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Sample records for structural response properties

  1. Marsh Soil Responses to Nutrients: Belowground Structural and Organic Properties.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal marsh responses to nutrient enrichment apparently depend upon soil matrix and whether the system is primarily biogenic or minerogenic. Deteriorating organic rich marshes (Jamaica Bay, NY) receiving wastewater effluent had lower belowground biomass, organic matter, and soi...

  2. Marsh Soil Responses to Nutrients: Belowground Structural and Organic Properties

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal marsh responses to nutrient enrichment apparently depend upon soil matrix and whether the system is primarily biogenic or minerogenic. Deteriorating organic rich marshes (Jamaica Bay, NY) receiving wastewater effluent had lower belowground biomass, organic matter, and soi...

  3. Marsh Soil Responses to Nutrients: Belowground Structural and Organic Properties

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal marsh responses to nutrient enrichment apparently depend upon soil matrix and whether the system is primarily biogenic or minerogenic. Deteriorating organic rich marshes (Jamaica Bay, NY) receiving wastewater effluent had lower belowground biomass, organic matter, and soi...

  4. Marsh Soil Responses to Nutrients: Belowground Structural and Organic Properties.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal marsh responses to nutrient enrichment apparently depend upon soil matrix and whether the system is primarily biogenic or minerogenic. Deteriorating organic rich marshes (Jamaica Bay, NY) receiving wastewater effluent had lower belowground biomass, organic matter, and soi...

  5. Mechanical properties and fire response of geopolymer structural composites

    SciTech Connect

    Foden, A.J.; Balaguru, P.; Lyon, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    One of the major concerns in using Fiber Reinforced Composites in applications that might be subjected to fire is their resistance to high temperature. Some of the fabrics used in FRC, such as carbon, are fire resistant. However, almost all the resins used cannot withstand temperatures higher than 200{degrees}C. This paper deals with the development and use of a potassium aluminosilicate (GEOPOLYNER) that is inorganic and can easily sustain more than 1000{degrees}. The results presented include the composite behavior in tension, flexure, and shear. Tests have been conducted on the virgin samples and samples exposed to temperatures from 200 to 1000{degrees}. The results indicate that the composite can withstand 327, 245, and 14 MPa in tension, flexure, and shear respectively. It retains about 63 percent of its original flexural Strength at 800{degrees}. The fire response of the carbon fiber composite was measured and the results compared to organic matrix composites being used for infrastructure and transportation applications. At irradiance levels of 50 kW/m{sup 2} typical of the heat flux in a well developed fire, glass- or carbon-reinforced polyester, vinylester, epoxy, bismaleimde cyanate ester, polyimide, phenolic, and engineered thermoplastic laminates ignited readily and released appreciable heat and smoke, while carbon-fiber reinforced GEOPOLYNER composites did not ignite, bum, or release any smoke even after extended heat flux exposure.

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure, electronic structure, and photoelectric response properties of KCu2SbS3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xian; He, Jianqiao; Zheng, Chong; Lin, Jianhua; Huang, Fuqiang

    2016-02-28

    Copper thioantimonates have received enormous attention due to their potential for applications in photovoltaic devices. In this work, a new layered compound KCu2SbS3 was synthesized via a reactive flux method using thiourea as a reactive flux. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1[combining macron]. The structure features two-dimensional [Cu2SbS3](-) layers stacking along the c axis with K(+) ions intercalated between the layers. Each [Cu2SbS3](-) layer is composed of two single graphene-like layers connected via interlayer Cu-S bonds and CuSb contacts. The optical measurements indicate that the compound has a band gap of 1.7 eV. The Hall effect measurement shows that KCu2SbS3 is a p-type semiconductor with a carrier concentration of 7 × 10(16) cm(-3). First-principles calculations reveal that the direct transition occurs between Cu-3d-S-3p orbitals (VBM) to Sb-5p-S-3p orbitals (CBM). The photoelectric response properties of KCu2SbS3 under visible light irradiation were analyzed. The photocurrent is 3.7 μA cm(-2) at 10 V bias, demonstrating its potential for applications in photoelectric devices.

  7. Revisiting structure-property relationship of pH-responsive polymers for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Bazban-Shotorbani, Salime; Hasani-Sadrabadi, Mohammad Mahdi; Karkhaneh, Akbar; Serpooshan, Vahid; Jacob, Karl I; Moshaverinia, Alireza; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2017-02-27

    pH-responsive polymers contain ionic functional groups as pendants in their structure. The total number of charged groups on polymer chains determines the overall response of the system to changes in the external pH. This article reviews various pH-responsive polymers classified as polyacids (e.g., carboxylic acid based polymers, sulfonamides, anionic polysaccharides, and anionic polypeptides) and polybases (e.g., polyamines, pyridine and imidazole containing polymers, cationic polysaccharides, and cationic polypeptides). We correlate the pH variations in the body at the organ level (e.g., gastrointestinal tract and vaginal environment), tissue level (e.g., cancerous and inflamed tissues), and cellular level (e.g., sub-cellular organelles), with the intrinsic properties of pH-responsive polymers. This knowledge could help to select more effective ('smart') polymeric systems based on the biological target. Considering the pH differences in the body, various drug delivery systems can be designed by utilizing smart biopolymeric compounds with the required pH-sensitivity. We also review the pharmaceutical application of pH-responsive polymeric carriers including hydrogels, polymer-drug conjugates, micelles, dendrimers, and polymersomes.

  8. Response of Simulated Drinking Water Biofilm Mechanical and Structural Properties to Long-Term Disinfectant Exposure.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yun; Huang, Conghui; Monroy, Guillermo L; Janjaroen, Dao; Derlon, Nicolas; Lin, Jie; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-02-16

    Mechanical and structural properties of biofilms influence the accumulation and release of pathogens in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS). Thus, understanding how long-term residual disinfectants exposure affects biofilm mechanical and structural properties is a necessary aspect for pathogen risk assessment and control. In this study, elastic modulus and structure of groundwater biofilms was monitored by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) during three months of exposure to monochloramine or free chlorine. After the first month of disinfectant exposure, the mean stiffness of monochloramine- or free-chlorine-treated biofilms was 4 to 9 times higher than those before treatment. Meanwhile, the biofilm thickness decreased from 120 ± 8 μm to 93 ± 6-107 ± 11 μm. The increased surface stiffness and decreased biofilm thickness within the first month of disinfectant exposure was presumably due to the consumption of biomass. However, by the second to third month during disinfectant exposure, the biofilm mean stiffness showed a 2- to 4-fold decrease, and the biofilm thickness increased to 110 ± 7-129 ± 8 μm, suggesting that the biofilms adapted to disinfectant exposure. After three months of the disinfectant exposure process, the disinfected biofilms showed 2-5 times higher mean stiffness (as determined by AFM) and 6-13-fold higher ratios of protein over polysaccharide, as determined by differential staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), than the nondisinfected groundwater biofilms. However, the disinfected biofilms and nondisinfected biofilms showed statistically similar thicknesses (t test, p > 0.05), suggesting that long-term disinfection may not significantly remove net biomass. This study showed how biofilm mechanical and structural properties vary in response to a complex DWDS environment, which will contribute to further research on the risk assessment and control of biofilm-associated-pathogens in DWDS.

  9. Enzymatic Degradation Identifies Components Responsible for the Structural Properties of the Vitreous Body

    PubMed Central

    Filas, Benjamen A.; Zhang, Qianru; Okamoto, Ruth J.; Shui, Ying-Bo; Beebe, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Vitreous degeneration contributes to several age-related eye diseases, including retinal detachment, macular hole, macular traction syndrome, and nuclear cataracts. Remarkably little is understood about the molecular interactions responsible for maintaining vitreous structure. The purpose of this study was to measure the structural properties of the vitreous body after enzymatic degradation of selected macromolecules. Methods. Mechanical properties of plugs of bovine and porcine vitreous were analyzed using a rheometer. Oscillatory and extensional tests measured vitreous stiffness and adhesivity, respectively. Major structural components of the vitreous were degraded by incubation overnight in collagenase, trypsin, or hyaluronidase, singly or in combination. Vitreous bodies were also incubated in hyper- or hypotonic saline. Effects of these treatments on the mechanical properties of the vitreous were measured by rheometry. Results. Enzymatic digestion of each class of macromolecules decreased the stiffness of bovine vitreous by approximately half (P < 0.05). Differential effects were observed on the damping capacity of the vitreous (P < 0.05), which was shown to correlate with material behavior in extension (P < 0.01). Digestion of hyaluronan significantly decreased the damping capacity of the vitreous and increased adhesivity. Collagen degradation resulted in the opposite effect, whereas digestion of proteins and proteoglycans with trypsin did not alter behavior relative to controls. Osmotic perturbations and double-enzyme treatments further implicated hyaluronan and hyaluronan-associated water as a primary regulator of adhesivity and material behavior in extension. Conclusions. Collagen, hyaluronan, and proteoglycans act synergistically to maintain vitreous stiffness. Hyaluronan is a key mediator of vitreous adhesivity, and mechanical damping is an important factor influencing dynamic vitreous behavior. PMID:24222300

  10. Structural building response review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-15

    The integrity of a nuclear power plant during a postulated seismic event is required to protect the public against radiation. Therefore, a detailed set of seismic analyses of various structures and equipment is performed while designing a nuclear power plant. This report describes the structural response analysis method, including the structural model, soil-structure interaction as it relates to structural models, methods for seismic structural analysis, numerical integration methods, methods for non-seismic response analysis approaches for various response combinations, structural damping values, nonlinear response, uncertainties in structural properties, and structural response analysis using random properties. The report describes the state-of-the-art in these areas for nuclear power plants. It also details the past studies made at Sargent and Lundy to evaluate different alternatives and the conclusions reached for the specific purposes that those studies were intended. These results were incorporated here because they fall into the general scope of this report. The scope of the present task does not include performing new calculations.

  11. Transient response of structures with uncertain properties to nonlinear shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caresta, Mauro; Langley, Robin S.; Woodhouse, Jim

    2013-10-01

    A method is presented to predict the transient response of a structure at the driving point following an impact or a shock loading. The displacement and the contact force are calculated solving the discrete convolution between the impulse response and the contact force itself, expressed in terms of a nonlinear Hertzian contact stiffness. Application of random point process theory allows the calculation of the impulse response function from knowledge of the modal density and the geometric characteristics of the structure only. The theory is applied to a wide range of structures and results are experimentally verified for the case of a rigid object hitting a beam, a plate, a thin and a thick cylinder and for the impact between two cylinders. The modal density of the flexural modes for a thick slender cylinder is derived analytically. Good agreement is found between experimental, simulated and published results, showing the reliability of the method for a wide range of situations including impacts and pyroshock applications.

  12. Structural and Rheological Properties of Temperature-Responsive Amphiphilic Triblock Copolymers in Aqueous Media.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Josefine Eilsø; Zhu, Kaizheng; Sande, Sverre Arne; Kováčik, Lubomír; Cmarko, Dušan; Knudsen, Kenneth D; Nyström, Bo

    2017-05-11

    Thermoresponsive amphiphilic biodegradable block copolymers of the type poly(ε-caprolactone-co-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone-co-lactide) (PCLA-PEGm-PCLA) have great potential for various biomedical applications. In the present study, we have surveyed the effects of PEG spacer length (m = 1000 and 1500), temperature, and polymer concentration on the self-assembling process to form supramolecular structures in aqueous solutions of the PCLA-PEGm-PCLA copolymer. This copolymer has a lower critical solution temperature, and the cloud point depends on both concentration and PEG length. Thermoreversible hydrogels are formed in the semidilute regime; the gel windows in the phase diagrams can be tuned by the concentration and length of the PEG spacer. The rheological properties of both dilute and semidilute samples were characterized; especially the sol-to-gel transition was examined. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments reveal fundamental structural differences between the two copolymers for both dilute and semidilute samples. The intensity profiles for the copolymer with the long PEG spacer could be described by a spherical core-shell model over a broad temperature domain, whereas the copolymer with the short hydrophilic spacer forms rod-like species over an extended temperature range. This finding is supported by cryo-TEM images. At temperatures approaching macroscopic phase separation, both copolymers seem to assume extended rod-like structures.

  13. Structure, innervation and response properties of integumentary sensory organs in crocodilians.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Duncan B; Catania, Kenneth C

    2012-12-01

    Integumentary sensory organs (ISOs) are densely distributed on the jaws of crocodilians and on body scales of members of the families Crocodilidae and Gavialidae. We examined the distribution, anatomy, innervation and response properties of ISOs on the face and body of crocodilians and documented related behaviors for an alligatorid (Alligator mississippiensis) and a crocodylid (Crocodylus niloticus). Each of the ISOs (roughly 4000 in A. mississippiensis and 9000 in C. niloticus) was innervated by networks of afferents supplying multiple different mechanoreceptors. Electrophysiological recordings from the trigeminal ganglion and peripheral nerves were made to isolate single-unit receptive fields and to test possible osmoreceptive and electroreceptive functions. Multiple small (<0.1 mm(2)) receptive fields, often from a single ISO, were recorded from the premaxilla, the rostral dentary, the gingivae and the distal digits. These responded to a median threshold of 0.08 mN. The less densely innervated caudal margins of the jaws had larger receptive fields (>100 mm(2)) and higher thresholds (13.725 mN). Rapidly adapting, slowly adapting type I and slowly adapting type II responses were identified based on neuronal responses. Several rapidly adapting units responded maximally to vibrations at 20-35 Hz, consistent with reports of the ISOs' role in detecting prey-generated water surface ripples. Despite crocodilians' armored bodies, the ISOs imparted a mechanical sensitivity exceeding that of primate fingertips. We conclude that crocodilian ISOs have diverse functions, including detection of water movements, indicating when to bite based on direct contact of pursued prey, and fine tactile discrimination of items held in the jaws.

  14. Structure, innervation and response properties of integumentary sensory organs in crocodilians

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Duncan B.; Catania, Kenneth C.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Integumentary sensory organs (ISOs) are densely distributed on the jaws of crocodilians and on body scales of members of the families Crocodilidae and Gavialidae. We examined the distribution, anatomy, innervation and response properties of ISOs on the face and body of crocodilians and documented related behaviors for an alligatorid (Alligator mississippiensis) and a crocodylid (Crocodylus niloticus). Each of the ISOs (roughly 4000 in A. mississippiensis and 9000 in C. niloticus) was innervated by networks of afferents supplying multiple different mechanoreceptors. Electrophysiological recordings from the trigeminal ganglion and peripheral nerves were made to isolate single-unit receptive fields and to test possible osmoreceptive and electroreceptive functions. Multiple small (<0.1 mm2) receptive fields, often from a single ISO, were recorded from the premaxilla, the rostral dentary, the gingivae and the distal digits. These responded to a median threshold of 0.08 mN. The less densely innervated caudal margins of the jaws had larger receptive fields (>100 mm2) and higher thresholds (13.725 mN). Rapidly adapting, slowly adapting type I and slowly adapting type II responses were identified based on neuronal responses. Several rapidly adapting units responded maximally to vibrations at 20–35 Hz, consistent with reports of the ISOs' role in detecting prey-generated water surface ripples. Despite crocodilians' armored bodies, the ISOs imparted a mechanical sensitivity exceeding that of primate fingertips. We conclude that crocodilian ISOs have diverse functions, including detection of water movements, indicating when to bite based on direct contact of pursued prey, and fine tactile discrimination of items held in the jaws. PMID:23136155

  15. Using the structure of natural scenes and sounds to predict neural response properties in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deweese, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The natural scenes and sounds we encounter in the world are highly structured. The fact that animals and humans are so efficient at processing these sensory signals compared with the latest algorithms running on the fastest modern computers suggests that our brains can exploit this structure. We have developed a sparse mathematical representation of speech that minimizes the number of active model neurons needed to represent typical speech sounds. The model learns several well-known acoustic features of speech such as harmonic stacks, formants, onsets and terminations, but we also find more exotic structures in the spectrogra representation of sound such as localized checkerboard patterns and frequency-modulated excitatory subregions flanked by suppressive sidebands. Moreover, several of these novel features resemble neuronal receptive fields reported in the Inferior Colliculus (IC), as well as auditory thalamus (MGBv) and primary auditory cortex (A1), and our model neurons exhibit the same tradeoff in spectrotemporal resolution as has been observed in IC. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that receptive fields of neurons in the ascending mammalian auditory pathway beyond the auditory nerve can be predicted based on coding principles and the statistical properties of recorded sounds. We have also developed a biologically-inspired neural network model of primary visual cortex (V1) that can learn a sparse representation of natural scenes using spiking neurons and strictly local plasticity rules. The representation learned by our model is in good agreement with measured receptive fields in V1, demonstrating that sparse sensory coding can be achieved in a realistic biological setting.

  16. Structural and static electric response properties of highly symmetric lithiated silicon cages: theoretical predictions.

    PubMed

    Koukaras, Emmanuel N; Zdetsis, Aristides D; Karamanis, Panaghiotis; Pouchan, Claude; Avramopoulos, Aggelos; Papadopoulos, Manthos G

    2012-04-15

    It is shown by density functional theory calculations that high symmetry silicon cages can be designed by coating with Li atoms. The resulting highly symmetric lithiated silicon cages (up to D(5d) symmetry) are low-lying true minima of the energy hypersurface with binding energies of the order of 4.6 eV per Si atom and moderate highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gaps. Moreover, relying on a systematic study of the electric response properties obtained by ab initio (Hartree-Fock, MP2, and configuration interaction singles (CIS)) and density functional (B3LYP, B2PLYP, and CAM-B3LYP) methods, it is shown that lithium coating has a large impact on the magnitude of their second hyperpolarizabilities resulting to highly hyperpolarizable species. Such hyperpolarizable character is directly connected to the increase in the density of the low-lying excited states triggered by the interaction between the Si cage and the surrounding Li atoms.

  17. Different behavioral effect dose-response profiles in mice exposed to two-carbon chlorinated hydrocarbons: influence of structural and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Umezu, Toyoshi; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to clarify whether dose-response profiles of acute behavioral effects of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE), trichloroethylene (TRIC), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) differ. A test battery involving 6 behavioral endpoints was applied to evaluate the effects of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC in male ICR strain mice under the same experimental conditions. The behavioral effect dose-response profiles of these compounds differed. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the dose-response profiles and structural and physical properties of the compounds. Dose-response profile differences correlated significantly with differences in specific structural and physical properties. These results suggest that differences in specific structural and physical properties of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC are responsible for differences in behavioral effects that lead to a variety of dose-response profiles.

  18. Design, synthesis and characterization of ion-responsive microgels: Effect of structure and composition on properties and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenbaum, Gary Marc

    The overall goal of this dissertation was to design, synthesize and characterize ion responsive microgels, focussing on the effect of their composition and structure on their properties and performance. The ability to use ionic microgels in chemical and biomedical applications requires a thorough understanding of these parameters. In pursuit of this understanding, poly(methacrylic acid-co-nitrophenyl acrylate) microgels (1--20 mum diameter) were synthesized by free radical precipitation polymerization and modified in post-polymerization reactions. The microgels were characterized with respect to their pH and ion swelling response, apparent pKa, density, capacity, drug and protein loading and metal binding properties. Systematic changes were made to the microgels' crosslink density and functional group composition with the goal of creating new microgels, which have distinctly different swelling and drug loading properties. The following methods were applied in this work. A micropipet manipulation technique was applied to measure the swelling response of individual microgels. Bulk titrations were performed to measure the apparent pKa's and capacities of the microgels. UV/VIS spectraphotometry was used to measure the drug and protein loading. Titration calorimetry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were applied to measure the metal binding properties of the microgels. The swelling ratio of the microgels increased linearly from 2 to 12 when the mole fraction of crosslinking monomer decreased from 0.25 to 0.10 (at pH's > 5.3). The pH range of the swelling response for the five different microgel compositions (containing ethanol, carboxylic, glutamic, hydroxamic and sulfonic acid functional groups) shifted by an amount that was proportional to the solution pKa's of their functional groups. The microgels' capacity and drug loading increased in proportion to the number of functional groups per repeat unit. The degree of drug loading was found to correlate

  19. Structure and properties of transcriptional networks driving selenite stress response in yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Salin, Hélène; Fardeau, Vivienne; Piccini, Eugenia; Lelandais, Gaelle; Tanty, Véronique; Lemoine, Sophie; Jacq, Claude; Devaux, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    Background Stress responses provide valuable models for deciphering the transcriptional networks controlling the adaptation of the cell to its environment. We analyzed the transcriptome response of yeast to toxic concentrations of selenite. We used gene network mapping tools to identify functional pathways and transcription factors involved in this response. We then used chromatin immunoprecipitation and knock-out experiments to investigate the role of some of these regulators and the regulatory connections between them. Results Selenite rapidly activates a battery of transcriptional circuits, including iron deprivation, oxidative stress and protein degradation responses. The mRNA levels of several transcriptional regulators are themselves regulated. We demonstrate the existence of a positive transcriptional loop connecting the regulator of proteasome expression, Rpn4p, to the pleiotropic drug response factor, Pdr1p. We also provide evidence for the involvement of this regulatory module in the oxidative stress response controlled by the Yap1p transcription factor and its conservation in the pathogenic yeast C. glabrata. In addition, we show that the drug resistance regulator gene YRR1 and the iron homeostasis regulator gene AFT2 are both directly regulated by Yap1p. Conclusion This work depicted a highly interconnected and complex transcriptional network involved in the adaptation of yeast genome expression to the presence of selenite in its chemical environment. It revealed the transcriptional regulation of PDR1 by Rpn4p, proposed a new role for the pleiotropic drug resistance network in stress response and demonstrated a direct regulatory connection between oxidative stress response and iron homeostasis. PMID:18627600

  20. The Effect of Structural Design on Mechanical Properties and Cellular Response of Additive Manufactured Titanium Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Wieding, Jan; Jonitz, Anika; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Restoration of segmental defects in long bones remains a challenging task in orthopedic surgery. Although autologous bone is still the ‘Gold Standard’ because of its high biocompatibility, it has nevertheless been associated with several disadvantages. Consequently, artificial materials, such as calcium phosphate and titanium, have been considered for the treatment of bone defects. In the present study, the mechanical properties of three different scaffold designs were investigated. The scaffolds were made of titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V), fabricated by means of an additive manufacturing process with defined pore geometry and porosities of approximately 70%. Two scaffolds exhibited rectangular struts, orientated in the direction of loading. The struts for the third scaffold were orientated diagonal to the load direction, and featured a circular cross-section. Material properties were calculated from stress-strain relationships under axial compression testing. In vitro cell testing was undertaken with human osteoblasts on scaffolds fabricated using the same manufacturing process. Although the scaffolds exhibited different strut geometry, the mechanical properties of ultimate compressive strength were similar (145–164 MPa) and in the range of human cortical bone. Test results for elastic modulus revealed values between 3.7 and 6.7 GPa. In vitro testing demonstrated proliferation and spreading of bone cells on the scaffold surface.

  1. Different behavioral effect dose–response profiles in mice exposed to two-carbon chlorinated hydrocarbons: Influence of structural and physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Umezu, Toyoshi Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to clarify whether dose–response profiles of acute behavioral effects of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE), trichloroethylene (TRIC), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) differ. A test battery involving 6 behavioral endpoints was applied to evaluate the effects of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC in male ICR strain mice under the same experimental conditions. The behavioral effect dose–response profiles of these compounds differed. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the dose–response profiles and structural and physical properties of the compounds. Dose–response profile differences correlated significantly with differences in specific structural and physical properties. These results suggest that differences in specific structural and physical properties of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC are responsible for differences in behavioral effects that lead to a variety of dose–response profiles. - Highlights: • We examine effects of 4 chlorinated hydrocarbons on 6 behavioral endpoints in mice. • The behavioral effect dose–response profiles for the 4 compounds are different. • We utilize regression analysis to clarify probable causes of the different profiles. • The compound's physicochemical properties probably produce the different profiles.

  2. A microscopic and macroscopic study of aging collagen on its molecular structure, mechanical properties, and cellular response.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Samantha L; Guilbert, Marie; Sulé-Suso, Josep; Torbet, Jim; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Yang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    During aging, collagen structure changes, detrimentally affecting tissues' biophysical and biomechanical properties due to an accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). In this investigation, we conducted a parallel study of microscopic and macroscopic properties of different-aged collagens from newborn to 2-yr-old rats, to examine the effect of aging on fibrillogenesis, mechanical and contractile properties of reconstituted hydrogels from these collagens seeded with or without fibroblasts. In addition to fibrillogenesis of collagen under the conventional conditions, some fibrillogenesis was conducted alongside a 12-T magnetic field, and gelation rate and AGE content were measured. A nondestructive indentation technique and optical coherence tomography were used to determine the elastic modulus and dimensional changes, respectively. It was revealed that in comparison to younger specimens, older collagens exhibited higher viscosity, faster gelation rates, and a higher AGE-specific fluorescence. Exceptionally, only young collagens formed highly aligned fibrils under magnetic fields. The youngest collagen demonstrated a higher elastic modulus and contraction in comparison to the older collagen. We conclude that aging changes collagen monomer structure, which considerably affects the fibrillogenesis process, the architecture of the resulting collagen fibers and the global network, and the macroscopic properties of the formed constructs.

  3. The role of reactive silicates on the structure/property relationships and cell response evaluation in polyurethane nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Lorena; Garcia, Inaki; Palomares, Teodoro; Alonso-Varona, Ana; Mondragon, Inaki; Corcuera, Marian; Eceiza, Arantxa

    2011-06-15

    Precursors of polyurethane chains have been reacted by means of in situ polymerization with organically modified montmorillonite clay to obtain polyurethane nanocomposites containing from 1 to 4 wt % of nanoreinforcement. The effective final dispersion of inorganic component at nanometric scale was investigated by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the effect of the nanoreinforcement incorporation on thermal and mechanical behavior of polyurethane nanocomposites was evaluated. Nanocomposites showed similar mechanical properties to polyurethanes containing high-hard segment contents with higher tensile modulus and a decrease in elastomeric properties of polyurethane materials. Finally, biocompatibility studies using L-929 fibroblast have been carried out to examine in vitro cell response and cytotoxicity of the matrix and their nanocomposite materials. Results suggested that the organic modifier in the clay is unsuitable for biomedical devices in spite of the fact that the matrix is a good candidate for cell adhesion and proliferation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Responsive Emulsion Gels with Tunable Properties Formed by Self-Assembled Nanofibrils of Natural Saponin Glycyrrhizic Acid for Oil Structuring.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhili; Sun, Yingen; Ma, Lulu; Yang, Xiaoquan; Guo, Jian; Yin, Shouwei

    2017-03-22

    Saponin nanofibrils assembled from natural glycyrrhizic acid (GA) have been recently shown to be an effective structurant for edible oil structuring. This work showed that the microstructure and mechanical properties of the novel emulsion gels formed by GA fibrils could be well tuned by oil phase polarity. For more polar oils (algal oil), the GA fibrils had a higher affinity to the oil-water interface, showing a faster adsorption kinetics, thus leading to the formation of fine multilayer emulsion droplets with smaller droplet size. Accordingly, the emulsion gels had a denser network microstructure and higher mechanical strength, which should be attributed to the fact that the smaller emulsion droplets could be packed more tightly within the continuous network, providing stronger interdroplet interactions, and thereby contribute to reinforcing the gel matrix. In addition, all emulsion gels had interesting thermoresponsive behavior, independent of oil phase, which is probably due to the thermoreversibility of the hydrogen-bond fibrillar network in the continuous phase.

  5. Response of Mg Addition on the Dendritic Structures and Mechanical Properties of Hypoeutectic Al-10Si (Wt Pct) Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaköse, Ercan; Yildiz, Mehmet; Keskin, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Rapidly solidified hypoeutectic Al-10Si- xMg ( x = 0, 5, 10 wt pct) alloys were produced by the melt-spinning method. The phase composition was identified by X-ray diffractometry, and the microstructures of the alloys were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The melting characteristics were studied by differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis under an Ar atmosphere. The mechanical properties of the melt-spun and conventionally solidified alloys were tested by tensile-strength and Vickers microhardness tests. The results illustrate that the cooling rate and solidification time of 89 μm thick melt-spun ribbon were estimated to be 2.97 × 107 K s-1 and 9.31 × 10-6 s, respectively. Nanoscale Si spot particles were observed growing on the surface of the dendritic α-Al matrix and the average sizes of these spots ranged from 10 to 50 nm. The improvement in the tensile properties and microhardness was related to structural refinement and the supersaturated α-Al solid solution; the nanoscale-dispersed Si spot particles made a significant improvement to the mechanical properties of the melt-spun ribbon. Detailed electrical resistivity tests of the ribbons were carried out at temperatures of 300 K to 800 K (27 °C to 527 °C).

  6. Electrochemical and structural properties of the electrical double layer of two-component electrolytes in response to varied electrode potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyohara, Kenji; Yamagata, Masaki; Ishikawa, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    The electrochemical and structural properties of the electrical double layers for two-component electrolytes were studied by Monte Carlo simulations using simple models. When the electrolyte contains two species of cations that have different diameters, the capacitance on the cathode dramatically increases as a large negative potential is applied. This behavior is qualitatively similar to the one reported in an experimental work that has used Li-containing ionic liquid as the electrolyte [M. Yamagata et al., Electrochim. Acta 110, 181-190 (2013)], in which it has also been reported that addition of Li ions to the electrolyte enhances the potential window to the negative side. The analysis of the ionic structure showed that the electrical double layer on the cathode is dominantly formed by the larger cations under small negative potentials, while they are replaced by the smaller cations under large negative potentials. This transition of the ionic structure with electrode potential is also consistent with the enhancement of the potential window that was found in the experimental work, which suggests that the organic cations are expelled from the electrical double layer under large negative potentials and the chance of decomposition is reduced.

  7. Crystalline structure, magnetic response and electronic properties of RE2MgTiO6 (RE = Dy, Gd) double perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landínez Téllez, D. A.; Martínez Buitrago, D.; Cardona C, R.; Barrera, E. W.; Roa-Rojas, J.

    2014-06-01

    The synthesis, crystal structure, morphology, magnetic properties and electronic calculations of two members of the family of double perovskite materials RE2MgTiO6 (RE = Dy, Gd) are described. X-ray powder diffraction measurements show that these materials crystallize in monoclinic perovskite structures with space group P21/n (#14). Unit cell parameters, atomic positions, tilt angle, inter-atomic distances and site occupancies were calculated by Rietveld through the GSAS code reveal. Lattice parameters for Dy2MgTiO6 were a = 5.3624(4) Å, b = 5.5973(2) Å and c = 7.6794(2) Å, and for Gd2MgTiO6a = 5.3143(5) Å, b = 5.5826(2) Å and c = 7.6324(2) Å. Samples morphology analyzed by scanning electron microscopy reveal strongly coupled grains with mean size 3 μm. Paramagnetic behavior is evidenced by magnetic susceptibility measurements and Curie-Weiss fitting supplies effective magnetic moments which lay 98% in agreement with the theoretical predictions for the isolated rare earth elements for each compound.

  8. Optimizing and modeling of effective parameters on the structural and magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles synthesized by coprecipitation technique using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfari, Mohammad Reza; Kashefi, Mehrdad; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2016-07-01

    In present work, the Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by coprecipitation method. In order to study the effects of influential factors on the structural and magnetic properties of particles, the experimental runs were designed using response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD), while the reaction temperature, Fe2+/Fe3+ cation ratio, and pH of reaction were defined as effective factors on the two responses include the amounts of crystallinity degree and saturation magnetization (Ms). The investigation of structural, magnetic, and microstructural properties of particles were carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As a result, the predictive quadratic models were fitted on the both responses while the R2 values were more than 0.97 for both models. The highest amounts of both responses (crystallinity degree: 88.07% and Ms: 65.801 emu/g) are presented when the reaction temperature, cation ratio, and pH amounts are equal to 90 °C, 0.60, and 10.5, respectively. Finally, the TEM results show the particles with size of about 10 nm and narrow size distribution.

  9. Structural Properties of Cruciferin and Napin of Brassica napus (Canola) Show Distinct Responses to Changes in pH and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Suneru P.; McIntosh, Tara C.; Wanasundara, Janitha P. D.

    2016-01-01

    The two major storage proteins identified in Brassica napus (canola) were isolated and studied for their molecular composition, structural characteristics and the responses of structural features to the changes in pH and temperature. Cruciferin, a complex of six monomers, has a predominantly β-sheet-containing secondary structure. This protein showed low pH unstable tertiary structure, and distinctly different solubility behaviour with pH when intact in the seed cellular matrix. Cruciferin structure unfolds at pH 3 even at ambient temperature. Temperature-induced structure unfolding was observed above the maximum denaturation temperature of cruciferin. Napin was soluble in a wider pH range than cruciferin and has α-helices dominating secondary structure. Structural features of napin showed less sensitivity to the changes in medium pH and temperature. The surface hydrophobicity (S0) and intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan residue appear to be good indicators of cruciferin unfolding, however they were not the best to demonstrate structural changes of napin. These two storage proteins of B. napus have distinct molecular characteristics, therefore properties and functionalities they provide are contrasting rather than complementary. PMID:27618118

  10. Structural Properties of Cruciferin and Napin of Brassica napus (Canola) Show Distinct Responses to Changes in pH and Temperature.

    PubMed

    Perera, Suneru P; McIntosh, Tara C; Wanasundara, Janitha P D

    2016-09-07

    The two major storage proteins identified in Brassica napus (canola) were isolated and studied for their molecular composition, structural characteristics and the responses of structural features to the changes in pH and temperature. Cruciferin, a complex of six monomers, has a predominantly β-sheet-containing secondary structure. This protein showed low pH unstable tertiary structure, and distinctly different solubility behaviour with pH when intact in the seed cellular matrix. Cruciferin structure unfolds at pH 3 even at ambient temperature. Temperature-induced structure unfolding was observed above the maximum denaturation temperature of cruciferin. Napin was soluble in a wider pH range than cruciferin and has α-helices dominating secondary structure. Structural features of napin showed less sensitivity to the changes in medium pH and temperature. The surface hydrophobicity (S₀) and intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan residue appear to be good indicators of cruciferin unfolding, however they were not the best to demonstrate structural changes of napin. These two storage proteins of B. napus have distinct molecular characteristics, therefore properties and functionalities they provide are contrasting rather than complementary.

  11. Bonding and magnetic response properties of several toroid structures. Insights of the role of Ni2S2 as a building block from relativistic density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Castro, Alvaro

    2011-10-06

    Relativistic density functional calculations were carried out on several nickel toroid mercaptides of the general formula [Ni(μ-SR)(2)](n), with the aim to characterize and analyze their stability and magnetic response properties, in order to gain more insights into their stabilization and size-dependent behavior. The Ni-ligand interaction has been studied by means projected density of states and energy decomposition analysis, which denotes its stabilizing character. The graphical representation of the response to an external magnetic field is applied for the very first time taking into account the spin-orbit term. This map allows one to clearly characterize the magnetic behavior inside and in the closeness of the toroid structure showing the prescence of paratropic ring currents inside the Ni(n) ring, and by contrast, diatropic currents confined in each Ni(2)S(2) motif denoting an aromatic behavior (in terms of magnetic criteria). The calculated data suggests that the Ni(2)S(2) moiety can be regarded as a stable constructing block, which can afford several toroid structures of different nuclearities in agreement with that reported in the experimental literature. In addition, the effects of the relativistic treatment over the magnetic response properties on these lighter compounds are denoted by comparing nonrelativistic, scalar relativistic, and scalar plus spin-orbit relativistic treatments, showing their acting, although nonpronunced, role.

  12. The Structures & Properties of Carbon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellini, Olivia M.; Lisensky, George C.; Ehrlich, Jennifer; Zenner, Greta M.; Crone, Wendy C.

    2006-01-01

    The four main forms of carbon--diamond, graphite, buckyballs, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)--are an excellent vehicle for teaching fundamental principles of chemical bonding, material structure, and properties. Carbon atoms form a variety of structures that are intrinsically connected to the properties they exhibit. Educators can take advantage of…

  13. The Structures & Properties of Carbon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellini, Olivia M.; Lisensky, George C.; Ehrlich, Jennifer; Zenner, Greta M.; Crone, Wendy C.

    2006-01-01

    The four main forms of carbon--diamond, graphite, buckyballs, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)--are an excellent vehicle for teaching fundamental principles of chemical bonding, material structure, and properties. Carbon atoms form a variety of structures that are intrinsically connected to the properties they exhibit. Educators can take advantage of…

  14. Visible light-responsive core-shell structured In₂O₃@CaIn₂O₄ photocatalyst with superior bactericidal properties and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Ku; Sun, Der-Shan; Chan, Hao; Huang, Pai-Tsang; Wu, Wen-Shiang; Lin, Ching-Hui; Tseng, Yao-Hsuan; Cheng, Yi-Hung; Tseng, Chun-Chieh; Chang, Hsin-Hou

    2012-07-01

    Antibacterial activity of photocatalytic substrates is primarily induced by ultraviolet light irradiation. Visible light-responsive photocatalysts were recently discovered, offering greater opportunity to use photocatalysts as disinfectants in our living environment. The development of antibacterial photocatalysts, however, has mainly focused on titanium oxide (TiO(2))-related materials with antibacterial properties not comparable with conventional chemical disinfectants. This study demonstrated that a core-shell structured In(2)O(3)@CaIn(2)O(4) substrate has superior visible light-induced bactericidal properties, as compared with several commercially available and laboratory-prepared visible light-responsive photocatalysts. The high performance is enhanced by more easily photoexcited electron transfer between the interfaces of In(2)O(3) and CaIn(2)O(4) to minimize the electron-hole recombination during photocatalysis. Additionally, when compared with TiO(2)-based photocatalysts, In(2)O(3)@CaIn(2)O(4) treatments did not induce significant cell death and tissue damage, implying a superior biocompatibility. These findings suggest that In(2)O(3)@CaIn(2)O(4) may have potential application in the development of a safer and highly bactericidal photocatalyst. A photocatalytic susbstrate is described that functions in visible light, possesses bactericidal properties and better biocompatibility than the standard TiO(2) based methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of shock loading on the structure/property response of Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb and Ti-24Al-11Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.T. III

    1994-02-01

    Intermetallics are receiving increasing attention for applications requiring high-leverage materials possessing potentially high pay-offs such as in gas-turbine engines. While the quasi-static deformation response of a broad range of intermetallics is receiving intense scientific and engineering study, increased utilization of intermetallics under dynamic loading requires an understanding of their high-rate/shock-wave behavior. In this paper the influence of shock loading on structure/property behavior of Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb and Ti-24Al-11Nb is presented. The reload constitutive response of both shock-loaded intermetallics supports the dynamic deformation of both intermetallics being controlled by a Peierls mechanism. Defect generation and storage in intermetallics is compared and contrasted to that typical to conventional disordered metals and alloys.

  16. Celotex Structural Properties Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.C.

    2001-01-26

    In the course of regulatory review of the 9975 packaging, the question of the effects environmental conditions on performance of the packaging was raised. The results of previous tests of the Celotex material, used for impact absorption and thermal insulation, indicated that the effect of temperature variation was small. Accordingly, performance under ambient conditions was judged to be representative of performance under temperature extremes. To extend the database to include other effects, and in response to the questions, a series of materials tests were performed on the Celotex brand cellulose fiberboard material.

  17. Phospholipids fatty acids of drinking water reservoir sedimentary microbial community: Structure and function responses to hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Chai, Bei-Bei; Huang, Ting-Lin; Zhao, Xiao-Guang; Li, Ya-Jiao

    2015-07-01

    Microbial communities in three drinking water reservoirs, with different depth in Xi'an city, were quantified by phospholipids fatty acids analysis and multivariate statistical analysis was employed to interpret their response to different hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical properties of sediment and overlying water. Principle component analyses of sediment characteristics parameters showed that hydrostatic pressure was the most important effect factor to differentiate the overlying water quality from three drinking water reservoirs from each other. NH4+ content in overlying water was positive by related to hydrostatic pressure, while DO in water-sediment interface and sediment OC in sediment were negative by related with it. Three drinking water reservoir sediments were characterized by microbial communities dominated by common and facultative anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria, as well as, by sulfur oxidizing bacteria. Hydrostatic pressure and physico-chemical properties of sediments (such as sediment OC, sediment TN and sediment TP) were important effect factors to microbial community structure, especially hydrostatic pressure. It is also suggested that high hydrostatic pressure and low dissolved oxygen concentration stimulated Gram-positive and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) bacterial population in drinking water reservoir sediment. This research supplied a successful application of phospholipids fatty acids and multivariate analysis to investigate microbial community composition response to different environmental factors. Thus, few physico-chemical factors can be used to estimate composition microbial of community as reflected by phospholipids fatty acids, which is difficult to detect.

  18. Detecting Structural Failures Via Acoustic Impulse Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Joshi, Sanjay S.

    1995-01-01

    Advanced method of acoustic pulse reflectivity testing developed for use in determining sizes and locations of failures within structures. Used to detect breaks in electrical transmission lines, detect faults in optical fibers, and determine mechanical properties of materials. In method, structure vibrationally excited with acoustic pulse (a "ping") at one location and acoustic response measured at same or different location. Measured acoustic response digitized, then processed by finite-impulse-response (FIR) filtering algorithm unique to method and based on acoustic-wave-propagation and -reflection properties of structure. Offers several advantages: does not require training, does not require prior knowledge of mathematical model of acoustic response of structure, enables detection and localization of multiple failures, and yields data on extent of damage at each location.

  19. Research on structures, mechanical properties, and mechanical responses of TKX-50 and TKX-50 based PBX with molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Song; Li, Yajin; Li, Yang; Luo, Yunjun

    2016-02-01

    To improve the practicality and safety of a novel explosive dihydroxylamm onium 5,5'-bis (tetrazole)-1,1'-diolate (TKX-50), polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) and polychlorotrifluoroe-thylene (PCTFE) were respectively added to the TKX-50, forming the polymer-bonded explosives (PBX). Interfacial and mechanical properties of PBX were investigated through molecular dynamics (MD) method, desensitizing mechanisms of fluorine-polymers for TKX-50 were researched by compression and bulk shear simulations. Results show that the binding energies (E bind ) between polymers (PVDF or PCTFE) and TKX-50 surfaces all rank in order of (011) > (100) > (010), shorter interatomic distance and the resulted higher potentials lead to higher E bind on TKX-50/PVDF interfaces than that on PCTFE/TKX-50 interfaces. Compared with TKX-50, the ductility of PBX is improved due to the isotropic mechanical property and flexibility of fluorine-polymers especially the PCTFE. Desensitizing effect of fluorine-polymers for TKX-50 is found under loading condition, which is attributed to the enhanced compressibility and buffer capacity against external pressure in compression, as well as the improved lubricity to reduce the sliding potentials in bulk shear process. Graphical Abstract Comparisons of the internal stress and slide potentials of the novel explosive,TKX-50 and its based PBX. Desensitizing effects can be found by the adding of fluorine-polymers, it owes to their better flexibility and lubricity as well as the amorphous nature.

  20. Investigation of the electronic and physical properties of defect structures responsible for laser-induced damage in DKDP crystals.

    PubMed

    Demos, Stavros G; DeMange, Paul; Negres, Raluca A; Feit, Michael D

    2010-06-21

    Laser-induced damage at near operational laser excitation conditions can limit the performance of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH(2)PO(4), or KDP) and its deuterated analog (DKDP) which are currently the only nonlinear optical materials suitable for use in large-aperture laser systems. This process has been attributed to pre-existing damage precursors that were incorporated or formed during growth that have not yet been identified. In this work, we present a novel experimental approach to probe the electronic structure of the damage precursors. The results are modeled assuming a multi-level electronic structure that includes a bottleneck for 532 nm excitation. This model reproduces our experimental observations as well as other well-documented behaviors of laser damage in KDP crystals. Comparison of the electronic structure of known defects in KDP with this model allows for identification of a specific class that we postulate may be the constituent defects in the damage precursors. The experimental results also provide evidence regarding the physical parameters affecting the ability of individual damage precursors to initiate damage, such as their size and defect density; these parameters were found to vary significantly between KDP materials that exhibit different damage performance characteristics.

  1. Finite Element Estimation of Meteorite Structural Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Kenneth Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the project titled Asteroid Threat Assessment at NASA Ames Research Center is to develop risk assessment tools. The expertise in atmospheric entry in the Entry Systems and Technology Division is being used to describe the complex physics of meteor breakup in the atmosphere. The breakup of a meteor is dependent on its structural properties, including homogeneity of the material. The present work describes an 11-week effort in which a literature survey was carried for structural properties of meteoritic material. In addition, the effect of scale on homogeneity isotropy was studied using a Monte Carlo approach in Nastran. The properties were then in a static structural response simulation of an irregularly-shape meteor (138-scale version of Asteroid Itokawa). Finally, an early plan was developed for doctoral research work at Georgia Tech. in the structural failure fragmentation of meteors.

  2. Rodent intestinal folate transporters (SLC46A1): secondary structure, functional properties, and response to dietary folate restriction.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Andong; Min, Sang Hee; Jansen, Michaela; Malhotra, Usha; Tsai, Eugenia; Cabelof, Diane C; Matherly, Larry H; Zhao, Rongbao; Akabas, Myles H; Goldman, I David

    2007-11-01

    This laboratory recently identified a human gene that encodes a novel folate transporter [Homo sapiens proton-coupled folate transporter (HsPCFT); SLC46A1] required for intestinal folate absorption. This study focused on mouse (Mus musculus) PCFT (MmPCFT) and rat (Rattus norvegicus) PCFT (RnPCFT) and addresses their secondary structure, specificity, tissue expression, and regulation by dietary folates. Both rodent PCFT proteins traffic to the cell membrane with the NH(2)- and COOH-termini accessible to antibodies targeted to these domains only in permeabilized HeLa cells. This, together with computer-based topological analyses, is consistent with a model in which rodent PCFT proteins likely contain 12 transmembrane domains. Transport of [(3)H]folates was optimal at pH 5.5 and decreased with increasing pH due to an increase in K(m) and a decrease in V(max). At pH 7.0, folic acid and methotrexate influx was negligible, but there was residual (6S)5-methyltetrahydrofolate transport. Uptake of folates in PCFT-injected Xenopus oocytes was electrogenic and pH dependent. Folic acid influx K(m) values of MmPCFT and RnPCFT, assessed electrophysiologically, were 0.7 and 0.3 microM at pH 5.5 and 1.1 and 0.8 microM at pH 6.5, respectively. Rodent PCFTs were highly specific for monoglutamyl but not polyglutamyl methotrexate. MmPCFT mRNA was highly expressed in the duodenum, proximal jejunum, liver, and kidney with lesser expression in the brain and other tissues. MmPCFT protein was localized to the apical brush-border membrane of the duodenum and proximal jejunum. MmPCFT mRNA levels increased approximately 13-fold in the proximal small intestine in mice fed a folate-deficient vesus folate-replete diet, consistent with the critical role that PCFT plays in intestinal folate absorption.

  3. Structural and Catalytic Properties of S1 Nuclease from Aspergillus oryzae Responsible for Substrate Recognition, Cleavage, Non–Specificity, and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kovaľ, Tomáš; Østergaard, Lars H.; Lehmbeck, Jan; Nørgaard, Allan; Lipovová, Petra; Dušková, Jarmila; Skálová, Tereza; Trundová, Mária; Kolenko, Petr; Fejfarová, Karla; Stránský, Jan; Švecová, Leona; Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The single–strand–specific S1 nuclease from Aspergillus oryzae is an archetypal enzyme of the S1–P1 family of nucleases with a widespread use for biochemical analyses of nucleic acids. We present the first X–ray structure of this nuclease along with a thorough analysis of the reaction and inhibition mechanisms and of its properties responsible for identification and binding of ligands. Seven structures of S1 nuclease, six of which are complexes with products and inhibitors, and characterization of catalytic properties of a wild type and mutants reveal unknown attributes of the S1–P1 family. The active site can bind phosphate, nucleosides, and nucleotides in several distinguished ways. The nucleoside binding site accepts bases in two binding modes–shallow and deep. It can also undergo remodeling and so adapt to different ligands. The amino acid residue Asp65 is critical for activity while Asn154 secures interaction with the sugar moiety, and Lys68 is involved in interactions with the phosphate and sugar moieties of ligands. An additional nucleobase binding site was identified on the surface, which explains the absence of the Tyr site known from P1 nuclease. For the first time ternary complexes with ligands enable modeling of ssDNA binding in the active site cleft. Interpretation of the results in the context of the whole S1–P1 nuclease family significantly broadens our knowledge regarding ligand interaction modes and the strategies of adjustment of the enzyme surface and binding sites to achieve particular specificity. PMID:28036383

  4. Structural and Catalytic Properties of S1 Nuclease from Aspergillus oryzae Responsible for Substrate Recognition, Cleavage, Non-Specificity, and Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kovaľ, Tomáš; Østergaard, Lars H; Lehmbeck, Jan; Nørgaard, Allan; Lipovová, Petra; Dušková, Jarmila; Skálová, Tereza; Trundová, Mária; Kolenko, Petr; Fejfarová, Karla; Stránský, Jan; Švecová, Leona; Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The single-strand-specific S1 nuclease from Aspergillus oryzae is an archetypal enzyme of the S1-P1 family of nucleases with a widespread use for biochemical analyses of nucleic acids. We present the first X-ray structure of this nuclease along with a thorough analysis of the reaction and inhibition mechanisms and of its properties responsible for identification and binding of ligands. Seven structures of S1 nuclease, six of which are complexes with products and inhibitors, and characterization of catalytic properties of a wild type and mutants reveal unknown attributes of the S1-P1 family. The active site can bind phosphate, nucleosides, and nucleotides in several distinguished ways. The nucleoside binding site accepts bases in two binding modes-shallow and deep. It can also undergo remodeling and so adapt to different ligands. The amino acid residue Asp65 is critical for activity while Asn154 secures interaction with the sugar moiety, and Lys68 is involved in interactions with the phosphate and sugar moieties of ligands. An additional nucleobase binding site was identified on the surface, which explains the absence of the Tyr site known from P1 nuclease. For the first time ternary complexes with ligands enable modeling of ssDNA binding in the active site cleft. Interpretation of the results in the context of the whole S1-P1 nuclease family significantly broadens our knowledge regarding ligand interaction modes and the strategies of adjustment of the enzyme surface and binding sites to achieve particular specificity.

  5. Studies and correlation among the structural, electrical and gas response properties of aerosol spray deposited self assembled nanocrystalline CuO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Iqbal; Bedi, R. K.

    2011-06-01

    Nanostructured CuO films have been grown on to the glass substrate by varying the deposition time from 10 to 30 min and substrate temperature from 300 to 400 °C by a simple ultrasonic spray pyrolysis technique, using aqueous a cupric nitrate solution as precursor. The effect of the substrate temperature on the textural, structural, electrical, and gas sensing properties of CuO films was studied and correlated. Thermal analysis of the dried precursor shows the elimination of physisorbed and chemisorbed water. It suggests the formation of CuO phase on substrate at temperature of 300 °C. X-ray diffractograms of the films indicate the formation of polycrystalline monoclinic CuO having monoclinic with crystallite size around 18 nm. The texture coefficient finds the (0 0 2) plane as the preferred orientation in films. The microstrain and dislocation densities have been calculated and found to decreases with increase in substrate temperature. The scanning electron micrographs indicate the formation of trapezium like facet structures on the film surface. AFM analysis shows uniform deposition of the CuO film over the entire substrate surface. Observations reveal that the film deposited at 300 °C show comparatively higher activation energy and appreciable response to ammonia at room temperature. The use of aqueous cupric nitrate as precursor results in the deposition of single phase copper oxide films.

  6. Semiconductor alloys - Structural property engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Berding, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor alloys have been used for years to tune band gaps and average bond lengths to specific applications. Other selection criteria for alloy composition, and a growth technique designed to modify their structural properties, are presently considered. The alloys Zn(1-y)Cd(y)Te and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) are treated as examples.

  7. Semiconductor alloys - Structural property engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Berding, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor alloys have been used for years to tune band gaps and average bond lengths to specific applications. Other selection criteria for alloy composition, and a growth technique designed to modify their structural properties, are presently considered. The alloys Zn(1-y)Cd(y)Te and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) are treated as examples.

  8. Structural response synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ozisik, H.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    The open loop control technique of predicting a conditioned input signal based on a specified output response for a second order system has been analyzed both analytically and numerically to gain a firm understanding of the method. Differences between this method of control and digital closed loop control using pole cancellation were investigated as a follow up to previous experimental work. Application of the technique to diamond turning using a fast tool is also discussed.

  9. Force Identification from Structural Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-12-01

    Jan 1986. 20. Distefano, Nestor, and Amitav Rath , (1975). "System Identification in Nonlinear Structural Seismic Dynamics." Computer Methods ill...response identification. Distefano and Rath (1975) presented methods of identification for the determination of nonlinear parameters associated with

  10. Structural characterization, spectroscopic signatures, nonlinear optical response, and antioxidant property of 4-benzyloxybenzaldehyde and its binding activity with microtubule-associated tau protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbu, V.; Vijayalakshmi, K. A.; Karthick, T.; Tandon, Poonam; Narayana, B.

    2017-09-01

    In the proposed work, the non-linear optical response, spectroscopic signature and binding activity of 4-Benzyloxybenzaldehyde (4BB) has been investigated. In order to find the vibrational contribution of functional groups in mixed or coupled modes in the experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra, the potential energy distribution (PED) based on the internal coordinates have been computed. Since the molecule exists in the form of dimer in solid state, the electronic structure of dimer has been proposed in order to explain the intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions via aldehyde group. The experimental and simulated powder X-ray diffraction data was compared and the miller indices which define the crystallographic planes in the crystal lattices were identified. Optical transmittance and absorbance measurement were taken at ambient temperature in order to investigate the transparency and optical band gap. For screening the material for nonlinear applications, theoretical second order hyperpolarizability studies were performed and compared with the standard reference urea. To validate the theoretical results, powder second harmonic generation (SHG) studies were carried out using Kurtz and Perry technique. The results show that the molecule studied in this work exhibit considerable non-linear optical (NLO) response. In addition to the characterization and NLO studies, we also claimed based on the experimental and theoretical data that the molecule shows antioxidant property and inhibition capability. Since the title molecule shows significant binding with Tau protein that helps to stabilize microtubules in the nervous system, the molecular docking investigation was performed to find the inhibition constant, binding affinity and active binding residues.

  11. Responses of leaf structure and photosynthetic properties to intra-canopy light gradients: a common garden test with four broadleaf deciduous angiosperm and seven evergreen conifer tree species.

    PubMed

    Wyka, Tomasz P; Oleksyn, J; Zytkowiak, R; Karolewski, P; Jagodziński, A M; Reich, P B

    2012-09-01

    Spectra of leaf traits in northern temperate forest canopies reflect major differences in leaf longevity between evergreen conifers and deciduous broadleaf angiosperms, as well as plastic modifications caused by within-crown shading. We investigated (1) whether long-lived conifer leaves exhibit similar intra-canopy plasticity as short-lived broadleaves, and (2) whether global interspecific relationships between photosynthesis, nitrogen, and leaf structure identified for sun leaves adequately describe leaves differentiated in response to light gradients. We studied structural and photosynthetic properties of intra-tree sun and shade foliage in adult trees of seven conifer and four broadleaf angiosperm species in a common garden in Poland. Shade leaves exhibited lower leaf mass-per-area (LMA) than sun leaves; however, the relative difference was smaller in conifers than in broadleaves. In broadleaves, LMA was correlated with lamina thickness and tissue density, while in conifers, it was correlated with thickness but not density. In broadleaves, but not in conifers, reduction of lamina thickness was correlated with a thinner palisade layer. The more conservative adjustment of conifer leaves could result from a combination of phylogenetic constraints, contrasting leaf anatomies and shoot geometries, but also from functional requirements of long-lived foliage. Mass-based nitrogen concentration (N(mass)) was similar between sun and shade leaves, and was lower in conifers than in deciduous broadleaved species. Given this, the smaller LMA in shade corresponded with a lower area-based N concentration (N(area)). In evergreen conifers, LMA and N(area) were less powerful predictors of area-based photosynthetic rate (A (max(area))) in comparison with deciduous broadleaved angiosperms. Multiple regression for sun and shade leaves showed that, in each group, A (max(mass)) was related to N(mass) but not to LMA, whereas LMA became a significant codeterminant of A (max(mass)) in

  12. [Structure and properties of pectin].

    PubMed

    Wikiera, Agnieszka; Mika, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Pectin represents a very complex, heterogeneous family of plant cell wall polysaccharides that play a significant role in plant growth, morphology, development, and plant defense and also serves as a gelling and stabilizing polymer in diverse food and specialty products and has positive effects on human health. In this review functional and structural characteristic of pectin molecule elements and their interconnections are described. Attention is also given to process of commercial production of pectin with special emphasis on composition and physical properties of commercial pectin as a result of the acid extraction.

  13. Vibration Response of Airplane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, Theodore; Gelalles, A G

    1935-01-01

    This report presents test results of experiments on the vibration-response characteristics of airplane structures on the ground and in flight. It also gives details regarding the construction and operation of vibration instruments developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

  14. Force Identification from Structural Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    Amitav Rath , (1975). "System Identification in Nonlinear Structural Seismic Dynamics." Computer Mechods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 5 (1975) 353...than linear models. Singh and Subramanian (1980) attacked the problem from a frequency response identification. Distefano and Rath (1975) presented

  15. Structural optimization for nonlinear dynamic response.

    PubMed

    Dou, Suguang; Strachan, B Scott; Shaw, Steven W; Jensen, Jakob S

    2015-09-28

    Much is known about the nonlinear resonant response of mechanical systems, but methods for the systematic design of structures that optimize aspects of these responses have received little attention. Progress in this area is particularly important in the area of micro-systems, where nonlinear resonant behaviour is being used for a variety of applications in sensing and signal conditioning. In this work, we describe a computational method that provides a systematic means for manipulating and optimizing features of nonlinear resonant responses of mechanical structures that are described by a single vibrating mode, or by a pair of internally resonant modes. The approach combines techniques from nonlinear dynamics, computational mechanics and optimization, and it allows one to relate the geometric and material properties of structural elements to terms in the normal form for a given resonance condition, thereby providing a means for tailoring its nonlinear response. The method is applied to the fundamental nonlinear resonance of a clamped-clamped beam and to the coupled mode response of a frame structure, and the results show that one can modify essential normal form coefficients by an order of magnitude by relatively simple changes in the shape of these elements. We expect the proposed approach, and its extensions, to be useful for the design of systems used for fundamental studies of nonlinear behaviour as well as for the development of commercial devices that exploit nonlinear behaviour.

  16. Louisianins A, B, C and D: non-steroidal growth inhibitors of testosterone-responsive SC 115 cells. II. Physico-chemical properties and structural elucidation.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, S; Kim, Y P; Hayashi, M; Furuhata, K; Takayanagi, H; Komiyama, K; Woodruff, H B; Omura, S

    1995-10-01

    New non-steroidal growth inhibitors of testosterone-responsive SC 115 cells, louisianins A (MW: 189; C11H11NO2), B (MW: 191; C11H13NO2), C (MW: 173; C11H11NO) and D (MW: 173; C11H11NO) were isolated from the cultured broth of Streptomyces sp. WK-4028. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data. The structure of louisianin A in particular was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The four compounds commonly possess a unique pyrindine skeleton in the molecule.

  17. Cellulose nanomaterials review: structure, properties and nanocomposites

    Treesearch

    Robert J. Moon; Ashlie Martini; John Nairn; John Simonsen; Jeff Youngblood

    2011-01-01

    This critical review provides a processing-structure-property perspective on recent advances in cellulose nanoparticles and composites produced from them. It summarizes cellulose nanoparticles in terms of particle morphology, crystal structure, and properties. Also described are the self-assembly and rheological properties of cellulose nanoparticle suspensions. The...

  18. The Effect of Response Format on the Psychometric Properties of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory: Consequences for Item Meaning and Factor Structure.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Robert A; Donnellan, M Brent; Roberts, Brent W; Fraley, R Chris

    2016-04-01

    The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) is currently the most widely used measure of narcissism in social/personality psychology. It is also relatively unique because it uses a forced-choice response format. We investigate the consequences of changing the NPI's response format for item meaning and factor structure. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: 40 forced-choice items (n = 2,754), 80 single-stimulus dichotomous items (i.e., separate true/false responses for each item; n = 2,275), or 80 single-stimulus rating scale items (i.e., 5-point Likert-type response scales for each item; n = 2,156). Analyses suggested that the "narcissistic" and "nonnarcissistic" response options from the Entitlement and Superiority subscales refer to independent personality dimensions rather than high and low levels of the same attribute. In addition, factor analyses revealed that although the Leadership dimension was evident across formats, dimensions with entitlement and superiority were not as robust. Implications for continued use of the NPI are discussed.

