Science.gov

Sample records for structures selected topics

  1. Chaotic features of nuclear structure and dynamics: selected topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelevinsky, Vladimir; Volya, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Quantum chaos has become an important element of our knowledge about physics of complex systems. In typical mesoscopic systems of interacting particles the dynamics invariably become chaotic when the level density, growing by combinatorial reasons, leads to the increasing probability of mixing simple mean-field (particle-hole) configurations. The resulting stationary states have exceedingly complicated structures that are comparable to those in random matrix theory. We discuss the main properties of mesoscopic quantum chaos and show that it can serve as a justification for application of statistical mechanics to mesoscopic systems. We show that quantum chaos becomes a powerful instrument for experimental, theoretical and computational work. The generalization to open systems and effects in the continuum are discussed with the help of the effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian; it is shown how to formulate this approach for numerous problems of quantum signal transmission. The artificially introduced randomness can also be helpful for a deeper understanding of physics. We indicate the problems that require more investigation so as to be understood further.

  2. Viral vaccines: selected topics.

    PubMed

    Kańtoch, M

    1996-01-01

    Significant role of viruses in pathology, their dominating position in etiology of infectious diseases point at the special position of active prophylactic procedures based on vaccination. The real role and value of viral vaccines of classic and modern generations, the limitation of immune potency in suppression of defence mechanisms, some problems of immunization against virus vertical transmission are presented in the paper. The reader may find tables which cumulate selected but significant patterns of viral vaccines and vaccinations, and selected papers devoted to topics discussed. PMID:9017153

  3. Discourse Structure, Topicality, and Questioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Kuppevelt, Jan

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative approach to discourse structure according to which topicality is the general organizing principle in discourse. This approach accounts for the fact that the segmentation structure of discourse is in correspondence with the hierarchy of topics defined for the discourse units. (52 references) (JL)

  4. Selected topics of fluid mechanics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindsvater, Carl E.

    1958-01-01

    the Euler, Froude, Reynolds, Weber, and Cauchy numbers are defined as essential tools for interpreting and using experimental data. The derivations of the energy and momentum equations are treated in detail. One-dimensional equations for steady nonuniform flow are developed, and the restrictions applicable to the equations are emphasized. Conditions of uniform and gradually varied flow are discussed, and the origin of the Chezy equation is examined in relation to both the energy and the momentum equations. The inadequacy of all uniform-flow equations as a means of describing gradually varied flow is explained. Thus, one of the definitive problems of river hydraulics is analyzed in the light of present knowledge. This report is the outgrowth of a series of short schools conducted during the spring and summer of 1953 for engineers of the Surface Water Branch, Water Resources Division, U. S. Geological Survey. The topics considered are essentially the same as the topics selected for inclusion in the schools. However, in order that they might serve better as a guide and outline for informal study, the arrangement of the writer's original lecture notes has been considerably altered. The purpose of the report, like the purpose of the schools which inspired it, is to build a simple but strong framework of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics. It is believed that this framework is capable of supporting a detailed analysis of most of the practical problems met by the engineers of the Geological Survey. It is hoped that the least accomplishment of this work will be to inspire the reader with the confidence and desire to read more of the recent and current technical literature of modern fluid mechanics.

  5. Selected topics in robotics for space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Raymond C. (Editor); Kaufman, Howard (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Papers and abstracts included represent both formal presentations and experimental demonstrations at the Workshop on Selected Topics in Robotics for Space Exploration which took place at NASA Langley Research Center, 17-18 March 1993. The workshop was cosponsored by the Guidance, Navigation, and Control Technical Committee of the NASA Langley Research Center and the Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration (CIRSSE) at RPI, Troy, NY. Participation was from industry, government, and other universities with close ties to either Langley Research Center or to CIRSSE. The presentations were very broad in scope with attention given to space assembly, space exploration, flexible structure control, and telerobotics.

