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Sample records for structured reminiscence therapy

  1. Reminiscence therapy for dementia.

    PubMed

    Woods, B; Spector, A; Jones, C; Orrell, M; Davies, S

    2005-04-18

    Reminiscence Therapy (RT) involves the discussion of past activities, events and experiences with another person or group of people, usually with the aid of tangible prompts such as photographs, household and other familiar items from the past, music and archive sound recordings. Reminiscence groups typically involve group meetings in which participants are encouraged to talk about past events at least once a week. Life review typically involves individual sessions, in which the person is guided chronologically through life experiences, encouraged to evaluate them, and may produce a life story book. Family care-givers are increasingly involved in reminiscence therapy. Reminiscence therapy is one of the most popular psychosocial interventions in dementia care, and is highly rated by staff and participants. There is some evidence to suggest it is effective in improving mood in older people without dementia. Its effects on mood, cognition and well-being in dementia are less well understood. The objective of the review is to assess the effects of reminiscence therapy for older people with dementia and their care-givers. The trials were identified from a search of the Specialised Register of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group on 4 May 2004 using the term "reminiscence". The CDCIG Specialized Register contains records from all major health care databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycLIT, CINAHL) and many ongoing trials databases and is regularly updated. We contacted specialists in the field and also searched relevant Internet sites. We hand-searched Aging and Mental Health, the Gerontologist, Journal of Gerontology, Current Opinion in Psychiatry, Current Research in Britain: Social Sciences, British Psychological Society conference proceedings and Reminiscence database. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials of reminiscence therapy for dementia. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. Five trials are included

  2. Reminiscence therapy for dementia.

    PubMed

    Spector, A; Orrell, M; Davies, S; Woods, R T

    2000-01-01

    Reminiscence Therapy (RT) has been defined as vocal or silent recall of events in a person's life, either alone, or with another person or group of people. It typically involves group meetings, at least once a week. in which participants are encouraged to talk about past events, often assisted by aids such as photos, music, objects and videos of the past. There is, often, little consistent application of psychological therapies in dementia services. A number of these 'therapies' were greeted with enthusiasm by health care practitioners in understimulating care environments. They were expected to work miracles and their 'failure' to do this has led to their widespread disuse. A systematic review of the available evidence is important in order to identify the effectiveness of the different therapies. Subsequently, guidelines for their use can be made on a sound evidence base. RT involves groups of elderly people talking of past events, assisted by aids such as videos, pictures and archives, as a means of communicating and reflecting upon their life experiences. The objective of the review is to assess the effects of RT for dementia. We searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, PSYCHLIT, EMBASE, OMNI, BIDS, Dissertation Abstracts International, SIGLE and reference lists of relevant articles up to 1998, and we contacted specialists in the field. We also searched relevant internet sites and we handsearched Aging and Mental Health, the Gerontologist, Journal of Gerontology, Current Opinion in Psychiatry, Current Research in Britain: Social Sciences, British Psychological Society conference proceedings and Reminiscence database. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials of RT for dementia in elderly people. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. Two trials are included in the review, but only one trial with 15 participants had extractable data. The results were statistically non-significant for both cognition

  3. Reminiscence therapy for dementia.

    PubMed

    Spector, A; Orrell, M; Davies, S; Woods, R T

    2000-01-01

    Reminiscence Therapy (RT) has been defined as vocal or silent recall of events in a person's life, either alone, or with another person or group of people. It typically involves group meetings, at least once a week, in which participants are encouraged to talk about past events, often assisted by aids such as photos, music, objects and videos of the past. There is, often, little consistent application of psychological therapies in dementia services. A number of these 'therapies' were greeted with enthusiasm by health care practitioners in under stimulating care environments. They were expected to work miracles and their 'failure' to do this has led to their widespread disuse. A systematic review of the available evidence is important in order to identify the effectiveness of the different therapies. Subsequently, guidelines for their use can be made on a sound evidence base. RT involves groups of elderly people talking of past events, assisted by aids such as videos, pictures and archives, as a means of communicating and reflecting upon their life experiences. The objective of the review is to assess the effects of RT for dementia. We searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, PSYCHLIT, EMBASE, OMNI, BIDS, Dissertation Abstracts International, SIGLE and reference lists of relevant articles up to 1998, and we contacted specialists in the field. We also searched relevant Internet sites and we hand searched Aging and Mental Health, the Gerontologist, Journal of Gerontology, Current Opinion in Psychiatry, Current Research in Britain: Social Sciences, British Psychological Society conference proceedings and Reminiscence database. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials of RT for dementia in elderly people. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. Two trials are included in the review, but only one trial with 15 participants had extractable data. The results were statistically non-significant for both

  4. [The Effect of Structured Group Reminiscence Therapy on the Life Satisfaction of Institutionalized Elderly].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Mei; Kuo, Chien-Lin; Chen, Mei-Rong; Lee, Lai-Ling; Lee, Pi-Yueh; Wang, Shu-Fen

    2016-08-01

    Long-term care institutions have become an option for older people who are dependent in daily living. However, insufficient attention has been focused on assessing the life satisfaction of those currently residing in these institutions in Taiwan. Previous research indicates that group reminiscence may improve the life satisfaction of older adults. However, there is currently no consensus regarding the implementation and evaluation of reminiscence interventions. To examine the effect of a structured group reminiscence protocol on the life satisfaction of institutionalized older adults. The study used a quasi-experimental design. A total of 48 older adults were conveniently recruited from two long-term care institutions in southern Taiwan. The experimental group (n = 23) received 8 weeks of structured-group reminiscence for 40 minutes weekly, while the control group (n = 25) received routine care from the institution. Both groups were evaluated using a life-satisfaction questionnaire before and after the intervention and again four weeks later. Life satisfaction scores were statistically similar on the pre-test and significantly different on both post-test questionnaires for the two groups. The scores for the experimental and control groups were pre-test: 24.22 vs 23.36 (p = .063); post-test I: 27.22 vs 23.32 (p < .001); and post-test II: 26.43 vs 23.00 (p < .001). The mean post-test scores for the experimental group were significantly higher than the pre-test score (p < .001). The generalized estimating equation test showed that the overall score of life satisfaction for the experimental group increased by 0.85-points (p = .042) more than the control group, which is a significant difference. The results support that the 8-week structured group reminiscence protocol effectively enhances life satisfaction in older adults. The results of this study may be referenced in the continuing education of nurses working in long-term care institutions in the context of helping

  5. Structured group reminiscence: an intervention for older adults.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Cynthia Kellam

    2009-11-01

    Group reminiscence is an intervention recommended for care of older adults in structured and unstructured settings. One problem experienced by nurses is how to organize, facilitate, and evaluate reminiscence groups for older people. Hence, there is a need for further research on reminiscence to determine how to use this as an intervention to improve the well-being of older adults. There is also a need for continuing education to provide nurses with education on this intervention for older persons. This article provides an overview of qualitative and quantitative research on group reminiscence and offers a suggested evidence-based protocol for a 6-week group intervention based on this research. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Effects of Reminiscence Group Therapy on Demented Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldwasser, A. Norman; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Assigned 27 demented elderly nursing home residents to either reminiscence group therapy, supportive group therapy, or a no-treatment control group. Results showed the self-reported level of depression in participants given reminiscence therapy was positively affected compared with participants in the supportive therapy and control groups.…

  7. Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Effects of Reminiscence Group Therapy on Demented Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldwasser, A. Norman; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Assigned 27 demented elderly nursing home residents to either reminiscence group therapy, supportive group therapy, or a no-treatment control group. Results showed the self-reported level of depression in participants given reminiscence therapy was positively affected compared with participants in the supportive therapy and control groups.…

  8. Group reminiscence therapy for cognitive and affective function of demented elderly in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Jy

    2007-12-01

    Elderly people with cognitive impairments are often associated with depressed mood and are heavy consumers in both medical services and need in caregivers. Reminiscence is believed to be effective in improving the cognition and mood of demented people. This study tested the hypothesis that structured group reminiscence therapy can prevent the progression of cognitive impairment and enhance affective function in the cognitively impaired elderly. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) based on a two group pre- and post-test design was used. The experimental subjects underwent eight group sessions, one session per week. The measurements were performed using Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Geriatric Depression Scale short form (GDS-SF), and Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD). The sample consisted of 102 subjects, with 51 in the experimental group and 51 in the control group. Results demonstrated that the intervention significantly affected cognitive function and affective function as measured by MMSE and CSDD (p = 0.015 and 0.026), indicating that the cognitive function of the experimental subjects increased and their depressive symptoms diminished following intervention. Participation in reminiscence activities can be a positive and valuable experience for demented older persons. Consequently, the development of a structured care program for elderly persons with cognitive impairment and the need for long-term care is essential. Thus, health providers in long-term care facilities should be trained in reminiscence group therapy, and to be able to deliver such a program to the targeted group.

  9. [Individual reminiscence therapy improves self-esteem for Japanese community-dwelling older adults].

    PubMed

    Nomura, Nobutake

    2009-04-01

    This study examined the effects of individual reminiscence therapy in Japanese community-dwelling older adults without dementia. Participants (twenty three men and fifty seven women, mean age = 82.6 yrs) were recruited from a community day-care center. They were randomly assigned to a reminiscence therapy group or a control group. Participants in the reminiscence group completed five or six weekly sessions (30-60 minutes) of individual reminiscence therapy. Participant's depression, life satisfaction, and self-esteem were assessed before and after the sessions. The results showed that the reminiscence group had a significant improvement in self-esteem. Thus individual reminiscence therapy can be a tool to maintain or improve self-esteem for Japanese older adults without dementia.

  10. Group integrative reminiscence therapy on self-esteem, life satisfaction and depressive symptoms in institutionalised older veterans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Fen

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to use group integrative reminiscence as a nursing intervention to evaluate the immediate effects on self-esteem, life satisfaction and depressive symptoms for a special group named 'institutionalised older veterans' after a 12-week intervention. The study group comprised institutionalised older veterans with combat experience, including being wounded in war and who were twice forced to relocate. The group participants had lower life satisfaction, and greater use for mental health services and greater non-specific health complaints were reported from this group. Reminiscence therapy has been considered an effective nursing intervention, but the effects on institutionalised older veterans have not been studied. A quasi-experimental design and purposive sampling were conducted. A total of 74 participants were studied with pre- and post-tests to measure the effect of group integrative reminiscence therapy. The activity was held once weekly for 12 weeks. The Life Satisfaction Index A, self-esteem scale and Geriatric Depression Scale Short Form were used as research tools, and the t-test, Fisher's exact test and generalised estimating equation were used for data analysis. All participants were male, with an average age of 81·34 years old, 91·9% unmarried and were in bad health. After 12 weeks of intervention, the reminiscence groups significantly improved their self-esteem and life satisfaction and decreased depressive symptoms compared with control groups. Group integrative reminiscence revealed immediate effects on improving the self-esteem and life satisfaction of institutionalised older veterans, and depressive symptoms were also decreased. Moreover, a sense of positive self-value and belonging to the institution was produced. Group integrative reminiscence is an applicable nursing intervention for vulnerable persons such as institutionalised older veterans. A structured protocol based on the characteristics of the residents and the

  11. Cognitive-reminiscence therapy and usual care for depression in young adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hallford, David J; Mellor, David

    2013-10-21

    Depression is a common affliction for young adults, and is associated with a range of adverse outcomes. Cognitive-reminiscence therapy is a brief, structured intervention that has been shown to be highly effective for reducing depressive symptoms, yet to date has not been evaluated in young adult populations. Given its basis in theory-guided reminiscence-based therapy, and incorporation of effective therapeutic techniques drawn from cognitive therapy and problem-solving frameworks, it is hypothesized to be effective in treating depression in this age group. This article presents the design of a randomized controlled trial implemented in a community-based youth mental health service to compare cognitive-reminiscence therapy with usual care for the treatment of depressive symptoms in young adults. Participants in the cognitive-reminiscence group will receive six sessions of weekly, individual psychotherapy, whilst participants in the usual-care group will receive support from the youth mental health service according to usual procedures. A between-within repeated-measures design will be used to evaluate changes in self-reported outcome measures of depressive symptoms, psychological wellbeing and anxiety across baseline, three weeks into the intervention, post-intervention, one month post-intervention and three months post-intervention. Interviews will also be conducted with participants from the cognitive-reminiscence group to collect information about their experience receiving the intervention, and the process underlying any changes that occur. This study will determine whether a therapeutic approach to depression that has been shown to be effective in older adult populations is also effective for young adults. The expected outcome of this study is the validation of a brief, evidence-based, manualized treatment for young adults with depressive symptoms. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613000084785.

  12. Comparative Effectiveness of Social Problem-Solving Therapy and Reminiscence Therapy as Treatments for Depression in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arean, Patricia A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared effects of problem-solving therapy (PST), reminiscence therapy (RT), or waiting-list control (WLC) on 75 randomly assigned older adults diagnosed with major depressive disorder. At posttreatment, both PST and RT conditions produced significant reductions in depressive symptoms, compared with WLC group, and PST participants experienced…

  13. Combining music and reminiscence therapy interventions for wellbeing in elderly populations: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Istvandity, Lauren

    2017-08-01

    Both music therapy and reminiscence therapy are currently being used to increase aspects of wellbeing in older people, including those with memory diseases such as dementia, as alternatives to pharmacological treatments. There is growing evidence that combining these therapies in a focused way would provide unique wellbeing outcomes for this population. This review aims to report on the existing intervention studies that utilize both music and reminiscence activities in equal measure in elderly adult populations. A systematic review of intervention-based studies published between 1996 and 2016 was carried out: five studies were included in this review. Included studies were predominantly carried out in aged care facilities with aged populations affected by a range of conditions; all studies assessed aspects of mental well-being. The review found music reminiscence therapy to have positive effects for participants in four out of five studies. Further research incorporating qualitative methods and mapping of intervention procedures would complement existing findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Systematic Review of the Use of Technology for Reminiscence Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Amanda; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2016-01-01

    As the segment of the population 65 years of age or older continues to grow, the number of individuals with dementia increases proportionally, highlighting the need to design therapies that meet the social and emotional needs of people with dementia. Information and communication technologies (ICT) are potential venues for supporting the delivery of such therapies, including reminiscence therapy (RT), which is a non-pharmacological intervention involving the prompting of past memories, often with artifacts such as old photographs or music for therapeutic benefits such as the facilitation of social interactions or the increase of self-esteem. This paper systematically examines the scientific literature on the use of ICT for facilitating RT to assess the current state of the evidence and identify future trends. We searched the PubMed (1966–2013), ACM (1954–2013), and PsycINFO (1908–2013) repositories using the keywords dementia and reminiscence. Three hundred eighty-six articles were retrieved, 44 of which met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Findings of the systematic review include that there are benefits to using ICT for RT interventions. Some of these benefits are access to rich and engaging multimedia reminiscence materials, opportunities for people with dementia to participate in social interactions and take ownership of conversations, and a reduction of barriers due to motor deficits during interactions with media. Future studies should explore the types and content of media beneficial to individuals at different stages of dementia. PMID:25274711

  15. A systematic review of the use of technology for reminiscence therapy.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Amanda; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2014-10-01

    As the segment of the population 65 years of age or older continues to grow, the number of individuals with dementia increases proportionally, highlighting the need to design therapies that meet the social and emotional needs of people with dementia. Information and communication technologies (ICT) are potential venues for supporting the delivery of such therapies, including reminiscence therapy (RT), which is a non-pharmacological intervention involving the prompting of past memories, often with artifacts such as old photographs or music for therapeutic benefits such as the facilitation of social interactions or the increase of self-esteem. This paper systematically examines the scientific literature on the use of ICT for facilitating RT to assess the current state of the evidence and identify future trends. We searched the PubMed (1966-2013), ACM (1954-2013), and PsycINFO (1908-2013) repositories using the keywords dementia and reminiscence. Three hundred eighty-six articles were retrieved, 44 of which met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Findings of the systematic review include that there are benefits to using ICT for RT interventions. Some of these benefits are access to rich and engaging multimedia reminiscence materials, opportunities for people with dementia to participate in social interactions and take ownership of conversations, and a reduction of barriers due to motor deficits during interactions with media. Future studies should explore the types and content of media beneficial to individuals at different stages of dementia.

  16. Structuring Reminiscence Group Interventions for Older Adults Using a Framework of Mattering to Promote Wellness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukow, Herman R., II.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined if the wellness of older adult residents of a continuing care retirement community was enhanced through the promotion of a sense of mattering to others. A ten-session reminiscence therapy protocol (REM) was developed as a treatment baseline for this study and four tenets of mattering promotion were developed as an additive to…

  17. The effects of reminiscence therapy on depressive symptoms of Chinese elderly: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Depression is one of the most common mental disorders with a high prevalence among the older adults. In recent years, after realizing some side effects of the antidepressants, non-pharmacological psychological treatments begin to attract accruing attention. Reminiscence therapy is one of the psychological treatments that specially designed for the elderly to improve their mental health status by recalling and assessing their existing memory. Though some studies indicate reminiscence therapy can be effective and beneficial for the mental health of elderly, the conclusions are not consistent yet. The aim of this research is to assess the effectiveness of reminiscence therapy for Chinese elderly. Methods Sixty older adults (≥60 years of age) with mild to moderate depression will be randomly assigned to an experimental or a control condition. The participants in the experiment group will receive the reminiscence therapy under the Watt’s protocol with adaptation to Chinese Culture which consists of six weekly sessions of 90 minutes each. The control group will be treated as before. An assessor who is blind to intervention will conduct the measures before treatment, after treatment immediately, and three months after treatment. Discussion This study will provide the evidence whether the reminiscence therapy is effective to treat depressive symptoms of Chinese elderly. This research has been registered in the clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01553669). PMID:23126676

  18. The effects of group reminiscence therapy on depression, self esteem, and life satisfaction of elderly nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Chao, Shu-Yuan; Liu, Hsing-Yuan; Wu, Chiu-Yen; Jin, Suh-Fen; Chu, Tsung-Lan; Huang, Tzu-Shin; Clark, Mary Jo

    2006-03-01

    The need to provide quality mental health care for elders in nursing home settings has been a critical issue, as the aging population grows rapidly and institutional care becomes a necessity for some elders. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to describe the effect of participation in reminiscence group therapy on older nursing home residents' depression, self-esteem, and life satisfaction. Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants who met the study criteria. Residents of one ward were assigned to the reminiscence therapy group intervention, while residents of the other ward served as controls. Nine weekly one-hour sessions were designed to elicit reminiscence as group therapy for 12 elders in the experimental group. Another 12 elders were recruited for a control group matched to experimental subjects on relevant criteria. Depression, self-esteem, and life satisfaction were measured one week before and after the therapy. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, Version 10.0) was used to analyze data. Results indicated that group reminiscence therapy significantly improved self-esteem, although effects on depression and life satisfaction were not significant. Reminiscence groups could enhance elders' social interaction with one another in nursing home settings and become support groups for participants. The model we created here can serve as a reference for future application in institutional care.

  19. The effectiveness of group reminiscence therapy for loneliness, anxiety and depression in older adults in long-term care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Syed Elias, Sharifah Munirah; Neville, Christine; Scott, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    Loneliness, anxiety and depression are common problems for older adults in long-term care. Reminiscence therapy is a non-pharmacological intervention that may be of some benefit. In comparison to individual reminiscence therapy, group reminiscence therapy is a preferred option when dealing with the resource constraints of long-term care. The aim of this paper was to systematically review the literature in order to explore the effectiveness of group reminiscence therapy for older adults with loneliness, anxiety and depression in long-term care. Results indicated that group reminiscence therapy is an effective treatment for depression in older adults, however to date, there is limited research support for its effectiveness to treat loneliness and anxiety. Further research and an improvement in methodological quality, such as using qualitative and mixed methods approaches, is recommended to help establish an evidence base and provide better understanding of the effectiveness of group reminiscence therapy.

  20. Auto Therapy: Using Automobiles as Vehicles for Reminiscence With Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Keith A; Weber, Katherine V

    2015-01-01

    Reminiscence can be beneficial for older adults and contribute to well-being and ego integrity. In this exploratory pilot study, researchers assessed the feasibility and tolerability of a novel reminiscence intervention using automobiles as the focal point. Nineteen older adults (N = 19) were asked to reminisce using photographs of automobiles from across their lifespan. The RE-AIM framework was used to assess the intervention in terms of reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance. The intervention was well-received, quickly established rapport, and effectively fostered reminiscence. Social workers may find this intervention useful in helping older adults to explore their lives.

  1. The Effect of Reminiscence Therapy on Cognition, Depression, and Activities of Daily Living for Patients With Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Duru Aşiret, Güler; Kapucu, Sevgisun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was, conducted with experimental design, to investigate the effect of reminiscence therapy on cognition, depression, activities of daily living of institutionalized mild and moderate Alzheimer patients. The study was conducted with a total of 62 patients (31 intervention group and 31 control group) in four home care in Ankara, Turkey. Study was done between the July 1, 2013 and December 20, 2014. Reminiscence therapy sessions were held with groups consists of 4-5 patients, once a week with 30-35 minute duration for 12 weeks. Standardized Mini Mental Test was used in sample selection. Patients were listed through their mini mental test scores, and randomized as odd numbers to control group and even numbers to intervention group. Data were collected with forms developed by researcher 'Data Sheet' and 'Activities of Daily Living Follow-up Form' as well as scales 'Standardized Mini Mental Test' and 'Geriatric Depression Scale'. Chi-square, Mann Whitney-U test, variance analyses in repeated measures and Bonferroni tests were used for analysis. The increase in mean Standardized Mini Mental Test score and the decrease in mean Geriatric Depression Scale score of the individuals in the intervention group compared to the control group at the end of the reminiscence therapy was statistically significant (P < 0.05). At the end of reminiscence therapy sessions, increase in cognition and decrease in depression were found statistically significant in intervention group. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Effectiveness of follow-up reminiscence therapy on autobiographical memory in pathological ageing.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Juan C; Torres, Marta; Redondo, Rita; Mayordomo, Teresa; Sales, Alicia

    2017-08-01

    The objective is to examine the effects of reminiscence therapy (RT) on total, episodic and semantic autobiographical memory in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) groups, testing the effects of RT on different stages of autobiographical memory, and its effectiveness at follow-up. A sample composed of 43 aMCI (27 treatments, 16 controls) and 30 AD (15 treatments, 15 controls) subjects were evaluated with the Autobiographical Memory Interview (AMI) test. The RT consisted of 10 sessions lasting 60 minutes each. Both groups, aMCI and AD, showed significant effects on overall autobiographical memory; aMCI showed significant main effects on episodic and semantic autobiographical memory in the treatment group, increasing scores in both cases. For AD, significant effects were observed on autobiographical episodic memory, showing an increase in the treatment group from Time 1 to follow-up; semantic memory showed a decrease in the control group from Time 1 to follow-up. Results show that RT implementation and follow-up are effective in increasing autobiographical memory in subjects with aMCI and AD. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  3. Personalized reminiscence therapy M-health application for patients living with dementia: Innovating using open source code repository.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Melvyn W B; Ho, Roger C M

    2017-01-01

    Dementia is known to be an illness which brings forth marked disability amongst the elderly individuals. At times, patients living with dementia do also experience non-cognitive symptoms, and these symptoms include that of hallucinations, delusional beliefs as well as emotional liability, sexualized behaviours and aggression. According to the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines, non-pharmacological techniques are typically the first-line option prior to the consideration of adjuvant pharmacological options. Reminiscence and music therapy are thus viable options. Lazar et al. [3] previously performed a systematic review with regards to the utilization of technology to delivery reminiscence based therapy to individuals who are living with dementia and has highlighted that technology does have benefits in the delivery of reminiscence therapy. However, to date, there has been a paucity of M-health innovations in this area. In addition, most of the current innovations are not personalized for each of the person living with Dementia. Prior research has highlighted the utility for open source repository in bioinformatics study. The authors hoped to explain how they managed to tap upon and make use of open source repository in the development of a personalized M-health reminiscence therapy innovation for patients living with dementia. The availability of open source code repository has changed the way healthcare professionals and developers develop smartphone applications today. Conventionally, a long iterative process is needed in the development of native application, mainly because of the need for native programming and coding, especially so if the application needs to have interactive features or features that could be personalized. Such repository enables the rapid and cost effective development of application. Moreover, developers are also able to further innovate, as less time is spend in the iterative process.

  4. Protecting cognition from aging and Alzheimer's disease: a computerized cognitive training combined with reminiscence therapy.

    PubMed

    Barban, Francesco; Annicchiarico, Roberta; Pantelopoulos, Stelios; Federici, Alessia; Perri, Roberta; Fadda, Lucia; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto; Ricci, Claudia; Giuli, Simone; Scalici, Francesco; Turchetta, Chiara Stella; Adriano, Fulvia; Lombardi, Maria Giovanna; Zaccarelli, Chiara; Cirillo, Giulio; Passuti, Simone; Mattarelli, Paolo; Lymperopoulou, Olga; Sakka, Paraskevi; Ntanasi, Eva; Moliner, Reyes; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess the efficacy of process-based cognitive training (pb-CT) combined with reminiscence therapy (RT) in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (mAD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and in healthy elderly (HE) subjects. This multicenter, randomized, controlled trial involved 348 participants with mAD, MCI, and HE from four European countries. Participants were randomly assigned to two arms of a crossover design: those in arm A underwent 3 months of computerized pb-CT for memory and executive functions combined with RT and 3 months of rest; those in arm B underwent the reverse. The primary outcome was the effect of the training on memory and executive functions performance. The secondary outcome was the effect of the training on functional abilities in mAD assessed with the instrumental activities of daily living. We found a significant effect of the training for memory in all three groups on delayed recall of the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test and for executive functions in HE on the phonological fluency test. MCI and HE participants maintained these effects at follow-up. MCI and mAD participants also showed a significant effect of the training on the Mini-mental state examination scale. Participants with mAD showed more stable instrumental activities of daily living during the training versus the rest period. Our results corroborate the positive effect of pb-CT and its maintenance primarily on memory in HE and MCI participants that did not seem to be potentiated by RT. Moreover, our results are very promising for the mAD participants. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The effect of reminiscence music therapy sessions on changes in depressive symptoms in elderly persons with dementia.

    PubMed

    Ashida, S

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of reminiscence focused music therapy treatment on depressive symptoms in elderly people with dementia. Twenty elderly (3 male & 17 female) who were diagnosed as having dementia and residing at 2 different residential care facilities in Florida were assigned to 1 of 4 small groups. Each of the participants served as his or her own control in an O1 O2 X O3 design. The depressive symptoms were measured using Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia. The differences between the scores of pretest, posttest 1 after a week of 5-day no treatment, and posttest 2 after a week of 5-day reminiscence focused music therapy treatment were compared. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Newman-Keuls Multiple Comparison Procedure indicated statistically significant differences between pretest and posttest 2 as well as posttest 1 and posttest 2, while no significant differences were found between pretest and posttest 1. Results indicated that participation in small group reminiscence focused music therapy groups might help to reduce depressive symptoms in elderly people with dementia. Results of behavioral observations and future implications are also discussed.

  6. The Effects of Intermittent Reminiscence Therapy on Nursing Home Residents' Depression Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Patricia

    Depression is regarded as the most prevalent mental health disorder in the elderly. Reminiscence, a normative and universal process which can facilitate the resolution, integration, and reorganization of past conflicts can have positive or negative effects on depression. One environment where the elderly are particularly at risk for the negative…

  7. Peer support and reminiscence therapy for people with dementia and their family carers: a factorial pragmatic randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Burnell, Karen; Crellin, Nadia; Hoare, Zoe; Hoe, Juanita; Knapp, Martin; Russell, Ian; Wenborn, Jennifer; Woods, Bob; Orrell, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate peer support and reminiscence therapy, separately and together, in comparison with usual care for people with dementia and their family carers. Design Factorial pragmatic randomised trial, analysed by treatment allocated, was used for this study. Setting The trial ran in Community settings in England. Participants People with dementia and their family carers were the participants. Interventions Treatment as usual (TAU) plus one of the following: one-to-one peer support to family carers from experienced carers (Carer Supporter Programme; CSP), group reminiscence therapy (Remembering Yesterday, Caring Today; RYCT) for people with dementia and carers, both or neither. Main outcome measures Primary outcomes included health-related quality of life (SF-12) for carers and quality of life (QoL-AD) for people with dementia; secondary outcomes included quality of relationship for carers and people with dementia; both were collected by blinded assessors at baseline, 5 and 12 months (primary end point). Results Of 291 pairs recruited, we randomised 145 (50%) to CSP (71% uptake) and 194 (67%) to RYCT (61% uptake). CSP and RYCT, separately or together, were not effective in improving primary outcomes or most secondary outcomes. For CSP versus ‘no CSP’, adjusted difference in means was 0.52 points on the SF-12 (95% CI −1.28 to 2.32) and −0.08 points on the QoL-AD (95% CI −1.70 to 1.56). For RYCT versus ‘no RYCT’, the difference was 0.10 points on the SF-12 (95% CI −1.72 to 1.93) and 0.51 points on the QoL-AD (95% CI −1.17 to 2.08). However, carers reported better relationships with the people with dementia (difference 1.11, 95% CI 0.00 to 2.21, p=0.05). Comparison of combined intervention with TAU, and of intervention received, suggested differential impacts for carers and persons with dementia. Conclusions There is no evidence from the trial that either peer support or reminiscence is effective in

  8. Reminiscence Therapy Improves Cognitive Functions and Reduces Depressive Symptoms in Elderly People With Dementia: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Chuan; Chen, Yu-Ting; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Huey-Lan Hu, Sophia; Liu, Fang; Kuo, Ying-Ling; Chiu, Hsiao-Yean

    2015-12-01

    Cognitive function impairments and depressive symptoms are common in elderly people with dementia. Previous meta-analyses of outdated and small-scale studies have reported inconsistent results regarding the effects of reminiscence therapy on cognitive functions and depressive symptoms; therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis by including more recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with large sample sizes to investigate the immediate and long-term (6-10 months) effects of reminiscence therapy on cognitive functions and depressive symptoms in elderly people with dementia. Electronic databases, including PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ProQuest, Google Scholar, and Chinese databases were searched to select eligible articles. Primary outcome measures included the scores of cognitive functions and depressive symptoms. In total, 12 RCT studies investigating the effects of reminiscence therapy on cognitive functions and depressive symptoms in elderly people with dementia were included. Two reviewers independently extracted data. All analyses were performed using a random-effects model. Reminiscence therapy had a small-size effect on cognitive functions (g = 0.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.05-0.30) and a moderate-size effect on depressive symptoms (g = -0.49, 95% CI -0.70 to -0.28) in elderly people with dementia. Long-term effects of reminiscence therapy on cognitive functions and depressive symptoms were not confirmed. Moderator analysis revealed that institutionalized elderly people with dementia exhibited greater improvement in depressive symptoms than community-dwelling people with dementia did (g = -0.59 vs. -0.16, P = .003). This meta-analysis confirms that reminiscence therapy is effective in improving cognitive functions and depressive symptoms in elderly people with dementia. Our findings suggest that regular reminiscence therapy should be considered for inclusion as routine care for the improvement

  9. A Systematic Review of the Use of Technology for Reminiscence Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazar, Amanda; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    As the segment of the population 65 years of age or older continues to grow, the number of individuals with dementia increases proportionally, highlighting the need to design therapies that meet the social and emotional needs of people with dementia. Information and communication technologies (ICT) are potential venues for supporting the delivery…

  10. A Systematic Review of the Use of Technology for Reminiscence Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazar, Amanda; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    As the segment of the population 65 years of age or older continues to grow, the number of individuals with dementia increases proportionally, highlighting the need to design therapies that meet the social and emotional needs of people with dementia. Information and communication technologies (ICT) are potential venues for supporting the delivery…

  11. Art therapy and music reminiscence activity in the prevention of cognitive decline: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, Rathi; Rawtaer, Iris; Fam, Johnson; Wong, Jonathan; Kumar, Alan Prem; Gandhi, Mihir; Jing, Kenny Xu; Feng, Lei; Kua, Ee Heok

    2017-07-12

    Attention has shifted to the use of non-pharmacological interventions to prevent cognitive decline as a preventive strategy, as well as for those at risk and those with mild cognitive impairment. Early introduction of psycho-social interventions can address cognitive decline and significantly impact quality of life and the wellbeing of elderly individuals. This pilot study explores the feasibility of using art therapy and music reminiscence activity to improve the cognition of community living elderly with mild cognitive impairment. This open-label, interventional study involves a parallel randomized controlled trial design with three arms (two intervention arms and a control group) over a nine-month period. Participants will be community-living elderly individuals aged 60-85 years, both genders, who meet predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. In the initial three months, interventions will be provided weekly and for the remaining six months fortnightly. A sample size of 90 participants is targeted based on expected neuropsychological test performance, a primary outcome measure, and drop-out rates. The randomization procedure will be carried out via a web-based randomization system. Interventions will be provided by trained staff with a control group not receiving any intervention but continuing life as usual. Assessments will be done at baseline, three months, and nine months, and include neuroimaging to measure cerebral changes and neuropsychological tests to measure for changes in cognition. Secondary outcome measures will include mood changes in anxiety and depression and telomere lengths. Statistical analysis will be undertaken by statisticians; all efficacy analysis will be carried out on an intention-to-treat basis. Primary and secondary outcomes will be modeled using the linear mixed model for repeated measurements and further analysis may be undertaken to adjust for potential confounders. This will be the first study to compare the effectiveness of

  12. Reminiscences of Stanley Mandelstam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, John H.

    2017-01-01

    I reminisce about my interactions with Stanley Mandelstam during my years as a graduate student at UC Berkeley (1962-66) and afterwards. His contributions to S-matrix theory, quantum field theory, and string theory are also discussed.

  13. Reminiscence in dementia: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Laura; Murphy, Kathy; Cooney, Adeline; Casey, Dympna; O'Shea, Eamon; Devane, Declan; Jordan, Fionnuala; Hunter, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    This paper is a report of an analysis of the concept of reminiscence in dementia and highlights its uses as a therapeutic intervention used on individuals with dementia. No single definition of reminiscence exists in healthcare literature; however, definitions offered have similar components. The term life review is commonly used when discussing reminiscence; however, both terms are quite different in their goals, theory base and content. This concept analysis identified reminiscence as a process which occurs in stages, involving the recalling of early life events and interaction between individuals. The antecedents of reminiscence are age, life transitions, attention span, ability to recall, ability to vocalise and stressful situations. Reminiscence can lead to positive mental health, enhanced self esteem and improved communication skills. It also facilitates preparation for death, increases interaction between people, prepares for the future and evaluates a past life. Reminiscence therapy is used extensively in dementia care and evidence shows when used effectively it helps individuals retain a sense of self worth, identity and individuality.

  14. Distinctive effects between cognitive stimulation and reminiscence therapy on cognitive function and quality of life for different types of behavioural problems in dementia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiu-Ching; Yang, Ya-Ping; Cheng, Wen-Yun; Wang, Jing-Jy

    2017-09-07

    Among the various complementary therapies for patients with dementia (PwD), cognitive stimulation therapy (CST) and reminiscence therapy (RT) are frequently used to improve cognitive function and quality of life. However, no studies have examined the use of complementary therapies applied to different types of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia in PwD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distinctive effects of CST and RT on cognitive function and quality of life for PwD with three types of behavioural problems - the dispute, return and dissociate types. A quasi-experimental design was employed. A total of PwD residing in 10 long-term care institutions participated in the study and were divided into three groups. The CST and RT groups received 50-minute sessions of intervention therapy once a week for 10 continuous weeks, and the control group participated in regular activities. The pretest (week 1), post-test (week 12) and follow-up (week 24) data were collected using the Mini-Mental State Examination and Quality of Life-Alzheimer's Disease. Two-way analysis of variance was used for data analysis. The results of our study revealed CST and RT interventions had positive effects on cognition and quality of life of PwD. For short-term effects on cognitive function, CST was the most positive intervention for the dispute type. With regard to short-term effects on quality of life, CST was greater than RT for PwD. For follow-up effects, CST and RT may have potentially sustained effects. This study suggests that CST and RT could be applied to improve the cognitive function and quality of life for PwD, as well as contribute to the effectiveness of nonpharmacological approaches to PwD with certain types of behavioural problems. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Group discussions with structured reminiscence and a problem-based method as an intervention to prevent depressive symptoms in older people.

    PubMed

    Djukanović, Ingrid; Carlsson, Jörg; Peterson, Ulla

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of group discussions, in which structured reminiscence and a problem-based method were used, on depressive symptoms, quality of life and self-rated health among older people. Depressive symptoms in older people have a considerable impact on self-rated health and quality of life, with a high rate of co-morbidity and mortality. As the ageing population is growing, late-life depression is becoming an important public health problem and there is a need to find preventive interventions to avert unnecessary suffering. The study was quasi-experimental, with a one-group pretest-post-test design and follow-up after one year. Initially, a questionnaire was sent to the total population of 55-80-year-old retirees in a community in the northeast of Sweden, (n = 679). The questionnaire concerned demographics and covered areas such as health, depression and quality of life. The intervention consisted of group discussions where structured reminiscence and a problem-based method were used. The participants (n = 18) met 10 times under the guidance of a group-leader, a registered nurse educated in the method. Each session had different themes with a focus on positive memories but also on the present situation and the future. Parametric, nonparametric tests and content analysis were used. Participants evaluated the intervention positively, showed a decrease in depressive symptoms, an increase in self-rated health and experienced an increased autonomy. No long- lasting effect was seen. Group discussions where structured reminiscence and a problem-based method are used might be an option to prevent depressive symptoms in older people. This method might provide an opportunity for older people with depressive symptoms to improve their quality of life, however, to maintain the positive outcome the intervention should probably be continuous. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Themes in Reminiscence Groups with Older Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnside, Irene

    1993-01-01

    Examined use of themes in reminiscence therapy groups for older women. Themes used in protocols for three research studies were analyzed. Results revealed that, for one of the three studies, the female participants' (n=67) most-discussed themes were favorite holiday, first pet, and first job. (Author/NB)

  17. Meaning in life and mastery mediate the relationship of negative reminiscence with psychological distress among older adults with mild to moderate depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Korte, Jojanneke; Cappeliez, Philippe; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; Westerhof, Gerben J

    2012-12-01

    To understand the adaptive value of reminiscence, a mediational model of reminiscence was tested in a sample of older adults with mild to moderate depressive symptoms. Using structural equation modeling, we investigated if psychological resources (mastery and meaning in life) mediate the relation between reminiscence (positive: identity construction and problem solving; and negative: bitterness revival and boredom reduction) and psychological distress (depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms). A total of 202 older Dutch adults living in the community participated in this study. The present study consisted of baseline measurements of a randomized controlled trial that evaluated the effectiveness of a life-review therapy intervention on depression. Results showed that psychological resources fully mediated the relation between negative reminiscence and psychological distress. Specifically, negative reminiscing is related to decreased psychological distress through meaning in life and sense of mastery. The study contributes to current knowledge on the relation between reminiscence and mental health, both empirically and clinically. It helps to increase understanding of how reminiscence is related to psychological distress, especially in depressed older adults, and the relative importance of psychological resources, i.e., mastery and meaning in life. From a clinical perspective, these findings suggest the usefulness of focusing on strengthening psychological resources in therapeutic reminiscence-based strategies for older adults with depressive symptoms.

  18. Structural Features Reminiscent of ATP-Driven Protein Translocases Are Essential for the Function of a Type III Secretion-Associated ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Junya; Lefebre, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many bacterial pathogens and symbionts utilize type III secretion systems to interact with their hosts. These machines have evolved to deliver bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic target cells to modulate a variety of cellular functions. One of the most conserved components of these systems is an ATPase, which plays an essential role in the recognition and unfolding of proteins destined for secretion by the type III pathway. Here we show that structural features reminiscent of other ATP-driven protein translocases are essential for the function of InvC, the ATPase associated with a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium type III secretion system. Mutational and functional analyses showed that a two-helix-finger motif and a conserved loop located at the entrance of and within the predicted pore formed by the hexameric ATPase are essential for InvC function. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the function of this highly conserved component of type III secretion machines. IMPORTANCE Type III secretion machines are essential for the virulence or symbiotic relationships of many bacteria. These machines have evolved to deliver bacterial effector proteins into host cells to modulate cellular functions, thus facilitating bacterial colonization and replication. An essential component of these machines is a highly conserved ATPase, which is necessary for the recognition and secretion of proteins destined to be delivered by the type III secretion pathway. Using modeling and structure and function analyses, we have identified structural features of one of these ATPases from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium that help to explain important aspects of its function. PMID:26170413

  19. Effectiveness of group reminiscence for improving wellbeing of institutionalized elderly adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gaggioli, Andrea; Scaratti, Chiara; Morganti, Luca; Stramba-Badiale, Marco; Agostoni, Monica; Spatola, Chiara A M; Molinari, Enrico; Cipresso, Pietro; Riva, Giuseppe

    2014-10-25

    Group reminiscence therapy is a brief and structured intervention in which participants share personal past events with peers. This approach has been shown to be promising for improving wellbeing and reducing depressive symptoms among institutionalized older adults. However, despite the considerable interest in reminiscence group therapy, controlled studies to determine its specific benefits as compared to generic social interactions with peers (group conversations about everyday subjects) are still lacking. We have designed a randomized controlled trial aimed at comparing the effects of group reminiscence therapy with those of group recreational activity on the psychological wellbeing of an institutionalized sample of older adults. The study includes two groups of 20 hospitalized elderly participants: the experimental group and the control group. Participants included in the experimental group will receive six sessions of group reminiscence therapy, while the control group will participate in a recreational group discussion. A repeated-measures design will be used post-intervention and three months post-intervention to evaluate changes in self-reported outcome measures of depressive symptoms, self-esteem, life satisfaction, and quality of life from baseline. The protocol of a study aimed at examining the specific effects of group reminiscence therapy on psychological wellbeing, depression, and quality of life among institutionalized elderly people is described. It is expected that the outcomes of this trial will contribute to our knowledge about the process of group reminiscence, evaluate its effectiveness in improving psychological wellbeing of institutionalized individuals, and identify the best conditions for optimizing this approach. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (registration number: NCT02077153) on 31 January 2014.

  20. Narrative Structure and Emotional References in Parent-Child Reminiscing: Associations with Child Gender, Temperament, and the Quality of Parent-Child Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bost, Kelly K.; Choi, Eunsil; Wong, Maria S.

    2010-01-01

    The present research examined child gender, temperament, and the quality of parent-child interactions as predictors of narrative style and references to emotion during mother-child and father-child reminiscing. Although models predicting parents' narrative styles were non-significant, results revealed significant interactions between parental…

  1. Narrative Structure and Emotional References in Parent-Child Reminiscing: Associations with Child Gender, Temperament, and the Quality of Parent-Child Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bost, Kelly K.; Choi, Eunsil; Wong, Maria S.

    2010-01-01

    The present research examined child gender, temperament, and the quality of parent-child interactions as predictors of narrative style and references to emotion during mother-child and father-child reminiscing. Although models predicting parents' narrative styles were non-significant, results revealed significant interactions between parental…

  2. Effects of a reminiscence program among institutionalized elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Meléndez-Moral, Juan Carlos; Charco-Ruiz, Laura; Mayordomo-Rodríguez, Teresa; Sales-Galán, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Institutionalization during old age requires tremendous adaptability. Among the main consequences of the difficulty of adapting to the institutional context are prevalent depressive symptoms and low well-being. Reminiscence therapy has proven to be among the most effective at minimizing these outcomes. This study purpose was to investigate the usefulness of reminiscence intervention in an elderly, institutionalized sample. Following a group format, the intervention lasted eight sessions and compared a treatment group and a control group, using pre-post measures and a single-blind design. We predicted that reminiscence intervention would have a positive impact on depressive symptoms, self-esteem, life satisfaction, and psychological well-being. Significant results were obtained, including a drop in depressive symptoms and improved self-esteem, satisfaction, and psychological well-being. We conclude that reminiscence intervention yielded positive effects in institutionalized, elderly participants.

  3. Reminiscence to restore the soul.

    PubMed

    2005-05-01

    Hymns are proving a popular means of unlocking the past for older people in Scotland. A reminiscence project run by a church community in Edinburgh has been so successful that it has culminated in the production of a CD of popular hymns sung by the choirs and members of three churches in Morningside, in the south of the city.

  4. The Role of Reminiscence in Everyday Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Fred B.; And Others

    Although the role of reminiscence in subjective adjustment has been studied among older adults, very little research has examined the functions of reminiscence in the everyday lives of younger people. A study was conducted to extend previous work on reminiscence in the elderly to younger populations by exploring the relationship between…

  5. Reminiscence through the Lens of Social Media

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Lisa; Briggs, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Reminiscence is used to support and create new social bonds and give meaning to life. Originally perceived as a preoccupation of the aged, we now recognize that reminiscence has value throughout the lifespan. Increasingly, social media can be used to both support and prompt reminiscence, with Facebook’s Lookback or Year in Review as recent examples. This work takes prompted reminiscence further, asking what forms and functions of reminiscence are supported by social media. Utilizing the online service MySocialBook, we invited participants to curate content from their personal Facebook account to then be transformed into a printed book. We used that book as a prompt for discussion of the reminiscence function of the curated material, using Westerhof and Bohlmeijer’s (2014) reminiscence framework as a starting point. We conclude that this framework is valuable in understanding the role of social media in reminiscence, but note that earlier models, such as Webster’s Reminiscence Functions Scale, are also relevant. We contribute to the reminiscence debate by adding a technological lens to the process of life review, whilst concurring with other researchers in this field that a robust conceptual framework is lacking, particularly when considering the forms of reminiscence that are most salient for younger people. PMID:27378971

  6. A Method for Producing Reminiscence Videos by Using Photo Annotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Noriaki; Kuwabara, Kazuhiro; Abe, Shinji; Susami, Kenji; Yasuda, Kiyoshi

    Providing good home-based care to people with dementia is becoming an important issue as the size of the elderly population increases. One of the main problems in providing such care is that it must be constantly provided without interruption, and this puts a great burden on caregivers, who are often family members. Networked Interaction Therapy is the name we call our methods designed to relieve the stress of people suffering from dementia as well as that of their family members. This therapy aims to provide a system that interacts with people with dementia by utilizing various engaging stimuli. One such stimulus is a reminiscence video created from old photo albums, which is a promising way to hold a dementia sufferer's attention for a long time. In this paper, we present an authoring tool to assist in the production of a reminiscence video by using photo annotations. We conducted interviews with several video creators on how they used photo annotations such as date, title and subject of photos when they produced the reminiscence videos. According to the creators' comments, we have defined an ontology for representing the creators' knowledge of how to add visual effects to a reminiscence video. Subsequently, we developed an authoring tool that automatically produces a reminiscence video from the annotated photos. Subjective evaluation of the quality of reminiscence videos produced with our tool indicates that they give impressions similar to those produced by creators using conventional video editing software. The effectiveness of presenting such a video to people with dementia is also discussed.

  7. The experience of family carers attending a joint reminiscence group with people with dementia: A thematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Melunsky, Nina; Crellin, Nadia; Dudzinski, Emma; Orrell, Martin; Wenborn, Jennifer; Poland, Fiona; Woods, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Reminiscence therapy has the potential to improve quality of life for people with dementia. In recent years reminiscence groups have extended to include family members, but carers’ experience of attending joint sessions is undocumented. This qualitative study explored the experience of 18 family carers attending ‘Remembering Yesterday Caring Today’ groups. Semi-structured interviews were transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Five themes were identified: experiencing carer support; shared experience; expectations (met and unmet), carer perspectives of the person with dementia’s experience; and learning and comparing. Family carers’ experiences varied, with some experiencing the intervention as entirely positive whereas others had more mixed feelings. Negative aspects included the lack of respite from their relative, the lack of emphasis on their own needs, and experiencing additional stress and guilt through not being able to implement newly acquired skills. These findings may explain the failure of a recent trial of joint reminiscence groups to replicate previous findings of positive benefit. More targeted research within subgroups of carers is required to justify the continued use of joint reminiscence groups in dementia care. PMID:24381218

  8. Does Pedagogical Documentation Support Maternal Reminiscing Conversations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleck, Bethany; Richmond, Aaron S.; Sanderson, Jordace; Yacovetta, Sara

    2015-01-01

    When parents talk with their children about lessons learned in school, they are participating in reminiscing of an unshared event. This study sought to understand if pedagogical documentation, from the Reggio Approach to early childhood education, would support and enhance the conversation. Mother-child dyads reminisced two separate times about…

  9. Reminiscence and Hypermnesia in Children's Eyewitness Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooy, D.L.; Pipe, M.E.; Murray, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    Three experiments examined reminiscence and hypermnesia in 5- and 6-year-olds' memory for an event across repeated interviews that occurred either immediately afterward (Experiment 1) or after a 6-month delay (Experiments 2 and 3). Reminiscence (recall of new information) was reliably obtained in all of the experiments, although the numbers of new…

  10. Reminiscence and Vivid Personal Memories across Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Jeffrey Dean; Gould, Odette

    2007-01-01

    This study examined reminiscence functions and vivid (i.e., landmark) personal memories in nine samples ranging from the teens to the nineties. Participants (n = 198) ranging in age from 18-95 years completed the Reminiscence Functions Scale (Webster, 1997) and described a vivid personal memory which was subsequently rated for frequency of recall,…

  11. Reminiscence and Its Relationship to the Psychological Adjustment of the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Michael; And Others

    Reminiscence has long been considered an integral part of the aging process, whether as a form of cultural transmission or as a method of strengthening the ego structure. To examine the form of reminiscence defined as life review and its relationship to adjustment in the final stages of development, older Canadian adults (N=82) completed a…

  12. The Uses of Reminiscence in Older Adulthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriam, Sharan B.

    1993-01-01

    Results of the Uses of Reminiscence Scale completed by 89 60-year olds, 95 80-year olds, and 104 centenarians identified 17 reasons for thinking or talking about the past. Three factors were most important: therapeutic, informative, and enjoyment. (SK)

  13. The Uses of Reminiscence in Older Adulthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriam, Sharan B.

    1993-01-01

    Results of the Uses of Reminiscence Scale completed by 89 60-year olds, 95 80-year olds, and 104 centenarians identified 17 reasons for thinking or talking about the past. Three factors were most important: therapeutic, informative, and enjoyment. (SK)

  14. Individual Differences in Reminiscence among Older Adults: Predictors of Frequency and Pleasantness Ratings of Reminiscence Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, P. S.

    1991-01-01

    Interviewed 70 community-dwelling older adults and 70 nursing home residents to assess frequency of reminiscence activity and ratings of pleasantness associated with it. Found that, despite wide variability in use of reminiscence, certain specific factors of personality, psychological well-being, will to meaning, and negative life events were…

  15. Mother-child reminiscing at risk: Maternal attachment, elaboration, and child autobiographical memory specificity.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Christina G; Valentino, Kristin; Comas, Michelle; Nuttall, Amy K

    2016-03-01

    Mother-child reminiscing, the process by which mothers and their children discuss past events and emotional experiences, has been robustly linked with child outcomes, including autobiographical memory. To advance previous work linking elaborative maternal reminiscing with child autobiographical memory specificity, the ability to generate and retrieve specific memories from one's past, it is essential to make distinctions among aspects of elaboration and to consider how maternal risk factors may influence the reminiscing context. The current study evaluated (a) an interaction between emotional and structural elaboration predicting child autobiographical memory specificity and (b) the potential moderating role of maternal adult attachment. Participants consisted of 95 preschool-aged children and their mothers. The sample was predominantly low income and racially diverse. Dyads completed a reminiscing task that was coded for emotional and structural elaboration. Mothers completed the Experiences in Close Relationships questionnaire (ECR-R) to assess attachment-related avoidance and anxiety, and children completed the Autobiographical Memory Test-Preschool Version (AMT-PV) to assess memory specificity. Results indicated that the association between structural reminiscing and child memory specificity was moderated by emotional elements of reminiscing. At high levels of emotional elaboration, mothers with high levels of structural elaboration had children with more specific memory than mothers with low levels of structural elaboration. Moreover, emotional elaboration (a) predicted less specific child memory without high structural support and (b) negatively predicted child specificity at high levels of maternal attachment avoidance and anxiety, a profile associated with fearful avoidance. Future directions and implications are discussed.

  16. [Exploration of life experiences of an aged woman in a military housing community through reminiscing on photos].

    PubMed

    Ku, Ya-Lie; Ku, Chao-Kuang; Ku, Ju-Li

    2009-02-01

    Reminiscence therapy helps elders recall memories of old times through activities designed to achieve self-healing. The qualitative case in this research was a 70 year-old woman who had lived in a military village for 40 years. Semi-structured questionnaires were used for the interview and data was recorded and transcribed word for word. Analytical methods used the three major patterns of reminiscing over objects, vertical and horizontal life. In reminiscing over objects, the author performed interconnected analysis using selected objects that were beloved and/or had special meaning to the subject. In the perspective of vertical life, the author explored the subject's life experiences through each life stage (childhood, adolescence, middle age, and aged). Themes examined included the Confucian ethical code and patriarch, marriage, economic life, and living alone with loneliness. In the perspective of horizontal life, the author described and analyzed special events in the subject's life, including themes of illness and death, serving in the KMT (Kuomintang) political party and women's organizations, and the contribution of medical treatment. Life experience stories from the subject's four decades living in a military housing community was shared through personal photos. Such a process was targeted to help integrate the life experience of an aged woman in a military housing community and confirm the meaning, value, and contribution of her own life.

  17. Collage as a Therapeutic Modality for Reminiscence in Patients with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolhiser Stallings, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Traditional therapy, with its emphasis on verbal communication between therapist and client, may not be appropriate for patients with dementia due to impaired cognitive and verbal abilities. This brief report presents a qualitative study on the use of collage in art therapy to aid in the process of reminiscence in individuals with dementia. Data…

  18. Asher Brown Durand: "An Old Man's Reminiscences."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Ted

    1988-01-01

    Uses Durand's "An Old Man's Reminiscences" to introduce students in grades 4-6 to the effective use of nostalgia and memories in artwork. Presents lesson objectives, instructional strategies, evaluation criteria, and background information about the artist and the painting. (GEA)

  19. The Effect of Narrative Reminiscence on Happiness of Elderly Women

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Zahra; Sharifi, Khadijeh; Tagharrobi, Zahra; Akbari, Hossien

    2015-01-01

    Background: Happiness has a considerable impact on elderly quality of life. Reminiscence therapy can be an effective intervention in increasing the positive emotions among elderly. Objectives: This study was performed to investigate the effect of reminiscence therapy on Iranian elderly women’s happiness. Patients and Methods: This randomized clinical trial conducted on 32 elderly women (census sampling) attending the jahandidegan daycare elderly center IN Gorgan city, Iran, in 2013. Happiness scores of 4 phases were measured: before, the third session, the sixth session and one month after the intervention. Three instruments were used in this study including a demographic questionnaire, the mini mental state examination test, and Oxford happiness questionnaire. The intervention group participated in six sessions of narrative group reminiscence that were held in three consecutive weeks, two sessions per week. The control group was also participated in six sessions of group discussions that were held in three consecutive weeks, two sessions per week. Data analysis was performed the chi-square, independent t-test, Paired t-test. Results: From a total of 32 elderly women, 29 cases completed the study. No significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of demographic characteristics. The mean happiness scores before the intervention between the two groups were not significantly different (P = 0.824). Comparison of the mean happiness scores of the intervention group in the four measurement times revealed a significant difference only after the third and sixth sessions (P = 0.03), and no significant difference was found between the mean happiness scores of the control group in the four measurement times. Conclusions: The elderly participating in the matched group sessions can be effective in increasing positive emotions. PMID:26734470

  20. How Collaborative Is Structural Family Therapy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Ryan T.; Nichols, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the charge by "collaborative" therapies, such as solution focused and narrative, that structural family therapy is an aggressive, confrontational, and impositional approach, this investigation examines the role of therapist empathy in creating a collaborative partnership in structural family therapy. Twenty-four videotaped therapy…

  1. How Collaborative Is Structural Family Therapy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Ryan T.; Nichols, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the charge by "collaborative" therapies, such as solution focused and narrative, that structural family therapy is an aggressive, confrontational, and impositional approach, this investigation examines the role of therapist empathy in creating a collaborative partnership in structural family therapy. Twenty-four videotaped therapy…

  2. Reminiscence functions over time: consistency of self functions and variation of prosocial functions.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Norm; King, David B; Cappeliez, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    The current study examines the temporal stability of the tripartite model of reminiscence functions in which eight separate reminiscence functions map onto three second-order factors which contribute significantly to measurement of an overarching reminiscence latent construct. We collected online responses from 411 adults 50+ years of age. Confirmatory factor analytic models were computed at three points of data collection over 16 months. Invariance analyses were next undertaken to simultaneously compare the measurement properties to assess within-person stability of reminiscence functions over time. The tripartite structure of reminiscence functions was replicated at each point of data collection. As hypothesised, self-positive and self-negative functions are consistent across points of data collection, whereas prosocial functions vary over time. The temporal stability of the self functions may be attributed to enduring characteristics of the individual such as personality traits and life attitudes, as well as their solitary nature. Previous research indicates that consistency of self-positive reminiscence functions has ensuing benefits for physical health and psychological well-being; the opposite is true for self-negative functions. The temporal variation of prosocial functions may be due to the varying availability of others to share memories and their responsiveness to the emotional context.

  3. Effectiveness of personalised reminiscence photo videos for individuals with dementia.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kiyoshi; Kuwabara, Kazuhiro; Kuwahara, Noriaki; Abe, Shinji; Tetsutani, Nobuji

    2009-08-01

    Reminiscence intervention is effective for increasing self-esteem and decreasing behavioural disturbances in individuals with dementia. This paper introduces the concept of a "personalised reminiscence photo video" as a convenient method for reminiscence intervention. The video utilises a slideshow video of personal photos with narration, background music, and pan/zoom visual effects. A group of 15 individuals with dementia watched personalised reminiscence photo videos as well as two types of TV shows: a variety show and a news show. Eighty percent of the subjects (12 out of 15) showed more attention to their personalised reminiscence photo video than to the other two types of TV shows, thus suggesting the effectiveness of personalised reminiscence photo videos for reminiscence intervention.

  4. Cascading reminiscence bumps in popular music.

    PubMed

    Krumhansl, Carol Lynne; Zupnick, Justin Adam

    2013-10-01

    Autobiographical memories are disproportionately recalled for events in late adolescence and early adulthood, a phenomenon called the reminiscence bump. Previous studies on music have found autobiographical memories and life-long preferences for music from this period. In the present study, we probed young adults' personal memories associated with top hits over 5-and-a-half decades, as well as the context of their memories and their recognition of, preference for, quality judgments of, and emotional reactions to that music. All these measures showed the typical increase for music released during the two decades of their lives. Unexpectedly, we found that the same measures peaked for the music of participants' parents' generation. This finding points to the impact of music in childhood and suggests that these results reflect the prevalence of music in the home environment. An earlier peak occurred for 1960s music, which may be explained by its quality or by its transmission through two generations. We refer to this pattern of musical cultural transmission over generations as cascading reminiscence bumps.

  5. Early Reminiscing in Cultural Contexts: Cultural Models, Maternal Reminiscing Styles, and Children's Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroder, Lisa; Keller, Heidi; Kartner, Joscha; Kleis, Astrid; Abels, Monika; Yovsi, Relindis D.; Chaudhary, Nandita; Jensen, Henning; Papaligoura, Zaira

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined conversations of 164 mothers from seven different cultural contexts when reminiscing with their 3-year-old children. We chose samples based on their sociodemographic profiles, which represented three different cultural models: (1) autonomy (urban middle-class families from Western societies), (2) relatedness (rural…

  6. Early Reminiscing in Cultural Contexts: Cultural Models, Maternal Reminiscing Styles, and Children's Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroder, Lisa; Keller, Heidi; Kartner, Joscha; Kleis, Astrid; Abels, Monika; Yovsi, Relindis D.; Chaudhary, Nandita; Jensen, Henning; Papaligoura, Zaira

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined conversations of 164 mothers from seven different cultural contexts when reminiscing with their 3-year-old children. We chose samples based on their sociodemographic profiles, which represented three different cultural models: (1) autonomy (urban middle-class families from Western societies), (2) relatedness (rural…

  7. Crafts as memory triggers in reminiscence: a case study of older women with dementia.

    PubMed

    Pöllänen, Sinikka Hannele; Hirsimäki, Reetta Marja

    2014-10-01

    This case study explored the benefits of crafts as memory triggers in reminiscence sessions with older women in residential care who had severe symptoms of dementia and had enjoyed crafting as a leisure activity during their lifetime. Three structured reminiscence sessions, involving different kinds of handicrafts, craft material, and craft tools, were used to trigger memories and offer multisensory stimuli. Thematization, quantification, and theory-based reasoning were employed for content analysis. Multisensory triggers activated nonverbal and verbal reactions, sustaining attention and prompting interaction and nonverbal communication. The most interesting triggers stimulated recall of forgotten, pleasing craft experiences.

  8. Reminiscence: A Nonformal Technique for Improving Cognitive Functioning in the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughston, George A.; Merriam, Sharan B.

    1982-01-01

    Investigated effects of structured reminiscent intervention upon elderly cognitive functioning. Volunteers were given learning tasks using material from their past lives, asked to perform operations on new material, or given no treatment. Findings suggested stimulating cognitive functioning in older people is worthwhile, and memories can provide…

  9. Mother-Child Reminiscing and Children's Understanding of Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Elaine; Cleveland, Emily Sutcliffe

    2006-01-01

    Children's autobiographical memory is hypothesized to be a function of their understanding of mind (Perner & Ruffman, 1995; Welch-Ross, 1995). In the context of mother-child reminiscing, children may learn about and display their understanding of mind (Nelson, 1999; Welch-Ross, 1997). We studied links among maternal reminiscing style,…

  10. Mother-Child Reminiscing and Children's Understanding of Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Elaine; Cleveland, Emily Sutcliffe

    2006-01-01

    Children's autobiographical memory is hypothesized to be a function of their understanding of mind (Perner & Ruffman, 1995; Welch-Ross, 1995). In the context of mother-child reminiscing, children may learn about and display their understanding of mind (Nelson, 1999; Welch-Ross, 1997). We studied links among maternal reminiscing style,…

  11. The effects of integrative reminiscence on meaning in life: results of a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bohlmeijer, E T; Westerhof, G J; Emmerik-de Jong, M

    2008-09-01

    Finding meaning in life is often cited as an important outcome of reminiscence, but this theoretical claim has not been empirically tested until now. A new intervention combining integrative reminiscence and elements of narrative therapy was developed and the effects on meaning in life were studied. A total of 106 older adults with depressive symptomatology participated in a quasi-experimental study with two parallel conditions: integrative reminiscence vs a waiting list control group. Measurements were taken before and after the intervention. A significant improvement in the overall meaning in life in the participants of the intervention was found, but these effects were not significant in comparison to a waiting-list control group. There is a specific effect of the intervention in that it results in a decline of negative evaluation of the self by the participants and an increase in positive evaluation of social relations. The program also results in more positive evaluation of the past as well as in less negative evaluation of the future. These findings are somewhat stronger for women than for men. Integrative reminiscence within a narrative therapeutic framework may be an effective intervention for enhancing meaning in life with depressed older adults. The intervention has to be developed further and should then be studied in a randomized controlled trial with a larger sample and with follow-up measurements.