  19. Reversible Polymorphism, Liquid Crystallinity, and Stimuli-Responsive Luminescence in a Bola-amphiphilic π-System: Structure-Property Correlations Through Nanoindentation and DFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Roy, Syamantak; Hazra, Arpan; Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Raut, Devraj; Madhuri, P Lakshmi; Rao, D S Shankar; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Pati, Swapan Kumar; Krishna Prasad, S; Maji, Tapas Kumar

    2016-10-03

    We report the design, synthesis, detailed characterization, and analysis of a new multifunctional π-conjugated bola-amphiphilic chromophore: oligo-(p-phenyleneethynylene)dicarboxylic acid with dialkoxyoctadecyl side chains (OPE-C18-1). OPE-C18-1 shows two polymorphs at 123 K (OPE-C18-1') and 373 K (OPE-C18-1″), whose crystal structures were characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction. OPE-C18-1 also exhibits thermotropic liquid crystalline property revealing a columnar phase. The inherent π-conjugation of OPE-C18-1 imparts luminescence to the system. Photoluminescence measurements on the mesophase also reveal similar luminescence as in the crystalline state. Additionally, OPE-C18-1 shows mechano-hypsochromic luminescence behavior. Density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations unravel the origins behind the simultaneous existence of all these properties. Nanoindentation experiments on the single crystal reveal its mechanical strength and accurately correlate the molecular arrangement with the liquid crystalline and mechanochromic luminescence behavior.

  20. Structure, processing, and properties of potatoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Isabel K.; Kolos, Kimberly R.; Menegaux, Edmond C.; Luo, Huy; Mccuen, Richard H.; Regan, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this experiment and lesson intended for high school students in an engineering or materials science course or college freshmen is to demonstrate the relation between processing, structure, and thermodynamic and physical properties. The specific objectives are to show the effect of structure and structural changes on thermodynamic properties (specific heat) and physical properties (compressive strength); to illustrate the first law of thermodynamics; to compare boiling a potato in water with cooking it in a microwave in terms of the rate of structural change and the energy consumed to 'process' the potato; and to demonstrate compression testing.

  1. Structural properties, electric response and magnetic behaviour of La2SrFe2CoO9 triple complex perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casallas, F.; Vera, E.; Landínez, D.; Parra, C.; Roa, J.

    2016-02-01

    The triple perovskite La2SrFe2CoO9 was prepared by the solid state reaction method from the high purity precursor powders La2O3, SrCO3, Fe2O3, Co2O3 (99.9%). The crystalline structure was studied by X-ray diffraction experiments and Rietveld refinement analysis. Results reveal that this material crystallizes in an orthorhombic triple perovskite belonging to the space group Pnma (#62) with lattice constants a=5.491978(2)Ǻ, b=7.719842(2)Ǻ and c=5.436260(3)Ǻ. The granular surface morphology was studied from images of Scanning Electron Microscopy. The electric response was studied by the Impedance Spectroscopy technique from 10.0mHz up to 0.1MHz, at different temperatures (77-300K). Measurements of magnetization as a function of temperature permitted to determine the occurrence of a paramagnetic - ferromagnetic transition for a Curie temperature of 280K, which suggests it application in nanoelectronic devices. From the fit of the magnetic response with the Curie- Weiss equation it was concluded that the effective magnetic moment is particularly large due to the contribution of La, Fe and Co cations.

  2. Structure and physical properties of silkworm cocoons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fujia; Porter, David; Vollrath, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Silkworm cocoons have evolved a wide range of different structures and combinations of physical and chemical properties in order to cope with different threats and environmental conditions. We present our observations and measurements on 25 diverse types of cocoons in a first attempt to correlate physical properties with the structure and morphology of the cocoons. These two architectural parameters appear to be far more important than the material properties of the silk fibres themselves. We consider tensile and compressive mechanical properties and gas permeation of the cocoon walls, and in each case identify mechanisms or models that relate these properties to cocoon structure, usually based upon non-woven fibre composites. These properties are of relevance also for synthetic non-woven composite materials and our studies will help formulate bio-inspired design principles for new materials. PMID:22552916

  3. Cellulose nanomaterials review: structure, properties and nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Moon, Robert J; Martini, Ashlie; Nairn, John; Simonsen, John; Youngblood, Jeff

    2011-07-01

    This critical review provides a processing-structure-property perspective on recent advances in cellulose nanoparticles and composites produced from them. It summarizes cellulose nanoparticles in terms of particle morphology, crystal structure, and properties. Also described are the self-assembly and rheological properties of cellulose nanoparticle suspensions. The methodology of composite processing and resulting properties are fully covered, with an emphasis on neat and high fraction cellulose composites. Additionally, advances in predictive modeling from molecular dynamic simulations of crystalline cellulose to the continuum modeling of composites made with such particles are reviewed (392 references).

  4. Determinants of Long Bone Structural Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleek, T. M.; Katz, B.; Whalen, R. T.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The objective of our research is to determine whether a non-invasive determination of long bone cross-sectional areal properties using only the mineral component of bone accurately predicts the true structural properties. In this study section properties of a whole long bone were compared using two methods: (1) special analysis of bone densitometry data, and (2) experimental determination of flexural rigidities from bone surface strain measurements during controlled loading.

  5. The electromagnetic response of different metamaterial structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Dinh Lam; Tuong Pham, Van; Viet Do, Thanh; Nguyen, Thanh Tung; Thanh Thuy Vu, Tran; Le, Van Hong; Pak Lee, Young

    2010-12-01

    This report investigates systematically the effect of structural parameters on the left-handed behavior of a combined structure. The combined structure consists of a 'cut-wire pair', providing a negative magnetic permeability μ<0, and a 'continuous wire', yielding a negative electric permittivity ε<0. The left-handed metamaterials were designed, fabricated and measured in the microwave-frequency regime. It was found that the width of the continuous wire as well as the distance between the substructures play an important role in determining whether negative refractive properties (in other words, left-handed behavior) are obtained or not. Additionally, we studied the influence of the lattice constant on the electromagnetic response of the combined structure. The actual measurements are compared with numerical simulation values to show good coincidence. Finally, we designed and simulated an electromagnetic absorber made of metamaterials. It is expected that this work will allow us to optimize appropriate characteristic parameters even without avoiding trial and error fabrications.

  6. Structural properties of compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Carvalho, R. R.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of a systematic study of galaxies in the regions of Hickson compact groups. Our sample is composed of the 22 Hickson groups which are located in the southern hemisphere and have cz less than 9000 km/s. Making use of digitized images of IIIa-J plates that cover an area of 0.5 x 0.5 deg around each group, we were able to detect and classify images down to a magnitude limit of 19.5 in the B band. This limit is typically three magnitudes fainter than previous studies. Most groups show a statistically significant excess of fainter galaxies compared to the background. These fainter galaxies typically have a somewhat more extended spatial distribution than the brighter galaxies originally classified by Hickson. Our data suggest that Hickson groups have a wide range in density and radius, ranging from very compact structures with overdensities of the order of 10(exp 2) and crossing times of roughly 0.01 H(sub 0 sup -1), to much more diffuse structures, similar to loose groups, with overdensities of about 3 and crossing times of roughly 0.5 H(sub 0 sup -1).

  7. Structural properties of scandium inorganic salts

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Jeremiah M.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-16

    Here, the structural properties of reported inorganic scandium (Sc) salts were reviewed, including the halide (Cl, Br, and I), nitrate, sulfate, and phosphate salts. Additional analytical techniques used for characterization of these complexes (metrical data, FTIR and 45Sc NMR spectroscopy) were tabulated. A structural comparison of Sc to select lanthanide (La, Gd, Lu) salt complexes was briefly evaluated.

  8. Structural properties of scandium inorganic salts

    DOE PAGES

    Sears, Jeremiah M.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-16

    Here, the structural properties of reported inorganic scandium (Sc) salts were reviewed, including the halide (Cl, Br, and I), nitrate, sulfate, and phosphate salts. Additional analytical techniques used for characterization of these complexes (metrical data, FTIR and 45Sc NMR spectroscopy) were tabulated. A structural comparison of Sc to select lanthanide (La, Gd, Lu) salt complexes was briefly evaluated.

  9. Tribological properties of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Miyoshi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The tribological and lubricated behavior of both oxide and nonoxide ceramics are reviewed in this chapter. Ceramics are examined in contact with themselves, other harder materials and metals. Elastic, plastic and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid state contact is discussed. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as has been observed with metals. Grit size effects in two and three body abrasive wear are observed for ceramics. Both free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Surface contaminants affect friction and adhesive wear. For example, carbon on silicon carbide and chlorine on aluminum oxide reduce friction while oxygen on metal surfaces in contact with ceramics increases friction. Lubrication increases the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics both in indentation and with sliding or rubbing. Ceramics compositions both as coatings and in composites are described for the high temperature lubrication of both alloys and ceramics.

  10. Tribological properties of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1989-01-01

    The tribological and lubricated behavior of both oxide and nonoxide ceramics are reviewed in this chapter. Ceramics are examined in contact with themselves, other harder materials and metals. Elastic, plastic and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid state contact is discussed. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as has been observed with metals. Grit size effects in two and three body abrasive wear are observed for ceramics. Both free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Surface contaminants affect friction and adhesive wear. For example, carbon on silicon carbide and chlorine on aluminum oxide reduce friction while oxygen on metal surfaces in contact with ceramics increases friction. Lubrication increases the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics both in indentation and with sliding or rubbing. Ceramics compositions both as coatings and in composites are described for the high temperature lubrication of both alloys and ceramics.

  11. The effects of bolted joints on dynamic response of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, I.; Khalid, A.; Manshoor, B.; Araby, S.; Ghazali, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Joint is an universal fastening technology for structural members; in particular bolted joints are extensively used in mechanical structures due to their simple maintenance and low cost. However, the components of bolted joints are imperative because failure could be catastrophic and endanger lives. Hence, in this study, the effects of bolted joints on vibrating structures are investigated by determining the structural dynamic properties, such as mode shapes, damping ratios and natural frequencies, and these are compared with the monolithic structures (welding). Two approaches of experimental rigs are developed: a beam and a frame where both are subjected to dynamic loading. The analysis reveals the importance of bolted joints in increasing the damping properties and minimizing the vibration magnitude of structures, this indicates the significant influence of bolted joints on the dynamic behaviour of assembled structures. The outcome of this study provides a good model for predicting the experimental variable response in different types of structural joints.

  12. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres.

    PubMed

    Lassalas, Pierrik; Gay, Bryant; Lasfargeas, Caroline; James, Michael J; Tran, Van; Vijayendran, Krishna G; Brunden, Kurt R; Kozlowski, Marisa C; Thomas, Craig J; Smith, Amos B; Huryn, Donna M; Ballatore, Carlo

    2016-04-14

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure-property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group.

  13. Leaf structural characteristics are less important than leaf chemical properties in determining the response of leaf mass per area and photosynthesis of Eucalyptus saligna to industrial-age changes in [CO2] and temperature.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng-Yuan; Salih, Anya; Ghannoum, Oula; Tissue, David T

    2012-10-01

    The rise in atmospheric [CO(2)] is associated with increasing air temperature. However, studies on plant responses to interactive effects of [CO(2)] and temperature are limited, particularly for leaf structural attributes. In this study, Eucalyptus saligna plants were grown in sun-lit glasshouses differing in [CO(2)] (290, 400, and 650 µmol mol(-1)) and temperature (26 °C and 30 °C). Leaf anatomy and chloroplast parameters were assessed with three-dimensional confocal microscopy, and the interactive effects of [CO(2)] and temperature were quantified. The relative influence of leaf structural attributes and chemical properties on the variation of leaf mass per area (LMA) and photosynthesis within these climate regimes was also determined. Leaf thickness and mesophyll size increased in higher [CO(2)] but decreased at the warmer temperature; no treatment interaction was observed. In pre-industrial [CO(2)], warming reduced chloroplast diameter without altering chloroplast number per cell, but the opposite pattern (reduced chloroplast number per cell and unchanged chloroplast diameter) was observed in both current and projected [CO(2)]. The variation of LMA was primarily explained by total non-structural carbohydrate (TNC) concentration rather than leaf thickness. Leaf photosynthetic capacity (light- and [CO(2)]-saturated rate at 28 °C) and light-saturated photosynthesis (under growth [CO(2)] and temperature) were primarily determined by leaf nitrogen contents, while secondarily affected by chloroplast gas exchange surface area and chloroplast number per cell, respectively. In conclusion, leaf structural attributes are less important than TNC and nitrogen in affecting LMA and photosynthesis responses to the studied climate regimes, indicating that leaf structural attributes have limited capacity to adjust these functional traits in a changing climate.

  14. Response of structural and magnetic properties of ultra-thin FeCo-V foils to high-energy beam welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostaan, H.; Shamanian, M.; Hasani, S.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Microstructural evolutions and grain-boundary-character distribution during high-energy-beam welding of ultra-thin FeCo-V foils were studied. Detailed data about the boundaries, coincidence site lattice (CSL) relationships, grain sizes, and microstructural features were acquired from electron-backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps. Moreover, the evolution of the magnetic properties during high-energy-beam welding was studied using vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The fraction of low-angle boundaries was observed to increase in the fusion zones of both electron- and laser-beam-welded foils. The results showed that the fractions of low-Ʃ CSL boundaries (particularly twin boundaries, Ʃ3) in the fusion zones of the welded foils are higher than those in the base metal. Because the strain rates produced during high-energy-beam welding are very high (because of the extremely high cooling rate), grain deformation by a slip mechanism is limited; therefore, deformation by grain twinning is dominant. VSM analysis showed that the magnetic properties of the welded foils, i.e., their remanence, coercive force, and energy product, changed significantly. The formation of large grains with preferred orientation parallel to the easy axis of magnetization was the main reason for the diminished magnetic properties.

  15. Structure Defect Property Relationships in Binary Intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medasani, Bharat; Ding, Hong; Chen, Wei; Persson, Kristin; Canning, Andrew; Haranczyk, Maciej; Asta, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Ordered intermetallics are light weight materials with technologically useful high temperature properties such as creep resistance. Knowledge of constitutional and thermal defects is required to understand these properties. Vacancies and antisites are the dominant defects in the intermetallics and their concentrations and formation enthalpies could be computed by using first principles density functional theory and thermodynamic formalisms such as dilute solution method. Previously many properties of the intermetallics such as melting temperatures and formation enthalpies were statistically analyzed for large number of intermetallics using structure maps and data mining approaches. We undertook a similar exercise to establish the dependence of the defect properties in binary intermetallics on the underlying structural and chemical composition. For more than 200 binary intermetallics comprising of AB, AB2 and AB3 structures, we computed the concentrations and formation enthalpies of vacancies and antisites in a small range of stoichiometries deviating from ideal stoichiometry. The calculated defect properties were datamined to gain predictive capabilities of defect properties as well as to classify the intermetallics for their suitability in high-T applications. Supported by the US DOE under Contract No. DEAC02-05CH11231 under the Materials Project Center grant (Award No. EDCBEE).

  16. Highly Swellable, Dual-Responsive Hydrogels Based on PNIPAM and Redox Active Poly(ferrocenylsilane) Poly(ionic liquid)s: Synthesis, Structure, and Properties.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xueling; Zhang, Kaihuan; Chen, Peng; Sui, Xiaofeng; Hempenius, Mark A; Liedberg, Bo; Vancso, G Julius

    2016-12-01

    Highly swellable, dual-responsive hydrogels, consisting of thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and redox-responsive poly(ferrocenylsilane) (PFS) based poly(ionic liquid)s (PILs) are formed by photo-polymerization. PFS chains bearing cross-linkable vinylimidazolium (VIm) side groups are copolymerized with NIPAM in aqueous solutions under ultraviolet light (λ = 365 nm) in the presence of a photoinitiator. The PFS-PILs serve as a macro-cross-linker and also provide redox responsiveness. The swelling ratio, morphology, and lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the hydrogels are studied as a function of the PNIPAM/PFS ratio. The value of the LCST is dependent on the choice of the counterion of the PIL and the PNIPAM/PFS ratio. The hydrogel is employed as a reducing environment for the in situ fabrication of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), forming AuNP-hydrogel composites. The localized surface plasmon resonance peak of the as-synthesized Au nanoparticles inside the hydrogel could be tuned by altering the temperature.

  17. Structure--properties relationships for manganese perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Dabrowski, B.; Xiong, X.; Chmaissem, O.; Bukowski, Z.; Jorgensen, J. D.

    1999-10-14

    By combining the results of dc magnetization, ac susceptibility, magnetoresistivity, magnetostriction, and x-ray and neutron powder diffraction data for stoichiometric La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} the authors have constructed a phase diagram that describes the magnetic, transport, and structural properties and the relationships among them as a function of composition and temperature. Correlations among physical and structural properties have been observed that are consistent with a competition between ferromagnetism and JT distortion. A metallic state occurs below the Curie temperature when both coherent and incoherent JT distortions are suppressed.

  18. Annealing and structural properties of composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, L. N.; Ustyugov, V. A.; Vlasov, V. S.; Turkov, V. K.; Dianov, M. Yu; Antonets, I. V.; Kalinin, Yu E.; Sitnikov, A. V.; Golubev, E. A.

    2017-02-01

    The composite films were investigated by AFM methods before and after annealing. Topographic and phase-contrast AFM images of the composite films at different annealing temperature were obtained. The separate metal granules and larger-scale labyrinth-like formations were described. These formations appear by the process of the film growth, also by film annealing. Strong changes of the structural properties of the films are observed after the percolation transition. The significant changes of the structural properties are connected with nanostructural transformations in the metal granules topology and presence of metal crystal phase.

  19. Modeling adsorption properties of structurally deformed metal-organic frameworks using structure-property map.

    PubMed

    Jeong, WooSeok; Lim, Dae-Woon; Kim, Sungjune; Harale, Aadesh; Yoon, Minyoung; Suh, Myunghyun Paik; Kim, Jihan

    2017-07-25

    Structural deformation and collapse in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can lead to loss of long-range order, making it a challenge to model these amorphous materials using conventional computational methods. In this work, we show that a structure-property map consisting of simulated data for crystalline MOFs can be used to indirectly obtain adsorption properties of structurally deformed MOFs. The structure-property map (with dimensions such as Henry coefficient, heat of adsorption, and pore volume) was constructed using a large data set of over 12000 crystalline MOFs from molecular simulations. By mapping the experimental data points of deformed SNU-200, MOF-5, and Ni-MOF-74 onto this structure-property map, we show that the experimentally deformed MOFs share similar adsorption properties with their nearest neighbor crystalline structures. Once the nearest neighbor crystalline MOFs for a deformed MOF are selected from a structure-property map at a specific condition, then the adsorption properties of these MOFs can be successfully transformed onto the degraded MOFs, leading to a new way to obtain properties of materials whose structural information is lost.

  20. Structural and electronic properties of dense liquid and amorphous nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Boates, B; Bonev, S A

    2011-02-11

    We present first-principles calculations of the structural and electronic properties of liquid nitrogen in the pressure-temperature range of 0-200 GPa and 2000-6000 K. The molecular-polymerization and molecular-atomic liquid phase boundaries have been mapped over this region. We find the polymeric liquid to be metallic, similar to what has been reported for the higher-temperature atomic fluid. An explanation of the electronic properties is given based on the structure and bonding character of the transformed liquids. We discuss the structural and bonding differences between the polymeric liquid and insulating solid cubic-gauche nitrogen to explain the differences in their electronic properties. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanism responsible for charge transport in polymeric nitrogen systems to explain the conductivity of the polymeric fluid and the semi-conducting nature of low-temperature amorphous nitrogen.

  1. The direct measurement of structural mass, stiffness and damping properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. G.; Dobson, B. J.

    1991-02-01

    A method is described for directly evaluating the spatial properties (i.e., mass, stiffness and damping) of a structure from experimentally measured frequency response data. The resulting structural model can be compared directly with an equivalent finite element idealization. The effects of model reduction, such as the Guyan method, which can be employed to ensure that the experimental and theoretical models contain comparable degrees of freedom, are discussed. It is shown that it is possible to detect regions within the structure at which differences exist between the experimental and theoretical models. Further, it is demonstrated that the resulting experimentally derived models can be used to predict the effects of structural modifications upon the frequency response behaviour of the structure.

  2. Structure, chemistry, and properties of mineral nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Waychunas, G.A.; Zhang, H.; Gilbert, B.

    2008-12-02

    Nanoparticle properties can depart markedly from their bulk analog materials, including large differences in chemical reactivity, molecular and electronic structure, and mechanical behavior. The greatest changes are expected at the smallest sizes, e.g. 10 nm and below, where surface effects are expected to dominate bonding, shape and energy considerations. The precise chemistry at nanoparticle interfaces can have a profound effect on structure, phase transformations, strain, and reactivity. Certain phases may exist only as nanoparticles, requiring transformations in chemistry, stoichiometry and structure with evolution to larger sizes. In general, mineralogical nanoparticles have been little studied.

  3. Structure-property relationships in fluorinated polyimides

    SciTech Connect

    Auman, B.C.

    1995-12-01

    Over the past several years we have been exploring new fluorinated polyimides for electronics applications. In this paper we explore the effects of fluorine incorporation into polyimides by various methods. These include backbone modification via fluorinated linking groups and/or aromatic ring substitution, and incorporation of pendant fluoroalkyl side chains. Factors such as structural and positional isomerism of certain fluorinated groups on the properties of polyimide films are also considered. The properties investigated include dielectric constant, moisture absorption, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal stability, glass transition temperature, mechanical properties and solubility. The goal of this work has been to define the most fortuitous method of fluorine incorporation that will allow the optimum combination of properties for electronics.

  4. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure–property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group. PMID:26967507

  5. MASPROP- MASS PROPERTIES OF A RIGID STRUCTURE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    The computer program MASPROP was developed to rapidly calculate the mass properties of complex rigid structural systems. This program's basic premise is that complex systems can be adequately described by a combination of basic elementary structural shapes. Thirteen widely used basic structural shapes are available in this program. They are as follows: Discrete Mass, Cylinder, Truncated Cone, Torus, Beam (arbitrary cross section), Circular Rod (arbitrary cross section), Spherical Segment, Sphere, Hemisphere, Parallelepiped, Swept Trapezoidal Panel, Symmetric Trapezoidal Panels, and a Curved Rectangular Panel. MASPROP provides a designer with a simple technique that requires minimal input to calculate the mass properties of a complex rigid structure and should be useful in any situation where one needs to calculate the center of gravity and moments of inertia of a complex structure. Rigid body analysis is used to calculate mass properties. Mass properties are calculated about component axes that have been rotated to be parallel to the system coordinate axes. Then the system center of gravity is calculated and the mass properties are transferred to axes through the system center of gravity by using the parallel axis theorem. System weight, moments of inertia about the system origin, and the products of inertia about the system center of mass are calculated and printed. From the information about the system center of mass the principal axes of the system and the moments of inertia about them are calculated and printed. The only input required is simple geometric data describing the size and location of each element and the respective material density or weight of each element. This program is written in FORTRAN for execution on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 62K (octal) of 60 bit words. The development of this program was completed in 1978.

  6. Whole Proteome Analyses on Ruminiclostridium cellulolyticum Show a Modulation of the Cellulolysis Machinery in Response to Cellulosic Materials with Subtle Differences in Chemical and Structural Properties

    PubMed Central

    Badalato, Nelly; Guillot, Alain; Sabarly, Victor; Dubois, Marc; Pourette, Nina; Pontoire, Bruno; Robert, Paul; Bridier, Arnaud; Monnet, Véronique; Sousa, Diana Z.; Durand, Sylvie; Mazéas, Laurent; Buléon, Alain; Bouchez, Théodore; Mortha, Gérard

    2017-01-01

    Lignocellulosic materials from municipal solid waste emerge as attractive resources for anaerobic digestion biorefinery. To increase the knowledge required for establishing efficient bioprocesses, dynamics of batch fermentation by the cellulolytic bacterium Ruminiclostridium cellulolyticum were compared using three cellulosic materials, paper handkerchief, cotton discs and Whatman filter paper. Fermentation of paper handkerchief occurred the fastest and resulted in a specific metabolic profile: it resulted in the lowest acetate-to-lactate and acetate-to-ethanol ratios. By shotgun proteomic analyses of paper handkerchief and Whatman paper incubations, 151 proteins with significantly different levels were detected, including 20 of the 65 cellulosomal components, 8 non-cellulosomal CAZymes and 44 distinct extracytoplasmic proteins. Consistent with the specific metabolic profile observed, many enzymes from the central carbon catabolic pathways had higher levels in paper handkerchief incubations. Among the quantified CAZymes and cellulosomal components, 10 endoglucanases mainly from the GH9 families and 7 other cellulosomal subunits had lower levels in paper handkerchief incubations. An in-depth characterization of the materials used showed that the lower levels of endoglucanases in paper handkerchief incubations could hypothetically result from its lower crystallinity index (50%) and degree of polymerization (970). By contrast, the higher hemicellulose rate in paper handkerchief (13.87%) did not result in the enhanced expression of enzyme with xylanase as primary activity, including enzymes from the “xyl-doc” cluster. It suggests the absence, in this material, of molecular structures that specifically lead to xylanase induction. The integrated approach developed in this work shows that subtle differences among cellulosic materials regarding chemical and structural characteristics have significant effects on expressed bacterial functions, in particular the

  7. Whole Proteome Analyses on Ruminiclostridium cellulolyticum Show a Modulation of the Cellulolysis Machinery in Response to Cellulosic Materials with Subtle Differences in Chemical and Structural Properties.

    PubMed

    Badalato, Nelly; Guillot, Alain; Sabarly, Victor; Dubois, Marc; Pourette, Nina; Pontoire, Bruno; Robert, Paul; Bridier, Arnaud; Monnet, Véronique; Sousa, Diana Z; Durand, Sylvie; Mazéas, Laurent; Buléon, Alain; Bouchez, Théodore; Mortha, Gérard; Bize, Ariane

    2017-01-01

    Lignocellulosic materials from municipal solid waste emerge as attractive resources for anaerobic digestion biorefinery. To increase the knowledge required for establishing efficient bioprocesses, dynamics of batch fermentation by the cellulolytic bacterium Ruminiclostridium cellulolyticum were compared using three cellulosic materials, paper handkerchief, cotton discs and Whatman filter paper. Fermentation of paper handkerchief occurred the fastest and resulted in a specific metabolic profile: it resulted in the lowest acetate-to-lactate and acetate-to-ethanol ratios. By shotgun proteomic analyses of paper handkerchief and Whatman paper incubations, 151 proteins with significantly different levels were detected, including 20 of the 65 cellulosomal components, 8 non-cellulosomal CAZymes and 44 distinct extracytoplasmic proteins. Consistent with the specific metabolic profile observed, many enzymes from the central carbon catabolic pathways had higher levels in paper handkerchief incubations. Among the quantified CAZymes and cellulosomal components, 10 endoglucanases mainly from the GH9 families and 7 other cellulosomal subunits had lower levels in paper handkerchief incubations. An in-depth characterization of the materials used showed that the lower levels of endoglucanases in paper handkerchief incubations could hypothetically result from its lower crystallinity index (50%) and degree of polymerization (970). By contrast, the higher hemicellulose rate in paper handkerchief (13.87%) did not result in the enhanced expression of enzyme with xylanase as primary activity, including enzymes from the "xyl-doc" cluster. It suggests the absence, in this material, of molecular structures that specifically lead to xylanase induction. The integrated approach developed in this work shows that subtle differences among cellulosic materials regarding chemical and structural characteristics have significant effects on expressed bacterial functions, in particular the cellulolysis

  8. Structural properties of small rhodium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Soon, Yee Yeen; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    We report a systematic study of the structural properties of rhodium clusters at the atomistic level. A novel global-minimum search algorithm, known as parallel tempering multicanonical basin hopping plus genetic algorithm (PTMBHGA), is used to obtain the geometrical structures with lowest minima at the semi-empirical level where Gupta potential is used to describe the atomic interaction among the rhodium atoms. These structures are then re-optimized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with exchange-correlation energy approximated by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The structures are optimized for different spin multiplicities. The ones with lowest energies will be taken as ground-state structures. In most cases, we observe only minor changes in the geometry and bond length of the clusters as a result of DFT-level re-optimization. Only in some limited cases, the initial geometries obtained from the PTMBHGA are modified by the re-optimization. The variation of structural properties, such as ground-state geometry, symmetry and binding energy, with respect to the cluster size is studied and agreed well with other results available in the literature.

  9. The Structure and Properties of Parachute Cloths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnicholas, H J; Hedrick, F

    1930-01-01

    The requisite properties of a parachute cloth are discussed and the methods for measuring these properties described. In addition to the structural analysis of the cloths, the properties measured were weight, breaking strength, tear resistance, elasticity, and air permeability. Thirty-six silk cloths of domestic manufacture, not previously used in parachute construction are compared with some silk cloths of foreign manufacture. These foreign cloths were ones proven by trial and extended use to be suitable materials for parachute construction. Contrary to the belief that domestic woven cloths were not suitable materials for parachute construction, it is shown that many domestic silk cloths are satisfactory and in some respects superior to the foreign products. Based on a comparative study of all the cloths, specifications are drawn for the manufacture of silk parachute cloth.

  10. Dynamically hot galaxies. I - Structural properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Ralf; Burstein, David; Faber, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    Results are reported from an analysis of the structural properties of dynamically hot galaxies which combines central velocity dispersion, effective surface brightness, and effective radius into a new 3-space (k), in which the axes are parameters that are physically meaningful. Hot galaxies are found to divide into groups in k-space that closely parallel conventional morphological classifications, namely, luminous ellipticals, compacts, bulges, bright dwarfs, and dwarf spheroidals. A major sequence is defined by luminous ellipticals, bulges, and most compacts, which together constitute a smooth continuum in k-space. Several properties vary smoothly with mass along this continuum, including bulge-to-disk ratio, radio properties, rotation, degree of velocity anisotropy, and 'unrelaxed'. A second major sequence is comprised of dwarf ellipticals and dwarf spheroidals. It is suggested that mass loss is a major factor in hot dwarf galaxies, but the dwarf sequence cannot be simply a mass-loss sequence, as it has the wrong direction in k-space.

  11. Algorithms for Determining Physical Responses of Structures Under Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W. Lance; Ko, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-efficient real-time structural monitoring algorithms have been developed to provide extensive information about the physical response of structures under load. These algorithms are driven by actual strain data to measure accurately local strains at multiple locations on the surface of a structure. Through a single point load calibration test, these structural strains are then used to calculate key physical properties of the structure at each measurement location. Such properties include the structure s flexural rigidity (the product of the structure's modulus of elasticity, and its moment of inertia) and the section modulus (the moment of inertia divided by the structure s half-depth). The resulting structural properties at each location can be used to determine the structure s bending moment, shear, and structural loads in real time while the structure is in service. The amount of structural information can be maximized through the use of highly multiplexed fiber Bragg grating technology using optical time domain reflectometry and optical frequency domain reflectometry, which can provide a local strain measurement every 10 mm on a single hair-sized optical fiber. Since local strain is used as input to the algorithms, this system serves multiple purposes of measuring strains and displacements, as well as determining structural bending moment, shear, and loads for assessing real-time structural health. The first step is to install a series of strain sensors on the structure s surface in such a way as to measure bending strains at desired locations. The next step is to perform a simple ground test calibration. For a beam of length l (see example), discretized into n sections and subjected to a tip load of P that places the beam in bending, the flexural rigidity of the beam can be experimentally determined at each measurement location x. The bending moment at each station can then be determined for any general set of loads applied during operation.

  12. Polarization properties of localized structures in VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averlant, Etienne; Tlidi, Mustapha; Ackemann, Thorsten; Thienpont, Hugo; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-04-01

    Broad area Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) have peculiar polarization properties which are a field of study by itself.1-3 These properties have already been used for localized structure generation, in a simple configuration, where only one polarization component was used.4 Here, we present new experimental and theoretical results on the complex polarization behavior of localized structures generated in an optically-injected broad area VCSEL. A linear stability analysis of the spin-flip VCSEL model is performed for the case of broad area devices, in a restrained and experimentally relevant parameter set. Numerical simulations are performed, in one and two dimensions. They reveal existence of vector localized structures. These structures have a complex polarization state, which is not simply a linear polarization following the one of the optical injection. Experimental results confirm theoretical predictions. Applications of this work can lead to the encoding of small color images in the polarization state of an ensemble of localized structures at the surface of a broad area VCSEL.

  13. Thermal and structural properties of ionic fluids.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Hendrik; Dannenmann, Oliver; Bier, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The electrostatic interaction in ionic fluids is well known to give rise to a characteristic phase behavior and structure. Sometimes its long range is proposed to single out the electrostatic potential over other interactions with shorter ranges. Here the importance of the range for the phase behavior and the structure of ionic fluids is investigated by means of grandcanonical Monte Carlo simulations of the lattice restricted primitive model (LRPM). The long-ranged electrostatic interaction is compared to various types of short-ranged potentials obtained by sharp and/or smooth cutoff schemes. Sharply cutoff electrostatic potentials are found to lead to a strong dependence of the phase behavior and the structure on the cutoff radius. However, when combined with a suitable additional smooth cutoff, the short-ranged LRPM is found to exhibit quantitatively the same phase behavior and structure as the conventional long-ranged LRPM. Moreover, the Stillinger-Lovett perfect screening property, which is well known to be generated by the long-ranged electrostatic potential, is also fulfilled by short-ranged LRPMs with smooth cutoffs. By showing that the characteristic phase behavior and structure of ionic fluids can also be found in systems with short-ranged potentials, one can conclude that the decisive property of the electrostatic potential in ionic fluids is not the long range but rather the valency dependence.

  14. Acoustical properties of nonwoven fiber network structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascan, Mevlut

    Sound insulation is one of the most important issues for the automotive and building industries. Because they are porous fibrous structures, textile materials can be used as sound insulating and sound absorbing materials. Very high-density materials such as steel can insulate sound very effectively but these rigid materials reflect most of the sound back to the environment, causing sound pollution. Additionally, because high-density, rigid materials are also heavy and high cost, they cannot be used for sound insulation for the automotive and building industries. Nonwoven materials are more suitable for these industries, and they can also absorb sound in order to decrease sound pollution in the environment. Therefore, nonwoven materials are one of the most important materials for sound insulation and absorption applications materials. Insulation and absorption properties of nonwoven fabrics depend on fiber geometry and fiber arrangement within the fabric structure. Because of their complex structure, it is very difficult to define the microstructure of nonwovens. The structure of nonwovens only has fibers and voids that are filled by air. Because of the complexity of fiber-void geometry, there is still not a very accurate theory or model that defines the structural arrangement. A considerable amount of modeling has been reported in literature [1--19], but most models are not accurate due to the assumptions made. Voids that are covered by fibers are called pores in nonwoven structures and their geometry is very important, especially for the absorption properties of nonwovens. In order to define the sound absorption properties of nonwoven fabrics, individual pore structure and the number of pores per unit thickness of the fabric should be determined. In this research, instead of trying to define pores, the properties of the fibers are investigated and the number of fibers per volume of fabric is taken as a parameter in the theory. Then the effect of the nonwoven

  15. Electrooptical properties and structural features of amorphous ITO

    SciTech Connect

    Amosova, L. P.

    2015-03-15

    Thin indium-tin oxide (ITO) films are deposited onto cold substrates by magnetron-assisted sputtering. The dependences of the structural, electrical, and optical properties of the films on the oxygen content in the atmosphere of sputtering and the growth rate are studied. It is shown that, if the substrate temperature is no higher than the ITO crystallization temperature and the conditions of growth deviate from the optimal relationship between the oxygen pressure and the growth rate, the resistance of the layers can be six or seven orders of magnitude higher than the resistance of conducting amorphous layers and reach hundreds of megaohms. At the same time, the optical properties of insulating layers in the visible spectral region are completely identical to the properties of the conducing amorphous modification. A conceptual model of defects responsible for the insulating properties of amorphous ITO is proposed.

  16. Effective structural properties in polycrystalline graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Zubaer

    This talk will discuss effective structural properties in polycrystalline graphene under the presence of atomic scale heterogeneity. Polycrystallinity is ubiquitous in solids, but theories describing their effective behavior remain limited, particularly when heterogeneity is present in the form of nonuniform deformation or composition. Over the decades, exploration of the effective transport and strength properties of heterogeneous systems has been carried out mostly with random distribution of grains or regular periodic structures under various approximations, in translating the underlying physics into a single representative volume element. Although heterogeneity can play a critical role in modulating the basic behavior of low-dimensional materials, it is difficult to capture the local characteristics accurately by these approximations. Taking polycrystalline graphene as an example material, we study the effective structural properties (such as Young's Modulus, Poisson's ratio and Toughness) by using a combination of density functional theory and molecular dynamic simulations. We identify the key mechanisms that govern their effective behavior and exploit the understanding to engineer the behavior by doping with a carefully selected choice of chemical elements.

  17. Relaxation mechanisms, structure and properties of semi-coherent interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Shao, Shuai; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-15

    In this work, using the Cu–Ni (111) semi-coherent interface as a model system, we combine atomistic simulations and defect theory to reveal the relaxation mechanisms, structure, and properties of semi-coherent interfaces. By calculating the generalized stacking fault energy (GSFE) profile of the interface, two stable structures and a high-energy structure are located. During the relaxation, the regions that possess the stable structures expand and develop into coherent regions; the regions with high-energy structure shrink into the intersection of misfit dislocations (nodes). This process reduces the interface excess potential energy but increases the core energy of the misfit dislocations and nodes.more » The core width is dependent on the GSFE of the interface. The high-energy structure relaxes by relative rotation and dilatation between the crystals. The relative rotation is responsible for the spiral pattern at nodes. The relative dilatation is responsible for the creation of free volume at nodes, which facilitates the nodes’ structural transformation. Several node structures have been observed and analyzed. In conclusion, the various structures have significant impact on the plastic deformation in terms of lattice dislocation nucleation, as well as the point defect formation energies.« less

  18. Relaxation mechanisms, structure and properties of semi-coherent interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Shuai; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-15

    In this work, using the Cu–Ni (111) semi-coherent interface as a model system, we combine atomistic simulations and defect theory to reveal the relaxation mechanisms, structure, and properties of semi-coherent interfaces. By calculating the generalized stacking fault energy (GSFE) profile of the interface, two stable structures and a high-energy structure are located. During the relaxation, the regions that possess the stable structures expand and develop into coherent regions; the regions with high-energy structure shrink into the intersection of misfit dislocations (nodes). This process reduces the interface excess potential energy but increases the core energy of the misfit dislocations and nodes. The core width is dependent on the GSFE of the interface. The high-energy structure relaxes by relative rotation and dilatation between the crystals. The relative rotation is responsible for the spiral pattern at nodes. The relative dilatation is responsible for the creation of free volume at nodes, which facilitates the nodes’ structural transformation. Several node structures have been observed and analyzed. In conclusion, the various structures have significant impact on the plastic deformation in terms of lattice dislocation nucleation, as well as the point defect formation energies.

  19. Structural and dynamical properties of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Gourab

    Recent years have witnessed a substantial amount of interest within the physics community in the properties of networks. Techniques from statistical physics coupled with the widespread availability of computing resources have facilitated studies ranging from large scale empirical analysis of the worldwide web, social networks, biological systems, to the development of theoretical models and tools to explore the various properties of these systems. Following these developments, in this dissertation, we present and solve for a diverse set of new problems, investigating the structural and dynamical properties of both model and real world networks. We start by defining a new metric to measure the stability of network structure to disruptions, and then using a combination of theory and simulation study its properties in detail on artificially generated networks; we then compare our results to a selection of networks from the real world and find good agreement in most cases. In the following chapter, we propose a mathematical model that mimics the structure of popular file-sharing websites such as Flickr and CiteULike and demonstrate that many of its properties can solved exactly in the limit of large network size. The remaining part of the dissertation primarily focuses on the dynamical properties of networks. We first formulate a model of a network that evolves under the addition and deletion of vertices and edges, and solve for the equilibrium degree distribution for a variety of cases of interest. We then consider networks whose structure can be manipulated by adjusting the rules by which vertices enter and leave the network. We focus in particular on degree distributions and show that, with some mild constraints, it is possible by a suitable choice of rules to arrange for the network to have any degree distribution we desire. In addition we define a simple local algorithm by which appropriate rules can be implemented in practice. Finally, we conclude our

  20. Structure Property Relationships of Biobased Epoxy Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorana, Anthony Surraht

    The thesis is about the synthesis, characterization, development, and application of epoxy resins derived from sustainable feedstocks such as lingo-cellulose, plant oils, and other non-food feedstocks. The thesis can be divided into two main topics 1) the synthesis and structure property relationship investigation of new biobased epoxy resin families and 2) mixing epoxy resins with reactive diluents, nanoparticles, toughening agents, and understanding co-curing reactions, filler/matrix interactions, and cured epoxy resin thermomechanical, viscoelastic, and dielectric properties. The thesis seeks to bridge the gap between new epoxy resin development, application for composites and advanced materials, processing and manufacturing, and end of life of thermoset polymers. The structures of uncured epoxy resins are characterized through traditional small molecule techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, high resolution mass spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopy. The structure of epoxy resin monomers are further understood through the process of curing the resins and cured resins' properties through rheology, chemorheology, dynamic mechanical analysis, tensile testing, fracture toughness, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and notched izod impact testing. It was found that diphenolate esters are viable alternatives to bisphenol A and that the structure of the ester side chain can have signifi-cant effects on monomer viscosity. The structure of the cured diphenolate based epoxy resins also influence glass transition temperature and dielectric properties. Incorporation of reactive diluents and flexible resins can lower viscosity, extend gel time, and enable processing of high filler content composites and increase fracture toughness. Incorpora-tion of high elastic modulus nanoparticles such as graphene can provide increases in physical properties such as elastic modulus and fracture toughness. The synthesis

  1. Structural Properties of Defects in Glassy Liquids.

    PubMed

    Cubuk, Ekin D; Schoenholz, Samuel S; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Liu, Andrea J

    2016-07-07

    At zero temperature a disordered solid corresponds to a local minimum in the energy landscape. As the temperature is raised or the system is driven with a mechanical load, the system explores different minima via dynamical events in which particles rearrange their relative positions. We have shown recently that the dynamics of particle rearrangements are strongly correlated with a structural quantity associated with each particle, "softness", which we can identify using supervised machine learning. Particles of a given softness have a well-defined energy scale that governs local rearrangements; because of this property, softness greatly simplifies our understanding of glassy dynamics. Here we investigate the correlation of softness with other commonly used structural quantities, such as coordination number and local potential energy. We show that although softness strongly correlates with these properties, its predictive power for rearrangement dynamics is much higher. We introduce a useful metric for quantifying the quality of structural quantities as predictors of dynamics. We hope that, in the future, authors introducing new structural measures of dynamics will compare their proposals quantitatively to softness using this metric. We also show how softness correlations give insight into rearrangements. Finally, we explore the physical meaning of softness using unsupervised dimensionality reduction and reduced curve-fitting models, and show that softness can be recast in a form that is amenable to analytical treatment.

  2. Electronic and structural properties of functional nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Teng

    In this Thesis, I present a study of electronic and structural properties of functional nanostructures such as MoSxIy nanowires, self-assembled monolayer on top of metallic surfaces and structural changes induced in graphite by photo excitations. MoSxI y nanowires, which can be easily synthesized in one step, show many advantages over conventional carbon nanotubes in molecular electronics and many other applications. But how to self-assemble them into desired pattern for practical electronic network? Self-assembled monolayers of polymers on metallic surfaces may help to guide pattern formation of some nanomaterials such as MoSxIy nanowires. I have investigated the physical properties of these nanoscale wires and microscopic self-assembly mechanisms of patterns by total energy calculations combined with molecular dynamics simulations and structure optimization. First, I studied the stability of novel Molybdenum chaicohalide nanowires, a candidate for molecular electronics applications. Next, I investigated the self-assembly of nanoparticles into ordered arrays with the aid of a template. Such templates, I showed, can be formed by polymer adsorption on surfaces such as highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and Ag(111). Finally, I studied the physical origin of of structural changes induced in graphite by light in form of a femtosecond laser pulse.

  3. Optical properties of honeycomb photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnik, Artem D.; Rybin, Mikhail V.; Lukashenko, Stanislav Y.; Limonov, Mikhail F.; Samusev, Kirill B.

    2017-06-01

    We study, theoretically and experimentally, optical properties of different types of honeycomb photonic structures, known also as "photonic graphene." First, we employ the two-photon polymerization method to fabricate the honeycomb structures. In the experiment, we observe a strong diffraction from a finite number of elements, thus providing a unique tool to define the exact number of scattering elements in the structure with the naked eye. Next, we study theoretically the transmission spectra of both honeycomb single layer and two-dimensional (2D) structures of parallel dielectric circular rods. When the dielectric constant of the rod materials ɛ is increasing, we reveal that a 2D photonic graphene structure transforms into a metamaterial when the lowest TE 01 Mie gap opens up below the lowest Bragg band gap. We also observe two Dirac points in the band structure of 2D photonic graphene at the K point of the Brillouin zone and demonstrate a manifestation of Dirac lensing for the TM polarization. The performance of the Dirac lens is that the 2D photonic graphene layer converts a wave from point source into a beam with flat phase surfaces at the Dirac frequency for the TM polarization.

  4. Structural and electronic properties for atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan

    We have studied the structural and electronic properties for different groups of atomic clusters by doing a global search on the potential energy surface using the Taboo Search in Descriptors Space (TSDS) method and calculating the energies with Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (KS-DFT). Our goal was to find the structural and electronic principles for predicting the structure and stability of clusters. For Ben (n = 3--20), we have found that the evolution of geometric and electronic properties with size reflects a change in the nature of the bonding from van der Waals to metallic and then bulk-like. The cluster sizes with extra stability agree well with the predictions of the jellium model. In the 4d series of transition metal (TM) clusters, as the d-type bonding becomes more important, the preferred geometric structure changes from icosahedral (Y, Zr), to distorted compact structures (Nb, Mo), and FCC or simple cubic crystal fragments (Tc, Ru, Rh) due to the localized nature of the d-type orbital. Analysis of relative isomer energies and their electronic density of states suggest that these clusters tend to follow a maximum hardness principle (MHP). For A4B12 clusters (A is divalent, B is monovalent), we found unusually large (on average 1.95 eV) HOMO-LUMO gap values. This shows the extra stability at an electronic closed shell (20 electrons) predicted by the jellium model. The importance of symmetry, closed electronic and ionic shells in stability is shown by the relative stability of homotops of Mg4Ag12 which also provides support for the hypothesis that clusters that satisfy more than one stability criterion ("double magic") should be particularly stable.

  5. Native Cellulose: Structure, Characterization and Thermal Properties

    PubMed Central

    Poletto, Matheus; Ornaghi Júnior, Heitor L.; Zattera, Ademir J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the relationship between cellulose crystallinity, the influence of extractive content on lignocellulosic fiber degradation, the correlation between chemical composition and the physical properties of ten types of natural fibers were investigated by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry techniques. The results showed that higher extractive contents associated with lower crystallinity and lower cellulose crystallite size can accelerate the degradation process and reduce the thermal stability of the lignocellulosic fibers studied. On the other hand, the thermal decomposition of natural fibers is shifted to higher temperatures with increasing the cellulose crystallinity and crystallite size. These results indicated that the cellulose crystallite size affects the thermal degradation temperature of natural fibers. This study showed that through the methods used, previous information about the structure and properties of lignocellulosic fibers can be obtained before use in composite formulations. PMID:28788179

  6. Final disposal room structural response calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.M.

    1997-08-01

    Finite element calculations have been performed to determine the structural response of waste-filled disposal rooms at the WIPP for a period of 10,000 years after emplacement of the waste. The calculations were performed to generate the porosity surface data for the final set of compliance calculations. The most recent reference data for the stratigraphy, waste characterization, gas generation potential, and nonlinear material response have been brought together for this final set of calculations.

  7. Input estimation from measured structural response

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Dustin; Cross, Elizabeth; Silva, Ramon A; Farrar, Charles R; Bement, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This report will focus on the estimation of unmeasured dynamic inputs to a structure given a numerical model of the structure and measured response acquired at discrete locations. While the estimation of inputs has not received as much attention historically as state estimation, there are many applications where an improved understanding of the immeasurable input to a structure is vital (e.g. validating temporally varying and spatially-varying load models for large structures such as buildings and ships). In this paper, the introduction contains a brief summary of previous input estimation studies. Next, an adjoint-based optimization method is used to estimate dynamic inputs to two experimental structures. The technique is evaluated in simulation and with experimental data both on a cantilever beam and on a three-story frame structure. The performance and limitations of the adjoint-based input estimation technique are discussed.

  8. Structure-Property Relationships of Bismaleimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenteris-Noebe, Anita D.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to control and systematically vary the network topology of bismaleimides through cure temperature and chemistry (addition of various coreactants) and subsequently attempt to determine structure-mechanical property relationships. Characterization of the bismaleimide structures by dielectric, rheological, and thermal analyses, and density measurements was subsequently correlated with mechanical properties such as modulus, yield strength, fracture energy, and stress relaxation. The model material used in this investigation was 4,4'-BismaleiMidodIphenyl methane (BMI). BMI was coreacted with either 4,4'-Methylene Dianiline (MDA), o,o'-diallyl bisphenol A (DABA) from Ciba Geigy, or Diamino Diphenyl Sulfone (DDS). Three cure paths were employed: a low- temperature cure of 140 C where chain extension should predominate, a high-temperature cure of 220 C where both chain extension and crosslinking should occur simultaneously, and a low-temperature (140 C) cure followed immediately by a high-temperature (220 C) cure where the chain extension reaction or amine addition precedes BMI homopolymerization or crosslinking. Samples of cured and postcured PMR-15 were also tested to determine the effects of postcuring on the mechanical properties. The low-temperature cure condition of BMI/MDA exhibited the highest modulus values for a given mole fraction of BMI with the modulus decreasing with decreasing concentration of BMI. The higher elastic modulus is the result of steric hindrance by unreacted BMI molecules in the glassy state. The moduli values for the high- and low/high-temperature cure conditions of BMI/MDA decreased as the amount of diamine increased. All the moduli values mimic the yield strength and density trends. For the high-temperature cure condition, the room- temperature modulus remained constant with decreasing mole fraction of BMT for the BMI/DABA and BMI/DDS systems. Postcuring PMR-15 increases the modulus over that of the cured

  9. Sources of Environmental Structuring and Participant Responses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-08

    IS. CON4TROLLING OFFICE NAIWE AMC ACORESS IL. REPORT DATE Organizational Effectiveness Research Programs April 8, 1982 *office of Naval Research...technology, leader structure, employee >0 Tis Study investigated the effects of four sources of environmental struc- 0... turing on employee responses...These sources are: job, technology, work unit, and leader behavior. Main, joint, and interactive effects were examined. Job structure had the strongest

  10. Structural, electronic and optical properties of carbonnitride

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Marvin L.

    1996-01-31

    Carbon nitride was proposed as a superhard material and a structural prototype, Beta-C3N4, was examined using several theoretical models. Some reports claiming experimental verifications have been made recently. The current status of the theory and experiment is reviewed, and a detailed discussion is presented of calculations of the electronic and optical properties of this material. These calculations predict that Beta-C3N4 will have a minimum gap which is indirect at 6.4 plus or minus 0.5 eV. A discussion of the possibility of carbon nitride nanotubes is also presented.

  11. Nanostructured lead sulfide: synthesis, structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Gusev, A. I.; Rempel, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The theoretical and experimental results of recent studies dealing with nanostructured lead sulfide are summarized and analyzed. The key methods for the synthesis of nanostructured lead sulfide are described. The crystal structure of PbS in nanopowders and nanofilms is discussed. The influence of the size of nanostructure elements on the optical and thermal properties of lead sulfide is considered. The dependence of the band gap of PbS on the nanoparticle (crystallite) size for powders and films is illustrated. The bibliography includes 222 references.

  12. Structural properties of impact ices accreted on aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scavuzzo, R. J.; Chu, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    The structural properties of ice accretions formed on aircraft surfaces are studied. The overall objectives are to measure basic structural properties of impact ices and to develop finite element analytical procedures for use in the design of all deicing systems. The Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to produce simulated natural ice accretion over a wide range of icing conditions. Two different test apparatus were used to measure each of the three basic mechanical properties: tensile, shear, and peeling. Data was obtained on both adhesive shear strength of impact ices and peeling forces for various icing conditions. The influences of various icing parameters such as tunnel air temperature and velocity, icing cloud drop size, material substrate, surface temperature at ice/material interface, and ice thickness were studied. A finite element analysis of the shear test apparatus was developed in order to gain more insight in the evaluation of the test data. A comparison with other investigators was made. The result shows that the adhesive shear strength of impact ice typically varies between 40 and 50 psi, with peak strength reaching 120 psi and is not dependent on the kind of substrate used, the thickness of accreted ice, and tunnel temperature below 4 C.

  13. Structure and Properties of Dense Silica Glass

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Liang, Yunfeng; Jiang, Jian-Zhong; Tse, John S.

    2012-01-01

    The O K-edge x-ray Raman scattering (XRS), Brillouin scattering and diffraction studies on silica glass at high pressure have been elucidated in a unified manner using model structures obtained from First-Principles molecular dynamics calculations. This study provides a comprehensive understanding on how the structure is related to the physical and electronic properties. The origin of the “two peak” pattern in the XRS is found to be the result of increased packing of oxygen near the Si and is not a specific sign for sixfold coordination. The compression mechanism involving the presence of 5- and 6-fold coordinated silicon is confirmed. A slight increase in the silicon-oxygen coordination higher than six was found to accompany the increase in the acoustic wave velocity near 140 GPa. PMID:22570763

  14. Structural and optical properties of nanostructured nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J. Pandey, J.; Gupta, R.; Tripathi, J.; Kaurav, N.

    2016-05-06

    Metal nanoparticles are attractive because of their special structure and better optical properties. Nickel nanoparticles (Ni-Np) have been synthesized successfully by thermal decomposition method in the presence of trioctyl phosphine (TOP) and oleylamine (OAm). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Zetapotential measurement and Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The size of Ni nanoparticles can be readily tuned from 13.86 nm. As-synthesized Ni nanoparticles have hexagonal closed pack (hcp) cubic structure as characterized by power X-ray diffraction (XRD) prepared at 280°C. The possible formation mechanism has also been phenomenological proposed for as synthesized Ni-Np. The value of Zeta potential was found 12.25 mV.

  15. Properties of multilayer nonuniform holographic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pen, E F; Rodionov, Mikhail Yu

    2010-12-09

    Experimental results and analysis of properties of multilayer nonuniform holographic structures formed in photopolymer materials are presented. The theoretical hypotheses is proved that the characteristics of angular selectivity for the considered structures have a set of local maxima, whose number and width are determined by the thicknesses of intermediate layers and deep holograms and that the envelope of the maxima coincides with the selectivity contour of a single holographic array. It is also experimentally shown that hologram nonuniformities substantially distort shapes of selectivity characteristics: they become asymmetric, the local maxima differ in size and the depths of local minima reduce. The modelling results are made similar to experimental data by appropriately choosing the nonuniformity parameters. (imaging and image processing. holography)

  16. Responses in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreira, Alexandre; Schmidt, Fabian

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a rigorous definition of general power-spectrum responses as resummed vertices with two hard and n soft momenta in cosmological perturbation theory. These responses measure the impact of long-wavelength perturbations on the local small-scale power spectrum. The kinematic structure of the responses (i.e., their angular dependence) can be decomposed unambiguously through a ``bias'' expansion of the local power spectrum, with a fixed number of physical response coefficients, which are only a function of the hard wavenumber k. Further, the responses up to n-th order completely describe the (n+2)-point function in the squeezed limit, i.e. with two hard and n soft modes, which one can use to derive the response coefficients. This generalizes previous results, which relate the angle-averaged squeezed limit to isotropic response coefficients. We derive the complete expression of first- and second-order responses at leading order in perturbation theory, and present extrapolations to nonlinear scales based on simulation measurements of the isotropic response coefficients. As an application, we use these results to predict the non-Gaussian part of the angle-averaged matter power spectrum covariance CovNGl=0(k1,k2), in the limit where one of the modes, say k2, is much smaller than the other. Without any free parameters, our model results are in very good agreement with simulations for k2 lesssim 0.06 h Mpc-1, and for any k1 gtrsim 2k2. The well-defined kinematic structure of the power spectrum response also permits a quick evaluation of the angular dependence of the covariance matrix. While we focus on the matter density field, the formalism presented here can be generalized to generic tracers such as galaxies.

  17. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ⪉rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in

  18. Structure and electrooptical properties of orthoconic antiferroelectric liquid crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, R.; Czupryński, K.; Gąsowska, J.; Tykarska, M.; Kula, P.; Dziaduszek, J.; Oton, J.; Castillo, P.; Benis, N.

    2005-09-01

    The optic and electrooptic properties of recently prepared orthoconic antiferroelectrics have been revieved. Relation between their chemical structure and mesogenic properties, smectic layer structure and helical pitch is discussed.

  19. Effects of material degradation on large space structures dynamic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigao, Alan J.

    1992-08-01

    Composite Large Space Structures (LSS) including booms, planar surfaces, antennas, platforms, and space stations are proposed for use in NASA's Space Station 'Freedom' and the DOD's Global Protection Against Limited Strikes programs. Because of their low mass and high strength and stiffness, composite repetitive lattice structures are ideal for these space applications. LSS will be required to sustain severe environmental effects - radiation, thermal cycling, atomic oxygen bombardment, collision with micrometeoroids and space debris, and hostile actions - and transient operational loads - docking, slewing, manned activities, control system, and the mobile service center - while maintaining strict mission parameters. Platform pointing is one example of these requirements and necessitates tolerances of less than one thousandth of a degree. Over time, material and structural degradation will occur due to environmental effects causing a change in the structure's stiffness and dynamic response. Likely, this structural damage will require immediate repair to restore the LSS to full mission capability. This thesis investigates the dynamic response of one LSS - the NASA Dual-Keel Space Station with 5 meter graphite epoxy erectable truss under one operational load - shuttle docking - and Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environmental conditions, and predicts how the material, structural properties, and dynamic response change over the 20-30 year design life. Results show the effects of material degradation on the station's dynamic response and mission requirements and has applications for NASA and DOD logistics planning for future LSS.

  20. Structural properties of autoclaved aerated concrete masonry

    SciTech Connect

    Matthys, J.H.; Nelson, R.L.

    1999-07-01

    Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry units are manufactured from portland cement, quartz sand, water, lime, gypsum and a gas forming agent. The units are steam cured under pressure in an autoclave transforming the material into a hard calcium silicate. The autoclaved aerated concrete masonry units are large-size solid rectangular prisms which are laid using thin-bed mortar layers into masonry assemblages. The system and product are not new--patented in 1924 by Swedish architect Johan Eriksson. Over a period of 60 years this product has been used in all areas of residential and industrial construction and in virtually all climates. However, the principal locations of application have been generally outside the US Little information in the US is available on the structural properties of this product. Due to the interest in use of this product in the construction industry and the construction of production plants in the US, the Construction Research Center at the University of Texas at Arlington and Robert L. Nelson & Associates conducted a series of tests to determine some of the basic structural properties of this product. This paper presents the findings of those investigations.

  1. Lattice Truss Structural Response Using Energy Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Winfred Scottson

    1996-01-01

    A deterministic methodology is presented for developing closed-form deflection equations for two-dimensional and three-dimensional lattice structures. Four types of lattice structures are studied: beams, plates, shells and soft lattices. Castigliano's second theorem, which entails the total strain energy of a structure, is utilized to generate highly accurate results. Derived deflection equations provide new insight into the bending and shear behavior of the four types of lattices, in contrast to classic solutions of similar structures. Lattice derivations utilizing kinetic energy are also presented, and used to examine the free vibration response of simple lattice structures. Derivations utilizing finite element theory for unique lattice behavior are also presented and validated using the finite element analysis code EAL.

  2. Structural properties of Alumnum nitride compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, R.; Katırcıoğlu, Ş.