  6. Selected topics of hypoglycemia care

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review 4 topics in hypoglycemia (HoG) care: diagnosis, circumstances predisposing to HoG, risk of adverse effects, and prevention. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE was searched using the words hypoglycemia and diabetes mellitus. Other relevant sources were hand searched. Evidence was mostly level III and IV from consensus, from observation, and from the author’s clinical experience. MAIN MESSAGES Hypoglycemia can be diagnosed using clinical criteria or using a glucometer; it cannot be diagnosed after death. Capillary blood glucose testing for HoG is required only for patients taking insulin and insulin secretagogues. With intensified treatment of diabetes, a greater incidence of HoG is inevitable. Chronic morbidity and mortality resulting from HoG are believed to be rare. There are no reliable data on HoG-related mortality for idiopathic or accidental sudden death. Interventions by friends, family, colleagues, and teachers can prevent HoG. CONCLUSION Clinical diagnosis of HoG deserves greater emphasis; when patients are unaware of having HoG, physicians must rely on blood glucose testing. Patients not taking insulin or insulin secretagogues need neither fear nor test for HoG. The risk of HoG should not preclude efforts to achieve best possible control of blood sugar. Patients with unstable cardiac arrhythmias, drivers of motor vehicles, and those in high-risk industrial occupations require special vigilance for HoG. PMID:16639972

  7. Selected Topics in CVD Diamond Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Satoshi; Nebel, Christoph E.; Nesladek, Milos

    2006-10-01

    Since the discovery of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond growth in 1976, the steady scientific progress often resulted in surprising new discoveries and breakthroughs. This brought us to the idea to publish the special issue Selected Topics in CVD Diamond Research in physica status solidi (a), reflecting such advancements and interesting results at the leading edge of diamond research.The present issue summarizes this progress in the CVD diamond field by selecting contributions from several areas such as superconductivity, super-excitonic radiation, quantum computing, bio-functionalization, surface electronic properties, the nature of phosphorus doping, transport properties in high energy detectors, CVD growth and properties of nanocrystalline diamond. In all these directions CVD diamond appears to be very competitive in comparison with other semiconducting materials.As Editors of this special issue, we must admit that the selection is biased by our opinion. Nonetheless, we are sure that each contribution introduces new ideas and results which will improve the understanding of the current level of physics and chemistry of this attractive wide-bandgap semiconductor and which will help to bring it closer to applications.All submissions were invited based on the contributions of the authors to their specific research field. The Feature Articles have the format of topical reviews to give the reader a comprehensive summary. Partially, however, they are written in research paper style to report new results of ongoing research.We hope that this issue will attract the attention of a broad community of scientists and engineers, and that it will facilitate the utilization of diamond in electronic applications and technologies of the future.

  8. Selected topics on parton distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, M.; Saito, K.; Kawamura, H.; Kumano, S.

    2011-12-14

    We report recent studies on structure functions of the nucleon and nuclei. First, clustering effects are investigated in the structure function F{sub 2} of {sup 9}Be for explaining an unusual nuclear correction found in a JLab experiment. We propose that high densities created by formation of clustering structure like 2{alpha}+neutron in {sup 9}Be is the origin of the unexpected JLab result by using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). There is an approved proposal at JLab to investigate the structure functions of light nuclei including the cluster structure, so that much details will become clear in a few years. Second, tensor-polarized quark and antiquark distributions are obtained by analyzing HERMES measurements on the structure function b{sub 1} for the deuteron. The result suggests a finite tensor polarization for antiquark distributions, which is an interesting topic for further theoretical and experimental investigations. An experimental proposal exists at JLab for measuring b{sub 1} of the deuteron as a new tensor-structure study in 2010's. Furthermore, the antiquark tensor polarization could be measured by polarized deuteron Drell-Yan processes at hadron facilities such as J-PARC and GSI-FAIR. Third, the recent CDF dijet anomaly is investigated within the standard model by considering possible modifications of the strange-quark distribution. We find that the shape of a dijet-mass spectrum changes depending on the strange-quark distribution. It indicates that the CDF excess could be partially explained as a PDF effect, particularly by the strangeness in the nucleon, within the standard model if the excess at m{sub jj}{approx_equal}140 GeV is not a sharp peak.

