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Sample records for structural response properties

  1. Marsh Soil Responses to Nutrients: Belowground Structural and Organic Properties

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal marsh responses to nutrient enrichment apparently depend upon soil matrix and whether the system is primarily biogenic or minerogenic. Deteriorating organic rich marshes (Jamaica Bay, NY) receiving wastewater effluent had lower belowground biomass, organic matter, and soi...

  2. Marsh Soil Responses to Nutrients: Belowground Structural and Organic Properties.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal marsh responses to nutrient enrichment apparently depend upon soil matrix and whether the system is primarily biogenic or minerogenic. Deteriorating organic rich marshes (Jamaica Bay, NY) receiving wastewater effluent had lower belowground biomass, organic matter, and soi...

  3. Structure property relationships for the nonlinear optical response of fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustagi, Kailash C.; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.; Nair, Selvakumar V.

    1994-11-01

    We present a phenomenological theory of nonlinear optical response of fullerenes. An empirical tight-binding model is used in conjunction with a classical electromagnetic picture for the screening. Since in bulk media such a picture of screening corresponds to the self- consistent field approach, the only additional approximation involved in our approach is the neglect of nonlocality. We obtain reliable estimates for the linear and nonlinear susceptibilities of C60, C70, C76 and other pure carbon fullerenes and also substituted fullerenes. The relatively large values of (beta) that we obtain for C76 and substituted fullerenes appear promising for the development of fullerene-based nonlinear optical materials. Our phenomenological picture of screening provides a good understanding of the linear absorption spectra of higher fullerenes and predicts that a comparison of the one-photon and multi-photon spectra will provide an insight into screening effects in these systems.

  4. Mechanical properties and fire response of geopolymer structural composites

    SciTech Connect

    Foden, A.J.; Balaguru, P.; Lyon, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    One of the major concerns in using Fiber Reinforced Composites in applications that might be subjected to fire is their resistance to high temperature. Some of the fabrics used in FRC, such as carbon, are fire resistant. However, almost all the resins used cannot withstand temperatures higher than 200{degrees}C. This paper deals with the development and use of a potassium aluminosilicate (GEOPOLYNER) that is inorganic and can easily sustain more than 1000{degrees}. The results presented include the composite behavior in tension, flexure, and shear. Tests have been conducted on the virgin samples and samples exposed to temperatures from 200 to 1000{degrees}. The results indicate that the composite can withstand 327, 245, and 14 MPa in tension, flexure, and shear respectively. It retains about 63 percent of its original flexural Strength at 800{degrees}. The fire response of the carbon fiber composite was measured and the results compared to organic matrix composites being used for infrastructure and transportation applications. At irradiance levels of 50 kW/m{sup 2} typical of the heat flux in a well developed fire, glass- or carbon-reinforced polyester, vinylester, epoxy, bismaleimde cyanate ester, polyimide, phenolic, and engineered thermoplastic laminates ignited readily and released appreciable heat and smoke, while carbon-fiber reinforced GEOPOLYNER composites did not ignite, bum, or release any smoke even after extended heat flux exposure.

  5. Synthesis, crystal structure, electronic structure, and photoelectric response properties of KCu2SbS3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xian; He, Jianqiao; Zheng, Chong; Lin, Jianhua; Huang, Fuqiang

    2016-02-28

    Copper thioantimonates have received enormous attention due to their potential for applications in photovoltaic devices. In this work, a new layered compound KCu2SbS3 was synthesized via a reactive flux method using thiourea as a reactive flux. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1[combining macron]. The structure features two-dimensional [Cu2SbS3](-) layers stacking along the c axis with K(+) ions intercalated between the layers. Each [Cu2SbS3](-) layer is composed of two single graphene-like layers connected via interlayer Cu-S bonds and CuSb contacts. The optical measurements indicate that the compound has a band gap of 1.7 eV. The Hall effect measurement shows that KCu2SbS3 is a p-type semiconductor with a carrier concentration of 7 × 10(16) cm(-3). First-principles calculations reveal that the direct transition occurs between Cu-3d-S-3p orbitals (VBM) to Sb-5p-S-3p orbitals (CBM). The photoelectric response properties of KCu2SbS3 under visible light irradiation were analyzed. The photocurrent is 3.7 μA cm(-2) at 10 V bias, demonstrating its potential for applications in photoelectric devices.

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure, electronic structure, and photoelectric response properties of KCu2SbS3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xian; He, Jianqiao; Zheng, Chong; Lin, Jianhua; Huang, Fuqiang

    2016-02-28

    Copper thioantimonates have received enormous attention due to their potential for applications in photovoltaic devices. In this work, a new layered compound KCu2SbS3 was synthesized via a reactive flux method using thiourea as a reactive flux. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1[combining macron]. The structure features two-dimensional [Cu2SbS3](-) layers stacking along the c axis with K(+) ions intercalated between the layers. Each [Cu2SbS3](-) layer is composed of two single graphene-like layers connected via interlayer Cu-S bonds and CuSb contacts. The optical measurements indicate that the compound has a band gap of 1.7 eV. The Hall effect measurement shows that KCu2SbS3 is a p-type semiconductor with a carrier concentration of 7 × 10(16) cm(-3). First-principles calculations reveal that the direct transition occurs between Cu-3d-S-3p orbitals (VBM) to Sb-5p-S-3p orbitals (CBM). The photoelectric response properties of KCu2SbS3 under visible light irradiation were analyzed. The photocurrent is 3.7 μA cm(-2) at 10 V bias, demonstrating its potential for applications in photoelectric devices. PMID:26794832

  7. Photo-responsive carbon nanomaterials functionalized by azobenzene moieties: structures, properties and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wei; Luo, Wen; Feng, Yiyu

    2012-09-01

    The ability to tune the microstructures, bandgap, conductance, chemical environment and thermal storage of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes by optical modulation or response is important to design and fabricate advanced optoelectronic nanodevices. This review is focused on optical control and regulation of structures, properties, interface and interaction of a new generation of photo-responsive carbon nanomaterials/azobenzene moieties (Carbon-AZO) hybrids. The optical switching properties of Carbon-AZO hybrids resulting from the photo-isomerization between trans and cis isomers are highlighted and discussed in terms of photo-energy conversion devices including switches, sensors, detectors, fuels and storage. A wide range of advanced energy conversion devices using Carbon-AZO hybrids can be developed in the future by the optimization of the chemical structure, steric conformation, electrostatic environment and functionalization of specific molecules.

  8. Output-only identification of the modal and physical properties of structures using free vibration response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaviria, Carlos A.; Montejo, Luis A.

    2016-09-01

    The viability of a complete structural characterization of civil structures is explored and discussed. In particular, the identification of modal (i.e. natural frequencies, damping ratios and modal shapes) and physical properties (i.e. mass and stiffness) using only the structure's free decay response is studied. To accomplish this, modal analysis from free vibration response only (MAFVRO) and mass modification (MM) methodologies are engaged along with Wavelet based techniques for optimal signal processing and modal reconstruction. The methodologies are evaluated using simulated and experimental data. The simulated data are extracted from a simple elastic model of a 5 story shear building and from a more realistic nonlinear model of a RC frame structure. The experimental data are gathered from shake table test of a 2-story scaled shear building. Guidelines for the reconstruction procedure from the data are proposed as the quality of the identified properties is shown to be governed by adequate selection of the frequency bands and optimal modal shape reconstruction. Moreover, in cases where the structure has undergone damage, the proposed identification scheme can also be applied for preliminary assessment of structural health.

  9. Response of Simulated Drinking Water Biofilm Mechanical and Structural Properties to Long-Term Disinfectant Exposure.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yun; Huang, Conghui; Monroy, Guillermo L; Janjaroen, Dao; Derlon, Nicolas; Lin, Jie; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-02-16

    Mechanical and structural properties of biofilms influence the accumulation and release of pathogens in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS). Thus, understanding how long-term residual disinfectants exposure affects biofilm mechanical and structural properties is a necessary aspect for pathogen risk assessment and control. In this study, elastic modulus and structure of groundwater biofilms was monitored by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) during three months of exposure to monochloramine or free chlorine. After the first month of disinfectant exposure, the mean stiffness of monochloramine- or free-chlorine-treated biofilms was 4 to 9 times higher than those before treatment. Meanwhile, the biofilm thickness decreased from 120 ± 8 μm to 93 ± 6-107 ± 11 μm. The increased surface stiffness and decreased biofilm thickness within the first month of disinfectant exposure was presumably due to the consumption of biomass. However, by the second to third month during disinfectant exposure, the biofilm mean stiffness showed a 2- to 4-fold decrease, and the biofilm thickness increased to 110 ± 7-129 ± 8 μm, suggesting that the biofilms adapted to disinfectant exposure. After three months of the disinfectant exposure process, the disinfected biofilms showed 2-5 times higher mean stiffness (as determined by AFM) and 6-13-fold higher ratios of protein over polysaccharide, as determined by differential staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), than the nondisinfected groundwater biofilms. However, the disinfected biofilms and nondisinfected biofilms showed statistically similar thicknesses (t test, p > 0.05), suggesting that long-term disinfection may not significantly remove net biomass. This study showed how biofilm mechanical and structural properties vary in response to a complex DWDS environment, which will contribute to further research on the risk assessment and control of biofilm-associated-pathogens in DWDS.

  10. Enzymatic Degradation Identifies Components Responsible for the Structural Properties of the Vitreous Body

    PubMed Central

    Filas, Benjamen A.; Zhang, Qianru; Okamoto, Ruth J.; Shui, Ying-Bo; Beebe, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Vitreous degeneration contributes to several age-related eye diseases, including retinal detachment, macular hole, macular traction syndrome, and nuclear cataracts. Remarkably little is understood about the molecular interactions responsible for maintaining vitreous structure. The purpose of this study was to measure the structural properties of the vitreous body after enzymatic degradation of selected macromolecules. Methods. Mechanical properties of plugs of bovine and porcine vitreous were analyzed using a rheometer. Oscillatory and extensional tests measured vitreous stiffness and adhesivity, respectively. Major structural components of the vitreous were degraded by incubation overnight in collagenase, trypsin, or hyaluronidase, singly or in combination. Vitreous bodies were also incubated in hyper- or hypotonic saline. Effects of these treatments on the mechanical properties of the vitreous were measured by rheometry. Results. Enzymatic digestion of each class of macromolecules decreased the stiffness of bovine vitreous by approximately half (P < 0.05). Differential effects were observed on the damping capacity of the vitreous (P < 0.05), which was shown to correlate with material behavior in extension (P < 0.01). Digestion of hyaluronan significantly decreased the damping capacity of the vitreous and increased adhesivity. Collagen degradation resulted in the opposite effect, whereas digestion of proteins and proteoglycans with trypsin did not alter behavior relative to controls. Osmotic perturbations and double-enzyme treatments further implicated hyaluronan and hyaluronan-associated water as a primary regulator of adhesivity and material behavior in extension. Conclusions. Collagen, hyaluronan, and proteoglycans act synergistically to maintain vitreous stiffness. Hyaluronan is a key mediator of vitreous adhesivity, and mechanical damping is an important factor influencing dynamic vitreous behavior. PMID:24222300

  11. Stochastic modeling of structural behavior: Stability, effective properties and dynamic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tootkaboni, Mazdak P.

    This manuscript contains three main parts which address three different problems in the field of stochastic computational mechanics. Stochastic Galerkin projection, except in the third part where only the primary and necessary ingredient of this approach i.e. the representation of uncertainties in input parameters using (space/time dependent) Hermite Chaos expansions is employed, plays the central role in the propagation of uncertainties in inputs to the response of systems under consideration, In the first part that deals with geometrically non-linear behavior of structural systems with random material property, an asymptotic spectral stochastic paradigm is presented for computing the statistics of equilibrium path in the post-bifurcation regime. The approach combines numerical implementation of Koiter's asymptotic theory with Stochastic Galerkin projection and collocation in stochastic space to quantify uncertainties in the parametric representation of load-displacement relationship in the form of uncertain post-buckling slope and curvature, and a family of stochastic displacements fields. The second part concerns obtaining a probabilistic description for the effective elastic properties of multi-phase periodic composites. A spectral stochastic computational scheme is proposed that links the global elastic properties of the composite to the geometry and randomness in its constituents. The scheme benefits from a combination of homogenization theory built into a Finite Element framework and the Stochastic Galerkin projection where a probabilistic characterization of the solutions to a set of local problems defined on the period cell is first sought. A full stochastic description of the global properties is then obtained by averaging the strains that are associated to these solutions over the unit cell. The last part of this manuscript addresses response of linear dynamic systems to random excitations. In this part a stochastic version of direct integration schemes

  12. Structural building response review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-15

    The integrity of a nuclear power plant during a postulated seismic event is required to protect the public against radiation. Therefore, a detailed set of seismic analyses of various structures and equipment is performed while designing a nuclear power plant. This report describes the structural response analysis method, including the structural model, soil-structure interaction as it relates to structural models, methods for seismic structural analysis, numerical integration methods, methods for non-seismic response analysis approaches for various response combinations, structural damping values, nonlinear response, uncertainties in structural properties, and structural response analysis using random properties. The report describes the state-of-the-art in these areas for nuclear power plants. It also details the past studies made at Sargent and Lundy to evaluate different alternatives and the conclusions reached for the specific purposes that those studies were intended. These results were incorporated here because they fall into the general scope of this report. The scope of the present task does not include performing new calculations.

  13. Structure, innervation and response properties of integumentary sensory organs in crocodilians

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Duncan B.; Catania, Kenneth C.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Integumentary sensory organs (ISOs) are densely distributed on the jaws of crocodilians and on body scales of members of the families Crocodilidae and Gavialidae. We examined the distribution, anatomy, innervation and response properties of ISOs on the face and body of crocodilians and documented related behaviors for an alligatorid (Alligator mississippiensis) and a crocodylid (Crocodylus niloticus). Each of the ISOs (roughly 4000 in A. mississippiensis and 9000 in C. niloticus) was innervated by networks of afferents supplying multiple different mechanoreceptors. Electrophysiological recordings from the trigeminal ganglion and peripheral nerves were made to isolate single-unit receptive fields and to test possible osmoreceptive and electroreceptive functions. Multiple small (<0.1 mm2) receptive fields, often from a single ISO, were recorded from the premaxilla, the rostral dentary, the gingivae and the distal digits. These responded to a median threshold of 0.08 mN. The less densely innervated caudal margins of the jaws had larger receptive fields (>100 mm2) and higher thresholds (13.725 mN). Rapidly adapting, slowly adapting type I and slowly adapting type II responses were identified based on neuronal responses. Several rapidly adapting units responded maximally to vibrations at 20–35 Hz, consistent with reports of the ISOs' role in detecting prey-generated water surface ripples. Despite crocodilians' armored bodies, the ISOs imparted a mechanical sensitivity exceeding that of primate fingertips. We conclude that crocodilian ISOs have diverse functions, including detection of water movements, indicating when to bite based on direct contact of pursued prey, and fine tactile discrimination of items held in the jaws. PMID:23136155

  14. Using the structure of natural scenes and sounds to predict neural response properties in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deweese, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The natural scenes and sounds we encounter in the world are highly structured. The fact that animals and humans are so efficient at processing these sensory signals compared with the latest algorithms running on the fastest modern computers suggests that our brains can exploit this structure. We have developed a sparse mathematical representation of speech that minimizes the number of active model neurons needed to represent typical speech sounds. The model learns several well-known acoustic features of speech such as harmonic stacks, formants, onsets and terminations, but we also find more exotic structures in the spectrogra representation of sound such as localized checkerboard patterns and frequency-modulated excitatory subregions flanked by suppressive sidebands. Moreover, several of these novel features resemble neuronal receptive fields reported in the Inferior Colliculus (IC), as well as auditory thalamus (MGBv) and primary auditory cortex (A1), and our model neurons exhibit the same tradeoff in spectrotemporal resolution as has been observed in IC. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that receptive fields of neurons in the ascending mammalian auditory pathway beyond the auditory nerve can be predicted based on coding principles and the statistical properties of recorded sounds. We have also developed a biologically-inspired neural network model of primary visual cortex (V1) that can learn a sparse representation of natural scenes using spiking neurons and strictly local plasticity rules. The representation learned by our model is in good agreement with measured receptive fields in V1, demonstrating that sparse sensory coding can be achieved in a realistic biological setting.

  15. Structural and static electric response properties of highly symmetric lithiated silicon cages: theoretical predictions.

    PubMed

    Koukaras, Emmanuel N; Zdetsis, Aristides D; Karamanis, Panaghiotis; Pouchan, Claude; Avramopoulos, Aggelos; Papadopoulos, Manthos G

    2012-04-15

    It is shown by density functional theory calculations that high symmetry silicon cages can be designed by coating with Li atoms. The resulting highly symmetric lithiated silicon cages (up to D(5d) symmetry) are low-lying true minima of the energy hypersurface with binding energies of the order of 4.6 eV per Si atom and moderate highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gaps. Moreover, relying on a systematic study of the electric response properties obtained by ab initio (Hartree-Fock, MP2, and configuration interaction singles (CIS)) and density functional (B3LYP, B2PLYP, and CAM-B3LYP) methods, it is shown that lithium coating has a large impact on the magnitude of their second hyperpolarizabilities resulting to highly hyperpolarizable species. Such hyperpolarizable character is directly connected to the increase in the density of the low-lying excited states triggered by the interaction between the Si cage and the surrounding Li atoms.

  16. A physiological and structural study of neuron types in the cochlear nucleus. II. Neuron types and their structural correlation with response properties.

    PubMed

    Ostapoff, E M; Feng, J J; Morest, D K

    1994-08-01

    The present study examined the morphological cell types of neurons labeled with intracellular horseradish peroxidase injections, many of them following electrophysiological recordings in the cochlear nucleus of gerbils and chinchillas. Most of the subdivisions and neuronal types previously described in the cat were identified in the present material, including spherical and globular bushy cells, stellate, bushy multipolar, elongate, octopus, and giant cells in the ventral cochlear nucleus, and a cartwheel cell in the dorsal cochlear nucleus. In many cases these structurally distinct neurons were correlated with their characteristic responses to stimulation by sound or intracellular injection of depolarizing current. The dendritic terminals of the elongate, antenniform, and clavate cells of the posteroventral cochlear nucleus link each of these cell types with neighboring structures in distinct patterns, which may provide a basis for differences in synaptic organization. These cell types differ from each other and from the stellate cells of the anteroventral cochlear nucleus. Despite their heterogeneous morphology, most of these neurons had a regular discharge in response to stimulation (choppers). Irregularly firing neurons (primary-like) had very different structures, e.g., the spherical and globular bushy cells and the bushy multipolar neuron. They, too, represent a heterogeneous population. An onset neuron was identified as an octopus cell. This paper compares the morphological observations with the electrophysiological properties of different cell types reported in a companion paper (Feng et al. [1994] J. Comp. Neurol.). Together, these findings imply that response properties may be partially independent of neuronal structure. Morphologically distinct neurons can generate similar temporal patterns in response to simple acoustic stimuli. Nevertheless, the synaptic organization of these different neuron types, including their connections, would be expected to

  17. Different behavioral effect dose-response profiles in mice exposed to two-carbon chlorinated hydrocarbons: influence of structural and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Umezu, Toyoshi; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to clarify whether dose-response profiles of acute behavioral effects of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE), trichloroethylene (TRIC), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) differ. A test battery involving 6 behavioral endpoints was applied to evaluate the effects of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC in male ICR strain mice under the same experimental conditions. The behavioral effect dose-response profiles of these compounds differed. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the dose-response profiles and structural and physical properties of the compounds. Dose-response profile differences correlated significantly with differences in specific structural and physical properties. These results suggest that differences in specific structural and physical properties of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC are responsible for differences in behavioral effects that lead to a variety of dose-response profiles.

  18. Structure and properties of transcriptional networks driving selenite stress response in yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Salin, Hélène; Fardeau, Vivienne; Piccini, Eugenia; Lelandais, Gaelle; Tanty, Véronique; Lemoine, Sophie; Jacq, Claude; Devaux, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    Background Stress responses provide valuable models for deciphering the transcriptional networks controlling the adaptation of the cell to its environment. We analyzed the transcriptome response of yeast to toxic concentrations of selenite. We used gene network mapping tools to identify functional pathways and transcription factors involved in this response. We then used chromatin immunoprecipitation and knock-out experiments to investigate the role of some of these regulators and the regulatory connections between them. Results Selenite rapidly activates a battery of transcriptional circuits, including iron deprivation, oxidative stress and protein degradation responses. The mRNA levels of several transcriptional regulators are themselves regulated. We demonstrate the existence of a positive transcriptional loop connecting the regulator of proteasome expression, Rpn4p, to the pleiotropic drug response factor, Pdr1p. We also provide evidence for the involvement of this regulatory module in the oxidative stress response controlled by the Yap1p transcription factor and its conservation in the pathogenic yeast C. glabrata. In addition, we show that the drug resistance regulator gene YRR1 and the iron homeostasis regulator gene AFT2 are both directly regulated by Yap1p. Conclusion This work depicted a highly interconnected and complex transcriptional network involved in the adaptation of yeast genome expression to the presence of selenite in its chemical environment. It revealed the transcriptional regulation of PDR1 by Rpn4p, proposed a new role for the pleiotropic drug resistance network in stress response and demonstrated a direct regulatory connection between oxidative stress response and iron homeostasis. PMID:18627600

  19. Design, synthesis and characterization of ion-responsive microgels: Effect of structure and composition on properties and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenbaum, Gary Marc

    The overall goal of this dissertation was to design, synthesize and characterize ion responsive microgels, focussing on the effect of their composition and structure on their properties and performance. The ability to use ionic microgels in chemical and biomedical applications requires a thorough understanding of these parameters. In pursuit of this understanding, poly(methacrylic acid-co-nitrophenyl acrylate) microgels (1--20 mum diameter) were synthesized by free radical precipitation polymerization and modified in post-polymerization reactions. The microgels were characterized with respect to their pH and ion swelling response, apparent pKa, density, capacity, drug and protein loading and metal binding properties. Systematic changes were made to the microgels' crosslink density and functional group composition with the goal of creating new microgels, which have distinctly different swelling and drug loading properties. The following methods were applied in this work. A micropipet manipulation technique was applied to measure the swelling response of individual microgels. Bulk titrations were performed to measure the apparent pKa's and capacities of the microgels. UV/VIS spectraphotometry was used to measure the drug and protein loading. Titration calorimetry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were applied to measure the metal binding properties of the microgels. The swelling ratio of the microgels increased linearly from 2 to 12 when the mole fraction of crosslinking monomer decreased from 0.25 to 0.10 (at pH's > 5.3). The pH range of the swelling response for the five different microgel compositions (containing ethanol, carboxylic, glutamic, hydroxamic and sulfonic acid functional groups) shifted by an amount that was proportional to the solution pKa's of their functional groups. The microgels' capacity and drug loading increased in proportion to the number of functional groups per repeat unit. The degree of drug loading was found to correlate

  20. Different behavioral effect dose–response profiles in mice exposed to two-carbon chlorinated hydrocarbons: Influence of structural and physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Umezu, Toyoshi Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to clarify whether dose–response profiles of acute behavioral effects of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE), trichloroethylene (TRIC), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) differ. A test battery involving 6 behavioral endpoints was applied to evaluate the effects of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC in male ICR strain mice under the same experimental conditions. The behavioral effect dose–response profiles of these compounds differed. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the dose–response profiles and structural and physical properties of the compounds. Dose–response profile differences correlated significantly with differences in specific structural and physical properties. These results suggest that differences in specific structural and physical properties of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC are responsible for differences in behavioral effects that lead to a variety of dose–response profiles. - Highlights: • We examine effects of 4 chlorinated hydrocarbons on 6 behavioral endpoints in mice. • The behavioral effect dose–response profiles for the 4 compounds are different. • We utilize regression analysis to clarify probable causes of the different profiles. • The compound's physicochemical properties probably produce the different profiles.

  1. A microscopic and macroscopic study of aging collagen on its molecular structure, mechanical properties, and cellular response.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Samantha L; Guilbert, Marie; Sulé-Suso, Josep; Torbet, Jim; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Yang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    During aging, collagen structure changes, detrimentally affecting tissues' biophysical and biomechanical properties due to an accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). In this investigation, we conducted a parallel study of microscopic and macroscopic properties of different-aged collagens from newborn to 2-yr-old rats, to examine the effect of aging on fibrillogenesis, mechanical and contractile properties of reconstituted hydrogels from these collagens seeded with or without fibroblasts. In addition to fibrillogenesis of collagen under the conventional conditions, some fibrillogenesis was conducted alongside a 12-T magnetic field, and gelation rate and AGE content were measured. A nondestructive indentation technique and optical coherence tomography were used to determine the elastic modulus and dimensional changes, respectively. It was revealed that in comparison to younger specimens, older collagens exhibited higher viscosity, faster gelation rates, and a higher AGE-specific fluorescence. Exceptionally, only young collagens formed highly aligned fibrils under magnetic fields. The youngest collagen demonstrated a higher elastic modulus and contraction in comparison to the older collagen. We conclude that aging changes collagen monomer structure, which considerably affects the fibrillogenesis process, the architecture of the resulting collagen fibers and the global network, and the macroscopic properties of the formed constructs.

  2. Magnetically Responsive Nanostructures with Tunable Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingsheng; Yin, Yadong

    2016-05-25

    Stimuli-responsive materials can sense specific environmental changes and adjust their physical properties in a predictable manner, making them highly desired components for designing novel sensors, intelligent systems, and adaptive structures. Magnetically responsive structures have unique advantages in applications, as external magnetic stimuli can be applied in a contactless manner and cause rapid and reversible responses. In this Perspective, we discuss our recent progress in the design and fabrication of nanostructured materials with various optical responses to externally applied magnetic fields. We demonstrate tuning of the optical properties by taking advantage of the magnetic fields' abilities to induce magnetic dipole-dipole interactions or control the orientation of the colloidal magnetic nanostructures. The design strategies are expected to be extendable to the fabrication of novel responsive materials with new optical effects and many other physical properties. PMID:27115174

  3. Response of Mg Addition on the Dendritic Structures and Mechanical Properties of Hypoeutectic Al-10Si (Wt Pct) Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaköse, Ercan; Yildiz, Mehmet; Keskin, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Rapidly solidified hypoeutectic Al-10Si- xMg ( x = 0, 5, 10 wt pct) alloys were produced by the melt-spinning method. The phase composition was identified by X-ray diffractometry, and the microstructures of the alloys were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The melting characteristics were studied by differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis under an Ar atmosphere. The mechanical properties of the melt-spun and conventionally solidified alloys were tested by tensile-strength and Vickers microhardness tests. The results illustrate that the cooling rate and solidification time of 89 μm thick melt-spun ribbon were estimated to be 2.97 × 107 K s-1 and 9.31 × 10-6 s, respectively. Nanoscale Si spot particles were observed growing on the surface of the dendritic α-Al matrix and the average sizes of these spots ranged from 10 to 50 nm. The improvement in the tensile properties and microhardness was related to structural refinement and the supersaturated α-Al solid solution; the nanoscale-dispersed Si spot particles made a significant improvement to the mechanical properties of the melt-spun ribbon. Detailed electrical resistivity tests of the ribbons were carried out at temperatures of 300 K to 800 K (27 °C to 527 °C).

  4. Electrochemical and structural properties of the electrical double layer of two-component electrolytes in response to varied electrode potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyohara, Kenji; Yamagata, Masaki; Ishikawa, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    The electrochemical and structural properties of the electrical double layers for two-component electrolytes were studied by Monte Carlo simulations using simple models. When the electrolyte contains two species of cations that have different diameters, the capacitance on the cathode dramatically increases as a large negative potential is applied. This behavior is qualitatively similar to the one reported in an experimental work that has used Li-containing ionic liquid as the electrolyte [M. Yamagata et al., Electrochim. Acta 110, 181-190 (2013)], in which it has also been reported that addition of Li ions to the electrolyte enhances the potential window to the negative side. The analysis of the ionic structure showed that the electrical double layer on the cathode is dominantly formed by the larger cations under small negative potentials, while they are replaced by the smaller cations under large negative potentials. This transition of the ionic structure with electrode potential is also consistent with the enhancement of the potential window that was found in the experimental work, which suggests that the organic cations are expelled from the electrical double layer under large negative potentials and the chance of decomposition is reduced.

  5. Optimizing and modeling of effective parameters on the structural and magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles synthesized by coprecipitation technique using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfari, Mohammad Reza; Kashefi, Mehrdad; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2016-07-01

    In present work, the Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by coprecipitation method. In order to study the effects of influential factors on the structural and magnetic properties of particles, the experimental runs were designed using response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD), while the reaction temperature, Fe2+/Fe3+ cation ratio, and pH of reaction were defined as effective factors on the two responses include the amounts of crystallinity degree and saturation magnetization (Ms). The investigation of structural, magnetic, and microstructural properties of particles were carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As a result, the predictive quadratic models were fitted on the both responses while the R2 values were more than 0.97 for both models. The highest amounts of both responses (crystallinity degree: 88.07% and Ms: 65.801 emu/g) are presented when the reaction temperature, cation ratio, and pH amounts are equal to 90 °C, 0.60, and 10.5, respectively. Finally, the TEM results show the particles with size of about 10 nm and narrow size distribution.

  6. Structural Properties of Cruciferin and Napin of Brassica napus (Canola) Show Distinct Responses to Changes in pH and Temperature.

    PubMed

    Perera, Suneru P; McIntosh, Tara C; Wanasundara, Janitha P D

    2016-01-01

    The two major storage proteins identified in Brassica napus (canola) were isolated and studied for their molecular composition, structural characteristics and the responses of structural features to the changes in pH and temperature. Cruciferin, a complex of six monomers, has a predominantly β-sheet-containing secondary structure. This protein showed low pH unstable tertiary structure, and distinctly different solubility behaviour with pH when intact in the seed cellular matrix. Cruciferin structure unfolds at pH 3 even at ambient temperature. Temperature-induced structure unfolding was observed above the maximum denaturation temperature of cruciferin. Napin was soluble in a wider pH range than cruciferin and has α-helices dominating secondary structure. Structural features of napin showed less sensitivity to the changes in medium pH and temperature. The surface hydrophobicity (S₀) and intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan residue appear to be good indicators of cruciferin unfolding, however they were not the best to demonstrate structural changes of napin. These two storage proteins of B. napus have distinct molecular characteristics, therefore properties and functionalities they provide are contrasting rather than complementary. PMID:27618118

  7. Structural Properties of Cruciferin and Napin of Brassica napus (Canola) Show Distinct Responses to Changes in pH and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Suneru P.; McIntosh, Tara C.; Wanasundara, Janitha P. D.

    2016-01-01

    The two major storage proteins identified in Brassica napus (canola) were isolated and studied for their molecular composition, structural characteristics and the responses of structural features to the changes in pH and temperature. Cruciferin, a complex of six monomers, has a predominantly β-sheet-containing secondary structure. This protein showed low pH unstable tertiary structure, and distinctly different solubility behaviour with pH when intact in the seed cellular matrix. Cruciferin structure unfolds at pH 3 even at ambient temperature. Temperature-induced structure unfolding was observed above the maximum denaturation temperature of cruciferin. Napin was soluble in a wider pH range than cruciferin and has α-helices dominating secondary structure. Structural features of napin showed less sensitivity to the changes in medium pH and temperature. The surface hydrophobicity (S0) and intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan residue appear to be good indicators of cruciferin unfolding, however they were not the best to demonstrate structural changes of napin. These two storage proteins of B. napus have distinct molecular characteristics, therefore properties and functionalities they provide are contrasting rather than complementary. PMID:27618118

  8. Influence of shock loading on the structure/property response of Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb and Ti-24Al-11Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.T. III

    1994-02-01

    Intermetallics are receiving increasing attention for applications requiring high-leverage materials possessing potentially high pay-offs such as in gas-turbine engines. While the quasi-static deformation response of a broad range of intermetallics is receiving intense scientific and engineering study, increased utilization of intermetallics under dynamic loading requires an understanding of their high-rate/shock-wave behavior. In this paper the influence of shock loading on structure/property behavior of Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb and Ti-24Al-11Nb is presented. The reload constitutive response of both shock-loaded intermetallics supports the dynamic deformation of both intermetallics being controlled by a Peierls mechanism. Defect generation and storage in intermetallics is compared and contrasted to that typical to conventional disordered metals and alloys.

  9. The Structures & Properties of Carbon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellini, Olivia M.; Lisensky, George C.; Ehrlich, Jennifer; Zenner, Greta M.; Crone, Wendy C.

    2006-01-01

    The four main forms of carbon--diamond, graphite, buckyballs, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)--are an excellent vehicle for teaching fundamental principles of chemical bonding, material structure, and properties. Carbon atoms form a variety of structures that are intrinsically connected to the properties they exhibit. Educators can take advantage of…

  10. The Psychometric Properties of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale in Chinese Primary Care Patients: Factor Structure, Construct Validity, Reliability, Sensitivity and Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) is a commonly used instrument to measure depressive symptomatology. Despite this, the evidence for its psychometric properties remains poorly established in Chinese populations. The aim of this study was to validate the use of the CES-D in Chinese primary care patients by examining factor structure, construct validity, reliability, sensitivity and responsiveness. Methods and Results The psychometric properties were assessed amongst a sample of 3686 Chinese adult primary care patients in Hong Kong. Three competing factor structure models were examined using confirmatory factor analysis. The original CES-D four-structure model had adequate fit, however the data was better fit into a bi-factor model. For the internal construct validity, corrected item-total correlations were 0.4 for most items. The convergent validity was assessed by examining the correlations between the CES-D, the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9) and the Short Form-12 Health Survey (version 2) Mental Component Summary (SF-12 v2 MCS). The CES-D had a strong correlation with the PHQ-9 (coefficient: 0.78) and SF-12 v2 MCS (coefficient: -0.75). Internal consistency was assessed by McDonald’s omega hierarchical (ωH). The ωH value for the general depression factor was 0.855. The ωH values for “somatic”, “depressed affect”, “positive affect” and “interpersonal problems” were 0.434, 0.038, 0.738 and 0.730, respectively. For the two-week test-retest reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.91. The CES-D was sensitive in detecting differences between known groups, with the AUC >0.7. Internal responsiveness of the CES-D to detect positive and negative changes was satisfactory (with p value <0.01 and all effect size statistics >0.2). The CES-D was externally responsive, with the AUC>0.7. Conclusions The CES-D appears to be a valid, reliable, sensitive and responsive instrument for screening and

  11. Phospholipids fatty acids of drinking water reservoir sedimentary microbial community: Structure and function responses to hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Chai, Bei-Bei; Huang, Ting-Lin; Zhao, Xiao-Guang; Li, Ya-Jiao

    2015-07-01

    Microbial communities in three drinking water reservoirs, with different depth in Xi'an city, were quantified by phospholipids fatty acids analysis and multivariate statistical analysis was employed to interpret their response to different hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical properties of sediment and overlying water. Principle component analyses of sediment characteristics parameters showed that hydrostatic pressure was the most important effect factor to differentiate the overlying water quality from three drinking water reservoirs from each other. NH4+ content in overlying water was positive by related to hydrostatic pressure, while DO in water-sediment interface and sediment OC in sediment were negative by related with it. Three drinking water reservoir sediments were characterized by microbial communities dominated by common and facultative anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria, as well as, by sulfur oxidizing bacteria. Hydrostatic pressure and physico-chemical properties of sediments (such as sediment OC, sediment TN and sediment TP) were important effect factors to microbial community structure, especially hydrostatic pressure. It is also suggested that high hydrostatic pressure and low dissolved oxygen concentration stimulated Gram-positive and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) bacterial population in drinking water reservoir sediment. This research supplied a successful application of phospholipids fatty acids and multivariate analysis to investigate microbial community composition response to different environmental factors. Thus, few physico-chemical factors can be used to estimate composition microbial of community as reflected by phospholipids fatty acids, which is difficult to detect.

  12. Research on structures, mechanical properties, and mechanical responses of TKX-50 and TKX-50 based PBX with molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Song; Li, Yajin; Li, Yang; Luo, Yunjun

    2016-02-01

    To improve the practicality and safety of a novel explosive dihydroxylamm onium 5,5'-bis (tetrazole)-1,1'-diolate (TKX-50), polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) and polychlorotrifluoroe-thylene (PCTFE) were respectively added to the TKX-50, forming the polymer-bonded explosives (PBX). Interfacial and mechanical properties of PBX were investigated through molecular dynamics (MD) method, desensitizing mechanisms of fluorine-polymers for TKX-50 were researched by compression and bulk shear simulations. Results show that the binding energies (E bind ) between polymers (PVDF or PCTFE) and TKX-50 surfaces all rank in order of (011) > (100) > (010), shorter interatomic distance and the resulted higher potentials lead to higher E bind on TKX-50/PVDF interfaces than that on PCTFE/TKX-50 interfaces. Compared with TKX-50, the ductility of PBX is improved due to the isotropic mechanical property and flexibility of fluorine-polymers especially the PCTFE. Desensitizing effect of fluorine-polymers for TKX-50 is found under loading condition, which is attributed to the enhanced compressibility and buffer capacity against external pressure in compression, as well as the improved lubricity to reduce the sliding potentials in bulk shear process. Graphical Abstract Comparisons of the internal stress and slide potentials of the novel explosive,TKX-50 and its based PBX. Desensitizing effects can be found by the adding of fluorine-polymers, it owes to their better flexibility and lubricity as well as the amorphous nature.

  13. Celotex Structural Properties Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.C.

    2001-01-26

    In the course of regulatory review of the 9975 packaging, the question of the effects environmental conditions on performance of the packaging was raised. The results of previous tests of the Celotex material, used for impact absorption and thermal insulation, indicated that the effect of temperature variation was small. Accordingly, performance under ambient conditions was judged to be representative of performance under temperature extremes. To extend the database to include other effects, and in response to the questions, a series of materials tests were performed on the Celotex brand cellulose fiberboard material.

  14. Redox-responsive organometallic foldamers from ferrocene amino acid: solid-phase synthesis, secondary structure and mixed-valence properties.

    PubMed

    Siebler, Daniel; Förster, Christoph; Heinze, Katja

    2011-04-14

    Oligoferrocenes Fmoc-Fca(n)-OMe (n=3-5) are assembled in a stepwise precise manner from Fmoc-protected ferrocene amino acid Fmoc-Fca-OH (H-Fca-OH = 1-amino-1'-ferrocene carboxylic acid; Fmoc = 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl) via amide bonds on solid supports by sequential Fmoc deprotection, acid activation and coupling steps. The resulting well-defined oligomers form ordered zigzag structures in THF solution with characteristic hydrogen bonding patterns. Electrochemical experiments reveal sequential oxidations of the individual ferrocene units in these peptides giving mixed-valent cations. Optical intervalence electron transfer is detected by intervalence transitions in the near-IR.

  15. Delivery method, target gene structure and growth properties of target cells impact mutagenic responses to reactive nitrogen and oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Young Kim, Min; Hoon Lim, Chang; Trudel, Laura J.; Deen, William M.; Wogan, Gerald N.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulated production of nitric oxide (NO•) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) by inflammatory cells in vivo may contribute to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Here we compare cytotoxicity and mutagenicity induced by NO• and ROS in TK6 and AS52 cells, delivered by two methods: a well-characterized delivery system; and a novel adaptation of a system for co-culture. When exposed to preformed NO•, a cumulative dose of 620 µM•min reduced viability of TK6 cells at 24 h to 36% and increased mutation frequencies in the HPRT and TK1 genes to 7.7 × 106 (p < 0.05) and 24.8 × 106 (p < 0.01), 2.7- and 3.7-fold higher than background, respectively. In AS52 cells, cumulative doses of 1700 and 3700 µM•min reduced viability to 49% and 22%, respectively, and increased mutation frequency 10.2- and 14.6-fold higher than the argon control (132 × 106 and 190 × 106, respectively). These data show that TK6 cells were more sensitive than AS52 cells to killing by NO•. However, the two cell lines were very similar in relative susceptibility to mutagenesis; on the basis of fold-increases in MF, average relative sensitivity values [(MFexp/MFcontrol) /cumulative NO• dose] were 5.16 × 10−3 µM−1min−1, and 4.97 × 10−3µM−1min−1 for AS52 cells. When AS52 cells were exposed to reactive species generated by activated macrophages in the co-culture system, cell killing was greatly reduced by addition of NMA to the culture medium, and was completely abrogated by combined additions of NMA and the superoxide scavenger Tiron, indicating the relative importance of NO• to loss of viability. Exposure in the co-culture system for 48 h increased mutation frequency in the gpt gene by more than 9 fold, and NMA plus Tiron again completely prevented the response. Molecular analysis of gpt mutants induced by preformed NO• or by activated macrophages revealed that both doubled the frequency of gene inactivation (40% in induced vs 20% in spontaneous mutants). Sequencing showed

  16. Finite Element Estimation of Meteorite Structural Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Kenneth Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the project titled Asteroid Threat Assessment at NASA Ames Research Center is to develop risk assessment tools. The expertise in atmospheric entry in the Entry Systems and Technology Division is being used to describe the complex physics of meteor breakup in the atmosphere. The breakup of a meteor is dependent on its structural properties, including homogeneity of the material. The present work describes an 11-week effort in which a literature survey was carried for structural properties of meteoritic material. In addition, the effect of scale on homogeneity isotropy was studied using a Monte Carlo approach in Nastran. The properties were then in a static structural response simulation of an irregularly-shape meteor (138-scale version of Asteroid Itokawa). Finally, an early plan was developed for doctoral research work at Georgia Tech. in the structural failure fragmentation of meteors.

  17. Structural response synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ozisik, H.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    The open loop control technique of predicting a conditioned input signal based on a specified output response for a second order system has been analyzed both analytically and numerically to gain a firm understanding of the method. Differences between this method of control and digital closed loop control using pole cancellation were investigated as a follow up to previous experimental work. Application of the technique to diamond turning using a fast tool is also discussed.

  18. Semiconductor alloys - Structural property engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Berding, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor alloys have been used for years to tune band gaps and average bond lengths to specific applications. Other selection criteria for alloy composition, and a growth technique designed to modify their structural properties, are presently considered. The alloys Zn(1-y)Cd(y)Te and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) are treated as examples.

  19. Responses of leaf structure and photosynthetic properties to intra-canopy light gradients: a common garden test with four broadleaf deciduous angiosperm and seven evergreen conifer tree species.

    PubMed

    Wyka, Tomasz P; Oleksyn, J; Zytkowiak, R; Karolewski, P; Jagodziński, A M; Reich, P B

    2012-09-01

    Spectra of leaf traits in northern temperate forest canopies reflect major differences in leaf longevity between evergreen conifers and deciduous broadleaf angiosperms, as well as plastic modifications caused by within-crown shading. We investigated (1) whether long-lived conifer leaves exhibit similar intra-canopy plasticity as short-lived broadleaves, and (2) whether global interspecific relationships between photosynthesis, nitrogen, and leaf structure identified for sun leaves adequately describe leaves differentiated in response to light gradients. We studied structural and photosynthetic properties of intra-tree sun and shade foliage in adult trees of seven conifer and four broadleaf angiosperm species in a common garden in Poland. Shade leaves exhibited lower leaf mass-per-area (LMA) than sun leaves; however, the relative difference was smaller in conifers than in broadleaves. In broadleaves, LMA was correlated with lamina thickness and tissue density, while in conifers, it was correlated with thickness but not density. In broadleaves, but not in conifers, reduction of lamina thickness was correlated with a thinner palisade layer. The more conservative adjustment of conifer leaves could result from a combination of phylogenetic constraints, contrasting leaf anatomies and shoot geometries, but also from functional requirements of long-lived foliage. Mass-based nitrogen concentration (N(mass)) was similar between sun and shade leaves, and was lower in conifers than in deciduous broadleaved species. Given this, the smaller LMA in shade corresponded with a lower area-based N concentration (N(area)). In evergreen conifers, LMA and N(area) were less powerful predictors of area-based photosynthetic rate (A (max(area))) in comparison with deciduous broadleaved angiosperms. Multiple regression for sun and shade leaves showed that, in each group, A (max(mass)) was related to N(mass) but not to LMA, whereas LMA became a significant codeterminant of A (max(mass)) in

  20. Dynamic response of aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The physical and mathematical problems associated with the response of elastic structures to random excitations such as occurs during buffeting and other transonic phenomena were discussed. The following subjects were covered: (1) general dynamic system consisting of the aircraft structure, the aerodynamic driving forces due to separated flow, and the aerodynamic forces due to aircraft structural motion, (2) structural and aerodynamic quantities of the dynamic system with special emphasis given to the description of the aerodynamic forces, and including a treatment of similarity laws, scaling effects, and wind tunnel testing, and (3) methods for data processing of fluctuating pressure recordings and techniques for response analysis for random excitation. A general buffeting flutter model, which takes into account the interactions between the separated and motion induced flows was presented. Relaxations of this model leading to the forced vibration model were explained.

  1. Structural properties of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-Alcaraz, J. M.; Chávez-Páez, M.; D'Aguanno, B.; Klein, R.

    1995-02-01

    Structural properties of three- and two-dimensional colloids composed by hard spheres and/or by Yukawa particles, which can have different diameters and charges, are studied by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation, together with Percus-Yevick, hypernetted chain and Rogers-Young approximations. From the partial radial distribution functions gij( r) the partial structure factors Sij( k) are determined, and with them the compressibility structure factor Sx( k), the measured structure factor SM( k) and the Bhatia-Thornton structure factors SNN( k), SNQ( k) and SQQ( k). As an effect of diameter and/or charge polydispersity on the structure of binary mixtures, the position and height of the main peak of SM( k), and its value at k = 0, change non-monotonously with the composition. In the case of binary mixtures of hard and Yukawa spheres the structure is given by two different scales. A liquid-solid phase transition induced by a change in the dimensionality was found for monodisperse systems.

  2. Structural response and input identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, G. D.; Callahan, J. C.; Mcelman, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Three major goals were delineated: (1) to develop a general method for determining the response of a structure to combined base and acoustic random excitation: (2) to develop parametric relationships to aid in the design of plates which are subjected to random force or random base excitation: (3) to develop a method to identify the individual acoustic and base input to a structure with only a limited number of measurement channels, when both types of excitation act simultaneously.

  3. Vibration Response of Airplane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, Theodore; Gelalles, A G

    1935-01-01

    This report presents test results of experiments on the vibration-response characteristics of airplane structures on the ground and in flight. It also gives details regarding the construction and operation of vibration instruments developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

  4. Structural optimization for nonlinear dynamic response.

    PubMed

    Dou, Suguang; Strachan, B Scott; Shaw, Steven W; Jensen, Jakob S

    2015-09-28

    Much is known about the nonlinear resonant response of mechanical systems, but methods for the systematic design of structures that optimize aspects of these responses have received little attention. Progress in this area is particularly important in the area of micro-systems, where nonlinear resonant behaviour is being used for a variety of applications in sensing and signal conditioning. In this work, we describe a computational method that provides a systematic means for manipulating and optimizing features of nonlinear resonant responses of mechanical structures that are described by a single vibrating mode, or by a pair of internally resonant modes. The approach combines techniques from nonlinear dynamics, computational mechanics and optimization, and it allows one to relate the geometric and material properties of structural elements to terms in the normal form for a given resonance condition, thereby providing a means for tailoring its nonlinear response. The method is applied to the fundamental nonlinear resonance of a clamped-clamped beam and to the coupled mode response of a frame structure, and the results show that one can modify essential normal form coefficients by an order of magnitude by relatively simple changes in the shape of these elements. We expect the proposed approach, and its extensions, to be useful for the design of systems used for fundamental studies of nonlinear behaviour as well as for the development of commercial devices that exploit nonlinear behaviour.

  5. Structure, processing, and properties of potatoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Isabel K.; Kolos, Kimberly R.; Menegaux, Edmond C.; Luo, Huy; McCuen, Richard H.; Regan, Thomas M.

    1992-06-01

    The objective of this experiment and lesson intended for high school students in an engineering or materials science course or college freshmen is to demonstrate the relation between processing, structure, and thermodynamic and physical properties. The specific objectives are to show the effect of structure and structural changes on thermodynamic properties (specific heat) and physical properties (compressive strength); to illustrate the first law of thermodynamics; to compare boiling a potato in water with cooking it in a microwave in terms of the rate of structural change and the energy consumed to 'process' the potato; and to demonstrate compression testing.

  6. Structure, processing, and properties of potatoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Isabel K.; Kolos, Kimberly R.; Menegaux, Edmond C.; Luo, Huy; Mccuen, Richard H.; Regan, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this experiment and lesson intended for high school students in an engineering or materials science course or college freshmen is to demonstrate the relation between processing, structure, and thermodynamic and physical properties. The specific objectives are to show the effect of structure and structural changes on thermodynamic properties (specific heat) and physical properties (compressive strength); to illustrate the first law of thermodynamics; to compare boiling a potato in water with cooking it in a microwave in terms of the rate of structural change and the energy consumed to 'process' the potato; and to demonstrate compression testing.

  7. Structure-property evolution during polymer crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Deepak

    The main theme of this research is to understand the structure-property evolution during crystallization of a semicrystalline thermoplastic polymer. A combination of techniques including rheology, small angle light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry and optical microscopy are applied to follow the mechanical and optical properties along with crystallinity and the morphology. Isothermal crystallization experiments on isotactic poly-1-butene at early stages of spherulite growth provide quantitative information about nucleation density, volume fraction of spherulites and their crystallinity, and the mechanism of connecting into a sample spanning structure. Optical microscopy near the fluid-to-solid transition suggests that the transition, as determined by time-resolved mechanical spectroscopy, is not caused by packing/jamming of spherulites but by the formation of a percolating network structure. The effect of strain, Weissenberg number (We ) and specific mechanical work (w) on rate of crystallization (nucleation followed by growth) and on growth of anisotropy was studied for shear-induced crystallization of isotactic poly-1-butene. The samples were sheared for a finite strain at the beginning of the experiment and then crystallized without further flow (Janeschitz-Kriegl protocol). Strain requirements to attain steady state/leveling off of the rate of crystallization were found to be much larger than the strain needed to achieve steady state of flow. The large strain and We>1 criteria were also observed for morphological transition from spherulitic growth to oriented growth. An apparatus for small angle light scattering (SALS) and light transmission measurements under shear was built and tested at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. As a new development, the polarization direction can be rotated by a liquid crystal polarization rotator (LCPR) with a short response time of 20 ms. The experiments were controlled and analyzed with a LabVIEW(TM) based

  8. Structure and physical properties of silkworm cocoons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fujia; Porter, David; Vollrath, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Silkworm cocoons have evolved a wide range of different structures and combinations of physical and chemical properties in order to cope with different threats and environmental conditions. We present our observations and measurements on 25 diverse types of cocoons in a first attempt to correlate physical properties with the structure and morphology of the cocoons. These two architectural parameters appear to be far more important than the material properties of the silk fibres themselves. We consider tensile and compressive mechanical properties and gas permeation of the cocoon walls, and in each case identify mechanisms or models that relate these properties to cocoon structure, usually based upon non-woven fibre composites. These properties are of relevance also for synthetic non-woven composite materials and our studies will help formulate bio-inspired design principles for new materials. PMID:22552916

  9. Localized sclerotic bone response demonstrated reduced nanomechanical creep properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiuli; Goh, James Cho Hong; Teoh, Swee Hin; De, Shamal Das; Soong, Richie; Lee, Taeyong

    2013-01-01

    Sclerosis (tissue hardening) development is a common occurrence in slow growing or benign osteolytic lesions. However, there is lack of knowledge on the mechanical and material property changes associated with sclerotic bone response. The immune system is postulated to play a relevant role in evoking sclerotic bone responses. In this study, localized sclerotic response in an immunocompetent model of Walker 256 breast carcinoma in SD rats showed an apparent increase in new reactive bone formation. Sclerotic rat femurs had significant increases in bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), bone volume fraction (BV/TV), bone surface density (BS/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N) and a significant decrease in trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) and structural model index (SMI) as compared to control rat femurs. Significantly reduced creep responses (increased η) were observed for both trabecular and cortical bone in sclerotic bones while no significant difference was observed in elastic modulus (E) and hardness (H) values. Therefore, we conclude that viscoelastic creep property using nanoindentation would serve as a more sensitive indicator of localized bone modeling than elastic properties. Moreover, reduced viscoelasticity can contribute towards increased microcrack propagation and therefore reduced toughness. Since significant positive correlations between elastic properties (E) and (H) with viscosity (η) were also observed, our results indicate that sclerotic response of bone metastasis would cause reduced toughness (increased η) with stiffening of material (increased E and H). PMID:23127639

  10. Structural response analysis of tension leg platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, K.; Oka, N.; Ozaki, M.

    1984-03-01

    A linear response analysis method of the Tension Leg Platform (TLP) subjected to regular waves is proposed. In this analysis method, flexibility of the superstructure can be taken into account in the equations of motion; response motions, tension variations of tendons and structural member forces are solved simultaneously. The applicability of this method is confirmed by comparison with the test results on two kinds of small-scale TLP models. The structural responses obtained from these calculations and their effects on tension variation of tendons are studied. Finally, several kinds of structural response characteristics are conclusively discussed.

  11. Structural Properties of Mismatched Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand

    The problem of understanding the local structure of disordered alloys has been around for a long time. In this thesis, I look more specifically at the effect of size-mismatch disorder in binary alloys under many forms: metallic and semiconductor alloys, bulk and surfaces, two and three dimensional systems. I have studied the limitations of a central-force model (CFM) and an embedded-atom potential (EAM) in describing the local structure of binary metallic alloys composed of Ag, Au, Cu, Ni, Pd, or Pt. Although an analytical model developed using the CFM explains qualitatively well the experimental and numerical results, in many cases, it is important to add electronic density effects through a more sophisticated potential like EAM in order to agree quantitatively with experiment. I have also looked at amorphous and crystalline silicon-germanium alloys. It turns out that the effect of size-mismatch is the same on a crystalline and an amorphous lattice. In the latter case, it can be seen as a perturbation of the much larger disorder due to the amorphisation process. However, the analytical predictions differ, for both the crystalline and amorphous alloys, from the experimental results. If one is to believe the data, there is only one possible explanation for this inconsistency: large amounts of hydrogen are present in the samples used for the measurements. Since the data analysis of EXAFS results is not always straightforward, I have proposed some experiments that could shed light on this problem. One of these experiments would be to look at the (111) surface of a Si-Ge alloy with a scanning tunneling microscope. I also present in this thesis the theoretical predictions for the height distribution at the surface as well as some more general structural information about the relaxation in the network as one goes away from the surface. Finally, I have studied the effect of size -mismatch in a purely two dimensional lattice, looking for mismatch-driven phase transitions

  12. Structure, Transport Properties, and Magnetism of Artificially-Structured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, John Q.

    Structural, magnetic, and magneto-transport properties of three different classes of artificially structured materials: (1) multilayers (Fe(110)/Ag(111) and Fe(110)/W(110)), (2) Fe-nitrides, and (3) metallic granular solids (Co/Ag, Co/Cu Fe/Ag and (Ni-Fe)/Ag), prepared by magnetron sputtering are presented. In the multilayers, the structure has been characterized using both low-angle and high-angle x-ray diffraction together with theoretical modeling. The magnetic properties of the Fe/Ag and Fe/W multilayers have been studied when the layer thickness of Fe and the intervening Ag or W layers are systematically varied. In the case of Fe/Ag multilayers, the interfaces are sharp. The Fe magnetic moment slightly increases with decreasing Fe layer thickness. The magnetization shows a B T^{3/2} dependence with very large values of B. In the Fe/W multilayers, there are small intermixed regions of one or two monolayers at the interfaces. The Fe moments within this region are deteriorated, whereas the rest of the Fe moments maintain their bulk values. With reactive sputtering using a mixture of argon and ammonia gases, all stable Fe-nitrides (gamma ^'-Fe_4N, varepsilon-Fe_{2 -3}N, and zeta-Fe _2N) of single phase can be fabricated. The phase diagram of Fe-nitride composition as a function of pressure of NH_3 has been determined. The magnetic properties and the Mossbauer parameters are in excellent agreement with those from the bulk samples. The magneto-transport properties in metallic granular solids, related metastable alloys and in samples with mixed phases, have been extensively studied. We have investigated the magneto-transport properties as a function of the annealing temperature, temperatures, and the magnetic concentration. For the first time, giant magnetoresistance (GMR) has been observed in non-layered but granular solids. We have shown that the GMR is isotropic and is the extra resistivity due to scattering from the non-aligned ferromagnetic entities. This extra

  13. Properties of sizeable [n]cycloparaphenylenes as molecular models of single-wall carbon nanotubes elucidated by Raman spectroscopy: structural and electron-transfer responses under mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Peña Alvarez, Miriam; Mayorga Burrezo, Paula; Kertesz, Miklos; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Yamago, Shigeru; Xia, Jianlong; Jasti, Ramesh; López Navarrete, Juan T; Taravillo, Mercedes; Baonza, Valentín G; Casado, Juan

    2014-07-01

    [n]Cycloparaphenylenes behave as molecular templates of "perfectly chemically defined" single-wall carbon nanotubes. These [n]CPP molecules have electronic, mechanical, and chemical properties in size correspondence with their giant congeners. Under mechanical stress, they form charge-transfer salts, or complexes with fullerene, by one-electron concave-convex electron transfer. PMID:24838669

  14. Tribological properties of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Miyoshi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The tribological and lubricated behavior of both oxide and nonoxide ceramics are reviewed in this chapter. Ceramics are examined in contact with themselves, other harder materials and metals. Elastic, plastic and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid state contact is discussed. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as has been observed with metals. Grit size effects in two and three body abrasive wear are observed for ceramics. Both free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Surface contaminants affect friction and adhesive wear. For example, carbon on silicon carbide and chlorine on aluminum oxide reduce friction while oxygen on metal surfaces in contact with ceramics increases friction. Lubrication increases the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics both in indentation and with sliding or rubbing. Ceramics compositions both as coatings and in composites are described for the high temperature lubrication of both alloys and ceramics.

  15. Structure, Relationships, and Community Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiTomaso, Nancy; Parks-Yancy, Rochelle; Post, Corinne

    2003-01-01

    Offers several suggestions about how educators' efforts have gone wrong and makes recommendations about what they need to teach students about ethics and management to prepare students more adequately. Concludes that ethics are about structures, processes, and the relationships that endure, get reproduced, and that generate outcomes that affect…

  16. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres.

    PubMed

    Lassalas, Pierrik; Gay, Bryant; Lasfargeas, Caroline; James, Michael J; Tran, Van; Vijayendran, Krishna G; Brunden, Kurt R; Kozlowski, Marisa C; Thomas, Craig J; Smith, Amos B; Huryn, Donna M; Ballatore, Carlo

    2016-04-14

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure-property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group.

  17. Structure Defect Property Relationships in Binary Intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medasani, Bharat; Ding, Hong; Chen, Wei; Persson, Kristin; Canning, Andrew; Haranczyk, Maciej; Asta, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Ordered intermetallics are light weight materials with technologically useful high temperature properties such as creep resistance. Knowledge of constitutional and thermal defects is required to understand these properties. Vacancies and antisites are the dominant defects in the intermetallics and their concentrations and formation enthalpies could be computed by using first principles density functional theory and thermodynamic formalisms such as dilute solution method. Previously many properties of the intermetallics such as melting temperatures and formation enthalpies were statistically analyzed for large number of intermetallics using structure maps and data mining approaches. We undertook a similar exercise to establish the dependence of the defect properties in binary intermetallics on the underlying structural and chemical composition. For more than 200 binary intermetallics comprising of AB, AB2 and AB3 structures, we computed the concentrations and formation enthalpies of vacancies and antisites in a small range of stoichiometries deviating from ideal stoichiometry. The calculated defect properties were datamined to gain predictive capabilities of defect properties as well as to classify the intermetallics for their suitability in high-T applications. Supported by the US DOE under Contract No. DEAC02-05CH11231 under the Materials Project Center grant (Award No. EDCBEE).

  18. Structural and electronic properties of dense liquid and amorphous nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Boates, B; Bonev, S A

    2011-02-11

    We present first-principles calculations of the structural and electronic properties of liquid nitrogen in the pressure-temperature range of 0-200 GPa and 2000-6000 K. The molecular-polymerization and molecular-atomic liquid phase boundaries have been mapped over this region. We find the polymeric liquid to be metallic, similar to what has been reported for the higher-temperature atomic fluid. An explanation of the electronic properties is given based on the structure and bonding character of the transformed liquids. We discuss the structural and bonding differences between the polymeric liquid and insulating solid cubic-gauche nitrogen to explain the differences in their electronic properties. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanism responsible for charge transport in polymeric nitrogen systems to explain the conductivity of the polymeric fluid and the semi-conducting nature of low-temperature amorphous nitrogen.

  19. Structure-Property Relations in Nonferrous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Alan; Loong Lee, Kok

    2005-05-01

    A long-awaited text that fills the void in non-ferrous metallurgy literature While most undergraduate metallurgy textbooks focus on iron, the most commercially important metallic element, Structure-Property Relations in Nonferrous Metals is a comprehensive textbook covering the remaining eighty-two nonferrous metals. Designed to be readily accessible to materials engineering students at all academic levels, the text describes the relationships between the atomic-, crystal-, and micro-structures of nonferrous metals, and such physical behaviors as strength, ductility, electrical conductivity, and corrosion. In order to capture and retain students' interest, the authors maintain a strong focus on practical application. Each chapter supplements fundamental concepts with engaging examples from actual engineering case studies and industrial projects, directly relating content to real-world application. Part One describes the general concepts of crystal- and micro-structures and the implications of these structures for the mechanical, thermal, and electronic properties of nonferrous metals, intermetallic compounds, and metal matrix composites. Chapters focus on such relevant topics as: Point, line, and planar defects and their effects on a material's properties

  20. Dislocations and strengthening mechanisms Fracture and fatigue Strain rate effects and creep Deviations from classic crystallinity Processing methods Composites and intermetallic compounds Part Two builds on Part One by exploring how the concepts presented define the properties of a particular metallic element and its alloys, and how these properties contribute to the engineering uses of each nonferrous metal. An accompanying ftp site contains homework problems, appendices, bibliographies, and tables of data indicating the nations producing metallic elements and the quantities produced. Structure-Property Relations in Nonferrous Metals is a valuable reference for both students in

  21. Effect of Gd3+ doping on structural, optical and frequency-dependent dielectric response properties of pseudo-cubic BaTiO3 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Manjit; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2014-06-01

    We report on the structural, optical and dielectric characterization of solid state derived, pseudo-cubic nanoscale barium titanates (BTs) with gadolinium (Gd3+) as substitutional dopant. Referring to X-ray diffractograms, apart from the BT peaks related to perovskite structure, the non-existence of any additional peaks due to byproducts has revealed that Gd3+ has undergone substitutional doping into the BT host lattice. The well-separated BT nanoparticles of typical size ˜10-15 nm were observed through electron microscopy studies. Following a direct, allowed type carrier transition ( n=1/2), a reduction in the optical band gap value (from 3.28 to 3.255 eV) was observed when the Gd-doping level was varied within 0-7 %. Conversely, the Urbach energy followed an increasing trend, from a value of 0.741 to 1.879 eV. Furthermore, the dielectric constant showed a decreasing tendency with doping content and with increasing frequency. However, in the low-frequency region, the loss tangent (tan δ), which is the combined result of orientational polarization and electrical conduction, was found to be quite high in the doped samples as compared to their un-doped counterpart. The frequency-dependent electrical data were also analyzed in the framework of conductivity and impedance formalisms. In particular, the ac conductivity which varies as ˜ ω s approaches ideal Debye behavior ( s→1) for a low Gd level and a higher doping concentration did not show improved dielectric feature of the host. The incorporation of rare-earth (Gd3+) ions into the BT host system could greatly manifest dielectric relaxation and carrier conduction mechanisms, in a given frequency range, and thus can find immense scope in miniaturized nanoelectronic elements including ceramic capacitors and transducers.