    2014-10-01

    Structural properties of Alumnum nitride in wurtzite, zinc-blende and rock-salt phases have been investigated by Full Potential-Linearized Augmented Plane Waves method based on Density Functional Theory within Local Density Approximation and seven Generalized Gradient schemes. It is found that, Alumnum nitride in wurtzite phase is the stable ground state structure and makes a transition to rock-salt phase at a low transition pressure (11.54 GPa). According to present total energy calculations, zinc-blende phase of Alumnum nitride also makes a transition to rock-salt phase, at a low transition pressure (10.17 GPa). Generalized Gradient functionals of Perdew-Wang-Engel-Vosko and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof are found to be more successful than other approximations considered in this work for providing the closest values of the structural features, such as, lattice constants, bulk moduli, first order pressure derivatives of bulk moduli and cohesive energies of Alumnum nitride three phases to available experimental ones. Although Generalized Gradient approaches of Perdew-Wang-Engel-Vosko, Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof, Becke-Perdew-Wang and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (revised) are found to be accurate schemes for elastic constants of rock-salt AlN, only Perdew-Wang-Engel-Vosko and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functionals are observed to be more successful than the other schemes for supplying accurately both C_{11} and C_{12} of zinc-blende Alumnum nitride structure. Perdew-Wang-Engel-Vosko functional is observed to be superior to Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof for elastic constants of wurtzite Alumnum nitride structure. Elastic constants of wurtzite Alumnum nitride obtained by self Perdew-Wang-Engel-Vosko approach and Martin's transformation calculations in which elastic constants of zinc-blende Alumnum nitride are calculated with Perdew-Wang-Engel-Vosko scheme, are very close to the experimental ones. Hence, functional of Perdew-Wang-Engel-Vosko is decided to be the most accurate approximation

  3. Structural and material properties of human foot tendons.

    PubMed

    Morales-Orcajo, Enrique; Becerro de Bengoa Vallejo, Ricardo; Losa Iglesias, Marta; Bayod, Javier

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the mechanical properties of the main balance tendons of the human foot in vitro reporting mechanical structural properties and mechanical material properties separately. Tendon structural properties are relevant for clinical applications, for example in orthopedic surgery to elect suitable replacements. Tendon material properties are important for engineering applications such as the development of refined constitutive models for computational simulation or in the design of synthetic materials. One hundred uniaxial tensile tests were performed to obtain the mechanical response of the main intrinsic and extrinsic human foot tendons. The specimens were harvested from five frozen cadaver feet including: Extensor and Flexor tendons of all toes, Tibialis Anterior and Posterior tendons and Peroneus Brevis and Longus tendons. Cross-sectional area, load and strain failure, Young's modulus and ultimate tensile stress are reported as a reference of foot tendon mechanical properties. Two different behaviors could be differentiated. Tibialis and Peroneus tendons exhibited higher values of strain failure compared to Flexor and Extensor tendons which had higher Young's modulus and ultimate tensile stress. Stress-strain tendon curves exhibited proportionality between regions. The initial strain, the toe region and the yield point corresponded to the 15, 30 and 70% of the strain failure respectively. Mechanical properties of the lesser-studied human foot tendons are presented under the same test protocol for different engineering and clinical applications. The tendons that work at the inversion/eversion plane are more deformable at the same stress and strain rate than those that work at the flexion/extension plane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mapping magnetoelastic response of terfenol-D ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, George; Newacheck, Scott; Lopez, Mario

    2017-05-01

    The magneto-elastic response of a Terfenol-D (Tb.3Dy.7Fe1.92) ring has been experimentally investigated and analyzed. Ring structures give rise to complex behavior based on the interaction of the magnetic field with the material, which is further compounded with anisotropies associated with mechanical and magnetic properties. Discrete strain measurements were used to construct magnetostriction maps, which are used to elucidate the non-uniformity of the strain distribution due to geometrical factors and magnetic field interactions, namely, magnetic shielding and stable onion state in the ring structure.

  5. The Response to Conflict Scale: Psychometric Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birchler, Gary R.; Fals-Stewart, William

    1994-01-01

    The Response to Conflict Scale, a 24-item measure of maladaptive responses to marital conflict, was evaluated psychometrically with 420 couples. The inventory showed high internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct and discriminant validity, and classification efficiency. Clinical utility is discussed. (SLD)

  6. Landscape structure and climate influences on hydrologic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nippgen, Fabian; McGlynn, Brian L.; Marshall, Lucy A.; Emanuel, Ryan E.

    2011-12-01

    Climate variability and catchment structure (topography, geology, vegetation) have a significant influence on the timing and quantity of water discharged from mountainous catchments. How these factors combine to influence runoff dynamics is poorly understood. In this study we linked differences in hydrologic response across catchments and across years to metrics of landscape structure and climate using a simple transfer function rainfall-runoff modeling approach. A transfer function represents the internal catchment properties that convert a measured input (rainfall/snowmelt) into an output (streamflow). We examined modeled mean response time, defined as the average time that it takes for a water input to leave the catchment outlet from the moment it reaches the ground surface. We combined 12 years of precipitation and streamflow data from seven catchments in the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (Little Belt Mountains, southwestern Montana) with landscape analyses to quantify the first-order controls on mean response times. Differences between responses across the seven catchments were related to the spatial variability in catchment structure (e.g., slope, flowpath lengths, tree height). Annual variability was largely a function of maximum snow water equivalent. Catchment averaged runoff ratios exhibited strong correlations with mean response time while annually averaged runoff ratios were not related to climatic metrics. These results suggest that runoff ratios in snowmelt dominated systems are mainly controlled by topography and not by climatic variability. This approach provides a simple tool for assessing differences in hydrologic response across diverse watersheds and climate conditions.

  7. Measuring Tree Properties and Responses Using Low-Cost Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    van Emmerik, Tim; Steele-Dunne, Susan; Hut, Rolf; Gentine, Pierre; Guerin, Marceau; Oliveira, Rafael S.; Wagner, Jim; Selker, John; van de Giesen, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Trees play a crucial role in the water, carbon and nitrogen cycle on local, regional and global scales. Understanding the exchange of momentum, heat, water, and CO2 between trees and the atmosphere is important to assess the impact of drought, deforestation and climate change. Unfortunately, ground measurements of tree properties such as mass and canopy interception of precipitation are often expensive or difficult due to challenging environments. This paper aims to demonstrate the concept of using robust and affordable accelerometers to measure tree properties and responses. Tree sway is dependent on mass, canopy structure, drag coefficient, and wind forcing. By measuring tree acceleration, we can relate the tree motion to external forcing (e.g., wind, precipitation and related canopy interception) and tree physical properties (e.g., mass, elasticity). Using five months of acceleration data of 19 trees in the Brazilian Amazon, we show that the frequency spectrum of tree sway is related to mass, canopy interception of precipitation, and canopy–atmosphere turbulent exchange. PMID:28492477

  8. Measuring Tree Properties and Responses Using Low-Cost Accelerometers.

    PubMed

    van Emmerik, Tim; Steele-Dunne, Susan; Hut, Rolf; Gentine, Pierre; Guerin, Marceau; Oliveira, Rafael S; Wagner, Jim; Selker, John; van de Giesen, Nick

    2017-05-11

    Trees play a crucial role in the water, carbon and nitrogen cycle on local, regional and global scales. Understanding the exchange of momentum, heat, water, and CO 2 between trees and the atmosphere is important to assess the impact of drought, deforestation and climate change. Unfortunately, ground measurements of tree properties such as mass and canopy interception of precipitation are often expensive or difficult due to challenging environments. This paper aims to demonstrate the concept of using robust and affordable accelerometers to measure tree properties and responses. Tree sway is dependent on mass, canopy structure, drag coefficient, and wind forcing. By measuring tree acceleration, we can relate the tree motion to external forcing (e.g., wind, precipitation and related canopy interception) and tree physical properties (e.g., mass, elasticity). Using five months of acceleration data of 19 trees in the Brazilian Amazon, we show that the frequency spectrum of tree sway is related to mass, canopy interception of precipitation, and canopy-atmosphere turbulent exchange.

  9. On Structure and Properties of Amorphous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Stachurski, Zbigniew H.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical, optical, magnetic and electronic properties of amorphous materials hold great promise towards current and emergent technologies. We distinguish at least four categories of amorphous (glassy) materials: (i) metallic; (ii) thin films; (iii) organic and inorganic thermoplastics; and (iv) amorphous permanent networks. Some fundamental questions about the atomic arrangements remain unresolved. This paper focuses on the models of atomic arrangements in amorphous materials. The earliest ideas of Bernal on the structure of liquids were followed by experiments and computer models for the packing of spheres. Modern approach is to carry out computer simulations with prediction that can be tested by experiments. A geometrical concept of an ideal amorphous solid is presented as a novel contribution to the understanding of atomic arrangements in amorphous solids. PMID:28824158

  10. Selenium quantum dots: Preparation, structure, and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Fuli; Li, Xueming; Tang, Libin; Lai, Sin Ki; Lu, Chaoyu; Lau, Shu Ping

    2017-01-01

    An interesting class of low-dimensional nanomaterials, namely, selenium quantum dots (SeQDs), which are composed of nano-sized selenium particles, is reported in this study. The SeQDs possess a hexagonal crystal structure. They can be synthesized in large quantity by ultrasound liquid-phase exfoliation using NbSe2 powders as the source material and N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as the dispersant. During sonication, the Nb-Se bonds dissociate; the SeQDs are formed, while niobium is separated by centrifugation. The SeQDs have a narrow diameter distribution from 1.9 to 4.6 nm and can be dispersed with high stability in NMP without the need for passivating agents. They exhibit photoluminescence properties that are expected to find useful applications in bioimaging, optoelectronics, as well as nanocomposites.

  11. Structure, Stability and Electronic Properties of Nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Giulia

    Diamond nanoparticles, or nanodiamonds, have the most disparate origins. They are found in crude oil at concentrations up to thousands of parts per million, in meteorites, interstellar dust, and protoplanetary nebulae, as well as in certain sediment layers on Earth. They can also be produced in the laboratory by chemical vapor deposition or by detonating high explosive materials. Here we summarize what is known about nanodiamond sources; we then describe the atomic and electronic structure, and stability of diamond nanoparticles, highlighting the role of theory and computations in understanding and predicting their properties. Possible technological applications of thin films composed of nanodiamonds, ranging from micro-resonators to substrates for drug delivery, are briefly discussed.

  12. Melt Structure and Properties: Progress and Prognoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, J. F.

    2004-12-01

    Recent advances in quantitative determinations of silicate glass structure are beginning to place important constraints on models of the physical and chemical properties of melts, but much remains to be done before such models can become entirely based on structure. For example, models of free energy and major component activities generally assume (lacking better constraints) that network species (e.g. Al, Si, "Qn" groups) and network modifiers (e.g. Na, Ca, K, Mg) each mix randomly. However, recent spectroscopic studies demonstrate strong ordering in the network (significant if incomplete Al avoidance; preference of Al for "Q4" groups, etc.) and between modifier cations differing greatly in field strength (e.g. K+, Mg2+). Solution models thus may need substantial revision, unless new studies of temperature effects on such ordering indicate approach to randomness at magmatic temperatures. Such studies are ongoing, facilitated by recent developments in hyper-quenching technology. On the other hand, discovery of such low-T ordering provides a likely (and long-suspected) mechanism for at least some of the configurational entropy in multicomponent melts, which in turn is a critical part of models of viscosity: at least in systems with high Al/Si ratios, for example, increase in Al/Si disorder with increasing T will a major part of this term. In many systems, however, the structural origins of Sconf remain mysterious. For both major and minor components, considerable information now exists to constrain models both of activity and of transport processes, but progress awaits development of useful model forms. Examples include new information on the local coordination of anions such as fluoride and chloride, which again show strong chemical ordering. Similarly, we now know a great deal about the concentration of minor "defect" species, that have been considered to be important to viscosity and diffusion (e.g. AlO5, SiO5, "excess" NBO). However, going from speculative

  13. Dense-spray properties: Structure and turbulence modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, G. A.; Parthasarathy, R. N.; Faeth, G. M.

    1989-08-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of aspects of dense sprays is described, considering: the structure and mixing properties of the near injector, dense spray region of pressure atomized sprays; and the direct effect of particle (drop) motion on the turbulence properties of multiphase flows (which is often called turbulence modulation). The structure of dense sprays was studied using large scale (9.5 and 19.1 mm jet exit diameters) water sprays in still air. Measurements included: flow visualization using flash photography; liquid volume fractions using gamma ray absorption; streamwise mean and fluctuating velocities at the injector exit, and entrainment velocities, using laser velocimetry; and dispersed phase properties using single- and double-flash holography. Predictions based on the locally homogeneous flow (LHF) approximation of multiphase flow theory were evaluated using the measurements. Measurements showed that mixing was strongly influenced by the degree of flow development at the injector exit and the breakup regime: fully developed flow and atomization breakup yielded the fastest mixing rates. Turbulence modulation was studied by considering nearly monodisperse spherical glass particles falling in a stagnant water bath, where effects of turbulence modulation were responsible for the entire turbulence field. Measurements included phase velocities, as well as the temporal and spatial correlations of continuous phase velocities, using a two-point phase discriminating laser velocimeters, and calibration of particle motion properties using motion picture shadowgraphs.

  14. Revisiting HOPG superlattices: Structure and conductance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sumati; Kolekar, Sadhu; Deshpande, Aparna

    2017-04-01

    Superlattices observed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) have been studied extensively by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The interest in the study of graphite superlattices has seen a resurgence since the discovery of graphene. Single layer graphene, bilayer graphene, and few layer graphene can now be grown on different substrates. The adherence of graphene to various substrates often leads to a periodic out-of-plane modulation and superlattices due to lattice mismatch. In this paper, we report STM imaging and scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) of different kinds of superlattices on HOPG characterized by a variation in lattice periodicities. Our study also shows evidence of the displacement of the topmost HOPG layer by scanning different areas of the same superlattice. A correlation between the lattice periodicity with its conductance properties is derived. The results of this work are important for understanding the origin of the superlattice structure on HOPG. Investigation of such superlattices may open up possible ways to modify two dimensional electron systems to create materials with tailored electronic properties.

  15. Structure and elastic properties of tunneling nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Bruno; Viana, Nathan B; Campanati, Loraine; Farina, Marcos; Neto, Vivaldo Moura; Nussenzveig, H Moysés

    2008-02-01

    We investigate properties of a reported new mechanism for cell-cell interactions, tunneling nanotubes (TNT's). TNT's mediate actin-based transfer of vesicles and organelles and they allow signal transmission between cells. The effects of lateral pulling with polystyrene beads trapped by optical tweezers on TNT's linking separate U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells in culture are described. This cell line was chosen for handling ease and possible pathology implications of TNT persistence in communication between cancerous cells. Observed nanotubes are shown to have the characteristic features of TNT's. We find that pulling induces two different types of TNT bifurcations. In one of them, termed V-Y bifurcation, the TNT is first distorted into a V-shaped form, following which a new branch emerges from the apex. In the other one, termed I-D bifurcation, the pulled TNT is bent into a curved arc of increasingly broader span. Curves showing the variation of pulling force with displacement are obtained. Results yield information on TNT structure and elastic properties.

  16. Structure Property Studies for Additively Manufactured Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Milenski, Helen M; Schmalzer, Andrew Michael; Kelly, Daniel

    2015-08-17

    Since the invention of modern Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes engineers and designers have worked hard to capitalize on the unique building capabilities that AM allows. By being able to customize the interior fill of parts it is now possible to design components with a controlled density and customized internal structure. The creation of new polymers and polymer composites allow for even greater control over the mechanical properties of AM parts. One of the key reasons to explore AM, is to bring about a new paradigm in part design, where materials can be strategically optimized in a way that conventional subtractive methods cannot achieve. The two processes investigated in my research were the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process and the Direct Ink Write (DIW) process. The objectives of the research were to determine the impact of in-fill density and morphology on the mechanical properties of FDM parts, and to determine if DIW printed samples could be produced where the filament diameter was varied while the overall density remained constant.

  17. Structure and general properties of flavins.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Flavins are a family of yellow-colored compounds with the basic structure of 7,8-dimethyl-10-alkylisoalloxazine. Riboflavin, commonly known as vitamin B2, is an essential component of living organisms and is the precursor of all biologically important flavins. In this chapter, the redox properties of flavins are described, with special emphasis in their ability to participate in both one-electron and two-electron transfer processes; hence, flavins are indispensable mediators between two-electron and one-electron processes in biological systems. The photophysical and photochemical properties of flavins are also discussed. All oxidized flavins exhibit strong absorption in the ultraviolet and visible regions and an intense yellow-green fluorescence (in their neutral oxidized form). Flavins are thermostable compounds; however, they are photosensitive. In the absence of an external reductant, the isoalloxazine ring system undergoes intramolecular photoreduction. Some flavins are efficient photosensitizers; they can induce photomodifications of compounds that are not directly modified by visible light.

  18. Elastic Properties and Enhanced Piezoelectric Response at Morphotropic Phase Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The search for improved piezoelectric materials is based on the morphotropic phase boundaries (MPB) between ferroelectric phases with different crystal symmetry and available directions for the spontaneous polarization. Such regions of the composition x−T phase diagrams provide the conditions for minimal anisotropy with respect to the direction of the polarization, so that the polarization can easily rotate maintaining a substantial magnitude, while the near verticality of the TMPBx boundary extends the temperature range of the resulting enhanced piezoelectricity. Another consequence of the quasi-isotropy of the free energy is a reduction of the domain walls energies, with consequent formation of domain structures down to nanoscale. Disentangling the extrinsic and intrinsic contributions to the piezoelectricity in such conditions requires a high level of sophistication from the techniques and analyses for studying the structural, ferroelectric and dielectric properties. The elastic characterization is extremely useful in clarifying the phenomenology and mechanisms related to ferroelectric MPBs. The relationship between dielectric, elastic and piezoelectric responses is introduced in terms of relaxation of defects with electric dipole and elastic quadrupole, and extended to the response near phase transitions in the framework of the Landau theory. An account is provided of the anelastic experiments, from torsional pendulum to Brillouin scattering, that provided new important information on ferroelectric MPBs, including PZT, PMN-PT, NBT-BT, BCTZ, and KNN-based systems. PMID:28793707

  19. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals: 3. Relationships between smectite redox and structural properties.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Christopher A; Klüpfel, Laura E; Voegelin, Andreas; Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Structural Fe in clay minerals is an important redox-active species in many pristine and contaminated environments as well as in engineered systems. Understanding the extent and kinetics of redox reactions involving Fe-bearing clay minerals has been challenging due to the inability to relate structural Fe(2+)/Fe(total) fractions to fundamental redox properties, such as reduction potentials (EH). Here, we overcame this challenge by using mediated electrochemical reduction (MER) and oxidation (MEO) to characterize the fraction of redox-active structural Fe (Fe(2+)/Fe(total)) in smectites over a wide range of applied EH-values (-0.6 V to +0.6 V). We examined Fe(2+)/Fe(total )- EH relationships of four natural Fe-bearing smectites (SWy-2, SWa-1, NAu-1, NAu-2) in their native, reduced, and reoxidized states and compared our measurements with spectroscopic observations and a suite of mineralogical properties. All smectites exhibited unique Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships, were redox active over wide EH ranges, and underwent irreversible electron transfer induced structural changes that were observable with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Variations among the smectite Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships correlated well with both bulk and molecular-scale properties, including Fe(total) content, layer charge, and quadrupole splitting values, suggesting that multiple structural parameters determined the redox properties of smectites. The Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships developed for these four commonly studied clay minerals may be applied to future studies interested in relating the extent of structural Fe reduction or oxidation to EH-values.

  20. PROBABILISTIC STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF STRUCTURE UNDER COLLAPSE LOADING

    SciTech Connect

    J. PEPIN; E. RODRIGUEZ; ET AL

    2001-01-05

    Engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are currently developing the capability to provide a reliability-based structural evaluation technique for performing weapon reliability assessments. To enhance the analyst's confidence with these new methods, an integrated experiment and analysis project has been developed. The uncertainty associated with the collapse response of commercially available spherical marine float is evaluated with the aid of the non-linear explicit dynamics code DYNA3D (Whirley and Engelmann 1988) coupled with the probabilistic code NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) (Thacker et al. 1998). Variations in geometric shape parameters and uncertainties in material parameters are characterized and included in the probabilistic model.

  1. Structural Properties of Green Tea Catechins.

    PubMed

    Botten, Dominic; Fugallo, Giorgia; Fraternali, Franca; Molteni, Carla

    2015-10-08

    Green tea catechins are polyphenols which are believed to provide health benefits; they are marketed as health supplements and are studied for their potential effects on a variety of medical conditions. However, their mechanisms of action and interaction with the environment at the molecular level are still not well-understood. Here, by means of atomistic simulations, we explore the structural properties of four green tea catechins, in the gas phase and water solution: specifically, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, which is the most abundant, (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-(3-O-methyl)-gallate, and (-)-epigallocatechin. We characterize the free energy conformational landscapes of these catechins at ambient conditions, as a function of the torsional degrees of freedom of the pholyphenolic rings, determining the stable conformers and their connections. We show that these free energy landscapes are only subtly influenced by the interactions with the solvent and by the structural details of the polyphenolic rings. However, the number and position of the hydroxyl groups (or their sustituents) and the presence/absence of the galloyl moiety have significant impact on the selected catechin solvation shells and hydrogen bond capabilities, which are ultimately linked to their ability to interact with and affect the biological environment.

  2. Melt Structure and Properties: a Spectroscopic Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, J.

    2006-12-01

    Entropy, volume, and their P/T derivatives are at the heart of models of the thermodynamics of silicate melts and magmas. Quantitative characterization of glass structure is leading to important new insights into the links from "Microscopic to Macroscopic" that can at least guide interpretations of data and in some cases even have predictive power. A few recent examples will be discussed here. The often-large configurational components to heat capacities, thermal expansivities, and compressibilities of melts strongly indicate that structural changes with temperature and pressure are of key importance. At least some aspects of thermal increases in configurational (as opposed to vibrational) disorder are amenable to spectroscopic detection, either with in situ methods or on glasses with varying quench rates and thus varying fictive temperatures. In some systems, such changes are now clear, and can be shown to make significant contributions to properties. These include network cation coordination in systems such as borate liquids (BO4 to BO3 at higher T), and Al-Si disordering in aluminosilicates. In general, however, progress in this rich problem has only begun. It has long been suspected from thermodynamic analyses (and theoretical simulations) that configurational changes in melts play a key role in volume compression at high pressure, over and above that which can be expressed in "normal" equations of state or from those expected from bond compression and bending. Scattering and spectroscopic studies have revealed some of the important aspects of pressure-induced structural changes, but again we are just at the beginning of full understanding. For example, binary silicate glasses quenched from high-P melts clearly record some systematic increases in Si coordination, while aluminosilicates record systematic pressure and compositional (modifier cation field strength) effects on Al coordination in recovered samples with large, quenched-in density increases

  3. Optimum structural sizing for gust induced response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, P.; Bach, C. T.

    1988-01-01

    The present paper describes an optimization capability for sizing airframe structures that are subjected to a combination of deterministic and random loads. Design constraints are implemented to prevent structural failure in fatigue and due to a single exceedance of the allowable stress. The random load is treated as a stationary, homogeneous process with a Gaussian probability distribution, and a frequency domain method is used for the computation of dynamic response parameters. An equal-probability-of-load-combination criterion is proposed in the formulation of strength constraints. This alleviates problems associated with the incomplete phase information available when using power spectral density methods. The optimization procedure is illustrated by examples using typical built-up structures.

  4. Structural properties, phase stability, elastic properties and electronic structures of Cu-Ti intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuai; Duan, Yong-Hua; Huang, Bo; Hu, Wen-Cheng

    2015-11-01

    The structural properties, phase stabilities, anisotropic elastic properties and electronic structures of Cu-Ti intermetallics have been systematically investigated using first principles based on the density functional theory. The calculated equilibrium structural parameters agree well with available experimental data. The ground-state convex hull of formation enthalpies as a function of Cu content is slightly symmetrical at CuTi with a minimal formation enthalpy (-13.861 kJ/mol of atoms), which indicates that CuTi is the most stable phase. The mechanical properties, including elastic constants, polycrystalline moduli and anisotropic indexes, were evaluated. G/B is more pertinent to hardness than to the shear modulus G due to the high power indexes of 1.137 for G/B. The mechanical anisotropy was also characterized by describing the three-dimensional (3D) surface constructions. The order of elastic anisotropy is Cu4Ti3 > Cu3Ti2 > α-Cu4Ti > Cu2Ti > CuTi > β-Cu4Ti > CuTi2. Finally, the electronic structures were discussed and Cu2Ti is a semiconductor.

  5. Structural and electronic properties of fluorographene.

    PubMed

    Samarakoon, Duminda K; Chen, Zhifan; Nicolas, Chantel; Wang, Xiao-Qian

    2011-04-04

    The structural and electronic characteristics of fluorinated graphene are investigated based on first-principles density-functional calculations. A detailed analysis of the energy order for stoichiometric fluorographene membranes indicates that there exists prominent chair and stirrup conformations, which correlate with the experimentally observed in-plane lattice expansion contrary to a contraction in graphane. The optical response of fluorographene is investigated using the GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation approach. The results are in good conformity with the experimentally observed optical gap and reveal predominant charge-transfer excitations arising from strong electron-hole interactions. The appearance of bounded excitons in the ultraviolet region can result in an excitonic Bose-Einstein condensate in fluorographene.

  6. Structure and shear response of lipid monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1990-02-01

    Organic monolayers and multilayers are both scientifically fascinating and technologically promising; they are, however, both complex systems and relatively inaccessible to experimental probes. In this Progress Report, we describe our X-ray diffraction studies, which have given us substantial new information about the structures and phase transitions in monolayers on the surface of water; our use of these monolayers as a unique probe of the dynamics of wetting and spreading; and our studies of monolayer mechanical properties using a simple but effective technique available to anyone using the Wilhelmy method to measure surface tension.

  7. Thin films of tetrafluorosubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine: Structure and sensor properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyamer, Darya D.; Sukhikh, Aleksandr S.; Krasnov, Pavel O.; Gromilov, Sergey A.; Morozova, Natalya B.; Basova, Tamara V.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, thin films of tetrafluorosubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPcF4) were prepared by organic molecular beam deposition and their structure was studied using UV-vis, polarization dependent Raman spectroscopy, XRD and atomic force microscopy. Quantum chemical calculations (DFT) have been employed in order to determine the detailed assignment of the bands in the CoPcF4 IR and Raman spectra. The electrical sensor response of CoPcF4 films to ammonia vapours was investigated and compared with that of unsubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine films. In order to explain the difference in sensitivity of the unsubstituted and fluorinated phthalocyanines to ammonia, the nature and properties of chemical binding between CoPc derivatives and NH3 were described by quantum-chemical calculations utilizing DFT method. The effect of post-deposition annealing on surface morphology and gas sensing properties of CoPcF4 films was also studied.

  8. Broadband multiple responses of surface modes in quasicrystalline plasmonic structure

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Haiming; Jiang, Xiangqian; Huang, Feng; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the multiple excitation of surface modes in 2D photonic quasicrystal/metal/substrate structure. An improved rigorous coupled wave analysis method that can handle the quasicrystalline structure is presented. The quasicrystalline lattice, which refers to Penrose tiling in this paper, is generated by the cut-and-project method. The normal incidence spectrum presents a broadband multiple responses property. We find that the phase matching condition determines the excitation frequency for a given incident angle, while the depth of the reflection valley depends on the incident polarization. The modes will split into several sub-modes at oblique incidence, which give rise to the appearance of more responses on the spectrum. PMID:27492782

  9. Properties and shock response of PMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Jennifer L.; Casem, Daniel; Moy, Paul; Walter, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is used widely in shock experiments as a window material and in explosive characterization tests, e.g. gap tests, as a shock mitigation material. In order to simulate the complex loading present in a gap test, the constitutive response of the PMMA must be well understood. However, it is not clear what characterization must be done when the PMMA material is changed, e.g. changing supplier, and the Rohm and Haas Type II UVA PMMA, which was used for many of the calibration experiments, is no longer available. In this paper, we will present characterization results on legacy Rohm and Haas Type II UVA in comparison with a new PMMA grade proposed for use in gap tests. Planar shock experiments are performed to determine the compression and release response.

  10. Structure-Property Study of Piezoelectricity in Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida; Park, Cheol; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Smith, Joseph G.; Hinkley, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    High performance piezoelectric polymers are of interest to NASA as they may be useful for a variety of sensor applications. Over the past few years research on piezoelectric polymers has led to the development of promising high temperature piezoelectric responses in some novel polyimides. In this study, a series of polyimides have been studied with systematic variations in the diamine monomers that comprise the polyimide while holding the dianhydride constant. The effect of structural changes, including variations in the nature and concentration of dipolar groups, on the remanent polarization and piezoelectric coefficient is examined. Fundamental structure-piezoelectric property insight will enable the molecular design of polymers possessing distinct improvements over state-of-the-art piezoelectric polymers including enhanced polarization, polarization stability at elevated temperatures, and improved processability.

  11. Extended structures and physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Xue; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2011-07-19

    The ability of uranium to undergo nuclear fission has been exploited primarily to manufacture nuclear weapons and to generate nuclear power. Outside of its nuclear physics, uranium also exhibits rich chemistry, and it forms various compounds with other elements. Among the uranium-bearing compounds, those with a uranium oxidation state of +6 are most common and a particular structural unit, uranyl UO(2)(2+) is usually involved in these hexavalent uranium compounds. Apart from forming solids with inorganic ions, the uranyl unit also bonds to organic molecules to generate uranyl-organic coordination materials. If appropriate reaction conditions are employed, uranyl-organic extended structures (1-D chains, 2-D layers, and 3-D frameworks) can be obtained. Research on uranyl-organic compounds with extended structures allows for the exploration of their rich structural chemistry, and such studies also point to potential applications such as in materials that could facilitate nuclear waste disposal. In this Account, we describe the structural features of uranyl-organic compounds and efforts to synthesize uranyl-organic compounds with desired structures. We address strategies to construct 3-D uranyl-organic frameworks through rational selection of organic ligands and the incorporation of heteroatoms. The UO(2)(2+) species with inactive U═O double bonds usually form bipyramidal polyhedral structures with ligands coordinated at the equatorial positions, and these polyhedra act as primary building units (PBUs) for the construction of uranyl-organic compounds. The geometry of the uranyl ions and the steric arrangements and functionalities of organic ligands can be exploited in the the design of uranyl--organic extended structures, We also focus on the investigation of the promising physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds. Uranyl-organic materials with an extended structure may exhibit attractive properties, such as photoluminescence, photocatalysis

  12. Silicene oxides: formation, structures and electronic properties

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong; Pi, Xiaodong; Ni, Zhenyi; Liu, Yong; Lin, Shisheng; Xu, Mingsheng; Yang, Deren

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the oxidation of silicon has been critical to the success of all types of silicon materials, which are the cornerstones of modern silicon technologies. For the recent experimentally obtained two-dimensional silicene, oxidation should also be addressed to enable the development of silicene-based devices. Here we focus on silicene oxides (SOs) that result from the partial or full oxidation of silicene in the framework of density functional theory. It is found that the formation of SOs greatly depends on oxidation conditions, which concern the oxidizing agents of oxygen and hydroxyl. The honeycomb lattice of silicene may be preserved, distorted or destroyed after oxidation. The charge state of Si in partially oxidized silicene ranges from +1 to +3, while that in fully oxidized silicene is +4. Metals, semimetals, semiconductors and insulators can all be found among the SOs, which show a wide spectrum of electronic structures. Our work indicates that the oxidation of silicene should be exquisitely controlled to obtain specific SOs with desired electronic properties. PMID:24336409

  13. Chiral Peropyrene: Synthesis, Structure, and Properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenlong; Longhi, Giovanna; Abbate, Sergio; Lucotti, Andrea; Tommasini, Matteo; Villani, Claudio; Catalano, Vincent J; Lykhin, Aleksandr O; Varganov, Sergey A; Chalifoux, Wesley A

    2017-09-20

    Herein we describe the synthesis, structure, and properties of chiral peropyrenes. Using p-terphenyl-2,2″,6,6″-tetrayne derivatives as precursors, chiral peropyrenes were formed after a 4-fold alkyne cyclization reaction promoted by triflic acid. Due to the repulsion of the two aryl substituents within the same bay region, the chiral peropyrene adopts a twisted backbone with an end-to-end twist angle of 28° that was unambiguously confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The chiral peropyrene products absorb and emit in the green region of the UV-visible spectrum. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows strong Cotton effects (Δε = ±100 M(-1) cm(-1) at 300 nm). The Raman data shows the expected D-band along with a split G-band that is due to longitudinal and transversal G modes. This data corresponds well with the simulated Raman spectra of chiral peropyrenes. The chiral peropyrene products also display circularly polarized luminescence. The cyclization reaction mechanism and the enantiomeric composition of the peropyrene products are explained using DFT calculations. The inversion barrier for racemization was determined experimentally to be 29 kcal/mol and is supported by quantum mechanical calculations.

  14. Curdlan ester derivatives: synthesis, structure, and properties.

    PubMed

    Marubayashi, Hironori; Yukinaka, Kazuyori; Enomoto-Rogers, Yukiko; Takemura, Akio; Iwata, Tadahisa

    2014-03-15

    A series of ester derivatives of curdlan, which is a β-(1 → 3)-D-glucan extracellularly produced by microorganism, with varying alkyl chain lengths (C2-C12) were synthesized by the heterogeneous reaction using trifluoroacetic anhydride. As a result, high-molecular-weight (Mw ≥ 6 × 10(5)) and fully-acylated curdlan was obtained with relatively high yield (>70%). Thermal stability of curdlan was greatly improved by esterification. Crystallization was observed for curdlan esters with C2-C6 side chains. Both Tg (170 → 50 °C) and Tm (290 → 170 °C) of curdlan esters decreased with increasing the side-chain length. By the increase in the side-chain carbon number, curdlan esters showed lower Young's modulus and tensile strength, and larger elongation at break. Thus, material properties of curdlan esters can be controlled by changing the side-chain length. It was found that the increase of the side-chain length resulted in the decrease of crystallinity and the change of crystal structures.

  15. Crystalline mesophases: Structure, mobility, and pharmaceutical properties.

    PubMed

    Shalaev, Evgenyi; Wu, Ke; Shamblin, Sheri; Krzyzaniak, Joseph F; Descamps, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Crystalline mesophases, which are commonly classified according to their translational, orientational, and conformational order as liquid crystals, plastic crystals, and conformationally disordered crystals, represent a common state of condensed matter. As an intermediate state between crystalline and amorphous materials, crystalline mesophases resemble amorphous materials in relation to their molecular mobility, with the glass transition being their common property, and at the same time possessing a certain degree of translational periodicity (with the exception of nematic phase), with corresponding narrow peaks in X-ray diffraction patterns. For example, plastic crystals, which can be formed both by near-spherical molecules and molecules of lower symmetry, such as planar or chain molecules, can have both extremely sharp X-ray diffraction lines and exhibit glass transition. Fundamentals of structural arrangements in mesophases are compared with several types of disorder in crystalline materials, as well as with short-range ordering in amorphous solids. Main features of the molecular mobility in crystalline mesophases are found to be generally similar to amorphous materials, although some important differences do exist, depending on a particular type of mobility modes involved in relaxation processes. In several case studies reviewed, chemical stability appears to follow the extent of disorder, with the stability of crystalline mesophase found to be intermediate between amorphous (least stable) and crystalline (most stable) materials. Finally, detection of crystalline mesophases during manufacturing of two different types of dosage forms is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Bio-related noble metal nanoparticle structure property relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Donovan Nicholas

    Structure property relationships of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) can be drastically different than bulk properties of the same metals. This research study used state-of-the-art analytical electron microscopy and scanned probe microscopy to determine material properties on the nanoscale of bio-related Au and Pd NPs. Recently, it has been demonstrated the self-assembly of Au NPs on functionalized silica surfaces creates a conductive surface. Determination of the aggregate morphology responsible for electron conduction was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, changes in the electrical properties of the substrates after low temperature (<350°C) annealing was also studied. It was found that coalescence and densification of the Au NP aggregates disrupted the interconnected network which subsequently created a loss of conductivity. Investigation of bio-related Au/SiO2 core-shell NPs determined why published experimental results showed the sol-gel silica shell improved, by almost an order of magnitude, the detection efficiency of a DNA detection assay. Novel 360° rotation scanning TEM (STEM) imaging allowed study of individual NP surface morphology and internal structure. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectrum imaging determined optoelectronic properties and chemical composition of the silica shell used to encapsulate Au NPs. Results indicated the sol-gel deposited SiO2 had a band gap energy of ˜8.9eV, bulk plasmon-peak energy of ˜25.5eV and chemical composition of stoichiometric SiO2. Lastly, an attempt to elicit structure property relationships of novel RNA mediated Pd hexagon NPs was performed. Selected area electron diffraction (SAD), low voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy (LV-STEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were chosen for characterization of atomic ordering, chemical composition and optoelectronic properties of the novel

  17. Crystal structures and second-order NLO properties of borogermanates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian-Han; Kong, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Mao, Jiang-Gao

    2012-11-15

    Borogermanates are a class of very important compounds in materials chemistry. In this paper, the syntheses, structures, and properties of metal borogermanates are reviewed. Organically templated borogermanates with zeolite-like open-frameworks show potential applications as microporous materials. Many compounds in alkali or alkaline-earth borogermanate systems are structurally acentric or polar, some of which exhibit excellent Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) coefficients, wide transparency regions, and high optical-damage thresholds as well as excellent thermal stability. Most of the lanthanide borogermanates are structurally centrosymmetric and not SHG active; however, they are able to emit strong luminescence in visible or near-IR region. In the B-rich compounds, BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} groups can be polymerized into a variety of discrete polynuclear anionic cluster units or extended architectures via B-O-B bridges; whereas in the Ge-rich compounds, GeO{sub 4} and GeO{sub 6} polyhedra can also be polymerized. The combinations of borate and germinate afforded rich structural and topological types. - Graphical abstract: Borogermanates are a class of very important compounds in materials chemistry. Both BO{sub x} (x=3, 4) and GeO{sub y} (y=4, 6) polyhedra can be polymerized into a variety of discrete polynuclear anionic cluster units or extended architectures. The combinations of borate and germanate groups in the same oxide framework not only give rise to a rich structural chemistry, but also afford many polar compounds with good SHG properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Borogermanates are a class of new materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They feature to be the combination of B and Ge atoms into the same oxide framework. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They can form a large number of novel 2D and 3D framework structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some of them are acentric or polar with moderate strong SHG responses.

  18. Growth and Structural Properties of Lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Kai

    Using the high-resolution low-energy electron diffraction (HRLEED) technique, we have studied the structures of thin Pb films during the Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). In an effort to find out the characteristics of a non-equilibrium growth process, we have investigated the homoepitaxy of Pb on a Pb(110) substrate using a high deposition rate. In comparison, we have also examined in detail the heteroepitaxy of Pb using W(112) as a substrate, in which we have obtained information about the interface formation and its kinetics property. As a precursor to understand the structures observed during growth, we have performed a detailed study on Pb itself, using Pb(110) as a sample, with or without impurities. During the non-equilibrium growth of Pb on Pb(110), we have observed the kinetic roughening phenomena in the form of non-conventional dynamic scaling and faceting. At the initial stage of growth, the interface width w changes with deposition time t in a scaling form w ~ t^beta with beta = 0.77 +/- 0.05. The other scaling hypothesis involving lateral correlation length xi ~ t ^{beta/alpha} is not valid and the local roughness increases dramatically. However, the short-range height-height correlation function H(r) still scales with r in the form of H(r) ~ f(t)r^{2alpha} with alpha = 1.33 +/- 0.05.. During the growth of Pb on W(112), we have observed rotational disorder. Pb grows on W(112) in a typical 3 -D fashion, forming Pb(111) islands. While the surface normal of the Pb(111) islands aligns with that of the W(112), the lateral lattice orientation within the Pb(111) plane is not unique with respect to the W(112) substrate. Depending on the growth rate, the Pb overlayer may have different morphologies in terms of number of different island orientations. The structure of a clean Pb(110) surface goes through a series of phase transitions between room temperature and the bulk melting temperature (600.7 K), such as ordered flat phase (OF), disordered flat (DOF) phase

  19. Chiral hexagonal cellular sandwich structures: dynamic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spadoni, A.; Ruzzene, M.; Scarpa, F.

    2005-05-01

    Periodic cellular configurations with negative Poisson's ratio have attracted the attention of several researchers because of their superior dynamic characteristics. Among the geometries featuring a negative Poisson's ratio, the chiral topology possesses a geometric complexity that guarantees unique deformed configurations when excited at one of its natural frequencies. Specifically, localized deformations have been observed even at relatively low excitation frequencies. This is of particular importance as resonance can be exploited to minimize the power required for the appearance of localized deformations, thus giving practicality to the concept. The particular nature of these deformed configurations and the authority provided by the chiral geometry, suggest the application of the proposed structural configuration for the design of innovative lifting bodies, such as helicopter rotor blades or airplane wings. The dynamic characteristics of chiral structures are here investigated through a numerical model and experimental investigations. The numerical formulation uses dynamic shape functions to accurately describe the behavior of the considered structural assembly over a wide frequency range. The model is used to predict frequency response functions, and to investigate the occurrence of localized deformations. Experimental tests are also performed to demonstrate the accuracy of the model and to illustrate the peculiarities of the behavior of the considered chiral structures.

  20. Structure property relationships in various filled polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiong

    The toughness of impact modified poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) compounds was examined using a modified Charpy test. Increasing impact speed resulted in a quasi-brittle to ductile transition in all PVC compounds. In the quasi-brittle region, a PVC of 56,000 Mw fractured through a craze-like damage zone that could be described by a modified Dugdale model. Furthermore, the same molecular weight PVC modified with either 10 pph chlorinated polyethylene (CPE) or 10 pph methylmethacrylate-butadiene-styrene (MBS) impact modifier also conformed to the Dugdale model with the craze-like damage zone. It was found that CPE effectively improved the impact performance of PVC by shifting the quasi-brittle to ductile transition to a higher loading rate. Compared to CPE, MBS was found to be a better impact modifier and resulted in a higher quasi-brittle to ductile transition loading rate in the same PVC matrix. Fracture initiation toughness of all the materials was described by the Hayes-Williams modification of the Dugdale model. The intrinsic brittle fracture energy obtained by extrapolation to zero craze length was determined only by the PVC matrix and was independent of the impact modifier. However, the kinetics of craze growth, and hence the response to rapid loading, depended on the impact modifier. Increasing molecular weight of the PVC resin resulted in a more complex damage zone that was not amendable to the Dugdale analysis. A new in-situ infusion method was used to incorporate small amounts (ca. 1wt%) of metal and metal oxide particles into a polymer matrix. Nano-sized particles were observed by both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) transport properties of the infused materials were investigated using a dynamic diffusion approach in which both testing and purge gases can be controlled. It was discovered that trace amounts (ca. 2%) of hydrogen (H2) in the purge gas was sufficient to considerably

  1. Superprotonic solid acids: Structure, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boysen, Dane Andrew

    In this work, the structure and properties of superprotonic MH nXO4-type solid acids (where M = monovalent cation, X = S, Se, P, As, and n = 1, 2) have been investigated and, for the first time, applied in fuel cell devices. Several MH nXO4-type solid acids are known to undergo a "superprotonic" solid-state phase transition upon heating, in which the proton conductivity increases by several orders of magnitude and takes on values of ˜10 -2O-1cm-1. The presence of superprotonic conductivity in fully hydrogen bonded solid acids, such as CsH2PO4, has long been disputed. In these investigations, through the use of pressure, the unequivocal identification of superprotonic behavior in both RbH2PO4 and CsH2PO 4 has been demonstrated, whereas for chemically analogous compounds with smaller cations, such as KH2PO4 and NaH2PO 4, superprotonic conductivity was notably absent. Such observations have led to the adoption of radius ratio rules, in an attempt to identify a critical ion size effect on the presence of superprotonic conductivity in solid acids. It has been found that, while ionic size does play a prominent role in the presence of superprotonic behavior in solid acids, equally important are the effects of ionic and hydrogen bonding. Next, the properties of superprotonic phase transition have been investigated from a thermodynamic standpoint. With contributions from this work, a formulation has been developed that accounts for the entropy resulting from both the disordering of both hydrogen bonds and oxy-anion librations in the superprotonic phase of solid acids. This formulation, fundamentally derived from Linus Pauling's entropy rules for ice, accurately accounts for the change in entropy through a superprotonic phase transition. Lastly, the first proof-of-priniciple fuel cells based upon solid acid electrolytes have been demonstrated. Initial results based upon a sulfate electrolyte, CsHSO4, demonstrated the viability of solid acids, but poor chemical stability

  2. Which structural features stand behind micelization of ionic liquids? Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship studies.

    PubMed

    Barycki, Maciej; Sosnowska, Anita; Puzyn, Tomasz

    2017-02-01

    Different ions constituting ionic liquids (ILs) change their properties, including the Critical Micelization Concentration (CMC). It is possible to identify and quantitatively describe specific structural ions' features having influence on the micelization of ILs. Moreover, it should be possible to verify, whether the phenomenon of micelization is governed by the influence of the single ion only, rather than being a sum of both ions' mutual influence. The qualitative and quantitative description of the structural properties responsible for micelles formation was performed with the use of the Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) approach. Structural features were expressed with help of the molecular GEometry, Topology, and Atom-Weights AssemblY (GETAWAY) descriptors system. The QSPR model was properly validated and its quality and usability was additionally proven by applying it to predict the CMC for 15,000 computationally designed ILs. It was the first model to the CMC assessment for ILs. The analysis showed that longer (containing big hydrophobic domain), less spherical and not "folded" cations as well as bigger anions are the main factors causing the decrease of CMC. According to the presented model, the influence of cations and anions is independent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal response properties of protective clothing fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Baitinger, W.F.

    1995-12-31

    In the industrial workplace, it becomes increasingly incumbent upon employers to require employees to use suitable protective equipment and to wear protective apparel. When workers may be subjected to accidental radiant, flame, or electric arc heat sources, work clothing should be used that does not become involved in burning. It is axiomatic that work clothing should not become a primary fuel source, adding to the level of heat exposure, since clothing is usually in intimate contact with the skin. Further, clothing should provide sufficient insulation to protect the skin from severe burn injury. If the worker receives such protection from clothing, action then may be taken to escape the confronted thermal hazard. Published laboratory test methods are used to measure flame resistance and thermal responses of flame resistant fabrics in protective clothing. The purpose of this article is to review these test methods, to discuss certain limitations in application, and to suggest how flame resistant cotton fabrics may be used to enhance worker safety.

  4. Interface properties of wide bandgap semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, R. J.; Bedair, Salah; Bernholc, Jerry; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    1994-12-01

    The initial stages of epitaxial growth of SiC on 6H-SiC substrates were studied by UHV STM. The results showed single bilayer undulating steps and stepped structures that were related to the annealing temperature. A new method of cleaning SiC based on silane exposure was developed, and the surfaces examined by UV photoemission showed the presence of surface electronic states. Gas source MBE growth of SiC on 2H-A1N indicated the potential of the formation of 2H-SiC, and doped 3C- and 6H-SiC have been grown on 6H-SiC. Pt films on 6H-SiC exhibited 1.26eV Schottky barrier with nearly ideal electrical properties. A planar RF system was developed for large area diamond deposition. Bias-enhanced nucleation of diamond on TiC(111) has been demonstrated. Theoretical studies of F-based ALE of diamond indicated that HF desorption is a crucial step. The negative electron affinity of H-terminated diamond was verified with combined theoretical and experimental studies. Future studies of NEA diamond surfaces will involve a new plasma system integrated into the UHV transfer line. A system for measuring electron emission has been designed. High purity GaN powder has been synthesized. ALE of GaN and InGaN has been analyzed to address several growth related difficulties. A1N and SiC/AlN pseudomorphic heterostructures have been grown by plasma assisted GSMBE. A computer controlled CVD system has been constructed for the growth of A1N, GaN and InN. OMVPE techniques have been used to prepare doped GaN monocrystalline thin films. A system has been designed for ECR deposition of the nitrides.

  5. Structure and Early Soot Oxidation Properties of Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    Soot is an important unsolved problem of combustion science because it is present in most hydrocarbon-fueled flames and current understanding of the reactive and physical properties of soot in flame environments is limited. This lack of understanding affects progress toward developing reliable predictions of flame radiation properties, reliable predictions of flame pollutant emission properties and reliable methods of computational combustion, among others. Motivated by these observations, the present investigation extended past studies of soot formation in this laboratory, to consider soot oxidation in laminar diffusion flames using similar methods. Early work showed that O2 was responsible for soot oxidation in high temperature O2-rich environments. Subsequent work in high temperature flame environments having small O2 concentrations, however, showed that soot oxidation rates substantially exceeded estimates based on the classical O2 oxidation rates of Nagle and Strickland-Constable and suggests that radicals such as O and OH might be strong contributors to soot oxidation for such conditions. Neoh et al. subsequently made observations in premixed flames, supported by later work, that showed that OH was responsible for soot oxidation at these conditions with a very reasonable collision efficiency of 0.13. Subsequent studies in diffusion flames, however, were not in agreement with the premixed flame studies: they agreed that OH played a dominant role in soot oxidation in flames, but found collision efficiencies that varied with flame conditions and were not in good agreement with each other or with Neoh et al. One explanation for these discrepancies is that optical scattering and extinction properties were used to infer soot structure properties for the studies that have not been very successful for representing the optical properties of soot. Whatever the source of the problem, however, these differences among observations of soot oxidation in premixed and

  6. Structure and Properties of Rare Earth Aluminosilicate Glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohli, Jeffrey Todd

    1991-02-01

    Rare earth aluminosilicate (REAS) glasses have been formed using conventional melting techniques. The glass-forming regions of six different ternary systems have been defined with praseodymium, neodymium, samarium, terbium, erbium, or ytterbium oxides, with alumina and silica. The glass-forming regions systematically decreased in size as the atomic number of the particular rare earth in the ternary systems increased. Glasses, of the molar composition 2R_2O_3 -2Al_2O_3 -6SiO_2, were formed with twelve of the fourteen true rare earth oxides in order to investigate further effects related to the identity of the rare earth ion in the glasses. Several properties of the rare earth aluminosilicate glasses were measured. These properties include: thermal expansion, glass transformation temperature, dilatometric softening point, density, molar volume, index of refraction, Vicker's hardness, magnetic susceptibility and the Faraday rotatory response. The structures of rare earth aluminosilicate glasses were investigated using infrared and Raman spectroscopies as well as magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR). MAS-NMR provided information regarding the local environments of silicon and aluminum ions in yttrium aluminosilicate (YAS) glasses. Since the size and valence of the yttrium ion are similar to the true rare earth ions, and the properties of the REAS and YAS glasses are similar, it is believed that the structures of yttrium aluminosilicate glasses are similar to those of the true rare earth aluminosilicate glasses. Several rare earth aluminogermanate glasses, having the molar formula 2R_2O _3-2Al_2O _3-6GeO_2, were also formed using conventional melting techniques. The properties of these glasses were compared and contrasted with those of the REAS glasses. Finally, a chapter on the study of magnetic susceptibility in common insulator glasses was added to the thesis. Several techniques used to measure magnetic susceptibility are reviewed in this chapter

  7. Structure-function properties of anticorrosive exopolyaccharides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nanoscale biobased exopolymer films were shown that provide protection to metal substrates under corrosive environments and that the films could be self-repairing in aqueous environments. This work describes the fundamental properties of thin exopolymer films including thermodynamic properties, film...

  8. Doubly responsive polymer-microgel composites: rheology and structure.

    PubMed

    Monti, Fabrice; Fu, Shang-Yi; Iliopoulos, Ilias; Cloitre, Michel

    2008-10-21

    Mixtures of alkali swellable microgels and linear PNIPAm chains exhibit doubly responsive properties both with pH and temperature. Below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), the linear chains of PNIPAm are soluble and increase the osmotic pressure outside the microgels, which causes them to deswell. Above the LCST, the PNIPAm chains become insoluble and form spherical colloidal particles confined between the microgels that subsequently reswell. The swelling and deswelling of the microgels change the rheological properties of the composites, providing a unique way to tune the elasticity of the composites with temperature. The structure of the composites above the LCST is studied using multiple light scattering and fluorescence confocal microscopy. The phase separation of PNIPAm above the LCST is strongly affected by the confinement of the PNIPAm chains between the microgels.

  9. A simple auxetic tubular structure with tuneable mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xin; Shen, Jianhu; Ghaedizadeh, Arash; Tian, Hongqi; Xie, Yi Min

    2016-06-01

    Auxetic materials and structures are increasingly used in various fields because of their unusual properties. Auxetic tubular structures have been fabricated and studied due to their potential to be adopted as oesophageal stents where only tensile auxetic performance is required. However, studies on compressive mechanical properties of auxetic tubular structures are limited in the current literature. In this paper, we developed a simple tubular structure which exhibits auxetic behaviour in both compression and tension. This was achieved by extending a design concept recently proposed by the authors for generating 3D metallic auxetic metamaterials. Both compressive and tensile mechanical properties of the auxetic tubular structure were investigated. It was found that the methodology for generating 3D auxetic metamaterials could be effectively used to create auxetic tubular structures as well. By properly adjusting certain parameters, the mechanical properties of the designed auxetic tubular structure could be easily tuned.

  10. 3D Structures of Responsive Nanocompartmentalized Microgels.

    PubMed

    Gelissen, Arjan P H; Oppermann, Alex; Caumanns, Tobias; Hebbeker, Pascal; Turnhoff, Sarah K; Tiwari, Rahul; Eisold, Sabine; Simon, Ulrich; Lu, Yan; Mayer, Joachim; Richtering, Walter; Walther, Andreas; Wöll, Dominik

    2016-11-09

    Compartmentalization in soft matter is important for segregating and coordinating chemical reactions, sequestering (re)active components, and integrating multifunctionality. Advances depend crucially on quantitative 3D visualization in situ with high spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we show the direct visualization of different compartments within adaptive microgels using a combination of in situ electron and super-resolved fluorescence microscopy. We unravel new levels of structural details and address the challenge of reconstructing 3D information from 2D projections for nonuniform soft matter as opposed to monodisperse proteins. Moreover, we visualize the thermally induced shrinkage of responsive core-shell microgels live in water. This strategy opens doors for systematic in situ studies of soft matter systems and their application as smart materials.

  11. Tools to Understand Structural Property Relationships for Wood Cell Walls

    Treesearch

    Joseph E. Jakes; Daniel J. Yelle; Charles R. Frihart

    2011-01-01

    Understanding structure-property relationships for wood cell walls has been hindered by the complex polymeric structures comprising these cell walls and the difficulty in assessing meaningful mechanical property measurements of individual cell walls. To help overcome these hindrances, we have developed two experimental methods: 1) two-dimensional solution state nuclear...

  12. Design of Hybrid Solid Polymer Electrolytes: Structure and Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronstein, Lyudmila M.; Karlinsey, Robert L.; Ritter, Kyle; Joo, Chan Gyu; Stein, Barry; Zwanziger, Josef W.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports synthesis, structure, and properties of novel hybrid solid polymer electrolytes (SPE's) consisting of organically modified aluminosilica (OM-ALSi), formed within a poly(ethylene oxide)-in-salt (Li triflate) phase. To alter the structure and properties we fused functionalized silanes containing poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) tails or CN groups.

  13. Synthesis, Structure And Properties of Electrochemically Active Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-01

    agents such as alkali metals (Li and Na), alkaline-earth, hydrazine , sodium borohydride (NaBH4) and even late transition metals such as Zn [44, 45... SYNTHESIS , STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF ELECTROCHEMICALLY ACTIVE NANOCOMPOSITES IL-SEOK KIM Department of Materials...A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Synthesis , Structure And Properties Of Electrochemically Active Nanocomposites 5a. CONTRACT

  14. Mechanical properties of bimetallic one-dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smelova, Ekaterina M.; Sitnikov, Ivan I.; Zelensky, Vladimir S.; Tsysar, Kseniya M.; Andreev, Valery G.; Vdovin, Vladimir A.; Saletsky, Alexander M.

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical properties of freestanding Au-Mn nanowires and Au-Mn nanowire on a Cu (110) substrate are studied with ab initio theoretical approach. The calculations were carried out using the software package Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP), which is based on the density functional theory (DFT). It was shown that the breaking force (0.45nN) as well as the interatomic distance at a breaking point in bimetallic nanowire (3.0 Å) are higher than in one component Au wire (0.4 nN and 2.6Å respectively). Relative elongation of 15 % results in a fracture of bimetallic nanowire. We studied the mechanical response of the nanojunction in a form of three-atomic Au chain aligned vertically between two pyramidal gold electrodes and demonstrated that the breaking of nanocontact depends only the interaction between Au atoms in the chain and dependents slightly on the structure and properties of the atomic structure of the electrodes.

  15. Habitat structure mediates biodiversity effects on ecosystem properties.

    PubMed

    Godbold, J A; Bulling, M T; Solan, M

    2011-08-22

    Much of what we know about the role of biodiversity in mediating ecosystem processes and function stems from manipulative experiments, which have largely been performed in isolated, homogeneous environments that do not incorporate habitat structure or allow natural community dynamics to develop. Here, we use a range of habitat configurations in a model marine benthic system to investigate the effects of species composition, resource heterogeneity and patch connectivity on ecosystem properties at both the patch (bioturbation intensity) and multi-patch (nutrient concentration) scale. We show that allowing fauna to move and preferentially select patches alters local species composition and density distributions, which has negative effects on ecosystem processes (bioturbation intensity) at the patch scale, but overall positive effects on ecosystem functioning (nutrient concentration) at the multi-patch scale. Our findings provide important evidence that community dynamics alter in response to localized resource heterogeneity and that these small-scale variations in habitat structure influence species contributions to ecosystem properties at larger scales. We conclude that habitat complexity forms an important buffer against disturbance and that contemporary estimates of the level of biodiversity required for maintaining future multi-functional systems may need to be revised.

  16. Habitat structure mediates biodiversity effects on ecosystem properties

    PubMed Central

    Godbold, J. A.; Bulling, M. T.; Solan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Much of what we know about the role of biodiversity in mediating ecosystem processes and function stems from manipulative experiments, which have largely been performed in isolated, homogeneous environments that do not incorporate habitat structure or allow natural community dynamics to develop. Here, we use a range of habitat configurations in a model marine benthic system to investigate the effects of species composition, resource heterogeneity and patch connectivity on ecosystem properties at both the patch (bioturbation intensity) and multi-patch (nutrient concentration) scale. We show that allowing fauna to move and preferentially select patches alters local species composition and density distributions, which has negative effects on ecosystem processes (bioturbation intensity) at the patch scale, but overall positive effects on ecosystem functioning (nutrient concentration) at the multi-patch scale. Our findings provide important evidence that community dynamics alter in response to localized resource heterogeneity and that these small-scale variations in habitat structure influence species contributions to ecosystem properties at larger scales. We conclude that habitat complexity forms an important buffer against disturbance and that contemporary estimates of the level of biodiversity required for maintaining future multi-functional systems may need to be revised. PMID:21227969

  17. Efficient frequency response analysis of structures with viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Eric Dexter

    Noise and vibration levels in structures like automobiles and aircraft have been reduced through the application of viscoelastic materials (VEMs) as damping treatments for many years [18, 34, 37]. Adding a VEM to a structure makes accurate prediction of a structure's response to harmonic excitations challenging. This is because the VEM's properties, including the Young's modulus, damping coefficient, and shear modulus, vary significantly as functions of both frequency of excitation and temperature [34]. The solution algorithm presented in this research takes advantage of the fact that the VEM properties typically vary smoothly with frequency by interpolating VEM property variations between known values at perhaps a half dozen frequencies. The typical finite element (FE) discretization targeted by this work has millions of FE degrees of freedom in order to obtain acceptable accuracy over the frequency range of interest and is typically solved at hundreds of frequencies for tens to hundreds of load cases. Accurate approximate solutions to this large frequency response problem (FRP) can be computed efficiently on an approximating subspace. To decrease the cost of factoring the resulting reduced FRP at every frequency, the dimension of the approximating subspace is minimized by replacing hundreds to thousands of eigenvectors with a significantly smaller number of enrichment vectors called residual flexibility vectors (RFVs), damping deformation vectors (DDVs), and dynamic response vectors (DRVs). The RFVs and DDVs represent quasistatic response to loads and to dashpot forces, respectively, and including RFVs and DDVs in the approximating subspace is a common industrial practice. The use of DRVs, which are corrections to approximate solutions of the FRP at select frequencies, is new. Because computing DRVs is very expensive on the FE subspace, we accurately approximate DRVs in a reduced subspace associated with the automated multilevel substructuring (AMLS) method. Also

  18. Nonlinear frequency response analysis of structural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeger, Oliver; Wever, Utz; Simeon, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present a method for nonlinear frequency response analysis of mechanical vibrations of 3-dimensional solid structures. For computing nonlinear frequency response to periodic excitations, we employ the well-established harmonic balance method. A fundamental aspect for allowing a large-scale application of the method is model order reduction of the discretized equation of motion. Therefore we propose the utilization of a modal projection method enhanced with modal derivatives, providing second-order information. For an efficient spatial discretization of continuum mechanics nonlinear partial differential equations, including large deformations and hyperelastic material laws, we employ the concept of isogeometric analysis. Isogeometric finite element methods have already been shown to possess advantages over classical finite element discretizations in terms of higher accuracy of numerical approximations in the fields of linear vibration and static large deformation analysis. With several computational examples, we demonstrate the applicability and accuracy of the modal derivative reduction method for nonlinear static computations and vibration analysis. Thus, the presented method opens a promising perspective on application of nonlinear frequency analysis to large-scale industrial problems.