  9. Selected Topics in International Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    This article provides information on special education topics on the international front. Information is presented on projects that evaluated early intervention programs, a life-centered career education program in the Philippines, a Peruvian vocational program for individuals with severe disabilities, and special classes for children with…

  10. Selected Antimicrobial Activity of Topical Ophthalmic Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Margaret M.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Patel, Robin; Pulido, Jose S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Endophthalmitis is a rare complication of intravitreal injection (IVI). It is recommended that povidone-iodine be the last agent applied before IVI. Patients have reported povidone-iodine application to be the most bothersome part of IVIs. Topical anesthetics have been demonstrated to have antibacterial effects. This study compared the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of topical anesthetic eye drops (proparacaine 0.5%, tetracaine 0.5%, lidocaine 2.0%) and the antiseptic, 5.0% povidone-iodine, against two organisms causing endophthalmitis after IVI. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentration values of topical anesthetics, povidone-iodine, preservative benzalkonium chloride (0.01%), and saline control were determined using five isolates of each Staphylococcus epidermidis and viridans group Streptococcus species (VGS). A broth microdilution technique was used with serial dilutions. Results Lidocaine (8.53 × 10−5mol/mL) had MICs of 4.27 to 8.53 × 10−5 mol/mL, and tetracaine (1.89 × 10−5 mol/mL) had MICs of 9.45 × 10−6 mol/mL for all isolates. Proparacaine (1.7 × 10−5 mol/mL) had MICs of 1.32 to 5.3 × 10−7 and 4.25 × 10−6 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively). Benzalkonium chloride (3.52 × 10−7 mol/mL) had MICs of 1.86 × 10−9 to 1.1 × 10−8 and 4.40 × 10−8 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively. Povidone-iodine (1.37 × 10−4 mol/mL) had MICs of 2.14 to 4.28 × 10−6 and 8.56 × 10−6 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively. Conclusion Proparacaine was the anesthetic with the lowest MICs, lower than that of povidone-iodine. Benzalkonium chloride had lower MICs than proparacaine. All tested anesthetics and povidone-iodine inhibited growth of S. epidermidis and VGS at commercially available concentrations. Translational Relevance For certain patients, it could be possible to use topical anesthetic after povidone-iodine for comfort without inhibiting and perhaps contributing additional antimicrobial

  11. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY: THREE SELECTED TOPICS.

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT,J.W.DENG,Y.GLIMM,J.SAMULYAK,R.

    2003-09-15

    We present an overview of computational science at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), with selections from three areas: fluids, nanoscience, and biology. The work at BNL in each of these areas is itself very broad, and we select a few topics for presentation within each of them.

  12. Selected Topics on Hadronic B Decays From BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; /SLAC

    2011-11-23

    Recent measurements of branching fractions and decay-rate asymmetries in charmless hadronic B decays at the BaBar experiment are presented. The selected topics include Dalitz plot analyses of B {yields} K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi} and signal searches in B {yields} PP and PV, where isoscalar mesons are involved, and in B {yields} b{sub 1}P, P and V denote a pseudoscalar and vector meson, respectively. Several measurements in charmless hadronic B decays have indicated possible deviations from the theoretical predictions within the Standard Model. The measurements presented would contribute to searching for and resolving such puzzles.

  13. A Review of Carbon Dioxide Selective Membranes: A Topical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dushyant Shekhawat; David R. Luebke; Henry W. Pennline

    2003-12-01

    Carbon dioxide selective membranes provide a viable energy-saving alternative for CO2 separation, since membranes do not require any phase transformation. This review examines various CO2 selective membranes for the separation of CO2 and N2, CO2 and CH4, and CO2 and H2 from flue or fuel gas. This review attempts to summarize recent significant advances reported in the literature about various CO2 selective membranes, their stability, the effect of different parameters on the performance of the membrane, the structure and permeation properties relationships, and the transport mechanism applied in different CO2 selective membranes.