  1. Structure, chemistry, and properties of mineral nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Waychunas, G.A.; Zhang, H.; Gilbert, B.

    2008-12-02

    Nanoparticle properties can depart markedly from their bulk analog materials, including large differences in chemical reactivity, molecular and electronic structure, and mechanical behavior. The greatest changes are expected at the smallest sizes, e.g. 10 nm and below, where surface effects are expected to dominate bonding, shape and energy considerations. The precise chemistry at nanoparticle interfaces can have a profound effect on structure, phase transformations, strain, and reactivity. Certain phases may exist only as nanoparticles, requiring transformations in chemistry, stoichiometry and structure with evolution to larger sizes. In general, mineralogical nanoparticles have been little studied.

  2. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure–property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group. PMID:26967507

  3. Algorithms for Determining Physical Responses of Structures Under Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W. Lance; Ko, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-efficient real-time structural monitoring algorithms have been developed to provide extensive information about the physical response of structures under load. These algorithms are driven by actual strain data to measure accurately local strains at multiple locations on the surface of a structure. Through a single point load calibration test, these structural strains are then used to calculate key physical properties of the structure at each measurement location. Such properties include the structure s flexural rigidity (the product of the structure's modulus of elasticity, and its moment of inertia) and the section modulus (the moment of inertia divided by the structure s half-depth). The resulting structural properties at each location can be used to determine the structure s bending moment, shear, and structural loads in real time while the structure is in service. The amount of structural information can be maximized through the use of highly multiplexed fiber Bragg grating technology using optical time domain reflectometry and optical frequency domain reflectometry, which can provide a local strain measurement every 10 mm on a single hair-sized optical fiber. Since local strain is used as input to the algorithms, this system serves multiple purposes of measuring strains and displacements, as well as determining structural bending moment, shear, and loads for assessing real-time structural health. The first step is to install a series of strain sensors on the structure s surface in such a way as to measure bending strains at desired locations. The next step is to perform a simple ground test calibration. For a beam of length l (see example), discretized into n sections and subjected to a tip load of P that places the beam in bending, the flexural rigidity of the beam can be experimentally determined at each measurement location x. The bending moment at each station can then be determined for any general set of loads applied during operation.

  4. Structural properties of small rhodium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soon, Yee Yeen; Lim, Thong Leng; Yoon, Tiem Leong

    2015-04-01

    We report a systematic study of the structural properties of rhodium clusters at the atomistic level. A novel global-minimum search algorithm, known as parallel tempering multicanonical basin hopping plus genetic algorithm (PTMBHGA), is used to obtain the geometrical structures with lowest minima at the semi-empirical level where Gupta potential is used to describe the atomic interaction among the rhodium atoms. These structures are then re-optimized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with exchange-correlation energy approximated by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The structures are optimized for different spin multiplicities. The ones with lowest energies will be taken as ground-state structures. In most cases, we observe only minor changes in the geometry and bond length of the clusters as a result of DFT-level re-optimization. Only in some limited cases, the initial geometries obtained from the PTMBHGA are modified by the re-optimization. The variation of structural properties, such as ground-state geometry, symmetry and binding energy, with respect to the cluster size is studied and agreed well with other results available in the literature.

  5. Structural properties of small rhodium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Soon, Yee Yeen; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    We report a systematic study of the structural properties of rhodium clusters at the atomistic level. A novel global-minimum search algorithm, known as parallel tempering multicanonical basin hopping plus genetic algorithm (PTMBHGA), is used to obtain the geometrical structures with lowest minima at the semi-empirical level where Gupta potential is used to describe the atomic interaction among the rhodium atoms. These structures are then re-optimized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with exchange-correlation energy approximated by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The structures are optimized for different spin multiplicities. The ones with lowest energies will be taken as ground-state structures. In most cases, we observe only minor changes in the geometry and bond length of the clusters as a result of DFT-level re-optimization. Only in some limited cases, the initial geometries obtained from the PTMBHGA are modified by the re-optimization. The variation of structural properties, such as ground-state geometry, symmetry and binding energy, with respect to the cluster size is studied and agreed well with other results available in the literature.

  6. Composition-Structure-Property Relations of Compressed Borosilicate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenson, Mouritz N.; Bechgaard, Tobias K.; Fuglsang, Søren D.; Pedersen, Rune H.; Tjell, Anders Ø.; Østergaard, Martin B.; Youngman, Randall E.; Mauro, John C.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2014-08-01

    Hot isostatic compression is an interesting method for modifying the structure and properties of bulk inorganic glasses. However, the structural and topological origins of the pressure-induced changes in macroscopic properties are not yet well understood. In this study, we report on the pressure and composition dependences of density and micromechanical properties (hardness, crack resistance, and brittleness) of five soda-lime borosilicate glasses with constant modifier content, covering the extremes from Na-Ca borate to Na-Ca silicate end members. Compression experiments are performed at pressures ≤1.0 GPa at the glass transition temperature in order to allow processing of large samples with relevance for industrial applications. In line with previous reports, we find an increasing fraction of tetrahedral boron, density, and hardness but a decreasing crack resistance and brittleness upon isostatic compression. Interestingly, a strong linear correlation between plastic (irreversible) compressibility and initial trigonal boron content is demonstrated, as the trigonal boron units are the ones most disposed for structural and topological rearrangements upon network compaction. A linear correlation is also found between plastic compressibility and the relative change in hardness with pressure, which could indicate that the overall network densification is responsible for the increase in hardness. Finally, we find that the micromechanical properties exhibit significantly different composition dependences before and after pressurization. The findings have important implications for tailoring microscopic and macroscopic structures of glassy materials and thus their properties through the hot isostatic compression method.

  7. Multifunctional composites and structures with integrated mechanical and electromagnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkhizi, Alireza Vakil

    Composite materials are used for their excellent structural performance. Load-bearing properties are traditionally the only aspects for which a composite structure is designed. Recent technological advances have made it possible to reach beyond this limited view. Inspired by biological systems, we seek to develop engineering materials that exhibit multiple functionalities in addition to providing structural integrity. Composites are a natural host for embedding elements that can enhance their nonstructural response. The present work is focused on embedding periodic arrays of scattering elements within composites to modify and tune their overall electromagnetic properties. A number of techniques for numerical and analytical modeling of the periodic media are discussed. Based on these methods we have designed and fabricated composites with tuned electromagnetic properties. Examples include fiber-reinforced polymer composites with embedded arrays of straight wires or coils. In both cases, the overall dielectric constant of the medium is reduced and can even be rendered negative within microwave frequencies. The coil medium can exhibit chiral response. Solutions for eliminating this behavior as well as a method for calculation of the bianisotropic material parameters are presented. One can achieve similar response at higher frequencies by reducing the length scale. For example, we show that a polymer film with embedded nano-strips of gold can demonstrate negative dielectric constant in infrared regime. An example of a structural composite is presented for which the magnetic permeability is altered and is turned negative within a microwave band. Finally, a general method for homogenization of the electromagnetic properties of periodic media based on the microstructure is developed. Two independent chapters complete this dissertation. In Chapter 8 the response of a soft hypo-elastic material in a pressure---shear experiment is studied. A nonlinear pressure- and

  8. Final disposal room structural response calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.M.

    1997-08-01

    Finite element calculations have been performed to determine the structural response of waste-filled disposal rooms at the WIPP for a period of 10,000 years after emplacement of the waste. The calculations were performed to generate the porosity surface data for the final set of compliance calculations. The most recent reference data for the stratigraphy, waste characterization, gas generation potential, and nonlinear material response have been brought together for this final set of calculations.

  9. Structural and electronic properties of endohedral metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Takeshi; Lu, Xing

    2012-04-01

    This account presents an overview of our achievements in structural and chemical understanding of endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs), a new class of metal-carbon hybrid materials formed by encapsulation of metals inside fullerene cavities. Structural determination of EMFs is of fundamental importance for understanding their intrinsic properties and the formation mechanism, and for broadening their applications. We have developed an effective method for determining the structures of paramagnetic EMFs, and also succeeded in observing the motion of cluster in a di-metal EMF for the first time. Recently, we unambiguously established the structures of some carbide EMFs which had been wrongly assumed as conventional EMFs previously. More importantly, we have obtained some insoluble EMF species which had never been explored or even expected before. Meanwhile, the chemical properties of various EMFs with different cage structures or different metallic cores have been systematically investigated by means of both covalent and supramolecular considerations, yielding many fascinating results relating to the dictating effect of internal metals. It is noteworthy that all these achievements are based on unambiguous X-ray results of pristine or functionalized EMFs.

  10. Polarization properties of localized structures in VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averlant, Etienne; Tlidi, Mustapha; Ackemann, Thorsten; Thienpont, Hugo; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-04-01

    Broad area Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) have peculiar polarization properties which are a field of study by itself.1-3 These properties have already been used for localized structure generation, in a simple configuration, where only one polarization component was used.4 Here, we present new experimental and theoretical results on the complex polarization behavior of localized structures generated in an optically-injected broad area VCSEL. A linear stability analysis of the spin-flip VCSEL model is performed for the case of broad area devices, in a restrained and experimentally relevant parameter set. Numerical simulations are performed, in one and two dimensions. They reveal existence of vector localized structures. These structures have a complex polarization state, which is not simply a linear polarization following the one of the optical injection. Experimental results confirm theoretical predictions. Applications of this work can lead to the encoding of small color images in the polarization state of an ensemble of localized structures at the surface of a broad area VCSEL.

  11. The Structure and Properties of Parachute Cloths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnicholas, H J; Hedrick, F

    1930-01-01

    The requisite properties of a parachute cloth are discussed and the methods for measuring these properties described. In addition to the structural analysis of the cloths, the properties measured were weight, breaking strength, tear resistance, elasticity, and air permeability. Thirty-six silk cloths of domestic manufacture, not previously used in parachute construction are compared with some silk cloths of foreign manufacture. These foreign cloths were ones proven by trial and extended use to be suitable materials for parachute construction. Contrary to the belief that domestic woven cloths were not suitable materials for parachute construction, it is shown that many domestic silk cloths are satisfactory and in some respects superior to the foreign products. Based on a comparative study of all the cloths, specifications are drawn for the manufacture of silk parachute cloth.

  12. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Neetu; Srivastava, Vipul

    2016-05-01

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a0), bulk modulus (B0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  13. Electrooptical properties and structural features of amorphous ITO

    SciTech Connect

    Amosova, L. P.

    2015-03-15

    Thin indium-tin oxide (ITO) films are deposited onto cold substrates by magnetron-assisted sputtering. The dependences of the structural, electrical, and optical properties of the films on the oxygen content in the atmosphere of sputtering and the growth rate are studied. It is shown that, if the substrate temperature is no higher than the ITO crystallization temperature and the conditions of growth deviate from the optimal relationship between the oxygen pressure and the growth rate, the resistance of the layers can be six or seven orders of magnitude higher than the resistance of conducting amorphous layers and reach hundreds of megaohms. At the same time, the optical properties of insulating layers in the visible spectral region are completely identical to the properties of the conducing amorphous modification. A conceptual model of defects responsible for the insulating properties of amorphous ITO is proposed.

  14. Structure and Electronic Properties of Polycrystalline Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Mckenna, Keith P.; Shluger, AL

    2013-07-07

    We present an overview of the theoretical approaches that can be employed to model polycrystalline oxides along with a discussion of their limitations and associated challenges. We then present results for two metal oxide materials, MgO and HfO2, where theory and experiment have come together to provide insight into the structure and electronic properties of grain boundaries. Finally, we conclude with a discussion and outlook.

  15. Relaxation mechanisms, structure and properties of semi-coherent interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Shao, Shuai; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-15

    In this work, using the Cu–Ni (111) semi-coherent interface as a model system, we combine atomistic simulations and defect theory to reveal the relaxation mechanisms, structure, and properties of semi-coherent interfaces. By calculating the generalized stacking fault energy (GSFE) profile of the interface, two stable structures and a high-energy structure are located. During the relaxation, the regions that possess the stable structures expand and develop into coherent regions; the regions with high-energy structure shrink into the intersection of misfit dislocations (nodes). This process reduces the interface excess potential energy but increases the core energy of the misfit dislocations and nodes.more » The core width is dependent on the GSFE of the interface. The high-energy structure relaxes by relative rotation and dilatation between the crystals. The relative rotation is responsible for the spiral pattern at nodes. The relative dilatation is responsible for the creation of free volume at nodes, which facilitates the nodes’ structural transformation. Several node structures have been observed and analyzed. In conclusion, the various structures have significant impact on the plastic deformation in terms of lattice dislocation nucleation, as well as the point defect formation energies.« less

  16. Relaxation mechanisms, structure and properties of semi-coherent interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Shuai; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-15

    In this work, using the Cu–Ni (111) semi-coherent interface as a model system, we combine atomistic simulations and defect theory to reveal the relaxation mechanisms, structure, and properties of semi-coherent interfaces. By calculating the generalized stacking fault energy (GSFE) profile of the interface, two stable structures and a high-energy structure are located. During the relaxation, the regions that possess the stable structures expand and develop into coherent regions; the regions with high-energy structure shrink into the intersection of misfit dislocations (nodes). This process reduces the interface excess potential energy but increases the core energy of the misfit dislocations and nodes. The core width is dependent on the GSFE of the interface. The high-energy structure relaxes by relative rotation and dilatation between the crystals. The relative rotation is responsible for the spiral pattern at nodes. The relative dilatation is responsible for the creation of free volume at nodes, which facilitates the nodes’ structural transformation. Several node structures have been observed and analyzed. In conclusion, the various structures have significant impact on the plastic deformation in terms of lattice dislocation nucleation, as well as the point defect formation energies.

  17. Input estimation from measured structural response

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Dustin; Cross, Elizabeth; Silva, Ramon A; Farrar, Charles R; Bement, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This report will focus on the estimation of unmeasured dynamic inputs to a structure given a numerical model of the structure and measured response acquired at discrete locations. While the estimation of inputs has not received as much attention historically as state estimation, there are many applications where an improved understanding of the immeasurable input to a structure is vital (e.g. validating temporally varying and spatially-varying load models for large structures such as buildings and ships). In this paper, the introduction contains a brief summary of previous input estimation studies. Next, an adjoint-based optimization method is used to estimate dynamic inputs to two experimental structures. The technique is evaluated in simulation and with experimental data both on a cantilever beam and on a three-story frame structure. The performance and limitations of the adjoint-based input estimation technique are discussed.

  18. Effective structural properties in polycrystalline graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Zubaer

    This talk will discuss effective structural properties in polycrystalline graphene under the presence of atomic scale heterogeneity. Polycrystallinity is ubiquitous in solids, but theories describing their effective behavior remain limited, particularly when heterogeneity is present in the form of nonuniform deformation or composition. Over the decades, exploration of the effective transport and strength properties of heterogeneous systems has been carried out mostly with random distribution of grains or regular periodic structures under various approximations, in translating the underlying physics into a single representative volume element. Although heterogeneity can play a critical role in modulating the basic behavior of low-dimensional materials, it is difficult to capture the local characteristics accurately by these approximations. Taking polycrystalline graphene as an example material, we study the effective structural properties (such as Young's Modulus, Poisson's ratio and Toughness) by using a combination of density functional theory and molecular dynamic simulations. We identify the key mechanisms that govern their effective behavior and exploit the understanding to engineer the behavior by doping with a carefully selected choice of chemical elements.

  19. Structural and dynamical properties of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Gourab

    Recent years have witnessed a substantial amount of interest within the physics community in the properties of networks. Techniques from statistical physics coupled with the widespread availability of computing resources have facilitated studies ranging from large scale empirical analysis of the worldwide web, social networks, biological systems, to the development of theoretical models and tools to explore the various properties of these systems. Following these developments, in this dissertation, we present and solve for a diverse set of new problems, investigating the structural and dynamical properties of both model and real world networks. We start by defining a new metric to measure the stability of network structure to disruptions, and then using a combination of theory and simulation study its properties in detail on artificially generated networks; we then compare our results to a selection of networks from the real world and find good agreement in most cases. In the following chapter, we propose a mathematical model that mimics the structure of popular file-sharing websites such as Flickr and CiteULike and demonstrate that many of its properties can solved exactly in the limit of large network size. The remaining part of the dissertation primarily focuses on the dynamical properties of networks. We first formulate a model of a network that evolves under the addition and deletion of vertices and edges, and solve for the equilibrium degree distribution for a variety of cases of interest. We then consider networks whose structure can be manipulated by adjusting the rules by which vertices enter and leave the network. We focus in particular on degree distributions and show that, with some mild constraints, it is possible by a suitable choice of rules to arrange for the network to have any degree distribution we desire. In addition we define a simple local algorithm by which appropriate rules can be implemented in practice. Finally, we conclude our

  20. Structure Property Relationships of Biobased Epoxy Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorana, Anthony Surraht

    The thesis is about the synthesis, characterization, development, and application of epoxy resins derived from sustainable feedstocks such as lingo-cellulose, plant oils, and other non-food feedstocks. The thesis can be divided into two main topics 1) the synthesis and structure property relationship investigation of new biobased epoxy resin families and 2) mixing epoxy resins with reactive diluents, nanoparticles, toughening agents, and understanding co-curing reactions, filler/matrix interactions, and cured epoxy resin thermomechanical, viscoelastic, and dielectric properties. The thesis seeks to bridge the gap between new epoxy resin development, application for composites and advanced materials, processing and manufacturing, and end of life of thermoset polymers. The structures of uncured epoxy resins are characterized through traditional small molecule techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, high resolution mass spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopy. The structure of epoxy resin monomers are further understood through the process of curing the resins and cured resins' properties through rheology, chemorheology, dynamic mechanical analysis, tensile testing, fracture toughness, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and notched izod impact testing. It was found that diphenolate esters are viable alternatives to bisphenol A and that the structure of the ester side chain can have signifi-cant effects on monomer viscosity. The structure of the cured diphenolate based epoxy resins also influence glass transition temperature and dielectric properties. Incorporation of reactive diluents and flexible resins can lower viscosity, extend gel time, and enable processing of high filler content composites and increase fracture toughness. Incorpora-tion of high elastic modulus nanoparticles such as graphene can provide increases in physical properties such as elastic modulus and fracture toughness. The synthesis

  1. Structural Properties of Defects in Glassy Liquids.

    PubMed

    Cubuk, Ekin D; Schoenholz, Samuel S; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Liu, Andrea J

    2016-07-01

    At zero temperature a disordered solid corresponds to a local minimum in the energy landscape. As the temperature is raised or the system is driven with a mechanical load, the system explores different minima via dynamical events in which particles rearrange their relative positions. We have shown recently that the dynamics of particle rearrangements are strongly correlated with a structural quantity associated with each particle, "softness", which we can identify using supervised machine learning. Particles of a given softness have a well-defined energy scale that governs local rearrangements; because of this property, softness greatly simplifies our understanding of glassy dynamics. Here we investigate the correlation of softness with other commonly used structural quantities, such as coordination number and local potential energy. We show that although softness strongly correlates with these properties, its predictive power for rearrangement dynamics is much higher. We introduce a useful metric for quantifying the quality of structural quantities as predictors of dynamics. We hope that, in the future, authors introducing new structural measures of dynamics will compare their proposals quantitatively to softness using this metric. We also show how softness correlations give insight into rearrangements. Finally, we explore the physical meaning of softness using unsupervised dimensionality reduction and reduced curve-fitting models, and show that softness can be recast in a form that is amenable to analytical treatment.

  2. Lattice Truss Structural Response Using Energy Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Winfred Scottson

    1996-01-01

    A deterministic methodology is presented for developing closed-form deflection equations for two-dimensional and three-dimensional lattice structures. Four types of lattice structures are studied: beams, plates, shells and soft lattices. Castigliano's second theorem, which entails the total strain energy of a structure, is utilized to generate highly accurate results. Derived deflection equations provide new insight into the bending and shear behavior of the four types of lattices, in contrast to classic solutions of similar structures. Lattice derivations utilizing kinetic energy are also presented, and used to examine the free vibration response of simple lattice structures. Derivations utilizing finite element theory for unique lattice behavior are also presented and validated using the finite element analysis code EAL.

  3. Structural Properties of the Native Ligamentum Teres

    PubMed Central

    Philippon, Marc J.; Rasmussen, Matthew T.; Turnbull, Travis Lee; Trindade, Christiano A.C.; Hamming, Mark G.; Ellman, Michael B.; Harris, Matthew; LaPrade, Robert F.; Wijdicks, Coen A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: A majority of studies investigating the role of the ligamentum teres (LT) have focused primarily on anatomical and histological descriptions. To date, however, the structural properties of the LT have yet to be fully elucidated. Purpose: To investigate the structural properties of the native LT in a human cadaveric model. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: A total of 12 human cadaveric hemipelvises (mean age, 53.6 years; range, 34-63 years) were dissected free of all extra-articular soft tissues to isolate the LT and its acetabular and femoral attachments. A dynamic tensile testing machine distracted each femur in line with the fibers of the LT at a displacement-controlled rate of 0.5 mm/s. The anatomic dimensions, structural properties, and modes of failure were recorded. Results: The LT achieved a mean yield load of 75 N and ultimate failure load of 204 N. The LT had mean lengths of 38.0 and 53.0 mm at its yield and failure points, respectively. The most common (75% of specimens) mechanism of failure was tearing at the fovea capitis. On average, the LT had a linear stiffness of 16 N/mm and elastic modulus of 9.24 MPa. The mean initial length and cross-sectional area were 32 mm and 59 mm2, respectively. Conclusion: The human LT had a mean ultimate failure load of 204 N. Therefore, the results of this investigation, combined with recent biomechanical and outcomes studies, suggest that special consideration should be given to preserving the structural and corresponding biomechanical integrity of the LT during surgical intervention. Clinical Relevance: The LT may be more important as a static stabilizer of the hip joint than previously recognized. Further studies are recommended to investigate the appropriate indications to perform surgical repair or reconstruction of the LT for preservation of hip stability and function. PMID:26535290

  4. Structural and electronic properties for atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan

    We have studied the structural and electronic properties for different groups of atomic clusters by doing a global search on the potential energy surface using the Taboo Search in Descriptors Space (TSDS) method and calculating the energies with Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (KS-DFT). Our goal was to find the structural and electronic principles for predicting the structure and stability of clusters. For Ben (n = 3--20), we have found that the evolution of geometric and electronic properties with size reflects a change in the nature of the bonding from van der Waals to metallic and then bulk-like. The cluster sizes with extra stability agree well with the predictions of the jellium model. In the 4d series of transition metal (TM) clusters, as the d-type bonding becomes more important, the preferred geometric structure changes from icosahedral (Y, Zr), to distorted compact structures (Nb, Mo), and FCC or simple cubic crystal fragments (Tc, Ru, Rh) due to the localized nature of the d-type orbital. Analysis of relative isomer energies and their electronic density of states suggest that these clusters tend to follow a maximum hardness principle (MHP). For A4B12 clusters (A is divalent, B is monovalent), we found unusually large (on average 1.95 eV) HOMO-LUMO gap values. This shows the extra stability at an electronic closed shell (20 electrons) predicted by the jellium model. The importance of symmetry, closed electronic and ionic shells in stability is shown by the relative stability of homotops of Mg4Ag12 which also provides support for the hypothesis that clusters that satisfy more than one stability criterion ("double magic") should be particularly stable.

  5. glass chemistry: structure-property relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Youngman, Randall E.; Mauro, John C.

    2014-08-01

    Pyrex® glass was one of the first commercial boroaluminosilicate glass compositions, selected in 1915 from thousands of compositions due to its ability to sustain mechanical and thermal shock. While the microscopic structure of Pyrex® glass has recently been investigated, the microscopic origins of its macroscopic properties are not well understood, i.e., the atomic scale foundation of the original empirical invention of Pyrex® glass has yet to be established. In this work, we have tackled this problem by investigating the effects of varying Si/Al and Na/B ratios on the boron and aluminum speciation and a range of physical and rheological properties in the Pyrex® glass family. We show that the canonical Pyrex® boroaluminosilicate composition is indeed optimal for attaining relatively high values of glass transition temperature and elastic moduli and a low coefficient of thermal expansion, while simultaneously maintaining a high glass-forming ability.

  6. Landscape structure and climate influences on hydrologic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nippgen, Fabian; McGlynn, Brian L.; Marshall, Lucy A.; Emanuel, Ryan E.

    2011-12-01

    Climate variability and catchment structure (topography, geology, vegetation) have a significant influence on the timing and quantity of water discharged from mountainous catchments. How these factors combine to influence runoff dynamics is poorly understood. In this study we linked differences in hydrologic response across catchments and across years to metrics of landscape structure and climate using a simple transfer function rainfall-runoff modeling approach. A transfer function represents the internal catchment properties that convert a measured input (rainfall/snowmelt) into an output (streamflow). We examined modeled mean response time, defined as the average time that it takes for a water input to leave the catchment outlet from the moment it reaches the ground surface. We combined 12 years of precipitation and streamflow data from seven catchments in the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (Little Belt Mountains, southwestern Montana) with landscape analyses to quantify the first-order controls on mean response times. Differences between responses across the seven catchments were related to the spatial variability in catchment structure (e.g., slope, flowpath lengths, tree height). Annual variability was largely a function of maximum snow water equivalent. Catchment averaged runoff ratios exhibited strong correlations with mean response time while annually averaged runoff ratios were not related to climatic metrics. These results suggest that runoff ratios in snowmelt dominated systems are mainly controlled by topography and not by climatic variability. This approach provides a simple tool for assessing differences in hydrologic response across diverse watersheds and climate conditions.

  7. Structure-Property Relationships of Bismaleimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenteris-Noebe, Anita D.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to control and systematically vary the network topology of bismaleimides through cure temperature and chemistry (addition of various coreactants) and subsequently attempt to determine structure-mechanical property relationships. Characterization of the bismaleimide structures by dielectric, rheological, and thermal analyses, and density measurements was subsequently correlated with mechanical properties such as modulus, yield strength, fracture energy, and stress relaxation. The model material used in this investigation was 4,4'-BismaleiMidodIphenyl methane (BMI). BMI was coreacted with either 4,4'-Methylene Dianiline (MDA), o,o'-diallyl bisphenol A (DABA) from Ciba Geigy, or Diamino Diphenyl Sulfone (DDS). Three cure paths were employed: a low- temperature cure of 140 C where chain extension should predominate, a high-temperature cure of 220 C where both chain extension and crosslinking should occur simultaneously, and a low-temperature (140 C) cure followed immediately by a high-temperature (220 C) cure where the chain extension reaction or amine addition precedes BMI homopolymerization or crosslinking. Samples of cured and postcured PMR-15 were also tested to determine the effects of postcuring on the mechanical properties. The low-temperature cure condition of BMI/MDA exhibited the highest modulus values for a given mole fraction of BMI with the modulus decreasing with decreasing concentration of BMI. The higher elastic modulus is the result of steric hindrance by unreacted BMI molecules in the glassy state. The moduli values for the high- and low/high-temperature cure conditions of BMI/MDA decreased as the amount of diamine increased. All the moduli values mimic the yield strength and density trends. For the high-temperature cure condition, the room- temperature modulus remained constant with decreasing mole fraction of BMT for the BMI/DABA and BMI/DDS systems. Postcuring PMR-15 increases the modulus over that of the cured

  8. Stimulus properties of fixed-interval responses.

    PubMed

    Buchman, I B; Zeiler, M D

    1975-11-01

    Responses in the first component of a chained schedule produced a change to the terminal component according to a fixed-interval schedule. The number of responses emitted in the fixed interval determined whether a variable-interval schedule of food presentation or extinction prevailed in the terminal component. In one condition, the variable-interval schedule was in effect only if the number of responses during the fixed interval was less than that specified; in another condition, the number of responses had to exceed that specified. The number of responses emitted in the fixed interval did not shift markedly in the direction required for food presentation. Instead, responding often tended to change in the opposite direction. Such an effect indicated that differential food presentation did not modify the reference behavior in accord with the requirement, but it was consistent with other data on fixed-interval schedule performance. Behavior in the terminal component, however, did reveal sensitivity to the relation between total responses emitted in the fixed interval and the availability of food. Response rate in the terminal component was a function of the proximity of the response number emitted in the fixed interval to that required for food presentation. Thus, response number served as a discriminative stimulus controlling subsequent performance.

  9. Structural properties of impact ices accreted on aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scavuzzo, R. J.; Chu, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    The structural properties of ice accretions formed on aircraft surfaces are studied. The overall objectives are to measure basic structural properties of impact ices and to develop finite element analytical procedures for use in the design of all deicing systems. The Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to produce simulated natural ice accretion over a wide range of icing conditions. Two different test apparatus were used to measure each of the three basic mechanical properties: tensile, shear, and peeling. Data was obtained on both adhesive shear strength of impact ices and peeling forces for various icing conditions. The influences of various icing parameters such as tunnel air temperature and velocity, icing cloud drop size, material substrate, surface temperature at ice/material interface, and ice thickness were studied. A finite element analysis of the shear test apparatus was developed in order to gain more insight in the evaluation of the test data. A comparison with other investigators was made. The result shows that the adhesive shear strength of impact ice typically varies between 40 and 50 psi, with peak strength reaching 120 psi and is not dependent on the kind of substrate used, the thickness of accreted ice, and tunnel temperature below 4 C.

  10. Nanostructured lead sulfide: synthesis, structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Gusev, A. I.; Rempel, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The theoretical and experimental results of recent studies dealing with nanostructured lead sulfide are summarized and analyzed. The key methods for the synthesis of nanostructured lead sulfide are described. The crystal structure of PbS in nanopowders and nanofilms is discussed. The influence of the size of nanostructure elements on the optical and thermal properties of lead sulfide is considered. The dependence of the band gap of PbS on the nanoparticle (crystallite) size for powders and films is illustrated. The bibliography includes 222 references.

  11. Molecular and structural analysis of viscoelastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapp, Rebecca D.; Kalyanam, Sureshkumar; Insana, Michael F.

    2007-03-01

    Elasticity imaging is emerging as an important tool for breast cancer detection and monitoring of treatment. Viscoelastic image contrast in breast lesions is generated by disease specific processes that modify the molecular structure of connective tissues. We showed previously that gelatin hydrogels exhibit mechanical behavior similar to native collagen found in breast tissue and therefore are suitable as phantoms for elasticity imaging. This paper summarizes our study of the viscoelastic properties of hydrogels designed to discover molecular-scale sources of elasticity image contrast.

  12. Electronic structure and optical properties of resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Zhi-Fan; Zhou, Rong-Feng

    2013-03-01

    We used the density of functional theory (DFT) to study the electronic structure and density of states of resin by ab initio calculation. The results show the band gap of resin is 1.7 eV. The covalent bond is combined C/O atoms with H atoms. The O 2p orbital is the biggest effect near the Fermi level. The results of optical properties show the reflectivity is low, and the refractive index is 1.7 in visible light range. The highest absorption coefficient peak is in 490 nm and the value is 75,000.

  13. Structural and optical properties of nanostructured nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J.; Pandey, J.; Gupta, R.; Kaurav, N.; Tripathi, J.

    2016-05-01

    Metal nanoparticles are attractive because of their special structure and better optical properties. Nickel nanoparticles (Ni-Np) have been synthesized successfully by thermal decomposition method in the presence of trioctyl phosphine (TOP) and oleylamine (OAm). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Zetapotential measurement and Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The size of Ni nanoparticles can be readily tuned from 13.86 nm. As-synthesized Ni nanoparticles have hexagonal closed pack (hcp) cubic structure as characterized by power X-ray diffraction (XRD) prepared at 280°C. The possible formation mechanism has also been phenomenological proposed for as synthesized Ni-Np. The value of Zeta potential was found 12.25 mV.

  14. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ⪉rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in

  15. Protoglobin: structure and ligand-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Alessandra; Bolognesi, Martino; Nardini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Protoglobin is the first globin identified in Archaea; its biological role is still unknown, although it can bind O2, CO and NO reversibly in vitro. The X-ray structure of Methanosarcina acetivorans protoglobin revealed several peculiar structural features. Its tertiary structure can be considered as an expanded version of the canonical globin fold, characterised by the presence of a pre-A helix (named Z) and a 20-residue N-terminal extension. Other unusual trends are a large distortion of the haem moiety, and its complete burial in the protein matrix due to the extended CE and FG loops and the 20-residue N-terminal loop. Access of diatomic ligands to the haem has been proposed to be granted by two tunnels, which are mainly defined by helices B/G (tunnel 1) and B/E (tunnel 2), and whose spatial orientation and topology give rise to an almost orthogonal two-tunnel system unprecedented in other globins. At a quaternary level, protoglobin forms a tight dimer, mostly based on the inter-molecular four-helix bundle built by the G- and H-helices, similar to that found in globin-coupled sensor proteins, which share with protoglobin a common phylogenetic origin. Such unique structural properties, together with an unusually low O2 dissociation rate and a selectivity ratio for O2/CO binding that favours O2 ligation, make protoglobin a peculiar case for gaining insight into structure to function relationships within the globin superfamily. While recent structural and biochemical data have given answers to important questions, the functional issue is still unclear and it is expected to represent the major focus of future investigations. PMID:24054795

  16. Repair material properties for effective structural application

    SciTech Connect

    Mangat, P.S.; Limbachiya, M.C.

    1997-04-01

    Strength and engineering properties of three generic repair materials which are likely to influence long-term performance of repaired concrete structures were studied. Measured properties include strength, stiffness, shrinkage and creep deformations, together with the complete compressive stress-strain characteristics including post-cracking behavior. The repair materials considered in this investigation are commercially available and widely used. These included a high performance non-shrinkable concrete, a mineral based cementitious material with no additives or coarse aggregate size particles, and a cementitious mortar containing styrene acrylic copolymer with fiber additives. Performance comparisons are also made between these materials and plain concrete mixes of similar strength and stiffness, suitable for repair applications. The results show that shrinkage of the repair materials was significantly greater than the shrinkage of normal concrete. Moreover, the shrinkage of those modified with a polymer admixture was found to be very sensitive to the relative humidity of the exposure compared to normal concrete. The post-peak strain capacity of the material modified with a polymer admixture was markedly improved leading to a more pronounced falling branch of stress-strain curve. The ultimate stress level (at a maximum load) of specially formulated repair materials varies significantly, the lowest ultimate stress being recorded for the porous mineral-based material. The inclusion of aggregates improves the mechanical properties and dimensional stability of repair materials.

  17. Property-optimized Gaussian basis sets for molecular response calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Furche, Filipp

    2010-10-01

    With recent advances in electronic structure methods, first-principles calculations of electronic response properties, such as linear and nonlinear polarizabilities, have become possible for molecules with more than 100 atoms. Basis set incompleteness is typically the main source of error in such calculations since traditional diffuse augmented basis sets are too costly to use or suffer from near linear dependence. To address this problem, we construct the first comprehensive set of property-optimized augmented basis sets for elements H-Rn except lanthanides. The new basis sets build on the Karlsruhe segmented contracted basis sets of split-valence to quadruple-zeta valence quality and add a small number of moderately diffuse basis functions. The exponents are determined variationally by maximization of atomic Hartree-Fock polarizabilities using analytical derivative methods. The performance of the resulting basis sets is assessed using a set of 313 molecular static Hartree-Fock polarizabilities. The mean absolute basis set errors are 3.6%, 1.1%, and 0.3% for property-optimized basis sets of split-valence, triple-zeta, and quadruple-zeta valence quality, respectively. Density functional and second-order Møller-Plesset polarizabilities show similar basis set convergence. We demonstrate the efficiency of our basis sets by computing static polarizabilities of icosahedral fullerenes up to C720 using hybrid density functional theory.

  18. Synthesis, structure, and properties of glasses under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerette, Michael J.

    Anomalous mechanical properties of silica glass include stiffening upon heating, initially softening under pressure, and non-linear elastic response to strains. Through understanding structural changes in silica glass under a broad range of temperature, pressure, and strain conditions and how they influence the mechanical properties, insight was gained for how to change the silica glass network to better suit specific uses in extreme conditions. In this dissertation, pressure-quenching routes were used to effectively change the glass atomic packing and to make densified glass. Applied in the non-rigid state near the glass transition temperature, quench pressures up to 8 GPa have been used to achieve density increase of 25% in silica glass. The resulting structure and properties of as-quenched samples have been investigated using XRD, Raman and Brillouin spectroscopy. In-situ Raman and Brillouin light scattering techniques were developed to study the structure, elastic and dynamic properties of silica glass under high temperature, high pressure and high strain conditions. High temperature measurements were carried out in an optical furnace up to 1500°C, a diamond anvil cell was used to carry out high pressure experiments up to 25 GPa, and a two-point bender was used for measuring glasses in excess of 6% strain in both tensile and compressive regions. Pressure-quenching from the non-rigid state near the glass transition temperature imparts structural signatures to densified silica glass that cannot be accomplished through cold compression at room temperature. The unique structures of pressure-quenched silica glass are reflected in decreased anomalous response of silica glass to external stimuli of high temperature or high pressure, and therefore greater thermo-mechanical stability. The nonlinear elastic behavior of silica glass has been directly probed from the compressive to the tensile side of silica fibers in bend by using in-situ Brillouin light scattering. This

  19. PROBABILISTIC STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF STRUCTURE UNDER COLLAPSE LOADING

    SciTech Connect

    J. PEPIN; E. RODRIGUEZ; ET AL

    2001-01-05

    Engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are currently developing the capability to provide a reliability-based structural evaluation technique for performing weapon reliability assessments. To enhance the analyst's confidence with these new methods, an integrated experiment and analysis project has been developed. The uncertainty associated with the collapse response of commercially available spherical marine float is evaluated with the aid of the non-linear explicit dynamics code DYNA3D (Whirley and Engelmann 1988) coupled with the probabilistic code NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) (Thacker et al. 1998). Variations in geometric shape parameters and uncertainties in material parameters are characterized and included in the probabilistic model.

  20. Structure and shear response of lipid monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1990-02-01

    Organic monolayers and multilayers are both scientifically fascinating and technologically promising; they are, however, both complex systems and relatively inaccessible to experimental probes. In this Progress Report, we describe our X-ray diffraction studies, which have given us substantial new information about the structures and phase transitions in monolayers on the surface of water; our use of these monolayers as a unique probe of the dynamics of wetting and spreading; and our studies of monolayer mechanical properties using a simple but effective technique available to anyone using the Wilhelmy method to measure surface tension.

  1. Structure and Properties of Tactic Hydrogenated Polynorbornenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Adam B.; Register, Richard A.

    Tacticity is one of the most important structural parameters for determining the physical properties of a polymer. A high degree of steroregularity typically promotes crystallization, with different tacticities giving rise to differences in crystal structure, melting point, and degree of crystallinity. In polynorbornene (PN) made by ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP), tacticity is determined by the relative configuration of the nonplanar cyclopentylene rings enchained in the backbone. Traditional ROMP initiators yield atactic polymers (aPN); however, recent advances in catalyst design have produced both isotactic and syndiotactic PN. Newly reported cis,isotactic- and cis,syndiotactic-PNs were catalytically hydrogenated (abbreviated ihPN and shPN, respectively) without altering the tacticity. The thermal and structural characteristics of ihPN and shPN were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) and compared to that of ahPN. Remarkably, all three polymers are semicrystalline, each with a distinct crystal structure. ihPN has a nominal melting point of 165 C, more than 20 C above that of ahPN. WAXS patterns of melt-drawn fibers of ihPN show few strong reflections indicative of either a highly symmetric unit cell or poor long-range order. ihPN fibers also exhibit a crystal-crystal transition near 130 C, which is not fully reversible on subsequent cooling. On the other hand, shPN has a nominal melting point some 15 C below that of ahPN, and shPN fibers show no evidence of polymorphism.

  2. Broadband multiple responses of surface modes in quasicrystalline plasmonic structure

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Haiming; Jiang, Xiangqian; Huang, Feng; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the multiple excitation of surface modes in 2D photonic quasicrystal/metal/substrate structure. An improved rigorous coupled wave analysis method that can handle the quasicrystalline structure is presented. The quasicrystalline lattice, which refers to Penrose tiling in this paper, is generated by the cut-and-project method. The normal incidence spectrum presents a broadband multiple responses property. We find that the phase matching condition determines the excitation frequency for a given incident angle, while the depth of the reflection valley depends on the incident polarization. The modes will split into several sub-modes at oblique incidence, which give rise to the appearance of more responses on the spectrum. PMID:27492782

  3. Broadband multiple responses of surface modes in quasicrystalline plasmonic structure.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haiming; Jiang, Xiangqian; Huang, Feng; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the multiple excitation of surface modes in 2D photonic quasicrystal/metal/substrate structure. An improved rigorous coupled wave analysis method that can handle the quasicrystalline structure is presented. The quasicrystalline lattice, which refers to Penrose tiling in this paper, is generated by the cut-and-project method. The normal incidence spectrum presents a broadband multiple responses property. We find that the phase matching condition determines the excitation frequency for a given incident angle, while the depth of the reflection valley depends on the incident polarization. The modes will split into several sub-modes at oblique incidence, which give rise to the appearance of more responses on the spectrum. PMID:27492782

  4. Structure-property relationships of carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; Kong, F.M.

    1993-12-01

    Of the organic reactions in sol-gel polymerizations, the most studied reaction is the aqueous polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde; the resulting crosslinked gels are supercritically dried from CO{sub 2} to give resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels. These aerogels can be pyrolyzed to form vitreous carbon monoliths with black color, high porosity, ultrafine cell/pore size, high surface area, and interconnected particles of the organic precursor. The structure and properties of the carbon aerogels depend on R/C (resorcinol/catalyst) ratio of starting solution, pyrolysis temperature, and chemical activation. Each variable is discussed. Carbon aerogels provide an almost ideal electrode material (in double-layer capacitors) owing to low electrical resistivity (<40 mohm-cm), controllable pore size distribution (5--500 {angstrom}), and high volumetric surface areas ({approximately}500 m{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}).

  5. Structure and general properties of flavins.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Flavins are a family of yellow-colored compounds with the basic structure of 7,8-dimethyl-10-alkylisoalloxazine. Riboflavin, commonly known as vitamin B2, is an essential component of living organisms and is the precursor of all biologically important flavins. In this chapter, the redox properties of flavins are described, with special emphasis in their ability to participate in both one-electron and two-electron transfer processes; hence, flavins are indispensable mediators between two-electron and one-electron processes in biological systems. The photophysical and photochemical properties of flavins are also discussed. All oxidized flavins exhibit strong absorption in the ultraviolet and visible regions and an intense yellow-green fluorescence (in their neutral oxidized form). Flavins are thermostable compounds; however, they are photosensitive. In the absence of an external reductant, the isoalloxazine ring system undergoes intramolecular photoreduction. Some flavins are efficient photosensitizers; they can induce photomodifications of compounds that are not directly modified by visible light.

  6. Structure Property Studies for Additively Manufactured Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Milenski, Helen M; Schmalzer, Andrew Michael; Kelly, Daniel

    2015-08-17

    Since the invention of modern Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes engineers and designers have worked hard to capitalize on the unique building capabilities that AM allows. By being able to customize the interior fill of parts it is now possible to design components with a controlled density and customized internal structure. The creation of new polymers and polymer composites allow for even greater control over the mechanical properties of AM parts. One of the key reasons to explore AM, is to bring about a new paradigm in part design, where materials can be strategically optimized in a way that conventional subtractive methods cannot achieve. The two processes investigated in my research were the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process and the Direct Ink Write (DIW) process. The objectives of the research were to determine the impact of in-fill density and morphology on the mechanical properties of FDM parts, and to determine if DIW printed samples could be produced where the filament diameter was varied while the overall density remained constant.

  7. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals: 3. Relationships between smectite redox and structural properties.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Christopher A; Klüpfel, Laura E; Voegelin, Andreas; Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Structural Fe in clay minerals is an important redox-active species in many pristine and contaminated environments as well as in engineered systems. Understanding the extent and kinetics of redox reactions involving Fe-bearing clay minerals has been challenging due to the inability to relate structural Fe(2+)/Fe(total) fractions to fundamental redox properties, such as reduction potentials (EH). Here, we overcame this challenge by using mediated electrochemical reduction (MER) and oxidation (MEO) to characterize the fraction of redox-active structural Fe (Fe(2+)/Fe(total)) in smectites over a wide range of applied EH-values (-0.6 V to +0.6 V). We examined Fe(2+)/Fe(total )- EH relationships of four natural Fe-bearing smectites (SWy-2, SWa-1, NAu-1, NAu-2) in their native, reduced, and reoxidized states and compared our measurements with spectroscopic observations and a suite of mineralogical properties. All smectites exhibited unique Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships, were redox active over wide EH ranges, and underwent irreversible electron transfer induced structural changes that were observable with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Variations among the smectite Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships correlated well with both bulk and molecular-scale properties, including Fe(total) content, layer charge, and quadrupole splitting values, suggesting that multiple structural parameters determined the redox properties of smectites. The Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships developed for these four commonly studied clay minerals may be applied to future studies interested in relating the extent of structural Fe reduction or oxidation to EH-values.

  8. Structural and Elastic Properties of Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Joseph; Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitris; Bernstein, Noam; Mehl, Michael

    2003-03-01

    In this work we study the elastic and structural properties of amorphous silicon using the NRL tight-binding method (N. Bernstein, et al., Phys. Rev. B 62, 4477 (2000).). Using conjugate gradient energy minimization we have relaxed a 216 atom model. The amorphous-crystal energy difference is 0.017 Ryd/atom, similar to a calculation on a related model using the empirical Stillinger-Weber potential and twice the experimental value. The structure of the relaxed model is consistent with diffraction experiments as well as more indirect experimental results. The model is fully four-fold coordinated with an RMS bond angle deviation of only 11^rc, and is expanded 2% in volume with respect to the TB crystalline value. Using the method of homogeneous deformation we have found a relaxed shear modulus of ˜57 GPa (with an estimated 2% uncertainty due to anisotropy) and relaxed bulk modulus of 87.3 GPa, in very good agreement with a previous (ab initio) calculated value of 82.5 GPa (M. Durandurdu and D. A. Drabold, Phys. Rev. B 64, 014101 (2001).). We find that the distribution of relaxation displacements under shear is markedly skewed towards large values. Finally, we discuss the force constants and vacancy energy distributions for several models.

  9. Structural Properties of Green Tea Catechins.

    PubMed

    Botten, Dominic; Fugallo, Giorgia; Fraternali, Franca; Molteni, Carla

    2015-10-01

    Green tea catechins are polyphenols which are believed to provide health benefits; they are marketed as health supplements and are studied for their potential effects on a variety of medical conditions. However, their mechanisms of action and interaction with the environment at the molecular level are still not well-understood. Here, by means of atomistic simulations, we explore the structural properties of four green tea catechins, in the gas phase and water solution: specifically, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, which is the most abundant, (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-(3-O-methyl)-gallate, and (-)-epigallocatechin. We characterize the free energy conformational landscapes of these catechins at ambient conditions, as a function of the torsional degrees of freedom of the pholyphenolic rings, determining the stable conformers and their connections. We show that these free energy landscapes are only subtly influenced by the interactions with the solvent and by the structural details of the polyphenolic rings. However, the number and position of the hydroxyl groups (or their sustituents) and the presence/absence of the galloyl moiety have significant impact on the selected catechin solvation shells and hydrogen bond capabilities, which are ultimately linked to their ability to interact with and affect the biological environment. PMID:26369298

  10. High-pressure structural properties of tetramethylsilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen-Xing, Qin; Xiao-Jia, Chen

    2016-02-01

    High-pressure structural properties of tetramethylsilane are investigated by synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction at pressures up to 31.1 GPa and room temperature. A phase with the space group of Pnma is found to appear at 4.2 GPa. Upon compression, the compound transforms to two following phases: the phase with space groups of P21/c at 9.9 GPa and the phase with P2/m at 18.2 GPa successively via a transitional phase. The unique structural character of P21/c supports the phase stability of tetramethylsilane without possible decomposition upon heavy compression. The appearance of the P2/m phase suggests the possible realization of metallization for this material at higher pressure. Project supported by the Cultivation Fund of the Key Scientific and Technical Innovation Project from Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 708070), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, South China University of Technology (Grant No. 2014ZZ0069), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51502189), and the Doctoral Project of Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 20132010).

  11. Spectral Response of Multilayer Optical Structures to Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scripka, David; Lecroy, Garrett; Lee, Gyuhyon; Sun, Changyan; Kang, Zhitao; Summers, Christopher J.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2015-06-01

    Distributed Bragg Reflectors and optical microcavities are multilayer optical structures with spectral properties that are intrinsically sensitive to external perturbations. With nanometer to micrometer dimensions and near instantaneous optical response, these structures show significant potential as the basis for mesoscale time-resolved diagnostics that can be used to probe the dynamic behavior of mesoscale heterogeneous materials. In order to characterize the optical and mechanical behavior of the multilayer structures, a coupled computational-experimental study is underway. A mechanistic analysis of the spectral response of the structures to dynamic loading will be presented, along with computational simulations illustrating the observable spectral effects of 1D shock compression. Results from fabrication of specific multilayer designs and initial laser-driven shock loading experiments will be shown and compared to the simulation results. Preliminary results indicate that the magnitude of dynamic loading can be directly correlated to the altered spectral response. Potential applications of the theoretical diagnostics and challenges associated with spatially resolved data collection methodology will also be discussed. DTRA grant HDTRA-1-12-1-0052 is acknowledged. David Scripka is supported by the Department of Defense through the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship Program.

  12. Structural Properties of Amorphous Indium-Based Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Rabi; Medvedeva, Julia

    2014-03-01

    Amorphous transparent conducting and semiconducting oxides exhibit similar or even superior properties to those observed in their crystalline counterparts. To understand how the structural properties change upon amorphization and how chemical composition affects the local and long-range structure of the amorphous oxides, we employ first-principles molecular dynamics to generate amorphous In-X-O with X =Zn, Ga, Sn, Ge, Y, or Sc, and compare their local structure features to those obtained for amorphous and crystalline indium oxide. The results reveal that the short-range structure of the Metal-O polyhedra is generally preserved in the amorphous oxides; however, different metals (In and X) show quantitatively or qualitatively different behavior. Some of the metals retain their natural distances and/or coordination; while others allow for a highly distorted environment and thus favor ``defect'' formation under variable oxygen conditions. At the same time, we find that the presence of X increases both the average In-O coordination and the number of the 6-coordinated In atoms as compared to those in IO. The improved In coordination may be responsible for the observed reduction in the carrier concentration as the substitution level in In-X-O increases.

  13. Thin films of tetrafluorosubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine: Structure and sensor properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyamer, Darya D.; Sukhikh, Aleksandr S.; Krasnov, Pavel O.; Gromilov, Sergey A.; Morozova, Natalya B.; Basova, Tamara V.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, thin films of tetrafluorosubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPcF4) were prepared by organic molecular beam deposition and their structure was studied using UV-vis, polarization dependent Raman spectroscopy, XRD and atomic force microscopy. Quantum chemical calculations (DFT) have been employed in order to determine the detailed assignment of the bands in the CoPcF4 IR and Raman spectra. The electrical sensor response of CoPcF4 films to ammonia vapours was investigated and compared with that of unsubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine films. In order to explain the difference in sensitivity of the unsubstituted and fluorinated phthalocyanines to ammonia, the nature and properties of chemical binding between CoPc derivatives and NH3 were described by quantum-chemical calculations utilizing DFT method. The effect of post-deposition annealing on surface morphology and gas sensing properties of CoPcF4 films was also studied.

  14. Response properties of self-improving systems.

    PubMed

    Krakovsky, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    We observe that a sustained positivity (or negativity) of a system's second-order response will result in a directional change of the system's characteristics under the corresponding random exposure. We identify these changes with improvement (or decline) in the state of a system and introduce the concept of self-improving systems as systems which characteristics can sustainably improve under a random exposure. The resulting framework is of a general phenomenological nature and can be applied to complex systems across different areas of knowledge. PMID:27059562

  15. Geometrical, response, and gap properties of Lindbladians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Victor V.; Bradlyn, Barry; Fraas, Martin; Jiang, Liang

    We study Lindbladians admitting multi-dimensional steady-state subspaces (SSS) which can be used to store, protect, and process quantum information. We derive an analytical formula for the left eigenmatrices of such Lindbladians corresponding to purely imaginary eigenvalues. This formula resolves how Lindbladian evolution affects perturbative response and geometrical features of the SSS and allows us to generalize recent work to all types of SSS. We show that Hamiltonian and certain jump operator perturbations induce, to first order, exclusively unitary evolution on the SSS. Similarly, the holonomy (generalization of geometric phase) induced on the SSS after adiabatic traversal of a closed path in parameter space is unitary. We derive a new Riemannian metric tensor in parameter space induced by one type of SSS, generalizing the Fubini-Study metric to Lindbladians possessing one or more mixed steady states. We derive a Kubo formula governing linear response of the SSS to Hamiltonian perturbations. Finally, we show that the energy scale governing leakage out of the SSS is different from the conventional Lindbladian dissipative gap.

  16. Structural response of fiber composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minich, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    A fiber composite airfoil, typical for high-tip speed compressor applications, is subjected to load conditions anticipated to be encountered in such applications, and its structural response is theoretically investigated. The analysis method used consists of composite mechanics embedded in pre- and post-processors and coupled with NASTRAN. The load conditions examined include thermal due to aerodynamic heating, pressure due to aerodynamic forces, centrifugal, and combinations of these. The various responses investigated include root reactions due to various load conditions, average composite and ply stresses, ply delaminations, and the fundamental modes and the corresponding reactions. The results show that the thermal and pressure stresses are negligible compared to those caused by the centrifugal forces. Also, the core-shell concept for composite blades is an inefficient design (core plies not highly stressed) and appears to be sensitive to interply delaminations. The results are presented in graphical and tabular forms to illustrate the types and amount of data required for such an analysis, and to provide quantitative data of the various responses which can be helpful in designing such composite blades.

  17. Structure-Property Study of Piezoelectricity in Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida; Park, Cheol; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Smith, Joseph G.; Hinkley, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    High performance piezoelectric polymers are of interest to NASA as they may be useful for a variety of sensor applications. Over the past few years research on piezoelectric polymers has led to the development of promising high temperature piezoelectric responses in some novel polyimides. In this study, a series of polyimides have been studied with systematic variations in the diamine monomers that comprise the polyimide while holding the dianhydride constant. The effect of structural changes, including variations in the nature and concentration of dipolar groups, on the remanent polarization and piezoelectric coefficient is examined. Fundamental structure-piezoelectric property insight will enable the molecular design of polymers possessing distinct improvements over state-of-the-art piezoelectric polymers including enhanced polarization, polarization stability at elevated temperatures, and improved processability.

  18. Silicene oxides: formation, structures and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Pi, Xiaodong; Ni, Zhenyi; Liu, Yong; Lin, Shisheng; Xu, Mingsheng; Yang, Deren

    2013-12-16

    Understanding the oxidation of silicon has been critical to the success of all types of silicon materials, which are the cornerstones of modern silicon technologies. For the recent experimentally obtained two-dimensional silicene, oxidation should also be addressed to enable the development of silicene-based devices. Here we focus on silicene oxides (SOs) that result from the partial or full oxidation of silicene in the framework of density functional theory. It is found that the formation of SOs greatly depends on oxidation conditions, which concern the oxidizing agents of oxygen and hydroxyl. The honeycomb lattice of silicene may be preserved, distorted or destroyed after oxidation. The charge state of Si in partially oxidized silicene ranges from +1 to +3, while that in fully oxidized silicene is +4. Metals, semimetals, semiconductors and insulators can all be found among the SOs, which show a wide spectrum of electronic structures. Our work indicates that the oxidation of silicene should be exquisitely controlled to obtain specific SOs with desired electronic properties.

  19. Crystal structures and second-order NLO properties of borogermanates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian-Han; Kong, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Mao, Jiang-Gao

    2012-11-15

    Borogermanates are a class of very important compounds in materials chemistry. In this paper, the syntheses, structures, and properties of metal borogermanates are reviewed. Organically templated borogermanates with zeolite-like open-frameworks show potential applications as microporous materials. Many compounds in alkali or alkaline-earth borogermanate systems are structurally acentric or polar, some of which exhibit excellent Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) coefficients, wide transparency regions, and high optical-damage thresholds as well as excellent thermal stability. Most of the lanthanide borogermanates are structurally centrosymmetric and not SHG active; however, they are able to emit strong luminescence in visible or near-IR region. In the B-rich compounds, BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} groups can be polymerized into a variety of discrete polynuclear anionic cluster units or extended architectures via B-O-B bridges; whereas in the Ge-rich compounds, GeO{sub 4} and GeO{sub 6} polyhedra can also be polymerized. The combinations of borate and germinate afforded rich structural and topological types. - Graphical abstract: Borogermanates are a class of very important compounds in materials chemistry. Both BO{sub x} (x=3, 4) and GeO{sub y} (y=4, 6) polyhedra can be polymerized into a variety of discrete polynuclear anionic cluster units or extended architectures. The combinations of borate and germanate groups in the same oxide framework not only give rise to a rich structural chemistry, but also afford many polar compounds with good SHG properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Borogermanates are a class of new materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They feature to be the combination of B and Ge atoms into the same oxide framework. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They can form a large number of novel 2D and 3D framework structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some of them are acentric or polar with moderate strong SHG responses.

  20. Parabens: a review of epidemiology, structure, allergenicity, and hormonal properties.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Allison L; Warshaw, Erin M

    2005-06-01

    Parabens are the most commonly used preservatives in cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and industrial products. The epidemiology, structural properties, allergenicity, hormonal properties, and hypotheses regarding the "paraben paradox" are addressed in this review.

  1. Atmospheric structure and cloud properties on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasova, L. V.

    We discuss the structure of the Venus atmosphere from the surface to 100 km and properties of the clouds. The solar energy deposited on Venus is the same as that on the Earth. However, because of the greenhouse effect in the thick atmosphere the surface temperature is of 735K. Thermal structure of troposphere (below 58-60 km) is characterized by the temperature rate of 7.7K/km, and small negative equator-pole temperature gradient. Two connective zones are observed in the troposphere: in the middle clouds (50-56 km) and below 30 km. Middle atmosphere above 60 km (mesosphere) is stable. In the upper clouds (58-68 km) 50 % of the solar energy is absorbed by `unknown UV absorber'. This leads to generation of the thermal tides, which influence the thermal structure of the mesosphere. Dissipation of the tides may produce energy to support the superrotation - dynamic state of the Venus atmosphere. Local time variation of temperature of the mesosphere, upper boundary of the clouds and zonal wind is defined by the tides. Strongest thermal tides are observed in the cold collar near 100 mb level. Temperature of the atmosphere decreases from equator to pole below 70 km and increases above the clouds, in a way that the polar region is of 20 K warmer than low latitudes. Air masses, which ascend in equatorial region move to the polar region above the clouds against the temperature gradient and descend in the near polar region. The main component of the clouds from 48 to 70 km is sulfuric acid at all latitudes, which is produced by photochemistry from the SO2 and H2O. Being conservative scattering, the clouds allow investigation on the night side of the atmosphere below the clouds and the surface in the windows between the CO2 bands. The altitude of the upper boundary of the clouds decreases from equator to high latitudes and it has the lowest position at polar region in the hot dipole (below 60 km). The haze of submicron particles, which may be found from 30 to 90 km, is strongly

  2. Bio-related noble metal nanoparticle structure property relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Donovan Nicholas

    Structure property relationships of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) can be drastically different than bulk properties of the same metals. This research study used state-of-the-art analytical electron microscopy and scanned probe microscopy to determine material properties on the nanoscale of bio-related Au and Pd NPs. Recently, it has been demonstrated the self-assembly of Au NPs on functionalized silica surfaces creates a conductive surface. Determination of the aggregate morphology responsible for electron conduction was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, changes in the electrical properties of the substrates after low temperature (<350°C) annealing was also studied. It was found that coalescence and densification of the Au NP aggregates disrupted the interconnected network which subsequently created a loss of conductivity. Investigation of bio-related Au/SiO2 core-shell NPs determined why published experimental results showed the sol-gel silica shell improved, by almost an order of magnitude, the detection efficiency of a DNA detection assay. Novel 360° rotation scanning TEM (STEM) imaging allowed study of individual NP surface morphology and internal structure. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectrum imaging determined optoelectronic properties and chemical composition of the silica shell used to encapsulate Au NPs. Results indicated the sol-gel deposited SiO2 had a band gap energy of ˜8.9eV, bulk plasmon-peak energy of ˜25.5eV and chemical composition of stoichiometric SiO2. Lastly, an attempt to elicit structure property relationships of novel RNA mediated Pd hexagon NPs was performed. Selected area electron diffraction (SAD), low voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy (LV-STEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were chosen for characterization of atomic ordering, chemical composition and optoelectronic properties of the novel

  3. Electrostatic and electrodynamic response properties of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaz, Yuksel

    1999-11-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of nanostructure dielectric response to excitation by electric fields, both in the electrostatic c→infinity and the electrodynamic regimes. The nanostructures treated include planar quantum wells and quantum wires embedded in the vicinity of the bounding surface of the host semiconductor medium. Various cases are analyzed, including a single well or wire, a double well or wire, a lattice of N wells or wires and an infinite superlattice of wells or wires. The host medium is considered to have phonons and/or a bulk semiconductor plasma which interact with the plasmons of the embedded quantum wells or wires, and the host plasma is treated in both the local "cold" plasma regime and the nonlocal "hot" plasma regime. New hybridized quantum plasma collective modes emerge from these studies. The techniques employed here include the variational differential formulation of integral equations for the inverse dielectric function (in electrostatic case) and the dyadic Green's function (in the electrodynamic case) for the various systems described above. These integral equations are then solved in frequency-position representation by a variety of techniques depending on the geometrical features of the particular problem. Explicit closed form solutions for the inverse dielectric function or dyadic Green's function facilitate identification of the coupled collective modes in terms of their frequency poles, and the residues at the pole positions provide the relative amplitudes with which these normal modes respond to external excitation. Interesting features found include, for example, explicit formulas showing the transference of coupling of a two dimensional (2D) quantum well plasmon from a surface phonon to a bulk phonon as the 2D quantum well is displaced away from the bounding surface, deeper into the medium.