  19. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savrasov, Sergej Y.; Toropova, Antonina; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Lichtenstein, Alexander I.; Antropov, Vladimir; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2005-05-01

    We review basic computational techniques for simulations of various magnetic properties of solids. Several applications to compute magnetic anisotropy energy, spin wave spectra, magnetic susceptibilities and temperature dependent magnetisations for a number of real systems are presented for illustrative purposes.

  20. Optical Detection Properties of Silicon-Germanium Quantum Well Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-18

    AFIT/DS/ENP/96-07 OPTICAL DETECTION PROPERTIES OF SILICON-GERMANIUM QUANTUM WELL STRUCTURES DISSERTATION Michael R. Gregg, Captain, USAF AFIT/DS/ENP...96 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited DTC Qr. ~r AFIT/DS/ENP/96-07 Optical Detection Properties of Silicon-Germanium Quantum Well ...release; distribution unlimited AFIT/DS/ENP/96-07 Optical Detection Properties of Silicon-Germanium Quantum Well Structures Michael R. Gregg, BA, MS

  1. Structural properties of PAS domains from the KCNH potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Adaixo, Ricardo; Harley, Carol A; Castro-Rodrigues, Artur F; Morais-Cabral, João H

    2013-01-01

    KCNH channels form an important family of voltage gated potassium channels. These channels include a N-terminal Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain with unknown function. In other proteins PAS domains are implicated in cellular responses to environmental queues through small molecule binding or involvement in signaling cascades. To better understand their role we characterized the structural properties of several channel PAS domains. We determined high resolution structures of PAS domains from the mouse EAG (mEAG), drosophila ELK (dELK) and human ERG (hERG) channels and also of the hERG domain without the first nine amino acids. We analyzed these structures for features connected to ligand binding and signaling in other PAS domains. In particular, we have found cavities in the hERG and mEAG structures that share similarities with the ligand binding sites from other PAS domains. These cavities are lined by polar and apolar chemical groups and display potential flexibility in their volume. We have also found that the hydrophobic patch on the domain β-sheet is a conserved feature and appears to drive the formation of protein-protein contacts. In addition, the structures of the dELK domain and of the truncated hERG domain revealed the presence of N-terminal helices. These helices are equivalent to the helix described in the hERG NMR structures and are known to be important for channel function. Overall, these channel domains retain many of the PAS domain characteristics known to be important for cell signaling.

  2. Structure and Properties of Carbon Based Nanocomposite Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-18

    Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Structure and Properties of Carbon Based...MAR 2004 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Structure and Properties of Carbon Based Nanocomposite Films 5a...INTRODUCTION The theoretically predicted superhard β-C3N4 has not yet been experimentally realized, however, the different CNx structures and their

  3. Structure-Property Relationships of Architectural Coatings by Neutron Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Architectural coatings formulations are multi-component mixtures containing latex polymer binder, pigment, rheology modifiers, surfactants, and colorants. In order to achieve the desired flow properties for these formulations, measures of the underlying structure of the components as a function of shear rate and the impact of formulation variables on the structure is necessary. We have conducted detailed measurements to understand the evolution under shear of local microstructure and larger scale mesostructure in model architectural coatings formulations by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS), respectively. The SANS results show an adsorbed layer of rheology modifier molecules exist on the surface of the latex particles. However, the additional hydrodynamic volume occupied by the adsorbed surface layer is insufficient to account for the observed viscosity by standard hard sphere suspension models (Krieger-Dougherty). The USANS results show the presence of latex aggregates, which are fractal in nature. These fractal aggregates are the primary structures responsible for coatings formulation viscosity. Based on these results, a new model for the viscosity of coatings formulations has been developed, which is capable of reproducing the observed viscosity behavior.

  4. Cardiac Tissue Structure, Properties, and Performance: A Materials Science Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Golob, Mark; Moss, Richard L.; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2014-01-01

    From an engineering perspective, many forms of heart disease can be thought of as a reduction in biomaterial performance, in which the biomaterial is the tissue comprising the ventricular wall. In materials science, the structure and properties of a material are recognized to be interconnected with performance. In addition, for most measurements of structure, properties, and performance, some processing is required. Here, we review the current state of knowledge regarding cardiac tissue structure, properties, and performance as well as the processing steps taken to acquire those measurements. Understanding the impact of these factors and their interactions may enhance our understanding of heart function and heart failure. We also review design considerations for cardiac tissue property and performance measurements because, to date, most data on cardiac tissue has been obtained under non-physiological loading conditions. Novel measurement systems that account for these design considerations may improve future experiments and lead to greater insight into cardiac tissue structure, properties, and ultimately performance. PMID:25081385

  5. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I). Project IV. Structural building response; Structural Building Response Review

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, J.J.; Wu, S.T.; Murga, M.

    1980-02-01

    As part of the Phase I effort of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) being performed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the basic objective of Subtask IV.1 (Structural Building Response Review) is to review and summarize current methods and data pertaining to seismic response calculations particularly as they relate to the objectives of the SSMRP. This material forms one component in the development of the overall computational methodology involving state of the art computations including explicit consideration of uncertainty and aimed at ultimately deriving estimates of the probability of radioactive releases due to seismic effects on nuclear power plant facilities.

  6. Structural and mechanical properties of thorium carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Aynyas, Mahendra; Pataiya, Jagdeesh; Arya, B. S.; Singh, A.; Sanyal, S. P.

    2015-06-24

    We have investigated the cohesive energies, equilibrium lattice constants, pressure-volume relationship, phase transition pressure and elastic constant for thorium carbide using an interionic potential theory with modified ionic charge, which includes Coulomb screening effect due to d-electrons. This compound undergoes structural phase transition from NaCl (B{sub 1}) to CsCl (B{sub 2}) structure at high pressure 40 GPa. We have also calculated bulk, Young, and shear moduli, Poisson ratio and anisotropic ratio in NaCl (B{sub 1}) structure and compared them with other experimental and theoretical results which show a good agreement.

  7. Structure-Function-Property-Design Interplay in Biopolymers: Spider Silk

    PubMed Central

    Tokareva, Olena; Jacobsen, Matthew; Buehler, Markus; Wong, Joyce; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Spider silks have been a focus of research for almost two decades due to their outstanding mechanical and biophysical properties. Recent advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of recombinant spider silks, thus helping to unravel a fundamental understanding of structure-function-property relationships. The relationships between molecular composition, secondary structures, and mechanical properties found in different types of spider silks are described, along with a discussion of artificial spinning of these proteins and their bioapplications, including the role of silks in biomineralization and fabrication of biomaterials with controlled properties. PMID:23962644

  8. Structure-function-property-design interplay in biopolymers: spider silk.

    PubMed

    Tokareva, Olena; Jacobsen, Matthew; Buehler, Markus; Wong, Joyce; Kaplan, David L

    2014-04-01

    Spider silks have been a focus of research for almost two decades due to their outstanding mechanical and biophysical properties. Recent advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of recombinant spider silks, thus helping to unravel a fundamental understanding of structure-function-property relationships. The relationships between molecular composition, secondary structures and mechanical properties found in different types of spider silks are described, along with a discussion of artificial spinning of these proteins and their bioapplications, including the role of silks in biomineralization and fabrication of biomaterials with controlled properties. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Structure and properties of radiation modified polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancharova, U. V.; Mikhailenko, M. A.; Sharafutdinov, M. R.; Tolochko, B. P.; Gerasimov, K. B.; Korobeynikov, M. V.; Bryazgin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Polyethylene was irradiated with intensive electron beam with different doses. Structure changes after irradiation ex situ and in situ during heating up to its melting point were studied using synchrotron radiation X-Ray diffraction and thermal analysis.

  10. Diazophenols - Their Structure and Explosive Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    of these structures found in the literature are perhaps best attributed to differing percep- tions of organic bonding theory . la lb lc N N D N- NN2 II...diazophenols are resonance hybrids in which the quinonoid structures are clearly favored (Reference 13). Dipole moments of 3-5, debye units (D) were measured...be made of the Huckel molecular orbital calculations of Kazitsyna and co-workers, who concluded that o- and p-diazophenols, indeed, each show

  11. Electronic structure and photophysical properties of polyimides

    SciTech Connect

    LaFemina, J.P. ); Kafafi, S.A. . Div. of Environmental Chemistry)

    1992-04-01

    The quantum mechanical AM1 and CNDO/S3 models were used to examine the effect of isoelectronic substitutions on the conformation, electronic structure, and optical absorption spectra for a series of aromatic polyimides. An analysis of the geometric changes at the substitution site and its effect on the electronic structure allowed for the prediction of changes in the ICT band of the optical absorption spectra.

  12. Transmission properties analysis of 1D PT-symmetric photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossakowska-Wyszyńska, Agnieszka; Witoński, Piotr; Szczepański, Paweł

    2016-12-01

    The transmission properties of one dimensional PT-symmetric photonic crystal (PC) structure with gain and loss regions are presented. Obtained characteristics illustrate the influence of the structures parameters such as the ratio of the PC period to the operating wavelength, the number of the primitive cells creating PC, the loss and gain level (imaginary part of the refractive indices) on reflection and transmission coefficients. It demonstrates strong nonreciprocal response of the structure.

  13. Structure and properties of diamond and diamond-like films

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    This section is broken into four parts: (1) introduction, (2) natural IIa diamond, (3) importance of structure and composition, and (4) control of structure and properties. Conclusions of this discussion are that properties of chemical vapor deposited diamond films can compare favorably with natural diamond, that properties are anisotropic and are a strong function of structure and crystal perfection, that crystal perfection and morphology are functions of growth conditions and can be controlled, and that the manipulation of texture and thereby surface morphology and internal crystal perfection is an important step in optimizing chemically deposited diamond films for applications.

  14. Fiber: composition, structures, and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Sims, Ian M; Monro, John A

    2013-01-01

    Kiwifruit dietary fiber consists of cell-wall polysaccharides that are typical of the cell walls of many dicotyledonous fruits, being composed of pectic polysaccharides, hemicelluloses, and cellulose. The kiwifruit pectic polysaccharides consist of homo- and rhamnogalacturonans with various neutral, (arabino)-galactan side chains, while the hemicelluloses are mostly xyloglucan and xylan. The proportions of pectic polysaccharide, hemicellulose, and cellulose in both green 'Hayward' and 'Zespri® Gold' are similar and are little affected by in vitro exposure to gastric and small intestinal digestion. The hydration properties of the kiwifruit-swelling and water retention capacity-are also unaffected by foregut digestion, indicating that the functional properties of kiwifruit fiber survive in the foregut. However, in the hindgut, kiwifruit fiber is fermented, but whole kiwifruit consumed in association with slowly fermented fiber leads to distal displacement of fermentation, indicating that hindgut benefits of kiwifruit may result from its interaction with other dietary sources of fiber.

  15. Structure-property relationships in block copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Block copolymers are a class of relatively new materials which contain long sequences of two (or more) chemically different repeat units. Unlike random copolymers, each segment may retain some properties which are characteristic of its homopolymer. It is well known that most physical blends of two different homopolymers are incompatible on a macro-scale. By contrast most block copolymers display only a microphase (eg. 100-200 A domains) separation. Complete separation is restricted because of a loss in configurational entropy. The latter is due to presence of chemical bond(s) between the segments. Novel physical properties can be obtained because it is possible to prepare any desired combination of rubber-like, glassy, or crystalline blocks. The architecture and sequential arrangement of the segments can strongly influence mechanical behavior.

  16. Metal oxoalkoxides. Synthesis, properties and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turova, Nataliya Ya

    2004-11-01

    The review surveys the pathways of formation of crystalline oligomeric oxoalkoxides MmOn(OR)p, which are products of partially controlled (or uncontrolled) hydrolysis, oxidation, thermal decomposition of mono- and bimetallic alkoxides of the ortho series M(OR)n and MmM'n(OR)p or elimination of ethers from these compounds. The physicochemical properties of oxoalkoxides (solubility, the behaviour in solutions, volatility, etc.) differ considerably from the properties of the corresponding alkoxides. Hence, oxoalkoxides can be considered as immediate precursors of oxide materials produced by sol-gel technology. The MmOn(OR)p compounds are classified according to the sizes of associates. The crystal chemistry of alkoxides is discussed.

  17. Structures and Properties of Polyurethanes. Part II,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-23

    values of module/moaulus and strength for tear. The presence 𔄃. DOC =79011109 PAs;j fo of pliable groups in hardaer, tur example thioester, lowered...properties it is polyurethane in soluticn ana Diock. It is important to also explain a guestion concerning what projeLties of the isclated/ insulated ...isolated/ insulated macromoecule, with temperature transitions in polymeric block, that tear cooperdtive character (95]. The authors tried to reveal

  18. Interface Properties of Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Metal Contacts XIII. Chemical and Electrical Mechanisms in Titanium , Platinum, and 108 Hafnium Contacts to Alpha (6H) Silicon Carbide Atomic Layer...and (2) the negative electron affinity and formation of metal-diamond interfaces. The surface and interface properties are probed with STM, Raman ...show distinct I-V ch-act.risti,-, of the nuclei and the substrate. The presence of optical defects and the diamond quality are studied with micro- Raman

  19. MPOD: A Material Property Open Database linked to structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepponi, Giancarlo; Gražulis, Saulius; Chateigner, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Inspired by the Crystallography Open Database (COD), the Material Properties Open Database (MPOD) was given birth. MPOD aims at collecting and making publicly available at no charge tensorial properties (including scalar properties) of phases and linking such properties to structural information of the COD when available. MPOD files are written with the STAR file syntax, used and developed for the Crystallographic Information Files. A dictionary containing new definitions has been written according to the Dictionary Definition Language 1, although some tricks were adopted to allow for multiple entries still avoiding ambiguousness. The initial set includes mechanical properties, elastic stiffness and compliance, internal friction; electrical properties, resistivity, dielectric permittivity and stiffness, thermodynamic properties, heat capacity, thermal conductivity, diffusivity and expansion; electromechanical properties, piezoelectricity, electrostriction, electromechanical coupling; optical properties; piezooptic and photoelastic properties; superconducting properties, critical fields, penetration and coherence lengths. Properties are reported in MPOD files where the original published paper containing the data is cited and structural and experimental information is also given. One MPOD file contains information relative to only one publication and one phase. The files and the information contained therein can also be consulted on-line at http://www.materialproperties.org.

  20. Dynamic condensation approach to calculation of structural responses and response sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Shun; Tian, Wei; Zhu, Hongping; Xia, Yong; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Yaoting; Li, Jiajing

    2017-05-01

    Structural responses and response sensitivities are widely used in the finite element model updating, damage identification and optimization design. Calculation of the responses and response sensitivities of a large-scale structure consumes considerable computation storage and is usually time-consuming. This paper proposes an improved dynamic condensation approach to calculate the structural responses and response sensitivities. The condensed vibration equation is achieved by a simplified iterative scheme. By selecting the DOFs associated with the concerned element to be master DOFs, the response sensitivity is rapidly calculated from the derivatives of the master stiffness and mass matrices. Since the condensed vibration equation has a much smaller size than the original vibration equation, the proposed method is quite efficient in calculating the structural responses and response sensitivities. Finally, applications of the proposed method to an eight-storey frame and a cantilever plate demonstrate its accuracy and efficiency in the calculation of structural responses and response sensitivities.

  1. Synthesis, X-Ray crystal structure, photophysical characterization and nonlinear optical properties of the unique manganese complex with picolinate and 1,10 phenantroline: toward the designing of new high NLO response crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2016-12-01

    The first manganese complex of picolinic acid (also known as 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid) and 1,10 phenantroline has been synthesized, and its structure has been fully characterized by means of X-Ray diffraction method as well as FT-IR, Raman and UV-vis spectroscopies. In order to provide a deep understanding about the relation among the nonlinear optical properties, structural, spectroscopic and electronic behaviors, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed by using hybrid B3LYP level. The intensive interactions between the bonding orbitals of donor O/N atoms and antibonding orbitals of Mn(II) lone pairs confirm the X-Ray diffraction results. Each of the conditions such as small energy gap between HOMO and LUMO, high energy second order perturbation interaction, elongation of conjugated π system and high spin Mn(II) ion induce the first static hyperpolarizability (β) parameter of investigated complex. The β parameter for [Mn(pic)2(phen)]·H2O complex has been found to be approximately 22 times higher than p-nitroaniline.

  2. Status of geometry effects on structural nuclear composite properties

    SciTech Connect

    Will Windes; Y. Katoh; L.L. Snead; E. Lara-Curzio; C. Henagar, Jr.

    2005-09-01

    structural ceramic composites being considered for control rod applications within the VHTR design. While standard sized (i.e. 150-mm long or longer) test specimens can be used for baseline non-irradiated thermal creep studies, very small, compact, tensile specimens will be required for the irradiated creep studies. Traditionally, it is standard practice to use small, representative test samples in place of full-size components for an irradiated study. However, a real problem exists for scale-up of composite materials. Unlike monolithic materials, these composites are engineered from two distinct materials using complicated infiltration techniques to provide full density and maximum mechanical properties. The material properties may be significantly affected when the component geometry or size is changed. It must be demonstrated that the smaller test samples used in an irradiated study will adequately represent larger composite tubes used for control rod applications. To accomplish this, two different test programs are being implemented to establish that small, flat test specimens are representative of the mechanical response for large, cylindrical composite tubes: a size effect study and a geometry effect study.

  3. Electric and magnetic properties computed for valence bond structures: is there a link between pauling resonance energy and ring current?

    PubMed

    Havenith, Remco W A

    2006-04-28

    To establish the link between the aromaticity descriptors based on the Pauling resonance energy and the molecular properties, the electric (polarizability) and magnetic (magnetizability) field response properties have been calculated using the valence bond approach for various molecules and their individual Kekulé resonance structures. The results show that there is no direct relationship between the Pauling resonance energy and the properties; the response properties are weighted averages of the properties of the individual structures. According to the aromaticity criteria based on molecular properties, one-structure benzene would be aromatic; thus, concerning molecular properties, spin-coupled bonds do not behave like localized bonds in Lewis structures, with which they are usually associated.

  4. Nanoscale Properties of Neural Cell Prosthetic and Astrocyte Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, D. A.; Ayres, V. M.; Delgado-Rivera, R.; Ahmed, I.; Meiners, S. A.

    2009-03-01

    Preliminary data from in-vivo investigations (rat model) suggest that a nanofiber prosthetic device of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-modified nanofibers can correctly guide regenerating axons across an injury gap with aligned functional recovery. Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy (SPRM) with auto-tracking of individual nanofibers is used for investigation of the key nanoscale properties of the nanofiber prosthetic device for central nervous system tissue engineering and repair. The key properties under SPRM investigation include nanofiber stiffness and surface roughness, nanofiber curvature, nanofiber mesh density and porosity, and growth factor presentation and distribution. Each of these factors has been demonstrated to have global effects on cell morphology, function, proliferation, morphogenesis, migration, and differentiation. The effect of FGF-2 modification on the key nanoscale properties is investigated. Results from the nanofiber prosthetic properties investigations are correlated with astrocyte response to unmodified and FGF-2 modified scaffolds, using 2D planar substrates as a control.

  5. Seismic Response Analysis and Design of Structure with Base Isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosko, Peter

    2010-05-21

    The paper reports the study on seismic response and energy distribution of a multi-story civil structure. The nonlinear analysis used the 2003 Bam earthquake acceleration record as the excitation input to the structural model. The displacement response was analyzed in time domain and in frequency domain. The displacement and its derivatives result energy components. The energy distribution in each story provides useful information for the structural upgrade with help of added devices. The objective is the structural displacement response minimization. The application of the structural seismic response research is presented in base-isolation example.

  6. Seismic response control of frame structure braced with SMA tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shi; Song, Gangbing; Huo, Linsheng; Gu, Haichang

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents studies of seismic response control of a frame structure braced with SMA (Shape Memory Alloy) tendons through both numerical and experimental approaches. Based on the Brinson one-dimensional constitutive law for SMAs, a two-story frame structure braced diagonally with SMA tendons is used as an example to simulate numerically the vibration control process. By considering the temperature, different initial states and thermal properties of the SMA tendon, and the variable intensity and frequency of earthquake input, the parameters of the system were analyzed during the numerically simulation. The time histories of the displacement and hysteretic loops of the SMA tendons were simulated under earthquake ground motion by using finite element method (FEM). To validate the efficiency of the simulation, a shaking table test for the frame structure was conducted. Both numerical simulation and experimental results show that the actively controlled martensite SMA tendons can effectively suppress the vibration of the multi-story frame structure during an earthquake.

  7. Structural and plasmonic properties of gold nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapalan, Sean T.

    the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were then tilted such that were oriented so that the electron beam was parallel to a major zone axis and the diffraction pattern recorded. We observed streaks at each Bragg reflection that changed depending on the shape of the nanoparticle. This is in contrast to the spots for the Bragg reflections observed for normal small area diffraction patterns of gold nanoparticles. The angles between the streaks were compared using vector analysis to theoretical simulated three dimensional models and showed good correlation. These studies indicate such a platform can be used to elucidate the structure of high-index gold nanoparticle shapes such as trisoctahedra. The as-synthesized gold nanoparticles had surface plasmon resonances that incrementally spanned the spectral region of 500-900 nm. The reporter molecules used all have an absorption maximum far from the excitation wavelength. This ensures that chemical resonant based effects are minimized and plasmonic electromagnetic effects dominate the observed signal enhancement. For gold nanorods, the highest SERS signal from six different aspect ratios was observed with absorption maxima blue-shifted from the laser excitation wavelength. This finding is in contrast to substrate measurements where the maximum observed signal is red-shifted from the laser excitation wavelength. A similar platform was used to compare the effects of changing the nanoparticle shape on the observed SERS enhancement. We synthesized trisoctahedral, cubic and spherical geometries with electronic absorption maxima that overlapped within 3 nm. The relative SERS enhancement with 785 nm excitation was compared to theoretical simulations using finite element analysis. The observed signal intensities correlated well to the theory, suggesting the electromagnetic fields focused towards sharp edges and corners dominated the spectral response. The final chapters of this thesis are tailored towards understanding the distance

  8. Forest canopy structural properties. Chapter 14

    Treesearch

    Marie-Louise Smith; Jeanne Anderson; Matthew. Fladeland

    2008-01-01

    The forest canopy is the interface between the land and the atmosphere, fixing atmospheric carbon into biomass and releasing oxygen and water. The arrangement of individual trees, differences in species morphology, the availability of light and soil nutrients, and many other factors determine canopy structure. Overviews of approaches for basic measurements of canopy...

  9. Infrared properties of the Double Barrier Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, H. Y.; Sinkkonen, J.

    The infrared admittance of the Double Barrier Structure (DBS) is investigated by using a time-dependent quantum theory. The analysis is carried out under the small signal condition with no dc bias. The calculated results show conductance oscillations in the infrared frequency region. The oscillations are associated with the quantum well transit time resonances.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Gradient Structure Mg Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongliang; Yang, Jiang; Zhou, Hao; Moering, Jordan; Yin, Zhe; Gong, Yulan; Zhao, KunYu

    2017-09-01

    In this work, a surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) process was applied to AZ31B magnesium alloy at room temperature. This method produced a gradient structure on the treated AZ31B, in which the grains of the topmost layer are refined to nanoscale sizes. A combination of nanocrystallites at the surface and coarse-grains in the center are the main features of this structure. This structure results in an excellent combination of both strength and ductility. The highest yield strength for the 30 minutes SMAT AZ31B samples increased to 249 ± 5 MPa and the uniform elongation decreased to 9.3 ± 0.8 pct, whereas the original yield strength was only 147 ± 4 MPa and the uniform elongation was 15.4 ± 1.1 pct. Microstructural observations, stress relaxation tests, and hardness tests were used to verify the results. Additionally, there is a specific volume fraction of gradient structure to achieve the best mechanical performance, which is shown to be in the range of 9.3 to 14 pct for the AZ31B alloy.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Gradient Structure Mg Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongliang; Yang, Jiang; Zhou, Hao; Moering, Jordan; Yin, Zhe; Gong, Yulan; Zhao, KunYu

    2017-07-01

    In this work, a surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) process was applied to AZ31B magnesium alloy at room temperature. This method produced a gradient structure on the treated AZ31B, in which the grains of the topmost layer are refined to nanoscale sizes. A combination of nanocrystallites at the surface and coarse-grains in the center are the main features of this structure. This structure results in an excellent combination of both strength and ductility. The highest yield strength for the 30 minutes SMAT AZ31B samples increased to 249 ± 5 MPa and the uniform elongation decreased to 9.3 ± 0.8 pct, whereas the original yield strength was only 147 ± 4 MPa and the uniform elongation was 15.4 ± 1.1 pct. Microstructural observations, stress relaxation tests, and hardness tests were used to verify the results. Additionally, there is a specific volume fraction of gradient structure to achieve the best mechanical performance, which is shown to be in the range of 9.3 to 14 pct for the AZ31B alloy.

  12. Structure and Magnetic Properties of Lanthanide Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, James Henry

    2014-06-01

    We have had considerable success on this project, particularly in the understanding of the relationship between nanostructure and magnetic properties in lanthanide nanocrystals. We also have successfully facilitated the doctoral degrees of Dr. Suseela Somarajan, in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Dr. Melissa Harrison, in the Materials Science Program. The following passages summarize the various accomplishments that were featured in 9 publications that were generated based on support from this grant. We thank the Department of Energy for their generous support of our research efforts in this area of materials science, magnetism, and electron microscopy.

  13. Electronic structure and properties of superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershina, V.

    2015-12-01

    Spectacular developments in the relativistic quantum theory and computational algorithms in the last few decades allowed for accurate calculations of properties of the superheavy elements (SHE) and their compounds. Often conducted in a close link to the experimental research, these investigations helped predict and interpret an outcome of sophisticated and expensive experiments with single atoms. Most of the works, particularly those related to the experimental studies, are overviewed in this publication. The role of relativistic effects being of paramount importance for the heaviest elements is elucidated.

  14. Synthesis, structure and properties of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Changchun

    Over the last decade, the concept of utilizing nanoparticles to enhance polymer performance has drawn a great deal of research interest. Significant property enhancement can be achieved with a small amount of addition of nanoparticles. Spherical, platelet or tube/fiber like particles have all been used in the fabrication of nanocomposites. In this study, we chose platelet like clay particles to study the particle dispersion and properties of polymer nanocomposites and polymer nanocomposite foams. Free radical polymerization of methylmethacrylate (MMA) and styrene (St) in the presence of clay nanoparticles were studied in detail. The effect of interactions between the monomer, the initiator and clay surface modification was studied. By careful surface modification of clay surface and choice of initiator, clay particles can be dispersed uniformly at the nanometer scale (exfoliation). Exfoliation was achieved for PS nanocomposites with a clay concentration as high as 20 wt%. For PMMA, although fully exfoliated nanocomposite was only observed for clay concentration of 5 wt%, substantial exfoliation was observed in the 20 wt% nanocomposite. Nanocomposites were also prepared by extrusion compounding, with or without the aid of CO2. The effect of processing conditions on the degree of clay dispersion was studied. The relationships between clay dispersion, surfactant thermal stability and the resulting thermal properties, e.g., thermal stability, dimension stability, fire resistance were investigated. Novel polymer clay nanocomposite foams were prepared using carbon dioxide as the foaming agent. The role of clay on the foaming process was thoroughly investigated. It was found that clay serves as an efficient nucleation agent. Nucleation efficiency increases as the degree of clay dispersion improves. The exfoliated clay provides the highest nucleation efficiency. Nucleation efficiency can be further improved by tuning the interaction between polymer, CO2 and the surface

  15. Synthesis, crystal structures and properties of lead phosphite compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jun-Ling Hu, Chun-Li; Xu, Xiang; Kong, Fang; Mao, Jiang-Gao

    2015-11-15

    Here, we report the preparation and characterization of two lead(II) phosphites, namely, Pb{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2} and Pb{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} through hydrothermal reaction or simple solution synthesis, respectively. A new lead phosphite, namely, Pb{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}, crystallizes in the noncentrosymmetric space group Cmc2{sub 1} (no. 36), which features 3D framework formed by the interconnection of 2D layer of lead(II) phosphites and 1D chain of [Pb(HPO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sub ∞}. The nonlinear optical properties of Pb{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} have been studied for the first time. The synergistic effect of the stereo-active lone-pairs on Pb{sup 2+} cations and π-conjugated NO{sub 3} units in Pb{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} produces a moderate second harmonic generation (SHG) response of ∼1.8×KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}), which is phase matchable (type I). IR, UV–vis spectra and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for the two compounds were also measured. - Graphical abstract: Two lead phosphites Pb{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2} and Pb{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} are studied. A new lead phosphite Pb{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2} features a unique 3D framework structure and Pb{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} shows a moderate SHG response of ∼1.8×KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}). - Highlights: • A new lead phosphite, Pb{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2} is reported. • Pb{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2} features a unique 3D framework structure. • NLO property of Pb{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} is investigated. • Pb{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} produces a moderate SHG response of ∼1.8×KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}).

  16. Statistical energy analysis response prediction methods for structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an effort to document methods for accomplishing response predictions for commonly encountered aerospace structural configurations is presented. Application of these methods to specified aerospace structure to provide sample analyses is included. An applications manual, with the structural analyses appended as example problems is given. Comparisons of the response predictions with measured data are provided for three of the example problems.

  17. A primer for structural response to random pressure fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.; Vaicaitis, R.

    1975-01-01

    A review was made of power spectral methods for determining linear response of structures to random pressure fluctuations. Various simplifying assumptions are made for the purpose of obtaining useful formula for structural response. The transmission of sound through a flexible structure into an interior cavity was also treated.

  18. THE FERROELECTRIC AND STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF HAFNIUM OXIDE COMPOUNDS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HAFNIUM COMPOUNDS, OXIDES), (* FERROELECTRICITY , HAFNIUM COMPOUNDS), (*CRYSTAL STRUCTURE, HAFNIUM COMPOUNDS), DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES, HYSTERESIS... FERROELECTRIC MATERIALS, SOLID SOLUTIONS, X RAY DIFFRACTION, CRYSTAL LATTICES, LOW TEMPERATURE, CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, STRONTIUM COMPOUNDS, LEAD COMPOUNDS, BARIUM COMPOUNDS

  19. Effect of processing on Polymer/Composite structure and properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in the vitality and economic health of the field of polymer forecasting are discussed. A consistent and rational point of view which considers processing as a participant in the underlying triad of relationships which comprise materials science and engineering is outlined. This triad includes processing as it influences material structure, and ultimately properties. Methods in processing structure properties, polymer science and engineering, polymer chemistry and synthesis, structure and modification and optimization through processing, and methods of melt flow modeling in processing structure property relations of polymer were developed. Mechanical properties of composites are considered, and biomedical materials research to include polymer processing effects are studied. An analysis of the design technology of advances graphite/epoxy composites is also reported.

  20. Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Foss, Peter; Wyzgoski, Michael; Trantina, Gerry; Kunc, Vlastimil; Schutte, Carol; Smith, Mark T.

    2009-12-23

    This report summarizes our FY 2009 research activities for the project titled:"Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures." These activities include (i) the completion of the development of a fiber length attrition model for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs), (ii) development of the a fatigue damage model for LFTs and its implementation in ABAQUS, (iii) development of an impact damage model for LFTs and its implementation in ABAQUS, (iv) development of characterization methods for fatigue testing, (v) characterization of creep and fatigue responses of glass-fiber/polyamide (PA6,6) and glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP), (vi) characterization of fiber length distribution along the flow length of glass/PA6,6 and glass-fiber/PP, and (vii) characterization of impact responses of glass-fiber/PA6,6. The fiber length attrition model accurately captures the fiber length distribution along the flow length of the studied glass-fiber/PP material. The fatigue damage model is able to predict the S-N and stiffness reduction data which are valuable to the fatigue design of LFTs. The impact damage model correctly captures damage accumulation observed in experiments of glass-fiber/PA6,6 plaques.Further work includes validations of these models for representative LFT materials and a complex LFT part.

  1. Structure and properties of oil bodies in diatoms.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yoshiaki; Nojima, Daisuke; Yoshino, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2017-09-05

    Diatoms accumulate triacylglycerols in spherical organelles called oil bodies when exposed to nutrient deprivation conditions. Oil body biology in diatoms has attracted significant attention due to the complexity of the intracellular organelles and the unique combination of genes generated by the evolutionary history of secondary endosymbiosis. The demand for biofuel production has further increased the interest in and importance of a better understanding of oil body biology in diatoms, because it could provide targets for genetic engineering to further enhance their promising lipid accumulation. This review describes recent progress in studies of the structure and properties of diatom oil bodies. Firstly, the general features of diatom oil bodies are described, in particular, their number, size and morphology, as well as the quantity and quality of lipids they contain. Subsequently, the diatom oil body-associated proteins, which were recently discovered through oil body proteomics, are introduced. Then, the metabolic pathways responsible for the biogenesis and degradation of diatom oil bodies are summarized. During biogenesis and degradation, oil bodies interact with other organelles, including chloroplasts, the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, suggesting their dynamic nature in response to environmental changes. Finally, the functions of oil bodies in diatoms are discussed.This article is part of the themed issue 'The peculiar carbon metabolism in diatoms'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Relating Dynamic Properties to Atomic Structure in Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, H.W.; Ma, E.; Kramer, Matthew J.

    2012-07-18

    Atomic packing in metallic glasses is not completely random but displays various degrees of structural ordering. While it is believed that local structures profoundly affect the properties of glasses, a fundamental understanding of the structure–property relationship has been lacking. In this article, we provide a microscopic picture to uncover the intricate interplay between structural defects and dynamic properties of metallic glasses, from the perspective of computational modeling. Computational methodologies for such realistic modeling are introduced. Exploiting the concept of quasi-equivalent cluster packing, we quantify the structural ordering of a prototype metallic glass during its formation process, with a new focus on geometric measures of subatomic “voids.” Atomic sites connected with the voids are found to be crucial in terms of understanding the dynamic, including vibrational and atomic transport, properties. Normal mode analysis is performed to reveal the structural origin of the anomalous boson peak (BP) in the vibration spectrum of the glass, and its correlation with atomic packing cavities. Through transition-state search on the energy landscape of the system, such structural disorder is found to be a facilitating factor for atomic diffusion, with diffusion energy barriers and diffusion pathways significantly varying with the degree of structural relaxation/ordering. The implications of structural defects for the mechanical properties of metallic glasses are also discussed.

  3. Investigations of structure-property relationships to enhance the multifunctional properties of PVDF-based polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neese, Bret P.

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)-based polymers have been some of the most widely researched semicrystalline polymers over the past several decades, due mostly to their ability to exhibit ferroelectric properties not capable in many soft materials. While much has been learned about these properties and much advancement has been made in utilizing them for many applications, we are still only beginning to understand their origins and how they can be enhanced by altering the polymer structure. In this thesis, structure-property relationships are analyzed in a variety of PVDF-based polymers with varying chemical and crystalline structures. The work consists of three parts as distinguished by the property under investigation: electromechanical effects, electrical energy storage, and the electrocaloric effect (ECE). First is the electromechanical effects, where a large converse piezoelectric effect is discovered in P(VDF-HFP) (HFP: hexafluoropropylene) copolymer. The nature of the piezoelectric property is linked to the structure change through a detailed structural analysis to provide explanation to the large and unusual electromechanical strain response. P(VDF-HFP) is further investigated for its use as an energy storage capacitor and various processing methods are utilized to alter the crystalline structure and study the effects on the energy storage characteristics. The results indicate that uniaxial stretching is beneficial in improving energy storage efficiency up to a certain draw ratio (4--5x the original length), but as the draw ratio is increased and the polar ss crystalline phase becomes more prominent, ferroelectric losses become detrimental to the energy storage efficiency. Furthermore, the effects of biaxial stretching on the crystalline structure are examined. The data suggests that biaxial stretching of extruded films to a similar draw ratio as the uniaxially stretched blown films produces a similar composition of crystalline structure. In view of the

  4. Structural and electronic properties of hexagonal yttrium trihydride

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Chou, M.Y. )

    1995-03-15

    The structural and electronic properties of yttrium trihydride with metal atoms in the hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) structure are studied by the pseudopotential method within the local-density-functional approximation (LDA). It is found that the hydrogen positions within the metal lattice have a major role in determining these properties. Calculations confirmed that hexagonal YH[sub 3] with unusual wavelike hydrogen displacements (space group [ital D][sub 3[ital d

  5. Relaxation, Structure and Properties of Semi-coherent Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Shuai; Wang, Jian

    2015-11-05

    Materials containing high density of interfaces are promising candidates for future energy technologies, because interfaces acting as sources, sinks, and barriers for defects can improve mechanical and irradiation properties of materials. Semi-coherent interface widely occurring in various materials is composed of a network of misfit dislocations and coherent regions separated by misfit dislocations. Lastly, in this article, we review relaxation mechanisms, structure and properties of (111) semi-coherent interfaces in face centered cubic structures.

  6. Structure of excited states and properties of organic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klessinger, M.

    1992-03-01

    Optimized geometries and charge distributions for the ground state and the first allowed π,π* excited singlet state are reported for some polyenes, polyene aldehydes, merocyanines and cyanines, which may be considered as representatives of conjugated chain chromophores of organic dyes. The dependence of excited state properties on molecular structure is discussed in relation to spectroscopic properties of these systems.

  7. Structure-property study of keto-ether polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezern, James F.; Croall, Catharine I.

    1991-01-01

    As part of an on-going effort to develop an understanding of how changes in the chemical structure affect polymer properties, an empirical study was performed on polyimides containing only ether and/or carbonyl connecting groups in the polymer backbone. During the past two decades the structure-property relationships in linear aromatic polyimides have been extensively investigated. More recently, work has been performed to study the effect of isomeric attachment of keto-ether polyimides on properties such as glass transition temperature and solubility. However, little work has been reported on the relation of polyimide structure to mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of structural changes in the backbone of keto-ether polyimides on their mechanical properties, specifically, unoriented thin film tensile properties. This study was conducted in two stages. The purpose of the initial stage was to examine the physical and mechanical properties of a representative group (four) of polyimide systems to determine the optimum solvent and cure cycle requirements. These optimum conditions were then utilized in the second stage to prepare films of keto-ether polyimides which were evaluated for mechanical and physical properties. All of the polyimides were prepared using isomers of oxydianiline (ODA) and diaminobenzophenone (DABP) in combination with 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride (ODPA).

  8. [Structural properties and functional importance of metzincin metalloproteinases].

    PubMed

    Balaban, N P; Rudakova, N L; Sharipova, M R

    2013-01-01

    Here wediscuss known properties of metzincin metalloproteinases, their structure, physiological roles in the cell and potential medical uses. We also present results describing a novel extracellular metzincin metalloproteinase from Bacillus pumilus with a unique combination of properties typical for both astacins and adamalysins.

  9. Influence of surface structure on thermoprotection properties of intumescent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, Igor S.; Yablokova, Marina Yu.; Khalturinskij, Nikolay A.

    1997-06-01

    Intumescent fire retardant coatings have found great application due to high thermoprotection properties, which reduce heat flow on the polymer surface. However there were no attempts to study the influence of surface structure on foamed char formation processes. In this work we present the experimental investigation of thermoprotection properties of CFR with a PTFE modified surface.

  10. Quantitative structure-property relationships in pharmaceutical research - Part 2.

    PubMed

    Grover; Singh; Bakshi

    2000-02-01

    Part one of this two-part review described the advantages and limitations of quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR), and offered an overview of the components involved in the development of correlations1. Part two provides a discussion of a few notable examples of relationships with organoleptic, physicochemical and pharmaceutical properties.

  11. A Initio Pseudopotentials and Structural Properties of Metals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Pui Kwong

    The Ab initio pseudopotential method and the density functional approach are employed to study the structural properties of metals. The aim of this study is to gain both a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the connection between the macroscopic structural properties of metals and the microscopic core-valence and valence -valence interactions. Emphasis is placed on metals because relatively simple models can be applied in conjunction with the ab initio method to study trends in the structural properties. This thesis is organized as followed: (1) The analytic behavior of the pseudopotentials are examined in order to get acquainted with their variations across the periodic table. The variations of these potentials are in accord with the chemical trends exhibited by the elements. (2) Detailed calculations and analyses of the various structural properties of Al and Be are presented. These properties include equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus, cohesive energy, Poisson ratio, phonon frequencies, elastic constants, and temperature and pressure induced crystal phase transitions. The dependence of these properties on the pseudopotentials are extracted from the ab initio calculations. (3) Simple models which generalize some of these relationships between the structural properties and the pseudopotentials are presented. A preliminary application of the ab initio pseudopotential method to a more complicated system, V(,3)Si, is also discussed.

  12. Structure-Property Relationships in Intercalated Graphite.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-15

    2% 293 (1984). 45. "Raman Microprobe Studies of the Structure of SbCls-Graphite Intercalation Compounds’, L.E. McNeil, J. Steinbeck , L. Salamanca-Riba...Using the Rutherford Backscattering-Channeling Teachnique’, G. Braunstein, B. Elman, J. Steinbeck , M.S. Dresseihaus, T. Venkatesan and B. Wilkens, to be...8217Razuan Mcroprobe Observation of Intercalate Contraction In Graphite Inter- calation Compounds’, L.E. McNeil, J. Steinbeck , L. Salamancar-Riba, and G

  13. Structure and Properties of High Symmetry Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-27

    utilizing a 4-directional reinforcement. Reducing the close-to-cubic symmetry concept into practice in our laboratory by a three-dimensional braiding...modelled by utilizing the different elastic strain energy expressions produced by different combinations of symmetry elements. Symmetry in Materials The...rings is insignmicant. Utilizing the above assumptions, numerous textile structures possess holosymmetric cubic symmetry. This symmetry state is found in

  14. Structural properties of rare earth chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, Ramakant; Bhardwaj, Purvee Singh, Sadhna

    2016-05-06

    The pressure induced NaCl (B1) to CsCl (B2) structural phase transition of rare earth mono-chalcogenide (PuTe) has been investigated in this paper. A modified interaction potential model (MIPM) (including the covalency effect) has been developed. Phase transition pressures are associated with a sudden collapse in volume. The phase transition pressures and associated volume collapses obtained from present potential model show a generally good agreement with available experimental data than others.

  15. Structure and properties of detonation soot particles

    SciTech Connect

    MalKOV, I.Y.; Titiov, V.M.

    1996-05-01

    The influence of TNT/RDX (50/50) detonation parameters and conservation conditions of detonation products during their expansion in hermetic detonation chamber on structure and phase composition of the detonation carbon has been considered. Systematic studies made it possible to establish the real structure of detonation carbon depending on experimental conditions. It has been shown that both during explosion in a chamber and thermal annealing in vacuum the nanoparticles of diamond have the tendency to transform not into graphite particles, as was assumed earlier, but into onionlike structures of fullerene series, composed of closed concentric carbon shells, the so-called carbon onions. The nanometer carbon particles have been obtained which comprise a diamond nucleus surrounded by a graphite-like mantle composed of quasi-spherical carbon shells which are the intermediate products of annealing of nanodiamond. The influence of initial sizes of the diamond particles and temperature on the annealing of diamond has been studied. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Experiments on Structural Properties of Yukawa balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arp, Oliver; Block, Dietmar; Piel, Alexander; Melzer, Andre

    2006-10-01

    Recently, it was shown that it is possible to confine spherical dust clouds in a plasma [1,2]. It was found that these dust clouds have a crystalline structure which differs noteably from the well known fcc, bcc and hcp order in extended crystalline systems. These objects are called 'Yukawa Balls' because of the screened Coulomb interaction between the particles. The experiments show that the particles arrange in nested shells with hcp order on individual shells. This seems to be a unique feature of few-particle systems with strong coupling as it is also reported for trapped laser-cooled ions [3]. Interestingly, the structure in the center of ions clouds changes to bulk order as the ion number and hence the cloud size grows. Here, we present results from experiments on small and large Yukawa balls to discuss whether this can be observed for Yukawa balls as well. Additionally, first experiments are reported which investigate structural changes due to a elliptical deformation of the dust cloud. [1] O. Arp et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 165004 (2004). [2] O. Arp et al., Phys. of Plasmas 12, 122102 (2005). [3] D.H.E. Dubin and T.M. O'Neill, Rev. Mod. Phys. 71, 87 (1999).

  17. Pressure-responsive mesoscopic structures in room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Russina, Olga; Lo Celso, Fabrizio; Triolo, Alessandro

    2015-11-28

    Among the most spectacular peculiarities of room temperature ionic liquids, their mesoscopically segregated structural organization keeps on attracting attention, due to its major consequences for the bulk macroscopic properties. Herein we use molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nm-scale architecture in 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, as a function of pressure. This study reveals an intriguing new feature: the mesoscopic segregation in ionic liquids is characterized by a high level of pressure-responsiveness, which progressively vanishes upon application of high enough pressure. These results are in agreement with recent X-ray scattering data and are interpreted in terms of the microscopic organization. This new feature might lead to new methods of developing designer solvents for enhanced solvation capabilities and selectivity.

  18. Starch: Structure, Properties, Chemistry, and Enzymology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robyt, John F.

    Starch is a very important and widely distributed natural product, occurring in the leaves of green plants, seeds, fruits, stems, roots, and tubers. It serves as the chemical storage form of the energy of the sun and is the primary source of energy for the organisms on the Earth. Starch is composed of two kinds of polysaccharides, amylose and amylopectin, exclusively composed of D-glucose residues with α-(1→4) linkages in a linear amylose and α-(1→4) linkages and ˜5% α-(1→6) branch linkages in amylopectin, both combined in a water-insoluble granule that is partially crystalline and whose size, shape, and morphology are dependent on its biological source. The properties, isolation, fractionation, enzymatic degradation, biosynthesis, chemical modification, and specific methods of analysis of starch are presented.

  19. Processing, structure, and properties of nanostructured multifunctional tribological coatings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jianliang; Park, In-Wook; Mishra, Brajendra; Pinkas, Malki; Moore, John J; Anton, Jennifer M; Kim, Kwang Ho; Voevodin, Andrey A; Levashov, Evgeny A

    2009-07-01

    . Applying higher pulse frequency and longer reverse time (lower duty cycle) will result in higher ion energy and ion flux in the plasma, which can be utilized to improve the film structure and properties. For example, optimum properties of the TiC-a:C coating were a hardness of 35 to 40 GPa and a COF of 0.2 to 0.22 for moderate maximum ion energies of 70 to 100 eV, and a super high hardness of 41 GPa and low wear rate of 3.41 x 10(-6) mm3N(-1) m(-1) was obtained for Cr-Al-N coatings deposited with a maximum ion energy of 122 eV. These conditions can be achieved by adjusting the pulsing parameters and target voltages. However, the pulsed ion energy together with the applied substrate bias are need to be carefully controlled in order to avoid excessive ion bombardment (e.g., the maximum ion energy is larger than 180 eV in the current study), which will responsible for an increase in point and line defects, and high residual stress in the crystalline structure.

  20. Transport properties of pancreatic cancer describe gemcitabine delivery and response

    PubMed Central

    Koay, Eugene J.; Truty, Mark J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M.; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya’an; Bhosale, Priya R.; Tamm, Eric P.; Crane, Christopher H.; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H.; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N.; Rozner, Marc A.; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffery E.; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Ferrari, Mauro; Fleming, Jason B.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The therapeutic resistance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is partly ascribed to ineffective delivery of chemotherapy to cancer cells. We hypothesized that physical properties at vascular, extracellular, and cellular scales influence delivery of and response to gemcitabine-based therapy. Methods. We developed a method to measure mass transport properties during routine contrast-enhanced CT scans of individual human PDAC tumors. Additionally, we evaluated gemcitabine infusion during PDAC resection in 12 patients, measuring gemcitabine incorporation into tumor DNA and correlating its uptake with human equilibrative nucleoside transporter (hENT1) levels, stromal reaction, and CT-derived mass transport properties. We also studied associations between CT-derived transport properties and clinical outcomes in patients who received preoperative gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy for resectable PDAC. Results. Transport modeling of 176 CT scans illustrated striking differences in transport properties between normal pancreas and tumor, with a wide array of enhancement profiles. Reflecting the interpatient differences in contrast enhancement, resected tumors exhibited dramatic differences in gemcitabine DNA incorporation, despite similar intravascular pharmacokinetics. Gemcitabine incorporation into tumor DNA was inversely related to CT-derived transport parameters and PDAC stromal score, after accounting for hENT1 levels. Moreover, stromal score directly correlated with CT-derived parameters. Among 110 patients who received preoperative gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy, CT-derived parameters correlated with pathological response and survival. Conclusion. Gemcitabine incorporation into tumor DNA is highly variable and correlates with multiscale transport properties that can be derived from routine CT scans. Furthermore, pretherapy CT-derived properties correlate with clinically relevant endpoints. Trial registration. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01276613

  1. Determining the Mechanical Properties of Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Lattice block structures and shape memory alloys possess several traits ideal for solving intriguing new engineering problems in industries such as aerospace, military, and transportation. Recent testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center has investigated the material properties of lattice block structures cast from a conventional aerospace titanium alloy as well as lattice block structures cast from nickel-titanium shape memory alloy. The lattice block structures for both materials were sectioned into smaller subelements for tension and compression testing. The results from the cast conventional titanium material showed that the expected mechanical properties were maintained. The shape memory alloy material was found to be extremely brittle from the casting process and only compression testing was completed. Future shape memory alloy lattice block structures will utilize an adjusted material composition that will provide a better quality casting. The testing effort resulted in baseline mechanical property data from the conventional titanium material for comparison to shape memory alloy materials once suitable castings are available.

  2. Electronic and Thermal Properties of Graphene and Carbon Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Gilmore; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    We will present the general properties of carbon structures. The research involves the study of carbon structures: Graphene, Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), and Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs). A review of electrical and thermal conduction phenomena of the structures will be discussed. Particularly carbon nanoribbons and CNTs have many interesting physical properties, and have the potential for device applications. Our research interests include the study of electronic structures, electrical and thermal transport properties of the carbon structures. Results are produced analytically as well as by simulation. The numerical simulations are conducted using various tools such as Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD), Large Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS), NanoHub at Purdue University and the Beowulf Cluster at Ball State University.

  3. Personality Research Form: Factor Structure and Response Style Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stricker, Lawrence J.

    1974-01-01

    Explores factor structure of the Personality Research Form (PRF) and examines the inventory's relations with response styles. In general, the PRF content scales correlate moderately with each other and with measures of acquiescence, social desirability, and defensiveness response biases. (Author)

  4. Computing Response Of A Structure To Random Transient Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepcenko, Valentin; Margasahayam, Ravi

    1994-01-01

    Improved method of computing vibrational response of structure to transient random acoustic excitation at predominantly low frequencies devised, called "deterministic". Motivated by need to analyze more accurately vibro/acoustic responses of structures at spacecraft-launching facilities and determine whether need for reinforcement or redesign to withstand launch environment. Also used to study such phenomena as earthquake motions, ocean waves, aircraft pressure gusts, responses of bridges to winds, and effects to jet-engine noise on aircraft structures.

  5. Structure and properties of solid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    Difficulties in experimental studies of crystalline surfaces are related to the fact that surface atoms have an intrinsic tendency to react with their environment. A second problem is connected with the effective thickness of surfaces, which ranges from one to several atom layers. The phenomenology of surface interactions with gases are considered, taking into account physical adsorption, chemisorption, and the oxidation of surfaces. Studies of the surface structure are discussed, giving attention to field emission microscopy, field-ion microscopy, electron diffraction techniques, Auger spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, ion microprobe methods, and low-energy backscattering spectroscopy. Investigations of semiconductor surfaces are also described.

  6. Surface structure and electronic properties of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is developed to explain dopant effects on chemical vapor deposition. Auger analysis of the interaction between allotropic forms of carbon and silicon films has shown Si-C formation for all forms by glassy carbon. LEED intensity measurements have been used to determine the mean square displacement of surface atoms of silicon single crystals, and electron loss spectroscopy has shown the effect of structure and impurities on surface states located within the band gap. A thin film of Al has been used to enhance film crystallinity at low temperature.

  7. Structure and properties of solid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    Difficulties in experimental studies of crystalline surfaces are related to the fact that surface atoms have an intrinsic tendency to react with their environment. A second problem is connected with the effective thickness of surfaces, which ranges from one to several atom layers. The phenomenology of surface interactions with gases are considered, taking into account physical adsorption, chemisorption, and the oxidation of surfaces. Studies of the surface structure are discussed, giving attention to field emission microscopy, field-ion microscopy, electron diffraction techniques, Auger spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, ion microprobe methods, and low-energy backscattering spectroscopy. Investigations of semiconductor surfaces are also described.

  8. The structural origin of anomalous properties of liquid water

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Water is unique in its number of unusual, often called anomalous, properties. When hot it is a normal simple liquid; however, close to ambient temperatures properties, such as the compressibility, begin to deviate and do so increasingly on further cooling. Clearly, these emerging properties are connected to its ability to form up to four well-defined hydrogen bonds allowing for different local structural arrangements. A wealth of new data from various experiments and simulations has recently become available. When taken together they point to a heterogeneous picture with fluctuations between two classes of local structural environments developing on temperature-dependent length scales. PMID:26643439

  9. Auxetic oesophageal stents: structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Ali, Murtaza Najabat; Busfield, James J C; Rehman, Ihtesham U

    2014-02-01

    Oesophageal cancer is the ninth leading cause of malignant cancer death and its prognosis remains poor, ranking as the sixth most frequent cause of death in the world. This research work aims to adopt an Auxetic (rotating-squares) geometry device, that had previously been examined theoretically and analysed by Grima and Evans (J Mater Sci Lett 19(17):1563-1565, 2000), to produce a novel Auxetic oesophageal stent and stent-grafts relevant to the palliative treatment of oesophageal cancer and also for the prevention of dysphagia. This paper discusses the manufacture of a small diameter Auxetic oesophageal stent and stent-graft. The oral deployment of such an Auxetic stent would be simplest if a commercial balloon dilatational catheter was used as this obviates the need for an expensive dedicated delivery system. A novel manufacturing route was employed in this research to develop both Auxetic films and Auxetic oesophageal stents, which ranged from conventional subtractive techniques to a new additive manufacturing method. Polyurethane was selected as a material for the fabrication of Auxetic films and Auxetic oesophageal stents because of its good biocompatibility and non-toxicological properties. The Auxetic films were later used for the fabrication of seamed Auxetic oesophageal stents. The flexible polyurethane tubular grafts were also attached to the inner luminal side of the seamless Auxetic oesophageal stents, in order to prevent tumour in-growth. Scanning electron microscopy was used to conduct surface morphology study by using different Auxetic specimens developed from different conventional and new additive manufacturing techniques. Tensile testing of the Auxetic films was performed to characterise their mechanical properties. The stent expansion tests of the Auxetic stents were done to analyse the longitudinal extension and radial expansion of the Auxetic stent at a range of radial pressures applied by the balloon catheter, and to also identify the pressure

  10. Structure and Soot Formation Properties of Laminar Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    Soot formation within hydrocarbon-fueled flames is an important unresolved problem of combustion science for several reasons: soot emissions are responsible for more deaths than any other combustion-generated pollutant, thermal loads due to continuum radiation from soot limit the durability of combustors, thermal radiation from soot is mainly responsible for the growth and spread of unwanted fires, carbon monoxide emissions associated with soot emissions are responsible for most fire deaths, and limited understanding of soot processes in flames is a major impediment to the development of computational combustion. Motivated by these observations, soot processes within laminar premixed and nonpremixed (diffusion) flames are being studied during this investigation. The study is limited to laminar flames due to their experimental and computational tractability, noting the relevance of these results to practical flames through laminar flamelet concepts. Nonbuoyant flames are emphasized because buoyancy affects soot processes in laminar diffusion flames whereas effects of buoyancy are small for most practical flames. This study involves both ground- and space-based experiments, however, the following discussion will be limited to ground-based experiments because no space-based experiments were carried out during the report period. The objective of this work was to complete measurements in both premixed and nonpremixed flames in order to gain a better understanding of the structure of the soot-containing region and processes of soot nucleation and surface growth in these environments, with the latter information to be used to develop reliable ways of predicting soot properties in practical flames. The present discussion is brief, more details about the portions of the investigation considered here can be found in refs. 8-13.

  11. Metallurgical coke: formation, structure and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, H.

    1982-01-01

    Metallurgical coke has an optical texture or microstructure composed of anisotropic carbon in the form of mosaics and flow-type anisotropy as well as isotropic carbon or inerts. The anisotropic carbon is formed via the intermediates of nematic liquid crystals and mesophase. The physical and chemical properties of the coal ultimately control the fluidity of the carbonization system and this, in turn, is important in controlling the size and shape of resultant anisotropy in the coke. Each component of the optical texture makes a contribution to coke performance. The interlocked, randomly orientated units of the mosaics, 1 to 10 ..mu..m diameter, are more resistant to crack propagation and fracture than is the isotropic carbon or the flow-type anisotropic carbon (length > 10 ..mu..m). Anisotropic carbon is more resistant to gasification than is isotropic carbon and this factor is relevant in discussion of solution-loss in the blast furnace. The mosaic units of anisotropic carbon, on gasification, do not develop the fissures which ooccur in the flow-type anisotropy and hence coke strength can be maintained relatively. The mosaics, which constitute a major part of the optical texture of metallurgical cokes, are more resistant to attack by alkali than the flow-type anisotropy. The isotropic carbon is probably more resistant. Co-carbonizations are described which produce cokes with these suitable optical textures. The concepts of hydrogen shuttling is introduced to explain the successful use of pitch additives in coal blends.

  12. Waveguide sensor with metamaterial structure for determination of dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigmann, R.; Savin, A.; Isteníková, K.; Faktorová, D.; Fabo, P.

    2017-08-01

    Microwave sensor (MWS) compared with classical sensor, offers many advantage such as rapid and nondestructive measurement. At microwave (MW) frequencies, dielectric properties of materials depend on frequency, moisture content, bulk density and temperature. MW waveguide sensors can measure properties of materials based on MW interaction with matter, and provide information about dielectric properties of investigated dielectric material, characterized with complex permittivity. The paper presents a new approach for determination of the dielectric properties of dielectric material by embedding a metamaterial (MM) structure over the aperture of waveguide sensor in order to increase the sensing properties of classical waveguide sensor. The optimal design of MM structure for waveguide sensor tuning in MW X-band is obtained. In this new approach the MM function in two ways: like a tool for increasing the sensibility of classical waveguide sensor and the tool sensitive to the dielectric properties of investigated material through the adjusted resonance frequency of designed MM units. The numerical simulation of 2D MM structure properties and experimental results for dielectric properties of dielectric materials are carried out.

  13. Determination of HART I Blade Structural Properties by Laboratory Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Sung N.; Lau, Benton H.

    2012-01-01

    The structural properties of higher harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART I) blades were measured using the original set of blades tested in the German-dutch wind tunnel (DNW) in 1994. the measurements include bending and torsion stiffness, geometric offsets, and mass and inertia properties of the blade. the measured properties were compared to the estimated values obtained initially from the blade manufacturer. The previously estimated blade properties showed consistently higher stiffness, up to 30 percent for the flap bending in the blade inboard root section.