  14. Selecting Topics for Journals: Some Advice for Beginners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddux, Cleborne D.

    2004-01-01

    This article provides suggestions for prospective authors searching for topics for manuscripts. The article first provides examples of topics for non-data-based articles, then for research topics. Authors are invited to submit manuscripts on these, and on any other topics to this journal.

  15. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program: Topical report I, selection of candidate alloys. Volume 3. Selection of surface coating/substrate systems for screening creep and structural stability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-20

    Considering the high temperature, low O/sub 2/, high C environment of operation in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Systems, the utilization of coatings is envisaged to hold potential for extending component lifetimes through the formation of stable and continuous oxide films with enhanced resistance to C diffusion. A survey of the current state of technology for high temperature coatings has been performed. The usefulness of these coatings on the Mo, Ni, and Fe base alloys is discussed. Specifically, no coating substitute was identified for TZM other than the well known W-3 (pack silicide) and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ forming coatings were recommended for the Fe and Ni base structural materials. Recommendations as to coating types and processng have been made based on the predicted VHTR component size, shape, base metal and operational environment. Four tests designed to evaluate the effects of selected combinations of coatings and substrate matrices are recommended for consideration.

  16. Topics in the structure of hadronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lebed, R. F.

    1994-04-01

    In this dissertation the author examines a variety of different problems in the physics of strongly-bound systems. Each is elucidated by a different standard method of analysis developed to probe the properties of such systems. He begins with an examination of the properties and consequences of the current algebra of weak currents in the limit of heavy quark spin-flavor symmetry. In particular, he examines the assumptions in the proof of the Ademollo-Gatto theorem in general and for spin-flavor symmetry, and exhibit the constraints imposed upon matrix elements by this theorem. Then he utilizes the renormalization-group method to create composite fermions in a three-generation electroweak model. Such a model is found to reproduce the same low energy behavior as the top-condensate electroweak model, although in general it may have strong constraints upon its Higgs sector. Next he uncovers subtleties in the nonrelativistic quark model that drastically alter the picture of the physical origins of meson electromagnetic and hyperfine mass splittings; in particular, the explicit contributions due to (m{sub d}{minus}m{sub u}) and electrostatic potentials may be overwhelmed by other effects. Such novel effects are used to explain the anomalous pattern of mass splittings recently measured in bottom mesons. Finally, he considers the topic of baryon masses in heavy fermion chiral perturbation theory, including both tree-level and loop effects.

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: Mesoscale structures in microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komura, S.

    2007-11-01

    Due to the existence of intermediate mesoscopic internal structures, soft matter exhibits various fascinating non-linear and non-equilibrium phenomena. In this review article, we focus on microemulsions consisting of water, oil, and surfactant from the viewpoint of soft matter physics. Microemulsions exhibit a rich phase behavior as the composition and/or the temperature is varied. In the middle phase, oil and water mix in the presence of surfactant molecules to form a mesoscopic bicontinuous structure. To explain the complex behavior of microemulsions, it is useful to employ phenomenological approaches such as the Ginzburg-Landau theory or the membrane theory. We discuss the Ginzburg-Landau theory and also review the Teubner-Strey model, the Gompper-Schick model, and the two-order-parameter model. Based on these models, we discuss the structure of the middle phase and its wetting transition. The membrane theory proposed by Helfrich is also useful for describing the physical properties of microemulsions. Various structures in microemulsions, such as droplets, bicontinuous and network structures, are properly accounted for by the curvature elasticity model. We focus on the Exxon model which clarifies the physical origin of the middle phase. Within the phenomenological level of description, we review the dynamical aspects of droplet and bicontinuous microemulsions. We also give an overview of microemulsions found in multicomponent polymeric systems (polymeric microemulsions). A discussion on recent applications of microemulsions completes the review.