  4. Nonlinear frequency response analysis of structural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeger, Oliver; Wever, Utz; Simeon, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present a method for nonlinear frequency response analysis of mechanical vibrations of 3-dimensional solid structures. For computing nonlinear frequency response to periodic excitations, we employ the well-established harmonic balance method. A fundamental aspect for allowing a large-scale application of the method is model order reduction of the discretized equation of motion. Therefore we propose the utilization of a modal projection method enhanced with modal derivatives, providing second-order information. For an efficient spatial discretization of continuum mechanics nonlinear partial differential equations, including large deformations and hyperelastic material laws, we employ the concept of isogeometric analysis. Isogeometric finite element methods have already been shown to possess advantages over classical finite element discretizations in terms of higher accuracy of numerical approximations in the fields of linear vibration and static large deformation analysis. With several computational examples, we demonstrate the applicability and accuracy of the modal derivative reduction method for nonlinear static computations and vibration analysis. Thus, the presented method opens a promising perspective on application of nonlinear frequency analysis to large-scale industrial problems.

  5. Superprotonic solid acids: Structure, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boysen, Dane Andrew

    In this work, the structure and properties of superprotonic MH nXO4-type solid acids (where M = monovalent cation, X = S, Se, P, As, and n = 1, 2) have been investigated and, for the first time, applied in fuel cell devices. Several MH nXO4-type solid acids are known to undergo a "superprotonic" solid-state phase transition upon heating, in which the proton conductivity increases by several orders of magnitude and takes on values of ˜10 -2O-1cm-1. The presence of superprotonic conductivity in fully hydrogen bonded solid acids, such as CsH2PO4, has long been disputed. In these investigations, through the use of pressure, the unequivocal identification of superprotonic behavior in both RbH2PO4 and CsH2PO 4 has been demonstrated, whereas for chemically analogous compounds with smaller cations, such as KH2PO4 and NaH2PO 4, superprotonic conductivity was notably absent. Such observations have led to the adoption of radius ratio rules, in an attempt to identify a critical ion size effect on the presence of superprotonic conductivity in solid acids. It has been found that, while ionic size does play a prominent role in the presence of superprotonic behavior in solid acids, equally important are the effects of ionic and hydrogen bonding. Next, the properties of superprotonic phase transition have been investigated from a thermodynamic standpoint. With contributions from this work, a formulation has been developed that accounts for the entropy resulting from both the disordering of both hydrogen bonds and oxy-anion librations in the superprotonic phase of solid acids. This formulation, fundamentally derived from Linus Pauling's entropy rules for ice, accurately accounts for the change in entropy through a superprotonic phase transition. Lastly, the first proof-of-priniciple fuel cells based upon solid acid electrolytes have been demonstrated. Initial results based upon a sulfate electrolyte, CsHSO4, demonstrated the viability of solid acids, but poor chemical stability

  6. Consensus structure elucidation combining GC/EI-MS, structure generation, and calculated properties.

    PubMed

    Schymanski, Emma L; Gallampois, Christine M J; Krauss, Martin; Meringer, Markus; Neumann, Steffen; Schulze, Tobias; Wolf, Sebastian; Brack, Werner

    2012-04-01

    This article explores consensus structure elucidation on the basis of GC/EI-MS, structure generation, and calculated properties for unknown compounds. Candidate structures were generated using the molecular formula and substructure information obtained from GC/EI-MS spectra. Calculated properties were then used to score candidates according to a consensus approach, rather than filtering or exclusion. Two mass spectral match calculations (MOLGEN-MS and MetFrag), retention behavior (Lee retention index/boiling point correlation, NIST Kovat's retention index), octanol-water partitioning behavior (log K(ow)), and finally steric energy calculations were used to select candidates. A simple consensus scoring function was developed and tested on two unknown spectra detected in a mutagenic subfraction of a water sample from the Elbe River using GC/EI-MS. The top candidates proposed using the consensus scoring technique were purchased and confirmed analytically using GC/EI-MS and LC/MS/MS. Although the compounds identified were not responsible for the sample mutagenicity, the structure-generation-based identification for GC/EI-MS using calculated properties and consensus scoring was demonstrated to be applicable to real-world unknowns and suggests that the development of a similar strategy for multidimensional high-resolution MS could improve the outcomes of environmental and metabolomics studies. PMID:22414024

  7. Structure and Early Soot Oxidation Properties of Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    Soot is an important unsolved problem of combustion science because it is present in most hydrocarbon-fueled flames and current understanding of the reactive and physical properties of soot in flame environments is limited. This lack of understanding affects progress toward developing reliable predictions of flame radiation properties, reliable predictions of flame pollutant emission properties and reliable methods of computational combustion, among others. Motivated by these observations, the present investigation extended past studies of soot formation in this laboratory, to consider soot oxidation in laminar diffusion flames using similar methods. Early work showed that O2 was responsible for soot oxidation in high temperature O2-rich environments. Subsequent work in high temperature flame environments having small O2 concentrations, however, showed that soot oxidation rates substantially exceeded estimates based on the classical O2 oxidation rates of Nagle and Strickland-Constable and suggests that radicals such as O and OH might be strong contributors to soot oxidation for such conditions. Neoh et al. subsequently made observations in premixed flames, supported by later work, that showed that OH was responsible for soot oxidation at these conditions with a very reasonable collision efficiency of 0.13. Subsequent studies in diffusion flames, however, were not in agreement with the premixed flame studies: they agreed that OH played a dominant role in soot oxidation in flames, but found collision efficiencies that varied with flame conditions and were not in good agreement with each other or with Neoh et al. One explanation for these discrepancies is that optical scattering and extinction properties were used to infer soot structure properties for the studies that have not been very successful for representing the optical properties of soot. Whatever the source of the problem, however, these differences among observations of soot oxidation in premixed and

  8. Shock Wave Treatment of Polytetrafluoroethylene: Structure and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, A. E.; Adamenko, N. A.; Agafonova, G. V.; Kazurov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    The paper considers changes of the structure and thermomechanical properties of polytetrafluoroethylene pressing after the explosive treatment depending on the thickness of the pressing. Structural changes and defects in samples, preserved even after sintering, were detected.

  9. Structure-function properties of anticorrosive exopolyaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nanoscale biobased exopolymer films were shown that provide protection to metal substrates under corrosive environments and that the films could be self-repairing in aqueous environments. This work describes the fundamental properties of thin exopolymer films including thermodynamic properties, film...

  10. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I). Project IV. Structural building response; Structural Building Response Review

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, J.J.; Wu, S.T.; Murga, M.

    1980-02-01

    As part of the Phase I effort of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) being performed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the basic objective of Subtask IV.1 (Structural Building Response Review) is to review and summarize current methods and data pertaining to seismic response calculations particularly as they relate to the objectives of the SSMRP. This material forms one component in the development of the overall computational methodology involving state of the art computations including explicit consideration of uncertainty and aimed at ultimately deriving estimates of the probability of radioactive releases due to seismic effects on nuclear power plant facilities.

  11. Habitat structure mediates biodiversity effects on ecosystem properties.

    PubMed

    Godbold, J A; Bulling, M T; Solan, M

    2011-08-22

    Much of what we know about the role of biodiversity in mediating ecosystem processes and function stems from manipulative experiments, which have largely been performed in isolated, homogeneous environments that do not incorporate habitat structure or allow natural community dynamics to develop. Here, we use a range of habitat configurations in a model marine benthic system to investigate the effects of species composition, resource heterogeneity and patch connectivity on ecosystem properties at both the patch (bioturbation intensity) and multi-patch (nutrient concentration) scale. We show that allowing fauna to move and preferentially select patches alters local species composition and density distributions, which has negative effects on ecosystem processes (bioturbation intensity) at the patch scale, but overall positive effects on ecosystem functioning (nutrient concentration) at the multi-patch scale. Our findings provide important evidence that community dynamics alter in response to localized resource heterogeneity and that these small-scale variations in habitat structure influence species contributions to ecosystem properties at larger scales. We conclude that habitat complexity forms an important buffer against disturbance and that contemporary estimates of the level of biodiversity required for maintaining future multi-functional systems may need to be revised.

  12. A simple auxetic tubular structure with tuneable mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xin; Shen, Jianhu; Ghaedizadeh, Arash; Tian, Hongqi; Xie, Yi Min

    2016-06-01

    Auxetic materials and structures are increasingly used in various fields because of their unusual properties. Auxetic tubular structures have been fabricated and studied due to their potential to be adopted as oesophageal stents where only tensile auxetic performance is required. However, studies on compressive mechanical properties of auxetic tubular structures are limited in the current literature. In this paper, we developed a simple tubular structure which exhibits auxetic behaviour in both compression and tension. This was achieved by extending a design concept recently proposed by the authors for generating 3D metallic auxetic metamaterials. Both compressive and tensile mechanical properties of the auxetic tubular structure were investigated. It was found that the methodology for generating 3D auxetic metamaterials could be effectively used to create auxetic tubular structures as well. By properly adjusting certain parameters, the mechanical properties of the designed auxetic tubular structure could be easily tuned.

  13. Design of Hybrid Solid Polymer Electrolytes: Structure and Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronstein, Lyudmila M.; Karlinsey, Robert L.; Ritter, Kyle; Joo, Chan Gyu; Stein, Barry; Zwanziger, Josef W.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports synthesis, structure, and properties of novel hybrid solid polymer electrolytes (SPE's) consisting of organically modified aluminosilica (OM-ALSi), formed within a poly(ethylene oxide)-in-salt (Li triflate) phase. To alter the structure and properties we fused functionalized silanes containing poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) tails or CN groups.

  14. Organic bulk heterojunction photovoltaic structures: design, morphology and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulavko, G. V.; Ishchenko, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    Main approaches to the design of organic bulk heterojunction photovoltaic structures are generalized and systematized. Novel photovoltaic materials based on fullerenes, organic dyes and related compounds, graphene, conjugated polymers and dendrimers are considered. The emphasis is placed on correlations between the chemical structure and properties of materials. The effect of morphology of the photoactive layer on the photovoltaic properties of devices is analyzed. Main methods of optimization of the photovoltaic properties are outlined. The bibliography includes 338 references.

  15. Structure and Properties of Block Copolymers of Polystyrene and Polybutadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askadskii, Andrei A.; Andryushchenko, T. A.; Zubov, P. I.

    1984-08-01

    Recent studies of the structure and properties of block copolymers of polystyrene and polybutadiene are reviewed, with special emphasis on the effect of the structure and of the formation conditions for the samples on the interrelated physico-mechanical properties. Problems associated with the macro- and micro-layering of block copolymer solutions are examined in detail. Work on the analysis of block copolymer structures from measurements of sorption characteristics is reviewed in the light of an assumed relaxation mechanism for the sorption and swelling processes. The prospects of controlling the structure and properties of block copolymers are shown to be good. The bibliography contains 190 references.

  16. Properties of carbon deposits on tungsten nano-structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaji, Y.; Miyata, K.; Wada, T.; Ohtsuka, Y.; Ueda, Y.

    2013-07-01

    C deposition characteristics on W nano-structure by two different deposition methods are investigated to study C deposition mechanisms on W nano-structure and its characteristics. The two methods were as follows: irradiation by mixed D and C ion beam, and deposition by magnetron sputtering. Differences on deposition condition such as deposition temperature, incident species and energy affected properties of C deposits. Structure of C deposits was investigated by SEM and Raman spectroscopy. D retention properties were investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy. It was found that C deposits on nano-structured surface have low internal stress and porous structure compared with C deposits on flat surfaces. Increase of CD4 release from C deposition layers on nano-structured surface was investigated by TDS. These results showed the effects of nano-structure on structure and thermal desorption properties of C deposits.

  17. A primer for structural response to random pressure fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.; Vaicaitis, R.

    1975-01-01

    A review was made of power spectral methods for determining linear response of structures to random pressure fluctuations. Various simplifying assumptions are made for the purpose of obtaining useful formula for structural response. The transmission of sound through a flexible structure into an interior cavity was also treated.

  18. Statistical energy analysis response prediction methods for structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an effort to document methods for accomplishing response predictions for commonly encountered aerospace structural configurations is presented. Application of these methods to specified aerospace structure to provide sample analyses is included. An applications manual, with the structural analyses appended as example problems is given. Comparisons of the response predictions with measured data are provided for three of the example problems.

  19. Structure-Property Relationships of Architectural Coatings by Neutron Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Architectural coatings formulations are multi-component mixtures containing latex polymer binder, pigment, rheology modifiers, surfactants, and colorants. In order to achieve the desired flow properties for these formulations, measures of the underlying structure of the components as a function of shear rate and the impact of formulation variables on the structure is necessary. We have conducted detailed measurements to understand the evolution under shear of local microstructure and larger scale mesostructure in model architectural coatings formulations by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS), respectively. The SANS results show an adsorbed layer of rheology modifier molecules exist on the surface of the latex particles. However, the additional hydrodynamic volume occupied by the adsorbed surface layer is insufficient to account for the observed viscosity by standard hard sphere suspension models (Krieger-Dougherty). The USANS results show the presence of latex aggregates, which are fractal in nature. These fractal aggregates are the primary structures responsible for coatings formulation viscosity. Based on these results, a new model for the viscosity of coatings formulations has been developed, which is capable of reproducing the observed viscosity behavior.

  20. Nanoscale Properties of Neural Cell Prosthetic and Astrocyte Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, D. A.; Ayres, V. M.; Delgado-Rivera, R.; Ahmed, I.; Meiners, S. A.

    2009-03-01

    Preliminary data from in-vivo investigations (rat model) suggest that a nanofiber prosthetic device of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-modified nanofibers can correctly guide regenerating axons across an injury gap with aligned functional recovery. Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy (SPRM) with auto-tracking of individual nanofibers is used for investigation of the key nanoscale properties of the nanofiber prosthetic device for central nervous system tissue engineering and repair. The key properties under SPRM investigation include nanofiber stiffness and surface roughness, nanofiber curvature, nanofiber mesh density and porosity, and growth factor presentation and distribution. Each of these factors has been demonstrated to have global effects on cell morphology, function, proliferation, morphogenesis, migration, and differentiation. The effect of FGF-2 modification on the key nanoscale properties is investigated. Results from the nanofiber prosthetic properties investigations are correlated with astrocyte response to unmodified and FGF-2 modified scaffolds, using 2D planar substrates as a control.

  1. Synthesis, X-Ray crystal structure, photophysical characterization and nonlinear optical properties of the unique manganese complex with picolinate and 1,10 phenantroline: toward the designing of new high NLO response crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2016-12-01

    The first manganese complex of picolinic acid (also known as 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid) and 1,10 phenantroline has been synthesized, and its structure has been fully characterized by means of X-Ray diffraction method as well as FT-IR, Raman and UV-vis spectroscopies. In order to provide a deep understanding about the relation among the nonlinear optical properties, structural, spectroscopic and electronic behaviors, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed by using hybrid B3LYP level. The intensive interactions between the bonding orbitals of donor O/N atoms and antibonding orbitals of Mn(II) lone pairs confirm the X-Ray diffraction results. Each of the conditions such as small energy gap between HOMO and LUMO, high energy second order perturbation interaction, elongation of conjugated π system and high spin Mn(II) ion induce the first static hyperpolarizability (β) parameter of investigated complex. The β parameter for [Mn(pic)2(phen)]·H2O complex has been found to be approximately 22 times higher than p-nitroaniline.

  2. Structural and mechanical properties of thorium carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Aynyas, Mahendra; Pataiya, Jagdeesh; Arya, B. S.; Singh, A.; Sanyal, S. P.

    2015-06-24

    We have investigated the cohesive energies, equilibrium lattice constants, pressure-volume relationship, phase transition pressure and elastic constant for thorium carbide using an interionic potential theory with modified ionic charge, which includes Coulomb screening effect due to d-electrons. This compound undergoes structural phase transition from NaCl (B{sub 1}) to CsCl (B{sub 2}) structure at high pressure 40 GPa. We have also calculated bulk, Young, and shear moduli, Poisson ratio and anisotropic ratio in NaCl (B{sub 1}) structure and compared them with other experimental and theoretical results which show a good agreement.

  3. Personality Research Form: Factor Structure and Response Style Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stricker, Lawrence J.

    1974-01-01

    Explores factor structure of the Personality Research Form (PRF) and examines the inventory's relations with response styles. In general, the PRF content scales correlate moderately with each other and with measures of acquiescence, social desirability, and defensiveness response biases. (Author)

  4. Structure-Function-Property-Design Interplay in Biopolymers: Spider Silk

    PubMed Central

    Tokareva, Olena; Jacobsen, Matthew; Buehler, Markus; Wong, Joyce; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Spider silks have been a focus of research for almost two decades due to their outstanding mechanical and biophysical properties. Recent advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of recombinant spider silks, thus helping to unravel a fundamental understanding of structure-function-property relationships. The relationships between molecular composition, secondary structures, and mechanical properties found in different types of spider silks are described, along with a discussion of artificial spinning of these proteins and their bioapplications, including the role of silks in biomineralization and fabrication of biomaterials with controlled properties. PMID:23962644

  5. Structure and properties of diamond and diamond-like films

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    This section is broken into four parts: (1) introduction, (2) natural IIa diamond, (3) importance of structure and composition, and (4) control of structure and properties. Conclusions of this discussion are that properties of chemical vapor deposited diamond films can compare favorably with natural diamond, that properties are anisotropic and are a strong function of structure and crystal perfection, that crystal perfection and morphology are functions of growth conditions and can be controlled, and that the manipulation of texture and thereby surface morphology and internal crystal perfection is an important step in optimizing chemically deposited diamond films for applications.

  6. Dentin caries zones: mineral, structure, and properties.

    PubMed

    Pugach, M K; Strother, J; Darling, C L; Fried, D; Gansky, S A; Marshall, S J; Marshall, G W

    2009-01-01

    Caries Detector staining reveals 4 zones in dentin containing caries lesions, but characteristics of each zone are not well-defined. We therefore investigated the physical and microstructural properties of carious dentin in the 4 different zones to determine important differences revealed by Caries Detector staining. Six arrested dentin caries lesions and 2 normal controls were Caries-Detector-stained, each zone (pink, light pink, transparent, apparently normal) being analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging for microstructure, by AFM nano-indentation for mechanical properties, and by transverse digital microradiography (TMR) for mineral content. Microstructure changes, and nanomechanical properties and mineral content significantly decreased across zones. Hydrated elastic modulus and mineral content from normal dentin to pink Caries-Detector-stained dentin ranged from 19.5 [10.6-25.3] GPa to 1.6 [0.0-5.0] GPa and from 42.9 [39.8-44.6] vol% to 12.4 [9.1-14.2] vol%, respectively. Even the most demineralized pink zone contained considerable residual mineral.

  7. Transport properties of pancreatic cancer describe gemcitabine delivery and response

    PubMed Central

    Koay, Eugene J.; Truty, Mark J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M.; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya’an; Bhosale, Priya R.; Tamm, Eric P.; Crane, Christopher H.; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H.; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N.; Rozner, Marc A.; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffery E.; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Ferrari, Mauro; Fleming, Jason B.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The therapeutic resistance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is partly ascribed to ineffective delivery of chemotherapy to cancer cells. We hypothesized that physical properties at vascular, extracellular, and cellular scales influence delivery of and response to gemcitabine-based therapy. Methods. We developed a method to measure mass transport properties during routine contrast-enhanced CT scans of individual human PDAC tumors. Additionally, we evaluated gemcitabine infusion during PDAC resection in 12 patients, measuring gemcitabine incorporation into tumor DNA and correlating its uptake with human equilibrative nucleoside transporter (hENT1) levels, stromal reaction, and CT-derived mass transport properties. We also studied associations between CT-derived transport properties and clinical outcomes in patients who received preoperative gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy for resectable PDAC. Results. Transport modeling of 176 CT scans illustrated striking differences in transport properties between normal pancreas and tumor, with a wide array of enhancement profiles. Reflecting the interpatient differences in contrast enhancement, resected tumors exhibited dramatic differences in gemcitabine DNA incorporation, despite similar intravascular pharmacokinetics. Gemcitabine incorporation into tumor DNA was inversely related to CT-derived transport parameters and PDAC stromal score, after accounting for hENT1 levels. Moreover, stromal score directly correlated with CT-derived parameters. Among 110 patients who received preoperative gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy, CT-derived parameters correlated with pathological response and survival. Conclusion. Gemcitabine incorporation into tumor DNA is highly variable and correlates with multiscale transport properties that can be derived from routine CT scans. Furthermore, pretherapy CT-derived properties correlate with clinically relevant endpoints. Trial registration. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01276613

  8. Structural and plasmonic properties of gold nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapalan, Sean T.

    the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were then tilted such that were oriented so that the electron beam was parallel to a major zone axis and the diffraction pattern recorded. We observed streaks at each Bragg reflection that changed depending on the shape of the nanoparticle. This is in contrast to the spots for the Bragg reflections observed for normal small area diffraction patterns of gold nanoparticles. The angles between the streaks were compared using vector analysis to theoretical simulated three dimensional models and showed good correlation. These studies indicate such a platform can be used to elucidate the structure of high-index gold nanoparticle shapes such as trisoctahedra. The as-synthesized gold nanoparticles had surface plasmon resonances that incrementally spanned the spectral region of 500-900 nm. The reporter molecules used all have an absorption maximum far from the excitation wavelength. This ensures that chemical resonant based effects are minimized and plasmonic electromagnetic effects dominate the observed signal enhancement. For gold nanorods, the highest SERS signal from six different aspect ratios was observed with absorption maxima blue-shifted from the laser excitation wavelength. This finding is in contrast to substrate measurements where the maximum observed signal is red-shifted from the laser excitation wavelength. A similar platform was used to compare the effects of changing the nanoparticle shape on the observed SERS enhancement. We synthesized trisoctahedral, cubic and spherical geometries with electronic absorption maxima that overlapped within 3 nm. The relative SERS enhancement with 785 nm excitation was compared to theoretical simulations using finite element analysis. The observed signal intensities correlated well to the theory, suggesting the electromagnetic fields focused towards sharp edges and corners dominated the spectral response. The final chapters of this thesis are tailored towards understanding the distance

  9. Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Foss, Peter; Wyzgoski, Michael; Trantina, Gerry; Kunc, Vlastimil; Schutte, Carol; Smith, Mark T.

    2009-12-23

    This report summarizes our FY 2009 research activities for the project titled:"Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures." These activities include (i) the completion of the development of a fiber length attrition model for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs), (ii) development of the a fatigue damage model for LFTs and its implementation in ABAQUS, (iii) development of an impact damage model for LFTs and its implementation in ABAQUS, (iv) development of characterization methods for fatigue testing, (v) characterization of creep and fatigue responses of glass-fiber/polyamide (PA6,6) and glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP), (vi) characterization of fiber length distribution along the flow length of glass/PA6,6 and glass-fiber/PP, and (vii) characterization of impact responses of glass-fiber/PA6,6. The fiber length attrition model accurately captures the fiber length distribution along the flow length of the studied glass-fiber/PP material. The fatigue damage model is able to predict the S-N and stiffness reduction data which are valuable to the fatigue design of LFTs. The impact damage model correctly captures damage accumulation observed in experiments of glass-fiber/PA6,6 plaques.Further work includes validations of these models for representative LFT materials and a complex LFT part.

  10. Synthesis, structure and properties of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Changchun

    Over the last decade, the concept of utilizing nanoparticles to enhance polymer performance has drawn a great deal of research interest. Significant property enhancement can be achieved with a small amount of addition of nanoparticles. Spherical, platelet or tube/fiber like particles have all been used in the fabrication of nanocomposites. In this study, we chose platelet like clay particles to study the particle dispersion and properties of polymer nanocomposites and polymer nanocomposite foams. Free radical polymerization of methylmethacrylate (MMA) and styrene (St) in the presence of clay nanoparticles were studied in detail. The effect of interactions between the monomer, the initiator and clay surface modification was studied. By careful surface modification of clay surface and choice of initiator, clay particles can be dispersed uniformly at the nanometer scale (exfoliation). Exfoliation was achieved for PS nanocomposites with a clay concentration as high as 20 wt%. For PMMA, although fully exfoliated nanocomposite was only observed for clay concentration of 5 wt%, substantial exfoliation was observed in the 20 wt% nanocomposite. Nanocomposites were also prepared by extrusion compounding, with or without the aid of CO2. The effect of processing conditions on the degree of clay dispersion was studied. The relationships between clay dispersion, surfactant thermal stability and the resulting thermal properties, e.g., thermal stability, dimension stability, fire resistance were investigated. Novel polymer clay nanocomposite foams were prepared using carbon dioxide as the foaming agent. The role of clay on the foaming process was thoroughly investigated. It was found that clay serves as an efficient nucleation agent. Nucleation efficiency increases as the degree of clay dispersion improves. The exfoliated clay provides the highest nucleation efficiency. Nucleation efficiency can be further improved by tuning the interaction between polymer, CO2 and the surface

  11. Effect of processing on Polymer/Composite structure and properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in the vitality and economic health of the field of polymer forecasting are discussed. A consistent and rational point of view which considers processing as a participant in the underlying triad of relationships which comprise materials science and engineering is outlined. This triad includes processing as it influences material structure, and ultimately properties. Methods in processing structure properties, polymer science and engineering, polymer chemistry and synthesis, structure and modification and optimization through processing, and methods of melt flow modeling in processing structure property relations of polymer were developed. Mechanical properties of composites are considered, and biomedical materials research to include polymer processing effects are studied. An analysis of the design technology of advances graphite/epoxy composites is also reported.

  12. Structural properties of a scaled gecko foot-hair.

    PubMed

    Berengueres, Jose; Saito, Shigeki; Tadakuma, Kenjiro

    2007-03-01

    Experimental measurements on a cm-scale replica structure of a gecko foot-hair where magnets are used in place of (the usual) van der Waals force are reported. We conduct naked-eye experiments and investigate the mechanical properties of such hair structure and shapes that constitute it. Links between shapes and mechanical properties (functions) useful in geckos for clinging onto walls and adhering to rough surfaces are explained in terms of energy efficiency.

  13. Structure and properties of detonation soot particles

    SciTech Connect

    MalKOV, I.Y.; Titiov, V.M.

    1996-05-01

    The influence of TNT/RDX (50/50) detonation parameters and conservation conditions of detonation products during their expansion in hermetic detonation chamber on structure and phase composition of the detonation carbon has been considered. Systematic studies made it possible to establish the real structure of detonation carbon depending on experimental conditions. It has been shown that both during explosion in a chamber and thermal annealing in vacuum the nanoparticles of diamond have the tendency to transform not into graphite particles, as was assumed earlier, but into onionlike structures of fullerene series, composed of closed concentric carbon shells, the so-called carbon onions. The nanometer carbon particles have been obtained which comprise a diamond nucleus surrounded by a graphite-like mantle composed of quasi-spherical carbon shells which are the intermediate products of annealing of nanodiamond. The influence of initial sizes of the diamond particles and temperature on the annealing of diamond has been studied. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Structure-property study of keto-ether polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezern, James F.; Croall, Catharine I.

    1991-01-01

    As part of an on-going effort to develop an understanding of how changes in the chemical structure affect polymer properties, an empirical study was performed on polyimides containing only ether and/or carbonyl connecting groups in the polymer backbone. During the past two decades the structure-property relationships in linear aromatic polyimides have been extensively investigated. More recently, work has been performed to study the effect of isomeric attachment of keto-ether polyimides on properties such as glass transition temperature and solubility. However, little work has been reported on the relation of polyimide structure to mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of structural changes in the backbone of keto-ether polyimides on their mechanical properties, specifically, unoriented thin film tensile properties. This study was conducted in two stages. The purpose of the initial stage was to examine the physical and mechanical properties of a representative group (four) of polyimide systems to determine the optimum solvent and cure cycle requirements. These optimum conditions were then utilized in the second stage to prepare films of keto-ether polyimides which were evaluated for mechanical and physical properties. All of the polyimides were prepared using isomers of oxydianiline (ODA) and diaminobenzophenone (DABP) in combination with 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride (ODPA).

  15. Starch: Structure, Properties, Chemistry, and Enzymology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robyt, John F.

    Starch is a very important and widely distributed natural product, occurring in the leaves of green plants, seeds, fruits, stems, roots, and tubers. It serves as the chemical storage form of the energy of the sun and is the primary source of energy for the organisms on the Earth. Starch is composed of two kinds of polysaccharides, amylose and amylopectin, exclusively composed of D-glucose residues with α-(1→4) linkages in a linear amylose and α-(1→4) linkages and ˜5% α-(1→6) branch linkages in amylopectin, both combined in a water-insoluble granule that is partially crystalline and whose size, shape, and morphology are dependent on its biological source. The properties, isolation, fractionation, enzymatic degradation, biosynthesis, chemical modification, and specific methods of analysis of starch are presented.

  16. Effect of metal coordination on photocurrent response properties of a tetrathiafulvalene organogel film.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shu-Fang; Sun, Yong-Gang; Huo, Peng; Shen, Wei-Chun; Huang, Yu-De; Zhu, Qin-Yu; Dai, Jie

    2014-04-01

    Organic low molecular weight gelators with a tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) unit have received considerable attention because the formed gels usually exhibit redox active response and conducting or semiconducting properties. However, to our knowledge, metal coordination systems have not been reported for TTF-derived gels up to date. We have designed and synthesized a series of TTF derivatives with a diamide-diamino moiety that can coordinate to specific metal ions with square coordination geometry. Gelation properties and morphologies of the films prepared by the gelators in different hydrophobic solvents are characterized. The TTF derivative with a dodecyl group shows effective gelation properties, and electrodes with the organogel films are prepared. The effect of the Ni(II) and Cu(II) coordination on the photocurrent response property of the electrodes is examined. The metal square coordination significantly increases the photocurrent response. This gel system is the first metal coordination related TTF-gel-based photoelectric material. The mechanism of the metal coordination-improved photocurrent response property is discussed based on the crystal structural analysis and theoretical calculations.

  17. Electronic and Thermal Properties of Graphene and Carbon Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Gilmore; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    We will present the general properties of carbon structures. The research involves the study of carbon structures: Graphene, Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), and Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs). A review of electrical and thermal conduction phenomena of the structures will be discussed. Particularly carbon nanoribbons and CNTs have many interesting physical properties, and have the potential for device applications. Our research interests include the study of electronic structures, electrical and thermal transport properties of the carbon structures. Results are produced analytically as well as by simulation. The numerical simulations are conducted using various tools such as Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD), Large Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS), NanoHub at Purdue University and the Beowulf Cluster at Ball State University.

  18. Determining the Mechanical Properties of Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Lattice block structures and shape memory alloys possess several traits ideal for solving intriguing new engineering problems in industries such as aerospace, military, and transportation. Recent testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center has investigated the material properties of lattice block structures cast from a conventional aerospace titanium alloy as well as lattice block structures cast from nickel-titanium shape memory alloy. The lattice block structures for both materials were sectioned into smaller subelements for tension and compression testing. The results from the cast conventional titanium material showed that the expected mechanical properties were maintained. The shape memory alloy material was found to be extremely brittle from the casting process and only compression testing was completed. Future shape memory alloy lattice block structures will utilize an adjusted material composition that will provide a better quality casting. The testing effort resulted in baseline mechanical property data from the conventional titanium material for comparison to shape memory alloy materials once suitable castings are available.

  19. Structure and Soot Formation Properties of Laminar Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    Soot formation within hydrocarbon-fueled flames is an important unresolved problem of combustion science for several reasons: soot emissions are responsible for more deaths than any other combustion-generated pollutant, thermal loads due to continuum radiation from soot limit the durability of combustors, thermal radiation from soot is mainly responsible for the growth and spread of unwanted fires, carbon monoxide emissions associated with soot emissions are responsible for most fire deaths, and limited understanding of soot processes in flames is a major impediment to the development of computational combustion. Motivated by these observations, soot processes within laminar premixed and nonpremixed (diffusion) flames are being studied during this investigation. The study is limited to laminar flames due to their experimental and computational tractability, noting the relevance of these results to practical flames through laminar flamelet concepts. Nonbuoyant flames are emphasized because buoyancy affects soot processes in laminar diffusion flames whereas effects of buoyancy are small for most practical flames. This study involves both ground- and space-based experiments, however, the following discussion will be limited to ground-based experiments because no space-based experiments were carried out during the report period. The objective of this work was to complete measurements in both premixed and nonpremixed flames in order to gain a better understanding of the structure of the soot-containing region and processes of soot nucleation and surface growth in these environments, with the latter information to be used to develop reliable ways of predicting soot properties in practical flames. The present discussion is brief, more details about the portions of the investigation considered here can be found in refs. 8-13.

  20. Structure and properties of solid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    Difficulties in experimental studies of crystalline surfaces are related to the fact that surface atoms have an intrinsic tendency to react with their environment. A second problem is connected with the effective thickness of surfaces, which ranges from one to several atom layers. The phenomenology of surface interactions with gases are considered, taking into account physical adsorption, chemisorption, and the oxidation of surfaces. Studies of the surface structure are discussed, giving attention to field emission microscopy, field-ion microscopy, electron diffraction techniques, Auger spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, ion microprobe methods, and low-energy backscattering spectroscopy. Investigations of semiconductor surfaces are also described.

  1. Structure and electronic properties of azadirachtin.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Elton A S; de Oliveira, Daniel A B; Farias, Sergio A S; Gargano, Ricardo; Martins, João B L

    2014-02-01

    We performed a combined DFT and Monte Carlo (13)C NMR chemical-shift study of azadirachtin A, a triterpenoid that acts as a natural insect antifeedant. A conformational search using a Monte Carlo technique based on the RM1 semiempirical method was carried out in order to establish its preferred structure. The B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), wB97XD/6-311++G(d,p), M06/6-311++G(d,p), M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p), and CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) levels of theory were used to predict NMR chemical shifts. A Monte Carlo population-weighted average spectrum was produced based on the predicted Boltzmann contributions. In general, good agreement between experimental and theoretical data was obtained using both methods, and the (13)C NMR chemical shifts were predicted highly accurately. The geometry was optimized at the semiempirical level and used to calculate the NMR chemical shifts at the DFT level, and these shifts showed only minor deviations from those obtained following structural optimization at the DFT level, and incurred a much lower computational cost. The theoretical ultraviolet spectrum showed a maximum absorption peak that was mainly contributed by the tiglate group. PMID:24509732

  2. The structural origin of anomalous properties of liquid water

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Water is unique in its number of unusual, often called anomalous, properties. When hot it is a normal simple liquid; however, close to ambient temperatures properties, such as the compressibility, begin to deviate and do so increasingly on further cooling. Clearly, these emerging properties are connected to its ability to form up to four well-defined hydrogen bonds allowing for different local structural arrangements. A wealth of new data from various experiments and simulations has recently become available. When taken together they point to a heterogeneous picture with fluctuations between two classes of local structural environments developing on temperature-dependent length scales. PMID:26643439

  3. Aeroelastic Stability & Response of Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    2001-01-01

    A summary of the work performed under NASA grant NCC3-605 is presented. More details can be found in the cited references. This grant led to the development of relatively faster aeroelastic analyses methods for predicting flutter and forced response in fans, compressors, and turbines using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods.

  4. Structures and properties of anionic clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Chr. Bender

    1998-12-01

    The Mössbauer spectra of pyroaurite-sjögrenite-type compounds (PTC) (layered anion exchangers) are discussed with reference to the crystal structure, cation order, and crystallite morphology. It is shown that cation-ordered layers are produced in the synthesis of carbonate and sulphate types of green rust. In contrast, synthetic and natural pyroaurite only occurs as disordered types. The redox chemistry of Fe(III) within the metal hydroxide layer is illustrated with examples of electrochemical oxidation and reversible reduction by boiling glycerol. The chemistry of iron in the interlayer is exemplified by the intercalation of Fe-cyanide complexes in hydrotalcite. This reaction may be used as a probe for the charge distribution in the interlayer.

  5. Gogny HFB prediction of nuclear structure properties

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Girod, M.

    2011-10-28

    Large scale mean field calculations from proton to neutron drip lines have been performed using the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method based on the Gogny nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. This extensive study has shown the ability of the method to reproduce bulk nuclear structure data available experimentally. This includes nuclear masses, radii, matter densities, deformations, moment of inertia as well as collective mode (low energy and giant resonances). In particular, the first mass table based on a Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov calculation including an explicit and coherent account of all the quadrupole correlation energies is presented. The rms deviation with respect to essentially all the available mass data is 798 keV. Nearly 8000 nuclei have been studied under the axial symmetry hypothesis and going beyond the mean-field approach.

  6. Electronic and structural properties of metallic microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.

    1992-04-01

    The first part of this thesis presents a first-order pseudopotential calculation at T=O of the total energy of small sodium clusters of size N<800. The calculation is based on a local-pseudopotential scheme and local-density correlation and exchange. A temperature-size (T-N) phase-diagram is then derived using the T=O results and Lindemann`s criterion for melting. The phase-diagram contains three regions of stability: (1) a liquid (jellium) phase at temperatures above the melting line T{sub M}(N) where cluster-stability occurs at electronic magic numbers: (2) a phase related to complete geometrical shells of body-centered-cubic structure at temperatures below the melting line; and (3) a close-packed structure at very low temperatures and sufficiently large N. The melting line drops to T{sub M}(N)=O for N<65, where electronic magic numbers are stable even at T=O. The phase diagram reduces asymptotically to the known phases of sodium as N{yields}{infinity}, including the known martensitic transformation at T{approximately}5 K. The second and the last part of this thesis consists of a study of small-cluster many-body systems by means of an on-site ``local`` chemical potential which allows the continuous variation of local electron-density. This method yields a criterion to distinguish particular features of a small cluster that are likely to survive in the large-N thermodynamic limit from those discontinuities that arise only from finite-size effects.

  7. Electronic and structural properties of metallic microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.

    1992-04-01

    The first part of this thesis presents a first-order pseudopotential calculation at T=O of the total energy of small sodium clusters of size N<800. The calculation is based on a local-pseudopotential scheme and local-density correlation and exchange. A temperature-size (T-N) phase-diagram is then derived using the T=O results and Lindemann's criterion for melting. The phase-diagram contains three regions of stability: (1) a liquid (jellium) phase at temperatures above the melting line T{sub M}(N) where cluster-stability occurs at electronic magic numbers: (2) a phase related to complete geometrical shells of body-centered-cubic structure at temperatures below the melting line; and (3) a close-packed structure at very low temperatures and sufficiently large N. The melting line drops to T{sub M}(N)=O for N<65, where electronic magic numbers are stable even at T=O. The phase diagram reduces asymptotically to the known phases of sodium as N{yields}{infinity}, including the known martensitic transformation at T{approximately}5 K. The second and the last part of this thesis consists of a study of small-cluster many-body systems by means of an on-site local'' chemical potential which allows the continuous variation of local electron-density. This method yields a criterion to distinguish particular features of a small cluster that are likely to survive in the large-N thermodynamic limit from those discontinuities that arise only from finite-size effects.

  8. Handling properties of diverse automobiles and correlation with full scale response data. [driver/vehicle response to aerodynamic disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoh, R. H.; Weir, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Driver/vehicle response and performance of a variety of vehicles in the presence of aerodynamic disturbances are discussed. Steering control is emphasized. The vehicles include full size station wagon, sedan, compact sedan, van, pickup truck/camper, and wagon towing trailer. Driver/vehicle analyses are used to estimate response and performance. These estimates are correlated with full scale data with test drivers and the results are used to refine the driver/vehicle models, control structure, and loop closure criteria. The analyses and data indicate that the driver adjusts his steering control properties (when he can) to achieve roughly the same level of performance despite vehicle variations. For the more disturbance susceptible vehicles, such as the van, the driver tightens up his control. Other vehicles have handling dynamics which cause him to loosen his control response, even though performance degrades.

  9. Structure Properties of Ternary Hydrides Ni3AlHx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi-wei; Zhang, Wen-qing; Chen, Nan-xian

    1996-09-01

    The structure properties of the ternary hydrides Ni3AlHx are studied by use of the interatomic pair potentials obtained from the first principles electronic structure calculation and Chen-Mobius 3-dimensional lattice inversion method. The heat of formation and volume expansion of the hydrogenized systems are investigated.

  10. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  11. Determination of HART I Blade Structural Properties by Laboratory Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Sung N.; Lau, Benton H.

    2012-01-01

    The structural properties of higher harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART I) blades were measured using the original set of blades tested in the German-dutch wind tunnel (DNW) in 1994. the measurements include bending and torsion stiffness, geometric offsets, and mass and inertia properties of the blade. the measured properties were compared to the estimated values obtained initially from the blade manufacturer. The previously estimated blade properties showed consistently higher stiffness, up to 30 percent for the flap bending in the blade inboard root section.

  12. Bio-inspired fabrication of stimuli-responsive photonic crystals with hierarchical structures and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Peng, Wenhong; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Di

    2016-03-01

    When the constitutive materials of photonic crystals (PCs) are stimuli-responsive, the resultant PCs exhibit optical properties that can be tuned by the stimuli. This can be exploited for promising applications in colour displays, biological and chemical sensors, inks and paints, and many optically active components. However, the preparation of the required photonic structures is the first issue to be solved. In the past two decades, approaches such as microfabrication and self-assembly have been developed to incorporate stimuli-responsive materials into existing periodic structures for the fabrication of PCs, either as the initial building blocks or as the surrounding matrix. Generally, the materials that respond to thermal, pH, chemical, optical, electrical, or magnetic stimuli are either soft or aggregate, which is why the manufacture of three-dimensional hierarchical photonic structures with responsive properties is a great challenge. Recently, inspired by biological PCs in nature which exhibit both flexible and responsive properties, researchers have developed various methods to synthesize metals and metal oxides with hierarchical structures by using a biological PC as the template. This review will focus on the recent developments in this field. In particular, PCs with biological hierarchical structures that can be tuned by external stimuli have recently been successfully fabricated. These findings offer innovative insights into the design of responsive PCs and should be of great importance for future applications of these materials.

  13. 41 CFR 102-37.90 - What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? 102-37.90 Section 102-37.90 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Services Administration (GSA) § 102-37.90 What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? The General Services...

  14. 41 CFR 102-37.90 - What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? 102-37.90 Section 102-37.90 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Services Administration (GSA) § 102-37.90 What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? The General Services...

  15. Hierarchical photonic structured stimuli-responsive materials as high-performance colorimetric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhu, Shenmin; Chen, Zhixin; Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Wang; Zhang, Di

    2016-05-01

    Hierarchical photonic structures in nature are of special interest because they can be used as templates for fabrication of stimuli-responsive photonic crystals (PCs) with unique structures beyond man-made synthesis. The current stimuli-responsive PCs templated directly from natural PCs showed a very weak external stimuli response and poor durability due to the limitations of natural templates. Herein, we tackle this problem by chemically coating functional polymers, polyacrylamide, on butterfly wing scales which have hierarchical photonic structures. As a result of the combination of the strong water absorption properties of the polyacrylamide and the PC structures of the butterfly wing scales, the designed materials demonstrated excellent humidity responsive properties and a tremendous colour change. The colour change is induced by the refractive index change which is in turn due to the swollen nature of the polymer when the relative humidity changes. The butterfly wing scales also showed an excellent durability which is due to the chemical bonds formed between the polymer and wing scales. The synthesis strategy provides an avenue for the promising applications of stimuli-responsive PCs with hierarchical structures.Hierarchical photonic structures in nature are of special interest because they can be used as templates for fabrication of stimuli-responsive photonic crystals (PCs) with unique structures beyond man-made synthesis. The current stimuli-responsive PCs templated directly from natural PCs showed a very weak external stimuli response and poor durability due to the limitations of natural templates. Herein, we tackle this problem by chemically coating functional polymers, polyacrylamide, on butterfly wing scales which have hierarchical photonic structures. As a result of the combination of the strong water absorption properties of the polyacrylamide and the PC structures of the butterfly wing scales, the designed materials demonstrated excellent humidity

  16. Acid-responsive properties of fibrils from heat-induced whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Hua; Wang, Jing; Dong, Shi-Rong; Cheng, Wen; Kong, Bao-Hua; Tan, Jun-Yan

    2016-08-01

    The heat-induced fibrils of whey protein concentrate (WPC) have demonstrated an acid-responsive property; that is, the fibrils went through formation-depolymerization-reformation as pH was adjusted to 1.8, 6.5, and back to 1.8. We investigated the microstructure, driving force, and thermal stability of 3.0% (wt) WPC nanofibrils adjusted between pH 6.5 and 1.8 twice. The results showed that the nanofibrils had acid-responsive properties and good thermal stability after reheating for 10h at 90°C and adjusting pH from 1.8 to 6.5 to 1.8. The content of WPC fibril aggregates was not much different with the prolongation of heating times during pH variation. Although the nanofibrils' structure could be destroyed only by changing the pH, the essence of this destruction might only form fiber fragments, polymers that would restore a fibrous structure upon returning to pH 1.8. A described model for the acid-responsive assembly of fibrils of WPC was proposed. The fibrils went through formation-depolymerization-reformation by weaker noncovalent interactions (surface hydrophobicity) as pH changed from 1.8 to 6.5 back to 1.8. However, the fibrils lost the acid-responsive properties because much more S-S (disulfide) formation occurred when the solution was adjusted to pH 6.5 and reheated. Meanwhile, fibrils still possessed acid-responsive properties when reheated at pH 1.8, and the content of fibrils slightly increased with a further reduction of α-helix structure. PMID:27265171

  17. Structural properties of silver nanowires from atomistic descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jianming; Shi, Daning; Zhao, Jijun; Wang, Baolin

    2007-10-01

    The structural formation process and physical properties of silver nanowires were investigated via an unbiased genetic algorithm search using empirical potential combined with density-functional theory calculations. Some unexpected structural behaviors resulting from the intrinsic properties of silver were revealed. Two kinds of atomic arrangements, i.e., normal and abnormal configurations, appear alternately during the growth of wire, from which a (111) facet-based formation mechanism was observed. The excellent agreements between theoretical results and experimental observations on the structural motif, Young’s modulus, and shell effects of Ag nanowires indicate the importance of objective and precise atomistic descriptions in the study of nanosystems.

  18. Structural electronic and phonon properties of some transition metal aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, Bushra; Pandit, Premlata; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2012-06-01

    The structural and electronic properties of some Transition metal Aluminides (TMAl) namely ruthenium aluminide (RuAl), nickel aluminide (NiAl) and cobalt aluminide (CoAl) have been studied using plane wave pseudopotential method (PWSCF) within the local density approximation (LDA). The three TMAl's crystallizes in the CsCl-type structure (B2 phase). From the analysis of band structure and density of state, we found that these TMAl's are metallic in nature. The vibrational properties in terms of phonon dispersion curves and density of state have also been reported for RuAl using density functional perturbation theory (DFPT).

  19. Effect of wet grinding on structural properties of ball clay

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, A. Chander, S.; Dhaka, M. S.; Hameed, A.; Singh, P.; Nehra, S. P.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, the effect of wet grinding on structural properties of ball clay is undertaken. The wet grinding treatment was performed employing ball and vibro mills for different time spells of 2, 4, 8 and 16 hours. The structural properties were carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structure of ground samples is found to be simple cubic. The crystallographic parameters are calculated and slight change in lattice constant, inter planner spacing and particle size is observed with grinding treatment. The results are in agreement with the available literature.

  20. Cement-aggregate compatibility and structure property relationships including modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, H.M.; Xi, Y.

    1993-07-15

    The role of aggregate, and its interface with cement paste, is discussed with a view toward establishing models that relate structure to properties. Both short (nm) and long (mm) range structure must be considered. The short range structure of the interface depends not only on the physical distribution of the various phases, but also on moisture content and reactivity of aggregate. Changes that occur on drying, i.e. shrinkage, may alter the structure which, in turn, feeds back to alter further drying and shrinkage. The interaction is dynamic, even without further hydration of cement paste, and the dynamic characteristic must be considered in order to fully understand and model its contribution to properties. Microstructure and properties are two subjects which have been pursued somewhat separately. This review discusses both disciplines with a view toward finding common research goals in the future. Finally, comment is made on possible chemical reactions which may occur between aggregate and cement paste.

  1. Bubble-included chocolate: relating structure with sensory response.

    PubMed

    Haedelt, J; Beckett, S T; Niranjan, K

    2007-04-01

    Bubbles impart a very unique texture, chew, and mouth-feel to foods. However, little is known about the relationship between structure of such products and consumer response in terms of mouth-feel and eating experience. The objective of this article is to investigate the sensory properties of 4 types of bubble-containing chocolates, produced by using different gases: carbon dioxide, nitrogen, nitrous oxide, and argon. The structure of these chocolates were characterized in terms of (1) gas hold-up values determined by density measurements and (2) bubble size distribution which was measured by undertaking an image analysis of X-ray microtomograph sections. Bubble size distributions were obtained by measuring bubble volumes after reconstructing 3D images from the tomographic sections. A sensory study was undertaken by a nonexpert panel of 20 panelists and their responses were analyzed using qualitative descriptive analysis (QDA). The results show that chocolates made from the 4 gases could be divided into 2 groups on the basis of bubble volume and gas hold-up: the samples produced using carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide had a distinctly higher gas hold-up containing larger bubbles in comparison with those produced using argon and nitrogen. The sensory study also demonstrated that chocolates made with the latter were perceived to be harder, less aerated, slow to melt in the mouth, and having a higher overall flavor intensity. These products were further found to be creamier than the chocolates made by using carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide; the latter sample also showed a higher intensity of cocoa flavor.

  2. [Morphogenesis, structure and properties of lymphatic vessels].

    PubMed

    Ratajska, Anna; Jankowska-Steifer, Ewa; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Flaht, Aleksandra; Radomska-Leśniewska, Dorota

    2012-11-19

    In this paper, we present literature results related to structure and various manners of lymphatic vessel formation during embryonic development and in pathological events, such as tumorigenesis, wound healing, and other diseases. The functions of the lymphatic system include the collection of fluids that enter tissues from the circulation, absorption of lipids and lipid-soluble vitamins from the intestine and their subsequent transport, participation in antigen, dendritic cell, and lymphocyte migration. The lymphatic system is also a route for tumor cell and inflammatory cell transport. Native lymphatic capillaries differ from blood capillaries by having an irregular lumen, a discontinuous basement membrane, absence of pericytes, and a strong anchorage of their endothelial cells to the extracellular matrix via microfibrils built of emilin and fibrillin. Lymphatic endothelial cells express surface antigens such as Lyve-1, podoplanin, VEGFR3 (Flk4) and transcription factor Prox-1, as well as molecules which are common for blood endothelial cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (CD31, CD34, Flk-1, Tie-1, Tie-2, neuropilin 2). Lymphatic vessel formation during embryonic development starts with the occurrence of lymphatic sacs sprouting from systemic jugular veins and/or by co-option of lymphangioblasts or hematopoietic-derived cells. It can also proceed by dedifferentiation of venous endothelial cells after their detachment from the venous system, migration to the target places within the body and assembly in the lymphatic lumen. Mechanisms of lymphatic vessel formation during embryonic development and in pathological conditions, such as tumorigenesis, wound healing, and metastasis, is regulated by a plethora of growth factors and molecules, among which the most important are VEGF-C, VEGF-D, HGF, FGF, retinoic acid, IL-3, and IL-7. Macrophages and cells bearing CD45 phenotype seem to take part in the formation of lymphatics. Macrophages might act as a source of growth

  3. Radar response from vegetation with nodal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.; Oneill, P. E.

    1984-01-01

    Radar images from the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) produced unusually high returns from corn and sorghum fields, which seem to indicate a correlation between nodal separation in the stalk and the wavelength of the radar. These images also show no difference in return from standing or harvested corn. Further investigation using images from the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A) substantiated these observations and showed a degradation of the high return with time after harvest. From portions of corn and sweet sorghum stalks that were sampled to measure stalk water content, it was determined that near and after maturity the water becomes more concentrated in the stalk nodes. The stalk then becomes a linear sequence of alternating dielectrics as opposed to a long slender cylinder with uniform dielectric properties.

  4. High temperature structural and magnetic properties of cobalt nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Ait Atmane, Kahina; Zighem, Fatih; Soumare, Yaghoub; Ibrahim, Mona; Boubekri, Rym; Maurer, Thomas; Margueritat, Jeremie; Piquemal, Jean-Yves; Ott, Frederic; Chaboussant, Gregory; Schoenstein, Frederic; Jouini, Noureddine; Viau, Guillaume

    2013-01-15

    We present in this paper the structural and magnetic properties of high aspect ratio Co nanoparticles ({approx}10) at high temperatures (up to 623 K) using in-situ X ray diffraction (XRD) and SQUID characterizations. We show that the anisotropic shapes, the structural and texture properties are preserved up to 500 K. The coercivity can be modelled by {mu}{sub 0}H{sub C}=2(K{sub MC}+K{sub shape})/M{sub S} with K{sub MC} the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, K{sub shape} the shape anisotropy constant and M{sub S} the saturation magnetization. H{sub C} decreases linearly when the temperature is increased due to the loss of the Co magnetocrystalline anisotropy contribution. At 500 K, 50% of the room temperature coercivity is preserved corresponding to the shape anisotropy contribution only. We show that the coercivity drop is reversible in the range 300-500 K in good agreement with the absence of particle alteration. Above 525 K, the magnetic properties are irreversibly altered either by sintering or by oxidation. - Graphical abstract: We present in this paper the structural and magnetic properties of high aspect ratio Co nanorods ({approx}10) at high temperatures (up to 623 K) using in-situ X-ray diffraction and SQUID characterizations. We show that the anisotropic shapes, the structural and texture properties are preserved up to 500 K. Above 525 K, the magnetic properties are irreversibly altered either by sintering or by oxidation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferromagnetic Co nanorods are prepared using the polyol process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural and texture properties of the Co nanorods are preserved up to 500 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic properties of the Co nanorods are irreversibly altered above 525 K.

  5. Nano-structured magnetic metamaterial with enhanced nonlinear properties

    PubMed Central

    Kobljanskyj, Yuri; Melkov, Gennady; Guslienko, Konstantin; Novosad, Valentyn; Bader, Samuel D.; Kostylev, Michael; Slavin, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Nano-structuring can significantly modify the properties of materials. We demonstrate that size-dependent modification of the spin-wave spectra in magnetic nano-particles can affect not only linear, but also nonlinear magnetic response. The discretization of the spectrum removes the frequency degeneracy between the main excitation mode of a nano-particle and the higher spin-wave modes, having the lowest magnetic damping, and reduces the strength of multi-magnon relaxation processes. This reduction of magnon-magnon relaxation for the main excitation mode leads to a dramatic increase of its lifetime and amplitude, resulting in the intensification of all the nonlinear processes involving this mode. We demonstrate this experimentally on a two-dimensional array of permalloy nano-dots for the example of parametric generation of a sub-harmonic of an external microwave signal. The characteristic lifetime of this sub-harmonic is increased by two orders of magnitude compared to the case of a continuous magnetic film, where magnon-magnon relaxation limits the lifetime. PMID:22745899

  6. Structure-Property-Function Relationship in Humic Substances to Explain the Biological Activity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    García, Andrés Calderín; de Souza, Luiz Gilberto Ambrosio; Pereira, Marcos Gervasio; Castro, Rosane Nora; García-Mina, José María; Zonta, Everaldo; Lisboa, Francy Junior Gonçalves; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure-property-function relationship of humic substances (HSs) is key for understanding their role in soil. Despite progress, studies on this topic are still under discussion. We analyzed 37 humic fractions with respect to their isotopic composition, structural characteristics, and properties responsible for stimulating plant root parameters. We showed that regardless of the source of origin of the carbon (C3 or C4), soil-extracted HSs and humic acids (HAs) are structurally similar to each other. The more labile and functionalized HS fraction is responsible for root emission, whereas the more recalcitrant and less functionalized HA fraction is related to root growth. Labile structures promote root stimulation at lower concentrations, while recalcitrant structures require higher concentrations to promote a similar stimulus. These findings show that lability and recalcitrance, which are derived properties of humic fractions, are related to the type and intensity of their bioactivity. In summary, the comparison of humic fractions allowed a better understanding of the relationship between the source of origin of plant carbon and the structure, properties, and type and intensity of the bioactivity of HSs in plants. In this study, scientific concepts are unified and the basis for the agronomic use of HSs is established. PMID:26862010

  7. Structure-Property-Function Relationship in Humic Substances to Explain the Biological Activity in Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Andrés Calderín; de Souza, Luiz Gilberto Ambrosio; Pereira, Marcos Gervasio; Castro, Rosane Nora; García-Mina, José María; Zonta, Everaldo; Lisboa, Francy Junior Gonçalves; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro

    2016-02-01

    Knowledge of the structure-property-function relationship of humic substances (HSs) is key for understanding their role in soil. Despite progress, studies on this topic are still under discussion. We analyzed 37 humic fractions with respect to their isotopic composition, structural characteristics, and properties responsible for stimulating plant root parameters. We showed that regardless of the source of origin of the carbon (C3 or C4), soil-extracted HSs and humic acids (HAs) are structurally similar to each other. The more labile and functionalized HS fraction is responsible for root emission, whereas the more recalcitrant and less functionalized HA fraction is related to root growth. Labile structures promote root stimulation at lower concentrations, while recalcitrant structures require higher concentrations to promote a similar stimulus. These findings show that lability and recalcitrance, which are derived properties of humic fractions, are related to the type and intensity of their bioactivity. In summary, the comparison of humic fractions allowed a better understanding of the relationship between the source of origin of plant carbon and the structure, properties, and type and intensity of the bioactivity of HSs in plants. In this study, scientific concepts are unified and the basis for the agronomic use of HSs is established.

  8. Photovoltaic properties of ZnO nanorods/p-type Si heterojunction structures

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Bartlomiej Slawomir; Luka, Grzegorz; Wachnicki, Lukasz; Gieraltowska, Sylwia; Kopalko, Krzysztof; Zielony, Eunika; Bieganski, Piotr; Placzek-Popko, Ewa; Godlewski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Summary Selected properties of photovoltaic (PV) structures based on n-type zinc oxide nanorods grown by a low temperature hydrothermal method on p-type silicon substrates (100) are investigated. PV structures were covered with thin films of Al doped ZnO grown by atomic layer deposition acting as transparent electrodes. The investigated PV structures differ in terms of the shapes and densities of their nanorods. The best response is observed for the structure containing closely-spaced nanorods, which show light conversion efficiency of 3.6%. PMID:24605282

  9. Structure and physical properties of Hydrogrossular mineral series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Puja

    The mineral hydrogrossular series (Ca3Al2(SiO 4)3-x(OH)4x; 0 ≤ x ≤ 3) are important water bearing minerals found in the upper and lower part of the Earth's mantle. They are vital to the planet's hydrosphere under different hydrothermal conditions. The composition and structure of this mineral series are important in geoscience and share many commonalities with cement and clay materials. Other than the end members of the series x = 0 (grossular) and x = 3 (katoite) which have a cubic garnet structure, the structure of the series is totally unknown. We used large-scale ab initio modeling to investigate the structures and properties for hydrogrossular series for x = 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3. Results indicate that for x > 0 and x < 3, the structures are tetragonal. This shows that there is structural change related to the lowering of overall symmetry associated with the composition of SiO4 tetrahedra and AlO6 octahedra. Total Bond order also explains the reason behind the change in the compressibility of the series. The electronic structure, mechanical and optical properties of the hydrogrossular series are calculated and the results for grossular and katoite are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The x--dependence of these physical properties for the series supports the notion of the aforementioned structural transition from cubic to tetragonal.

  10. An Analytical Solution for Transient Thermal Response of an Insulated Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical solution was derived for the transient response of an insulated aerospace vehicle structure subjected to a simplified heat pulse. This simplified problem approximates the thermal response of a thermal protection system of an atmospheric entry vehicle. The exact analytical solution is solely a function of two non-dimensional parameters. A simpler function of these two parameters was developed to approximate the maximum structural temperature over a wide range of parameter values. Techniques were developed to choose constant, effective properties to represent the relevant temperature and pressure-dependent properties for the insulator and structure. A technique was also developed to map a time-varying surface temperature history to an equivalent square heat pulse. Using these techniques, the maximum structural temperature rise was calculated using the analytical solutions and shown to typically agree with finite element simulations within 10 to 20 percent over the relevant range of parameters studied.

  11. Transmission properties of frequency selective structures with air gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Li-Feng; Lü, Ming-Yun; Wu, Zhe

    2010-12-01

    The transmission properties of compound frequency selective structures with dielectric slab and air gaps were investigated by computation and experimentation. Mechanism analyses were also carried out. Results show that the air gaps have a distinct influence on the transmission properties. Resonant frequency of the structure would increase rapidly when the air gap appears. After the gap gets larger to a specific value, generally 1/5 wavelength corresponding to the resonant frequency, the transmission properties would change periodically with the gap thickness. The change of transmission properties in one period has a close relationship with the dielectric thickness. These results provide a new method for designing a bandpass radome of large incidence angle and low loss with the concept of stealth shield radome.

  12. Structures and Mechanical Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    A revolution in the diamond technology is in progress, as the low-pressure process becomes an industrial reality. It will soon be possible to take advantage of the demanding properties of diamond to develop a myriad of new applications, particularly for self-lubricating, wear-resistant, and superhard coatings. The production of large diamond films or sheets at low cost, a distinct possibility in the not-too-distant future, may drastically change tribology technology, particularly regarding solid lubricants and lubricating materials and systems. This paper reviews the structures and properties of natural and synthetic diamonds to gain a better understanding of the tribological properties of diamond and related materials. Atomic and crystal structure, impurities, mechanical properties, and indentation hardness of diamond are described.