  14. Engineering the Structure and Properties of DNA-Nanoparticle Superstructures Using Polyvalent Counterions.

    PubMed

    Chou, Leo Y T; Song, Fayi; Chan, Warren C W

    2016-04-06

    DNA assembly of nanoparticles is a powerful approach to control their properties and prototype new materials. However, the structure and properties of DNA-assembled nanoparticles are labile and sensitive to interactions with counterions, which vary with processing and application environment. Here we show that substituting polyamines in place of elemental counterions significantly enhanced the structural rigidity and plasmonic properties of DNA-assembled metal nanoparticles. These effects arose from the ability of polyamines to condense DNA and cross-link DNA-coated nanoparticles. We further used polyamine wrapped DNA nanostructures as structural templates to seed the growth of polymer multilayers via layer-by-layer assembly, and controlled the degree of DNA condensation, plasmon coupling efficiency, and material responsiveness to environmental stimuli by varying polyelectrolyte composition. These results highlight counterion engineering as a versatile strategy to tailor the properties of DNA-nanoparticle assemblies for various applications, and should be applicable to other classes of DNA nanostructures.

  15. Effect of wet grinding on structural properties of ball clay

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, A. Chander, S.; Dhaka, M. S.; Hameed, A.; Singh, P.; Nehra, S. P.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, the effect of wet grinding on structural properties of ball clay is undertaken. The wet grinding treatment was performed employing ball and vibro mills for different time spells of 2, 4, 8 and 16 hours. The structural properties were carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structure of ground samples is found to be simple cubic. The crystallographic parameters are calculated and slight change in lattice constant, inter planner spacing and particle size is observed with grinding treatment. The results are in agreement with the available literature.

  16. Structures and optical properties of solid hydrogen at ultrahigh pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagara, H.

    2003-09-01

    The electronic energy bands in structures whose primitive cell contains up to four molecules are studied with full optimization of the structures on the basis of GGA and LDA band calculations. Above 250 GPa, the eventual optimal structure obtained by the GGA or the LDA calculation is Cmca, which is a layered structure with the molecular bonds lying in planes and which has a metallic band structure with no band gaps. The metallic property of the band structure remains unchanged even if the molecular bonds in the plane of the Cmca are inclined so that the atoms in the molecule lie out of the plane. The electronic bands of the Cmca structure and those of some other candidate structures are discussed in the light of recent experimental results. Effects of the occupation of electronic states on the predicted optimal structures are also studied.

  17. Effect of metal coordination on photocurrent response properties of a tetrathiafulvalene organogel film.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shu-Fang; Sun, Yong-Gang; Huo, Peng; Shen, Wei-Chun; Huang, Yu-De; Zhu, Qin-Yu; Dai, Jie

    2014-04-07

    Organic low molecular weight gelators with a tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) unit have received considerable attention because the formed gels usually exhibit redox active response and conducting or semiconducting properties. However, to our knowledge, metal coordination systems have not been reported for TTF-derived gels up to date. We have designed and synthesized a series of TTF derivatives with a diamide-diamino moiety that can coordinate to specific metal ions with square coordination geometry. Gelation properties and morphologies of the films prepared by the gelators in different hydrophobic solvents are characterized. The TTF derivative with a dodecyl group shows effective gelation properties, and electrodes with the organogel films are prepared. The effect of the Ni(II) and Cu(II) coordination on the photocurrent response property of the electrodes is examined. The metal square coordination significantly increases the photocurrent response. This gel system is the first metal coordination related TTF-gel-based photoelectric material. The mechanism of the metal coordination-improved photocurrent response property is discussed based on the crystal structural analysis and theoretical calculations.

  18. Inferring Earth structure from the response to ocean tidal loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, H. R.; Simons, M.; Ito, T.

    2012-12-01

    Tidal forces, generated primarily by gravitational interactions with the moon and Sun, distort the shape of Earth's solid interior (body tides) and redistribute the mass of the oceans (ocean tides). The periodic shifting of ocean mass places cyclic loads on Earth, with the response to these loads observable as spatial displacements in Global Positioning System (GPS) data. Gravitational and elastic responses of the solid Earth to ocean tidal loads (OTLs) are controlled by the material properties of Earth's interior and may hence be used to constrain independently the absolute values of density and the elastic moduli down to c. 300km depth. Previous analysis of this type focused on structure in the western United States. We present observational results and modeled predictions for OTL-induced surface displacements at nearly 100 GPS stations across Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay. Relative to the earlier study region, eastern South America is an ideal geographic location to study the effects of OTLs because it is composed primarily of stable shield and platform provinces, implying less structural complexity. Furthermore, the region is bounded to the north and east by large amplitude ocean tides. Obtaining absolute values for material properties in the crust and upper mantle beneath South America could provide valuable insight into the structure of the Amazonian craton and hence knowledge about its long-term stability against tectonic deformation. We extract the amplitude and phase of several main tidal constituents from the GPS data using classical harmonic analysis. We then compare our observations with theoretical predictions drawn from a variety of Earth models. Predicted surface displacements derived from radially symmetric Earth models, such as PREM and ad hoc perturbations to PREM, exhibit spatially correlated residuals, suggesting a need to explore a wider family of models, including those with lateral heterogeneity. Initially we have relied on one

  19. Remarkable luminescence properties of lanthanide complexes with asymmetric dodecahedron structures.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kohei; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Kawakami, Ryuhei; Kita, Yuki; Sugimoto, Katsufumi; Nakashima, Takuya; Harada, Takashi; Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2011-01-10

    The distorted coordination structures and luminescence properties of novel lanthanide complexes with oxo-linked bidentate phosphane oxide ligands--4,5-bis(diphenylphosphoryl)-9,9-dimethylxanthene (xantpo), 4,5-bis(di-tert-butylphosphoryl)-9,9-dimethylxanthene (tBu-xantpo), and bis[(2-diphenylphosphoryl)phenyl] ether (dpepo)--and low-vibrational frequency hexafluoroacetylacetonato (hfa) ligands are reported. The lanthanide complexes exhibit characteristic square antiprism and trigonal dodecahedron structures with eight-coordinated oxygen atoms. The luminescence properties of these complexes are characterized by their emission quantum yields, emission lifetimes, and their radiative and nonradiative rate constants. Lanthanide complexes with dodecahedron structures offer markedly high emission quantum yields (Eu: 55-72 %, Sm: 2.4-5.0 % in [D(6)]acetone) due to enhancement of the electric dipole transition and suppression of vibrational relaxation. These remarkable luminescence properties are elucidated in terms of their distorted coordination structures.

  20. Cement-aggregate compatibility and structure property relationships including modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, H.M.; Xi, Y.

    1993-07-15

    The role of aggregate, and its interface with cement paste, is discussed with a view toward establishing models that relate structure to properties. Both short (nm) and long (mm) range structure must be considered. The short range structure of the interface depends not only on the physical distribution of the various phases, but also on moisture content and reactivity of aggregate. Changes that occur on drying, i.e. shrinkage, may alter the structure which, in turn, feeds back to alter further drying and shrinkage. The interaction is dynamic, even without further hydration of cement paste, and the dynamic characteristic must be considered in order to fully understand and model its contribution to properties. Microstructure and properties are two subjects which have been pursued somewhat separately. This review discusses both disciplines with a view toward finding common research goals in the future. Finally, comment is made on possible chemical reactions which may occur between aggregate and cement paste.

  1. Growth, structure, morphology, and magnetic properties of Ni ferrite films

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The morphology, structure, and magnetic properties of nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) films fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering on Si(111) substrate have been investigated as functions of film thickness. Prepared films that have not undergone post-annealing show the better spinel crystal structure with increasing growth time. Meanwhile, the size of grain also increases, which induces the change of magnetic properties: saturation magnetization increased and coercivity increased at first and then decreased. Note that the sample of 10-nm thickness is the superparamagnetic property. Transmission electron microscopy displays that the film grew with a disorder structure at initial growth, then forms spinel crystal structure as its thickness increases, which is relative to lattice matching between substrate Si and NiFe2O4. PMID:23622034

  2. Relating secondary structure to the mechanical properties of polypeptide hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Sharon Anne

    Biomimetic hydrogels are being developed for use in medicine as drug delivery devices and tissue engineering matrices, and the mechanical properties of the materials play an important role in their performance. For example, in tissue engineering, gene expression and cell adhesion have been closely linked to the mechanical properties of the surrounding hydrogel matrix. In poly-L-lysine hydrogels, a five-fold increase in storage modulus, a 50% increase in equilibrium modulus, and a 62% decrease in swelling degree are shown to occur as the hydrogel network chains transition from an alpha-helix to a beta-sheet conformation. The manipulation of the network's mechanical behavior through changes in the secondary structure of the polymer chains offers an additional design variable in the development of biosynthetic materials. Analogous to poly-L-lysine, elastin-mimetic proteins based on the consensus repeat sequence of elastin (VPGVG) undergo a temperature-dependent secondary structure transition from a random coil to a beta-spiral. In this research, chemically-crosslinked poly[(VPGVG)4(VPGKG)] hydrogels are shown to possess temperature- and pH-dependent swelling. Following scaling law predictions (G ˜ φ2n), the hydrogels have been shown to behave as ideal elastic networks when the crosslink density is varied at synthesis (theory: n = 9/4, experimental: n = 2.0 +/- 0.1), and behave as flexible networks above and below their structural transition temperature of 35°C (theory: n = 1/3, experimental: n = 0.45 +/- 0.06). Evaluation of published data on elastin-mimetic hydrogels shows that the hydrogels behave as ideal elastic networks for all crosslinking techniques, crosslink spacings, and crosslink functionalities reported. As a contrast to chemically-crosslinked hydrogels, a novel elastin-mimetic triblock (EMT) copolymer was evaluated because of its potential use in cell encapsulation without potentially harmful side reactions. Unlike other thermally gelling copolymers

  3. Structure - property relations in lead tungstate based perovskite relaxor ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhas, Pavol

    The structure and dielectric properties of (1 - x)Pb(Sc 2/3W1/3)O3-(x)PbTiO3 (PSW-PT), (1 - x)Pb(Sc2/3W1/3)O 3-(x)PbZrO3 (PSW-PZ) and (1 - x)Pb(Sc1/2W1/4Ti1/4)O3-( x)Pb(Sc1/2Nb1/2)O3 (PSWT-PSN) ceramics have been investigated over a full substitution range. All compositions with x < 0.5 adopt a cubic perovskite structure; however, for x ≤ 0.25 the periodicity of the lattice is doubled due to a 1:1 ordered distribution of the B-site cations. The structural order in PSW can be described by a "random site model" with one cation site occupied by Sc3+ and the other by a random distribution of the remaining ions ( Sc3+1/3W6+2/3 ). This ordering is destabilized in solid solutions of PSW with PbZrO 3, but highly stabilized by PbTiO3, with a degree of order in excess of 95% for x ≤ 0.25 in (1 - x )PSW-(x)PT. The distinct effects of Zr and Ti on the B-site order are accompanied by remarkably different alterations in the dielectric response of the two solid solutions. Both systems are relaxor ferroelectrics, and for the substitution of PZ the temperature of permittivity maximum Tepsilon,max increases with x. However, Tepsilon,max decreases for additions of Ti up to x ≈ 0.25, even though PT has a much higher Curie temperature ( TC = 763 K) than PZ (503 K). Variations of T epsilon,max in the PSW-PT system could be also induced by altering the degree of order of a given composition; changes as high as 50°C were observed for x = 0.25. Strong effects of order were also observed in (0.25)PSWT-(0.75)PSN, where the introduction of partial order induced a relaxor to ferroelectric transition. To understand the relations between the atomic structure and dielectric properties, the effects of PT and PZ on the structure and ordering of PSW were studied using synchrotron x-ray and neutron diffraction. Rietveld refinement was carried out on the PSW-PT and PSW-PZ systems to determine their average long-range crystallographic structure, along with Pair Distribution Function (PDF

  4. Metal borohydrides and derivatives - synthesis, structure and properties.

    PubMed

    Paskevicius, Mark; Jepsen, Lars H; Schouwink, Pascal; Černý, Radovan; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Dornheim, Martin; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R

    2017-03-06

    A wide variety of metal borohydrides, MBH4, have been discovered and characterized during the past decade, revealing an extremely rich chemistry including fascinating structural flexibility and a wide range of compositions and physical properties. Metal borohydrides receive increasing interest within the energy storage field due to their extremely high hydrogen density and possible uses in batteries as solid state ion conductors. Recently, new types of physical properties have been explored in lanthanide-bearing borohydrides related to solid state phosphors and magnetic refrigeration. Two major classes of metal borohydride derivatives have also been discovered: anion-substituted compounds where the complex borohydride anion, BH4(-), is replaced by another anion, i.e. a halide or amide ion; and metal borohydrides modified with neutral molecules, such as NH3, NH3BH3, N2H4, etc. Here, we review new synthetic strategies along with structural, physical and chemical properties for metal borohydrides, revealing a number of new trends correlating composition, structure, bonding and thermal properties. These new trends provide general knowledge and may contribute to the design and discovery of new metal borohydrides with tailored properties towards the rational design of novel functional materials. This review also demonstrates that there is still room for discovering new combinations of light elements including boron and hydrogen, leading to complex hydrides with extreme flexibility in composition, structure and properties.

  5. Relationship of the optical absorption and scattering properties with mechanical and structural properties of apple tissue

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Optical absorption and scattering properties of fruit change with the physiological and biochemical activities in the tissue during ripening and postharvest storage. But it has not been well understood on how these changes are related to the structural and mechanical properties of fruit. This resear...

  6. High temperature structural and magnetic properties of cobalt nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Ait Atmane, Kahina; Zighem, Fatih; Soumare, Yaghoub; Ibrahim, Mona; Boubekri, Rym; Maurer, Thomas; Margueritat, Jeremie; Piquemal, Jean-Yves; Ott, Frederic; Chaboussant, Gregory; Schoenstein, Frederic; Jouini, Noureddine; Viau, Guillaume

    2013-01-15

    We present in this paper the structural and magnetic properties of high aspect ratio Co nanoparticles ({approx}10) at high temperatures (up to 623 K) using in-situ X ray diffraction (XRD) and SQUID characterizations. We show that the anisotropic shapes, the structural and texture properties are preserved up to 500 K. The coercivity can be modelled by {mu}{sub 0}H{sub C}=2(K{sub MC}+K{sub shape})/M{sub S} with K{sub MC} the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, K{sub shape} the shape anisotropy constant and M{sub S} the saturation magnetization. H{sub C} decreases linearly when the temperature is increased due to the loss of the Co magnetocrystalline anisotropy contribution. At 500 K, 50% of the room temperature coercivity is preserved corresponding to the shape anisotropy contribution only. We show that the coercivity drop is reversible in the range 300-500 K in good agreement with the absence of particle alteration. Above 525 K, the magnetic properties are irreversibly altered either by sintering or by oxidation. - Graphical abstract: We present in this paper the structural and magnetic properties of high aspect ratio Co nanorods ({approx}10) at high temperatures (up to 623 K) using in-situ X-ray diffraction and SQUID characterizations. We show that the anisotropic shapes, the structural and texture properties are preserved up to 500 K. Above 525 K, the magnetic properties are irreversibly altered either by sintering or by oxidation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferromagnetic Co nanorods are prepared using the polyol process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural and texture properties of the Co nanorods are preserved up to 500 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic properties of the Co nanorods are irreversibly altered above 525 K.

  7. Structures and Properties of Alkali Metal Intercalated CARBON(60)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qing

    Studies of new phases, structural transitions, superconducting properties and phase diagrams of alkali metal (K, Rb and Cs) intercalated solid C_ {60} are presented. The primary experimental probes are synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and DC magnetic susceptibility. High-temperature site-ordered rocksalt phases of composition M_1C_{60} (M=K,Rb,Cs) were discovered for the first time. Temperature -dependent x-ray and DSC studies reveal different thermal stabilities for different choices of M. The rocksalt phase of K_1C_{60} phase separates into K_{~0}C _{60} (alpha-C_ {60}) and K_3C_ {60} below 423K with slow kinetics, while Rb_1C_{60} and Cs_1C_{60} both distort into orthorhombic structures below 350K. Rapid quenching of rocksalt K_1C_{60 } also yields a metastable orthorhombic phase at low-T. The fcc-orthorhombic transition appears to be a diffusionless (displacive) phenomenon. No superconductivity is observed above 2K in either slow-cooled or quenched M_1C_{60} phases. Rietveld refinement of single-phase nominal K _3C_{60} suggests nonstoichiometric behavior in the superconducting compound. The refined stoichiometry is K_{3-delta}C _{60}, delta = 0.15 +/- 0.02. Merohedral disorder of C_{60 } molecules (1) persists at temperatures below the superconducting T_{c}. Anisotropic crystallite microstructure or strain is identified to be a dominant feature associated with M_3C _{60} (M = K,Rb) superconducting compounds. High-pressure studies of the superconducting ternary compounds Rb_2CsC_{60} and Na_2RbC_{60} were carried out, and the results compared with those from other fulleride superconductors. Na _2RbC_{60} undergoes a structural distortion, reminiscent of the low-T M_1C _{60} transitions, at ~6 kbar pressure. This unique structural distortion might be responsible for the anomalously low T_{c} in this compound, for example, through "phonon softening". Binary phase diagrams of K_{x }C_{60} and Rb_ {x}C_{60} are presented

  8. [Morphogenesis, structure and properties of lymphatic vessels].

    PubMed

    Ratajska, Anna; Jankowska-Steifer, Ewa; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Flaht, Aleksandra; Radomska-Leśniewska, Dorota

    2012-11-19

    In this paper, we present literature results related to structure and various manners of lymphatic vessel formation during embryonic development and in pathological events, such as tumorigenesis, wound healing, and other diseases. The functions of the lymphatic system include the collection of fluids that enter tissues from the circulation, absorption of lipids and lipid-soluble vitamins from the intestine and their subsequent transport, participation in antigen, dendritic cell, and lymphocyte migration. The lymphatic system is also a route for tumor cell and inflammatory cell transport. Native lymphatic capillaries differ from blood capillaries by having an irregular lumen, a discontinuous basement membrane, absence of pericytes, and a strong anchorage of their endothelial cells to the extracellular matrix via microfibrils built of emilin and fibrillin. Lymphatic endothelial cells express surface antigens such as Lyve-1, podoplanin, VEGFR3 (Flk4) and transcription factor Prox-1, as well as molecules which are common for blood endothelial cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (CD31, CD34, Flk-1, Tie-1, Tie-2, neuropilin 2). Lymphatic vessel formation during embryonic development starts with the occurrence of lymphatic sacs sprouting from systemic jugular veins and/or by co-option of lymphangioblasts or hematopoietic-derived cells. It can also proceed by dedifferentiation of venous endothelial cells after their detachment from the venous system, migration to the target places within the body and assembly in the lymphatic lumen. Mechanisms of lymphatic vessel formation during embryonic development and in pathological conditions, such as tumorigenesis, wound healing, and metastasis, is regulated by a plethora of growth factors and molecules, among which the most important are VEGF-C, VEGF-D, HGF, FGF, retinoic acid, IL-3, and IL-7. Macrophages and cells bearing CD45 phenotype seem to take part in the formation of lymphatics. Macrophages might act as a source of growth

  9. Structural response of rectilinear containment to overpressurization

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kulak, R.F.

    1995-07-01

    Containment structures for nuclear reactors are the final barrier between released radionuclides and the public. Containment structures are constructed from steel, reinforced concrete, or prestressed concrete. US nuclear reactor containment geometries tend to be cylindrical with elliptical or hemispherical heads. The older Soviet designed reactors do not use a containment building to mitigate the effects of accidents. Instead, they employ a sealed set of rectilinear, interconnected compartments, collectively called the accident localization system (ALS), to reduce the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere during accidents. The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology that can be used to find the structural capacity of reinforced concrete structures. The method is applicable to both cylindrical and rectilinear geometries. As an illustrative example, the methodology is applied to a generic VVER-440/V213 design.

  10. 41 CFR 102-37.90 - What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? 102-37.90 Section 102-37.90 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Services Administration (GSA) § 102-37.90 What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? The General Services...

  11. 41 CFR 102-37.90 - What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? 102-37.90 Section 102-37.90 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Services Administration (GSA) § 102-37.90 What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? The General Services Administration...

  12. 41 CFR 102-37.90 - What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? 102-37.90 Section 102-37.90 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Services Administration (GSA) § 102-37.90 What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? The General Services Administration...

  13. Tailoring the Acoustic Properties of Truss-Core Sandwich Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard

    Undesirable cabin noise has an adverse physiological effect on passengers and crews in an aircraft. In order to reduce the noise level, a passive approach using a truss-core sandwich (TCS) panel as a sound insulator is proposed. Design guidelines and analysis methodologies were developed in order to explore the vibro-acoustic characteristics of TCS structure. Its sound isolation properties can be thereby assessed. Theoretical analyses show that the transmission-loss and sound radiation properties of a TCS structure can be represented by the root-mean-square velocity of its surface, and a beam structure analysis is sufficient to reveal many of the important aspects of TCS panel design. Using finite element analysis, a sensitivity study was performed to create design guidelines for TCS structures. Transmission-loss experiments show that the analytical and numerical analyses correctly predict the trend of TCS structure's vibro-acoustic performance.

  14. Nano-structured magnetic metamaterial with enhanced nonlinear properties.

    PubMed

    Kobljanskyj, Yuri; Melkov, Gennady; Guslienko, Konstantin; Novosad, Valentyn; Bader, Samuel D; Kostylev, Michael; Slavin, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Nano-structuring can significantly modify the properties of materials. We demonstrate that size-dependent modification of the spin-wave spectra in magnetic nano-particles can affect not only linear, but also nonlinear magnetic response. The discretization of the spectrum removes the frequency degeneracy between the main excitation mode of a nano-particle and the higher spin-wave modes, having the lowest magnetic damping, and reduces the strength of multi-magnon relaxation processes. This reduction of magnon-magnon relaxation for the main excitation mode leads to a dramatic increase of its lifetime and amplitude, resulting in the intensification of all the nonlinear processes involving this mode. We demonstrate this experimentally on a two-dimensional array of permalloy nano-dots for the example of parametric generation of a sub-harmonic of an external microwave signal. The characteristic lifetime of this sub-harmonic is increased by two orders of magnitude compared to the case of a continuous magnetic film, where magnon-magnon relaxation limits the lifetime.

  15. Nano-structured magnetic metamaterial with enhanced nonlinear properties

    PubMed Central

    Kobljanskyj, Yuri; Melkov, Gennady; Guslienko, Konstantin; Novosad, Valentyn; Bader, Samuel D.; Kostylev, Michael; Slavin, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Nano-structuring can significantly modify the properties of materials. We demonstrate that size-dependent modification of the spin-wave spectra in magnetic nano-particles can affect not only linear, but also nonlinear magnetic response. The discretization of the spectrum removes the frequency degeneracy between the main excitation mode of a nano-particle and the higher spin-wave modes, having the lowest magnetic damping, and reduces the strength of multi-magnon relaxation processes. This reduction of magnon-magnon relaxation for the main excitation mode leads to a dramatic increase of its lifetime and amplitude, resulting in the intensification of all the nonlinear processes involving this mode. We demonstrate this experimentally on a two-dimensional array of permalloy nano-dots for the example of parametric generation of a sub-harmonic of an external microwave signal. The characteristic lifetime of this sub-harmonic is increased by two orders of magnitude compared to the case of a continuous magnetic film, where magnon-magnon relaxation limits the lifetime. PMID:22745899

  16. Structure and physical properties of Hydrogrossular mineral series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Puja

    The mineral hydrogrossular series (Ca3Al2(SiO 4)3-x(OH)4x; 0 ≤ x ≤ 3) are important water bearing minerals found in the upper and lower part of the Earth's mantle. They are vital to the planet's hydrosphere under different hydrothermal conditions. The composition and structure of this mineral series are important in geoscience and share many commonalities with cement and clay materials. Other than the end members of the series x = 0 (grossular) and x = 3 (katoite) which have a cubic garnet structure, the structure of the series is totally unknown. We used large-scale ab initio modeling to investigate the structures and properties for hydrogrossular series for x = 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3. Results indicate that for x > 0 and x < 3, the structures are tetragonal. This shows that there is structural change related to the lowering of overall symmetry associated with the composition of SiO4 tetrahedra and AlO6 octahedra. Total Bond order also explains the reason behind the change in the compressibility of the series. The electronic structure, mechanical and optical properties of the hydrogrossular series are calculated and the results for grossular and katoite are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The x--dependence of these physical properties for the series supports the notion of the aforementioned structural transition from cubic to tetragonal.

  17. Structure-Property-Function Relationship in Humic Substances to Explain the Biological Activity in Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Andrés Calderín; de Souza, Luiz Gilberto Ambrosio; Pereira, Marcos Gervasio; Castro, Rosane Nora; García-Mina, José María; Zonta, Everaldo; Lisboa, Francy Junior Gonçalves; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro

    2016-02-01

    Knowledge of the structure-property-function relationship of humic substances (HSs) is key for understanding their role in soil. Despite progress, studies on this topic are still under discussion. We analyzed 37 humic fractions with respect to their isotopic composition, structural characteristics, and properties responsible for stimulating plant root parameters. We showed that regardless of the source of origin of the carbon (C3 or C4), soil-extracted HSs and humic acids (HAs) are structurally similar to each other. The more labile and functionalized HS fraction is responsible for root emission, whereas the more recalcitrant and less functionalized HA fraction is related to root growth. Labile structures promote root stimulation at lower concentrations, while recalcitrant structures require higher concentrations to promote a similar stimulus. These findings show that lability and recalcitrance, which are derived properties of humic fractions, are related to the type and intensity of their bioactivity. In summary, the comparison of humic fractions allowed a better understanding of the relationship between the source of origin of plant carbon and the structure, properties, and type and intensity of the bioactivity of HSs in plants. In this study, scientific concepts are unified and the basis for the agronomic use of HSs is established.

  18. Structure-Property-Function Relationship in Humic Substances to Explain the Biological Activity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    García, Andrés Calderín; de Souza, Luiz Gilberto Ambrosio; Pereira, Marcos Gervasio; Castro, Rosane Nora; García-Mina, José María; Zonta, Everaldo; Lisboa, Francy Junior Gonçalves; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure-property-function relationship of humic substances (HSs) is key for understanding their role in soil. Despite progress, studies on this topic are still under discussion. We analyzed 37 humic fractions with respect to their isotopic composition, structural characteristics, and properties responsible for stimulating plant root parameters. We showed that regardless of the source of origin of the carbon (C3 or C4), soil-extracted HSs and humic acids (HAs) are structurally similar to each other. The more labile and functionalized HS fraction is responsible for root emission, whereas the more recalcitrant and less functionalized HA fraction is related to root growth. Labile structures promote root stimulation at lower concentrations, while recalcitrant structures require higher concentrations to promote a similar stimulus. These findings show that lability and recalcitrance, which are derived properties of humic fractions, are related to the type and intensity of their bioactivity. In summary, the comparison of humic fractions allowed a better understanding of the relationship between the source of origin of plant carbon and the structure, properties, and type and intensity of the bioactivity of HSs in plants. In this study, scientific concepts are unified and the basis for the agronomic use of HSs is established. PMID:26862010

  19. Statistical measures on residue-level protein structural properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Bonett, Stephen; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert; Wu, Zhijun

    2011-07-01

    The atomic-level structural properties of proteins, such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles, have been well studied and understood based on either chemistry knowledge or statistical analysis. Similar properties on the residue-level, such as the distances between two residues and the angles formed by short sequences of residues, can be equally important for structural analysis and modeling, but these have not been examined and documented on a similar scale. While these properties are difficult to measure experimentally, they can be statistically estimated in meaningful ways based on their distributions in known proteins structures. Residue-level structural properties including various types of residue distances and angles are estimated statistically. A software package is built to provide direct access to the statistical data for the properties including some important correlations not previously investigated. The distributions of residue distances and angles may vary with varying sequences, but in most cases, are concentrated in some high probability ranges, corresponding to their frequent occurrences in either α-helices or β-sheets. Strong correlations among neighboring residue angles, similar to those between neighboring torsion angles at the atomic-level, are revealed based on their statistical measures. Residue-level statistical potentials can be defined using the statistical distributions and correlations of the residue distances and angles. Ramachandran-like plots for strongly correlated residue angles are plotted and analyzed. Their applications to structural evaluation and refinement are demonstrated. With the increase in both number and quality of known protein structures, many structural properties can be derived from sets of protein structures by statistical analysis and data mining, and these can even be used as a supplement to the experimental data for structure determinations. Indeed, the statistical measures on various types of

  20. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  1. Acid-responsive properties of fibrils from heat-induced whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Hua; Wang, Jing; Dong, Shi-Rong; Cheng, Wen; Kong, Bao-Hua; Tan, Jun-Yan

    2016-08-01

    The heat-induced fibrils of whey protein concentrate (WPC) have demonstrated an acid-responsive property; that is, the fibrils went through formation-depolymerization-reformation as pH was adjusted to 1.8, 6.5, and back to 1.8. We investigated the microstructure, driving force, and thermal stability of 3.0% (wt) WPC nanofibrils adjusted between pH 6.5 and 1.8 twice. The results showed that the nanofibrils had acid-responsive properties and good thermal stability after reheating for 10h at 90°C and adjusting pH from 1.8 to 6.5 to 1.8. The content of WPC fibril aggregates was not much different with the prolongation of heating times during pH variation. Although the nanofibrils' structure could be destroyed only by changing the pH, the essence of this destruction might only form fiber fragments, polymers that would restore a fibrous structure upon returning to pH 1.8. A described model for the acid-responsive assembly of fibrils of WPC was proposed. The fibrils went through formation-depolymerization-reformation by weaker noncovalent interactions (surface hydrophobicity) as pH changed from 1.8 to 6.5 back to 1.8. However, the fibrils lost the acid-responsive properties because much more S-S (disulfide) formation occurred when the solution was adjusted to pH 6.5 and reheated. Meanwhile, fibrils still possessed acid-responsive properties when reheated at pH 1.8, and the content of fibrils slightly increased with a further reduction of α-helix structure.

  2. Abnormal Structural Correlates of Response Perseveration in Individuals With Psychopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaling; Raine, Adrian; Colletti, Patrick; Toga, Arthur W.; Narr, Katherine L.

    2011-01-01

    Structural deficits in the frontotemporal network have been shown in individuals with psychopathy and are posited to contribute to neuropsychological impairments such as response perseveration. However, no study to date has examined structural correlates of response perseveration in individuals with psychopathy. In this structural MRI study, the authors found higher correlations between increased response perseveration and reduced cortical thickness in the orbitofrontal and anterior temporal regions in individuals with psychopathy than in healthy-comparison subjects. The findings provide preliminary evidence suggesting potential contributions of frontotemporal structural deficits in neurocognitive impairment with perseveration in individuals with psychopathy. PMID:21304146

  3. Handling properties of diverse automobiles and correlation with full scale response data. [driver/vehicle response to aerodynamic disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoh, R. H.; Weir, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Driver/vehicle response and performance of a variety of vehicles in the presence of aerodynamic disturbances are discussed. Steering control is emphasized. The vehicles include full size station wagon, sedan, compact sedan, van, pickup truck/camper, and wagon towing trailer. Driver/vehicle analyses are used to estimate response and performance. These estimates are correlated with full scale data with test drivers and the results are used to refine the driver/vehicle models, control structure, and loop closure criteria. The analyses and data indicate that the driver adjusts his steering control properties (when he can) to achieve roughly the same level of performance despite vehicle variations. For the more disturbance susceptible vehicles, such as the van, the driver tightens up his control. Other vehicles have handling dynamics which cause him to loosen his control response, even though performance degrades.

  4. Tunable device properties of free-standing inorganic/organic flexible hybrid structures obtained by exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Amitha; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2012-06-01

    We report the fabrication of free-standing flexible inorganic/organic hybrid structures by exfoliating ZnO nanostructured films from the flat indium tin oxide (ITO)/silicon/sapphire substrates using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). Strong interaction between ZnO and PEDOT:PSS and the thermomechanical response of PEDOT:PSS are the key issues for the exfoliation to prevail. The performance of the free-standing hybrid structures as rectifiers and photodetectors is better as compared to ITO supported hybrid structures. It is also shown that device properties of hybrid structures can be tuned by using different electrode materials.

  5. SSI response of a typical shear wall structure. Appendix B. In-structure response spectra comparisons. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.J.; Schewe, E.C.; Maslenikov, O.R.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives of this study were two-fold: (1) develop building response calibration factors, i.e., factors which relate best estimate or median level response to responses calculated by selected design procedures. Soil-structure interaction was the phenomenon of interest because significant simplifications are frequently introduced in its treatment; and (2) the second objective can be viewed in the context of a question: what effect does placing an identical structure on different sites and with different foundation conditions have on structure response. The structure selected for this study is a part of the Zion AFT complex. Only the auxiliary, fuel-handling, and diesel generator buildings were studied. This structure is a connected group of shear-wall buildings constructed of reinforced concrete, typical of nuclear power plant structures. The bases of comparison for this study were structure responses: peak in-structure accelerations (27 components), and peak wall forces and moments (111 components). In-structure response spectra were also considered. This appendix contains in-structure response spectra comparisons in detail.

  6. Optical and Structural Properties of Thin Film Composites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Ursula Jane

    This work describes the optical and structural characterization of metal-insulator and bimetallic composite films. Included are experimental details, theoretical descriptions of these systems, and a correlation of the optical response and microstructure of these thin film systems. The films were made by simultaneous or sequential evaporation of the constituents onto either amorphous or single crystal substrates. Two reflectance and one transmittance measurements were combined and inverted to determine the intrinsic optical constants of these materials over the wavelength range 0.2 to 3.0 microns. The metal insulator systems studied were Au-Al(,2)O(,3) and Au-MgO. The optical behavior and transport properties of these materials were measured, and correlated with their disparate microstructures. The optical behavior was compared to the predictions of three effective medium theories, labelled as the Maxwell-Garnett, Bruggeman Self-Consistent and Probabilistic Growth theories. The differing topological assumptions which form the bases of these theories were correlated with microscopic examination of the morphologies of the films, and it was found that the simple theories adequately predicted the optical response of the composites. Bimetallic systems were also studied, to investigate the extension of the Bruggeman theory to symmetric composites of immiscible metal constituents. It was found that the theory adequately predicts the behavior of films which display the symmetric morphology assumed by the theory. Studies of non-symmetric composites, and anisotropic systems (such as epitaxial layered materials (ELMs), showed that the symmetric morphology is necessary in order to model these systems with the Bruggeman theory.

  7. Structures and Mechanical Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    A revolution in the diamond technology is in progress, as the low-pressure process becomes an industrial reality. It will soon be possible to take advantage of the demanding properties of diamond to develop a myriad of new applications, particularly for self-lubricating, wear-resistant, and superhard coatings. The production of large diamond films or sheets at low cost, a distinct possibility in the not-too-distant future, may drastically change tribology technology, particularly regarding solid lubricants and lubricating materials and systems. This paper reviews the structures and properties of natural and synthetic diamonds to gain a better understanding of the tribological properties of diamond and related materials. Atomic and crystal structure, impurities, mechanical properties, and indentation hardness of diamond are described.

  8. Structural and oxidation properties of CoNi nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera-Granja, Faustino; Montejano-Carrizales, Juan Martin; Vogel, Eugenio E.

    2016-06-01

    Nanocylinders made out of CoNi alloys offer interesting properties which are dependent on the proportion of the constituent elements, the preparation methods and the thermal history of the sample. In the present paper we calculate the structural and electronic properties of Co1- x Ni x alloys at subnanoscopic level. SIESTA program is used to relax the structures following standard protocols. Relative positions of the minority atoms (Ni) are varied aiming to find the lowest energy configurations. It is found that Ni atoms minimize energy at surface positions mainly at the ends of the cylinders. The implications of this result in the magnetic properties of the systems are discussed. The work is continued to study the oxidation properties of the different possible surface compositions. It is found that surfaces of Ni are more resistant to oxidation than Co ones. The combination of the two previous results can lead to cylinders with high magnetic coercivity and relatively high resistance to oxidation.

  9. Aeroelastic Stability and Response of Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1998-01-01

    A summary of the work performed from 1996 to 1997 is presented. More details can be found in the cited references. This grant led to the development of aeroelastic analyses methods for predicting flutter and forced response in fans, compressors, and turbines using computational

  10. Aeroelastic Stability & Response of Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    2001-01-01

    A summary of the work performed under NASA grant NCC3-605 is presented. More details can be found in the cited references. This grant led to the development of relatively faster aeroelastic analyses methods for predicting flutter and forced response in fans, compressors, and turbines using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods.

  11. Structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of actinide carbides AnC (An = U, Np)

    SciTech Connect

    Manikandan, M.; Santhosh, M.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.

    2016-05-06

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of actinide carbides AnC (An=U, Np) for three different crystal structures, namely NaCl, CsCl and ZnS. Among the considered structures, NaCl structure is found to be the most stable structure for these carbides at normal pressure. A pressure induced structural phase transition from NaCl to ZnS is observed. The electronic structure reveals that these carbides are metals. The calculated elastic constants indicate that these carbides are mechanically stable at normal pressure.

  12. Bio-inspired fabrication of stimuli-responsive photonic crystals with hierarchical structures and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Peng, Wenhong; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Di

    2016-03-01

    When the constitutive materials of photonic crystals (PCs) are stimuli-responsive, the resultant PCs exhibit optical properties that can be tuned by the stimuli. This can be exploited for promising applications in colour displays, biological and chemical sensors, inks and paints, and many optically active components. However, the preparation of the required photonic structures is the first issue to be solved. In the past two decades, approaches such as microfabrication and self-assembly have been developed to incorporate stimuli-responsive materials into existing periodic structures for the fabrication of PCs, either as the initial building blocks or as the surrounding matrix. Generally, the materials that respond to thermal, pH, chemical, optical, electrical, or magnetic stimuli are either soft or aggregate, which is why the manufacture of three-dimensional hierarchical photonic structures with responsive properties is a great challenge. Recently, inspired by biological PCs in nature which exhibit both flexible and responsive properties, researchers have developed various methods to synthesize metals and metal oxides with hierarchical structures by using a biological PC as the template. This review will focus on the recent developments in this field. In particular, PCs with biological hierarchical structures that can be tuned by external stimuli have recently been successfully fabricated. These findings offer innovative insights into the design of responsive PCs and should be of great importance for future applications of these materials.

  13. Bio-inspired fabrication of stimuli-responsive photonic crystals with hierarchical structures and their applications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Peng, Wenhong; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Di

    2016-03-29

    When the constitutive materials of photonic crystals (PCs) are stimuli-responsive, the resultant PCs exhibit optical properties that can be tuned by the stimuli. This can be exploited for promising applications in colour displays, biological and chemical sensors, inks and paints, and many optically active components. However, the preparation of the required photonic structures is the first issue to be solved. In the past two decades, approaches such as microfabrication and self-assembly have been developed to incorporate stimuli-responsive materials into existing periodic structures for the fabrication of PCs, either as the initial building blocks or as the surrounding matrix. Generally, the materials that respond to thermal, pH, chemical, optical, electrical, or magnetic stimuli are either soft or aggregate, which is why the manufacture of three-dimensional hierarchical photonic structures with responsive properties is a great challenge. Recently, inspired by biological PCs in nature which exhibit both flexible and responsive properties, researchers have developed various methods to synthesize metals and metal oxides with hierarchical structures by using a biological PC as the template. This review will focus on the recent developments in this field. In particular, PCs with biological hierarchical structures that can be tuned by external stimuli have recently been successfully fabricated. These findings offer innovative insights into the design of responsive PCs and should be of great importance for future applications of these materials.

  14. Structure and spectral-luminescent properties of polymethine dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishchenko, Aleksandr A.

    1991-08-01

    The review considers the influence of the length of the polymethine chain, the structures of the hetero-radicals, the nature of substituents, electronic asymmetry, interactions of chromophores, structures of ion-pairs, photochemical reactions with proton transfer, and concentration, on the spectral-luminescent properties of polymethine dyes. The characteristic features of these properties in low-polarity media, including polymeric matrices, are discussed. Solvatochromism and solvatofluorochromism of polymethines are considered. Major factors influencing changes in the spectral-luminescent properties of cyanines, in relation to their structure and the nature of the medium, are revealed. Possible applications of polymethines to the solution of various problems connected with the transformation of light energy are discussed. The bibliography includes 231 references.

  15. Structural and Spectroscopic Properties of Water Around Small Hydrophobic Solutes

    PubMed Central

    Montagna, Maria; Sterpone, Fabio; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the structural, dynamical and spectroscopic properties of water molecules around a solvated methane by means of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Despite their mobility, in the first-shell water molecules are dynamically displaced in a clathrate-like cage around the hydrophobic solute. No significant differences in water geometrical parameters, in molecular dipole moments or in hydrogen bonding properties are observed between in-shell and out-shell molecules, indicating that liquid water can accommodate a small hydrophobic solute without altering its structural properties. The calculated contribution of the first shell water molecules to the infrared spectra does not show significant differences with respect the bulk signal once the effects of the missing polarization of second-shell molecules has been taken into account. Small fingerprints of the clathrate-like structure appear in the vibrational density of states in the libration and OH stretching regions. PMID:22946539

  16. Electrophysical properties and structural features of shungite (natural nanostructured carbon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, E. A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations of the electrical conductive properties with a nanoscale locality at nanoampere currents and the results of an analysis of the correlation between the electrical conductivity and structural features of natural glassy carbon, i.e., shungite. The investigations have been performed using atomic force microscopy, electric force spectroscopy, scanning spreading resistance microscopy, X-ray spectroscopic analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. It has been found that there are differences in electrical conductive properties of the structurally similar shungite samples formed under different PT conditions. Based on the analysis of the structural parameters and specific features of the shungite compositions, it has been shown that the effect of intercalation of impurities into boundary layers of graphene sheets has the most significant influence on the electrical and physical properties of the shungites. The differences in types and values of conductivity of the shungite samples are determined by the different degrees of intercalation.

  17. Molecular structures and properties of starches of Australian wild rice.

    PubMed

    Tikapunya, Tiparat; Zou, Wei; Yu, Wenwen; Powell, Prudence O; Fox, Glen P; Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert J; Gilbert, Robert G

    2017-09-15

    Australian wild rices have significant genetic differences from domesticated rices, which might provide rices with different starch molecular structure and thus different functional properties. Molecular structure, gelatinization properties, and pasting behaviours of starch of three Australian wild rices (Oryza australiensis, taxa A (O. rufipogon like) and taxa B (O. meridionalis like)) were determined and compared to domesticated indica and japonica rice. These had higher amylose content, more shorter amylose chains and fewer short amylopectin chains, resulted in a high gelatinization temperature in these wild rices. Compared to domesticated japonica rice, taxa A had a lower pasting viscosity; taxa B had a similar pasting viscosity but lower final viscosity. The significantly different starch molecular structure from that of normal domesticated rices, and concomitantly different properties, suggest advantageous uses in products such as rice crackers or rice pudding, and a source of nutritionally-desirable slowly digestible starch. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Structural and viscoelastic properties of actin networks formed by espin or pathologically relevant espin mutants.

    PubMed

    Lieleg, Oliver; Schmoller, Kurt M; Purdy Drew, Kirstin R; Claessens, Mireille M A E; Semmrich, Christine; Zheng, Lili; Bartles, James R; Bausch, Andreas R

    2009-11-09

    The structural organization of the cytoskeleton determines its viscoelastic response which is crucial for the correct functionality of living cells. Both the mechanical response and microstructure of the cytoskeleton are regulated on a microscopic level by the local activation of different actin binding and/or bundling proteins (ABPs). Misregulations in the expression of these ABPs or mutations in their sequence can entail severe cellular dysfunctions and diseases. Here, we study the structural and viscoelastic properties of reconstituted actin networks cross-linked by the ABP espin and compare the obtained network properties to those of other bundled actin networks. Moreover, we quantify the impact of pathologically relevant espin mutations on the viscoelastic properties of these cytoskeletal networks.

  19. Structural Causes and Cyber Effects: A Response to Our Critics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    STRATEGIC STUDIES UARTERLY Structural Causes and Cyber Effects A Response to Our Critics james Wood Forsyth Jr. Maj Billy E. Pope) USAF Abstract...mind when writing "Structural Causes and Cyber Effects : Why International 0 rder is Inevitable in Cyberspace." First, we set out to provide an...COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Structural Causes and Cyber Effects : A Response to Our Critics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  20. Hierarchical photonic structured stimuli-responsive materials as high-performance colorimetric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhu, Shenmin; Chen, Zhixin; Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Wang; Zhang, Di

    2016-05-01

    Hierarchical photonic structures in nature are of special interest because they can be used as templates for fabrication of stimuli-responsive photonic crystals (PCs) with unique structures beyond man-made synthesis. The current stimuli-responsive PCs templated directly from natural PCs showed a very weak external stimuli response and poor durability due to the limitations of natural templates. Herein, we tackle this problem by chemically coating functional polymers, polyacrylamide, on butterfly wing scales which have hierarchical photonic structures. As a result of the combination of the strong water absorption properties of the polyacrylamide and the PC structures of the butterfly wing scales, the designed materials demonstrated excellent humidity responsive properties and a tremendous colour change. The colour change is induced by the refractive index change which is in turn due to the swollen nature of the polymer when the relative humidity changes. The butterfly wing scales also showed an excellent durability which is due to the chemical bonds formed between the polymer and wing scales. The synthesis strategy provides an avenue for the promising applications of stimuli-responsive PCs with hierarchical structures.Hierarchical photonic structures in nature are of special interest because they can be used as templates for fabrication of stimuli-responsive photonic crystals (PCs) with unique structures beyond man-made synthesis. The current stimuli-responsive PCs templated directly from natural PCs showed a very weak external stimuli response and poor durability due to the limitations of natural templates. Herein, we tackle this problem by chemically coating functional polymers, polyacrylamide, on butterfly wing scales which have hierarchical photonic structures. As a result of the combination of the strong water absorption properties of the polyacrylamide and the PC structures of the butterfly wing scales, the designed materials demonstrated excellent humidity

  1. Structure and mechanical properties of liquid crystalline filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, Alexey; Nemes, Alexandru; Stannarius, Ralf; Schulz, Mario; Nadasi, Hajnalka; Weissflog, Wolfgang

    2005-03-01

    The formation of stable freely suspended filaments is an interesting peculiarity of some liquid crystal phases. So far, little is known about their structure and stability. Similarly to free-standing smectic films, an internal molecular structure of the mesophase stabilizes these macroscopically well-ordered objects with length to diameter ratios of 10{sup 3} and above. In this paper, we report observations of smectic liquid crystal fibers formed by bent-shaped molecules in different mesophases. Our study, employing several experimental techniques, focuses on mechanical and structural aspects of fiber formation such as internal structure, stability, and mechanical and optical properties.

  2. Impulse Response Operators for Structural Complexes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-12

    systems of the complex. The statistical energy analysis (SEA) is one such a device [ 13, 14]. The rendering of SEA from equation (21) and/or (25) lies...Propagation.] 13. L. Cremer, M. Heckl, and E.E. Ungar 1973 Structure-Borne Sound (Springer Verlag). 14. R. H. Lyon 1975 Statistical Energy Analysis of

  3. Nano-hierarchical structure and electromechanical coupling properties of clamshell.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zeng, Kaiyang

    2012-10-01

    Electromechanical coupling is a nearly universal property of biomaterials, and may play an important role in many physiological and functional phenomena. The intrinsic or externally-generated electric field within biomaterials may also contribute to their predominant mechanical properties. Mollusc shells are well known for their outstanding mechanical properties, which are generally believed to originate from their hierarchical structures in multi-levels. This paper is therefore focused on the studies of the hierarchical structures and electromechanical coupling behaviors of clamshell from micro- to nano-levels, and in particular, the biopolymer concentrated regions. Detailed studies are performed to characterize the piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties of clamshell. It was found that the piezoresponse of clamshell is originated from the biopolymers between the mineral grains, as well as those intercalated within the mineral crystalline structure after the biomineralization process. Local ferroelectric hysteresis loops of clamshell have also been observed and analyzed on the samples with different orientations, biopolymer contents, or moisture contents. It is believed that the overall functioning of the clamshell or even other mollusc shells may incorporate many mechanisms interacting together, rather than originate from the hierarchical structure alone. This study of the electromechanical coupling effects of clamshell can be a path to have more comprehensive understandings of the properties and behaviors of mollusc shells.

  4. Design and fabrication of planar structures with graded electromagnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Brandon Lowell

    Successfully integrating electromagnetic properties in planar structures offers numerous benefits to the microwave and optical communities. This work aims at formulating new analytic and optimized design methods, creating new fabrication techniques for achieving those methods, and matching appropriate implementation of methods to fabrication techniques. The analytic method consists of modifying an approach that realizes perfect antireflective properties from graded profiles. This method is shown for all-dielectric and magneto-dielectric grading profiles. The optimized design methods are applied to transformer (discrete) or taper (continuous) designs. From these methods, a subtractive and an additive manufacturing technique were established and are described. The additive method, dry powder dot deposition, enables three dimensional varying electromagnetic properties in a structural composite. Combining the methods and fabrication is shown in two applied methodologies. The first uses dry powder dot deposition to design one dimensionally graded electromagnetic profiles in a planar fiberglass composite. The second method simultaneously applies antireflective properties and adjusts directivity through a slab through the use of subwavelength structures to achieve a flat antireflective lens. The end result of this work is a complete set of methods, formulations, and fabrication techniques to achieve integrated electromagnetic properties in planar structures.

  5. Structural phase transition and electronic properties of NdBi

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Ashvini K.; Patiya, Jagdish; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2015-06-24

    The structural and electronic properties of NdBi from an electronic structure calculation have been presented. The calculation is performed using self-consistent tight binding linear muffin tin orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA). The calculated equilibrium structural parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental results. It is found that this compound shows metallic behavior under ambient condition and undergoes a structural phase transition from the NaCl structure to the CsCl structure at the pressure 20.1 GPa. The electronic structures of NdBi under pressure are investigated. It is found that NdBi have metallization and the hybridizations of atoms in NdBi under pressure become stronger.

  6. Folding/Unfolding Properties of Metal Foils in Transformable Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daming, Nie; Zhen, Lu; Kaifeng, Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Transformable structures are widely applied in the aerospace, temporary facilities, etc. Compared to the structures made of polyester materials, the metal foil ones occupy many special advantages while have been rarely investigated. In this study, a series of transformable structures made of four different metal materials, 6065 Al, copper, TA1 and SUS 304 stainless steel, with thickness of 0.1 mm were prepared. Moreover, the folding (i.e., compressing the structure to the lowest height with external force) and unfolding (i.e., extending the structure to the largest height with external force) behaviors of these structures were exhibited and explained by experiments. Besides, the differences and corresponding mechanisms of various materials on the folding/unfolding properties of the structures were examined and discussed.

  7. Folding/Unfolding Properties of Metal Foils in Transformable Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daming, Nie; Zhen, Lu; Kaifeng, Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Transformable structures are widely applied in the aerospace, temporary facilities, etc. Compared to the structures made of polyester materials, the metal foil ones occupy many special advantages while have been rarely investigated. In this study, a series of transformable structures made of four different metal materials, 6065 Al, copper, TA1 and SUS 304 stainless steel, with thickness of 0.1 mm were prepared. Moreover, the folding (i.e., compressing the structure to the lowest height with external force) and unfolding (i.e., extending the structure to the largest height with external force) behaviors of these structures were exhibited and explained by experiments. Besides, the differences and corresponding mechanisms of various materials on the folding/unfolding properties of the structures were examined and discussed.

  8. Optical and mechanical properties of cellulose nanopaper structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsalagkas, Dimitrios; Zhai, Lindong; Kim, Hyun Chan; Kim, Jaehwan

    2017-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to prepare and investigate the optical and tensile properties of the obtained cellulose nanopaper structures. A ball mill mechanical pretreatment combined with a wet pulverization process by using an aqueous counter collision machine were used to extract CNFs from softwood and hardwood bleached kraft pulps. Cellulose nanofiber (CNF) nanopapers were fabricated via vacuum filtration and oven drying method. The mechanical and optical properties of the fabricated nanopaper were investigated by using tensile test and UV-vis spectrometer. Results have shown that the softwood sample demonstrated better mechanical properties than the hardwood sample. UV-vis transmittance measurements did not indicate significant differences.

  9. Fire Response of Geopolymer Structural Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    The fire response of a potassium aluminosilicate matrix ( geopolymer ) carbon fiber composite was measured and the results compared to organic matrix...laminates ignited readily and released appreciable heat and smoke, while carbon-fiber reinforced geopolymer composites did not ignite, burn, or release...any smoke even after extended heat flux exposure. The geopolymer matrix carbon fiber composite retains sixty-three percent of its original 245 MPa flexural strength after a simulated large fire exposure. (MM)

  10. Structural and luminescent properties of electron-irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, N. A.; Loshachenko, A. S.; Aruev, P. N.; Kalyadin, A. E.; Shek, E. I.; Zabrodskiy, V. V.; Shtel'makh, K. F.; Vdovin, V. I.; Xiang, Luelue; Yang, Deren

    2014-02-21

    Structural defects induced by electron irradiation of p-Cz-Si wafers were identified. The influence of the annealing conditions in a chlorine-containing atmosphere on the structural and luminescent properties of the samples was examined. Light-emitting diodes based on electron-irradiated and high-temperature-annealed wafers were fabricated by a vapour-phase epitaxy technique and their luminescence properties were studied. A high-intensity dislocation-related D1 line was observed at 1.6 μm in the room-temperature electroluminescence spectrum.

  11. The Structure, Functions, and Mechanical Properties of Keratin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKittrick, J.; Chen, P.-Y.; Bodde, S. G.; Yang, W.; Novitskaya, E. E.; Meyers, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Keratin is one of the most important structural proteins in nature and is widely found in the integument in vertebrates. It is classified into two types: α-helices and β-pleated sheets. Keratinized materials can be considered as fiber-reinforced composites consisting of crystalline intermediate filaments embedded in an amorphous protein matrix. They have a wide variety of morphologies and properties depending on different functions. Here, we review selected keratin-based materials, such as skin, hair, wool, quill, horn, hoof, feather, and beak, focusing on the structure-mechanical property-function relationships and finally give some insights on bioinspired composite design based on keratinized materials.

  12. Structure and properties of molten oxide-salt clinkers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, T.V.; Osokin, A.P.; Potapova, E.N.; Burygin, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    The change in the structure and properties of a eutectic clinker solution is determined in the presence of individual and complexes of alkali and halogen-containing additions. It is shown that the structure of the modified alloys depends upon the acid-base properties of the dissolving ions, whereas the nature of the modifying effect depends upon the displacement of the acid-base equilibrium in the melt. The principles governing the changes in the viscosity and surface tension of the clinker liquid as a function of the nature and concentration of the modifiers can be used for predicting the kinetics of liquid-phase sintering of raw Portland cement mixtures.

  13. Electrical properties and applications of carbon nanotube structures.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Prabhakar R

    2007-01-01

    The experimentally verified electrical properties of carbon nanotube structures and manifestations in related phenomena such as thermoelectricity, superconductivity, electroluminescence, and photoconductivity are reviewed. The possibility of using naturally formed complex nanotube morphologies, such as Y-junctions, for new device architectures are then considered. Technological applications of the electrical properties of nanotube derived structures in transistor applications, high frequency nanoelectronics, field emission, and biological sensing are then outlined. The review concludes with an outlook on the technological potential of nanotubes and the need for new device architectures for nanotube systems integration.

  14. Structural and luminescent properties of electron-irradiated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, N. A.; Aruev, P. N.; Kalyadin, A. E.; Shek, E. I.; Zabrodskiy, V. V.; Loshachenko, A. S.; Shtel`makh, K. F.; Vdovin, V. I.; Xiang, Luelue; Yang, Deren

    2014-02-01

    Structural defects induced by electron irradiation of p-Cz-Si wafers were identified. The influence of the annealing conditions in a chlorine-containing atmosphere on the structural and luminescent properties of the samples was examined. Light-emitting diodes based on electron-irradiated and high-temperature-annealed wafers were fabricated by a vapour-phase epitaxy technique and their luminescence properties were studied. A high-intensity dislocation-related D1 line was observed at 1.6 μm in the room-temperature electroluminescence spectrum.

  15. Hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of remineralized dentin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Wang, Jianming; Sun, Jian; Mao, Caiyun; Wang, Wei; Pan, Haihua; Tang, Ruikang; Gu, Xinhua

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the mechanical properties of dentin are significantly determined by its hierarchical structure. The current correlation between the mechanical properties and the hierarchical structure was mainly established by studying altered forms of dentin, which limits the potential outcome of the research. In this study, dentins with three different hierarchical structures were obtained via two different remineralization procedures and at different remineralization stages: (1) a dentin structure with amorphous minerals incorporated into the collagen fibrils, (2) a dentin with crystallized nanominerals incorporated into the collagen fibrils, and (3) a dentin with an out-of-order mineral layer filling the collagen fibrils matrix. Nanoindentation tests were performed to investigate the mechanical behavior of the remineralized dentin slides. The results showed that the incorporation of the crystallized nanominerals into the acid-etched demineralized organic fibrils resulted in a remarkable improvement of the mechanical properties of the dentin. In contrast, for the other two structures, i.e. the amorphous minerals inside the collagen fibrils and the out-of-order mineral layer within the collagen fibrils matrix, the excellent mechanical properties of dentin could not be restored. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Structure-Property Relationships of Solids in Pharmaceutical Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattoraj, Sayantan

    Pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of solid dosage forms is witnessing a seismic shift in the recent years. In contrast to the earlier days when drug development was empirical, now there is a significant emphasis on a more scientific and structured development process, primarily driven by the Quality-by-Design (QbD) initiatives of US Food and Drug Administration (US-FDA). Central to such an approach is the enhanced understanding of solid materials using the concept of Materials Science Tetrahedron (MST) that probes the interplay between four elements, viz., the structure, properties, processing, and performance of materials. In this thesis work, we have investigated the relationships between the structure and those properties of pharmaceutical solids that influence their processing behavior. In all cases, we have used material-sparing approaches to facilitate property assessment using very small sample size of materials, which is a pre-requisite in the early stages of drug development when the availability of materials, drugs in particular, is limited. The influence of solid structure, either at the molecular or bulk powder levels, on crystal plasticity and powder compaction, powder flow, and solid-state amorphization during milling, has been investigated in this study. Through such a systematic evaluation, we have captured the involvement of structure-property correlations within a wide spectrum of relevant processing behaviors of pharmaceutical solids. Such a holistic analysis will be beneficial for addressing both regulatory and scientific issues in drug development.

  17. Peak earthquake response of structures under multi-component excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jianwei; Liang, Zach; Chu, Yi-Lun; Lee, George C.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate estimation of the peak seismic responses of structures is important in earthquake resistant design. The internal force distributions and the seismic responses of structures are quite complex, since ground motions are multi-directional. One key issue is the uncertainty of the incident angle between the directions of ground motion and the reference axes of the structure. Different assumed seismic incidences can result in different peak values within the scope of design spectrum analysis for a given structure and earthquake ground motion record combination. Using time history analysis to determine the maximum structural responses excited by a given earthquake record requires repetitive calculations to determine the critical incident angle. This paper presents a transformation approach for relatively accurate and rapid determination of the maximum peak responses of a linear structure subjected to three-dimensional excitations within all possible seismic incident angles. The responses can be deformations, internal forces, strains and so on. An irregular building structure model is established using SAP2000 program. Several typical earthquake records and an artificial white noise are applied to the structure model to illustrate the variation of the maximum structural responses for different incident angles. Numerical results show that for many structural parameters, the variation can be greater than 100%. This method can be directly applied to time history analysis of structures using existing computer software to determine the peak responses without carrying out the analyses for all possible incident angles. It can also be used to verify and/or modify aseismic designs by using response spectrum analysis.