  18. Topics on Nuclear Structure with Electroweak Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya de Guerra, E.; Moreno, O.; Sarriguren, P.; Ramon, M.

    2012-05-01

    We study some relevant aspects of complex nuclei structure using electroweak probes within the framework of self-consistent mean field theories with Skyrme density-dependent two-body interactions, including pairing and spin-isospin RPA correlations where necessary. We apply the formalism to the study of single and double beta decays as normal modes of the system, as well as to the analysis of parity-violating electron scattering by nuclei. Finally, we profit from the studied processes to draw some conclusions on the neutrino nature (eigenstates mixing).

  19. Topic Sequence and Emphasis Variability of Selected Organic Chemistry Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houseknecht, Justin B.

    2010-01-01

    Textbook choice has a significant effect upon course success. Among the factors that influence this decision, two of the most important are material organization and emphasis. This paper examines the sequencing of 19 organic chemistry topics, 21 concepts and skills, and 7 biological topics within nine of the currently available organic textbooks.…

  20. Topics in Finance. Part V--Capital Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Continuing this series on the theory of financial management, the current article investigates capital structure, offering insight into the roles of stockholder wealth maximization, the risk-return tradeoff, and agency conflicts. Much literature addresses this topic, and some of the most recent literature challenges certain theoretical…

  1. Culture, Diet, and Nutrition: Selected Themes and Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grivetti, Louis Evan

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: How do nutritious diets develop? What is the antiquity of nutritional disease? Why do humans consume nonfood items? What impact do religious prohibitions and practices have on nutritional status? And why are some toxic plants and animals consumed and desired by man? (Author/BB)

  2. Methods of Teaching Selected Topics in Business Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golen, Steven P., Ed.; And Others

    In order to help teachers of business communication look for new and innovative ways to improve their teaching, this book offers a "how to" approach to various topics in business communication. The ideas expressed in this book are a collaboration of 32 members of The Association for Business Communication who served on the Teaching Methodology and…

  3. Summary of SMIRT20 Preconference Topical Workshop – Identifying Structural Issues in Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    William Richins; Stephen Novascone; Cheryl O'Brien

    2009-08-01

    Summary of SMIRT20 Preconference Topical Workshop – Identifying Structural Issues in Advanced Reactors William Richins1, Stephen Novascone1, and Cheryl O’Brien1 1Idaho National Laboratory, US Dept. of Energy, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA, e-mail: William.Richins@inl.gov The Idaho National Laboratory (INL, USA) and IASMiRT sponsored an international forum Nov 5-6, 2008 in Porvoo, Finland for nuclear industry, academic, and regulatory representatives to identify structural issues in current and future advanced reactor design, especially for extreme conditions and external threats. The purpose of this Topical Workshop was to articulate research, engineering, and regulatory Code development needs. The topics addressed by the Workshop were selected to address critical industry needs specific to advanced reactor structures that have long lead times and can be the subject of future SMiRT technical sessions. The topics were; 1) structural/materials needs for extreme conditions and external threats in contemporary (Gen. III) and future (Gen. IV and NGNP) advanced reactors and 2) calibrating simulation software and methods that address topic 1 The workshop discussions and research needs identified are presented. The Workshop successfully produced interactive discussion on the two topics resulting in a list of research and technology needs. It is recommended that IASMiRT communicate the results of the discussion to industry and researchers to encourage new ideas and projects. In addition, opportunities exist to retrieve research reports and information that currently exists, and encourage more international cooperation and collaboration. It is recommended that IASMiRT continue with an off-year workshop series on select topics.

  4. Strategies for Finding and Selecting an Ideal Thesis or Dissertation Topic: A Review of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lei, Simon A.