  12. Using social reminiscence to teach therapeutic communication skills.

    PubMed

    Puentes, W J

    2000-01-01

    The nursing profession universally accepts the premise that effective communication skills are essential for RNs to function in any health care environment. This article discusses the use of social reminiscence as a teaching tool to encourage the development of these skills. Various approaches to teaching effective communication skills that have been discussed in the literature are described and evaluated. The rationale for social reminiscence to enhance communication is presented, and the teaching/learning experience is described. Finally, the strengths and weaknesses of using social reminiscence as a teaching tool are discussed.

  13. A quasi-experimental study of a reminiscence program focused on autobiographical memory in institutionalized older adults with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Teresa Silveira; Afonso, Rosa Marina Lopes Brás Martins; Ribeiro, Óscar Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Working with past memories through reminiscence interventions has been practiced for several decades with successful outcomes on mental health in older adults. Few studies however have focused on autobiographical memory recall in older individuals with cognitive impairment. This study aims to analyze the impact of an individual reminiscence program in a group of older persons with cognitive decline living in nursing homes on the dimensions of cognition, autobiographical memory, mood, behavior and anxiety. A two-group pre-test and post-test design with single blinded assessment was conducted. Forty-one participants were randomized to an experimental group (n=20) and a control group (n=21). The first group attended five weekly individual reminiscence sessions. Changes in the outcome measures were examined for cognition (Montreal Cognitive Assessment; Autobiographical Memory Test), behavior (Alzheimer Disease Assessment Subscale Non-Cog) and emotional status (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia; Geriatric Depression Scale, and Geriatric Anxiety Inventory). Participants attending reminiscence sessions exhibited better outcomes compared to the control group in cognition, anxiety and depression (p<0.001), and presented a higher number of retrieved autobiographical events, specificity of evoked memories and positive valence of events (p<0.001), and also presented lower latency time for recalling events, and lower negative recalled events (p<0.01). This study supports the potential value of reminiscence therapy in improving the recall of autobiographical memory. Reminiscence therapy can be helpful to maintain or improve cognitive function, decrease anxiety and manage depressive symptoms and altered behavior, but further investigation is needed to clarify long-term effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A computer-aided program for helping patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease engage in verbal reminiscence.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Ferlisi, Gabriele; Zullo, Valeria; Schirone, Simona; Prisco, Raffaella; Denitto, Floriana

    2014-11-01

    This study assessed a simple computer-aided program for helping patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease engage in verbal reminiscence. In practice, the program was aimed at fostering the patient's verbal engagement on a number of life experiences/topics previously selected for him or her and introduced in the sessions through a friendly female, who appeared on the computer screen. The female asked the patient about the aforementioned experiences/topics, and provided him or her with positive attention, and possibly verbal guidance (i.e., prompts/encouragements). Eight patients were involved in the study, which was carried out according to non-concurrent multiple baseline designs across participants. Seven of them showed clear improvement during the intervention phase (i.e., with the program). Their mean percentages of intervals with verbal engagement/reminiscence ranged from close to zero to about 15 during the baseline and from above 50 to above 75 during the intervention. The results were discussed in relation to previous literature on reminiscence therapy, with specific emphasis on the need for (a) replication studies and (b) the development of new versions of the technology-aided program to improve its impact and reach a wider number of patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Chronic myeloid leukemia: reminiscences and dreams

    PubMed Central

    Mughal, Tariq I.; Radich, Jerald P.; Deininger, Michael W.; Apperley, Jane F.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Harrison, Christine J.; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cortes, Jorge; Daley, George Q.

    2016-01-01

    With the deaths of Janet Rowley and John Goldman in December 2013, the world lost two pioneers in the field of chronic myeloid leukemia. In 1973, Janet Rowley, unraveled the cytogenetic anatomy of the Philadelphia chromosome, which subsequently led to the identification of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene and its principal pathogenetic role in the development of chronic myeloid leukemia. This work was also of major importance to support the idea that cytogenetic changes were drivers of leukemogenesis. John Goldman originally made seminal contributions to the use of autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation from the late 1970s onwards. Then, in collaboration with Brian Druker, he led efforts to develop ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the late 1990s. He also led the global efforts to develop and harmonize methodology for molecular monitoring, and was an indefatigable organizer of international conferences. These conferences brought together clinicians and scientists, and accelerated the adoption of new therapies. The abundance of praise, tributes and testimonies expressed by many serve to illustrate the indelible impressions these two passionate and affable scholars made on so many people’s lives. This tribute provides an outline of the remarkable story of chronic myeloid leukemia, and in writing it, it is clear that the historical triumph of biomedical science over this leukemia cannot be considered without appreciating the work of both Janet Rowley and John Goldman. PMID:27132280

  16. Chronic myeloid leukemia: reminiscences and dreams.

    PubMed

    Mughal, Tariq I; Radich, Jerald P; Deininger, Michael W; Apperley, Jane F; Hughes, Timothy P; Harrison, Christine J; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cortes, Jorge; Daley, George Q

    2016-05-01

    With the deaths of Janet Rowley and John Goldman in December 2013, the world lost two pioneers in the field of chronic myeloid leukemia. In 1973, Janet Rowley, unraveled the cytogenetic anatomy of the Philadelphia chromosome, which subsequently led to the identification of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene and its principal pathogenetic role in the development of chronic myeloid leukemia. This work was also of major importance to support the idea that cytogenetic changes were drivers of leukemogenesis. John Goldman originally made seminal contributions to the use of autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation from the late 1970s onwards. Then, in collaboration with Brian Druker, he led efforts to develop ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the late 1990s. He also led the global efforts to develop and harmonize methodology for molecular monitoring, and was an indefatigable organizer of international conferences. These conferences brought together clinicians and scientists, and accelerated the adoption of new therapies. The abundance of praise, tributes and testimonies expressed by many serve to illustrate the indelible impressions these two passionate and affable scholars made on so many people's lives. This tribute provides an outline of the remarkable story of chronic myeloid leukemia, and in writing it, it is clear that the historical triumph of biomedical science over this leukemia cannot be considered without appreciating the work of both Janet Rowley and John Goldman. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  17. Parent-Child Reminiscing Locates the Self in the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fivush, Robyn; Nelson, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we extend our social-cultural developmental model of autobiographical memory development (Nelson & Fivush, 2004) to discuss children's developing understanding of self and other as temporally extended in time. Parent-guided reminiscing about past events that includes discussion, comparison, and negotiation of internal states of self…

  18. Personal reminiscences of ophthalmology giants of the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Tasman, William

    2013-01-01

    This paper records personal reminiscences of seven 20th century ophthalmologists who each in his own way metaphorically split the atom and, thereby, changed ophthalmology forever. In addition to their major contributions, they each shared some very desirable traits. They were gentlemen who were devoted to their families and their families to them.

  19. Reminiscences of my work with Richard Lewis Arnowitt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Pran

    2015-06-01

    This article contains reminiscences of the collaborative work that Richard Arnowitt and I did together which stretched over many years and encompasses several areas of particle theory. The article is an extended version of my talk at the Memorial Symposium in honor of Richard Arnowitt at Texas A&M, College Station, Texas, 19-20 September 2014.

  20. Jacob L. Moreno and "Sociometry": A Mid-Century Reminiscence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgatta, Edgar F.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how he first met Jacob L. Moreno, the founder of "Social Psychology Quarterly," through the intervention of Professor Wellman J. Warner, then the chairman of New York University's Department of Sociology. He then reminisces about his experience of working with Moreno on the journal "Sociometry."

  1. The Subversive Practices of Reminiscence Theatre in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wan-Jung

    2006-01-01

    Founded in 1995, the Taiwanese Uhan Shii Theatre Group has created 12 distinctive reminiscence theatre productions and has performed locally in Taiwan as well as globally around the world. The company has developed its own theatrical aesthetics of memory, and their work not only represents the traditions of Taiwanese culture and habitus, but it…

  2. Jacob L. Moreno and "Sociometry": A Mid-Century Reminiscence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgatta, Edgar F.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how he first met Jacob L. Moreno, the founder of "Social Psychology Quarterly," through the intervention of Professor Wellman J. Warner, then the chairman of New York University's Department of Sociology. He then reminisces about his experience of working with Moreno on the journal "Sociometry."

  3. Reminiscence and strategies of performance in rotary pursuit tracking.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, U

    1989-02-01

    The maximum speed at which man detects and corrects errors is analyzed on the pursuit rotor. During the prerest performance, scores of about 220 msec. are found, for both extravertive and introvertive subjects. During the postrest performance a crossover effect appeared: extraverts had scores near 60 msec., while introverts did not surpass 100 msec. The results are discussed in the framework of Eysenck and Frith's (1977) theory of reminiscence.

  4. Extroversion and reminiscence following a frustrating paired-associate task.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, J E; Koenig, K P

    1978-01-01

    Two experiments were reported relating extroversion to reminiscence following a frustrating paired-associate (PA) task. In the first experiment a group of 30 male and female college students was randomly assigned to one of two tasks in which they learned a PA list of high or low stimulus similarity. All PA lists were mixed lists composed of half solvable and half unsolvable (randomized) stimulus-response items. Recall for solvable items was tested immediately, 15 min, and 30 min after criterion was reached. Results indicated a significant difference between high and low stimulus similarity with superior recall for low similarity. The predicted reminiscence effect for high stimulus similarity recall was present but not significant. Comparison of recall scores for extroverts and introverts indicated a significant difference in recall favoring the introverts. The second experiment made a similar test of recall for two groups of S s that had been established as extreme extroverts or introverts (N = 8 in each group). The superiority of recall for introverts was replicated, and a reminiscence effect was found for the extroverts. Results were discussed in relation to Eysenck's formulation and previous conflicting results.

  5. Connecting with the Well-Elderly through Reminiscence: Analysis of Lived Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Peg; Carey, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Reminiscing is a therapeutic nursing intervention for older adults. Nursing students and elders who participated in reminiscing interviews were excited by this activity. Researchers across disciplines collaborated in this qualitative research project to clarify the meaning and experience of reminiscing for the student and the diverse elder.…

  6. Connecting with the Well-Elderly through Reminiscence: Analysis of Lived Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Peg; Carey, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Reminiscing is a therapeutic nursing intervention for older adults. Nursing students and elders who participated in reminiscing interviews were excited by this activity. Researchers across disciplines collaborated in this qualitative research project to clarify the meaning and experience of reminiscing for the student and the diverse elder.…

  7. Early Childhood Autism and Structural Therapy: Outcome after 3 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Alan J.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the effect of three years of structural therapy on inpatient cases of early childhood autism (ECA). Treatment resulted in the discharge of 12 patients. Results indicate that high stimulation, physically intrusive, gamelike, novelty filled, and developmentally oriented treatment of structural therapy can produce significant improvement in…

  8. Using an associational trends framework to understand the meaning of obsessive reminiscence.

    PubMed

    Puentes, William J

    2008-07-01

    When the psychodynamics of simple reminiscence, the kind of reminiscence used to manage anxiety, are disrupted, individuals can become stuck on certain memories and begin to obsess or ruminate about them. Generally, obsessive reminiscence is identified as nonpurposive and dysfunctional. However, interpreting the content of obsessive reminiscence within an associational trends framework demonstrates that useful diagnostic information can be gleaned from obsessive reminiscence. This information can be incorporated into the treatment plan to enhance the quality of care delivered to clients, as well as clients'interpersonal relationships.

  9. Effects of hormone therapy on brain structure

    PubMed Central

    Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Zuk, Samantha M.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Gleason, Carey E.; Wharton, Whitney; Dowling, N. Maritza; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Senjem, Matthew L.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Bailey, Kent R.; Rocca, Walter A.; Jack, Clifford R.; Asthana, Sanjay; Miller, Virginia M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of hormone therapy on brain structure in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in recently postmenopausal women. Methods: Participants (aged 42–56 years, within 5–36 months past menopause) in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study were randomized to (1) 0.45 mg/d oral conjugated equine estrogens (CEE), (2) 50 μg/d transdermal 17β-estradiol, or (3) placebo pills and patch for 48 months. Oral progesterone (200 mg/d) was given to active treatment groups for 12 days each month. MRI and cognitive testing were performed in a subset of participants at baseline, and at 18, 36, and 48 months of randomization (n = 95). Changes in whole brain, ventricular, and white matter hyperintensity volumes, and in global cognitive function, were measured. Results: Higher rates of ventricular expansion were observed in both the CEE and the 17β-estradiol groups compared to placebo; however, the difference was significant only in the CEE group (p = 0.01). Rates of ventricular expansion correlated with rates of decrease in brain volume (r = −0.58; p ≤ 0.001) and with rates of increase in white matter hyperintensity volume (r = 0.27; p = 0.01) after adjusting for age. The changes were not different between the CEE and 17β-estradiol groups for any of the MRI measures. The change in global cognitive function was not different across the groups. Conclusions: Ventricular volumes increased to a greater extent in recently menopausal women who received CEE compared to placebo but without changes in cognitive performance. Because the sample size was small and the follow-up limited to 4 years, the findings should be interpreted with caution and need confirmation. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that brain ventricular volume increased to a greater extent in recently menopausal women who received oral CEE compared to placebo. PMID:27473135

  10. Personality traits and existential concerns as predictors of the functions of reminiscence in older adults.

    PubMed

    Cappeliez, Philippe; O'Rourke, Norm

    2002-03-01

    This study examines to what extent personality and existential constructs predict the frequency of reminiscence, in general, and its various functions, in particular. Eighty-nine older adults completed the NEO-Five Factor Inventory, the Life Attitude Profile--Revised, and the Reminiscence Functions Scale. Neuroticism predicted total reminiscence frequency, as well as reminiscence for self-understanding and ruminating about a negative past. Extraversion predicted total reminiscence frequency, as well as reminiscence for generating stimulation, conversation, and maintaining memories of departed loved ones. Openness to experience predicted total reminiscence frequency and reminiscence for addressing life meaning and death. Existential concerns, and in particular low desire to seek new challenges, added significant additional predictive power for total reminiscence frequency and for such uses as generating stimulation, preparing for death, and ruminating about the past. The discussion draws the implications of the finding that the combination of personality traits and existential concerns predicted the overall reminiscence frequency together with the intrapersonal functions of reminiscence.

  11. Couple relationship distress and observed expression of intimacy during reminiscence about positive relationship events.

    PubMed

    Osgarby, Susan M; Halford, W Kim

    2013-12-01

    Satisfied couples report that positive, intimate communication is central to their relationship. We developed the positive reminiscence task, in which couples discuss positive relationship moments to assess communication of positive intimacy. The behavior and heart rate of 28 satisfied and 25 distressed couples were assessed during positive reminiscence and problem solving. As predicted, satisfied couples demonstrated higher rates of positive affect and dyadic intimacy than distressed couples during positive reminiscence, and these positive behaviors occurred at much lower rates during problem solving than positive reminiscence. However, the differences between distressed and satisfied couples were more marked on most assessed behaviors during problem solving rather than positive reminiscence. Two notable exceptions were that dyadic intimacy and sadness differed more between distressed and satisfied couples during positive reminiscence than problem solving. The positive reminiscence task assesses intimate behaviors in a manner likely to be useful in research and practice. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Randomized controlled trial of a six-week spiritual reminiscence intervention on hope, life satisfaction, and spiritual well-being in elderly with mild and moderate dementia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Fen; Koo, Malcolm

    2016-02-01

    Reminiscence therapy has been reported to improve the well-being in patients with dementia. However, few studies have examined the effects of spiritual reminiscence, which emphasizes on reconnecting and enhancing the meaning of one's own experience, on patients with dementia. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of spiritual reminiscence on hope, life satisfaction, and spiritual well-being in elderly Taiwanese with mild or moderate dementia. A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 103 patients with mild or moderate dementia recruited from a medical center in central Taiwan. The patients were randomly assigned to either a 6-week spiritual reminiscence group (n = 53) or control group (n = 50). The Herth Hope Index, the Life Satisfaction Scale, the Spirituality Index of Well-Being were administered before and after the 6-week period. The interaction terms between group and time for the three outcome measures were found to be significant (P < 0.001), indicating that the changes over time in them were different between the intervention and control groups. Findings of this randomized controlled trial showed that hope, life satisfaction, and spiritual well-being of elderly patients with mild or moderate dementia could significantly be improved with a 6-week spiritual reminiscence intervention. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. DOING THERAPY: A POST-STRUCTURAL RE-VISION.

    PubMed

    de Shazer, S; Berg, I K

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this essay is to develop a way to look at doing therapy based on (a) Wittgenstein's concept of "language game"; (b) the relationship between Wittgenstein's "private language" argument, language games, and constructivism; and (c) post-structural thinking about language, how therapy works within language, and how language works within therapy. Case material is used to illustrate the usefulness of this approach.

  14. Effects of SolCos model-based individual reminiscence on older adults with mild to moderate dementia due to Alzheimer disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Van Grinsven, Regine; Tolson, Debbie; Wouters, Kristien; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Van der Mussele, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    To examine effects of individual thematically-based reminiscence sessions based on the SolCos model for older adults with dementia because of Alzheimer disease (AD) as a pilot study. Reminiscence activities are popular within nursing homes and generally considered to be enjoyable and helpful, however, there is a paucity of robust data demonstrating therapeutic impact. Criticisms of existing reminiscence studies include the failure to explicate the reminiscence protocol and to standardize delivery and choice of outcome measures. In this study, 82 older adults with probable AD were recruited from psychiatric day care, inpatient, and long term care facilities. Of the study group, 41 participants were randomly selected for individual reminiscence sessions during 4 weeks performed by 1 facilitator. A control group of 41 older adults were randomly involved and had no planned reminiscence treatment of any kind in the study period. All study participants were tested pre- and postintervention period with validated assessment scales to evaluate cognition and behavior. Analyses were based on delta scores, the differences between assessment scales pre- and postintervention scores, compared between the intervention and the control group. A structured reminiscence protocol was developed with user involvement, and intervention group participants received 6-8 reminiscence sessions (average 7.4). The primary outcomes of Mini- Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-30) delta scores of the intervention group were significantly better than those of the control group. Participants of the intervention group with both mild and moderate AD had significantly better GDS-30 delta scores compared with the control group. Significantly better MMSE delta scores were found only in the intervention sub-group with moderate AD. Logistic regression analyses with all study participants showed an impact of reminiscence sessions on depressive symptoms measured with GDS-30

  15. Gestalt and psychoanalytic therapies: structural analysis and rapprochement.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, A C

    1980-10-01

    This paper examines the psychoanalytic concepts of interpretation, resistance, and transference as manifest in gestalt therapy. Although these concepts are de-emphasized, criticized, and disavowed in gestalt theoretical writings, they are actually fundamental to the underlying or "deep" structure of gestalt therapy. Examples of gestalt interventions are described and indications for their use suggested.

  16. Training maltreating parents in elaborative and emotion-rich reminiscing with their preschool-aged children

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Kristin; Comas, Michelle; Nuttall, Amy K.; Thomas, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Objective In the current study, the effects of training maltreating parents and their preschool-aged children in elaborative and emotion-rich reminiscing were examined. Method 44 parent-child dyads were randomly assigned to a training (reminiscing) or wait-list (control) condition. All participating parents had substantiated maltreatment and were involved with the Department of Child Services at the time of enrollment. Children were 3–6 years old (M = 4.88, SD = .99) and living in the custody of the participating parent. Dyads in the reminiscing condition received four, weekly, in-home sessions in elaborative and emotion rich reminiscing. Results At a follow-up assessment, maltreating parents in the reminiscing condition provided more high-elaborative utterances, references to children’s negative emotions, and explanations of children’s emotion during reminiscing than did parents in the control condition. Children in the reminiscing condition had richer memory recall and made more emotion references than did children in the control condition during reminiscing with their mothers, but not with an experimenter. Conclusion The findings suggest that maltreating parents can be taught elaborative and emotion-rich reminiscing skills, with benefits for child cognitive and emotional development. The potential clinical utility of a reminiscing-based training for maltreating families with young children is discussed. PMID:23548682

  17. Preparation of reminiscent aroma mixture of Japanese soy sauce.

    PubMed

    Bonkohara, Kaori; Fuji, Maiko; Nakao, Akito; Igura, Noriyuki; Shimoda, Mitsuya

    2016-01-01

    To prepare an aroma mixture of Japanese soy sauce by fewest components, the aroma concentrate of good sensory attributes was prepared by polyethylene membrane extraction, which could extract only the volatiles with diethyl ether. GC-MS-Olfactometry was done with the aroma concentrate, and 28 odor-active compounds were detected. Application of aroma extract dilution analysis to the separated fraction revealed high flavor dilution factors with respect to acetic acid, 4-hydroxy-2(or5)-ethyl-5(or2)-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (HEMF), 3-methyl-1-butanol (isoamyl alcohol), and 3-(methylsulfanyl)propanal (methional). A model aroma mixture containing above four odorants showed a good similarity with the aroma of the soy sauce itself. Consequently, the reminiscent aroma mixture of soy sauce was prepared in water. The ratio of acetic acid, HEMF, isoamyl alcohol, and methional was 2500:300:100:1.

  18. Nanoscience and Reminiscences of a Woman in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresselhaus, Mildred

    My entry into carbon science and nanoscience at an early stage in my career occurred in part because I was a woman in physics. In these reminiscences I will relate why working on carbon science started because I was a woman interested in working on a topic that interested me greatly, but was unpopular at the time; carbon science and thermoelectricity are two examples. I will elaborate on how our research system allows safe study of unpopular topics so that both the researcher and research sponsor are satisfied with outcomes. I also learned a lot from my family and acknowledge their contributions as well as those of sponsors who supported high-risk projects.

  19. Reminiscences - Interrupted: A solar modulation theory once lost, now found?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, William R.

    2013-02-01

    In the course of reminiscing about the first studies of the newly discovered galactic proton and helium nuclei and their modulation in the 1950's, we recognized that this field has actually come full circle with the Voyager studies of these same nuclei out to beyond 120 AU in 2012. In the 1950's the first models of the heliospheric modulation postulated a "ring current" or something equivalent, which produced a modulation potential of up to 1 to 3 GV as a source of solar modulation. This potential difference was needed to explain the relative modulation of protons and helium nuclei. Later this modulation was explained as a force field potential by Gleeson and Axford in a Parker description of cosmic ray transport. Recent Voyager measurements of the proton, helium and carbon spectra in the outer heliosphere beyond the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) up to the beginning of 2012 are in accordance with this same earlier picture describing the modulation as due to a modulation potential. However, there is no longer a solar wind in the outermost heliosphere so Parker's original description is no longer complete. So our reminiscences have led us back to a modern picture of solar modulation in the heliosphere that is very similar to that existing in the 50's and 60's, searching for a cause for the modulation. Since Voyager 1 now appears to be at a location where this modulation potential is approaching zero, a whole new field of study of the unmodulated spectra of the charged species of galactic cosmic rays at lower energies down to perhaps as low as 10-20 MeV also is being opened up, similar in development to the original studies of these individual nuclei in the 1950's that were the result of newly developed high altitude balloons and also new experimental techniques that separated the individual charges.

  20. Including social factors in the analysis of reminiscence in elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Lamme, S; Baars, J

    1993-01-01

    Developmental psychologists have studied reminiscence in elderly individuals using widely varied conceptions of adult development. Determinist psychologists conceived of reminiscent behavior in elderly individuals as constituting the last phase in normal development. Contextualist psychologists have pointed to the historical and cultural relativity of adult development, and highlighted the variation in elderly persons with respect to reminiscent behavior. However, they do not fully acknowledge the role the environment plays in establishing reminiscent behavior in elderly people. Therefore, sociological life course theory should be included in the analyses and interpretation of this behavior.

  1. The functions and value of reminiscence for older adults in long-term residential care facilities.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Linda A; Kris, Alison; Birney, Sarah; Krauss, Kaitlyn

    2017-03-01

    For the many older adults living in long-term care facilities, the ability to connect with others, as well as with one's own personal past, may be of particular value. Reflecting on the past and sharing reminiscences with others serves different psychosocial functions in various settings. This study examined the functions of reminiscence for long-term care residents in the United States (Mage = 86.5) by addressing the self-reported frequency of reminiscence, the counterparties involved, the overall purpose and value of reminiscence, and the relation to residents' mental health and well-being. Results demonstrated that although some functions of reminiscence were comparable to those found in community-dwelling older adults, others were unique to the long-term care setting. Residents were most likely to reminisce alone and they found the experience enjoyable. They reported engaging in and enjoying reminiscence with family more than with fellow residents, and a subset desired increased opportunities to share memories with healthcare providers. Residents with lower morale and more depressive symptoms were more likely to engage in unhealthy styles of reminiscence. These findings suggest that interventions shaping reminiscence encounters may have positive outcomes for long-term care residents.

  2. Cortical stimulation study of the role of rhinal cortex in déjà vu and reminiscence of memories.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, F; Barbeau, E; Gavaret, M; Guye, M; McGonigal, A; Régis, J; Chauvel, P

    2004-09-14

    To study the role of perirhinal (PC) and entorhinal cortices (EC) in dreamy state symptoms (déjà vu and reminiscence of scenes). These phenomena have been attributed to functional alteration of memory networks supported by the medial temporal lobes, principally involving the amygdala and hippocampus. The role of sub-hippocampal structures (EC and PC) in inducing these phenomena has not previously been addressed. The authors studied the symptoms evoked by direct electrical stimulations of PC and EC in comparison with those obtained after stimulation of the amygdala and hippocampus. Stimulations were performed in a group of 24 patients with epilepsy, during stereoelectroencephalographic (SEEG) recordings in the setting of presurgical evaluation. All patients had electrodes that sampled the rhinal cortices, amygdala, and hippocampus. A total of 280 stimulations were analyzed. Entorhinal and perirhinal stimulations induced classic mesial temporal lobe responses (emotional, dysautonomic) but also more specific responses, particularly the déjà vu phenomenon and reminiscence of scenes. Such déjà vu or déjà vécu type responses were produced proportionately more often by stimulation of the EC than by stimulation of the amygdala and hippocampus. In particular, déjà vu was associated with stimulation of the EC and reminiscence of memories with PC stimulation. This study strongly suggests that experiential symptoms are largely dependent upon functional modification of the physiology of the rhinal cortices.

  3. Scenario-Based Design of a Digital Reminiscing System for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiry, Elizabeth Ann

    2013-01-01

    Reminiscing--"the act or process of recalling the past (Butler, 1963, p. 66)"--is a core activity for any society. Research shows that the desire and tradition for reminiscing can be traced back to early civilizations where the elders of the community were responsible to know and share the history of their community (Butler, 1995;…

  4. Program Development of Reminiscence Group Work for Ageing People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Puyenbroeck, Joris; Maes, Bea

    2006-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study was to adapt a narrative reminiscence program for the special needs of ageing people with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities. Research has shown that stimulating reminiscence in the elderly can be a meaningful activity, and holds promise for positive effects on well-being. Method: In the first stage (10…

  5. Two Is the Beginning of the End: "Peter Pan" and the Doctrine of Reminiscence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Glenda A.

    2006-01-01

    This article considers J.M. Barrie's satirical treatment of the Platonic doctrine of reminiscence in "Peter Pan," and how Barrie's work both honors and undercuts it. It will first analyze the Platonic notion of the doctrine of reminiscence in Wordsworth's "Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood" (1807). It will then…

  6. Two Is the Beginning of the End: "Peter Pan" and the Doctrine of Reminiscence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Glenda A.

    2006-01-01

    This article considers J.M. Barrie's satirical treatment of the Platonic doctrine of reminiscence in "Peter Pan," and how Barrie's work both honors and undercuts it. It will first analyze the Platonic notion of the doctrine of reminiscence in Wordsworth's "Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood" (1807). It will then…

  7. Social identification moderates cognitive health and well-being following story- and song-based reminiscence.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Catherine; Haslam, S Alexander; Ysseldyk, Renate; McCloskey, Lauren-Grace; Pfisterer, Kaylen; Brown, Susan G

    2014-05-01

    Reminiscence is a popular intervention for seniors, but, with mixed evidence supporting its efficacy, questions have been raised about the mechanisms underlying improvement. The present paper addresses this question by investigating the degree to which health effects depend on the development of a shared sense of group identification. This is examined in the context of traditional story-based reminiscence as well as novel forms of song-based reminiscence. As the focus of a manualized intervention, 40 participants were randomly assigned to secular song (n=13), religious song (n=13), or standard story reminiscence (n=14) groups. These were run over six weeks with cognitive performance, anxiety, and life satisfaction measured before and after the intervention. Measures of group fit were included to examine whether social identification contributed to outcomes. No evidence of change emerged over time as a function of intervention form alone, but analysis of identification data revealed significant interactions with the type of reminiscence group. Specifically, initial fit with the story reminiscence group was associated with enhanced cognitive outcomes and greater life satisfaction, while fit with the religious song reminiscence group was associated with greater life satisfaction and less anxiety. These findings show that group identification is a key moderator through which reminiscence promotes health outcomes. Implications for theory and practice highlight an inherent limitation in randomized controlled trials insofar as they may compromise participants' group identification.

  8. Constructing Emotional and Relational Understanding: The Role of Mother-Child Reminiscing about Negatively Valenced Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laible, Deborah; Murphy, Tia Panfile; Augustine, Mairin

    2013-01-01

    Although there is some evidence from cross-sectional studies that reminiscing is an important context in which children construct socioemotional understanding, longitudinal evidence is lacking. The goal of this study was to examine longitudinally the links between the quality of reminiscing at 42 months and children's subsequent socioemotional…

  9. Reminiscence Activity and Increased Communication Interaction among Cognitively Disabled Elderly Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krupar, Karen R.; Smith, N. Richmond

    Designed as the first phase of a larger project to explore the relationships between the possible impact of reminiscence on memory deterioration in elderly women confined to nursing home environments, a study demonstrated that reminiscence activity is positively correlated with increases in communication interactions. Women were chosen as the…

  10. Family Reminiscing Style: Parent Gender and Emotional Focus in Relation to Child Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fivush, Robyn; Marin, Kelly; McWilliams, Kelly; Bohanek, Jennifer G.

    2009-01-01

    Family reminiscing is a critical part of family interaction related to child outcome. In this study, we extended previous research by examining both mothers and fathers, in two-parent racially diverse middle-class families, reminiscing with their 9- to 12-year-old children about both the facts and the emotional aspects of shared positive and…

  11. Scenario-Based Design of a Digital Reminiscing System for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiry, Elizabeth Ann

    2013-01-01

    Reminiscing--"the act or process of recalling the past (Butler, 1963, p. 66)"--is a core activity for any society. Research shows that the desire and tradition for reminiscing can be traced back to early civilizations where the elders of the community were responsible to know and share the history of their community (Butler, 1995;…

  12. Death Preparation and Boredom Reduction as Functions of Reminiscence in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    El Haj, Mohamad; Antoine, Pascal

    2016-09-06

    Reminiscence, or the process of thinking or telling about past experience, is thought to serve social, instrumental, and integrative functions. Our paper investigated these functions in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Twenty-six participants with a clinical diagnosis of probable mild AD and 28 control older adults filled in a French adaptation of the Reminiscence Functions Scale. Eight specific functions were assessed: death preparation, identity, problem-solving, teaching/informing, conversation, boredom reduction, bitterness revival, and intimacy maintenance. Both older adults and AD participants reported reminiscence about their past to prepare themselves for the idea of their own mortality. All participants also reported reminiscence "to reduce boredom" and "for something to do". However, reminiscence for death preparation and boredom reduction was reported more by AD participants than by older adults. In all participants, the death preparation function of reminiscence was significantly correlated with depression. Individuals with AD seem to reminiscence to cope with thoughts about their own mortality. This helps them to see that they have lived a full life and can therefore accept death more calmly. Individuals with AD also seem to cope with boredom by using reminiscence, probably as a tool to fill time or simply to create ease of conversation.

  13. A Review of Reminiscing in Early Childhood Settings and Links to Sustained Shared Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Dave; Pino-Pasternak, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    The importance of parent-child reminiscing for young children's social and cognitive development has been well established, but despite the increasing numbers of children attending formal early childhood settings such as nurseries and preschools, there has been surprisingly little research exploring educator-child reminiscing in these contexts.…

  14. Maternal Elaborative Reminiscing Increases Low-Income Children's Narrative Skills Relative to Dialogic Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Elaine; Leyva, Diana; Sparks, Alison; Grolnick, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Research Findings: This study compared the unique effects of training low-income mothers in dialogic reading versus elaborative reminiscing on children's oral language and emergent literacy. Thirty-three low-income parents of 4-year-old children attending Head Start were randomly assigned to either dialogic reading, elaborative reminiscing, or a…

  15. Enhancing homework adherence of Chinese older adults: A case study using Instrumental Reminiscence Intervention.

    PubMed

    Lou, Vivian Wei Qun; Au, Judith Wing Nam; Choy, Jacky Chak Pui

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to examine effective clinical strategies that facilitate homework adherence among Chinese older adults who participated in group therapy using Instrumental Reminiscence Intervention (IRI) to reduce depressive symptoms. Examination was based on IRI for 15 groups of older adults, with four to eight participants in each group. Homework assignment was included as a core component of the intervention in each session, except the first session. Particular emphasis was put on both homework design and assignment strategies. Two effective strategies were developed. The first was the development of a tactic card as a tool for homework content and assignment. The second strategy was interventionist training. Clinical examples are used to illustrate how these strategies can enhance homework adherence in a Chinese context. The two clinical strategies were found to be effective in enhancing homework adherence among Chinese older participants in a group therapy setting. These strategies are recommended for use in group clinical settings for Chinese participants. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 1153-1160. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  16. Functions of parent-child reminiscing about emotionally negative events.

    PubMed

    Fivush, Robyn; Berlin, Lisa J; Sales, Jessica McDermott; Mennuti-Washburn, Jean; Cassidy, Jude

    2003-03-01

    Parent-child reminiscing about negative experiences influences children's developing "emotional self-concept", which comprises three interrelated functions: self-defining (this is the kind of emotional person I am), self-in-relation (this is how I express and share my emotions with others), and coping (this is how I cope with and resolve negative emotion). In this study, we examined how 70 mostly white, middle-class mothers discuss three negative experiences (fear, anger, and sadness) with their 4-year-old children. Conversations about fear elaborate on the facts of the event and emotional resolutions, thus focusing on coping. Conversations about sadness contain evaluative feedback and emotional resolutions, thus focusing on self-in-relation and coping. Finally, conversations about anger highlight the emotional state itself, thus focusing on self-definition. Mothers are also more elaborative and more evaluative with daughters than with sons, and place emotional events in a more interpersonal context with daughters than sons. Thus girls may be forming a more elaborated and more interpersonal emotional self-concept than boys.

  17. Transient Structured Distance as a Maneuver in Marital Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Bernard L.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Experience with 73 cases has shown the value of Transient Structured Distance as a maneuver in marriage therapy. While the TSD is a radical form of intervention with risks of anxiety reactions, homosexual panic, or divorce, it has proved effective with difficult forms of acute or chronic marital disharmony. (Author)

  18. SenseCam reminiscence and action recall in memory-unimpaired people.

    PubMed

    Seamon, John G; Moskowitz, Tacie N; Swan, Ashley E; Zhong, Boyuan; Golembeski, Amy; Liong, Christopher; Narzikul, Alexa C; Sosan, Olumide A

    2014-01-01

    Case studies of memory-impaired individuals consistently show that reminiscing with SenseCam images enhances event recall. This exploratory study examined whether a similar benefit would occur for the consolidation of memories in memory-unimpaired people. We tested delayed recall for atypical actions observed on a lengthy walk. Participants used SenseCam, a diary, or no external memory aid while walking, followed by reminiscence with SenseCam images, diary entries, or no aid, either alone (self-reminiscence) or with the experimenter (social reminiscence). One week later, when tested without SenseCam images or diary entries, prior social reminiscence produced greater recall than self-reminiscence, but there were no differences between memory aid conditions for action free recall or action order recall. When methodological variables were controlled, there was no recall advantage for SenseCam reminiscence with memory-unimpaired participants. The case studies and present study differ in multiple ways, making direct comparisons problematic. SenseCam is a valuable aid to the memory impaired, but its mnemonic value for non-clinical populations remains to be determined.

  19. Living in aged care: using spiritual reminiscence to enhance meaning in life for those with dementia.

    PubMed

    Mackinlay, Elizabeth; Trevitt, Corinne

    2010-12-01

    Spiritual reminiscence is a way of telling a life story with emphasis on meaning. Spiritual reminiscence can identify meaning associated with joy, sadness, anger, guilt, or regret. Exploring these issues in older age can help people to reframe some of these events and come to new understanding of the meaning and purpose of their lives. A total of 113 older adults with dementia, living in aged-care facilities, participated in this study. They were allocated to small groups for spiritual reminiscence, to meet weekly over 6weeks or 6months. Quantitative data were gathered using a behavioural scale before and after each spiritual reminiscence session. Qualitative data included taped and transcribed reminiscence sessions, individual interviews, and observer journals. A facilitator led the small-group discussion based on spiritual reminiscence. New relationships were developed among group members that improved life for these people in aged care. This paper examines aspects of the qualitative data around the themes of 'meaning in life' and 'vulnerability and transcendence'. Spiritual reminiscence offers nursing staff a way of knowing those with dementia in a deeper and more meaningful way.

  20. Profiles of reminiscence among older adults: perceived stress, life attitudes, and personality variables.

    PubMed

    Cappeliez, Philippe; O'Rourke, Norm

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to identify subgroups of older participants on the basis of unique configurations of variables among functions of reminiscence, personality traits, life attitudes, and perceived stress by means of cluster analysis. Ninety-three older adults (M = 66.7 years of age) completed the NEO-Five Factor Inventory, the Life Attitude Profile-Revised, the Reminiscence Functions Scale, and the Psychological State of Stress Measure. Cluster membership was determined on the basis of intra-personal functions of reminiscence (Boredom Reduction, Death Preparation, Identity, Bitterness Revival). These groups were subsequently compared on personality traits (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness to experience), life attitudes (Existential Vacuum, Goal Seeking), and perceived stress. Three distinct groupings emerged. A greater tendency to ruminate about negative memories and lower extraversion characterized the negative reminiscers. Higher frequency of reminiscence related to issues of identity, life meaning and death, together with a tendency toward openness to experience, typified the meaning seekers. Lower reminiscence frequency for each of the four functions, combined with lower perceived stress and neuroticism, characterized the infrequent reminiscers. These results are interpreted in terms of differential patterns of coping and adaptation.

  1. Telomerase Structure Paves the way for New Cancer Therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Skordalakes, S.

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of a single enzyme, telomerase, is associated with the uncontrollable proliferation of cells observed in as many as 90% of all of human cancers. Since the mid-1990s, when telomerase activity was detected in human tumors, scientists have eyed the enzyme as an ideal target for developing broadly effective anticancer drugs. One of the missing links in the effort to identify such therapies has been the high-resolution structure of the enzyme, a powerful tool used for the identification and development of clinical drugs. A recent structure of the catalytic subunit of teleomerase from the Skordalakes laboratory, a major advancement in the field of telomeres, has opened the door to the development of new, broadly effective cancer drugs, as well as anti-aging therapies. Here we present a brief description of telomerase biology, current efforts to identify telomerase function modulators and the potential importance of the telomerase structure in future drug development.

  2. Structured dyadic behavior therapy processes for ADHD intervention.

    PubMed

    Curtis, David F

    2014-03-01

    Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) present significant problems with behavioral disinhibition that often negatively affect their peer relationships. Although behavior therapies for ADHD have traditionally aimed to help parents and teachers better manage children's ADHD-related behaviors, therapy processes seldom use peer relationships to implement evidence-based behavioral principles. This article introduces Structured Dyadic Behavior Therapy as a milieu for introducing effective behavioral techniques within a socially meaningful context. Establishing collaborative behavioral goals, benchmarking, and redirection strategies are discussed to highlight how in-session dyadic processes can be used to promote more meaningful reinforcement and change for children with ADHD. Implications for improving patient care, access to care, and therapist training are also discussed.

  3. Teaching Through Remembering: Using Written Reminiscences in Courses for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Bendien, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the use of reminiscence work in educational courses for older adults. The author analyzes a course that addresses experiences of time and the process of remembering at a later age. The study demonstrates how reminiscences, written by participants of the course, are used as illustrative material for some of the theoretical points. They are also instrumental in unfolding an answer to one of the key questions of the course, which is, what is the meaning of remembering in later life? The author argues that an educative use of personal reminiscences can improve the insight of the participants in theoretical issues at hand and can help them to develop new social skills, thus enabling them to translate experiences of aging into a sense-making process in later life. In addition, an educational application of reminiscence work broadens the possibilities for the participants to strengthen their feeling of belonging and to reach beyond one dominant version of history.

  4. [Structure and process quality of multimodal pain therapy. Results of a survey of pain therapy clinics].

    PubMed

    Nagel, B; Pfingsten, M; Brinkschmidt, T; Casser, H-R; Gralow, I; Irnich, D; Klimczyk, K; Sabatowski, R; Schiltenwolf, M; Sittl, R; Söllner, W; Arnold, B

    2012-12-01

    Multimodal therapy has demonstrated good clinical effectiveness in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. However, within the German health system a comprehensive and nationwide access to multimodal therapy is not available and further improvement is therefore necessary. In order to analyze the current status of multimodal therapy and specifically its structural and procedural requirements and qualities, a survey was carried out in 37 pain clinics with established multimodal treatment programs. An anonymous questionnaire was used for data collection. Results demonstrated that a substantial accordance was found between all pain clinics concerning requirements for space, facilities and staff. Structured multidisciplinary assessments were carried out by all pain clinics even though the amount of time allocated for this varied widely. The main focus of multimodal therapy in all facilities was based on a common philosophy with a cognitive-behavioral approach to reduce patient helplessness and avoidance behavior and to increase physical and psychosocial activities as well as to strengthen self-efficacy. Some differences in the ways and means to achieve these goals could be demonstrated in the various programs.

  5. Attachment-Focused Integrative Reminiscence with Older African-Americans: A Randomized Controlled Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Charles R.; Kang, Suk-Young; Pillemer, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Prior integrative reminiscence interventions have had a limited focus on attachment themes. The Attachment-Focused Integrative Reminiscence (AFIR) intervention differs from these in its central emphasis on attachment themes. The wide range of health benefits resulting from integrative reminiscence may be due in part to reminiscing about, mourning, and integrating unresolved attachment experiences. Method Participants were randomized into treatment and wait-list control conditions; completed a pre-test; met for 8 consecutive weekly 2-hour sessions of largely attachment-focused reminiscence; then completed post-tests immediately following the intervention and again 6 months later. Results Results show treatment effects for depression (p = .01 and .05 at 8 weeks and 6 months), perceived stress (p = .01 and .04), and emergency room (ER) visits at 6 months (p = .04), with the intervention group showing lower depression and stress and fewer ER visits. Conclusion Integrative reminiscence interventions are cost-effective, have rapid impact, and carry a certain appeal to older adults. Augmenting such interventions with a focus on attachment experiences may reduce perceived stress, an important health risk factor. Wider application of AFIRs may further reduce health disparities among U.S. older adults. PMID:25812080

  6. Maternal Elaborative Reminiscing Mediates the Effect of Child Maltreatment on Behavioral and Physiological Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Kristin; Hibel, Leah C; Cummings, E. Mark; Nuttall, Amy K.; Comas, Michelle; McDonnell, Christina G.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence suggest that the way in which parents discuss everyday emotional experiences with their young children (i.e., elaborative reminiscing) has significant implications for child cognitive and socio-emotional functioning, and that maltreating parents have a particularly difficult time in engaging in this type of dialogue. This dyadic interactional exchange, therefore, has the potential to be an important process variable linking child maltreatment to developmental outcomes at multiple levels of analysis. The current investigation evaluated the role of maternal elaborative reminiscing in associations between maltreatment and child cognitive, emotional, and physiological functioning. Participants included 43 maltreated and 49 nonmaltreated children (aged 3–6) and their mothers. Dyads participated in a joint reminiscing task about four past emotional events, and children participated in assessments of receptive language and emotion knowledge. Child salivary cortisol was also collected from children three times a day (waking, midday, and bedtime) on two consecutive days to assess daily levels and diurnal decline. Results indicated that maltreating mothers engaged in significantly less elaborative reminiscing than nonmaltreating mothers. Maternal elaborative reminiscing mediated associations between child maltreatment and child receptive language and child emotion knowledge. Additionally, there was support for an indirect pathway between child maltreatment and child cortisol diurnal decline through maternal elaborative reminiscing. Directions for future research are discussed and potential clinical implications are addressed. PMID:26535941

  7. Eukaryotic GPN-loop GTPases paralogs use a dimeric assembly reminiscent of archeal GPN.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Béatrice; Beraud, Carole; Meguellati, Sarra; Chen, Shu W; Pellequer, Jean Luc; Armengaud, Jean; Godon, Christian

    2013-02-01

    GTPases are molecular switches that regulate a wide-range of cellular processes. The GPN-loop GTPase (GPN) is a sub-family of P-loop NTPase that evolved from a single gene copy in archaea to triplicate paralog genes in eukaryotes, each having a non-redundant essential function in cell. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yGPN1 and yGPN2 are involved in sister chromatid cohesion mechanism, whereas nothing is known regarding yGPN3 function. Previous high-throughput experiments suggested that GPN paralogs interaction may occur. In this work, GPN|GPN contact was analyzed in details using TAP-Tag approach, yeast two-hybrid assay, in silico energy computation and site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved Glu residue located at the center of the interaction interface. It is demonstrated that this residue is essential for cell viability. A chromatid cohesion assay revealed that, like yGPN1 and yGPN2, yGPN3 also plays a role in sister chromatid cohesion. These results suggest that all three GPN proteins act at the molecular level in sister chromatid cohesion mechanism as a GPN|GPN complex reminiscent of the homodimeric structure of PAB0955, an archaeal member of GPN-loop GTPase.

  8. Consequences from use of reminiscence - a randomised intervention study in ten Danish nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reminiscence is the systematic use of memories and recollections to strengthen self-identity and self-worth. The study aim was to investigate the consequences for nursing home residents and staff of integrating reminiscence into daily nursing care. Methods In this randomised study, ten nursing homes were matched into two groups on the basis of location, type and size. In the period August 2006 - August 2007, staff in the Intervention Group were trained and supported in the use of reminiscence, involving individual and group sessions with residents as well as reminiscence boxes, posters and exhibitions. At baseline and again 6 and 12 months after the intervention start, data were collected on residents' cognitive level, agitated behaviour, general functioning and proxy-assessed quality of life, as well as on staff well-being and job satisfaction. Mixed linear modelling was used to analyse differences in outcome between the intervention and control groups. Results Project drop-out rates were 32% for residents and 38% for nursing staff. Most staff in the Intervention Group considered reminiscence a useful tool that improved their communication with residents, and that they would recommend to other nursing homes. There were no significant differences between residents in the Intervention and the Control Group in cognitive level, agitated behaviour or general functioning. Residents in the Intervention Group showed significant higher score at 6 months in quality of life subscale 'Response to surroundings', but there was no significant difference at 12 months. Positive effects of reminiscence were observed for all staff outcome measures, the only exception being SF-12 self-rated physical health. At 6 months after start of reminiscence, staff in the Intervention Group had significantly better scores than those in the Control Group for Personal accomplishment, Emotional exhaustion, Depersonalisation, 'Attitude towards individual contact with residents' and SF-12

  9. Consequences from use of reminiscence--a randomised intervention study in ten Danish nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Gudex, Claire; Horsted, Charlotte; Jensen, Anders Møller; Kjer, Marianne; Sørensen, Jan

    2010-06-06

    Reminiscence is the systematic use of memories and recollections to strengthen self-identity and self-worth. The study aim was to investigate the consequences for nursing home residents and staff of integrating reminiscence into daily nursing care. In this randomised study, ten nursing homes were matched into two groups on the basis of location, type and size. In the period August 2006--August 2007, staff in the Intervention Group were trained and supported in the use of reminiscence, involving individual and group sessions with residents as well as reminiscence boxes, posters and exhibitions. At baseline and again 6 and 12 months after the intervention start, data were collected on residents' cognitive level, agitated behaviour, general functioning and proxy-assessed quality of life, as well as on staff well-being and job satisfaction. Mixed linear modelling was used to analyse differences in outcome between the intervention and control groups. Project drop-out rates were 32% for residents and 38% for nursing staff. Most staff in the Intervention Group considered reminiscence a useful tool that improved their communication with residents, and that they would recommend to other nursing homes. There were no significant differences between residents in the Intervention and the Control Group in cognitive level, agitated behaviour or general functioning. Residents in the Intervention Group showed significant higher score at 6 months in quality of life subscale 'Response to surroundings', but there was no significant difference at 12 months. Positive effects of reminiscence were observed for all staff outcome measures, the only exception being SF-12 self-rated physical health. At 6 months after start of reminiscence, staff in the Intervention Group had significantly better scores than those in the Control Group for Personal accomplishment, Emotional exhaustion, Depersonalisation, 'Attitude towards individual contact with residents' and SF-12 self-rated mental health. At

  10. Life scripts for emotionally charged autobiographical memories: A cultural explanation of the reminiscence bump.

    PubMed

    Haque, Shamsul; Hasking, Penelope A

    2010-10-01

    Two studies examined the ability of the life script account to explain the reminiscence bump for emotionally charged autobiographical memories among Malaysian participants. In Study 1 volunteers, aged 50-90 years, participated in a two-phased task. In the first phase, participants estimated the timing of 11 life events (both positive and negative) that may occur in a prototypical life course within their own culture. Two weeks later the participants retrieved the same set of events from their lives and reported how old they were when those events occurred. In the second study 92 undergraduate students produced life scripts for the same 11 events. The findings revealed reminiscence bumps in both life script and retrieval curves for the memories judged happiest, most important, most in love, and most jealous. A reminiscence bump was also noted for success, although this was later in the lifespan than other reminiscence bumps. It was suggested that the life scripts can be used as an alternative account for the reminiscence bump, for highly positive and occasionally for negative autobiographical memories.

  11. High Gradient Accelerating Structures for Carbon Therapy Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsaev, Sergey; Agustsson, R.; Faillace, L.; Goel, A.; Mustapha, B.; Nassiri, A.; Ostroumov, P.; Plastun, A.; Savin, E.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon therapy is the most promising among techniques for cancer treatment, as it has demonstrated significant improvements in clinical efficiency and reduced toxicity profiles in multiple types of cancer through much better localization of dose to the tumor volume. RadiaBeam, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, are developing an ultra-high gradient linear accelerator, Advanced Compact Carbon Ion Linac (ACCIL), for the delivery of ion-beams with end-energies up to 450 MeV/u for 12C6+ ions and 250 MeV for protons. In this paper, we present a thorough comparison of standing and travelling wave designs for high gradient S-Band accelerating structures operating with ions at varying velocities, relative to the speed of light, in the range 0.3-0.7. In this paper we will compare these types of accelerating structures in terms of RF, beam dynamics and thermo-mechanical performance.

  12. Becoming a teller of tales: Associations between children’s fictional narratives and parent-child reminiscence narratives

    PubMed Central

    Wenner, Jennifer A.; Burch, Melissa M.; Lynch, Julie S.; Bauer, Patricia J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has revealed a connection between the contributions parents make while reminiscing and their children’s narratives for personally experienced events. The present research expands the literature by focusing on the connection between parental reminiscing and children’s production of fictional narratives. Four- to 9-year-olds and their parents reminisced about past shared events and then, with an experimenter, the children produced narratives based on wordless picture books. The results revealed that the overall quality of the fictional narratives was correlated with parents’ provision statements that emphasized orientation and evaluation in the reminiscence narrative. For younger children, correlations held for reminiscence narratives about recent events. For older children, correlations held for reminiscence narratives about events from the distant past. The results are consistent with the suggestion that children learn general storytelling skills from adult models. PMID:18062986

  13. Hydrogen bonding in protic ionic liquids: reminiscent of water.

    PubMed

    Fumino, Koichi; Wulf, Alexander; Ludwig, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Similarities and differences: Far-infrared spectra of protic ionic liquids could be assigned to intermolecular bending and stretching modes of hydrogen bonds. The characteristics of the low-frequency spectra resemble those of water. Both liquids form three-dimensional network structures, but only water is capable of building tetrahedral configurations. EAN: ethylammonium nitrate, PAN: propylammonium nitrate, DMAN: dimethylammonium nitrate.

  14. Structural and functional imaging for vascular targeted photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Buhong; Gu, Ying; Wilson, Brian C.

    2017-02-01

    Vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (V-PDT) has been widely used for the prevention or treatment of vascular-related diseases, such as localized prostate cancer, wet age-related macular degeneration, port wine stains, esophageal varices and bleeding gastrointestinal mucosal lesions. In this study, the fundamental mechanisms of vascular responses during and after V-PDT will be introduced. Based on the V-PDT treatment of blood vessels in dorsal skinfold window chamber model, the structural and functional imaging, which including white light microscopy, laser speckle imaging, singlet oxygen luminescence imaging, and fluorescence imaging for evaluating vascular damage will be presented, respectively. The results indicate that vessel constriction and blood flow dynamics could be considered as the crucial biomarkers for quantitative evaluation of vascular damage. In addition, future perspectives of non-invasive optical imaging for evaluating vascular damage of V-PDT will be discussed.

  15. How to Make Reminiscence Movies: A Project-Based Gerontology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yancura, Loriena A.

    2013-01-01

    One key to successful gerontological education lies in teaching students to integrate information from diverse academic disciplines into practical contexts. This article describes a project-based course within which students learn to integrate theories by working with older adult partners to make reminiscence movies based on an important event or…

  16. Socialization of Past Event Talk: Cultural Differences in Maternal Elaborative Reminiscing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tougu, Pirko; Tulviste, Tiia; Schroder, Lisa; Keller, Heidi; De Geer, Boel

    2011-01-01

    This study examines mother-child reminiscing conversations with respect to variation in use and function of mothers' elaborations, the nature of children's memory elaborations, and the connections between the two, in three Western middle-class cultures where autonomy is valued over relatedness. Mothers participated with their 4-year-old children…

  17. Maternal Reminiscing Style during Early Childhood Predicts the Age of Adolescents' Earliest Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Fiona; MacDonald, Shelley; Reese, Elaine; Hayne, Harlene

    2009-01-01

    Individual differences in parental reminiscing style are hypothesized to have long-lasting effects on children's autobiographical memory development, including the age of their earliest memories. This study represents the first prospective test of this hypothesis. Conversations about past events between 17 mother-child dyads were recorded on…

  18. Socialization of Past Event Talk: Cultural Differences in Maternal Elaborative Reminiscing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tougu, Pirko; Tulviste, Tiia; Schroder, Lisa; Keller, Heidi; De Geer, Boel

    2011-01-01

    This study examines mother-child reminiscing conversations with respect to variation in use and function of mothers' elaborations, the nature of children's memory elaborations, and the connections between the two, in three Western middle-class cultures where autonomy is valued over relatedness. Mothers participated with their 4-year-old children…

  19. Psychometric Properties of the "Reminiscence Functions Scale" for the Portuguese Population: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goncalves, Daniela C.; Guedes, Joana Martins; Fonseca, Antonio M.; Martin, Inacio

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the psychometric properties of a version in Portuguese of the "Reminiscence Functions Scale." Total sample was composed of 628 participants aged between 18 and 92 years, divided into three groups according to their age (18-24 years, "n" = 249; 26-54 years, "n" = 174; 55 and…

  20. A Controlled Evaluation of Reminiscence and Current Topics Discussion Groups in a Nursing Home Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rattenbury, Christine; Stones, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    Compared psychological well-being of elderly nursing home residents who participated in reminiscence and current topics group discussions with control group of residents. Rated participants' happiness/depression, activity, mood, and functional levels before and after intervention. Intervention had significant effect only on happiness/depression…

  1. Mothers' Attributions in Reminiscing Conversations about Children's Successes and Failures: Connections with Children's Self-Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodvin, Rebecca; Rolfson, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Effects of feedback on children's self-evaluations are well established, yet little is known about how parents talk with children about everyday successes and failures, despite the importance of parent-child reminiscing in children's psychological understanding. We examine mothers' attributions and performance evaluations in conversations about…

  2. Reminiscence, Psychological Well-Being, and Ego Integrity in Portuguese Elderly People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afonso, Rosa Maria; Bueno, Belen; Loureiro, Manuel Joachim; Pereira, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of a reminiscence program on the psychological well-being and ego integrity of elderly people with depressive symptomatology. Ninety people aged 65 and over participated in a quasi-experimental design with pretest and posttest evaluations. They were assigned to one of three groups: (a) experimental group…

  3. How to Make Reminiscence Movies: A Project-Based Gerontology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yancura, Loriena A.

    2013-01-01

    One key to successful gerontological education lies in teaching students to integrate information from diverse academic disciplines into practical contexts. This article describes a project-based course within which students learn to integrate theories by working with older adult partners to make reminiscence movies based on an important event or…

  4. Maternal Reminiscing Style during Early Childhood Predicts the Age of Adolescents' Earliest Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Fiona; MacDonald, Shelley; Reese, Elaine; Hayne, Harlene

    2009-01-01

    Individual differences in parental reminiscing style are hypothesized to have long-lasting effects on children's autobiographical memory development, including the age of their earliest memories. This study represents the first prospective test of this hypothesis. Conversations about past events between 17 mother-child dyads were recorded on…

  5. Functions of Memory Sharing and Mother-Child Reminiscing Behaviors: Individual and Cultural Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkofsky, Sarah; Wang, Qi; Koh, Jessie Bee Kim

    2009-01-01

    This study examined maternal beliefs about the functions of memory sharing and the relations between these beliefs and mother-child reminiscing behaviors in a cross-cultural context. Sixty-three European American and 47 Chinese mothers completed an open-ended questionnaire concerning their beliefs about the functions of parent-child memory…

  6. Psychometric Properties of the "Reminiscence Functions Scale" for the Portuguese Population: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goncalves, Daniela C.; Guedes, Joana Martins; Fonseca, Antonio M.; Martin, Inacio

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the psychometric properties of a version in Portuguese of the "Reminiscence Functions Scale." Total sample was composed of 628 participants aged between 18 and 92 years, divided into three groups according to their age (18-24 years, "n" = 249; 26-54 years, "n" = 174; 55 and…

  7. Reminiscence, Psychological Well-Being, and Ego Integrity in Portuguese Elderly People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afonso, Rosa Maria; Bueno, Belen; Loureiro, Manuel Joachim; Pereira, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of a reminiscence program on the psychological well-being and ego integrity of elderly people with depressive symptomatology. Ninety people aged 65 and over participated in a quasi-experimental design with pretest and posttest evaluations. They were assigned to one of three groups: (a) experimental group…

  8. Profiles of Reminiscence among Older Adults: Perceived Stress, Life Attitudes, and Personality Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappeliez, Philippe; O'Rourke, Norm

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to identify subgroups of older participants on the basis of unique configurations of variables among functions of reminiscence, personality traits, life attitudes, and perceived stress by means of cluster analysis. Ninety-three older adults (M = 66.7 years of age) completed the NEO-Five Factor Inventory, the Life…

  9. The Theory and Practice of Structural and Strategic Family Therapies: A Delphi Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Linda Stone; Piercy, Fred P.

    1987-01-01

    Examined the similarities and differences in the theory and practice of structural and strategic family therapy. A national panel of structural and strategic therapists identified items they thought important to a profile of either structural or strategic family therapy. Mental Research Institute, Haley/Madanes, and Milan/Ackerman approaches to…

  10. The Theory and Practice of Structural and Strategic Family Therapies: A Delphi Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Linda Stone; Piercy, Fred P.

    1987-01-01

    Examined the similarities and differences in the theory and practice of structural and strategic family therapy. A national panel of structural and strategic therapists identified items they thought important to a profile of either structural or strategic family therapy. Mental Research Institute, Haley/Madanes, and Milan/Ackerman approaches to…

  11. Doing Therapy: A Post-Structural Re-Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Shazer, Steve; Berg, Insoo Kim

    1992-01-01

    Develops way to look at doing therapy based on Wittgenstein's concept of "language game"; relationship between Wittgenstein's "private language" argument, language games, and constructivism; and poststructural thinking about language, how therapy works within language, and how language works within therapy. Uses case material to illustrate…

  12. The Effect of Reminiscence Group Work on Life Satisfaction, Self-Esteem and Mood of Ageing People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Puyenbroeck, Joris; Maes, Bea

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study evaluates the effects of reminiscence group work on the subjective well-being of ageing people with intellectual disabilities. Methods: The content of the successive group work sessions was manipulated as follows: a control-phase with three "current topics" sessions, an experimental phase with six "reminiscence" sessions and…

  13. The Effect of Reminiscence Group Work on Life Satisfaction, Self-Esteem and Mood of Ageing People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Puyenbroeck, Joris; Maes, Bea

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study evaluates the effects of reminiscence group work on the subjective well-being of ageing people with intellectual disabilities. Methods: The content of the successive group work sessions was manipulated as follows: a control-phase with three "current topics" sessions, an experimental phase with six "reminiscence" sessions and…

  14. [Structured diagnostics and therapy of the CUP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Löffler, H; Neben, K; Krämer, A

    2014-02-01

    In the majority of cases, patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) have a poor prognosis with no prospect of being cured. Hence, a reasonable focus of diagnostics on its essential targets seems appropriate. Particularly important is the identification of all patients who can be assigned to subgroups with a favorable prognosis and who might benefit from a specific therapy. For all other patients, platinum-based combination therapy is the standard cytostatic therapy. In addition to platinum derivatives, taxanes, gemcitabine and irinotecan can also be used. Promising innovative approaches include targeted therapies, in particular bevacizumab and erlotinib, and identification of the tissue origin with micro-RNA or gene expression analyses which can help identify the most suitable organ-specific therapy for individual patients. It would be desirable if the group of patients treated with unspecific therapy could be reduced by improved diagnostics so that these patients could be treated with organ-specific therapy or with molecularly targeted approaches. Micro-RNA and gene expression analyses appear to be interesting for this purpose. Another complementary approach is to improve the treatment results of patients receiving an unspecific standard combination therapy by additional administration of new targeted substances.

  15. A Reminiscence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobind Khorana, H.

    1997-12-01

    Leslie Orgel and Francis Crick with Gobind Khorana in Madison, Wisconsin (December 1965). I first met Leslie at the Endicott House (MIT) in February 1964. Leslie was then spending a period of time at MIT and the occasion was a party for him. During our conversation, Leslie talked about starting some experimental work. He seemed to be particularly interested in polyphosphates and the chemical activation of small molecules (building blocks). Shortly after his move to the Salk Institute in the Fall of 1964 I visited him in January 1965. He already had a lab going. I remember meeting Jim Ferris, in particular, and John Sulston sometime later. That particular time was exciting for my research as well. We had the first results on the Genetic Code using the chemical-biochemical approach that my lab had developed. Francis Crick was also at the Salk Institute during the time of my visit. Both Leslie and Francis were very excited by my results and they began to ask a lot of questions and gave me a whole lot of suggestions about further experiments. In fact, my thinking and planning of things that we were doing were so scrutinized and clarified during these discussions that, it seemed to me, my own group had only to turn out all the experiments that were needed. These interactions with Francis and Leslie continued intensively throughout that year and later. In fact, both Leslie and Francis accepted my invitation to Madison in December 1965 for more discussions. Since those early days of the Salk Institute, I have made numerous visits over the years to Leslie and his research group. It has always been very exciting to learn about the many discoveries bearing on chemical evolution that have unfolded from Leslie's research group. In addition, I have always benefitted from the insightful comments that Leslie invariably provided on my own research. I look forward to our continued interactions and friendship in the future. Leslie, A Happy Birthday!