  13. From insect scales to sensor design: modelling the mechanochromic properties of bicontinuous cubic structures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xia; Ma, Duancheng; Eisenlohr, Philip; Raabe, Dierk; Fabritius, Helge-Otto

    2016-06-15

    Many of the three-dimensional photonic crystals occurring in the scales of insects have bicontinuous cubic structures. Their optical properties have been studied extensively, however little is known about their mechanical properties and their optical response under deformation. We demonstrated a mechanochromic effect by deforming the scales of a weevil and calculated the elastic, optical and mechanochromic (assuming homogeneous deformation) properties of the three types of bicontinuous cubic structures occurring in nature: P-structure (primitive), G-structure (gyroid) and D-structure (diamond). The results show that all investigated properties of these three structure types strongly depend on their geometry, structural parameters such as volume fractions of the two constituting phases and the directions of the incident light or applied stress, respectively. Interestingly, the mechanochromic simulation results predict that these structures may show blue-shift or even red-shift under compression along certain directions. Our results provide design guidelines for mechanochromic sensing materials operating in the elastic regime, including parameters such as sensitivity and direction of spectral shift.

  14. 3D lidar imaging for detecting and understanding plant responses and canopy structure.

    PubMed

    Omasa, Kenji; Hosoi, Fumiki; Konishi, Atsumi

    2007-01-01

    Understanding and diagnosing plant responses to stress will benefit greatly from three-dimensional (3D) measurement and analysis of plant properties because plant responses are strongly related to their 3D structures. Light detection and ranging (lidar) has recently emerged as a powerful tool for direct 3D measurement of plant structure. Here the use of 3D lidar imaging to estimate plant properties such as canopy height, canopy structure, carbon stock, and species is demonstrated, and plant growth and shape responses are assessed by reviewing the development of lidar systems and their applications from the leaf level to canopy remote sensing. In addition, the recent creation of accurate 3D lidar images combined with natural colour, chlorophyll fluorescence, photochemical reflectance index, and leaf temperature images is demonstrated, thereby providing information on responses of pigments, photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal opening, and shape to environmental stresses; these data can be integrated with 3D images of the plants using computer graphics techniques. Future lidar applications that provide more accurate dynamic estimation of various plant properties should improve our understanding of plant responses to stress and of interactions between plants and their environment. Moreover, combining 3D lidar with other passive and active imaging techniques will potentially improve the accuracy of airborne and satellite remote sensing, and make it possible to analyse 3D information on ecophysiological responses and levels of various substances in agricultural and ecological applications and in observations of the global biosphere. PMID:17030540

  15. Structural response of SSME turbine blade airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, V. K.; Abdul-Aziz, A.; Thompson, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Reusable space propulsion hot gas-path components are required to operate under severe thermal and mechanical loading conditions. These operating conditions produce elevated temperature and thermal transients which results in significant thermally induced inelastic strains, particularly, in the turbopump turbine blades. An inelastic analysis for this component may therefore be necessary. Anisotropic alloys such as MAR M-247 or PWA-1480 are being considered to meet the safety and durability requirements of this component. An anisotropic inelastic structural analysis for an SSME fuel turbopump turbine blade was performed. The thermal loads used resulted from a transient heat transfer analysis of a turbine blade. A comparison of preliminary results from the elastic and inelastic analyses is presented.

  16. Structural inhomogeneity and magnetic properties of strontium hexaferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Pashchenko, V.P.; Samoilenko, Z.A.; Vintonyak, V.M.

    1995-07-01

    The clustered inhomogeneity observed in ferromagnetic materials deepens our concepts of the actual structure of solids and opens new possibilities for controlling their properties. These investigations were made for the purpose of establishment of the relationship between clusterization and magnetic properties of SrO-nFe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, where 5.4 < n < 6.2, metal oxide magnetically hard strontium ferrites.

  17. Structure and mechanical properties of liquid crystalline filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, Alexey; Nemes, Alexandru; Stannarius, Ralf; Schulz, Mario; Nadasi, Hajnalka; Weissflog, Wolfgang

    2005-03-01

    The formation of stable freely suspended filaments is an interesting peculiarity of some liquid crystal phases. So far, little is known about their structure and stability. Similarly to free-standing smectic films, an internal molecular structure of the mesophase stabilizes these macroscopically well-ordered objects with length to diameter ratios of 10{sup 3} and above. In this paper, we report observations of smectic liquid crystal fibers formed by bent-shaped molecules in different mesophases. Our study, employing several experimental techniques, focuses on mechanical and structural aspects of fiber formation such as internal structure, stability, and mechanical and optical properties.

  18. The structural response of a rail accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The transient response of a 0.4 by 0.6 cm rectangular bore rail accelerator was analyzed by a three dimensional finite element code. The copper rail deflected to a peak value of 0.08 mm in compression and then oscillated at an amplitude of 0.02 mm. Simultaneously the insulating side wall of glass fabric base, epoxy resin laminate (G-1o) was compressed to a peak value of 0.13 mm and rebounded to a steady state in extension. Projectile pinch or blowby due to the rail extension or compression, respectively, can be identified by examining the time history of the rail displacement. The effect of blowby was most significant at the side wall characterized by mm size displacement in compression. Dynamic stress calculations indicate that the G-10 supporting material behind the rail is subjected to over 21 MPa at which the G-10 could fail if the laminate was not carefully oriented. Results for a polycarbonate resin (Lexan) side wall show much larger displacements and stresses than for G-10. The tradeoff between the transparency of Lexan and the mechanical strength of G-10 for sidewall material is obvious. Displacement calculations from the modal method are smaller than the results from the direct integration method by almost an order of magnitude, because the high frequency effect is neglected.

  19. The structural response of a rail acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.

    1984-01-01

    The transient response of a 0.4 by 0.6 cm rectangular bore rail accelerator was analyzed by a three dimensional finite element code. The copper rail deflected to a peak value of 0.08 mm in compression and then oscillated at an amplitude of 0.02 mm. Simultaneously the insulating side wall of glass fabric base, epoxy resin laminate (G-10) was compressed to a peak value of 0.13 mm and rebounded to a steady state in extension. Projectile pinch or blowby due to the rail extension or compression, respectively, can be identified by examining the time history of the rail displacement. The effect of blowby was most significant at the side wall characterized by mm size displacement in compression. Dynamic stress calculations indicate that the G-10 supporting material behind the rail is subjected to over 21 MPa at which the G-10 could fail if the laminate was not carefully oriented. Results for a polycarbonate resin (Lexan) side wall show much larger displacements and stresses than for G-10. The tradeoff between the transparency of Lexan and the mechanical strength of G-10 for sidewall material is obvious. Displacement calculations from the modal method are smaller than the results from the direct integration method by almost an order of magnitude, because the high frequency effect is neglected. Previously announced in STAR as N83-35412

  20. Structural phase transition and electronic properties of NdBi

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Ashvini K.; Patiya, Jagdish; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2015-06-24

    The structural and electronic properties of NdBi from an electronic structure calculation have been presented. The calculation is performed using self-consistent tight binding linear muffin tin orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA). The calculated equilibrium structural parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental results. It is found that this compound shows metallic behavior under ambient condition and undergoes a structural phase transition from the NaCl structure to the CsCl structure at the pressure 20.1 GPa. The electronic structures of NdBi under pressure are investigated. It is found that NdBi have metallization and the hybridizations of atoms in NdBi under pressure become stronger.

  1. Tunable and responsive plasmonic properties of metal oxide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliron, Delia

    2015-03-01

    Degenerately doped metal oxide semiconductors, like ITO, exhibit plasmonic resonance at near and mid-infrared wavelengths tunable by varying their composition. Nanocrystals of many such materials have now been synthesized and applications are emerging that leverage the responsiveness of their localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) to electronic charging and discharging. For example, electrochromic glass that can dynamically control heat loads in buildings is under development. In biological systems, plasmonic oxide nanocrystals can act as remote sensors, where changes in their optical absorption indicates biochemical redox has occurred. Nonetheless, significant fundamental questions remain open regarding the nature of the infrared optical response in these doped oxides. Dopant impurities influence the optoelectronic properties beyond simply donating free carriers. For example, the distribution of Sn in ITO was found to dramatically influence the line shape of the LSPR and the effective electron mobility. In addition, by post-synthetically modifying carrier concentrations (through photodoping or electrochemical doping), we have observed that aliovalent doping and electronic doping each modify LSPR spectra, providing access to a broad range of tunable optical properties. Heterogeneous broadening, uncovered by single nanocrystal spectroscopy, also contributes to ensemble line shapes, complicating direct interpretation of LSPR spectra. Finally, the possibility of electric field enhancement by metal oxide LSPRs is critically examined to suggest what future applications might be on the horizon.

  2. Nanostructured ferroelectrics: fabrication and structure-property relations.

    PubMed

    Han, Hee; Kim, Yunseok; Alexe, Marin; Hesse, Dietrich; Lee, Woo

    2011-10-25

    With the continued demand for ultrahigh density ferroelectric data storage applications, it is becoming increasingly important to scale the dimension of ferroelectrics down to the nanometer-scale region and to thoroughly understand the effects of miniaturization on the materials properties. Upon reduction of the physical dimension of the material, the change in physical properties associated with size reduction becomes extremely difficult to characterize and to understand because of a complicated interplay between structures, surface properties, strain effects from substrates, domain nucleation, and wall motions. In this Review, the recent progress in fabrication and structure-property relations of nanostructured ferroelectric oxides is summarized. Various fabrication approaches are reviewed, with special emphasis on a newly developed stencil-based method for fabricating ferroelectric nanocapacitors, and advantages and limitations of the processes are discussed. Stress-induced evolutions of domain structures upon reduction of the dimension of the material and their implications on the electrical properties are discussed in detail. Distinct domain nucleation, growth, and propagation behaviors in nanometer-scale ferroelectric capacitors are discussed and compared to those of micrometer-scale counterparts. The structural effect of ferroelectric nanocapacitors on the domain switching behavior and cross-talk between neighboring capacitors under external electric field is reviewed. PMID:21919083

  3. Nano-hierarchical structure and electromechanical coupling properties of clamshell.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zeng, Kaiyang

    2012-10-01

    Electromechanical coupling is a nearly universal property of biomaterials, and may play an important role in many physiological and functional phenomena. The intrinsic or externally-generated electric field within biomaterials may also contribute to their predominant mechanical properties. Mollusc shells are well known for their outstanding mechanical properties, which are generally believed to originate from their hierarchical structures in multi-levels. This paper is therefore focused on the studies of the hierarchical structures and electromechanical coupling behaviors of clamshell from micro- to nano-levels, and in particular, the biopolymer concentrated regions. Detailed studies are performed to characterize the piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties of clamshell. It was found that the piezoresponse of clamshell is originated from the biopolymers between the mineral grains, as well as those intercalated within the mineral crystalline structure after the biomineralization process. Local ferroelectric hysteresis loops of clamshell have also been observed and analyzed on the samples with different orientations, biopolymer contents, or moisture contents. It is believed that the overall functioning of the clamshell or even other mollusc shells may incorporate many mechanisms interacting together, rather than originate from the hierarchical structure alone. This study of the electromechanical coupling effects of clamshell can be a path to have more comprehensive understandings of the properties and behaviors of mollusc shells.

  4. Design and fabrication of planar structures with graded electromagnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Brandon Lowell

    Successfully integrating electromagnetic properties in planar structures offers numerous benefits to the microwave and optical communities. This work aims at formulating new analytic and optimized design methods, creating new fabrication techniques for achieving those methods, and matching appropriate implementation of methods to fabrication techniques. The analytic method consists of modifying an approach that realizes perfect antireflective properties from graded profiles. This method is shown for all-dielectric and magneto-dielectric grading profiles. The optimized design methods are applied to transformer (discrete) or taper (continuous) designs. From these methods, a subtractive and an additive manufacturing technique were established and are described. The additive method, dry powder dot deposition, enables three dimensional varying electromagnetic properties in a structural composite. Combining the methods and fabrication is shown in two applied methodologies. The first uses dry powder dot deposition to design one dimensionally graded electromagnetic profiles in a planar fiberglass composite. The second method simultaneously applies antireflective properties and adjusts directivity through a slab through the use of subwavelength structures to achieve a flat antireflective lens. The end result of this work is a complete set of methods, formulations, and fabrication techniques to achieve integrated electromagnetic properties in planar structures.

  5. Response of butterflies to structural and resource boundaries.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Cheryl B; Franco, Aldina M A; Crone, Elizabeth E

    2012-05-01

    1. Two aspects of landscape composition shape the behavioural response of animals to habitat heterogeneity: physical habitat structure and abundance of key resources. In general, within-habitat movement behaviour has been investigated in relation to resources, and preference at boundaries has been quantified in response to physical structure. 2. Habitat preference studies suggest that responses to resources vs. structure should differ, e.g. between male and female animals, and effects of responses to structure and resources may also interact. However, most studies of animal movement combine various aspects of behavioural responses to 'habitat', implicitly assuming that resources and structure are broadly equivalent. 3. We conducted a large-scale experiment of the movement of Fender's blue (Icaricia icarioides fenderi), an endangered butterfly, to investigate butterfly response to physical structure of the landscape (prairie, open woods and dense woods) and to resources [presence or absence of Kincaid's lupine, Lupinus oreganus (larval hostplant patches)]. The experiment included 606 butterfly flight paths across four habitat types and nine ecotones. 4. Responses to physical structure and resource patches were not congruent. Butterflies were attracted to resource patches within both prairies and open woods and moved more slowly when in resource patches. Butterflies tended to prefer prairie at prairie-forest edges but tended to move faster in prairies than in open woods. Physical structure and resources also interacted; butterflies did not respond to physical habitat structure when resource patches spanned prairie - open woods ecotones. 5. Even dense woods were not perfect barriers, in contrast to a large body of literature that assumes insects from open habitats will not enter dense forests. 6. Movement of both males and females responded to resources and structure. However, female butterflies had stronger responses to both resources and structure in most cases

  6. Electrical properties and applications of carbon nanotube structures.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Prabhakar R

    2007-01-01

    The experimentally verified electrical properties of carbon nanotube structures and manifestations in related phenomena such as thermoelectricity, superconductivity, electroluminescence, and photoconductivity are reviewed. The possibility of using naturally formed complex nanotube morphologies, such as Y-junctions, for new device architectures are then considered. Technological applications of the electrical properties of nanotube derived structures in transistor applications, high frequency nanoelectronics, field emission, and biological sensing are then outlined. The review concludes with an outlook on the technological potential of nanotubes and the need for new device architectures for nanotube systems integration. PMID:17450889

  7. Structure and properties of molten oxide-salt clinkers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, T.V.; Osokin, A.P.; Potapova, E.N.; Burygin, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    The change in the structure and properties of a eutectic clinker solution is determined in the presence of individual and complexes of alkali and halogen-containing additions. It is shown that the structure of the modified alloys depends upon the acid-base properties of the dissolving ions, whereas the nature of the modifying effect depends upon the displacement of the acid-base equilibrium in the melt. The principles governing the changes in the viscosity and surface tension of the clinker liquid as a function of the nature and concentration of the modifiers can be used for predicting the kinetics of liquid-phase sintering of raw Portland cement mixtures.

  8. Structural and luminescent properties of electron-irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, N. A.; Loshachenko, A. S.; Aruev, P. N.; Kalyadin, A. E.; Shek, E. I.; Zabrodskiy, V. V.; Shtel'makh, K. F.; Vdovin, V. I.; Xiang, Luelue; Yang, Deren

    2014-02-21

    Structural defects induced by electron irradiation of p-Cz-Si wafers were identified. The influence of the annealing conditions in a chlorine-containing atmosphere on the structural and luminescent properties of the samples was examined. Light-emitting diodes based on electron-irradiated and high-temperature-annealed wafers were fabricated by a vapour-phase epitaxy technique and their luminescence properties were studied. A high-intensity dislocation-related D1 line was observed at 1.6 μm in the room-temperature electroluminescence spectrum.

  9. Freshwater ecosystems--structure and response.

    PubMed

    Jones, J G

    2001-10-01

    Before it is possible to predict the impact of human activities on the natural environment it is necessary to understand the forces that drive and, therefore, control that environment. This paper is concerned with the freshwater component of the aquatic environment. The driving forces involved (some of which are under man's control) can be divided into the physical and the chemical, but the response is, almost entirely, biological. Although most impacts of the food processing industry might be perceived to be on running waters, this is not always the case, but we can apply the same basic rules to both static and running waters. The physical forces that determine how a lake functions are as follows. In early spring, in the temperate zone, the temperature of the surface water in lakes rises and the sunlight input increases. This results in stratification of the water body. The cooler, deeper water is separated, physically, by gravity. This isolated water plays a very different role in the function of the lake and is analogous to how a river works. Man's activities drive these systems by our input of inorganic and organic substances. The inorganic inputs, particularly of phosphorous, stimulate undesirable algal growths, some of which may produce particularly dangerous toxins. We must now accept that climate change, driven by man, will exacerbate these problems. Organic inputs from the food industry, i.e., carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins, will all impact lakes and rivers by increasing the biological oxygen demand. The worst case scenario is total loss of oxygen from the water as a result of microbial activity. Lipids create the greatest oxygen demand but carbohydrates (more easily biodegradable) also result in unsightly "sewage fungus." Protein waste can be degraded to produce ammonia and sulfide, both of which produce toxicity problems. Bioremediation processes, particularly phytoremediation, can alleviate these problems in a cost-effective manner and this paper

  10. Formation, Structure and Properties of Amorphous Carbon Char from Polymer Materials in Extreme Atmospheric Reentry Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous carbonaceous char produced from the pyrolysis of polymer solids has many desirable properties for ablative heat shields for space vehicles. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented to study the transformation of the local atomic structure from virgin polymer to a dense, disordered char [1]. Release of polymer hydrogen is found to be critical to allow the system to collapse into a highly coordinated char structure. Mechanisms of the char formation process and the morphology of the resulting structures are elucidated. Thermal conductivity and mechanical response of the resulting char are evaluated [2]. During reenty, the optical response and oxidative reactivity of char are also important properties. Results of ab initio computations of char optical functions [3] and char reactivity [4] are also presented.

  11. Seismic response analysis of an instrumented building structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, H.-J.; Zhu, S.-Y.; Celebi, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Sheraton - Universal hotel, an instrumented building lying in North Hollywood, USA is selected for case study in this paper. The finite element method is used to produce a linear time - invariant structural model, and the SAP2000 program is employed for the time history analysis of the instrumented structure under the base excitation of strong motions recorded in the basement during the Northridge, California earthquake of 17 January 1994. The calculated structural responses are compared with the recorded data in both time domain and frequency domain, and the effects of structural parameters evaluation and indeterminate factors are discussed. Some features of structural response, such as the reason why the peak responses of acceleration in the ninth floor are larger than those in the sixteenth floor, are also explained.

  12. Structure-Property Relationships of Solids in Pharmaceutical Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattoraj, Sayantan

    Pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of solid dosage forms is witnessing a seismic shift in the recent years. In contrast to the earlier days when drug development was empirical, now there is a significant emphasis on a more scientific and structured development process, primarily driven by the Quality-by-Design (QbD) initiatives of US Food and Drug Administration (US-FDA). Central to such an approach is the enhanced understanding of solid materials using the concept of Materials Science Tetrahedron (MST) that probes the interplay between four elements, viz., the structure, properties, processing, and performance of materials. In this thesis work, we have investigated the relationships between the structure and those properties of pharmaceutical solids that influence their processing behavior. In all cases, we have used material-sparing approaches to facilitate property assessment using very small sample size of materials, which is a pre-requisite in the early stages of drug development when the availability of materials, drugs in particular, is limited. The influence of solid structure, either at the molecular or bulk powder levels, on crystal plasticity and powder compaction, powder flow, and solid-state amorphization during milling, has been investigated in this study. Through such a systematic evaluation, we have captured the involvement of structure-property correlations within a wide spectrum of relevant processing behaviors of pharmaceutical solids. Such a holistic analysis will be beneficial for addressing both regulatory and scientific issues in drug development.

  13. Personality Research Form: Factor Structure and Response Style Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stricker, Lawrence J.

    The aims of this study were (1) to explore the factor structure of the Personality Research Form (PRF) and (2) to examine the inventory's relations with response styles. In general the PRF content scales correlated moderately with each other and with measures of acquiesence, social desirability, and defensiveness response Biases. Six oblique…

  14. Transient response of lattice structures based on exact member theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Melvin S.

    1989-01-01

    The computer program BUNVIS-RG, which treats vibration and buckling of lattice structures using exact member stiffness matrices, has been extended to calculate the exact modal mass and stiffness quantities that can be used in a conventional transient response analysis based on modes. The exact nature of the development allows inclusion of local member response without introduction of any interior member nodes. Results are given for several problems in which significant interaction between local and global response occurs.

  15. Spatially localized structure-function relations in the elastic properties of sheared articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, Jesse; Bonassar, Lawrence; Cohen, Itai

    2013-03-01

    Contemporary developments in therapeutic tissue engineering have been enabled by basic research efforts in the field of biomechanics. Further integration of technology in medicine requires a deeper understanding of the mechanical properties of soft biological materials and the structural origins of their response under extreme stresses and strains. Drawing on the science generated by the ``Extreme Mechanics'' community, we present experimental results on the mechanical properties of articular cartilage, a hierarchically structured soft biomaterial found in the joints of mammalian long bones. Measurements of the spatially localized structure and mechanical properties will be compared with theoretical descriptions based on networks of deformed rods, poro-visco-elasticity, and standard continuum models. Discrepancies between experiment and theory will be highlighted, and suggestions for how models can be improved will be given.

  16. Solar Sail Material Performance Property Response to Space Environmental Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Semmel, Charles; Hovater, Mary; Nehls, Mary; Gray, Perry; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues research into the utilization of photonic materials for spacecraft propulsion. Spacecraft propulsion, using photonic materials, will be achieved using a solar sail. A solar sail operates on the principle that photons, originating from the sun, impart pressure to the sail and therefore provide a source for spacecraft propulsion. The pressure imparted to a solar sail can be increased, up to a factor of two, if the sun-facing surface is perfectly reflective. Therefore, these solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic sun-facing layer, a thin polymeric substrate and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. Near term solar sail propelled science missions are targeting the Lagrange point 1 (Ll) as well as locations sunward of L1 as destinations. These near term missions include the Solar Polar Imager and the L1 Diamond. The Environmental Effects Group at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues to actively characterize solar sail material in preparation for these near term solar sail missions. Previous investigations indicated that space environmental effects on sail material thermo-optical properties were minimal and would not significantly affect the propulsion efficiency of the sail. These investigations also indicated that the sail material mechanical stability degrades with increasing radiation exposure. This paper will further quantify the effect of space environmental exposure on the mechanical properties of candidate sail materials. Candidate sail materials for these missions include Aluminum coated Mylar[TM], Teonex[TM], and CPl (Colorless Polyimide). These materials were subjected to uniform radiation doses of electrons and protons in individual exposures sequences. Dose values ranged from 100 Mrads to over 5 Grads. The engineering performance property responses of thermo-optical and mechanical properties were

  17. Structural properties of prokaryotic promoter regions correlate with functional features.

    PubMed

    Meysman, Pieter; Collado-Vides, Julio; Morett, Enrique; Viola, Roberto; Engelen, Kristof; Laukens, Kris

    2014-01-01

    The structural properties of the DNA molecule are known to play a critical role in transcription. In this paper, the structural profiles of promoter regions were studied within the context of their diversity and their function for eleven prokaryotic species; Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella Typhimurium, Pseudomonas auroginosa, Geobacter sulfurreducens Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Synechocystis sp., Synechoccocus elongates, Bacillus anthracis, and the archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus. The main anchor point for these promoter regions were transcription start sites identified through high-throughput experiments or collected within large curated databases. Prokaryotic promoter regions were found to be less stable and less flexible than the genomic mean across all studied species. However, direct comparison between species revealed differences in their structural profiles that can not solely be explained by the difference in genomic GC content. In addition, comparison with functional data revealed that there are patterns in the promoter structural profiles that can be linked to specific functional loci, such as sigma factor regulation or transcription factor binding. Interestingly, a novel structural element clearly visible near the transcription start site was found in genes associated with essential cellular functions and growth in several species. Our analyses reveals the great diversity in promoter structural profiles both between and within prokaryotic species. We observed relationships between structural diversity and functional features that are interesting prospects for further research to yet uncharacterized functional loci defined by DNA structural properties.

  18. Impact of physicochemical properties of engineered fullerenes on key biological responses

    SciTech Connect

    Rebecca, Martin; Hsing-Lin, Wang; Jun, Gao; Srinivas, Iyer; Gabriel, Montano A.; Jennifer, Martinez; Andrew, Shreve P.; Bao Yuping; Wang, C.-C.; Chang Zhong; Gao Yuan; Rashi, Iyer

    2009-01-01

    Engineered fullerenes are widely integrated into several commercial and medical products and are now also being recognized as byproducts of many industrial activities. For most applications fullerenes have to be chemically modified. Surface modification of fullerenes can potentially impact their effect on biosystems. The purpose of the current study was to establish criteria to correlate fullerene structure to biological responses. We report studies of cellular responses induced by three different types of fullerenes that provide varying chemical and physical properties such as electronic behavior, solubility, and degree of agglomeration. Using a systematic and multipronged approach for material characterization and employing critical biological endpoints, we determined the impact of the physicochemical properties of fullerenes on cellular interactions. We examined the ability of these fullerenes to regulate intracellular oxidative stress, necrosis and apoptosis in human monocytic THP1 cells. Results indicate that the carboxylate derivatization of fullerenes was the determining factor in their ability to induce apoptosis. In contrast, the dispersion characteristics of fullerenes were found to be more relevant when considering their redox function. We also established a significant role for functionalization-dependent fullerene-regulation of the caspase proteases in the elicited responses. In addition, there was a notable increase in the level of several anti-oxidant enzymes. Collectively, the results clearly indicate that the physicochemical properties of fullerenes significantly influence the elicited biological response, thus impacting future applications. This study is an initial effort to lay the groundwork for routine correlation and predictive analysis on engineered fullerenes, thus expediting their use.

  19. Viscoplastic response of structures for intense local heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Kolenski, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    A thermoviscoplastic finite element method employing the Bodner-Partom constitutve model is used to investigate the response of simplified thermal-structural models to intense local heating. The computational method formulates the problem in rate and advances the solution in time by numerical integration. The thermoviscoplastic response of simplified structures with prescribed temperatures is investigated. With rapid rises of temperature, the nickel alloy structures display initially higher yield stresses due to strain rate effects. As temperatures approach elevated values, yield stress and stiffness degrade rapidly and pronounced plastic deformation occurs.

  20. The influence of structural response on sympathetic detonation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The role that a munition's structural response plays in the ignition process and the development of violent reactions and detonations is explored. The munition's structural response is identified as one of the factors that influences reaction violence. If the structural response of a round is known, this knowledge can be used to redstruce the probability that a large explosion would result from the sequential detonation of individual rounds within a large storage array. The response of an acceptor round was studied. The castings fail in the same manner regardless of whether or not there is a fill material present in the round. These failures are caused by stress waves which are transformed from compressive waves to tensile waves by reflection as the impact energy moves around the casting. Since these waves move in opposite directions around the projectile circumference and collide opposite the point of impact, very high tensile forces are developed which can crack the casing.

  1. Simulating the Structural Response of a Preloaded Bolted Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper describes the structural analyses performed on a preloaded bolted-joint configuration. The joint modeled was comprised of two L-shaped structures connected together using a single bolt. Each L-shaped structure involved a vertical flat segment (or shell wall) welded to a horizontal segment (or flange). Parametric studies were performed using elasto-plastic, large-deformation nonlinear finite element analyses to determine the influence of several factors on the bolted-joint response. The factors considered included bolt preload, washer-surface-bearing size, edge boundary conditions, joint segment length, and loading history. Joint response is reported in terms of displacements, gap opening, and surface strains. Most of the factors studied were determined to have minimal effect on the bolted-joint response; however, the washer-bearing-surface size affected the response significantly.

  2. The structures and physicochemical properties of organic cofactors in biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Julia D; Holliday, Gemma L; Rahman, Syed A; Thornton, Janet M

    2010-11-12

    Many crucial biochemical reactions in the cell require not only enzymes for catalysis but also organic cofactors or metal ions. Here, we analyse the physicochemical properties, chemical structures and functions of organic cofactors. Based on a thorough analysis of the literature complemented by our quantitative characterisation and classification, we found that most of these molecules are constructed from nucleotide and amino-acid-type building blocks, as well as some recurring cofactor-specific chemical scaffolds. We show that, as expected, organic cofactors are on average significantly more polar and slightly larger than other metabolites in the cell, yet they cover the full spectrum of physicochemical properties found in the metabolome. Furthermore, we have identified intrinsic groupings among the cofactors, based on their molecular properties, structures and functions, that represent a new way of considering cofactors. Although some classes of cofactors, as defined by their physicochemical properties, exhibit clear structural communalities, cofactors with similar structures can have diverse functional and physicochemical profiles. Finally, we show that the molecular functions of the cofactors not only may duplicate reactions performed by inorganic metal cofactors and amino acids, the cell's other catalytic tools, but also provide novel chemistries for catalysis.

  3. Carbon aerogels: An update on structure, properties, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Mayer, S.T.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Kong, F.M.

    1993-07-01

    Aerogels are unique porous materials whose composition, structure, and properties can be controlled at the nanometer scale. This paper examines the synthesis of organic aerogels and their carbonized derivatives. Carbon aerogels have low electrical resistivity, high surface area, and a tunable pore size. These materials are finding applications as electrodes in double layer capacitors.

  4. Biobased oil structure on amphiphilic and tribological properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biobased oils are those derived from farm-based renewable raw materials. Most are vegetable oils (such as soybean, canola, corn, etc.) or chemical modifications of vegetable oils. They have a number of interesting structural features that impact their amphiphilic and lubrication properties. The basi...

  5. Frequency response modeling and control of flexible structures: Computational methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, William H.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of vibrations in flexible structures can be conventiently modeled in terms of frequency response models. For structural control such models capture the distributed parameter dynamics of the elastic structural response as an irrational transfer function. For most flexible structures arising in aerospace applications the irrational transfer functions which arise are of a special class of pseudo-meromorphic functions which have only a finite number of right half place poles. Computational algorithms are demonstrated for design of multiloop control laws for such models based on optimal Wiener-Hopf control of the frequency responses. The algorithms employ a sampled-data representation of irrational transfer functions which is particularly attractive for numerical computation. One key algorithm for the solution of the optimal control problem is the spectral factorization of an irrational transfer function. The basis for the spectral factorization algorithm is highlighted together with associated computational issues arising in optimal regulator design. Options for implementation of wide band vibration control for flexible structures based on the sampled-data frequency response models is also highlighted. A simple flexible structure control example is considered to demonstrate the combined frequency response modeling and control algorithms.

  6. An Integrated Theory for Predicting the Hydrothermomechanical Response of Advanced Composite Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    An integrated theory is developed for predicting the hydrothermomechanical (HDTM) response of fiber composite components. The integrated theory is based on a combined theoretical and experimental investigation. In addition to predicting the HDTM response of components, the theory is structured to assess the combined hydrothermal effects on the mechanical properties of unidirectional composites loaded along the material axis and off-axis, and those of angleplied laminates. The theory developed predicts values which are in good agreement with measured data at the micromechanics, macromechanics, laminate analysis and structural analysis levels.

  7. Acoustic response analysis of large light space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defosse, H.; Mercier, F.

    1989-10-01

    The dynamic behavior of large lightweight aerospace structures under reverberant acoustic excitation is investigated. A review of the modal superposition theory is presented, along with an improved analysis method of air mass and acoustic radiation damping effects. An efficient postprocessor uses classic finite element codes to compute structural responses up to medium frequencies. Experiments performed on a honeycomb panel demonstrate the importance of two factors for the accurate analysis of the vibroacoustic responses of such aerospace structures: specifically, it is shown that the low frequency response calculations should include correlation characteristics of the excitation pressure field, and the test data processing should include pressure cross spectra calculations. Theoretical and analytical results are compared to assess air effects on a rigid circular plate. Dynamic analysis of large lightweight aerospace structures under a vacuum hypothesis may lead to a significant overestimation of predicted levels.

  8. Structural properties of rutherfordium: An ab-initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyanchandani, Jyoti; Sikka, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of rutherfordium, the latest group IV B element, have been evaluated by first principles density functional theory in scalar relativistic formalism with and without spin-orbit coupling and compared with its 5d homologue Hf. It is found that Rf will crystallize in the hexagonal close packed structure as in Hf. However, under pressure, it will have different sequence of phase transitions than Hf: hcp→bcc instead of hcp→ω→bcc. An explanation is offered for this difference in terms of the competition between the band structure and the Ewald energy contributions.

  9. Bacterial community structure and soil properties of a subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Min; Jung, Ji Young; Yergeau, Etienne; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Hinzman, Larry; Nam, Sungjin; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ok-Sun; Chun, Jongsik; Lee, Yoo Kyung

    2014-08-01

    The subarctic region is highly responsive and vulnerable to climate change. Understanding the structure of subarctic soil microbial communities is essential for predicting the response of the subarctic soil environment to climate change. To determine the composition of the bacterial community and its relationship with soil properties, we investigated the bacterial community structure and properties of surface soil from the moist acidic tussock tundra in Council, Alaska. We collected 70 soil samples with 25-m intervals between sampling points from 0-10 cm to 10-20 cm depths. The bacterial community was analyzed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and the following soil properties were analyzed: soil moisture content (MC), pH, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-). The community compositions of the two different depths showed that Alphaproteobacteria decreased with soil depth. Among the soil properties measured, soil pH was the most significant factor correlating with bacterial community in both upper and lower-layer soils. Bacterial community similarity based on jackknifed unweighted unifrac distance showed greater similarity across horizontal layers than through the vertical depth. This study showed that soil depth and pH were the most important soil properties determining bacterial community structure of the subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.

  10. Diverse Structural and Magnetic Properties of Differently Prepared MnAs Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, S.J.; Tian, P.; Zhang, Y.; Senevirathne, K.; Brock, S.L.; Dixit, A.; Lawes, G.

    2011-04-01

    Discrete nanoparticles of MnAs with distinct magnetostructural properties have been prepared by small modifications of solution-phase arrested precipitation reactions. Rietveld and X-ray atomic pair distribution function based approaches were used to explore the evolution of the structure of the samples with temperature, and these data were compared to the magnetic response measured with ac susceptibility. Relative to a bulk standard, one type of MnAs nanoparticles was found to demonstrate similar but smaller structural transitions and corresponding magnetic changes. However, both magnetic and structural transitions in the second type of nanoparticles are strongly suppressed.

  11. Probabilistic structural response of a valve assembly to high impact loading

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, E.A.; Thacker, B.H.

    2000-10-01

    Engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are currently developing capabilities, in cooperation with Southwest Research Institute, to provide reliability-based structural evaluation techniques for performing weapon component and system reliability assessments. The development and applications of Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) is an important ingredient in the overall weapon reliability assessments. Focus, herein, is placed on the uncertainty associated with the structural response of an explosive actuated valve-piston assembly. The probabilistic dynamic response of the piston upon impact is evaluated through the coupling of the probabilistic code NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) [1] with the non-linear structural dynamics code, ABAQUS/Explicit [2]. The probabilistic model includes variations in piston mass and geometry, and mechanical properties, such as Young's Modulus, yield strength, and flow characteristics. Finally, the probability of exceeding a specified strain limit, which is related to piston fracture, is determined.

  12. Properties of Air Traffic Conflicts for Free and Structured Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilimoria, Karl D.; Lee, Hilda Q.

    2001-01-01

    This paper analyzes the properties of air traffic conflicts in a future free routing system against those in the current structured routing system. Simulation of en route air traffic operations (above 18,000 ft) over the contiguous United States for a 24-hour period, constructed with initial conditions from actual air traffic data, were conducted using the Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool (FACET). Free routes were modeled as great circle (direct) routes from origin to destination, and structured routes were derived from actual flight plans along the current system of air routes. The conflict properties analyzed in this study include: (1) Total number of conflicts; (2) Distributions of key conflict parameters; and, (3) Categorization of conflicts into independent conflicts and two types of interacting conflicts. Preliminary results (for Denver Center traffic) indicate that conflict properties in a free routing system are different from those in the current structured routing system. In particular, a free routing system has significantly fewer conflicts, involving a correspondingly smaller number of aircraft, compared to the current structured routing system. Additionally, the conflict parameter distributions indicate that free routing conflicts are less intrusive than structured routing conflicts, and would therefore require small trajectory deviations for resolution.

  13. Optical properties and structure of beryllium lead silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhidkov, I. S.; Zatsepin, A. F.; Cholakh, S. O.; Kuznetsova, Yu. A.

    2014-10-21

    Luminescence and optical properties and structural features of (BeO){sub x}(PbO⋅SiO{sub 2}){sub 1−x} glasses (x = 0 ÷ 0.3) are investigated by means of optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The regularities of the formation of the optical absorption edge and static disorder are studied. It is shown that the optical absorption and luminescence are determined by transitions between localized states of lead ions. The impact of beryllium oxide on optical and luminescence properties and electronic structure of bands tails is discussed. The presence of two different concentration ranges with various short-range order structure and band tails nature has been established.

  14. Optical properties and structure of beryllium lead silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhidkov, I. S.; Zatsepin, A. F.; Cholakh, S. O.; Kuznetsova, Yu. A.

    2014-10-01

    Luminescence and optical properties and structural features of (BeO)x(PbOṡSiO2)1-x glasses (x = 0 ÷ 0.3) are investigated by means of optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The regularities of the formation of the optical absorption edge and static disorder are studied. It is shown that the optical absorption and luminescence are determined by transitions between localized states of lead ions. The impact of beryllium oxide on optical and luminescence properties and electronic structure of bands tails is discussed. The presence of two different concentration ranges with various short-range order structure and band tails nature has been established.

  15. Synthesis and surface properties of environmentally responsive segmented polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Ashish; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2002-05-01

    Polyurethanes, containing well-defined assemblies of perfluoro-polyether (PFPE or hexafluoropropene oxide oligomer), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and polyethylene glycol (PEG) segments, exhibit oleophobic, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic properties in response to the polarity of the contacting medium. These polymers were prepared by reacting hydroxy(polyethyleneoxy)-propylether-terminated PDMS block copolymer (HO-PEG-PDMS-PEG-OH) with 4,4'-methylene-bis(phenylene isocyanate) (MDI) in the presence of dibutyltin dilaurate catalyst, followed by reaction with 1,2-diol functional PFPE and chain extension with 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoro-1,4-butanediol (FB). The oleophobic and hydrophobic properties of the segmented polyurethanes (SPU) are due to the segregation of PFPE segments at the polymer-air interface. Wettability studies revealed that the same surface becomes hydrophilic, presumably due to the segregation of the PEG segments at the polymer-water interface. This hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transformation of the surface prevails not only when the polymer is in contact with liquid water but with water vapor as well. The understanding of the reconstruction mechanism of this novel family of SPU surfaces would furnish valuable information for various applications where dynamic transformation of surface activity is desired. PMID:16290591

  16. Synthesis and surface properties of environmentally responsive segmented polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Ashish; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2002-05-01

    Polyurethanes, containing well-defined assemblies of perfluoro-polyether (PFPE or hexafluoropropene oxide oligomer), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and polyethylene glycol (PEG) segments, exhibit oleophobic, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic properties in response to the polarity of the contacting medium. These polymers were prepared by reacting hydroxy(polyethyleneoxy)-propylether-terminated PDMS block copolymer (HO-PEG-PDMS-PEG-OH) with 4,4'-methylene-bis(phenylene isocyanate) (MDI) in the presence of dibutyltin dilaurate catalyst, followed by reaction with 1,2-diol functional PFPE and chain extension with 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoro-1,4-butanediol (FB). The oleophobic and hydrophobic properties of the segmented polyurethanes (SPU) are due to the segregation of PFPE segments at the polymer-air interface. Wettability studies revealed that the same surface becomes hydrophilic, presumably due to the segregation of the PEG segments at the polymer-water interface. This hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transformation of the surface prevails not only when the polymer is in contact with liquid water but with water vapor as well. The understanding of the reconstruction mechanism of this novel family of SPU surfaces would furnish valuable information for various applications where dynamic transformation of surface activity is desired.

  17. Nickel-aluminum alloy clusters -- structural and dynamical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Jellinek, J.; Krissinel, E.B.

    1997-08-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of mixed Ni{sub n}Al{sub m} alloy clusters mimicked by a many-body potential are studied computationally for all the possible compositions n and m such that n + m = 13. It is shown that the manifold of the usually very large number of the different possible structural forms can be systematized by introducing classes of structures corresponding to the same concentration of the components, geometry and type of the central atom. General definitions of mixing energy and mixing coefficient are introduced, and it is shown that the energy ordering of the structural forms within each class is governed by the mixing coefficient. The peculiarities of the solid-to-liquid-like transition are described as a function of the concentration of the two types of atoms. These peculiarities are correlated with and explained in terms of the energy spectra of the structural forms. Class-dependent features of the dynamics are described and analyzed.

  18. Salt-Responsive Zwitterionic Polymer Brushes with Tunable Friction and Antifouling Properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jintao; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Shengwei; Shen, Mingxue; Chen, Feng; Fan, Ping; Zhong, Mingqiang; Zheng, Jie

    2015-08-25

    Development of smart, multifunction materials is challenging but important for many fundamental and industrial applications. Here, we synthesized and characterized zwitterionic poly(3-(1-(4-vinylbenzyl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium-3-yl)propane-1-sulfonate) (polyVBIPS) brushes as ion-responsive smart surfaces via the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. PolyVBIPS brushes were carefully characterized for their surface morphologies, compositions, wettability, and film thicknesses by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle, and ellipsometer, respectively. Salt-responsive, switching properties of polyVBIPS brushes on surface hydration, friction, and antifouling properties were further examined and compared both in water and in salt solutions with different salt concentrations and counterion types. Collective data showed that polyVBIPS brushes exhibited reversible surface wettability switching between in water and saturated NaCl solution. PolyVBIPS brushes in water induced the larger protein absorption, higher surface friction, and lower surface hydration than those in salt solutions, exhibiting "anti-polyelectrolyte effect" salt responsive behaviors. At appropriate ionic conditions, polyVBIPs brushes were able to switch to superlow fouling surfaces (<0.3 ng/cm(2) protein adsorption) and superlow friction surfaces (u ∼ 10(-3)). The relationship between brush structure and its salt-responsive performance was also discussed. This work provides new zwitterionic surface-responsive materials with controllable antifouling and friction capabilities for multifunctional applications.

  19. Molecular response properties from a Hermitian eigenvalue equation for a time-periodic Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawłowski, Filip; Olsen, Jeppe; Jørgensen, Poul

    2015-03-01

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a time-periodic perturbation is recasted into a Hermitian eigenvalue equation, where the quasi-energy is an eigenvalue and the time-periodic regular wave function an eigenstate. From this Hermitian eigenvalue equation, a rigorous and transparent formulation of response function theory is developed where (i) molecular properties are defined as derivatives of the quasi-energy with respect to perturbation strengths, (ii) the quasi-energy can be determined from the time-periodic regular wave function using a variational principle or via projection, and (iii) the parametrization of the unperturbed state can differ from the parametrization of the time evolution of this state. This development brings the definition of molecular properties and their determination on par for static and time-periodic perturbations and removes inaccuracies and inconsistencies of previous response function theory formulations. The development where the parametrization of the unperturbed state and its time evolution may differ also extends the range of the wave function models for which response functions can be determined. The simplicity and universality of the presented formulation is illustrated by applying it to the configuration interaction (CI) and the coupled cluster (CC) wave function models and by introducing a new model—the coupled cluster configuration interaction (CC-CI) model—where a coupled cluster exponential parametrization is used for the unperturbed state and a linear parametrization for its time evolution. For static perturbations, the CC-CI response functions are shown to be the analytical analogues of the static molecular properties obtained from finite field equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) energy calculations. The structural similarities and differences between the CI, CC, and CC-CI response functions are also discussed with emphasis on linear versus non-linear parametrizations and the size-extensivity of the

  20. Level set based structural topology optimization for minimizing frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Lei; Wang, Michael Yu; Fang, Zongde; Ma, Zhengdong; Wei, Peng

    2011-11-01

    For the purpose of structure vibration reduction, a structural topology optimization for minimizing frequency response is proposed based on the level set method. The objective of the present study is to minimize the frequency response at the specified points or surfaces on the structure with an excitation frequency or a frequency range, subject to the given amount of the material over the admissible design domain. The sensitivity analysis with respect to the structural boundaries is carried out, while the Extended finite element method (X-FEM) is employed for solving the state equation and the adjoint equation. The optimal structure with smooth boundaries is obtained by the level set evolution with advection velocity, derived from the sensitivity analysis and the optimization algorithm. A number of numerical examples, in the frameworks of two-dimension (2D) and three-dimension (3D), are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  1. Structure response and damage produced by airblast from surface mining

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, D.E.; Stachura, V.J.; Stagg, M.S.; Kopp, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines studied airblast from surface mining to assess its damage and annoyance potential, and to determine safe levels and appropriate measurement techniques. Research results obtained from direct measurements of airblast-produced structure responses, damage, and analysis of instrument characteristics were combined with studies of sonic booms and human response to transient overpressures. Safe levels of airblast were found to be 134 db (0.1 Hz), 133 db (2 Hz), 129 db (6 Hz), and 105 db C-slow. These four airblast levels and measurement methods are equivalent in terms of structure response, and any one could be used as a safe-level criterion. Of the four methods, only the 0.1-Hz high-pass linear method accurately measures the total airblast energy present; however, the other three were found to adequately quantify the structure response and also represent techniques that are readily available to industry. Where a single airblast measuring system must be used, the 2-Hz linear peak response is the best overall compromise. The human response and annoyance problem from airblast is probably caused primarily by wall rattling and the resulting secondary noises. Although these will not entirely be precluded by the recommended levels, they are low enough to preclude damage to residential structures and any possible human injury over the long term.

  2. Topologically nontrivial Fermi regions and their novel electromagnetic response properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching Hua; Zhang, Xiao

    In the last decade, there has been a surge of interest in the application of topology to condensed matter physics. So far, most studies have been concerned with the novel properties that arise due to nontrivial band topology, i.e Quantum Anomalous Hall and Z2 topological insulators (TIs). In this talk, I shall describe another context where nontrivial topology also leads to interesting, measurable effects. Within the semi-classical Boltzmann approach, it can be shown that a topologically nontrivial Fermi sea region generically exhibits a non-monotonic nonlinear electromagnetic response in the limit of low chemical potential. Such topologically nontrivial regions of filled states can arise in experimentally realized TI heterostructures or materials with large Rashba splitting, i.e. BiTeI, where the Fermi sea is not simply connected. A non-monotonic electromagnetic response implies regimes of negative differential resistance, which have important applications in technologies involving microwave generation, like motion sensing and radio astronomy. We hope that nontrivial Fermi sea topology will hence provide another route for the realization of such technologies.

  3. Wind turbine design codes: A comparison of the structural response

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, M.L. Jr.; Wright, A.D.; Pierce, K.G.

    2000-03-01

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is continuing a comparison of several computer codes used in the design and analysis of wind turbines. The second part of this comparison determined how well the programs predict the structural response of wind turbines. In this paper, the authors compare the structural response for four programs: ADAMS, BLADED, FAST{_}AD, and YawDyn. ADAMS is a commercial, multibody-dynamics code from Mechanical Dynamics, Inc. BLADED is a commercial, performance and structural-response code from Garrad Hassan and Partners Limited. FAST{_}AD is a structural-response code developed by Oregon State University and the University of Utah for the NWTC. YawDyn is a structural-response code developed by the University of Utah for the NWTC. ADAMS, FAST{_}AD, and YawDyn use the University of Utah's AeroDyn subroutine package for calculating aerodynamic forces. Although errors were found in all the codes during this study, once they were fixed, the codes agreed surprisingly well for most of the cases and configurations that were evaluated. One unresolved discrepancy between BLADED and the AeroDyn-based codes was when there was blade and/or teeter motion in addition to a large yaw error.

  4. Structural and electrical properties of silicon hyperdoped with gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Jay; Liu, Yining; Malladi, Girish; Efstathiadis, Harry; Warrender, Jeffrey

    Recent advances in the field of laser hyperdoping have produced a new class of materials that could lead the way to silicon-based, CMOS-compatible infrared detectors. Using the method of ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting (II-PLM), silicon films with impurities at concentrations well above the solid solubility limit can be fabricated. Recent work has centered around Si:Au, from which prototype IR detectors have been successfully fabricated, but there are still many questions about the structural, electrical, and optical properties of this material. In order to enhance the infrared absorption and achieve high-efficiency devices, a thorough understanding of these properties is necessary, and the processes for device fabrication must be optimized. In this work, we explore the structural and electrical properties of Si:Au hyperdoped films. Si:Au films were annealed at various temperatures, and RBS channeling was used to measure the fraction of Au atoms sitting at substitutional sites. Additionally, transmission line method (TLM) and van der Pauw (VDP) test structures were fabricated in order to investigate formation of Ohmic contacts on the hyperdoped films and to study the electrical properties of Si:Au.

  5. Structure, properties and applications of mussel-inspired polydopamine.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chia-Che; Ding, Shinn-Jyh

    2014-10-01

    Mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA) has emerged as a promising molecule used for anchoring synthetic and biological substances or forming an adhesive layer onto various substrates for biomedical and nanotechnology applications because of its outstanding properties. This review article provides an overview of the recent progress in the PDA-based materials, including synthesis of nanoparticles, capsules, structure-mechanism, physicochemical and biological properties, and medical applications. Frist, to understand how PDA nanoparticles, capsules and films produce the unique properties is insight on the processing parameters. Next, we highlight what is known regarding the mechanism of self-polymerization and the structure features of dopamine (DA), which is based on the formation of covalent bond or through a combination mode between monomers. The inherent hydrophilicity and adhesive property of PDA with the coexistence of catechol and amine functionalities provide desirable surface characteristics without the need for further modification. Finally, successful applications, such as grafting substances, biomineralization, antifouling and antibacterial coatings, drug/gene delivery, and tissue engineering, reported to date involving PDA will be focused. The future study of PDA to develop novel materials with unique properties is emerging for specific nanomedicine applications.

  6. Structure and Properties of Amorphous Transparent Conducting Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Julia

    Driven by technological appeal, the research area of amorphous oxide semiconductors has grown tremendously since the first demonstration of the unique properties of amorphous indium oxide more than a decade ago. Today, amorphous oxides, such as a-ITO, a-IZO, a-IGZO, or a-ZITO, exhibit the optical, electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties that are comparable or even superior to those possessed by their crystalline counterparts, pushing the latter out of the market. Large-area uniformity, low-cost low-temperature deposition, high carrier mobility, optical transparency, and mechanical flexibility make these materials appealing for next-generation thin-film electronics. Yet, the structural variations associated with crystalline-to-amorphous transition as well as their role in carrier generation and transport properties of these oxides are far from being understood. Although amorphous oxides lack grain boundaries, factors like (i) size and distribution of nanocrystalline inclusions; (ii) spatial distribution and clustering of incorporated cations in multicomponent oxides; (iii) formation of trap defects; and (iv) piezoelectric effects associated with internal strains, will contribute to electron scattering. In this work, ab-initio molecular dynamics (MD) and accurate density-functional approaches are employed to understand how the properties of amorphous ternary and quaternary oxides depend on quench rates, cation compositions, and oxygen stoichiometries. The MD results, combined with thorough experimental characterization, reveal that interplay between the local and long-range structural preferences of the constituent oxides gives rise to a complex composition-dependent structural behavior in the amorphous oxides. The proposed network models of metal-oxygen polyhedra help explain the observed intriguing electrical and optical properties in In-based oxides and suggest ways to broaden the phase space of amorphous oxide semiconductors with tunable properties. The

  7. Solar Sail Material Performance Property Response to Space Environmental Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Semmel, Charles; Hovater, Mary; Nehls, Mary; Gray, Perry; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues research into the utilization of photonic materials for spacecraft propulsion. Spacecraft propulsion, using photonic materials, will be achieved using a solar sail. A solar sail operates on the principle that photons, originating from the sun, impart pressure to the sail and therefore provide a source for spacecraft propulsion. The pressure imparted to a solar sail can be increased, up to a factor of two if the sun-facing surface is perfectly reflective. Therefore, these solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic sun-facing layer, a thin polymeric substrate and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. Near term solar sail propelled science missions are targeting the Lagrange point 1 (L1) as well as locations sunward of L1 as destinations. These near term missions include the Solar Polar Imager' and the L1 Diamond '. The Environmental Effects Group at NASA's Marshall Space Fliglit Center (MSFC) continues to actively characterize solar sail material in preparation for these near term solar sail missions. Previous investigations indicated that space environmental effects on sail material thermo-optical properties were minimal and would not significantly affect the propulsion efficiency of the sail3-'. These investigations also indicated that the sail material mechanical stability degrades with increasing radiation exposure. This paper will further quantify the effect of space environmental exposure on the mechanical properties of candidate sail materials. Candidate sail materials for these missions include Aluminum coated Mylar TM, Teonexm, and CP1 (Colorless Polyimide). These materials were subjected to uniform radiation doses of electrons and protons in individual exposures sequences. Dose values ranged from 100 Mrads to over 5 Grads. The engineering performance property responses of thermo-optical and mechanical properties were

  8. Lipid-derived Thermoplastic Poly(ester urethane)s: Effect of Structure on Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetranjiwalla, Shegufta

    Thermoplastic poly(ester urethane)s (TPEU)s derived from vegetable oils possess inferior physical properties compared to their entirely petroleum-based counterparts due to the structural limitations and lower reactivity of the precursor lipid-derived monomers. The present work shows that high molecular weight of TPEUs with enhanced performance can be obtained from lipid-derived monomers via (i) the synthesis of polyester diols with controlled molecular weights, (ii) the tuning of the functional group stoichiometry of the polyester diols and the diisocyanate during polymerization, (iii) the degree of polymerization (iv) the control of the hard segment hydrogen bond density and distribution via the use of a chain extender and (v) different polymerization protocols. Solvent-resistant TPEUs with high molecular weight displaying polyethylene-like behavior and controlled polyester and urethane segment phase separation were obtained. Structure-property investigations revealed that the thermal transition temperatures and tensile properties increased and eventually plateaued with increasing molecular weight. Novel segmented TPEUs possessed high phase separation and showed elastomeric properties such as low modulus and high elongation analogous to rubber. The response of the structurally optimized TPEUs to environmental degradation was also established by subjecting the TPEUs to hydrothermal ageing. TPEUs exhibited thermal and mechanical properties that were comparable to commercially available entirely petroleum-based counterparts, and that could be tuned in order to achieve enhanced physical properties and controlled degradability.

  9. Structure property relationships of carbonaceous films grown under ion enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Weissmantel, C.; Ackermann, E.; Bewilogua, K.; Hecht, G.; Kupfer, H.; Rau, B.

    1986-11-01

    Based on our own results and in comparison with data published by other groups the structure property relationships of carbon and carbon/metal films prepared by sputtering and deposition of partially ionized species are discussed. Films grown by ion beam sputtering are dark brownish and amorphous with a small fraction of microcrystals. However, a transition to transparent and insulating layers can be effected by ion bombardment. C/Me coatings, where Me stands for Ti or Sn, were obtained by magnetron sputtering of composite targets. The films proved to be amorphous up to metal concentrations of more than 10 at. %, but metal and carbide crystals grow upon annealing. Measurements of the hardness, the electrical conductivity, and the contact behavior in dependence on the composition provided interesting information. For carbon films prepared by deposition of partially ionized benzene species it has been found that the properties depend characteristically on the ion energy; typical ''diamondlike'' i-C films are obtained by applying a bias voltage from 1--3 keV. The thermal stability of the amorphous coatings is discussed in conjunction with their electrical conductivity. Summarizing extensive structure investigations, a structure model based on tetrahedrally interlinked carbon rings is proposed. Composites of the type i-C/Me (Me: Al, Ti, Cr), which were prepared by simultaneous metal evaporation, exhibit a wide range of structure property relations.

  10. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Structural response and failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorris, William J.; Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Tien; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    Non-linear analysis methods were adapted and incorporated in a finite element based DIAL code. These methods are necessary to evaluate the global response of a stiffened structure under combined in-plane and out-of-plane loading. These methods include the Arc Length method and target point analysis procedure. A new interface material model was implemented that can model elastic-plastic behavior of the bond adhesive. Direct application of this method is in skin/stiffener interface failure assessment. Addition of the AML (angle minus longitudinal or load) failure procedure and Hasin's failure criteria provides added capability in the failure predictions. Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis modules were developed as interactive pre-and post-processors. Each module provides the means of performing self-initiated finite elements based analysis of primary structures such as a flat or curved stiffened panel; a corrugated flat sandwich panel; and a curved geodesic fuselage panel. This module brings finite element analysis into the design of composite structures without the requirement for the user to know much about the techniques and procedures needed to actually perform a finite element analysis from scratch. An interactive finite element code was developed to predict bolted joint strength considering material and geometrical non-linearity. The developed method conducts an ultimate strength failure analysis using a set of material degradation models.

  11. Three Dimensional Response Spectrum Soil Structure Modeling Versus Conceptual Understanding To Illustrate Seismic Response Of Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Touqan, Abdul Razzaq

    2008-07-08

    Present methods of analysis and mathematical modeling contain so many assumptions that separate them from reality and thus represent a defect in design which makes it difficult to analyze reasons of failure. Three dimensional (3D) modeling is so superior to 1D or 2D modeling, static analysis deviates from the true nature of earthquake load which is 'a dynamic punch', and conflicting assumptions exist between structural engineers (who assume flexible structures on rigid block foundations) and geotechnical engineers (who assume flexible foundations supporting rigid structures). Thus a 3D dynamic soil-structure interaction is a step that removes many of the assumptions and thus clears reality to a greater extent. However such a model cannot be analytically analyzed. We need to anatomize and analogize it. The paper will represent a conceptual (analogical) 1D model for soil structure interaction and clarifies it by comparing its outcome with 3D dynamic soil-structure finite element analysis of two structures. The aim is to focus on how to calculate the period of the structure and to investigate effect of variation of stiffness on soil-structure interaction.

  12. Lanthanide coordination polymers: Synthesis, diverse structure and luminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xue-Qin Lei, Yao-Kun; Wang, Xiao-Run; Zhao, Meng-Meng; Peng, Yun-Qiao; Cheng, Guo-Quan

    2014-10-15

    The new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand incorporating furfurysalicylamide terminal groups, namely, 1,4-bis([(2′-furfurylaminoformyl)phenoxyl]methyl)-2,5-bismethylbenzene (L) was synthesized and used as building blocks for constructing lanthanide coordination polymers with luminescent properties. The series of lanthanide nitrate complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The semirigid ligand L, as a bridging ligand, reacts with lanthanide nitrates forming three distinct structure types: chiral noninterpenetrated two-dimensional (2D) honeycomblike (6,3) (hcb, Schläfli symbol 6{sup 3}, vertex symbol 6 6 6) topological network as type I, 1D zigzag chain as type II and 1D trapezoid ladder-like chain as type III. The structural diversities indicate that lanthanide contraction effect played significant roles in the structural self-assembled process. The luminescent properties of Eu{sup III}, Tb{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes are discussed in detail. Due to the good match between the lowest triplet state of the ligand and the resonant energy level of the lanthanide ion, the lanthanide ions in Eu{sup III}, Tb{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes can be efficiently sensitized by the ligand. - Graphical abstract: We present herein six lanthanide coordination polymers of a new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand which not only display diverse structures but also possess strong luminescence properties. - Highlights: • We present lanthanide coordination polymers of a new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand. • The lanthanide coordination polymers exhibit diverse structures. • The luminescent properties of Tb{sup III}, Eu{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes are discussed in detail.

  13. Structural Plasticity Denoises Responses and Improves Learning Speed

    PubMed Central

    Spiess, Robin; George, Richard; Cook, Matthew; Diehl, Peter U.

    2016-01-01

    Despite an abundance of computational models for learning of synaptic weights, there has been relatively little research on structural plasticity, i.e., the creation and elimination of synapses. Especially, it is not clear how structural plasticity works in concert with spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) and what advantages their combination offers. Here we present a fairly large-scale functional model that uses leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, STDP, homeostasis, recurrent connections, and structural plasticity to learn the input encoding, the relation between inputs, and to infer missing inputs. Using this model, we compare the error and the amount of noise in the network's responses with and without structural plasticity and the influence of structural plasticity on the learning speed of the network. Using structural plasticity during learning shows good results for learning the representation of input values, i.e., structural plasticity strongly reduces the noise of the response by preventing spikes with a high error. For inferring missing inputs we see similar results, with responses having less noise if the network was trained using structural plasticity. Additionally, using structural plasticity with pruning significantly decreased the time to learn weights suitable for inference. Presumably, this is due to the clearer signal containing less spikes that misrepresent the desired value. Therefore, this work shows that structural plasticity is not only able to improve upon the performance using STDP without structural plasticity but also speeds up learning. Additionally, it addresses the practical problem of limited resources for connectivity that is not only apparent in the mammalian neocortex but also in computer hardware or neuromorphic (brain-inspired) hardware by efficiently pruning synapses without losing performance.

  14. Structural Plasticity Denoises Responses and Improves Learning Speed

    PubMed Central

    Spiess, Robin; George, Richard; Cook, Matthew; Diehl, Peter U.