  18. Stimulus-responsive hydrogels made from biosynthetic fibrinogen conjugates for tissue engineering: structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Frisman, Ilya; Shachaf, Yonatan; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2011-06-07

    Nanostructured hydrogels based on "smart" polymer conjugates of poloxamers and protein molecules were developed in order to form stimulus-responsive materials with bioactive properties for 3-D cell culture. Functionalized Pluronic F127 was covalently attached to a fibrinopeptide backbone and cross-linked into a structurally versatile and mechanically stable polymer network endowed with bioactivity and temperature-responsive structural features. Small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy combined with rheology were used to characterize the structural and mechanical features of this biosynthetic conjugate, both in solution and in hydrogel form. The temperature at which the chemical cross-linking of F127-fibrinopeptide conjugates was initiated had a profound influence on the mechanical properties of the thermo-responsive hydrogel. The analysis of the scattering data revealed modification in the structure of the protein backbone resulting from increases in ambient temperature, whereas the structure of the polymer was not affected by ambient temperature. The hydrogel cross-linking temperature also had a major influence on the modulus of the hydrogel, which was rationally correlated to the molecular structure of the polymer network. The hydrogel structure exhibited a small mesh size when cross-linked at low temperatures and a larger mesh size when cross-linked at higher temperatures. The mesh size was nicely correlated to the mechanical properties of the hydrogels at the respective cross-linking temperatures. The schematic charts that model this material's behavior help to illustrate the relationship that exists between the molecular structure, the cross-linking temperature, and the temperature-responsive features for this class of protein-polymer conjugates. The precise control over structural and mechanical properties that can be achieved with this bioactive hydrogel material is essential in designing a tissue-engineering scaffold for clinical

  19. Directionally Solidified Biopolymer Scaffolds: Mechanical Properties and Endothelial Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Meghri, Nichols W.; Donius, Amalie E.; Riblett, Benjamin W.; Martin, Elizabeth J.; Clyne, Alisa Morss; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.

    2011-01-01

    Vascularization is a primary challenge in tissue engineering. To achieve it in a tissue scaffold, an environment with the appropriate structural, mechanical, and biochemical cues must be provided enabling endothelial cells to direct blood vessel growth. While biochemical stimuli such as growth factors can be added through the scaffold material, the culture medium, or both, a well-designed tissue engineering scaffold is required to provide the necessary local structural and mechanical cues. As chitosan is a well-known carrier for biochemical stimuli, the focus of this study was on structure-property correlations, to evaluate the effects of composition and processing conditions on the three-dimensional architecture and properties of freeze-cast scaffolds; to establish whether freeze-cast scaffolds are promising candidates as constructs promoting vascularization; and to conduct initial tissue culture studies with endothelial cells on flat substrates of identical compositions as those of the scaffolds to test whether these are biocompatible and promote cell attachment and proliferation. PMID:21544225

  20. Directionally solidified biopolymer scaffolds: Mechanical properties and endothelial cell responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghri, Nicholas W.; Donius, Amalie E.; Riblett, Benjamin W.; Martin, Elizabeth J.; Clyne, Alisa Morss; Wegst, Ulrike G. K.

    2010-07-01

    Vascularization is a primary challenge in tissue engineering. To achieve it in a tissue scaffold, an environment with the appropriate structural, mechanical, and biochemical cues must be provided enabling endothelial cells to direct blood vessel growth. While biochemical stimuli such as growth factors can be added through the scaffold material, the culture medium, or both, a well-designed tissue engineering scaffold is required to provide the necessary local structural and mechanical cues. As chitosan is a well-known carrier for biochemical stimuli, the focus of this study was on structure-property correlations, to evaluate the effects of composition and processing conditions on the three-dimensional architecture and properties of freeze-cast scaffolds; to establish whether freeze-east scaffolds are promising candidates as constructs promoting vascularization; and to conduct initial tissue culture studies with endothelial cells on flat substrates of identical compositions as those of the scaffolds to test whether these are biocompatible and promote cell attachment and proliferation.

  1. Directionally Solidified Biopolymer Scaffolds: Mechanical Properties and Endothelial Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Meghri, Nichols W; Donius, Amalie E; Riblett, Benjamin W; Martin, Elizabeth J; Clyne, Alisa Morss; Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2010-07-01

    Vascularization is a primary challenge in tissue engineering. To achieve it in a tissue scaffold, an environment with the appropriate structural, mechanical, and biochemical cues must be provided enabling endothelial cells to direct blood vessel growth. While biochemical stimuli such as growth factors can be added through the scaffold material, the culture medium, or both, a well-designed tissue engineering scaffold is required to provide the necessary local structural and mechanical cues. As chitosan is a well-known carrier for biochemical stimuli, the focus of this study was on structure-property correlations, to evaluate the effects of composition and processing conditions on the three-dimensional architecture and properties of freeze-cast scaffolds; to establish whether freeze-cast scaffolds are promising candidates as constructs promoting vascularization; and to conduct initial tissue culture studies with endothelial cells on flat substrates of identical compositions as those of the scaffolds to test whether these are biocompatible and promote cell attachment and proliferation.

  2. 41 CFR 102-75.955 - Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... decontaminating excess and surplus real property? 102-75.955 Section 102-75.955 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Management of Excess and Surplus Real Property Decontamination § 102-75.955 Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property? The landholding agency is...

  3. 41 CFR 102-75.955 - Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... decontaminating excess and surplus real property? 102-75.955 Section 102-75.955 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Management of Excess and Surplus Real Property Decontamination § 102-75.955 Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property? The landholding agency is...

  4. 41 CFR 102-75.955 - Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... decontaminating excess and surplus real property? 102-75.955 Section 102-75.955 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Management of Excess and Surplus Real Property Decontamination § 102-75.955 Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property? The landholding agency is...

  5. 41 CFR 102-75.955 - Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... decontaminating excess and surplus real property? 102-75.955 Section 102-75.955 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Management of Excess and Surplus Real Property Decontamination § 102-75.955 Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property? The landholding agency is...

  6. 41 CFR 102-75.955 - Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... decontaminating excess and surplus real property? 102-75.955 Section 102-75.955 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Management of Excess and Surplus Real Property Decontamination § 102-75.955 Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property? The landholding agency is...

  7. Formation, Structure and Properties of Amorphous Carbon Char from Polymer Materials in Extreme Atmospheric Reentry Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous carbonaceous char produced from the pyrolysis of polymer solids has many desirable properties for ablative heat shields for space vehicles. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented to study the transformation of the local atomic structure from virgin polymer to a dense, disordered char [1]. Release of polymer hydrogen is found to be critical to allow the system to collapse into a highly coordinated char structure. Mechanisms of the char formation process and the morphology of the resulting structures are elucidated. Thermal conductivity and mechanical response of the resulting char are evaluated [2]. During reenty, the optical response and oxidative reactivity of char are also important properties. Results of ab initio computations of char optical functions [3] and char reactivity [4] are also presented.

  8. Transport properties of ribbon-shaped carbon fibers: Property-structure relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Nidia Constanza

    Mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers are an ideal material for applications in which high rates of heat dissipation and low mass are required. Unfortunately, the high cost of current commercial high thermal conductivity mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers has limited their use in high volume applications. Understanding how the structure develops during the fiber formation process and how this structure relates to the final fiber properties is the way to optimizing the fiber properties while reducing the processing costs. Ribbon-shaped fibers have been developed at Clemson University and are being evaluated as a low-cost high thermal conductivity alternative fiber to traditional round-shaped fibers. However, the characterization of the thermal transport properties of carbon fibers is a difficult and time-consuming process. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the transport (both thermal and electronic) properties of ribbon-shaped fibers produced from an AR mesophase at different processing conditions, to characterize the structure of these fibers, to study their structure-property relationships, and to develop a model capable of estimating the thermal conductivity of carbon fibers based upon their structural parameters. For this purpose, several sets of ribbon fibers were produced from an AR mesophase at different spinning temperatures and shear rates and heat treated at a final temperature of 2400°C. The electrical resistivities, magnetoresistances and thermal conductivities of these fibers were measured and the structural parameters were determined with x-ray techniques. Two approaches (a short-fiber composite, and a periodic composite) were utilized to model the relationship between the structure of the fiber and its thermal conductivity. The results of this study confirmed that ribbon-shaped fibers develop excellent transport properties at lower graphitization temperatures than those used commercially for round-shaped fibers. Additionally, for the first

  9. Radar response from vegetation with nodal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.; Oneill, P. E.

    1984-01-01

    Radar images from the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) produced unusually high returns from corn and sorghum fields, which seem to indicate a correlation between nodal separation in the stalk and the wavelength of the radar. These images also show no difference in return from standing or harvested corn. Further investigation using images from the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A) substantiated these observations and showed a degradation of the high return with time after harvest. From portions of corn and sweet sorghum stalks that were sampled to measure stalk water content, it was determined that near and after maturity the water becomes more concentrated in the stalk nodes. The stalk then becomes a linear sequence of alternating dielectrics as opposed to a long slender cylinder with uniform dielectric properties.

  10. Aeroelastic Stability and Response of Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Reddy, Tondapu

    2004-01-01

    A summary of the work performed under NASA grant is presented. More details can be found in the cited references. This grant led to the development of relatively faster aeroelastic analysis methods for predicting flutter and forced response in fans, compressors, and turbines using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods. These methods are based on linearized two- and three-dimensional, unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamic equations. During the period of the grant, aeroelastic analysis that includes the effects of uncertainties in the design variables has also been developed.

  11. Interply layer degradation effects on composite structural response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Williams, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    Recent research activities at NASA Lewis Research Center to computationally evaluate the effects of interply layer progressive weakening (degradation) on the structural response of a composite beam are summarized. The structural responses of interest include: (1) bending, (2) buckling, (3) free vibrations, (4) periodic excitation, and (5) impact. Finite element analysis was used for the computational evaluations. The interply layer degradation effects on the various structural responses were determined and assessed as a function of the interply layer modulus varying from 1 million psi down to 1000 psi and even lower for some limiting cases. The results obtained show that the interply layer degradation has generally negligible effects on composite structural response and, therefore, structural integrity, unless the interply layer modulus degrades to about 10,000 psi or less.

  12. Structural-mechanical and thermophysical properties of modified polyvinyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordyuk, N. A.; Bestyuk, Yu. N.; Nikitchuk, V. I.; Kolupaev, B. S.

    1991-06-01

    On the basis of a systematic investigation of the viscoelastic properties of polyvinyl chloride filled with waste from mineral fertilizer and phosphoric acid production in the form of highly dispersed phospho-gypsum, the specific heat is calculated and the energy of interaction of the structural elements of the system matrix is determined, together with the effective thermal conductivity coefficient, with allowance for energy dissipation by the elements of the structure.

  13. Spatially localized structure-function relations in the elastic properties of sheared articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, Jesse; Bonassar, Lawrence; Cohen, Itai

    2013-03-01

    Contemporary developments in therapeutic tissue engineering have been enabled by basic research efforts in the field of biomechanics. Further integration of technology in medicine requires a deeper understanding of the mechanical properties of soft biological materials and the structural origins of their response under extreme stresses and strains. Drawing on the science generated by the ``Extreme Mechanics'' community, we present experimental results on the mechanical properties of articular cartilage, a hierarchically structured soft biomaterial found in the joints of mammalian long bones. Measurements of the spatially localized structure and mechanical properties will be compared with theoretical descriptions based on networks of deformed rods, poro-visco-elasticity, and standard continuum models. Discrepancies between experiment and theory will be highlighted, and suggestions for how models can be improved will be given.

  14. Structure and physical properties of biomembranes and model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hianik, T.

    2006-12-01

    Biomembranes belong to the most important structures of the cell and the cell organels. They play not only structural role of the barrier separating the external and internal part of the membrane but contain also various functional molecules, like receptors, ionic channels, carriers and enzymes. The cell membrane also preserves non-equillibrium state in a cell which is crucial for maintaining its excitability and other signaling functions. The growing interest to the biomembranes is also due to their unique physical properties. From physical point of view the biomembranes, that are composed of lipid bilayer into which are incorporated integral proteins and on their surface are anchored peripheral proteins and polysaccharides, represent liquid scrystal of smectic type. The biomembranes are characterized by anisotropy of structural and physical properties. The complex structure of biomembranes makes the study of their physical properties rather difficult. Therefore several model systems that mimic the structure of biomembranes were developed. Among them the lipid monolayers at an air-water interphase, bilayer lipid membranes (BLM), supported bilayer lipid membranes (sBLM) and liposomes are most known. This work is focused on the introduction into the "physical word" of the biomembranes and their models. After introduction to the membrane structure and the history of its establishment, the physical properties of the biomembranes and their models areare stepwise presented. The most focus is on the properties of lipid monolayers, BLM, sBLM and liposomes that were most detailed studied. This contribution has tutorial character that may be usefull for undergraduate and graduate students in the area of biophysics, biochemistry, molecular biology and bioengineering, however it contains also original work of the author and his co-worker and PhD students, that may be usefull also for specialists working in the field of biomembranes and model membranes.

  15. Structure-property relations in engineered semiconductor nanomaterials (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Htoon, Han

    2016-09-01

    Particle-size or `quantum-confinement' effects have been used for decades to tune semiconductor opto-electronic properties. More recently, particle size control as the primary means for properties control has been succeeded by nanoscale hetero-structuring. In this case, the nanosized particle is modified to include internal, nanoscale interfaces, generally defined by compositional variations that induce additional changes to semiconductor properties. These changes can entail enhancements to the size-induced properties as well as unexpected or `emergent' behaviors. Common structural motifs include enveloping a spherical semiconductor nanocrystal, i.e., a quantum dot, within a shell of a different composition. In this talk, I will discuss how solution-phase synthesis can be used to create these structures with precisely `engineered' complexity. Most notably, I will review our experiences with so-called `giant' quantum dots that, due to their internal nanoscale structure, exhibit a range of novel behaviors, including being non-blinking and non-photobleaching (Chen et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 5026; Ghosh et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 9634; Dennis et al. Nano Lett. 2012 12, 5545; Acharya et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 3755), and remarkably efficient emitters of `multi-excitons' due to extreme suppression of Auger recombination (Mangum et al. Nanoscale 2014, 6, 3712; Gao et al. Adv. Optical Mater. 2015, 3, 39). I will discuss recent work extending non-blinking behavior to the blue/green and "dual-color" emission, and show how correlated optical/structural characterization can reveal new information regarding structure-property relations to guide new nanomaterials development (Orfield et al. ACS Nano, Article ASAP).

  16. An Analytical Solution for Transient Thermal Response of an Insulated Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical solution was derived for the transient response of an insulated aerospace vehicle structure subjected to a simplified heat pulse. This simplified problem approximates the thermal response of a thermal protection system of an atmospheric entry vehicle. The exact analytical solution is solely a function of two non-dimensional parameters. A simpler function of these two parameters was developed to approximate the maximum structural temperature over a wide range of parameter values. Techniques were developed to choose constant, effective properties to represent the relevant temperature and pressure-dependent properties for the insulator and structure. A technique was also developed to map a time-varying surface temperature history to an equivalent square heat pulse. Using these techniques, the maximum structural temperature rise was calculated using the analytical solutions and shown to typically agree with finite element simulations within 10 to 20 percent over the relevant range of parameters studied.

  17. Structural Properties of Prokaryotic Promoter Regions Correlate with Functional Features

    PubMed Central

    Meysman, Pieter; Collado-Vides, Julio; Morett, Enrique; Viola, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The structural properties of the DNA molecule are known to play a critical role in transcription. In this paper, the structural profiles of promoter regions were studied within the context of their diversity and their function for eleven prokaryotic species; Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella Typhimurium, Pseudomonas auroginosa, Geobacter sulfurreducens Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Synechocystis sp., Synechoccocus elongates, Bacillus anthracis, and the archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus. The main anchor point for these promoter regions were transcription start sites identified through high-throughput experiments or collected within large curated databases. Prokaryotic promoter regions were found to be less stable and less flexible than the genomic mean across all studied species. However, direct comparison between species revealed differences in their structural profiles that can not solely be explained by the difference in genomic GC content. In addition, comparison with functional data revealed that there are patterns in the promoter structural profiles that can be linked to specific functional loci, such as sigma factor regulation or transcription factor binding. Interestingly, a novel structural element clearly visible near the transcription start site was found in genes associated with essential cellular functions and growth in several species. Our analyses reveals the great diversity in promoter structural profiles both between and within prokaryotic species. We observed relationships between structural diversity and functional features that are interesting prospects for further research to yet uncharacterized functional loci defined by DNA structural properties. PMID:24516674

  18. Structural properties of prokaryotic promoter regions correlate with functional features.

    PubMed

    Meysman, Pieter; Collado-Vides, Julio; Morett, Enrique; Viola, Roberto; Engelen, Kristof; Laukens, Kris

    2014-01-01

    The structural properties of the DNA molecule are known to play a critical role in transcription. In this paper, the structural profiles of promoter regions were studied within the context of their diversity and their function for eleven prokaryotic species; Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella Typhimurium, Pseudomonas auroginosa, Geobacter sulfurreducens Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Synechocystis sp., Synechoccocus elongates, Bacillus anthracis, and the archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus. The main anchor point for these promoter regions were transcription start sites identified through high-throughput experiments or collected within large curated databases. Prokaryotic promoter regions were found to be less stable and less flexible than the genomic mean across all studied species. However, direct comparison between species revealed differences in their structural profiles that can not solely be explained by the difference in genomic GC content. In addition, comparison with functional data revealed that there are patterns in the promoter structural profiles that can be linked to specific functional loci, such as sigma factor regulation or transcription factor binding. Interestingly, a novel structural element clearly visible near the transcription start site was found in genes associated with essential cellular functions and growth in several species. Our analyses reveals the great diversity in promoter structural profiles both between and within prokaryotic species. We observed relationships between structural diversity and functional features that are interesting prospects for further research to yet uncharacterized functional loci defined by DNA structural properties.

  19. Quantum-walk transport properties on graphene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougroura, Hamza; Aissaoui, Habib; Chancellor, Nicholas; Kendon, Viv

    2016-12-01

    We present numerical studies of quantum walks on C60 and related graphene structures to investigate their transport properties. Also known as a honeycomb lattice, the lattice formed by carbon atoms in the graphene phase can be rolled up to form nanotubes of various dimensions. Graphene nanotubes have many important applications, some of which rely on their unusual electrical conductivity and related properties. Quantum walks on graphs provide an abstract setting in which to study such transport properties independent of the other chemical and physical properties of a physical substance. They can thus be used to further the understanding of mechanisms behind such properties. We find that nanotube structures are significantly more efficient in transporting a quantum walk than cycles of equivalent size, provided the symmetry of the structure is respected in how they are used. We find faster transport on zigzag nanotubes compared to armchair nanotubes, which is unexpected given that for the actual materials the armchair nanotube is metallic, while the zigzag is semiconducting.

  20. Tunable and responsive plasmonic properties of metal oxide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliron, Delia

    2015-03-01

    Degenerately doped metal oxide semiconductors, like ITO, exhibit plasmonic resonance at near and mid-infrared wavelengths tunable by varying their composition. Nanocrystals of many such materials have now been synthesized and applications are emerging that leverage the responsiveness of their localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) to electronic charging and discharging. For example, electrochromic glass that can dynamically control heat loads in buildings is under development. In biological systems, plasmonic oxide nanocrystals can act as remote sensors, where changes in their optical absorption indicates biochemical redox has occurred. Nonetheless, significant fundamental questions remain open regarding the nature of the infrared optical response in these doped oxides. Dopant impurities influence the optoelectronic properties beyond simply donating free carriers. For example, the distribution of Sn in ITO was found to dramatically influence the line shape of the LSPR and the effective electron mobility. In addition, by post-synthetically modifying carrier concentrations (through photodoping or electrochemical doping), we have observed that aliovalent doping and electronic doping each modify LSPR spectra, providing access to a broad range of tunable optical properties. Heterogeneous broadening, uncovered by single nanocrystal spectroscopy, also contributes to ensemble line shapes, complicating direct interpretation of LSPR spectra. Finally, the possibility of electric field enhancement by metal oxide LSPRs is critically examined to suggest what future applications might be on the horizon.

  1. Study of wound dressing structure and hydration/dehydration properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugão, A. B.; Machado, L. D. B.; Miranda, L. F.; Alvarez, M. R.; Rosiak, J. M.

    1998-06-01

    Hydrogels manufactured by radio-induced crosslinking and simultaneous sterilisation of hydrogels of PVP, PEG and agar, according to the Rosiak method, have many desirable properties for using as wound dressings. However, some properties need to be improved or better controlled. The membranes need to be strong enough to be freely used. Another important property to be controlled is the capacity of absorption of exudate and the kinetics of drying. Therefore, it was necessary to understand the role of main parameters (agar, PVP, PEG concentration and dose) in the structure of the net and in the hydration and dehydration properties. The structure of the membranes was studied by sol analysis and the hydrating/dehydrating properties were studied by isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. The gel content for all samples were always in agreement with expected values considering that only PVP undergoes crosslinking. The hydrating and dehydration results did not show variation with the tested parameters. It was concluded that the network was solely composed of crosslinked PVP plasticezed by the other compounds. The properties of hydration/dehydration is related rather to diffusion than to capillarity or osmose and to the chemical retention of water in the polymeric matrix.

  2. Composition, structure, physicochemical properties, and modifications of cassava starch.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan

    2015-05-20

    Cassava is highly tolerant to harsh climatic conditions and has great productivity on marginal lands. The supply of cassava starch, the major component of the root, is thus sustainable and cheap. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the composition, physical and chemical structures, physicochemical properties, nutritional quality, and modifications of cassava starch. Research opportunities to better understand this starch are provided.

  3. Structures, physicochemical properties, and applications of amaranth starch.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan

    2017-01-22

    Amaranth as a rediscovered "new" crop is becoming a research focus in the recent two decades. The major carbohydrate of some amaranth species is starch, which accounts up to around 60% of the dry grains. This review summarizes the present knowledge of the isolation, composition, structures, physiochemical properties, modifications, and applications of amaranth starches, and provides suggestions for research to further improve the utilization.

  4. Energetics and structural properties of twist grain boundaries in Cu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Majid

    1992-01-01

    Structural and energetics properties of atoms near a grain boundary are of great importance from theoretical and experimental standpoints. From various experimental work it is concluded that diffusion at low temperatures at polycrystalline materials take place near grain boundary. Experimental and theoretical results also indicate changes of up to 70 percent in physical properties near a grain boundary. The Embedded Atom Method (EAM) calculations on structural properties of Au twist grain boundaries are in quite good agreement with their experimental counterparts. The EAM is believed to predict reliable values for the single vacancy formation energy as well as migration energy. However, it is not clear whether the EAM functions which are fitted to the bulk properties of a perfect crystalline solid can produce reliable results on grain boundaries. One of the objectives of this work is to construct the EAM functions for Cu and use them in conjunction with the molecular static simulation to study structures and energetics of atoms near twist grain boundaries in Cu. This provides tests of the EAM functions near a grain boundary. In particular, we determine structure, single vacancy formation energy, migration energy, single vacancy activation energy, and interlayer spacing as a function of distance from grain boundary. Our results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results from grain boundaries and bulk.

  5. Structure and electronic properties of lead-selenide nanocrystal solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitham, Kevin

    Recent advances in the controlled formation of nanocrystal superlattices have potential for creating materials with properties by design. The ability to tune nanocrystal size, shape and composition as well as symmetry of the superlattice opens routes to new materials. Calculations of such materials predict interesting electronic phenomena including topological states and Dirac cones, however experimental support is lacking. We have investigated electron localization in nanocrystal superlattices using a combination of advanced structural characterization techniques and charge transport measurements. Recent experimental efforts to improve the electronic properties of nanocrystal solids have focused on increasing inter-dot coupling. However, this approach only leads to electronic bands if the coupling energy can overcome energetic and translational disorder. We have investigated oriented-attachment as a method to create nanocrystal superlattices with increased coupling and translational order. We show that epitaxially connected superlattices form by a coherent phase transformation that is sensitive to structural defects and ligand length. In order to measure intrinsic electronic properties we demonstrate control over electronic defects by tailoring surface chemistry and device architecture. To probe charge transport in these structures we performed variable temperature field-effect measurements. By integrating structure analysis, surface chemistry, and transport measurements we find that carriers are localized to a few superlattice constants due to disorder. Importantly, our analysis shows that greater delocalization is possible by optimizing dot-to-dot bonding, thus providing a path forward to create quantum dot solids in which theoretically predicted properties can be realized.

  6. Structure and properties of nitrides on the surface of collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, M. M.; Grebenshchikova, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    A study of the structure and composition of titanium and hafnium nitride coatings, deposited by condensation from plasma phase, on the leather by methods of scanning electron microscopy and x-ray fluorescence analysis. Nanostructured nitride coatings don’t degrade the properties of the leather and also inhibits the growth of pathogenic microflora and slow the migration of chromium ions.

  7. Structure-property considerations in the development of biolubricants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vegetable oils and their derivatives such as alkyl esters of various fatty acids are good candidates for the development of biolubricants. These materials possess structures that gives them certain highly desirable properties for lubricant applications than that found in petroleum-based oil. Among s...

  8. Biobased oil structure on amphiphilic and tribological properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biobased oils are those derived from farm-based renewable raw materials. Most are vegetable oils (such as soybean, canola, corn, etc.) or chemical modifications of vegetable oils. They have a number of interesting structural features that impact their amphiphilic and lubrication properties. The basi...

  9. Carbon aerogels: An update on structure, properties, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Mayer, S.T.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Kong, F.M.

    1993-07-01

    Aerogels are unique porous materials whose composition, structure, and properties can be controlled at the nanometer scale. This paper examines the synthesis of organic aerogels and their carbonized derivatives. Carbon aerogels have low electrical resistivity, high surface area, and a tunable pore size. These materials are finding applications as electrodes in double layer capacitors.

  10. Structural and magnetic properties of CrSb compounds: NiAs structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polesya, S.; Kuhn, G.; Mankovsky, S.; Ebert, H.; Regus, M.; Bensch, W.

    2012-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of CrSb compounds with NiAs structure have been studied by means of the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) band structure method. An analysis of the structural and magnetic stability has been performed on the basis of total energy calculations for various magnetic states. The magnetic properties at finite temperature have been investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations on the basis of a classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian and the exchange coupling parameters calculated from first principles. This approach allowed us to determine the critical temperature in good agreement with experiment.

  11. Structural and magnetic properties of CrSb compounds: NiAs structure.

    PubMed

    Polesya, S; Kuhn, G; Mankovsky, S; Ebert, H; Regus, M; Bensch, W

    2012-01-25

    The structural and magnetic properties of CrSb compounds with NiAs structure have been studied by means of the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) band structure method. An analysis of the structural and magnetic stability has been performed on the basis of total energy calculations for various magnetic states. The magnetic properties at finite temperature have been investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations on the basis of a classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian and the exchange coupling parameters calculated from first principles. This approach allowed us to determine the critical temperature in good agreement with experiment.

  12. Structural Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Semiconductor Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Continenza, Alessandra

    1990-01-01

    This work is focussed on the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of semiconductor interfaces. The issues and the interest involved in these particular systems are various and have engaged both the scientific and the technological community for more than three decades. The technological interest toward semiconductors is obviously related to device applications while the scientific interest is mainly focussed on the understanding of some characteristic properties, such as potential barriers, carrier properties and band gaps, and how these can be modified by changing different external factors, such as epitaxial growth, strain effects, junctions and doping. A complete knowledge and understanding of these complex issues is, in fact, the basic requirement necessary in order to achieve the ability to "tune" basic properties "at will" and designing the "ad hoc" material for each different device application. We have performed a study of the magnetic, structural and electronic properties of a few particular examples of semiconductor interfaces and heterojunctions namely, rm Fe_{n}/(ZnSe)_ {m}, rm(InAs)_{n }/(InP)_{n} and rm( alpha-Sn)_{n}/(CdTe)_{n }, using the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method. Together with a study of the interface properties, we present results of calculations performed on all the pure constituents, in order to provide comparisons and to better understand how the bulk properties are modified by the interface. In particular, we have analyzed how the properties of these structures can be tailored by changing quantities such as the superlattice periodicity, the epitaxial strain and the interface morphology. We found that the relevance of these factors changes depending on the particular material under study and that it is possible, indeed, to model the characteristics electronic and transport properties of each structure by properly tuning the growth conditions. Our results are in very good agreement with

  13. Universal structural parameter to quantitatively predict metallic glass properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Jun; Cheng, Yong-Qiang; Sheng, Howard; Asta, Mark; Ritchie, Robert O.; Ma, Evan

    2016-12-12

    Quantitatively correlating the amorphous structure in metallic glasses (MGs) with their physical properties has been a long-sought goal. Here we introduce flexibility volume' as a universal indicator, to bridge the structural state the MG is in with its properties, on both atomic and macroscopic levels. The flexibility volume combines static atomic volume with dynamics information via atomic vibrations that probe local configurational space and interaction between neighbouring atoms. We demonstrate that flexibility volume is a physically appropriate parameter that can quantitatively predict the shear modulus, which is at the heart of many key properties of MGs. Moreover, the new parameter correlates strongly with atomic packing topology, and also with the activation energy for thermally activated relaxation and the propensity for stress-driven shear transformations. These correlations are expected to be robust across a very wide range of MG compositions, processing conditions and length scales.

  14. Universal structural parameter to quantitatively predict metallic glass properties

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Cheng, Yong-Qiang; Sheng, Howard; Asta, Mark; Ritchie, Robert O.; Ma, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Quantitatively correlating the amorphous structure in metallic glasses (MGs) with their physical properties has been a long-sought goal. Here we introduce ‘flexibility volume' as a universal indicator, to bridge the structural state the MG is in with its properties, on both atomic and macroscopic levels. The flexibility volume combines static atomic volume with dynamics information via atomic vibrations that probe local configurational space and interaction between neighbouring atoms. We demonstrate that flexibility volume is a physically appropriate parameter that can quantitatively predict the shear modulus, which is at the heart of many key properties of MGs. Moreover, the new parameter correlates strongly with atomic packing topology, and also with the activation energy for thermally activated relaxation and the propensity for stress-driven shear transformations. These correlations are expected to be robust across a very wide range of MG compositions, processing conditions and length scales. PMID:27941922

  15. Universal structural parameter to quantitatively predict metallic glass properties

    DOE PAGES

    Ding, Jun; Cheng, Yong-Qiang; Sheng, Howard; ...

    2016-12-12

    Quantitatively correlating the amorphous structure in metallic glasses (MGs) with their physical properties has been a long-sought goal. Here we introduce flexibility volume' as a universal indicator, to bridge the structural state the MG is in with its properties, on both atomic and macroscopic levels. The flexibility volume combines static atomic volume with dynamics information via atomic vibrations that probe local configurational space and interaction between neighbouring atoms. We demonstrate that flexibility volume is a physically appropriate parameter that can quantitatively predict the shear modulus, which is at the heart of many key properties of MGs. Moreover, the new parametermore » correlates strongly with atomic packing topology, and also with the activation energy for thermally activated relaxation and the propensity for stress-driven shear transformations. These correlations are expected to be robust across a very wide range of MG compositions, processing conditions and length scales.« less

  16. Universal structural parameter to quantitatively predict metallic glass properties.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Cheng, Yong-Qiang; Sheng, Howard; Asta, Mark; Ritchie, Robert O; Ma, Evan

    2016-12-12

    Quantitatively correlating the amorphous structure in metallic glasses (MGs) with their physical properties has been a long-sought goal. Here we introduce 'flexibility volume' as a universal indicator, to bridge the structural state the MG is in with its properties, on both atomic and macroscopic levels. The flexibility volume combines static atomic volume with dynamics information via atomic vibrations that probe local configurational space and interaction between neighbouring atoms. We demonstrate that flexibility volume is a physically appropriate parameter that can quantitatively predict the shear modulus, which is at the heart of many key properties of MGs. Moreover, the new parameter correlates strongly with atomic packing topology, and also with the activation energy for thermally activated relaxation and the propensity for stress-driven shear transformations. These correlations are expected to be robust across a very wide range of MG compositions, processing conditions and length scales.

  17. Universal structural parameter to quantitatively predict metallic glass properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jun; Cheng, Yong-Qiang; Sheng, Howard; Asta, Mark; Ritchie, Robert O.; Ma, Evan

    2016-12-01

    Quantitatively correlating the amorphous structure in metallic glasses (MGs) with their physical properties has been a long-sought goal. Here we introduce `flexibility volume' as a universal indicator, to bridge the structural state the MG is in with its properties, on both atomic and macroscopic levels. The flexibility volume combines static atomic volume with dynamics information via atomic vibrations that probe local configurational space and interaction between neighbouring atoms. We demonstrate that flexibility volume is a physically appropriate parameter that can quantitatively predict the shear modulus, which is at the heart of many key properties of MGs. Moreover, the new parameter correlates strongly with atomic packing topology, and also with the activation energy for thermally activated relaxation and the propensity for stress-driven shear transformations. These correlations are expected to be robust across a very wide range of MG compositions, processing conditions and length scales.

  18. Structural and electronic properties of arsenic nitrogen monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pei; Nie, Yao-zhuang; Xia, Qing-lin; Guo, Guang-hua

    2017-03-01

    We present our first-principles calculations of a new two-dimensional material, arsenic nitrogen monolayer. The structural, electronic, and mechanical properties are investigated in detail by means of density functional theory computations. The calculated binding energy and the phonon spectra demonstrate that the AsN can form stable monolayer in puckered honeycomb structure. It is a semiconductor with indirect band gap of 0.73 eV, and displays highly anisotropic mechanical properties. Strain has obvious influence on the electronic properties of AsN monolayer. It is found that in the armchair direction, a moderate compression strain (-12%) can trigger an indirect to direct band gap transition and a tensile strain of 18% can make the AsN becoming a stable metal. In the zigzag direction, a rather smaller strain than armchair direction (12% for compression and 8% for stretch) can induce the indirect band gap to metal transition.

  19. 3D lidar imaging for detecting and understanding plant responses and canopy structure.

    PubMed

    Omasa, Kenji; Hosoi, Fumiki; Konishi, Atsumi

    2007-01-01

    Understanding and diagnosing plant responses to stress will benefit greatly from three-dimensional (3D) measurement and analysis of plant properties because plant responses are strongly related to their 3D structures. Light detection and ranging (lidar) has recently emerged as a powerful tool for direct 3D measurement of plant structure. Here the use of 3D lidar imaging to estimate plant properties such as canopy height, canopy structure, carbon stock, and species is demonstrated, and plant growth and shape responses are assessed by reviewing the development of lidar systems and their applications from the leaf level to canopy remote sensing. In addition, the recent creation of accurate 3D lidar images combined with natural colour, chlorophyll fluorescence, photochemical reflectance index, and leaf temperature images is demonstrated, thereby providing information on responses of pigments, photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal opening, and shape to environmental stresses; these data can be integrated with 3D images of the plants using computer graphics techniques. Future lidar applications that provide more accurate dynamic estimation of various plant properties should improve our understanding of plant responses to stress and of interactions between plants and their environment. Moreover, combining 3D lidar with other passive and active imaging techniques will potentially improve the accuracy of airborne and satellite remote sensing, and make it possible to analyse 3D information on ecophysiological responses and levels of various substances in agricultural and ecological applications and in observations of the global biosphere.

  20. Transient Response of Continuous Elastic Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    structural member with linear hysteretic damping governed by the following equation of motion : 2 - Du(x ,t) — ~~ A~ (x)3~u(x~t) — f (x)e~~ t ( lOla ) - i—i...phase. Hence I (u,t) — 3u — i~2u(x , t) (102) which when substituted into Equation ( lOla ) yields Du(x , t) i~2A 1u + A232u — f (x)e~~ t (103) I This... ChicO of Nov.! OpIr.t1000 ‘3 9’ ~o.po.o 2e.rtn. Dept. 0 5 thC 9509’ Co...aodioI 00(1.., Cttd. r t90 Eoplo .ton 9 , . n a r c 3 710 . *4.h in

  1. Modelling of the structure-property relationships in the α-quartz structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yongtao; Alderson, Kim; Alderson, Andrew; Leng, Jinsong

    2013-04-01

    The molecular mechanism has been employed to model the structure-property relationships of auxetic material with tetrahedral framework at the atomistic level. The germania α-quartz subject uniaxial stress loading in z direction will be investigated. The strain-dependent structure and mechanical properties will be predicted from the force field based simulations, including the transformation from positive-to-negative Poisson's ratio behaviour and vice versa.

  2. Entropy model of dissipative structure on corporate social responsibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuozhi; Jiang, Jie

    2017-06-01

    Enterprise is prompted to fulfill the social responsibility requirement by the internal and external environment. In this complex system, some studies suggest that firms have an orderly or chaotic entropy exchange behavior. Based on the theory of dissipative structure, this paper constructs the entropy index system of corporate social responsibility(CSR) and explores the dissipative structure of CSR through Brusselator model criterion. Picking up listed companies of the equipment manufacturing, the research shows that CSR has positive incentive to negative entropy and promotes the stability of dissipative structure. In short, the dissipative structure of CSR has a positive impact on the interests of stakeholders and corporate social images.

  3. Band structures and localization properties of aperiodic layered phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2012-03-01

    The band structures and localization properties of in-plane elastic waves with coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes oblique propagating in aperiodic phononic crystals based on Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequences are studied. Using transfer matrix method, the concept of the localization factor is introduced and the correctness is testified through the Rytov dispersion relation. For comparison, the perfect periodic structure and the quasi-periodic Fibonacci system are also considered. In addition, the influences of the random disorder, local resonance, translational and/or mirror symmetries on the band structures of the aperiodic phononic crystals are analyzed in this paper.

  4. Calculating nonlocal optical properties of structures with arbitrary shape.

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, J. M.; Gray, S. K.; Schatz, G. C.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-07-16

    In a recent Letter [J. M. McMahon, S. K. Gray, and G. C. Schatz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 097403 (2009)], we outlined a computational method to calculate the optical properties of structures with a spatially nonlocal dielectric function. In this paper, we detail the full method and verify it against analytical results for cylindrical nanowires. Then, as examples of our method, we calculate the optical properties of Au nanostructures in one, two, and three dimensions. We first calculate the transmission, reflection, and absorption spectra of thin films. Because of their simplicity, these systems demonstrate clearly the longitudinal (or volume) plasmons characteristic of nonlocal effects, which result in anomalous absorption and plasmon blueshifting. We then study the optical properties of spherical nanoparticles, which also exhibit such nonlocal effects. Finally, we compare the maximum and average electric field enhancements around nanowires of various shapes to local theory predictions. We demonstrate that when nonlocal effects are included, significant decreases in such properties can occur.

  5. RNA intrusions change DNA elastic properties and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Koh, Kyung Duk; Evich, Marina; Lesiak, Annie L.; Germann, Markus W.; Bongiorno, Angelo; Riedo, Elisa; Storici, Francesca

    2014-08-01

    The units of RNA, termed ribonucleoside monophosphates (rNMPs), have been recently found as the most abundant defects present in DNA. Despite the relevance, it is largely unknown if and how rNMPs embedded in DNA can change the DNA structure and mechanical properties. Here, we report that rNMPs incorporated in DNA can change the elastic properties of DNA. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single molecule elasticity measurements show that rNMP intrusions in short DNA duplexes can decrease - by 32% - or slightly increase the stretch modulus of DNA molecules for two sequences reported in this study. Molecular dynamics simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy identify a series of significant local structural alterations of DNA containing embedded rNMPs, especially at the rNMPs and nucleotide 3' to the rNMP sites. The demonstrated ability of rNMPs to locally alter DNA mechanical properties and structure may help in understanding how such intrusions impact DNA biological functions and find applications in structural DNA and RNA nanotechnology.The units of RNA, termed ribonucleoside monophosphates (rNMPs), have been recently found as the most abundant defects present in DNA. Despite the relevance, it is largely unknown if and how rNMPs embedded in DNA can change the DNA structure and mechanical properties. Here, we report that rNMPs incorporated in DNA can change the elastic properties of DNA. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single molecule elasticity measurements show that rNMP intrusions in short DNA duplexes can decrease - by 32% - or slightly increase the stretch modulus of DNA molecules for two sequences reported in this study. Molecular dynamics simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy identify a series of significant local structural alterations of DNA containing embedded rNMPs, especially at the rNMPs and nucleotide 3' to the rNMP sites. The demonstrated ability of rNMPs to locally alter DNA mechanical properties and structure

  6. Cellular Responses to the Metal-Binding Properties of Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Logie, Lisa; Harthill, Jean; Patel, Kashyap; Bacon, Sandra; Hamilton, D. Lee; Macrae, Katherine; McDougall, Gordon; Wang, Huan-Huan; Xue, Lin; Jiang, Hua; Sakamoto, Kei; Prescott, Alan R.; Rena, Graham

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, the antihyperglycemic biguanide metformin has been used extensively in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, despite continuing uncertainty over its direct target. In this article, using two independent approaches, we demonstrate that cellular actions of metformin are disrupted by interference with its metal-binding properties, which have been known for over a century but little studied by biologists. We demonstrate that copper sequestration opposes known actions of metformin not only on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent signaling, but also on S6 protein phosphorylation. Biguanide/metal interactions are stabilized by extensive π-electron delocalization and by investigating analogs of metformin; we provide evidence that this intrinsic property enables biguanides to regulate AMPK, glucose production, gluconeogenic gene expression, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial copper binding. In contrast, regulation of S6 phosphorylation is prevented only by direct modification of the metal-liganding groups of the biguanide structure, supporting recent data that AMPK and S6 phosphorylation are regulated independently by biguanides. Additional studies with pioglitazone suggest that mitochondrial copper is targeted by both of these clinically important drugs. Together, these results suggest that cellular effects of biguanides depend on their metal-binding properties. This link may illuminate a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms enabling antihyperglycemic drug action. PMID:22492524

  7. Structural property of regulatory elements in human promoters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiao-Qin; Zeng, Jia; Yan, Hong

    2008-04-01

    The capacity of transcription factors to activate gene expression is encoded in the promoter sequences, which are composed of short regulatory motifs that function as transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) for specific proteins. To the best of our knowledge, the structural property of TFBSs that controls transcription is still poorly understood. Rigidity is one of the important structural properties of DNA, and plays an important role in guiding DNA-binding proteins to the target sites efficiently. After analyzing the rigidity of 2897 TFBSs in 1871 human promoters, we show that TFBSs are generally more flexible than other genomic regions such as exons, introns, 3' untranslated regions, and TFBS-poor promoter regions. Furthermore, we find that the density of TFBSs is consistent with the average rigidity profile of human promoters upstream of the transcription start site, which implies that TFBSs directly influence the promoter structure. We also examine the local rigid regions probably caused by specific TFBSs such as the DNA sequence TATA(A/T)A(A/T) box, which may inhibit nucleosomes and thereby facilitate the access of transcription factors bound nearby. Our results suggest that the structural property of TFBSs accounts for the promoter structure as well as promoter activity.

  8. Properties of Air Traffic Conflicts for Free and Structured Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilimoria, Karl D.; Lee, Hilda Q.

    2001-01-01

    This paper analyzes the properties of air traffic conflicts in a future free routing system against those in the current structured routing system. Simulation of en route air traffic operations (above 18,000 ft) over the contiguous United States for a 24-hour period, constructed with initial conditions from actual air traffic data, were conducted using the Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool (FACET). Free routes were modeled as great circle (direct) routes from origin to destination, and structured routes were derived from actual flight plans along the current system of air routes. The conflict properties analyzed in this study include: (1) Total number of conflicts; (2) Distributions of key conflict parameters; and, (3) Categorization of conflicts into independent conflicts and two types of interacting conflicts. Preliminary results (for Denver Center traffic) indicate that conflict properties in a free routing system are different from those in the current structured routing system. In particular, a free routing system has significantly fewer conflicts, involving a correspondingly smaller number of aircraft, compared to the current structured routing system. Additionally, the conflict parameter distributions indicate that free routing conflicts are less intrusive than structured routing conflicts, and would therefore require small trajectory deviations for resolution.

  9. Properties of Air Traffic Conflicts for Free and Structured Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilimoria, Karl D.; Lee, Hilda Q.

    2001-01-01

    This paper analyzes the properties of air traffic conflicts in a future free routing system against those in the current structured routing system. Simulation of en route air traffic operations (above 18,000 ft) over the contiguous United States for a 24-hour period, constructed with initial conditions from actual air traffic data, were conducted using the Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool (FACET). Free routes were modeled as great circle (direct) routes from origin to destination, and structured routes were derived from actual flight plans along the current system of air routes. The conflict properties analyzed in this study include: (1) Total number of conflicts; (2) Distributions of key conflict parameters; and, (3) Categorization of conflicts into independent conflicts and two types of interacting conflicts. Preliminary results (for Denver Center traffic) indicate that conflict properties in a free routing system are different from those in the current structured routing system. In particular, a free routing system has significantly fewer conflicts, involving a correspondingly smaller number of aircraft, compared to the current structured routing system. Additionally, the conflict parameter distributions indicate that free routing conflicts are less intrusive than structured routing conflicts, and would therefore require small trajectory deviations for resolution.

  10. The structural response of a rail acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.

    1984-01-01

    The transient response of a 0.4 by 0.6 cm rectangular bore rail accelerator was analyzed by a three dimensional finite element code. The copper rail deflected to a peak value of 0.08 mm in compression and then oscillated at an amplitude of 0.02 mm. Simultaneously the insulating side wall of glass fabric base, epoxy resin laminate (G-10) was compressed to a peak value of 0.13 mm and rebounded to a steady state in extension. Projectile pinch or blowby due to the rail extension or compression, respectively, can be identified by examining the time history of the rail displacement. The effect of blowby was most significant at the side wall characterized by mm size displacement in compression. Dynamic stress calculations indicate that the G-10 supporting material behind the rail is subjected to over 21 MPa at which the G-10 could fail if the laminate was not carefully oriented. Results for a polycarbonate resin (Lexan) side wall show much larger displacements and stresses than for G-10. The tradeoff between the transparency of Lexan and the mechanical strength of G-10 for sidewall material is obvious. Displacement calculations from the modal method are smaller than the results from the direct integration method by almost an order of magnitude, because the high frequency effect is neglected. Previously announced in STAR as N83-35412

  11. The structural response of a rail acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.

    1984-01-01

    The transient response of a 0.4 by 0.6 cm rectangular bore rail accelerator was analyzed by a three dimensional finite element code. The copper rail deflected to a peak value of 0.08 mm in compression and then oscillated at an amplitude of 0.02 mm. Simultaneously the insulating side wall of glass fabric base, epoxy resin laminate (G-10) was compressed to a peak value of 0.13 mm and rebounded to a steady state in extension. Projectile pinch or blowby due to the rail extension or compression, respectively, can be identified by examining the time history of the rail displacement. The effect of blowby was most significant at the side wall characterized by mm size displacement in compression. Dynamic stress calculations indicate that the G-10 supporting material behind the rail is subjected to over 21 MPa at which the G-10 could fail if the laminate was not carefully oriented. Results for a polycarbonate resin (Lexan) side wall show much larger displacements and stresses than for G-10. The tradeoff between the transparency of Lexan and the mechanical strength of G-10 for sidewall material is obvious. Displacement calculations from the modal method are smaller than the results from the direct integration method by almost an order of magnitude, because the high frequency effect is neglected. Previously announced in STAR as N83-35412

  12. The structural response of a rail accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The transient response of a 0.4 by 0.6 cm rectangular bore rail accelerator was analyzed by a three dimensional finite element code. The copper rail deflected to a peak value of 0.08 mm in compression and then oscillated at an amplitude of 0.02 mm. Simultaneously the insulating side wall of glass fabric base, epoxy resin laminate (G-1o) was compressed to a peak value of 0.13 mm and rebounded to a steady state in extension. Projectile pinch or blowby due to the rail extension or compression, respectively, can be identified by examining the time history of the rail displacement. The effect of blowby was most significant at the side wall characterized by mm size displacement in compression. Dynamic stress calculations indicate that the G-10 supporting material behind the rail is subjected to over 21 MPa at which the G-10 could fail if the laminate was not carefully oriented. Results for a polycarbonate resin (Lexan) side wall show much larger displacements and stresses than for G-10. The tradeoff between the transparency of Lexan and the mechanical strength of G-10 for sidewall material is obvious. Displacement calculations from the modal method are smaller than the results from the direct integration method by almost an order of magnitude, because the high frequency effect is neglected.

  13. Solar Sail Material Performance Property Response to Space Environmental Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Semmel, Charles; Hovater, Mary; Nehls, Mary; Gray, Perry; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues research into the utilization of photonic materials for spacecraft propulsion. Spacecraft propulsion, using photonic materials, will be achieved using a solar sail. A solar sail operates on the principle that photons, originating from the sun, impart pressure to the sail and therefore provide a source for spacecraft propulsion. The pressure imparted to a solar sail can be increased, up to a factor of two, if the sun-facing surface is perfectly reflective. Therefore, these solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic sun-facing layer, a thin polymeric substrate and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. Near term solar sail propelled science missions are targeting the Lagrange point 1 (Ll) as well as locations sunward of L1 as destinations. These near term missions include the Solar Polar Imager and the L1 Diamond. The Environmental Effects Group at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues to actively characterize solar sail material in preparation for these near term solar sail missions. Previous investigations indicated that space environmental effects on sail material thermo-optical properties were minimal and would not significantly affect the propulsion efficiency of the sail. These investigations also indicated that the sail material mechanical stability degrades with increasing radiation exposure. This paper will further quantify the effect of space environmental exposure on the mechanical properties of candidate sail materials. Candidate sail materials for these missions include Aluminum coated Mylar[TM], Teonex[TM], and CPl (Colorless Polyimide). These materials were subjected to uniform radiation doses of electrons and protons in individual exposures sequences. Dose values ranged from 100 Mrads to over 5 Grads. The engineering performance property responses of thermo-optical and mechanical properties were

  14. Solar Sail Material Performance Property Response to Space Environmental Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Semmel, Charles; Hovater, Mary; Nehls, Mary; Gray, Perry; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues research into the utilization of photonic materials for spacecraft propulsion. Spacecraft propulsion, using photonic materials, will be achieved using a solar sail. A solar sail operates on the principle that photons, originating from the sun, impart pressure to the sail and therefore provide a source for spacecraft propulsion. The pressure imparted to a solar sail can be increased, up to a factor of two, if the sun-facing surface is perfectly reflective. Therefore, these solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic sun-facing layer, a thin polymeric substrate and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. Near term solar sail propelled science missions are targeting the Lagrange point 1 (Ll) as well as locations sunward of L1 as destinations. These near term missions include the Solar Polar Imager and the L1 Diamond. The Environmental Effects Group at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues to actively characterize solar sail material in preparation for these near term solar sail missions. Previous investigations indicated that space environmental effects on sail material thermo-optical properties were minimal and would not significantly affect the propulsion efficiency of the sail. These investigations also indicated that the sail material mechanical stability degrades with increasing radiation exposure. This paper will further quantify the effect of space environmental exposure on the mechanical properties of candidate sail materials. Candidate sail materials for these missions include Aluminum coated Mylar[TM], Teonex[TM], and CPl (Colorless Polyimide). These materials were subjected to uniform radiation doses of electrons and protons in individual exposures sequences. Dose values ranged from 100 Mrads to over 5 Grads. The engineering performance property responses of thermo-optical and mechanical properties were

  15. Perovskite oxide nanowires: synthesis, property and structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinhua; Liu, Zhiguo; Ming, Naiben

    2010-07-01

    Perovskite oxide materials display a wide spectrum of functional properties, including switchable polarization, piezoelectricity, pyroelectricity, and non-linear dielectric behavior. These properties are indispensable for application in electronic devices such as non-volatile memories, sensors, microactuators, infrared detectors, microwave phase filters, and so on. Recent advances in science and technology of perovskite oxide materials have resulted in the feature sizes of perovskite oxides-based electronic devices entering into nanoscale dimensions. At nanoscale perovskite oxide materials exhibit a pronounced size effect manifesting itself in a significant deviation of the properties of low-dimensional structures from the bulk and film counterparts. In the last decade low-dimensional perovskite nanosized oxides have been received much attention because of their superior physical and chemical properties. Among them, perovskite oxide nanowires are especially attractive for nanoscience studies and nanotechnology applications. Compared to other low-dimensional perovskite oxide systems, perovskite oxide nanowires are not only used as the building blocks of future nanodevices, but also they offer fundamental scientific opportunities for investigating the intrinsic size effects of physical properties. In the recent years, much progress has been made both in synthesis and physical property testing of perovskite oxide nanowires, which have a profound impact on the nanoelectronics. In this work, an overview of the state of art in perovskite oxide nanowires is presented, which covers their synthesis, property, and structural characterization. In the first part, the recent literatures for fabricating perovskite oxide nanowires with promising features, are critically reviewed. The second part deals with the recent advances on the physical property testing of perovskite oxide nanowires. The third part summarizes the recent progress on microstructural characterizations of

  16. Bacterial community structure and soil properties of a subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Min; Jung, Ji Young; Yergeau, Etienne; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Hinzman, Larry; Nam, Sungjin; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ok-Sun; Chun, Jongsik; Lee, Yoo Kyung

    2014-08-01

    The subarctic region is highly responsive and vulnerable to climate change. Understanding the structure of subarctic soil microbial communities is essential for predicting the response of the subarctic soil environment to climate change. To determine the composition of the bacterial community and its relationship with soil properties, we investigated the bacterial community structure and properties of surface soil from the moist acidic tussock tundra in Council, Alaska. We collected 70 soil samples with 25-m intervals between sampling points from 0-10 cm to 10-20 cm depths. The bacterial community was analyzed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and the following soil properties were analyzed: soil moisture content (MC), pH, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-). The community compositions of the two different depths showed that Alphaproteobacteria decreased with soil depth. Among the soil properties measured, soil pH was the most significant factor correlating with bacterial community in both upper and lower-layer soils. Bacterial community similarity based on jackknifed unweighted unifrac distance showed greater similarity across horizontal layers than through the vertical depth. This study showed that soil depth and pH were the most important soil properties determining bacterial community structure of the subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.

  17. The polarization response in InAs quantum dots: theoretical correlation between composition and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Usman, Muhammad; Tasco, Vittorianna; Todaro, Maria Teresa; De Giorgi, Milena; O'Reilly, Eoin P; Klimeck, Gerhard; Passaseo, Adriana

    2012-04-27

    III-V growth and surface conditions strongly influence the physical structure and resulting optical properties of self-assembled quantum dots (QDs). Beyond the design of a desired active optical wavelength, the polarization response of QDs is of particular interest for optical communications and quantum information science. Previous theoretical studies based on a pure InAs QD model failed to reproduce experimentally observed polarization properties. In this work, multi-million atom simulations are performed in an effort to understand the correlation between chemical composition and polarization properties of QDs. A systematic analysis of QD structural parameters leads us to propose a two-layer composition model, mimicking In segregation and In-Ga intermixing effects. This model, consistent with mostly accepted compositional findings, allows us to accurately fit the experimental PL spectra. The detailed study of QD morphology parameters presented here serves as a tool for using growth dynamics to engineer the strain field inside and around the QD structures, allowing tuning of the polarization response.

  18. Structural and electronic properties of B2-CdNb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galav, K. L.; Maurya, V.; Joshi, K. B.

    2017-05-01

    The first-principles total energy calculations are coupled with the Murnaghan equation of state to predict lattice constant and the bulk modulus of hypothetical B2 crystal structure of CdNb intermetallic. The calculations for structure determination are performed deploying the linear combination of atomic orbitals method within the framework of density functional theory. After settling the structure, electronic properties such as partial density of states, total density of states, two dimensional electron momentum density etc. are calculated. All electronic properties and the Fermi surface are obtained by applying the linear augmented plane wave method. Features of the Fermi surface are interpreted in terms of bands and the two dimensional electron momentum density distribution.

  19. Nanoporous Cyanate Ester Resins: Structure-Gas Transport Property Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakova, Kristina; Fainleib, Alexander; Espuche, Eliane; Grigoryeva, Olga; Starostenko, Olga; Gouanve, Fabrice; Boiteux, Gisèle; Saiter, Jean-Marc; Grande, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    This contribution addresses the relationships between the structure and gas transport properties of nanoporous thermostable cyanate ester resins (CERs) derived from polycyclotrimerization of 1,1'-bis(4-cyanatophenyl)ethane in the presence of 30 or 50 wt% of inert high-boiling temperature porogens (i.e., dimethyl- or dibutyl phthalates), followed by their quantitative removal. The nanopores in the films obtained were generated via a chemically induced phase separation route with further porogen extraction from the densely crosslinked CERs. To ensure a total desorption of the porogen moieties from the networks, an additional short-term thermal annealing at 250 °C was performed. The structure and morphology of such nanoporous CER-based films were investigated by FTIR and SEM techniques, respectively. Further, the gas transport properties of CER films were analyzed after the different processing steps, and relationships between the material structure and the main gas transport parameters were established.

  20. Optical properties and structure of beryllium lead silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhidkov, I. S.; Zatsepin, A. F.; Cholakh, S. O.; Kuznetsova, Yu. A.

    2014-10-21

    Luminescence and optical properties and structural features of (BeO){sub x}(PbO⋅SiO{sub 2}){sub 1−x} glasses (x = 0 ÷ 0.3) are investigated by means of optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The regularities of the formation of the optical absorption edge and static disorder are studied. It is shown that the optical absorption and luminescence are determined by transitions between localized states of lead ions. The impact of beryllium oxide on optical and luminescence properties and electronic structure of bands tails is discussed. The presence of two different concentration ranges with various short-range order structure and band tails nature has been established.

  1. Defective graphene and nanoribbons: electronic, magnetic and structural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Thiago; Azevedo, Sérgio; Machado, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    We make use of first-principles calculations, based on the density functional theory (DFT), to investigate the alterations at the structural, energetic, electronic and magnetic properties of graphene and zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) due to the inclusion of different types of line and punctual defects. For the graphene it is found that the inclusion of defects breaks the translational symmetry of the crystal with drastic changes at its electronic structure, going from semimetallic to semiconductor and metallic. Regarding the magnetic properties, no magnetization is observed for the defective graphene. We also show that the inclusion of defects at ZGNRs is a good way to create and control pronounced peaks at the Fermi level. Furthermore, defective ZGNRs structures show magnetic moment by supercell up to 2.0 μ B . For the non defective ZGNRs is observed a switch of the magnetic coupling between opposite ribbon edges from the antiferromagnetic to the ferrimagnetic and ferromagnetic configurations.

  2. Structural properties for determining mechanisms of toxic action

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, S.P.; Lipnick, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a workshop co-sponsored by EPA through the Health and Environmental Review Division, Office of Toxic Substances and the Environmental Research Laboratory-Duluth, of the Office of Research and Development are briefly summarized as an introduction to a series of manuscripts dealing with the structural properties of chemicals that determine their toxic mechanisms. Results of the workshop are intended to be incorporated in an expert system to predict mechanisms from chemical structure and aid in predictive toxicology applications in the Agency. The goal of the workshop was to review current understanding of fundamental mechanisms, and develop an initial knowledge base on chemical features and properties from which toxic mechanisms could be predicted from structure. Areas addressed included general anesthesia, or narcosis, oxidative phosphorylation uncoupling, electrophile and free-radical reactivity, and a variety of pesticide-based mechanisms.

  3. Optical properties and structure of beryllium lead silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhidkov, I. S.; Zatsepin, A. F.; Cholakh, S. O.; Kuznetsova, Yu. A.

    2014-10-01

    Luminescence and optical properties and structural features of (BeO)x(PbOṡSiO2)1-x glasses (x = 0 ÷ 0.3) are investigated by means of optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The regularities of the formation of the optical absorption edge and static disorder are studied. It is shown that the optical absorption and luminescence are determined by transitions between localized states of lead ions. The impact of beryllium oxide on optical and luminescence properties and electronic structure of bands tails is discussed. The presence of two different concentration ranges with various short-range order structure and band tails nature has been established.

  4. The Structure and Properties of Amorphous Indium Oxide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of In2O3 thin films, ranging from X-ray diffraction amorphous to highly crystalline, were grown on amorphous silica substrates using pulsed laser deposition by varying the film growth temperature. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition and the structure of amorphous In2O3 were investigated by grazing angle X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), Hall transport measurement, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron diffraction, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) liquid-quench simulation. On the basis of excellent agreement between the EXAFS and MD results, a model of the amorphous oxide structure as a network of InOx polyhedra was constructed. Mechanisms for the transport properties observed in the crystalline, amorphous-to-crystalline, and amorphous deposition regions are presented, highlighting a unique structure–property relationship. PMID:25678743

  5. Dynamic response of nonuniform structures to classes of pressure fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottis, M. G.

    1971-01-01

    A semi-analytical method is developed for the calculation of the response of nonuniform structures to deterministic and random excitation. The method is based on parametric representations of the impulse response and input functions. With these representations, a class of structures of specified geometry and a class of pressure fields of practical concern can be considered simultaneously in a single analytical calculation of structural response. In engineering applications, the parameters in the impulse response function can be fixed once the numerical solution of the associated eigenvalue problem is available; the input function parameters can be specified given a particular input function or pressure field data. This methodology is applied to nonuniform beams and circular cylindrical shells for which parametric response solutions are derived. The computerized version of these solutions is also presented.