    2009-01-01

    Choosing an ideal master's thesis or doctoral dissertation topic is probably one of the most important decisions students will make while in graduate school. Some graduate students may spend a year or even longer looking for potential topics before finally selecting one for their thesis or dissertation. There are a number of successful strategies…

  5. Antrim shale bibliography: Selected references. Topical report, June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Picciano, L.

    1995-06-01

    The Antrim Shale citations listed in this bibliography present select research reports, papers, and workshops that provide an overview of research and development (R&D) efforts related to this resource. Section I lists only publications resulting directly from GRI`s research investment, or reviews that extensively utilized GRI results. The second section focuses on non-GRI technical publications sponsored by such organizations as the Department of Energy, the Society of Petroleum Engineers, and the U.S. Geological Survey.

  6. Selected Topics in Tau Physics from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Paramesvaran, S.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London

    2012-04-06

    Selected results from {tau} analyses performed using the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. A precise measurement of the {tau} mass and the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} mass difference is undertaken using the hadronic decay mode {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. In addition an investigation into the strange decay modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is also presented, including a fit to the {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} invariant mass spectrum. Precise values for M(K*(892)) and {Lambda}(K*(892)) are obtained.

  7. A Socio-Technical Approach for Topic Community Member Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moor, Aldo; Anjewierden, Anjo

    Wicked problems and social complexity abound in our globalizing, ever more complex society [6]. Wicked problems, such as many socioeconomic and environmental issues, cannot be solved in traditional ways, as no perfect solution can be found. Also, the understanding of the problem evolves as the solution is being worked on, but no clear agreement on what the real problem is can be reached. The only way to seriously address these problems is by examining a wide range of possible solutions, argumentations, and viewpoints by as many stakeholders as possible [13, 6]. Classical organizations, like governments and official scientific bodies, are no longer capable of representing these interests on their own. New forms of agile social structures are needed, covering a wide spectrum of public interests instead of limited national or organizational interests.

  8. Beyond Topical Relevance: Document Selection Behavior of Real Users of IR Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Peiling; Soergel, Dagobert

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study of users' document selection behavior that was conducted to build a tentative cognitive model of document selection behavior to be used in designing intelligent information retrieval systems. Topics addressed include studies of relevance and of decision making; value judgments; and document information elements considered during…

  9. Exploring and Contrasting EFL Learners' Perceptions of Textbook-Assigned and Self-Selected Discussion Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, James P.

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to explore the significance of a "willingness to communicate" (WTC) variable in second language (L2) acquisition, this article reports on a survey study that investigated 101 Japanese university English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners' perceptions of textbook-assigned and self-selected discussion topics. Additionally, the study…

  10. Selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes in a concise manner three selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems. The three topics are as follows: (1) the active control of helicopter air-resonance using an LQG/LTR approach; (2) simulation of higher harmonic control (HHC) applied to a four bladed hingeless helicopter rotor in forward flight; and (3) vibration suppression in forward flight on a hingeless helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap, which is mounted on the blade. Only a few selected illustrative results are presented. The results obtained clearly indicate that the partial span, actively controlled flap has considerable potential for vibration reduction in helicopter rotors.

  11. An Empirical Study of Knowledge Structures of Research Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Peiling

    1999-01-01

    Examines cognitive maps on research topics generated by experts and non-experts. Both experts and non-experts modified the given vocabulary by either adding or dropping terms. The dominant configuration for the maps was top-down. Experts tended to use a problem-oriented approach to organize vocabulary while non-experts often applied a…

  12. Topical liposome targeting of dyes, melanins, genes, and proteins selectively to hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, R M