    2016-01-01

    Despite an abundance of computational models for learning of synaptic weights, there has been relatively little research on structural plasticity, i.e., the creation and elimination of synapses. Especially, it is not clear how structural plasticity works in concert with spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) and what advantages their combination offers. Here we present a fairly large-scale functional model that uses leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, STDP, homeostasis, recurrent connections, and structural plasticity to learn the input encoding, the relation between inputs, and to infer missing inputs. Using this model, we compare the error and the amount of noise in the network's responses with and without structural plasticity and the influence of structural plasticity on the learning speed of the network. Using structural plasticity during learning shows good results for learning the representation of input values, i.e., structural plasticity strongly reduces the noise of the response by preventing spikes with a high error. For inferring missing inputs we see similar results, with responses having less noise if the network was trained using structural plasticity. Additionally, using structural plasticity with pruning significantly decreased the time to learn weights suitable for inference. Presumably, this is due to the clearer signal containing less spikes that misrepresent the desired value. Therefore, this work shows that structural plasticity is not only able to improve upon the performance using STDP without structural plasticity but also speeds up learning. Additionally, it addresses the practical problem of limited resources for connectivity that is not only apparent in the mammalian neocortex but also in computer hardware or neuromorphic (brain-inspired) hardware by efficiently pruning synapses without losing performance. PMID:27660610

  15. Structural Plasticity Denoises Responses and Improves Learning Speed.

    PubMed

    Spiess, Robin; George, Richard; Cook, Matthew; Diehl, Peter U

    2016-01-01

    Despite an abundance of computational models for learning of synaptic weights, there has been relatively little research on structural plasticity, i.e., the creation and elimination of synapses. Especially, it is not clear how structural plasticity works in concert with spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) and what advantages their combination offers. Here we present a fairly large-scale functional model that uses leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, STDP, homeostasis, recurrent connections, and structural plasticity to learn the input encoding, the relation between inputs, and to infer missing inputs. Using this model, we compare the error and the amount of noise in the network's responses with and without structural plasticity and the influence of structural plasticity on the learning speed of the network. Using structural plasticity during learning shows good results for learning the representation of input values, i.e., structural plasticity strongly reduces the noise of the response by preventing spikes with a high error. For inferring missing inputs we see similar results, with responses having less noise if the network was trained using structural plasticity. Additionally, using structural plasticity with pruning significantly decreased the time to learn weights suitable for inference. Presumably, this is due to the clearer signal containing less spikes that misrepresent the desired value. Therefore, this work shows that structural plasticity is not only able to improve upon the performance using STDP without structural plasticity but also speeds up learning. Additionally, it addresses the practical problem of limited resources for connectivity that is not only apparent in the mammalian neocortex but also in computer hardware or neuromorphic (brain-inspired) hardware by efficiently pruning synapses without losing performance. PMID:27660610

  16. Atomic structures and electronic properties of phosphorene grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu; Zhou, Si; Zhang, Junfeng; Bai, Yizhen; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundary (GB) is one main type of defects in two-dimensional (2D) crystals, and has significant impact on the physical properties of 2D materials. Phosphorene, a recently synthesized 2D semiconductor, possesses a puckered honeycomb lattice and outstanding electronic properties. It is very interesting to know the possible GBs present in this novel material, and how their properties differ from those in the other 2D materials. Based on first-principles calculations, we explore the atomic structure, thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of phosphorene GBs. A total of 19 GBs are predicted and found to be energetically stable with formation energies much lower than those in graphene. These GBs do not severely affect the electronic properties of phosphorene: the band gap of perfect phosphorene is preserved, and the electron mobilities are only moderately reduced in these defective systems. Our theoretical results provide vital guidance for experimental tailoring the electronic properties of phosphorene as well as the device applications using phosphorene materials.

  17. Noise transmission properties and control strategies for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Beyer, Todd B.; Lester, Harold C.

    1991-01-01

    A study of several component technologies required to apply active control techniques to reduce interior noise in composite aircraft structures is described. The mechanisms of noise transmission in an all composite, large-scale, fuselage model are studied in an experimental program and found similar to mechanisms found in conventional aircraft construction. Two primary conditions of structural acoustic response are found to account for the dominant interior acoustic response. A preliminary study of active noise control in cylinders used piezoceramic actuators as force inputs for a simple aluminum fuselage model. These actuators provided effective control for the same two conditions of noise transmission found in the composite fuselage structure. The use of piezoceramic actuators to apply force inputs overcomes the weight and structural requirements of conventional shaker actuators. Finally, in order to accurately simulate these types of actuators in a cylindrical shell, two analytical models are investigated that apply either in-plane forces or bending moments along the boundaries of a finite patch. It is shown that the bending model may not be as effective as the force model for exciting the low order azimuthal modes that typically dominate the structural acoustic response in these systems. This result will affect the arrangement and distribution of actuators required for effective active control systems.

  18. Surface Structure and Property Coupling of Sr3(Ru1-xMnx)2 O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Durand, Corentin; Li, An-Ping; Zhang, Jiandi; Jin, Rongying; Plummer, Ward

    2014-03-01

    The double-layered Ruthenate Sr3Ru2O7 exhibits interesting behavior under the influence of pressure, while partial substitution of Mn for Ru generates a dramatic response in the physical properties. Even more striking is the structure-property relationship observed at the surface. Combining LEED I - V , with STM/STS and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), we document a very unique surface phase diagram. The octahedra are tilted at the surface (not in the bulk) for low Mn doping, and the surface stabilizes and enhances the octahedra rotation, present in the bulk for Mn doping less that ~ 20%. The structure-property relationship at the surface is consistent with calculations of a tilt/rotation phase diagram (PRB 64, 020509 (2001)). Tilt distortion at the surface favors an insulating AFM ordered phase and when tilt is removed by doping of Mn the surface becomes conducting. Supported by NSF

  19. Designing structures for dynamical properties via natural frequencies separation. Application to tensegrity structures design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Cornel

    2009-05-01

    The design of structures for dynamic properties is addressed by placing conditions on the separation between natural frequencies. Additional constraints, like lower and upper bounds on the natural frequencies, are also included. A fast numerical algorithm that exploits the mathematical structure of the resulting problem is developed. Examples of the algorithm's application to tensegrity structures design are presented and the connection between natural frequencies separation and proportional damping approximation is analyzed.

  20. Harnessing data structure for recovery of randomly missing structural vibration responses time history: Sparse representation versus low-rank structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongchao; Nagarajaiah, Satish

    2016-06-01

    Randomly missing data of structural vibration responses time history often occurs in structural dynamics and health monitoring. For example, structural vibration responses are often corrupted by outliers or erroneous measurements due to sensor malfunction; in wireless sensing platforms, data loss during wireless communication is a common issue. Besides, to alleviate the wireless data sampling or communication burden, certain accounts of data are often discarded during sampling or before transmission. In these and other applications, recovery of the randomly missing structural vibration responses from the available, incomplete data, is essential for system identification and structural health monitoring; it is an ill-posed inverse problem, however. This paper explicitly harnesses the data structure itself-of the structural vibration responses-to address this (inverse) problem. What is relevant is an empirical, but often practically true, observation, that is, typically there are only few modes active in the structural vibration responses; hence a sparse representation (in frequency domain) of the single-channel data vector, or, a low-rank structure (by singular value decomposition) of the multi-channel data matrix. Exploiting such prior knowledge of data structure (intra-channel sparse or inter-channel low-rank), the new theories of ℓ1-minimization sparse recovery and nuclear-norm-minimization low-rank matrix completion enable recovery of the randomly missing or corrupted structural vibration response data. The performance of these two alternatives, in terms of recovery accuracy and computational time under different data missing rates, is investigated on a few structural vibration response data sets-the seismic responses of the super high-rise Canton Tower and the structural health monitoring accelerations of a real large-scale cable-stayed bridge. Encouraging results are obtained and the applicability and limitation of the presented methods are discussed.

  1. Seismic Safety Program: Ground motion and structural response

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    In 1964, John A. Blume & Associates Research Division (Blume) began a broad-range structural response program to assist the Nevada Operations Office of the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in ensuring the continued safe conduct of underground nuclear detonation testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere. Blume`s long experience in earthquake engineering provided a general basis for the program, but much more specialized knowledge was required for the AEC`s purposes. Over the next 24 years Blume conducted a major research program to provide essential understanding of the detailed nature of the response of structures to dynamic loads such as those imposed by seismic wave propagation. The program`s results have been embodied in a prediction technology which has served to provide reliable advanced knowledge of the probable effects of seismic ground motion on all kinds of structures, for use in earthquake engineering and in building codes as well as for the continuing needs of the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). This report is primarily an accounting of the Blume work, beginning with the setting in 1964 and the perception of the program needs as envisioned by Dr. John A. Blume. Subsequent chapters describe the structural response program in detail and the structural prediction procedures which resulted; the intensive data acquisition program which, as is discussed at some length, relied heavily on the contributions of other consultant-contractors in the DOE/NV Seismic Safety Support Program; laboratory and field studies to provide data on building elements and structures subjected to dynamic loads from sources ranging from testing machines to earthquakes; structural response activities undertaken for testing at the NTS and for off-NTS underground nuclear detonations; and concluding with an account of corollary studies including effects of natural forces and of related studies on building response.

  2. Effect of the aerated structure on selected properties of freeze-dried hydrocolloid gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciurzyńska, Agnieszka; Lenart, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The ability to create diverse structures and studies on the effect of the aerated structure on selected properties with the use of freeze-dried gels may provide knowledge about the properties of dried foods. Such gels can be a basis for obtaining innovative food products. For the gel preparation, 3 types of hydrocolloids were used: low-methoxyl pectin, a mixture of xanthan gum and locust-bean gum, and a mixture of xanthan gum and guar gum. Gels were aerated for 3 and 7 min, frozen at a temperature of -45°C 2 h-1, and freeze-dried at a temperature of 30°C. For the samples obtained, structure, porosity, shrinkage, rehydration, and colour were investigated. It was shown that the type of the hydrocolloid and aeration time influence the structure of freeze-dried gels, which determines such properties of samples as porosity, shrinkage, density, rehydration, and colour. The bigger pores of low-methoxyl pectin gels undergo rehydration in the highest degree. The delicate and aerated structure of gels with the mixture of xanthan gum and locust-bean gum was damaged during freeze-drying and shrinkage exhibited the highest value. Small pores of samples with the mixture of xanthan gum and guar gum were responsible for the lower rehydration properties, but the highest porosity value contributed to the highest lightness value.

  3. Structural and electrical properties of In-implanted Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, R. Kremer, F.; Mirzaei, S.; Medling, S. A.; Ridgway, M. C.; Sprouster, D. J.; Decoster, S.; Glover, C. J.; Russo, S. P.

    2015-10-28

    We report on the effects of dopant concentration on the structural and electrical properties of In-implanted Ge. For In concentrations of ≤ 0.2 at. %, extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements demonstrate that all In atoms occupy a substitutional lattice site while metallic In precipitates are apparent in transmission electron micrographs for In concentrations ≥0.6 at. %. Evidence of the formation of In-vacancy complexes deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements is complimented by density functional theory simulations. Hall effect measurements of the conductivity, carrier density, and carrier mobility are then correlated with the substitutional In fraction.

  4. Chiral phosphorus nanotubes: structure, bonding, and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Escamilla, H N; Quijano-Briones, J J; Tlahuice-Flores, A

    2016-05-14

    The study of black phosphorus nanotubes (PNTs) had been devoted to zigzag and armchair structures, with no consideration of chiral structures to date. In this communication, we studied the structural and electronic (band structure) properties of chiral nanotubes using a periodic plane wave-pseudopotential approach. We found that some chiral nanotubes display similar bandgaps and binding energies per atom (BEA) as armchair PNTs and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations attest their thermal stability. Interestingly, we determined that the bandgap is tuned by varying the PNTs chirality and it is not related to their diameters. This feature can be exploited in optical and electronic applications wherein a direct and sizable bandgap is required. PMID:27094567

  5. Scattering properties of PT- symmetric layered periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shramkova, O. V.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2016-10-01

    The optical properties of PT-symmetric periodic stacks of the layers with balanced loss and gain are examined. We demonstrate that the tunnelling phenomenon in periodic structures is connected with excitation of surface waves at the boundaries separating gain and loss regions within each unit cell and tunnelling conditions for periodic stacks can be reduced to the conditions for one period. Alternatively, it is shown that coherent perfect absorber laser states are mediated by excitation of surface modes localised at all internal boundaries of the structure. The effects of structure parameters, angles, direction of incidence on the resonant phenomena and spontaneous symmetry breaking transition are determined. It is shown that structural periodicity significantly increases the number of resonant phenomena, especially in stacks with high real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity of the layers.

  6. RaptorX-Property: a web server for protein structure property prediction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Wei; Liu, Shiwang; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-07-01

    RaptorX Property (http://raptorx2.uchicago.edu/StructurePropertyPred/predict/) is a web server predicting structure property of a protein sequence without using any templates. It outperforms other servers, especially for proteins without close homologs in PDB or with very sparse sequence profile (i.e. carries little evolutionary information). This server employs a powerful in-house deep learning model DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) to predict secondary structure (SS), solvent accessibility (ACC) and disorder regions (DISO). DeepCNF not only models complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent property labels. Our experimental results show that, tested on CASP10, CASP11 and the other benchmarks, this server can obtain ∼84% Q3 accuracy for 3-state SS, ∼72% Q8 accuracy for 8-state SS, ∼66% Q3 accuracy for 3-state solvent accessibility, and ∼0.89 area under the ROC curve (AUC) for disorder prediction.

  7. RaptorX-Property: a web server for protein structure property prediction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Wei; Liu, Shiwang; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    RaptorX Property (http://raptorx2.uchicago.edu/StructurePropertyPred/predict/) is a web server predicting structure property of a protein sequence without using any templates. It outperforms other servers, especially for proteins without close homologs in PDB or with very sparse sequence profile (i.e. carries little evolutionary information). This server employs a powerful in-house deep learning model DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) to predict secondary structure (SS), solvent accessibility (ACC) and disorder regions (DISO). DeepCNF not only models complex sequence–structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent property labels. Our experimental results show that, tested on CASP10, CASP11 and the other benchmarks, this server can obtain ∼84% Q3 accuracy for 3-state SS, ∼72% Q8 accuracy for 8-state SS, ∼66% Q3 accuracy for 3-state solvent accessibility, and ∼0.89 area under the ROC curve (AUC) for disorder prediction. PMID:27112573

  8. RaptorX-Property: a web server for protein structure property prediction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Wei; Liu, Shiwang; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-07-01

    RaptorX Property (http://raptorx2.uchicago.edu/StructurePropertyPred/predict/) is a web server predicting structure property of a protein sequence without using any templates. It outperforms other servers, especially for proteins without close homologs in PDB or with very sparse sequence profile (i.e. carries little evolutionary information). This server employs a powerful in-house deep learning model DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) to predict secondary structure (SS), solvent accessibility (ACC) and disorder regions (DISO). DeepCNF not only models complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent property labels. Our experimental results show that, tested on CASP10, CASP11 and the other benchmarks, this server can obtain ∼84% Q3 accuracy for 3-state SS, ∼72% Q8 accuracy for 8-state SS, ∼66% Q3 accuracy for 3-state solvent accessibility, and ∼0.89 area under the ROC curve (AUC) for disorder prediction. PMID:27112573

  9. Humic acids: Structural properties and multiple functionalities for novel technological developments.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Bruna Alice Gomes; Motta, Fernanda Lopes; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade

    2016-05-01

    Humic acids (HAs) are macromolecules that comprise humic substances (HS), which are organic matter distributed in terrestrial soil, natural water, and sediment. HAs differ from the other HS fractions (fulvic acid and humins) in that they are soluble in alkaline media, partially soluble in water, and insoluble in acidic media. Due to their amphiphilic character, HAs form micelle-like structures in neutral to acidic conditions, which are useful in agriculture, pollution remediation, medicine and pharmaceuticals. HAs have undefined compositions that vary according to the origin, process of obtainment, and functional groups present in their structures, such as quinones, phenols, and carboxylic acids. Quinones are responsible for the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HAs, which are useful for wound healing and have fungicidal/bactericidal properties. Phenols and carboxylic acids deprotonate in neutral and alkaline media and are responsible for various other functions, such as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of HAs. In particular, the presence of phenolic groups in HAs provides antioxidant properties due to their free radical scavenging capacity. This paper describes the main multifunctionalities of HAs associated with their structures and properties, focusing on human health applications, and we note perspectives that may lead to novel technological developments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review to address this topic from this approach. PMID:26952503

  10. Dielectric and structural properties of ferroelectric betaine arsenate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashova, E. V.; Krichevtsov, B. B.; Zaitseva, N. V.; Yurko, E. I.; Svinarev, F. B.

    2014-12-01

    Ferroelectric films of betaine arsenate and partially deuterated betaine arsenate have been grown by evaporation on LiNbO3, α-Al2O3, and NdGaO3 substrates with a preliminarily deposited structure of interdigitated electrodes, as well as on the Al/glass substrate. This paper presents the results of the examination of the block structure of the films in a polarizing microscope, the X-ray diffraction analysis of their crystal structure, and the investigation of the dielectric properties in a measuring field oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the plane of the film. The transition of the films to the ferroelectric state at T = T c is accompanied by anomalies of the capacitance of the structure, an increase in the dielectric loss, and the appearance of dielectric hysteresis loops. The growth of the films from a solution of betaine arsenate in a heavy water leads to an increase in the ferroelectric transition temperature from T c = 119 K in the films without deuterium to T c = 149 K, which corresponds to the degree of deuteration of approximately 60-70%. The dielectric and structural properties of the films are compared with those of the betaine arsenate single crystals and the previously studied films of betaine phosphite and glycine phosphite.

  11. Properties and structure of raised bog peat humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-10-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic components of soil, peat and natural waters, and their structure and properties differ very much depending on their source. The aims of this study are to characterize humic acids (HAs) from raised bog peat, to evaluate the homogeneity of peat HAs within peat profiles, and to study peat humification impact on properties of HAs. A major impact on the structure of peat HAs have lignin-free raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin). On diagenesis scale, peat HAs have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter, and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, while thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge as a result of abiotic synthesis. However, in comparison with soil, aquatic and other HAs, aromaticity of peat HAs is much lower. Comparatively, the raised bog peat HAs are at the beginning of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups change depending on the peat age and decomposition degree from where HAs have been isolated, and carboxylic acidity of peat HAs increases with peat depth and humification degree.

  12. Bioinspired Cellular Structures: Additive Manufacturing and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampfl, J.; Pettermann, H. E.; Liska, R.

    Biological materials (e.g., wood, trabecular bone, marine skeletons) rely heavily on the use of cellular architecture, which provides several advantages. (1) The resulting structures can bear the variety of "real life" load spectra using a minimum of a given bulk material, featuring engineering lightweight design principles. (2) The inside of the structures is accessible to body fluids which deliver the required nutrients. (3) Furthermore, cellular architectures can grow organically by adding or removing individual struts or by changing the shape of the constituting elements. All these facts make the use of cellular architectures a reasonable choice for nature. Using additive manufacturing technologies (AMT), it is now possible to fabricate such structures for applications in engineering and biomedicine. In this chapter, we present methods that allow the 3D computational analysis of the mechanical properties of cellular structures with open porosity. Various different cellular architectures including disorder are studied. In order to quantify the influence of architecture, the apparent density is always kept constant. Furthermore, it is shown that how new advanced photopolymers can be used to tailor the mechanical and functional properties of the fabricated structures.

  13. Structural conditionality of the piezoelectric properties of langasite family crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dudka, A. P. Simonov, V. I.

    2011-11-15

    The atomic displacements upon isomorphic substitutions in crystals of the langasite family have been analyzed. The thermal parameters are determined and the probability density function of atoms is analyzed. Local potential energy minima are found which can be occupied by atoms under external effects. The contributions of cations in all four independent crystallographic positions and anions in all three such positions to the piezoelectric properties are established. One specific structural feature is the constant (at isomorphic substitutions) or possible (under external effects) but always opposite displacements of two cations along symmetry axis 2. Large cations in eight-vertex polyhedra make the main contribution to the piezoelectric properties. The cations in the tetrahedra on symmetry axis 2 weaken these properties. The cations in the octahedra in the origin of coordinates and in the tetrahedra on symmetry axes 3 only slightly affect the piezoelectricity.

  14. Thermal Properties of Structural Materials Used in LWR Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Daw; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson

    2011-01-01

    High temperature material property data for structural materials used in existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) are limited. Often, extrapolated values recommended in the literature differ significantly. To reduce uncertainties in predictions relying upon extrapolated data for LWR vessel and penetration materials, high temperature tests were completed on SA533 Grade B, Class 1 (SA533B1) low alloy steel, Stainless Steel 304 (SS304), and Inconel 600 using material property measurement systems available in the High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Properties measured include thermal expansion, specific heat capacity, and thermal diffusivity for temperatures up to 1200 °C. From these results, thermal conductivity and density were calculated. Results show that, in some cases, previously recommended values for these materials differ significantly from measured values at high temperatures.

  15. Chemical, electrochemical, and structural properties of endohedral metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Chaur, Manuel N; Melin, Frederic; Ortiz, Angy L; Echegoyen, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Ever since the first experimental evidence of the existence of endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs) was obtained, the search for carbon cages with encapsulated metals and small molecules has become a very active field of research. EMFs exhibit unique electronic and structural features, with potential applications in many fields. Furthermore, functionalized EMFs offer additional potential applications because of their higher solubility and their ease of characterization by X-ray crystallography and other techniques. Herein we review the general field of EMFs, particularly of functionalized EMFs. We also address their structures and their (electrochemical) properties, as well as applications of these fascinating compounds.

  16. Density Functional Study of the structural properties in Tamoxifen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Coss-Martinez, Romeo; Tapia, Jorge A.; Quijano-Quiñones, Ramiro F.; Canto, Gabriel I.

    2013-03-01

    Using the density functional theory, we have studied the structural properties of Tamoxifen. The calculations were performed with two methodological approaches, which were implemented in SIESTA and Spartan codes. For SIESTA, we considerate a linear combination of atomic orbitals method, using pseudopotentials and the van der Waals approximation for the exchange-correlation potential. Here we analyzed and compared the atomic structure between our results and other theoretical study. We found differences in the bond lengths between the results, that could be attributed to code approaches in each one. This work was supported under Grant FOMIX 2011-09 N: 170297 of Ph.D. A. Tapia.

  17. Three decades of structure- and property-based molecular design.

    PubMed

    Müller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Roche has pioneered structure- and property-based molecular design to drug discovery. While this is an ongoing development, the past three decades feature key events that have revolutionized the way drug discovery is conducted in Big Pharma industry. It has been a great privilege to have been involved in this transformation process, to have been able to collaborate with, direct, guide, or simply encourage outstanding experts in various disciplines to build and further develop what has become a major pillar of modern small-molecule drug discovery. This article is an account of major events that took place since the early decision of Roche to implement computer-assisted molecular modeling 32 years ago and is devoted to the key players involved. It highlights the internal build-up of structural biology, with protein X-ray structure determination at its core, and the early setup of bioinformatics. It describes the strategic shift to large compound libraries and high-throughput screening with the development of novel compound storage and ultra-high-throughput screening facilities, as well as the strategic return to focused screening of small motif-based compound libraries. These developments were accompanied by the rise of miniaturized parallel compound property analytics which resulted in a major paradigm shift in medicinal chemistry from linear to multi-dimensional lead optimization. The rapid growth of huge collections of property data stimulated the development of various novel data mining concepts with 'matched molecular pair' analysis and novel variants thereof playing crucial roles. As compound properties got more prominent in molecular design, exploration of specific structural motifs for property modulation became a research activity complementary to target-oriented medicinal chemistry. The exploration of oxetane is given as an example. For the sake of brevity, this account cannot detail all further developments that have taken place in each individual area of

  18. Chirality-Mediated Mechanical and Structural Properties of Oligopeptide Hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Taraban, Marc B.; Feng, Yue; Hammouda, Boualem; Hyland, Laura L.; Yu, Y. Bruce

    2012-10-29

    The origin and the effects of homochirality in the biological world continuously stimulate numerous hypotheses and much debate. This work attempts to look at the biohomochirality issue from a different angle - the mechanical properties of the bulk biomaterial and their relation to nanoscale structures. Using a pair of oppositely charged peptides that co-assemble into hydrogels, we systematically investigated the effect of chirality on the mechanical properties of these hydrogels through different combinations of syndiotactic and isotactic peptides. It was found that homochirality confers mechanical advantage, resulting in a higher elastic modulus and strain yield value. Yet, heterochirality confers kinetic advantage, resulting in faster gelation. Structurally, both homochiral and heterochiral hydrogels are made of fibers interconnected by lappet-like webs, but the homochiral peptide fibers are thicker and denser. These results highlight the possible role of biohomochirality in the evolution and/or natural selection of biomaterials.

  19. Computer program for determining mass properties of a rigid structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, R. A.; Gilbert, J. L.; Klich, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program was developed for the rapid computation of the mass properties of complex structural systems. The program uses rigid body analyses and permits differences in structural material throughout the total system. It is based on the premise that complex systems can be adequately described by a combination of basic elemental shapes. Simple geometric data describing size and location of each element and the respective material density or weight of each element were the only required input data. From this minimum input, the program yields system weight, center of gravity, moments of inertia and products of inertia with respect to mutually perpendicular axes through the system center of gravity. The program also yields mass properties of the individual shapes relative to component axes.

  20. Luminescent and structural properties of ZnO-Ag films

    SciTech Connect

    Khomchenko, V. S. Kushnirenko, V. I. Papusha, V. P.; Savin, A. K.; Lytvyn, O. S.

    2010-05-15

    ZnO-Ag thin films were prepared by a two-stage method on glass and sapphire substrates. Ag doping was carried out by a method of close space sublimation at atmospheric pressure. The film thickness is varied from 0.6 to 7 {mu}m. The structural and radiative properties were explored by X-ray diffraction technique, atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. The influence of the fabricating conditions on the properties of ZnO-Ag films is studied. It is found that the Ag doping modifies the crystalline structure of the films and promotes the oriented growth of monocrystalline blocks with the size of 500-2000 nm in the [0002] direction. Improvement of the crystalline quality correlates with the change of the radiative characteristics of the films. The origin of emission centers is discussed.

  1. Structural response of bead-stiffened thermoplastic shear webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall

    1991-01-01

    The results of an experimental and analytical study of the structural response and failure characteristics of selected bead-stiffened thermoplastic shear-webs are presented. Results are given for specimens with one stiffeneer, with two stiffeners, and different stiffener geometries. Selected analytical results that were obtained with the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed computer code are presented. Analytical results that describe normal and transverse shear stress are also presented.

  2. Material Properties Analysis of Structural Members in Pumpkin Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    The efficient design, service-life qualification, and reliability predictions for lightweight aerospace structures require careful mechanical properties analysis of candidate structural materials. The demand for high-quality laboratory data is particularly acute when the candidate material or the structural design has little history. The pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloon presents both challenges. Its design utilizes load members (tendons) extending from apex to base around the gas envelope to achieve a lightweight structure. The candidate tendon material is highly weight-efficient braided HM cord. Previous mechanical properties studies of Zylon have focused on fiber and yarn, and industrial use of the material in tensile applications is limited. For high-performance polymers, a carefully plamed and executed properties analysis scheme is required to ensure the data are relevant to the desired application. Because no directly-applicable testing standard was available, a protocol was developed based on guidelines fiom professional and industry organizations. Due to the liquid-crystalline nature of the polymer, the cord is very stiff, creeps very little, and does not yield. Therefore, the key material property for this application is the breaking strength. The pretension load and gauge length were found to have negligible effect on the measured breaking strength over the ranges investigated. Strain rate was found to have no effect on breaking strength, within the range of rates suggested by the standards organizations. However, at the lower rate more similar to ULDB operations, the strength was reduced. The breaking strength increased when the experiment temperature was decreased from ambient to 183K which is the lowest temperature ULDB is expected to experience. The measured strength under all test conditions was well below that resulting from direct scale-up of fiber strength based on the manufacturers data. This expected result is due to the effects of the

  3. Computational study of hydroxyapatite structures, properties and defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystrov, V. S.; Coutinho, J.; Bystrova, A. V.; Dekhtyar, Yu D.; Pullar, R. C.; Poronin, A.; Palcevskis, E.; Dindune, A.; Alkan, B.; Durucan, C.; Paramonova, E. V.

    2015-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) was studied from a first principle approach using the local density approximation (LDA) method in AIMPRO code, in combination with various quantum mechanical (QM) and molecular mechanical (MM) methods from HypemChem 7.5/8.0. The data obtained were used for studies of HAp structures, the physical properties of HAp (density of electronic states—DOS, bulk modulus etc) and defects in HAp. Computed data confirmed that HAp can co-exist in different phases—hexagonal and monoclinic. Ordered monoclinic structures, which could reveal piezoelectric properties, are of special interest. The data obtained allow us to characterize the properties of the following defects in HAp: O, H and OH vacancies; H and OH interstitials; substitutions of Ca by Mg, Sr, Mn or Se, and P by Si. These properties reveal the appearance of additional energy levels inside the forbidden zone, shifts of the top of the valence band or the bottom of the conduction band, and subsequent changes in the width of the forbidden zone. The data computed are compared with other known data, both calculated and experimental, such as alteration of the electron work functions under different influences of various defects and treatments, obtained by photoelectron emission. The obtained data are very useful, and there is an urgent need for such analysis of modified HAp interactions with living cells and tissues, improvement of implant techniques and development of new nanomedical applications.

  4. Structure for Storing Properties of Particles (PoP)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N. R.; Mattoon, C. M.; Beck, B. R.; Summers, N. C.; Brown, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    Some evaluated nuclear databases are critical for applications such as nuclear energy, nuclear medicine, homeland security, and stockpile stewardship. Particle masses, nuclear excitation levels, and other “Properties of Particles” are essential for making evaluated nuclear databases. Currently, these properties are obtained from various databases that are stored in outdated formats. Moreover, the “Properties of Particles” (PoP) structure is being designed that will allow storing all information for one or more particles in a single place, so that each evaluation, simulation, model calculation, etc. can link to the same data. Information provided in PoP will include properties of nuclei, gammas and electrons (along with other particles such as pions, as evaluations extend to higher energies). Presently, PoP includes masses from the Atomic Mass Evaluation version 2003 (AME2003), and level schemes and gamma decays from the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL-3). The data are stored in a hierarchical structure. An example of how PoP stores nuclear masses and energy levels will be presented here.

  5. Structure/property relationships in multipass GMA welding of beryllium.

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, P. W.; Hults, W. L.; Thoma, D. J.; Dave, V. R.; Kelly, A. M.; Pappin, P. A.; Cola, M. J.; Burgardt, P.

    2001-01-01

    Beryllium is an interesting metal that has a strength to weight ratio six times that of steel. Because of its unique mechanical properties, beryllium is used in aerospace applications such as satellites. In addition, beryllium is also used in x-ray windows because it is nearly transparent to x-rays. Joining of beryllium has been studied for decades (Ref.l). Typically joining processes include braze-welding (either with gas tungsten arc or gas metal arc), soldering, brazing, and electron beam welding. Cracking which resulted from electron beam welding was recently studied to provide structure/property relationships in autogenous welds (Ref. 2). Braze-welding utilizes a welding arc to melt filler, and only a small amount of base metal is melted and incorporated into the weld pool. Very little has been done to characterize the braze-weld in terms of the structure/property relationships, especially with reference to multipass welding. Thus, this investigation was undertaken to evaluate the effects of multiple passes on microstructure, weld metal composition, and resulting material properties for beryllium welded with aluminum-silicon filler metal.

  6. Structure for Storing Properties of Particles (PoP)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Beck, B.R.; Summers, N.C.; Brown, D.A.

    2014-06-15

    Evaluated nuclear databases are critical for applications such as nuclear energy, nuclear medicine, homeland security, and stockpile stewardship. Particle masses, nuclear excitation levels, and other “Properties of Particles” are essential for making evaluated nuclear databases. Currently, these properties are obtained from various databases that are stored in outdated formats. A “Properties of Particles” (PoP) structure is being designed that will allow storing all information for one or more particles in a single place, so that each evaluation, simulation, model calculation, etc. can link to the same data. Information provided in PoP will include properties of nuclei, gammas and electrons (along with other particles such as pions, as evaluations extend to higher energies). Presently, PoP includes masses from the Atomic Mass Evaluation version 2003 (AME2003), and level schemes and gamma decays from the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL-3). The data are stored in a hierarchical structure. An example of how PoP stores nuclear masses and energy levels will be presented here.

  7. Reconstruction of in vivo time-evolving neuroendocrine dose–response properties unveils admixed deterministic and stochastic elements

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Daniel M.; Alexander, Susan; Irvine, Clifford H. G.; Clarke, Iain; Scott, Chris; Turner, Anne; Tilbrook, A. J.; Canny, B. J.; Veldhuis, Johannes D.

    2004-01-01

    Homeostasis in the intact organism is achieved implicitly by repeated incremental feedback (inhibitory) and feedforward (stimulatory) adjustments enforced via intermittent signal exchange. In separated systems, neurohormone signals act deterministically on target cells via quantifiable effector-response functions. On the other hand, in vivo interglandular signaling dynamics have not been estimable to date. Indeed, experimentally isolating components of an interactive network definitionally disrupts time-sensitive linkages. We implement and validate analytical reconstruction of endogenous effector-response properties via a composite model comprising (i) a deterministic basic feedback and feedforward ensemble structure; (ii) judicious statistical allowance for possible stochastic variability in individual biologically interpretable dose–response properties; and (iii) the sole data requirement of serially observed concentrations of a paired signal (input) and response (output). Application of this analytical strategy to a prototypical neuroendocrine axis in the conscious uninjected horse, sheep, and human (i) illustrates probabilistic estimation of endogenous effector dose–response properties; and (ii) unmasks statistically vivid (2- to 5-fold) random fluctuations in inferred target-gland responsivity within any given pulse train. In conclusion, balanced mathematical formalism allows one to (i) reconstruct deterministic properties of interglandular signaling in the intact mammal and (ii) quantify apparent signal-response variability over short time scales in vivo. The present proof-of-principle experiments introduce a previously undescribed means to estimate time-evolving signal-response relationships without isotope infusion or pathway disruption. PMID:15090645

  8. Structure Evolution and Associated Catalytic Properties of Pt-Sn Bimetallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rong, Hongpan; Niu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yafan; Cheng, Hao; Li, Zhi; Ma, Lei; Li, Jun; Wei, Shiqiang; Li, Yadong

    2015-08-17

    Bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) often show new catalytic properties that are different from those of the parent metals. Carefully exploring the structures of bimetallic NPs is a prerequisite for understanding the structure-associated properties. Herein, binary PtSn NPs with tunable composition are prepared in a controllable manner. X-ray characterizations reveal that their structures evolve from SnO2-x -patched PtSn alloys to SnO2-x -patched Pt clusters when more tin is incorporated. An obvious composition-dependent catalytic performance is observed for the hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes: the selectivity to unsaturated alcohol increases substantially at high tin content, whereas the reaction rate follows a volcano shape. Furthermore, Pt sites are responsible for hydrogen dissociation, whereas oxygen vacancy (Ovac ) sites, provided by SnO2-x , drastically enhance the adsorption of carbonyl group.

  9. Designing the Structure of Carbon Fibers for Optimal Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Soydan; Vautard, Frederic; Naskar, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber manufacturing follows generic processing steps: formation of thermoplastic fibers, stabilization, and carbonization. The final structures and end properties of the carbon fiber can differ significantly depending on the precursor chemistry and the associated processing sciences. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and mesophase pitch are the predominant precursors used in the production of carbon fibers. PAN-based carbon fibers consist of nanocrystalline graphitic domains typically 1.5 5 nm in size surrounded by amorphous carbon; in contrast, pitch-based carbon fibers are 10 50 nm crystallites with the graphitic (002) planes mostly aligned parallel to the fiber axis. It has been seen that the skin core structure of PAN-based carbon fibers plays a significant role in their mechanical properties. Designing a more homogenous carbon fiber microstructure by controlling the starting polymer and process parameters results in a different set of tensile strengths and elastic moduli. In this study the microstructural defect distribution (0.1 200 nm), measured by small-angle X-ray scattering, was shown to be directly related to the tensile strength of the carbon fibers. Here the formation of carbon structures from various polymer precursors is reviewed. Such a comprehensive understanding offers the opportunity to design carbon fiber microstructures with improved properties and to ultimately create new types of carbon fibers from alternative precursors at reduced cost.

  10. Characterization of ion-exchange membrane materials: properties vs structure.

    PubMed

    Berezina, N P; Kononenko, N A; Dyomina, O A; Gnusin, N P

    2008-06-22

    This review focuses on the preparation, structure and applications of ion-exchange membranes formed from various materials and exhibiting various functions (electrodialytic, perfluorinated sulphocation-exchange and novel laboratory-tested membranes). A number of experimental techniques for measuring electrotransport properties as well as the general procedure for membrane testing are also described. The review emphasizes the relationships between membrane structures, physical and chemical properties and mechanisms of electrochemical processes that occur in charged membrane materials. The water content in membranes is considered to be a key factor in the ion and water transfer and in polarization processes in electromembrane systems. We suggest the theoretical approach, which makes it possible to model and characterize the electrochemical properties of heterogeneous membranes using several transport-structural parameters. These parameters are extracted from the experimental dependences of specific electroconductivity and diffusion permeability on concentration. The review covers the most significant experimental and theoretical research on ion-exchange membranes that have been carried out in the Membrane Materials Laboratory of the Kuban State University. These results have been discussed at the conferences "Membrane Electrochemistry", Krasnodar, Russia for many years and were published mainly in Russian scientific sources.

  11. Aircraft Structural Mass Property Prediction Using Conceptual-Level Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexstone, Matthew G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology that extends the use of the Equivalent LAminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) structural analysis code from conceptual-level aircraft structural analysis to conceptual-level aircraft mass property analysis. Mass property analysis in aircraft structures has historically depended upon parametric weight equations at the conceptual design level and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) at the detailed design level ELAPS allows for the modeling of detailed geometry, metallic and composite materials, and non-structural mass coupled with analytical structural sizing to produce high-fidelity mass property analyses representing fully configured vehicles early in the design process. This capability is especially valuable for unusual configuration and advanced concept development where existing parametric weight equations are inapplicable and FEA is too time consuming for conceptual design. This paper contrasts the use of ELAPS relative to empirical weight equations and FEA. ELAPS modeling techniques are described and the ELAPS-based mass property analysis process is detailed Examples of mass property stochastic calculations produced during a recent systems study are provided This study involved the analysis of three remotely piloted aircraft required to carry scientific payloads to very high altitudes at subsonic speeds. Due to the extreme nature of this high-altitude flight regime,few existing vehicle designs are available for use in performance and weight prediction. ELAPS was employed within a concurrent engineering analysis process that simultaneously produces aerodynamic, structural, and static aeroelastic results for input to aircraft performance analyses. The ELAPS models produced for each concept were also used to provide stochastic analyses of wing structural mass properties. The results of this effort indicate that ELAPS is an efficient means to conduct multidisciplinary trade studies at the conceptual design level.

  12. Aircraft Structural Mass Property Prediction Using Conceptual-Level Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexstone, Matthew G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology that extends the use of the Equivalent LAminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) structural analysis code from conceptual-level aircraft structural analysis to conceptual-level aircraft mass property analysis. Mass property analysis in aircraft structures has historically depended upon parametric weight equations at the conceptual design level and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) at the detailed design level. ELAPS allows for the modeling of detailed geometry, metallic and composite materials, and non-structural mass coupled with analytical structural sizing to produce high-fidelity mass property analyses representing fully configured vehicles early in the design process. This capability is especially valuable for unusual configuration and advanced concept development where existing parametric weight equations are inapplicable and FEA is too time consuming for conceptual design. This paper contrasts the use of ELAPS relative to empirical weight equations and FEA. ELAPS modeling techniques are described and the ELAPS-based mass property analysis process is detailed. Examples of mass property stochastic calculations produced during a recent systems study are provided. This study involved the analysis of three remotely piloted aircraft required to carry scientific payloads to very high altitudes at subsonic speeds. Due to the extreme nature of this high-altitude flight regime, few existing vehicle designs are available for use in performance and weight prediction. ELAPS was employed within a concurrent engineering analysis process that simultaneously produces aerodynamic, structural, and static aeroelastic results for input to aircraft performance analyses. The ELAPS models produced for each concept were also used to provide stochastic analyses of wing structural mass properties. The results of this effort indicate that ELAPS is an efficient means to conduct multidisciplinary trade studies at the conceptual design level.

  13. Dielectric properties modelling of cellular structures with PDMS for micro-sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachroudi, Achraf; Basrour, Skandar; Rufer, Libor; Sylvestre, Alain; Jomni, Fathi

    2015-12-01

    Electro-active polymers are emerging in the fields of actuators and micro-sensors because their good dielectric and mechanical properties makes them suitable for such applications. In this work, we focus on micro-structured (cellular) polymer materials (referred as piezoelectrets or ferroelectrets) that need prior charging to attain piezoelectric behaviour. The development of such applications requires an in-depth knowledge of the intrinsic dielectric properties of such structures and models to enable the accurate prediction of a given micro-structured material’s dielectric properties. Various polymers including polypropylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, fluoroethylenepropylene, cyclo-olefines and poly(ethylene terephthalate) in a cellular form have been studied by researchers over the last fifteen years. However, there is still a lack of information on the intrinsic dielectric properties of the most recently used dielectric polymer (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS) over wide frequency and temperature ranges. In this work, we shall propose an exhaustive equivalent electrical circuit model and explain how it can be used to predict the micro-structured PDMS complex permittivity versus frequency and temperature. The results obtained from the model were found to be in good agreement with experimental data for various micro-structured PDMS materials. Typically, for micro-sensor applications, the dielectric constant and dielectric losses are key factors which need to be minimized. We have developed a configuration which enables both to be strongly reduced with a reduction of 16% in the dielectric constant of a micro-structured PDMS compared with the bulk material. In addition, the phenomena responsible for dielectric losses variations with frequency and temperature are discussed and correlated with the theoretical model. Our model is thus proved to be a powerful tool for the control of the dielectric properties of micro-structured PDMS material for micro-sensor applications.

  14. Relationships among Genetic, Structural, and Functional Properties of Rice Starch.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangli; Chen, Yaling; Zhu, Ping; Sui, Zhongquan; Corke, Harold; Bao, Jinsong

    2015-07-15

    We determined the relationships among the structural properties, in vitro digestibility, and genetic factors in starches of 14 rice cultivars. Weight-based chain-length distributions in amylopectin ranged from 18.07% to 24.71% (fa, DP 6-12), 45.01% to 55.67% (fb1, DP 13-24), 12.72% to 14.05% (fb2, DP 25-36), and 10.80 to 20.72% (fb3, DP > 36), respectively. The contents of rapidly digestible starch (RDS), slowly digestible starch (SDS), and resistant starch (RS) ranged from 78.5% to 87.5%, 1.2% to 6.0%, and 10.1% to 18.0%, respectively. AAC was negatively correlated with RDS content but positively correlated with RS content in rice starch. The proportion of short chains in amylopectin, i.e. the amount of fraction IIa (FrIIa) fractionated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), was positively correlated with RDS. Starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) gene controlled the degree of crystallinity, the amount of fa chains of amylopectin. SSIIIa gene controlled the amount of fb1 chains. Wx gene controlled the FrI, FrIIa, RDS, and RS. Starch debranching enzyme isoamylase II (ISA2) gene also controlled the RDS, which may suggest that RDS was also affected by amylopectin structure, although no correlation between them was found. This study indicated that genetics (i.e., starch biosynthesis related genes) controlled the structural properties of starch, and both amylose content and amylopectin fine structure determined functional properties of rice starch (i.e., the digestion), each in a different way. Understanding the "genetics-structure-function" relationships in rice starches will assist plant breeders and food processors in developing new rice varieties and functional foods.

  15. Structure and Properties of Azobenzene Thin-Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. A.

    1987-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A number of monomer and polymer materials, all containing the azobenzene group, have been deposited as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) multilayers and their structures and physical properties studied. LB films of two monomeric materials exhibited liquid crystal phase changes that were investigated by optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Multilayers built up from one of the materials exhibited a phase change upon aging and this demonstrated that the LB technique had produced a structure that was not the equilibrium state. A monomer material possessing a fluorocarbon chain was found to initially deposit as an LB film in a Z-type manner, but changed to Y-type deposition with increasing multilayer thickness. A correlation was observed between this behaviour and the surface potential changes that were brought about when deposition took place on an aluminium substrate. The feasibility of building up alternating multilayers of monomer and polymer materials was demonstrated. Combining these two classes of material in the same LB film may confer on it the mechanical durability of the polymers and the highly ordered structure and potentially interesting physical properties of the monomer. The structures developed here may prove to have high second harmonic generation capabilities. Polymer materials were built up into relatively thick Y-type LB multilayers and studied by X-ray diffraction. Only poorly defined layered structures were found. Polymer materials were also cast into thin films from the melt and from solution. One of the compounds developed a high degree of anisotropy in its structure after exposure to linearly polarised white light. A birefringence of up to Deltan = 0.21 was measured. In contrast, LB films formed from the same material could not be ordered in the same manner and this appeared to result from the very close packing that takes place in such structures.

  16. Optical properties of vanadium dioxide thin film in nanoparticle structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Baoying; Li, Yi; Tong, Guoxiang; Wang, Xiaohua; Yan, Meng; Liang, Qian; Wang, Feng; Qin, Yuan; Ding, Jie; Chen, Shaojuan; Chen, Jiankun; Zheng, Hongzhu; Yuan, Wenrui

    2015-09-01

    The thermo-optic effect and infrared optical properties of VO2 nanoparticles were studied to obtain an optical material with special property that can be used in smart windows. The reflectance and transmittance spectra of the VO2 nanoparticles with different duty cycles at different temperatures were simulated with a specific dispersion relation. Vanadium metal nanoparticles were deposited on glass substrate by magnetic reactive sputtering with porous alumina template (AAO) mask, and the VO2 nanoparticles were prepared by thermal oxidation. The nanostructure and optical properties of the VO2 nanoparticles were characterized by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and spectrophotometry. The method of preparation of the sample is economical and the phase transition temperature is observed to drop to 43 °C. The transmission at 1700 nm exhibits a variation of 29% between the metallic and semiconducting states. The VO2 nanoparticles exhibit a significant thermochromic property. The transmittance of the VO2 nanoparticles is improved compared with the VO2 film. The decrease in phase transition temperature and the enhancement of optical properties demonstrate that VO2 film in nanoparticle structure is a viable candidate material for smart windows.

  17. Crystal structure and physical properties of Mo{sub 2}B: First-principle calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dan; Cui, Qiliang E-mail: liquan777@jlu.edu.cn; Li, Quan E-mail: liquan777@jlu.edu.cn; Wang, Jingshu

    2014-03-21

    Several decades ago, Mo{sub 2}B was assumed to have an Al{sub 2}Cu-type structure with I4/mcm space group. Using ab initio phonon calculations, we identify the earlier proposed Al{sub 2}Cu-type structure is dynamically unstable at ambient pressure. An energetically more favorable phase with the tetragonal I4/m structure was then predicted by employing frozen-phonon technique. The currently predicted I4/m phase is mechanically and dynamically stable and energetically more favorable than that of the earlier proposed Al{sub 2}Cu-type structure. The electronic structures calculations indicate that Mo{sub 2}B is a metal with several bands crossing the Fermi level. Our analysis indicates that the three-dimensional network of the covalent Mo-B bond is responsible for the ultra-incompressible property of Mo{sub 2}B.

  18. Mechanisms Responsible for Microwave Properties in High Performance Dielectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengke

    Microwave properties of low-loss commercial dielectric materials are optimized by adding transition-metal dopants or alloying agents (i.e. Ni, Co, Mn) to tune the temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (tau f) to zero. This occurs as a result of the temperature dependence of dielectric constant offsetting the thermal expansion. At cryogenic temperatures, the microwave loss in these dielectric materials is dominated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) loss, which results from the spin-excitations of d-shell electron spins in exchange-coupled clusters. We show that the origin of the observed magnetically-induced shifts in the dielectric resonator frequency originates from the same mechanism, as described by the Kramers-Kronig relations. The temperature coefficient of resonator frequency, tauf, is related to three material parameters according to the equation, tau f = - (½ tauepsilon + ½ taumu + alphaL), where tauepsilon, taumu , and alphaL are the temperature coefficient of dielectric constant, magnetic permeability, and lattice constant, respectively. Each of these parameters for dielectric materials of interest are measured experimentally. These results, in combination with density functional simulations, developed a much improved understanding of the fundamental mechanisms responsible for tau f. The same experimental methods have been used to characterize in-situ the physical nature and concentration of performance-degrading point defects in the dielectrics of superconducting planar microwave resonators.

  19. Structure-property correlation of Zr-base alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadekar, S. L.; Raman, V. V.; Banerjee, S.; Asundi, M. K.

    1988-01-01

    Zirconium alloys, because of their unique combination of high strength, good corrosion resistance in water and low capture cross-section for thermal neutrons, have become attractive for use as structural materials in the nuclear industry. Presently, Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 find wide application as fuel and pressure tube materials for water cooled power reactors. In order to understand how the various alloying elements of Zircaloy, namely Sn, Fe, Cr and Ni, affect the mechanical properties, a programme has been initiated to evolve a correlation between chemistry, microstructure and mechanical properties of Zr-alloy containing various amounts of Sn, Fe and Cr. In the present investigation, mechanical properties of Zr-alloys with various addition of Sn, Fe and Cr have been determined at 300 K and 573 K in various metallurgical conditions such as recrystallised annealed, β-quenched, tempered and α-annealed conditions. The study revealed that the reduced tin content dit not affect the mechanical properties as the reduced tin leads to formation of fine precipitates. The mechanical properties were also not altered drastically with the low level of iron and chromium concentrations studied. Cold work and α-annealing after β-quenching resulted in the growth and redistribution of second phase particles. Metallographie studies showed that particle distribution was not uniform. A TEM investigation of the alloys has also been undertaken to study the details of microstructure developed during various heat-treated conditions. It has been found that the β-quenched samples exhibit the most uniform microstructure consisting of acicular alpha phase with lath boundary enriched by solute element and fine intermetallic particle formation. The observed microstructural features together with the mechanical properties data have been compared with the available mechanical properties cum microstructure of Zircaloy.

  20. SEISMIC RESPONSE OF DAM WITH SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bycroft, G.N.; Mork, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical solution to the response of a long trapezoidal-section dam on a foundation consisting of an elastic half-space and subjected to simulated earthquake motion is developed. An optimum seismic design is achieved when the cross section of the dam is triangular. The effect of soil structure interaction is to lower the strain occurring in the dam.

  1. Structural properties of ultrafine Ba-hexaferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Makovec, Darko; Primc, Darinka; Sturm, Saso; Kodre, Alojz; Hanzel, Darko; Drofenik, Miha

    2012-12-15

    Crystal structure of ultrafine Ba-hexaferrite (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}) nanoparticles was studied using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), and Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS), to be compared to the structure of larger nanoparticles and the bulk. The nanoparticles were synthesized with hydrothermal treatment of an appropriate suspension of Ba and Fe hydroxides in the presence of a large excess of OH{sup -}. The ultrafine nanoparticles were formed in a discoid shape, {approx}10 nm wide and only {approx}3 nm thick, comparable to the size of the hexagonal unit cell in the c-direction. The HRTEM image analysis confirmed the hexaferrite structure, whereas EDXS showed the composition matching the BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} formula. XAFS and MS analyses showed considerable disorder of the structure, most probably responsible for the low magnetization. - Graphical abstract: Left: HREM image of an ultrafine Ba-hexaferrite nanoparticle (inset: TEM image of the nanoparticles); Right: the experimental HRTEM image is compared with calculated image and corresponding atomic model. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal structure of ultrafine Ba-hexaferrite (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}) nanoparticles was compared to the structure of the bulk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thickness the discoid nanoparticles was comparable to the size of the hexagonal unit cell in the c-direction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Considerable disorder of the nanoparticles' structure is most probably responsible for their low magnetization.

  2. Impact response of preloaded structures with revolute joints

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Pfeiffer, P.A.

    1997-09-01

    Many structural components designed to support static loads must also demonstrate the ability to withstand low probability events that can produce impact loading. For some constructs the structure is not only subjected to the initial impact, but is also subjected to rebound impacts as well. In some designs, support structures must be moved in and out of position as part of normal operations. These structures often employ revolute joints to allow the motions. In addition, functional requirements may require that a significant preload exist within the structure during normal operating conditions. This paper present the methodology needed for simulating the impact response of preloaded structures with revolute joints. A three-dimensional revolute joint is presented for use in explicit time integration analysis of problems with severe impacts. The computational engine used for the transient solution of preloaded structures is discussed. These developments are used in the analysis of a preloaded platen subjected to drop loads. The resulting transient response of the system is presented.

  3. Strain properties analysis and wireless collection system of PVDF for structural local health monitoring of civil engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan; Wang, Yang; Dong, Weijie; Jin, Yajing; Ou, Jinping

    2009-07-01

    For large civil engineering structures and base establishments, for example, bridges, super-high buildings, long-span space structures, offshore platforms and pipe systems of water & gas supply, their lives are up to a few decades or centuries. Damaged by environmental loads, fatigue effects, corrosion effects and material aging, these structures experience inevitably such side effects as damage accumulation, resistance reduction and even accidents. The traditional civil structure is a kind of passive one, whose performance and status are unpredictable to a great extent, but the informatics' introduction breaks a new path to obtain the status of the structure, thus it is an important research direction to evaluate and improve reliability of civil structures by the use of monitoring and health diagnosis technique, and this also assures the security of service for civil engineering structures. Smart material structure, originated from the aerospace sector, has been a research hotspot in civil engineering, medicine, shipping, and so on. For structural health monitoring of civil engineering, the research about high-performance sensing unit of smart material structure is very important, and this will possibly push further the development and application of monitoring and health diagnosis techniques. At present, piezoelectric materials are one of the most widely used sensing materials among the research of smart material structures. As one of the piezoelectric materials, PVDF(Polyvinylidene Fluoride)film is widely considered for the advantages of low cost, good mechanical ability, high sensibility, the ability of being easily placed and resistance of corrosion. However, only a few studies exit about building a mature monitoring system using PVDF. In this paper, for the sake of using PVDF for sensing unit for structural local monitoring of civil engineering, the strain sensing properties of PVDF are studied in detail. Firstly, the operating mechanism of PVDF is analyzed

  4. Non-dimensional response surfaces for structural optimization with uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, Gerhardus

    Approximation concepts are an effective approach for alleviating some of the problems associated with the direct use of modern computerized analysis techniques in an optimization environment. Recently, response surface approximations have gained popularity as polynomial approximations that are global in nature. Response surface approximations shift the computational burden from the optimization problem to the problem of constructing the approximations, and accommodate the use of detailed analysis techniques without the need of derivative information. Additionally, response surface approximations filter out numerical noise inherent to most numerical analysis procedures, by providing a smooth approximate response function, and simplify the integration of the analysis and the optimization codes. The present dissertation investigates the use of response surface approximations in expensive structural optimization problems and aims to suggest techniques for improving both the accuracy of response surface approximations as well as the efficiency with which they are constructed. A stepped plate design problem is considered and response surface approximations are constructed for different failure mechanisms using numerical experiments conducted with a finite element analysis. Both an isotropic and a composite laminated plate, where the change in thickness is a result of internal ply drop off, are considered. The proposed methodology uses a combination of dimensional analysis, higher order response surface approximations, stepwise regression, a detailed error analysis and statistical design of experiments to improve both accuracy and efficiency. Dimensional analysis identifies variables intrinsic to the problem, and thus reduces the number of variables in the resulting response surface approximation. Stepwise regression is used to eliminate insignificant parameters from a response surface approximation and statistical design of experiments is used to identify a small set of

  5. Biological glass fibers: Correlation between optical and structural properties

    PubMed Central

    Aizenberg, Joanna; Sundar, Vikram C.; Yablon, Andrew D.; Weaver, James C.; Chen, Gang

    2004-01-01

    Biological systems have, through the course of time, evolved unique solutions for complex optical problems. These solutions are often achieved through a sophisticated control of fine structural features. Here we present a detailed study of the optical properties of basalia spicules from the glass sponge Euplectella aspergillum and reconcile them with structural characteristics. We show these biosilica fibers to have a distinctive layered design with specific compositional variations in the glass/organic composite and a corresponding nonuniform refractive index profile with a high-index core and a low-index cladding. The spicules can function as single-mode, few-mode, or multimode fibers, with spines serving as illumination points along the spicule shaft. The presence of a lens-like structure at the end of the fiber increases its light-collecting efficiency. Although free-space coupling experiments emphasize the similarity of these spicules to commercial optical fibers, the absence of any birefringence, the presence of technologically inaccessible dopants in the fibers, and their improved mechanical properties highlight the advantages of the low-temperature synthesis used by biology to construct these remarkable structures. PMID:14993612

  6. Hierarchical structure and physicochemical properties of plasticized chitosan.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingkai; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Carreau, Pierre J

    2014-04-14

    Plasticized chitosan with hierarchical structure, including multiple length scale structural units, was prepared by a "melt"-based method, that is, thermomechanical mixing, as opposed to the usual casting-evaporation procedure. Chitosan was successfully plasticized by thermomechanical mixing in the presence of concentrated lactic acid and glycerol using a batch mixer. Different plasticization formulations were compared in this study, in which concentrated lactic acid was used as protonation agent as well as plasticizer. The microstructure of thermomechanically plasticized chitosan was investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. With increasing amount of additional plasticizers (glycerol or water), the crystallinity of the plasticized chitosan decreased from 63.7% for the original chitosan powder to almost zero for the sample plasticized with additional water. Salt linkage between lactic acid molecules and amino side chains of chitosan was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy: the lactic acid molecules expanded the space between the chitosan molecules of the crystalline phase. In the presence of other plasticizers (glycerol and water), various levels of structural units including an amorphous phase, nanofibrils, nanofibril clusters, and microfibers were produced under mechanical shear and thermal energy and identified for the first time. The thermal and thermomechanical properties of the plasticized chitosan were measured by thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetric, and DMA. These properties were correlated with the different levels of microstructure, including multiple structural units. PMID:24564751

  7. Silicified structures affect leaf optical properties in grasses and sedge.

    PubMed

    Klančnik, Katja; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Gaberščik, Alenka

    2014-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is an important structural element that can accumulate at high concentrations in grasses and sedges, and therefore Si structures might affect the optical properties of the leaves. To better understand the role of Si in light/leaf interactions in species rich in Si, we examined the total Si and silica phytoliths, the biochemical and morphological leaf properties, and the reflectance and transmittance spectra in grasses (Phragmites australis, Phalaris arundinacea, Molinia caerulea, Deschampsia cespitosa) and sedge (Carex elata). We show that these grasses contain >1% phytoliths per dry mass, while the sedge contains only 0.4%. The data reveal the variable leaf structures of these species and significant differences in the amount of Si and phytoliths between developing and mature leaves within each species and between grasses and sedge, with little difference seen among the grass species. Redundancy analysis shows the significant roles of the different near-surface silicified leaf structures (e.g., prickle hairs, cuticle, epidermis), phytoliths and Si contents, which explain the majority of the reflectance and transmittance spectra variability. The amount of explained variance differs between mature and developing leaves. The transmittance spectra are also significantly affected by chlorophyll a content and calcium levels in the leaf tissue.

  8. 41 CFR 102-75.955 - Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Management of Excess and Surplus Real Property Decontamination § 102-75... responsible for all expenses to the Government and for the supervision of the decontamination of excess and... be exercised in the decontamination, management, and disposal of contaminated property in order...

  9. 41 CFR 102-75.955 - Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Management of Excess and Surplus Real Property Decontamination § 102-75... responsible for all expenses to the Government and for the supervision of the decontamination of excess and... be exercised in the decontamination, management, and disposal of contaminated property in order...

  10. 41 CFR 102-75.955 - Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Management of Excess and Surplus Real Property Decontamination § 102-75... responsible for all expenses to the Government and for the supervision of the decontamination of excess and... be exercised in the decontamination, management, and disposal of contaminated property in order...

  11. 41 CFR 102-75.955 - Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Management of Excess and Surplus Real Property Decontamination § 102-75... responsible for all expenses to the Government and for the supervision of the decontamination of excess and... be exercised in the decontamination, management, and disposal of contaminated property in order...

  12. 41 CFR 102-75.955 - Who is responsible for decontaminating excess and surplus real property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Management of Excess and Surplus Real Property Decontamination § 102-75... responsible for all expenses to the Government and for the supervision of the decontamination of excess and... be exercised in the decontamination, management, and disposal of contaminated property in order...

  13. Structural and optical properties of axial silicon-germanium nanowire heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Tsybeskov, L.; Kamins, T. I.; Wu, X.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2015-12-21

    Detailed studies of the structural and optical properties of axial silicon-germanium nanowire heterojunctions show that despite the 4.2% lattice mismatch between Si and Ge they can be grown without a significant density of structural defects. The lattice mismatch induced strain is partially relieved due to spontaneous SiGe intermixing at the heterointerface during growth and lateral expansion of the Ge segment of the nanowire. The mismatch in Ge and Si coefficients of thermal expansion and low thermal conductivity of Si/Ge nanowire heterojunctions are proposed to be responsible for the thermally induced stress detected under intense laser radiation in photoluminescence and Raman scattering measurements.

  14. On the dimension of complex responses in nonlinear structural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R.; Spottswood, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    The ability to accurately model engineering systems under extreme dynamic loads would prove a major breakthrough in many aspects of aerospace, mechanical, and civil engineering. Extreme loads frequently induce both nonlinearities and coupling which increase the complexity of the response and the computational cost of finite element models. Dimension reduction has recently gained traction and promises the ability to distill dynamic responses down to a minimal dimension without sacrificing accuracy. In this context, the dimensionality of a response is related to the number of modes needed in a reduced order model to accurately simulate the response. Thus, an important step is characterizing the dimensionality of complex nonlinear responses of structures. In this work, the dimensionality of the nonlinear response of a post-buckled beam is investigated. Significant detail is dedicated to carefully introducing the experiment, the verification of a finite element model, and the dimensionality estimation algorithm as it is hoped that this system may help serve as a benchmark test case. It is shown that with minor modifications, the method of false nearest neighbors can quantitatively distinguish between the response dimension of various snap-through, non-snap-through, random, and deterministic loads. The state-space dimension of the nonlinear system in question increased from 2-to-10 as the system response moved from simple, low-level harmonic to chaotic snap-through. Beyond the problem studied herein, the techniques developed will serve as a prescriptive guide in developing fast and accurate dimensionally reduced models of nonlinear systems, and eventually as a tool for adaptive dimension-reduction in numerical modeling. The results are especially relevant in the aerospace industry for the design of thin structures such as beams, panels, and shells, which are all capable of spatio-temporally complex dynamic responses that are difficult and computationally expensive to

  15. Study on the Response Coefficient of Setback Structures Compared to Regular Moment Frame Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mirghaderi, S. Rasoul; Khafaf, Bardia; Epackachi, Siamak

    2008-07-08

    In design practice of many countries, seismic analysis and proportioning of structures are usually based upon linear elastic analysis due to reduced seismic forces by response coefficient; R. Setback structures are one of the most popular shapes of the constructed buildings. In setback structures, the shape and proportions of the building have a major effect on distribution of earthquake forces as they work their way through the building. On the other hand, geometric configuration has a profound effect on the structural-dynamic response of a building. Therefore, when a building has irregular features, such as asymmetric in height or vertical discontinuity, the traditional assumptions used in development of seismic criteria for regular buildings may not be applicable. Inelastic seismic behavior of these types of structures seems to be quite different from the regular steel moment resisting structures in which the overall ductility is localized at beam-ends.In order to investigate the seismic behavior and estimate the Response Coefficient of those structures, nonlinear static analysis (pushover) are used for three categories of setback structures namely low rise, medium rise and high rise buildings with different setbacks in their height. The Response Coefficient are calculated and compared with those taken from regular type of moment frame structures.