  6. Band structure and phonon properties of lithium fluoride at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, J. M.; Joshi, Mitesh; Gajjar, P. N.

    2016-05-23

    High pressure structural and electronic properties of Lithium Fluoride (LiF) have been studied by employing an ab-initio pseudopotential method and a linear response scheme within the density functional theory (DFT) in conjunction with quasi harmonic Debye model. The band structure and electronic density of states conforms that the LiF is stable and is having insulator behavior at ambient as well as at high pressure up to 1 Mbar. Conclusions based on Band structure, phonon dispersion and phonon density of states are outlined.

  7. Response of butterflies to structural and resource boundaries.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Cheryl B; Franco, Aldina M A; Crone, Elizabeth E

    2012-05-01

    1. Two aspects of landscape composition shape the behavioural response of animals to habitat heterogeneity: physical habitat structure and abundance of key resources. In general, within-habitat movement behaviour has been investigated in relation to resources, and preference at boundaries has been quantified in response to physical structure. 2. Habitat preference studies suggest that responses to resources vs. structure should differ, e.g. between male and female animals, and effects of responses to structure and resources may also interact. However, most studies of animal movement combine various aspects of behavioural responses to 'habitat', implicitly assuming that resources and structure are broadly equivalent. 3. We conducted a large-scale experiment of the movement of Fender's blue (Icaricia icarioides fenderi), an endangered butterfly, to investigate butterfly response to physical structure of the landscape (prairie, open woods and dense woods) and to resources [presence or absence of Kincaid's lupine, Lupinus oreganus (larval hostplant patches)]. The experiment included 606 butterfly flight paths across four habitat types and nine ecotones. 4. Responses to physical structure and resource patches were not congruent. Butterflies were attracted to resource patches within both prairies and open woods and moved more slowly when in resource patches. Butterflies tended to prefer prairie at prairie-forest edges but tended to move faster in prairies than in open woods. Physical structure and resources also interacted; butterflies did not respond to physical habitat structure when resource patches spanned prairie - open woods ecotones. 5. Even dense woods were not perfect barriers, in contrast to a large body of literature that assumes insects from open habitats will not enter dense forests. 6. Movement of both males and females responded to resources and structure. However, female butterflies had stronger responses to both resources and structure in most cases

  8. STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF F-84F AIRCRAFT IN FLIGHT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The objective of this project was to determine, through an experimental investigation, the structural response of the F-84F type aircraft when...exposed during flight to the effects of a nuclear explosion. Specifically, the program was arranged to secure fundamental data on: (1) relationships between...weapon yield, aircraftplacement, orientation, and aircraft structural responses ; (2) resultant stresses caused by thermal radiation impinging upon

  9. Acoustic responses of coupled fluid-structure system by acoustic-structural analogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Y. S.; Chargin, M. K.

    1983-01-01

    The use of an analogy between structural mechanics and acoustics makes it possible to solve fluid-structural interaction (FSI) problems using an existing structural analysis computer program. This method was implemented in MSC/NASTRAN program and the FSI analysis was performed using two dimensional coupled fluid beam model to assess and evaluate the adequacy of this approach. The coupled modal analysis of 3-D model is also briefly discussed. The normal mode, modal frequency response and transient response analysis of 2-D coupled fluid beam system is presented. The significant reduction of the acoustic pressure response at the fluid structure interface is observed as a result of fluid structure interaction.

  10. Nickel-aluminum alloy clusters -- structural and dynamical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Jellinek, J.; Krissinel, E.B.

    1997-08-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of mixed Ni{sub n}Al{sub m} alloy clusters mimicked by a many-body potential are studied computationally for all the possible compositions n and m such that n + m = 13. It is shown that the manifold of the usually very large number of the different possible structural forms can be systematized by introducing classes of structures corresponding to the same concentration of the components, geometry and type of the central atom. General definitions of mixing energy and mixing coefficient are introduced, and it is shown that the energy ordering of the structural forms within each class is governed by the mixing coefficient. The peculiarities of the solid-to-liquid-like transition are described as a function of the concentration of the two types of atoms. These peculiarities are correlated with and explained in terms of the energy spectra of the structural forms. Class-dependent features of the dynamics are described and analyzed.

  11. Aeroelastic response of an airfoil with structural and aerodynamic nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodar, Denis Borisovich

    2002-04-01

    The effects of structural and aerodynamic nonlinearities on the response of aeroelastic systems are examined for a typical airfoil section. Control surface freeplay is the source of the structural nonlinearity. Classical Theodorsen aerodynamic theory is combined with an appropriate structural theory to construct a nonlinear aeroelastic model that is used to simulate responses due to a prescribed angle of attack or gust loads. A companion wing tunnel experimental program using an aeroelastic airfoil model and a rotating slotted cylinder gust generator is used to validate the theoretical results. To study nonlinear aerodynamic effects, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method based upon Euler equations and developed at Duke is combined with a linear structural airfoil model to determine flutter and limit cycle oscillation (LCO) response for a wide range of structural parameters and Mach number. Finally, a system identification based reduced order aerodynamic model (ROM) is also presented. It will be useful when considering flutter and LCO of more complex wing planforms.

  12. Seismic response analysis of an instrumented building structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, H.-J.; Zhu, S.-Y.; Celebi, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Sheraton - Universal hotel, an instrumented building lying in North Hollywood, USA is selected for case study in this paper. The finite element method is used to produce a linear time - invariant structural model, and the SAP2000 program is employed for the time history analysis of the instrumented structure under the base excitation of strong motions recorded in the basement during the Northridge, California earthquake of 17 January 1994. The calculated structural responses are compared with the recorded data in both time domain and frequency domain, and the effects of structural parameters evaluation and indeterminate factors are discussed. Some features of structural response, such as the reason why the peak responses of acceleration in the ninth floor are larger than those in the sixteenth floor, are also explained.

  13. Hierarchical photonic structured stimuli-responsive materials as high-performance colorimetric sensors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Zhu, Shenmin; Chen, Zhixin; Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Wang; Zhang, Di

    2016-05-21

    Hierarchical photonic structures in nature are of special interest because they can be used as templates for fabrication of stimuli-responsive photonic crystals (PCs) with unique structures beyond man-made synthesis. The current stimuli-responsive PCs templated directly from natural PCs showed a very weak external stimuli response and poor durability due to the limitations of natural templates. Herein, we tackle this problem by chemically coating functional polymers, polyacrylamide, on butterfly wing scales which have hierarchical photonic structures. As a result of the combination of the strong water absorption properties of the polyacrylamide and the PC structures of the butterfly wing scales, the designed materials demonstrated excellent humidity responsive properties and a tremendous colour change. The colour change is induced by the refractive index change which is in turn due to the swollen nature of the polymer when the relative humidity changes. The butterfly wing scales also showed an excellent durability which is due to the chemical bonds formed between the polymer and wing scales. The synthesis strategy provides an avenue for the promising applications of stimuli-responsive PCs with hierarchical structures.

  14. Structural and electrical properties of silicon hyperdoped with gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Jay; Liu, Yining; Malladi, Girish; Efstathiadis, Harry; Warrender, Jeffrey

    Recent advances in the field of laser hyperdoping have produced a new class of materials that could lead the way to silicon-based, CMOS-compatible infrared detectors. Using the method of ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting (II-PLM), silicon films with impurities at concentrations well above the solid solubility limit can be fabricated. Recent work has centered around Si:Au, from which prototype IR detectors have been successfully fabricated, but there are still many questions about the structural, electrical, and optical properties of this material. In order to enhance the infrared absorption and achieve high-efficiency devices, a thorough understanding of these properties is necessary, and the processes for device fabrication must be optimized. In this work, we explore the structural and electrical properties of Si:Au hyperdoped films. Si:Au films were annealed at various temperatures, and RBS channeling was used to measure the fraction of Au atoms sitting at substitutional sites. Additionally, transmission line method (TLM) and van der Pauw (VDP) test structures were fabricated in order to investigate formation of Ohmic contacts on the hyperdoped films and to study the electrical properties of Si:Au.

  15. Structure, properties and applications of mussel-inspired polydopamine.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chia-Che; Ding, Shinn-Jyh

    2014-10-01

    Mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA) has emerged as a promising molecule used for anchoring synthetic and biological substances or forming an adhesive layer onto various substrates for biomedical and nanotechnology applications because of its outstanding properties. This review article provides an overview of the recent progress in the PDA-based materials, including synthesis of nanoparticles, capsules, structure-mechanism, physicochemical and biological properties, and medical applications. Frist, to understand how PDA nanoparticles, capsules and films produce the unique properties is insight on the processing parameters. Next, we highlight what is known regarding the mechanism of self-polymerization and the structure features of dopamine (DA), which is based on the formation of covalent bond or through a combination mode between monomers. The inherent hydrophilicity and adhesive property of PDA with the coexistence of catechol and amine functionalities provide desirable surface characteristics without the need for further modification. Finally, successful applications, such as grafting substances, biomineralization, antifouling and antibacterial coatings, drug/gene delivery, and tissue engineering, reported to date involving PDA will be focused. The future study of PDA to develop novel materials with unique properties is emerging for specific nanomedicine applications.

  16. Personality Research Form: Factor Structure and Response Style Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stricker, Lawrence J.

    The aims of this study were (1) to explore the factor structure of the Personality Research Form (PRF) and (2) to examine the inventory's relations with response styles. In general the PRF content scales correlated moderately with each other and with measures of acquiesence, social desirability, and defensiveness response Biases. Six oblique…

  17. Structure and Properties of Amorphous Transparent Conducting Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Julia

    Driven by technological appeal, the research area of amorphous oxide semiconductors has grown tremendously since the first demonstration of the unique properties of amorphous indium oxide more than a decade ago. Today, amorphous oxides, such as a-ITO, a-IZO, a-IGZO, or a-ZITO, exhibit the optical, electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties that are comparable or even superior to those possessed by their crystalline counterparts, pushing the latter out of the market. Large-area uniformity, low-cost low-temperature deposition, high carrier mobility, optical transparency, and mechanical flexibility make these materials appealing for next-generation thin-film electronics. Yet, the structural variations associated with crystalline-to-amorphous transition as well as their role in carrier generation and transport properties of these oxides are far from being understood. Although amorphous oxides lack grain boundaries, factors like (i) size and distribution of nanocrystalline inclusions; (ii) spatial distribution and clustering of incorporated cations in multicomponent oxides; (iii) formation of trap defects; and (iv) piezoelectric effects associated with internal strains, will contribute to electron scattering. In this work, ab-initio molecular dynamics (MD) and accurate density-functional approaches are employed to understand how the properties of amorphous ternary and quaternary oxides depend on quench rates, cation compositions, and oxygen stoichiometries. The MD results, combined with thorough experimental characterization, reveal that interplay between the local and long-range structural preferences of the constituent oxides gives rise to a complex composition-dependent structural behavior in the amorphous oxides. The proposed network models of metal-oxygen polyhedra help explain the observed intriguing electrical and optical properties in In-based oxides and suggest ways to broaden the phase space of amorphous oxide semiconductors with tunable properties. The

  18. Graph Theoretic Foundations of Multibody Dynamics Part I: Structural Properties

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Abhinandan

    2011-01-01

    This is the first part of two papers that use concepts from graph theory to obtain a deeper understanding of the mathematical foundations of multibody dynamics. The key contribution is the development of a unifying framework that shows that key analytical results and computational algorithms in multibody dynamics are a direct consequence of structural properties and require minimal assumptions about the specific nature of the underlying multibody system. This first part focuses on identifying the abstract graph theoretic structural properties of spatial operator techniques in multibody dynamics. The second part paper exploits these structural properties to develop a broad spectrum of analytical results and computational algorithms. Towards this, we begin with the notion of graph adjacency matrices and generalize it to define block-weighted adjacency (BWA) matrices and their 1-resolvents. Previously developed spatial operators are shown to be special cases of such BWA matrices and their 1-resolvents. These properties are shown to hold broadly for serial and tree topology multibody systems. Specializations of the BWA and 1-resolvent matrices are referred to as spatial kernel operators (SKO) and spatial propagation operators (SPO). These operators and their special properties provide the foundation for the analytical and algorithmic techniques developed in the companion paper. We also use the graph theory concepts to study the topology induced sparsity structure of these operators and the system mass matrix. Similarity transformations of these operators are also studied. While the detailed development is done for the case of rigid-link multibody systems, the extension of these techniques to a broader class of systems (e.g. deformable links) are illustrated. PMID:22102790

  19. Structural and electronic properties of cadmium sulfide clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Joswig, J.O.; Springborg, M.; Seifert, G.

    2000-03-30

    Crystalline cadmium sulfide is a semiconductor for which the wurtzite and zinc blend structures are energetically almost degenerate. Due to quantum-confinement effects, it is possible to tune the optical properties of finite cadmium sulfide clusters by varying their size. The authors report results of a theoretical study devoted to the properties of stoichiometric Cd{sub n}S{sub n} clusters as a function of their size n. The authors have optimized the structure, whereby the initial structures are spherical parts of either of the two crystal structures, and have studied systems with up to almost 200 atoms. The calculations were performed by using a simplified LCAO-DFT-LDA scheme. The results include the structure, electronic energy levels (in particular the frontier orbitals HOMO and LUMO), and stability as a function of size. The results allow for a unique definition of a surface region. The Mulliken populations indicate that the bonds within this region are more ionic than in the bulk. Furthermore, whereas the HOMO is delocalized over major parts of the nanoparticle, the LUMO is a surface state, which confirms recent experimental findings. Finally, the relative stability of the zinc blend and wurtzite structures is strongly dependent on the size of the system, and there is a close connection between the HOMO-LUMO energy gap and stability.

  20. Structures, properties, modifications, and uses of oat starch.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan

    2017-08-15

    There has been increasing interest to utilise oats and their components to formulate healthy food products. Starch is the major component of oat kernels and may account up to 60% of the dry weight. Starch properties may greatly determine the product quality. As a by-product of oat processing and fractionation, the starch may also be utilised for food and non-food applications. This mini-review updates the recent advances in the isolation, chemical and granular structures, physicochemical properties, chemical and physical modifications, and food and non-food uses of oat starch. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural and Magnetic Properties of Thin Film of Iron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayani, Zohra Nazir; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad

    2014-12-01

    The nano-crystalline iron nitride films with a mixture of γ-Fe4N, ɛFe3N and αFe2N phases were synthesized on copper substrate by sol-gel technology. The structure, morphology and magnetic properties of the samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The films are ferromagnetic at room temperature. Magnetic properties such as coercive forces and saturation magnetization were found to be 398 Oestered and 32.92 emu/cm3, respectively.

  2. Science in Emergency Response at CDC: Structure and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Dale A.; Ghiya, Neelam D.

    2017-01-01

    Recent high-profile activations of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) include responses to the West African Ebola and Zika virus epidemics. Within the EOC, emergency responses are organized according to the Incident Management System, which provides a standardized structure and chain of command, regardless of whether the EOC activation occurs in response to an outbreak, natural disaster, or other type of public health emergency. By embedding key scientific roles, such as the associate director for science, and functions within a Scientific Response Section, the current CDC emergency response structure ensures that both urgent and important science issues receive needed attention. Key functions during emergency responses include internal coordination of scientific work, data management, information dissemination, and scientific publication. We describe a case example involving the ongoing Zika virus response that demonstrates how the scientific response structure can be used to rapidly produce high-quality science needed to answer urgent public health questions and guide policy. Within the context of emergency response, longer-term priorities at CDC include both streamlining administrative requirements and funding mechanisms for scientific research. PMID:28892452

  3. Science in Emergency Response at CDC: Structure and Functions.

    PubMed

    Iskander, John; Rose, Dale A; Ghiya, Neelam D

    2017-09-01

    Recent high-profile activations of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) include responses to the West African Ebola and Zika virus epidemics. Within the EOC, emergency responses are organized according to the Incident Management System, which provides a standardized structure and chain of command, regardless of whether the EOC activation occurs in response to an outbreak, natural disaster, or other type of public health emergency. By embedding key scientific roles, such as the associate director for science, and functions within a Scientific Response Section, the current CDC emergency response structure ensures that both urgent and important science issues receive needed attention. Key functions during emergency responses include internal coordination of scientific work, data management, information dissemination, and scientific publication. We describe a case example involving the ongoing Zika virus response that demonstrates how the scientific response structure can be used to rapidly produce high-quality science needed to answer urgent public health questions and guide policy. Within the context of emergency response, longer-term priorities at CDC include both streamlining administrative requirements and funding mechanisms for scientific research.

  4. The properties of electromagnetic responses and optical modulation in terahertz metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Shi, Yulei; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Qingli; Zhang, Cunlin

    2016-11-01

    Metamaterials with subwavelength structural features show unique electromagnetic responses that are unattainable with natural materials. Recently, the research on these artificial materials has been pushed forward to the terahertz (THz) region because of potential applications in biological fingerprinting, security imaging, and high frequency magnetic and electric resonant devices. Furthermore, active control of their properties could further facilitate and open up new applications in terms of modulation and switching. In our work, we will first present our studies of dipole arrays at terahertz frequencies. Then in experimental and theoretical studies of terahertz subwavelength L-shaped structure, we proposed an unusual-mode current resonance responsible for low-frequency characteristic dip in transmission spectra. Comparing spectral properties of our designed simplified structures with that of split-ring resonators, we attribute this unusual mode to the resonance coupling and splitting under the broken symmetry of the structure. Finally, we use optical pump-terahertz probe method to investigate the spectral and dynamic behaviour of optical modulation in the split-ring resonators. We have observed the blue-shift and band broadening in the spectral changes of transmission under optical excitation at different delay times. The calculated surface currents using finite difference time domain simulation are presented to characterize these resonances, and the blue-shift can be explained by the changed refractive index and conductivity in the photoexcited semiconductor substrate.

  5. Lanthanide coordination polymers: Synthesis, diverse structure and luminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xue-Qin Lei, Yao-Kun; Wang, Xiao-Run; Zhao, Meng-Meng; Peng, Yun-Qiao; Cheng, Guo-Quan

    2014-10-15

    The new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand incorporating furfurysalicylamide terminal groups, namely, 1,4-bis([(2′-furfurylaminoformyl)phenoxyl]methyl)-2,5-bismethylbenzene (L) was synthesized and used as building blocks for constructing lanthanide coordination polymers with luminescent properties. The series of lanthanide nitrate complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The semirigid ligand L, as a bridging ligand, reacts with lanthanide nitrates forming three distinct structure types: chiral noninterpenetrated two-dimensional (2D) honeycomblike (6,3) (hcb, Schläfli symbol 6{sup 3}, vertex symbol 6 6 6) topological network as type I, 1D zigzag chain as type II and 1D trapezoid ladder-like chain as type III. The structural diversities indicate that lanthanide contraction effect played significant roles in the structural self-assembled process. The luminescent properties of Eu{sup III}, Tb{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes are discussed in detail. Due to the good match between the lowest triplet state of the ligand and the resonant energy level of the lanthanide ion, the lanthanide ions in Eu{sup III}, Tb{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes can be efficiently sensitized by the ligand. - Graphical abstract: We present herein six lanthanide coordination polymers of a new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand which not only display diverse structures but also possess strong luminescence properties. - Highlights: • We present lanthanide coordination polymers of a new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand. • The lanthanide coordination polymers exhibit diverse structures. • The luminescent properties of Tb{sup III}, Eu{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes are discussed in detail.

  6. Lipid-derived Thermoplastic Poly(ester urethane)s: Effect of Structure on Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetranjiwalla, Shegufta

    Thermoplastic poly(ester urethane)s (TPEU)s derived from vegetable oils possess inferior physical properties compared to their entirely petroleum-based counterparts due to the structural limitations and lower reactivity of the precursor lipid-derived monomers. The present work shows that high molecular weight of TPEUs with enhanced performance can be obtained from lipid-derived monomers via (i) the synthesis of polyester diols with controlled molecular weights, (ii) the tuning of the functional group stoichiometry of the polyester diols and the diisocyanate during polymerization, (iii) the degree of polymerization (iv) the control of the hard segment hydrogen bond density and distribution via the use of a chain extender and (v) different polymerization protocols. Solvent-resistant TPEUs with high molecular weight displaying polyethylene-like behavior and controlled polyester and urethane segment phase separation were obtained. Structure-property investigations revealed that the thermal transition temperatures and tensile properties increased and eventually plateaued with increasing molecular weight. Novel segmented TPEUs possessed high phase separation and showed elastomeric properties such as low modulus and high elongation analogous to rubber. The response of the structurally optimized TPEUs to environmental degradation was also established by subjecting the TPEUs to hydrothermal ageing. TPEUs exhibited thermal and mechanical properties that were comparable to commercially available entirely petroleum-based counterparts, and that could be tuned in order to achieve enhanced physical properties and controlled degradability.

  7. Spatiotemporal Properties of Vestibular Responses in Area MSTd

    PubMed Central

    Fetsch, Christopher R.; Rajguru, Suhrud M.; Karunaratne, Anuk; Gu, Yong; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that many neurons in the primate dorsal medial superior temporal area (MSTd) show spatial tuning during inertial motion and that these responses are vestibular in origin. Given their well-studied role in processing visual self-motion cues (i.e., optic flow), these neurons may be involved in the integration of visual and vestibular signals to facilitate robust perception of self-motion. However, the temporal structure of vestibular responses in MSTd has not been characterized in detail. Specifically, it is not known whether MSTd neurons encode velocity, acceleration, or some combination of motion parameters not explicitly encoded by vestibular afferents. In this study, we have applied a frequency-domain analysis to single-unit responses during translation in three dimensions (3D). The analysis quantifies the stimulus-driven temporal modulation of each response as well as the degree to which this modulation reflects the velocity and/or acceleration profile of the stimulus. We show that MSTd neurons signal a combination of velocity and acceleration components with the velocity component being stronger for most neurons. These two components can exist both within and across motion directions, although their spatial tuning did not show a systematic relationship across the population. From these results, vestibular responses in MSTd appear to show characteristic features of spatiotemporal convergence, similar to previous findings in the brain stem and thalamus. The predominance of velocity encoding in this region may reflect the suitability of these signals to be integrated with visual signals regarding self-motion perception. PMID:20631212

  8. Atomic structures and electronic properties of phosphorene grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu; Zhou, Si; Zhang, Junfeng; Bai, Yizhen; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundary (GB) is one main type of defects in two-dimensional (2D) crystals, and has significant impact on the physical properties of 2D materials. Phosphorene, a recently synthesized 2D semiconductor, possesses a puckered honeycomb lattice and outstanding electronic properties. It is very interesting to know the possible GBs present in this novel material, and how their properties differ from those in the other 2D materials. Based on first-principles calculations, we explore the atomic structure, thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of phosphorene GBs. A total of 19 GBs are predicted and found to be energetically stable with formation energies much lower than those in graphene. These GBs do not severely affect the electronic properties of phosphorene: the band gap of perfect phosphorene is preserved, and the electron mobilities are only moderately reduced in these defective systems. Our theoretical results provide vital guidance for experimental tailoring the electronic properties of phosphorene as well as the device applications using phosphorene materials.

  9. Structural properties of planar graphs of urban street patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardillo, Alessio; Scellato, Salvatore; Latora, Vito; Porta, Sergio

    2006-06-01

    Recent theoretical and empirical studies have focused on the structural properties of complex relational networks in social, biological, and technological systems. Here we study the basic properties of twenty 1-square-mile samples of street patterns of different world cities. Samples are turned into spatial valued graphs. In such graphs, the nodes are embedded in the two-dimensional plane and represent street intersections, the edges represent streets, and the edge values are equal to the street lengths. We evaluate the local properties of the graphs by measuring the meshedness coefficient and counting short cycles (of three, four, and five edges), and the global properties by measuring global efficiency and cost. We also consider, as extreme cases, minimal spanning trees (MST) and greedy triangulations (GT) induced by the same spatial distribution of nodes. The measures found in the real and the artificial networks are then compared. Surprisingly, cities of the same class, e.g., grid-iron or medieval, exhibit roughly similar properties. The correlation between a priori known classes and statistical properties is illustrated in a plot of relative efficiency vs cost.

  10. Electronic and optical properties of novel carbon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Manyalibo Joseph

    Novel carbon structures in the form of fullerenes and disordered carbon clusters offer a wide variety of physical systems, possessing both long or short range order, which can generally be tuned through non- combustive heat-treatment at various elevated temperatures, THT. Due to the sheer complexity and diversity of the possible nanoscale arrangements, the optical and electronic properties of carbon structures with finite dimensions and crystallinity are still not fully understood. In this study, we focus mainly on the structures produced from carbonization of the hydrocarbon polymer polyparaphenylene (PPP), but we also present experimental results from carbons based on other precursors (e.g. mesophase pitch) which yield quite different structures with both comparable and contrasting physical properties. In terms of electronic properties, we show that in the low-THT PPP-based structures, which exemplify extreme disorder, the electronic states are strongly localized, giving rise to a Mott T1/4 hopping conductivity and self-trapped spin defects AS evidenced by low-temperature transport and electron spin resonance experiments. Electronic transitions which give rise to ~2-3 eV photoluminescent emissions in PPP-based structures are found to be influenced most strongly by residual semi-localized polymeric states which weakly couple to low-frequency PPP phonon modes. However, at intermediate heat-treatment temperatures (THT~ 1500[-]2500oC), all sp2-bonded carbon compounds in this study exhibit a characteristic phonon spectrum (as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy) in which disorder may be characterized by non-zone-center phonon scattering arising from finite crystallite sizes. Because of its intimate connection to carrier confinement and structural disorder, the anomalous 'disorder-induced' graphite D-band is thoroughly investigated by use of Raman spectroscopy, showing that strong dispersion effects are due to a photon-phonon coupling mediated by electronic transitions

  11. Dielectric response of capacitor structures based on PZT annealed at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenshchikov, Mikhail V.; Solnyshkin, Alexander V.; Pronin, Igor P.

    2016-12-01

    Dielectric response of thin-film capacitor structures of Pt/PZT/Pt deposited by the RF magnetron sputtering method and annealed at temperatures of 540-570 °C was investigated. It was found that dielectric properties of these structures depend on the synthesis temperature. Stability of a polarized state is considered on the basis of the analysis of hysteresis loops and capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics. The contribution of the domain mechanism in the dielectric response of the capacitor structure comprising a ferroelectric is discussed. Extreme dependences of electrophysical characteristics of PZT films on their synthesis temperature were observed. Correlation of dielectric properties with microstructure of these films is found out.

  12. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Effective Anisotropic Dielectric Properties of Crystal Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, En-Bo; Gu, Guo-Qing; Poon, Ying-Ming; Franklin, G. Shin

    2010-02-01

    Transformation field method (TFM) is developed to estimate the anisotropic dielectric properties of crystal composites having arbitrary shapes and dielectric properties of crystal inclusions, whose principal dielectric axis are different from those of anisotropic crystal matrix. The complicated boundary-value problem caused by inclusion shapes is circumvented by introducing a transformation electric field into the crystal composites regions, and the effective anisotropic dielectric responses are formulated in terms of the transformation field. Furthermore, the numerical results show that the effective anisotropic dielectric responses of crystal composites periodically vary as a function of the rotating angle between the principal dielectric axes of inclusion and matrix crystal materials. It is found that at larger inclusion volume fraction the inclusion shapes induce profound effect on the effective anisotropic dielectric responses.

  13. An Integrated Theory for Predicting the Hydrothermomechanical Response of Advanced Composite Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    An integrated theory is developed for predicting the hydrothermomechanical (HDTM) response of fiber composite components. The integrated theory is based on a combined theoretical and experimental investigation. In addition to predicting the HDTM response of components, the theory is structured to assess the combined hydrothermal effects on the mechanical properties of unidirectional composites loaded along the material axis and off-axis, and those of angleplied laminates. The theory developed predicts values which are in good agreement with measured data at the micromechanics, macromechanics, laminate analysis and structural analysis levels.

  14. The influence of structural response on sympathetic detonation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The role that a munition's structural response plays in the ignition process and the development of violent reactions and detonations is explored. The munition's structural response is identified as one of the factors that influences reaction violence. If the structural response of a round is known, this knowledge can be used to redstruce the probability that a large explosion would result from the sequential detonation of individual rounds within a large storage array. The response of an acceptor round was studied. The castings fail in the same manner regardless of whether or not there is a fill material present in the round. These failures are caused by stress waves which are transformed from compressive waves to tensile waves by reflection as the impact energy moves around the casting. Since these waves move in opposite directions around the projectile circumference and collide opposite the point of impact, very high tensile forces are developed which can crack the casing.

  15. The influence of structural response on sympathetic detonation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The role that a munition's structural response plays in the ignition process and the development of violent reactions and detonations is explored. The munition's structural response is identified as one of the factors that influences reaction violence. If the structural response of a round is known, this knowledge can be used to redstruce the probability that a large explosion would result from the sequential detonation of individual rounds within a large storage array. The response of an acceptor round was studied. The castings fail in the same manner regardless of whether or not there is a fill material present in the round. These failures are caused by stress waves which are transformed from compressive waves to tensile waves by reflection as the impact energy moves around the casting. Since these waves move in opposite directions around the projectile circumference and collide opposite the point of impact, very high tensile forces are developed which can crack the casing.

  16. Simulating the Structural Response of a Preloaded Bolted Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper describes the structural analyses performed on a preloaded bolted-joint configuration. The joint modeled was comprised of two L-shaped structures connected together using a single bolt. Each L-shaped structure involved a vertical flat segment (or shell wall) welded to a horizontal segment (or flange). Parametric studies were performed using elasto-plastic, large-deformation nonlinear finite element analyses to determine the influence of several factors on the bolted-joint response. The factors considered included bolt preload, washer-surface-bearing size, edge boundary conditions, joint segment length, and loading history. Joint response is reported in terms of displacements, gap opening, and surface strains. Most of the factors studied were determined to have minimal effect on the bolted-joint response; however, the washer-bearing-surface size affected the response significantly.

  17. Frequency response modeling and control of flexible structures: Computational methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, William H.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of vibrations in flexible structures can be conventiently modeled in terms of frequency response models. For structural control such models capture the distributed parameter dynamics of the elastic structural response as an irrational transfer function. For most flexible structures arising in aerospace applications the irrational transfer functions which arise are of a special class of pseudo-meromorphic functions which have only a finite number of right half place poles. Computational algorithms are demonstrated for design of multiloop control laws for such models based on optimal Wiener-Hopf control of the frequency responses. The algorithms employ a sampled-data representation of irrational transfer functions which is particularly attractive for numerical computation. One key algorithm for the solution of the optimal control problem is the spectral factorization of an irrational transfer function. The basis for the spectral factorization algorithm is highlighted together with associated computational issues arising in optimal regulator design. Options for implementation of wide band vibration control for flexible structures based on the sampled-data frequency response models is also highlighted. A simple flexible structure control example is considered to demonstrate the combined frequency response modeling and control algorithms.

  18. First principles study on structural, lattice dynamical and thermal properties of BaCeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingping; Ding, Jinwen; He, Min

    2017-09-01

    BaCeO3 exhibits impressive application potentials on solid oxide fuel cell electrolyte, hydrogen separation membrane and photocatalyst, owing to its unique ionic and electronic properties. In this article, the electronic structures, phonon spectra and thermal properties of BaCeO3 in orthorhombic, rhombohedral and cubic phases are investigated based on density functional theory. Comparisons with reported experimental results are also presented. The calculation shows that orthorhombic structure is both energetically and dynamically stable under ground state, which is supported by the experiment. Moreover, charge transfer between cations and anions accompanied with phase transition is observed, which is responsible for the softened phonon modes in rhombohedral and cubic phases. Besides, thermal properties are discussed. Oxygen atoms contribute most to the specific heat. The calculated entropy and specific heat at constant pressure fit well with the experimental ones within the measured temperature range.

  19. Complexity in the structural and magnetic properties of almost multiferroic EuTi O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guguchia, Z.; Salman, Z.; Keller, H.; Roleder, K.; Köhler, J.; Bussmann-Holder, A.

    2016-12-01

    In a number of recent publications hidden magnetic properties at high temperatures have been reported for EuTi O3 (ETO), which orders antiferromagnetically below TN=5.7 K . In addition, structural phase transitions have been discovered which correlate with the magnetic responses and can be tuned by a magnetic field. In order to identify the magnetic properties of ETO at temperatures well above TN, low-energy muon-spin rotation (μSR) experiments have been performed on thin films of ETO which exhibit all properties observed in bulk materials and are thus well suited to conclude about the magnetic order of the bulk. The μSR data reveal anomalies at 282 and 200 K related to the structural phase transitions in accordance with birefringence results. In addition, a transition to some kind of magnetic order below 100 K was observed as previously indirectly deduced from conductivity and dielectric constant measurements.

  20. Chiral phosphorus nanotubes: structure, bonding, and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Escamilla, H N; Quijano-Briones, J J; Tlahuice-Flores, A

    2016-05-14

    The study of black phosphorus nanotubes (PNTs) had been devoted to zigzag and armchair structures, with no consideration of chiral structures to date. In this communication, we studied the structural and electronic (band structure) properties of chiral nanotubes using a periodic plane wave-pseudopotential approach. We found that some chiral nanotubes display similar bandgaps and binding energies per atom (BEA) as armchair PNTs and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations attest their thermal stability. Interestingly, we determined that the bandgap is tuned by varying the PNTs chirality and it is not related to their diameters. This feature can be exploited in optical and electronic applications wherein a direct and sizable bandgap is required.

  1. Structural and electrical properties of In-implanted Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, R. Kremer, F.; Mirzaei, S.; Medling, S. A.; Ridgway, M. C.; Sprouster, D. J.; Decoster, S.; Glover, C. J.; Russo, S. P.

    2015-10-28

    We report on the effects of dopant concentration on the structural and electrical properties of In-implanted Ge. For In concentrations of ≤ 0.2 at. %, extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements demonstrate that all In atoms occupy a substitutional lattice site while metallic In precipitates are apparent in transmission electron micrographs for In concentrations ≥0.6 at. %. Evidence of the formation of In-vacancy complexes deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements is complimented by density functional theory simulations. Hall effect measurements of the conductivity, carrier density, and carrier mobility are then correlated with the substitutional In fraction.

  2. Structural and electrical properties of In-implanted Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, R.; Kremer, F.; Sprouster, D. J.; Mirzaei, S.; Decoster, S.; Glover, C. J.; Medling, S. A.; Russo, S. P.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2015-10-22

    Here, we report on the effects of dopant concentration on the structural and electrical properties of In-implanted Ge. For In concentrations of ≤ 0.2 at. %, extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements demonstrate that all In atoms occupy a substitutional lattice site while metallic In precipitates are apparent in transmission electron micrographs for In concentrations ≥0.6 at. %. Evidence of the formation of In-vacancy complexes deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements is complimented by density functional theory simulations. Hall effect measurements of the conductivity, carrier density, and carrier mobility are then correlated with the substitutional In fraction.

  3. Structural and electrical properties of In-implanted Ge

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, R.; Kremer, F.; Sprouster, D. J.; ...

    2015-10-22

    Here, we report on the effects of dopant concentration on the structural and electrical properties of In-implanted Ge. For In concentrations of ≤ 0.2 at. %, extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements demonstrate that all In atoms occupy a substitutional lattice site while metallic In precipitates are apparent in transmission electron micrographs for In concentrations ≥0.6 at. %. Evidence of the formation of In-vacancy complexes deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements is complimented by density functional theory simulations. Hall effect measurements of the conductivity, carrier density, and carrier mobility are then correlated withmore » the substitutional In fraction.« less

  4. Molecular response properties from a Hermitian eigenvalue equation for a time-periodic Hamiltonian.

    PubMed

    Pawłowski, Filip; Olsen, Jeppe; Jørgensen, Poul

    2015-03-21

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a time-periodic perturbation is recasted into a Hermitian eigenvalue equation, where the quasi-energy is an eigenvalue and the time-periodic regular wave function an eigenstate. From this Hermitian eigenvalue equation, a rigorous and transparent formulation of response function theory is developed where (i) molecular properties are defined as derivatives of the quasi-energy with respect to perturbation strengths, (ii) the quasi-energy can be determined from the time-periodic regular wave function using a variational principle or via projection, and (iii) the parametrization of the unperturbed state can differ from the parametrization of the time evolution of this state. This development brings the definition of molecular properties and their determination on par for static and time-periodic perturbations and removes inaccuracies and inconsistencies of previous response function theory formulations. The development where the parametrization of the unperturbed state and its time evolution may differ also extends the range of the wave function models for which response functions can be determined. The simplicity and universality of the presented formulation is illustrated by applying it to the configuration interaction (CI) and the coupled cluster (CC) wave function models and by introducing a new model-the coupled cluster configuration interaction (CC-CI) model-where a coupled cluster exponential parametrization is used for the unperturbed state and a linear parametrization for its time evolution. For static perturbations, the CC-CI response functions are shown to be the analytical analogues of the static molecular properties obtained from finite field equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) energy calculations. The structural similarities and differences between the CI, CC, and CC-CI response functions are also discussed with emphasis on linear versus non-linear parametrizations and the size-extensivity of the obtained

  5. Quality assessment of modeled protein structure using physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Rana, Prashant Singh; Sharma, Harish; Bhattacharya, Mahua; Shukla, Anupam

    2015-04-01

    Physicochemical properties of proteins always guide to determine the quality of the protein structure, therefore it has been rigorously used to distinguish native or native-like structure from other predicted structures. In this work, we explore nine machine learning methods with six physicochemical properties to predict the Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD), Template Modeling (TM-score), and Global Distance Test (GDT_TS-score) of modeled protein structure in the absence of its true native state. Physicochemical properties namely total surface area, euclidean distance (ED), total empirical energy, secondary structure penalty (SS), sequence length (SL), and pair number (PN) are used. There are a total of 95,091 modeled structures of 4896 native targets. A real coded Self-adaptive Differential Evolution algorithm (SaDE) is used to determine the feature importance. The K-fold cross validation is used to measure the robustness of the best predictive method. Through the intensive experiments, it is found that Random Forest method outperforms over other machine learning methods. This work makes the prediction faster and inexpensive. The performance result shows the prediction of RMSD, TM-score, and GDT_TS-score on Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) as 1.20, 0.06, and 0.06 respectively; correlation scores are 0.96, 0.92, and 0.91 respectively; R(2) are 0.92, 0.85, and 0.84 respectively; and accuracy are 78.82% (with ± 0.1 err), 86.56% (with ± 0.1 err), and 87.37% (with ± 0.1 err) respectively on the testing data set. The data set used in the study is available as supplement at http://bit.ly/RF-PCP-DataSets.

  6. RaptorX-Property: a web server for protein structure property prediction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Wei; Liu, Shiwang; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-07-08

    RaptorX Property (http://raptorx2.uchicago.edu/StructurePropertyPred/predict/) is a web server predicting structure property of a protein sequence without using any templates. It outperforms other servers, especially for proteins without close homologs in PDB or with very sparse sequence profile (i.e. carries little evolutionary information). This server employs a powerful in-house deep learning model DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) to predict secondary structure (SS), solvent accessibility (ACC) and disorder regions (DISO). DeepCNF not only models complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent property labels. Our experimental results show that, tested on CASP10, CASP11 and the other benchmarks, this server can obtain ∼84% Q3 accuracy for 3-state SS, ∼72% Q8 accuracy for 8-state SS, ∼66% Q3 accuracy for 3-state solvent accessibility, and ∼0.89 area under the ROC curve (AUC) for disorder prediction. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. RaptorX-Property: a web server for protein structure property prediction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Wei; Liu, Shiwang; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    RaptorX Property (http://raptorx2.uchicago.edu/StructurePropertyPred/predict/) is a web server predicting structure property of a protein sequence without using any templates. It outperforms other servers, especially for proteins without close homologs in PDB or with very sparse sequence profile (i.e. carries little evolutionary information). This server employs a powerful in-house deep learning model DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) to predict secondary structure (SS), solvent accessibility (ACC) and disorder regions (DISO). DeepCNF not only models complex sequence–structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent property labels. Our experimental results show that, tested on CASP10, CASP11 and the other benchmarks, this server can obtain ∼84% Q3 accuracy for 3-state SS, ∼72% Q8 accuracy for 8-state SS, ∼66% Q3 accuracy for 3-state solvent accessibility, and ∼0.89 area under the ROC curve (AUC) for disorder prediction. PMID:27112573

  8. Probabilistic structural response of a valve assembly to high impact loading

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, E.A.; Thacker, B.H.

    2000-10-01

    Engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are currently developing capabilities, in cooperation with Southwest Research Institute, to provide reliability-based structural evaluation techniques for performing weapon component and system reliability assessments. The development and applications of Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) is an important ingredient in the overall weapon reliability assessments. Focus, herein, is placed on the uncertainty associated with the structural response of an explosive actuated valve-piston assembly. The probabilistic dynamic response of the piston upon impact is evaluated through the coupling of the probabilistic code NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) [1] with the non-linear structural dynamics code, ABAQUS/Explicit [2]. The probabilistic model includes variations in piston mass and geometry, and mechanical properties, such as Young's Modulus, yield strength, and flow characteristics. Finally, the probability of exceeding a specified strain limit, which is related to piston fracture, is determined.

  9. Hydroelastic responses of pontoon type very large floating offshore structure

    SciTech Connect

    Haeda, Hisaaki; Miyajima, Shyogo; Masuda, Koich; Ikoma, Tomoki

    1996-12-31

    The authors developed the estimating method of the hydroelastic response of a very large pontoon type floating structure. In this method, the pressure distribution method with shallow draft assumption was used to obtain the hydrodynamic forces considering the elastic motion of a floating body. The elastic responses of very large floating structure were estimated by using 1-D beam modeling. On the other hand, to observe the elastic response of a large pontoon type structure they carried out experiments in head sea and head-beam sea conditions. The experimental model was an elastic model of pontoon type large floating body. To validate numerical estimation method the authors compared the numerical results with experimental results. From these results, they found good agreement and confirmed the accuracy of this numerical estimation method of the hydroelasticity of a very large pontoon type floating structure.

  10. Melanopsin-encoded response properties of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Mure, Ludovic S.; Hatori, Megumi; Zhu, Quansheng; Demas, James; Kim, Irene M.; Nayak, Surendra K.; Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Melanopsin photopigment expressed in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) plays a crucial role in the adaptation of mammals to their ambient light environment through both image-forming and non-image-forming (NIF) visual responses. ipRGCs are structurally and functionally distinct from classical rod/cone photoreceptors and have unique properties including single-photon response, long response latency, photon integration over time, and slow deactivation. Here we discovered that amino-acid sequence features of melanopsin protein contribute to the functional properties of the ipRGCs. Phosphorylation of a cluster of Ser/Thr residues in the C-terminal cytoplasmic region of melanopsin contributes to deactivation, which in turn determines response latency and threshold sensitivity of the ipRGCs. The poorly conserved region distal to phosphorylation cluster inhibits functional role of phosphorylation, thereby constituting a unique delayed-deactivation mechanism. Concerted action of both regions sustains responses to dim light, allows for the integration of light over time, and results in precise signal duration. PMID:27181062

  11. Salt-Responsive Zwitterionic Polymer Brushes with Tunable Friction and Antifouling Properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jintao; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Shengwei; Shen, Mingxue; Chen, Feng; Fan, Ping; Zhong, Mingqiang; Zheng, Jie

    2015-08-25

    Development of smart, multifunction materials is challenging but important for many fundamental and industrial applications. Here, we synthesized and characterized zwitterionic poly(3-(1-(4-vinylbenzyl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium-3-yl)propane-1-sulfonate) (polyVBIPS) brushes as ion-responsive smart surfaces via the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. PolyVBIPS brushes were carefully characterized for their surface morphologies, compositions, wettability, and film thicknesses by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle, and ellipsometer, respectively. Salt-responsive, switching properties of polyVBIPS brushes on surface hydration, friction, and antifouling properties were further examined and compared both in water and in salt solutions with different salt concentrations and counterion types. Collective data showed that polyVBIPS brushes exhibited reversible surface wettability switching between in water and saturated NaCl solution. PolyVBIPS brushes in water induced the larger protein absorption, higher surface friction, and lower surface hydration than those in salt solutions, exhibiting "anti-polyelectrolyte effect" salt responsive behaviors. At appropriate ionic conditions, polyVBIPs brushes were able to switch to superlow fouling surfaces (<0.3 ng/cm(2) protein adsorption) and superlow friction surfaces (u ∼ 10(-3)). The relationship between brush structure and its salt-responsive performance was also discussed. This work provides new zwitterionic surface-responsive materials with controllable antifouling and friction capabilities for multifunctional applications.

  12. Noise transmission properties and control strategies for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Beyer, Todd B.; Lester, Harold C.

    1991-01-01

    A study of several component technologies required to apply active control techniques to reduce interior noise in composite aircraft structures is described. The mechanisms of noise transmission in an all composite, large-scale, fuselage model are studied in an experimental program and found similar to mechanisms found in conventional aircraft construction. Two primary conditions of structural acoustic response are found to account for the dominant interior acoustic response. A preliminary study of active noise control in cylinders used piezoceramic actuators as force inputs for a simple aluminum fuselage model. These actuators provided effective control for the same two conditions of noise transmission found in the composite fuselage structure. The use of piezoceramic actuators to apply force inputs overcomes the weight and structural requirements of conventional shaker actuators. Finally, in order to accurately simulate these types of actuators in a cylindrical shell, two analytical models are investigated that apply either in-plane forces or bending moments along the boundaries of a finite patch. It is shown that the bending model may not be as effective as the force model for exciting the low order azimuthal modes that typically dominate the structural acoustic response in these systems. This result will affect the arrangement and distribution of actuators required for effective active control systems.

  13. Structural and rheological properties of chitosan semi-interpenetrated networks.

    PubMed

    Payet, L; Ponton, A; Grossiord, J-L; Agnely, F

    2010-06-01

    The local structure and the viscoelastic properties of semi-interpenetrated biopolymer networks based on cross-linked chitosan and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) were investigated by Small Angle Neutron Scattering and rheological measurements. The specific viscosity and the entanglement concentration of chitosan were first determined, respectively, by capillary viscosimetry and steady-state shear rheology experiments performed at different polymer concentrations. Mechanical spectroscopy was then used to study the gelation process of chitosan/PEO semi-interpenetrated networks. By fitting the frequency dependence of the elastic and loss moduli with extended relations of relaxation shear modulus around the sol-gel transition, it was shown that the addition of PEO chains had a significant effect on the viscoelastic properties of aqueous chitosan networks but no effect on the gelation time. The improvement of mechanical properties was in accordance with the correlation length decrease deduced from Small Angle Neutron Scattering experiments.

  14. Structure and properties of nanoparticles used in paper compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioelovich, M.; Figovsky, O.

    2010-11-01

    The structural characteristics of cellulose and chalk nanoparticles were studied by the methods of electronic microscopy, laser light scattering, X-ray diffraction, sorption, water retention, and some others. It is shown that nanocellulose consists of rodlike particles having an increased hydrophility. In contrast to the organic nanocellulose, the inorganic nanochalk contains ellipsoidal particles having a relatively low hydrohpility. Paper samples containing cellulose fibers and nanoparticles, as well as flocking and sizing agents, were made and their properties were tested. Testing the mechanical properties of the paper samples showed that the introduction of the hydrophilic cellulose nanoparticles, having a developed surface, decreased the porosity and sharply increased the strength of the final paper. In contrast to this result, chalk nanoparticles did not improve the physicomechanical properties of paper, because of the low bonding between the inorganic particles and the organic cellulose fibrils.

  15. Thermal Properties of Structural Materials Used in LWR Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Daw; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson

    2011-01-01

    High temperature material property data for structural materials used in existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) are limited. Often, extrapolated values recommended in the literature differ significantly. To reduce uncertainties in predictions relying upon extrapolated data for LWR vessel and penetration materials, high temperature tests were completed on SA533 Grade B, Class 1 (SA533B1) low alloy steel, Stainless Steel 304 (SS304), and Inconel 600 using material property measurement systems available in the High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Properties measured include thermal expansion, specific heat capacity, and thermal diffusivity for temperatures up to 1200 °C. From these results, thermal conductivity and density were calculated. Results show that, in some cases, previously recommended values for these materials differ significantly from measured values at high temperatures.

  16. Electronic, structural, and thermodynamic properties of actinide dioxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Li; Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Ray, Asok K.

    2010-03-01

    As a continuation of our studies of pure actinide metals using hybrid density functional theory,footnotetextR. Atta-Fynn and A. K. Ray, Europhysics Letters, 85, 27008-p1- p6 (2009); Chemical Physics Letters, 482, 223-227 (2009). we present here a systematic study of the electronic and geometric structure properties of the actinide dioxides, UO2, PuO2 and AmO2, using both density functional and hybrid density functional theories. For the hybrid density functionals, the fractions of exact Hartree-Fock exchange used were 25% and 40%. Each compound has been studied at the nonmagnetic, ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations, with and without spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The influence of SOC on the properties of the actinide dioxides will be discussed. Thermodynamic properties such as phonon dispersion curves, heat capacity, entropy, internal energy and free energy have been calculated by a coupling of first-principles calculations and lattice dynamics.

  17. Effect of the aerated structure on selected properties of freeze-dried hydrocolloid gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciurzyńska, Agnieszka; Lenart, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The ability to create diverse structures and studies on the effect of the aerated structure on selected properties with the use of freeze-dried gels may provide knowledge about the properties of dried foods. Such gels can be a basis for obtaining innovative food products. For the gel preparation, 3 types of hydrocolloids were used: low-methoxyl pectin, a mixture of xanthan gum and locust-bean gum, and a mixture of xanthan gum and guar gum. Gels were aerated for 3 and 7 min, frozen at a temperature of -45°C 2 h-1, and freeze-dried at a temperature of 30°C. For the samples obtained, structure, porosity, shrinkage, rehydration, and colour were investigated. It was shown that the type of the hydrocolloid and aeration time influence the structure of freeze-dried gels, which determines such properties of samples as porosity, shrinkage, density, rehydration, and colour. The bigger pores of low-methoxyl pectin gels undergo rehydration in the highest degree. The delicate and aerated structure of gels with the mixture of xanthan gum and locust-bean gum was damaged during freeze-drying and shrinkage exhibited the highest value. Small pores of samples with the mixture of xanthan gum and guar gum were responsible for the lower rehydration properties, but the highest porosity value contributed to the highest lightness value.

  18. Topologically nontrivial Fermi regions and their novel electromagnetic response properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching Hua; Zhang, Xiao

    In the last decade, there has been a surge of interest in the application of topology to condensed matter physics. So far, most studies have been concerned with the novel properties that arise due to nontrivial band topology, i.e Quantum Anomalous Hall and Z2 topological insulators (TIs). In this talk, I shall describe another context where nontrivial topology also leads to interesting, measurable effects. Within the semi-classical Boltzmann approach, it can be shown that a topologically nontrivial Fermi sea region generically exhibits a non-monotonic nonlinear electromagnetic response in the limit of low chemical potential. Such topologically nontrivial regions of filled states can arise in experimentally realized TI heterostructures or materials with large Rashba splitting, i.e. BiTeI, where the Fermi sea is not simply connected. A non-monotonic electromagnetic response implies regimes of negative differential resistance, which have important applications in technologies involving microwave generation, like motion sensing and radio astronomy. We hope that nontrivial Fermi sea topology will hence provide another route for the realization of such technologies.

  19. Three decades of structure- and property-based molecular design.

    PubMed

    Müller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Roche has pioneered structure- and property-based molecular design to drug discovery. While this is an ongoing development, the past three decades feature key events that have revolutionized the way drug discovery is conducted in Big Pharma industry. It has been a great privilege to have been involved in this transformation process, to have been able to collaborate with, direct, guide, or simply encourage outstanding experts in various disciplines to build and further develop what has become a major pillar of modern small-molecule drug discovery. This article is an account of major events that took place since the early decision of Roche to implement computer-assisted molecular modeling 32 years ago and is devoted to the key players involved. It highlights the internal build-up of structural biology, with protein X-ray structure determination at its core, and the early setup of bioinformatics. It describes the strategic shift to large compound libraries and high-throughput screening with the development of novel compound storage and ultra-high-throughput screening facilities, as well as the strategic return to focused screening of small motif-based compound libraries. These developments were accompanied by the rise of miniaturized parallel compound property analytics which resulted in a major paradigm shift in medicinal chemistry from linear to multi-dimensional lead optimization. The rapid growth of huge collections of property data stimulated the development of various novel data mining concepts with 'matched molecular pair' analysis and novel variants thereof playing crucial roles. As compound properties got more prominent in molecular design, exploration of specific structural motifs for property modulation became a research activity complementary to target-oriented medicinal chemistry. The exploration of oxetane is given as an example. For the sake of brevity, this account cannot detail all further developments that have taken place in each individual area of

  20. Computer program for determining mass properties of a rigid structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, R. A.; Gilbert, J. L.; Klich, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program was developed for the rapid computation of the mass properties of complex structural systems. The program uses rigid body analyses and permits differences in structural material throughout the total system. It is based on the premise that complex systems can be adequately described by a combination of basic elemental shapes. Simple geometric data describing size and location of each element and the respective material density or weight of each element were the only required input data. From this minimum input, the program yields system weight, center of gravity, moments of inertia and products of inertia with respect to mutually perpendicular axes through the system center of gravity. The program also yields mass properties of the individual shapes relative to component axes.

  1. Structure and Electronic Properties of Cerium Orthophosphate: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, Nicole; Mun, B. Simon; Ray, Hannah; Ross Jr, Phillip; Neaton, Jeffrey; De Jonghe, Lutgard

    2010-07-27

    Structural and electronic properties of cerium orthophosphate (CePO{sub 4}) are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with the local spin-density approximation (LSDA+U), with and without gradient corrections (GGA-(PBE)+U), and compared to X-ray diffraction and photoemission spectroscopy measurements. The density of states is found to change significantly as the Hubbard parameter U, which is applied to the Ce 4f states, is varied from 0 to 5 eV. The calculated structural properties are in good agreement with experiment and do not change significantly with U. Choosing U = 3 eV for LDSA provides the best agreement between the calculated density of states and the experimental photoemission spectra.

  2. Mechanical and structural properties of similar and dissimilar steel joints

    SciTech Connect

    Celik, A.; Alsaran, A.

    1999-11-01

    The mechanical properties of specimens from similar and dissimilar weld joints were examined. A ferritic steel (St37-2) and an austenitic stainless steel (AISI 304) were joined by the gas tungsten arc weld (GTAW) process using an austenitic filler metal. Mechanical and metallographic properties of the specimens were obtained by means of microhardness testing, tensile testing, bending fatigue testing, and light optical and scanning electron microscopy. The highest microhardness values were recorded on the ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld joint, whereas the highest tensile strength and bending fatigue life were obtained with the austenitic-austenitic joints. Ferritic and pearlitic structures were observed in the microstructure of the ferritic-ferritic joint. The microstructures of austenitic-austenitic and austenitic-ferritic joints showed small recrystallization grains in addition to the typical austenitic and ferritic structures. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the fracture surfaces of the specimens and the origins of the fatigue cracks.

  3. Chirality-Mediated Mechanical and Structural Properties of Oligopeptide Hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Taraban, Marc B.; Feng, Yue; Hammouda, Boualem; Hyland, Laura L.; Yu, Y. Bruce

    2012-10-29

    The origin and the effects of homochirality in the biological world continuously stimulate numerous hypotheses and much debate. This work attempts to look at the biohomochirality issue from a different angle - the mechanical properties of the bulk biomaterial and their relation to nanoscale structures. Using a pair of oppositely charged peptides that co-assemble into hydrogels, we systematically investigated the effect of chirality on the mechanical properties of these hydrogels through different combinations of syndiotactic and isotactic peptides. It was found that homochirality confers mechanical advantage, resulting in a higher elastic modulus and strain yield value. Yet, heterochirality confers kinetic advantage, resulting in faster gelation. Structurally, both homochiral and heterochiral hydrogels are made of fibers interconnected by lappet-like webs, but the homochiral peptide fibers are thicker and denser. These results highlight the possible role of biohomochirality in the evolution and/or natural selection of biomaterials.

  4. Structure-Property Relationship in High Tg Thermosetting Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; HardyGreen, DeNise

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the structure-property relationship in high glass transition temperatures (T(sub g)) thermosetting polyimides. The objectives of this work are to replace MDA in PMR-15 with 2,2-substituted benzidine and to evaluate the thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties of DMBZ-15 against PMR-15. Details are given on the T(sub g) of polyimide resins, the x-ray crystal structure of 2,2-Bis(trifluoro)benzidine (BFBZ), the isothermal aging of polyimide resins at 288 C under 1 atm of circulating air, the compressive strength of polyimide composites, and a gas evaluation profile of DMBZ-15 polyimide resins.

  5. Structural and optical properties of hydrothermally synthesized vanadium oxides nanobelts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkaoui, I.; Khenfouch, M.; Elmokri, I.; Mothudi, B. M.; Dhlamini, M. S.; Moloi, S. J.; Zorkani, I.; Jorio, A.; Maaza, M.

    2017-03-01

    Nanostructured metal oxides have attracted a lot of attention recently owning to their unique structural advantages, and demonstrated promising chemical and physical properties for various applications. In this study, we report the structural and optical properties of vanadium oxide nanoparticles (VO-NPs) prepared via a hydrothermal method. Our results are revealing that the components of VO-NPs films are having a belt-like shape with a uniform size distribution. The nanobelts with very smooth and flat surfaces have a typical length of up to 1μm and a width of about 9-14 nm. Moreover, The UV-Visible spectroscopy revealed an excellent optical propertiesshowing clearly the good stoichiometry and crystallinity of our VO-NPs films. This synthesis method provides a new simple route to fabricate one-dimensional nanostructured metal oxides which is suitable for a large field of applications.

  6. Structural and optical properties for typical solid mirror shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Myung K.; Richard, Ralph M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is developed to determine the weight, center of gravity, areal properties, and mass inertial properties for typical mirrors. A number of support conditions were considered to examine optical surface deflections, surface quality, and fundamental natural frequency for single- and double-arch mirror shapes. Structural performance estimates were made with the NASTRAN program, and optical performances were evaluated with the FRINGE program, using an SXA 40-in mirror. To show the behavior of element types from the NASTRAN program, finite element validity and sensitivity studies were performed in optical model applications. Material parameters, contoured back shapes, and support locations are shown to have significant effects on structural and optical performances. Optimal support locations and support points are given. Fundamental natural frequencies for some shapes are found with the closed-form solution. The plate models results may not be acceptable for determining real mirror optical performances.

  7. DNA-linked nanoparticle materials: optical, electrical, and structural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarides, A.; Park, S.-J.; Mirkin, C.; Storhoff, J.; Schatz, G.; Brazis, P.; Kannewurf, C.

    2001-03-01

    Novel bioinorganic materials composed of Au nanoparticles linked with DNA have been developed as colorimetric DNA sensors. In the presence of complimentary DNA, particles dressed with one of two oligonucleotide sequences are linked to form binary nanoparticle aggregates. Assemblies linked at 298K have plasmon frequency shifts that decrease with increasing linker length; annealing, however, eliminates the length dependence of the shift. Neither sedimentation rate measurements nor theoretical studies of the optical properties provide unambiguous explanation. However, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements indicate that separations between nanoparticles with or without annealing are proportional to the number of base pairs in the oligonucleotide linkers. DNA is thus shown to offer a means for tuning separations in nanoparticle materials. We have also investigated the electrical and structural properties of dry Au nanoparticle films linked by DNA. The assemblies are semiconducting, which suggests that DNA can be used as a chemically specific scaffolding material for assembly of conductive structures.

  8. Structures and Properties of Polymers Important to Their Wear Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, K.

    1984-01-01

    The wear and transfer of various semicrystalline polymers sliding against smooth steel or glass surfaces were examined. The effects of structures, and properties of polymers on their wear behavior are discussed. It is found that the high wear characteristics of PTFE is due to the easy destruction of the banded structure of PTFE. The size of spherulites and the molecular profile are closely related to the magnitude of wear rates of typical semicrystalline polymers. The effects of these factors on the wear rate on the basis of the destruction or melting of spherulites at the frictional surface are discussed. Although the fatigue theory of wear indicates that some mechanical properties are important to wear behavior, it is shown that the theory does not always explain the experimental result obtained on a smooth surface.