    1998-01-01

    For therapeutic and cosmetic modification of hair, we have developed a hair-follicle-selective macromolecule and small molecule targeting system with topical application of phosphatidylcholine-based liposomes. Liposome-entrapped melanins, proteins, genes, and small-molecules have been selectively targeted to the hair follicle and hair shafts of mice. Liposomal delivery of these molecules is time dependent. Negligible amounts of delivered molecules enter the dermis, epidermis, or bloodstream thereby demonstrating selective follicle delivery. Naked molecules are trapped in the stratum corneum and are unable to enter the follicle. The potential of the hair-follicle liposome delivery system for therapeutic use for hair disease as well as for cosmesis has been demonstrated in 3-dimensional histoculture of hair-growing skin and mouse in vivo models. Topical liposome selective delivery to hair follicles has demonstrated the ability to color hair with melanin, the delivery of the active lac-Z gene to hair matrix cells and delivery of proteins as well. Liposome-targeting of molecules to hair follicles has also been achieved in human scalp in histoculture. Liposomes thus have high potential in selective hair follicle targeting of large and small molecules, including genes, opening the field of gene therapy and other molecular therapy of the hair process to restore hair growth, physiologically restore or alter hair pigment, and to prevent or accelerate hair loss.

  13. Structural, Linguistic and Topic Variables in Verbal and Computational Problems in Elementary Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beardslee, Edward C.; Jerman, Max E.

    Five structural, four linguistic and twelve topic variables are used in regression analyses on results of a 50-item achievement test. The test items are related to 12 topics from the third-grade mathematics curriculum. The items reflect one of two cases of the structural variable, cognitive level; the two levels are characterized, inductive…

  14. Selected Topical Agents Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Treatment of Minor Injuries- A Review

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ping-chung; Ko, Erik Chun-hay; Siu, Wing-sum; Pang, Ellie Suet-yee; Lau, Clara Bik-san

    2016-01-01

    Topical medicinal patches have been popular for the treatment of minor injuries like sprains and avulsions. Other inflammatory conditions like chronic musculo-tendinous pain and or fasciitis are also taken care of by local ointments or rubs. In the oriental communities, medicinal herbs frequently form the major components of the patches. In spite of the lack of scientific evidence of efficacy, the popularity of such traditional application persists for centuries. In this era of evidence-based clinical treatment, there is an urgent need to look into this traditional practice. The purpose should include a scientific verification of the efficacy of the practice, and once proven, further explorations would be indicated to bring the practice to a higher level. A system of comprehensive exploration was proposed and practiced in the past years to fulfill the aspiration. The research consisted of four areas: (1) Identification of the suitable medicinal herbs for the topical study; (2) Study of the biological activities of the selected herbs, concentrating on the areas of anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, angiogenesis and cellular proliferation; (3) Study on the transcutaneous transport of the chemicals of the selected herbs to deeper tissues; and (4) Pilot clinical studies on common superficial inflammatory musculo-skeletal conditions to give objective clinical evidences to the topical applications. Five herbs were identified as suitable candidates of study. They were put into relevant laboratory platforms and were proven to be anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic. Three of the herbs were prepared as topical patches with an enhancer and used to treat three common ailments in pilot clinical trials, viz., plantar fasciitis, undisplaced metatarsal fracture and tendonitis of the wrist (de-Quervain’s disease) and the elbow (Tennis elbow). The clinical results of the pilot studies were very positive. It is therefore concluded that further explorations are

  15. Selected Topical Agents Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Treatment of Minor Injuries- A Review.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ping-Chung; Ko, Erik Chun-Hay; Siu, Wing-Sum; Pang, Ellie Suet-Yee; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2016-01-01