  16. Low Temperature Crystal Structure and Magnetic Properties of RAl2

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Arjun K.; Paudyal, Durga; Gschneidner, Karl A.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2014-01-08

    Low temperature crystal structure and magnetic properties of RAl2 (R = Pr and Nd) have been studied using temperature dependent powder x-ray diffraction, magnetization, and heat capacity measurements. Unlike PrAl2, NdAl2 retains cubic MgCu2-type structure from room temperature down to 5 K, which is also confirmed from first principles electronic structure calculations. The magnetization measurements show both PrAl2 and NdAl2 order ferromagnetically at TC = 32 K and 77 K, respectively. However, the magnetization measurements show the former is a hard ferromagnet compared to the latter which is a soft ferromagnetic material. The magnetic entropy change obtained from heat capacity measurements at ΔH = 30 kOe for PrAl2 and NdAl2 are 3.15 J mol-1 K-1 and 1.18 J mol-1 K-1, respectively.

  17. Vibrational and structural properties of tetramethyltin under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhen-Xing; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Zhang, Chao; Tang, Ling-Yun; Zhong, Guo-Hua; Lin, Hai-Qing; Meng, Yue; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2013-01-01

    The vibrational and structural properties of a hydrogen-rich group IVa hydride, Sn(CH3)4, have been investigated by combining Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements at room temperature and at pressures up to 49.9 GPa. Both techniques allow the obtaining of complementary information on the high-pressure behaviors and yield consistent phase transitions at 0.9 GPa for the liquid to solid and 2.8, 10.4, 20.4, and 32.6 GPa for the solid to solid. The foregoing solid phases are identified to have the orthorhombic, tetragonal, monoclinic crystal structures with space groups of Pmmm for phase I, P4/mmm for phase II, P2/m for phase III, respectively. The phases IV and V coexist with phase III, resulting in complex analysis on the possible structures. These transitions suggest the variation in the inter- and intra-molecular bonding of this compound.

  18. Production, structure, texture, and mechanical properties of severely deformed magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. Yu.; Antonova, O. V.; Kamenetskii, B. I.; Klyukin, I. V.; Komkova, D. A.; Antonov, B. D.

    2016-05-01

    Methods of the severe plastic deformation (SPD) of pure magnesium at room temperature, namely, transverse extrusion and hydroextrusion in a self-destroyed shell, have been developed. The maximum true strain of the samples after the hydroextrusion was e ~ 3.2; in the course of transverse extrusion and subsequent cold rolling, a true strain of e ~ 6.0 was achieved. The structure and mechanical properties of the magnesium samples have been studied in different structural states. It has been shown that the SPD led to a decrease in the grain size d to ~2 μm; the relative elongation at fracture δ increased to ~20%. No active twinning has been revealed. The reasons for the high plasticity of magnesium after SPD according to the deformation modes suggested are discussed from the viewpoint of the hierarchy of the observed structural states.

  19. TECHNIQUES FOR THE STUDY OF THE STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES.

    SciTech Connect

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA, M.; RODRIGUEZ, J.A.; MARTINEZ-ARIAS, A.; HANSON, J.C.

    2006-06-30

    The evolution of our understanding of the behavior of oxide nanostructures depends heavily on the structural information obtained from a wide range of physical methods traditionally used in solid state physics, surface science and inorganic chemistry. In this chapter, we describe several techniques that are useful for the characterization of the structural properties of oxide nanostructures: X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scattering, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ultimate goal is to obtain information about the spatial arrangement of atoms in the nanostructures with precise interatomic distances and bond angles. This may not be possible for complex systems and one may get only partial information about the local geometry or morphology.

  20. Surface structure, crystallographic and ice-nucleating properties of cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Möhler, Ottmar; Kiselev, Alexei; Saathoff, Harald; Weidler, Peter; Shutthanandan, Shuttha; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Jantsch, Evelyn; Koop, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence of the high diversity and efficient freezing ability of biological ice-nucleating particles is driving a reevaluation of their impact upon climate. Despite their potential importance, little is known about their atmospheric abundance and ice nucleation efficiency, especially non-proteinaceous ones, in comparison to non-biological materials (e.g., mineral dust). Recently, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC; non-proteinaceous plant structural polymer) has been identified as a potential biological ice-nucleating particle. However, it is still uncertain if the ice-nucleating activity is specific to the MCC structure or generally relevant to all cellulose materials, such that the results of MCC can be representatively scaled up to the total cellulose content in the atmosphere to address its role in clouds and the climate system. Here we use the helium ion microscopy (HIM) imaging and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique to characterize the nanoscale surface structure and crystalline properties of the two different types of cellulose (MCC and fibrous cellulose extracted from natural wood pulp) as model proxies for atmospheric cellulose particles and to assess their potential accessibility for water molecules. To complement these structural characterizations, we also present the results of immersion freezing experiments using the cold stage-based droplet freezing BINARY (Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARaY) technique. The HIM results suggest that both cellulose types have a complex porous morphology with capillary spaces between the nanoscale fibrils over the microfiber surface. These surface structures may make cellulose accessible to water. The XRD results suggest that the structural properties of both cellulose materials are in agreement (i.e., P21 space group; a=7.96 Å, b=8.35 Å, c=10.28 Å) and comparable to the crystallographic properties of general monoclinic cellulose (i.e., Cellulose Iβ). The results obtained from the BINARY measurements suggest

  1. Structure-topology-property correlations of sodium phosphosilicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hermansen, Christian; Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Guo, Xiaoju; Youngman, Randall E.; Mauro, John C.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-08-14

    In this work, we investigate the correlations among structure, topology, and properties in a series of sodium phosphosilicate glasses with [SiO{sub 2}]/[SiO{sub 2} + P{sub 2}O{sub 5}] ranging from 0 to 1. The network structure is characterized by {sup 29}Si and {sup 31}P magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy. The results show the formation of six-fold coordinated silicon species in phosphorous-rich glasses. Based on the structural data, we propose a formation mechanism of the six-fold coordinated silicon, which is used to develop a quantitative structural model for predicting the speciation of the network forming units as a function of chemical composition. The structural model is then used to establish a temperature-dependent constraint description of phosphosilicate glass topology that enables prediction of glass transition temperature, liquid fragility, and indentation hardness. The topological constraint model provides insight into structural origin of the mixed network former effect in phosphosilicate glasses.

  2. Structural phase transition and electronic properties in samarium chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Y. S.; Aynyas, Mahendra; Pataiya, J.; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structure and high pressure properties of samarium monochalcogenides SmS, SmSe and SmTe have been reported by using tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA). The total energy as a function of volume is evaluated. It is found that these monochalcogenides are stable in NaCl-type structure under ambient pressure. We predict a structural phase transition from NaCl-type (B1-phase) structure to CsCl-type (B2-type) structure for these compounds. Phase transition pressures were found to be 1.7, 4.4 and 6.6 GPa, for SmS, SmSe and SmTe respectively. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a0), bulk modulus (B0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed that these compounds exhibit metallic character. The calculated values of equilibrium lattice parameter and phase transition pressure are in general good agreement with available data.

  3. Thermodynamic and structural properties of Bi-based liquid alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, S. K.; Jha, L. N.; Adhikari, D.

    2015-10-01

    Thermodynamic and microscopic structural properties of two Bi-based liquid alloys, such as In-Bi at 900 K and Tl-Bi at 750 K have been studied employing the regular associated solution model. We have estimated the mole fractions of the complexes and the free monomers assuming the existence of complexes In2 Bi in In-Bi melt and TlBi in Tl-Bi melt. The thermodynamic properties have been studied by computing the Gibbs free energy of mixing, enthalpy of mixing, entropy of mixing and activities of the monomers. The compositional contributions of the heat associated with the formation of complexes and the heat of mixing of the monomers to the net enthalpy change has also been studied. The structural properties of the liquid alloys have been studied by computing concentration fluctuation in the long-wavelength limit, chemical short-range order parameter and the ratio of mutual to intrinsic diffusion coefficients. For both of the alloy systems, the theoretical as well as the experimental values of SCC (0) are found to be lower than the corresponding ideal values over the whole composition range, indicating the hetero-coordinating nature of Bi-In and Bi-Tl alloy melts. All the interaction energy parameters are found to be negative and temperature dependent, and both the alloy systems are found to be weakly interacting.

  4. Polycaprolactone/starch composite: Fabrication, structure, properties, and applications.

    PubMed

    Ali Akbari Ghavimi, Soheila; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2015-07-01

    Interests in the use of biodegradable polymers as biomaterials have grown. Among the different polymeric composites currently available, the blend of starch and polycaprolactone (PCL) has received the most attention since the 1980s. Novamont is the first company that manufactured a PCL/starch (SPCL) composite under the trademark Mater-Bi®. The properties of PCL (a synthetic, hydrophobic, flexible, expensive polymer with a low degradation rate) and starch (a natural, hydrophilic, stiff, abundant polymer with a high degradation rate) blends are interesting because of the composite components have completely different structures and characteristics. PCL can adjust humidity sensitivity of starch as a biomaterial; while starch can enhance the low biodegradation rate of PCL. Thus, by appropriate blending, SPCL can overcome important limitations of both PCL and starch components and promote controllable behavior in terms of mechanical properties and degradation which make it suitable for many biomedical applications. This article reviewed the different fabrication and modification methods of the SPCL composite; different properties such as structural, physical, and chemical as well as degradation behavior; and different applications as biomaterials.

  5. Xylonucleic acid: synthesis, structure, and orthogonal pairing properties

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Mohitosh; Maiti, Munmun; Knies, Christine; Dumbre, Shrinivas; Lescrinier, Eveline; Rosemeyer, Helmut; Ceulemans, Arnout; Herdewijn, Piet

    2015-01-01

    There is a common interest for studying xeno-nucleic acid systems in the fields of synthetic biology and the origin of life, in particular, those with an engineered backbone and possessing novel properties. Along this line, we have investigated xylonucleic acid (XyloNA) containing a potentially prebiotic xylose sugar (a 3′-epimer of ribose) in its backbone. Herein, we report for the first time the synthesis of four XyloNA nucleotide building blocks and the assembly of XyloNA oligonucleotides containing all the natural nucleobases. A detailed investigation of pairing and structural properties of XyloNAs in comparison to DNA/RNA has been performed by thermal UV-melting, CD, and solution state NMR spectroscopic studies. XyloNA has been shown to be an orthogonal self-pairing system which adopts a slightly right-handed extended helical geometry. Our study on one hand, provides understanding for superior structure-function (-pairing) properties of DNA/RNA over XyloNA for selection as an informational polymer in the prebiotic context, while on the other hand, finds potential of XyloNA as an orthogonal genetic system for application in synthetic biology. PMID:26175047

  6. Probabilistic SSME blades structural response under random pulse loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael; Rubinstein, Robert; Nagpal, Vinod K.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose is to develop models of random impacts on a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump blade and to predict the probabilistic structural response of the blade to these impacts. The random loading is caused by the impact of debris. The probabilistic structural response is characterized by distribution functions for stress and displacements as functions of the loading parameters which determine the random pulse model. These parameters include pulse arrival, amplitude, and location. The analysis can be extended to predict level crossing rates. This requires knowledge of the joint distribution of the response and its derivative. The model of random impacts chosen allows the pulse arrivals, pulse amplitudes, and pulse locations to be random. Specifically, the pulse arrivals are assumed to be governed by a Poisson process, which is characterized by a mean arrival rate. The pulse intensity is modelled as a normally distributed random variable with a zero mean chosen independently at each arrival. The standard deviation of the distribution is a measure of pulse intensity. Several different models were used for the pulse locations. For example, three points near the blade tip were chosen at which pulses were allowed to arrive with equal probability. Again, the locations were chosen independently at each arrival. The structural response was analyzed both by direct Monte Carlo simulation and by a semi-analytical method.

  7. Quantum chemistry structures and properties of 134 kilo molecules.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Dral, Pavlo O; Rupp, Matthias; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2014-01-01

    Computational de novo design of new drugs and materials requires rigorous and unbiased exploration of chemical compound space. However, large uncharted territories persist due to its size scaling combinatorially with molecular size. We report computed geometric, energetic, electronic, and thermodynamic properties for 134k stable small organic molecules made up of CHONF. These molecules correspond to the subset of all 133,885 species with up to nine heavy atoms (CONF) out of the GDB-17 chemical universe of 166 billion organic molecules. We report geometries minimal in energy, corresponding harmonic frequencies, dipole moments, polarizabilities, along with energies, enthalpies, and free energies of atomization. All properties were calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G(2df,p) level of quantum chemistry. Furthermore, for the predominant stoichiometry, C7H10O2, there are 6,095 constitutional isomers among the 134k molecules. We report energies, enthalpies, and free energies of atomization at the more accurate G4MP2 level of theory for all of them. As such, this data set provides quantum chemical properties for a relevant, consistent, and comprehensive chemical space of small organic molecules. This database may serve the benchmarking of existing methods, development of new methods, such as hybrid quantum mechanics/machine learning, and systematic identification of structure-property relationships. PMID:25977779

  8. Effects of skeleton structure on necrosis targeting and clearance properties of radioiodinated dianthrones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongjian; Jiang, Cuihua; Yang, Shengwei; Gao, Meng; Huang, Dejian; Wang, Xiaoning; Shao, Haibo; Feng, Yuanbo; Sun, Ziping; Ni, Yicheng; Zhang, Jian; Yin, Zhiqi

    2016-01-01

    Necrosis avid agents (NAAs) can be used for diagnose of necrosis-related diseases, evaluation of therapeutic responses and targeted therapeutics of tumor. In order to probe into the effects of molecular skeleton structure on necrosis targeting and clearance properties of radioiodinated dianthrones, four dianthrone compounds with the same substituents but different skeletal structures, namely Hypericin (Hyp), protohypericin (ProHyp), emodin dianthrone mesomer (ED-1) and emodin dianthrone raceme (ED-2) were synthesized and radioiodinated. Then radioiodinated dianthrones were evaluated in vitro for their necrosis avidity in A549 lung cancer cells untreated and treated with H2O2. Their biodistribution and pharmacokinetic properties were determined in rat models of induced necrosis. In vitro cell assay revealed that destruction of rigid skeleton structure dramatically reduced their necrosis targeting ability. Animal studies demonstrated that destruction of rigid skeleton structure dramatically reduced the necrotic tissue uptake and speed up the clearance from the most normal tissues for the studied compounds. Among these (131)I-dianthrones, (131)I-Hyp exhibited the highest uptake and persistent retention in necrotic tissues. Hepatic infarction could be clearly visualized by SPECT/CT using (131)I-Hyp as an imaging probe. The results suggest that the skeleton structure of Hyp is the lead structure for further structure optimization of this class of NAAs.

  9. From photogrammetry, computer vision to structural response measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. C.

    2007-04-01

    Measuring displacement response of large-scale structures is necessary to assess their performance and health condition. Current global position systems (GPS), with a significant cost, can provide point coordinate measurement with an accuracy of +/-1cm horizontally and +/-2cm vertically at a sampling frequency up to 20 Hz. Photogrammetry is a measurement technology in which the three-dimensional coordinates of points on an object are determined by measurements made with two or more photographic images taken from different positions. This technology is regaining its popularity in various engineering disciplines due to a recent remarkable evolution in the consumer digital cameras. The image resolution of these cameras has increased rapidly from below 1 million pixels a few years ago to over 10 million pixels today, with little increase or even decrease in cost. Image sequences recorded by these cameras contain both spatial and temporal information of the target object; hence can be used to extract the object's dynamic characteristics such as natural frequencies and mode shapes. Research indicates that accuracy in the order of as high as 1 part in 30,000 can be achieved when cameras are properly calibrated in the field and multiple high-resolution images are used. At this level of accuracy, point positions of a 30m object would be accurate to 1mm at 68% probability and responses of large-scale structures can be measured for further meaningful processing and interpretation. In this paper, several image-based sensing techniques that can be used for measuring response of large-scale structures are presented. These techniques are developed based on some methods from photogrammetry and computer vision such as the optical flow method and the egomotion estimation. Examples used to illustrate these techniques include response measurement of buildings and cable-stayed bridges. Results show that the image-based sensing techniques have a great potential for accurately measuring

  10. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of zigzag blue phosphorene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Tao; Hong, Jisang

    2015-08-07

    We investigated the electronic structure and magnetism of zigzag blue phosphorene nanoribbons (ZBPNRs) using first principles density functional theory calculations by changing the widths of ZBPNRs from 1.5 to 5 nm. In addition, the effect of H and O passivation was explored as well. The ZBPNRs displayed intra-edge antiferromagnetic ground state with a semiconducting band gap of ∼0.35 eV; and this was insensitive to the edge structure relaxation effect. However, the edge magnetism of ZBPNRs disappeared with H-passivation. Moreover, the band gap of H-passivated ZBPNRs was greatly enhanced because the calculated band gap was ∼1.77 eV, and this was almost the same as that of two-dimensional blue phosphorene layer. For O-passivated ZBPNRs, we also found an intra-edge antiferromagnetic state. Besides, both unpassivated and O-passivated ZBPNRs preserved almost the same band gap. We predict that the electronic band structure and magnetic properties can be controlled by means of passivation. Moreover, the edge magnetism can be also modulated by the strain. Nonetheless, the intrinsic physical properties are size independent. This feature can be an advantage for device applications because it may not be necessary to precisely control the width of the nanoribbon.

  11. Oxide Thermoelectric Materials: A Structure-Property Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Abanti; Shubha, V.

    2014-04-01

    Recent demand for thermoelectric materials for power harvesting from automobile and industrial waste heat requires oxide materials because of their potential advantages over intermetallic alloys in terms of chemical and thermal stability at high temperatures. Achievement of thermoelectric figure of merit equivalent to unity ( ZT ≈ 1) for transition-metal oxides necessitates a second look at the fundamental theory on the basis of the structure-property relationship giving rise to electron correlation accompanied by spin fluctuation. Promising transition-metal oxides based on wide-bandgap semiconductors, perovskite and layered oxides have been studied as potential candidate n- and p-type materials. This paper reviews the correlation between the crystal structure and thermoelectric properties of transition-metal oxides. The crystal-site-dependent electronic configuration and spin degeneracy to control the thermopower and electron-phonon interaction leading to polaron hopping to control electrical conductivity is discussed. Crystal structure tailoring leading to phonon scattering at interfaces and nanograin domains to achieve low thermal conductivity is also highlighted.

  12. Structure-property relations in amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Risplendi, Francesca; Cicero, Giancarlo; Bernardi, Marco; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2014-07-28

    Carbon is emerging as a material with great potential for photovoltaics (PV). However, the amorphous form (a-C) has not been studied in detail as a PV material, even though it holds similarities with amorphous Silicon (a-Si) that is widely employed in efficient solar cells. In this work, we correlate the structure, bonding, stoichiometry, and hydrogen content of a-C with properties linked to PV performance such as the electronic structure and optical absorption. We employ first-principles molecular dynamics and density functional theory calculations to generate and analyze a set of a-C structures with a range of densities and hydrogen concentrations. We demonstrate that optical and electronic properties of interest in PV can be widely tuned by varying the density and hydrogen content. For example, sunlight absorption in a-C films can significantly exceed that of a same thickness of a-Si for a range of densities and H contents in a-C. Our results highlight promising features of a-C as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  13. Structural and magnetic properties of chromium doped zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, Rintu Mary; Thankachan, Smitha; Xavier, Sheena; Mohammed, E. M.; Joseph, Shaji

    2014-01-28

    Zinc chromium ferrites with chemical formula ZnCr{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) were prepared by Sol - Gel technique. The structural as well as magnetic properties of the synthesized samples have been studied and reported here. The structural characterizations of the samples were analyzed by using X – Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The single phase spinel cubic structure of all the prepared samples was tested by XRD and FTIR. The particle size was observed to decrease from 18.636 nm to 6.125 nm by chromium doping and induced a tensile strain in all the zinc chromium mixed ferrites. The magnetic properties of few samples (x = 0.0, 0.4, 1.0) were investigated using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM)

  14. Structural Properties of Finite MoS2 Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Shaylyn; Salgado, Andres; Fernandez-Seivane, Lucas; Lopez-Lozano, Xochitl

    2015-03-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has been one of the most important catalysts used in refineries worldwide for hydrodesulfurization over the past century. In the last decade, and with the advent of nanotechnology, there has been a special interest in MoS2 nanostructures due to their high potential as novel nanocatalysts. The study of the properties of these systems is of fundamental interest for the experimental design of their catalytic activity and efficiency. In this work, we have performed ab initio density-functional calculations (DFT) to investigate the structural properties of finite MoS2 nanostrutures. All the models here presented were based on newly experimentally observed morphologies in MoS2 industrial catalysts using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images. We simulated STEM images of the theoretical models to compare it with the experimental ones. In contrast with infinite models, the finite models prefer a rippled/twisted structure morphology over the planar or helical ones. The rippled/twisted models appear to be structurally more stable.

  15. A novel self-assembling peptide with UV-responsive properties.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ran; Jin, Cheng-Cheng; Quan, Jing; Nie, Hua-li; Zhu, Li-Min

    2014-03-01

    A novel heptapeptide comprising Ile-Gln-Ser-Pro-His-Phe-Phe (IQSPHFF) identified and found to undergo self-assembly into microparticles in solution. To understand the effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the self-assembly process, IQSPHFF solutions were exposed to the UV light of 365 nm at room temperature. This exposure was found to have a profound effect on the morphology of the self-assembled aggregates, converting the microparticles to nanorod shapes. Circular dichroism and FTIR studies indicated distinct structural differences in the arrangements of the peptide moieties before and after UV irradiation. However, Mass spectrum analysis and high performance liquid chromatography of the peptide molecules before and after UV irradiation demonstrated that the chemical structure of IQSPHFF was not changed. UV-visible spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy studies showed that the absorption peak both increased after UV irradiation. Overall, our data show that the heptapeptide with UV-responsive properties.

  16. The Structure and Properties of Cast Iron Alloyed with Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razumakov, A. A.; Stepanova, N. V.; Bataev, I. A.; Lenivtseva, O. G.; Riapolova, Iu Iu; Emurlaev, K. I.

    2016-04-01

    Cast iron with 3 wt. % Cu was prepared by induction melting and casting in sand molds. The structure of the samples was studied using light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The addition of Cu promoted formation of pearlite and slightiy decreased the volume fraction of graphite. No Cu inclusions were found by LM and SEM. The nanoprecipitations of ε-Cu in lamellar pearlite were observed by TEM. The properties of the Cu-alloyed cast iron were compared with the properties of cast iron not alloyed with Cu. The hardness of cast iron after alloying with Cu increased and the friction coefficient decreased in comparison with the reference sample.

  17. Lanthanides caged by the organic chelates; structural properties.

    PubMed

    Smentek, Lidia

    2011-04-13

    The structure, in particular symmetry, geometry and morphology of organic chelates coordinated with the lanthanide ions are analyzed in the present review. This is the first part of a complete presentation of a theoretical description of the properties of systems, which are widely used in technology, but most of all, in molecular biology and medicine. The discussion is focused on the symmetry and geometry of the cages, since these features play a dominant role in the spectroscopic activity of the lanthanides caged by organic chelates. At the same time, the spectroscopic properties require more formal presentation in the language of Racah algebra, and deserve a separate analysis. In addition to the parent systems of DOTA, DOTP, EDTMP and CDTMP presented here, their modifications by various antennas are analyzed. The conclusions that have a strong impact upon the theory of the energy transfer and the sensitized luminescence of these systems are based on the results of numerical density functional theory calculations.

  18. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-14

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet. PMID:26374054

  19. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-14

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet.

  20. Lanthanides caged by the organic chelates; structural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smentek, Lidia

    2011-04-01

    The structure, in particular symmetry, geometry and morphology of organic chelates coordinated with the lanthanide ions are analyzed in the present review. This is the first part of a complete presentation of a theoretical description of the properties of systems, which are widely used in technology, but most of all, in molecular biology and medicine. The discussion is focused on the symmetry and geometry of the cages, since these features play a dominant role in the spectroscopic activity of the lanthanides caged by organic chelates. At the same time, the spectroscopic properties require more formal presentation in the language of Racah algebra, and deserve a separate analysis. In addition to the parent systems of DOTA, DOTP, EDTMP and CDTMP presented here, their modifications by various antennas are analyzed. The conclusions that have a strong impact upon the theory of the energy transfer and the sensitized luminescence of these systems are based on the results of numerical density functional theory calculations.

  1. The cortical analysis of speech-specific temporal structure revealed by responses to sound quilts

    PubMed Central

    Overath, Tobias; McDermott, Josh H; Zarate, Jean Mary; Poeppel, David

    2016-01-01

    Speech contains temporal structure that the brain must analyze to enable linguistic processing. To investigate the neural basis of this analysis, we used sound quilts, stimuli constructed by shuffling segments of a natural sound, approximately preserving its properties on short timescales while disrupting them on longer scales. We generated quilts from foreign speech to eliminate language cues and manipulated the extent of natural acoustic structure by varying the segment length. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we identified bilateral regions of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) whose responses varied with segment length. This effect was absent in primary auditory cortex and did not occur for quilts made from other natural sounds or acoustically matched synthetic sounds, suggesting tuning to speech-specific spectrotemporal structure. When examined parametrically, the STS response increased with segment length up to ~500 ms. Our results identify a locus of speech analysis in human auditory cortex that is distinct from lexical, semantic or syntactic processes. PMID:25984889

  2. The cortical analysis of speech-specific temporal structure revealed by responses to sound quilts.

    PubMed

    Overath, Tobias; McDermott, Josh H; Zarate, Jean Mary; Poeppel, David

    2015-06-01

    Speech contains temporal structure that the brain must analyze to enable linguistic processing. To investigate the neural basis of this analysis, we used sound quilts, stimuli constructed by shuffling segments of a natural sound, approximately preserving its properties on short timescales while disrupting them on longer scales. We generated quilts from foreign speech to eliminate language cues and manipulated the extent of natural acoustic structure by varying the segment length. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we identified bilateral regions of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) whose responses varied with segment length. This effect was absent in primary auditory cortex and did not occur for quilts made from other natural sounds or acoustically matched synthetic sounds, suggesting tuning to speech-specific spectrotemporal structure. When examined parametrically, the STS response increased with segment length up to ∼500 ms. Our results identify a locus of speech analysis in human auditory cortex that is distinct from lexical, semantic or syntactic processes. PMID:25984889

  3. Carbide cluster metallofullerenes: structure, properties, and possible origin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xing; Akasaka, Takeshi; Nagase, Shigeru

    2013-07-16

    Endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs) are hybrid molecules with different metallic species encapsulated inside the fullerene cages. In addition to conventional EMFs that contain only metal ions, researchers have constructed novel compounds that encapsulate metallic clusters of nitride, carbide, oxide, cyanide, and sulfide. Among these structures, carbide cluster metallofullerenes (CCMFs) are unique because their synthesis requires only graphite and the metal source. As a result the molecular structures of CCMFs are particularly difficult to characterize. Two carbon atoms are encapsulated inside the cage, but they do not participate in constructing the cage framework. Recent X-ray crystallographic studies of EMFs have allowed researchers to unambiguously identify CCMFs (MxC₂@C2n). Previously most of these structures had been described as conventional EMFs Mx@C2n+2. Most of these species are scandium-containing compounds such as Sc3C₂@Ih(7)-C₈₀ [not Sc₃@C3v(7)-C₈₂], Sc₂C₂@C2v(5)-C₈₀ [not Sc₂@C₈₂], Sc₂C₂@Cs(6)-C₈₂ [not Sc₂@Cs(10)-C₈₄], Sc₂C₂@C2v(9)-C₈₂ [not Sc₂@C2v(17)-C₈₄], Sc₂C₂@C3v(8)-C₈₂ [not Sc₂@D2d(23)-C₈₄], and Sc₂C₂@D2d(23)-C₈₄ [not Sc₂@C₈₆]. Additional examples of CCMFs include Gd₂C₂@D₃(85)-C₉₂, Sc₂C₂@C2v(6073)-C₆₈, Ti₂C₂@D3h(5)-C₇₈, M₂C₂@C3v(8)-C₈₂, M₂C₂@Cs(6)-C₈₂ (M = Y, Er, etc.), Y₂C₂@C₈₄, Y₂C₂@D₃(85)-C₉₂, Y₂C₂@D₅(450)-C₁₀₀, and Lu₃C₂@D₂(35)-C₈₈. The existence of so many CCMF species reminds us that the symbol '@' (which denotes the encapsulation status of EMFs) should be used with caution with species whose molecular structures have not been determined unambiguously. This Account presents a detailed summary of all aspects of CCMFs, including historically erroneous assignments and corrected structural characterizations, along with their intrinsic properties such as electrochemical and chemical

  4. Scanning Probe Evaluation of Electronic, Mechanical and Structural Material Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virwani, Kumar

    2011-03-01

    We present atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of a range of properties from three different classes of materials: mixed ionic electronic conductors, low-k dielectrics, and polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles. (1) Mixed ionic electronic conductors are being investigated as novel diodes to drive phase-change memory elements. Their current-voltage characteristics are measured with direct-current and pulsed-mode conductive AFM (C-AFM). The challenges to reliability of the C-AFM method include the electrical integrity of the probe, the sample and the contacts, and the minimization of path capacitance. The role of C-AFM in the optimization of these electro-active materials will be presented. (2) Low dielectric constant (low-k) materials are used in microprocessors as interlayer insulators, a role directly affected by their mechanical performance. The mechanical properties of nanoporous silicate low-k thin films are investigated in a comparative study of nanomechanics measured by AFM and by traditional nanoindentation. Both methods are still undergoing refinement as reliable analytical tools for determining nanomechanical properties. We will focus on AFM, the faster of the two methods, and its developmental challenges of probe shape, cantilever force constant, machine compliance and calibration standards. (3) Magnetic nanoparticles are being explored for their use in patterned media for magnetic storage. Current methods for visualizing the core-shell structure of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles include dye-staining the polymer shell to provide contrast in transmission electron microscopy. AFM-based fast force-volume measurements provide direct visualization of the hard metal oxide core within the soft polymer shell based on structural property differences. In particular, the monitoring of adhesion and deformation between the AFM tip and the nanoparticle, particle-by-particle, provides a reliable qualitative tool to visualize core-shell contrast without the use

  5. The Synthesis of Structural Responses Using Experimentally Measured Frequency Response Functions and Field Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    CAP,JEROME S.; NELSON,CURTIS F.

    2000-11-17

    This paper presents an analysis technique used to generate the structural response at locations not measured during the ejection of a captive-carried store. The ejection shock event is complicated by the fact that forces may be imparted to the store at eight distinct locations. The technique derives forcing functions by combining the initial field test data for a limited number of measurement locations with Frequency Response Functions (FRFs) measured using a traditional modal-type impact (tap) test at the same locations. The derived forcing functions were then used with tap test FRFs measured at additional locations of interest to produce the desired response data.

  6. Physico-chemical properties and cytotoxic effects of sugar-based surfactants: Impact of structural variations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Biao; Vayssade, Muriel; Miao, Yong; Chagnault, Vincent; Grand, Eric; Wadouachi, Anne; Postel, Denis; Drelich, Audrey; Egles, Christophe; Pezron, Isabelle

    2016-09-01

    Surfactants derived from the biorefinery process can present interesting surface-active properties, low cytotoxicity, high biocompatibility and biodegradability. They are therefore considered as potential sustainable substitutes to currently used petroleum-based surfactants. To better understand and anticipate their performances, structure-property relationships need to be carefully investigated. For this reason, we applied a multidisciplinary approach to systematically explore the effect of subtle structural variations on both physico-chemical properties and biological effects. Four sugar-based surfactants, each with an eight carbon alkyl chain bound to a glucose or maltose head group by an amide linkage, were synthesized and evaluated together along with two commercially available standard surfactants. Physico-chemical properties including solubility, Krafft point, surface-tension lowering and critical micellar concentration (CMC) in water and biological medium were explored. Cytotoxicity evaluation by measuring proliferation index and metabolic activity against dermal fibroblasts showed that all surfactants studied may induce cell death at low concentrations (below their CMC). Results revealed significant differences in both physico-chemical properties and cytotoxic effects depending on molecule structural features, such as the position of the linkage on the sugar head-group, or the orientation of the amide linkage. Furthermore, the cytotoxic response increased with the reduction of surfactant CMC. This study underscores the relevance of a methodical and multidisciplinary approach that enables the consideration of surfactant solution properties when applied to biological materials. Overall, our results will contribute to a better understanding of the concomitant impact of surfactant structure at physico-chemical and biological levels. PMID:27137806

  7. Structures and chemical properties of silicene: unlike graphene.

    PubMed

    Jose, Deepthi; Datta, Ayan

    2014-02-18

    The discovery of graphene and its remarkable and exotic properties have aroused interest in other elements and molecules that form 2D atomic layers, such as metal chalcogenides, transition metal oxides, boron nitride, silicon, and germanium. Silicene and germanene, the Si and Ge counterparts of graphene, have interesting fundamental physical properties with potential applications in technology. For example, researchers expect that silicene will be relatively easy to incorporate within existing silicon-based electronics. In this Account, we summarize the challenges and progress in the field of silicene research. Theoretical calculations have predicted that silicene possesses graphene-like properties such as massless Dirac fermions that carry charge and the quantum spin Hall effect. Researchers are actively exploring the physical and chemical properties of silicene and tailoring it for wide variety of applications. The symmetric buckling in each of the six-membered rings of silicene differentiates it from graphene and imparts a variety of interesting properties with potential technological applications. The pseudo-Jahn-Teller (PJT) distortion breaks the symmetry and leads to the buckling in silicenes. In graphene, the two sublattice structures are equivalent, which does not allow for the opening of the band gap by an external electric field. However, in silicene where the neighboring Si atoms are displaced alternatively perpendicular to the plane, the intrinsic buckling permits a band gap opening in silicene in the presence of external electric field. Silicene's stronger spin orbit coupling than graphene has far reaching applications in spintronic devices. Because silicon prefers sp(3) hybridization over sp(2), hydrogenation is much easier in silicene. The hydrogenation of silicene to form silicane opens the band gap and increases the puckering angle. Lithiation can suppress the pseudo-Jahn-Teller distortion in silicene and hence can flatten silicene's structure

  8. Structural and optical properties of Tin sulphide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Akkari, A.; Ben Nasr, T.; Kamoun, N.

    2007-09-19

    Tin sulphide SnS thin films were deposited on glass substrates using the chemical bath deposition technique (CBD). By investigating the influence of triethanolamine (TEA) concentration on the properties of deposited films, we obtained the optimum deposition parameter. These films were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and spectrophotometric measurements. The obtained thin films exhibit the orthorhombic structure and the direct band gap energy is found to be about 1.65 eV, for films prepared at TEA concentration films equal to 13.5 M.

  9. Structural, anisotropic and electronic properties of C96 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Mengjiang; Li, Binhua; Yu, Zhengtao; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of the structural, elastic, electronic and anisotropic properties of C96 under high pressure has been calculated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, as implemented in the Cambridge Serial Total Energy Package code. At elevated pressures, the elastic constants and shear modulus, Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio for C96 increase with pressure increasing. The anisotropy studies of Young's modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, Zener anisotropy index, the universal elastic anisotropy index AU and hardness show that C96 exhibits a small anisotropy. The sound velocities, Debye temperature and band gap of C96 under high pressure are also calculated.

  10. Structural properties of amorphous silicon produced by electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamasaki, J.; Takeda, S.

    1999-07-01

    The structural properties of the amorphous Si (a-Si), which was created from crystalline silicon by 2 MeV electron irradiation at low temperatures about 25 K, are examined in detail by means of transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron diffraction. The peak positions in the radial distribution function (RDF) of the a-Si correspond well to those of a-Si fabricated by other techniques. The electron-irradiation-induced a-Si returns to crystalline Si after annealing at 550 C.

  11. Star shaped ferrocenyl truxenes: synthesis, structure and properties.

    PubMed

    Misra, Rajneesh; Sharma, Rekha; Mobin, Shaikh M

    2014-05-14

    This article reports the design and synthesis of star shaped, C3-symmetric ferrocenyl substituted truxenes by the Pd-catalyzed Sonogashira cross-coupling and cycloaddition reaction. The single photon absorption and electrochemical properties indicate significant electronic interaction between ferrocene and truxene core. The bathochromic shift in the absorption spectra of truxenes 4a-4c and 5a is a function of enhanced conjugation. The incorporation of tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) results in a strong charge transfer band in truxene 5a. The single crystal structure of truxene 4a is presented, which shows interesting supramolecular interactions.

  12. Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of Twisted Bilayer Black Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ting; Li, Zhenglu; Qiu, Diana Y.; Louie, Steven G.

    Using first-principles calculations, we find that the electronic structure and optical properties of bilayer black phosphorus can be modified significantly through changing the interlayer twist angle. We demonstrate the origin of these twist angle dependent effects, and connect our predicted results to experimental measurements. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR15-1508412, and the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's NERSC facility.

  13. Electronic structure and properties of layered gallium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, U. Sandhya; Gupta, Uttam; Narang, Deepa S.; Late, Dattatray J.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2016-05-01

    Layer-dependent electronic structure and properties of gallium monochalcogenides, GaX where X = S, Se, Te, have been investigated using first-principles calculations based on various functionals, with a motivation to assess their use in photocatalytic water splitting. Since hydrogen evolution by water splitting using visible light provides a promising way for solar energy conversion, both theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out on the photochemical hydrogen evolution by GaTe. We also present the Raman spectra of GaTe examined by both theory and experiment.

  14. Structural characteristics and radiative properties of tropical cloud clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, L.A.T.; Rossow, W.B.

    1993-12-01

    By identifying individual tropical cloud clusters in eight months of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project data, the size distribution, average cloud properties, and their variation with system size in tropical convective systems (CS) is examined. The geographic distribution of CS shows a concentration over land areas in the summer hemisphere with little seasonal variation except for the major shift of location into the summer hemisphere. When the tropics are considered as a whole or a region is considered over a whole season, CS of all sizes form a continuous size distribution where the area covered by the clouds in each size range is approximately the same. Land CS show a small excess of the smallest CS and a small deficit of the largest CS in comparison to ocean CS. Average CS cloud properties suggest two major cloud types: One with lower cloud-top pressures and much higher optical thicknesses, associated with deep convection, and one with higher cloud-top pressures and some evidence of a further division into optically thicker and thinner parts. The average properties of these clouds vary in a correlated fashion such that a larger horizontal extent of the convective system cloud is accompanied by a lower convective cloud-top pressure, larger anvil cloud size, and larger anvil cloud optical thickness. These structural properties and their diurnal variation also suggest that the smallest CS may represent a mixture of the formative and dissipative stages of CS, while the medium and large sizes are, principally, the mature stage. A radiative transfer model is used to evaluate the local radiative effects of CS with average cloud properties. The results imply that the mesoscale anvil cloud reinforces the diabatic heating of the atmosphere by the convection and may help sustain these systems at night. The radiative effects of the convective clouds may reinforce the diurnal variation of convection. 80 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Bridging the gap between structures and properties: An investigation and evaluation of students' representational competence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Sonia Miller

    The heart of learning chemistry is the ability to connect a compound's structure to its function; Lewis structures provide an essential link in this process. In many cases, their construction is taught using an algorithmic approach, containing a set of step-by-step rules. We believe that this approach is in direct conflict with the precepts of meaningful learning. From a sequential, mixed methods study, we found that students have much difficulty constructing these structures and that the step-by-step rules do not make use of students' relevant prior knowledge. This causes students to develop "home grown" rules when unsure of how to progress with the construction process. It also became clear that most students are uncertain of the importance of Lewis structures since they perceive them as being useful only for obtaining structural information but not property information. Using responses from student interviews and open ended questions, the Information from Lewis Structures Survey (ILSS) was developed, validated, and found reliable to assess students' representational competence by determining their understanding of the purpose of Lewis structures. Since students had many problems with the relationship of structures and properties, an alternative curriculum was evaluated to determine if it could help students develop a more meaningful understanding of this process. This instruction was part of a larger NSF-funded general chemistry curriculum redesign called Chemistry, Life, the Universe and Everything (CLUE). Using a control and treatment group, the effectiveness of this new curriculum was evaluated for two main aspects: 1. the students' ability to construct Lewis structures using OrganicPad and 2. the students' representational competence using the ILSS. Through four main studies (a pilot study, instructor effect study, main study, and retention study), we found that the CLUE curriculum helps students develop more expert-like strategies for constructing Lewis

  16. Structural and mechanical property changes in toughened magnesia-partially-stabilized zirconia at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, D.B.; James, M.R.; Porter, J.R.

    1989-02-01

    The mechanical properties of high-toughness magnesia-partially-stabilized zirconia were found to be dramatically altered by a single cooling cycle between room temperature and - 196/sup 0/C. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to correlate the changes in mechanical properties with structural changes that occur at temperatures below -- 100/sup 0/C. Most of the the tetragonal precipitates that are responsible for toughening transformed to an orthorhombic phase with unit-cell volume intermediate between those of the tetragonal and monoclinic phases. The orthorhombic phase was stable with heating to 300/sup 0/C, but it transformed back to the tetragonal structure when heated to 400/sup 0/C.

  17. Investigation of structural and electrical properties of mixed ferrite system

    SciTech Connect

    Astik, Nidhi M. Jha, Prafulla K.

    2015-05-15

    In the present work, structural and electrical properties of mixed ferrite systems are studied. As prepared compound of Co{sub 0.85}Ca{sub 0.15-y}Cd{sub y}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (y=0.10, 0.15) is synthesized in polycrystalline form, using the stoichiometric mixture of oxides with conventional standard ceramic route with double sintering at 950°C and 1100°C and characterized by X-ray diffraction. The X-ray diffraction pattern confirms the presence of cubic (FCC) structure. The sharp intensified peaks in X-ray diffraction pattern clearly indicate the completeness of reaction.

  18. Structural and electrical properties of Ni-YSZ cermet materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberko, K.; Jasinski, M.; Pasierb, P.; Radecka, M.; Rekas, M.

    Ceramic-metal composites (cermets) containing yttria-stabilized zirconia, YSZ, and Ni particles are commonly used as anode materials in solid oxide fuel cells. The long-term performance of fuel cells is strictly related to both the structural and electrical properties of anode materials. In order to achieve high mixed electrical conductivity and high activity of electrochemical reactions and hydrocarbon fuel reforming, it is necessary to select an appropriate chemical composition and a suitable method of preparation. Materials containing 8 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia and Ni were prepared by means of two methods: co-precipitation and impregnation. The structure of the materials was characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and porosity studies. The thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) was determined using the dilathometric method. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the Wagner polarization method were used to determine electrical conductivity and the electron transference numbers, respectively.

  19. Structural, optical and thermal properties of silver colloidal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, S.; Ghaderi, A.; Solaymani, S.; Golzan, M. M.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, colloidal silver nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction of AgNO3 and pure Sn in a new and simple method. The type of crystallite lattice and the size of nanopowders were estimated by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. The geometric, heterogeneous and mixing structure of synthesized nanopowders were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Optical properties such as plasmon absorption and frequency of soluble colloidal nanopowders in two solutions of distilled water and oil were investigated by UV-Visible spectroscopy, which was developed to calculate the absorbance spectra of nanoparticles solution containing a size distribution of particles using the Mie theory. Dipole and quadrupole plasmons related to molecular structure of water and oil were found by absorbance spectra. Also, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis was used for determining the thermal behavior, endothermic and exothermic peaks of Ag nanopowder.

  20. Characterization of structure and thermophysical properties of three ESR slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkowski, A.; deBarbadillo, J.; Krane, Matthew J. M.

    2016-07-01

    The structure and properties of electroslag remelting (ESR) slags were characterized. Slags samples of three compositions were obtained from industrial remelting processes at Special Metals Corporation and from casting in a laboratory vacuum induction melter. The structure of the slag samples was observed using optical and electron microscopy, and phases were identified and their relative amounts quantified using X-ray diffraction. Laser flash thermal diffusivity, density, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements for specific heat were performed to determine the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples. Sample porosity was measured as a function of depth using a serial sectioning technique, and a onedimensional computational model was developed to estimate the thermal conductivity of the fully dense slags. These results are discussed in context with previous studies, and opportunities for future research are identified. AFRL Case Number: 88ABW-2015-1871.

  1. Structure and other properties of Jupiter's distant magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Desch, M. D.; Klein, L. W.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Sullivan, J. D.; Kurth, W. S.; Behannon, K. W.

    1983-01-01

    Analyses of data from Voyager 2 experiments provide evidence for, and characteristics of, a Jovian magnetotail extending at least to 9,000 Jovian radii from the planet. During approximately (25 day) periodic sightings of the tail, the magnetic field tended to point radially towards or away from Jupiter, indicating preservation to large distances of the bipolar, lobe like structure observed near the planet. This periodicity, along with various properties of the solar wind at this time, indicates that the tail is apparently influenced by recurrent solar wind features. Anomalous magnetic fields, not aligned with the nominal tail axis, also exist within the tail, especially in the low density, central (core) region, indicating some complexity of internal structure.

  2. Interfacial Ga-As suboxide: Structural and electronic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Colleoni, Davide Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2015-07-20

    The structural and electronic properties of Ga-As suboxide representative of the transition region at the GaAs/oxide interface are studied through density functional calculations. Two amorphous models generated by quenches from the melt are taken under consideration. The absence of As–O bonds indicates that the structure is a mixture of GaAs and Ga-oxide, in accordance with photoemission experiments. The band edges of the models are found to be closely aligned to those of GaAs. The simulation of charging and discharging processes leads to the identification of an As-related defect with an energy level at ∼0.7 eV above the GaAs valence band maximum, in good agreement with the experimental density of interface states.

  3. Structural and optical properties of porous nanocrystalline Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartopu, G.; Sapelkin, A. V.; Karavanskii, V. A.; Serincan, U.; Turan, R.

    2008-06-01

    Nanocrystalline Ge films were prepared by isotropic chemical etching on single-crystalline Ge substrates with 100 and 111 orientations. The structural and optical properties have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED), Raman photoluminescence (PL), and infrared spectroscopy. The average size of nanocrystals (NCs) was estimated by fitting of the Raman spectra using a phonon-confinement model developed for spherical semiconductor NCs. Considered collectively TEM, ED, and Raman results indicate that all films contain high density of 3-4 nm diameter, diamond-structured Ge NCs with disordered surfaces. There are indications that surface of nanoparticles is mainly hydrogen terminated even for air-stabilized samples. Red PL is observed at room temperature upon excitation by 1.96 eV with peak energy of ˜1.55 eV and correlates well with recent theoretical calculations of the enlarged optical gap in Ge NCs of similar size.

  4. Structural and Electrical Properties of Nb5+ Substituted PZT Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, O. P.; Prakash, Chandra

    The effect of niobium doping on the structure and electrical properties with the following compositions Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)1-5X/4NbXO3 with 0structure was determined by X-ray diffractometry. The average grain size, the maximum dielectric permittivity and the remnant polarization first increases up to x = 0.005 concentration of Nb5+ and then decreases with higher concentration of niobium, while the coercive field does not show any variation. The transition temperature decreases with the increase in niobium concentration.

  5. Structural, optical, and magnetic properties of FeVO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pooja; Gupta, Anurag; Dogra, Anjana

    2016-05-01

    We report the structural, optical, and magnetic properties of polycrystalline FeVO3 synthesized by solid state reaction technique.While FeVO3 has rhombohedral crystal structure with space group R-3c (167) identical to the parentα-Fe2O3, the lattice volume reduces due to the replacement of Fe3+ with V3+ having smaller ionic radii. The most remarkable outcome of doping is reduction in band gap from 2.1 (α-Fe2O3) to 1.5 eV (FeVO3), which is favorable for photo-electrochemical applications. Although the canted ferromagnetism persists in FeVO3, an enhancement in magnetic moment is observed as compared to the parent compound.

  6. Interfacial Ga-As suboxide: Structural and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleoni, Davide; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    The structural and electronic properties of Ga-As suboxide representative of the transition region at the GaAs/oxide interface are studied through density functional calculations. Two amorphous models generated by quenches from the melt are taken under consideration. The absence of As-O bonds indicates that the structure is a mixture of GaAs and Ga-oxide, in accordance with photoemission experiments. The band edges of the models are found to be closely aligned to those of GaAs. The simulation of charging and discharging processes leads to the identification of an As-related defect with an energy level at ˜0.7 eV above the GaAs valence band maximum, in good agreement with the experimental density of interface states.

  7. Unusual structure, bonding and properties in a californium borate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polinski, Matthew J.; Garner, Edward B.; Maurice, Rémi; Planas, Nora; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Parker, T. Gannon; Cross, Justin N.; Green, Thomas D.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; van Cleve, Shelley M.; Depmeier, Wulf; Gagliardi, Laura; Shatruk, Michael; Knappenberger, Kenneth L.; Liu, Guokui; Skanthakumar, S.; Soderholm, Lynda; Dixon, David A.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2014-05-01

    The participation of the valence orbitals of actinides in bonding has been debated for decades. Recent experimental and computational investigations demonstrated the involvement of 6p, 6d and/or 5f orbitals in bonding. However, structural and spectroscopic data, as well as theory, indicate a decrease in covalency across the actinide series, and the evidence points to highly ionic, lanthanide-like bonding for late actinides. Here we show that chemical differentiation between californium and lanthanides can be achieved by using ligands that are both highly polarizable and substantially rearrange on complexation. A ligand that suits both of these desired properties is polyborate. We demonstrate that the 5f, 6d and 7p orbitals are all involved in bonding in a Cf(III) borate, and that large crystal-field effects are present. Synthetic, structural and spectroscopic data are complemented by quantum mechanical calculations to support these observations.

  8. Unusual structure, bonding and properties in a californium borate.

    PubMed

    Polinski, Matthew J; Garner, Edward B; Maurice, Rémi; Planas, Nora; Stritzinger, Jared T; Parker, T Gannon; Cross, Justin N; Green, Thomas D; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Van Cleve, Shelley M; Depmeier, Wulf; Gagliardi, Laura; Shatruk, Michael; Knappenberger, Kenneth L; Liu, Guokui; Skanthakumar, S; Soderholm, Lynda; Dixon, David A; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2014-05-01

    The participation of the valence orbitals of actinides in bonding has been debated for decades. Recent experimental and computational investigations demonstrated the involvement of 6p, 6d and/or 5f orbitals in bonding. However, structural and spectroscopic data, as well as theory, indicate a decrease in covalency across the actinide series, and the evidence points to highly ionic, lanthanide-like bonding for late actinides. Here we show that chemical differentiation between californium and lanthanides can be achieved by using ligands that are both highly polarizable and substantially rearrange on complexation. A ligand that suits both of these desired properties is polyborate. We demonstrate that the 5f, 6d and 7p orbitals are all involved in bonding in a Cf(III) borate, and that large crystal-field effects are present. Synthetic, structural and spectroscopic data are complemented by quantum mechanical calculations to support these observations.

  9. 41 CFR 102-37.130 - What are a SASP's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? 102-37.130 Section 102-37.130 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY State Agency for Surplus Property (SASP) § 102-37.130 What are a SASP's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? As a SASP,...

  10. 41 CFR 102-37.130 - What are a SASP's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? 102-37.130 Section 102-37.130 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY State Agency for Surplus Property (SASP) § 102-37.130 What are a SASP's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? As a SASP,...

  11. Structural properties of the Caenorhabditis elegans neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Lav R; Chen, Beth L; Paniagua, Eric; Hall, David H; Chklovskii, Dmitri B

    2011-02-03

    Despite recent interest in reconstructing neuronal networks, complete wiring diagrams on the level of individual synapses remain scarce and the insights into function they can provide remain unclear. Even for Caenorhabditis elegans, whose neuronal network is relatively small and stereotypical from animal to animal, published wiring diagrams are neither accurate nor complete and self-consistent. Using materials from White et al. and new electron micrographs we assemble whole, self-consistent gap junction and chemical synapse networks of hermaphrodite C. elegans. We propose a method to visualize the wiring diagram, which reflects network signal flow. We calculate statistical and topological properties of the network, such as degree distributions, synaptic multiplicities, and small-world properties, that help in understanding network signal propagation. We identify neurons that may play central roles in information processing, and network motifs that could serve as functional modules of the network. We explore propagation of neuronal activity in response to sensory or artificial stimulation using linear systems theory and find several activity patterns that could serve as substrates of previously described behaviors. Finally, we analyze the interaction between the gap junction and the chemical synapse networks. Since several statistical properties of the C. elegans network, such as multiplicity and motif distributions are similar to those found in mammalian neocortex, they likely point to general principles of neuronal networks. The wiring diagram reported here can help in understanding the mechanistic basis of behavior by generating predictions about future experiments involving genetic perturbations, laser ablations, or monitoring propagation of neuronal activity in response to stimulation.

  12. Structural and functional properties of hemp seed protein products.

    PubMed

    Malomo, Sunday A; He, Rong; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2014-08-01

    The effects of pH and protein concentration on some structural and functional properties of hemp seed protein isolate (HPI, 84.15% protein content) and defatted hemp seed protein meal (HPM, 44.32% protein content) were determined. The HPI had minimum protein solubility (PS) at pH 4.0, which increased as pH was decreased or increased. In contrast, the HPM had minimum PS at pH 3.0, which increased at higher pH values. Gel electrophoresis showed that some of the high molecular weight proteins (>45 kDa) present in HPM were not well extracted by the alkali and were absent or present in low ratio in the HPI polypeptide profile. The amino acid composition showed that the isolation process increased the Arg/Lys ratio of HPI (5.52%) when compared to HPM (3.35%). Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism data indicate that the HPI proteins had a well-defined structure at pH 3.0, which was lost as pH value increased. The differences in structural conformation of HPI at different pH values were reflected as better foaming capacity at pH 3.0 when compared to pH 5.0, 7.0, and 9.0. At 10 and 25 mg/mL protein concentrations, emulsions formed by the HPM had smaller oil droplet sizes (higher quality), when compared to the HPI-formed emulsions. In contrast at 50 mg/mL protein concentration, the HPI-formed emulsions had smaller oil droplet sizes (except at pH 3.0). We conclude that the functional properties of hemp seed protein products are dependent on structural conformations as well as protein concentration and pH.

  13. Influence of the Interior Properties of Mercury on Its Tidal Response (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovan, S.; Margot, J.; Hauck, S. A.; Moore, W. B.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Dynamical measurements currently yield the only direct constraints on the interior structure of Mercury. The combination of Mercury's second-harmonic-degree gravitational coefficients J2 and C22, along with the measured obliquity and libration amplitude, provide the moment of inertia of the planet, C, and the moment of inertia of its outer solid shell, Cm. Models of the interior structure constrained by the bulk density ρ, C, and Cm provide information on the radius of the liquid core and of the mean density of material below and above that radius. The response of Mercury to the differential gravitational pull of the Sun, i.e., the solid-body tide, depends on the physical properties of the subsurface materials and can provide an additional constraint on the interior of the planet. The solid-body tide induces a periodic variation of the gravitational field, of which the largest component (degree 2) is parameterized through the complex Love number k2. By modeling Mercury's internal structure as a set of homogenous, spherically symmetric layers with Maxwell rheology, we calculate k2 for a suite of interior structure models compatible with ρ, C, and Cm. Results show that the measurement of the real component of k2 can improve the determination of both the radius of the liquid core and the mean density of the material below the outer solid shell and can provide an indication of the rigidity of the outer solid shell. A set of models with a solid FeS layer at the top of the liquid core is compatible both with the geochemical evidence collected by MESSENGER and with the dynamical constraints. The elastic properties of this layer are markedly different from those of the overlying silicate mantle and crust, with the effect of modifying the tidal response. Thus the measurement of k2 represents an avenue to test for the presence of such an FeS layer. The imaginary part of k2 relates directly to the energy dissipation induced by the tidal deformation. The choice of interior

  14. Structural, elastic and thermodynamic properties of the tetragonal structure of germanium carbonitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Mengjiang; Li, Binhua; Yu, Zhengtao; Chen, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The structural, mechanical, electronic and thermodynamic properties of the tetragonal structure germanium carbonitride (t-GeCN) were first investigated using the density function theory with the ultrasoft psedopotential scheme in the frame of the generalized gradient approximation and the local density approximation. The elastic constants have confirmed that the t-GeCN is mechanically stable and phonon spectra have confirmed that the t-GeCN is dynamically stable. The anisotropy studies show that t-GeCN exhibits a larger anisotropy in its Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus, shear modulus, sound velocities and universal elastic anisotropy index. Electronic structure study shows that t-GeCN is an indirect semiconductor with band gap of 0.628 eV. The thermodynamic properties of t-GeCN, including Debye temperature, heat capacity, Grüneisen parameter and thermal expansion coefficient are investigated utilizing the quasi-harmonic Debye model.

  15. Distributed adaptive diagnosis of sensor faults using structural response data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragos, Kosmas; Smarsly, Kay

    2016-10-01

    The reliability and consistency of wireless structural health monitoring (SHM) systems can be compromised by sensor faults, leading to miscalibrations, corrupted data, or even data loss. Several research approaches towards fault diagnosis, referred to as ‘analytical redundancy’, have been proposed that analyze the correlations between different sensor outputs. In wireless SHM, most analytical redundancy approaches require centralized data storage on a server for data analysis, while other approaches exploit the on-board computing capabilities of wireless sensor nodes, analyzing the raw sensor data directly on board. However, using raw sensor data poses an operational constraint due to the limited power resources of wireless sensor nodes. In this paper, a new distributed autonomous approach towards sensor fault diagnosis based on processed structural response data is presented. The inherent correlations among Fourier amplitudes of acceleration response data, at peaks corresponding to the eigenfrequencies of the structure, are used for diagnosis of abnormal sensor outputs at a given structural condition. Representing an entirely data-driven analytical redundancy approach that does not require any a priori knowledge of the monitored structure or of the SHM system, artificial neural networks (ANN) are embedded into the sensor nodes enabling cooperative fault diagnosis in a fully decentralized manner. The distributed analytical redundancy approach is implemented into a wireless SHM system and validated in laboratory experiments, demonstrating the ability of wireless sensor nodes to self-diagnose sensor faults accurately and efficiently with minimal data traffic. Besides enabling distributed autonomous fault diagnosis, the embedded ANNs are able to adapt to the actual condition of the structure, thus ensuring accurate and efficient fault diagnosis even in case of structural changes.

  16. Analysis of community properties and node properties to understand the structure of the bus transport network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yeran; Mburu, Lucy; Wang, Shaohua

    2016-05-01

    Akin to most infrastructures, intraurban bus networks are large and highly complex. Understanding the composition of such networks requires an intricate decomposition of the network into modules, taking into account the manner in which network links are distributed among the nodes. There exists for each set of highly interlinked nodes little connectivity with the next set of highly interlinked nodes. This inherent property of nodes makes community detection a popular approach for analyzing the structure of complex networks. In this study, we attempt to understand the structure of the intraurban bus network of Ireland's capital city, Dublin in a two-step approach. We first analyze the modular structure of the network by identifying potential communities. Secondly, we assess the prominence of each network node by examining the module-based topological properties of the nodes. Results of this empirical study reveal a clear pattern of independent communities, indicating thus, an implicit multi-community structure of the intraurban bus network. Examination of the geographic characteristics of the identified communities shows a degree of socio-economic divisions of the Dublin city. Furthermore, a large majority of the important nodes (vital transportation hubs) are located at the city center, implying that most of the bus lines in Dublin city tend to intersect the city's core.

  17. Response of fiber reinforced sandwich structures subjected to explosive loading

    SciTech Connect

    Perotti, Luigi E.; El Sayed, Tamer; Deiterding, Ralf; Ortiz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The capability to numerically simulate the response of sandwich structures to explosive loading constitutes a powerful tool to analyze and optimize their design by investigating the influence of different parameters. In order to achieve this objective, the necessary models for foam core and fiber reinforced materials in finite kinematics have been developed together with a finite element scheme which includes C1 finite elements for shells and cohesive elements able to capture the fracture propagation in composite fiber reinforced materials. This computational capability has been used to investigate the response of fiber reinforced sandwich shells to explosive loading. Based on the dissipated fracture energy resulting from these simulations, a factorial design has been carried out to assess the effect of different parameters on the sandwich shell response creating a tool for its optimization.

  18. Characterization of structural response to hypersonic boundary-layer transition

    DOE PAGES

    Riley, Zachary B.; Deshmukh, Rohit; Miller, Brent A.; McNamara, Jack J.; Casper, Katya M.

    2016-05-24

    The inherent relationship between boundary-layer stability, aerodynamic heating, and surface conditions makes the potential for interaction between the structural response and boundary-layer transition an important and challenging area of study in high-speed flows. This paper phenomenologically explores this interaction using a fundamental two-dimensional aerothermoelastic model under the assumption of an aluminum panel with simple supports. Specifically, an existing model is extended to examine the impact of transition onset location, transition length, and transitional overshoot in heat flux and fluctuating pressure on the structural response of surface panels. Transitional flow conditions are found to yield significantly increased thermal gradients, and theymore » can result in higher maximum panel temperatures compared to turbulent flow. Results indicate that overshoot in heat flux and fluctuating pressure reduces the flutter onset time and increases the strain energy accumulated in the panel. Furthermore, overshoot occurring near the midchord can yield average temperatures and peak displacements exceeding those experienced by the panel subject to turbulent flow. Lastly, these results suggest that fully turbulent flow does not always conservatively predict the thermo-structural response of surface panels.« less

  19. Structural health monitoring in composite materials using frequency response methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Seth S.; Spearing, S. Mark; Atalla, Mauro J.; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Soutis, Constantinos

    2001-08-01

    Cost effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials in structural applications. Non-destructive evaluation techniques (e.g. ultrasound, radiography, infra-red imaging) are available for use during standard repair and maintenance cycles, however by comparison to the techniques used for metals these are relatively expensive and time consuming. This paper presents part of an experimental and analytical survey of candidate methods for the detection of damage in composite materials. The experimental results are presented for the application of modal analysis techniques applied to rectangular laminated graphite/epoxy specimens containing representative damage modes, including delamination, transverse ply cracks and through-holes. Changes in natural frequencies and modes were then found using a scanning laser vibrometer, and 2-D finite element models were created for comparison with the experimental results. The models accurately predicted the response of the specimems at low frequencies, but the local excitation and coalescence of higher frequency modes make mode-dependent damage detection difficult and most likely impractical for structural applications. The frequency response method was found to be reliable for detecting even small amounts of damage in a simple composite structure, however the potentially important information about damage type, size, location and orientation were lost using this method since several combinations of these variables can yield identical response signatures.