  16. Apical regional wall motion abnormalities reminiscent to Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy following consumption of psychoactive fungi.

    PubMed

    Nef, Holger M; Möllmann, Helge; Hilpert, Pirmin; Krause, Nicola; Troidl, Christian; Weber, Michael; Rolf, Andreas; Dill, Thorsten; Hamm, Christian; Elsässer, A

    2009-05-01

    Consumption of natural hallucinogenic substances continues to be a problem. In this case we report from a young male patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome with significant ST-elevation after the abuse of psychoactive fungi, commonly referred to as "magic mushrooms". Coronary angiography excludes relevant coronary artery disease. In ventriculography contractile dysfunction with hypokinesia in the apical segments could be documented reminiscent to wall motion abnormalities in Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC). Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging showed no pathological signal activity in the late-enhancement sequences ruling out myocardial infarction or inflammatory processes. Ventricular function normalized within several days. The active metabolite of psychoactive fungi psilocybin is known to interact with several different dopaminergic, adrenergic and serotonergic receptors. Thus, the pathomechanisms leading to contractile dysfunction after consumption of psychoactive fungi are reminiscent to those documented in TTC.

  17. Training Mothers in Elaborative Reminiscing Enhances Children's Autobiographical Memory and Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Elaine; Newcombe, Rhiannon

    2007-01-01

    This longitudinal intervention assessed children's memory at 2-1/2 years (short-term posttest; N = 115) and their memory and narrative at 3-1/2 years (long-term posttest; N = 100) as a function of maternal training in elaborative reminiscing when children were 1-1/2 to 2-1/2 years. At both posttests, trained mothers were more elaborative in their…

  18. Training Mothers in Elaborative Reminiscing Enhances Children's Autobiographical Memory and Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Elaine; Newcombe, Rhiannon

    2007-01-01

    This longitudinal intervention assessed children's memory at 2-1/2 years (short-term posttest; N = 115) and their memory and narrative at 3-1/2 years (long-term posttest; N = 100) as a function of maternal training in elaborative reminiscing when children were 1-1/2 to 2-1/2 years. At both posttests, trained mothers were more elaborative in their…

  19. Mother-child reminiscing and autobiographical memory specificity among preschool-age children.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Kristin; Nuttall, Amy K; Comas, Michelle; McDonnell, Christina G; Piper, Brianna; Thomas, Taylor E; Fanuele, Suzanne

    2014-04-01

    Overgeneral memory (OGM) refers to difficulty in retrieving specific autobiographical memories. The tendency to be overgeneral in autobiographical memory recall is more commonly observed among individuals with emotional disorders compared with those without. Despite significant advances in theory and identification of mechanisms that underlie the etiology of OGM, there has been little integration between normative research on the development of autobiographical memory and research on OGM. Informed by a developmental psychopathology perspective and drawing on normative developmental research on the social construction of autobiographical memory, the current investigation examined whether the elaborative quantity and elaborative quality of maternal reminiscing are predictive of preschool-age children's autobiographical memory specificity. Additionally, this investigation tested whether children's positive self-representations may explain these hypothesized associations. Participants consisted of 95 mother-child dyads. Children's ages ranged between 3.5 and 6 years, and the sample was predominantly low income and of minority race/ethnicity. Dyads participated in a joint reminiscing task about 4 past events, and children participated in assessments of autobiographical memory specificity and self-representations. Results indicated that the elaborative quality, defined by maternal-sensitive guidance and emotional narrative coherence, but not the elaborative quantity, of maternal reminiscing style was significantly associated with children's autobiographical memory specificity. Additionally, there was support for an indirect pathway between maternal reminiscing quality and child memory specificity through children's positive self-representations. Directions for future research are discussed, and potential clinical implications are addressed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. An intergenerational reminiscence programme for older adults with early dementia and youth volunteers: values and challenges.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jenny C C

    2009-06-01

    To examine the values of a reminiscence programme, adopting an intergenerational approach, on older persons with early dementia and youth volunteers. A pre- and post- one group design was adopted. Forty-nine elderly participants with early dementia and 117 youth volunteers participated in the study. Each elderly participant was assigned to two youth participants. This dyad group participated in a 12-session reminiscence programme. The youth participants acted as facilitators to prompt the elderly participants to share and discuss past events and experiences, and to support them to fabricate a personalized life-story book. An occupational therapist provided ongoing support and monitoring. The elderly participants were evaluated by the Chinese version of Mini-mental State Examination, Quality of Life-Alzheimer's Disease (QoL-AD), and Chinese version of Geriatric Depression Scale (CGDS) before and after the programme. Dementia Quiz (DQ), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and a 20-item feedback questionnaire on the programme were used to evaluate the youth participants. Significant pre- and postprogramme differences were found for QoL-AD (mean change = -1.91; 95% CI = -3.18, -0.64) and CGDS (mean change = 1.86; 95% CI = 0.92, 2.80) among the elderly participants, and for DQ (mean change = -1.14; 95% CI = -2.11, -0.17) among the youth participants. Volunteers also showed positive appreciation of older persons and opined that this community service provided them an opportunity to reflect on their relationship with elderly relatives. Some volunteers, however, commented the heavy workload of the reminiscence programme. The intergenerational reminiscence programme suggests mutually beneficial values for both groups of participants. Whilst it is feasible to involve trained volunteers in the implementation of dementia-related programmes, it is essential that they are adequately trained and that ongoing support and monitoring are provided.

  1. Social integration, a sense of belonging and the Cenotaph Service: old soldiers reminisce about Remembrance.

    PubMed

    Barron, Duncan S; Davies, Stephen P; Wiggins, Richard D

    2008-07-01

    This study explored how war commemorations such as the Cenotaph Service in the UK enable older veterans to benefit from a feeling of integration and belonging gained from both comradeship and acknowledgement from wider society. Focus groups preceded by a video clip of the Cenotaph Service with 45 veterans were used to discuss the significance of collective commemorations for older veterans. Findings indicated that social integration and a sense of belonging are fostered both by comradeship and societal support during collective commemorations allowing veterans to reminisce safely. Spontaneous reminiscences involving troubling memories may be processed more easily with the support, social integration and sense of belonging which occurs at collective commemorations. Many Korean War and female World War II veterans felt forgotten and socially isolated, but described gaining vicarious support via collective commemorations. Cohen and Wills' (1985) main-effects and buffering models of social support are used to discuss the findings further. Collective commemorations can be important sources of support for many older veterans. Both comradeship and societal support promote social integration and a sense of belonging (main-effects), which enabled reminiscing and processing (buffering) to occur.

  2. Development of Dual-Retrieval Processes in Recall: Learning, Forgetting, and Reminiscence

    PubMed Central

    Brainerd, C. J.; Aydin, C.; Reyna, V. F.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the development of dual-retrieval processes with a low-burden paradigm that is suitable for research with children and neurocognitively impaired populations (e.g., older adults with mild cognitive impairment or dementia). Rich quantitative information can be obtained about recollection, reconstruction, and familiarity judgment by defining a Markov model over simple recall tasks like those that are used in clinical neuropsychology batteries. The model measures these processes separately for learning, forgetting, and reminiscence. We implemented this procedure in some developmental experiments, whose aims were (a) to measure age changes in recollective and nonrecollective retrieval during learning, forgetting, and reminiscence and (b) to measure age changes in content dimensions (e.g., taxonomic relatedness) that affect the two forms of retrieval. The model provided excellent fits in all three domains. Concerning (a), recollection, reconstruction, and familiarity judgment all improved during the child-to-adolescent age range in the learning domain, whereas only recollection improved in the forgetting domain, and the processes were age-invariant in the reminiscence domain. Concerning (b), although some elements of the adult pattern of taxonomic relatedness effects were detected by early adolescence, the adult pattern differs qualitatively from corresponding patterns in children and adolescents. PMID:22778491

  3. Complementarity as a Function of Stage in Therapy: An Analysis of Minuchin's Structural Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Heather; Vande Kemp, Hendrika

    1987-01-01

    Explored the level of family therapist complementarity in the early, middle and late stages of therapy performing a micro-analysis of Salvador Minuchin with one family in successful therapy. Level of therapist complementarity was signficantly greater in the early and late stages than in the middle stage, and was significantly correlated with…

  4. Manualized Therapy for PTSD: Flexing the Structure of Cognitive Processing Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galovski, Tara E.; Blain, Leah M.; Mott, Juliette M.; Elwood, Lisa; Houle, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study tested a modified cognitive processing therapy (MCPT) intervention designed as a more flexible administration of the protocol. Number of sessions was determined by client progress toward a priori defined end-state criteria, "stressor sessions" were inserted when necessary, and therapy was conducted by novice CPT clinicians.…

  5. Brief reminiscence activities improve state well-being and self-concept in young adults: a randomised controlled experiment.

    PubMed

    Hallford, David John; Mellor, David

    2016-11-01

    Reminiscence-based psychotherapies have been demonstrated to have robust effects on a range of therapeutic outcomes. However, little research has been conducted on the immediate effects of guided activities they are composed of, or how these might differ dependent on the type of reminiscence. The current study utilised a controlled experimental design, whereby 321 young adults (mean age = 25.5 years, SD = 3.0) were randomised to one of four conditions of online reminiscence activity: problem-solving (successful coping experiences), identity (self-defining events contributing to a meaningful and continuous personal identity), bitterness revival (negative or adverse events), or a control condition (any memory from their past). Participants recalled autobiographical memories congruent with the condition, and answered questions to facilitate reflection on the memories. The results indicated that problem-solving and identity reminiscence activities caused significant improvements in self-esteem, meaning in life, self-efficacy and affect, whereas no effects were found in the bitterness revival and control conditions. Problem-solving reminiscence also caused a small effect in increasing perceptions of a life narrative/s. Differences between the conditions did not appear to be explained by the positive-valence of memories. These results provide evidence for the specific effects of adaptive types of problem-solving and identity reminiscence in young adults.

  6. Functions of reminiscence and the psychological well-being of young-old and older adults over time.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Norm; Cappeliez, Philippe; Claxton, Amy

    2011-03-01

    Existing cross-sectional research demonstrates an association between reminiscence functions and well-being in later life. The results of this study replicate and extend previous findings in separate participant samples above and below 70 years of age. Findings suggest a link between reminiscence functions and psychological well-being, and indirectly between reminiscence and well-being 16 months thereafter. Invariance analyses reveal few differences in association between reminiscence and well-being when young-old (n = 196) and older adults (n = 215) are compared. These findings suggest a direct positive association between self-positive reminiscence functions (identity, death preparation, and problem-solving) and a direct negative association between self-negative functions (boredom reduction, bitterness revival, and intimacy maintenance) and psychological well-being (life satisfaction, depressive, and anxiety symptoms). In contrast, prosocial reminiscence functions (conversation, teach/inform others) appear to have an indirect association with well-being (i.e., via self-positive and self-negative functions). These findings are discussed relative to evolving theory and research linking cognition and health.

  7. Assessment and Therapeutic Application of the Expressive Therapies Continuum: Implications for Brain Structures and Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusebrink, Vija B.

    2010-01-01

    The Expressive Therapies Continuum (ETC) provides a theoretical model for art-based assessments and applications of media in art therapy. The three levels of the ETC (Kinesthetic/Sensory, Perceptual/Affective, and Cognitive/Symbolic) appear to reflect different functions and structures in the brain that process visual and affective information.…

  8. Max Graf's "Reminiscences of Professor Sigmund Freud" revisited: new evidence from the Freud archives.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Jerome C

    2007-01-01

    Recently derestricted Freud Archive interviews with Max and Herbert Graf and Herbert's wife shed new light on Max Graf's article, "Reminiscences of Professor Sigmund Freud," published in The Psychoanalytic Quarterly in 1942. To explain discrepancies between the interviews and the earlier article, the author postulates that, in the article, Max Graf purposely distorted or omitted certain details in order not to reveal Herbert's identity as "Little Hans" (Freud 1909). The interviews place incidents reported in the article in a new and more complex light, and also underscore the intensely personal nature of the intellectual development of the psychoanalytic movement.

  9. John Widdicombe’s contribution to respiratory physiology and cough: reminiscences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    John Widdicombe has made substantial contributions to respiratory physiology and to the field of cough particularly. He was one of the first to characterise Aδ-myelinated fibres in the airways that could mediate cough and increased breathing. Later on, he initiated the series of international London Cough Symposia that gathered researchers and clinicians on a two-yearly basis to discuss recent results and concepts regarding cough. John Widdicombe was interested in all aspects of cough from the definition to potential new antitussives. This article will focus on his contributions and on his generous personality through reminiscences from three friends. PMID:23497652

  10. Interpersonal communication in and through family: structure and therapy in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, Defne; Yakali-Çamoğlu, Dikmen; Harunzade, Yael Profeta; Ergun, Berk Murat; Dokur, Murat

    2012-04-01

    It is essential for professionals in the mental health sector to identify and understand the different family models and the effects of social transformations. Historically and at present, however, Turkish families live in a 'culture of relatedness', with emotional and/or material interdependence between generations. Marriage and family therapy is a newly emerging discipline in Turkey. Although studies on family structure and common problems in families have been made, data on the practice of family therapy are limited. To our knowledge, this is the first paper aiming to describe the practice of family therapies in Turkey, situating them against a backdrop of sociological and social/psychological studies in family structure.

  11. [Multimodal pain therapy in Germany: structure and quality].

    PubMed

    Casser, Hans-Raimund; Nagel, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Multimodal Pain Management is a comprehensive treatment of complex chronic pain syndromes. In addition to medical therapy various other specialized therapeutical interventions based on the biopsychosocial model of pain origin and chronic pain development are added.Medical indications are given for patients with chronic pain syndromes, but also if there is an elevated risk of chronic pain in the early stadium of the disease and aiming at delaying the process of chronification. Multimodal pain management has been included in the official catalogue of the recognized medical procedure for day clinic units as well as for inpatients pain management. As there is still a lack of clarity and of consistency about the implementation of multimodal pain management the ad-hoc-Kommission on multimodal interdisciplinary pain management of the German Pain Society has proposed a position paper that has been worked out in a multilevel and interdisciplinary consensus process. Moreover a basic tool for documentation and quality management of pain therapy was developed by the German Pain Society (KEDOQ-Schmerz) as the data basis for nationwide, cross-sectional and independent scientific research in health services in Germany. In future KEDOQ-Schmerz will also used as a method for external quality management in chronic pain therapy in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Manualized Therapy for PTSD: Flexing the Structure of Cognitive Processing Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galovski, Tara E.; Blain, Leah M.; Mott, Juliette M.; Elwood, Lisa; Houle, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study tested a modified Cognitive Processing Therapy intervention (MCPT) designed as a more flexible administration of the protocol. Number of sessions was determined by client progress toward a priori defined end-state criteria, “stressor sessions” were inserted when necessary, and therapy was conducted by novice CPT clinicians. Method A randomized, controlled, repeated measures, semi-crossover design was utilized to 1) test the relative efficacy of the MCPT intervention compared to a Symptom-Monitoring Delayed Treatment (SMDT) condition and 2) to assess within-group variation in change with a sample of 100 male and female interpersonal trauma survivors with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Results Hierarchical linear modeling analyses revealed that MCPT evidenced greater improvement on all primary (PTSD and depression) and secondary (guilt, quality of life, general mental health, social functioning, and health perceptions) outcomes compared with SMDT. After the conclusion of SMDT, participants crossed over to MCPT, resulting in a Combined MCPT sample (n = 69). Of the 50 participants who completed MCPT, 58% reached end-state criteria prior to the 12th session, 8% at session 12, and 34% between sessions 12-18. Maintenance of treatment gains was found at the 3-month follow-up, with only two of the treated sample meeting criteria for PTSD. The use of stressor sessions did not result in poorer treatment outcomes. Conclusions Findings suggest that individuals respond at a variable rate to CPT, with significant benefit from additional therapy when indicated and excellent maintenance of gains. The insertion of stressor sessions did not alter the efficacy of the therapy. PMID:23106761

  13. Salvador Minuchin's structural family therapy and its application to multicultural family systems.

    PubMed

    Navarre, S E

    1998-01-01

    The structural approach to family therapy offers a useful perspective to the nurse therapist working with families with various cultural backgrounds. Asian and Hispanic families are examined to illustrate using Minuchin's approach to family counseling. The rationale for the structural approach is explored, and specific therapeutic techniques for practice are described. Nurses who work with culturally diverse families might profit by using this approach.

  14. Autonomy Support and Structure Enhance Children's Memory and Motivation to Reminisce: A Parental Training Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Emily Sutcliffe; Morris, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Thirty parents observed their preschoolers (M [subscript age] = 4;2) experience a standardized laboratory event and discussed the event with their child later that day. Children's memory for this event was subsequently tested at two delay intervals. Prior to the laboratory event, parents were randomly assigned to receive either autonomy-support…

  15. Autonomy Support and Structure Enhance Children's Memory and Motivation to Reminisce: A Parental Training Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Emily Sutcliffe; Morris, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Thirty parents observed their preschoolers (M [subscript age] = 4;2) experience a standardized laboratory event and discussed the event with their child later that day. Children's memory for this event was subsequently tested at two delay intervals. Prior to the laboratory event, parents were randomly assigned to receive either autonomy-support…

  16. [Effect of structural family therapy on family structure and function in children with hematological tumors].

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao-Yan; Xie, Xiao-Tian; Mei, Zhu

    2014-09-01

    To explore the effect of structural family therapy (SFT), which refers to the application of the theory and technology of SFT for improving the internal family environment of pediatric patients through reorganization of the family roles, tasks, and boundaries, on the family structure and function in children with hematological tumors. Forty children with hematological tumors were randomly divided into SFT and control groups (n=20 each). The control group received conventional chemotherapy. The SFT group received SFT by a trained therapist in addition to conventional chemotherapy; the family of each patient received SFT four times (once every two weeks). Both groups were assessed by the Family Assessment Device (FAD) and Family Environment Scale-Chinese Version (FES-CV) on admission and one month after the end of SFT. After treatment, the SFT group showed significant decreases in all factor scores of FAD (P<0.05); the SFT group had significantly lower scores of problem solving, communication, roles, affective involvement, behavior control, and general functioning than the control group (P<0.05). In addition, the SFT group had significantly increased FES-CV scores of cohesion, emotional expression, intellectual-cultural orientation, and active-recreational orientation and a significantly decreased score of conflict after treatment (P<0.05), and the SFT group was significantly superior to the control group in terms of these items (P<0.05). SFT could promote beneficial family changes in children with hematological tumors by improving the family function and internal environment, which would increase the long-term chemotherapy compliance of these children and their parents.

  17. The theory, structure, and techniques for the inclusion of children in family therapy: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lund, Lori K; Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Haddock, Shelley A

    2002-10-01

    Many barriers prevent therapists from including young children in family therapy, despite the theoretical belief that every family member should be present. Although there is a wealth of literature describing how to include children, the information has not been compiled in a way that is easily accessible to therapists. In this article, we report the findings of an exhaustive and systematic literature review of 64 publications, published between 1972 and 1999, related to including children in family therapy. The purpose of this article is to offer therapists a succinct compilation of theoretical, structural, and practical aspects as well as a comprehensive listing of specific techniques for including children in family therapy.

  18. Microcirculation and structural reorganization of the bladder mucosa in chronic cystitis under conditions of ozone therapy.

    PubMed

    Neimark, A I; Nepomnyashchikh, L M; Lushnikova, E L; Bakarev, M A; Abdullaev, N A; Sizov, K A

    2014-01-01

    Structural reorganization of the bladder mucosa in chronic cystitis and its correction by ozone therapy were studied. A relationship between the epithelial layer restructuring of different kinds (dystrophy, metaplasia, and degeneration), level of cell proliferation, and ultrastructural organization of urotheliocytes was detected. This complex of structural reactions was combined with dysregulation of tissue bloodflow in the bladder mucosa, shown by laser Doppler flowmetry. Positive structural changes were most marked in intravesical and less so in parenteral ozone therapy added to the therapeutic complex and manifested in reduction of inflammation and alteration in parallel with more intense reparative reactions. A special feature of parenteral ozone therapy was a significant improvement of microcirculation in the bladder mucosa.

  19. Structural and Physical Basis for Anti-IgE Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jon D.; Chu, Hsing-Mao; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Ma, Che; Wen Chang, Tse; Lim, Carmay

    2015-06-01

    Omalizumab, an anti-IgE antibody, used to treat severe allergic asthma and chronic idiopathic urticaria, binds to IgE in blood or membrane-bound on B lymphocytes but not to IgE bound to its high (FcɛRI) or low (CD23) affinity receptor. Mutagenesis studies indicate overlapping FcɛRI and omalizumab-binding sites in the Cɛ3 domain, but crystallographic studies show FcɛRI and CD23-binding sites that are far apart, so how can omalizumab block IgE from binding both receptors? We report a 2.42-Å omalizumab-Fab structure, a docked IgE-Fc/omalizumab-Fab structure consistent with available experimental data, and the free energy contributions of IgE residues to binding omalizumab, CD23, and FcɛRI. These results provide a structural and physical basis as to why omalizumab cannot bind receptor-bound IgE and why omalizumab-bound IgE cannot bind to CD23/FcɛRI. They reveal the key IgE residues and their roles in binding omalizumab, CD23, and FcɛRI.

  20. Structural and Physical Basis for Anti-IgE Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jon D.; Chu, Hsing-Mao; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Ma, Che; Wen Chang, Tse; Lim, Carmay

    2015-01-01

    Omalizumab, an anti-IgE antibody, used to treat severe allergic asthma and chronic idiopathic urticaria, binds to IgE in blood or membrane-bound on B lymphocytes but not to IgE bound to its high (FcεRI) or low (CD23) affinity receptor. Mutagenesis studies indicate overlapping FcεRI and omalizumab-binding sites in the Cε3 domain, but crystallographic studies show FcεRI and CD23-binding sites that are far apart, so how can omalizumab block IgE from binding both receptors? We report a 2.42-Å omalizumab-Fab structure, a docked IgE-Fc/omalizumab-Fab structure consistent with available experimental data, and the free energy contributions of IgE residues to binding omalizumab, CD23, and FcεRI. These results provide a structural and physical basis as to why omalizumab cannot bind receptor-bound IgE and why omalizumab-bound IgE cannot bind to CD23/FcεRI. They reveal the key IgE residues and their roles in binding omalizumab, CD23, and FcεRI. PMID:26113483

  1. Controlled therapy by imaging of functional structures of intact liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Zhuang, Feng Y.; Ruan, G.; Kakihana, Yasuyuki; Krug, A.; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2000-04-01

    Ligustrazine, a Chinese herb medicine has been used to treat the diseases of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular diseases in China by Chinese traditional physicians or many years. Recently, results showed that ligustrazine is a powerful hepatic vasodilator. It can greatly change the blood supply of the tissues. Due to micro-optical tissue sensor developed recently it became possible to image functional structures of tissue on the level of intact blood capillaries. In our experiment we used the Oxyscan in order to study the effect of Ligustrazine on the oxygen supply of rat liver.

  2. Structured parallel therapy with parents in time-limited psychotherapy with children experiencing difficult family situations.

    PubMed

    Haugvik, Marianne

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss how parallel therapy work with parents can be structured to achieve the goals of therapy with their children. Time-limited psychotherapy with children is a structured therapeutic method, where the goal and the number of sessions are contracted together with the child and parents. In this study, we focus on parallel parental therapy for three separate families whose children are experiencing difficult family situations. Six main themes emerge from our interviews with the parents and an analysis of session notes: The parents expressed positive experiences with the therapy; their perspectives about the family situation changed; they reported positive changes on behalf of the children, and they reported an increasing number of factors to explain these changes. In addition, a number of positive changes in the family situation itself were reported, and the parents were increasingly concerned with understanding their children's expressions. Our findings indicate that this therapy method gives parents an opportunity for reflection and mentalization, which is found to be crucial to the child's mental health. Based on these findings, we suggest some guidelines for effectively engaging in therapy work with parents.

  3. Polymeric micelles encapsulating photosensitizer: structure/photodynamic therapy efficiency relation.

    PubMed

    Gibot, Laure; Lemelle, Arnaud; Till, Ugo; Moukarzel, Béatrice; Mingotaud, Anne-Françoise; Pimienta, Véronique; Saint-Aguet, Pascale; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Gaucher, Mireille; Violleau, Frédéric; Chassenieux, Christophe; Vicendo, Patricia

    2014-04-14

    Various polymeric micelles were formed from amphiphilic block copolymers, namely, poly(ethyleneoxide-b-ε-caprolactone), poly(ethyleneoxide-b-d,l-lactide), and poly(ethyleneoxide-b-styrene). The micelles were characterized by static and dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. They all displayed a similar size close to 20 nm. The influence of the chemical structure of the block copolymers on the stability upon dilution of the polymeric micelles was investigated to assess their relevance as carriers for nanomedicine. In the same manner, the stability upon aging was assessed by FRET experiments under various experimental conditions (alone or in the presence of blood proteins). In all cases, a good stability over 48 h for all systems was encountered, with PDLLA copolymer-based systems being the first to release their load slowly. The cytotoxicity and photocytotoxicity of the carriers were examined with or without their load. Lastly, the photodynamic activity was assessed in the presence of pheophorbide a as photosensitizer on 2D and 3D tumor cell culture models, which revealed activity differences between the 2D and 3D systems.

  4. Recent versus Remote: Flashbulb Memory for 9/11 and Self-Selected Events from the Reminiscence Bump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denver, Jenny Y.; Lane, Sean M.; Cherry, Katie E.

    2010-01-01

    In two related studies, we examined flashbulb memories acquired from different points in the lifespan in younger and older adults. When asked to remember flashbulb memories from their lives, older adults were most likely to recall events from the reminiscence bump (Study 1A). In Study 1B, younger and older adults recalled 9/11 and a personal…

  5. Talking about Internal States in Mother-Child Reminiscing Influences Children's Self-Representations: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Qi; Doan, Stacey N.; Song, Qingfang

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relation of mother-child discussions of internal states during reminiscing to the development of trait and evaluative self-representations in 131 European American and Chinese immigrant 3-year olds. Mothers and children discussed one positive and one negative event, and children were interviewed for self-descriptions.…

  6. The Link between Preschoolers' Phonological Awareness and Mothers' Book-Reading and Reminiscing Practices in Low-Income Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyva, Diana; Sparks, Alison; Reese, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    The relation between preschoolers' phonological awareness and the frequency and quality of parents' book-reading and reminiscing practices were examined in 54 low-income and ethnically diverse families. Children's phonological awareness was assessed at the beginning and end of preschool. Mothers reported the frequency with which they read books…

  7. Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral, Reminiscence, and Activity Treatments on Life Satisfaction and Anxiety in the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scates, Sharon K. Harp; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined effects of a cognitive-behavioral group condition, a reminiscence treatment group condition, and an activity group condition on anxiety and life satisfaction for senior citizens. No significant differences on life satisfaction and trait anxiety were found. (Author/ABL)

  8. The Bonds That Remind Us: Maternal Reminiscing for Bonding Purposes in Relation to Children's Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkofsky, Sarah; Behrens, Kazuko Y.; Battin, David B.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the relation between characteristics of mother-child reminiscing and children's perceived competence and social acceptance. We focused specifically on conversations for bonding purposes (i.e., conversations that serve the function of maintaining or strengthening the relationship between the child and the mother) as…

  9. Recent versus Remote: Flashbulb Memory for 9/11 and Self-Selected Events from the Reminiscence Bump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denver, Jenny Y.; Lane, Sean M.; Cherry, Katie E.

    2010-01-01

    In two related studies, we examined flashbulb memories acquired from different points in the lifespan in younger and older adults. When asked to remember flashbulb memories from their lives, older adults were most likely to recall events from the reminiscence bump (Study 1A). In Study 1B, younger and older adults recalled 9/11 and a personal…

  10. Predicting the Quality of Mother-Child Reminiscing Surrounding Negative Emotional Events at 42 and 48 Months Old

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laible, Deborah; Murphy, Tia Panfile; Augustine, Mairin

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have speculated that a number of factors likely predict the quality of reminiscing between preschool children and their mothers. This study was designed to investigate three such factors, including child temperament, maternal personality, and maternal caregiving representations. Seventy mothers and their preschool children were…

  11. Predicting the Quality of Mother-Child Reminiscing Surrounding Negative Emotional Events at 42- and 48-Months

    PubMed Central

    Laible, Deborah; Panfile, Tia; Augustine, Mairin

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have speculated that a number of factors likely predict the quality of reminiscing between preschool children and their mothers. This study was designed to investigate three such factors, including child temperament, maternal personality, and maternal caregiving representations. 70 mothers and their preschool children were recruited for the study. When the child was 42 months of age, mothers completed measures of her personality and the child’s temperament. Mothers also took part in the shortened Parent Development Inventory that was coded for coherence, pleasure, comfort, and perspective taking. At both 42 and 48 months, the mother-child dyad reminisced about a past event in which the child experienced a negative emotion. These conversations were coded for the amount of maternal elaboration, the discussion of emotion, and dyadic qualities (such as collaboration and intersubjectivity). At 42 months, aspects of maternal personality and child temperament were most associated with reminiscing quality. However, at 48 months, it was primarily maternal representations of relationships that predicted high quality reminiscing in the dyad. PMID:23789023

  12. On the Eicosanoid Trail with John Vane and Jack McGiff: 1974-1976. A personal reminiscence.

    PubMed

    Flower, R J

    2015-07-01

    In this brief personal reminiscence I comment upon the friendship and mutual understanding that arose between two great scientists and co-travellers, John Vane and Jack McGiff. I relate the events that led up to their meeting and focus on the brief period of time when they worked together on eicosanoid pharmacology in the UK.

  13. Surface reconstruction from structured-light images for radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshko, Olesya; Anand, Christopher K.; Terlaky, Tamás

    2005-09-01

    To design and deliver proper radiation treatment for cancer patients, knowledge of the body's surface in the affected area is required. Currently, surface information is obtained by using a manually operated tracer. The drawbacks of this contact method include slow operation, and errors in repositioning the patient in an x-ray machine. Utilization of MRI or CT is also possible but expensive. We propose a non-contact, quick, inexpensive method to reconstruct the surface. In our non-contact method, a mask with transparent circular coloured spots and a black background, and an incoherent light source are used to create structured-light images. Colour coding is necessary to establish the correspondence between the projected and the observed patterns, which is essential for surface reconstruction. The deformed light pattern is photographed by an offset camera and analyzed. First, noise reduction is performed because images are noisy due to the low-light conditions and low sensitivity of an off-the-shelf camera. Then, pattern elements (light elliptical spots) are found in the image. We use an inverse polynomial to model the intensity of a light spot, which results in a non-convex, least-squares optimization problem. Next, spots are assigned to a grid according to their colours and location, and errors are corrected using the relative position of the spots. Finally, spatial coordinates of the surface points are computed and surface reconstruction is performed. The described algorithms are implemented as a MATLAB package, which converts the acquired images into a three-dimensional surface. The developed system is inexpensive, and it can easily be mounted on an x-ray machine. The software package can run on any standard PC.

  14. Brief Structural/Strategic Family Therapy with African American and Hispanic High Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santisteban, Daniel A.; Coatsworth, J. Douglas; Perez-Vidal, Angel; Mitrani, Victoria; Jean-Gilles, Michele; Szapocnik, Jose

    The intervention described in this paper used Brief Strategic/Structural Family Therapy (BSFT) to reduce the likelihood that African American and Hispanic youth would initiate drug use by decreasing existing behavior problems at the individual level and improving maladaptive family functioning at the family level. The program targeted African…

  15. Core-Shell-structured Dendritic Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Combined Photodynamic Therapy and Antibody Delivery.

    PubMed

    Abbaraju, Prasanna Lakshmi; Yang, Yannan; Yu, Meihua; Fu, Jianye; Xu, Chun; Yu, Chengzhong

    2017-07-04

    Multifunctional core-shell-structured dendritic mesoporous silica nanoparticles with a fullerene-doped silica core, a dendritic silica shell and large pores have been prepared. The combination of photodynamic therapy and antibody therapeutics significantly inhibits the cancer cell growth by effectively reducing the level of anti-apoptotic proteins. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Teaching Interpersonal Skills to Psychiatric Outpatients: Using Structured Learning Therapy in a Community-Based Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprafkin, Robert P.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The Structured Learning Therapy (SLT), a type of treatment used to assist psychiatric patients to learn skills they need for effective and satisfying living in the community, is described in this article. A description of the community-based treatment facility in which SLT may be utilized and the results of the evaluation studies are also…

  17. Competency-Based Training: Objective Structured Clinical Exercises (OSCE) in Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.

    2010-01-01

    The field of marriage and family therapy (MFT) has recently engaged in the process of defining core competencies for the profession. Many MFT training programs are adapting their curriculum to develop more competency-based training strategies. The Objective Structured Clinical "Examination" (OSCE) is widely used in the medical profession to assess…

  18. Effects of Structural Family Therapy on Child and Maternal Mental Health Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Addie; Greeno, Catherine G.; Marcus, Steven C.; Fusco, Rachel A.; Zimmerman, Tina; Anderson, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined the effect of structural family therapy (SFT) on children's impairment and depressive symptomatology and mothers' depressive symptomatology and anxiety for 31 families served by a community mental health clinic. Method: A one group predesign/postdesign, with a baseline and two follow-up time points, was used.…

  19. "Structured Spontaneity": The Thoughtful Art of Integrative Family Therapy at BFI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhl, Frederick J.; Duhl, Bunny S.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the "structured spontaneity" approach to family therapy training at the Boston Family Institute as it exists after ten years, considering the context of training as well as the flavor of the program. Reward for trainers is a kind of competent and creative independent thinking, focused on unjamming a deadlocked system.…

  20. Competency-Based Training: Objective Structured Clinical Exercises (OSCE) in Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.

    2010-01-01

    The field of marriage and family therapy (MFT) has recently engaged in the process of defining core competencies for the profession. Many MFT training programs are adapting their curriculum to develop more competency-based training strategies. The Objective Structured Clinical "Examination" (OSCE) is widely used in the medical profession to assess…

  1. Effects of Structural Family Therapy on Child and Maternal Mental Health Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Addie; Greeno, Catherine G.; Marcus, Steven C.; Fusco, Rachel A.; Zimmerman, Tina; Anderson, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined the effect of structural family therapy (SFT) on children's impairment and depressive symptomatology and mothers' depressive symptomatology and anxiety for 31 families served by a community mental health clinic. Method: A one group predesign/postdesign, with a baseline and two follow-up time points, was used.…

  2. Structured Sensory Therapy (SITCAP-ART) for Traumatized Adjudicated Adolescents in Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raider, Melvyn C.; Steele, William; Delillo-Storey, Margaret; Jacobs, Jacqueline; Kuban, Caelan

    2008-01-01

    This randomized controlled study assessed the efficacy of a structured group therapy for traumatized, adjudicated adolescents in residential treatment. Youth were randomly assigned to a trauma intervention (SITCAP-ART) or to a waitlist/comparison group. The intervention included both sensory and cognitive/behavioral components. Standardized trauma…

  3. Teaching Interpersonal Skills to Psychiatric Outpatients: Using Structured Learning Therapy in a Community-Based Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprafkin, Robert P.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The Structured Learning Therapy (SLT), a type of treatment used to assist psychiatric patients to learn skills they need for effective and satisfying living in the community, is described in this article. A description of the community-based treatment facility in which SLT may be utilized and the results of the evaluation studies are also…

  4. Considering psychoeducation on structural dissociation for dialectical behavior therapy patients experiencing high-risk dissociative behaviors.

    PubMed

    Shabb, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) programs, particularly for low-functioning individuals at the safety and stabilization phase of therapy, work with a variety of high-risk and often complex cases, with a curriculum consisting primarily of concrete skill acquisition and application. A significant subset of individuals in DBT programs, however, may suffer high-risk dissociative episodes in which skill application may be less available to them, contributing to further destabilization, demoralization, and thoughts of self-inefficacy in treatment. This article evaluates the potential benefits of complementing traditional DBT with psychoeducation on structural dissociation for such patients, acknowledging and addressing some of the concerns that might accompany such a consideration.

  5. Does recall of a past music event invoke a reminiscence bump in young adults?

    PubMed

    Schubert, Emery

    2016-08-01

    Many studies of the reminiscence bump (RB) in music invoke memories from different autobiographical times by using stimulus specific prompts (SSPs). This study investigated the utility of a non-SSP paradigm to determine whether the RB would emerge when participants were asked to recall a single memorable musical event from "a time long ago". The presence of a RB in response to music has not been obtained in such a manner for younger participants. Eighty-eight 20-22 year olds reported music episodes that peaked when their autobiographical age was 13-14 years. Self-selected stimuli included a range of musical styles, including classical and non-Western pop forms, such as J-pop and K-pop, as well as generational pop music, such as the Beatles. However, most participants reported pop/rock music that was contemporaneous with encoding age, providing support for the utility of published SSP paradigms using pop music. Implications for and limitations of SSP paradigms are discussed. Participants were also asked to relate the selected musical piece to current musical tastes. Most participants liked the music that they selected, with many continuing to like the music, but most also reported a general broadening of their taste, consistent with developmental literature on open-earedness.

  6. Reminiscences of microcirculatory studies on application of acupuncture needles to the rabbit in vivo.

    PubMed

    Asano, Makishige

    2006-01-01

    One of the favorites of traditional oriental medical treatments with Japanese people may be acupuncture for various intractable and/or chronic symptoms caused by external insults such as bruises and thermal injuries. The present paper was aimed to reminisce our previous two works using a rabbit ear chamber technique on effects of experimental acupuncture upon basic behaviors of cutaneous microcirculation and their pathophysiological changes induced by topical thermal stimulation in cutaneous microvascular system in vivo. Application of a single acupuncture needle (32-gauge, silver) to the back of rabbits, corresponding to Geshu (B17) in human beings, showed an increased microvascular blood flow in parallel with augmentation of vasomotion. Daily application of respective three larger (32-gauge, silver) and smaller (0.12 mm in diameter and 4 mm in length, stainless steel) needles to fixed places of the back and ear lobe showed a notable acceleration of recovery from pathophysiological microcirculatory changes induced by the thermal stimulation such as hemorrhages and stases in accordance with restoration of vasomotion. Some implications of vasomotion in the curative effects of experimental acupuncture treatments were discussed from the microcirculatory point of view in conjunction with the clinical efficacy in human beings.

  7. Reminiscing my sixty year pursuit of the physics of the Sun and the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Eugene N.

    2014-01-01

    Reminiscing begins with childhood and passes on to student days through graduate school and the first real contact with research. Then early academic positions and stumbling efforts to pursue my ideas. The first significant progress came as a research associate with Prof. W. M. Elsasser at the University of Utah, beginning with an introduction to magnetohydrodynamics and the generation of the geomagnetic field through induction in the liquid metal core of Earth. A move to the University of Chicago to work with Prof. J. A. Simpson, on the implications of cosmic ray variations and interplanetary magnetic fields, led to the theory of coronal expansion and the solar wind and then to exploring the dynamical effects of cosmic rays on the galactic magnetic field. Spontaneous current sheets and intrinsic rapid reconnection in interlaced magnetic field line topologies were the next big project, leading up to retirement. Finally, it is a pleasure to recall my many associates, whose fresh thinking helped stimulate the daily research activities.

  8. The reminiscence bump in autobiographical memory and for public events: A comparison across different cueing methods.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Jonathan; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    The reminiscence bump has been found for both autobiographical memories and memories of public events. However, there have been few comparisons of the bump across each type of event. In the current study, therefore, we compared the bump for autobiographical memories versus the bump for memories of public events. We did so between-subjects, through two cueing methods administered within-subjects, the cue word method and the important memories method. For word-cued memories, we found a similar bump from ages 5 to 19 for both types of memories. However, the bump was more pronounced for autobiographical memories. For most important memories, we found a bump from ages 20 to 29 in autobiographical memory, but little discernible age pattern for public events. Rather, specific public events (e.g., the Fall of the Berlin Wall) dominated recall, producing a chronological distribution characterised by spikes in citations according to the years these events occurred. Follow-up analyses suggested that the bump in most important autobiographical memories was a function of the cultural life script. Our findings did not yield support for any of the dominant existing accounts of the bump as underlying the bump in word-cued memories.

  9. Monte Carlo modelling of photodynamic therapy treatments comparing clustered three dimensional tumour structures with homogeneous tissue structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. L.; Wood, K.; Brown, C. T. A.; Moseley, H.

    2016-07-01

    We explore the effects of three dimensional (3D) tumour structures on depth dependent fluence rates, photodynamic doses (PDD) and fluorescence images through Monte Carlo radiation transfer modelling of photodynamic therapy. The aim with this work was to compare the commonly used uniform tumour densities with non-uniform densities to determine the importance of including 3D models in theoretical investigations. It was found that fractal 3D models resulted in deeper penetration on average of therapeutic radiation and higher PDD. An increase in effective treatment depth of 1 mm was observed for one of the investigated fractal structures, when comparing to the equivalent smooth model. Wide field fluorescence images were simulated, revealing information about the relationship between tumour structure and the appearance of the fluorescence intensity. Our models indicate that the 3D tumour structure strongly affects the spatial distribution of therapeutic light, the PDD and the wide field appearance of surface fluorescence images.

  10. [Comparison of patient therapy adherence of two structural different memory clinics].

    PubMed

    Weih, M; Sulimma, A-K; Lehfeld, H; Niklewski, G; Sonnenberg, M; Richter-Schmidinger, T; Alexopoulos, P; Grässel, E; Kornhuber, J

    2009-04-01

    There are more than 100 memory clinics established in Germany, Austria and German-speaking Switzerland. We compared the impact of the structure of two German memory clinics (Erlangen and Nuremberg) on therapeutic outcome. 483 patients suffering from dementia with indication for antidementive therapy were included in this study. The data ascertainment included patient-related data, the mini mental score, comorbidity as well as psychiatric drug therapy. After a mean follow-up of 3.7 years, we performed a single cross-sectional survey covering over 90 % of patients to assess clinical course and adherence to therapy. The patients of the Erlangen University Memory Clinic were significantly younger (69.8 +/- 9.49 vs. 74.6 +/- 10.7 years; p = 0.01) and had a better mini mental score at their first presentation (20.9 +/- 9.4 vs. 19.5 +/- 5.9; p = 0.02). They showed a non-significantly faster disease progression (as measured by mini mental decline per year), than the patients from Nuremberg. Concerning the allocation of diagnosis, more late onset-dementias and dementias of a mixed type were treated at the Nuremberg clinic. At the university clinic, more dementias were of unclassified origin. Concomitant drug therapies, death rates and therapy adherence (53 %) were not different between the two clinics. The two memory clinics under investigation differed in patient age, disease severity and diagnostic assessment. Still, parameters of therapeutic outcome showed converging results.

  11. Structure and Function of the Non-Structural Protein of Dengue Virus and its Applications in Antiviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qian; Zhang, Bao; Yu, JianHai; Wu, Qinghua; Yang, Fangji; Cao, Hong; Zhao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever, a type of global and tropical infectious disease, and its prevention has become a challenging issue worldwide. Antibody-dependent enhancement effects and the virus pathogenic mechanism have not yet been fully elucidated, hindering the development of dengue fever prevention and suitable drug treatment. There is currently no specific prevention and therapy in clinical trials, however, in recent years, studies have focused on the pathogenesis and treatment of dengue. Research focusing on dengue virus nonstructural protein in special drugs for the prevention and control of dengue fever is a new progress leading to improved understanding regarding the prevention and control of dengue fever and suitable drugs for the treatment. The main challenges regarding the structure of dengue virus nonstructural protein and the drugs for antiviral therapy are summarized in this paper.

  12. Recent Advances in Understanding the Reminiscence Bump: The Importance of Cues in Guiding Recall from Autobiographical Memory.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Jonathan; Rubin, David C

    2016-04-01

    The reminiscence bump is the increased proportion of autobiographical memories from youth and early adulthood observed in adults over 40. It is one of the most robust findings in autobiographical memory research. Although described as a single period of increased memories, a recent meta-analysis which reported the beginning and ending ages of the bump from individual studies found that different classes of cues produce distinct bumps that vary in size and temporal location. The bump obtained in response to cue words is both smaller and located earlier in the lifespan than the bump obtained when important memories are requested. The bump obtained in response to odor cues is even earlier. This variation in the size and location of the reminiscence bump argues for theories based primarily on retrieval rather than encoding and retention, which most current theories stress. Furthermore, it points to the need to develop theories of autobiographical memory that account for this flexibility in the memories retrieved.

  13. Recent Advances in Understanding the Reminiscence Bump: The Importance of Cues in Guiding Recall from Autobiographical Memory

    PubMed Central

    Koppel, Jonathan; Rubin, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The reminiscence bump is the increased proportion of autobiographical memories from youth and early adulthood observed in adults over 40. It is one of the most robust findings in autobiographical memory research. Although described as a single period of increased memories, a recent meta-analysis which reported the beginning and ending ages of the bump from individual studies found that different classes of cues produce distinct bumps that vary in size and temporal location. The bump obtained in response to cue words is both smaller and located earlier in the lifespan than the bump obtained when important memories are requested. The bump obtained in response to odor cues is even earlier. This variation in the size and location of the reminiscence bump argues for theories based primarily on retrieval rather than encoding and retention, which most current theories stress. Furthermore, it points to the need to develop theories of autobiographical memory that account for this flexibility in the memories retrieved. PMID:27141156

  14. Sticking out and fitting in: culture-specific predictors of 3-year-olds' autobiographical memories during joint reminiscing.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Lisa; Kärtner, Joscha; Keller, Heidi; Chaudhary, Nandita

    2012-12-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between mother-child interaction styles with 19 months and children's autobiographical memory with 3 years of age in two cultural contexts: New Delhi, India (n = 25) and Berlin, Germany (n = 33). Results demonstrate similarities as well as culture specificities. In both contexts, maternal elaborations during reminiscing were related to children's memory contributions. Over time, maternal support for toddlers' self-expression during free play at 19 months predicted their children's memory elaborations at 3 years in the Berlin context. In the Delhi context, toddlers' willingness to carry out their mothers' requests at 19 months predicted their memory elaborations at 3 years. These results suggest different motivational bases underlying children's autobiographical memory contributions during mother-child reminiscing related to different cultural orientations.

  15. Life Review: Implementation, Theory, Research, and Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    2006-01-01

    A selective literature review of publications on life review generated ideas on implementation, theory, research, and therapy. The review begins by differentiating life review from reminiscence, and summarizing ways to conduct a life review. A dozen theories that have been influenced by the life review technique are presented, with a focus placed…

  16. Life Review: Implementation, Theory, Research, and Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    2006-01-01

    A selective literature review of publications on life review generated ideas on implementation, theory, research, and therapy. The review begins by differentiating life review from reminiscence, and summarizing ways to conduct a life review. A dozen theories that have been influenced by the life review technique are presented, with a focus placed…

  17. Let's kōrero (talk): the practice and functions of reminiscing among mothers and children in Māori families.

    PubMed

    Reese, Elaine; Neha, Tia

    2015-01-01

    Māori adults recall earlier memories than New Zealand European or Chinese adults, highlighting the importance of memory in Māori culture. In this study, Māori preschool children and their mothers (N = 41) reminisced about a diverse range of past events, including everyday events, the child's birth, cultural rituals and the child's misbehaviour. Mothers also reported how frequently they discussed past events with their children, as well as their level of affiliation with Māori culture. Mothers who reported higher levels of cultural affiliation also reported reminiscing more frequently about a diverse range of past events. Mothers reminisced in more elaborative ways about everyday events with their children compared to birth stories, cultural rituals and misbehaviours. Maternal reminiscing about cultural rituals and misbehaviours, however, along with maternal reminiscing about everyday events and birth stories, were significantly correlated with children's memory across conversations. These results underscore the continued importance of reminiscing about culturally relevant events in Māori culture, and the newfound importance for Māori families of reminiscing about everyday events.

  18. [Reminiscence with different types of autobiographical memories: Effects on the reduction of depressive symptomatology in old age].

    PubMed

    Afonso, Rosa; Bueno, Belén

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the role of the type of autobiographical memories reported by an individual reminiscence program to explain the decrease of depressive symptomatology found in elderly Portuguese people. A quasi-experimental design was used with pre- and post-test evaluations of the type of autobiographical memories. In this study, participants were 90 people over 65 years old with depressive symptoms, no antidepressive medication, and no signs of dementia. The participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: experimental group (exposed to the program), control group or placebo-control group. The results of the study indicated that, in the participants of the experimental group, along with significant improvements in depressive symptomatology, significant increase in the number of specific autobiographical memories and positive autobiographical memories was recorded. The study also stresses the strong negative associations between depressive symptomatology and the specificity of the memories and their positive nature. The recovery and reconstruction of specific positive and negative autobiographical memories, using the reminiscence program, may be inherent to the reminiscence program developed that explain its efficiency as a therapeutic tool for psychological intervention aimed at the reduction of depressive symptomatology in old age.

  19. Celebrating fifty years of research and applications in reminiscence and life review: state of the art and new directions.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Gerben J; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T

    2014-04-01

    Fifty years ago, psychiatrist Robert Butler (1963) published an influential article on the recollection and evaluation of personal memories in later life. We discuss the major insights and applications in psychological gerontology that were inspired by Butler. Reminiscence and life review serve to create bonds between people, to cope with important life events, and to attribute meaning to life. We discuss a heuristic framework that relates reminiscence and life review to individual and contextual characteristics as well as to psychological resources and mental health and well-being. The increasing evidence is discussed that different types of interventions can effectively promote mental health and well-being in later life. We propose that processes of reminiscence and life review need further study. This can partly be achieved within the current research tradition by longitudinal studies and good trials that also address the processes accounting for effects of interventions. Synergy with psychological studies on autobiographical remembering and life stories will provide further innovation in the field, as these studies provide new methods and evidence of processes linked to the recollection and evaluation of personal memories. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Bone marrow and cortical bone structures].

    PubMed

    Schernberg, A; Hennequin, C

    2017-10-01

    In patients undergoing external radiation therapy, bone marrow and cortical bone structures are all often neglected as organs at risk. Still, from increased febrile neutropenia risk in patients undergoing chemoradiation for a pelvic tumour to increased risk of vertebral fracture when undergoing hypofractioned stereotactic radiotherapy of a spinal metastasis, adverse effects are frequent and sometimes serious. This literature review first defines the rules for contouring these structures, then the dose constraints currently recommended. This article focuses first on conventional irradiation or intensity modulation radiotherapy considering classical fractionation. Secondly, it focuses on stereotactic radiotherapy. The considered organs will be haematopoietic structures, and bone cortical structures. Current recommendations are summarised in a table. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Developmental trajectories of amphibian microbiota: response to bacterial therapy depends on initial community structure.

    PubMed

    Davis, Leyla R; Bigler, Laurent; Woodhams, Douglas C

    2017-02-22

    Improving host health through microbial manipulation requires untangling factors that shape the microbiome. There is currently little understanding of how initial community structure may drive the microbiota trajectory across host development or influence bacterial therapy outcomes. Probiotic baths of surface symbionts, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Flavobacterium johnsoniae were administered to 240 tadpoles of the midwife toad, Alytes obstetricans in semi-natural outdoor mesocosms originating from geographically and genetically distinct populations in Switzerland. Host bacterial and fungal assemblages were compared in tadpoles from the pond of origin, across metamorphosis, and in toadlets via microbial fingerprinting. Bacterial and fungal community structures differed significantly among populations and a microbial population signature persisted from the tadpole stage, through metamorphosis, and following probiotic treatment. A minimal core surface microbiota is described by persistence through development and by shared membership across populations. The impact of F. johnsoniae on the tadpole surface microbiome was assessed with shotgun metagenomics. Bacterial therapy reduced abundance, diversity, and functional repertoire compared to untreated controls. A correlation between host skin peptides and microbiota suggests a mechanism of host-directed symbiosis throughout development. Early developmental stages are ideal targets for amphibian bacterial therapy that can govern a microbiome trajectory at critical timepoints and may impact susceptibility to disease.

  2. Optimizing insulin pump therapy: the potential advantages of using a structured diabetes management program.

    PubMed

    Lange, Karin; Ziegler, Ralph; Neu, Andreas; Reinehr, Thomas; Daab, Iris; Walz, Marion; Maraun, Michael; Schnell, Oliver; Kulzer, Bernhard; Reichel, Andreas; Heinemann, Lutz; Parkin, Christopher G; Haak, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy improves glycemic control, reduces hypoglycemia and increases treatment satisfaction in individuals with diabetes. As a number of patient- and clinician-related factors can hinder the effectiveness and optimal usage of CSII therapy, new approaches are needed to address these obstacles. Ceriello and colleagues recently proposed a model of care that incorporates the collaborative use of structured SMBG into a formal approach to personalized diabetes management within all diabetes populations. We adapted this model for use in CSII-treated patients in order to enable the implementation of a workflow structure that enhances patient-physician communication and supports patients' diabetes self-management skills. We recognize that time constraints and current reimbursement policies pose significant challenges to healthcare providers integrating the Personalised Diabetes Management (PDM) process into clinical practice. We believe, however, that the time invested in modifying practice workflow and learning to apply the various steps of the PDM process will be offset by improved workflow and more effective patient consultations. This article describes how to implement PDM into clinical practice as a systematic, standardized process that can optimize CSII therapy.

  3. Toward Repurposing Metformin as a Precision Anti-Cancer Therapy Using Structural Systems Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Thomas; Dider, Shihab; Han, Weiwei; Xu, Hua; Zhao, Zhongming; Xie, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, a drug prescribed to treat type-2 diabetes, exhibits anti-cancer effects in a portion of patients, but the direct molecular and genetic interactions leading to this pleiotropic effect have not yet been fully explored. To repurpose metformin as a precision anti-cancer therapy, we have developed a novel structural systems pharmacology approach to elucidate metformin’s molecular basis and genetic biomarkers of action. We integrated structural proteome-scale drug target identification with network biology analysis by combining structural genomic, functional genomic, and interactomic data. Through searching the human structural proteome, we identified twenty putative metformin binding targets and their interaction models. We experimentally verified the interactions between metformin and our top-ranked kinase targets. Notably, kinases, particularly SGK1 and EGFR were identified as key molecular targets of metformin. Subsequently, we linked these putative binding targets to genes that do not directly bind to metformin but whose expressions are altered by metformin through protein-protein interactions, and identified network biomarkers of phenotypic response of metformin. The molecular targets and the key nodes in genetic networks are largely consistent with the existing experimental evidence. Their interactions can be affected by the observed cancer mutations. This study will shed new light into repurposing metformin for safe, effective, personalized therapies. PMID:26841718

  4. Non-swarming grasshoppers exhibit density-dependent phenotypic plasticity reminiscent of swarming locusts.

    PubMed

    Gotham, Steven; Song, Hojun

    2013-11-01

    Locusts are well known for exhibiting an extreme form of density-dependent phenotypic plasticity known as locust phase polyphenism. At low density, locust nymphs are cryptically colored and shy, but at high density they transform into conspicuously colored and gregarious individuals. Most of what we know about locust phase polyphenism come from the study of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria (Forskål), which is a devastating pest species affecting many countries in North Africa and the Middle East. The desert locust belongs to the grasshopper genus Schistocerca Stål, which includes mostly non-swarming, sedentary species. Recent phylogenetic studies suggest that the desert locust is the earliest branching lineage within Schistocerca, which raises a possibility that the presence of density-dependent phenotypic plasticity may be a plesiomorphic trait for the whole genus. In order to test this idea, we have quantified the effect of rearing density in terms of the resulting behavior, color, and morphology in two non-swarming Schistocerca species native to Florida. When reared in both isolated and crowded conditions, the two non-swarming species, Schistocerca americana (Drury) and Schistocerca serialis cubense (Saussure) clearly exhibited plastic reaction norms in all traits measured, which were reminiscent of the desert locust. Specifically, we found that both species were more active and more attracted to each other when reared in a crowded condition than in isolation. They were mainly bright green in color when isolated, but developed strong black patterns and conspicuous background colors when crowded. We found a strong effect of rearing density in terms of size. There were also more mechanoreceptor hairs on the outer face of the hind femora in the crowded nymphs in both species. Although both species responded similarly, there were some clear species-specific differences in terms of color and behavior. Furthermore, we compare and contrast our findings with

  5. Combination radiation-adriamycin therapy: renoprival growth, functional and structural effects in the immature mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, S.S.; Moskowitz, P.S.; Canty, E.L.; Fajardo, L.F.

    1980-07-01

    The normal tissue effects of radiation-adriamycin combination therapy were studied in the renoprival weanling mouse in an attempt to determine whether compensatory renal growth inhibition from radiation and chemotherapy could be associated with structural or functional abnormalities. Weanling BLc/sub Fl/ mice underwent unilateral nephrectomy, then single fraction renal irradiation, LD 1/21 doses of adriamycin in 5 daily doses, or combination therapy with radiation and adriamycin. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 12, and 24 weeks. Compensatory renal growth, body growth, serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and renal morphology by light microscopy were evaluated. Significant compensatory renal growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy exceeded that produced by adriamycin alone and radiation alone, at all time periods (p < 0.005). Body growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy or adriamycin alone significantly exceeded that produced by radiation alone (p < 0.005). Kidney and body growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy was proportionately severe. Kidney growth inhibition proportionately exceeded body growth inhibition with radiation alone; body growth inhibition proportionately exceeded kidney growth inhibition with adriamycin alone. Comparable azotemia developed by 24 weeks in both the radiation alone (p < .005) and radiation-adriamycin animals (p < 0.005), but not in the adriamycin only animals. Morphologic alterations consisting of increased glomerular density, tubular atrophy, and stromal fibrosis occurred with greater severity in the radiation-adriamycin animals than in the radiation only animals by 24 weeks; no alterations were seen in the adriamycin only animals. Using histologic criteria 750 rad plus adriamycin produced comparable injury as seen with 1000 rad alone, thus adriamycin produced an apparent dose-modifying factor of 1.33.

  6. Estimating antihypertensive effects of combination therapy in an observational study using marginal structural models.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Masahiro; Kushiro, Toshio; Saito, Ikuo; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Hiramatsu, Katsutoshi

    2009-10-01

    The evaluation of the antihypertensive effect of multiple antihypertensive drugs using data from an observational study requires adjustment for time-dependent confounders. Marginal structural models (MSMs) have been proposed to address this type of confounding through inverse probability weighting. Generally, the probabilities are estimated using logistic regression models that assume linearity between the logistic link and the predictors, but the linearity might be inaccurate. In this article, we proposed MSMs to assess the blood pressure-lowering effects of combination therapy with olmesartan medoxomil (OLM) plus calcium channel blockers (CCB) (OLM+CCB) in an observational study of OLM, and extended estimation methods of the probabilities for the MSMs using generalized additive models (GAMs). The estimation using GAMs was suggested to improve the balance of the distributions of confounder values between the therapy groups in the pseudo-population. We obtained estimated changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) for OLM+CCB combination therapy after 12 wk compared with OLM monotherapy of -4.3 mmHg (95% confidence interval (CI): -7.7 and -0.9 mmHg) and -2.9 mmHg (95% CI: -5.1 and -0.7 mmHg), respectively. The estimated target BP (SBP<140 mmHg and DBP<90 mmHg) achievement rates for OLM+CCB combination therapy and OLM monotherapy were 62.0 and 46.7%, respectively. The results of the MSMs were closer to those in the randomized controlled trial, such as the combination of OLM and amlodipine besylate in controlling high blood pressure study, than those of conventional methods. The proposed MSMs provided useful information to evaluate the effects of combination therapy of antihypertensive drugs in the context of an observational study.

  7. Brain effects of cognitive remediation therapy in schizophrenia: a structural and functional neuroimaging study.

    PubMed

    Penadés, Rafael; Pujol, Nuria; Catalán, Rosa; Massana, Guillem; Rametti, Giuseppina; García-Rizo, Clemente; Bargalló, Nuria; Gastó, Cristóbal; Bernardo, Miquel; Junqué, Carme

    2013-05-15

    Cognitive remediation therapy positively affects cognition and daily functioning in patients with schizophrenia. However, studies on the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of this treatment are scarce. The aim of the current study was to investigate functional and structural connectivity brain changes in schizophrenia patients after cognitive remediation therapy using a whole-brain approach that combined functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. A randomized controlled trial with 30 schizophrenia outpatients and 15 healthy volunteers. A strategy-learning-based treatment was used as a cognitive remediation therapy. A social skills training that provides useful information about illness management was used as an active control. We investigated changes in the pattern of functional connectivity assessed during an n-back task by tensorial independent component analysis as implemented in the multivariate exploratory linear decomposition into independent components and in the fractional anisotropy index of white matter integrity using tract-based spatial statistics. Brain networks activation pattern significantly changed in patients exposed to the cognitive treatment in the sense of normalizing toward the patterns observed in healthy control subjects. Additionally, in white matter, they showed an increase in fractional anisotropy index in the anterior part of the genu of the corpus callosum. Cognitive improvement, functional, and also structural changes showed statistically significant correlations. Improvement in brain functioning detected after cognitive remediation therapy in schizophrenia patients might be based on an increase of the interhemispheric information transfer between the bilateral prefrontal cortexes via the corpus callosum. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Human β-glucuronidase: structure, function, and application in enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Islam, Asimul; Waheed, Abdul; Sly, William S; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Imtaiyaz

    2013-10-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases occur due to incomplete metabolic degradation of macromolecules by various hydrolytic enzymes in the lysosome. Despite structural differences, most of the lysosomal enzymes share many common features including a lysosomal targeting motif and phosphotransferase recognition sites. β-Glucuronidase (GUSB) is an important lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of glucuronate-containing glycosaminoglycan. The deficiency of GUSB causes mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPSVII), leading to lysosomal storage in the brain. GUSB is a well-studied protein for its expression, sequence, structure, and function. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of sequence, structure, function, and evolution of GUSB and its lysosomal enzyme targeting. Enzyme replacement therapy reported for this protein is also discussed.

