proposed method could resolve the inherent problems of a conventional ICA technique.

  20. Research on a simulation system for diamond turning of optical components with micro-structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jingbo; Sun, Tao; Wang, Xiaohui

    2010-10-01

    Ultra-precision machine with a fast tool servo (FTS) can fabricate many kinds of optical components with complex micro-structured surfaces, achieving sub-micrometer form accuracy and nanometer surface finish without any subsequent processing. However, it is difficult to meet the ultimate processing requirements only by operators' experience due to the complicate numerical control (NC) programs and various machining parameters. To verify the NC programs, guarantee the processing quality and improve the efficiency, a simulation system is established according to the real micro-structured surface turning system. This system includes cutting force model, platform movement model, fast tool servo model, spindle movement model, vibration model and the surface topography model. Then some simulation results as the motion locus of the tool tip, three-dimensional microstructure morphology and the surface roughness are obtained. By comparing the simulated and actual results, it can be seen that this system can simulate the actual processing, predict the final machining results and has the guidance meaning for the machining of the microstructured surfaces.