  20. Harnessing the Unique Structural Properties of Isolated α-Helices*

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Carter J.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2014-01-01

    The α-helix is a ubiquitous secondary structural element that is almost exclusively observed in proteins when stabilized by tertiary or quaternary interactions. However, beginning with the unexpected observations of α-helix formation in the isolated C-peptide in ribonuclease A, there is growing evidence that a significant percentage (0.2%) of all proteins contain isolated stable single α-helical domains (SAH). These SAH domains provide unique structural features essential for normal protein function. A subset of SAH domains contain a characteristic ER/K motif, composed of a repeating sequence of ∼4 consecutive glutamic acids followed by ∼4 consecutive basic arginine or lysine (R/K) residues. The ER/K α-helix, also termed the ER/K linker, has been extensively characterized in the context of the myosin family of molecular motors and is emerging as a versatile structural element for protein and cellular engineering applications. Here, we review the structure and function of SAH domains, as well as the tools to identify them in natural proteins. We conclude with a discussion of recent studies that have successfully used the modular ER/K linker for engineering chimeric myosin proteins with altered mechanical properties, as well as synthetic polypeptides that can be used to monitor and systematically modulate protein interactions within cells. PMID:25059657

  1. Plant Coilin: Structural Characteristics and RNA-Binding Properties

    PubMed Central

    Protopopova, Anna; Yaminsky, Igor; Arutiunian, Alexander; Love, Andrew J.; Taliansky, Michael; Kalinina, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are dynamic subnuclear compartments involved in the biogenesis of ribonucleoproteins. Coilin is a major structural scaffolding protein necessary for CB formation, composition and activity. The predicted secondary structure of Arabidopsis thaliana coilin (Atcoilin) suggests that the protein is composed of three main domains. Analysis of the physical properties of deletion mutants indicates that Atcoilin might consist of an N-terminal globular domain, a central highly disordered domain and a C-terminal domain containing a presumable Tudor-like structure adjacent to a disordered C terminus. Despite the low homology in amino acid sequences, a similar type of domain organization is likely shared by human and animal coilin proteins and coilin-like proteins of various plant species. Atcoilin is able to bind RNA effectively and in a non-specific manner. This activity is provided by three RNA-binding sites: two sets of basic amino acids in the N-terminal domain and one set in the central domain. Interaction with RNA induces the multimerization of the Atcoilin molecule, a consequence of the structural alterations in the N-terminal domain. The interaction with RNA and subsequent multimerization may facilitate coilin’s function as a scaffolding protein. A model of the N-terminal domain is also proposed. PMID:23320094

  2. Table of periodic properties of fullerenes based on structural parameters.

    PubMed

    Torrens, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    The periodic table (PT) of the elements suggests that hydrogen could be the origin of everything else. The construction principle is an evolutionary process that is formally similar to those of Darwin and Oparin. The Kekulé structure count and permanence of the adjacency matrix of fullerenes are related to structural parameters involving the presence of contiguous pentagons p, q and r. Let p be the number of edges common to two pentagons, q the number of vertices common to three pentagons, and r the number of pairs of nonadjacent pentagon edges shared between two other pentagons. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the structural parameters and cluster analysis (CA) of the fullerenes permit classifying them and agree. A PT of the fullerenes is built based on the structural parameters, PCA and CA. The periodic law does not have the rank of the laws of physics. (1) The properties of the fullerenes are not repeated; only, and perhaps, their chemical character. (2) The order relationships are repeated, although with exceptions. The proposed statement is the following: The relationships that any fullerene p has with its neighbor p + 1 are approximately repeated for each period.

  3. Modelling benthic biophysical drivers of ecosystem structure and biogeochemical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Nicholas; Bruggeman, Jorn; Lessin, Gennadi; Allen, Icarus

    2016-04-01

    The fate of carbon deposited at the sea floor is ultimately decided by biophysical drivers that control the efficiency of remineralisation and timescale of carbon burial in sediments. Specifically, these drivers include bioturbation through ingestion and movement, burrow-flushing and sediment reworking, which enhance vertical particulate transport and solute diffusion. Unfortunately, these processes are rarely satisfactorily resolved in models. To address this, a benthic model that explicitly describes the vertical position of biology (e.g., habitats) and biogeochemical processes is presented that includes biological functionality and biogeochemical response capturing changes in ecosystem structure, benthic-pelagic fluxes and biodiversity on inter-annual timescales. This is demonstrated by the model's ability to reproduce temporal variability in benthic infauna, vertical pore water nutrients and pelagic-benthic solute fluxes compared to in-situ data. A key advance is the replacement of bulk parameterisation of bioturbation by explicit description of the bio-physical processes responsible. This permits direct comparison with observations and determination of key parameters in experiments. Crucially, the model resolves the two-way interaction between sediment biogeochemistry and ecology, allowing exploration of the benthic response to changing environmental conditions, the importance of infaunal functional traits in shaping benthic ecological structure and the feedback the resulting bio-physical processes exert on pore water nutrient profiles. The model is actively being used to understand shelf sea carbon cycling, the response of the benthos to climatic change, food provision and other societal benefits.

  4. Structure and properties of sodium bismuth titanate ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksel, Elena

    Piezoelectric materials are commonly used in sensor and actuator technologies due to their unique ability to couple electrical and mechanical displacements. Applications of piezoelectric materials range from diesel engine fuel injectors, sonar, ultrasound, and nanopositioners in scanning microscopes. Changing environmental regulations and policies have led to a recent surge in the research of lead-free piezoelectric materials. One such system currently under investigation is sodium bismuth titanate (Na0.5Bi0.5 TiO3) or NBT. It has recently been investigated with the addition of chemical modifiers as well as part of various solid solutions with other compounds. However, research into the structure and properties of NBT is still in its infancy. The aim of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive understanding of the crystal structure and property relationships in NBT. First, the formation of the NBT phase during solid state processing was examined using in situ X-ray diffraction. It was determined that NBT forms through a particle conversion mechanism of the Bi2O 3 particle. The average and local room temperature structure of calcined and sintered NBT were examined using both high resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction techniques. It was determined that the room temperature average structure of this material is best modeled using the monoclinic Cc space group rather than the previously accepted rhombohedral R3c space group. A combined high resolution XRD and neutron diffraction Rietveld refinement provided refined lattice parameters, atomic positions, and displacement parameters. The departure of the local structure of NBT from the average structure was examined through the Pair Distribution Function analysis. It was determined that Na+ and Bi3+, which share the A-site, have differing bonding environments with their surrounding O2- ions. In order to understand the origin of the piezoelectric depolarization behavior of NBT, crystal

  5. Biochemical and Structural Properties of Mouse Kynurenine Aminotransferase III

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Robinson, H; Cai, T; Tagle, D; Li, J

    2009-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase III (KAT III) has been considered to be involved in the production of mammalian brain kynurenic acid (KYNA), which plays an important role in protecting neurons from overstimulation by excitatory neurotransmitters. The enzyme was identified based on its high sequence identity with mammalian KAT I, but its activity toward kynurenine and its structural characteristics have not been established. In this study, the biochemical and structural properties of mouse KAT III (mKAT III) were determined. Specifically, mKAT III cDNA was amplified from a mouse brain cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was expressed in an insect cell protein expression system. We established that mKAT III is able to efficiently catalyze the transamination of kynurenine to KYNA and has optimum activity at relatively basic conditions of around pH 9.0 and at relatively high temperatures of 50 to 60C. In addition, mKAT III is active toward a number of other amino acids. Its activity toward kynurenine is significantly decreased in the presence of methionine, histidine, glutamine, leucine, cysteine, and 3-hydroxykynurenine. Through macromolecular crystallography, we determined the mKAT III crystal structure and its structures in complex with kynurenine and glutamine. Structural analysis revealed the overall architecture of mKAT III and its cofactor binding site and active center residues. This is the first report concerning the biochemical characteristics and crystal structures of KAT III enzymes and provides a basis toward understanding the overall physiological role of mammalian KAT III in vivo and insight into regulating the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain.

  6. Structure and mechanical properties of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, Francesca; Kovalev, Alexander; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the morphology and mechanical features of Octopus vulgaris suckers, which may serve as a model for the creation of a new generation of attachment devices. Octopus suckers attach to a wide range of substrates in wet conditions, including rough surfaces. This amazing feature is made possible by the sucker's tissues, which are pliable to the substrate profile. Previous studies have described a peculiar internal structure that plays a fundamental role in the attachment and detachment processes of the sucker. In this work, we present a mechanical characterization of the tissues involved in the attachment process, which was performed using microindentation tests. We evaluated the elasticity modulus and viscoelastic parameters of the natural tissues (E ∼ 10 kPa) and measured the mechanical properties of some artificial materials that have previously been used in soft robotics. Such a comparison of biological prototypes and artificial material that mimics octopus-sucker tissue is crucial for the design of innovative artificial suction cups for use in wet environments. We conclude that the properties of the common elastomers that are generally used in soft robotics are quite dissimilar to the properties of biological suckers. PMID:24284894

  7. Structure of nonevaporating sprays. II - Drop and turbulence properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, A. S. P.; Shuen, J.-S.; Zhang, Q.-Z.; Faeth, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    This is the second part of a study reporting structure measurements in the dilute portion of axisymmetric nonevaporating sprays. Measurements are compared with predictions of three typical methods for analyzing sprays: (1) locally homogeneous flow (LHF) analysis, where slip between the phases is neglected; (2) deterministic separated flow (DSF) analysis, where slip is considered but effects of drop interactions with turbulence are ignored; and (3) stochastic separated flow (SSF) analysis, where both slip and effects of drop interactions with turbulence are considered. This part of the study reports measurements of mean and fluctuating drop velocities, the variation of Sauter mean diameter, and gas-phase turbulence properties in the dilute portion of the sprays. Best agreement between predictions and measurements was obtained with the SSF analysis. For present measurements in the dilute region (void fraction greater than 99.1 percent), effects of drops on gas-phase turbulence properties (turbulence modulation) were small. However, as the dense spray regions near the injector were approached, the measurements indicated modification of turbulence properties by drop motion.

  8. Structure and mechanical properties of Octopus vulgaris suckers

    PubMed Central

    Tramacere, Francesca; Kovalev, Alexander; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the morphology and mechanical features of Octopus vulgaris suckers, which may serve as a model for the creation of a new generation of attachment devices. Octopus suckers attach to a wide range of substrates in wet conditions, including rough surfaces. This amazing feature is made possible by the sucker's tissues, which are pliable to the substrate profile. Previous studies have described a peculiar internal structure that plays a fundamental role in the attachment and detachment processes of the sucker. In this work, we present a mechanical characterization of the tissues involved in the attachment process, which was performed using microindentation tests. We evaluated the elasticity modulus and viscoelastic parameters of the natural tissues (E ∼ 10 kPa) and measured the mechanical properties of some artificial materials that have previously been used in soft robotics. Such a comparison of biological prototypes and artificial material that mimics octopus-sucker tissue is crucial for the design of innovative artificial suction cups for use in wet environments. We conclude that the properties of the common elastomers that are generally used in soft robotics are quite dissimilar to the properties of biological suckers. PMID:24284894

  9. Structure and mechanical properties of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, Francesca; Kovalev, Alexander; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the morphology and mechanical features of Octopus vulgaris suckers, which may serve as a model for the creation of a new generation of attachment devices. Octopus suckers attach to a wide range of substrates in wet conditions, including rough surfaces. This amazing feature is made possible by the sucker's tissues, which are pliable to the substrate profile. Previous studies have described a peculiar internal structure that plays a fundamental role in the attachment and detachment processes of the sucker. In this work, we present a mechanical characterization of the tissues involved in the attachment process, which was performed using microindentation tests. We evaluated the elasticity modulus and viscoelastic parameters of the natural tissues (E ∼ 10 kPa) and measured the mechanical properties of some artificial materials that have previously been used in soft robotics. Such a comparison of biological prototypes and artificial material that mimics octopus-sucker tissue is crucial for the design of innovative artificial suction cups for use in wet environments. We conclude that the properties of the common elastomers that are generally used in soft robotics are quite dissimilar to the properties of biological suckers.

  10. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  11. Tooth and bone deformation: structure and material properties by ESPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslansky, Paul; Shahar, Ron; Barak, Meir M.; Friesem, Asher A.; Weiner, Steve

    2006-08-01

    In order to understand complex-hierarchical biomaterials such as bones and teeth, it is necessary to relate their structure and mechanical-properties. We have adapted electronic speckle pattern-correlation interferometry (ESPI) to make measurements of deformation of small water-immersed specimens of teeth and bones. By combining full-field ESPI with precision mechanical loading we mapped sub-micron displacements and determined material-properties of the samples. By gradually and elastically compressing the samples, we compensate for poor S/N-ratios and displacement differences of about 100nm were reliably determined along samples just 2~3mm long. We produced stress-strain curves well within the elastic performance range of these materials under biologically relevant conditions. For human tooth-dentin, Young's modulus in inter-dental areas of the root is 40% higher than on the outer sides. For cubic equine bone samples the compression modulus of axial orientations is about double the modulus of radial and tangential orientations (20 GPa versus 10 GPa respectively). Furthermore, we measured and reproduced a surprisingly low Poisson's ratio, which averaged about 0.1. Thus the non-contact and non-destructive measurements by ESPI produce high sensitivity analyses of mechanical properties of mineralized tissues. This paves the way for mapping deformation-differences of various regions of bones, teeth and other biomaterials.

  12. Structural and functional properties of the Trichosporon asahii glucuronoxylomannan.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fernanda L; Frases, Susana; Casadevall, Arturo; Fischman-Gompertz, Olga; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Rodrigues, Marcio L

    2009-01-01

    The virulence attributes of Trichosporon asahii are virtually unknown, despite its growing relevance as causative agent of superficial and invasive diseases in humans. Glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) is a well described virulence factor of pathogenic species in the Cryptococcus genus. GXM is also produced by species of the Trichosporon genus, and both polysaccharides share antigenic determinants, but unlike cryptococcal GXM, relatively little work has been done on trichosporal GXMs. In this study, we analyzed structural and functional aspects of GXM produced by T. asahii and compared them to the properties of the cryptococcal polysaccharide. Trichosporal and cryptococcal GXM shared antigenic reactivity, but the former polysaccharide had smaller effective diameter and negative charge. GXM anchoring to the cell wall was perturbed by dimethylsulfoxide and required interactions of chitin-derived oligomers with the polysaccharide. GXM from T. asahii supernatants are incorporated by acapsular mutants of Cryptococcus neoformans, which renders these cells more resistant to phagocytosis by mouse macrophages. In summary, our results establish that despite similarities in cell wall anchoring, antigenic and antiphagocytic properties, trichosporal and cryptococcal GXMs manifest major structural differences that may directly affect polysaccharide assembly at the fungal surface.

  13. Structural and functional properties of the Trichosporon asahii glucuronoxylomannan

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernanda L.; Frases, Susana; Casadevall, Arturo; Fischman-Gompertz, Olga; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2015-01-01

    The virulence attributes of Trichosporon asahii are virtually unknown, despite its growing relevance as causative agent of superficial and invasive diseases in humans. Glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) is a well described virulence factor of pathogenic species in the Cryptococcus genus. GXM is also produced by species of the Trichosporon genus, and both polysaccharides share antigenic determinants, but unlike cryptococcal GXM, relatively little work has been done on trichosporal GXMs. In this study, we analyzed structural and functional aspects of GXM produced by T. asahii and compared them to the properties of the cryptococcal polysaccharide. Trichosporal and cryptococcal GXM shared antigenic reactivity, but the former polysaccharide had smaller effective diameter and negative charge. GXM anchoring to the cell wall was perturbed by dimethylsulfoxide and required interactions of chitin-derived oligomers with the polysaccharide. GXM from T. asahii supernatants are incorporated by acapsular mutants of Cryptococcus neoformans, which renders these cells more resistant to phagocytosis by mouse macrophages. In summary, our results establish that despite similarities in cell wall anchoring, antigenic and antiphagocytic properties, trichosporal and cryptococcal GXMs manifest major structural differences that may directly affect polysaccharide assembly at the fungal surface. PMID:19285564

  14. Structure and chemical properties of molybdenum oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ramana, C. V.; Atuchin, V. V.; Pokrovsky, L. D.; Becker, U.; Julien, C. M.

    2007-07-15

    Molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 3}) exhibits interesting structural, chemical, electrical, and optical properties, which are dependent on the growth conditions and the fabrication technique. In the present work, MoO{sub 3} films were produced by pulsed-laser deposition and dc magnetron sputtering under varying conditions of growth temperature (T{sub s}) and oxygen pressure (pO{sub 2}). The effect of growth conditions on the structure and chemical properties of MoO{sub 3} films was examined using x-ray diffraction, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopic measurements. The analyses indicate that the microstructure of Mo oxide films is sensitive to T{sub s} and pO{sub 2}. The growth conditions were optimized to produce stoichiometric and highly textured polycrystalline MoO{sub 3} films. A comparison of the microstructure of MoO{sub 3} films grown using pulsed-laser deposition and sputtering methods is also presented.

  15. Structure and rheological properties in alkali aluminosilicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, Charles; Neuville, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Rheological properties of silicate melts govern both magma ascension from the mantle to the surface of the earth and volcanological eruptions styles and behaviors. In this mind, it is very important to understand which parameters influence these properties. Up to now, we know for example that viscosity of silicate melts is dependent of temperature, pressure and chemical composition. In this work, we will focus on the Na2O-K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 system, which is of a prime importance because it deals with a non-negligible part of natural melts like haplogranitic rhyolitic alkali magmas. We will first present our viscosity measurements and some modelisation concepts based on the Adam and Gibbs theory. From configurational entropy theory we obtain some macroscopic information's that we can link to the structure of glasses and melts. In this mind, we have investigated them with Raman and NMR spectroscopies. These spectroscopies provide information on speciation and polymerization of glasses and melts. We will present and discuss structural and rheological variations as a function of temperature and chemical change.

  16. Structural properties of particle deposits at heterogeneous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojiljković, D.; Šćepanović, J. R.; Vrhovac, S. B.; Švrakić, N. M.

    2015-06-01

    The random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach is used to analyze adsorption of spherical particles of a fixed radius on nonuniform flat surfaces covered by rectangular cells. The configuration of the cells (heterogeneities) was produced by performing RSA simulations to a prescribed coverage fraction θ_0{(cell)} . Adsorption was assumed to occur if the particle (projected) center lies within a rectangular cell area, i.e. if sphere touches the cells. The jammed-state properties of the model were studied for different values of cell size α (comparable with the adsorbing particle size) and density θ_0{(cell)} . Numerical simulations were carried out to investigate adsorption kinetics, jamming coverage, and structure of coverings. Structural properties of the jammed-state coverings were analyzed in terms of the radial distribution function g(r) and distribution of the Delaunay ‘free’ volumes P(v). It was demonstrated that adsorption kinetics and the jamming coverage decreased significantly, at a fixed density θ_0{(cell)} , when the cell size α increased. The predictions following from our calculation suggest that the porosity (pore volumes) of deposited monolayer can be controlled by the size and shape of landing cells, and by anisotropy of the cell deposition procedure.

  17. Lanthanide Ion Doped Upconverting Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Structure and Properties.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chenglin; Zhao, Haiguang; Perepichka, Dmitrii F; Rosei, Federico

    2016-08-01

    Lanthanide doped upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) have emerged as a new class of luminescent materials, with major discoveries and overall significant progress during the last decade. Unlike multiphoton absorption in organic dyes or semiconductor quantum dots, lanthanide doped UCNPs involve real intermediate quantum states and convert infrared (IR) into visible light via sequential electronic excitation. The relatively high efficiency of this process even at low radiation flux makes UCNPs particularly attractive for many current and emerging areas of technology. The aim of this article is to highlight several recent advances in this rapidly growing field, emphasizing the relationships between structure and properties of UCNPs. Additionally, various strategies developed for the synthesis of UCNPs with a focus on the various synthetic approaches that yield high-quality monodisperse samples with controlled size, shape and crystalline phase are reviewed. Emerging synthetic approaches towards designed structure to improve the optical and electronic properties of UCNPs are discussed. Finally, recent examples of applications of UCNPs in biomedical and optoelectronics research, giving our own perspectives on future directions and emerging possibilities of the field are described. PMID:27345736

  18. Bridged bis-BODIPYs: their synthesis, structures and properties.

    PubMed

    Kesavan, Praseetha E; Das, Sudipta; Lone, Mohsin Y; Jha, Prakash C; Mori, Shigeki; Gupta, Iti

    2015-10-21

    A series of bis-BODIPYs 1-6 bridged via thiophene, furan, N-alkylcarbazole, triphenyl-amine, para- and meta-phenylene groups have been synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. The change in the spectroscopic properties of bis-BODIPYs upon varying the size of spacers was studied. X-ray crystal structures of three bis-BODIPYs containing triphenylamine, para- and meta-phenylene bridges were solved. Intermolecular C(H)π and ππ stacking interactions were observed in solid state structures of three bis-BODIPYs. The dihedral angles between the spacer unit and two boron-dipyrrin units were lower in all three compounds as compared to their corresponding monomers. This suggests increased interactions between the two boron-dipyrrin units in molecules which are in turn reflected in the anodic shifts in their reduction potentials. DFT studies indicated effective electronic interactions between spacers and two boron dipyrrin units in all the bis-BODIPYs. The calculated HOMO-LUMO gap was found to be lower for bis-BODIPY having bulky carbazole spacers and higher for bis-BODIPY having smaller furan spacers. Changing the spacer size clearly affected the spectroscopic properties of the bis-BODIPYs and red shifted absorption and emission maxima were observed for bis-BODIPYs with furan and thiophene spacers as compared to bis-BODIPYs with phenylene or bulky aromatic spacers. PMID:26373792

  19. Preparation and properties on hollow nano-structured smoke material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang-cui; Dai, Meng-yan; Fang, Guo-feng; Shi, Wei-dong; Cheng, Xiang; Liu, Hai-feng; Zhang, Tong

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, the weapon systems of laser guidance and infrared (IR) imaging guidance have been widely used in modern warfare because of their high precision and strong anti-interference. Notwithstanding, military smoke, as a rapid and effective passive jamming means, can effectively counteract the attack of enemy precision-guided weapons by scattering and absorbability. Conventional smoke has good attenuation capability only to visible light (0.4-0.76 μm), but hardly any effect to other electromagnetic wave band. The weapon systems of laser guidance and IR imaging guidance usually work in broad band, including near IR (1-3 μm), middle IR (3-5 μm), far IR (8-14 μm), and so on. Accordingly, exploiting and using new efficient obscurant materials, which is one of the important factors that develop smoke technology, have become a focus and attracted more interests around the world. Then nano-structured materials that are developing very quickly have turned into our new choice. Hollow nano-structured materials (HNSM) have many special properties because of their nano-size wall-thickness and sub-micron grain-size. After a lot of HNSM were synthesized in this paper, their physical and chemical properties, including grain size, phase composition, microstructure, optical properties and resistivity were tested and analysed. Then the experimental results of the optical properties showed that HNSM exhibit excellent wave-absorbing ability in ultraviolet, visible and infrared regions. On the basis of the physicochemmical properties, HNSM are firstly applied in smoke technology field. And the obscuration performance of HNSM smoke was tested in smoke chamber. The testing waveband included 1.06μm and 10.6μm laser, 3-5μm and 8-14μm IR radiation. Then the main parameters were obtained, including the attenuation rate, the transmission rate, the mass extinction coefficient, the efficiency obscuring time, and the sedimentation rate, etc. The main parameters of HNSM smoke were

  20. 41 CFR 102-78.55 - For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? 102-78.55 Section 102-78.55 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 78-HISTORIC PRESERVATION Historic Preservation § 102-78.55 For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? Federal agencies must...

  1. 41 CFR 102-78.55 - For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? 102-78.55 Section 102-78.55 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 78-HISTORIC PRESERVATION Historic Preservation § 102-78.55 For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? Federal agencies must...

  2. 41 CFR 102-78.55 - For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? 102-78.55 Section 102-78.55 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 78-HISTORIC PRESERVATION Historic Preservation § 102-78.55 For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? Federal agencies must...

  3. 41 CFR 102-78.55 - For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? 102-78.55 Section 102-78.55 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 78-HISTORIC PRESERVATION Historic Preservation § 102-78.55 For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? Federal agencies must...

  4. 41 CFR 102-78.55 - For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? 102-78.55 Section 102-78.55 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 78-HISTORIC PRESERVATION Historic Preservation § 102-78.55 For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? Federal agencies must...

  5. Structure and elastic properties of smectic liquid crystalline elastomer films.

    PubMed

    Stannarius, R; Köhler, R; Dietrich, U; Lösche, M; Tolksdorf, C; Zentel, R

    2002-04-01

    Mechanical measurements, x-ray investigations, and optical microscopy are employed to characterize the interplay of chemical composition, network topology, and elastic response of smectic liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) in various mesophases. Macroscopically ordered elastomer films of submicrometer thicknesses were prepared by cross linking freely suspended smectic polymer films. The cross-linked material preserves the mesomorphism and phase transitions of the precursor polymer. The elastic response of the smectic LCE is entropic, and the corresponding elastic moduli are of the order of MPa. In the tilted ferroelectric smectic-C* phase, the network structure plays an important role. Due to the coupling of elastic network deformations to the orientation of the mesogenic groups in interlayer cross-linked materials (mesogenic cross-linker units), the stress-strain characteristics is found to differ qualitatively from that in the other phases.

  6. Thermoluminescence properties of gamma-irradiated nano-structure hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Shafaei, M; Ziaie, F; Sardari, D; Larijani, M M

    2016-02-01

    The suitability of nano-structured hydroxyapatite (HAP) for use as a thermoluminescence dosimeter was investigated. HAP samples were synthesized using a hydrolysis method. The formation of nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and average particle size was estimated to be ~30 nm. The glow curve exhibited a peak centered at around 200 °C. The additive dose method was applied and this showed that the thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves follow first-order kinetics due to the non-shifting nature of Tm after different doses. The numbers of overlapping peaks and related kinetic parameters were identified from Tm -Tstop through computerized glow curve deconvolution methods. The dependence of the TL responses on radiation dose was studied and a linear dose response up to 1000 Gy was observed for the samples.

  7. Advanced structural analysis of nanoporous materials by thermal response measurements.

    PubMed

    Oschatz, Martin; Leistner, Matthias; Nickel, Winfried; Kaskel, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Thermal response measurements based on optical adsorption calorimetry are presented as a versatile tool for the time-saving and profound characterization of the pore structure of porous carbon-based materials. This technique measures the time-resolved temperature change of an adsorbent during adsorption of a test gas. Six carbide and carbon materials with well-defined nanopore architecture including micro- and/or mesopores are characterized by thermal response measurements based on n-butane and carbon dioxide as the test gases. With this tool, the pore systems of the model materials can be clearly distinguished and accurately analyzed. The obtained calorimetric data are correlated with the adsorption/desorption isotherms of the materials. The pore structures can be estimated from a single experiment due to different adsorption enthalpies/temperature increases in micro- and mesopores. Adsorption/desorption cycling of n-butane at 298 K/1 bar with increasing desorption time allows to determine the pore structure of the materials in more detail due to different equilibration times. Adsorption of the organic test gas at selected relative pressures reveals specific contributions of particular pore systems to the increase of the temperature of the samples and different adsorption mechanisms. The use of carbon dioxide as the test gas at 298 K/1 bar provides detailed insights into the ultramicropore structure of the materials because under these conditions the adsorption of this test gas is very sensitive to the presence of pores smaller than 0.7 nm. PMID:25773383

  8. Structure and Electronic Properties of Ionized PAH Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joblin, Christine; Kokkin, Damian L.; Sabbah, Hassan; Bonnamy, Anthony; Dontot, Leo; Rapacioli, Mathias; Simon, Aude; Spiegelman, Fernand; Parneix, Pascal; Pino, Thomas; Pirali, Olivier; Falvo, Cyril; Gamboa, Antonio; Brechignac, Philippe; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters have been proposed as candidates for evaporating very small grains that are revealed by their mid-IR emission at the surface of UV-irradiated clouds in interstellar space. This suggestion is a motivation for further characterization of the properties of these clusters in particular when they are ionized. We have used a molecular beam coupled to the photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectrometer DELICIOUS II/ III at the VUV beamline DESIRS of the synchrotron SOLEIL to characterize the electronic properties of cationic coronene (C24H12) and pyrene (C16H10) clusters up to the pentamer and heptamer, respectively. These experimental results are analysed in the light of electronic structure calculations. Simulations of the properties of ionized PAH clusters are faced with the difficulty of describing charge delocalization in these large systems. We will show that recent developments combining a Density Functional Tight Binding method with Configuration Interaction scheme is successful in simulating the ionization potential, which gives strong confidence into the predicted structures for these PAH clusters. We will also present current effort to study charge transfer states by performing complementary measurements with the PIRENEA ion trap set-up. Joint ANR project GASPARIM, ANR-10-BLAN-501 M. Rapacioli, C. Joblin and P. Boissel Astron. & Astrophys., 429 (2005), 193-204. G. Garcia, H. Soldi-Lose and L. Nahon Rev. Sci. Instrum., 80 (2009), 023102; G. Garcia, B. Cunha de Miranda, M. Tia, S. Daly, L. Nahon, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 84 (2013), 053112 M. Rapacioli, A. Simon, L. Dontot and F. Spiegelman Phys. Status Solidi B, 249 (2) (2012), 245-258; L. Dontot, M. Rapacioli and F. Spiegelman (2014) submitted

  9. Characterization of structural connections using free and forced response test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles; Huckelbridge, Arthur A.

    1989-01-01

    The accurate prediction of system dynamic response often has been limited by deficiencies in existing capabilities to characterize connections adequately. Connections between structural components often are complex mechanically, and difficult to accurately model analytically. Improved analytical models for connections are needed to improve system dynamic preditions. A procedure for identifying physical connection properties from free and forced response test data is developed, then verified utilizing a system having both a linear and nonlinear connection. Connection properties are computed in terms of physical parameters so that the physical characteristics of the connections can better be understood, in addition to providing improved input for the system model. The identification procedure is applicable to multi-degree of freedom systems, and does not require that the test data be measured directly at the connection locations.

  10. Structural response of transport airplanes in crash situations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, R. G.; Caiafa, C.

    1983-01-01

    This report highlights the results of contractural studies of transport accident data undertaken in a joint research program sponsored by the FAA and NASA. From these accident data studies it was concluded that the greatest potential for improved transport crashworthiness is in the reduction of fire related fatalities. Accident data pertaining to fuselage integrity, main landing gear collapse, fuel tank rupture, wing breaks, tearing of tank lower surfaces, and engine pod scrubbing are discussed. In those accidents where the energy absorbing protective capability of the fuselage structure is expended and the airplane experiences major structural damage, trauma caused fatalities are also discussed. The dynamic performance of current seat/restraint systems are examined but it is concluded that the accident data does not adequately define the relationship between occupant response and the dynamic interaction with the seat, floor and fuselage structure.

  11. FAST Mast Structural Response to Axial Loading: Modeling and Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Templeton, Justin D.; Song, Kyongchan; Rayburn, Jeffery T.

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station s solar array wing mast shadowing problem is the focus of this paper. A building-block approach to modeling and analysis is pursued for the primary structural components of the solar array wing mast structure. Starting with an ANSYS (Registered Trademark) finite element model, a verified MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is established for a single longeron. This finite element model translation requires the conversion of several modeling and analysis features for the two structural analysis tools to produce comparable results for the single-longeron configuration. The model is then reconciled using test data. The resulting MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is then extended to a single-bay configuration and verified using single-bay test data. Conversion of the MSC. Nastran (Trademark) single-bay model to Abaqus (Trademark) is also performed to simulate the elastic-plastic longeron buckling response of the single bay prior to folding.

  12. Domain Structure and Properties in Inhomogeneously-Strained Ferroelectric Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Lane

    Epitaxial thin-film growth and the ability to deterministically apply lattice mismatch strain has enabled dramatic control over the structure and properties of a range of ferroelectric materials. Modern ferroelectric films, including bilayer and superlattice heterostructures, have also provided access to exotic structures and properties not available in the bulk. In this work, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of how strain can be manipulated and controlled to elicit new types of responses and new understandings about response in ferroelectric materials. In particular, we will explore new modalities of strain control of ferroelectric materials that go beyond traditional lattice mismatch effects and how this can be used to enhance performance, independently tune susceptibilities, and provide new insights into the nature of these complex materials. In particular, we will focus on the deterministic production of large strain gradients (on the order of >10-5 m-1) via purposeful compositional gradients. We will highlight work on compositionally-graded versions of PbZr1-xTixO3 and Ba1-xSrxTiO3 where careful control of lattice mismatch and chemistry combine to produce large strain gradients, exotic properties, and new approaches to independently control traditionally coupled properties. As part of this discussion, we will explore the evolution of the crystal and domain structure as a function of the end-members of the compositional gradient, thickness of the film, and substrate. Advanced band-excitation piezoresponse force microscopy, switching spectroscopy, and non-linearity studies have been applied. These studies reveal both unexpected crystal and domain structures can be stabilized in these heterostructures and exotic low- and high-field responses can be obtained. Of particular interest will be the results of temperature-dependent probes of susceptibility which reveal large, nearly temperature-independent properties from 25-500°C and the observation of

  13. Charge carrier transport properties in layer structured hexagonal boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Doan, T. C.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2014-10-15

    Due to its large in-plane thermal conductivity, high temperature and chemical stability, large energy band gap (~ 6.4 eV), hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as an important material for applications in deep ultraviolet photonic devices. Among the members of the III-nitride material system, hBN is the least studied and understood. The study of the electrical transport properties of hBN is of utmost importance with a view to realizing practical device applications. Wafer-scale hBN epilayers have been successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical deposition and their electrical transport properties have been probed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. The results demonstrate that undoped hBN is a semiconductor exhibiting weak p-type at high temperatures (> 700 °K). The measured acceptor energy level is about 0.68 eV above the valence band. In contrast to the electrical transport properties of traditional III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, the temperature dependence of the hole mobility in hBN can be described by the form of μ ∝ (T/T{sub 0}){sup −α} with α = 3.02, satisfying the two-dimensional (2D) carrier transport limit dominated by the polar optical phonon scattering. This behavior is a direct consequence of the fact that hBN is a layer structured material. The optical phonon energy deduced from the temperature dependence of the hole mobility is ħω = 192 meV (or 1546 cm{sup -1}), which is consistent with values previously obtained using other techniques. The present results extend our understanding of the charge carrier transport properties beyond the traditional III-nitride semiconductors.

  14. Ground/Flight Correlation of Aerodynamic Loads with Structural Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalam, Arun S.; Davis, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    Ground and flight tests provide a basis and methodology for in-flight characterization of the aerodynamic and structural performance through the monitoring of the fluid-structure interaction. The NF-15B flight tests of the Intelligent Flight Control System program provided a unique opportunity to test the correlation of aerodynamic loads with points of flow attaching and detaching from the surface, which are also known as flow bifurcation points, as observed in a previous wind tunnel test performed at the U.S. Air Force Academy (Colorado Springs, Colorado). Moreover, flight tests, along with the subsequent unsteady aerodynamic tests in the NASA Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), provide a basis using surface flow sensors as means of assessing the aeroelastic performance of flight vehicles. For the flight tests, the NF-15B tail was instrumented with hot-film sensors and strain gages for measuring root-bending strains. This data were gathered via selected sideslip maneuvers performed at level flight and subsonic speeds. The aerodynamic loads generated by the sideslip maneuver resulted in a structural response, which were then compared with the hot-film sensor signals. The hot-film sensor signals near the stagnation region were found to be highly correlated with the root-bending strains. For the TDT tests, a flexible wing section developed under the U.S. Air Force Research Lab SensorCraft program was instrumented with strain gages, accelerometers, and hot-film sensors at two span stations. The TDT tests confirmed the correlation between flow bifurcation points and the wing structural response to tunnel-generated gusts. Furthermore, as the wings structural modes were excited by the gusts, a gradual phase change between the flow bifurcation point and the structural mode occurred during a resonant condition.

  15. Development and Validation of the Implicit Information from Lewis Structures Instrument(IILSI): Do Students Connect Structures with Properties?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Underwood, Sonia M.; Hilley, Caleb Z.

    2012-01-01

    Lewis structures are a simplified two dimensional "cartoon" of molecular structure that allow a knowledgeable user to predict the types of properties a particular substance may exhibit. However, prior research shows that many students fail to recognize these structure-property connections and are unable to decode the information contained in the…

  16. Structural and Dynamic Properties of the Human Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; van der Kamp, Marc W.; Daggett, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases involve the conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) to its misfolded pathogenic form (PrPSc). To better understand the structural mechanism of this conversion, we performed extensive all-atom, explicit-solvent molecular-dynamics simulations for three structures of the wild-type human PrP (huPrP) at different pH values and temperatures. Residue 129 is polymorphic, being either Met or Val. Two of the three structures have Met in position 129 and the other has Val. Lowering the pH or raising the temperature induced large conformational changes of the C-terminal globular domain and increased exposure of its hydrophobic core. In some simulations, HA and its preceding S1-HA loop underwent large displacements. The C-terminus of HB was unstable and sometimes partially unfolded. Two hydrophobic residues, Phe-198 and Met-134, frequently became exposed to solvent. These conformational changes became more dramatic at lower pH or higher temperature. Furthermore, Tyr-169 and the S2-HB loop, or the X-loop, were different in the starting structures but converged to common conformations in the simulations for the Met-129, but not the Val-129, protein. α-Strands and β-strands formed in the initially unstructured N-terminus. α-Strand propensity in the N-terminus was different between the Met-129 and Val129 proteins, but β-strand propensity was similar. This study reveals detailed structural and dynamic properties of huPrP, providing insight into the mechanism of the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. PMID:24606939

  17. Tyrosine Aminotransferase: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    P Mehere; Q Han; J Lemkul; C Vavricka; H Robinson; D Bevan; J Li

    2011-12-31

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  18. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mehere, P.; Robinson, H.; Han, Q.; Lemkul, J. A.; Vavricka, C. J.; Bevan, D. R.; Li, J.

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  19. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Mehere, Prajwalini; Han, Qian; Lemkul, Justin A; Vavricka, Christopher J; Robinson, Howard; Bevan, David R; Li, Jianyong

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using α-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  20. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-06-16

    We believe that the high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is the result of the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with a nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH3) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Additionally, the particular end group (COOH or CH3) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.

  1. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-06-16

    We believe that the high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is the result of the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with amore » nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH3) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Additionally, the particular end group (COOH or CH3) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.« less

  2. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes.

    PubMed

    Salerno, K Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S; Lane, J Matthew D; Grest, Gary S

    2015-06-01

    The high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is believed to result from the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with a nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH(3)) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Moreover, the particular end group (COOH or CH(3)) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.

  3. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, K. Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-06-01

    The high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is believed to result from the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with a nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH3) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Moreover, the particular end group (COOH or CH3) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.

  4. Magnetic and Structural Properties of Ultra-Thin Cobalt Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedmann, Michael Helmut

    In situ polar Kerr effect measurements have been used to study the magnetic anisotropy of Au(111)/Co/X, Pd(111)/Co/X, Cu(111)/Co/X, and Pd(100)/Co/X sandwiches, where X is the nonmagnetic metal Ag, Au, Cu, Ir, and Pd or the insulator MgO. The films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). For the metals, we found that the magnitude of the Co/X perpendicular interface anisotropy is strongly peaked at ~1 atomic layer (1.5-2.5 A) coverage. To investigate structural influences on the anisotropy, we have used reflection high energy diffraction (RHEED) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) to measure changes resulting from overlayer coverage. Analysis of digitized RHEED images captured every ~ 1 A during metal overlayer coverage shows no abrupt change of the in-plane lattice constant. We have also investigated the out-of-plane lattice spacing as a function of nonmagnetic metal coverage by measuring LEED I-V curves along the (0,0) rod. In the case of Cu, where the LEED behavior is nearly kinematic, we see no evidence of any abrupt structural changes at ~1 atomic layer coverage. These results suggest the observed peak in magnetic anisotropy is not structural in origin. The influence of an insulating overlayer, MgO, on the perpendicular magnetic properties was also investigated.

  5. Optical and structural properties of Al-ZnO nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geon Joon; Deshpande, Nishad Gopal; Lee, Young Pak; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Swami, Narasimha; Bhat, Jeddu Sadashiva

    2014-05-01

    The optical and structural properties of aluminium-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films were investigated by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy. Pure zinc oxide (ZnO) and AZO composite films were deposited using vacuum evaporation method. The films exhibited different morphologies and crystallinity depending on the Al-doping. The SEM micrographs showed that a granular and compact structure could be seen for the ZnO film, while a nanoleaf structure with relatively porous nature was observed for the AZO composite film. The XRD patterns indicated that the crystalline growth orientation would be significantly affected by addition of Al. Compared with pure ZnO, the XRD peak intensity of the AZO composite was stronger and the line-width was narrower. Two-probe resistivity measurements showed that the AZO composites could be used as transparent conducting materials. The PL spectra revealed that the PL intensities of the AZO composites were stronger than that of the pure ZnO. The PL enhancement might be ascribed to the surface plasmon resonance of metal nanoclusters within the composite. Another possible reason of the PL enhancement would be the metal-induced crystallization caused by doping Al to ZnO matrix.

  6. Structure and elastic properties of boron suboxide at 240 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. P.; He, D. W.

    2009-04-01

    Structure and elastic properties of boron suboxide at high pressure have been investigated using generalized gradient approximation within the plane-wave pseudopotential density functional theory. The elastic constants are calculated using the finite strain method. The pressure dependences of lattice parameters, elastic constants, aggregate elastic moduli, and sound velocities of boron suboxide are predicted. It is found that the most stable structure of hcp boron suboxide at zero pressure corresponds to the ratio c /a of about 2.274 and the equilibrium lattice parameters a0 and c0 are about 5.331 and 12.124 Å, respectively. The high-pressure elastic constants indicate that boron suboxide is mechanically stable up to 368 GPa. The pressure dependence of the calculated normalized volume and the aggregate elastic moduli agree well with the recent experimental results. The sound velocities along different directions for the structure of boron suboxide are obtained. It shows that the velocities of the shear wave decrease as pressure increases but those of all the longitudinal waves increase with pressure. Moreover, the azimuthal anisotropy of the compression and shear aggregate wave velocities for different pressures are predicted. They change behavior with increasing pressure around 87 GPa because of an electronic topological transition. A refined analysis has been made to reveal the high pressure elastic anisotropy in boron suboxide.

  7. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Oyama, A. B.; Silva-Molina, R. A.; Ruíz-García, J.; Gámez-Corrales, R.; Guirado-López, R. A.

    2014-11-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH-MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ˜2 nm, lengths of approximately 100-300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage θ˜0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH-MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO-LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube → OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH-MWCNTs might have promising applications.

  8. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    López-Oyama, A. B.; Silva-Molina, R. A.; Ruíz-García, J.; Guirado-López, R. A.; Gámez-Corrales, R.

    2014-11-07

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH–MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ∼2 nm, lengths of approximately 100–300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage θ∼0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH–MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO–LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube → OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH–MWCNTs might have promising applications.

  9. Structure, stability, and mechanical properties of intermetallic phases

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Liu, C.T.

    1993-12-31

    The importance of the structural stability of intermetallics with regard to their mechanical properties is illustrated with two case studies. First, the importance of structural and thermal defects for the strength of (weakly ordered) FeAl and (strongly ordered) NiAl is shown. Several inconsistencies and unresolved issues in the present understanding of point defects in FeAl are addressed. Since point defects alone may not explain the mechanical differences between these two materials, the role of dislocations is considered as well. It is shown that the differences in the atomic bonding of FeAl and NiAl, which deter-mine the active slip systems, are likely to influence the compositional dependence of the strength of these two intermetallics. Second, the class of the trialuminides is reviewed with emphasis on Al{sub 3}Ti. In addition to stabilizing a cubic crystal structure, the ratio of K/G, where K is the bulk modulus and G the shear modulus, needs to be increased in order to achieve extensive plastic deformation at room temperature. It is not clear, at the present time, to what extent macroalloying of trialuminides can achieve this goal, although promising results have been reported for Al{sub 3}Ti containing relatively high concentrations (14 at. %) of chromium.

  10. Bismuth iron titanate pyrochlores: Thermostability, structure and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Piir, I.V.; Koroleva, M.S.; Ryabkov, Yu.I.; Korolev, D.A.; Chezhina, N.V.; Semenov, V.G.; Panchuk, V.V.

    2013-08-15

    Iron containing bismuth titanates with pyrochlore structure Bi{sub 1.6}Fe{sub x}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7−δ}, where 0.08≤x≤0.4, were obtained by ceramic procedure. The results of bough pycnometric density of the pyrochlores and of X-ray powder diffraction structure refinement points to the preference for iron atoms to occupy the Bi{sup 3+}-sites. Electric and magnetic properties were studied for single phase pyrochlores based on bismuth titanates. The magnetic ordering was studied by the methods of Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility. - Graphical abstract: The ideal crystal structure of pyrochlore A{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 6}O' (A—Bi{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+}; B—Ti{sup 4+}, Fe{sup 3+}). Highlights: • Bismuth titanate pyrochlores stable over a wide temperature range were obtained. • The distribution of Fe{sup 3+} over various sites was determined. • The obtained systems were characterized by magnetic susceptibility, Mössbauer spectroscopy and conductivity.

  11. Structure and Properties of HELICAL CARBON NANOTUBES through MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, Akshay; Verma, Deepti; Gupta, Shakti S.

    Helical Carbon Nanotubes (HCNTs) are coiled 3-valent carbon networks which represent pure carbon helix. Here we study the geometries of two classes: hexagonal helix containing purely polyhex networks and the second class with 5-and 7-membered rings besides hexagons. We followed a model of hexagonal, single wall HCNTs, and determined their relaxed configuration using MD simulations based on Tersoff potential. A race-track like structure is observed in the cross-section of HCNTs upon minimization. For generating class two helix, the adjacency matrix eigenvector's (AME) method is applied which utilizes 3-coordinated tiling of the plane by 5-,6-,and 7-membered ring for the construction of helical structures. The application of the AME method to torusenes is crucial for class two helix generation as it is based on an appropriate choice of bi-lobial eigenvectors triplet which can be selected on the basis of their nodal properties as verified here. After 3-D transformations the final structure was obtained with the help of MM3-potential based MD simulations on Tinker commercial code. The spring constants of HCNTs are computed through MD simulations.

  12. Structure-based view on [PSI(+)] prion properties.

    PubMed

    Bondarev, Stanislav A; Zhouravleva, Galina A; Belousov, Mikhail V; Kajava, Andrey V

    2015-01-01

    Yeast [PSI(+)] prion is one of the most suitable and well characterized system for the investigation of the prion phenomenon. However, until recently, the lack of data on the 3D arrangement of Sup35p prion fibrils hindered progress in this area. The recent arrival in this field of new experimental techniques led to the parallel and in-register superpleated β-structure as a consensus model for Sup35p fibrils. Here, we analyzed the effect of amino acid substitutions of the Sup35 protein through the prism of this structural model. Application of a newly developed computational approach, called ArchCandy, gives us a better understanding of the effect caused by mutations on the fibril forming potential of Sup35 protein. This bioinformatics tool can be used for the design of new mutations with desired modification of prion properties. Thus, we provide examples of how today, having progress toward elucidation of the structural arrangement of Sup35p fibrils, researchers can advance more efficiently to a better understanding of prion [PSI(+)] stability and propagation.

  13. Carbon nanotubes on carbon fibers: Synthesis, structures and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiuhong

    localized transverse compression at low loads (muN to mN) and small displacements (nm to a few mum). Force, strain, stiffness, and electrical resistance were monitored simultaneously during compression experiments. The results showed that CNT/CF possess a high sensing capability between force and resistance. Hysteresis in both force-displacement and resistance-displacement curves was observed with CNT/CF, but was more evident as maximum strain increased and did not depend on strain rate. Force was higher and resistance was lower during compression as compared to decompression. A model is proposed to explain hysteresis where van der Waals forces between deformed and entangled nanotubes hinder decompression of some of the compressed tubes that are in contact with each other. This study provides a new understanding of the mechanical and electrical behavior of CNT/CF that will facilitate usage as stress and strain sensors in both stand-alone and composite materials applications. A novel method for in situ observation of nano-micro scale CNT/CF mechanical behavior by SEM has been developed in this study. The results indicated that deformation of vertical aligned CNT (VACNT) forest followed a column-like bending mechanism under localized radial (axial) compression. No fracture was observed even at very high compression strain on a VACNT forest. In order to fully understand CNT forest properties, the viscous creep behavior of VACNT arrays grown on flat Si substrate has also been characterized using a nanoindentation method. Resulting creep response was observed to consist of a short transient stage and a steady state stage in which the rate of displacement was constant. The strain rate sensitivity depended on the density of the nanotube arrays, but it was independent of the ramping (compression) rate of the indenter.

  14. Structure-property relationships in polymers for dielectric capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sahil

    Effective energy storage is a key challenge of the 21st century that has fueled research in the area of energy storage devices. In this dissertation, structure-property relationships have been evaluated for polymers that might be suitable for storing energy in high-energy density, high-temperature capacitors. Firstly, hydroxyl-modified polypropylenes (PPOH) were synthesized by copolymerization of the propylene and undecenyloxytrimethylsilane monomers. The presence of H-bonding in PPOH copolymers increased their glass-transition temperature. Steric hindrance by the comonomer reduced the PP crystal growth rate and crystal size, resulting in a melting point depression. The comonomer was restricted outside the crystalline domains leaving the alpha-monoclinic crystal structure of PP unaffected, but increasing the fold-surface free energy. Crystallization was slower for PPOH copolymers than PP, but exhibited a skewed bell curve as a function of hydroxyl concentration. H-bonding persisted even at melt temperatures up to 250°C resulting in a higher elasticity and viscosity for PPOH copolymers. Secondly, sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (HSPEEK) was synthesized by sulfonating PEEK with sulfuric acid, and further neutralized with Zn to obtain ZnSPEEK. The thermal and dielectric properties of SPEEK were compared with PEEK. The glass-transition increased and melting point were high enough to enable the use of polymer at 180°C. The incorporation of sulfonic groups in PEEK increased the dielectric constant. HSPEEK had a higher dielectric constant than ZnSPEEK due to higher dipolar mobility, but the dielectric loss was also higher for HSPEEK due to electrode polarization and DC conduction. These results were consistent with our observations from sulfonated polystyrene (HSPS), which was used as a >model&lang' polymer. Lastly, commercial poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) (P4MP) was characterized to check its viability as a high-temperature polymer dielectric. Thermal stability up to

  15. Dynamic structure of joint-action stimulus-response activity.

    PubMed

    Malone, MaryLauren; Castillo, Ramon D; Kloos, Heidi; Holden, John G; Richardson, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The mere presence of a co-actor can influence an individual's response behavior. For instance, a social Simon effect has been observed when two individuals perform a Go/No-Go response to one of two stimuli in the presence of each other, but not when they perform the same task alone. Such effects are argued to provide evidence that individuals co-represent the task goals and the to-be-performed actions of a co-actor. Motivated by the complex-systems approach, the present study was designed to investigate an alternative hypothesis--that such joint-action effects are due to a dynamical (time-evolving) interpersonal coupling that operates to perturb the behavior of socially situated actors. To investigate this possibility, participants performed a standard Go/No-Go Simon task in joint and individual conditions. The dynamic structure of recorded reaction times was examined using fractal statistics and instantaneous cross-correlation. Consistent with our hypothesis that participants responding in a shared space would become behaviorally coupled, the analyses revealed that reaction times in the joint condition displayed decreased fractal structure (indicative of interpersonal perturbation processes modulating ongoing participant behavior) compared to the individual condition, and were more correlated across a range of time-scales compared to the reaction times of pseudo-pair controls. Collectively, the findings imply that dynamic processes might underlie social stimulus-response compatibility effects and shape joint cognitive processes in general.

  16. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.

    2014-01-01

    For several decades large reverberant chambers and most recently direct field acoustic testing have been used in the aerospace industry to test larger structures with low surface densities such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify them and to detect faults in the design and fabrication. It has been reported that in reverberant chamber and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes may strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware (Reference 1). In this paper results from a recent reverberant chamber acoustic test of a composite reflector are discussed. These results provide further convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave and structural modes coupling phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to alert test organizations to this phenomenon so that they can account for the potential increase in structural responses and ensure that flight hardware undergoes safe testing. An understanding of the coupling phenomenon may also help minimize the over and/or under testing that could pose un-anticipated structural and flight qualification issues.

  17. The Otitis Media-6 questionnaire: psychometric properties with emphasis on factor structure and interpretability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Otitis Media-6 questionnaire (OM-6) is the most frequently used instrument to measure health related quality of life in children with otitis media. The main objectives of this study are 1) to translate and cross-culturally adapt the OM-6 into Danish, and 2) to assess important psychometric properties including structural validity and interpretability of the OM-6 in a Danish population of children suffering from otitis media. Methods The OM-6 was translated and cross-culturally adapted according to international guidelines. A longitudinal validation study enrolled 491 children and their families, and the measurement properties of the OM-6 were evaluated using the Cosmin taxonomy. The properties assessed were construct and structural validity (confirmatory factor analysis) including internal consistency, reproducibility (test-retest reliability and smallest detectable change), responsiveness and interpretability. Results A total of 435 children were eligible to participate in the study. Analyses of structural validity and internal consistency indicated that parent appraisal of hearing and speech problems may be problematic. Both scales showed similarly good test-retest reliability and construct validity, were able to discriminate between diagnostic subgroups and responsive to change. Cut-off values of 16.7 and 30.0 were found to represent minimal important change for the patients. Conclusions The Danish version of the OM-6 is a reliable, valid, responsive and interpretable questionnaire to measure quality of life in children with otitis media. This study sheds light on possible weaknesses of the instrument that needs to be acknowledged in the utilization of the instrument. However, despite these issues our results support the continuing use of OM-6 as a 1-factor functional health scale with a separate global health rating. Furthermore, indications of values representing minimal important change as perceived by the respondent are presented. PMID

  18. Composition-structure-property relationships of commercial polyurethane foams for mattresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarfato, P.; Di Maio, L.; D'Arienzo, L.; Rinaldi, S.; Incarnato, L.

    2015-12-01

    Three commercial flexible polyurethane foams used for mattress have been submitted to chemical-physical analyses, water vapor permeability and compression mechanical tests, in order to understand the relationships among their composition, structure, and some functional properties of interest for bedding applications. The results demonstrated that all the three foams have open cell morphology and similar cell structure, with average cell diameters ranging from 430 to 510 micron and wide cell size distribution. As a consequence, they also show comparable water vapor transport behavior. On the contrary, their mechanical response, in terms of hysteresis loss, surface firmness and resistance to bottoming out, was found strongly dependent on their chemical structure and molecular mobility, as inferred from infrared spectroscopy analysis.

  19. Cell wall pectic arabinans influence the mechanical properties of Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems and their response to mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Verhertbruggen, Yves; Marcus, Susan E; Chen, Jianshe; Knox, J Paul

    2013-08-01

    Little is known of the dynamics of plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides in response to the impact of mechanical stress on plant organs. The capacity of the imposition of a mechanical stress (periodic brushing) to reduce the height of the inflorescence stem of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings has been used to study the role of pectic arabinans in the mechanical properties and stress responsiveness of a plant organ. The arabinan-deficient-1 (arad1) mutation that affects arabinan structures in epidermal cell walls of inflorescence stems is demonstrated to reduce the impact on inflorescence stem heights caused by mechanical stress. The arabinan-deficient-2 (arad2) mutation, that does not have detectable impact on arabinan structures, is also shown to reduce the impact on stem heights caused by mechanical stress. The LM13 linear arabinan epitope is specifically detected in epidermal cell walls of the younger, flexible regions of inflorescence stems and increases in abundance at the base of inflorescence stems in response to an imposed mechanical stress. The strain (percentage deformation) of stem epidermal cells in the double mutant arad1 × arad2 is lower in unbrushed plants than in wild-type plants, but rises to wild-type levels in response to brushing. The study demonstrates the complexity of arabinan structures within plant cell walls and also that their contribution to cell wall mechanical properties is a factor influencing responsiveness to mechanical stress.

  20. Macromolecular properties and polymeric structure of canine tracheal mucins.

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, V; Virmani, A K; Naziruddin, B; Sachdev, G P

    1991-01-01

    Two high-Mr mucus glycoproteins (mucins), CTM-A and CTM-B, were highly purified from canine tracheal pouch secretions, and their macromolecular properties as well as polymeric structure were investigated. On SDS/composite-gel electrophoresis, a diffuse band was observed for each mucin. Polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis using 6% gels also showed the absence of low-Mr contaminants in the mucins. Comparison of chemical and amino acid compositions revealed significant differences between the two mucins. Using a static-laser-light-scattering technique, CTM-A and CTM-B were found to have weight-average Mr values of about 11.0 x 10(6) and 1.4 x 10(6) respectively. Both mucins showed concentration-dependent aggregation in buffer containing 6 M-guanidine hydrochloride. Under similar experimental conditions, reduced-alkylated CTM-A had an Mr of 5.48 x 10(6) and showed no concentration-dependent aggregation. Hydrophobic properties of the mucins, investigated by the fluorescent probe technique using mansylphenylalanine as the probe, showed the presence of a large number of low-affinity (KD approx. 10(5) M) binding sites. These sites appeared to be located on the non-glycosylated regions of the protein core, since Pronase digestion of the mucins almost completely eliminated probe binding. Reduction of disulphide bonds of CTM-A and CTM-B did not significantly alter the probe-binding properties. Also, addition of increasing NaCl concentrations (0.03-1.0 M) to the buffer caused only a small change in the hydrophobic properties of native and reduced-alkylated mucins. CTM-A was deglycosylated, without notable in the hydrophobic properties of native and reduced-alkylated mucins. CTM-A was deglycosylated, without notable degradation, using a combination of chemical and enzymic methods. On SDS/PAGE the protein core was estimated to have an Mr of approx. 60,000. On the basis of the protein and carbohydrate contents of the major mucin CTM-A, the mucin monomer was calculated to have an

  1. Effects of the Variation in Brain Tissue Mechanical Properties on the Intracranial Response of a 6-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shihai; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiangnan; Ruan, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue mechanical properties are of importance to investigate child head injury using finite element (FE) method. However, these properties used in child head FE model normally vary in a large range in published literatures because of the insufficient child cadaver experiments. In this work, a head FE model with detailed anatomical structures is developed from the computed tomography (CT) data of a 6-year-old healthy child head. The effects of brain tissue mechanical properties on traumatic brain response are also analyzed by reconstruction of a head impact on engine hood according to Euro-NCAP testing regulation using FE method. The result showed that the variations of brain tissue mechanical parameters in linear viscoelastic constitutive model had different influences on the intracranial response. Furthermore, the opposite trend was obtained in the predicted shear stress and shear strain of brain tissues caused by the variations of mentioned parameters. PMID:26495031

  2. Effects of the Variation in Brain Tissue Mechanical Properties on the Intracranial Response of a 6-Year-Old Child.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shihai; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiangnan; Ruan, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue mechanical properties are of importance to investigate child head injury using finite element (FE) method. However, these properties used in child head FE model normally vary in a large range in published literatures because of the insufficient child cadaver experiments. In this work, a head FE model with detailed anatomical structures is developed from the computed tomography (CT) data of a 6-year-old healthy child head. The effects of brain tissue mechanical properties on traumatic brain response are also analyzed by reconstruction of a head impact on engine hood according to Euro-NCAP testing regulation using FE method. The result showed that the variations of brain tissue mechanical parameters in linear viscoelastic constitutive model had different influences on the intracranial response. Furthermore, the opposite trend was obtained in the predicted shear stress and shear strain of brain tissues caused by the variations of mentioned parameters. PMID:26495031

  3. A DFT study on structural, vibrational properties, and quasiparticle band structure of solid nitromethane.

    PubMed

    Appalakondaiah, S; Vaitheeswaran, G; Lebègue, S

    2013-05-14

    We report a detailed theoretical study of the structural and vibrational properties of solid nitromethane using first principles density functional calculations. The ground state properties were calculated using a plane wave pseudopotential code with either the local density approximation, the generalized gradient approximation, or with a correction to include van der Waals interactions. Our calculated equilibrium lattice parameters and volume using a dispersion correction are found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. Also, our calculations reproduce the experimental trends in the structural properties at high pressure. We found a discontinuity in the bond length, bond angles, and also a weakening of hydrogen bond strength in the pressure range from 10 to 12 GPa, picturing the structural transition from phase I to phase II. Moreover, we predict the elastic constants of solid nitromethane and find that the corresponding bulk modulus is in good agreement with experiments. The calculated elastic constants show an order of C11> C22 > C33, indicating that the material is more compressible along the c-axis. We also calculated the zone center vibrational frequencies and discuss the internal and external modes of this material under pressure. From this, we found the softening of lattice modes around 8-11 GPa. We have also attempted the quasiparticle band structure of solid nitromethane with the G0W0 approximation and found that nitromethane is an indirect band gap insulator with a value of the band gap of about 7.8 eV with G0W0 approximation. Finally, the optical properties of this material, namely the absorptive and dispersive part of the dielectric function, and the refractive index and absorption spectra are calculated and the contribution of different transition peaks of the absorption spectra are analyzed. The static dielectric constant and refractive indices along the three inequivalent crystallographic directions indicate that this material

  4. Morphological, luminescence and structural properties of nanocrystalline silicon thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Atif Mossad; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Inokuma, Takao; Al-Hajry, Ali

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► The PL spectra showed two stronger peaks and one weaker peak. ► The PL peak energies and optical band-gap values were found higher than 1.12 eV. ► The structural change from an amorphous to nanocrystalline with increasing [SiH{sub 4}]. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) thin films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at various silane flow rates ([SiH{sub 4}]) are studied. The characterization of these films by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction reveals that no film and very thin film is deposited at [SiH{sub 4}] = 0.0 and 0.1 sccm, respectively. In addition, the structural change from an amorphous to a nanocrystalline phase occurs at around [SiH{sub 4}] = 0.2 sccm. In this study, the importance of arriving species at surfaces and precursors is clearly demonstrated by the effect of a small addition of SiH{sub 4} on the frequency and width of a Raman peak and the structure of the grown film. The infrared spectroscopic analysis shows no hydrogen incorporation in the nc-Si film deposited at the low value of [SiH{sub 4}]. However, the intensity of the peak around 2100 cm{sup −1} due to SiH decreases with increasing [SiH{sub 4}]. All fabricated films give photoluminescence in the range between 1.7 and 2.4 eV at room temperature, indicating enlargement of the band-gap energy. The presence of very small crystallites leads to the appearance of quantum confinement effects. The variations of the photoluminescence energy and spectral width are well correlated with the structural properties of the films such as crystallite size, crystalline volume fraction, and the density of Si-H bonds.