  9. Improvements in Bone Density and Structure during Anti-TNF-α Therapy in Pediatric Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thayu, Meena; Baldassano, Robert N.; DeBoer, Mark D.; Zemel, Babette S.; Denburg, Michelle R.; Denson, Lee A.; Shults, Justine; Herskovitz, Rita; Long, Jin; Leonard, Mary B.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Pediatric Crohn's Disease (CD) is associated with deficits in trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) and cortical structure, potentially related to TNF-α effects to decrease bone formation and promote bone resorption. Objective: This study aimed to examine changes in bone density and structure in children and adolescents with CD following initiation of anti-TNF-α therapy. Design and Participants: Participants (n = 74; age 5–21 years) with CD completed a 12-month prospective cohort study. Main Outcome Measures: Tibia peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans were obtained at initiation of anti-TNF-α therapy and 12 months later. Musculoskeletal outcomes were expressed as sex-and race-specific z scores relative to age, based on >650 reference participants. Results: At baseline, CD participants had lower height, trabecular BMD, cortical area (due to smaller periosteal and larger endocortical circumferences), and muscle area z scores, compared with reference participants (all P < .01). Pediatric CD activity index decreased during the 10-week induction (P < .001), in association with subsequent gains in height, trabecular BMD, cortical area (due to recovery of endocortical bone), and muscle area z scores over 12 months (height P < .05; others P < .001). Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase levels, a biomarker of bone formation, increased a median of 75% (P < .001) during induction with associated 12-month improvements in trabecular BMD and cortical area z scores (both P < .001). Younger age was associated with greater increases in trabecular BMD z scores (P < .001) and greater linear growth with greater recovery of cortical area (P < .001). Conclusions: Anti-TNF-α therapy was associated with improvements in trabecular BMD and cortical structure. Improvements were greater in younger and growing participants, suggesting a window of opportunity for treatment of bone deficits. PMID:25919459

  10. Improvements in Bone Density and Structure during Anti-TNF-α Therapy in Pediatric Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Lindsay M; Thayu, Meena; Baldassano, Robert N; DeBoer, Mark D; Zemel, Babette S; Denburg, Michelle R; Denson, Lee A; Shults, Justine; Herskovitz, Rita; Long, Jin; Leonard, Mary B

    2015-07-01

    Pediatric Crohn's Disease (CD) is associated with deficits in trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) and cortical structure, potentially related to TNF-α effects to decrease bone formation and promote bone resorption. This study aimed to examine changes in bone density and structure in children and adolescents with CD following initiation of anti-TNF-α therapy. Participants (n = 74; age 5-21 years) with CD completed a 12-month prospective cohort study. Tibia peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans were obtained at initiation of anti-TNF-α therapy and 12 months later. Musculoskeletal outcomes were expressed as sex-and race-specific z scores relative to age, based on >650 reference participants. At baseline, CD participants had lower height, trabecular BMD, cortical area (due to smaller periosteal and larger endocortical circumferences), and muscle area z scores, compared with reference participants (all P < .01). Pediatric CD activity index decreased during the 10-week induction (P < .001), in association with subsequent gains in height, trabecular BMD, cortical area (due to recovery of endocortical bone), and muscle area z scores over 12 months (height P < .05; others P < .001). Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase levels, a biomarker of bone formation, increased a median of 75% (P < .001) during induction with associated 12-month improvements in trabecular BMD and cortical area z scores (both P < .001). Younger age was associated with greater increases in trabecular BMD z scores (P < .001) and greater linear growth with greater recovery of cortical area (P < .001). Anti-TNF-α therapy was associated with improvements in trabecular BMD and cortical structure. Improvements were greater in younger and growing participants, suggesting a window of opportunity for treatment of bone deficits.

  11. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats

    PubMed Central

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  12. Teaching ill-structured problem solving using occupational therapy practice epistemology.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Anita Witt

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epistemic and ontological cognition (EOC) have to do with an individual's beliefs about knowledge and knowing. Research has shown that EOC have an influence on learning and achievement. EOC may be discipline-specific with a profession being defined by its practice epistemology. If an individual's EOC is inconsistent with the profession's practice epistemology, the student or practitioner may struggle with effectively solving ill-structured occupational performance problems. The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of the constructs of EOC, to describe its importance to occupational therapy education and practice, and to provide recommendations for educators and researchers. Specific examples are detailed and recommendations for future research are proposed.

  13. Structural Insights on the Role of Antibodies in HIV-1 Vaccine and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    West, Anthony P.; Scharf, Louise; Scheid, Johannes F.; Klein, Florian; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite 30 years of effort, there is no effective vaccine for HIV-1. However, antibodies can prevent HIV-1 infection in humanized mice and macaques when passively transferred. New single-cell-based methods have uncovered many broad and potent donor-derived antibodies, and structural studies have revealed the molecular bases for their activities. The new data suggest why such antibodies are difficult to elicit and inform HIV-1 vaccine development efforts. In addition to protecting against infection, the newly identified antibodies can suppress active infections in mice and macaques, suggesting they could be valuable additions to anti-HIV-1 therapies and to strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection. PMID:24529371

  14. Flexibility and structure may enhance implementation of family-focused therapy in community mental health settings.

    PubMed

    Chung, Bowen; Mikesell, Lisa; Miklowitz, David

    2014-10-01

    This study elicited provider and administrator preferences in implementing an evidence-based practice (EBP) for bipolar disorder or psychosis, family-focused therapy (FFT). Providers (n = 35) and administrators (n = 5) from three community mental health centers took part in FFT training and participated in pre- and post-training focus groups. Transcripts were examined using conventional content analysis. Providers and administrators discussed barriers to implementing EBPs. Successful EBPs were described as incorporating flexibility and close supervision to maximize provider adherence. Providers expressed preferences for structured EBPs like FFT that have both explicit implementation steps and built-in flexibility.

  15. Blood pressure, arterial function, structure, and aging: the role of hormonal replacement therapy in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Scuteri, Angelo; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of natural menopause may indicate that a woman is entering a period of increased risk for cardiovascular disease, due to both chronologic aging and lower levels of estrogen. This brief review aims to demonstrate the relevance of changes in blood pressure and large artery structure and function occurring after menopause. These changes, i.e., thickening and stiffening of large arteries (which, in turn would also result in increased systolic and pulse pressures), were found to predict subsequent cardiovascular events, independently of other known cardiovascular risk. The benefits of early hormone replacement therapy on the life expectancy of women have dramatically lost consensus since publication of the Womens Health Initiative study results. However, the authors believe that those results should increase the attention paid by clinicians and public health researchers to the individualization of hormone replacement therapy prescription for postmenopausal women, and to a better characterization of those vascular parameters and profiles identifying postmenopausal women who are most likely to benefit from specific hormone replacement therapy in terms of cardiovascular protection.

  16. Differentiating incretin therapies based on structure, activity, and metabolism: focus on liraglutide.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Samuel

    2009-12-01

    The incretin effect, mediated by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), plays an important role in the regulation of insulin secretion in response to oral glucose. The discovery of deficiencies in incretin pathways associated with development of type 2 diabetes mellitus has propelled the growth of incretin-based therapies in patients with this disease. The basic rationale for incretin-based therapies, including both GLP-1-receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors is reviewed, focusing on their roles in glucose regulation and potential therapeutic benefits. Increased awareness of the differences among incretin mimetics, GLP-1 analogs, and DPP-4 inhibitors, including their structures, half-lives, dosages, hemoglobin A(1c)-lowering capacities, effects on weight, and adverse events will help shape the future of these therapeutic agents. Improved understanding of the mechanism of action and clinical effects of incretin-based therapies will help advance their appropriate use within clinical practice.

  17. Hormonal therapy in the senescence: Prostatic microenvironment structure and adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Montico, Fábio; Hetzl, Amanda Cia; Cândido, Eduardo Marcelo; Fávaro, Wagner José; Cagnon, Valéria Helena Alves

    2011-08-01

    Hormonal replacement has been utilized to minimize the harmful effects of hormonal imbalance in elderly men. The development and progression of prostatic diseases and their relation to hormone therapy is still unclear. Thus, the aim herewith was to characterize the structure and dystroglycan molecule (DGs) reactivities in the ventral prostatic lobe from elderly rats submitted to steroid hormone replacement. Male rats (Sprague-Dawley) were divided into one Young group and six senile groups. The Young group (YNG) (4 months old) received peanut oil (5mL/kg, s.c.). The senile rats (10 months old) were submitted to the following treatments: Senile group (SEN) (5mL/kg peanut oil, s.c.); Testosterone group (TEST) (5mg/kg testosterone cipionate, s.c.); Estrogen group (EST) (25μg/kg 17β-estradiol, s.c.); Castrated group (CAS) (surgical castration); Castrated-Testosterone (CT) (surgical castration and treatment similar to TEST group); and Castrated-Estrogen (CE) (surgical castration and treatment similar to EST group). After 30 days treatment, blood samples were collected for hormonal analysis and ventral prostate samples were processed for light and transmission electron microscopies, morphometrical analysis, immunohistochemistry and Western Blotting. The results showed decreased serum testosterone levels in the senescence and increased testosterone and estrogen plasmatic levels after hormone administration in the TEST and EST groups, respectively, highlighting the therapy efficiency. Hypertrophied stroma and inflammatory cells were verified in the SEN group. After hormone replacement in the senescence or following castration, atrophic epithelium, epithelial cells with clear cytoplasmic halo around the nucleus, microacini and maintenance of hypertrophied stroma were seen. Decreased DG levels were verified in the senescence. After hormonal therapy, increased protein levels of these molecules were observed, especially in those groups which received estradiol. Thus, the

  18. Structural-functional brain changes in depressed patients during and after electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Yrondi, Antoine; Péran, Patrice; Sauvaget, Anne; Schmitt, Laurent; Arbus, Christophe

    2016-11-23

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a non-pharmacological treatment that is effective in treating severe and treatment-resistant depression. Although the efficacy of ECT has been demonstrated to treat major depressive disorder (MDD), the brain mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. Structural-functional changes occur with the use of ECT as a treatment for depression based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this reason, we have tried to identify the changes that were identified by MRI to try to clarify some operating mechanisms of ECT. We focus to brain changes on MRI [structural MRI (sMRI), functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imging (DTI)] after ECT. A systematic search of the international literature was performed using the bibliographic search engines PubMed and Embase. The research focused on papers published up to 30 September 2015. The following Medical Subject Headings (MESH) terms were used: electroconvulsive therapy AND (MRI OR fMRI OR DTI). Papers published in English were included. Four authors searched the database using a predefined strategy to identify potentially eligible studies. There were structural changes according to the sMRI performed before and after ECT treatment. These changes do not seem to be entirely due to oedema. This investigation assessed the functional network connectivity associated with the ECT response in MDD. ECT response reverses the relationship from negative to positive between the two pairs of networks. We found structural-functional changes in MRI post-ECT. Because of the currently limited MRI data on ECT in the literature, it is necessary to conduct further investigations using other MRI technology.

  19. Knowledge-based system for structured examination, diagnosis and therapy in treatment of traumatised teeth.

    PubMed

    Robertson, A; Norén, J G

    2001-02-01

    Dental trauma in children and adolescents is a common problem, and the prevalence of these injuries has increased in the last 10-20 years. A dental injury should always be considered an emergency and, thus, be treated immediately to relieve pain, facilitate reduction of displaced teeth, reconstruct lost hard tissue, and improve prognosis. Rational therapy depends upon a correct diagnosis, which can be achieved with the aid of various examination techniques. It must be understood that an incomplete examination can lead to inaccurate diagnosis and less successful treatment. Good knowledge of traumatology and models of treatments can also reduce stress and anxiety for both the patient and the dental team. Knowledge-based Systems (KBS) are a practical implementation of Artificial Intelligence. In complex domains which humans find difficult to understand, KBS can assist in making decisions and can also add knowledge. The aim of this paper is to describe the structure of a knowledge-based system for structured examination, diagnosis and therapy for traumatised primary and permanent teeth. A commercially available program was used as developmental tool for the programming (XpertRule, Attar, London, UK). The paper presents a model for a computerised decision support system for traumatology.

  20. Not all semantics: similarities and differences in reminiscing function and content between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

    PubMed

    Nile, Emma; Van Bergen, Penny

    2015-01-01

    This study explored why and how Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians remember the past. Indigenous Australians traditionally share a strong oral tradition in which customs, personal and cultural histories, and other narratives are passed across groups and between generations by word of mouth. Drawing on this tradition, in which inherent value is placed on sharing knowledge and maintaining connectedness with others, we hypothesised that Indigenous Australians would be more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to report reminiscing to fulfil social functions (but not self or directive functions). Furthermore, we hypothesised that Indigenous Australians would recall personal past experiences more elaborately than would non-Indigenous Australians. In Study 1, 33 Indigenous Australians and 76 non-Indigenous Australians completed Webster's Reminiscence Functions Scale. As predicted, Indigenous participants reported higher scores on subscales related to social functions than did non-Indigenous Australians: particularly "Teach/Inform" and "Intimacy Maintenance". They also scored higher on the "Identity" subscale. In Study 2, 15 Indigenous and 14 non-Indigenous Australians shared three memories from the distant and recent past. While Indigenous and non-Indigenous narratives did not differ in either emotion or elaboration, Indigenous Australians provided more memory context and detail by including a greater proportion of semantic memory content. Taken together, these findings suggest differences in both why and how Australians remember.

  1. A Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study in Transgender Persons on Cross-Sex Hormone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Sven C; Landré, Lionel; Wierckx, Katrien; T'Sjoen, Guy

    2017-01-01

    To date, research findings are inconsistent about whether the neuroanatomy in transgender persons resembles that of their natal sex or their gender identity. Moreover, few studies have examined the effects of long-term cross-sex hormonal treatment on neuroanatomy in this cohort. The purpose of the present study was to examine neuroanatomical differences in transgender persons after prolonged cross-sex hormone therapy. Eighteen transgender men (female-to-male), 17 transgender women (male-to-female), 30 nontransgender men (natal men), and 27 nontransgender women (natal women) completed a high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging scan at 3 T. Eligibility criteria for transgender persons were gender-affirming surgery and at least 2 years of cross-sex hormone therapy. Exclusion criteria for nontransgender persons were presence of psychiatric or neurological disorders. The mean neuroanatomical volume for the amygdala, putamen, and corpus callosum differed between transgender women and natal women but not between transgender women and natal men. Differences between transgender men and natal men were found in several brain structures, including the medial temporal lobe structures and cerebellum. Differences between transgender men and natal women were found in the medial temporal lobe, nucleus accumbens, and 3rd ventricle. Sexual dimorphism between nontransgender men and women included larger cerebellar volumes and a smaller anterior corpus callosum in natal men than in natal women. The results remained stable after correcting for additional factors including age, total intracranial volume, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Neuroanatomical differences were region specific between transgender persons and their natal sex as well as their gender identity, raising the possibility of a localized influence of sex hormones on neuroanatomy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. A structured patient identification model for medication therapy management services in a community pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Gina M; Groves, Brigid K; Kuhn, Catherine H; Porter, Kyle; Mehta, Bella H

    To describe the development and implementation of a structured patient identification model for medication therapy management (MTM) services within traditional dispensing activities of a community pharmacy to facilitate pharmacist-provided completion of MTM services. A daily clinical opportunity report was developed as a structured model to identify MTM opportunities daily for all MTM-eligible patients expecting to pick up a prescription. Pharmacy staff was trained and the standardized model was implemented at study sites. One hundred nineteen grocery store-based community pharmacies throughout Ohio, West Virginia, and Michigan. A structured patient identification model in a community pharmacy consists of reviewing a clinical opportunity report, identifying interventions for MTM-eligible patients, and possibly collaborating with an interdisciplinary team. This model allows pharmacists to increase MTM cases performed by providing a structured process for identifying MTM-eligible patients and completing MTM services. The development and implementation of a structured patient identification model in the community pharmacy was completed and consists of pharmacists reviewing a clinical opportunity report to identify MTM opportunities and perform clinical interventions for patients. In a 3-month pre- and post-implementation comparison, there was a 49% increase in the number of MTM services provided by pharmacists (P < 0.001). A structured patient identification model in the community pharmacy was associated with an increase in the amount of MTM services provided by pharmacists. This method could be a useful tool at a variety of community pharmacies to solve challenges associated with MTM completion. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Confirming, Validating, and Norming the Factor Structure of Systemic Therapy Inventory of Change Initial and Intersession.

    PubMed

    Pinsof, William M; Zinbarg, Richard E; Shimokawa, Kenichi; Latta, Tara A; Goldsmith, Jacob Z; Knobloch-Fedders, Lynne M; Chambers, Anthony L; Lebow, Jay L

    2015-09-01

    Progress or feedback research tracks and feeds back client progress data throughout the course of psychotherapy. In the effort to empirically ground psychotherapeutic practice, feedback research is both a complement and alternative to empirically supported manualized treatments. Evidence suggests that tracking and feeding back progress data with individual or nonsystemic feedback systems improves outcomes in individual and couple therapy. The research reported in this article pertains to the STIC(®) (Systemic Therapy Inventory of Change)-the first client-report feedback system designed to empirically assess and track change within client systems from multisystemic and multidimensional perspectives in individual, couple, and family therapy. Clients complete the STIC Initial before the first session and the shorter STIC Intersession before every subsequent session. This study tested and its results supported the hypothesized factor structure of the six scales that comprise both STIC forms in a clinical outpatient sample and in a normal, random representative sample of the U.S. This study also tested the STIC's concurrent validity and found that its 6 scales and 40 of its 41 subscales differentiated the clinical and normal samples. Lastly, the study derived clinical cut-offs for each scale and subscale to determine whether and how much a client's score falls in the normal or clinical range. Beyond supporting the factorial and concurrent validity of both STIC forms, this research supported the reliabilities of the six scales (Omegahierarchical ) as well as the reliabilities of most subscales (alpha and rate-rerate). This article delineates clinical implications and directions for future research. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  4. Prediction of Individual Response to Electroconvulsive Therapy via Machine Learning on Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    PubMed

    Redlich, Ronny; Opel, Nils; Grotegerd, Dominik; Dohm, Katharina; Zaremba, Dario; Bürger, Christian; Münker, Sandra; Mühlmann, Lisa; Wahl, Patricia; Heindel, Walter; Arolt, Volker; Alferink, Judith; Zwanzger, Peter; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Kugel, Harald; Dannlowski, Udo

    2016-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe depression. However, biomarkers that accurately predict a response to ECT remain unidentified. To investigate whether certain factors identified by structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are able to predict ECT response. In this nonrandomized prospective study, gray matter structure was assessed twice at approximately 6 weeks apart using 3-T MRI and voxel-based morphometry. Patients were recruited through the inpatient service of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Muenster, from March 11, 2010, to March 27, 2015. Two patient groups with acute major depressive disorder were included. One group received an ECT series in addition to antidepressants (n = 24); a comparison sample was treated solely with antidepressants (n = 23). Both groups were compared with a sample of healthy control participants (n = 21). Binary pattern classification was used to predict ECT response by structural MRI that was performed before treatment. In addition, univariate analysis was conducted to predict reduction of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score by pretreatment gray matter volumes and to investigate ECT-related structural changes. One participant in the ECT sample was excluded from the analysis, leaving 67 participants (27 men and 40 women; mean [SD] age, 43.7 [10.6] years). The binary pattern classification yielded a successful prediction of ECT response, with accuracy rates of 78.3% (18 of 23 patients in the ECT sample) and sensitivity rates of 100% (13 of 13 who responded to ECT). Furthermore, a support vector regression yielded a significant prediction of relative reduction in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score. The principal findings of the univariate model indicated a positive association between pretreatment subgenual cingulate volume and individual ECT response (Montreal Neurological Institute [MNI] coordinates x = 8, y = 21, z = -18

  5. Electroconvulsive Therapy-Induced Brain Structural and Functional Changes in Major Depressive Disorders: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Haitang; Li, Xirong; Zhao, Wenjing; Du, Lian; Huang, Peiyu; Fu, Yixiao; Qiu, Tian; Xie, Peng; Meng, Huaqing; Luo, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to study the brain structural and functional changes after 8 courses of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Material/Methods MRI scans were performed on 12 depressive patients before and after 8 courses of ECT and compared with those of 15 normal controls. Data were analyzed by voxel-based morphometry (VBM) using SPM8 software. Functional MRI (fMRI) and regional homogeneity (ReHo) analyses were used to assess the functional changes after ECT. Results Grey matter volumes were smaller in the right cingulate gyrus of depressive patients before ECT compared with normal controls. After false discovery rate (FDR) correction, post-ECT grey matter volumes were increased in bilateral amygdala and hippocampus compared with pre-ECT. Resting-state ReHo maps showed significant differences in brain activity pre- and post-ECT. Compared with healthy controls, MDD patients treated with 8 courses of ECT showed higher ReHo values in the bilateral frontal lobe, bilateral parietal lobe, and right caudate nucleus. Decreased ReHo values were observed in the right medial temporal gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus, right cingulate gyrus, and left anterior cerebellar lobe. Conclusions Results suggested that there were both structural and functional differences between the brains of MDD patients and healthy controls. After ECT, both structural and functional changes occurred, but without complete recovery to normal. ECT may display effects through regulating other brain regions to compensate for the original defects. PMID:27888657

  6. Structural characterization of functionalized gold nanoparticles for drug delivery in cancer therapy: a NMR based approach.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Sílvia C; Rangel, Maria; Pereira, Maria C; Coelho, Manuel A N; Ivanova, Galya

    2015-07-15

    In the present paper, we report results from a study of the structure and physicochemical properties of gold nanoparticles modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) designed for the drug delivery of the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib (BTZ) in cancer therapy. A number of advanced analytical techniques were used to define important physicochemical characteristics such as composition, structure, surface properties, particle size and morphology. A new approach based on detailed NMR studies was employed to define specific intermolecular interactions and mechanisms of drug immobilization and location into surface modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Particularly important information was gained from analysis of NMR spectroscopic parameters such as the spectral line shape, translation diffusion, the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) and spin-lattice relaxation (T1). The results confirmed the coexistence of two different types of BTZ inclusion into polyethylene glycol coated gold nanoparticles: (i) association with the polymer chains by weak H-bonds and/or dipole-charge interactions and (ii) adsorption on the surface of the gold nanoparticles. The results allowed for determination of the overall structure of Bortezomib loaded PEG coated AuNPs, which is related to the therapeutic drug efficacy and activity in the treatment of cancer.

  7. Competency-based training: objective structured clinical exercises (OSCE) in marriage and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Miller, John K

    2010-07-01

    The field of marriage and family therapy (MFT) has recently engaged in the process of defining core competencies for the profession. Many MFT training programs are adapting their curriculum to develop more competency-based training strategies. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is widely used in the medical profession to assess clinical competence. These examinations involve using simulated clinical situations as a tool in conducting summative evaluations of trainee competence. This article describes an adaptation of the OSCE procedures for competency-based training of MFT students. Instead of using the procedures as a summative examination as is typical in medical education, this article proposes how to use them as formative exercises in the development of student competence. The development of the OSCE is discussed, including "blueprinting," focused competencies, procedures, and feedback protocols. The article concludes with suggestions of how to continue the development of the OSCE for evaluation in MFT education.

  8. Structure-function relationships in pulmonary surfactant membranes: from biophysics to therapy.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is an essential lipid-protein complex to maintain an operative respiratory surface at the mammalian lungs. It reduces surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface to stabilise the lungs against physical forces operating along the compression-expansion breathing cycles. At the same time, surfactant integrates elements establishing a primary barrier against the entry of pathogens. Lack or deficiencies of the surfactant system are associated with respiratory pathologies, which treatment often includes supplementation with exogenous materials. The present review summarises current models on the molecular mechanisms of surfactant function, with particular emphasis in its biophysical properties to stabilise the lungs and the molecular alterations connecting impaired surfactant with diseased organs. It also provides a perspective on the current surfactant-based strategies to treat respiratory pathologies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy.

  9. Pilot study: whole body manual subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) therapy improved pain and SAT structure in women with lipedema.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Karen L; Ussery, Christopher; Eekema, Alyna

    2017-09-20

    Background Lipedema is a common painful subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) disorder in women affecting the limbs. SAT therapy is a manual therapy to improve soft tissue quality. Objective Determine if SAT therapy improves pain and structure of lipedema SAT. Design Single arm prospective pilot study. Setting Academic medical center. Patients Seven women, 46 ± 5 years, weight 90 ± 19 kg, with lipedema. Intervention Twelve 90-min SAT therapy sessions over 4 weeks. Outcomes Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, SAT ultrasound (Vevo 2100), leg volumetrics, skin caliper assessment, tissue exam, weight, resting metabolic rate, pain assessment, lower extremity functional scale (LEFS) and body shape questionnaire (BSQ) at baseline and end of study. Results Weight, resting metabolic rate and BSQ did not change significantly. Limb fat over total body fat mass (p = 0.08) and trunk fat over total body mass trended down from baseline (p = 0.08) by DXA. Leg volume and caliper assessments in eight of nine areas (p < 0.007), LEFS (p = 0.002) and average pain (p = 0.007) significantly decreased from baseline. Fibrosis significantly decreased in the nodules, hips and groin. Ultrasound showed improved SAT structure in some subjects. Side effects included pain, bruising, itching, swelling and gastroesophageal reflux disease. All women said they would recommend SAT therapy to other women with lipedema. Limitations Small number of subjects. Conclusion SAT therapy in 4 weeks improved tissue structure, perceived leg function, and volume although shape was not affected. While side effects of SAT therapy were common, all women felt the therapy was beneficial.

  10. Aberrant wound healing in the horse: naturally occurring conditions reminiscent of those observed in man.

    PubMed

    Theoret, Christine L; Wilmink, Jacintha M

    2013-01-01

    Impaired wound healing represents an enormous clinical and financial problem for companion animals and humans alike. Unfortunately, most models used to study healing rely on rodents, which have significant differences in the healing and scarring process and rarely develop complications. In order to better simulate impaired healing, the model should strive to reproduce the natural processes of healing and delayed healing. Wounds on the limbs of horses display similarities to wounds in humans in their epithelialization/contraction ratio, genetic influence as well as dysregulated cytokine profile and the spontaneous development of fibroproliferative disorders. Veterinarians have access to advanced wound therapies that are often identical to those provided to human patients. Wound research in large animals has resulted in new wound models as well as a better understanding of the physiology, immunology, and local environmental impact on both normal and aberrant wound healing. One such model reproduces the naturally occurring fibroproliferative disorder of horses known as exuberant granulation tissue. Comparisons between the normally healing and impaired wounds provide insight into the repair process and can facilitate product development. A better understanding of the wound healing physiopathology based on clinically accurate animal models should lead to the development of novel therapies thereby improving outcomes in both human and veterinary patients. © 2013 by the Wound Healing Society.

  11. The reminiscence bump in the temporal distribution of the best football players of all time: Pelé, Cruijff or Maradona?

    PubMed

    Janssen, Steve M J; Rubin, David C; Conway, Martin A

    2012-01-01

    The reminiscence bump is the tendency to recall more autobiographical memories from adolescence and early adulthood than from adjacent lifetime periods. In this online study, the robustness of the reminiscence bump was examined by looking at participants' judgements about the quality of football players. Dutch participants (N = 619) were asked who they thought the five best players of all time were. The participants could select the names from a list or enter the names when their favourite players were not on the list. Johan Cruijff, Pelé, and Diego Maradona were the three most often mentioned players. Participants frequently named football players who reached the midpoint of their career when the participants were adolescents (mode = 17). The results indicate that the reminiscence bump can also be identified outside the autobiographical memory domain.

  12. Enhancing sexual desire and intimacy via the metaphor of a problem child: utilizing structural-strategic family therapy.

    PubMed

    Young, Teresa L; Negash, Sesen M; Long, Rhonda M

    2009-01-01

    This article explores structural-strategic family therapy as a treatment modality for couples with problems of intimacy and sexual desire. Parents whose presenting problem involves a child with problematic behavior may also struggle with problems in their intimate relationship. Instead of speaking to these problems directly, however, the couple may communicate about their intimate problems via the metaphor of their "problem" child. Structural-strategic family therapy can then be utilized to strengthen the parental subsystem by establishing a parenting team, which in turn nourishes the partner subsystem. Success is then measured not only by improvements in the child's behavior, but also by the enhancement of intimacy and sexual desire between partners.

  13. Parental Co-Construction of 5- to 13-Year-Olds' Global Self-Esteem Through Reminiscing About Past Events.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michelle A; Donnellan, M B; Guo, Jen; McAdams, Dan P; Garnier-Villarreal, Mauricio; Trzesniewski, Kali H

    2017-09-11

    The current study explored parental processes associated with children's global self-esteem development. Eighty 5- to 13-year-olds and one of their parents provided qualitative and quantitative data through questionnaires, open-ended questions, and a laboratory-based reminiscing task. Parents who included more explanations of emotions when writing about the lowest points in their lives were more likely to discuss explanations of emotions experienced in negative past events with their child, which was associated with child attachment security. Attachment was associated with concurrent self-esteem, which predicted relative increases in self-esteem 16 months later, on average. Finally, parent support also predicted residual increases in self-esteem. Findings extend prior research by including younger ages and uncovering a process by which two theoretically relevant parenting behaviors impact self-esteem development. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  14. Reminiscence of Dr. Emanuel Luxardo (1848-1905) and the family of Miho Klaić (1829-1896).

    PubMed

    Marinovic, Ivo

    2008-01-01

    This article is a reminiscence of four distinctive public figures who were related by family and who played key roles in the development of public health in Dalmatia in the second half of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. Dr Emanuel Luxardo (1848-1905) was a prominent physician and an able manager of the Dubrovnik and Zadar hospitals. In spite of his Italian origin, he championed the Croatian national reformation in Dalmatia. His father-in-law Miho Klaić (1829- 1896), as one of the most prominent Dalmatian politicians and champions of the national reformation movement, greatly contributed to the building of new hospitals in Zadar (1882), Sibenik (1883), and Dubrovnik (1888). The older of his two sons, Petar (1862-1910) was a lawyer and very active in the Dalmatian parliament, while the younger son Ljubo (1871-?) was a successful surgeon in Zadar and Split.

  15. Recent versus remote: flashbulb memory for 9/11 and self-selected events from the reminiscence bump.

    PubMed

    Denver, Jenny Y; Lane, Sean M; Cherry, Katie E

    2010-01-01

    In two related studies, we examined flashbulb memories acquired from different points in the lifespan in younger and older adults. When asked to remember flashbulb memories from their lives, older adults were most likely to recall events from the reminiscence bump (Study 1A). In Study 1B, younger and older adults recalled 9/11 and a personal flashbulb event that occurred between ages 10 and 30. Older adults' memories of a recent event (9/11) were less likely than younger adults' to be classified as flashbulb memories; however, when memories were examined in their entirety, these age-related declines disappeared. Older adults' memories for a remote flashbulb event appeared to be quite similar, if not more detailed than their memories for the recent event, suggesting that remote flashbulb memories are relatively stable over time. Implications of these data for current views of flashbulb memory in late adulthood are discussed.

  16. Effects of full-neck volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs split-field intensity-modulated head and neck radiation therapy on low neck targets and structures

    PubMed Central

    Anamalayil, Shibu J; Teo, Boon-Keng K; Lin, Alexander; Lustig, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While split-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (SF-IMRT) decreases dose to low neck (LAN) structures such as the glottic larynx compared with full-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), it is unknown whether SF-IMRT affords superior dose avoidance to organs than whole neck-field volumetric-modulated arc therapy (WF-VMAT). Methods: 10 patients treated definitively with radiation for oropharyngeal, oral cavity or nasopharyngeal carcinoma were compared. Only patients ideally suited for SF-IMRT plans were included. The glottic larynx, supraglottic larynx, arytenoids, pharyngeal constrictors, oesophagus, brachial plexus and target volume coverage in the LAN were compared between WF-VMAT and SF-IMRT. Results: Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) yielded statistically significant decreases in maximum dose to the arytenoids and mean dose to the oesophagus. There was no difference in dose to the glottic larynx, supraglottic larynx, pharyngeal constrictors and brachial plexus. WF-VMAT led to improved coverage to 50/2 Gy fraction equivalent in LAN compared with SF-IMRT using an anteroposterior (AP) LAN field but no difference to the 60/2 Gy fraction equivalent between SF-IMRT and WF-VMAT using AP/posterior–anterior LAN boost. Conclusion: WF-VMAT affords equivalent glottic and supraglottic larynx dose and lower dose to the arytenoids and oesophagus. WF-VMAT better covers most LAN target structures. Given these findings as well as concerns with matchline cold spots or hotspots with SF-IMRT, patients requiring comprehensive elective nodal irradiation should typically be treated with WF-VMAT. Advances in Knowledge: SF-IMRT for larynx sparing has better dosimetric results to normal structures than whole-neck IMRT, but with increased matchline recurrence risk. We show dosimetric equivalence or superiority of WF-VMAT compared with SF-IMRT. PMID:27043353

  17. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy with Functionalized Fullerenes: Quantitative Structure-activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kazue; Zhiyentayev, Timur; Huang, Liyi; Khalil, Sarwat; Nasim, Faria; Tegos, George P; Gali, Hariprasad; Jahnke, Ashlee; Wharton, Tim; Hamblin, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Photosensitive dyes or photo sensitizers (PS) in combination with visible light and oxygen produce reactive oxygen species that kill cells in the process known as photodynamic therapy (PDT). Antimicrobial PDT employs PS that is selective for microbial cells and is a new treatment for infections. Most antimicrobial PS is based on tetrapyrrole or phenothiazinium structures that have been synthesized to carry quaternary cationic charges or basic amino groups. However we recently showed that cationic-substituted fullerene derivative were highly effective in killing a broad spectrum of microbial cells after illumination with white light. In the present report we compared a new group of synthetic fullerene derivatives that possessed either basic or quaternary amino groups as antimicrobial PS against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and fungi (Candida albicans). Quantitative structure-function relationships were derived with LogP and hydrophilic lipophilic balance parameters. Compounds with non-quaternary amino groups tended to form nanoaggregates in water and were only effective against S. aureus. The most important determinant of effectiveness was an increased number of quaternary cationic groups that were widely dispersed around the fullerene cage to minimize aggregation. S. aureus was most susceptible; E. coli was intermediate, while C. albicans was the most resistant species tested. The high effectiveness of antimicrobial PDT with quaternized fullerenes suggest they may have applications in treatment of superficial infections (for instance in wounds and burns) where light penetration into tissue is not problematic. PMID:21743839

  18. Crystal structure and interaction of phycocyanin with β-secretase: A putative therapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Hasan, Syed S; Kumar, Jitendra; Raj, Isha; Pathan, Amrin A; Parmar, Asha; Shakil, Shazi; Gourinath, Samudrala; Madamwar, Datta

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents a neurological disorder, which is caused by enzymatic degradation of an amyloid precursor protein into short peptide fragments that undergo association to form insoluble plaques. Preliminary studies suggest that cyanobacterial extracts, especially the light-harvesting protein phycocyanin, may provide a means to control the progression of the disease. However, the molecular mechanism of disease control remains elusive. In the present study, intact hexameric phycocyanin was isolated and crystallized from the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya sp. N62DM, and the structure was solved to a resolution of 2.6 A. Molecular docking studies show that the phycocyanin αβ-dimer interacts with the enzyme β-secretase, which catalyzes the proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein to form plaques. The molecular docking studies suggest that the interaction between phycocyanin and β-secretase is energetically more favorable than previously reported inhibitor-β-secretase interactions. Transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans worms, with a genotype to serve as an AD-model, were significantly protected by phycocyanin. Therefore, the present study provides a novel structure-based molecular mechanism of phycocyanin-mediated therapy against AD.

  19. Measuring Professional Behaviour in Canadian Physical Therapy Students' Objective Structured Clinical Examinations: An Environmental Scan

    PubMed Central

    Ellerton, Cindy; Evans, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To identify professional behaviours measured in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) by Canadian university physical therapy (PT) programs. Method: A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted to review current practice and determine which OSCE items Canadian PT programs are using to measure PT students' professional behaviours. Telephone interviews using semi-structured questions were conducted with individual instructors responsible for courses that included an OSCE as part of the assessment component. Results: Nine PT programmes agreed to take part in the study, and all reported conducting at least one OSCE. The number and characteristics of OSCEs varied both within and across programs. Participants identified 31 professional behaviour items for use in an OSCE; these items clustered into four categories: communication (n=14), respect (n=10), patient safety (n=4), and physical therapists' characteristics (n=3). Conclusions: All Canadian entry-level PT programmes surveyed assess professional behaviours in OSCE-type examinations; however, the content and style of assessment is variable. The local environment should be considered when determining what professional behaviours are appropriate to assess in the OSCE context in individual programmes. PMID:25931656

  20. Current and future trends in antibiotic therapy of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Concia, E; Cristini, F; De Rosa, F G; Esposito, S; Menichetti, F; Petrosillo, N; Tumbarello, M; Venditti, M; Viale, P; Viscoli, C; Bassetti, M

    2016-04-01

    In 2013 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued recommendations and guidance on developing drugs for treatment of skin infection using a new definition of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infection (ABSSSI). The new classification includes cellulitis, erysipelas, major skin abscesses and wound infection with a considerable extension of skin involvement, clearly referring to a severe subset of skin infections. The main goal of the FDA was to better identify specific infections where the advantages of a new antibiotic could be precisely estimated through quantifiable parameters, such as improvement of the lesion size and of systemic signs of infection. Before the spread and diffusion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in skin infections, antibiotic therapy was relatively straightforward. Using an empiric approach, a β-lactam was the preferred therapy and cultures from patients were rarely obtained. With the emergence of MRSA in the community setting, initial ABSSSI management has been changed and readdressed. Dalbavancin, oritavancin and tedizolid are new drugs, approved or in development for ABSSSI treatment, that also proved to be efficient against MRSA. Dalbavancin and oritavancin have a long half-life and can be dosed less frequently. This in turn makes it possible to treat patients with ABSSSI in an outpatient setting, avoiding hospitalization or potentially allowing earlier discharge, without compromising efficacy. In conclusion, characteristics of long-acting antibiotics could represent an opportunity for the management of ABSSSI and could profoundly modify the management of these infections by reducing or in some cases eliminating both costs and risks of hospitalization.

  1. Chinese inpatients' subjective experiences of the helping process as viewed through examination of a nurses' focused, structured therapy group.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Fei-Hsiu; Lin, Shu-Mei; Liao, Hsiao-Yuan; Lai, Mei-Chih

    2004-10-01

    This study examined Chinese inpatients' views on what aspects of a nurses' focused, structured therapy group worked to help their psychological and interpersonal problems and what traditional Chinese cultural values influenced their viewpoints. Nine Chinese inpatients with mental illness participated in the four-session nurses' focused, structured therapy group. After they completed the last session of therapy, they were invited to participate in a structured interview and a semi-structured interview regarding their perceptions of the change mechanisms in nurses' focused, structured group therapy. The semi-structured interviews were recorded and transcribed to be further analysed according to the principal of content analysis. The results indicate that (i) all patients believed that a nurses' focused, structured group psychotherapy enhanced their interpersonal learning and improved the quality of their lives, (ii) traditional Chinese cultural values--those emphasizing the importance of maintaining harmonious interpersonal relationships--influenced the Chinese inpatients' expression of negative emotions in the group and their motivation on interpersonal learning. In conclusion, we found that transcultural modification for applying Western group psychotherapy in Chinese culture was needed. The modification included establishing a 'pseudo-kin' or 'own people' relationship among group members and the therapists, organizing warm-up exercises and structured activities, applying projective methods and focusing on the issues of interpersonal relationships and interpersonal problems. The small sample size of the present study raises questions regarding how representative the views of the sample are with respect to the majority of Chinese inpatients. Nevertheless, this preliminary study revealed a cultural aspect in nursing training that requires significant consideration in order to work effectively with Chinese patients. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

  2. Changes in Self-Schema Structure in Cognitive Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dozois, David J. A.; Bieling, Peter J.; Patelis-Siotis, Irene; Hoar, Lori; Chudzik, Susan; McCabe, Katie; Westra, Henny A.

    2009-01-01

    Negative cognitive structure (particularly for interpersonal content) has been shown in some research to persist past a current episode of depression and potentially to be a stable marker of vulnerability for depression (D. J. A. Dozois, 2007; D. J. A. Dozois & K. S. Dobson, 2001a). Given that cognitive therapy (CT) is highly effective for…

  3. Changes in Self-Schema Structure in Cognitive Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dozois, David J. A.; Bieling, Peter J.; Patelis-Siotis, Irene; Hoar, Lori; Chudzik, Susan; McCabe, Katie; Westra, Henny A.

    2009-01-01

    Negative cognitive structure (particularly for interpersonal content) has been shown in some research to persist past a current episode of depression and potentially to be a stable marker of vulnerability for depression (D. J. A. Dozois, 2007; D. J. A. Dozois & K. S. Dobson, 2001a). Given that cognitive therapy (CT) is highly effective for…

  4. A Pilot Study for a Structured, Time-Limited Therapy Group for Sexually Abused Pre-Adolescent Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Billie F.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Structured group therapy techniques were developed to foster mastery skill development and defense mechanisms in the treatment of eight sexually abused female children, aged six to eight. The techniques included development of intellectualization defenses through board games, cathartic exploration of feelings through art and storytelling, and…

  5. Factor Structure and Validity of the Therapy Process Observational Coding System for Child Psychotherapy--Alliance Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fjermestad, Krister W.; McLeod, Bryce D.; Heiervang, Einar R.; Havik, Odd E.; Ost, Lars-Goran; Haugland, Bente S. M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure and psychometric properties of an observer-rated youth alliance measure, the Therapy Process Observational Coding System for Child Psychotherapy-Alliance scale (TPOCS-A). The sample was 52 youth diagnosed with anxiety disorders ("M" age = 12.43, "SD" = 2.23, range = 15;…

  6. Structural Ecosystems Therapy for HIV-Seropositive African American Women: Effects on Psychological Distress, Family Hassles, and Family Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szapocznik, Jose; Feaster, Daniel J.; Mitrani, Victoria B.; Prado, Guillermo; Smith, Lila; Robinson-Batista, Carleen; Schwartz, Seth J.; Mauer, Magaly H.; Robbins, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    This study tests the efficacy of Structural Ecosystems Therapy (SET), a family-ecological intervention, in improving psychosocial functioning when compared with an attention-comparison person-centered condition and a community control condition. A sample of 209 HIV-seropositive, urban, low-income, African American women was randomized into 1 of…

  7. Reminiscences of research on the chemistry and biology of natural sterols in insects, plants and humans.

    PubMed

    Ikekawa, Nobuo; Fujimoto, Yoshinori; Ishiguro, Masaji

    2013-01-01

    Natural sterols often occur as a heterogeneous mixture of homologs, which had disturbed the progress of steroid research. Development and application of GC methodology overcame this difficulty and enabled us to obtain detailed sterol profiles. Together, fine synthesis of stereo-defined isomers and homologs of steroids having oxygenated side chains allowed us to compare them with natural samples as well as to investigate structure-activity relationship. Advance of HPLC technology also facilitated the determination of the stereochemical structure of naturally occurring steroidal compounds, which were obtained only in minute amounts. This review highlights three topics out of our steroid research that have been performed mainly at Tokyo Institute of Technology around 1970-1990. These are sterol metabolism in insects focusing on the mechanism of the conversion of plant sterols to cholesterol and ecdysone biosynthesis, the synthesis and biochemical research of active forms of vitamin D3 derivatives, and the synthesis and microanalysis of plant hormone brassinosteroids.

  8. Self-similar mesostructure evolution of the growing mollusc shell reminiscent of thermodynamically driven grain growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayerlein, Bernd; Zaslansky, Paul; Dauphin, Yannicke; Rack, Alexander; Fratzl, Peter; Zlotnikov, Igor

    2014-12-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the interaction between mineral precursors and organic components leading to material formation and structuring in biomineralizing systems. The mesostructure of biological materials, such as the outer calcitic shell of molluscs, is characterized by many parameters and the question arises as to what extent they all are, or need to be, controlled biologically. Here, we analyse the three-dimensional structure of the calcite-based prismatic layer of Pinna nobilis, the giant Mediterranean fan mussel, using high-resolution synchrotron-based microtomography. We show that the evolution of the layer is statistically self-similar and, remarkably, its morphology and mesostructure can be fully predicted using classical materials science theories for normal grain growth. These findings are a fundamental step in understanding the constraints that dictate the shape of these biogenic minerals and shed light on how biological organisms make use of thermodynamics to generate complex morphologies.

  9. Self-similar mesostructure evolution of the growing mollusc shell reminiscent of thermodynamically driven grain growth.

    PubMed

    Bayerlein, Bernd; Zaslansky, Paul; Dauphin, Yannicke; Rack, Alexander; Fratzl, Peter; Zlotnikov, Igor

    2014-12-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the interaction between mineral precursors and organic components leading to material formation and structuring in biomineralizing systems. The mesostructure of biological materials, such as the outer calcitic shell of molluscs, is characterized by many parameters and the question arises as to what extent they all are, or need to be, controlled biologically. Here, we analyse the three-dimensional structure of the calcite-based prismatic layer of Pinna nobilis, the giant Mediterranean fan mussel, using high-resolution synchrotron-based microtomography. We show that the evolution of the layer is statistically self-similar and, remarkably, its morphology and mesostructure can be fully predicted using classical materials science theories for normal grain growth. These findings are a fundamental step in understanding the constraints that dictate the shape of these biogenic minerals and shed light on how biological organisms make use of thermodynamics to generate complex morphologies.

  10. Reminiscences of research on the chemistry and biology of natural sterols in insects, plants and humans

    PubMed Central

    IKEKAWA, Nobuo; FUJIMOTO, Yoshinori; ISHIGURO, Masaji

    2013-01-01

    Natural sterols often occur as a heterogeneous mixture of homologs, which had disturbed the progress of steroid research. Development and application of GC methodology overcame this difficulty and enabled us to obtain detailed sterol profiles. Together, fine synthesis of stereo-defined isomers and homologs of steroids having oxygenated side chains allowed us to compare them with natural samples as well as to investigate structure-activity relationship. Advance of HPLC technology also facilitated the determination of the stereochemical structure of naturally occurring steroidal compounds, which were obtained only in minute amounts. This review highlights three topics out of our steroid research that have been performed mainly at Tokyo Institute of Technology around 1970–1990. These are sterol metabolism in insects focusing on the mechanism of the conversion of plant sterols to cholesterol and ecdysone biosynthesis, the synthesis and biochemical research of active forms of vitamin D3 derivatives, and the synthesis and microanalysis of plant hormone brassinosteroids. PMID:24126284

  11. Long-term proteasomal inhibition in transgenic mice by UBB(+1) expression results in dysfunction of central respiration control reminiscent of brainstem neuropathology in Alzheimer patients.

    PubMed

    Irmler, Martin; Gentier, Romina J G; Dennissen, Frank J A; Schulz, Holger; Bolle, Ines; Hölter, Sabine M; Kallnik, Magdalena; Cheng, Jing Jun; Klingenspor, Martin; Rozman, Jan; Ehrhardt, Nicole; Hermes, Denise J H P; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Meyer, Helmut E; Hopkins, David A; Van Leeuwen, Fred W; Beckers, Johannes

    2012-08-01

    Aging and neurodegeneration are often accompanied by a functionally impaired ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In tauopathies and polyglutamine diseases, a mutant form of ubiquitin B (UBB(+1)) accumulates in disease-specific aggregates. UBB(+1) mRNA is generated at low levels in vivo during transcription from the ubiquitin B locus by molecular misreading. The resulting mutant protein has been shown to inhibit proteasome function. To elucidate causative effects and neuropathological consequences of UBB(+1) accumulation, we used a UBB(+1) expressing transgenic mouse line that models UPS inhibition in neurons and exhibits behavioral phenotypes reminiscent of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In order to reveal affected organs and functions, young and aged UBB(+1) transgenic mice were comprehensively phenotyped for more than 240 parameters. This revealed unexpected changes in spontaneous breathing patterns and an altered response to hypoxic conditions. Our findings point to a central dysfunction of respiratory regulation in transgenic mice in comparison to wild-type littermate mice. Accordingly, UBB(+1) was strongly expressed in brainstem regions of transgenic mice controlling respiration. These regions included, e.g., the medial part of the nucleus of the tractus solitarius and the lateral subdivisions of the parabrachial nucleus. In addition, UBB(+1) was also strongly expressed in these anatomical structures of AD patients (Braak stage #6) and was not expressed in non-demented controls. We conclude that long-term UPS inhibition due to UBB(+1) expression causes central breathing dysfunction in a transgenic mouse model of AD. The UBB(+1) expression pattern in humans is consistent with the contribution of bronchopneumonia as a cause of death in AD patients.

  12. Does It Matter if Preschool Children and Mothers Discuss Positive vs. Negative Events during Reminiscing? Links with Mother-Reported Attachment, Family Emotional Climate, and Socioemotional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laible, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the differential relations between mother-child reminiscing about a positive emotional event vs. a negative emotional event and attachment security, family climate, and young children's socioemotional development. Fifty preschool children (M age = 50.69 months, SD = 4.64) and their mothers completed two…

  13. Structural Ecosystems Therapy for Recovering HIV-Positive Women: Child, Mother, and Parenting Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mitrani, Victoria B.; McCabe, Brian E.; Robinson, Carleen; Weiss-Laxer, Nomi S.; Feaster, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents results of a subgroup analysis from a randomized trial to examine whether Structural Ecosystems Therapy (SET), a family intervention intended to improve medication adherence and reduce drug relapse of HIV-seropositive (HIV+) women recovering from drug abuse, provided benefits for families with children. Data from 42 children and 25 mothers were analyzed at baseline, and 4, 8, and 12 months post-baseline. Results of longitudinal Generalized Estimating Equations analyses suggested that SET was more efficacious than the Health Group (HG) control condition in decreasing children's internalizing and externalizing problems and reducing mothers' psychological distress and drug relapse. Children in SET reported improvements in positive parenting as compared to the children in HG, but there were no differences in mother-reported positive parenting, or parental involvement as reported by either the children or mothers. These findings suggest that family interventions such as SET may be beneficial for mothers and children. An adaptation of SET specifically for families with children could further enhance benefits and improve acceptability and cost-effectiveness. PMID:21171773

  14. Family mechanisms of structural ecosystems therapy for HIV-seropositive women in drug recovery.

    PubMed

    Mitrani, Victoria B; McCabe, Brian E; Burns, Myron J; Feaster, Daniel J

    2012-09-01

    Examined the effects of Structural Ecosystems Therapy (SET), a family intervention for women living with HIV or AIDS, compared to a psycho-educational health group (HG) intervention, and reciprocal relationships between women and family members. Women (n = 126) and their family members (n = 269) were randomized to one of two conditions and assessed every 4 months for 12 months. Family functioning, drug use, and psychological distress was reported by multiple family members. Multilevel growth curve modeling showed a different family functioning trajectory between SET and HG, B = -0.05, SE = 0.02, p < .01. There was no intervention effect on the trajectory of family-level drug abstinence or psychological distress, but there was a significant difference in the trajectory of psychological distress after controlling for change in family functioning, B = -0.28, SE = 0.13, p < .05. There was an indirect effect from treatment through change in family functioning to change in psychological distress, B = 0.29, SE = 0.12, p < .05. With respect to reciprocal effects, family drug abstinence significantly predicted women's abstinence 4 months later, B = 0.22, SE = 0.06, p < .001. Findings demonstrated the interdependence of family members and the impact of family in relapse prevention and partially supported SET's potential for maintaining family functioning and well-being for women living with HIV or AIDS in drug recovery. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Family Mechanisms of Structural Ecosystems Therapy for HIV-Seropositive Women in Drug Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Mitrani, Victoria B.; McCabe, Brian E.; Burns, Myron J.; Feaster, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Examined the effects of Structural Ecosystems Therapy (SET), a family intervention for women living with HIV or AIDS, compared to a psycho-educational health group (HG) intervention, and reciprocal relationships between women and family members. Method Women (n = 126) and their family members (n = 269) were randomized to one of two conditions and assessed every 4 months for 12 months. Family functioning, drug use, and psychological distress was reported by multiple family members. Results Multilevel growth curve modeling showed a different family functioning trajectory between SET and HG, B = −0.05, SE = 0.02, p < .01. There was no intervention effect on the trajectory of family-level drug abstinence or psychological distress, but there was a significant difference in the trajectory of psychological distress after controlling for change in family functioning, B = −0.28, SE = 0.13, p < .05. There was an indirect effect from treatment through change in family functioning to change in psychological distress, B = 0.29, SE = 0.12, p < .05. With respect to reciprocal effects, family drug abstinence significantly predicted women’s abstinence 4 months later, B = 0.22, SE = 0.06, p < .001. Conclusion Findings demonstrated the interdependence of family members and the impact of family in relapse prevention and partially supported SET’s potential for maintaining family functioning and well-being for women living with HIV or AIDS in drug recovery. PMID:22708519

  16. Gold conjugate-based liposomes with hybrid cluster bomb structure for liver cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Chen, Huan; Liu, Ai-Yun; Shen, Jia-Jia; Shah, Vishva; Zhang, Can; Hong, Jin; Ding, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid drug delivery system containing both organic and inorganic nanocarriers is expected to achieve its complementary advantages for the aim of improving the performance of antineoplastic drugs in tumor therapy. Here we report the use of liposomes and gold nanoparticles to construct a liposome with a hybrid Cluster Bomb structure and discuss its unique multi-order drug release property for liver tumor treatment. A very simple method is used for the hybrid liposome preparation and involves mixing two solutions containing liposomes loaded with either non-covalent or covalent Paclitaxel (PTX, namely free PTX or PTX-conjugated GNPs, respectively) by different ratio of volume (25:75, 50:50, 25:75, v/v). Various mixed liposomes were tested to determine the optimal conditions for maximum drug delivery. The optimized liposome was then tested using xenograft Heps tumor-bearing mice and showed the best efficacy for chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumor at PTX liposome: PTX-conjugated GNP liposome of 25:75 ratio (v/v). This system allows for simple and easy preparation while providing a more accurate site- and time-release mode for tumor treatment using antitumor drugs.

  17. Modulation of Epigenetic Targets for Anticancer Therapy: Clinicopathological Relevance, Structural Data and Drug Discovery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Andreol, Federico; Barbosa, Arménio Jorge Moura; Daniele Parenti, Marco; Rio, Alberto Del

    2013-01-01

    Research on cancer epigenetics has flourished in the last decade. Nevertheless growing evidence point on the importance to understand the mechanisms by which epigenetic changes regulate the genesis and progression of cancer growth. Several epigenetic targets have been discovered and are currently under validation for new anticancer therapies. Drug discovery approaches aiming to target these epigenetic enzymes with small-molecules inhibitors have produced the first pre-clinical and clinical outcomes and many other compounds are now entering the pipeline as new candidate epidrugs. The most studied targets can be ascribed to histone deacetylases and DNA methyltransferases, although several other classes of enzymes are able to operate post-translational modifications to histone tails are also likely to represent new frontiers for therapeutic interventions. By acknowledging that the field of cancer epigenetics is evolving with an impressive rate of new findings, with this review we aim to provide a current overview of pre-clinical applications of small-molecules for cancer pathologies, combining them with the current knowledge of epigenetic targets in terms of available structural data and drug design perspectives. PMID:23016851

  18. [Reminiscences on the occasion of the Whipple's disease centenary: a summary paper].

    PubMed

    Kojecký, Z; Benýsek, L; Krc, I; Ehrmann, J; Kod'ousek, R; Malínský, J

    2008-03-01

    The disease referred to eponymically as Whipple's disease (WD) in medical literature was thoroughly described by the American physician and pathologist George Hoyot Whipple (1878-1976) in 1907 and given a temporary denomination of "intestinal lipodystrophy". According to literature, WD is rare, but its precise incidence has not yet been established. Familial incidence of the disease is acknowledged, and its immunogenetic pathogenesis is assumed. The incidence ofWD is prevailingly observed in middle-aged men (mean age 55), exceptionally at child age - the ratio being 3 to 6 for men and women, respectively. 1. Clinical diagnosis is based on symptoms in the GIT region and, in rare cases, on extraintestinal symptoms. Clinical symptomatology includes: abdominal pain with persistent diarrhoea (steatorrhoea), symptoms typical of malabsorption connected with weight loss, fevers, polyarthritic symptoms, swollen lymph nodes and, in part of patients, skin hyperpigmentation. Anaemia and hypoalbuminaemia (reduced IgA) are typically detected in laboratory tests. Rarer extraintestinal symptoms of the disease are of a diverse nature: cardiac lesions, cerebral lesions, ocular symptoms, conspicuous or even tumour-like enlargement of lymph nodes, lesions of the hemopoietic system. The clinical course ofWD is of progressive or remittent nature and the disease is fatal without treatment. Long-term therapy with antibiotics, especially a combination oftetracyclines (doxycyclin) and corticoids (dexametazone), or chloramphenicol in case of cerebral lesion, have a significantly positive effect on the course and prognosis of WD. From the point of view of pathology, WD is a multisystem infectious disease (Tropheryma whipplei) primarily affecting the GIT (39, 47, 52, 103) or different extraintestinal locations. Due to the known diversity of clinical symptoms, no clinical-diagnostic standard has been established for WD. Differential diagnosis includes different multisystem diseases, primarily

  19. Monitoring the influence of compression therapy on pathophysiology and structure of a swine scar model using multispectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Travis, Taryn E.; Shuppa, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Ramella-Romana, Jessica C.

    2014-03-01

    Scar contractures can lead to significant reduction in function and inhibit patients from returning to work, participating in leisure activities and even render them unable to provide care for themselves. Compression therapy has long been a standard treatment for scar prevention but due to the lack of quantifiable metrics of scar formation scant evidence exists of its efficacy. We have recently introduced a multispectral imaging system to quantify pathophysiology (hemoglobin, blood oxygenation, melanin, etc) and structural features (roughness and collagen matrix) of scar. In this study, hypertrophic scars are monitored in-vivo in a porcine model using the imaging system to investigate influence of compression therapy on its quality.

  20. Reminiscence of our research on membrane phospholipids in mammalian cells by using the novel technology.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    By using "our devised up-to-the-second technique" over 30 years ago, we succeeded in the first isolation in the world of the three different kinds of mammalian cell mutants defective in the biosynthesis on each of phosphatidylserine (PS), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin (SM) from the parental CHO cells. As the results, we found that during the biosyntheses of PS and SM, the biosynthetic precursor or the final lipids are transported from their synthesized intracellular organelles to the plasma membranes via the other intracellular organelles. We further clarified the presence of the reversed routes for PS and SM from the plasma membranes to their synthesized organelles too. Our first epoch-making finding is not only the cycling inter-conversion reactions between PS and PE catalyzed by PSS-II and PSD but also their simultaneous transferring between MAM and Mit (found by O. Kuge). Our second finding is "the ceramide-trafficking protein (CERT)" working as the specific transfer protein of ceramide from the ER to the Golgi apparatus, during the SM biosynthesis (by K. Hanada). As for their new biological roles, we clarified possible contribution of PS and/or PE to the fusion process between viral envelope and endosomal membrane, releasing the genetic information of the virus to the host cytoplasm. CL is contributing to the functional NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity by keeping the right structure of Coenzyme Q9 for its functioning. SM and cholesterol form the microdomain within the plasma membrane, so-called "the raft structure" where the GPI-anchored proteins are specifically located for their functioning.

  1. Chemokines: structure, receptors and functions. A new target for inflammation and asthma therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Voss, H-P.; Timmerman, H.

    1996-01-01

    Five to 10% of the human population have a disorder of the respiratory tract called ‘asthma’. It has been known as a potentially dangerous disease for over 2000 years, as it was already described by Hippocrates and recognized as a disease entity by Egyptian and Hebrew physicians. At the beginning of this decade, there has been a fundamental change in asthma management. The emphasis has shifted from symptom relief with bronchodilator therapies (e.g. β2-agonists) to a much earlier introduction of anti-inflammatory treatment (e.g. corticosteroids). Asthma is now recognized to be a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, involving various inflammatory cells and their mediators. Although asthma has been the subject of many investigations, the exact role of the different inflammatory cells has not been elucidated completely. Many suggestions have been made and several cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma, such as the eosinophils, the mast cells, the basophils and the lymphocytes. To date, however, the relative importance of these cells is not completely understood. The cell type predominantly found in the asthmatic lung is the eosinophil and the recruitment of these eosinophils can be seen as a characteristic of asthma. In recent years much attention is given to the role of the newly identified chemokines in asthma pathology. Chemokines are structurally and functionally related 8–10 kDa peptides that are the products of distinct genes clustered on human chromosomes 4 and 17 and can be found at sites of inflammation. They form a superfamily of proinflammatory mediators that promote the recruitment of various kinds of leukocytes and lymphocytes. The chemokine superfamily can be divided into three subgroups based on overall sequence homology. Although the chemokines have highly conserved amino acid sequences, each of the chemokines binds to and induces the chemotaxis of particular classes of white blood cells. Certain chemokines stimulate the

  2. Glucocorticoid receptor gene haplotype structure and steroid therapy outcome in IBD patients

    PubMed Central

    Mwinyi, Jessica; Wenger, Christa; Eloranta, Jyrki J; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study whether the glucocorticoid receptor (GR/NR3C1) gene haplotypes influence the steroid therapy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We sequenced all coding exons and flanking intronic sequences of the NR3C1 gene in 181 IBD patients, determined the single nucleotide polymorphisms, and predicted the NR3C1 haplotypes. Furthermore, we investigated whether certain NR3C1 haplotypes are significantly associated with steroid therapy outcomes. RESULTS: We detected 13 NR3C1 variants, which led to the formation of 17 different haplotypes with a certainty of > 95% in 173 individuals. The three most commonly occurring haplotypes were included in the association analysis of the influence of haplotype on steroid therapy outcome or IBD activity. None of the NR3C1 haplotypes showed statistically significant association with glucocorticoid therapy success. CONCLUSION: NR3C1 haplotypes are not related to steroid therapy outcome. PMID:20712049

  3. Leaf-cutting ant fungi produce cell wall degrading pectinase complexes reminiscent of phytopathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Leaf-cutting (attine) ants use their own fecal material to manure fungus gardens, which consist of leaf material overgrown by hyphal threads of the basidiomycete fungus Leucocoprinus gongylophorus that lives in symbiosis with the ants. Previous studies have suggested that the fecal droplets contain proteins that are produced by the fungal symbiont to pass unharmed through the digestive system of the ants, so they can enhance new fungus garden growth. Results We tested this hypothesis by using proteomics methods to determine the gene sequences of fecal proteins in Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutting ants. Seven (21%) of the 33 identified proteins were pectinolytic enzymes that originated from the fungal symbiont and which were still active in the fecal droplets produced by the ants. We show that these enzymes are found in the fecal material only when the ants had access to fungus garden food, and we used quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis to show that the expression of six of these enzyme genes was substantially upregulated in the fungal gongylidia. These unique structures serve as food for the ants and are produced only by the evolutionarily advanced garden symbionts of higher attine ants, but not by the fungi reared by the basal lineages of this ant clade. Conclusions Pectinolytic enzymes produced in the gongylidia of the fungal symbiont are ingested but not digested by Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants so that they end up in the fecal fluid and become mixed with new garden substrate. Substantial quantities of pectinolytic enzymes are typically found in pathogenic fungi that attack live plant tissue, where they are known to breach the cell walls to allow the fungal mycelium access to the cell contents. As the leaf-cutting ant symbionts are derived from fungal clades that decompose dead plant material, our results suggest that their pectinolytic enzymes represent secondarily evolved adaptations that are convergent to those normally found in

  4. Leaf-cutting ant fungi produce cell wall degrading pectinase complexes reminiscent of phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Schiøtt, Morten; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Roepstorff, Peter; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2010-12-31

    Leaf-cutting (attine) ants use their own fecal material to manure fungus gardens, which consist of leaf material overgrown by hyphal threads of the basidiomycete fungus Leucocoprinus gongylophorus that lives in symbiosis with the ants. Previous studies have suggested that the fecal droplets contain proteins that are produced by the fungal symbiont to pass unharmed through the digestive system of the ants, so they can enhance new fungus garden growth. We tested this hypothesis by using proteomics methods to determine the gene sequences of fecal proteins in Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutting ants. Seven (21%) of the 33 identified proteins were pectinolytic enzymes that originated from the fungal symbiont and which were still active in the fecal droplets produced by the ants. We show that these enzymes are found in the fecal material only when the ants had access to fungus garden food, and we used quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis to show that the expression of six of these enzyme genes was substantially upregulated in the fungal gongylidia. These unique structures serve as food for the ants and are produced only by the evolutionarily advanced garden symbionts of higher attine ants, but not by the fungi reared by the basal lineages of this ant clade. Pectinolytic enzymes produced in the gongylidia of the fungal symbiont are ingested but not digested by Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants so that they end up in the fecal fluid and become mixed with new garden substrate. Substantial quantities of pectinolytic enzymes are typically found in pathogenic fungi that attack live plant tissue, where they are known to breach the cell walls to allow the fungal mycelium access to the cell contents. As the leaf-cutting ant symbionts are derived from fungal clades that decompose dead plant material, our results suggest that their pectinolytic enzymes represent secondarily evolved adaptations that are convergent to those normally found in phytopathogens.