  9. Electronic and structural properties of alkali-halide cluster anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, Fredrik Kurosh

    We have used photoelectron spectroscopy to study alkali- halide clusters containing excess electrons. These measurements addressed five major aspects of the electronic and structural properties of the clusters. The underlying motivations for studying these clusters are to understand the transition from atomic to bulk behavior as a function of particle size and to identify those properties which are unique to clusters. We have observed excited states in many of the single excess electron clusters, and tested simple theoretical models against our experimental results. The two excess electron systems also contain excited states. However, the absorption of a photon in these systems often leads to the desorption of a negatively charged alkali ion. The abundance of various isomers of the cesium-halide systems depends strongly on the temperature of the source in which they are created, while those of the potassium and sodium halides do not. We have proven that this behavior indicates that the clusters undergo rapid structural interconversions on a subnanosecond time scale. The properties of alkali-halide clusters usually depend only on the type of alkali in the cluster. To understand the effect of different alkali ions on the electronic and structural properties of the clusters, we have examined mixed clusters which contain more than one alkali species. There properties are influenced most by the larger cations in single excess electron systems, and by the smaller cations in multiple excess electron particles. Finally, our measurements have shown that some of the potassium-rich potassium-iodide cluster anions (KI)m K- n( m=2- 7,n=1- 4) appear to separate into a purely metallic component K-n supported by an ionic component (KI)m. This behavior is clear for m = 2, 3, 4, and 6. For m = 5 and 7, the ions comprising the cluster show a high degree of mixing.

  10. Properties and structure of raised bog peat humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-10-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic components of soil, peat and natural waters, and their structure and properties differ very much depending on their source. The aims of this study are to characterize humic acids (HAs) from raised bog peat, to evaluate the homogeneity of peat HAs within peat profiles, and to study peat humification impact on properties of HAs. A major impact on the structure of peat HAs have lignin-free raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin). On diagenesis scale, peat HAs have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter, and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, while thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge as a result of abiotic synthesis. However, in comparison with soil, aquatic and other HAs, aromaticity of peat HAs is much lower. Comparatively, the raised bog peat HAs are at the beginning of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups change depending on the peat age and decomposition degree from where HAs have been isolated, and carboxylic acidity of peat HAs increases with peat depth and humification degree.

  11. Dielectric and structural properties of ferroelectric betaine arsenate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashova, E. V.; Krichevtsov, B. B.; Zaitseva, N. V.; Yurko, E. I.; Svinarev, F. B.

    2014-12-01

    Ferroelectric films of betaine arsenate and partially deuterated betaine arsenate have been grown by evaporation on LiNbO3, α-Al2O3, and NdGaO3 substrates with a preliminarily deposited structure of interdigitated electrodes, as well as on the Al/glass substrate. This paper presents the results of the examination of the block structure of the films in a polarizing microscope, the X-ray diffraction analysis of their crystal structure, and the investigation of the dielectric properties in a measuring field oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the plane of the film. The transition of the films to the ferroelectric state at T = T c is accompanied by anomalies of the capacitance of the structure, an increase in the dielectric loss, and the appearance of dielectric hysteresis loops. The growth of the films from a solution of betaine arsenate in a heavy water leads to an increase in the ferroelectric transition temperature from T c = 119 K in the films without deuterium to T c = 149 K, which corresponds to the degree of deuteration of approximately 60-70%. The dielectric and structural properties of the films are compared with those of the betaine arsenate single crystals and the previously studied films of betaine phosphite and glycine phosphite.

  12. Density Functional Study of the structural properties in Tamoxifen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Coss-Martinez, Romeo; Tapia, Jorge A.; Quijano-Quiñones, Ramiro F.; Canto, Gabriel I.

    2013-03-01

    Using the density functional theory, we have studied the structural properties of Tamoxifen. The calculations were performed with two methodological approaches, which were implemented in SIESTA and Spartan codes. For SIESTA, we considerate a linear combination of atomic orbitals method, using pseudopotentials and the van der Waals approximation for the exchange-correlation potential. Here we analyzed and compared the atomic structure between our results and other theoretical study. We found differences in the bond lengths between the results, that could be attributed to code approaches in each one. This work was supported under Grant FOMIX 2011-09 N: 170297 of Ph.D. A. Tapia.

  13. Correlating the structural, chemical, and optical properties at nanometer resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, L.; Özdöl, V. B.; Sigle, W.; Koch, C. T.; Srot, V.; van Aken, P. A.

    2010-01-01

    Valence electron spectroscopic imaging (VESI) techniques, taking advantages of the energy-losses suffered by inelastic scattering of the fast electrons in the transmission electron microscope, offer an inherently high spatial resolution to characterize the electronic structure of materials close to the Fermi level. Here we demonstrate that the combination of an electron monochromator and a highly dispersive imaging energy filter, which has become available only recently, allows reliable measurements of local bandgaps on the nanometer scale. In addition, the correlations of structural, chemical, and optical properties can be revealed via VESI using monochromated electrons with a high spatial resolution.

  14. Polymeric Thin Films for Organic Electronics: Properties and Adaptive Structures

    PubMed Central

    Cataldo, Sebastiano; Pignataro, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    This review deals with the correlation between morphology, structure and performance of organic electronic devices including thin film transistors and solar cells. In particular, we report on solution processed devices going into the role of the 3D supramolecular organization in determining their electronic properties. A selection of case studies from recent literature are reviewed, relying on solution methods for organic thin-film deposition which allow fine control of the supramolecular aggregation of polymers confined at surfaces in nanoscopic layers. A special focus is given to issues exploiting morphological structures stemming from the intrinsic polymeric dynamic adaptation under non-equilibrium conditions. PMID:28809362

  15. Structural and magnetic properties of Mg substituted Co nanoferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Jyoti Parashar, Jyoti; Jadoun, Priya; Saxena, V. K.; Bhatnagar, D.; Sharma, Neha; Yadav, Premlata; Sharma, K. B.

    2016-05-23

    The structural and magnetic properties of magnesium substituted cobalt nano ferrites Co{sub x}Mg{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x= 0.2, 0.4 and 1.0) have been investigated. The structural characterization has been done by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The magnetic studies indicate that the samples show ferromagnetic behaviour at room temperature as well as at low temperature. The magnetization decreases with Mg content in both the cases due to the less magnetic nature of Mg ions than that of the Co ions.

  16. Structural and ferromagnetic properties of KNbO3 microrods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, S.; Babu, R. Ramesh; Ramamurthi, K.

    2017-05-01

    Potassium niobate (KNbO3) microrods were synthesized at various calcination temperature (700, 800 and 900 °C) by solid state reaction method. The effects of crystallites size on the structural and magnetic properties of KNbO3 microrods were studied. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectral results show that all the samples exhibit single phase orthorhombic crystal structure with space group Cm2m. Vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) results show that the existence of ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature, the saturation magnetization (Ms) lie in the range of 0.012 - 0.015 emu g-1 and coercive field (Hc) is found to be 420 - 489 Oe.

  17. Electronic Structure of Lanthanum Hydrides with Switchable Optical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.; Zhang, F.; Ng, K.; Zhang, F.; Anisimov, V.; Rice, T.; Anisimov, V.

    1997-02-01

    Recent dramatic changes in the optical properties of LaH{sub 2+x} and YH{sub 2+x} films discovered by Huiberts {ital et al.}[Nature (London) {bold 380}, 231 (1996)] suggest their electronic structure is described best by a local model. Electron correlation is important in H{sup -} centers and in explaining the transparent insulating behavior of LaH{sub 3}. The metal-insulator transition at x{approximately}0.8 takes place in a band of highly localized states centered on the H vacancies in the LaH{sub 3} structure. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Electronic structure and optical properties of solid C 60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattesini, M.; Ahuja, R.; Sa, L.; Hugosson, H. W.; Johansson, B.; Eriksson, O.

    2009-06-01

    The electronic structure and the optical properties of face-centered-cubic C 60 have been investigated by using an all-electron full-potential method. Our ab initio results show that the imaginary dielectric function for high-energy values looks very similar to that of graphite, revealing close electronic structure similarities between the two systems. We have also identified the origin of different peaks in the dielectric function of fullerene by means of the calculated electronic density of states. The computed optical spectrum compares fairly well with the available experimental data for the Vis-UV absorption spectrum of solid C 60.

  19. Bioinformatics and variability in drug response: a protein structural perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lahti, Jennifer L.; Tang, Grace W.; Capriotti, Emidio; Liu, Tianyun; Altman, Russ B.

    2012-01-01

    Marketed drugs frequently perform worse in clinical practice than in the clinical trials on which their approval is based. Many therapeutic compounds are ineffective for a large subpopulation of patients to whom they are prescribed; worse, a significant fraction of patients experience adverse effects more severe than anticipated. The unacceptable risk–benefit profile for many drugs mandates a paradigm shift towards personalized medicine. However, prior to adoption of patient-specific approaches, it is useful to understand the molecular details underlying variable drug response among diverse patient populations. Over the past decade, progress in structural genomics led to an explosion of available three-dimensional structures of drug target proteins while efforts in pharmacogenetics offered insights into polymorphisms correlated with differential therapeutic outcomes. Together these advances provide the opportunity to examine how altered protein structures arising from genetic differences affect protein–drug interactions and, ultimately, drug response. In this review, we first summarize structural characteristics of protein targets and common mechanisms of drug interactions. Next, we describe the impact of coding mutations on protein structures and drug response. Finally, we highlight tools for analysing protein structures and protein–drug interactions and discuss their application for understanding altered drug responses associated with protein structural variants. PMID:22552919

  20. Effect of group walking traffic on dynamic properties of pedestrian structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabpoor, E.; Pavic, A.; Racic, V.; Zivanovic, S.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing number of reported vibration serviceability problems in newly built pedestrian structures, such as footbridges and floors, under walking load has attracted considerable attention in the civil engineering community over the past two decades. The key design challenges are: the inter- and intra-subject variability of walking people, the unknown mechanisms of their interaction with the vibrating walking surfaces and the synchronisation between individuals in a group. Ignoring all or some of these factors makes the current design methods an inconsistent approximation of reality. This often leads to considerable over- or under-estimation of the structural response, yielding an unreliable assessment of vibration performance. Changes to the dynamic properties of an empty structure due to the presence of stationary people have been studied extensively over the past two decades. The understanding of the similar effect of walking people on laterally swaying bridges has improved tremendously in the past decade, due to considerable research prompted by the Millennium Bridge problem. However, there is currently a gap in knowledge about how moving pedestrians affect the dynamic properties of vertically vibrating structures. The key reason for this gap is the scarcity of credible experimental data pertinent to moving pedestrians on vertically vibrating structures, especially for multi-pedestrian traffic. This paper addresses this problem by studying the dynamic properties of the combined human-structure system, i.e. occupied structure damping ratio, natural frequency and modal mass. This was achieved using a comprehensive set of frequency response function records, measured on a full-scale test structure, which was occupied by various numbers of moving pedestrians under different walking scenarios. Contrary to expectations, it was found that the natural frequency of the joint moving human-structure system was higher than that of the empty structure, while it was

  1. Magnetic and structural properties of manganese ion implanted silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awo-Affouda, Chaffra A.

    2007-12-01

    This thesis focuses on semiconductor based spin electronics. The integration of ferromagnetic regions into semiconductor "spintronic" devices to produce spin polarized current is a dynamic research area. One avenue is to make conventional semiconductors ferromagnetic by doping with a transition metal impurity such as Mn. For this, we first investigated the magnetic properties of Mn-implanted Si. We were able to measure above room temperature ferromagnetic hysteresis loops. The high Curie temperature obtained (>400 K), indicated that the synthesis of a technologically useful Si-based magnetic semiconductor is possible. We then focused on studying the structure of the implanted samples in order to establish a correlation between the magnetic and structural properties. The structural investigation involved secondary ion mass spectrometry, Rutherford backscattering, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as the main characterization techniques. The combination of the structural and magnetic studies allowed us to isolate an "active" region from which the ferromagnetism originates. We then found that the magnetic properties of the samples are strongly dependant on the interaction of the Mn atoms with the residual implant damage. The evolution of the Mn concentration profiles was also found to be closely related to the distribution of the Si lattice defects. We also observed the formation of Mn rich secondary phases at high enough annealing temperatures >800°C. However, we argued that theses crystallites cannot account for all the observed magnetic properties due to the low Curie temperature of these compounds in bulk form. We concluded that achieving a room temperature Si-based DMS has great potential but careful synthesis of this material system is needed to prevent secondary phase formation.

  2. Structure and Electrical Properties of an Assembly of Au Nanoclusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    Nanoclusters DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report: TITLE: Materials Research...Materials Research Society Structure and Electrical Properties of an Assembly of Au Nanoclusters G. Muralidharan, L. Maya and T. Thundat Oak Ridge National...interest both for understanding the fundamental physics involved and for potential applications. In this study, we describe a technique for preparing

  3. Relaxed structural property of Al nano-cluster: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwan, Bhoopendra Dhar; Khaskalam, Amit

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we have studied the thermodynamic property of metallic Aluminium (Al) nano-clusters with relaxed structure by model approach. The relaxed cohesive energy is higher than that of the un-relaxed one due to relaxation process decreasing the total energy. It is found that cohesive energy of nano-clauster depends on the size of the clusters and increase with increasing the cluster size.

  4. Material Properties Analysis of Structural Members in Pumpkin Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    The efficient design, service-life qualification, and reliability predictions for lightweight aerospace structures require careful mechanical properties analysis of candidate structural materials. The demand for high-quality laboratory data is particularly acute when the candidate material or the structural design has little history. The pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloon presents both challenges. Its design utilizes load members (tendons) extending from apex to base around the gas envelope to achieve a lightweight structure. The candidate tendon material is highly weight-efficient braided HM cord. Previous mechanical properties studies of Zylon have focused on fiber and yarn, and industrial use of the material in tensile applications is limited. For high-performance polymers, a carefully plamed and executed properties analysis scheme is required to ensure the data are relevant to the desired application. Because no directly-applicable testing standard was available, a protocol was developed based on guidelines fiom professional and industry organizations. Due to the liquid-crystalline nature of the polymer, the cord is very stiff, creeps very little, and does not yield. Therefore, the key material property for this application is the breaking strength. The pretension load and gauge length were found to have negligible effect on the measured breaking strength over the ranges investigated. Strain rate was found to have no effect on breaking strength, within the range of rates suggested by the standards organizations. However, at the lower rate more similar to ULDB operations, the strength was reduced. The breaking strength increased when the experiment temperature was decreased from ambient to 183K which is the lowest temperature ULDB is expected to experience. The measured strength under all test conditions was well below that resulting from direct scale-up of fiber strength based on the manufacturers data. This expected result is due to the effects of the

  5. Structure for Storing Properties of Particles (PoP)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N. R.; Mattoon, C. M.; Beck, B. R.; Summers, N. C.; Brown, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    Some evaluated nuclear databases are critical for applications such as nuclear energy, nuclear medicine, homeland security, and stockpile stewardship. Particle masses, nuclear excitation levels, and other “Properties of Particles” are essential for making evaluated nuclear databases. Currently, these properties are obtained from various databases that are stored in outdated formats. Moreover, the “Properties of Particles” (PoP) structure is being designed that will allow storing all information for one or more particles in a single place, so that each evaluation, simulation, model calculation, etc. can link to the same data. Information provided in PoP will include properties of nuclei, gammas and electrons (along with other particles such as pions, as evaluations extend to higher energies). Presently, PoP includes masses from the Atomic Mass Evaluation version 2003 (AME2003), and level schemes and gamma decays from the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL-3). The data are stored in a hierarchical structure. An example of how PoP stores nuclear masses and energy levels will be presented here.

  6. Structure for Storing Properties of Particles (PoP)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Beck, B.R.; Summers, N.C.; Brown, D.A.

    2014-06-15

    Evaluated nuclear databases are critical for applications such as nuclear energy, nuclear medicine, homeland security, and stockpile stewardship. Particle masses, nuclear excitation levels, and other “Properties of Particles” are essential for making evaluated nuclear databases. Currently, these properties are obtained from various databases that are stored in outdated formats. A “Properties of Particles” (PoP) structure is being designed that will allow storing all information for one or more particles in a single place, so that each evaluation, simulation, model calculation, etc. can link to the same data. Information provided in PoP will include properties of nuclei, gammas and electrons (along with other particles such as pions, as evaluations extend to higher energies). Presently, PoP includes masses from the Atomic Mass Evaluation version 2003 (AME2003), and level schemes and gamma decays from the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL-3). The data are stored in a hierarchical structure. An example of how PoP stores nuclear masses and energy levels will be presented here.

  7. Structural and thermodynamics properties of organo-modified montmorillonite clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anoukou, K.; Zaoui, A.; Zaïri, F.; Naït-Abdelaziz, M.; Gloaguen, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Polymer clay nanocomposites (PCNs) have been seen as the most novel materials in engineering applications since they exhibit significant improvement in mechanical and physical properties. Indeed, with few amount of organoclay, PCNs exhibit enhanced mechanical, optical, thermal and liquid or gas barrier properties compared to pure polymers and to their counterpart microcomposites. Thus, organoclays are extensively used as precursors in the preparation of PCNs. They are the best candidate in reinforcing PCNs because of the lightweight and the high availability of clay minerals in the nature. However, structure and physical phenomena arising at molecular level in organoclays, and subsequently in PCNs, are not completely or difficultly accessible with existing experimental techniques. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was conducted using the combination of two force fields (CLAYFF and CHARMM) to evaluate the thermodynamics and structural properties of organoclay such as heat capacities, isothermal bulk modulus, density, basal spacing and chains arrangement in the interlayer spacing. Our results regarding the basal spacing and density are in fairly good agreement with available experimental data. This allows us to validate the use of the two force fields to represent interactions in organoclays. The effect of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) on the basal spacing and the thermodynamics properties is assessed. We found, through our MD simulation, that the calculated isothermal bulk modulus is in good agreement with the density value of organoclays with two different CEC.

  8. Structure for Storing Properties of Particles (PoP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, N. R.; Mattoon, C. M.; Beck, B. R.; Summers, N. C.; Brown, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    Evaluated nuclear databases are critical for applications such as nuclear energy, nuclear medicine, homeland security, and stockpile stewardship. Particle masses, nuclear excitation levels, and other "Properties of Particles" are essential for making evaluated nuclear databases. Currently, these properties are obtained from various databases that are stored in outdated formats. A "Properties of Particles" (PoP) structure is being designed that will allow storing all information for one or more particles in a single place, so that each evaluation, simulation, model calculation, etc. can link to the same data. Information provided in PoP will include properties of nuclei, gammas and electrons (along with other particles such as pions, as evaluations extend to higher energies). Presently, PoP includes masses from the Atomic Mass Evaluation version 2003 (AME2003), and level schemes and gamma decays from the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL-3). The data are stored in a hierarchical structure. An example of how PoP stores nuclear masses and energy levels will be presented here.

  9. Solar Sail Material Performance Property Response to Space Environmental Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Semmel, Charles; Hovater, Mary; Nehls, Mary; Gray, Perry; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues research into the utilization of photonic materials for spacecraft propulsion. Spacecraft propulsion, using photonic materials, will be achieved using a solar sail. A solar sail operates on the principle that photons, originating from the sun, impart pressure to the sail and therefore provide a source for spacecraft propulsion. The pressure imparted to a solar sail can be increased, up to a factor of two if the sun-facing surface is perfectly reflective. Therefore, these solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic sun-facing layer, a thin polymeric substrate and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. Near term solar sail propelled science missions are targeting the Lagrange point 1 (L1) as well as locations sunward of L1 as destinations. These near term missions include the Solar Polar Imager' and the L1 Diamond '. The Environmental Effects Group at NASA's Marshall Space Fliglit Center (MSFC) continues to actively characterize solar sail material in preparation for these near term solar sail missions. Previous investigations indicated that space environmental effects on sail material thermo-optical properties were minimal and would not significantly affect the propulsion efficiency of the sail3-'. These investigations also indicated that the sail material mechanical stability degrades with increasing radiation exposure. This paper will further quantify the effect of space environmental exposure on the mechanical properties of candidate sail materials. Candidate sail materials for these missions include Aluminum coated Mylar TM, Teonexm, and CP1 (Colorless Polyimide). These materials were subjected to uniform radiation doses of electrons and protons in individual exposures sequences. Dose values ranged from 100 Mrads to over 5 Grads. The engineering performance property responses of thermo-optical and mechanical properties were

  10. Solar Sail Material Performance Property Response to Space Environmental Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Semmel, Charles; Hovater, Mary; Nehls, Mary; Gray, Perry; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues research into the utilization of photonic materials for spacecraft propulsion. Spacecraft propulsion, using photonic materials, will be achieved using a solar sail. A solar sail operates on the principle that photons, originating from the sun, impart pressure to the sail and therefore provide a source for spacecraft propulsion. The pressure imparted to a solar sail can be increased, up to a factor of two if the sun-facing surface is perfectly reflective. Therefore, these solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic sun-facing layer, a thin polymeric substrate and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. Near term solar sail propelled science missions are targeting the Lagrange point 1 (L1) as well as locations sunward of L1 as destinations. These near term missions include the Solar Polar Imager' and the L1 Diamond '. The Environmental Effects Group at NASA's Marshall Space Fliglit Center (MSFC) continues to actively characterize solar sail material in preparation for these near term solar sail missions. Previous investigations indicated that space environmental effects on sail material thermo-optical properties were minimal and would not significantly affect the propulsion efficiency of the sail3-'. These investigations also indicated that the sail material mechanical stability degrades with increasing radiation exposure. This paper will further quantify the effect of space environmental exposure on the mechanical properties of candidate sail materials. Candidate sail materials for these missions include Aluminum coated Mylar TM, Teonexm, and CP1 (Colorless Polyimide). These materials were subjected to uniform radiation doses of electrons and protons in individual exposures sequences. Dose values ranged from 100 Mrads to over 5 Grads. The engineering performance property responses of thermo-optical and mechanical properties were

  11. The influence of physical activity during youth on structural and functional properties of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lenskjold, A; Kongsgaard, M; Larsen, J O; Nielsen, R H; Kovanen, V; Aagaard, P; Kjaer, M; Magnusson, S P

    2015-02-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a highly prevalent sports injury. Animal studies show a growth response in tendons in response to loading in the immature phase but not after puberty maturation. The aim of this investigation was to examine the structural and material properties in long distance runners who were either physically active (HAY) or inactive (LAY) in young age. Twelve men in HAY group and eight men in LAY group participated. Structural, functional, and biochemical properties of Achilles tendon were estimated from magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound video recordings, mechanical tests, and tendon biopsies, respectively. There was no difference between the groups with respect to tendon cross-sectional area or tendon free length. There was no difference between the groups with respect to maximal force or mechanical properties. The collagen content, enzymatic and nonenzymatic cross-link density did not differ between the groups, nor did collagen fibril density, diameter, and area. There was a correlation between age and pentosidine/collagen within the groups [(HAY: P < 0.05 and r(2) = 0.47) and (LAY: P < 0.05 and r(2) = 0.52)]. The data suggest that high or low activity during youth did not appreciably influence the mechanical, structural, or biochemical properties of the Achilles tendon in adult long distance runners.

  12. Humic acids: Structural properties and multiple functionalities for novel technological developments.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Bruna Alice Gomes; Motta, Fernanda Lopes; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade

    2016-05-01

    Humic acids (HAs) are macromolecules that comprise humic substances (HS), which are organic matter distributed in terrestrial soil, natural water, and sediment. HAs differ from the other HS fractions (fulvic acid and humins) in that they are soluble in alkaline media, partially soluble in water, and insoluble in acidic media. Due to their amphiphilic character, HAs form micelle-like structures in neutral to acidic conditions, which are useful in agriculture, pollution remediation, medicine and pharmaceuticals. HAs have undefined compositions that vary according to the origin, process of obtainment, and functional groups present in their structures, such as quinones, phenols, and carboxylic acids. Quinones are responsible for the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HAs, which are useful for wound healing and have fungicidal/bactericidal properties. Phenols and carboxylic acids deprotonate in neutral and alkaline media and are responsible for various other functions, such as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of HAs. In particular, the presence of phenolic groups in HAs provides antioxidant properties due to their free radical scavenging capacity. This paper describes the main multifunctionalities of HAs associated with their structures and properties, focusing on human health applications, and we note perspectives that may lead to novel technological developments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review to address this topic from this approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Designing the Structure of Carbon Fibers for Optimal Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Soydan; Vautard, Frederic; Naskar, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber manufacturing follows generic processing steps: formation of thermoplastic fibers, stabilization, and carbonization. The final structures and end properties of the carbon fiber can differ significantly depending on the precursor chemistry and the associated processing sciences. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and mesophase pitch are the predominant precursors used in the production of carbon fibers. PAN-based carbon fibers consist of nanocrystalline graphitic domains typically 1.5 5 nm in size surrounded by amorphous carbon; in contrast, pitch-based carbon fibers are 10 50 nm crystallites with the graphitic (002) planes mostly aligned parallel to the fiber axis. It has been seen that the skin core structure of PAN-based carbon fibers plays a significant role in their mechanical properties. Designing a more homogenous carbon fiber microstructure by controlling the starting polymer and process parameters results in a different set of tensile strengths and elastic moduli. In this study the microstructural defect distribution (0.1 200 nm), measured by small-angle X-ray scattering, was shown to be directly related to the tensile strength of the carbon fibers. Here the formation of carbon structures from various polymer precursors is reviewed. Such a comprehensive understanding offers the opportunity to design carbon fiber microstructures with improved properties and to ultimately create new types of carbon fibers from alternative precursors at reduced cost.

  14. Aircraft Structural Mass Property Prediction Using Conceptual-Level Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexstone, Matthew G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology that extends the use of the Equivalent LAminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) structural analysis code from conceptual-level aircraft structural analysis to conceptual-level aircraft mass property analysis. Mass property analysis in aircraft structures has historically depended upon parametric weight equations at the conceptual design level and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) at the detailed design level ELAPS allows for the modeling of detailed geometry, metallic and composite materials, and non-structural mass coupled with analytical structural sizing to produce high-fidelity mass property analyses representing fully configured vehicles early in the design process. This capability is especially valuable for unusual configuration and advanced concept development where existing parametric weight equations are inapplicable and FEA is too time consuming for conceptual design. This paper contrasts the use of ELAPS relative to empirical weight equations and FEA. ELAPS modeling techniques are described and the ELAPS-based mass property analysis process is detailed Examples of mass property stochastic calculations produced during a recent systems study are provided This study involved the analysis of three remotely piloted aircraft required to carry scientific payloads to very high altitudes at subsonic speeds. Due to the extreme nature of this high-altitude flight regime,few existing vehicle designs are available for use in performance and weight prediction. ELAPS was employed within a concurrent engineering analysis process that simultaneously produces aerodynamic, structural, and static aeroelastic results for input to aircraft performance analyses. The ELAPS models produced for each concept were also used to provide stochastic analyses of wing structural mass properties. The results of this effort indicate that ELAPS is an efficient means to conduct multidisciplinary trade studies at the conceptual design level.

  15. Aircraft Structural Mass Property Prediction Using Conceptual-Level Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexstone, Matthew G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology that extends the use of the Equivalent LAminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) structural analysis code from conceptual-level aircraft structural analysis to conceptual-level aircraft mass property analysis. Mass property analysis in aircraft structures has historically depended upon parametric weight equations at the conceptual design level and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) at the detailed design level. ELAPS allows for the modeling of detailed geometry, metallic and composite materials, and non-structural mass coupled with analytical structural sizing to produce high-fidelity mass property analyses representing fully configured vehicles early in the design process. This capability is especially valuable for unusual configuration and advanced concept development where existing parametric weight equations are inapplicable and FEA is too time consuming for conceptual design. This paper contrasts the use of ELAPS relative to empirical weight equations and FEA. ELAPS modeling techniques are described and the ELAPS-based mass property analysis process is detailed. Examples of mass property stochastic calculations produced during a recent systems study are provided. This study involved the analysis of three remotely piloted aircraft required to carry scientific payloads to very high altitudes at subsonic speeds. Due to the extreme nature of this high-altitude flight regime, few existing vehicle designs are available for use in performance and weight prediction. ELAPS was employed within a concurrent engineering analysis process that simultaneously produces aerodynamic, structural, and static aeroelastic results for input to aircraft performance analyses. The ELAPS models produced for each concept were also used to provide stochastic analyses of wing structural mass properties. The results of this effort indicate that ELAPS is an efficient means to conduct multidisciplinary trade studies at the conceptual design level.

  16. Effects of structural coupling on mistuned cascade flutter and response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielb, R. E.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of structural coupling on mistuned cascade flutter and response are analytically investigated using an extended typical section model. This model includes both structural and aerodynamic coupling between the blades. The model assumes that the structurally coupled system natural modes were determined and are represented in the form of N bending and N torsional uncoupled modes for each blade, where N is the number of blades and, hence, is only valid for blade dominated motion. The aerodynamic loads are calculated by using two dimensional unsteady cascade theories in the subsonic and supersonic flow regimes. The results show that the addition of structural coupling can affect both the aeroelastic stability and frequency. The stability is significantly affected only when the system is mistuned. The resonant frequencies can be significantly changed by structural coupling in both tuned and mistuned systems, however, the peak response is significantly affected only in the latter.

  17. Optical properties of vanadium dioxide thin film in nanoparticle structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Baoying; Li, Yi; Tong, Guoxiang; Wang, Xiaohua; Yan, Meng; Liang, Qian; Wang, Feng; Qin, Yuan; Ding, Jie; Chen, Shaojuan; Chen, Jiankun; Zheng, Hongzhu; Yuan, Wenrui

    2015-09-01

    The thermo-optic effect and infrared optical properties of VO2 nanoparticles were studied to obtain an optical material with special property that can be used in smart windows. The reflectance and transmittance spectra of the VO2 nanoparticles with different duty cycles at different temperatures were simulated with a specific dispersion relation. Vanadium metal nanoparticles were deposited on glass substrate by magnetic reactive sputtering with porous alumina template (AAO) mask, and the VO2 nanoparticles were prepared by thermal oxidation. The nanostructure and optical properties of the VO2 nanoparticles were characterized by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and spectrophotometry. The method of preparation of the sample is economical and the phase transition temperature is observed to drop to 43 °C. The transmission at 1700 nm exhibits a variation of 29% between the metallic and semiconducting states. The VO2 nanoparticles exhibit a significant thermochromic property. The transmittance of the VO2 nanoparticles is improved compared with the VO2 film. The decrease in phase transition temperature and the enhancement of optical properties demonstrate that VO2 film in nanoparticle structure is a viable candidate material for smart windows.

  18. Thermal effects on the structural properties of tungsten oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tsung-Yeh; Wu, Chung-Yi; Tsai, Meng-Hung; Lin, Hong-Ming; Tsai, Wen-Li; Hwu, Yeukuang

    2004-06-01

    Tungsten oxide nanoparticles are prepared by evaporating and oxidizing the tungsten boat in helium and oxygen atmosphere and then quenched to the liquid nitrogen temperature. The as-prepared tungsten oxide nanoparticles are porous-free with uniform size. The morphology and particle size distribution of the as-prepared and after sinter treatments tungsten oxide nanoparticles are revealed by TEM and AFM. The long-range order of these nanoparticles can be examined by X-ray diffraction technique. The as-prepared nanoparticles exhibit a mixture structure of monoclinic and hexagonal crystals. Preliminary X-ray diffraction results indicate that the hexagonal structure is transformed to monoclinic structure after annealing to above 600°C. In order to better distinguish the structural properties of the tungsten oxide (WO3- x) nanoparticles before and after annealing, the X-ray absorption spectrum technique is utilized; thus, the detailed local atomic arrangement of oxygen and/or tungsten can be determined. According to the XAS result, the shape of the W L3-edge undergoes no considerable changes. This infers that structural transformation of tungsten oxide nanoparticle may be caused by the migration of oxygen after sintering. From the O K-edge of absorption spectrum, it suggests that a mixture phase structure is obtained when sintered below 300°C. And this result indicates that heat treatment to approximately 600°C produces a stable structure of a monoclinic crystal of WO3.

  19. Relationships among Genetic, Structural, and Functional Properties of Rice Starch.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangli; Chen, Yaling; Zhu, Ping; Sui, Zhongquan; Corke, Harold; Bao, Jinsong

    2015-07-15

    We determined the relationships among the structural properties, in vitro digestibility, and genetic factors in starches of 14 rice cultivars. Weight-based chain-length distributions in amylopectin ranged from 18.07% to 24.71% (fa, DP 6-12), 45.01% to 55.67% (fb1, DP 13-24), 12.72% to 14.05% (fb2, DP 25-36), and 10.80 to 20.72% (fb3, DP > 36), respectively. The contents of rapidly digestible starch (RDS), slowly digestible starch (SDS), and resistant starch (RS) ranged from 78.5% to 87.5%, 1.2% to 6.0%, and 10.1% to 18.0%, respectively. AAC was negatively correlated with RDS content but positively correlated with RS content in rice starch. The proportion of short chains in amylopectin, i.e. the amount of fraction IIa (FrIIa) fractionated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), was positively correlated with RDS. Starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) gene controlled the degree of crystallinity, the amount of fa chains of amylopectin. SSIIIa gene controlled the amount of fb1 chains. Wx gene controlled the FrI, FrIIa, RDS, and RS. Starch debranching enzyme isoamylase II (ISA2) gene also controlled the RDS, which may suggest that RDS was also affected by amylopectin structure, although no correlation between them was found. This study indicated that genetics (i.e., starch biosynthesis related genes) controlled the structural properties of starch, and both amylose content and amylopectin fine structure determined functional properties of rice starch (i.e., the digestion), each in a different way. Understanding the "genetics-structure-function" relationships in rice starches will assist plant breeders and food processors in developing new rice varieties and functional foods.

  20. Insights into the role of protein molecule size and structure on interfacial properties using designed sequences

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Mirjana Dimitrijev; He, Lizhong; James, Michael; Nelson, Andrew; Middelberg, Anton P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures of a large, structured protein with a smaller, unstructured component are inherently complex and hard to characterize at interfaces, leading to difficulties in understanding their interfacial behaviours and, therefore, formulation optimization. Here, we investigated interfacial properties of such a mixed system. Simplicity was achieved using designed sequences in which chemical differences had been eliminated to isolate the effect of molecular size and structure, namely a short unstructured peptide (DAMP1) and its longer structured protein concatamer (DAMP4). Interfacial tension measurements suggested that the size and bulk structuring of the larger molecule led to much slower adsorption kinetics. Neutron reflectometry at equilibrium revealed that both molecules adsorbed as a monolayer to the air–water interface (indicating unfolding of DAMP4 to give a chain of four connected DAMP1 molecules), with a concentration ratio equal to that in the bulk. This suggests the overall free energy of adsorption is equal despite differences in size and bulk structure. At small interfacial extensional strains, only molecule packing influenced the stress response. At larger strains, the effect of size became apparent, with DAMP4 registering a higher stress response and interfacial elasticity. When both components were present at the interface, most stress-dissipating movement was achieved by DAMP1. This work thus provides insights into the role of proteins' molecular size and structure on their interfacial properties, and the designed sequences introduced here can serve as effective tools for interfacial studies of proteins and polymers. PMID:23303222

  1. Dielectric properties modelling of cellular structures with PDMS for micro-sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachroudi, Achraf; Basrour, Skandar; Rufer, Libor; Sylvestre, Alain; Jomni, Fathi

    2015-12-01

    Electro-active polymers are emerging in the fields of actuators and micro-sensors because their good dielectric and mechanical properties makes them suitable for such applications. In this work, we focus on micro-structured (cellular) polymer materials (referred as piezoelectrets or ferroelectrets) that need prior charging to attain piezoelectric behaviour. The development of such applications requires an in-depth knowledge of the intrinsic dielectric properties of such structures and models to enable the accurate prediction of a given micro-structured material’s dielectric properties. Various polymers including polypropylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, fluoroethylenepropylene, cyclo-olefines and poly(ethylene terephthalate) in a cellular form have been studied by researchers over the last fifteen years. However, there is still a lack of information on the intrinsic dielectric properties of the most recently used dielectric polymer (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS) over wide frequency and temperature ranges. In this work, we shall propose an exhaustive equivalent electrical circuit model and explain how it can be used to predict the micro-structured PDMS complex permittivity versus frequency and temperature. The results obtained from the model were found to be in good agreement with experimental data for various micro-structured PDMS materials. Typically, for micro-sensor applications, the dielectric constant and dielectric losses are key factors which need to be minimized. We have developed a configuration which enables both to be strongly reduced with a reduction of 16% in the dielectric constant of a micro-structured PDMS compared with the bulk material. In addition, the phenomena responsible for dielectric losses variations with frequency and temperature are discussed and correlated with the theoretical model. Our model is thus proved to be a powerful tool for the control of the dielectric properties of micro-structured PDMS material for micro-sensor applications.

  2. Structure-property relationships in semicrystalline copolymers and ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Katsuyuki

    Many outstanding physical properties of ethylene/(meth)acrylic acid (E/(M)AA) copolymers and ionomers are associated with their nanometer-scale morphology, which consists of ethylene crystallites, amorphous segments, and acid/ionic functional groups. The goal of this dissertation is a fundamental understanding of the interplay between these structural motifs and the consequent effects on the material properties. We identify small-strain modulus as a key mechanical property and investigate its dependence upon material structure through X-ray scattering, calorimetry, and mechanical property measurements. We first treat E/(M)AA copolymers as composites of polyethylene crystallites and amorphous regions, and establish a quantitative combining rule to describe the copolymer modulus. At temperatures above the Tg of the copolymers, a monotonic increase in modulus with crystallinity is quantitatively described by the Davies equation for two-phase composites, which serves as the basis for separating the effects of amorphous and crystalline phases throughout this dissertation. The room-temperature modulus of E/(M)AA copolymers is concurrently affected by ethylene crystallinity and proximity to the amorphous phase Tg, which rises through room temperature with increasing comonomer content. In E/(M)AA ionomers, phase separation and aggregation of ionic groups provide additional stiffness and toughness. Ionomers are modeled as composites of crystallites and ionically crosslinked rubber, whose amorphous phase modulus far above the ionomer Tg is satisfactorily described by simple rubber elasticity theory. Thermomechanical analyses probe the multi-step relaxation behavior of E/(M)AA ionomers and lead to the development of a new semicrystalline ionomer morphological model, wherein secondary crystallites and ionic aggregates together form rigid percolated pathways throughout the amorphous phase. Metal soaps are oligomeric analogs of E/(M)AA ionomers, which can be blended into

  3. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Structural response and failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorris, William J.; Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Tien; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    Non-linear analysis methods were adapted and incorporated in a finite element based DIAL code. These methods are necessary to evaluate the global response of a stiffened structure under combined in-plane and out-of-plane loading. These methods include the Arc Length method and target point analysis procedure. A new interface material model was implemented that can model elastic-plastic behavior of the bond adhesive. Direct application of this method is in skin/stiffener interface failure assessment. Addition of the AML (angle minus longitudinal or load) failure procedure and Hasin's failure criteria provides added capability in the failure predictions. Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis modules were developed as interactive pre-and post-processors. Each module provides the means of performing self-initiated finite elements based analysis of primary structures such as a flat or curved stiffened panel; a corrugated flat sandwich panel; and a curved geodesic fuselage panel. This module brings finite element analysis into the design of composite structures without the requirement for the user to know much about the techniques and procedures needed to actually perform a finite element analysis from scratch. An interactive finite element code was developed to predict bolted joint strength considering material and geometrical non-linearity. The developed method conducts an ultimate strength failure analysis using a set of material degradation models.

  4. Structure and properties of alkali fullerides and structure solution from powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, Ashfia

    The close connection between structural and electronic properties of doped fullerene systems has prompted structural studies of these systems to understand their transport characteristics. The existence of a universal curve of superconducting transition temperature vs. lattice parameter among the fcc A3C60 materials is perhaps the most compelling relationship between structure and transport properties in condensed matter physics. In this work we revisit the structure of several alkali doped fullerenes using X-ray and neutron diffraction. Some subtleties of these structures along with their effect on transport properties are discussed. The superconducting A3C60 (where A = K, Rb) systems are generally considered to be BCS type superconductors. However, there is a school of thought arguing that all materials AnC 60 with integer n must be Mott insulators as these binary compounds have rather large Coulomb correlation compared to their band width. We investigated the relationship of the structure of non-stoichiometric Rb3C60 to the superconducting transition temperature and find no evident correlation. We also discuss the structure of Rb 4C60 under pressure to understand the metal insulator phase transition observed in earlier work. We find Rb4C60 undergoes a structural phase transition from a disordered tetragonal phase to an orientationally ordered orthorhombic phase at 10kbar. The nearest neighbor distances in this structure are indeed comparable to the conducting A 3C60. We also offer a detailed structural analysis of the polymer phase of RbC60 and KC60. The art of solving crystal structures from powder diffraction data has developed rapidly over the last decade due to the improvements in computing power and availability of high resolution data from synchrotron sources. In the last chapter, we discuss the application of simulated annealing techniques to solve structures of various organic molecules.

  5. Crystal structure and physical properties of Mo{sub 2}B: First-principle calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dan; Cui, Qiliang E-mail: liquan777@jlu.edu.cn; Li, Quan E-mail: liquan777@jlu.edu.cn; Wang, Jingshu

    2014-03-21

    Several decades ago, Mo{sub 2}B was assumed to have an Al{sub 2}Cu-type structure with I4/mcm space group. Using ab initio phonon calculations, we identify the earlier proposed Al{sub 2}Cu-type structure is dynamically unstable at ambient pressure. An energetically more favorable phase with the tetragonal I4/m structure was then predicted by employing frozen-phonon technique. The currently predicted I4/m phase is mechanically and dynamically stable and energetically more favorable than that of the earlier proposed Al{sub 2}Cu-type structure. The electronic structures calculations indicate that Mo{sub 2}B is a metal with several bands crossing the Fermi level. Our analysis indicates that the three-dimensional network of the covalent Mo-B bond is responsible for the ultra-incompressible property of Mo{sub 2}B.

  6. Silicified structures affect leaf optical properties in grasses and sedge.

    PubMed

    Klančnik, Katja; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Gaberščik, Alenka

    2014-01-05

    Silicon (Si) is an important structural element that can accumulate at high concentrations in grasses and sedges, and therefore Si structures might affect the optical properties of the leaves. To better understand the role of Si in light/leaf interactions in species rich in Si, we examined the total Si and silica phytoliths, the biochemical and morphological leaf properties, and the reflectance and transmittance spectra in grasses (Phragmites australis, Phalaris arundinacea, Molinia caerulea, Deschampsia cespitosa) and sedge (Carex elata). We show that these grasses contain >1% phytoliths per dry mass, while the sedge contains only 0.4%. The data reveal the variable leaf structures of these species and significant differences in the amount of Si and phytoliths between developing and mature leaves within each species and between grasses and sedge, with little difference seen among the grass species. Redundancy analysis shows the significant roles of the different near-surface silicified leaf structures (e.g., prickle hairs, cuticle, epidermis), phytoliths and Si contents, which explain the majority of the reflectance and transmittance spectra variability. The amount of explained variance differs between mature and developing leaves. The transmittance spectra are also significantly affected by chlorophyll a content and calcium levels in the leaf tissue.

  7. Circulating Microparticles Alter Formation, Structure, and Properties of Fibrin Clots

    PubMed Central

    Zubairova, Laily D.; Nabiullina, Roza M.; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Zuev, Yuriy F.; Mustafin, Ilshat G.; Litvinov, Rustem I.; Weisel, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of circulating microparticles in haemostasis and thrombosis, there is limited evidence for potential causative effects of naturally produced cell-derived microparticles on fibrin clot formation and its properties. We studied the significance of blood microparticles for fibrin formation, structure, and susceptibility to fibrinolysis by removing them from platelet-free plasma using filtration. Clots made in platelet-free and microparticle-depleted plasma samples from the same healthy donors were analyzed in parallel. Microparticles accelerate fibrin polymerisation and support formation of more compact clots that resist internal and external fibrinolysis. These variations correlate with faster thrombin generation, suggesting thrombin-mediated kinetic effects of microparticles on fibrin formation, structure, and properties. In addition, clots formed in the presence of microparticles, unlike clots from the microparticle-depleted plasma, contain 0.1–0.5-μm size granular and CD61-positive material on fibres, suggesting that platelet-derived microparticles attach to fibrin. Therefore, the blood of healthy individuals contains functional microparticles at the levels that have a procoagulant potential. They affect the structure and stability of fibrin clots indirectly through acceleration of thrombin generation and through direct physical incorporation into the fibrin network. Both mechanisms underlie a potential role of microparticles in haemostasis and thrombosis as modulators of fibrin formation, structure, and resistance to fibrinolysis. PMID:26635081

  8. Biological glass fibers: Correlation between optical and structural properties

    PubMed Central

    Aizenberg, Joanna; Sundar, Vikram C.; Yablon, Andrew D.; Weaver, James C.; Chen, Gang

    2004-01-01

    Biological systems have, through the course of time, evolved unique solutions for complex optical problems. These solutions are often achieved through a sophisticated control of fine structural features. Here we present a detailed study of the optical properties of basalia spicules from the glass sponge Euplectella aspergillum and reconcile them with structural characteristics. We show these biosilica fibers to have a distinctive layered design with specific compositional variations in the glass/organic composite and a corresponding nonuniform refractive index profile with a high-index core and a low-index cladding. The spicules can function as single-mode, few-mode, or multimode fibers, with spines serving as illumination points along the spicule shaft. The presence of a lens-like structure at the end of the fiber increases its light-collecting efficiency. Although free-space coupling experiments emphasize the similarity of these spicules to commercial optical fibers, the absence of any birefringence, the presence of technologically inaccessible dopants in the fibers, and their improved mechanical properties highlight the advantages of the low-temperature synthesis used by biology to construct these remarkable structures. PMID:14993612

  9. Three Dimensional Response Spectrum Soil Structure Modeling Versus Conceptual Understanding To Illustrate Seismic Response Of Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Touqan, Abdul Razzaq

    2008-07-08

    Present methods of analysis and mathematical modeling contain so many assumptions that separate them from reality and thus represent a defect in design which makes it difficult to analyze reasons of failure. Three dimensional (3D) modeling is so superior to 1D or 2D modeling, static analysis deviates from the true nature of earthquake load which is 'a dynamic punch', and conflicting assumptions exist between structural engineers (who assume flexible structures on rigid block foundations) and geotechnical engineers (who assume flexible foundations supporting rigid structures). Thus a 3D dynamic soil-structure interaction is a step that removes many of the assumptions and thus clears reality to a greater extent. However such a model cannot be analytically analyzed. We need to anatomize and analogize it. The paper will represent a conceptual (analogical) 1D model for soil structure interaction and clarifies it by comparing its outcome with 3D dynamic soil-structure finite element analysis of two structures. The aim is to focus on how to calculate the period of the structure and to investigate effect of variation of stiffness on soil-structure interaction.

  10. Electrical properties and magnetic response of cobalt germanosilicide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chun-I; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Tang, Jianshi; Hung, Min-Hsiu; Wang, Kang L; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2011-12-27

    The effects of partial substitution of Ge for Si in cobalt germanosilicide (CoSi(1-x)Ge(x) and Co(2)Si(1-x)Ge(x)) nanowires (NWs) on the electrical transport, magnetic properties, and magnetoresistance (MR) have been investigated. Cobalt germanosilicide NWs were synthesized by a spontaneous chemical vapor transport growth method. The Ge concentration can be selectively controlled from 0 to 15% and 0-50% for CoSi(1-x)Ge(x) and Co(2)Si(1-x)Ge(x) NWs, respectively, by varying the reaction temperature. Electrical measurements showed that the resistivities of CoSi(1-x)Ge(x) NWs are 90, 60, 30, and 23 μΩ-cm for x = 0, 0.01, 0.05, and 0.15, respectively. Therefore, the electrical resistivity of CoSi(1-x)Ge(x) NWs was found to decrease significantly with an increasing Ge concentration, which is believed to be a result of the band gap narrowing. On the other hand, the Co(2)Si(1-x)Ge(x) (x ≤ 0.5) NWs exhibited ferromagnetism at 300 K, which is attributed to the uncoordinated Co atoms on the NW surface and spin-glass behavior at low temperature. The highest MR response of Co(2)Si(1-x)Ge(x) NWs occurred at x = 0.5, where a MR ratio of 11.7% can be obtained at 10-25 K with a magnetic field of 8 T. The enhanced physical properties of cobalt germanosilicide NWs with Ge substitution shall lead to promising application in the fabrication of nanodevices, including spintronics and serving as the gate and interconnect material.

  11. Structure tailored properties and functionalities of zero-dimensional nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yun

    The field of nanoscience and nanotechnology has achieved significant progress over last thirty years. Complex nanostructures with tunable properties for novel applications have been successfully fabricated and characterized. In this thesis, I will focus on our recent efforts on precise controlled synthesis of zero-dimensional nanostructures as well as fundamental understanding of the physical behavior of assynthesized nanostructures. Particularly, three topics are presented: (1) Nanoscale crystallinity engineering: we have achieved nanoscale crystallinity control of noble metal nanoparticles with 100% yield by molecular engineering. We have used silver nanoparticles as example to demonstrate synthetic strategy and importance of such control in nanoscale chemical transformation, fundamental electron and phonon couplings and surface plasmon resonance based biological sensors. Such nanoscale crystallinity engineering provides a new pathway for design of complex nanostructures, tailoring nanoscale electronic and mechanical properties as well as controlling classical and quantum coupling interactions; (2) Precise control of core shell nanostructures: we have developed a new universal strategy denoted as intermediated phase assisted phase exchange and reaction (iPAPER) to achieve layer-by-layer control of shell components in core shell structures. Tunable plasmonic, optical and magnetic properties of core shell structures enabled by our iPAPER strategy are further demonstrated. These characterizations are promising for understanding and manipulating nanoscale phenomena as well as assembling nanoscale devices with desirable functionality; and (3) Fundamental spin and structure manipulation of semiconductor quantum dots by hydrostatic pressure. Pressure provides a unique means of modifying materials properties. By measuring dependence of spin dynamics on pressure, we revealed that the spin states of semiconductor quantum dots are very robust. We further provided the first

  12. Structural Plasticity Denoises Responses and Improves Learning Speed

    PubMed Central

    Spiess, Robin; George, Richard; Cook, Matthew; Diehl, Peter U.

    2016-01-01

    Despite an abundance of computational models for learning of synaptic weights, there has been relatively little research on structural plasticity, i.e., the creation and elimination of synapses. Especially, it is not clear how structural plasticity works in concert with spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) and what advantages their combination offers. Here we present a fairly large-scale functional model that uses leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, STDP, homeostasis, recurrent connections, and structural plasticity to learn the input encoding, the relation between inputs, and to infer missing inputs. Using this model, we compare the error and the amount of noise in the network's responses with and without structural plasticity and the influence of structural plasticity on the learning speed of the network. Using structural plasticity during learning shows good results for learning the representation of input values, i.e., structural plasticity strongly reduces the noise of the response by preventing spikes with a high error. For inferring missing inputs we see similar results, with responses having less noise if the network was trained using structural plasticity. Additionally, using structural plasticity with pruning significantly decreased the time to learn weights suitable for inference. Presumably, this is due to the clearer signal containing less spikes that misrepresent the desired value. Therefore, this work shows that structural plasticity is not only able to improve upon the performance using STDP without structural plasticity but also speeds up learning. Additionally, it addresses the practical problem of limited resources for connectivity that is not only apparent in the mammalian neocortex but also in computer hardware or neuromorphic (brain-inspired) hardware by efficiently pruning synapses without losing performance. PMID:27660610

  13. Structural Plasticity Denoises Responses and Improves Learning Speed.

    PubMed

    Spiess, Robin; George, Richard; Cook, Matthew; Diehl, Peter U

    2016-01-01

    Despite an abundance of computational models for learning of synaptic weights, there has been relatively little research on structural plasticity, i.e., the creation and elimination of synapses. Especially, it is not clear how structural plasticity works in concert with spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) and what advantages their combination offers. Here we present a fairly large-scale functional model that uses leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, STDP, homeostasis, recurrent connections, and structural plasticity to learn the input encoding, the relation between inputs, and to infer missing inputs. Using this model, we compare the error and the amount of noise in the network's responses with and without structural plasticity and the influence of structural plasticity on the learning speed of the network. Using structural plasticity during learning shows good results for learning the representation of input values, i.e., structural plasticity strongly reduces the noise of the response by preventing spikes with a high error. For inferring missing inputs we see similar results, with responses having less noise if the network was trained using structural plasticity. Additionally, using structural plasticity with pruning significantly decreased the time to learn weights suitable for inference. Presumably, this is due to the clearer signal containing less spikes that misrepresent the desired value. Therefore, this work shows that structural plasticity is not only able to improve upon the performance using STDP without structural plasticity but also speeds up learning. Additionally, it addresses the practical problem of limited resources for connectivity that is not only apparent in the mammalian neocortex but also in computer hardware or neuromorphic (brain-inspired) hardware by efficiently pruning synapses without losing performance.

  14. Surface structure, crystallographic and ice-nucleating properties of cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Möhler, Ottmar; Kiselev, Alexei; Saathoff, Harald; Weidler, Peter; Shutthanandan, Shuttha; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Jantsch, Evelyn; Koop, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence of the high diversity and efficient freezing ability of biological ice-nucleating particles is driving a reevaluation of their impact upon climate. Despite their potential importance, little is known about their atmospheric abundance and ice nucleation efficiency, especially non-proteinaceous ones, in comparison to non-biological materials (e.g., mineral dust). Recently, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC; non-proteinaceous plant structural polymer) has been identified as a potential biological ice-nucleating particle. However, it is still uncertain if the ice-nucleating activity is specific to the MCC structure or generally relevant to all cellulose materials, such that the results of MCC can be representatively scaled up to the total cellulose content in the atmosphere to address its role in clouds and the climate system. Here we use the helium ion microscopy (HIM) imaging and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique to characterize the nanoscale surface structure and crystalline properties of the two different types of cellulose (MCC and fibrous cellulose extracted from natural wood pulp) as model proxies for atmospheric cellulose particles and to assess their potential accessibility for water molecules. To complement these structural characterizations, we also present the results of immersion freezing experiments using the cold stage-based droplet freezing BINARY (Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARaY) technique. The HIM results suggest that both cellulose types have a complex porous morphology with capillary spaces between the nanoscale fibrils over the microfiber surface. These surface structures may make cellulose accessible to water. The XRD results suggest that the structural properties of both cellulose materials are in agreement (i.e., P21 space group; a=7.96 Å, b=8.35 Å, c=10.28 Å) and comparable to the crystallographic properties of general monoclinic cellulose (i.e., Cellulose Iβ). The results obtained from the BINARY measurements suggest

  15. Structural properties of ultrafine Ba-hexaferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Makovec, Darko; Primc, Darinka; Sturm, Saso; Kodre, Alojz; Hanzel, Darko; Drofenik, Miha

    2012-12-15

    Crystal structure of ultrafine Ba-hexaferrite (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}) nanoparticles was studied using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), and Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS), to be compared to the structure of larger nanoparticles and the bulk. The nanoparticles were synthesized with hydrothermal treatment of an appropriate suspension of Ba and Fe hydroxides in the presence of a large excess of OH{sup -}. The ultrafine nanoparticles were formed in a discoid shape, {approx}10 nm wide and only {approx}3 nm thick, comparable to the size of the hexagonal unit cell in the c-direction. The HRTEM image analysis confirmed the hexaferrite structure, whereas EDXS showed the composition matching the BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} formula. XAFS and MS analyses showed considerable disorder of the structure, most probably responsible for the low magnetization. - Graphical abstract: Left: HREM image of an ultrafine Ba-hexaferrite nanoparticle (inset: TEM image of the nanoparticles); Right: the experimental HRTEM image is compared with calculated image and corresponding atomic model. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal structure of ultrafine Ba-hexaferrite (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}) nanoparticles was compared to the structure of the bulk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thickness the discoid nanoparticles was comparable to the size of the hexagonal unit cell in the c-direction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Considerable disorder of the nanoparticles' structure is most probably responsible for their low magnetization.

  16. Production, structure, texture, and mechanical properties of severely deformed magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. Yu.; Antonova, O. V.; Kamenetskii, B. I.; Klyukin, I. V.; Komkova, D. A.; Antonov, B. D.

    2016-05-01

    Methods of the severe plastic deformation (SPD) of pure magnesium at room temperature, namely, transverse extrusion and hydroextrusion in a self-destroyed shell, have been developed. The maximum true strain of the samples after the hydroextrusion was e ~ 3.2; in the course of transverse extrusion and subsequent cold rolling, a true strain of e ~ 6.0 was achieved. The structure and mechanical properties of the magnesium samples have been studied in different structural states. It has been shown that the SPD led to a decrease in the grain size d to ~2 μm; the relative elongation at fracture δ increased to ~20%. No active twinning has been revealed. The reasons for the high plasticity of magnesium after SPD according to the deformation modes suggested are discussed from the viewpoint of the hierarchy of the observed structural states.

  17. TECHNIQUES FOR THE STUDY OF THE STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES.

    SciTech Connect

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA, M.; RODRIGUEZ, J.A.; MARTINEZ-ARIAS, A.; HANSON, J.C.

    2006-06-30

    The evolution of our understanding of the behavior of oxide nanostructures depends heavily on the structural information obtained from a wide range of physical methods traditionally used in solid state physics, surface science and inorganic chemistry. In this chapter, we describe several techniques that are useful for the characterization of the structural properties of oxide nanostructures: X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scattering, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ultimate goal is to obtain information about the spatial arrangement of atoms in the nanostructures with precise interatomic distances and bond angles. This may not be possible for complex systems and one may get only partial information about the local geometry or morphology.

  18. Electric field structures in thin films: formation and properties.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Andrew; Plekan, Oksana; Balog, Richard; Dunger, Jack; Field, David; Jones, Nykola C

    2014-08-21

    A newly discovered class of molecular materials, so-called "spontelectrics", display spontaneous electric fields. Here we show that the novel properties of spontelectrics can be used to create composite spontelectrics, illustrating how electric fields in solid films may be structured on the nanoscale by combining layers of different spontelectric materials. This is demonstrated using the spontelectric materials nitrous oxide, toluene, isoprene, isopentane, and CF2Cl2. These yield a variety of tailored electric field structures, with individual layers harboring fields between 10(7) and 10(8) V/m. Fields may be of the same sign or of opposite sign, the latter enabling the creation of nanoscale potential wells. The formation of fields is followed using an established electron beam technique, employing the ASTRID synchrotron storage ring. The influence of temperature on heterolayer structures, displaying new Curie effects, and the nature of the interfacial region between different spontelectrics are also discussed.

  19. Structure-Property Relationships for Branched Worm-Like Micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucage, Gregory; Rai, Durgesh

    2013-03-01

    Micellar solutions can display a wide range of phase structure as a function of counter ion content, surfactant concentration, and the presence of ternary components. Under some conditions, common to consumer products, extended cylindrical structures that display persistence and other chain features of polymers are produced. These worm-like micelles (WLMs) can form branched structures that dynamically change under shear and even in quiescent conditions. The rheology of these branched WLMs is strongly dependent on migration of the branch points, and the dynamics of branch formation and removal. Persistence and other polymer-based descriptions are also of importance. We have recently developed a scattering model for branched polyolefins and other topologically complex materials that can quantify the branching density, branch length, branch functionality and the hyperbranch (branch-on-branch) content of polymers. This work is being extended to study branching in WLMs in work coupled with Ron Larson at UMich to predict rheological properties.

  20. Vibrational and structural properties of tetramethyltin under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhen-Xing; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Zhang, Chao; Tang, Ling-Yun; Zhong, Guo-Hua; Lin, Hai-Qing; Meng, Yue; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2013-01-01

    The vibrational and structural properties of a hydrogen-rich group IVa hydride, Sn(CH3)4, have been investigated by combining Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements at room temperature and at pressures up to 49.9 GPa. Both techniques allow the obtaining of complementary information on the high-pressure behaviors and yield consistent phase transitions at 0.9 GPa for the liquid to solid and 2.8, 10.4, 20.4, and 32.6 GPa for the solid to solid. The foregoing solid phases are identified to have the orthorhombic, tetragonal, monoclinic crystal structures with space groups of Pmmm for phase I, P4/mmm for phase II, P2/m for phase III, respectively. The phases IV and V coexist with phase III, resulting in complex analysis on the possible structures. These transitions suggest the variation in the inter- and intra-molecular bonding of this compound.