  5. Structural magnetism: Experimental studies of the relations between structures and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tao

    The magnetic properties of transition metals are known to depend strongly upon their crystal structure. One way to artificially control the structure is through the preparation of superlattices, where a metastable phase of one element may be stabilized through epitaxial growth. Many metastable systems achieved exhibit unusual properties. Some newly developed technologies make this study possible. Epitaxial sputtering was established within this decade and it is our primary growth method. X-ray diffraction is still the most important technique in determining crystal structure. Magnetic optical Kerr effect (MOKE) can give lots of important information on magnetic properties such as the coercivity and the saturation Kerr effect. The theory of the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) is quite similar to MOKE except that it uses X-rays instead of visible light. This feature enables XMCD to detect the element specific magnetic properties which play a central role in this study. The studies on Fe/Ni and Fe/Ru multilayers discovered many extraordinary behaviors of Ni and Ru. in their metastable phase. For example, as an important ferromagnetic metal, Ni is found enhanced magnetic moment in bct structure for the first time. The study on the Slater-Pauling curve for the 4d elements is to continue a 70-year construction of Slater-Pauling curve. Benefited from those new techniques, the construction of the Slater- Pauling curve for the 4d elements was accomplished. Metastable phase fct-Fe is of particular interesting because it displays a large variety of structural magnetic properties. It was found in this project that Fe magnetic moment in the [4d alloy/Fe/4d alloy] structure has a strong dependence on the electron interaction between Fe and 4d element. Although there is no solid evidence indicating that the resistance of tunneling junctions with GdN barrier have dependence on external magnetic field, lots of interesting results were still found, such as the relation

  6. Structures and related properties of helical, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, M.D. |

    1993-11-01

    The three dimensional structure of several peptides were determined by NMR spectroscopy and distance geometry calculations. Each peptide formed a predictable, rigid structure, consisting of an {alpha}-helix, a {open_quotes}scaffold{close_quotes} region which packed along one face of the helix, and two disulfide bridges which covalently connect the helix and scaffold regions. The peptide Apa-M5 was designed to constrain the M5 peptide from MLCK in a helical geometry using the apamin disulfide scaffold. This scaffold constrains the N- terminal end of the helix with two disulfide bridges and a reverse turn. Like the M5 peptide, Apa-M5 was found to bind calmodulin in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent 1:1 stoichiometry. However, the dissociation constant of the (Apa-M5)-calmodulin complex, 107 nM, was 100-fold higher than the dissociation constant of the M5-calmodulin complex. This difference was due to a putative steric overlap between the Apa-M5 scaffold and calmodulin. The peptide Apa-Cro was designed to replace the large structural protein matrix of {lambda} Cro with the apamin disulfide scaffold. However, Apa-Cro did not bind the consensus DNA operator half-site of {lambda} Cro, probably due to a steric overlap between the Apa-Cro disulfide framework and the DNA. The amino acid sequence of the scaffold-disulfide bridge arrangement of the peptide Max was derived from the core sequence of scyllatoxin, which contains an {alpha}-helix constrained at the C-terminal end by two disulfide bridges and a two-stranded {beta}sheet scaffold. Max was shown to fold with >84% yield to form a predictable, stable structure that is similar to scyllatoxin. The folding and stability properties of Max make this scaffold and disulfide bridge arrangement an ideal candidate for the development of hybrid sequence peptides. The dynamics of a fraying C-terminal end of the helix of the peptide Apa-AlaN was determined by analysis of {sup 15}N NMR relaxation properties.

  7. Halo formation and evolution: unifying physical properties with structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, Alllan David; Collins, Matthew P.

    2015-08-01

    The assembly of matter in the universe proliferates a variety of structures with diverse properties. For example, massive halos of clusters of galaxies have temperatures often an order of magnitude or more higher than the individual galaxy halos within the cluster, or the temperatures of isolated galaxy halos. Giant spiral galaxies contain large quantities of both dark matter and hot gas while other structures like globular clusters appear to have little or no dark matter or gas. Still others, like the dwarf spheroidal galaxies have low gravity and little hot gas, but ironically contain some of the largest fractions of dark matter in the universe. Star forming rates (SFRs) also vary: compare for example the SFRs of giant elliptical galaxies, globular clusters, spiral and starburst galaxies. Furthermore there is evidence that the various structure types have existed over a large fraction of cosmic history. How can this array of variation in properties be reconciled with galaxy halo formation and evolution?We propose a model of halo formation [1] and evolution [2] that is consistent with both primordial nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the isotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The model uses two simple parameters, the total mass and size of a structure, to (1) explain why galaxies have the fractions of dark matter that they do (including why dwarf spheroidals are so dark matter dominated despite their weak gravity), (2) enable an understanding of the black hole-bulge/black hole-dark halo relations, (3) explain how fully formed massive galaxies can occur so early in cosmic history, (4) understand the connection between spiral and elliptical galaxies (5) unify the nature of globular clusters, dwarf spheroidal galaxies and bulges and (6) predict the temperatures of hot gas halos and understand how cool galaxy halos can remain stable in the hot environments of cluster-galaxy halos.[1] Ernest, A. D., 2012, in Prof. Ion Cotaescu (Ed) Advances in Quantum Theory, pp

  8. Structures and properties of materials recovered from high shock pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.

    1994-03-01

    Shock compression produces high dynamic pressures, densities, temperatures, and their quench rates. Because of these extreme conditions, shock compression produces materials with novel crystal structures, microstructures, and physical properties. Using a 6.5-m-long two-stage gun, we perform experiments with specimens up to 10 mm in diameter and 0.001--1 mm thick. For example, oriented disks of melt-textured superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} were shocked to 7 GPa without macroscopic fracture. Lattice defects are deposited in the crystal, which improve magnetic hysteresis at {approximately}1 kOe. A computer code has been developed to simulate shock compaction of 100 powder particles. Computations will be compared with experiments with 15--20 {mu}m Cu powders. The method is applicable to other powders and dynamic conditions.

  9. Structural, dielectric, and optical properties of yttrium calcium borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Cristiane N.; De Sousa Meneses, Domingos; Echegut, Patrick; Neuville, Daniel R.; Hernandes, Antonio C.; Ibanez, Alain

    2009-04-01

    Structural and optical properties of stable glasses in the Y2O3-CaO-B2O3 system, containing the same Y/Ca ratio as the YCa4O(BO3)3 (YCOB) crystal, were determined from Raman and reflectance infrared spectroscopy. Changes in optical functions with composition are associated with an increase in the number of non-bridging oxygen and to calcium/yttrium oxides content. Refractive indexes values (from 1.597 to 1.627 at λ =2 μm) are in good agreement with those of the YCOB crystal, an indication that these glasses are potential candidates for optical applications due to their ease of shaping as large bulk samples or fibers.

  10. Structural and Thermoelectric Properties of Ternary Full-Heusler Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.; Eguchi, M.; Miyazaki, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The thermoelectric properties of ternary full-Heusler alloys, Co2 YZ, which are in a ferromagnetic state up to high temperature above 300 K, were measured and are discussed in terms of the crystal structure and electronic states. Among the full-Heusler alloys studied, the Co2MnSi sample exhibited the highest absolute value of Seebeck coefficient and also the highest electrical conductivity in the temperature range from 300 K to 1023 K. The highest power factor of 2.9 × 10-3 W/m-K2 was obtained for the Co2MnSi sample at 550 K, demonstrating the potential of half-metallic full-Heusler alloys as thermoelectric materials.

  11. Structure-Property Relationships in Sulfonated Pentablock Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Hong; Willis, Carl; Winey, Karen I.

    2011-03-01

    Membranes of pentablock copolymers consisting of poly(tert-butyl styrene) (TBS), hydrogenated polyisoprene (HI), and partially sulfonated poly(styrene-ran-styrene sulfonate) (SS) were studied using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TBS-HI-SS-HI-TBS pentablock copolymer in solution forms spherical micelles with a core of SS and a corona of solvated HI and TBS. The spherical micelles in solution compact as the solvent evaporates and some of SS cores merge to form interconnected SS microdomains without substantially changing their shape. The number of connections increases with the volume fraction of the SS block, which increases with sulfonation level. The structure does not have long-range order, because strong ionic interactions prevent extensive rearrangement. The morphologies of the sulfonated pentablock copolymers will be correlated with their transport properties.

  12. Properties of structural clay load-bearing wall tile

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, R.D.; Butala, M.B.; Bennett, R.M.

    1993-02-02

    Structural clay tile has been produced in the United States and used in load-bearing walls for over a century. While the fundamentals of the manufacturing process have not changed significantly, specific fabrication details and material additives have led to increased strength and economy of current products. Red burned clay masonry units were sampled and tested in accordance with applicable ASTM standards. Objective of the tests was to compare tiles used in the original construction of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (1940s) to tiles being used in current large scale laboratory tests and wall repairs. Results of the tests are compared to other contemporary and historic clay tile data. The effects of the evolution of clay tile manufacturing on engineering properties is also examined.

  13. Fabrication, characterization, and optical properties of gold nanobowl submonolayer structures.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian; Van Dorpe, Pol; Van Roy, Willem; Borghs, Gustaaf; Maes, Guido

    2009-02-01

    We report on a versatile method to fabricate hollow gold nanobowls and complex gold nanobowls (with a core) based on an ion milling and a vapor HF etching technique. Two different sized hollow gold nanobowls are fabricated by milling and etching submonolayers of gold nanoshells deposited on a substrate, and their sizes and morphologies are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Optical properties of hollow gold nanobowls with different sizes are investigated experimentally and theoretically, showing highly tunable plasmon resonance ranging from the visible to the near-infrared region. Additionally, finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations show an enhanced localized electromagnetic field around hollow gold nanobowl structures, which indicates a potential application in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy for biomolecular detection. Finally, we demonstrate the fabrication of complex gold nanobowls with a gold nanoparticle core which offers the capability to create plasmon hybridized nanostructures. PMID:19125593

  14. Studies on structural properties of clay magnesium ferrite nano composite

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manpreet Singh, Mandeep; Jeet, Kiran Kaur, Rajdeep

    2015-08-28

    Magnesium ferrite-bentonite clay composite was prepared by sol-gel combustion method employing citric acid as complexing agent and fuel. The effect of clay on the structural properties was studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM- Energy dispersive Spectroscope (EDS) and BET surface area analyzer. Decrease in particle size and density was observed on addition of bentonite clay. The BET surface area of nano composite containing just 5 percent clay was 74.86 m{sup 2}/g. Whereas porosity increased from 40.5 per cent for the pure magnesium ferrite to 81.0 percent in the composite showing that nano-composite has potential application as an adsorbent.

  15. Structural and robustness properties of smart-city transportation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen-Gang; Ding, Zhuo; Fan, Jing-Fang; Meng, Jun; Ding, Yi-Min; Ye, Fang-Fu; Chen, Xiao-Song

    2015-09-01

    The concept of smart city gives an excellent resolution to construct and develop modern cities, and also demands infrastructure construction. How to build a safe, stable, and highly efficient public transportation system becomes an important topic in the process of city construction. In this work, we study the structural and robustness properties of transportation networks and their sub-networks. We introduce a complementary network model to study the relevance and complementarity between bus network and subway network. Our numerical results show that the mutual supplement of networks can improve the network robustness. This conclusion provides a theoretical basis for the construction of public traffic networks, and it also supports reasonable operation of managing smart cities. Project supported by the Major Projects of the China National Social Science Fund (Grant No. 11 & ZD154).

  16. Development and mechanical properties of structural materials from lunar simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Chandra S.; Girdner, K.; Saadatmanesh, H.; Allen, T.

    1991-01-01

    Development of the technologies for manufacture of structural and construction materials on the Moon, utilizing local lunar soil (regolith), without the use of water, is an important element for habitats and explorations in space. Here, it is vital that the mechanical behavior such as strength and flexural properties, fracture toughness, ductility and deformation characteristics be defined toward establishment of the ranges of engineering applications of the materials developed. The objective is to describe the research results in two areas for the above goal: (1) liquefaction of lunar simulant (at about 100 C) with different additives (fibers, powders, etc.); and (2) development and use of a new triaxial test device in which lunar simulants are first compressed under cycles of loading, and then tested with different vacuums and initial confining or in situ stress.

  17. Structural and functional properties of C-type starches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinwen; Cai, Canhui; Man, Jianmin; Zhou, Weidong; Wei, Cunxu

    2014-01-30

    This study investigated the structural and functional properties of C-type starches from pea seeds, faba bean seeds, yam rhizomes and water chestnut corms. These starches were mostly oval in shape with significantly different sizes and contents of amylose, damaged starch and phosphorus. Pea, faba bean and water chestnut starches had central hila, and yam starch had eccentric hilum. Water chestnut and yam starches had higher amylopectin short and long chain, respectively. Water chestnut and faba bean starches showed CA-type crystallinities, and pea and yam starches had C-type crystallinities. Water chestnut starch had the highest swelling power, granule swelling and pasting viscosity, lowest gelatinization temperatures and enthalpy. Faba bean starch had the lowest pasting viscosity, whereas yam starch had the highest gelatinization temperatures. Water chestnut and yam starches possessed significantly higher and lower susceptibility to acid and enzyme hydrolysis, the highest and lowest RDS contents, and the lowest and highest RS contents, respectively.

  18. Structural properties of bismuth-bearing semiconductor alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A.-B.; Miller, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    The structural properties of bismuth-bearing III-V semiconductor alloys InPBi, InAsBi, and InSbBi were studied theoretically. Bond energies, bond lengths, and strain coefficients were calculated for pure AlBi, GaBi, and InBi compounds and their alloys, and predictions were made for the mixing enthalpies, miscibility gaps, and critical metastable-to-stable material transition temperatures. Miscibility calculations indicate that InSbBi will be the most miscible, and the InPBi will be the the most difficult to mix. However, calculations of the hardness of the Bi compounds indicate that, once formed, the InPBi alloy will be harder than the other Bi alloys and substantially harder than the currently favored narrow-gap semiconductor HgCdTe.

  19. The Galaxy in Context: Structural, Kinematic, and Integrated Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Gerhard, Ortwin

    2016-09-01

    Our Galaxy, the Milky Way, is a benchmark for understanding disk galaxies. It is the only galaxy whose formation history can be studied using the full distribution of stars from faint dwarfs to supergiants. The oldest components provide us with unique insight into how galaxies form and evolve over billions of years. The Galaxy is a luminous (L⋆) barred spiral with a central box/peanut bulge, a dominant disk, and a diffuse stellar halo. Based on global properties, it falls in the sparsely populated “green valley” region of the galaxy color-magnitude diagram. Here we review the key integrated, structural and kinematic parameters of the Galaxy, and point to uncertainties as well as directions for future progress. Galactic studies will continue to play a fundamental role far into the future because there are measurements that can only be made in the near field and much of contemporary astrophysics depends on such observations.

  20. Structural properties of silver doped hydroxyapatite and their biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, C S; Iconaru, S L; Pasuk, I; Vasile, B S; Lupu, A R; Hermenean, A; Dinischiotu, A; Predoi, D

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain a novel hydroxyapatite-based material with high biocompatibility. The structural properties of the samples were well characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The X-ray diffraction studies revealed the characteristic peaks of hydroxyapatite in each sample. Other phases or impurities were not observed. The scanning electron microscopy observations suggest that the doping components have no influence on the surface morphology of the samples, which reveals a homogeneous aspect of the synthesized particles for all samples. The presence of calcium (Ca), phosphor (P), oxygen (O) and silver (Ag) in the Ag:HAp is confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy analyses. Nanocrystalline silver doped HAp stimulated viability and potentiated the activation of murine macrophages.

  1. One dimensional aluminum nitride nanostructures: synthesis, structural, and luminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, S H; Gharavi, M A; Haratizadeh, H; Kitai, A; de Oliveira, P W

    2011-09-01

    Aluminum nitride (AIN) is a direct bandgap semiconductor with a bandgap about 6.1 eV at room temperature, the largest among semiconductors. This paper emphasizes experimental results of the growth and optical properties of AIN nanostructures by direct nitridation. The nitridation process was performed by chemical vapor deposition method with nitrogen (N2) gas flow. AIN nanostructures were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscope and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. AIN nanowires with different widths from ultrathin to thick were synthesized with this method. All of the samples had high purity without presence of any other material in EDX spectrum. The PL spectra were obtained by a 325-nm helium-cadmium (He-Cd) laser as the excitation source showing high-intensity light emitting visible wavelengths for these structures at room temperature.

  2. The structural response of gadolinium phosphate to pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Heffernan, Karina M.; Ross, Nancy L.; Spencer, Elinor C.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2016-06-16

    In this study, accurate elastic constants for gadolinium phosphate (GdPO4) have been measured by single-crystal high-pressure diffraction methods. The bulk modulus of GdPO4 determined under hydrostatic conditions, 128.1(8) GPa (K'=5.8(2)), is markedly different from that obtained with GdPO4 under non-hydrostatic conditions (160(2) GPa), which indicates the importance of shear stresses on the elastic response of this phosphate. Finally, high pressure Raman and diffraction analysis indicate that the PO4 tetrahedra behave as rigid units in response to pressure and that contraction of the GdPO4 structure is facilitated by bending/twisting of the Gd–O–P links that result in increased distortion in the GdO9more » polyhedra.« less

  3. The structural response of gadolinium phosphate to pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Karina M.; Ross, Nancy L.; Spencer, Elinor C.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate elastic constants for gadolinium phosphate (GdPO4) have been measured by single-crystal high-pressure diffraction methods. The bulk modulus of GdPO4 determined under hydrostatic conditions, 128.1(8) GPa (Kʹ=5.8(2)), is markedly different from that obtained with GdPO4 under non-hydrostatic conditions (160(2) GPa), which indicates the importance of shear stresses on the elastic response of this phosphate. High pressure Raman and diffraction analysis indicate that the PO4 tetrahedra behave as rigid units in response to pressure and that contraction of the GdPO4 structure is facilitated by bending/twisting of the Gd-O-P links that result in increased distortion in the GdO9 polyhedra.

  4. The endoplasmic reticulum: structure, function and response to cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Dianne S; Blower, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a large, dynamic structure that serves many roles in the cell including calcium storage, protein synthesis and lipid metabolism. The diverse functions of the ER are performed by distinct domains; consisting of tubules, sheets and the nuclear envelope. Several proteins that contribute to the overall architecture and dynamics of the ER have been identified, but many questions remain as to how the ER changes shape in response to cellular cues, cell type, cell cycle state and during development of the organism. Here we discuss what is known about the dynamics of the ER, what questions remain, and how coordinated responses add to the layers of regulation in this dynamic organelle. PMID:26433683

  5. Geophysical properties of the ionospheric irregularities responsible for radio scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of F-region ionospheric irregularities are described based on in-situ measurements of the actual waveforms of ion concentration. The spectral properties of the irregularities are discussed. In high, middle and low latitudes most of the irregularities observed fall into a single 'noiselike' category having power spectra which can be approximated by f to the negative n-th power and S to the n-th power, where S is the irregularity scale size and n is approximately 2. Thus the spectral components have a maximum gradient which is almost independent of their size. Other categories of irregularities are also observed occasionally.

  6. Strangeness-changing response functions: an alternative approach to hypernuclear structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, H.; Piekarewicz, J.

    2001-01-01

    We study strangeness-changing response functions as an alternative description of hypernuclear structure. Hypernuclear states are treated in the same manner as any other conventional nuclear excitation that emerges from the response of the nuclear ground state to an external probe. The nuclear response is calculated using a random-phase approximation to an effective relativistic mean-field model that reproduces bulk properties of normal nuclei. The relevant meson-baryon vertices are constrained by imposing SU(3)-flavour symmetry, while the residual hyperon-particle-nucleon-hole interaction is assumed to be mediated by the two lightest S = -1 mesons: the pseudoscalar kaon and its vector partner K*(892). We use this model to analyse the spectra of 16YO and 40YCa hypernuclei.

  7. The effects of swift heavy ion irradiation on the structural properties of poly(lactide-co-glycolide)/clay nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Surinder; Mehta, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    Radiation has been used as a processing technique to modify structural, chemical, physical and morphological properties of polymers and its nanocomposite and can thus be used as a method to control the rate of degradation. The swift heavy ions (SHI) irradiation effects on the structural properties of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanocomposites containing 5wt% organo-montmorillonite (OMMT) clay by irradiating with 50 MeV Li3+ and 180 MeV Ag8+ ions has been studied at different fluences. The structural responses of PLGA nanocomposite under the influence of SHI were studied using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The presence of clay and irradiation by swift heavy ions (SHI) brings out interesting changes in structural properties of nanocomposite.

  8. Microwave-Absorption Properties of Three Kinds of Structured Cu/C Composites.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Linwen; Wang, Zhenhua; Li, Da; Geng, Dianyu; Wang, Yu; An, Jing; He, Jun; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhidong

    2016-06-01

    The microwave-absorption properties of three kinds of (core-shell, uniform-mixing and double-layer structured) Cu/C composites are investigated in the 2-18 GHz frequency range. The results show that the Cu/C composites with core-shell structure are favorable to obtain higher relative permittivity and better microwave-absorption properties in comparison with other Cu/C composites. The reflection loss (RL) values exceeding -10 dB are obtained in 13.0-17.2 GHz at the absorber thickness of 1.6 mm for the core-shell structured Cu/C nanoparticles, which cover most of Ku-band (12-18 GHz). The excellent microwave-absorption properties may result from synergetic effects induced by the tightly-connected core-shell interfaces. The synergetic effects are explained by a simulated physical model, wherein both the interfacial polarizations and interfacial multiple reflections are responsible to the excellent microwave-absorption performances.

  9. Nucleotides containing variously modified sugars: energetics, structure, and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Yurenko, Yevgen P; Novotný, Jan; Nikolaienko, Tymofii Yu; Marek, Radek

    2016-01-21

    The influence of various sugar residue modifications on intrinsic energetic, conformational, and mechanical properties of 2'-deoxyribonucleotide-5'-monophosphates (dNs) was comprehensively investigated using modern quantum chemical approaches. In total, fourteen sugar modifications, including double bonds and heteroatoms (S and N) inside the sugar ring, as well as fluorination in various positions, were analyzed. Among hundreds of possible conformational states of dNs, only two - AI and BI, corresponding to the most biologically significant forms of a double-helical DNA, were considered for each dN. It was established that the most of the studied modifications tend to strongly stabilize either AI or BI conformation of dNs both in the gas phase and in aqueous solution (modelled by implicit solvent models). Therefore, some of these modifications can be used as a tool for reducing structural polymorphism of nucleic acids in solution as well as for designing oligonucleotides with specific structural features. The evaluation of relaxed force constants (RFC) for glycosidic bonds suggests that the majority of the studied modifications of the sugar residue yield increased strengths of glycosidic bonds in dNs, and can therefore be used for designing modified nucleic acids with an increased resistance to abasic lesions. The most significant reinforcement of the glycosidic bond occurs in dNs containing the CF2 group instead of the O4' oxygen and the fluorine atom at the 2'-α-position. The calculation of the RFC and vibrational root-mean-square (VRMS) deviations for conformational degrees of freedom revealed a strong dependence between mechanical properties of dNs and their energetic characteristics. In particular, electronic energies of AI and BI conformers of dNs calculated in vacuo are closely connected with the values of relaxed force constants (RFC) for the δ angle: the higher RFC(δ) values correspond to more energetically favorable conformers.

  10. Structured microparticles with tailored properties produced by membrane emulsification.

    PubMed

    Vladisavljević, Goran T

    2015-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of membrane emulsification routes for fabrication of structured microparticles with tailored properties for specific applications. Direct (bottom-up) and premix (top-down) membrane emulsification processes are discussed including operational, formulation and membrane factors that control the droplet size and droplet generation regimes. A special emphasis was put on different methods of controlled shear generation on membrane surface, such as cross flow on the membrane surface, swirl flow, forward and backward flow pulsations in the continuous phase and membrane oscillations and rotations. Droplets produced by membrane emulsification can be used for synthesis of particles with versatile morphology (solid and hollow, matrix and core/shell, spherical and non-spherical, porous and coherent, composite and homogeneous), which can be surface functionalised and coated or loaded with macromolecules, nanoparticles, quantum dots, drugs, phase change materials and high molecular weight gases to achieve controlled/targeted drug release and impart special optical, chemical, electrical, acoustic, thermal and magnetic properties. The template emulsions including metal-in-oil, solid-in-oil-in-water, oil-in-oil, multilayer, and Pickering emulsions can be produced with high encapsulation efficiency of encapsulated materials and narrow size distribution and transformed into structured particles using a variety of solidification processes, such as polymerisation (suspension, mini-emulsion, interfacial and in-situ), ionic gelation, chemical crosslinking, melt solidification, internal phase separation, layer-by-layer electrostatic deposition, particle self-assembly, complex coacervation, spray drying, sol-gel processing, and molecular imprinting. Particles fabricated from droplets produced by membrane emulsification include nanoclusters, colloidosomes, carbon aerogel particles, nanoshells, polymeric (molecularly imprinted, hypercrosslinked, Janus and core

  11. Structure and statistical properties of plasmoids in Jupiter's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Marissa F.; Jackman, Caitriona M.; Slavin, James A.; Bunce, Emma J.; Cowley, Stanley W. H.; Kivelson, Margaret G.; Khurana, Krishan K.

    2014-02-01

    Plasmoids and other reconnection-related signatures have been observed in Jupiter's magnetotail through analysis of magnetic field and energetic particle data. Previous studies have established the spatial distribution and recurrence period of tail reconnection events, and identified the location of a statistical X-line separating inward and outward flow. Here we present new analysis focusing specifically on 43 plasmoid signatures observed in magnetometer data in order to establish the average properties and internal structure of Jovian plasmoids. We present statistics on the observed plasmoid length scale, duration, radial position, and local time distribution. On average, the observed plasmoids have a ~3 RJ radial extent and ~7 min duration and result in the closure of ~4-8 GWb of open flux from reconnection of open field lines in the postplasmoid plasma sheet. We also determine the amount of mass released and the magnetic flux closed in order to understand the role of tail reconnection in the transport of mass and flux in Jupiter's magnetosphere. The observed plasmoid properties are consistent with a mass loss rate of ~0.7-120 kg/s and a flux closure rate of ~7-70 GWb/d. We conclude that tail reconnection and plasmoid release is an important method of flux transport at Jupiter but likely cannot account for the mass input from Io, suggesting that additional mass loss mechanisms may be significant. Finally, we examine the plasmoid interior structure through minimum variance analysis and find that most plasmoids lack a core field and are better described by magnetic loops rather than flux ropes.

  12. Nucleotides containing variously modified sugars: energetics, structure, and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Yurenko, Yevgen P; Novotný, Jan; Nikolaienko, Tymofii Yu; Marek, Radek

    2016-01-21

    The influence of various sugar residue modifications on intrinsic energetic, conformational, and mechanical properties of 2'-deoxyribonucleotide-5'-monophosphates (dNs) was comprehensively investigated using modern quantum chemical approaches. In total, fourteen sugar modifications, including double bonds and heteroatoms (S and N) inside the sugar ring, as well as fluorination in various positions, were analyzed. Among hundreds of possible conformational states of dNs, only two - AI and BI, corresponding to the most biologically significant forms of a double-helical DNA, were considered for each dN. It was established that the most of the studied modifications tend to strongly stabilize either AI or BI conformation of dNs both in the gas phase and in aqueous solution (modelled by implicit solvent models). Therefore, some of these modifications can be used as a tool for reducing structural polymorphism of nucleic acids in solution as well as for designing oligonucleotides with specific structural features. The evaluation of relaxed force constants (RFC) for glycosidic bonds suggests that the majority of the studied modifications of the sugar residue yield increased strengths of glycosidic bonds in dNs, and can therefore be used for designing modified nucleic acids with an increased resistance to abasic lesions. The most significant reinforcement of the glycosidic bond occurs in dNs containing the CF2 group instead of the O4' oxygen and the fluorine atom at the 2'-α-position. The calculation of the RFC and vibrational root-mean-square (VRMS) deviations for conformational degrees of freedom revealed a strong dependence between mechanical properties of dNs and their energetic characteristics. In particular, electronic energies of AI and BI conformers of dNs calculated in vacuo are closely connected with the values of relaxed force constants (RFC) for the δ angle: the higher RFC(δ) values correspond to more energetically favorable conformers. PMID:26672740

  13. Structural Basis of Response Regulator Dephosphorylation by Rap Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    V Parashar; N Mirouze; D Dubnau; M Neiditch

    2011-12-31

    Bacterial Rap family proteins have been most extensively studied in Bacillus subtilis, where they regulate activities including sporulation, genetic competence, antibiotic expression, and the movement of the ICEBs1 transposon. One subset of Rap proteins consists of phosphatases that control B. subtilis and B. anthracis sporulation by dephosphorylating the response regulator Spo0F. The mechanistic basis of Rap phosphatase activity was unknown. Here we present the RapH-Spo0F X-ray crystal structure, which shows that Rap proteins consist of a 3-helix bundle and a tetratricopeptide repeat domain. Extensive biochemical and genetic functional studies reveal the importance of the observed RapH-Spo0F interactions, including the catalytic role of a glutamine in the RapH 3-helix bundle that inserts into the Spo0F active site. We show that in addition to dephosphorylating Spo0F, RapH can antagonize sporulation by sterically blocking phosphoryl transfer to and from Spo0F. Our structure-function analysis of the RapH-Spo0F interaction identified Rap protein residues critical for Spo0F phosphatase activity. This information enabled us to assign Spo0F phosphatase activity to a Rap protein based on sequence alone, which was not previously possible. Finally, as the ultimate test of our newfound understanding of the structural requirements for Rap phosphatase function, a non-phosphatase Rap protein that inhibits the binding of the response regulator ComA to DNA was rationally engineered to dephosphorylate Spo0F. In addition to revealing the mechanistic basis of response regulator dephosphorylation by Rap proteins, our studies support the previously proposed T-loop-Y allostery model of receiver domain regulation that restricts the aromatic 'switch' residue to an internal position when the {beta}4-{alpha}4 loop adopts an active-site proximal conformation.

  14. Magnetic and structural properties of ferrihydrite/hematite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariona, N.; Camacho-Aguilar, K. I.; Ramos-González, R.; Martinez, Arturo I.; Herrera-Trejo, M.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.

    2016-05-01

    A rich variety of ferrihydrite/hematite nanocomposites (NCs) with specific size, composition and properties were obtained in transformation reactions of 2-line ferrihydrite. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed that the NCs consist of clusters of strongly aggregated nanoparticles (NPs) similarly to a "plum pudding", where hematite NPs "raisins" are surrounded by ferrihydrite "pudding". Magnetic measurements of the NCs correlate very well with TEM results; i.e., higher coercive fields correspond to greater hematite crystallite size. First order reversal curve (FORC) measurements were used for the characterization of the magnetic components of the NCs. FORC diagrams revealed that the NCs prepared at short times are composed by single domains with low coercivity, and NCs prepared at times larger than 60 min exhibited elongated distribution along the Hc axis. It suggested that these samples consist of mixtures of different kinds of hematite particles, ones with low coercivity and others with coercivity greater than 600 Oe. For NCs prepared at times larger than 60 min, Mossbauer spectroscopy revealed the presence of two sextets, which one was assigned to fine hematite particles and other to hematite particles with hyperfine parameters near to bulk hematite. The correlation of the structural and magnetic properties of the ferrihydrite/hematite NCs revealed important characteristics of these materials which have not been reported elsewhere.

  15. Structural and Photoconductivity Properties of Tellurium/PMMA Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, Gianfranco; Palomba, Mariano; De Nicola, Sergio; Ambrosone, Giuseppina; Coscia, Ubaldo

    2015-08-01

    Owing to the very brittle nature of tellurium powder, nanoscopic grains with an average size of 4.8 ± 0.8 nm were produced by dry vibration milling technique using a mixer/mill apparatus. A novel material was obtained by binding the nanosized tellurium grains with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer. The morphology, elemental composition, and structural and optical properties of Te/PMMA films were investigated. The prepared material was composed of hexagonal tellurium and α-phase of tellurium oxide. The electrical properties of the films were studied, for different electrode contact configurations, in dark condition and under white light illumination varying the optical power density from 2 to 170 mW/cm2 and turning the light on and off cyclically. Data analysis shows that the photoconductivity of the film with sandwich contact configuration is a linear function of the light power density and increases more than 2 orders of magnitude as compared to the photoresponse of the film with coplanar contact configuration.

  16. Electronic structure and physicochemical properties of selected penicillins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano-Correa, Catalina; Ruiz, Juan F. Sánchez; Raya, A.; Esquivel, Rodolfo O.

    Traditionally, penicillins have been used as antibacterial agents due to their characteristics and widespread applications with few collateral effects, which have motivated several theoretical and experimental studies. Despite the latter, their mechanism of biological action has not been completely elucidated. We present a theoretical study at the Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (DFT) levels of theory of a selected group of penicillins such as the penicillin-G, amoxicillin, ampicillin, dicloxacillin, and carbenicillin molecules, to systematically determine the electron structure of full ?-lactam antibiotics. Our results allow us to analyze the electronic properties of the pharmacophore group, the aminoacyl side-chain, and the influence of the substituents (R and X) attached to the aminoacyl side-chain at 6? (in contrast with previous studies focused at the 3? substituents), and to corroborate the results of previous studies performed at the semiempirical level, solely on the ?-lactam ring of penicillins. Besides, several density descriptors are determined with the purpose of analyzing their link to the antibacterial activity of these penicillin compounds. Our results for the atomic charges (fitted to the electrostatic potential), the bond orders, and several global reactivity descriptors, such as the dipole moments, ionization potential, hardness, and the electrophilicity index, led us to characterize: the active sites, the effect of the electron-attracting substituent properties and their physicochemical features, which altogether, might be important to understand the biological activity of these type of molecules.

  17. Poly(trifluoromethyl)azulenes: structures and acceptor properties

    SciTech Connect

    Clikeman, Tyler T.; Bukovsky, Eric V.; Kuvychko, Igor V.; San, Long K.; Deng, Shihu; Wang, Xue B.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Strauss, Steven H.; Boltalina, Olga V.

    2014-07-10

    Azulene is a non-alternant, non-benzenoid aromatic hydrocarbon with an intense blue colour, a dipole moment of 1.0 D,1 positive electron affinity, and an “anomalous” emission from the second excited state in violation of Kasha’s rule.2,3 Azulene’s unique properties have potential uses in molecular switches,4,5 molecular diodes,6 organic photovoltaics,7 and charge transfer complexes.8-12 Introduction of electron-withdrawing groups to the azulenic core, such as CN,8,13,14 halogens,15-19 and CF3,20,21 can enhance certain electrical and photophysical properties. In this work, we report six new trifluoromethyl derivatives of azulene (AZUL), three isomers of AZUL(CF3)3 and three isomers of AZUL(CF3)4, and the first X-ray structure of a π-stacked donor-acceptor complex of a trifluoromethyl azulene with donor pyrene.

  18. Structural and Photoconductivity Properties of Tellurium/PMMA Films.

    PubMed

    Carotenuto, Gianfranco; Palomba, Mariano; De Nicola, Sergio; Ambrosone, Giuseppina; Coscia, Ubaldo

    2015-12-01

    Owing to the very brittle nature of tellurium powder, nanoscopic grains with an average size of 4.8 ± 0.8 nm were produced by dry vibration milling technique using a mixer/mill apparatus. A novel material was obtained by binding the nanosized tellurium grains with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer. The morphology, elemental composition, and structural and optical properties of Te/PMMA films were investigated. The prepared material was composed of hexagonal tellurium and α-phase of tellurium oxide. The electrical properties of the films were studied, for different electrode contact configurations, in dark condition and under white light illumination varying the optical power density from 2 to 170 mW/cm(2) and turning the light on and off cyclically. Data analysis shows that the photoconductivity of the film with sandwich contact configuration is a linear function of the light power density and increases more than 2 orders of magnitude as compared to the photoresponse of the film with coplanar contact configuration. PMID:26245856

  19. Structure-Property Correlations in Microwave Joining of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Amit; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Das, Shantanu

    2015-09-01

    The butt joining of Inconel 718 plates at 981°C solution treated and aged (981STA) condition was carried out using the microwave hybrid heating technique with Inconel 718 powder as a filler material. The developed joints were free from any microfissures (cracks) and were metallurgically bonded through complete melting of the powder particles. The as-welded joints were subjected to postweld heat treatments, including direct-aged, 981STA and 1080STA. The microstructural features of the welded joints were investigated using a field emission-scanning electron microscope equipped with x-ray elemental analysis. Microhardness and room-temperature tensile properties of the welded joints were evaluated. The postweld heat-treated specimens exhibited higher microhardness and tensile strength than the as-welded specimens due to the formation of strengthening precipitates in the microstructure after postweld heat treatments. The microhardness of the fusion zone of the joint in 1080STA condition was higher than all welded conditions due to the complete dissolution of Laves phase after 1080STA treatment. However, the tensile strength of the welded specimen in 981STA condition was higher than all welded conditions. The tensile strength in 1080STA condition was lower than that in 981STA condition because of the grain coarsening that took place after 1080STA condition. The fractography of the fractured surfaces was carried out to determine the structure-property-fracture correlation.

  20. Surface structure and the optical properties of black chrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. B.; McPhedran, R. C.; Derrick, G. H.

    1985-04-01

    A new optical model is presented for solar-selective black chrome. Surface texture is shown to be the primary factor which gives thin films of black chrome a uniformly high absorptance in the visible and near-infrared regions. Internal composition of the films is a secondary influence on their optical properties. We present results consistent with experimental data obtained from films having widely varying structures and compositions, both before and after heat treatment. Our optical model does not rely on the quasistatic approximation, hitherto universally employed in theoretical studies of solar-selective black chrome. Instead, we use a rigorous diffraction formulation for doubly-periodic surfaces (bigratings). The key parameters of the surface morphology are determined from stereo-pair electronmicrographs, and are used in the bigrating model. We present the predicted variation of spectral absorptance with wavelength, as well as integrated absorptance and thermal emittance, for roughened chromium. We give results both for bare metal, and for the metal conformally overcoated either with a thin layer of Cr2O3 or with a Cr/Cr2O3 cermet. Various shapes of surface features are examined, and surface profile is shown not to be crucial in determining optical properties.

  1. Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of Boron Difluoride Dibenzoylmethane Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Sergey A; Vovna, Vitaliy I; Gelfand, Natalia A; Osmushko, Ivan S; Fedorenko, Elena V; Mirochnik, Anatoliy G

    2016-09-22

    Electronic structure and optical properties of boron difluoride dibenzoylmethanate BF2Dbm and its four derivatives were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, absorption and luminescence spectroscopy, and quantum chemistry (DFT and TDDFT). In a series of the studied compounds, the relationship of molecular design and optical properties has been revealed. At the transition from BF2Dbm to BF2Dbm(OCH3)2, the HOMO-LUMO energy gap decreases, resulting in a bathochromic shift of the optical spectra. Substitution of one methoxy group by the nitro group in BF2Dbm(OCH3)2 causes a decrease in the contribution of the chelate ring π-orbital in the LUMO, resulting in a lower value of charge transfer from the substituents to the chelate ring in the case of the first excited state, which determines the characteristics of the main absorption bands. The nitro group transition from the m- to p-position of the benzene ring causes a change in the nature of the main bands of the optical spectra due to the increase of the splitting value of the LUMO and LUMO+1 levels. The main band in the optical spectra of the complex containing the C10H7 group is associated with the charge transfer transitions. PMID:27580170

  2. Refining the nuclear auxin response pathway through structural biology.

    PubMed

    Korasick, David A; Jez, Joseph M; Strader, Lucia C

    2015-10-01

    Auxin is a key regulator of plant growth and development. Classical molecular and genetic techniques employed over the past 20 years identified the major players in auxin-mediated gene expression and suggest a canonical auxin response pathway. In recent years, structural and biophysical studies clarified the molecular details of auxin perception, the recognition of DNA by auxin transcription factors, and the interaction of auxin transcription factors with repressor proteins. These studies refine the auxin signal transduction model and raise new questions that increase the complexity of auxin signaling.

  3. Structural responses of the supersonic turbulent boundary layer to expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian-cheng; Wang, Zhen-guo; Zhao, Yu-xin

    2016-09-01

    Structural responses of the supersonic turbulent boundary layer to the expansions induced by a convex wall and a ramp are experimentally investigated. Relaminarization of part of the turbulent boundary layer in the near wall region is clearly visualized, which has been seldom presented before. The relaminarized layers formed over two test models are different. While a thicker relaminarized layer is observed for the ramp, a longer lasting layer is noticed for the convex wall. The structure angle is found to be increased by the expansions. Increases of turbulence scale and boundary layer thickness are observed. The contribution of the bulk dilatation to the boundary layer growth is stronger than that of the centrifugal force.

  4. Predicting nonlinear properties of metamaterials from the linear response.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kevin; Suchowski, Haim; Rho, Junsuk; Salandrino, Alessandro; Kante, Boubacar; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of optical second harmonic generation in 1961 started modern nonlinear optics. Soon after, R. C. Miller found empirically that the nonlinear susceptibility could be predicted from the linear susceptibilities. This important relation, known as Miller's Rule, allows a rapid determination of nonlinear susceptibilities from linear properties. In recent years, metamaterials, artificial materials that exhibit intriguing linear optical properties not found in natural materials, have shown novel nonlinear properties such as phase-mismatch-free nonlinear generation, new quasi-phase matching capabilities and large nonlinear susceptibilities. However, the understanding of nonlinear metamaterials is still in its infancy, with no general conclusion on the relationship between linear and nonlinear properties. The key question is then whether one can determine the nonlinear behaviour of these artificial materials from their exotic linear behaviour. Here, we show that the nonlinear oscillator model does not apply in general to nonlinear metamaterials. We show, instead, that it is possible to predict the relative nonlinear susceptibility of large classes of metamaterials using a more comprehensive nonlinear scattering theory, which allows efficient design of metamaterials with strong nonlinearity for important applications such as coherent Raman sensing, entangled photon generation and frequency conversion.

  5. Structurally-modified subphthalocyanines: molecular design towards realization of expected properties from the electronic structure and structural features of subphthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Soji; Kobayashi, Nagao

    2014-07-01

    This feature article summarizes recent contributions of the authors in the synthesis of structurally-modified subphthalocyanines. The structural modification covers (1) modification of the conjugated system of subphthalocyanines to create novel conjugated systems comprising three pyrroles or pyrrole-like subunits, (2) core-modification by expansion of the inner pyrrolic five-membered ring to larger six- and seven-membered ring units, and (3) exterior-modification by annulation of functional units to subphthalocyanines. These modifications in the structure of subphthalocyanines have been performed with the aim of demonstrating unique properties originating from the bowl-shaped C3v-symmetric structure as well as the electronic structure delineated by the 14π-electron conjugated system on the curved molecular surface. The possible structural modifications surveyed in this feature article and their concomitant properties will provide important future guidelines to the design of subphthalocyanine-based functional molecules, considering the fact that subphthalocyanines have recently been attracting considerable attention as potential candidates in the field of optoelectronics and molecular electronics. PMID:24710280

  6. Dynamic response analysis of structure under time-variant interval process model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Baizhan; Qin, Yuan; Yu, Dejie; Jiang, Chao

    2016-10-01

    Due to the aggressiveness of the environmental factor, the variation of the dynamic load, the degeneration of the material property and the wear of the machine surface, parameters related with the structure are distinctly time-variant. Typical model for time-variant uncertainties is the random process model which is constructed on the basis of a large number of samples. In this work, we propose a time-variant interval process model which can be effectively used to deal with time-variant uncertainties with limit information. And then two methods are presented for the dynamic response analysis of the structure under the time-variant interval process model. The first one is the direct Monte Carlo method (DMCM) whose computational burden is relative high. The second one is the Monte Carlo method based on the Chebyshev polynomial expansion (MCM-CPE) whose computational efficiency is high. In MCM-CPE, the dynamic response of the structure is approximated by the Chebyshev polynomials which can be efficiently calculated, and then the variational range of the dynamic response is estimated according to the samples yielded by the Monte Carlo method. To solve the dependency phenomenon of the interval operation, the affine arithmetic is integrated into the Chebyshev polynomial expansion. The computational effectiveness and efficiency of MCM-CPE is verified by two numerical examples, including a spring-mass-damper system and a shell structure.

  7. Concurrent Probabilistic Simulation of High Temperature Composite Structural Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdi, Frank

    1996-01-01

    A computational structural/material analysis and design tool which would meet industry's future demand for expedience and reduced cost is presented. This unique software 'GENOA' is dedicated to parallel and high speed analysis to perform probabilistic evaluation of high temperature composite response of aerospace systems. The development is based on detailed integration and modification of diverse fields of specialized analysis techniques and mathematical models to combine their latest innovative capabilities into a commercially viable software package. The technique is specifically designed to exploit the availability of processors to perform computationally intense probabilistic analysis assessing uncertainties in structural reliability analysis and composite micromechanics. The primary objectives which were achieved in performing the development were: (1) Utilization of the power of parallel processing and static/dynamic load balancing optimization to make the complex simulation of structure, material and processing of high temperature composite affordable; (2) Computational integration and synchronization of probabilistic mathematics, structural/material mechanics and parallel computing; (3) Implementation of an innovative multi-level domain decomposition technique to identify the inherent parallelism, and increasing convergence rates through high- and low-level processor assignment; (4) Creating the framework for Portable Paralleled architecture for the machine independent Multi Instruction Multi Data, (MIMD), Single Instruction Multi Data (SIMD), hybrid and distributed workstation type of computers; and (5) Market evaluation. The results of Phase-2 effort provides a good basis for continuation and warrants Phase-3 government, and industry partnership.

  8. Transport properties and electroanalytical response characteristics of drotaverine ion-selective sensors.

    PubMed

    Kharitonov, Sergey V

    2005-08-01

    The construction and electroanalytical response characteristics of poly(vinyl chloride) matrix ion-selective sensors (ISSs) for drotaverine hydrochloride are described. The membranes incorporate ion-association complexes of drotaverine with tetraphenylborate, picrate, tetraiodomercurate, tetraiodobismuthate, Reinecke salt, and heteropolycompounds of Keggin structure-molybdophosphoric acid, tungstophosphoric acid, molybdosiliconic acid and tungstosiliconic acid as electroactive materials for ionometric sensor controls. These ISSs have a linear response to drotaverine hydrochloride over the range 8 x 10(-6) to 5 x 10(-2) mol L(-1) with cationic slopes from 51 to 58 mV per concentration decade. These ISSs have a fast response time (up to 1 min), a low determination limit (down to 4.3 x 10(-6) mol L(-1)), good stability (3-5 weeks), and reasonable selectivity. Permeabilities and ion fluxes through a membrane were calculated for major and interfering ions. Dependences of the transport properties of the membranes on the concentrations of the ion exchanger and near-membrane solution and their electrochemical characteristics are presented. The ISSs were used for direct potentiometry and potentiometric titration (sodium tetraphenylborate) of drotaverine hydrochloride. Results with mean accuracy of 99.1+/-1.0% of nominal were obtained which corresponded well to data obtained by use of high-performance liquid chromatography.

  9. Visual attention model based on statistical properties of neuron responses.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haibin; Wang, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Visual attention is a mechanism of the visual system that can select relevant objects from a specific scene. Interactions among neurons in multiple cortical areas are considered to be involved in attentional allocation. However, the characteristics of the encoded features and neuron responses in those attention related cortices are indefinite. Therefore, further investigations carried out in this study aim at demonstrating that unusual regions arousing more attention generally cause particular neuron responses. We suppose that visual saliency is obtained on the basis of neuron responses to contexts in natural scenes. A bottom-up visual attention model is proposed based on the self-information of neuron responses to test and verify the hypothesis. Four different color spaces are adopted and a novel entropy-based combination scheme is designed to make full use of color information. Valuable regions are highlighted while redundant backgrounds are suppressed in the saliency maps obtained by the proposed model. Comparative results reveal that the proposed model outperforms several state-of-the-art models. This study provides insights into the neuron responses based saliency detection and may underlie the neural mechanism of early visual cortices for bottom-up visual attention. PMID:25747859

  10. Effect of cleaning and sterilization on titanium implant surface properties and cellular response

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Hwa; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Baier, Robert E.; Meyer, Anne E.; Tannenbaum, Rina; Boyan, Barbara D.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) has been widely used as an implant material due to the excellent biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of its oxide surface. Biomaterials must be sterile before implantation, but the effects of sterilization on their surface properties have been less well studied. The effects of cleaning and sterilization on surface characteristics were bio-determined using contaminated and pure Ti substrata first manufactured to present two different surface structures: pretreated titanium (PT, Ra = 0.4 μm) (i.e. surfaces that were not modified by sandblasting and/or acid etching); (SLA, Ra = 3.4 μm). Previously cultured cells and associated extracellular matrix were removed from all bio-contaminated specimens by cleaning in a sonicator bath with a sequential acetone–isopropanol–ethanol–distilled water protocol. Cleaned specimens were sterilized with autoclave, gamma irradiation, oxygen plasma, or ultraviolet light. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurements, profilometry, and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine surface chemical components, hydrophilicity, roughness, and morphology, respectively. Small organic molecules present on contaminated Ti surfaces were removed with cleaning. XPS analysis confirmed that surface chemistry was altered by both cleaning and sterilization. Cleaning and sterilization affected hydrophobicity and roughness. These modified surface properties affected osteogenic differentiation of human MG63 osteoblast-like cells. Specifically, autoclaved SLA surfaces lost the characteristic increase in osteoblast differentiation seen on starting SLA surfaces, which was correlated with altered surface wettability and roughness. These data indicated that recleaned and resterilized Ti implant surfaces cannot be considered the same as the first surfaces in terms of surface properties and cell responses. Therefore, the reuse of Ti implants after resterilization may not result in the same tissue responses as

  11. Hygrothermal Properties of Cross Laminated Timber and Moisture Response of Wood at High Relative Humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlSayegh, George

    Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) is a new wood-based material composed of cross laminated wood boards that form a structural panel. This study focuses on identifying the appropriate methods to determine the hygrothermal properties of CLTs fabricated with Canadian and European Lumber. The laboratory tests carried out in this study will help establish heat, air and moisture response properties to be used for hygrothermal simulation to assess the durability of CLTs in building envelope construction. Measurement of water vapour permeability, liquid water absorption, sorption isotherms, thermal conductivity, and air permeability were performed on three Canadian CLT specimens composed of Hem-Fir, Eastern Spruce-Pine-Fir, and Western Spruce-Pine-Fir and one European specimen composed of Spruce. The hygrothermal properties of CLT, considered in this study, appear to be similar to commonly used wood specimens reported in the literature. However, liquid water absorption coefficients of CLT were found to be generally lower than common wood species, possibly due to the presence of glue between the wood layers which limits the moisture movement across the specimen. On the other hand, the air permeability across the CLT specimens varied due to the glue discontinuity within the specimen which led some CLTs to be permeable, however all the European specimens were found to be impermeable. This study also critically analyzed the significance of equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood at high relative humidity, measured by means of a pressure plate apparatus and humidity chambers, on the moisture management performance of a wood-frame stucco wall, using the hygrothermal simulation tool hygIRC-2D. The simulation results indicate that the prediction of the moisture response of a wood-frame stucco wall assembly depends significantly on the method adopted to derive the EMC of wood at high RH.

  12. Synthesis, structure, and mechanical properties of silica nanocomposite polyrotaxane gels.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kazuaki; Matsui, Daisuke; Mayumi, Koichi; Ito, Kohzo

    2015-01-01

    A significantly soft and tough nanocomposite gel was realized by a novel network formed using cyclodextrin-based polyrotaxanes. Covalent bond formation between the cyclic components of polyrotaxanes and the surface of silica nanoparticles (15 nm diameter) resulted in an infinite network structure without direct bonds between the main chain polymer and the silica. Small-angle X-ray scattering revealed that the homogeneous distribution of silica nanoparticles in solution was maintained in the gel state. Such homogeneous nanocomposite gels were obtained with at least 30 wt % silica content, and the Young's modulus increased with silica content. Gelation did not occur without silica. This suggests that the silica nanoparticles behave as cross-linkers. Viscoelastic measurements of the nanocomposite gels showed no stress relaxation regardless of the silica content for <20% compression strain, indicating an infinite stable network without physical cross-links that have finite lifetime. On the other hand, the infinite network exhibited an abnormally low Young's modulus, ~1 kPa, which is not explainable by traditional rubber theory. In addition, the composite gels were tough enough to completely maintain the network structure under 80% compression strain. These toughness and softness properties are attributable to both the characteristic sliding of polymer chains through the immobilized cyclodextrins on the silica nanoparticle and the entropic contribution of the cyclic components to the elasticity of the gels. PMID:26664642

  13. Structure and adsorption properties of a porous cooper hexacyanoferrate polymorph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roque-Malherbe, R.; Carballo, E.; Polanco, R.; Lugo, F.; Lozano, C.

    2015-11-01

    The key questions addressed here were: the structure elucidation and the investigation of the adsorption space and framework expansion effect of a Cu(II) hexacyanoferrate (III) polymorph (labeled Cu-PBA-I). The structural analysis was performed with a broad set of characterization methods. Additionally, a low and high pressure carbon dioxide adsorption investigation was performed, assuming, to comprehend the adsorption experiments, that the adsorbent plus the adsorbed phase were a solid solution. We concluded: that the Cu-PBA-I presented the following composition, K1/4 Cu (II)[ Fe (III)(CN)6 ] 3 / 4⋄1/4 nH2 O , exhibited an antiferromagnetic behavior and displayed a thermally stable I 4 bar m 2 space group lattice in the degassed state. Moreover, the low pressure adsorption study allowed the calculation of the micropore volume, W=0.09 cm3/g and the isosteric heat of adsorption, qiso=19 kJ/mol; further, the high pressure adsorption data revealed an extremely high adsorption capacity owing to a framework expansion effect. Finally, the DRIFTS spectrum of adsorbed CO2 displayed peaks corresponding to carbon dioxide physically adsorbed and interacting with electron accepting Lewis acid sites. Hence, was produced an excellent adsorbent which combine porosity and anti-ferromagnetism, antagonist properties rarely found together.

  14. Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Protein Solutions: Structural and Dynamical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Gabdoulline, Razif; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2010-12-01

    The study of solutions of biomacromolecules provides an important basis for understanding the behavior of many fundamental cellular processes, such as protein folding, self-assembly, biochemical reactions, and signal transduction. Here, we describe a Brownian dynamics simulation procedure and its validation for the study of the dynamic and structural properties of protein solutions. In the model used, the proteins are treated as atomically detailed rigid bodies moving in a continuum solvent. The protein-protein interaction forces are described by the sum of electrostatic interaction, electrostatic desolvation, nonpolar desolvation, and soft-core repulsion terms. The linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation is solved to compute electrostatic terms. Simulations of homogeneous solutions of three different proteins with varying concentrations, pH, and ionic strength were performed. The results were compared to experimental data and theoretical values in terms of long-time self-diffusion coefficients, second virial coefficients, and structure factors. The results agree with the experimental trends and, in many cases, experimental values are reproduced quantitatively. There are no parameters specific to certain protein types in the interaction model, and hence the model should be applicable to the simulation of the behavior of mixtures of macromolecules in cell-like crowded environments.

  15. Flame Radiation, Structure, and Scalar Properties in Microgravity Laminar Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feikema, Douglas; Lim, Jongmook; Sivathanu, Yudaya

    2007-01-01

    Results from microgravity combustion experiments conducted in the Zero Gravity Research Facility (ZGF) 5.18 second drop facility are reported. The results quantify flame radiation, structure, and scalar properties during the early phase of a microgravity fire. Emission mid-infrared spectroscopy measurements have been completed to quantitatively determine the flame temperature, water and carbon dioxide vapor concentrations, radiative emissive power, and soot concentrations in microgravity laminar methane/air, ethylene/nitrogen/air and ethylene/air jet flames. The measured peak mole fractions for water vapor and carbon dioxide are found to be in agreement with state relationship predictions for hydrocarbon/air combustion. The ethylene/air laminar flame conditions are similar to previously reported results including those from the flight project, Laminar Soot Processes (LSP). Soot concentrations and gas temperatures are in reasonable agreement with similar results available in the literature. However, soot concentrations and flame structure dramatically change in long-duration microgravity laminar diffusion flames as demonstrated in this report.

  16. Structural properties of bismuth-bearing semiconductor alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    The structural properties of bismuth-bearing III-V semiconductor alloys are addressed. Because the Bi compounds are not known to form zincblende structures, only the anion-substituted alloys InPBi, InAsBi, and InSbBi are considered candidates as narrow-gap semiconductors. Miscibility calculations indicate that InSbBi will be the most miscible, and InPBi, with the large lattice mismatch of the constituents, will be the most difficult to mix. Calculations of the hardness of the Bi compounds indicate that, once formed, the InPBi alloy will be harder than the other Bi alloys, and substantially harder than the currently favored narrow-gap semiconductor HgCdTe. Thus, although InSbBi may be an easier material to prepare, InPBi promises to be a harder material. Growth of the Bi compounds will require high effective growth temperatures, probably attainable only through the use of nonequilibrium energy-assisted epitaxial growth techniques.

  17. A new Cu–cysteamine complex: structure and optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Lun; Chen, Wei; Schatte, Gabriele; Wang, Wei; Joly, Alan G.; Huang, Yining; Sammynaiken, Ramaswami; Hossu, Marius

    2014-06-07

    Here we report the structure and optical properties of a new Cu–cysteamine complex (Cu–Cy) with a formula of Cu3Cl(SR)2 (R ¼ CH2CH2NH2). This Cu–Cy has a different structure from a previous Cu–Cy complex, in which both thio and amine groups from cysteamine bond with copper ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance results show that the oxidation state of copper in Cu3Cl(SR)2 is +1 rather than +2. Further, Cu3Cl(SR)2 has been observed to show intense photoluminescence and X-ray excited luminescence. More interesting is that Cu3Cl(SR)2 particles can produce singlet oxygen under irradiation by light or X-ray. This indicates that Cu3Cl(SR)2 is a new photosensitizer that can be used for deep cancer treatment as X-ray can penetrate soft tissues. All these findings mean that Cu3Cl(SR)2 is a new material with potential applications for lighting, radiation detection and cancer treatment.

  18. Synthesis, structure, and mechanical properties of silica nanocomposite polyrotaxane gels

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Daisuke; Mayumi, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Summary A significantly soft and tough nanocomposite gel was realized by a novel network formed using cyclodextrin-based polyrotaxanes. Covalent bond formation between the cyclic components of polyrotaxanes and the surface of silica nanoparticles (15 nm diameter) resulted in an infinite network structure without direct bonds between the main chain polymer and the silica. Small-angle X-ray scattering revealed that the homogeneous distribution of silica nanoparticles in solution was maintained in the gel state. Such homogeneous nanocomposite gels were obtained with at least 30 wt % silica content, and the Young’s modulus increased with silica content. Gelation did not occur without silica. This suggests that the silica nanoparticles behave as cross-linkers. Viscoelastic measurements of the nanocomposite gels showed no stress relaxation regardless of the silica content for <20% compression strain, indicating an infinite stable network without physical cross-links that have finite lifetime. On the other hand, the infinite network exhibited an abnormally low Young’s modulus, ~1 kPa, which is not explainable by traditional rubber theory. In addition, the composite gels were tough enough to completely maintain the network structure under 80% compression strain. These toughness and softness properties are attributable to both the characteristic sliding of polymer chains through the immobilized cyclodextrins on the silica nanoparticle and the entropic contribution of the cyclic components to the elasticity of the gels. PMID:26664642

  19. Translating innate response into long-lasting antibody response by the intrinsic antigen-adjuvant properties of papaya mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Ramírez, Elizabeth; Pérez-Flores, Rebeca; Majeau, Nathalie; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Ramírez-Saldaña, Maricela; Manjarrez-Orduño, Nataly; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Becker, Ingeborg; Isibasi, Armando; Leclerc, Denis; López-Macías, Constantino

    2008-01-01

    Identifying the properties of a molecule involved in the efficient activation of the innate and adaptive immune responses that lead to long-lasting immunity is crucial for vaccine and adjuvant development. Here we show that the papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) is recognized by the immune system as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and as an antigen in mice (Pamptigen). A single immunization of PapMV without added adjuvant efficiently induced both cellular and specific long-lasting antibody responses. PapMV also efficiently activated innate immune responses, as shown by the induction of lipid raft aggregation, secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on dendritic cells and macrophages, and long-lasting adjuvant effects upon the specific antibody responses to model antigens. PapMV mixed with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. typhi) outer membrane protein C increased its protective capacity against challenge with S. typhi, revealing the intrinsic adjuvant properties of PapMV in the induction of immunity. Antigen-presenting cells loaded with PapMV efficiently induced antibody responses in vivo, which may link the innate and adaptive responses observed. PapMV recognition as a Pamptigen might be translated into long-lasting antibody responses and protection observed. These properties could be used in the development of new vaccine platforms. PMID:18070030

  20. Structure-response relationship in electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry of sartans by artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Golubović, Jelena; Birkemeyer, Claudia; Protić, Ana; Otašević, Biljana; Zečević, Mira

    2016-03-18

    Quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) methods are based on the hypothesis that changes in the molecular structure are reflected in changes in the observed property of the molecule. Artificial neural network is a technique of data analysis, which sets out to emulate the human brain's way of working. For the first time a quantitative structure-response relationship in electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) by means of artificial neural networks (ANN) on the group of angiotensin II receptor antagonists--sartans has been established. The investigated descriptors correspond to different properties of the analytes: polarity (logP), ionizability (pKa), surface area (solvent excluded volume) and number of proton acceptors. The influence of the instrumental parameters: methanol content in mobile phase, mobile phase pH and flow rate was also examined. Best performance showed a multilayer perceptron network with the architecture 6-3-3-1, trained with backpropagation algorithm. It showed high prediction ability on the previously unseen (test) data set with a coefficient of determination of 0.994. High prediction ability of the model would enable prediction of ESI-MS responsiveness under different conditions. This is particularly important in the method development phase. Also, prediction of responsiveness can be important in case of gradient-elution LC-MS and LC-MS/MS methods in which instrumental conditions are varied during time. Polarity, chargeability and surface area all appeared to be crucial for electrospray ionization whereby signal intensity appeared to be the result of a simultaneous influence of the molecular descriptors and their interactions. Percentage of organic phase in the mobile phase showed a positive, while flow rate showed a negative impact on signal intensity.