  5. Effects of hormone therapy on brain structure: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, Kejal; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Lesnick, Timothy G; Zuk, Samantha M; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Gleason, Carey E; Wharton, Whitney; Dowling, N Maritza; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Senjem, Matthew L; Shuster, Lynne T; Bailey, Kent R; Rocca, Walter A; Jack, Clifford R; Asthana, Sanjay; Miller, Virginia M

    2016-08-30

    To investigate the effects of hormone therapy on brain structure in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in recently postmenopausal women. Participants (aged 42-56 years, within 5-36 months past menopause) in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study were randomized to (1) 0.45 mg/d oral conjugated equine estrogens (CEE), (2) 50 μg/d transdermal 17β-estradiol, or (3) placebo pills and patch for 48 months. Oral progesterone (200 mg/d) was given to active treatment groups for 12 days each month. MRI and cognitive testing were performed in a subset of participants at baseline, and at 18, 36, and 48 months of randomization (n = 95). Changes in whole brain, ventricular, and white matter hyperintensity volumes, and in global cognitive function, were measured. Higher rates of ventricular expansion were observed in both the CEE and the 17β-estradiol groups compared to placebo; however, the difference was significant only in the CEE group (p = 0.01). Rates of ventricular expansion correlated with rates of decrease in brain volume (r = -0.58; p ≤ 0.001) and with rates of increase in white matter hyperintensity volume (r = 0.27; p = 0.01) after adjusting for age. The changes were not different between the CEE and 17β-estradiol groups for any of the MRI measures. The change in global cognitive function was not different across the groups. Ventricular volumes increased to a greater extent in recently menopausal women who received CEE compared to placebo but without changes in cognitive performance. Because the sample size was small and the follow-up limited to 4 years, the findings should be interpreted with caution and need confirmation. This study provides Class I evidence that brain ventricular volume increased to a greater extent in recently menopausal women who received oral CEE compared to placebo. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Improved social interaction and increased anterior cingulate metabolism after group reminiscence with reality orientation approach for vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Akanuma, Kyoko; Meguro, Kenichi; Meguro, Mitsue; Sasaki, Eriko; Chiba, Kentaro; Ishii, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Naofumi

    2011-06-30

    A group reminiscence approach (GRA) with reality orientation (RO) is widely used as a psychosocial intervention for dementia. Since clinical effectiveness was reported for the intervention, interest has been directed toward areas of the neuronal network that might be being stimulated. We hypothesized that the frontal lobe associated with social interaction was being stimulated. To test this hypothesis, we studied 24 patients with vascular dementia. In addition to conventional care, a 1-h session of GRA with RO was provided once a week for 3 months in the GRA-RO arm (n=12). Only supportive care was provided in the control arm (n=12). Before and after the interventions, cognitive function, depressive state, and social activities were assessed. Since glucose metabolism is associated with brain function, cerebral glucose metabolism was measured by positron emission tomography (PET). Regarding behavioral improvement, 10 patients in the GRA-RO arm showed improvement compared with only two patients in the control arm, a significant difference. PET demonstrated that metabolism in the anterior cingulate was increased in the GRA-RO arm, whereas no significant changes were observed in the control arm. These results suggest that GRA-RO stimulates the anterior cingulate and has a positive effect on social interaction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Toward a Molecular Understanding of the Typicality of Chardonnay Wines: Identification of Powerful Aromatic Compounds Reminiscent of Hazelnut.

    PubMed

    Gros, Jacques; Lavigne, Valérie; Thibaud, Fannie; Gammacurta, Marine; Moine, Virginie; Dubourdieu, Denis; Darriet, Philippe; Marchal, Axel

    2017-02-08

    Chardonnay wines impart a unique complex aroma characterized by its buttery, yellow stone fruit, melon, bready, and woody notes. Among the terms used in the sensory analysis of these wines, this study investigated hazelnut-like attributes. Multidimensional gas chromatography coupled to olfactometry identified five pyrroles reminiscent of hazelnut: 1-ethylpyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde, 1H-pyrrole, 2-acetyl-1H-pyrrole (first identification in wine), 1-methylpyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde. Quantitative analyses demonstrated their significantly higher abundance in Chardonnay wines. However, they proved irrelevant in sensory terms, given the low amounts measured in wine compared to their olfactory detection threshold. Nevertheless, the presence of methanethiol derivatives from these pyrroles was investigated in wine. 1-Methylpyrrole-2-methanethiol and 1-ethylpyrrole-2-methanethiol were identified and exhibited hazelnut-like aroma. These compounds, which have not been observed in natural products to date, are potent volatile compounds with detection thresholds of 0.7 and 1.4 ng/L, respectively, in model wine. These findings open up promising perspectives concerning the interpretation of the typical aromatic nuances of some Chardonnay wines.

  8. Genetic disruption of ankyrin-G in adult mouse forebrain causes cortical synapse alteration and behavior reminiscent of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shanshan; Cordner, Zachary A; Xiong, Jiali; Chiu, Chi-Tso; Artola, Arabiye; Zuo, Yanning; Nelson, Andrew D; Kim, Tae-Yeon; Zaika, Natalya; Woolums, Brian M; Hess, Evan J; Wang, Xiaofang; Chuang, De-Maw; Pletnikov, Mikhail M; Jenkins, Paul M; Tamashiro, Kellie L; Ross, Christopher A

    2017-09-11

    Genome-wide association studies have implicated the ANK3 locus in bipolar disorder, a major human psychotic illness. ANK3 encodes ankyrin-G, which organizes the neuronal axon initial segment (AIS). We generated a mouse model with conditional disruption of ANK3 in pyramidal neurons of the adult forebrain (Ank-G cKO). This resulted in the expected loss of pyramidal neuron AIS voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. There was also dramatic loss of markers of afferent GABAergic cartridge synapses, resembling the cortical microcircuitry changes in brains from psychotic patients, and suggesting disinhibition. Expression of c-fos was increased in cortical pyramidal neurons, consistent with increased neuronal activity due to disinhibition. The mice showed robust behavioral phenotypes reminiscent of aspects of human mania, ameliorated by antimania drugs lithium and valproate. Repeated social defeat stress resulted in repeated episodes of dramatic behavioral changes from hyperactivity to "depression-like" behavior, suggestive of some aspects of human bipolar disorder. Overall, we suggest that this Ank-G cKO mouse model recapitulates some of the core features of human bipolar disorder and indicates that cortical microcircuitry alterations during adulthood may be involved in pathogenesis. The model may be useful for studying disease pathophysiology and for developing experimental therapeutics.

  9. Structural analyses of choroid after half-dose verteporfin photodynamic therapy for central serous chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Takahiko; Koizumi, Hideki; Maruko, Ichiro; Takahashi, Yohei; Sonoda, Shozo; Sakamoto, Taiji; Iida, Tomohiro

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the changes in the intrachoroidal structures after half-dose verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) for central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). Swept-source optical coherence tomography cross-sectional images of 22 eyes of 22 patients with CSC were retrospectively analysed by a manual delineation technique and binarisation method. In the 22 eyes, the mean subfoveal choroidal thickness decreased from 412.9±112.9 μm at baseline to 340.0±111.0 μm at 3 months (p<0.0001). The mean thickness of the large choroidal vessel layer decreased from 368.7±112.7 μm at baseline to 292.2±118.0 μm at 3 months (p<0.0001), but the mean choriocapillaris-medium choroidal vessel layer thickness did not change from 44.2±29.2 μm at baseline to 47.8±25.7 μm at 3 months (p=0.85). Analyses of the binarised choroidal images showed that a 3 mm subfoveal choroidal area decreased from 1.141±0.290 mm(2) at baseline to 0.962±0.320 mm(2) at 3 months after PDT (p=0.0001). The mean luminal areas decreased from 0.826±0.246 mm(2) at baseline to 0.665±0.234 mm(2) at 3 months (p=0.0001), however, the mean stromal areas did not change from 0.315±0.066 mm(2) at baseline to 0.297±0.095 mm(2) at 3 months (p=0.60). Half-dose PDT reduces subfoveal choroidal thickness and alters the intrachoroidal structures in eyes with CSC. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Plasmodium falciparum population structure in Sudan post artemisinin-based combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Bakhiet, Amani M A; Abdel-Muhsin, Abdel-Muhsin A; Elzaki, Salah-Eldin G; Al-Hashami, Zainab; Albarwani, Hamida S; AlQamashoui, Badar A; Al-Hamidhi, Salama; Idris, Mohamed A; Elagib, Atif A; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Babiker, Hamza A

    2015-08-01

    Over the past decade, Sudan has stepped up malaria control backed by WHO, and this has resulted in significant reduction in parasite rate, malaria morbidity and mortality. The present study analyzed Plasmodium falciparum parasites in four geographical separated areas, to examine whether the success in malaria control following the use of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has disrupted the population structure and evolution of the parasite. We examined 319 P. falciparum isolates collected between October 2009 and October 2012 in four different areas in Sudan (Jazira [central Sudan], Southern Darfur [western Sudan], Upper Nile [southern Sudan] and Kasala [eastern Sudan]). Twelve microsatellites were analyzed for allelic diversity, multi-locus haplotype and inter-population differentiation. Level of diversity was compared to that detected for three of the above microsatellites among P. falciparum parasites in central and eastern Sudan in 1999, prior to introduction of ACT. Diversity at each locus (unbiased heterozygosity [H]) was high in all areas (Jazira, H=0.67), (Southern Darfur, H=0.71), (Upper Nile, H=0.71), and (Kasala, H=0.63). Microsatellites were distributed widely and private alleles, detected in a single population, were rare. The extent of diversity in the above sites was similar to that seen, in 1999, in central (Khartoum, H=0.73) and eastern Sudan (Gedaref, H=0.75). Significant Linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between the microsatellites in all populations. Pairwise FST analysis revealed that parasites in the four areas could be considered as one population. However, the parasites in Sudan clustered away from parasites in West Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Despite marked reduction in malaria risk in Sudan, the extent of diversity and parasite genetic structure are indicative of a large population size. Further considerable reduction in transmission would be needed before fragmented sub-population can be seen. In addition, the large

  11. Persistence of HIV-1 structural proteins and glycoproteins in lymph nodes of patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Mikulas; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Pelser, Colleen; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; van Lunzen, Jan; Lewis, George; Kalyanaraman, Vaniambadi S; Gallo, Robert C; Racz, Paul

    2005-10-11

    Here we report a long-term persistence of HIV-1 structural proteins and glycoproteins in germinal centers (GCs) of lymph nodes (LNs) in the absence of detectable virus replication in patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The persistence of viral structural proteins and glycoproteins in GCs was accompanied by specific antibody responses to HIV-1. Seven patients during the chronic phase of HIV-1 infection were analyzed for the presence of the capsid protein (HIV-1p24), matrix protein (HIV-1p17), and envelope glycoproteins (HIV-1gp120/gp41), as well as for viral RNA (vRNA) in biopsy specimens from LNs obtained before initiation of therapy and during HAART that lasted from 5 to 13 months. In parallel, these patients were also monitored for viremia and specific anti-HIV-1 antibody responses to structural proteins and glycoproteins both before and during treatment. Before-therapy viral levels, as determined by RT-PCR, ranged from 3 x 10(3) to 6.3 x 10(5) copies of vRNA per ml, whereas during treatment, vRNA was under detectable levels (<25 copies per ml). The pattern of vRNA detection in peripheral blood was concordant with in situ hybridization results of LN specimens. Before treatment, vRNA associated with follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) was readily detected in GCs of LNs of the patients, whereas during therapy, vRNA was consistently absent in the GCs of LN biopsies of treated patients. In contrast to vRNA hybridization results, viral structural proteins and glycoproteins, evaluated by immunohistochemical staining, were present and persisted in the GC light zone of LNs in abundant amounts not only before initiation of therapy but also during HAART, when no vRNA was detected in GCs. Consistent with immunohistochemical findings, specific antibody responses to HIV-1p17, -p24, and -gp120/gp41, as evaluated by ELISA and virus neutralization, persisted in patients under therapy for up to 13 months of follow-up. The implications of these findings are

  12. Reminiscing on School Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charles C.

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper examines how former and current school health programs differ (e.g., school nurses moved from simply treating minor injuries and communicable diseases to working cooperatively with physicians and school staff to develop policies and procedures, and health education moved from simple anatomy and physiology to broader personal and…

  13. The reminiscence bump without memories: The distribution of imagined word-cued and important autobiographical memories in a hypothetical 70-year-old.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Jonathan; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2016-08-01

    The reminiscence bump is the disproportionate number of autobiographical memories dating from adolescence and early adulthood. It has often been ascribed to a consolidation of the mature self in the period covered by the bump. Here we stripped away factors relating to the characteristics of autobiographical memories per se, most notably factors that aid in their encoding or retention, by asking students to generate imagined word-cued and imagined 'most important' autobiographical memories of a hypothetical, prototypical 70-year-old of their own culture and gender. We compared the distribution of these fictional memories with the distributions of actual word-cued and most important autobiographical memories in a sample of 61-70-year-olds. We found a striking similarity between the temporal distributions of the imagined memories and the actual memories. These results suggest that the reminiscence bump is largely driven by constructive, schematic factors at retrieval, thereby challenging most existing theoretical accounts.

  14. "It Was Very Rewarding for Me …": Senior Volunteers' Experiences With Implementing a Reminiscence and Creative Activity Intervention.

    PubMed

    Allen, Rebecca S; Azuero, Casey B; Csikai, Ellen L; Parmelee, Patricia A; Shin, Hae Jung; Kvale, Elizabeth; Durkin, Daniel W; Burgio, Louis D

    2016-04-01

    To describe the experience of recruiting, training, and retaining retired senior volunteers (RSVs) as interventionists delivering a successful reminiscence and creative activity intervention to community-dwelling palliative care patients and their caregivers. A community-based participatory research framework involved Senior Corps RSV programs. Recruitment meetings and feedback groups yielded interested volunteers, who were trained in a 4-hr session using role plays and real-time feedback. Qualitative descriptive analysis identified themes arising from: (a) recruitment/feedback groups with potential RSV interventionists; and (b) individual interviews with RSVs who delivered the intervention. Themes identified within recruitment/feedback groups include questions about intervention process, concerns about patient health, positive perceptions of the intervention, and potential characteristics of successful interventionists. Twelve RSVs achieved 89.8% performance criterion in treatment delivery. Six volunteers worked with at least one family and 100% chose to work with additional families. Salient themes identified from exit interviews included positive and negative aspects of the experience, process recommendations, reactions to the Interventionist Manual, feelings arising during work with patient/caregiver participants, and personal reflections. Volunteers reported a strong desire to recommend the intervention to others as a meaningful volunteer opportunity. RSVs reported having a positive impact on palliative care dyads and experiencing personal benefit via increased meaning in life. Two issues require further research attention: (a) further translation of this cost-effective mode of treatment delivery for palliative dyads and (b) further characterization of successful RSVs and the long-term impact on their own physical, cognitive, and emotional functioning. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America

  15. Can senior volunteers deliver reminiscence and creative activity interventions? Results of the legacy intervention family enactment randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Allen, Rebecca S; Harris, Grant M; Burgio, Louis D; Azuero, Casey B; Miller, Leslie A; Shin, Hae Jung; Eichorst, Morgan K; Csikai, Ellen L; DeCoster, Jamie; Dunn, Linda L; Kvale, Elizabeth; Parmelee, Patricia

    2014-10-01

    Palliative care patients and their family caregivers may have a foreshortened perspective of the time left to live, or the expectation of the patient's death in the near future. Patients and caregivers may report distress in physical, psychological, or existential/spiritual realms. To conduct a randomized controlled trial examining the effectiveness of retired senior volunteers (RSVs) in delivering a reminiscence and creative activity intervention aimed at alleviating palliative care patient and caregiver distress. Of the 45 dyads that completed baseline assessments, 28 completed postintervention and 24 completed follow-up assessments. The intervention group received three home visits by RSVs; control group families received three supportive telephone calls by the research staff. Measures included symptom assessment and associated burden, depression, religiousness/spirituality, and meaning in life. Patients in the intervention group reported a significantly greater reduction in frequency of emotional symptoms (P=0.02) and emotional symptom bother (P=0.04) than the control group, as well as improved spiritual functioning. Family caregivers in the intervention group were more likely than control caregivers to endorse items on the Meaning of Life Scale (P=0.02). Only improvement in intervention patients' emotional symptom bother maintained at follow-up after discontinuing RSV contact (P=0.024). Delivery of the intervention by RSVs had a positive impact on palliative care patients' emotional symptoms and burden and caregivers' meaning in life. Meaningful prolonged engagement with palliative care patients and caregivers, possibly through alternative modes of treatment delivery such as continued RSV contact, may be necessary for maintenance of therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Can Senior Volunteers Deliver Reminiscence and Creative Activity Interventions? Results of the Legacy Intervention Family Enactment (LIFE) Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Rebecca S.; Harris, Grant M.; Burgio, Louis D.; Azuero, Casey B.; Miller, Leslie A.; Shin, Hae Jung; Eichorst, Morgan K.; Csikai, Ellen L.; DeCoster, Jamie; Dunn, Linda L.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Parmelee, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Context Palliative care patients and their family caregivers may have a foreshortened perspective of time left to live, or the expectation of the patient’s death in the near future. Patients and caregivers may report distress in physical, psychological, or existential/spiritual realms. Objectives To conduct a randomized controlled trial examining the effectiveness of retired senior volunteers (RSVs) in delivering a reminiscence and creative activity intervention aimed at alleviating palliative care patient and caregiver distress. Methods Of the 45 dyads that completed baseline, 28 completed post-intervention and 24 completed follow-up. The intervention group received three home visits by RSVs; control group families received three supportive telephone calls by research staff. Measures included symptom assessment and associated burden, depression, religiousness/spirituality, and meaning in life. Results Patients in the intervention group reported a significantly greater reduction in frequency of emotional symptoms (P = 0.02) and emotional symptom bother (P = 0.04) than the control group, as well as improved spiritual functioning. Family caregivers in the intervention group were more likely than control caregivers to endorse items on the Meaning in Life Scale (P = 0.02). Only improvement in intervention patients’ emotional symptom bother maintained at follow-up after discontinuing RSV contact (P = 0.024). Conclusion Delivery of the intervention by RSVs had a positive impact on palliative care patients’ emotional symptoms and burden and caregivers’ meaning in life. Meaningful prolonged engagement with palliative care patients and caregivers, possibly through alternative modes of treatment delivery such as continued RSV contact, may be necessary for maintenance of therapeutic effects. PMID:24667180

  17. Regulatory structures for gene therapy medicinal products in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Klug, Bettina; Celis, Patrick; Carr, Melanie; Reinhardt, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Taking into account the complexity and technical specificity of advanced therapy medicinal products: (gene and cell therapy medicinal products and tissue engineered products), a dedicated European regulatory framework was needed. Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007, the "ATMP Regulation" provides tailored regulatory principles for the evaluation and authorization of these innovative medicines. The majority of gene or cell therapy product development is carried out by academia, hospitals, and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Thus, acknowledging the particular needs of these types of sponsors, the legislation also provides incentives for product development tailored to them. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) and, in particular, its Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) provide a variety of opportunities for early interaction with developers of ATMPs to enable them to have early regulatory and scientific input. An important tool to promote innovation and the development of new medicinal products by micro-, small-, and medium-sized enterprises is the EMA's SME initiative launched in December 2005 to offer financial and administrative assistance to smaller companies. The European legislation also foresees the involvement of stakeholders, such as patient organizations, in the development of new medicines. Considering that gene therapy medicinal products are developed in many cases for treatment of rare diseases often of monogenic origin, the involvement of patient organizations, which focus on rare diseases and genetic and congenital disorders, is fruitful. Two such organizations are represented in the CAT. Research networks play another important role in the development of gene therapy medicinal products. The European Commission is funding such networks through the EU Sixth Framework Program.

  18. Integration of mechanical, structural and electrical imaging to understand response to cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Etelvino; Bijnens, Bart; Berruezo, Antonio; Mont, Lluis; Doltra, Adelina; Andreu, David; Brugada, Josep; Sitges, Marta

    2014-10-01

    There is extensive controversy exists on whether cardiac resynchronization therapy corrects electrical or mechanical asynchrony. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a correlation between electrical and mechanical sequences and if myocardial scar has any relevant impact. Six patients with normal left ventricular function and 12 patients with left ventricular dysfunction and left bundle branch block, treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy, were studied. Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography and electroanatomical mapping were performed in all patients and, where applicable, before and after therapy. Magnetic resonance was performed for evaluation of myocardial scar. Images were postprocessed and mechanical and electrical activation sequences were defined and time differences between the first and last ventricular segment to be activated were determined. Response to therapy was defined as a reduction in left ventricular end-systolic volume ≥ 15% after 12 months of follow-up. Good correlation between electrical and mechanical timings was found in patients with normal left ventricular function (r(2) = 0.88; P = .005) but not in those with left ventricular dysfunction (r(2) = 0.02; P = not significant). After therapy, both timings and sequences were modified and improved, except in those with myocardial scar. Despite a close electromechanical relationship in normal left ventricular function, there is no significant correlation in patients with dysfunction. Although resynchronization therapy improves this correlation, the changes in electrical activation may not yield similar changes in left ventricular mechanics particularly depending on the underlying myocardial substrate. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Patients with moderate Alzheimer’s disease engage in verbal reminiscence with the support of a computer-aided program: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O’Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; D’Amico, Fiora; Ferlisi, Gabriele; Denitto, Floriana; De Vanna, Floriana; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the assessment of a program recently developed for helping patients with moderate Alzheimer’s disease engage in computer-mediated verbal reminiscence (Lancioni et al., 2014a). Sixteen participants were involved in the study. Six of them used the original program version with the computer showing a virtual partner posing questions and providing attention and guidance. The other 10 used a slightly modified program version with the computer presenting photos and videos and providing encouragements to talk as well as attention and guidance. Participants were exposed to brief program sessions individually. The results showed that 15 participants (five of those using the first version and all of those using the second version) had a clear and lasting increase in verbal engagement/reminiscence during the intervention sessions with the program. Those 15 participants had mean percentages of intervals with verbal engagement/reminiscence below 10 during baseline and between about 45 and 75 during the intervention. The results’ implications and the need for new research were discussed. PMID:26089797

  20. Patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease engage in verbal reminiscence with the support of a computer-aided program: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; D'Amico, Fiora; Ferlisi, Gabriele; Denitto, Floriana; De Vanna, Floriana; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the assessment of a program recently developed for helping patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease engage in computer-mediated verbal reminiscence (Lancioni et al., 2014a). Sixteen participants were involved in the study. Six of them used the original program version with the computer showing a virtual partner posing questions and providing attention and guidance. The other 10 used a slightly modified program version with the computer presenting photos and videos and providing encouragements to talk as well as attention and guidance. Participants were exposed to brief program sessions individually. The results showed that 15 participants (five of those using the first version and all of those using the second version) had a clear and lasting increase in verbal engagement/reminiscence during the intervention sessions with the program. Those 15 participants had mean percentages of intervals with verbal engagement/reminiscence below 10 during baseline and between about 45 and 75 during the intervention. The results' implications and the need for new research were discussed.

  1. The Theory, Structure, and Techniques for the Inclusion of Children in Family Therapy: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Lori K.; Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Haddock, Shelley A.

    2002-01-01

    Many barriers prevent therapists from including young children in family therapy, despite the theoretical belief that every family member should be present. Although there is a wealth of literature describing how to include children, the information has not been compiled in a way that is easily accessible to therapists. In this article, we report…

  2. [In-patient nuclear medicine therapy in Germany from 2010 to 2012. Analysis of structured quality reports].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, R; Buck, A; Reiners, C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this analysis was to collect and analyse Germany-wide data on the status and development of in-patient Nuclear Medicine therapy. The official hospital quality reports were to be used as the data source. The reference reports from all hospitals in Germany with Nuclear Medicine therapy units, compiled by Gemeinsamer Bundesausschuss (G-BA) from the machine-usable XML data of the quality reports, were analysed for the years 2010 and 2012. Results from our own preceding investigations of structured quality reports for the years 2004, 2006 and 2008 were used to assess the longer-term development. To determine the Germany-wide incidence of thyroid surgery and radio-iodine therapy, public databases of Institut für das Entgeltsystem im Krankenhaus (InEK) were assessed for the years from 2004 to 2012. The total number of in-patient Nuclear Medicine treatment cases decreased from 50 363 to 47 314 patients in the period from 2010 to 2012. There was a marked decline of 17.5% in case incidence over the longer period from 2004 to 2012. The decrease is primarily due to a decrease in cases with hyperthyroidism (ICD code E05). The number of thyroid surgeries has been declining since 2009. There was a moderate 23.7% increase in the number of cases with the diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma (ICD code C73) from 2004 to 2012. Presumably, the improved iodine supply in Germany has led to a decline in inpatients with hyperthyroidism in nuclear medicine and consequently to a decrease in both the number of radio-iodine therapies and thyroid operations in surgery. In contrast, the number of patients in nuclear medicine therapy units diagnosed with thyroid cancer has increased moderately which correlates with the worldwide increasing incidence of this disease.

  3. Associations between alcohol use, other psychosocial factors, structural factors and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among South African ART recipients.

    PubMed

    Morojele, Neo K; Kekwaletswe, Connie T; Nkosi, Sebenzile

    2014-03-01

    We examined whether alcohol use is associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence independently of structural and psychosocial factors among 304 male and female ART recipients in ART sites in Tshwane, South Africa. ART adherence was assessed by the CASE Adherence Index. Independent variables were demographic, structural, psycho-social, and alcohol use (AUDIT score) factors. In hierarchical multiple regression, demographic variables (Step 1) explained 4 % of variance in ART adherence (p ≤ 0.01). Variance explained increased to 16 % (p ≤ 0.001) after entering structural variables (Step 2); 19 % (p ≤ 0.001) after entering psychosocial variables (Step 3); and 24 % (p ≤ 0.001) after entering AUDIT score (Step 4). Alcohol use is independently associated with ART adherence.

  4. A pilot study for a structured, time-limited therapy group for sexually abused pre-adolescent children.

    PubMed

    Corder, B F; Haizlip, T; DeBoer, P

    1990-01-01

    The critical role of specific types of mastery skill development in the treatment of sexually abused children is explored, and defense mechanisms of "invulnerable children," who function adequately despite trauma and stress, are described. The authors describe their development of structured group therapy techniques designed to foster these types of mastery skills with sexually abused children aged 6 to 8. These techniques include development of intellectualization defenses through original coloring books and therapeutic board games, cathartic exploration of feelings through structured art and storytelling exercises, cognitive relabeling and self-esteem building through role-play, "chants and cheers," homework shared with mothers, and other structured group procedures designed to develop specific coping skills.

  5. REMCARE: Pragmatic Multi-Centre Randomised Trial of Reminiscence Groups for People with Dementia and their Family Carers: Effectiveness and Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, Martin; Bruce, Errollyn; Edwards, Rhiannon T.; Hounsome, Barry; Keady, John; Orgeta, Vasiliki; Rees, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Background Joint reminiscence groups, involving people with dementia and family carers together, are popular, but the evidence-base is limited. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of joint reminiscence groups as compared to usual care. Methods This multi-centre, pragmatic randomised controlled trial had two parallel arms: intervention group and usual-care control group. A restricted dynamic method of randomisation was used, with an overall allocation ratio of 1:1, restricted to ensure viable sized intervention groups. Assessments, blind to treatment allocation, were carried out at baseline, three months and ten months (primary end-point), usually in the person's home. Participants were recruited in eight centres, mainly through NHS Memory Clinics and NHS community mental health teams. Included participants were community resident people with mild to moderate dementia (DSM-IV), who had a relative or other care-giver in regular contact, to act as informant and willing and able to participate in intervention. 71% carers were spouses. 488 people with dementia (mean age 77.5)were randomised: 268 intervention, 220 control; 350 dyads completed the study (206 intervention, 144 control). The intervention evaluated was joint reminiscence groups (with up to 12 dyads) weekly for twelve weeks; monthly maintenance sessions for further seven months. Sessions followed a published treatment manual and were held in a variety of community settings. Two trained facilitators in each centre were supported by volunteers. Primary outcome measures were self-reported quality of life for the person with dementia (QoL-AD), psychological distress for the carer (General Health Questionnaire, GHQ-28). Secondary outcome measures included: autobiographical memory and activities of daily living for the person with dementia; carer stress for the carer; mood, relationship quality and service use and costs for both. Results The intention to treat analysis (ANCOVA

  6. Prenatal neurogenesis induction therapy normalizes brain structure and function in Down syndrome mice.

    PubMed

    Nakano-Kobayashi, Akiko; Awaya, Tomonari; Kii, Isao; Sumida, Yuto; Okuno, Yukiko; Yoshida, Suguru; Sumida, Tomoe; Inoue, Haruhisa; Hosoya, Takamitsu; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2017-09-19

    Down syndrome (DS) caused by trisomy of chromosome 21 is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability. Although the prenatal diagnosis of DS has become feasible, there are no therapies available for the rescue of DS-related neurocognitive impairment. A growth inducer newly identified in our screen of neural stem cells (NSCs) has potent inhibitory activity against dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) and was found to rescue proliferative deficits in Ts65Dn-derived neurospheres and human NSCs derived from individuals with DS. The oral administration of this compound, named ALGERNON (altered generation of neurons), restored NSC proliferation in murine models of DS and increased the number of newborn neurons. Moreover, administration of ALGERNON to pregnant dams rescued aberrant cortical formation in DS mouse embryos and prevented the development of abnormal behaviors in DS offspring. These data suggest that the neurogenic phenotype of DS can be prevented by ALGERNON prenatal therapy.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy associated with endurance exercise training: Effects on the structural and functional remodeling of infarcted rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Lavorato, Victor Neiva; Del Carlo, Ricardo Junqueira; da Cunha, Daise Nunes Queiroz; Okano, Barbara Silva; Belfort, Felipe Gomes; de Freitas, Juliana Silveira; da Mota, Gloria de Fatima Alves; Quintão-Júnior, Judson Fonseca; Silame-Gomes, Luis Henrique Lobo; Drummond, Filipe Rios; Carneiro-Júnior, Miguel Araújo; de Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes; Monteiro, Betania Souza; Prímola-Gomes, Thales Nicolau; Natali, Antônio José

    2016-01-01

    We tested the effects of early mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy associated with endurance exercise on the structural and functional cardiac remodeling of rats with myocardial infarctation (MI). Male Wistar rats (40 days old) were divided into 6 groups: control and exercise sham; control and exercise MI; and control and exercise MI MSC. MI was surgically induced and bone marrow-derived MSCs were immediately injected via caudal vein (concentration: 1 × 10(6 )cells). Twenty-four hours later ET groups exercised on a treadmill (5 days/week; 60 min/day; 60% of maximal running velocity) for 12 weeks. Structural and functional changes were determined by echocardiography. Contractility and intracellular global calcium ([Ca(2 +)]i) transient were measured in myocytes from the left ventricular (LV) non-infarcted area. Calcium regulatory proteins were measured by Western blot. MI increased (p < 0.05) heart, ventricular and LV weights and its ratios to body weight; LV internal dimension in diastole (LVID-D) and in systole (LVID-S) and LV free wall in diastole (LVFW-D), but reduced the thickness of interventricular septum in systole (IVS-S), ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS). MI augmented (p < 0.05) the times to peak and to half relaxation of cell shortening as well as the amplitude of the [Ca(2 +)]i transient and the times to peak and to half decay. Early MSCs therapy restored LVFW-D, IVS-S and the amplitude and time to half decay of the [Ca(2 +)]i transient. Early endurance exercise intervention increased (p < 0.05) LVFW-S, IVS-S, EF and FS, and reduced the times to peak and to half relaxation of cell shortening, and the amplitude of the [Ca(2 +)]i transient. Exercise training also increased the expression of left ventricular SERCA2a and PLBser16. Nevertheless, the combination of these therapies did not cause additive effects. In conclusion, combining early MSCs therapy and endurance exercise does not potentiate the benefits of such treatments to

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi infection and benznidazole therapy independently stimulate oxidative status and structural pathological remodeling of the liver tissue in mice.

    PubMed

    Novaes, Rômulo Dias; Santos, Eliziária C; Cupertino, Marli C; Bastos, Daniel S S; Oliveira, Jerusa M; Carvalho, Thaís V; Neves, Mariana M; Oliveira, Leandro L; Talvani, André

    2015-08-01

    This study used a murine model of Chagas disease to investigate the isolated and combined impact of Trypanosoma cruzi infection and benznidazole (BZ) therapy on liver structure and function. Male C57BL/6 mice were challenged with T. cruzi and BZ for 15 days. Serum levels of cytokines and hepatic enzymes, liver oxidative stress, morphology, collagen, and glycogen content were monitored. Separately, T. cruzi infection and BZ treatment resulted in a pro-oxidant status and hepatic reactive damage. Concurrently, both T. cruzi infection and BZ treatment induced upregulation of antioxidant enzymes and pathological reorganization of the liver parenchyma and stroma. T. cruzi infection increased serum levels of Th1 cytokines, which were reduced by BZ in both infected and non-infected animals. BZ also induced functional organ damage, increasing serum levels of liver enzymes. When combined, T. cruzi infection and BZ therapy elicited intense hepatic reactive damage that was not compensated by antioxidant enzymatic reaction, subsequently culminating in more severe morphofunctional hepatic injury. Taken together, these findings indicate that during specific treatment of Chagas disease, hepatic pathology may be a result of an interaction between BZ metabolism and specific mechanisms activated during the natural course of T. cruzi infection, rather than an isolated toxic effect of BZ on liver structure and function.

  9. Structure of the physical therapy benefit in a typical Blue Cross Blue Shield preferred provider organization plan available in the individual insurance market in 2011.

    PubMed

    Sandstrom, Robert W; Lehman, Jedd; Hahn, Lee; Ballard, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 establishes American Health Benefit Exchanges. The benefit design of insurance plans in state health insurance exchanges will be based on the structure of existing small-employer-sponsored plans. The purpose of this study was to describe the structure of the physical therapy benefit in a typical Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) preferred provider organization (PPO) health insurance plan available in the individual insurance market in 2011. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The physical therapy benefit within 39 BCBS PPO plans in 2011 was studied for a standard consumer with a standard budget. First, whether physical therapy was a benefit in the plan was determined. If so, then the structure of the benefit was described in terms of whether the physical therapy benefit was a stand-alone benefit or part of a combined-discipline benefit and whether a visit or financial limit was placed on the physical therapy benefit. Physical therapy was included in all BCBS plans that were studied. Ninety-three percent of plans combined physical therapy with other disciplines. Two thirds of plans placed a limit on the number of visits covered. The results of the study are limited to 1 standard consumer, 1 association of insurance companies, 1 form of insurance (a PPO), and 1 PPO plan in each of the 39 states that were studied. Physical therapy is a covered benefit in a typical BCBS PPO health insurance plan. Physical therapy most often is combined with other therapy disciplines, and the number of covered visits is limited in two thirds of plans.

  10. 3-dimensional structures to enhance cell therapy and engineer contractile tissue.

    PubMed

    Schussler, Olivier; Chachques, Juan C; Mesana, Thierry G; Suuronen, Erik J; Lecarpentier, Yves; Ruel, Marc

    2010-02-01

    Experimental studies in animals and recent human clinical trials have revealed the current limitations of cellular transplantation, which include poor cell survival, lack of cell engraftment, and poor differentiation. Evidence in animals suggests that use of a 3-dimensional scaffold may enhance cell therapy and engineer myocardial tissue by improving initial cell retention, survival, differentiation, and integration. Several scaffolds of synthetic or natural origin are under development. Until now, contractility has been demonstrated in vitro only in biological scaffolds prepared from decellularized organs or tissue, or in collagenic porous scaffold obtained by crosslinking collagen fibers. While contractility of a cellularized collagen construct is poor, it can be greatly enhanced by tumor basement membrane extract. Recent advances in biochemistry have shown improved cell-matrix interactions by coupling adhesion molecules to achieve an efficient and safe bioartificial myocardium with no tumoral component. Fixation of adhesion molecules may also be a way to enhance cell homing and/or differentiation to increase local angiogenesis. Whatever the clinically successful combination ultimately proves to be, it is likely that cell therapy will require providing a supportive biochemical, physical, and spatial environment that will allow the cells to optimally differentiate and integrate within the target myocardial tissue.

  11. Structure of solid tumors and their vasculature: Implications for therapy with monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, H.F.; Nagy, J.A.; Dvorak, A.M. )

    1991-03-01

    Delivery of monoclonal antibodies to solid tumors is a vexing problem that must be solved if these antibodies are to realize their promise in therapy. Such success as has been achieved with monoclonal antibodies is attributable to the local hyperpermeability of the tumor vasculature, a property that favors antibody extravasation at tumor sites and that is mediated by a tumor-secreted vascular permeability factor. However, leaky tumor blood vessels are generally some distance removed from target tumor cells, separated by stroma and by other tumor cells that together represent significant barriers to penetration by extravasated monoclonal antibodies. For this reason, alternative approaches may be attractive. These include the use of antibody-linked cytotoxins, which are able to kill tumor cells without immediate contact, and direction of antibodies against nontumor cell targets, for example, antigens unique to the tumor vascular endothelium or to tumor stroma. 50 refs.

  12. Human DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferases: a functional and structural perspective for epigenetic cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Rondelet, Grégoire; Wouters, Johan

    2017-08-01

    Epigenetic modifications modulate chromatin states to regulate gene expression. Among them, DNA methylation and histone modifications play a crucial role in the establishment of the epigenome. In cancer, these epigenetic events may act in concert to repress tumor suppressor genes or promote oncogenic pathways. In the context of cancer initiation and progression, recruitment of DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferases to specific genomic regions is mainly mediated by histone epigenetic marks, transcription factors and co-regulators as part of a dynamic process. Herein, we will review these mechanisms and present state-of-the-art of DNA methylation, treatment and development of epigenetic cancer therapies targeting this epigenetic modification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  13. Singlet oxygen generation in PUVA therapy studied using electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano-Pérez, Juan José; Olaso-González, Gloria; Merchán, Manuela; Serrano-Andrés, Luis

    2009-06-01

    The ability of furocoumarins to participate in the PUVA (Psoralen + UV-A) therapy against skin disorders and some types of cancer, is analyzed on quantum chemical grounds. The efficiency of the process relies on its capability to populate its lowest triplet excited state, and then either form adducts with thymine which interfere DNA replication or transfer its energy, generating singlet molecular oxygen damaging the cell membrane in photoactivated tissues. By determining the spin-orbit couplings, shown to be the key property, in the intersystem crossing yielding the triplet state of the furocoumarin, the electronic couplings in the triplet-triplet energy transfer process producing the singlet oxygen, and the reaction rates and lifetimes, the efficiency in the phototherapeutic action of the furocoumarin family is predicted as: khellin < 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) < 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) < psoralen < 4,5‧,8-trimethylpsoralen (TMP) < 3-carbethoxypsoralen (3-CPS), the latter being the most efficient photosensitizer and singlet oxygen generator.

  14. Visualization and attributation of vascular structures for diagnostics and therapy planning.

    PubMed

    Kunert, Tobias; Thorn, Matthias; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2002-01-01

    In various medical fields vascular structures have to be examined with usually two-dimensional views which present imaging techniques produce. The interpretation of the data can be supported by 3-dimensional visualization techniques. The further analysis requires often the attributation of the particular functional or anatomical entities. To attribute these interactively we developed two different visualization strategies. In the first one the shape of the structures is modelled with OpenGL achieving very fast response times, most notably during the navigation. The second strategy, the direct rendering of the volume, benefits from the accurate reproduction of the vascular structures. Although the rendering needs much more time, the strategy provides similar response times for the attributation. Thus, the strategies complement one another.

  15. Structural basis of omalizumab therapy and omalizumab-mediated IgE exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Luke F.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana; Brigger, Daniel; Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Graham, Michelle T.; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Eggel, Alexander; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-05-19

    Omalizumab is a widely used therapeutic anti-IgE antibody. Here we report the crystal structure of the omalizumab–Fab in complex with an IgE-Fc fragment. This structure reveals the mechanism of omalizumab-mediated inhibition of IgE interactions with both high- and low-affinity IgE receptors, and explains why omalizumab selectively binds free IgE. The structure of the complex also provides mechanistic insight into a class of disruptive IgE inhibitors that accelerate the dissociation of the high-affinity IgE receptor from IgE. We use this structural data to generate a mutant IgE-Fc fragment that is resistant to omalizumab binding. Treatment with this omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragment, in combination with omalizumab, promotes the exchange of cell-bound full-length IgE with omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragments on human basophils. Furthermore, this combination treatment also blocks basophil activation more efficiently than either agent alone, providing a novel approach to probe regulatory mechanisms underlying IgE hypersensitivity with implications for therapeutic interventions.

  16. Structural basis of omalizumab therapy and omalizumab-mediated IgE exchange

    DOE PAGES

    Pennington, Luke F.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana; Brigger, Daniel; ...

    2016-05-19

    Omalizumab is a widely used therapeutic anti-IgE antibody. Here we report the crystal structure of the omalizumab–Fab in complex with an IgE-Fc fragment. This structure reveals the mechanism of omalizumab-mediated inhibition of IgE interactions with both high- and low-affinity IgE receptors, and explains why omalizumab selectively binds free IgE. The structure of the complex also provides mechanistic insight into a class of disruptive IgE inhibitors that accelerate the dissociation of the high-affinity IgE receptor from IgE. We use this structural data to generate a mutant IgE-Fc fragment that is resistant to omalizumab binding. Treatment with this omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragment, inmore » combination with omalizumab, promotes the exchange of cell-bound full-length IgE with omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragments on human basophils. Furthermore, this combination treatment also blocks basophil activation more efficiently than either agent alone, providing a novel approach to probe regulatory mechanisms underlying IgE hypersensitivity with implications for therapeutic interventions.« less

  17. Structural basis of omalizumab therapy and omalizumab-mediated IgE exchange

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, Luke F.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana; Brigger, Daniel; Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Graham, Michelle T.; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Eggel, Alexander; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Omalizumab is a widely used therapeutic anti-IgE antibody. Here we report the crystal structure of the omalizumab–Fab in complex with an IgE-Fc fragment. This structure reveals the mechanism of omalizumab-mediated inhibition of IgE interactions with both high- and low-affinity IgE receptors, and explains why omalizumab selectively binds free IgE. The structure of the complex also provides mechanistic insight into a class of disruptive IgE inhibitors that accelerate the dissociation of the high-affinity IgE receptor from IgE. We use this structural data to generate a mutant IgE-Fc fragment that is resistant to omalizumab binding. Treatment with this omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragment, in combination with omalizumab, promotes the exchange of cell-bound full-length IgE with omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragments on human basophils. This combination treatment also blocks basophil activation more efficiently than either agent alone, providing a novel approach to probe regulatory mechanisms underlying IgE hypersensitivity with implications for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27194387

  18. Multimodal luminescent-magnetic boron nitride nanotubes@NaGdF₄:Eu structures for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Wang, Xuebin; Yamaguchi, Maho; Yi, Wei; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2014-04-28

    Boron nitride nanotubes@NaGdF4:Eu composites with core@shell structures were fabricated giving the opportunity to trace, target and thus to manipulate BNNTs in vitro. The composites show a significantly higher cellular uptake and chemotherapy drug intracellular delivery ability in the presence of an external magnetic field than that in its absence.

  19. Objective structured clinical evaluation as an assessment method for undergraduate chest physical therapy students: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cibele C B M; Lunardi, Adriana C; Mendes, Felipe A R; Souza, Flavia F P; Carvalho, Celso R F

    2011-01-01

    The Objective Structured Clinical Evaluation (OSCE) has been considered a reliable method for the evaluation of students' clinical skills in health sciences, but it has been rarely applied in the teaching of physical therapy. To assess the use of the OSCE as a tool to evaluate the abilities of undergraduate chest physical therapy students and to verify the internal consistency of the OSCE exam. Forty-seven students were evaluated using two types of exams: the traditional exam and the OSCE. Independent educators elaborated the exams. Each question (traditional) or station (OSCE) was given a score ranging from 0.0 to 2.0; being 10.0 the highest possible score of both exams. The relationship between the total score that were obtained from both exams was analyzed using Bland-Altman analysis and Pearson's correlation coefficient. The internal consistency of the OSCE stations was evaluated by four experienced chest physical therapists and it was tested using Cronbach's alpha. The students' average score on the OSCE ranged from 4.4 to 9.6. The internal consistency of the OSCE stations was considered good (0.7). The agreement between exams was analyzed, and it was determined that the exams are not comparable. Examiners also observed a low agreement between the two exams (r=-0.1; p=0.9). Our results showed that OSCE and traditional exams are not interchangeable. The OSCE exam had good internal consistency and is able to evaluate aspects that the traditional exam fails to evaluate.

  20. Efficiency of photodynamic therapy on WM35 melanoma with synthetic porphyrins: Role of chemical structure, intracellular targeting and antioxidant defense.

    PubMed

    Baldea, Ioana; Olteanu, Diana Elena; Bolfa, Pompei; Ion, Rodica Mariana; Decea, Nicoleta; Cenariu, Mihai; Banciu, Manuela; Sesarman, Alina Viorica; Filip, Adriana Gabriela

    2015-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) could be an adjuvant therapy in melanoma, an aggressive cancer that arises from melanocytes. Several reports showed encouraging results of the efficacy of PDT in melanoma on experimental models and in clinical trials. Therefore, we studied the efficacy of two derivatives of tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP): meso-5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-hydroxyphenyl) porphyrin (THOPP) and meso-5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-10,15,20-tris (4-methoxyphenyl) porphyrin (THOMPP) as photosensitizers for PDT, compared to FDA approved delta aminolevulinic acid (ALA) against a lightly pigmented, melanoma cell line, WM35, in vitro. Both porphyrins were more efficient as photosensitizers, compared to ALA, without dark toxicity. The efficiency depended on the intracellular localization and the molecule structure. THOPP, the most efficient porphyrin localized mainly in mitochondria, while THOMPP accumulated in lysosomes; both showed melanosomal localization. The symmetric THOPP molecule was able to generate increased oxidative stress damage and apoptosis. THOPP also induced a low effect on the defense mechanisms like antioxidant enzyme SOD (superoxide dismutase), NF-kB (nuclear transcription factor kB) activation and MITF (microphthalmia transcription factor). The lower efficiency of the asymmetric molecule, THOMPP was probably due to a diminished photoactivation, which led to a lower ROS induced damage, combined with higher activation of the defense mechanisms.

  1. Beam Path Toxicities to Non-Target Structures During Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, David I. Chambers, Mark S.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Kies, Merrill S.

    2008-11-01

    Background: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams traverse nontarget normal structures not irradiated during three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). This study estimates the doses and toxicities to nontarget structures during IMRT. Materials and Methods: Oropharyngeal cancer IMRT and 3D-CRT cases were reviewed. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to evaluate radiation dose to the lip, cochlea, brainstem, occipital scalp, and segments of the mandible. Toxicity rates were compared for 3D-CRT, IMRT alone, or IMRT with concurrent cisplatin. Descriptive statistics and exploratory recursive partitioning analysis were used to estimate dose 'breakpoints' associated with observed toxicities. Results: A total of 160 patients were evaluated for toxicity; 60 had detailed DVH evaluation and 15 had 3D-CRT plan comparison. Comparing IMRT with 3D-CRT, there was significant (p {<=} 0.002) nonparametric differential dose to all clinically significant structures of interest. Thirty percent of IMRT patients had headaches and 40% had occipital scalp alopecia. A total of 76% and 38% of patients treated with IMRT alone had nausea and vomiting, compared with 99% and 68%, respectively, of those with concurrent cisplatin. IMRT had a markedly distinct toxicity profile than 3D-CRT. In recursive partitioning analysis, National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria adverse effects 3.0 nausea and vomiting, scalp alopecia and anterior mucositis were associated with reconstructed mean brainstem dose >36 Gy, occipital scalp dose >30 Gy, and anterior mandible dose >34 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Dose reduction to specified structures during IMRT implies an increased beam path dose to alternate nontarget structures that may result in clinical toxicities that were uncommon with previous, less conformal approaches. These findings have implications for IMRT treatment planning and research, toxicity assessment, and multidisciplinary patient

  2. Structural normalization of the lymphoid tissue in asymptomatic HIV-infected patients after 48 weeks of potent antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Macías, J; Japón, M A; Leal, M; Sáez, C; Pineda, J A; Segura, D I; Ortega, J; Lissen, E

    2001-12-07

    The hallmark of HIV infection is the involution and destruction of lymphoid tissue. However, very little information exists on the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on lymphoid tissue structure. To evaluate the effect of a HAART regimen after 48 weeks on the architecture and cell regeneration of tonsil lymphoid tissue in HIV-infected patients with CD4 T cell counts > or = 500/microl. From June 1997 to February 1998 all asymptomatic HIV-infected patients with CD4 T cell counts > or = 500/microl seen at our unit were offered quadruple antiretroviral therapy. Tonsil biopsies were obtained at baseline and at 48 weeks. Tonsil tissue sections were examined to evaluate structural and immunohistochemical changes by two blinded and independent pathologists. Cell numbers were counted for selected markers in T-dependent zones. Eleven patients were evaluable, six were excluded because of insufficient or inadequate sampling in at least one of the biopsies. Cellular depletion, plasma cell accumulation and prominent vessels were observed in all cases; three excluded patients with evaluable baseline biopsies showed similar tissue lesions. Follow-up biopsies demonstrated some degree of improvement in all patients. Germinal centres appeared in seven cases that were not seen at baseline. CD4 cell counts increased and CD8 cell counts decreased significantly in lymphoid tissue. An increase in CD45RA+ cells was observed; however, the proportion of CD45+Ki67+ cells did not differ between baseline and 48 weeks. This study shows an unexpected range of moderate to severe lymphoid tissue lesions in mildly immunosuppressed HIV-infected patients, which was partly restored after 48 weeks of HAART.

  3. Comparing results from multiple imputation and dynamic marginal structural models for estimating when to start antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Bryan E; Liu, Qi; Mercaldo, Nathaniel; Jenkins, Cathy A; Lau, Bryan; Cole, Stephen R; Saag, Michael S; Sterling, Timothy R

    2016-10-30

    Optimal timing of initiating antiretroviral therapy has been a controversial topic in HIV research. Two highly publicized studies applied different analytical approaches, a dynamic marginal structural model and a multiple imputation method, to different observational databases and came up with different conclusions. Discrepancies between the two studies' results could be due to differences between patient populations, fundamental differences between statistical methods, or differences between implementation details. For example, the two studies adjusted for different covariates, compared different thresholds, and had different criteria for qualifying measurements. If both analytical approaches were applied to the same cohort holding technical details constant, would their results be similar? In this study, we applied both statistical approaches using observational data from 12,708 HIV-infected persons throughout the USA. We held technical details constant between the two methods and then repeated analyses varying technical details to understand what impact they had on findings. We also present results applying both approaches to simulated data. Results were similar, although not identical, when technical details were held constant between the two statistical methods. Confidence intervals for the dynamic marginal structural model tended to be wider than those from the imputation approach, although this may have been due in part to additional external data used in the imputation analysis. We also consider differences in the estimands, required data, and assumptions of the two statistical methods. Our study provides insights into assessing optimal dynamic treatment regimes in the context of starting antiretroviral therapy and in more general settings. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Effect of chenodiol on the small intestine. Unimpaired structure and function during therapy for gallstone dissolution.

    PubMed

    Casanova, S; Roda, A; Festi, D; Mazzella, G; Aldini, R; Bazzoli, F; Sama, C; Morselli, A M; Barbara, L; Roda, E

    1981-12-04

    To test whether long-term oral dosage with chenodiol (chenodeoxycholic acid) used for dissolution of cholesterol gallstones would cause impairment of small-intestinal structuree or function, ten patients were studied before and after three months of oral chenodiol administration, 15 mg/kg of body weight per day. Small-intestinal structure was assessed by roentgenogram and intestinal biopsy, using both light and electron microscopy. Small-intestinal function was assessed by xylose, fat and vitamin B12, lactose, and bile-acid absorption. Bile acid metabolism was also characterized by the breath test for deconjugation using carbon dioxide labeled with radioactive carbon 14. No significant abnormalities were found. The results suggest that oral chenodiol administration does not impair intestinal structur or function in doses used for gallstone dissolution.

  5. Crystal structure of poxvirus thymidylate kinase: an unexpected dimerization has implications for antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Caillat, Christophe; Topalis, Dimitri; Agrofoglio, Luigi A; Pochet, Sylvie; Balzarini, Jan; Deville-Bonne, Dominique; Meyer, Philippe

    2008-11-04

    Unlike most DNA viruses, poxviruses replicate in the cytoplasm of host cells. They encode enzymes needed for genome replication and transcription, including their own thymidine and thymidylate kinases. Some herpes viruses encode only 1 enzyme catalyzing both reactions, a peculiarity used for prodrug activation to obtain maximum specificity. We have solved the crystal structures of vaccinia virus thymidylate kinase bound to TDP or brivudin monophosphate. Although the viral and human enzymes have similar sequences (42% identity), they differ in their homodimeric association and active-site geometry. The vaccinia TMP kinase dimer arrangement is orthogonal and not antiparallel as in human enzyme. This different monomer orientation is related to the presence of a canal connecting the edge of the dimer interface to the TMP base binding pocket. Consequently, the pox enzyme accommodates nucleotides with bulkier bases, like brivudin monophosphate and dGMP; these are efficiently phosphorylated and stabilize the enzyme. The brivudin monophosphate-bound structure explains the structural basis for this specificity, opening the way to the rational development of specific antipox agents that may also be suitable for poxvirus TMP kinase gene-based chemotherapy of cancer.

  6. Crystal structure of poxvirus thymidylate kinase: An unexpected dimerization has implications for antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Caillat, Christophe; Topalis, Dimitri; Agrofoglio, Luigi A.; Pochet, Sylvie; Balzarini, Jan; Deville-Bonne, Dominique; Meyer, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Unlike most DNA viruses, poxviruses replicate in the cytoplasm of host cells. They encode enzymes needed for genome replication and transcription, including their own thymidine and thymidylate kinases. Some herpes viruses encode only 1 enzyme catalyzing both reactions, a peculiarity used for prodrug activation to obtain maximum specificity. We have solved the crystal structures of vaccinia virus thymidylate kinase bound to TDP or brivudin monophosphate. Although the viral and human enzymes have similar sequences (42% identity), they differ in their homodimeric association and active-site geometry. The vaccinia TMP kinase dimer arrangement is orthogonal and not antiparallel as in human enzyme. This different monomer orientation is related to the presence of a canal connecting the edge of the dimer interface to the TMP base binding pocket. Consequently, the pox enzyme accommodates nucleotides with bulkier bases, like brivudin monophosphate and dGMP; these are efficiently phosphorylated and stabilize the enzyme. The brivudin monophosphate-bound structure explains the structural basis for this specificity, opening the way to the rational development of specific antipox agents that may also be suitable for poxvirus TMP kinase gene-based chemotherapy of cancer. PMID:18971333

  7. Cortical Bone Stem Cell Therapy Preserves Cardiac Structure and Function After Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Thomas E; Schena, Giana J; Hoachlandr-Hobby, Alexander R; Starosta, Timothy; Berretta, Remus M; Wallner, Markus; Borghetti, Giulia; Gross, Polina; Yu, Daohai; Johnson, Jaslyn; Feldsott, Eric A; Trappanese, Danielle M; Toib, Amir; Rabinowitz, Joseph E; George, Jon C; Kubo, Hajime; Mohsin, Sadia; Houser, Steven R

    2017-09-14

    Rationale: Cortical bone stem cells (CBSCs) have been shown to reduce ventricular remodeling and improve cardiac function in a murine myocardial infarction (MI) model. These effects were superior to other stem cell types that have been used in recent early stage clinical trials. However, CBSC efficacy has not been tested in a preclinical large animal model using approaches that could be applied to patients. Objective: To determine if post-MI transendocardial injection of allogeneic CBSCs reduces pathological structural and functional remodeling and prevents the development of heart failure in a swine MI model. Methods and Results: Female Göttingen swine underwent left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion (ischemia-reperfusion MI). Animals received, in a randomized, blinded manner, 1:1 ratio, CBSCs (n = 9) (2x10(7) cells total) or placebo (vehicle; VEH, n = 9) through NOGA® guided transendocardial injections. 5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine (EdU), a thymidine analog, containing minipumps were inserted at the time of MI induction. At 72hrs (n=8) initial injury and cell retention were assessed. At 3 Months post-MI, cardiac structure and function was evaluated by serial echocardiography, and terminal invasive hemodynamics. CBSCs were present in the MI border zone and proliferating at 72hrs post-MI but had no effect on initial cardiac injury or structure. At 3 months, CBSC-treated hearts had significantly reduced scar size, smaller myocytes and increased myocyte nuclear density. Noninvasive echocardiographic measurements showed that left ventricular (LV) volumes and ejection fraction were significantly more preserved in CBSC-treated hearts and invasive hemodynamic measurements documented improved cardiac structure and functional reserve. The number of EdU(+) cardiac myocytes was increased in CBSC- vs. VEH- treated animals. Conclusions: CBSC administration into the MI border zone reduces pathological cardiac structural and functional

  8. Assessment of the changes in alveolar bone quality after fixed orthodontic therapy: A trabecular structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haghnegahdar, Abdolaziz; Zarif Najafi, Hooman; Sabet, Maryam; Saki, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tooth displacement changes the periodontium. The aim of orthodontic treatment is desired tooth movement with minimum side effects on the alveolar bone quality. The aim of the present study was to assess changes of alveolar trabeculation in children, young adults and adults and the two genders. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, 63 patients who had been treated in Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, were chosen with convenient sampling method. They were divided into three groups based on their age. Their digitized panoramic radiographs (PRs) were evaluated at six interdental sites from the mesial aspect of the mandibular second molars to the distal aspect of the mandibular first premolars using a visual index. The trabeculation pattern was assigned as either dense (score 3), dense-sparse (score 2) or sparse (score 1). Data were imported to SPSS. Mean of the scores before treatment (score B) and mean of them after treatment (score A) were compared for each group with paired t-test. Changes between score B and sore A of the groups were compared using one-way ANOVA and post hoc tests. Results. Mean score A was significantly higher than mean score B in children (P = 0.001). In contrast, mean score A was significantly lower than mean score B in young adults (P = 0.003). Conclusion. Orthodontists should be cautious when treating young adults and adults regarding the probable, yet possibly temporary, negative effects of orthodontic therapy on the alveolar bone quality. PMID:28096944

  9. Electroconvulsive therapy and structural neuroplasticity in neocortical, limbic and paralimbic cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pirnia, T; Joshi, S H; Leaver, A M; Vasavada, M; Njau, S; Woods, R P; Espinoza, R; Narr, K L

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective and rapidly acting treatment for severe depression. To understand the biological bases of therapeutic response, we examined variations in cortical thickness from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in 29 patients scanned at three time points during an ECT treatment index series and in 29 controls at two time points. Changes in thickness across time and with symptom improvement were evaluated at high spatial resolution across the cortex and within discrete cortical regions of interest. Patients showed increased thickness over the course of ECT in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), inferior and superior temporal, parahippocampal, entorhinal and fusiform cortex and in distributed prefrontal areas. No changes across time occurred in controls. In temporal and fusiform regions showing significant ECT effects, thickness differed between patients and controls at baseline and change in thickness related to therapeutic response in patients. In the ACC, these relationships occurred in treatment responders only, and thickness measured soon after treatment initiation predicted the overall ECT response. ECT leads to widespread neuroplasticity in neocortical, limbic and paralimbic regions and changes relate to the extent of antidepressant response. Variations in ACC thickness, which discriminate treatment responders and predict response early in the course of ECT, may represent a biomarker of overall clinical outcome. Because post-mortem studies show focal reductions in glial density and neuronal size in patients with severe depression, ECT-related increases in thickness may be attributable to neuroplastic processes affecting the size and/or density of neurons and glia and their connections. PMID:27271858

  10. Electroconvulsive therapy and structural neuroplasticity in neocortical, limbic and paralimbic cortex.

    PubMed

    Pirnia, T; Joshi, S H; Leaver, A M; Vasavada, M; Njau, S; Woods, R P; Espinoza, R; Narr, K L

    2016-06-07

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective and rapidly acting treatment for severe depression. To understand the biological bases of therapeutic response, we examined variations in cortical thickness from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in 29 patients scanned at three time points during an ECT treatment index series and in 29 controls at two time points. Changes in thickness across time and with symptom improvement were evaluated at high spatial resolution across the cortex and within discrete cortical regions of interest. Patients showed increased thickness over the course of ECT in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), inferior and superior temporal, parahippocampal, entorhinal and fusiform cortex and in distributed prefrontal areas. No changes across time occurred in controls. In temporal and fusiform regions showing significant ECT effects, thickness differed between patients and controls at baseline and change in thickness related to therapeutic response in patients. In the ACC, these relationships occurred in treatment responders only, and thickness measured soon after treatment initiation predicted the overall ECT response. ECT leads to widespread neuroplasticity in neocortical, limbic and paralimbic regions and changes relate to the extent of antidepressant response. Variations in ACC thickness, which discriminate treatment responders and predict response early in the course of ECT, may represent a biomarker of overall clinical outcome. Because post-mortem studies show focal reductions in glial density and neuronal size in patients with severe depression, ECT-related increases in thickness may be attributable to neuroplastic processes affecting the size and/or density of neurons and glia and their connections.

  11. Clinical significance of cartilage biomarkers for monitoring structural joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with anti-TNF therapy.

    PubMed

    Niki, Yasuo; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Nakayama, Masanori; Nagasawa, Hayato; Kurasawa, Takahiko; Yamada, Harumoto; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    With the current use of biologics in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is a need to monitor ongoing structural joint damage due to the dissociation of articular cartilage damage from disease activity of RA. This study longitudinally analyzed levels of serum cartilage biomarkers during 54 weeks of infliximab therapy, to evaluate the feasibility of biomarkers for monitoring structural joint damage. Subjects comprised 33 patients with early RA and 33 patients with established RA. All patients received 3 mg/kg of infliximab and methotrexate for 54 weeks. Levels of the following serum cartilage markers were measured at baseline and at weeks 14, 22, and 54: hyaluronan (HA); cartilage oligometric matrix protein (COMP); type II collagen (CII)-related neoepitope (C2C); type II procollagen carboxy-propeptide (CPII); and keratin sulfate (KS). Time courses for each biomarker were assessed, and relationships between these biomarkers and clinical or radiographic parameters generally used for RA were investigated. Levels of CRP, MMP-3, DAS28-CRP, and annual progression of TSS were improved to similar degrees in both groups at week 54. HA and C2C/CPII were significantly decreased compared to baseline in the early RA group (p<0.001), whereas HA and COMP, but not C2C/CPII, were decreased in the established RA group. Strikingly, serum C2C/CPII levels were universally improved in early RA, regardless of EULAR response grade. Both ΔHA and ΔC2C/CPII from baseline to week 54 correlated significantly with not only ΔCRP, but also ΔDAS28 in early RA. Interestingly, when partial correlation coefficients were calculated by standardizing CRP levels, the significant correlation of ΔHA to ΔDAS28 disappeared, whereas correlations of ΔC2C/CPII to ΔDAS28, ΔJNS, and ΔHAQ remained significant. These results suggest a role of ΔC2C/CPII as a marker of ongoing structural joint damage with the least association with CRP, and that irreversible cartilage damage in established RA limits

  12. Clinical Significance of Cartilage Biomarkers for Monitoring Structural Joint Damage in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Treated with Anti-TNF Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Niki, Yasuo; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Nakayama, Masanori; Nagasawa, Hayato; Kurasawa, Takahiko; Yamada, Harumoto; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose With the current use of biologics in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is a need to monitor ongoing structural joint damage due to the dissociation of articular cartilage damage from disease activity of RA. This study longitudinally analyzed levels of serum cartilage biomarkers during 54 weeks of infliximab therapy, to evaluate the feasibility of biomarkers for monitoring structural joint damage. Methods Subjects comprised 33 patients with early RA and 33 patients with established RA. All patients received 3 mg/kg of infliximab and methotrexate for 54 weeks. Levels of the following serum cartilage markers were measured at baseline and at weeks 14, 22, and 54: hyaluronan (HA); cartilage oligometric matrix protein (COMP); type II collagen (CII)-related neoepitope (C2C); type II procollagen carboxy-propeptide (CPII); and keratin sulfate (KS). Time courses for each biomarker were assessed, and relationships between these biomarkers and clinical or radiographic parameters generally used for RA were investigated. Results Levels of CRP, MMP-3, DAS28-CRP, and annual progression of TSS were improved to similar degrees in both groups at week 54. HA and C2C/CPII were significantly decreased compared to baseline in the early RA group (p<0.001), whereas HA and COMP, but not C2C/CPII, were decreased in the established RA group. Strikingly, serum C2C/CPII levels were universally improved in early RA, regardless of EULAR response grade. Both ΔHA and ΔC2C/CPII from baseline to week 54 correlated significantly with not only ΔCRP, but also ΔDAS28 in early RA. Interestingly, when partial correlation coefficients were calculated by standardizing CRP levels, the significant correlation of ΔHA to ΔDAS28 disappeared, whereas correlations of ΔC2C/CPII to ΔDAS28, ΔJNS, and ΔHAQ remained significant. These results suggest a role of ΔC2C/CPII as a marker of ongoing structural joint damage with the least association with CRP, and that irreversible cartilage damage in

  13. Relationship Between Chromatin Structure and Sensitivity to Molecularly Targeted Auger Electron Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, Samantha Y.A.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The open structure of euchromatin renders it susceptible to DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR) compared with compact heterochromatin. The effect of chromatin configuration on the efficacy of Auger electron radiotherapy was investigated. Methods and Materials: Chromatin structure was altered in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N human breast cancer cells by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine, or hypertonic treatment. The extent and duration of chromatin structural changes were evaluated using the micrococcal nuclease assay. DNA damage ({gamma}H2AX assay) and clonogenic survival were evaluated after exposure to {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF, an Auger electron-emitting radiopharmaceutical, or IR. The intracellular distribution of {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF after chromatin modification was investigated in cell fractionation experiments. Results: Chromatin remained condensed for up to 20 minutes after NaCl and in a relaxed state 24 hours after SAHA treatment. The number of {gamma}H2AX foci per cell was greater in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells after IR (0.5 Gy) plus SAHA (1 {mu}M) compared with IR alone (16 {+-} 0.6 and 14 {+-} 0.3 vs. 12 {+-} 0.4 and 11 {+-} 0.2, respectively). More {gamma}H2AX foci were observed in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells exposed to {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF (6 MBq/{mu}g) plus SAHA vs. {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF alone (11 {+-} 0.3 and 12 {+-} 0.7 vs. 9 {+-} 0.4 and 7 {+-} 0.3, respectively). 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine enhanced the DNA damage caused by IR and {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF. Clonogenic survival was reduced in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells after IR (6 Gy) plus SAHA (1 {mu}M) vs. IR alone (0.6% {+-} 0.01 and 0.3% {+-} 0.2 vs. 5.8% {+-} 0.2 and 2% {+-} 0.1, respectively) and after {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF plus SAHA compared to {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF alone (21% {+-} 0.4% and 19% {+-} 4.6 vs. 33% {+-} 2.3 and 32% {+-} 3.7). SAHA did not affect {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF nuclear localization. Hypertonic treatment resulted in fewer {gamma}H2AX foci per cell

  14. Pharmacogenomics of the RNA World: Structural RNA Polymorphisms in Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sadee, W; Wang, D; Papp, AC; Pinsonneault, JK; Smith, RM; Moyer, RA; Johnson, AD

    2011-01-01

    The use of pharmacogenomic biomarkers can enhance treatment outcomes. Regulatory polymorphisms are promising biomarkers that have proven difficult to uncover. They come in two flavors: those that affect transcription (regulatory single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rSNPs)) and those that affect RNA functions such as splicing, turnover, and translation (termed structural RNA SNPs (srSNPs)). This review focuses on the role of srSNPs in drug metabolism, transport, and response. An understanding of the nature and diversity of srSNPs and rSNPs enables clinical scientists to evaluate genetic biomarkers. PMID:21289622

  15. [Reparative regeneration of connective tissue structures of mammals under antioxidant therapy conditions].

    PubMed

    Belova, S V; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M

    2015-01-01

    The influence of administration of the antioxidant complexes consisting of nonenzymatic antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol acetate preparation) and enzymatic antioxidants (ceruloplasmin) has been studied in rabbits with experimental arthritis. The introduction of alpha-tocopherol acetate (at a daily dose of 4 mg) improved metabolic processes in the organism (decreased in the rate of erythrocyte precipitation, total leukocytes and their stub and segmental forms; increased in erythrocyte count; reduced the glycosaminoglycan content as determined from uronic acid and hexose level; decreased ceruloplasmin activity and malonic dialdehyde level ion blood serum, all at p < 0.05), thus favoring reduction in the total activity of the inflammatory process as judged from hematological and biochemical data. Intra-articular introduction of ceruloplasmin (1.5 mg/kg, once per week) positively influenced the state of joint structures in damaged knee joints of the animals: decreased the activity of ceruloplasmin (from 5.28 ± 0.06 to 3.94 ± 0.01 AU), and malonic dialdehyde level (0.18 ± 0.02 to 0.08 ± 0.01 μM) in the articular fluid (all at p < 0.05). These effects are probably related to the elimination of inefficiency of the antioxidant system in the synovial medium, thus preventing inflammatory destruction of articular tissues, hindering the development of pannus, and assisting the activation of reparative regeneration of connective tissue structures.

  16. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K J; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Kamocka, Malgorzata; Miller, Caroline; Gattone, Vincent H; Dominguez, Jesus H

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA.

  17. Meta-Analysis of Catheter Ablation as an Adjunct to Medical Therapy for Treatment of Ventricular Tachycardia in Patients with Structural Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mallidi, Jaya; Nadkarni, Girish N.; Berger, Ronald D.; Calkins, Hugh; Nazarian, Saman

    2010-01-01

    Background Most studies of catheter ablation for treatment of ventricular tachycardia (VT) are relatively small observational trials. Objectives To define the relative risk of VT recurrence in patients undergoing catheter ablation as an adjunct to medical therapy versus medical therapy alone in a pooled analysis of controlled studies. Methods Randomized and non-randomized controlled trials of patients who underwent adjunctive catheter ablation of VT versus medical therapy alone were sought. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central register of controlled trials (CENTRAL), and Web of Science were searched from 1965 to July 2010. Supplemental searches included Internet resources, reference lists, and reports of arrhythmia experts. Three authors independently reviewed and extracted the data regarding baseline characteristics, ablation methodology, medical therapy, complications, VT recurrences, mortality, and study quality. Results Five studies were included totaling 457 participants with structural heart disease. Adjunctive catheter ablation was performed in 58% of participants whereas 42% received medical therapy alone for VT. Complications of catheter ablation included death (1%), stroke (1%), cardiac perforation (1%), and complete heart block (1.6%). Using a random effects model, a statistically significant 35% reduction in the number of patients with VT recurrence was noted with adjunctive catheter ablation (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in mortality. Conclusion Catheter ablation as an adjunct to medical therapy reduces VT recurrences in patients with structural heart disease and has no impact on mortality. PMID:21147263

  18. Building the rationale and structure for a complex physical therapy intervention within the context of a clinical trial: a multimodal individualized treatment for patients with hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bennell, Kim L; Egerton, Thorlene; Pua, Yong-Hao; Abbott, J Haxby; Sims, Kevin; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2011-10-01

    Evaluating the efficacy of complex interventions such as multimodal, impairment-based physical therapy treatments in randomized controlled trials is essential to inform practice and compare relative benefits of available treatment options. Studies of physical therapy interventions using highly standardized intervention protocols, although methodologically rigorous, do not necessarily reflect "real-world" clinical practice, and in many cases results have been disappointing. Development of a complex intervention that includes multiple treatment modalities and individualized treatment technique selection requires a systematic approach to designing all aspects of the intervention based on theory, evidence, and practical constraints. This perspective article outlines the development of the rationale and structure of a multimodal physical therapy program for painful hip osteoarthritis to be assessed in a clinical trial. The resulting intervention protocol comprises a semi-structured program of exercises and manual therapy, advice, physical activity, and optional prescription of a gait aid that is standardized, yet can be individualized according to physical assessment and radiographic findings. The program is evidence based and reflects contemporary physical therapist practice, while also being reproducible and reportable. This perspective article aims to encourage physical therapy researchers involved in evaluation of complex interventions to better document their own intervention development, as well as the outcomes, thus generating a body of knowledge about the development processes and protocols that is generalizable to the real-world complexity of providing physical therapy to individual patients.

  19. Structural Integration, an Alternative Method of Manual Therapy and Sensorimotor Education

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The objectives of this report are to review the clinical practice of Structural Integration (SI), an alternative method of soft-tissue manipulation and sensorimotor education, and to summarize the evidence to date for mechanism and clinical efficacy. Methods The author's personal knowledge of SI literature, theory, and practice was supplemented by a database search, consultation with other senior SI practitioners, and examination of published bibliographies and websites that archive SI literature. Results SI purports to improve biomechanical functioning as a whole by progressively approximating specific ideals of posture and movement, rather than to treat particular symptoms. Hypothesized mechanisms at the level of local tissue change include increases in soft-tissue pliability, release of adhesions between adjacent soft-tissue structures, and increased interstitial fluid flow with consequently improved clearance of nociceptive potentiators. Hypothesized mechanisms for more global changes include improved biomechanical organization leading to reductions in mechanical stress and nociceptive irritation, a perception of improved biomechanical efficiency and coordination that generalizes to the self, and improvements in sensory processing and vagal tone. Emotional catharsis is also thought to contribute to psychologic changes. Limited preliminary evidence exists for improvements in neuromotor coordination, sensory processing, self-concept and vagal tone, and for reductions in state anxiety. Preliminary, small sample clinical studies with cerebral palsy, chronic musculoskeletal pain, impaired balance, and chronic fatigue syndrome have reported improvements in gait, pain and range-of-motion, impaired balance, functional status, and well-being. Adverse events are thought to be mild and transient, although survey data are not available. Contraindications are thought to be the same as for massage. Conclusions Evidence for clinical effectiveness and

  20. Structural integration, an alternative method of manual therapy and sensorimotor education.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Eric

    2011-10-01

    The objectives of this report are to review the clinical practice of Structural Integration (SI), an alternative method of soft-tissue manipulation and sensorimotor education, and to summarize the evidence to date for mechanism and clinical efficacy. The author's personal knowledge of SI literature, theory, and practice was supplemented by a database search, consultation with other senior SI practitioners, and examination of published bibliographies and websites that archive SI literature. SI purports to improve biomechanical functioning as a whole by progressively approximating specific ideals of posture and movement, rather than to treat particular symptoms. Hypothesized mechanisms at the level of local tissue change include increases in soft-tissue pliability, release of adhesions between adjacent soft-tissue structures, and increased interstitial fluid flow with consequently improved clearance of nociceptive potentiators. Hypothesized mechanisms for more global changes include improved biomechanical organization leading to reductions in mechanical stress and nociceptive irritation, a perception of improved biomechanical efficiency and coordination that generalizes to the self, and improvements in sensory processing and vagal tone. Emotional catharsis is also thought to contribute to psychologic changes. Limited preliminary evidence exists for improvements in neuromotor coordination, sensory processing, self-concept and vagal tone, and for reductions in state anxiety. Preliminary, small sample clinical studies with cerebral palsy, chronic musculoskeletal pain, impaired balance, and chronic fatigue syndrome have reported improvements in gait, pain and range-of-motion, impaired balance, functional status, and well-being. Adverse events are thought to be mild and transient, although survey data are not available. Contraindications are thought to be the same as for massage. Evidence for clinical effectiveness and hypothesized mechanisms is severely limited by small

  1. Structural Barriers to Antiretroviral Therapy Among Sex Workers Living with HIV: Findings of a Longitudinal Study in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Shira M.; Montaner, Julio; Duff, Putu; Nguyen, Paul; Dobrer, Sabina; Guillemi, Silvia; Shannon, Kate

    2015-01-01

    In light of limited data on structural determinants of access and retention in antiretroviral therapy (ART) among sex workers, we examined structural correlates of ART use among sex workers living with HIV over time. Longitudinal data were drawn from a cohort of 646 female sex workers in Vancouver, Canada (2010–2012) and linked pharmacy records on ART dispensation. We used logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE) to examine correlates of gaps in ART use (i.e., treatment interruptions or delayed ART initiation), among sex workers living with HIV (n=74). Over a 2.5-year period, 37.8% of participants experienced gaps in ART use (i.e., no ART dispensed in a six-month period). In a multivariable GEE model, younger age, migration/mobility, incarceration, and non-injection drug use independently correlated with gaps in ART use. In spite of successes scaling-up ART in British Columbia, younger, mobile, or incarcerated sex workers face persistent gaps in access and retention irrespective of drug use. Community-based, tailored interventions to scale-up entry and retention in ART for sex workers should be further explored in this setting. PMID:26148850

  2. Modification of Structural and Luminescence Properties of Graphene Quantum Dots by Gamma Irradiation and Their Application in a Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Svetlana P; Syrgiannis, Zois; Marković, Zoran M; Bonasera, Aurelio; Kepić, Dejan P; Budimir, Milica D; Milivojević, Dušan D; Spasojević, Vuk D; Dramićanin, Miroslav D; Pavlović, Vladimir B; Todorović Marković, Biljana M

    2015-11-25

    Herein, the ability of gamma irradiation to enhance the photoluminescence properties of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) was investigated. Different doses of γ-irradiation were used on GQDs to examine the way in which their structure and optical properties can be affected. The photoluminescence quantum yield was increased six times for the GQDs irradiated with high doses compared to the nonirradiated material. Both photoluminescence lifetime and values of optical band gap were increased with the dose of applied gamma irradiation. In addition, the exploitation of the gamma-irradiated GQDs as photosensitizers was examined by monitoring the production of singlet oxygen under UV illumination. The main outcome was that the GQDs irradiated at lower doses act as better photoproducers than the ones irradiated at higher doses. These results corroborate that the structural changes caused by gamma irradiation have a direct impact on GQD ability to produce singlet oxygen and their photostability under prolonged UV illumination. This makes low-dose irradiated GQDs promising candidates for photodynamic therapy.

  3. Structural effects and competition mechanisms targeting the interactions between p53 and MDM2 for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shu-Xia; Geng, Yi-Zhao; Yan, Shi-Wei

    2017-06-01

    Approximately half of all human cancers show normal TP53 gene expression but aberrant overexpression of MDM2 and/or MDMX. This fact suggests a promising cancer therapeutic strategy in targeting the interactions between p53 and MDM2/MDMX. To help realize the goal of developing effective inhibitors to disrupt the p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction, we systematically investigated the structural and interaction characteristics of p53 with inhibitors of its interactions with MDM2 and MDMX from an atomistic perspective using stochastic molecular dynamics simulations. We found that some specific α helices in the structures of MDM2 and MDMX play key roles in their binding to inhibitors, and that the hydrogen bond formed by the Trp23 residue of p53 with its counterpart in MDM2 or MDMX determines the dynamic competition processes of the disruption of the MDM2-p53 interaction and replacement of p53 from the MDM2-p53 complex in vivo. The results reported in this paper are expected to provide basic information for designing functional inhibitors and realizing new strategies of cancer gene therapy.

  4. Variability of target and normal structure delineation using multimodality imaging for radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalah, Entesar; Moraru, Ion; Paulson, Eric; Erickson, Beth; Li, X Allen

    2014-07-01

    To explore the potential of multimodality imaging (dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging [DCE-MRI], apparent diffusion-coefficient diffusion-weighted imaging [ADC-DWI], fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [FDG-PET], and computed tomography) to define the gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk in radiation therapy planning for pancreatic cancer. Delineated volumetric changes of DCE-MRI, ADC-DWI, and FDG-PET were assessed in comparison with the finding on 3-dimensional/4-dimensional CT with and without intravenous contrast, and with pathology specimens for resectable and borderline resectable cases of pancreatic cancer. We studied a total of 19 representative patients, whose DCE-MRI, ADC-DWI, and FDG-PET data were reviewed. Gross tumor volume and tumor burden/active region inside pancreatic head/neck or body were delineated on MRI (denoted GTVDCE, and GTVADC), a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5, 40%SUVmax, and 50%SUVmax on FDG-PET (GTV2.5, GTV40%, and GTV50%). Volumes of the pancreas, duodenum, stomach, liver, and kidneys were contoured according to CT (VCT), T1-weighted MRI (VT1), and T2-weighted MRI (VT2) for 7 patients. Significant statistical differences were found between the GTVs from DCE-MRI, ADC-DW, and FDG-PET, with a mean and range of 4.73 (1.00-9.79), 14.52 (3.21-25.49), 22.04 (1.00-45.69), 19.10 (4.84-45.59), and 9.80 (0.32-35.21) cm(3) for GTVDCE, GTVADC, GTV2.5, GTV40%, and GTV50%, respectively. The mean difference and range in the measurements of maximum dimension of tumor on DCE-MRI, ADC-DW, SUV2.5, 40%SUVmax, and 50%SUVmax compared with pathologic specimens were -0.84 (-2.24 to 0.9), 0.41 (-0.15 to 2.3), 0.58 (-1.41 to 3.69), 0.66 (-0.67 to 1.32), and 0.15 (-1.53 to 2.38) cm, respectively. The T1- and T2-based volumes for pancreas, duodenum, stomach, and liver were generally smaller compared with those from CT, except for the kidneys. Differences exists between DCE-, ADC-, and FDG-PET-defined target volumes for

  5. Variability of Target and Normal Structure Delineation Using Multimodality Imaging for Radiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dalah, Entesar; Moraru, Ion; Paulson, Eric; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To explore the potential of multimodality imaging (dynamic contrast–enhanced magnetic resonance imaging [DCE-MRI], apparent diffusion-coefficient diffusion-weighted imaging [ADC-DWI], fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [FDG-PET], and computed tomography) to define the gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk in radiation therapy planning for pancreatic cancer. Delineated volumetric changes of DCE-MRI, ADC-DWI, and FDG-PET were assessed in comparison with the finding on 3-dimensional/4-dimensional CT with and without intravenous contrast, and with pathology specimens for resectable and borderline resectable cases of pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: We studied a total of 19 representative patients, whose DCE-MRI, ADC-DWI, and FDG-PET data were reviewed. Gross tumor volume and tumor burden/active region inside pancreatic head/neck or body were delineated on MRI (denoted GTV{sub DCE}, and GTV{sub ADC}), a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5, 40%SUVmax, and 50%SUVmax on FDG-PET (GTV2.5, GTV{sub 40%}, and GTV{sub 50%}). Volumes of the pancreas, duodenum, stomach, liver, and kidneys were contoured according to CT (V{sub CT}), T1-weighted MRI (V{sub T1}), and T2-weighted MRI (V{sub T2}) for 7 patients. Results: Significant statistical differences were found between the GTVs from DCE-MRI, ADC-DW, and FDG-PET, with a mean and range of 4.73 (1.00-9.79), 14.52 (3.21-25.49), 22.04 (1.00-45.69), 19.10 (4.84-45.59), and 9.80 (0.32-35.21) cm{sup 3} for GTV{sub DCE}, GTV{sub ADC}, GTV2.5, GTV{sub 40%}, and GTV{sub 50%}, respectively. The mean difference and range in the measurements of maximum dimension of tumor on DCE-MRI, ADC-DW, SUV2.5, 40%SUVmax, and 50%SUVmax compared with pathologic specimens were −0.84 (−2.24 to 0.9), 0.41 (−0.15 to 2.3), 0.58 (−1.41 to 3.69), 0.66 (−0.67 to 1.32), and 0.15 (−1.53 to 2.38) cm, respectively. The T1- and T2-based volumes for pancreas, duodenum, stomach, and liver were generally smaller

  6. Structural and functional evolution of jejunal allograft rejection in rats and the ameliorating effects of cyclosporine therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Madara, J L; Kirkman, R L

    1985-01-01

    injury or decreased epithelial regenerative ability secondary to crypt injury. Last, we show that the detrimental structural and functional sequellae of jejunal transplantation across the major histocompatibility complex in this model is strikingly ameliorated with cyclosporine therapy. Images PMID:3973015

  7. Differential effects of antibiotic therapy on the structure and function of human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cobas, Ana Elena; Artacho, Alejandro; Knecht, Henrik; Ferrús, María Loreto; Friedrichs, Anette; Ott, Stephan J; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo; Gosalbes, María José

    2013-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota performs many essential functions for the host. Antimicrobial agents, such as antibiotics (AB), are also known to disturb microbial community equilibrium, thereby having an impact on human physiology. While an increasing number of studies investigate the effects of AB usage on changes in human gut microbiota biodiversity, its functional effects are still poorly understood. We performed a follow-up study to explore the effect of ABs with different modes of action on human gut microbiota composition and function. Four individuals were treated with different antibiotics and samples were taken before, during and after the AB course for all of them. Changes in the total and in the active (growing) microbiota as well as the functional changes were addressed by 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic 454-based pyrosequencing approaches. We have found that the class of antibiotic, particularly its antimicrobial effect and mode of action, played an important role in modulating the gut microbiota composition and function. Furthermore, analysis of the resistome suggested that oscillatory dynamics are not only due to antibiotic-target resistance, but also to fluctuations in the surviving bacterial community. Our results indicated that the effect of AB on the human gut microbiota relates to the interaction of several factors, principally the properties of the antimicrobial agent, and the structure, functions and resistance genes of the microbial community.

  8. Differential Effects of Antibiotic Therapy on the Structure and Function of Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cobas, Ana Elena; Artacho, Alejandro; Knecht, Henrik; Ferrús, María Loreto; Friedrichs, Anette; Ott, Stephan J.; Moya, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota performs many essential functions for the host. Antimicrobial agents, such as antibiotics (AB), are also known to disturb microbial community equilibrium, thereby having an impact on human physiology. While an increasing number of studies investigate the effects of AB usage on changes in human gut microbiota biodiversity, its functional effects are still poorly understood. We performed a follow-up study to explore the effect of ABs with different modes of action on human gut microbiota composition and function. Four individuals were treated with different antibiotics and samples were taken before, during and after the AB course for all of them. Changes in the total and in the active (growing) microbiota as well as the functional changes were addressed by 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic 454-based pyrosequencing approaches. We have found that the class of antibiotic, particularly its antimicrobial effect and mode of action, played an important role in modulating the gut microbiota composition and function. Furthermore, analysis of the resistome suggested that oscillatory dynamics are not only due to antibiotic-target resistance, but also to fluctuations in the surviving bacterial community. Our results indicated that the effect of AB on the human gut microbiota relates to the interaction of several factors, principally the properties of the antimicrobial agent, and the structure, functions and resistance genes of the microbial community. PMID:24282523

  9. Optimal structure of particles-based superparamagnetic microrobots: application to MRI guided targeted drug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellal, Lyès; Belharet, Karim; Folio, David; Ferreira, Antoine

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an optimal design strategy for therapeutic magnetic micro carriers (TMMC) guided in real time by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. As aggregates of TMMCs must be formed to carry the most amount of drug and magnetic actuation capability, different clustering agglomerations could be arranged. Nevertheless, its difficult to predict the hydrodynamic behavior of any arbitrary-shaped object due to the nonlinear hydrodynamic effects. Indeed, the drag effect is related not only to the properties of the bolus but also to its interaction with the fluid viscosity, the free-stream velocity and the container geometry. In this work, we propose a mathematical framework to optimize the TMMC aggregates to improve the steering efficiency in experimental endovascular conditions. The proposed analysis is carried out on various sizes and geometries of microcarrier: spherical, ellipsoid-like, and chain-like of microsphere structures. We analyze the magnetophoretic behavior of such designs to exhibit the optimal configuration. Based on the optimal design of the boluses, experimental investigations were carried out in mm-sized fluidic artery phantoms to demonstrate the steerability of the magnetic bolus using a proof-of-concept setup. The experiments demonstrate the steerability of the magnetic bolus under different velocity, shear-stress, and trajectory constraints with a laminar viscous fluidic environment. Preliminary experiments with a MRI system confirm the feasibility of the steering of these TMMCs in hepatic artery microchannel phantom.

  10. Theranostic self-assembly structure of gold nanoparticles for NIR photothermal therapy and X-Ray computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Deng, Heng; Zhong, Yanqi; Du, Meihong; Liu, Qinjun; Fan, Zhanming; Dai, Fengying; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The controllable self-assembly of amphiphilic mixed polymers grafted gold nanoparitcles (AuNPs) leads to strong interparticle plasmonic coupling, which can be tuned to the near-infrared (NIR) region for enhanced photothermal therapy (PTT). In this study, an improved thiolation method was adopted for ATRP and ROP polymer to obtain amphiphilic brushes of PMEO2MA-SH and PCL-SH. By anchoring PCL-SH and PMEO2MA-SH onto the 14 nm AuNPs, a smart hybrid building block for self-assembly was obtained. Increasing the PCL/PMEO2MA chain ratio from 0.8:1, 2:1 and 3:1 to 7:1, the structure of gold assemblies (GAs) was observed to transfer from vesicle to large compound micelle (LCM). Contributed to the special dense packed structure of gold nanoparticles in LCM, the absorption spectrometry of gold nanoparticles drastically red-shifted from 520 nm to 830 nm, which endowed the GAs remarkable NIR photothermal conversion ability. In addition, gold has high X-ray absorption coefficient which qualifies gold nanomaterial a potential CT contrast agent Herein, we obtain a novel gold assembly structure which can be utilized as potential photothermal therapeutic and CT contrast agents. In vitro and In vivo studies testified the excellent treatment efficacy of optimum GAs as a PTT and CT contrast agent. In vitro degradation test, MTT assay and histology study indicated that GAs was a safe, low toxic reagent with good biodegradability. Therefore, the optimum GAs with strong NIR absorption and high X-ray absorption coefficient could be used as a theranostic agent and the formation of novel gold large compound micelle might offers a new theory foundation for engineering design and synthesis of polymer grafted AuNPs for biomedical applications.

  11. Theranostic Self-Assembly Structure of Gold Nanoparticles for NIR Photothermal Therapy and X-Ray Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Heng; Zhong, Yanqi; Du, Meihong; Liu, Qinjun; Fan, Zhanming; Dai, Fengying; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The controllable self-assembly of amphiphilic mixed polymers grafted gold nanoparitcles (AuNPs) leads to strong interparticle plasmonic coupling, which can be tuned to the near-infrared (NIR) region for enhanced photothermal therapy (PTT). In this study, an improved thiolation method was adopted for ATRP and ROP polymer to obtain amphiphilic brushes of PMEO2MA-SH and PCL-SH. By anchoring PCL-SH and PMEO2MA-SH onto the 14 nm AuNPs, a smart hybrid building block for self-assembly was obtained. Increasing the PCL/PMEO2MA chain ratio from 0.8:1, 2:1 and 3:1 to 7:1, the structure of gold assemblies (GAs) was observed to transfer from vesicle to large compound micelle (LCM). Contributed to the special dense packed structure of gold nanoparticles in LCM, the absorption spectrometry of gold nanoparticles drastically red-shifted from 520 nm to 830 nm, which endowed the GAs remarkable NIR photothermal conversion ability. In addition, gold has high X-ray absorption coefficient which qualifies gold nanomaterial a potential CT contrast agent Herein, we obtain a novel gold assembly structure which can be utilized as potential photothermal therapeutic and CT contrast agents. In vitro and In vivo studies testified the excellent treatment efficacy of optimum GAs as a PTT and CT contrast agent. In vitro degradation test, MTT assay and histology study indicated that GAs was a safe, low toxic reagent with good biodegradability. Therefore, the optimum GAs with strong NIR absorption and high X-ray absorption coefficient could be used as a theranostic agent and the formation of novel gold large compound micelle might offers a new theory foundation for engineering design and synthesis of polymer grafted AuNPs for biomedical applications. PMID:25057315

  12. Structural recovery of the retina in a retinoschisin-deficient mouse after gene replacement therapy by solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Apaolaza, P S; Del Pozo-Rodríguez, A; Solinís, M A; Rodríguez, J M; Friedrich, U; Torrecilla, J; Weber, B H F; Rodríguez-Gascón, A

    2016-06-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) is a retinal degenerative disorder caused by mutations in the RS1 gene encoding a protein termed retinoschisin. The disease is an excellent candidate for gene replacement therapy as the majority of mutations have been shown to lead to a complete deficiency of the secreted protein in the retinal structures. In this work, we have studied the ability of non-viral vectors based on solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) to induce the expression of retinoschisin in photoreceptors (PR) after intravitreal administration to Rs1h-deficient mice. We designed two vectors prepared with SLN, protamine, and dextran (DX) or hyaluronic acid (HA), bearing a plasmid containing the human RS1 gene under the control of the murin opsin promoter (mOPS). In vitro, the nanocarriers were able to induce the expression of retinoschisin in a PR cell line. After injection into the murine vitreous, the formulation prepared with HA induced a higher transfection level in PR than the formulation prepared with DX. Moreover, the level of retinoschisin in the inner nuclear layer (INL), where bipolar cells are located, was also higher. Two weeks after vitreal administration into Rs1h-deficient mice, both formulations showed significant improvement of the retinal structure by inducing a decrease of cavities and PR loss, and an increase of retinal and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness. HA-SLN resulted in a significant higher increase in the thickness of both retina and ONL, which can be explained by the higher transfection level of PR. In conclusion, we have shown the structural improvement of the retina of Rs1h-deficient mice with PR specific expression of the RS1 gene driven by the specific promoter mOPS, after successful delivery via SLN-based non-viral vectors.

  13. Long-term efficacy of empirical chronic amiodarone therapy in patients with sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmia and structural heart disease.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Takeshi; Kurita, Takashi; Taguchi, Atsushi; Shimizu, Wataru; Suyama, Kazuhiro; Aihara, Naohiko; Kamakura, Shiro

    2002-04-01

    The efficacy of empirical chronic oral amiodarone therapy in 129 patients with sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VTNVF) and structural heart disease is evaluated. Twenty-nine patients were treated with class I drugs and monitored by electrophysiological study (EPS) and Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) (class I). The remaining 100 non-responders to the class I drugs were treated with oral amiodarone, of whom 70 were tolerant (AMD+) and 30 were intolerant (AMD-). Patients were followed up to 36 months. The primary and secondary end-points were recurrence of VT/VF and hypothetical death, respectively; whereby, hypothetical death was defined as actual death and the event of rapid VT.VF (heart rate >240beats/min) in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Class I and AMD+ patients showed a better prognosis than AMD- patients. The VT/VF event free at 36 months in class I (64.8%) and AMD+ (56.1%) patients were significantly higher than that in AMD- (27.2%) (p<0.01) patients. Hypothetical survival rates in class I (92.0%) and AMD+ (83.6%) patients were significantly higher than that in AMD- (57.0%) (p<0.001) patients, but there were no significant differences in the actual survival rate among the 3 patient groups. The independent clinical factors suppressing the recurrence of VT/VF (Cox hazard) were treatment with amiodarone (p=0.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) =0.19-0.86) and EPS/Holter ECG-guided Class I drugs (p=0.04, 95% CI=0.14-0.94). The results demonstrate that empirical amiodarone has a substantial long-term benefit that is comparable to EPS/Holter ECG-guided class I drugs in the treatment of high-risk patients with VT/VF and structural heart disease.

  14. Studies of the significance of functional and structural changes in mitochondria in PhotofrinTM-photodynamic-therapy-resistant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brian C.; Olivo, Malini; Moorehead, Roger; Singh, Gurmit

    1994-07-01

    This paper reports further studies of Radiation Induced Fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumor cells which have been made resistant to Photodynamic Therapy by multiple treatment and regrowth in vitro using the hematoporphyrin derivative photosensitizer Photofrin. Previous work has shown both structural and functional changes in the mitochondria of the resistant (RIF-8A) cells. Colocalization of Photofrin and the mitochondrial localizer Rhodamine-123 was assessed by double-label confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM). At 18h Photofrin incubation, there was strong correlation in discrete subcellular sites between Photofrin and Rhodamine fluorescence. However, in RIF-8A cells there were also discrete regions of Rhodamine localization which showed weak or no Photofrin fluorescence. This was not observed in RIF-1 cells. CFM measurements also showed that the Photofrin fluorescence after 18h incubation was reduced by increasing concentration of Rhodamine (30 min. incubation), and that this dependence was different for the two cell types. The RIF-8A cells were also shown to be cross-resistant to cisplatin and to have an associated reduced level of Pt-DNA adducts, suggesting the possibility of increased repair capacity. Cross-resistance was not observed, however, with a ruthenium phthalocyanine photosensitizer nor, as previously reported, with other chemotherapeutic agents such as Adriamcyin. Thus, there is a complex pattern of cross-resistance with these cells. Preliminary observations of the effects of a respiratory chain inhibitor (oligomycin) and an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation (FCCP) indicate differences between RIF-8A and RIF-1 which may be related to the condensed mitochondrial structure of the RIF-8A cells.

  15. Life-review therapy with computer supplements for depression in the elderly: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Preschl, Barbara; Maercker, Andreas; Wagner, Birgit; Forstmeier, Simon; Baños, Rosa M; Alcañiz, Mariano; Castilla, Diana; Botella, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Life-review therapy has been recognized as an effective therapeutic approach for depression in older adults. Additionally, the use of new media is becoming increasingly common in psychological interventions. The aim of this study was to investigate a life-review therapy in a face-to-face setting with additional computer use. This study explored whether a six-week life-review therapy with computer supplements from the e-mental health Butler system constitutes an effective approach to treat depression in older adults aged 65 and over. A total of 36 participants with elevated levels of depressive symptoms were randomized to a treatment group or a waiting-list control group and completed the post-assessment. Fourteen individuals in the intervention group completed the follow-up assessment. Analyses revealed significant changes from pre- to post-treatment or follow-up for depression, well-being, self-esteem, and obsessive reminiscence, but not for integrative reminiscence and life satisfaction. Depressive symptoms decreased significantly over time until the three-month follow-up in the intervention group compared to the control group (pre to post: d = 1.13; pre to follow-up: d = 1.27; and group × time effect pre to post: d = 0.72). Furthermore, the therapy led to an increase in well-being and a decrease in obsessive reminiscence among the participants in the intervention group from pre-treatment to follow-up (well-being: d = 0.70; obsessive reminiscence: d = 0.93). Analyses further revealed a significant but small group × time effect regarding self-esteem (d = 0.19). By and large, the results indicate that the life-review therapy in this combined setting could be recommended for depressive older adults.

  16. Grey matter density changes of structures involved in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) after recovery following Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy.

    PubMed

    Boukezzi, Sarah; El Khoury-Malhame, Myriam; Auzias, Guillaume; Reynaud, Emmanuelle; Rousseau, Pierre-François; Richard, Emmanuel; Zendjidjian, Xavier; Roques, Jacques; Castelli, Nathalie; Correard, Nadia; Guyon, Valérie; Gellato, Caroline; Samuelian, Jean-Claude; Cancel, Aida; Comte, Magali; Latinus, Marianne; Guedj, Eric; Khalfa, Stéphanie

    2017-08-30

    Recovery of stress-induced structural alterations in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) remains largely unexplored. This study aimed to determine whether symptoms improvement is associated with grey matter (GM) density changes of brain structures involved in PTSD. Two groups of PTSD patients were involved in this study. The first group was treated with Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy and recovered from their symptoms (recovery group) (n = 11); Patients were scanned prior to therapy (T1), one week (T2) and five months after the end of therapy (T3). The second group included patients which followed a supportive therapy and remained symptomatic (wait-list group) (n = 7). They were scanned at three time-steps mimicking the same inter-scan intervals. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to characterize GM density evolution. GM density values showed a significant group-by-time interaction effect between T1 and T3 in prefrontal cortex areas. These interaction effects were driven by a GM density increase in the recovery group with respect to the wait-list group. Symptoms removal goes hand-in-hand with GM density enhancement of structures involved in emotional regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. REVIEW: The contribution of medical physics to the development of psoralen photochemotherapy (PUVA) in the UK: a personal reminiscence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diffey, Brian

    2006-07-01

    Psoralen photochemotherapy (PUVA) is the combined treatment of skin disorders with a photosensitizing drug (Psoralen) and UltraViolet A radiation. The introduction of PUVA therapy has arguably been the most important development in dermatology over the past 30 years and from the first days of the treatment being introduced in the UK, British medical physicists were an integral part of the effort to establish it. Medical physicists have contributed to this development in a number of ways, from designing irradiation units in the early days of the technique, through to collaborating with dermatologists in prosecuting clinical and experimental studies aimed at improving patient outcomes. That the dose of UVA radiation is administered quantitatively, and not qualitatively, has probably been the single most important contribution made by several medical physicists over this period. However, despite concerns that were expressed almost 30 years ago about the accuracy with which UVA doses are administered to patients, the medical physics community still has some way to go before we can be satisfied that statements about UVA irradiance and dose can be made with confidence.

  18. Cholinergic Potentiation and Audiovisual Repetition-Imitation Therapy Improve Speech Production and Communication Deficits in a Person with Crossed Aphasia by Inducing Structural Plasticity in White Matter Tracts.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Marcelo L; De-Torres, Irene; Paredes-Pacheco, José; Roé-Vellvé, Núria; Thurnhofer-Hemsi, Karl; Torres-Prioris, María J; Alfaro, Francisco; Moreno-Torres, Ignacio; López-Barroso, Diana; Dávila, Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    Donepezil (DP), a cognitive-enhancing drug targeting the cholinergic system, combined with massed sentence repetition training augmented and speeded up recovery of speech production deficits in patients with chronic conduction aphasia and extensive left hemisphere infarctions (Berthier et al., 2014). Nevertheless, a still unsettled question is whether such improvements correlate with restorative structural changes in gray matter and white matter pathways mediating speech production. In the present study, we used pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging to study treatment-induced brain changes in gray matter and white matter tracts in a right-handed male with chronic conduction aphasia and a right subcortical lesion (crossed aphasia). A single-patient, open-label multiple-baseline design incorporating two different treatments and two post-treatment evaluations was used. The patient received an initial dose of DP (5 mg/day) which was maintained during 4 weeks and then titrated up to 10 mg/day and administered alone (without aphasia therapy) during 8 weeks (Endpoint 1). Thereafter, the drug was combined with an audiovisual repetition-imitation therapy (Look-Listen-Repeat, LLR) during 3 months (Endpoint 2). Language evaluations, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were performed at baseline and at both endpoints in JAM and once in 21 healthy control males. Treatment with DP alone and combined with LLR therapy induced marked improvement in aphasia and communication deficits as well as in selected measures of connected speech production, and phrase repetition. The obtained gains in speech production remained well-above baseline scores even 4 months after ending combined therapy. Longitudinal DWI showed structural plasticity in the right frontal aslant tract and direct segment of the arcuate fasciculus with both interventions. VBM revealed no structural changes in other white matter tracts nor in cortical areas linked by these tracts. In

  19. Fabrication of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle with Well-Defined Multicompartment Structure as Efficient Drug Carrier for Cancer Therapy in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anhe; Yang, Yang; Qi, Yanfei; Qi, Wen; Fei, Jinbo; Ma, Hongchao; Zhao, Jie; Cui, Wei; Li, Junbai

    2016-04-13

    Vaterite particles are composed of particulate CaCO3 nanoparticles, which offer an ideal platform to synthesize architectures with hierarchical structure. Herein we show that mesoporous silica particles with well-defined multicompartment structure are fabricated by employing vaterite particles as templates. The obtained silica particles inherited the structure feature of vaterite and had excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability. Moreover, the silica particles were established as an efficient anticancer drugs carrier compared with hollow silica particles, which could be applied in cancer therapy in vitro and in vivo. The silica particles obtained here offer a cheap, facile, environmentally friendly avenue to assembly of hierarchical drugs carriers.

  20. Fine structure of carcinosarcoma cells and peritoneal macrophages activated by photodynamic therapy during their interaction in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, Vasile F.; Ionescu, Mircea D.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.; Coman, Niculina; Dima, Stefan V.

    1996-12-01

    The interaction of the photodynamic therapy activated macrophages (PDT-AM0) of the host and rat Walker-256 carcinosarcoma target cells (ascitic form) was investigated. The periotoneal macrophages were sensitized with different concentrations of Photofrin II (0.1 to 12 (mu) g/2.5 multiplied by 106 cells) and irradiated with He-Ne laser (632.8 nm; 10 mW) at different dose fluences varying between 1.5 and 15 kJ/m2. The degree of macrophage activation by PDT was estimated by means of the following parameters: (1) in vitro assay of cytotoxic and cytostatic activities and (2) observation at the electron microscopy. The results obtained indicate the following: (1) the highest rate of cytotoxic activity against Walker-256 (39.7%) and K562 (21.6%) cells was found in Photofrin II sensitized with 0.8 mg and exposure to He-Ne laser irradiation (3.0 kJ/m2): (2) the cytostatic activity of PDT-AM0 was higher against murine Walker-256 (54.7%) and lower on human K562 (28.1%) cells, in comparison with normal macrophages (NM0); (3) during interaction of PDT-AM0 in peritoneal cavity, the tumor cells were accompanied by strong changes in nuclear and cytoplasmic fine structure. Summing up, in photobioactivated macrophages by PDT some functional activities (cytotoxic, cytostatic and phagocytosis) were enhanced and induced ultrastructural changes in Walker-256 ascites carcinosarcoma cells by their interaction 'in vivo.'

  1. Changes in Choroidal Structures in Eyes with Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy after Half-Dose Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Mori, Terumi; Akaiwa, Kei; Semba, Kentaro; Egawa, Mariko; Mori, Junya; Sonoda, Shozo; Sakamoto, Taiji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the structural changes in the choroid after half-dose photodynamic therapy (hPDT) in eyes with chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). Methods This was a retrospective interventional study of 29 eyes of 29 patients who underwent hPDT for chronic CSC with serous retinal detachment (SRD) and were followed for ≥3 months. Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomographic (EDI-OCT) images of the subfoveal choroid were converted to binary images. The central choroidal thickness (CCT), the cross sectional subfoveal choroidal area, the hyporeflective and hyperreflective areas of the inner, outer, and whole choroid were determined at the baseline, and at 1, 3, and 12 months after the hPDT. Results The SRDs were resolved in 26 (89.7%) eyes at 3 months after the hPDT. The mean CCT (P = 0.001), the total choroidal area (P = 0.001), and the hypo-reflective area (P = 0.003) of the whole choroid were significantly decreased from the baseline at 3 months. The hyperreflective area of whole choroid was not significantly changed during the study period (P = 0.083). The hyperreflective but not the hyporeflective area of the inner choroid was significantly decreased at 3 months (P = 0.001, P = 1.000, respectively). The hyporeflective but not the hyperreflective area of the outer choroid was significantly decreased at 3 months (P = 0.001, P = 1.000, respectively). Conclusions The hyperreflective area of the inner choroid and hyporeflective area of the outer choroid were significantly decreased after hPDT for chronic CSC. Because the hyperreflective and hyporeflective area correspond to the choroidal stroma and vessels, respectively, the decreased CCT and subfoveal choroidal area after hPDT may be attributed to a decrease in the exudative changes in the inner choroidal stroma and the reduction of the dilation of the outer choroidal vessels. PMID:27636093

  2. Improved Biomedical and Psychological Outcomes 1 Year After Structured Education in Flexible Insulin Therapy for People With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, David; Lawrence, Ian; Mansell, Peter; Thompson, Gillian; Amiel, Stephanie; Campbell, Michael; Heller, Simon

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE DAFNE (Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating), a structured education program in flexible insulin therapy, has been widely adopted in the U.K. after validation in a randomized trial. To determine benefits in routine practice, we collected biomedical and psychological data from all participants attending during a 12-month period. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS HbA1c, weight, self-reported hypoglycemia awareness, severe hypoglycemia frequency, PAID (Problem Areas In Diabetes), HADS (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and EuroQol Group 5-Dimension Self-Report Questionnaire scores were recorded prior to DAFNE and after 1 year. RESULTS Complete baseline and follow-up HbA1c data were available for 639 (54.9%) of 1,163 attendees. HbA1c fell from 8.51 ± 1.41 (mean ± SD) to 8.24 ± 1.29% (difference 0.27 [95% CI 0.16–0.38]; P < 0.001), with a greater mean fall of 0.44% from baseline HbA1c >8.5%. Severe hypoglycemia rate fell from 1.7 ± 8.5 to 0.6 ± 3.7 episodes per person per year (1.1 [0.7–1.4]) and hypoglycemia recognition improved in 43% of those reporting unawareness. Baseline psychological distress was evident, with a PAID score of 25.2 and HADS scores of 5.3 (anxiety) and 4.8 (depression), falling to 16.7 (8.5 [6.6–10.4]), 4.6 (0.7 [0.4–1.0]), and 4.2 (0.6 [0.3–0.8]), respectively (all P < 0.001 at 1 year). Clinically relevant anxiety and depression (HADS ≥8) fell from 24.4 to 18.0% and 20.9 to 15.5%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS A structured education program delivered in routine clinical practice not only improves HbA1c while reducing severe hypoglycemia rate and restoring hypoglycemia awareness but also reduces psychological distress and improves perceived well-being. PMID:22619082

  3. Plasmid replication initiator RepB forms a hexamer reminiscent of ring helicases and has mobile nuclease domains

    PubMed Central

    Boer, D Roeland; Ruíz-Masó, José A; López-Blanco, José R; Blanco, Alexander G; Vives-Llàcer, Mireia; Chacón, Pablo; Usón, Isabel; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier; Espinosa, Manuel; Llorca, Oscar; del Solar, Gloria; Coll, Miquel

    2009-01-01

    RepB initiates plasmid rolling-circle replication by binding to a triple 11-bp direct repeat (bind locus) and cleaving the DNA at a specific distant site located in a hairpin loop within the nic locus of the origin. The structure of native full-length RepB reveals a hexameric ring molecule, where each protomer has two domains. The origin-binding and catalytic domains show a three-layer α–β–α sandwich fold. The active site is positioned at one of the faces of the β-sheet and coordinates a Mn2+ ion at short distance from the essential nucleophilic Y99. The oligomerization domains (ODs), each consisting of four α-helices, together define a compact ring with a central channel, a feature found in ring helicases. The toroidal arrangement of RepB suggests that, similar to ring helicases, it encircles one of the DNA strands during replication to confer processivity to the replisome complex. The catalytic domains appear to be highly mobile with respect to ODs. This mobility may account for the adaptation of the protein to two distinct DNA recognition sites. PMID:19440202

  4. Towards the Determination of the Structure of HIV-1 p24: A Possible Target for Antiviral Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prongay, Andrew J.

    1991-01-01

    The importance of targeting certain stages in the life cycle of the virus for antiviral therapy is discussed with reference to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1. Research conducted on a core antigen, p24, is described. (MSE)

  5. TOPOS: A new topometric patient positioning and tracking system for radiation therapy based on structured white light

    SciTech Connect

    Lindl, Bastian L.; Mueller, Reinhold G.; Lang, Stephanie; Herraiz Lablanca, Maria D.; Kloeck, Stephan

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: A patient positioning system for radiation therapy based on structured white light and using off-the-shelf hardware components for flexibility and cost-effectiveness has been developed in house. Increased accuracy, patient comfort, abandonment of any skin marks, accelerated workflow, objective reading/recording, better usability and robust sensor design, compared to other positioning approaches, were the main goals of this work. Another aim was the application of a 6 degrees of freedom tracking system working without dose deposition. Methods: Two optical sensors are the main parts of the TOPOS Registered-Sign system (Topometrical Positioning, cyberTECHNOLOGIES, Germany). The components: cameras, projectors, and computers are commercial off-the-shelf products, allowing for low production costs. The black/white cameras of the prototype are capable of taking up to 240 frames per second (resolution: 640 Multiplication-Sign 488 pixels). The projector has a resolution of 1024 Multiplication-Sign 768 and a refresh rate of 120 Hz. The patient's body surface is measured continuously and registered to a reference surface, providing a transformation to superimpose the patient's surface to the reference (planning CT) surface as best as possible. The execution of the calculated transformation provides the correct patient position before the treatment starts. Due to the high-speed acquisition of the surfaces, a surveillance of the patient's (respiration) motion during treatment is also accomplished. The accuracy of the system was determined using a male mannequin. Two treatment sites were evaluated: one simulating a head and neck treatment and the other simulating a thoracic wall treatment. The mannequin was moved to predefined positions, and shift vectors given by the surface registration were evaluated. Additionally manual positioning using a color-coding system was evaluated. Results: Two prototypes have been developed, each allowing a continuous high density scan of

  6. Structural Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Use, HIV Care Attendance, and Viral Suppression among Adolescents and Young Adults Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kahana, Shoshana Y.; Jenkins, Richard A.; Bruce, Douglas; Fernandez, Maria I.; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Bauermeister, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The authors examined associations between structural characteristics and HIV disease management among a geographically diverse sample of behaviorally and perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States. Methods The sample included 1891 adolescents and young adults living with HIV (27.8% perinatally infected; 72.2% behaviorally infected) who were linked to care through 20 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions Units. All completed audio computer–assisted self-interview surveys. Chart abstraction or blood draw provided viral load data. Geographic-level variables were extracted from the United States Census Bureau (e.g., socioeconomic disadvantage, percent of Black and Latino households, percent rural) and Esri Crime (e.g., global crime index) databases as Zip Code Tabulation Areas. AIDSVu data (e.g., prevalence of HIV among youth) were extracted at the county-level. Using HLM v.7, the authors conducted means-as-outcomes random effects multi-level models to examine the association between structural-level and individual-level factors and (1) being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) currently; (2) being on ART for at least 6 months; (3) missed HIV care appointments (not having missed any vs. having missed one or more appointments) over the past 12 months; and (4) viral suppression (defined by the corresponding assay cutoff for the lower limit of viral load at each participating site which denoted nondetectability vs. detectability). Results Frequencies for the 4 primary outcomes were as follows: current ART use (n = 1120, 59.23%); ART use for ≥6 months (n = 861, 45.53%); at least one missed HIV care appointment (n = 936, 49.50); and viral suppression (n = 577, 30.51%). After adjusting for individual-level factors, youth living in more disadvantaged areas (defined by a composite score derived from 2010 Census indicators including percent poverty, percent receiving public assistance, percent of female, single

  7. Structural Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Use, HIV Care Attendance, and Viral Suppression among Adolescents and Young Adults Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Kahana, Shoshana Y; Jenkins, Richard A; Bruce, Douglas; Fernandez, Maria I; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Bauermeister, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined associations between structural characteristics and HIV disease management among a geographically diverse sample of behaviorally and perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States. The sample included 1891 adolescents and young adults living with HIV (27.8% perinatally infected; 72.2% behaviorally infected) who were linked to care through 20 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions Units. All completed audio computer-assisted self-interview surveys. Chart abstraction or blood draw provided viral load data. Geographic-level variables were extracted from the United States Census Bureau (e.g., socioeconomic disadvantage, percent of Black and Latino households, percent rural) and Esri Crime (e.g., global crime index) databases as Zip Code Tabulation Areas. AIDSVu data (e.g., prevalence of HIV among youth) were extracted at the county-level. Using HLM v.7, the authors conducted means-as-outcomes random effects multi-level models to examine the association between structural-level and individual-level factors and (1) being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) currently; (2) being on ART for at least 6 months; (3) missed HIV care appointments (not having missed any vs. having missed one or more appointments) over the past 12 months; and (4) viral suppression (defined by the corresponding assay cutoff for the lower limit of viral load at each participating site which denoted nondetectability vs. detectability). Frequencies for the 4 primary outcomes were as follows: current ART use (n = 1120, 59.23%); ART use for ≥6 months (n = 861, 45.53%); at least one missed HIV care appointment (n = 936, 49.50); and viral suppression (n = 577, 30.51%). After adjusting for individual-level factors, youth living in more disadvantaged areas (defined by a composite score derived from 2010 Census indicators including percent poverty, percent receiving public assistance, percent of female, single-headed households, percent

  8. Content of maternal open-ended questions and statements in reminiscing with their 4-year-olds: links with independence and interdependence orientation in European contexts.

    PubMed

    Tõugu, Pirko; Tulviste, Tiia; Schröder, Lisa; Keller, Heidi; De Geer, Boel

    2012-07-01

    Mother's open-ended questions and elaborative statements during reminiscing were analysed for their content (child agency, co-agency, non-social, and social context) in three cultural contexts. Participants were 115 mothers and their 4-year-old children: 35 dyads from Berlin, Germany, 42 from Stockholm, Sweden, and 38 from Tallinn, Estonia. Across samples the most prominent content was talk about non-social context followed by co-agency and child agency. Tallinn mothers asked the children to talk about themselves, and Berlin mothers asked the children to talk about themselves together with other people, more frequently than they talked about these contents themselves. The content was related to the cultural orientations of mothers assessed through questionnaires: the Berlin mothers whose independence/ interdependence ratio was higher talked less about other people and asked the children fewer questions about other people; the Stockholm mothers with a higher independence/interdependence ratio talked more about child agency. In Tallinn both correlations existed on a trend level. The results are discussed in the light of common conversational practices and mothers' orientation to independence and interdependence in these cultural contexts.

  9. [The effect of gene therapy with the APOE3 Gene on structural and functional manifestations of secondary hippocampal damages in experimental traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Pedachenko, E G; Biloshytsky, V V; Mikhal'sky, S A; Gridina, N Ya; Kvitnitskaya-Ryzhova, T Yu

    2015-01-01

    to study the efficiency of gene therapy following traumatic brain injury (TBI) by evaluating the influences of liposomal transfection of the brain tissue by APOE3-containing plasmid vector on the structural and functional manifestations of development of secondary brain injuries after acute experimental TBI in the rats of different age. Severe diffuse TBI in rats was inflicted under overall anesthesia by free load weighing 450 g, falling from a 1.5 m elevation. The mixture of DOTAP liposome and 25 μg of plasmid vector pCMV·SPORT6 with cDNA of APOE3 gene was infused intraventricularly using ALZET osmotic pumps. Combined morphological, electron microscopic, immunohistochemical and morphometric studies of СА1 hippocampal region were conducted in rats at days 5 and 10 following TBI and gene therapy after investigation of motor functions (using composite neurological motor score) and cognitive functions in Morris water maze. Significant changes in the morphofunctional state of hippocampus, as well as in the neurological and cognitive functions were shown on the model of severe TBI in the adult and old Wistar rats. Gene therapy, specifically cationic-liposome mediated APOE3 gene transfer to the CNS cells by plasmid vector, decreased a TBI-induced death of neurons and improved qualitative composition of neuronal population, normalized neuron-glial relations, decreased gliosis and microglial activation, axonal damage, myelin destruction and lipofuscin accumulation, all these having age-related peculiarities. After gene therapy observed in the animal brain was a lower intensity of the processes of apoptosis and a decrease of its rate in old animals. The above changes were accompanied with a more fast and expressed regress of neurological and cognitive disturbances typical for TBI. Administration of plasmid vector after TBI resulted in an increase of survival rate of old animals vs. old animals which got no gene therapy. APOE3 gene therapy has therapeutic potential in

  10. The Effect of Combined Ezetimibe/Atorvastatin Therapy vs. Atorvastatin Monotherapy on the Erythrocyte Membrane Structure in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Jackowska, Paulina; Pytel, Edyta; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Olszewska-Banaszczyk, Małgorzata; Legęza, Aleksandra; Broncel, Marlena

    2016-01-01

    Erythrocytes play an important role in atherogenesis. An excessive accumulation of cholesterol in erythrocyte membranes leads to disruption of the erythrocytes. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two different hypolipidemic therapies on the structure of erythrocyte membranes. The study included 18 patients with angiographic confirmed coronary artery disease who, despite at least 6 months of hypolipidemic treatment, had not achieved LDL-C < 70 mg/dL and 18 healthy individuals as the control group. The following parameters were studied: total cholesterol level and erythrocyte membrane fluidity, lipid peroxidation, SH groups in membrane protein and plasma lipids. We observed a decrease in TC (20%), LDL-C (35%), level of lipid peroxidation (25%) and total cholesterol in erythrocytes (23%), and an increase in HDL-C (8%) and erythrocyte membrane fluidity of subsurface layers (14%) after 6 months of 10 mg atorvastatin + 10 mg ezetimibe therapy, in comparison with healthy controls. In the group treated with 40 mg atorvastatin for 6 months, decreased LDL-C (23%), lipid peroxidation (37%) and membrane cholesterol concentration (18%) was noted, as well as an increase in erythrocyte membrane fluidity in the subsurface layers (12%). Both the combination therapy and the monotherapy lead to an improvement of erythrocyte membrane structure, whose parameters reached values close to those in the control healthy group.

  11. Mistletoe lectin has a shiga toxin-like structure and should be combined with other Toll-like receptor ligands in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Maletzki, Claudia; Linnebacher, Michael; Savai, Rajkumar; Hobohm, Uwe

    2013-08-01

    Mistletoe extract (ME) is applied as an adjuvant treatment in cancer therapy in thousands of patients each year in Europe. The main immunostimulating component of mistletoe extract, mistletoe lectin, recently has been shown to be a pattern recognition receptor ligand and hence is binding to an important class of pathogen-sensing receptors. Pattern recognition receptor ligands are potent activators of dendritic cells. This activation is a prerequisite for a full-blown T-cell response against cancer cells. Pattern recognition receptor ligands are increasingly recognized as important players in cancer immunotherapy. We collect evidence from case studies on spontaneous regression, from epidemiology, from experiments in a mouse cancer model, and from protein structure comparisons to argue that a combination of mistletoe therapy with other pattern recognition receptor ligand substances leads to an increased immune stimulatory effect. We show that mistletoe lectin is a plant protein of bacterial origin with a 3D structure very similar to shiga toxin from Shigella dysenteriae, which explains the remarkable immunogenicity of mistletoe lectin. Secondly, we show that a combination of pattern recognition receptor ligands applied metronomically in a cancer mouse model leads to complete remission, while single pattern recognition receptor ligands slowed tumor growth. Taken together, we propose to combine mistletoe drugs with other pattern recognition receptor ligand drugs to increase its efficacy in adjuvant or even primary cancer therapy.

  12. Cholinergic Potentiation and Audiovisual Repetition-Imitation Therapy Improve Speech Production and Communication Deficits in a Person with Crossed Aphasia by Inducing Structural Plasticity in White Matter Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Marcelo L.; De-Torres, Irene; Paredes-Pacheco, José; Roé-Vellvé, Núria; Thurnhofer-Hemsi, Karl; Torres-Prioris, María J.; Alfaro, Francisco; Moreno-Torres, Ignacio; López-Barroso, Diana; Dávila, Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    Donepezil (DP), a cognitive-enhancing drug targeting the cholinergic system, combined with massed sentence repetition training augmented and speeded up recovery of speech production deficits in patients with chronic conduction aphasia and extensive left hemisphere infarctions (Berthier et al., 2014). Nevertheless, a still unsettled question is whether such improvements correlate with restorative structural changes in gray matter and white matter pathways mediating speech production. In the present study, we used pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging to study treatment-induced brain changes in gray matter and white matter tracts in a right-handed male with chronic conduction aphasia and a right subcortical lesion (crossed aphasia). A single-patient, open-label multiple-baseline design incorporating two different treatments and two post-treatment evaluations was used. The patient received an initial dose of DP (5 mg/day) which was maintained during 4 weeks and then titrated up to 10 mg/day and administered alone (without aphasia therapy) during 8 weeks (Endpoint 1). Thereafter, the drug was combined with an audiovisual repetition-imitation therapy (Look-Listen-Repeat, LLR) during 3 months (Endpoint 2). Language evaluations, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were performed at baseline and at both endpoints in JAM and once in 21 healthy control males. Treatment with DP alone and combined with LLR therapy induced marked improvement in aphasia and communication deficits as well as in selected measures of connected speech production, and phrase repetition. The obtained gains in speech production remained well-above baseline scores even 4 months after ending combined therapy. Longitudinal DWI showed structural plasticity in the right frontal aslant tract and direct segment of the arcuate fasciculus with both interventions. VBM revealed no structural changes in other white matter tracts nor in cortical areas linked by these tracts. In

  13. Manual therapy in joint and nerve structures combined with exercises in the treatment of recurrent ankle sprains: A randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Vergara-Vila, Marta; Val-Otero, Sandra; Rivera-Prieto, Cristina; Pecos-Martin, Daniel; Gallego-Izquierdo, Tomás; Ferragut-Garcías, Alejandro; Romero-Franco, Natalia

    2016-12-01

    Recurrent ankle sprains often involve residual symptoms for which subjects often perform proprioceptive or/and strengthening exercises. However, the effectiveness of mobilization to influence important nerve structures due to its anatomical distribution like tibial and peroneal nerves is unclear. To analyze the effects of proprioceptive/strengthening exercises versus the same exercises and manual therapy including mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures in the management of recurrent ankle sprains. A randomized single-blind controlled clinical trial. Fifty-six patients with recurrent ankle sprains and regular sports practice were randomly assigned to experimental or control group. The control group performed 4 weeks of proprioceptive/strengthening exercises; the experimental group performed 4 weeks of the same exercises combined with manual therapy (mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures). Pain, self-reported functional ankle instability, pressure pain threshold (PPT), ankle muscle strength, and active range of motion (ROM) were evaluated in the ankle joint before, just after and one month after the interventions. The within-group differences revealed improvements in all of the variables in both groups throughout the time. Between-group differences revealed that the experimental group exhibited lower pain levels and self-reported functional ankle instability and higher PPT, ankle muscle strength and ROM values compared to the control group immediately after the interventions and one month later. A protocol involving proprioceptive and strengthening exercises and manual therapy (mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures) resulted in greater improvements in pain, self-reported functional joint stability, strength and ROM compared to exercises alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Can Dialectical Behavior Therapy Be Learned in Highly Structured Learning Environments? Results from a Randomized Controlled Dissemination Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimeff, Linda A.; Woodcock, Eric A.; Harned, Melanie S.; Beadnell, Blair

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of methods of training community mental health providers (N=132) in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) distress tolerance skills, including (a) Linehan's (1993a) Skills Training Manual for Borderline Personality Disorder (Manual), (b) a multimedia e-Learning course covering the same content (e-DBT), and (c) a…

  15. Reminiscences from an Expatriate Scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, C.

    The Workshop "A WEEK OF SCIENCE" celebrating the 70th birthday (September 7th, real; 14th, legal; 2011) of Prof. Manuel G. Velarde, was an outstanding meeting. For me, Carlos Montes, Directeur de Recherche au CNRS (emeritus since 2006), was the best opportunity to embrace my friend Manuel. I know him from the early seventeens because we have a strong common history. We are both Spanish physicists emigrating from our country in order to carry out research in physics. At the end of the sixteens this was not possible in Spain.

  16. John Swales: Some Personal Reminiscences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Vijay

    1998-01-01

    The first doctoral student of linguist John Swales comments on three aspects of their advisor/advisee relationship: the relaxed atmosphere in which work was done; the collegial style of interaction; and the advisor's active participation with the student in the research process. (MSE)

  17. Loss of Tropomodulin4 in the zebrafish mutant träge causes cytoplasmic rod formation and muscle weakness reminiscent of nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Berger, Joachim; Tarakci, Hakan; Berger, Silke; Li, Mei; Hall, Thomas E; Arner, Anders; Currie, Peter D

    2014-12-01

    Nemaline myopathy is an inherited muscle disease that is mainly diagnosed by the presence of nemaline rods in muscle biopsies. Of the nine genes associated with the disease, five encode components of striated muscle sarcomeres. In a genetic zebrafish screen, the mutant träge (trg) was isolated based on its reduction in muscle birefringence, indicating muscle damage. Myofibres in trg appeared disorganised and showed inhomogeneous cytoplasmic eosin staining alongside malformed nuclei. Linkage analysis of trg combined with sequencing identified a nonsense mutation in tropomodulin4 (tmod4), a regulator of thin filament length and stability. Accordingly, although actin monomers polymerize to form thin filaments in the skeletal muscle of tmod4(trg) mutants, thin filaments often appeared to be dispersed throughout myofibres. Organised myofibrils with the typical striation rarely assemble, leading to severe muscle weakness, impaired locomotion and early death. Myofibrils of tmod4(trg) mutants often featured thin filaments of various lengths, widened Z-disks, undefined H-zones and electron-dense aggregations of various shapes and sizes. Importantly, Gomori trichrome staining and the lattice pattern of the detected cytoplasmic rods, together with the reactivity of rods with phalloidin and an antibody against actinin, is reminiscent of nemaline rods found in nemaline myopathy, suggesting that misregulation of thin filament length causes cytoplasmic rod formation in tmod4(trg) mutants. Although Tropomodulin4 has not been associated with myopathy, the results presented here implicateTMOD4 as a novel candidate for unresolved nemaline myopathies and suggest that the tmod4(trg) mutant will be a valuable tool to study human muscle disorders. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Loss of Tropomodulin4 in the zebrafish mutant träge causes cytoplasmic rod formation and muscle weakness reminiscent of nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Joachim; Tarakci, Hakan; Berger, Silke; Li, Mei; Hall, Thomas E.; Arner, Anders; Currie, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is an inherited muscle disease that is mainly diagnosed by the presence of nemaline rods in muscle biopsies. Of the nine genes associated with the disease, five encode components of striated muscle sarcomeres. In a genetic zebrafish screen, the mutant träge (trg) was isolated based on its reduction in muscle birefringence, indicating muscle damage. Myofibres in trg appeared disorganised and showed inhomogeneous cytoplasmic eosin staining alongside malformed nuclei. Linkage analysis of trg combined with sequencing identified a nonsense mutation in tropomodulin4 (tmod4), a regulator of thin filament length and stability. Accordingly, although actin monomers polymerize to form thin filaments in the skeletal muscle of tmod4trg mutants, thin filaments often appeared to be dispersed throughout myofibres. Organised myofibrils with the typical striation rarely assemble, leading to severe muscle weakness, impaired locomotion and early death. Myofibrils of tmod4trg mutants often featured thin filaments of various lengths, widened Z-disks, undefined H-zones and electron-dense aggregations of various shapes and sizes. Importantly, Gomori trichrome staining and the lattice pattern of the detected cytoplasmic rods, together with the reactivity of rods with phalloidin and an antibody against actinin, is reminiscent of nemaline rods found in nemaline myopathy, suggesting that misregulation of thin filament length causes cytoplasmic rod formation in tmod4trg mutants. Although Tropomodulin4 has not been associated with myopathy, the results presented here implicateTMOD4 as a novel candidate for unresolved nemaline myopathies and suggest that the tmod4trg mutant will be a valuable tool to study human muscle disorders. PMID:25288681

  19. The Group Reminiscence Approach Can Increase Self-Awareness of Memory Deficits and Evoke a Life Review in People With Mild Cognitive Impairment: The Kurihara Project Data.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kei; Kasai, Mari; Nakai, Megumi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Meguro, Kenichi

    2016-06-01

    The group reminiscence approach (GRA) and reality orientation (RO) are common psychosocial interventions for patients with dementia. As a qualitative evaluation of the reminiscence approach in patients with dementia, the Patient Report Outcome (PRO) is useful. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of GRA-RO for participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) using the PRO. A cluster randomized controlled trial. Community-based study. Ninety-four patients with MCI (39 GRA-RO, 23 physical activity, and 32 cognitive training) described their impressions. Based on the database of the Kurihara Project, we retrospectively analyzed the participants' descriptions of their impressions as a PRO in the nonpharmacological interventions: GRA-RO, physical activity, and cognitive training. We categorized the descriptions according to the following 2 types: impression with content and reminiscence with life review. We assessed what they wrote regarding memory loss. The content on their life reviews was also a particular focus for the GRA-RO group. PRO. Compared with the physical activity and the clinical training groups, the GRA-RO patients described their reminiscence with life review and their own memory problems. There was no confusion of the order of events of their autobiographical memories. There was a significant time effect between the 2 family involvement groups in quality-of-life (QOL) scores, and the postintervention QOL scores were significantly better than preintervention. This study suggests that the GRA-RO in participants with MCI not only stimulates life review but also increases self-awareness of memory deficits without confusion of the order of events. Thus, the GRA-RO may improve self-esteem and develop self-awareness. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Monte Carlo study of the relationship between the time structures of prompt gammas and the in-vivo radiation dose in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Wook-Geun; Min, Chul Hee; Shin, Jae-Ik; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Lee, Se Byeong

    2015-07-01

    For in-vivo range verification in proton therapy, attempts have been made to measure the spatial distribution of the prompt gammas generated by the proton-induced interactions and to determine the proton dose distribution. However, the high energies of prompt gammas and background gammas are still problematic in measuring the distribution. In this study, we suggested a new method for determining the in-vivo range by utilizing the time structure of the prompt gammas formed during the rotation of a range modulation wheel (RMW) in passive scattering proton therapy. To validate the Monte Carlo code simulating the proton beam nozzle, we compared the axial percent depth doses (PDDs) with the measured PDDs for varying beam range from 4.73 to 24.01 cm. Also, we assessed the relationship between the proton dose rate and the time structure of the prompt gammas in a water phantom. The results of the PDD showed agreement within relative errors of 1.1% in the distal range and 2.9% in the modulation width. The average dose difference in the modulation was assessed as less than 1.3% by comparison with the measurements. The time structure of prompt gammas was well-matched, within 0.39 ms, with the proton dose rate, and this enabled an accurate prediction of the in-vivo range.

  1. Automatic Atlas Based Electron Density and Structure Contouring for MRI-based Prostate Radiation Therapy on the Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, J. A.; Burdett, N.; Greer, P. B.; Sun, J.; Parker, J.; Pichler, P.; Stanwell, P.; Chandra, S.; Rivest-Hénault, D.; Ghose, S.; Salvado, O.; Fripp, J.

    2014-03-01

    Our group have been developing methods for MRI-alone prostate cancer radiation therapy treatment planning. To assist with clinical validation of the workflow we are investigating a cloud platform solution for research purposes. Benefits of cloud computing can include increased scalability, performance and extensibility while reducing total cost of ownership. In this paper we demonstrate the generation of DICOM-RT directories containing an automatic average atlas based electron density image and fast pelvic organ contouring from whole pelvis MR scans.

  2. HIV-1 Proviral DNA Loads (as Determined by Quantitative PCR) in Patients Subjected to Structured Treatment Interruption after Antiretroviral Therapy Failure

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Domingos E. M.; Santos, Carlos; Oliveros, Márcia P. R.; Sanabani, Sabri; Diaz, Ricardo S.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of Structured Treatment Interruption (STI) in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proviral reservoirs in 41 highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-treated viremic individuals at baseline and 12 weeks after STI was determined using quantitative PCR (qPCR). Viral load increased 0.7 log10 and CD4 decreased 97.5 cells/mm3 after 12 weeks. A total of 28 of the 41 individuals showed an increased proviral load, 19 with a statistically significant increase above 10%. An increase in active viral replication is an important factor in the replenishment of the proviral reservoir even for short time periods. PMID:22422851

  3. Creative music therapy to promote brain structure, function, and neurobehavioral outcomes in preterm infants: a randomized controlled pilot trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Haslbeck, Friederike Barbara; Bucher, Hans-Ulrich; Bassler, Dirk; Hagmann, Cornelia

    2017-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with increased risk of neurological impairment and deficits in cognition, motor function, and behavioral problems. Limited studies indicate that multi-sensory experiences support brain development in preterm infants. Music appears to promote neurobiological processes and neuronal learning in the human brain. Creative music therapy (CMT) is an individualized, interactive therapeutic approach based on the theory and methods of Nordoff and Robbins. CMT may promote brain development in preterm infants via concurrent interaction and meaningful auditory stimulation. We hypothesize that preterm infants who receive creative music therapy during neonatal intensive care admission will have developmental benefits short- and long-term brain function. A prospective, randomized controlled single-center pilot trial involving 60 clinically stable preterm infants under 32 weeks of gestational age is conducted in preparation for a multi-center trial. Thirty infants each are randomized to either standard neonatal intensive care or standard care with CMT. Music therapy intervention is approximately 20 min in duration three times per week. A trained music therapist sings for the infants in lullaby style, individually entrained and adjusted to the infant's rhythm and affect. Primary objectives of this study are feasibility of protocol implementation and investigating the potential mechanism of efficacy for this new intervention. To examine the effect of this new intervention, non-invasive, quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods at corrected age and standardized neurodevelopmental assessments using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development third edition at a corrected age of 24 months and Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children at 5 years will be performed. All assessments will be performed and analyzed by blinded experts. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled clinical trial to systematically examine possible

  4. SU-F-BRD-14: Dose Weighted Linear Energy Transfer Analysis of Critical Structures in Proton Therapy of Pediatric Brain Tumor Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pirlepesov, F.; Shin, J.; Moskvin, V. P.; Gray, J.; Hua, C.; Gajjar, A.; Krasin, M. J.; Merchant, T. E.; Farr, J. B.; Li, Z.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose weighted Linear Energy Transfer (LETd) analysis of critical structures may be useful in understanding the side effects of the proton therapy. The objective is to analyze the differences between LETd and dose distributions in brain tumor patients receiving double scattering proton therapy, to quantify LETd variation in critical organs, and to identify beam arrangements contributing to high LETd in critical organs. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of 9 pediatric brain tumor patients were performed. The treatment plans were reconstructed with the TOPAS Monte Carlo code to calculate LETd and dose. The beam data were reconstructed proximal to the aperture of the double scattering nozzle. The dose and LETd to target and critical organs including brain stem, optic chiasm, lens, optic nerve, pituitary gland, and hypothalamus were computed for each beam. Results: Greater variability in LETd compared to dose was observed in the brainstem for patients with a variety of tumor types including 5 patients with tumors located in the posterior fossa. Approximately 20%–44% brainstem volume received LETd of 5kev/µm or greater from beams within gantry angles 180°±30° for 5 patients treated with a 3 beam arrangement. Critical organs received higher LETd when located in the vicinity of the beam distal edge. Conclusion: This study presents a novel strategy in the evaluation of the proton treatment impact on critical organs. While the dose to critical organs is confined below the required limits, the LETd may have significant variation. Critical organs in the vicinity of beam distal edge receive higher LETd and depended on beam arrangement, e.g. in posterior fossa tumor treatment, brainstem receive higher LETd from posterior-anterior beams. This study shows importance of the LETd analysis of the radiation impact on the critical organs in proton therapy and may be used to explain clinical imaging observations after therapy.

  5. The development of an inventory to assess the structural barriers to clinic attendance and pill-taking amongst users of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    In addition to personal and psychological factors, structural factors may reduce the likelihood of optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among persons living with HIV. In this mixed-method study we report on the development of a scale to assess the salience of various structural barriers to ART adherence. After following conventional guidelines for scale development, two scales measuring structural barriers to adherence to clinic attendance and pill-taking were administered to 291 patients receiving ART at a public hospital in South Africa. Both exploratory and higher order factor analysis indicated that a single underlying general factor was appropriate for both scales. The final scales consisted of 12 items for the structural barriers to clinic attendance scale and 13 items for the structural barriers to medication-taking scale. Both scales displayed excellent internal consistency with Cronbach alpha coefficients above 0.80. Research to determine the construct validity of the scales may be a next step in this line of research.

  6. Current Status of Magnetite-Based Core@Shell Structures for Diagnosis and Therapy in Oncology Short running title: Biomedical Applications of Magnetite@Shell Structures.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Angela Leao; Fabris, Jose Domingos; Domingues, Rosana Zacarias; Pereira, Marcio C

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxides, as magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), are primary materials with intrinsic properties that enable them, as single components or as special composites, to base advanced techniques in medical clinical practices, as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as magnetically-induced hyperthermic heat generator, and as a magnetic guide to locally deliver drugs to specific sites in the human body. An interesting approach to developing nanoplatforms for those applications consists in manufacturing core@shell nanostructures, in which the precursor magnetic iron oxide (usually, magnetite) acts as a core, and an organic, or inorganic compound is used as a shell in a multifunctional composite. In this review, we report the current advances in the use of magnetite-based core@shell nanostructures, including Fe3O4@SiO2 and Fe3O4@polymers, in MRI, magnetic hyperthermia and drug delivery systems for diagnosis and therapy of tumor cells. The development of nanoplatforms for combined therapy and diagnostic (theranostic) is also addressed.

  7. COBRA combination therapy in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: long-term structural benefits of a brief intervention.

    PubMed

    Landewé, Robert B M; Boers, Maarten; Verhoeven, Arco C; Westhovens, Rene; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Markusse, Harry M; van Denderen, J Christiaan; Westedt, Marie Louise; Peeters, Andre J; Dijkmans, Ben A C; Jacobs, Piet; Boonen, Annelies; van der Heijde, Désirée M F M; van der Linden, Sjef

    2002-02-01

    The Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoide Artritis (COBRA) trial demonstrated that step-down combination therapy with prednisolone, methotrexate, and sulfasalazine (SSZ) was superior to SSZ monotherapy for suppressing disease activity and radiologic progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The current study was conducted to investigate whether the benefits of COBRA therapy were sustained over time, and to determine which baseline factors could predict outcome. All patients had participated in the 56-week COBRA trial. During followup, they were seen by their own rheumatologists and were also assessed regularly by study nurses; no treatment protocol was specified. Disease activity, radiologic damage, and functional ability were the primary outcome domains. Two independent assessors scored radiographs in sequence according to the Sharp/van der Heijde method. Outcomes were analyzed by generalized estimating equations on the basis of intent-to-treat, starting with data obtained at the last visit of the COBRA trial (56 weeks after baseline). At the beginning of followup, patients in the COBRA group had a significantly lower mean time-averaged 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) and a significantly lower median radiologic damage (Sharp) score compared with those in the SSZ monotherapy group. The functional ability score (Health Assessment Questionnaire [HAQ]) was similar in both groups. During the 4-5 year followup period, the time-averaged DAS28 decreased 0.17 points per year in the SSZ group and 0.07 in the COBRA group. The Sharp progression rate was 8.6 points per year in the SSZ group and 5.6 in the COBRA group. After adjustment for differences in treatment and disease activity during followup, the between-group difference in the rate of radiologic progression was 3.7 points per year. The HAQ score did not change significantly over time. Independent baseline predictors of radiologic progression over time (apart from treatment allocation) were rheumatoid factor

  8. Low Non-structured Antiretroviral Therapy Interruptions in HIV-Infected Persons Who Inject Drugs Receiving Multidisciplinary Comprehensive HIV Care at an Outpatient Drug Abuse Treatment Center.

    PubMed

    Vallecillo, Gabriel; Mojal, Sergio; Roquer, Albert; Samos, Pilar; Luque, Sonia; Martinez, Diana; Martires, Paula Karen; Torrens, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Continuous HIV treatment is necessary to ensure successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of patient-initiated non-structured treatment interruptions in HIV-infected persons who inject drugs and who received a multidisciplinary comprehensive program, including medical HIV care, drug-dependence treatment and psychosocial support, at a drug outpatient addiction center. Non-structured treatment interruptions were defined as ≥30 consecutive days off cART without medical indication. During a median follow-up of 53.8 months, 37/132 (28 %) patients experienced the first non-structured treatment interruptions. The cumulative probability of cART interruption at 5 years was 31.2 % (95 % CI 22.4-40.0). Current drug use injection ≥1/day (HR 14.77; 95 % CI 5.90-36.96) and cART naive patients (HR 0.35, 95 % CI 0.14-0.93) were predictive factors for non-structured treatment interruptions. HIV care provided at a drug addiction center is a useful strategy to sustain continuous cART, however, drug abstinence is essential for the long-term maintenance of cART.

  9. Structured self-monitoring of blood glucose regimens improve glycemic control in poorly controlled Chinese patients on insulin therapy: Results from COMPASS.

    PubMed

    Ji, Linong; Su, Qing; Feng, Bo; Shan, Zhongyan; Hu, Renming; Xing, Xiaoping; Xue, Yaoming; Yang, Tao; Hua, Yanyin

    2017-05-01

    The use of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) among patients with insulin-treated, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in China is suboptimal. Herein we evaluated the effectiveness of structured SMBG for improving glycemic control and increasing the frequency of SMBG. Insulin-treated (>3 months) T2DM patients aged ≥18 years with HbA1c >8.0 % (64 mmol/mol) were recruited to the study. They received SMBG materials and were advised on a structured SMBG regimen for their insulin therapy. Patients were trained to self-adjust insulin dosage according to SMBG readings and were seen by physicians at Months 3 and 6. Endpoints included changes in HbA1c, SMBG frequency, and hypoglycemia frequency. The study enrolled 820 patients, with mean (± SD) age 55.1 ± 9.8 years, body mass index 24.9 ± 3.6 kg/m(2) , HbA1c 9.7 ± 1.6 % (83 mmol/mol), and diabetes duration 9.8 ± 7.1 years, with median insulin therapy of 30.3 (3.0-274.1) months, from 19 Chinese clinics. By Month 3, 99.9 % of patients performed daily SMBG. At Months 3 and 6, HbA1c had decreased from baseline (-1.81 % and -1.73 %, respective; P < 0.0001 for both), with reduced hypoglycemia. In addition, 36.2 % and 39.9 % of patients achieved HbA1c <7.0 % (53 mmol/mol) at Months 3 and 6, respectively. The largest HbA1c improvements were for patients with a shorter duration of diabetes and insulin therapy. A structured SMBG regimen, with training on interpretation of and responses to SMBG readings, increased SMBG frequency and improved HbA1c and the management of insulin-treated T2DM. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Structured-light 3D scanner in use to assess the human body posture in physical therapy - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kurzydło, Wojciech; Stach, Beata; Bober, Aleksandra; Wodzińska, Mariola; Długosz, Mirosława M

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to asses the possibility of using mass production structured-light 3d scanner to asses human body posture. The study was conducted on a healthy 23 year old volunteer and a lay-figure. The experiment consisted of 28 3D scans, divided into three separate tests. The largest deviation observed in the first two trials was 24.42 mm. While the largest deviation observed in the third trial was 49.91 mm. Data obtained with the mass production structured-light 3d scanner may have comparable or better performance than commercially available systems for the assessment of BP.

  11. The fall of the postural-structural-biomechanical model in manual and physical therapies: exemplified by lower back pain.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Eyal

    2011-04-01

    Manual and physical therapists often use a postural-structural-biomechanical (PSB) model to ascertain the causes of various musculoskeletal conditions. It is believed that postural deviations, body asymmetries and pathomechanics are the predisposing/maintaining factors for many musculoskeletal conditions. The PSB model also plays an important role in clinical assessment and management, including the choice of manual techniques and the exercise prescribed. However, the most important question is consistently being ignored--can a person's physical shape/posture/structure/biomechanics be the cause of their lower back pain?

  12. Binary and ternary crystal structure analyses of a novel inhibitor with 17beta-HSD type 1: a lead compound for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Mausumi; Fournier, Diane; Zhu, Dao-Wei; Cadot, Christine; Poirier, Donald; Lin, Sheng-Xiang

    2009-12-10

    Oestradiol is a well-characterized sex hormone that stimulates breast cancer and other oestrogen-related diseases. 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (17beta-HSD1) catalyses the last step in the synthesis of oestradiol and androstenediol in breast tumour tissue. The enzyme's high expression and activity after simultaneous blockade of oestrogen receptors and inhibition of aromatase in the tumour shows the necessity for its inhibition as a requirement for breast cancer therapy. In the present paper, we report structures of the binary and ternary complexes of 17beta-HSD1 with a new inhibitor E2B {3-[3',17'beta-dihydroxyestra-1',3',5'(10')-trien-16'beta-methyl]benzamide}, and the enzyme inhibition by the later. The IC50 value for E2B was determined to be 42 nM in T47D cells. Multiple interactions between E2B and the enzyme include hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions, as well as pi-pi interactions. A kinetic study demonstrated that E2B inhibits the enzyme's reduction forming oestradiol from oestrone, with a Ki of 0.9+/-0.15 nM. Such strong inhibition is in agreement with its extensive interaction with the enzyme, suggesting its potential as a lead compound for breast cancer therapy. In fact, this possibility is enhanced by its capacity for cell penetration similar to natural steroids. Such inhibitors that block oestrogen synthesis to suppress the sulfatase pathway producing oestradiol can be used in adjuvant therapies with oestrogen receptor blockade, opening a new orientation of breast cancer treatment.

  13. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Teens > Radiation Therapy Print A ... how to cope with side effects. What Is Radiation Therapy? Cancer is a disease that causes cells ...

  14. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Teens > Radiation Therapy A A ... how to cope with side effects. What Is Radiation Therapy? Cancer is a disease that causes cells ...

  15. Bioactive glasses as potential radioisotope vectors for in situ cancer therapy: investigating the structural effects of yttrium.

    PubMed

    Christie, Jamieson K; Malik, Jahangir; Tilocca, Antonio

    2011-10-21

    The incorporation of yttrium in bioactive glasses (BGs) could lead to a new generation of radionuclide vectors for cancer therapy, with high biocompatibility, controlled biodegradability and the ability to enhance the growth of new healthy tissues after the treatment with radionuclides. It is essential to assess whether and to what extent yttrium incorporation affects the favourable properties of the BG matrix: ideally, one would like to combine the high surface reactivity typical of BGs with a slow release of radioactive yttrium. Molecular Dynamics simulations show that, compared to a BG composition with the same silica fraction, incorporation of yttrium results in two opposing effects on the glass durability: a more fragmented silicate network (leading to lower durability) and a stronger yttrium-mediated association between separate silicate fragments (leading to higher durability). The simulations also highlight a high site-selectivity and some clustering of yttrium cations, which are likely linked to the observed slow rate of yttrium released from related Y-BG compositions. Optimisation of yttrium BG compositions for radiotherapy applications thus depends on the delicate balance between these effects.

  16. JAK/STAT pathway directed therapy of T-cell leukemia/lymphoma: Inspired by functional and structural genomics.

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Thomas A

    2017-08-15

    Abnormal activation of the γc cytokine JAK/STAT signaling pathway assessed by STAT3 or STAT5b phosphorylation was present in a proportion of many T-cell malignancies. Activating mutations of STAT3/STAT5b and JAK1/3 were present in some but not in all cases with constitutive signaling pathway activation. Using shRNA analysis pSTAT malignant T-cell lines were addicted to JAKs/STATs whether they were mutated or not. Activating JAK/STAT mutations were not sufficient to support leukemic cell proliferation but only augmented upstream pathway signals. Functional cytokine receptors were required for pSTAT expression. Combining a JAK1/2 inhibitor with a Bcl-xL inhibitor navitoclax provided additive/synergistic activity with IL-2 dependent ATLL cell lines and in a mouse model of human IL-2 dependent ATLL. The insight that disorders of the γc/JAK/STAT system are pervasive suggests approaches including those that target gamma cytokines, their receptors or that use JAK kinase inhibitors may be of value in multicomponent therapy for T-cell malignancies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Effects of radiation therapy on the structure and function of the pelvic floor muscles of patients with cancer in the pelvic area: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Stéphanie; Ouellet, Marie-Pier; Moffet, Hélène; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Dumoulin, Chantale

    2016-04-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is often recommended in the treatment of pelvic cancers. Following RT, a high prevalence of pelvic floor dysfunctions (urinary incontinence, dyspareunia, and fecal incontinence) is reported. However, changes in pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) after RT remain unclear. The purpose of this review was to systematically document the effects of RT on the PFM structure and function in patients with cancer in the pelvic area. An electronic literature search using Pubmed Central, CINAHL, Embase, and SCOPUS was performed from date of inception up to June 2014. The following keywords were used: radiotherapy, muscle tissue, and pelvic floor. Two reviewers selected the studies in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement (PRISMA). Out of the 369 articles screened, 13 met all eligibility criteria. The methodological quality was assessed using the QualSyst scoring system, and standardized mean differences were calculated. Thirteen studies fulfilled all inclusion criteria, from which four were of good methodological quality. One presented strong evidence that RT affects PFM structure in men treated for prostate cancer. Four presented high-level evidence that RT affects PFM function in patients treated for rectal cancer. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity and lack of descriptive statistics. There is some evidence that RT has detrimental impacts on both PFMs' structure and function. A better understanding of muscle damage and dysfunction following RT treatment will improve pelvic floor rehabilitation and, potentially, prevention of its detrimental impacts.

  18. Structural divergence of essential triad ribbon synapse proteins among placental mammals - Implications for preclinical trials in photoreceptor transplantation therapy.

    PubMed

    Laver, Christopher R J; Matsubara, Joanne A

    2017-03-18

    As photoreceptor transplantation rapidly moves closer to the clinic, verifying graft efficacy in animal models may have unforeseen xenogeneic barriers. Although photoreceptor transplants have most convincingly exhibited functional synaptogenesis in conspecific studies, such evidence (while ruling out false-positives due to: viral graft labeling, fusion/cytosolic transfer, or neuroprotection) has not yet been shown for discordant xenografts. From this, a fundamental question should be raised: is useful xenosynaptogenesis likely between human photoreceptors and mouse retina? The triad ribbon synapse (TRS) that would normally form is unique and contains trans-synaptic proteins essential to its formation and function. Thus, could interspecific structural divergence be present that may inhibit this trans-synaptic bridge in discordant xenografts? In an effort to address this question computationally, we compared eight recently confirmed (including subcellular location) TRS specific (or predominantly expressed at the TRS) proteins among placental mammals (1-to-1 orthologs) using HyPhy selection analysis (a predictive measure of structural divergence) and by using Phyre2 tertiary structural modeling. Here, selection analysis revealed strong positive (diversifying) selection acting on a particularly important TRS protein: pikachurin. This positive selection was localized to its second Laminin-G (LG)-like domain and on its N-terminal domain - a putative region of trans-synaptic interaction. Localization of structural divergence to the N-terminus of each putative post-translational cleavage (PTC) product may suggest neofunctionalization from ancestral uncleaved pikachurin - this would be consistent with a recent counter-paradigm report of pikachurin cleavage predominating at the TRS. From this, we suggest a dual role after cleavage where the N-terminal fragment can still mediate the trans-synaptic bridge, while the C-terminal fragment may act as a diffusible trophic or

  19. Bone-tissue engineering: complex tunable structural and biological responses to injury, drug delivery, and cell-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Alghazali, Karrer M; Nima, Zeid A; Hamzah, Rabab N; Dhar, Madhu S; Anderson, David E; Biris, Alexandru S

    2015-01-01

    Bone loss and failure of proper bone healing continues to be a significant medical condition in need of solutions that can be implemented successfully both in human and veterinary medicine. This is particularly true when large segmental defects are present, the bone has failed to return to normal form or function, or the healing process is extremely prolonged. Given the inherent complexity of bone tissue - its unique structural, mechanical, and compositional properties, as well as its ability to support various cells - it is difficult to find ideal candidate materials that could be used as the foundation for tissue regeneration from technological platforms. Recently, important developments have been made in the implementation of complex structures built both at the macro- and the nano-level that have been shown to positively impact bone formation and to have the ability to deliver active biological molecules (drugs, growth factors, proteins, cells) for controlled tissue regeneration and the prevention of infection. These materials are diverse, ranging from polymers to ceramics and various composites. This review presents developments in this area with a focus on the role of scaffold structure and chemistry on the biologic processes that influence bone physiology and regeneration.

  20. Structural characterization of inhibitor complexes with checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), a drug target for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Jobson, Andrew G.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Self, Christopher R.; Zhang, Guangtao; Pommier, Yves; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Waugh, David S.

    2012-01-20

    Chk2 (checkpoint kinase 2) is a serine/threonine kinase that participates in a series of signaling networks responsible for maintaining genomic integrity and responding to DNA damage. The development of selective Chk2 inhibitors has recently attracted much interest as a means of sensitizing cancer cells to current DNA-damaging agents used in the treatment of cancer. Additionally, selective Chk2 inhibitors may reduce p53-mediated apoptosis in normal tissues, thereby helping to mitigate adverse side effects from chemotherapy and radiation. Thus far, relatively few selective inhibitors of Chk2 have been described and none have yet progressed into clinical trials. Here, we report crystal structures of the catalytic domain of Chk2 in complex with a novel series of potent and selective small molecule inhibitors. These compounds exhibit nanomolar potencies and are selective for Chk2 over Chk1. The structures reported here elucidate the binding modes of these inhibitors to Chk2 and provide information that can be exploited for the structure-assisted design of novel chemotherapeutics.

  1. Brain structural connectivity increases concurrent with functional improvement: Evidence from diffusion tensor MRI in children with cerebral palsy during therapy

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Zoë A.; Sun, Jessica; Laura Case; Mikati, Mohamad A.; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Song, Allen W.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) refers to a heterogeneous group of permanent but non-progressive movement disorders caused by injury to the developing fetal or infant brain (Bax et al., 2005). Because of its serious long-term consequences, effective interventions that can help improve motor function, independence, and quality of life are critically needed. Our ongoing longitudinal clinical trial to treat children with CP is specifically designed to meet this challenge. To maximize the potential for functional improvement, all children in this trial received autologous cord blood transfusions (with order randomized with a placebo administration over 2 years) in conjunction with more standard physical and occupational therapies. As a part of this trial, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to improve our understanding of how these interventions affect brain development, and to develop biomarkers of treatment efficacy. In this report, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and subsequent brain connectome analyses were performed in a subset of children enrolled in the clinical trial (n = 17), who all exhibited positive but varying degrees of functional improvement over the first 2-year period of the study. Strong correlations between increases in white matter (WM) connectivity and functional improvement were demonstrated; however no significant relationships between either of these factors with the age of the child at time of enrollment were identified. Thus, our data indicate that increases in brain connectivity reflect improved functional abilities in children with CP. In future work, this potential biomarker can be used to help differentiate the underlying mechanisms of functional improvement, as well as to identify treatments that can best facilitate functional improvement upon un-blinding of the timing of autologous cord blood transfusions at the completion of this study. PMID:25610796

  2. Brain structural connectivity increases concurrent with functional improvement: evidence from diffusion tensor MRI in children with cerebral palsy during therapy.

    PubMed

    Englander, Zoë A; Sun, Jessica; Laura Case; Mikati, Mohamad A; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Song, Allen W

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) refers to a heterogeneous group of permanent but non-progressive movement disorders caused by injury to the developing fetal or infant brain (Bax et al., 2005). Because of its serious long-term consequences, effective interventions that can help improve motor function, independence, and quality of life are critically needed. Our ongoing longitudinal clinical trial to treat children with CP is specifically designed to meet this challenge. To maximize the potential for functional improvement, all children in this trial received autologous cord blood transfusions (with order randomized with a placebo administration over 2 years) in conjunction with more standard physical and occupational therapies. As a part of this trial, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to improve our understanding of how these interventions affect brain development, and to develop biomarkers of treatment efficacy. In this report, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and subsequent brain connectome analyses were performed in a subset of children enrolled in the clinical trial (n = 17), who all exhibited positive but varying degrees of functional improvement over the first 2-year period of the study. Strong correlations between increases in white matter (WM) connectivity and functional improvement were demonstrated; however no significant relationships between either of these factors with the age of the child at time of enrollment were identified. Thus, our data indicate that increases in brain connectivity reflect improved functional abilities in children with CP. In future work, this potential biomarker can be used to help differentiate the underlying mechanisms of functional improvement, as well as to identify treatments that can best facilitate functional improvement upon un-blinding of the timing of autologous cord blood transfusions at the completion of this study.

  3. Whole-eye electrical stimulation therapy preserves visual function and structure in P23H-1 rats

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, Adam M.; Kim, Moon K.; Thomas, Joel G.; Ciavatta, Vincent T.; Chrenek, Micah; Hetling, John R.; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2016-01-01

    Low-level electrical stimulation to the eye has been shown to be neuroprotective against retinal degeneration in both human and animal subjects, using approaches such as subretinal implants and transcorneal electrical stimulation. In this study, we investigated the benefits of whole-eye electrical stimulation (WES) in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa. Transgenic rats with a P23H-1 rhodopsin mutation were treated with 30 min of low-level electrical stimulation (4 μA at 5 Hz; n = 10) or sham stimulation (Sham group; n = 15), twice per week, from 4 to 24 weeks of age. Retinal and visual functions were assessed every 4 weeks using electroretinography and optokinetic tracking, respectively. At the final time point, eyes were enucleated and processed for histology. Separate cohorts were stimulated once for 30 min, and retinal tissue harvested at 1 h and 24 h post-stimulation for real-time PCR detection of growth factors and inflammatory and apoptotic markers. At all time-points after treatment, WES-treated rat eyes exhibited significantly higher spatial frequency thresholds than untreated eyes. Inner retinal function, as measured by ERG oscillatory potentials (OPs), showed significantly improved OP amplitudes at 8 and 12 weeks post-WES compared to Sham eyes. Additionally, while photoreceptor segment and nuclei thicknesses in P23H-1 rats did not change between treatment groups, WES-treated eyes had significantly greater numbers of retinal ganglion cell nuclei than Sham eyes at 20 weeks post-WES. Gene expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), caspase 3, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), and glutamine synthetase (GS) were significantly higher at 1 h, but not 24 h after WES treatment. Our findings suggest that WES has a beneficial effect on visual function in a rat model of retinal degeneration and that post-receptoral neurons may be particularly responsive to electrical stimulation therapy. PMID:27327393

  4. Test–Retest Variability of Functional and Structural Parameters in Patients with Stargardt Disease Participating in the SAR422459 Gene Therapy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Maria A.; Choi, Dongseok; Erker, Laura R.; Pennesi, Mark E.; Yang, Paul; Chegarnov, Elvira N.; Steinkamp, Peter N.; Schlechter, Catherine L.; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Audo, Isabelle; Sahel, Jose; Weleber, Richard G.; Wilson, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this analysis was to determine the test–retest variability of functional and structural measures from a cohort of patients with advanced forms of Stargardt Disease (STGD) participating in the SAR422459 (NCT01367444) gene therapy clinical trial. Methods Twenty-two participants, aged 24 to 66, diagnosed with advanced forms of STGD, with at least one pathogenic ABCA4 mutation on each chromosome participating in the SAR422459 (NCT01367444) gene therapy clinical trial, were screened over three visits within 3 weeks or less. Functional visual evaluations included: best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letter score, semiautomated kinetic perimetry (SKP) using isopters I4e, III4e, and V4e, hill of vision (HOV) calculated from static visual fields (SVF) by using a 184n point centrally condensed grid with the stimulus size V test target. Retinal structural changes such as central macular thickness and macular volume were assessed by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Repeatability coefficients (RC) and 95% confidential intervals (CI) were calculated for each parameter using a hierarchical mixed-effects model and bootstrapping. Results Criteria for statistically significant changes for various parameters were found to be the following: BCVA letter score (8 letters), SKP isopters I4e, III4e, and V4e (3478.85; 2488.02 and 2622.46 deg2, respectively), SVF full volume HOV (VTOT, 14.62 dB-sr), central macular thickness, and macular volume (4.27 μm and 0.15 mm3, respectively). Conclusions This analysis provides important information necessary to determine if significant changes are occurring in structural and functional assessments commonly used to measure disease progression in this cohort of patients with STGD. Moreover, this information is useful for future trials assessing safety and efficacy of treatments in STGD. Translational Relevance Determination of variability of functional and

  5. [Physical therapy in osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Gnjidić, Zoja

    2010-01-01

    Physical therapy has an important role in treating rheumatic diseases; its goal is to reduced pain, swelling and to keep joints mobile. The properly manage osteoarthritis is nonpharmacological and pharmacological modalities. Physical therapy applied as a remedy for osteoarthritis is a part of multimodal therapy. The basis for physical therapy management is determined by the recommendation of the physical therapeutic science and evidence-based medicine. When making a decision about application of different methods of treatment in physical therapy, it is important to correctly diagnose a structural transformation and functional problem. Systematic review of the scientific, evidence-based, international concensus recommendations for the management of the osteoarthritis published between 2000 and 2010 were identified high-quality evidence therapy practice that is efficient and effective in increasing movement capability function, and reduce pain, disability, medical intake and improved physical function for patients with osteoarthritis

  6. Unraveling the structure of the variola topoisomerase IB-DNA complex: a possible new twist on smallpox therapy.

    PubMed

    Osheroff, Neil

    2006-10-01

    Smallpox is a serious and highly contagious disease that is caused by the variola virus. It is one of the most severe infectious human diseases known, with mortality rates as high as 30%. A successful worldwide vaccination program led to the eradication of smallpox in 1980. However, the high transmission rate of variola virus, coupled with the deadly nature of smallpox, makes this virus a potentially devastating weapon for bioterrorism. Currently, there is no specific treatment for smallpox. However, a recent article on the structure of a variola topoisomerase IB-DNA complex provides an intriguing starting point for the rational design of drugs with potential activity against smallpox.

  7. Psychodynamic therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Rachel; Moore, Theresa HM; Davies, Philippa; Caldwell, Deborah; Jones, Hannah; Lewis, Glyn; Hunot, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all psychodynamic therapy approaches compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of different psychodynamic therapy approaches (drive/structural, relational and integrative analytic models) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all psychodynamic therapy approaches compared with different psychological therapy approaches (behavioural, humanistic, integrative, cognitive-behavioural, ‘third-wave’ CBT) for acute depression. PMID:25267905

  8. Brief Therapy: An Adolescent Invention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Shirley

    1999-01-01

    Article states that brief, effective therapy with adolescents can occur by integrating the structure of solution-focused approaches with expressive qualities of art therapy within the framework of adolescent development. The three fundamentals of successful adolescent therapy are addressed. (Author/JDM)

  9. Whole-eye electrical stimulation therapy preserves visual function and structure in P23H-1 rats.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Adam M; Kim, Moon K; Thomas, Joel G; Ciavatta, Vincent T; Chrenek, Micah; Hetling, John R; Pardue, Machelle T

    2016-08-01

    Low-level electrical stimulation to the eye has been shown to be neuroprotective against retinal degeneration in both human and animal subjects, using approaches such as subretinal implants and transcorneal electrical stimulation. In this study, we investigated the benefits of whole-eye electrical stimulation (WES) in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa. Transgenic rats with a P23H-1 rhodopsin mutation were treated with 30 min of low-level electrical stimulation (4 μA at 5 Hz; n = 10) or sham stimulation (Sham group; n = 15), twice per week, from 4 to 24 weeks of age. Retinal and visual functions were assessed every 4 weeks using electroretinography and optokinetic tracking, respectively. At the final time point, eyes were enucleated and processed for histology. Separate cohorts were stimulated once for 30 min, and retinal tissue harvested at 1 h and 24 h post-stimulation for real-time PCR detection of growth factors and inflammatory and apoptotic markers. At all time-points after treatment, WES-treated rat eyes exhibited significantly higher spatial frequency thresholds than untreated eyes. Inner retinal function, as measured by ERG oscillatory potentials (OPs), showed significantly improved OP amplitudes at 8 and 12 weeks post-WES compared to Sham eyes. Additionally, while photoreceptor segment and nuclei thicknesses in P23H-1 rats did not change between treatment groups, WES-treated eyes had significantly greater numbers of retinal ganglion cell nuclei than Sham eyes at 20 weeks post-WES. Gene expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), caspase 3, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), and glutamine synthetase (GS) were significantly higher at 1 h, but not 24 h after WES treatment. Our findings suggest that WES has a beneficial effect on visual function in a rat model of retinal degeneration and that post-receptoral neurons may be particularly responsive to electrical stimulation therapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Structure-based Engineering of Species Selectivity in the Interaction Between Urokinase and its Receptor: Implication for Preclinical Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Gardsvoll, H; Huai, Q; Huang, M; Ploug, M

    2010-01-01

    The high affinity interaction between the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its glycolipid-anchored receptor (uPAR) is decisive for cell surface-associated plasminogen activation. Because plasmin activity controls fibrinolysis in a variety of pathological conditions, including cancer and wound healing, several intervention studies have focused on targeting the uPA {center_dot} uPAR interaction in vivo. Evaluations of such studies in xenotransplanted tumor models are, however, complicated by the pronounced species selectivity in this interaction. We now report the molecular basis underlying this difference by solving the crystal structure for the murine uPA {center_dot} uPAR complex and demonstrate by extensive surface plasmon resonance studies that the kinetic rate constants for this interaction can be swapped completely between these orthologs by exchanging only two residues. This study not only discloses the structural basis required for a successful rational design of the species selectivity in the uPA {center_dot} uPAR interaction, which is highly relevant for functional studies in mouse models, but it also suggests the possible development of general inhibitors that will target the uPA {center_dot} uPAR interaction across species barriers.

  11. Implications of investigating the structure-function relationship of human growth hormone in clinical diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, C J

    1994-01-01

    Human growth hormone (GH) mediates longitudinal bone growth and also exerts a variety of other biological effects, e.g. lactogenic, insulin-like, diabetogenic, lipolytic, protein-anabolic and sodium/water-retaining effects. Investigation of the structure-function relationship of human GH has been attempted by epitope mapping using monoclonal antibodies and by systematic point mutations of the human GH molecule. The diagnosis of GH-related disorders is complicated by the fact that different commercial immunoassay kits give widely differing results. This phenomenon cannot be explained by lack of standardization, but has to be attributed to the epitope specificities of the antibodies employed in the assay techniques and the spectra of different molecular forms of human GH recognized by them. The information required by a clinician in ordering a GH determination is the bioactivity of all the human GH forms in the sample, rather than the immunoreactivity with a given set of antibodies. Therefore, the aim of future GH immunoassays must be the identification of antibodies that bind with high affinity only those forms of human GH that bind and activate the GH receptor. Epitope mapping by monoclonal antibodies appears to be the ideal approach to this goal. It has recently been shown that one molecule of human GH binds two molecules of GH receptor, and dimerization of the receptor by its ligand is a prerequisite for biological function. Improvements in understanding the structure-function relationship of the human GH molecule and of the interplay of the hormone with its receptor make it conceivable that recombinant analogues of human GH will be designed to inhibit the effects of GH excess in acromegaly.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Myofascial Structural Integration Therapy on Gross Motor Function and Gait of Young Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Loi, Elizabeth C.; Buysse, Christina A.; Price, Karen S.; Jaramillo, Theresa M.; Pico, Elaine L.; Hansen, Alexis B.; Feldman, Heidi M.

    2015-01-01

    Though the cause of motor abnormalities in cerebral palsy is injury to the brain, structural changes in muscle and fascia may add to stiffness and reduced function. This study examined whether myofascial structural integration therapy, a complementary treatment that manipulates muscle and fascia, would improve gross motor function and gait in children <4 years with cerebral palsy. Participants (N = 29) were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial (NCT01815814, https://goo.gl/TGxvwd) or Open Label Extension. The main outcome was the Gross Motor Function Measure-66 assessed at 3-month intervals. Gait (n = 8) was assessed using the GAITRite® electronic walkway. Parents completed a survey at study conclusion. Comparing Treatment (n = 15) and Waitlist-Control groups (n = 9), we found a significant main effect of time but no effect of group or time × group interaction. The pooled sample (n = 27) showed a main effect of time, but no significantly greater change after treatment than between other assessments. Foot length on the affected side increased significantly after treatment, likely indicating improvement in the children’s ability to approach a heel strike. Parent surveys indicated satisfaction and improvements in the children’s quality of movement. MSI did not increase the rate of motor skill development, but was associated with improvement in gait quality. PMID:26442234

  13. MasterOnline Periodontology and Implant Therapy-revisited after seven years: A case study of the structures and outcomes in a blended learning CPD.

    PubMed

    Ratka-Krüger, P; Wölber, J P; Blank, J; Holst, K; Hörmeyer, I; Vögele, E

    2016-12-20

    There is a great need for postgraduate training and continuing professional development (CPD), specifically in the field of periodontology. Despite the plenty of periodontal CPDs, there is a lack of information about the performance of CPDs in a blended learning setting. This study is a case study of the structures and outcomes in a blended learning CPD programme in periodontology, the MasterOnline Periodontology and Implant Therapy hosted by the University of Freiburg's Dental School. The structures of the blended learning CPD were analysed with the aims to (i) make explicit how various innovative educational methods and ICT tools can be successfully applied to a Web-supported postgraduate periodontology training programme, (ii) identify the programme's impact on learning transfer in students' dental practices and (iii) identify other outcomes, synergies and any changes required during the existence. Using qualitative interviewing, the various types of learning transfer and elements of the study programme that foster transfer could be exemplified. A period of 7 years was analysed. In this duration, 50 students successfully graduated to a master of science. Qualitative interviews were performed with six students and four teachers affirming the learning transfer in a blended learning setting. This case study shows that blended learning can be a successful approach for CPD in dentistry. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Myofascial Structural Integration Therapy on Gross Motor Function and Gait of Young Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Loi, Elizabeth C; Buysse, Christina A; Price, Karen S; Jaramillo, Theresa M; Pico, Elaine L; Hansen, Alexis B; Feldman, Heidi M

    2015-01-01

    Though the cause of motor abnormalities in cerebral palsy is injury to the brain, structural changes in muscle and fascia may add to stiffness and reduced function. This study examined whether myofascial structural integration therapy, a complementary treatment that manipulates muscle and fascia, would improve gross motor function and gait in children <4 years with cerebral palsy. Participants (N = 29) were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial (NCT01815814, https://goo.gl/TGxvwd) or Open Label Extension. The main outcome was the Gross Motor Function Measure-66 assessed at 3-month intervals. Gait (n = 8) was assessed using the GAITRite(®) electronic walkway. Parents completed a survey at study conclusion. Comparing Treatment (n = 15) and Waitlist-Control groups (n = 9), we found a significant main effect of time but no effect of group or time × group interaction. The pooled sample (n = 27) showed a main effect of time, but no significantly greater change after treatment than between other assessments. Foot length on the affected side increased significantly after treatment, likely indicating improvement in the children's ability to approach a heel strike. Parent surveys indicated satisfaction and improvements in the children's quality of movement. MSI did not increase the rate of motor skill development, but was associated with improvement in gait quality.

  15. Confirming the mechanisms behind cognitive-behavioural therapy effectiveness in chronic pain using structural equation modeling in a sample of patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Durá-Ferrandis, Estrella; Ferrando-García, Maite; Galdón-Garrido, Mª José; Andreu-Vaillo, Yolanda

    2017-08-14

    To evaluate whether therapeutic mechanisms assumed to explain the effect of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) concerning temporomandibular symptoms are confirmed by structural equation modelling. Patients were randomly assigned to either an experimental group receiving CBT (N = 41) or a standard therapy control group (N = 31). Subjects were assessed before and after intervention using mediator variables hypothesized according to the CBT model, as well as outcome variables and other socio-demographic and clinical measures. The results confirm that the effect of treatment on pain intensity was partially mediated by distress, catastrophizing, perceived control, distraction, and mental self-control. The self-medication frequency was partially mediated by distraction. Pain interference was partially mediated by distress, distraction, and mental self-control. Reduction in the number of painful points on palpation was partially explained by distress, although in this case, there was a significant direct effect of treatment not mediated by other variables. The results could set the principles for the development of more efficient and effective cognitive behavioural interventions for chronic pain. Key Practitioner Message Cognitive-behavioural models fundamentals for chronic pain interventions (and concretely in TMD patients) are tested and partially confirmed, providing experts and professionals with specific knowledge to be transferred to clinical practice. The article provide key messages for the psychologists (and other professionals) working on pain management, identifying those strategies directly linked with the improvement of outcome measures. The results provide evidence-based orientations for the future application of the CBT to chronic pain, thereby making interventions more efficient as they would only be focused on the most effective technique. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Global connectivity of hub residues in Oncoprotein structures encodes genetic factors dictating personalized drug response to targeted Cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Venky; Aravamudan, Murali

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy and mechanisms of therapeutic action are largely described by atomic bonds and interactions local to drug binding sites. Here we introduce global connectivity analysis as a high-throughput computational assay of therapeutic action – inspired by the Google page rank algorithm that unearths most “globally connected” websites from the information-dense world wide web (WWW). We execute short timescale (30 ps) molecular dynamics simulations with high sampling frequency (0.01 ps), to identify amino acid residue hubs whose global connectivity dynamics are characteristic of the ligand or mutation associated with the target protein. We find that unexpected allosteric hubs – up to 20Å from the ATP binding site, but within 5Å of the phosphorylation site – encode the Gibbs free energy of inhibition (ΔGinhibition) for select protein kinase-targeted cancer therapeutics. We further find that clinically relevant somatic cancer mutations implicated in both drug resistance and personalized drug sensitivity can be predicted in a high-throughput fashion. Our results establish global connectivity analysis as a potent assay of protein functional modulation. This sets the stage for unearthing disease-causal exome mutations and motivates forecast of clinical drug response on a patient-by-patient basis. We suggest incorporation of structure-guided genetic inference assays into pharmaceutical and healthcare Oncology workflows. PMID:25465236

  17. Global connectivity of hub residues in Oncoprotein structures encodes genetic factors dictating personalized drug response to targeted Cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soundararajan, Venky; Aravamudan, Murali

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy and mechanisms of therapeutic action are largely described by atomic bonds and interactions local to drug binding sites. Here we introduce global connectivity analysis as a high-throughput computational assay of therapeutic action - inspired by the Google page rank algorithm that unearths most ``globally connected'' websites from the information-dense world wide web (WWW). We execute short timescale (30 ps) molecular dynamics simulations with high sampling frequency (0.01 ps), to identify amino acid residue hubs whose global connectivity dynamics are characteristic of the ligand or mutation associated with the target protein. We find that unexpected allosteric hubs - up to 20Å from the ATP binding site, but within 5Å of the phosphorylation site - encode the Gibbs free energy of inhibition (ΔGinhibition) for select protein kinase-targeted cancer therapeutics. We further find that clinically relevant somatic cancer mutations implicated in both drug resistance and personalized drug sensitivity can be predicted in a high-throughput fashion. Our results establish global connectivity analysis as a potent assay of protein functional modulation. This sets the stage for unearthing disease-causal exome mutations and motivates forecast of clinical drug response on a patient-by-patient basis. We suggest incorporation of structure-guided genetic inference assays into pharmaceutical and healthcare Oncology workflows.

  18. Heterogeneity of EGFR Aberrations and Correlation with Histological Structures: Analyses of Therapy-Naive Isogenic Lung Cancer Lesions with EGFR Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Kenichi; Murakami, Isao; Yu, Hui; Ellison, Kim; Shimoji, Masaki; Genova, Carlo; Rivard, Christopher J.; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Hirsch, Fred R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction EGFR gene somatic mutation is reportedly homogeneous. However, there are few data regarding the heterogeneity of expression of mutant EGFR protein and EGFR gene copy number, especially in extrathoracic lesions. These types of data may enhance our understanding of the biology of EGFR-mutated lung cancer and our understanding of the heterogeneous response patterns to EGFR TKIs. Methods An 81-year-old never-smoking female with lung adenocarcinoma could not receive any systemic therapy because of her poor performance status. After her death, 15 tumor specimens from different sites were obtained by autopsy. Expression of mutant EGFR protein and EGFR gene copy numbers were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis and by silver in situ hybridization, respectively. Heterogeneity in these EGFR aberrations was compared between metastatic sites (distant versus lymph node) or histological structures (micropapillary versus nonmicropapillary). Results All lesions showed positive staining for mutant EGFR protein, except for 40% of the papillary component in one of the pulmonary metastases (weak staining below the 1+ threshold). Expression of mutant-specific EGFR protein, evaluated by H-score, was significantly higher in the micropapillary components than in the nonmicropapillary components (Mann-Whitney U test, p = 0.014). EGFR gene copy number was quite different between lesions but not correlated with histological structure or metastatic form. However, EGFR gene copy numbers were similar between histological structures in each lesion. Conclusion These data indicate that expression of EGFR mutant protein and EGFR gene copy number do not change as a consequence of tumor progression. This also justifies using the biopsy specimens from metastases as a surrogate for primary tumors. PMID:27257133

  19. Structuralism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piaget, Jean

    Provided is an overview of the analytical method known as structuralism. The first chapter discusses the three key components of the concept of a structure: the view of a system as a whole instead of so many parts; the study of the transformations in the system; and the fact that these transformations never lead beyond the system but always…

  20. Structuralism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piaget, Jean

    Provided is an overview of the analytical method known as structuralism. The first chapter discusses the three key components of the concept of a structure: the view of a system as a whole instead of so many parts; the study of the transformations in the system; and the fact that these transformations never lead beyond the system but always…

  1. Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate therapy: assessment of the alveolar bone structure in rats – a blind randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Viviane N; Langie, Renan; Etges, Adriana; Ponzoni, Deise; Puricelli, Edela

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of zoledronic acid exposure on structures of the alveolar bone of rats. The sample was composed of 42 male Wistar rats. Animals in the T1 and T2 groups received weekly doses of 0.2 mg/kg intraperitoneal zoledronic acid for 3 weeks, while animals in the T3 group received the same treatment for 8 weeks. The control groups C1, C2 and C3 received equivalent doses of saline. The first upper molars of Wistar rats in the C2, T2, C3 and T3 groups were extracted. Cone-beam computerized tomography scans were performed, and the image density was analysed by grey levels. The presence and type of inflammatory infiltrate, vascularization and bone necrosis were assigned by histological qualitative scores. Histomorphometric analysis of bone density was performed in the groups without extraction. No significant differences were found in the bone grey density estimated by grey-level value and histomorphometric analysis between the C1 and T1 groups (P > 0.05). The grey levels in the T3 group were lower (P < 0.05) than in the C3 group, corresponding to the bone defect. Histological assessments showed the presence of bone necrosis in the T3 group and lower levels of bone remodelling in the test groups (T2 and T3) compared to the control groups (C2 and C3). The results of qualitative analyses did not differ significantly between the groups (P > 0.05). Zoledronic acid-exposed animals showed maxillary changes including reduced grey levels, the presence of bone necrosis and a higher prevalence of inflammatory signs. PMID:26119047

  2. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and simultaneous integrated boost in head-and-neck cancer: is there a place for critical swallowing structures dose sparing?

    PubMed Central

    Deodato, Francesco; Macchia, Gabriella; Digesù, Cinzia; Ianiro, Anna; Piermattei, Angelo; Valentini, Vincenzo; Morganti, Alessio G

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the potential of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to reduce the risk of swallowing problems after curative chemoradiotherapy. Methods: 20 patients with head and neck cancer who previously underwent radiotherapy were selected. Radiotherapy was prescribed according to simultaneous integrated boost technique with all targets irradiated simultaneously over 30 daily fractions. Doses of 70.5 (67.5), 60.0 and 55.5 Gy were prescribed to primary tumour, high-risk nodal regions and low-risk nodal regions, respectively. Pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) and glottic and supraglottic larynx (SGL) were considered organs at risk related to swallowing dysfunction (SW-OARs). Upper pharyngeal constrictor muscles (uPCM), middle pharyngeal constrictor muscles (mPCM) and lower pharyngeal constrictor muscles (lPCM) part of PCM were also outlined separately. Clinical standard plans (standard-VMAT) and plans aiming to spare SW-OARs (swallowing dysfunction-VMAT) were also created. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) for physician-rated swallowing dysfunction were calculated using a recently predictive model developed by Christianen et al. Results: Planning with two strategies demonstrated comparable planning target volume coverage and no differences in sparing of parotid glands and other non-swallowing organs at risk. SW-VMAT plans provided mean dose reduction for uPCM and SGL by 3.9 and 4.5 Gy, respectively. NTCP values for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 2–4 swallowing dysfunction was decreased by 9.2%. Dose reductions with SW-VMAT depended on tumour location and overlap with SW-OARs. Conclusion: VMAT plans aiming at sparing swallowing structures are feasible, providing a significant reduction in NTCP swallowing dysfunction with respect to conventional VMAT. Advances in knowledge: Dysphagia is today considered one of the dose-limiting toxicities of chemoradiotherapy. The dose sparing of swallowing structures represents a major

  3. What carers and family said about music therapy on behaviours of older people with dementia in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Tuckett, Anthony G; Hodgkinson, Brent; Rouillon, Lisa; Balil-Lozoya, Tania; Parker, Deborah

    2015-06-01

    This study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of group music therapy (MT) intervention on behaviours of older people with dementia. Reported here are qualitative data from five, semi-structured focus groups; two comprising a total of seven family members and three comprising a total of 23 staff members. A number of core themes emerged: temporality, effect and policy with a number of subthemes. The MT effect is tempered by the temporality of (i) the older person's dementia state, (ii) the session and (iii) the psychosomatic effect on the older person. Music therapy is perceived to (i) evoke memories and facilitate reminiscence, (ii) act as a diversion (has an instrumental value) and it is contentious to discount the (iii) dichotomy between music and therapist in terms of the overall effect. Finally, policymakers need to know that MT is (i) highly prized and more, not less, MT is recommended. Findings from this study illustrate that the timing of the MT session has consequences for the workflow in the residential aged care facility; MT has a psychosomatic effect and participants here evaluate this as temporal. Care providers and family members acknowledge the instrumental value of MT and its helping with cognition and exercise. They have mixed views about the effects of the music and the effect on the older person by the therapist but most definitely want policymakers to ensure more, not less, planned and better funded MT is part of ongoing care in the residential aged care context. Areas for future research and policy are also highlighted. These views on group MT in residential aged care can initiate critical reflection on current practices and systems. Research is needed exploring the timing and scheduling of MT sessions at different times in the day for older person with dementia exhibiting negative behaviours. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Radiation therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) Proton therapy is another kind of radiation used to ... than using x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  5. Behavior Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Print Share Behavior Therapy for Children with ADHD Page Content Most experts recommend using both medication and behavior therapy to treat ADHD. This is known as a multimodal treatment approach . ...

  6. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Proton Therapy Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side ... Proton Therapy Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side ...

  7. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Proton Therapy Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side ... Proton Therapy Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side ...

  8. Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Alternative Therapies Alternative therapies, also called complementary, can support ... of motion, pain, and fatigue are often reported. Energy work includes acupuncture and acupressure, traditional Chinese medicine ...

  9. The use of a rigid disc to protect exposed structures in wounds treated with negative pressure wound therapy: effects on wound bed pressure and microvascular blood flow.

    PubMed

    Anesäter, Erik; Borgquist, Ola; Torbrand, Christian; Roupé, K Markus; Ingemansson, Richard; Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin

    2012-01-01

    There are increasing reports of deaths and serious complications associated with the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Bleeding may occur in patients when NPWT is applied to a wound with exposed blood vessels or vascular grafts, possibly due to mechanical deformation and hypoperfusion of the vessel walls. Recent evidence suggests that using a rigid barrier disc to protect underlying tissue can prevent this mechanical deformation. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of rigid discs on the tissue exposed to negative pressure with regard to tissue pressure and microvascular blood flow. Peripheral wounds were created on the backs of eight pigs. The pressure and microvascular blood flow in the wound bed were measured when NPWT was applied. The wound was filled with foam, and rigid discs of different designs were inserted between the wound bed and the foam. The discs were created with or without channels (to accommodate exposed sensitive structures such as blood vessels and nerves), perforations, or a porous dressing that covered the underside of the discs (to facilitate pressure transduction and fluid evacuation). When comparing the results for pressure transduction to the wound bed, no significant differences were found using different discs covered with dressing, whereas pressure transduction was lower with bare discs. Microvascular blood flow in the wound bed decreased by 49 ± 7% when NPWT was applied to control wounds. The reduction in blood flow was less in the presence of a protective disc (e.g., -6 ± 5% for a dressing-covered, perforated disc, p = 0.006). In conclusion, NPWT causes hypoperfusion of superficial tissue in the wound bed. The insertion of a rigid barrier counteracts this effect. The placement of a rigid disc over exposed blood vessels or nerves may protect these structures from rupture and damage.

  10. Untangling the Relationship Between Antiretroviral Therapy Use and Incident Pregnancy: A Marginal Structural Model Analysis Using Data From 47,313 HIV-Positive Women in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Elul, Batya; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara K; Wu, Yingfeng; Musick, Beverly S; Nuwagaba-Biribonwoha, Harriet; Nash, Denis; Ayaya, Samuel; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Okong, Pius; Otieno, Juliana; Wabwire, Deo; Kambugu, Andrew; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T

    2016-07-01

    Scale-up of triple-drug antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Africa has transformed the context of childbearing for HIV-positive women and may impact pregnancy incidence in HIV programs. Using observational data from 47,313 HIV-positive women enrolled at 26 HIV clinics in Kenya and Uganda between 2001 and 2009, we calculated the crude cumulative incidence of pregnancy for the pre-ART and on-ART periods. The causal effect of ART use on incident pregnancy was assessed using inverse probability weighted marginal structural models, and the relationship was further explored in multivariable Cox models. Crude cumulative pregnancy incidence at 1 year after enrollment/ART initiation was 4.0% and 3.9% during the pre-ART and on-ART periods, respectively. In marginal structural models, ART use was not significantly associated with incident pregnancy [hazard ratio = 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99 to 1.12]. Similarly, in Cox models, there was no significant relationship between ART use and incident pregnancy (cause-specific hazard ratio: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.05), but effect modification was observed. Specifically, women who were pregnant at enrollment and on ART had an increased risk of incident pregnancy compared to those not pregnant at enrollment and not on ART (cause-specific hazard ratio: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.23). In this large cohort, ART initiation was not associated with incident pregnancy in the general population of women enrolling in HIV care but rather only among those pregnant at enrollment. This finding further highlights the importance of scaling up access to lifelong treatment for pregnant women.

  11. Is the atherosclerotic process accentuated under conditions of HIV infection, antiretroviral therapy, and protease inhibitor exposure? Meta-analysis of the markers of arterial structure and function.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dandan; Wu, Yupeng; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Yun; Liu, Wen; Yang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the apparent association of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, antiretroviral therapy (ART), and protease inhibitor (PI) exposure with the functional and structural markers of vasculature. A meta-analysis of the relationship between HIV infection, ART, and PI exposure and the functional and structural markers of vasculature. A systematic literature search was performed electronically using specific eligibility criteria. Weighted mean difference (WMD) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated and combined appropriately. Fifty-seven articles were included with nine different outcomes. Compared with HIV-negative patients, HIV-positive patients demonstrated significant elevated intima-media thickness (IMT) (WMD (95% CI) = 0.042 (0.028-0.057)), increased pulse wave velocity (PWV) (0.538 (0.283-0.792)), and reduced flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) (-2.049 (-2.806 to -1.293)). Elevated IMT was observed in HIV patients receiving ART when compared with those naïve to ART in the 20- to 40-year-old age group (0.078 (0.033-0.123)), the >40-year-old age group (0.038 (0.018-0.057)), and the group comprising >50% males (0.070 (0.041-0.099)). In addition, ART resulted in an increased PWV in HIV patients receiving ART in the group with >50% male proportion (0.628 (0.405-0.851)). HIV patients exposed to PI showed a significant trend toward elevated IMT (0.033 (0.007-0.058)) and increased PWV (0.264 (0.118-0.410)) compared with those without PI exposure. The atherosclerotic process was accentuated by elevated IMT, increased PWV, and reduced FMD under condition of HIV infection. Comparison of ART-receiving with ART-naïve patients showed a significant trend toward elevated IMT and increased PWV, especially under treatment with PI-containing drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effect of Cognitive Therapy on Structural Social Capital: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial Among Sexual Violence Survivors in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Paul A.; Annan, Jeannie; Kaysen, Debra; Robinette, Katie; Cetinoglu, Talita; Wachter, Karin; Bass, Judith K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated changes in social capital following group-based cognitive processing therapy (CPT) for female survivors of sexual violence. Methods. We compared CPT with individual support in a cluster-randomized trial in villages in South Kivu province, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Local psychosocial assistants delivered the interventions from April through July 2011. We evaluated differences between CPT and individual support conditions for structural social capital (i.e., time spent with nonkin social network, group membership and participation, and the size of financial and instrumental support networks) and emotional support seeking. We analyzed intervention effects with longitudinal random effects models. Results. We obtained small to medium effect size differences for 2 study outcomes. Women in the CPT villages increased group membership and participation at 6-month follow-up and emotional support seeking after the intervention compared with women in the individual support villages. Conclusions. Results support the efficacy of group CPT to increase dimensions of social capital among survivors of sexual violence in a low-income conflict-affected context. PMID:25033113

  13. The effect of cognitive therapy on structural social capital: results from a randomized controlled trial among sexual violence survivors in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    PubMed

    Hall, Brian J; Bolton, Paul A; Annan, Jeannie; Kaysen, Debra; Robinette, Katie; Cetinoglu, Talita; Wachter, Karin; Bass, Judith K

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated changes in social capital following group-based cognitive processing therapy (CPT) for female survivors of sexual violence. We compared CPT with individual support in a cluster-randomized trial in villages in South Kivu province, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Local psychosocial assistants delivered the interventions from April through July 2011. We evaluated differences between CPT and individual support conditions for structural social capital (i.e., time spent with nonkin social network, group membership and participation, and the size of financial and instrumental support networks) and emotional support seeking. We analyzed intervention effects with longitudinal random effects models. We obtained small to medium effect size differences for 2 study outcomes. Women in the CPT villages increased group membership and participation at 6-month follow-up and emotional support seeking after the intervention compared with women in the individual support villages. Results support the efficacy of group CPT to increase dimensions of social capital among survivors of sexual violence in a low-income conflict-affected context.

  14. Early- and Late-Onset Depression in Late Life: A Prospective Study on Clinical and Structural Brain Characteristics and Response to Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dols, Annemiek; Bouckaert, Filip; Sienaert, Pascal; Rhebergen, Didi; Vansteelandt, Kristof; Ten Kate, Mara; de Winter, Francois-Laurent; Comijs, Hannie C; Emsell, Louise; Oudega, Mardien L; van Exel, Eric; Schouws, Sigfried; Obbels, Jasmien; Wattjes, Mike; Barkhof, Frederik; Eikelenboom, Piet; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Stek, Max L

    2017-02-01

    The clinical profile of late-life depression (LLD) is frequently associated with cognitive impairment, aging-related brain changes, and somatic comorbidity. This two-site naturalistic longitudinal study aimed to explore differences in clinical and brain characteristics and response to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in early- (EOD) versus late-onset (LOD) late-life depression (respectively onset <55 and ≥55 years). Between January 2011 and December 2013, 110 patients aged 55 years and older with ECT-treated unipolar depression were included in The Mood Disorders in Elderly treated with ECT study. Clinical profile and somatic health were assessed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed before the first ECT and visually rated. Response rate was 78.2% and similar between the two sites but significantly higher in LOD compared with EOD (86.9 versus 67.3%). Clinical, somatic, and brain characteristics were not different between EOD and LOD. Response to ECT was associated with late age at onset and presence of psychotic symptoms and not with structural MRI characteristics. In EOD only, the odds for a higher response were associated with a shorter index episode. The clinical profile, somatic comorbidities, and brain characteristics in LLD were similar in EOD and LOD. Nevertheless, patients with LOD showed a superior response to ECT compared with patients with EOD. Our results indicate that ECT is very effective in LLD, even in vascular burdened patients. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Relationship between the tautomeric structures of curcumin derivatives and their Abeta-binding activities in the context of therapies for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Shirai, Nobuaki; Amatsubo, Tomone; Taguchi, Hiroyasu; Hirao, Koichi; Urushitani, Makoto; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Inubushi, Toshiro; Kato, Masanari; Kato, Fuminori; Morino, Kyuya; Kimura, Hirohiko; Nakano, Ichiro; Yoshida, Chikako; Okada, Takashi; Sano, Mitsuo; Wada, Yoshiko; Wada, Ken-nosuke; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2010-05-01

    Curcumin, which can exist in an equilibrium between keto and enol tautomers, binds to beta-amyloid (Abeta) fibrils/aggregates. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the tautomeric structures of curcumin derivatives and their Abeta-binding activities. Curcumin derivatives with keto-enol tautomerism showed high levels of binding to Abeta aggregates but not to Abeta monomers. The binding activity of the keto form analogue of curcumin to Abeta aggregates was found to be much weaker than that of curcumin derivatives with keto-enol tautomerism. The color of a curcumin derivative with keto-enol tautomerism, which was substituted at the C-4 position, changed from yellow to orange within 30 min of being combined with Abeta aggregates in physiological buffer. This resulted from a remarkable increase in the enol form with extended conjugation of double bonds upon binding. These findings suggest that curcumin derivatives exist predominantly in the enol form during binding to Abeta aggregates, and that the enolization of curcumin derivatives is crucial for binding to Abeta aggregates. The keto-enol tautomerism of curcumin derivatives may be a novel target for the design of amyloid-binding agents that can be used both for therapy and for amyloid detection in Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Blended nanoparticle system based on miscible structurally similar polymers: a safe, simple, targeted, and surprisingly high efficiency vehicle for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wei; Zhang, Jinxie; Zeng, Xiaowei; Liu, Danny; Liu, Gan; Zhu, Xi; Liu, Yanlan; Yu, Qingtong; Huang, Laiqiang; Mei, Lin

    2015-06-03

    A novel blended nanoparticle (NP) system for the delivery of anticancer drugs and its surprisingly high efficacy for cancer chemotherapy by blending a targeting polymer folic acid-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (FA-PEG-b-PLGA) and a miscible structurally similar polymer D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (TPGS-PLGA) is reported. This blended NP system can be achieved through a simple and effective nanoprecipitation technique, and possesses unique properties: i) improved long-term compatibility brought by PEG-based polymers; ii) reduced multidrug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in tumor cells and increased bioavailability of anticancer drugs by incorporation of TPGS; iii) the regulation of controlled release through polymer ratios and active targeting by FA. Both in vitro cell experiments and in vivo antitumor assays demonstrated the reported blended NP system can achieve the best therapeutic efficiency in an extremely safe, simple and highly efficient process for cancer therapy. Moreover, this NP system is highly efficient in forming NPs with multiple functions, without repeated chemical modification of polymers, which is sometimes complex, inefficient and high cost. Therefore, the development of this novel blended NP concept is extremely meaningful for the application of pharmaceutical nanotechnology in recent studies.

  17. The effects of vitamin D therapy on left ventricular structure and function - are these the underlying explanations for improved CKD patient survival?

    PubMed

    Covic, Adrian; Voroneanu, Luminita; Goldsmith, David

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of death among patients with chronic kidney disease and vitamin D deficiency is a common problem also among these patients. Abnormalities in left ventricular size and function are frequent, as they are encountered in 70-80% of incident dialysis patients. These alterations develop early in the course of renal disease and their prevalence progresses in parallel with the decline in renal function. This process of left ventricular dilatation with compensatory hypertrophy continues after the institution of dialysis therapy, especially in the first year. The main factors responsible for the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) are considered to be blood pressure and anemia, and in patients receiving hemodialysis, the arteriovenous fistula, volume overload and abnormalities in mineral metabolism. This additional potential set of factors related to LVH - mineral and bone metabolism - is intriguing and begs an immediate question: by what possible mechanism can these factors be linked to cardiac morphology? Recent observational studies have indeed indicated that vitamin D treatment was associated with a significant reduction of cardiovascular death among dialysis patients, and a reduction in LVH; in contrast, other studies suggested that excess vitamin D contributes to risk of hypercalcemia and vascular calcification, which is associated with reduced survival and morbidity. This review examines the evidence linking vitamin D with cardiac structure and function.

  18. Feminist Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laidlaw, Toni; Malmo, Cheryl

    1991-01-01

    Traces roots of feminist therapy and its independence from traditional and prevalent theories and therapy practices. Asserts that Freudian theory and humanistic assumptions are sexist and contribute to powerlessness of women. In contrast, feminist therapy is seen as dealing directly with client-counselor relationships, trust, advocacy, and…

  19. Play Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Play therapy represents a unique form of treatment that is not only geared toward young children, but is translated into a language children can comprehend and utilize—the language of play. For the referring provider or practitioner, questions may remain regarding the nature, course, and efficacy of play therapy. This article reviews the theoretical underpinnings of play therapy, some practical considerations, and finally a summary of the current state of research in regard to play therapy. The authors present the practicing psychiatrist with a road map for referring a patient to play therapy or initiating it in appropriate cases. PMID:21103141

  20. Long-term efficacy of a 5-day structured teaching and treatment programme for intensified conventional insulin therapy and risk for severe hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Schiel, R; Müller, U A; Ulbrich, S

    1997-02-01

    In the DCCT, intensification of insulin therapy led to a threefold increase in the risk of severe hypoglycemia (defined as the need for third party assistance). The reasons for this strong exponential relationship appears to be unclear to date. The present trial, a long-term evaluation of a 5-day structured teaching and treatment programme (5-DTTP) for intensified conventional insulin therapy (ICT), was performed to elucidate factors determining HbA1c and the incidence of severe hypoglycemia. A total of 71 patients were examined at baseline and 45.5 +/- 4.2 months following participation in a 5-DTTP. Comparing the data at follow-up examination with baseline measurements. HbA1c improved (8.52 +/- 2.29% vs. 8.0 +/- 1.43%, P = 0.04), the frequency of daily insulin injections (3.1 +/- 1.6 vs. 4.8 +/- 0.8, P < 0.001) and weekly blood-glucose self-tests (5.2 +/- 8.9 vs. 25.5 +/- 9.6, P < 0.001) increased, and the incidence of severe hypoglycemia (glucose i.v., glucagon injection) remained stable (0.18 vs. 0.17, P = 0.99). But, comparing the 21 patients who suffered from severe hypoglycemia during the follow-up period with the 50 patients without hypoglycemia, no differences between the two groups were found with respect to metabolic control (7.70 +/- 1.48% vs. 8.21 +/- 1.43%, P = 0.17), quality of life or treatment satisfaction. However differences arose with respect to diabetes knowledge. In the group of 21 patients with severe hypoglycemia we identified certain crucial gaps in diabetes knowledge: insulin self-adjustment; dietary aspects; hypo- and hyperglycemia. Performing multiple regression analysis, strong correlations were found between HbA1c and diabetes knowledge (r = -0.58. P = 0.002 for 50 patients without hypoglycemia and r = -0.63, P = 0.05 for 21 patients with hypoglycemia). In the total group, the most important factors determining HbA1c, were diabetes knowledge (r = -0.055, P = 0.007) and daily insulin dosage/kg body weight (r = 2.13, P = 0.0008, R2 = 0

  1. Structural white matter changes in descending motor tracts correlate with improvements in motor impairment after undergoing a treatment course of tDCS and physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2015-01-01

    Motor impairment after stroke has been related to the structural and functional integrity of corticospinal tracts including multisynaptic motor fibers and tracts such as the cortico-rubral-spinal and the cortico-tegmental-spinal tract. Furthermore, studies have shown that the concurrent use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with peripheral sensorimotor activities can improve motor impairment. We examined microstructural effects of concurrent non-invasive bihemispheric stimulation and physical/occupational therapy for 10 days on the structural components of the CST as well as other descending motor tracts which will be referred to here as alternate motor fibers (aMF). In this pilot study, ten chronic patients with a uni-hemispheric stroke underwent Upper-Extremity Fugl-Meyer assessments (UE-FM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for determining diffusivity measures such as fractional anisotropy (FA) before and after treatment in a section of the CST and aMF that spanned between the lower end of the internal capsule (below each patient's lesion) and the upper pons region on the affected and unaffected hemisphere. The treated group (tDCS + PT/OT) showed significant increases in the proportional UE-FM scores (+21%; SD 10%), while no significant changes were observed in an untreated comparison group. Significant increases in FA (+0.007; SD 0.0065) were found in the ipsilesional aMF in the treated group while no significant changes were found in the contralesional aMF, in either CST, or in any tracts in the untreated group. The FA changes in the ipsilesional aMF significantly correlated with the proportional change in the UE-FM (r = 0.65; p < 0.05). The increase in FA might indicate an increase in motor fiber alignment, myelination, and overall fiber integrity. Crossed and uncrossed fibers from multiple cortical regions might be one reason why the aMF fiber system showed more plastic structural changes that correlate with motor improvements than the CST.

  2. Marathon Group Therapy with Female Narcotic Addicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmann, Peter R.

    This study evaluated the impact of structured and unstructured marathon therapy on institutionalized female narcotic addicts. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of five groups: two structured therapy groups, two unstructured therapy groups, and a no-treatment control group. The Personal Orientation Inventory, the Adjective Check List, and a…

  3. A novel scandium fluoride, [C2N2H10]0.5[ScF4], with an unprecedented tungsten bronze-related layer structure.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Nicholas F; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Lightfoot, Philip

    2004-03-07

    [C(2)N(2)H(10)](0.5)[ScF(4)] exhibits isolated anionic layers of corner-linked ScF(6) octahedra enclosing 3-, 4-, 5- and 6-membered rings, with features reminiscent of both hexagonal and tetragonal tungsten bronze-type structures.

  4. Triple-functional core-shell structured upconversion luminescent nanoparticles covalently grafted with photosensitizer for luminescent, magnetic resonance imaging and photodynamic therapy in vitro.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xiao-Fei; Zhou, Jia-Cai; Xiao, Jia-Wen; Wang, Ye-Fu; Sun, Ling-Dong; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2012-08-07

    Upconversion luminescent nanoparticles (UCNPs) have been widely used in many biochemical fields, due to their characteristic large anti-Stokes shifts, narrow emission bands, deep tissue penetration and minimal background interference. UCNPs-derived multifunctional materials that integrate the merits of UCNPs and other functional entities have also attracted extensive attention. Here in this paper we present a core-shell structured nanomaterial, namely, NaGdF(4):Yb,Er@CaF(2)@SiO(2)-PS, which is multifunctional in the fields of photodynamic therapy (PDT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence/luminescence imaging. The NaGdF(4):Yb,Er@CaF(2) nanophosphors (10 nm in diameter) were prepared via sequential thermolysis, and mesoporous silica was coated as shell layer, in which photosensitizer (PS, hematoporphyrin and silicon phthalocyanine dihydroxide) was covalently grafted. The silica shell improved the dispersibility of hydrophobic PS molecules in aqueous environments, and the covalent linkage stably anchored the PS molecules in the silica shell. Under excitation at 980 nm, the as-fabricated nanomaterial gave luminescence bands at 550 nm and 660 nm. One luminescent peak could be used for fluorescence imaging and the other was suitable for the absorption of PS to generate singlet oxygen for killing cancer cells. The PDT performance was investigated using a singlet oxygen indicator, and was investigated in vitro in HeLa cells using a fluorescent probe. Meanwhile, the nanomaterial displayed low dark cytotoxicity and near-infrared (NIR) image in HeLa cells. Further, benefiting from the paramagnetic Gd(3+) ions in the core, the nanomaterial could be used as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compared with the clinical commercial contrast agent Gd-DTPA, the as-fabricated nanomaterial showed a comparable longitudinal relaxivities value (r(1)) and similar imaging effect.

  5. Some reminiscences on studies of age-dependent and activity-dependent degeneration of sensory and motor endings in mammalian skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ribchester, Richard R

    2015-01-01

    I present here an overview of research on the biology of neuromuscular sensory and motor endings that was inspired and influenced partly by my educational experience in the Department of Zoology at the University of Durham, from 1971 to 1974. I allude briefly to neuromuscular synaptic structure and function in dystrophic mice, influences of activity on synapse elimination in development and regeneration, and activity-dependent protection and degeneration of neuromuscular junctions in WldS mice. PMID:26179026

  6. A backward view from 16S rRNA to archaea to the universal tree of life to progenotes: reminiscences of Carl Woese.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Roger A

    2014-01-01

    I first became aware of Carl Woese in the mid-1970s when he and George Fox criticized a few of the 16S rRNA oligonucleotide sequences emerging from Strasbourg in the 10-12 y RNA sequencing project of the first 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli, some of which we were using for assembling RNA binding sites of ribosomal proteins. When I realized that they were attempting to sequence 16S rRNAs from a range of bacteria to classify them phylogenetically, I seriously questioned their sanity. Not because of the goal, which was admirable, but because of the sheer technical difficulty, and slowness, of sequencing large RNA molecules using the original Sanger RNA sequencing method, not to mention the health hazards of regularly preparing rRNA using 20-30 mCi [ (32)P]. My view changed radically, however, with their subsequent prediction of 5S rRNA secondary structures using a phylogenetic approach. Previously, the molecular biology community had been competing to generate the maximum numbers of base pairs in the model RNA molecule E. coli 5S RNA when Fox and Woese introduced the concept of compensatory base changes based on phylogeny for defining secondary structure and applied it to 5S RNA, they found evidence for only about 50% base pairing. This approach had previously been used for tRNA secondary structure predictions but its more general significance had never been acknowledged. Carl subsequently persuaded Harry Noller to apply the same method to predicting secondary structures of the large rRNAs.

  7. Psychosexual therapy.

    PubMed

    Gregory, P

    Sexual problems are more likely to originate from psychological or relationship difficulties rather than 'mechanical failure'. Here Peter Gregory reveals the often closed world of psychosexual therapy.

  8. [Physiotherapy as manual therapy].

    PubMed

    Torstensen, T A; Nielsen, L L; Jensen, R; Reginiussen, T; Wiesener, T; Kirkesola, G; Mengshoel, A M

    1999-05-30

    Manual therapy includes methods where the therapist's hands are used to stretch, mobilize or manipulate the spinal column, paravertebral structures or extremity joints. The aims of these methods are to relieve pain and improve function. In Norway only specially qualified physiotherapists and chiropractors are authorized to perform manipulation of joints (high velocity thrust techniques). To become a qualified manual therapist in Norway one must have a minimum of two years of clinical practice as physiotherapist followed by two year full time postgraduate training in manual therapy (a total of six years). Historically the Norwegian manual therapy system was developed in the 1950s by physiotherapists and medical doctors in England (James Cyriax and James Mennell) and Norway. As a result doctors allowed physiotherapists to use manipulation as a treatment method of both spinal and peripheral joints. In 1957 the Norwegian health authorities introduced reimbursement for manual therapy performed by physiotherapists.

  9. Sweat Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colmant, Stephen A.; Merta, Rod J.

    2000-01-01

    A study combined group sweating and group counseling. Four adolescent boys with disruptive behavior disorders participated in 12 sweat therapy sessions. They reported the sessions useful for sharing personal concerns and receiving assistance with problem solving. Three boys showed improvement in self-esteem. Advantages of sweat therapy over other…

  10. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Breast Esophagus Rectum Skull base sarcomas Pediatric brain tumors Head and neck - see the Head and Neck Cancer page Eye ... Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Brain Tumor Treatment Brain Tumors Prostate Cancer Lung Cancer ... related to Proton Therapy Videos related ...

  11. Intravenous Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galliart, Barbara

    Intended for teaching licensed practical nurses, this curriculum guide provides information related to the equipment and skills required for nursing care of patients needing intravenous (IV) therapy. It also explains the roles and responsibilities of the licensed practical nurse with regard to intravenous therapy. Each of the 15 instructional…

  12. Intravenous Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galliart, Barbara

    Intended for teaching licensed practical nurses, this curriculum guide provides information related to the equipment and skills required for nursing care of patients needing intravenous (IV) therapy. It also explains the roles and responsibilities of the licensed practical nurse with regard to intravenous therapy. Each of the 15 instructional…

  13. Poetry Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Ronald V.

    Poetry therapy is the method of therapy based on the principle that a poem is a special medium for expressing emotions and that this expression can have psychotherapeutic value. A survey taken in 1973 showed there were over 400 therapists treating 3,500 drug addicts, alcoholics, and mental retardates around the country. Poetry therapists…

  14. Colon cancer survival with herbal medicine and vitamins combined with standard therapy in a whole-systems approach: ten-year follow-up data analyzed with marginal structural models and propensity score methods.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Michael; Broffman, Michael; van der Laan, Mark; Hubbard, Alan; Kushi, Lawrence; Abrams, Donald I; Gao, Jin; Colford, John M

    2011-09-01

    Although localized colon cancer is often successfully treated with surgery, advanced disease requires aggressive systemic therapy that has lower effectiveness. Approximately 30% to 75% of patients with colon cancer use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), but there is limited formal evidence of survival efficacy. In a consecutive case series with 10-year follow-up of all colon cancer patients (n = 193) presenting at a San Francisco Bay-Area center for Chinese medicine (Pine Street Clinic, San Anselmo, CA), the authors compared survival in patients choosing short-term treatment lasting the duration of chemotherapy/radiotherapy with those continuing long-term. To put these data into the context of treatment responses seen in conventional medical practice, they also compared survival with Pan-Asian medicine + vitamins (PAM+V) with that of concurrent external controls from Kaiser Permanente Northern California and California Cancer Registries. Kaplan-Meier, traditional Cox regression, and more modern methods were used for causal inference-namely, propensity score and marginal structural models (MSMs), which have not been used before in studies of cancer survival and Chinese herbal medicine. PAM+V combined with conventional therapy, compared with conventional therapy alone, reduced the risk of death in stage I by 95%, stage II by 64%, stage III by 29%, and stage IV by 75%. There was no significant difference between short-term and long-term PAM+V. Combining PAM+V with conventional therapy improved survival, compared with conventional therapy alone, suggesting that prospective trials combining PAM+V with conventional therapy are justified.

  15. Colon Cancer Survival With Herbal Medicine and Vitamins Combined With Standard Therapy in a Whole-Systems Approach: Ten-Year Follow-up Data Analyzed With Marginal Structural Models and Propensity Score Methods

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Michael; Broffman, Michael; van der Laan, Mark; Hubbard, Alan; Kushi, Lawrence; Abrams, Donald I.; Gao, Jin; Colford, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Although localized colon cancer is often successfully treated with surgery, advanced disease requires aggressive systemic therapy that has lower effectiveness. Approximately 30% to 75% of patients with colon cancer use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), but there is limited formal evidence of survival efficacy. In a consecutive case series with 10-year follow-up of all colon cancer patients (n = 193) presenting at a San Francisco Bay-Area center for Chinese medicine (Pine Street Clinic, San Anselmo, CA), the authors compared survival in patients choosing short-term treatment lasting the duration of chemotherapy/radiotherapy with those continuing long-term. To put these data into the context of treatment responses seen in conventional medical practice, they also compared survival with Pan-Asian medicine + vitamins (PAM+V) with that of concurrent external controls from Kaiser Permanente Northern California and California Cancer Registries. Kaplan-Meier, traditional Cox regression, and more modern methods were used for causal inference—namely, propensity score and marginal structural models (MSMs), which have not been used before in studies of cancer survival and Chinese herbal medicine. PAM+V combined with conventional therapy, compared with conventional therapy alone, reduced the risk of death in stage I by 95%, stage II by 64%, stage III by 29%, and stage IV by 75%. There was no significant difference between short-term and long-term PAM+V. Combining PAM+V with conventional therapy improved survival, compared with conventional therapy alone, suggesting that prospective trials combining PAM+V with conventional therapy are justified. PMID:21964510

  16. Psychosocial interventions for individuals with dementia: an integration of theory, therapy, and a clinical understanding of dementia.

    PubMed

    Kasl-Godley, J; Gatz, M

    2000-08-01

    We reviewed six psychosocial interventions for individuals with dementia. Interventions are described in terms of theoretical basis, how knowledge about dementia is incorporated, techniques, and empirical support. Psychodynamic approaches appear helpful for understanding intrapsychic concerns of demented individuals. Support groups and cognitive/behavioral therapy assist early stage individuals to build coping strategies and reduce distress. Reminiscence and life review provide mild to moderate stage individuals with interpersonal connections. Behavioral approaches and memory training target specific cognitive and behavioral impairments and help to optimize remaining abilities. Reality orientation reflects a similar goal, yet is probably more useful for its interpersonal functions.

  17. The Deinococcus radiodurans DR1245 Protein, a DdrB Partner Homologous to YbjN Proteins and Reminiscent of Type III Secretion System Chaperones

    SciTech Connect

    Norais, Cédric; Servant, Pascale; Bouthier-de-la-Tour, Claire; Coureux, Pierre-Damien; Ithurbide, Solenne; Vannier, Françoise; Guerin, Philippe P.; Dulberger, Charles L.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Keck, James L.; Armengaud, Jean; Cox, Michael M.; Sommer, Suzanne

    2013-02-18

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. A small subset of Deinococcus genus-specific genes were shown to be up-regulated upon exposure to ionizing radiation and to play a role in genome reconstitution. These genes include an SSB-like protein called DdrB. Here, we identified a novel protein encoded by the dr1245gene as an interacting partner of DdrB. A strain devoid of the DR1245 protein is impaired in growth, exhibiting a generation time approximately threefold that of the wild type strain while radioresistance is not affected. We determined the three-dimensional structure of DR1245, revealing a relationship with type III secretion system chaperones and YbjN family proteins. Thus, DR1245 may display some chaperone activity towards DdrB and possibly other substrates.

  18. The Deinococcus radiodurans DR1245 Protein, a DdrB Partner Homologous to YbjN Proteins and Reminiscent of Type III Secretion System Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Bouthier-de-la-Tour, Claire; Coureux, Pierre-Damien; Ithurbide, Solenne; Vannier, Françoise; Guerin, Philippe P.; Dulberger, Charles L.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Keck, James L.; Armengaud, Jean; Cox, Michael M.; Sommer, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. A small subset of Deinococcus genus-specific genes were shown to be up-regulated upon exposure to ionizing radiation and to play a role in genome reconstitution. These genes include an SSB-like protein called DdrB. Here, we identified a novel protein encoded by the dr1245 gene as an interacting partner of DdrB. A strain devoid of the DR1245 protein is impaired in growth, exhibiting a generation time approximately threefold that of the wild type strain while radioresistance is not affected. We determined the three-dimensional structure of DR1245, revealing a relationship with type III secretion system chaperones and YbjN family proteins. Thus, DR1245 may display some chaperone activity towards DdrB and possibly other substrates. PMID:23441204

  19. IGF-1 Signaling Plays an Important Role in the Formation of Three-Dimensional Laminated Neural Retina and Other Ocular Structures From Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Mellough, Carla B; Collin, Joseph; Khazim, Mahmoud; White, Kathryn; Sernagor, Evelyne; Steel, David H W; Lako, Majlinda

    2015-08-01

    We and others have previously demonstrated that retinal cells can be derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells under defined culture conditions. While both cell types can give rise to retinal derivatives in the absence of inductive cues, this requires extended culture periods and gives lower overall yield. Further understanding of this innate differentiation ability, the identification of key factors that drive the differentiation process, and the development of clinically compatible culture conditions to reproducibly generate functional neural retina is an important goal for clinical cell based therapies. We now report that insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) can orchestrate the formation of three-dimensional ocular-like structures from hESCs which, in addition to retinal pigmented epithelium and neural retina, also contain primitive lens and corneal-like structures. Inhibition of IGF-1 receptor signaling significantly reduces the formation of optic vesicle and optic cups, while exogenous IGF-1 treatment enhances the formation of correctly laminated retinal tissue composed of multiple retinal phenotypes that is reminiscent of the developing vertebrate retina. Most importantly, hESC-derived photoreceptors exhibit advanced maturation features such as the presence of primitive rod- and cone-like photoreceptor inner and outer segments and phototransduction-related functional responses as early as 6.5 weeks of differentiation, making these derivatives promising candidates for cell replacement studies and in vitro disease modeling.

  20. IGF‐1 Signaling Plays an Important Role in the Formation of Three‐Dimensional Laminated Neural Retina and Other Ocular Structures From Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mellough, Carla B.; Collin, Joseph; Khazim, Mahmoud; White, Kathryn; Sernagor, Evelyne; Steel, David H. W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We and others have previously demonstrated that retinal cells can be derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells under defined culture conditions. While both cell types can give rise to retinal derivatives in the absence of inductive cues, this requires extended culture periods and gives lower overall yield. Further understanding of this innate differentiation ability, the identification of key factors that drive the differentiation process, and the development of clinically compatible culture conditions to reproducibly generate functional neural retina is an important goal for clinical cell based therapies. We now report that insulin‐like growth factor 1 (IGF‐1) can orchestrate the formation of three‐dimensional ocular‐like structures from hESCs which, in addition to retinal pigmented epithelium and neural retina, also contain primitive lens and corneal‐like structures. Inhibition of IGF‐1 receptor signaling significantly reduces the formation of optic vesicle and optic cups, while exogenous IGF‐1 treatment enhances the formation of correctly laminated retinal tissue composed of multiple retinal phenotypes that is reminiscent of the developing vertebrate retina. Most importantly, hESC‐derived photoreceptors exhibit advanced maturation features such as the presence of primitive rod‐ and cone‐like photoreceptor inner and outer segments and phototransduction‐related functional responses as early as 6.5 weeks of differentiation, making these derivatives promising candidates for cell replacement studies and in vitro disease modeling. Stem Cells 2015;33:2416–2430 PMID:25827910

  1. Development and application of pulmonary structure-function registration methods: towards pulmonary image-guidance tools for improved airway targeted therapies and outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fumin; Pike, Damien; Svenningsen, Sarah; Coxson, Harvey O.; Drozd, John J.; Yuan, Jing; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace

    2014-03-01

    Objectives: We aimed to develop a way to rapidly generate multi-modality (MRI-CT) pulmonary imaging structurefunction maps using novel non-rigid image registration methods. This objective is part of our overarching goal to provide an image processing pipeline to generate pulmonary structure-function maps and guide airway-targeted therapies. Methods: Anatomical 1H and functional 3He MRI were acquired in 5 healthy asymptomatic ex-smokers and 7 ex-smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at inspiration breath-hold. Thoracic CT was performed within ten minutes of MRI using the same breath-hold volume. Landmark-based affine registration methods previously validated for imaging of COPD, was based on corresponding fiducial markers located in both CT and 1H MRI coronal slices and compared with shape-based CT-MRI non-rigid registration. Shape-based CT-MRI registration was developed by first identifying the shapes of the lung cavities manually, and then registering the two shapes using affine and thin-plate spline algorithms. We compared registration accuracy using the fiducial localization error (FLE) and target registration error (TRE). Results: For landmark-based registration, the TRE was 8.4±5.3 mm for whole lung and 7.8±4.6 mm for the R and L lungs registered independently (p=0.4). For shape-based registration, the TRE was 8.0±4.6 mm for whole lung as compared to 6.9±4.4 mm for the R and L lung registered independently and this difference was significant (p=0.01). The difference for shape-based (6.9±4.4 mm) and landmark-based R and L lung registration (7.8±4.6 mm) was also significant (p=.04) Conclusion: Shape-based registration TRE was significantly improved compared to landmark-based registration when considering L and R lungs independently.

  2. Life review therapy for older adults with moderate depressive symptomatology: a pragmatic randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Korte, J; Bohlmeijer, E T; Cappeliez, P; Smit, F; Westerhof, G J

    2012-06-01

    BACKGROUND. Although there is substantial evidence for the efficacy of life review therapy as an early treatment of depression in later life, its effectiveness in natural settings has not been studied. The present study evaluates an intervention based on life review and narrative therapy in a large multi-site, pragmatic randomized controlled trial(RCT). METHOD. Life review therapy was compared with care as usual. The primary outcome was depressive symptoms;secondary outcomes were anxiety symptoms, positive mental health, quality of life, and current major depressive episode (MDE). To identify groups for whom the intervention was particularly effective, moderator analyses were carried out (on sociodemographic variables, personality traits, reminiscence functions, clinically relevant depressive and anxiety symptoms, and past MDEs). RESULTS. Compared with care as usual (n=102), life review therapy (n=100) was effective in reducing depressive symptoms, at post-treatment (d=0.60, B= -5.3, p<0.001), at 3-month follow-up (d=0.50, B= -5.0, p<0.001) and for the intervention also at 9-month follow-up (t=5.7, p<0.001). The likelihood of a clinically significant change in depressive symptoms was significantly higher [odds ratio (OR) 3.77, p<0.001 at post-treatment ; OR 3.76, p<0.001 at the 3-month follow-up]. Small significant effects were found for symptoms of anxiety and positive mental health.Moderator analyses showed only two significant moderators, the personality trait of extraversion and the reminiscence function of boredom reduction. CONCLUSIONS. This study shows the effectiveness of life review therapy as an early intervention for depression in an ecologically valid context, supporting its applicability to a broad target group. The intervention is also effective in reducing anxiety symptoms and strengthening positive mental health.

  3. A Structured Review of Antithrombotic Therapy in Peripheral Artery Disease With a Focus on Revascularization: A TASC (InterSociety Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Artery Disease) Initiative.

    PubMed

    Hess, Connie N; Norgren, Lars; Ansel, Gary M; Capell, Warren H; Fletcher, John P; Fowkes, F Gerry R; Gottsäter, Anders; Hitos, Kerry; Jaff, Michael R; Nordanstig, Joakim; Hiatt, William R

    2017-06-20

    Peripheral artery disease affects >200 million people worldwide and is associated with significant limb and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Limb revascularization is recommended to improve function and quality of life for symptomatic patients with peripheral artery disease with intermittent claudication who have not responded to medical treatment. For patients with critical limb ischemia, the goals of revascularization are to relieve pain, help wound healing, and prevent limb loss. The baseline risk of cardiovascular and limb-related events demonstrated among patients with stable peripheral artery disease is elevated after revascularization and related to atherothrombosis and restenosis. Both of these processes involve platelet activation and the coagulation cascade, forming the basis for the use of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies to optimize procedural success and reduce postprocedural cardiovascular risk. Unfortunately, few high-quality, randomized data to support use of these therapies after peripheral artery disease revascularization exist, and much of the rationale for the use of antiplatelet agents after endovascular peripheral revascularization is extrapolated from percutaneous coronary intervention literature. Consequently, guideline recommendations for antithrombotic therapy after lower limb revascularization are inconsistent and not always evidence-based. In this context, the purpose of this structured review is to assess the available randomized data for antithrombotic therapy after peripheral arterial revascularization, with a focus on clinical trial design issues that may affect interpretation of study results, and highlight areas that require further investigation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Triple-functional core-shell structured upconversion luminescent nanoparticles covalently grafted with photosensitizer for luminescent, magnetic resonance imaging and photodynamic therapy in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Xiao-Fei; Zhou, Jia-Cai; Xiao, Jia-Wen; Wang, Ye-Fu; Sun, Ling-Dong; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2012-07-01

    Upconversion luminescent nanoparticles (UCNPs) have been widely used in many biochemical fields, due to their characteristic large anti-Stokes shifts, narrow emission bands, deep tissue penetration and minimal background interference. UCNPs-derived multifunctional materials that integrate the merits of UCNPs and other functional entities have also attracted extensive attention. Here in this paper we present a core-shell structured nanomaterial, namely, NaGdF4:Yb,Er@CaF2@SiO2-PS, which is multifunctional in the fields of photodynamic therapy (PDT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence/luminescence imaging. The NaGdF4:Yb,Er@CaF2 nanophosphors (10 nm in diameter) were prepared via sequential thermolysis, and mesoporous silica was coated as shell layer, in which photosensitizer (PS, hematoporphyrin and silicon phthalocyanine dihydroxide) was covalently grafted. The silica shell improved the dispersibility of hydrophobic PS molecules in aqueous environments, and the covalent linkage stably anchored the PS molecules in the silica shell. Under excitation at 980 nm, the as-fabricated nanomaterial gave luminescence bands at 550 nm and 660 nm. One luminescent peak could be used for fluorescence imaging and the other was suitable for the absorption of PS to generate singlet oxygen for killing cancer cells. The PDT performance was investigated using a singlet oxygen indicator, and was investigated in vitro in HeLa cells using a fluorescent probe. Meanwhile, the nanomaterial displayed low dark cytotoxicity and near-infrared (NIR) image in HeLa cells. Further, benefiting from the paramagnetic Gd3+ ions in the core, the nanomaterial could be used as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compared with the clinical commercial contrast agent Gd-DTPA, the as-fabricated nanomaterial showed a comparable longitudinal relaxivities value (r1) and similar imaging effect.Upconversion luminescent nanoparticles (UCNPs) have been widely used in many biochemical

  5. Antiparasitic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kappagoda, Shanthi; Singh, Upinder; Blackburn, Brian G.

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic diseases affect more than 2 billion people globally and cause substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly among the world's poorest people. This overview focuses on the treatment of the major protozoan and helminth infections in humans. Recent developments in antiparasitic therapy include the expansion of artemisinin-based therapies for malaria, new drugs for soil-transmitted helminths and intestinal protozoa, expansion of the indications for antiparasitic drug treatment in patients with Chagas disease, and the use of combination therapy for leishmaniasis and human African trypanosomiasis. PMID:21628620

  6. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects of the treatment. top of page What equipment is used? Proton beam therapy uses special machines, ... tumor cells. top of page Who operates the equipment? With backgrounds in mechanical, electrical, software, hardware and ...

  7. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  8. Family Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that helps family members improve communication and resolve ... organizations? Do you have specialty training in family psychotherapy? What is your experience with my family's type ...

  9. Play Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lawver, Timothy; Blankenship, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Play therapy is a treatment modality in which the therapist engages in play with the child. Its use has been documented in a variety of settings and with a variety of diagnoses. Treating within the context of play brings the therapist and the therapy to the level of the child. By way of an introduction to this approach, a case is presented of a six-year-old boy with oppositional defiant disorder. The presentation focuses on the events and interactions of a typical session with an established patient. The primary issues of the session are aggression, self worth, and self efficacy. These themes manifest themselves through the content of the child’s play and narration of his actions. The therapist then reflects these back to the child while gently encouraging the child toward more positive play. Though the example is one of nondirective play therapy, a wide range of variation exists under the heading of play therapy. PMID:19724720

  10. Electroconvulsive therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Shock treatment; Shock therapy; ECT; Depression - ECT; Bipolar - ECT ... ECT is a highly effective treatment for depression, most commonly severe depression. It can be very helpful for treating depression in people who: Are having delusions or other psychotic ...

  11. Proton therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... TF. Charged particle radiotherapy. In: Gunderson LL, Tepper JE, eds. Gunderson and Tepper: Clinical Radiation Oncology . 4th ... March 22, 2017. Zeman EM, Schreiber EC, Tepper JE. Basics of radiation therapy. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage ...

  12. Hug Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sally; Franke, Sue

    1997-01-01

    Describes Hug Therapy as used at the Allegheny County Head Start centers in Pennsylvania. Discusses the value of appropriate touch for healthy physical and emotional development. Addresses barriers to therapeutic touching and benefits to children and parents. (KB)

  13. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  14. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    MedlinePlus

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation Written ... accelerated aging in children. Children with Progeria need Physical Therapy (PT) and Occupational Therapy (OT) as often as ...

  15. Radionuclide Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalutsky, M. R.

    Radionuclide therapy utilizes unsealed sources of radionuclides as a treatment for cancer or other pathological conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Radionuclides that decay by the emission of β and α particles, as well as those that emit Auger electrons, have been used for this purpose. In this chapter, radiochemical aspects of radionuclide therapy, including criteria for radionuclide selection, radionuclide production, radiolabeling chemistry, and radiation dosimetry are discussed.

  16. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  17. Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stalder, Hans

    1977-01-01

    The current status of antiviral therapy is reviewed, including discussion of older approaches together with more recently developed chemotherapy. Following the introduction dealing with pathophysiological aspects of virus disease, the different approaches to antiviral therapy are presented. The reasons for the slow progress in antiviral therapy are discussed. These include: 1. the necessity of intracellular penetration of drugs acting on viral replication; 2. the severe toxicity of most antiviral drugs; 3. the narrow antiviral spectrum of most of these agents; 4. the difficulty of making a rapid etiological diagnosis in view of the necessity of starting (specific?) treatment early in the course of the disease; 5. the difficult evaluation of beneficial as compared with deleterious effects of antiviral therapy. After a detailed review of clinically tested substances, including immunoglobulins, synthetic antiviral drugs (amantadine, nucleoside analogs, thiosemicarbazones and photodynamic dyes) and interferon, a guide concerning indications and application of specific antiviral therapy is presented. Although at present there are few indications, clinicians should be aware of the (present and future) possibilities of antiviral therapy. PMID:341538

  18. Multimodal imaging and photothermal therapy were simultaneously achieved in the core-shell UCNR structure by using single near-infrared light.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Xu, Liangge; Xu, Jiating; Yang, Dan; Liu, Bin; Gai, Shili; He, Fei; Yang, Piaoping

    2017-09-28

    Core-shell nanostructures consisting of plasmonic materials and lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) show promising applications in theranostics including bio-imaging, diagnosis and therapy. However, some challenges still remain in the synthetic control because of the non-coordination between energy transfer and photothermal therapy (PTT). Herein, we developed a novel type of thermal-fluorescent core-shell hybrid nanocomposite incorporating rare-earth Yb(3+) and Er(3+) ion doped GdOF as the shell and gold nanorods (GNRs) as the core, creating upconversion nanorods (UCNRs) of GNRs@GdOF:Yb(3+),Er(3+). In order to facilitate the absorption or excretion of UCNRs in vivo, we designed gold nanorods with lower aspect ratios by reducing the amount of CTAB in the growth solution. More importantly, under 980 nm near-infrared (NIR) light irradiation, the green and red emissions of GdOF:Yb(3+),Er(3+) generally overlap with the visible absorbance of GNRs; by altering the contents of Yb(3+) and Er(3+) ions appropriately, the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption of low aspect ratio GNRs under 980 nm NIR laser excitation can be enhanced for improving the PTT efficiency. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo assays reveal that the composite has excellent bio-compatibility and cancer therapy efficiency. This multi-functional nanocomposite, which possesses upconversion luminescence and photothermal and biocompatibility properties, shows strong potential for application in bio-imaging and photothermal anti-cancer therapy.

  19. Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Thomas J.; Gomer, Charles J.; Henderson, Barbara W.; Jori, Giulio; Kessel, David; Korbelik, Mladen; Moan, Johan; Peng, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy involves administration of a tumor-localizing photosensitizing agent, which may require metabolic synthesis (i.e., a prodrug), followed by activation of the agent by light of a specific wavelength. This therapy results in a sequence of photochemical and photobiologic processes that cause irreversible photodamage to tumor tissues. Results from preclinical and clinical studies conducted worldwide over a 25-year period have established photodynamic therapy as a useful treatment approach for some cancers. Since 1993, regulatory approval for photodynamic therapy involving use of a partially purified, commercially available hematoporphyrin derivative compound (Photofrin®) in patients with early and advanced stage cancer of the lung, digestive tract, and genitourinary tract has been obtained in Canada, The Netherlands, France, Germany, Japan, and the United States. We have attempted to conduct and present a comprehensive review of this rapidly expanding field. Mechanisms of subcellular and tumor localization of photosensitizing agents, as well as of molecular, cellular, and tumor responses associated with photodynamic therapy, are discussed. Technical issues regarding light dosimetry are also considered. PMID:9637138

  20. Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Barb; Takeya, Ryan; Vitelli, Francesca; Swanson, Xin

    2017-03-14

    Gene therapy refers to a rapidly growing field of medicine in which genes are introduced into the body to treat or prevent diseases. Although a variety of methods can be used to deliver the genetic materials into the target cells and tissues, modified viral vectors represent one of the more common delivery routes because of its transduction efficiency for therapeutic genes. Since the introduction of gene therapy concept in the 1970s, the field has advanced considerably with notable clinical successes being demonstrated in many clinical indications in which no standard treatment options are currently available. It is anticipated that the clinical success the field observed in recent years can drive requirements for more scalable, robust, cost effective, and regulatory-compliant manufacturing processes. This review provides a brief overview of the current manufacturing technologies for viral vectors production, drawing attention to the common upstream and downstream production process platform that is applicable across various classes of viral vectors and their unique manufacturing challenges as compared to other biologics. In addition, a case study of an industry-scale cGMP production of an AAV-based gene therapy product performed at 2,000 L-scale is presented. The experience and lessons learned from this largest viral gene therapy vector production run conducted to date as discussed and highlighted in this review should contribute to future development of commercial viable scalable processes for vial gene therapies.

  1. [Testosterone therapy].

    PubMed

    Diemer, T; Hauptmann, A; Wagenlehner, F M E

    2016-04-01

    Hormone replacement therapy with testosterone has become well-established over the course of time. The initial substantial concerns with respect to complications and potential adverse events, particularly in older patients, were proven to be unfounded over time. Testosterone therapy has therefore gradually become a regular treatment modality in urological practice. It has also been shown to represent a valuable tool as supportive treatment for patients with erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism. A variety of testosterone preparations are available for treatment. Recent pharmaceutical developments have greatly improved the practicability and ease of administration for patients. Several guidelines have been developed that provide clearly formulated standards and instructions for indications, contraindications, application, risk factors and monitoring of testosterone therapy. Adverse events affecting the cardiovascular system and especially diseases of the prostate gland are of great importance, thus making the urologist the primary partner in the treatment of patients with testosterone deficiency.

  2. Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, E.L.; Krebsbach, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is defined as the treatment of disease by transfer of genetic material into cells. This review will explore methods available for gene transfer as well as current and potential applications for craniofacial regeneration, with emphasis on future development and design. Though non-viral gene delivery methods are limited by low gene transfer efficiency, they benefit from relative safety, low immunogenicity, ease of manufacture, and lack of DNA insert size limitation. In contrast, viral vectors are nature’s gene delivery machines that can be optimized to allow for tissue-specific targeting, site-specific chromosomal integration, and efficient long-term infection of dividing and non-dividing cells. In contrast to traditional replacement gene therapy, craniofacial regeneration seeks to use genetic vectors as supplemental building blocks for tissue growth and repair. Synergistic combination of viral gene therapy with craniofacial tissue engineering will significantly enhance our ability to repair and replace tissues in vivo. PMID:19641145

  3. Structure of liquid PEO-LiTFSI electrolyte

    PubMed

    Mao; Saboungi; Price; Armand; Howells

    2000-06-12

    The structure of a polymer electrolyte, P(EO)7.5LiN(SO 2CF (3))(2), has been determined by neutron diffraction with isotropic substitution. The Li ions are bonded on average to five ether oxygens belonging to pairs of PEO coils. These are arranged with a considerable degree of extended-range order providing pathways for the Li ion conduction. The lack of ion pairing in this system below 4.8 A is reminiscent of that observed in the remarkable structure of P(EO)6LiAsF (6) and implies that anions and cations are free to migrate independently.

  4. Reminiscing about 15 years of interoperability efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Sompel, Herbert; Nelson, Michael L.

    2015-11-01

    Over the past fifteen years, our perspective on tackling information interoperability problems for web-based scholarship has evolved significantly. In this opinion piece, we look back at three efforts that we have been involved in that aptly illustrate this evolution: OAI-PMH, OAI-ORE, and Memento. Understanding that no interoperability specification is neutral, we attempt to characterize the perspectives and technical toolkits that provided the basis for these endeavors. With that regard, we consider repository-centric and web-centric interoperability perspectives, and the use of a Linked Data or a REST/HATEAOS technology stack, respectively. In addition, we lament the lack of interoperability across nodes that play a role in web-based scholarship, but end on a constructive note with some ideas regarding a possible path forward.

  5. Memories of home: reminiscences of Ellenton

    SciTech Connect

    Browder, T.A.; Brooks, R.D.

    1996-08-01

    It was announced on Nov. 28, 1950, that the federal government was going to take over parts of Barnwell, Aiken, and Allendale counties, to form the Savannah River Plant. Ellenton was one of the six small towns and hamlets thus displaced. This second volume in the Savannah River Archaeological Research Heritage Series examines Ellenton, a town rich in history (the first volume discusses Dunbarton and Meyers Mill, and the interview procedure used in both volumes). Ellenton was about 25 miles SE of Augusta, Georgia; in 1950 it contained 739 people. The data, gathered through a combination of mail-in questionnaires and oral interviews, are presented here on the basis of coresident families to reduce redundancy. Purpose of the Community History project (begun in 1990) is to record respondent data regarding everyday life in Aiken and Barnwell counties in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The data will be used to model the material culture and spatial layout of this time period archaeological sites for compliance purposes. This volume is intended for a general readership (especially those who once lived this area) and thus has emphasis on archival photographs, etc.

  6. Reminiscence of phospholipase B in Penicillium notatum.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Since the phospholipase B (PLB) was reported as a deacylase of both lecithin and lysolecithin yielding fatty acids and glycerophosphocholine (GPC), there was a question as to whether it is a single enzyme or a mixture of a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and a lysophospholipase (LPL). We purified the PLB in Penicillium notatum and showed that it catalyzed deacylation of sn-1 and sn-2 fatty acids of 1,2-diacylphospholipids and also sn-1 or sn-2 fatty acids of 1- or 2-monoacylphospholipids (lysophospholipids). Further, it also has a monoacyllipase activity. The purified PLB is a glycoprotein with m.w. of 91,300. The sugar moiety is M9 only and the protein moiety consists of 603 amino acids. PLB, different from PLA2, shows other enzymatic activities, such as transacylase, lipase and acylesterase. PLB activity is influenced by various substances, e.g. detergents, deoxycholate, diethylether, Fe(3+), and endogenous protease. Therefore, PLB might have broader roles than PLA2 in vivo. The database shows an extensive sequence similarity between P. notatum PLB and fungal PLB, cPLA2 and patatin, suggesting a homologous relationship. The catalytic triad of cPLA2, Ser, Asp and Arg, is also present in P. notatum PLB. Other related PLBs, PLB/Lipases are discussed.

  7. Some reminiscences from a long friendship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Lars

    The following sections are included: * My first encounters with Yoichiro Nambu * Zero-point fluctuations of strings * The σ-model action or how to supersymmetrise the Nambu-Gotō action * Nambu and the Nobel Prize * References

  8. Notes on Soho and a Reminiscence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Hollis

    1992-01-01

    Discusses George Maciunas' pivotal contributions to the renaissance of SoHo, the New York City community south of Houston Street. Recounts the establishment of Fluxus cooperatives, the history of the FilmMakers' Cinematheque, Maciunas' long struggle with the Attorney General's office, and closes with a description of the February 1978 erotic Flux…

  9. Reminiscences of cosmic ray research in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Peraza, Jorge

    2009-11-01

    Cosmic ray research in Mexico dates from the early 1930s with the work of the pioneering physicist, Manuel Sandoval Vallarta and his students from Mexico. Several experiments of international significance were carried out during that period in Mexico: they dealt with the geomagnetic latitude effect, the north-south and west-east asymmetry of cosmic ray intensity, and the sign of the charge of cosmic rays. The international cosmic ray community has met twice in Mexico for the International Cosmic Ray Conferences (ICRC): the fourth was held in Guanajuato in 1955, and the 30th took place in Mérida, in 2007. In addition, an international meeting on the Pierre Auger Collaboration was held in Morelia in 1999, and the International Workshop on Observing UHE Cosmic Rays took place in Metepec in 2000. A wide range of research topics has been developed, from low-energy Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) to the UHE. Instrumentation has evolved since the early 1950s, from a Simpson type neutron monitor installed in Mexico City (2300 m asl) to a solar neutron telescope and an EAS Cherenkov array, (within the framework of the Auger International Collaboration), both at present operating on Mt. Sierra La Negra in the state of Puebla (4580 m asl). Research collaboration has been undertaken with many countries; in particular, the long-term collaboration with Russian scientists has been very fruitful.

  10. Reminiscences on the study of wind waves

    PubMed Central

    MITSUYASU, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    The wind blowing over sea surface generates tiny wind waves. They develop with time and space absorbing wind energy, and become huge wind waves usually referred to ocean surface waves. The wind waves cause not only serious sea disasters but also take important roles in the local and global climate changes by affecting the fluxes of momentum, heat and gases (e.g. CO2) through the air-sea boundary. The present paper reviews the selected studies on wind waves conducted by our group in the Research Institute for Applied Mechanics (RIAM), Kyushu University. The themes discussed are interactions between water waves and winds, the energy spectrum of wind waves, nonlinear properties of wind waves, and the effects of surfactant on some air-sea interaction phenomena. PMID:25864467

  11. The remarkable S. Harvey Mudd - A reminiscence.

    PubMed

    Levy, Harvey L

    2016-07-01

    Harvey Mudd was the father of methionine metabolic disorders. Beginning with his identification of the enzyme defect in homocystinuria, he co-discovered cobalamin C disorder as the first known human disorder of vitamin B12 metabolism, thereby extending our concept of homocystinuria as a key feature of related disorders rather than a single disease, and identified new disorders that produce hypermethioninemia. He had no equal in our understanding of how critical methionine metabolism is to human homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Reminiscences From a Career in Geomicrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Henry L.

    2012-05-01

    This is a memoir relating how the author became a geomicrobiologist and how he practiced his specialty. Born in Germany and receiving his early schooling in Berlin, he completed his secondary education, followed by college and graduate school training, after emigration to the United States in 1940. After attaining a PhD degree in 1951, he spent his entire professional career as a faculty member of the Department of Biology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, New York. He was introduced to geomicrobiology in 1959 by a question from a colleague in the Department of Geology at RPI concerning the recent discovery of acidophilic iron-oxidizing, autotrophic bacteria in acid coal mine drainage. This led him to investigate bacterial interaction with metal sulfides, Mn(II) and Mn(IV) on land and in the sea, chromate, and bauxite; to teach a course in geomicrobiology; and to write a textbook on the subject, first published in 1981.

  13. Revolt, Reminiscence, and Renewal: June 4, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raxxano, Elaine

    1999-01-01

    Presents an essay written soon after the author's return to the United States after teaching at a University in China at the time of the Tiananmen Square tragedy. Explores issues of teaching overseas and the reality of Americans being caught in the midst of political turmoil. Remembers sacrifices made by Chinese students and teachers to test the…

  14. Notes on Soho and a Reminiscence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Hollis

    1992-01-01

    Discusses George Maciunas' pivotal contributions to the renaissance of SoHo, the New York City community south of Houston Street. Recounts the establishment of Fluxus cooperatives, the history of the FilmMakers' Cinematheque, Maciunas' long struggle with the Attorney General's office, and closes with a description of the February 1978 erotic Flux…

  15. Molecules at Solid Surfaces: A Personal Reminiscence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertl, Gerhard

    2017-05-01

    I was fortunate to start my career in physical chemistry at a time when the development of the ultrahigh vacuum technique and of novel physical methods enabled the study of processes on well-defined surfaces at an atomic scale. These investigations included the mechanisms of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions, such as CO oxidation and ammonia synthesis, and phenomena of spatio-temporal self-organization, as described by the concepts of nonlinear dynamics.

  16. Reminiscences on the study of wind waves.

    PubMed

    Mitsuyasu, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    The wind blowing over sea surface generates tiny wind waves. They develop with time and space absorbing wind energy, and become huge wind waves usually referred to ocean surface waves. The wind waves cause not only serious sea disasters but also take important roles in the local and global climate changes by affecting the fluxes of momentum, heat and gases (e.g. CO2) through the air-sea boundary. The present paper reviews the selected studies on wind waves conducted by our group in the Research Institute for Applied Mechanics (RIAM), Kyushu University. The themes discussed are interactions between water waves and winds, the energy spectrum of wind waves, nonlinear properties of wind waves, and the effects of surfactant on some air-sea interaction phenomena.

  17. Reminiscences regarding Professor R.N. Christiansen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarup, Govind

    2008-11-01

    In this short paper I describe my initiation into the field of radio astronomy fifty years ago, under the guidance of Professor W.N. ('Chris') Christiansen, soon after I joined the C.S.I.R.O.'s Division of Radiophysics (RP) in Sydney, Australia, in 1953 under a 2-year Colombo Plan Fellowship. During the early 1950s Christiansen had developed a remarkable 21 cm interferometric grating array of 32 east-west aligned parabolic dishes and another array of 16 dishes in a north-south direction at Potts Hill. Christiansen and Warburton used these two arrays to scan the Sun strip-wise yielding radio brightness distribution at various position angles. During a three month period I assisted them in making a 2-dimensional map of the Sun by a complex Fourier transform process. In the second year of my Fellowship, Parthasarathy and I converted the 32-antenna east-west grating array to study solar radio emission at 60cm. During this work, I noticed that the procedure adopted by Christiansen for phase adjustment of the grating array was time consuming. Based on this experience, I later developed an innovative technique at Stanford in 1959 for phase adjustment of long transmission lines and paths in space. In a bid to improve on the method used by Christiansen to make a 2-dimensional map of the Sun from strip scans, I suggested to R.N. Bracewell in 1962 a revolutionary method for direct 2-dimensional imaging without Fourier transforms. Bracewell and Riddle developed the method for making a 2-dimensional map of the Moon using strip scans obtained with the 32 element interferometer at Stanford. The method has since revolutionized medical tomography. I describe these developments here to highlight my initial work with Christiansen and to show how new ideas often are developed by necessity and have their origin in prior experience! The 32 Potts Hill solar grating array dishes were eventually donated by the C.S.I.R.0. to India and were set up by me at Kalyan near Mumbai, forming the core of the first radio astronomy group in India. This group went on to construct two of the world's largest radio telescopes, the Ooty Radio Telescope and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. Chris Christiansen was not only my guru but also a mentor and a friend for more than fifty years. I fondly remember his very warm personality.

  18. Reminiscing about 15 years of interoperability efforts

    DOE PAGES

    Van de Sompel, Herbert; Nelson, Michael L.

    2015-11-01

    Over the past fifteen years, our perspective on tackling information interoperability problems for web-based scholarship has evolved significantly. In this opinion piece, we look back at three efforts that we have been involved in that aptly illustrate this evolution: OAI-PMH, OAI-ORE, and Memento. Understanding that no interoperability specification is neutral, we attempt to characterize the perspectives and technical toolkits that provided the basis for these endeavors. With that regard, we consider repository-centric and web-centric interoperability perspectives, and the use of a Linked Data or a REST/HATEAOS technology stack, respectively. In addition, we lament the lack of interoperability across nodes thatmore » play a role in web-based scholarship, but end on a constructive note with some ideas regarding a possible path forward.« less

  19. Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Teitel, Jerome M.

    1984-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic diseases are among the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in Canada. Agents which interfere with the coagulation mechanism are highly effective in treating these disorders, but at the potentially high cost of serious hemorrhagic complications. The optimal prevention of both serious outcomes and complications of therapy can be achieved by prophylactic treatment of high risk patients. Heparin and vitamin K antagonists remain the mainstays of antithrombotic therapy. The pharmacology of these agents is reviewed, and a rational approach to their clinical use is presented. PMID:21279098

  20. Dance Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Marcia B.

    1980-01-01

    Dance therapy deals with personal growth via body-mind interaction. A change in movement expression is believed to result in a personality or behavior change. The therapist is trained to become sensitive to movement expression as it relates to the psychological, motor, and cognitive development of the child. (JN)