    Topical medicinal patches have been popular for the treatment of minor injuries like sprains and avulsions. Other inflammatory conditions like chronic musculo-tendinous pain and or fasciitis are also taken care of by local ointments or rubs. In the oriental communities, medicinal herbs frequently form the major components of the patches. In spite of the lack of scientific evidence of efficacy, the popularity of such traditional application persists for centuries. In this era of evidence-based clinical treatment, there is an urgent need to look into this traditional practice. The purpose should include a scientific verification of the efficacy of the practice, and once proven, further explorations would be indicated to bring the practice to a higher level. A system of comprehensive exploration was proposed and practiced in the past years to fulfill the aspiration. The research consisted of four areas: (1) Identification of the suitable medicinal herbs for the topical study; (2) Study of the biological activities of the selected herbs, concentrating on the areas of anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, angiogenesis and cellular proliferation; (3) Study on the transcutaneous transport of the chemicals of the selected herbs to deeper tissues; and (4) Pilot clinical studies on common superficial inflammatory musculo-skeletal conditions to give objective clinical evidences to the topical applications. Five herbs were identified as suitable candidates of study. They were put into relevant laboratory platforms and were proven to be anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic. Three of the herbs were prepared as topical patches with an enhancer and used to treat three common ailments in pilot clinical trials, viz., plantar fasciitis, undisplaced metatarsal fracture and tendonitis of the wrist (de-Quervain's disease) and the elbow (Tennis elbow). The clinical results of the pilot studies were very positive. It is therefore concluded that further explorations are

  16. The Effects of Topic Familiarity, Author Expertise, and Content Relevance on Norwegian Students' Document Selection: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrudden, Matthew T.; Stenseth, Tonje; Bråten, Ivar; Strømsø, Helge I.

    2016-01-01

    This mixed methods study investigated the extent to which author expertise and content relevance were salient to secondary Norwegian students (N = 153) when they selected documents that pertained to more familiar and less familiar topics. Quantitative results indicated that author expertise was more salient for the less familiar topic (nuclear…

  17. Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science progress report summary of selected research and development topics, FY97

    SciTech Connect

    Newkirk, L.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains summaries of research performed in the Chemistry and Materials Science division. Topics include Metals and Ceramics, High Explosives, Organic Synthesis, Instrument Development, and other topics.

  18. Topical alpha-selective p38 MAP kinase inhibition reduces acute skin inflammation in guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Medicherla, Satyanarayana; Ma, Jing Ying; Reddy, Mamtha; Esikova, Irina; Kerr, Irene; Movius, Fabiola; Higgins, Linda S; Protter, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    Certain skin pathologies, including psoriasis, are thought to be immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Available literature clearly indicates the involvement of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, T cells, and macrophages), their cytokines, and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in the pathophysiology of psoriasis. Neutrophils play an important role in the formation of acute inflammatory changes in psoriasis. Acute inflammation or acute flares in psoriasis remain poorly addressed in clinical medicine. In this communication, we first establish a simple and reproducible model for studying neutrophil-mediated acute skin inflammation. Using the hairless guinea pig, due to the similarity of skin architecture to that of human, acute inflammation was induced with an intradermal injection of 50 μg/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in 50 μL solution. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured by MPO-positive neutrophils and shown to increase for 24-hours post-injection. Simultaneously, the level of phosphorylated p38 MAPK was documented for 48-hours post-LPS injection in the skin. Next, we used this model to examine the therapeutic potential of an α-selective p38 MAPK inhibitor, SCIO-469. A comparison of topical application of SCIO-469 at 5 mg/mL or 15 mg/mL to vehicle revealed that SCIO-469 dose-dependently reduces acute skin inflammation and that this effect is statistically significant at the higher dose. Further examination of tissues that received this dose also revealed statistically significant reduction of MPO activity, phosphorylated p38 MAPK, interleukin-6, and cyclooxygenase-2. These data suggest that the α-selective p38 MAPK inhibitor, SCIO-469, acts as a topical anti-inflammatory agent via the p38 MAPK pathway to reduce neutrophil induced acute inflammation in the skin. These observations suggest that α-selective p38 MAPK inhibition may be an effective therapeutic strategy to manage acute skin inflammation PMID:22096353

  19. Selected topics in experimental aeroelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The results of selected studies that have been conducted by the NASA Langley Research Center in the last three years are presented. The topics presented focus primarily on the ever-important transonic flight regime and include the following: body-freedom flutter of a forward-swept-wing configuration with and without relaxed static stability; instabilities associated with a new tilt-rotor vehicle; effects of winglets, supercritical airfoils, and spanwise curvature on wing flutter; wind-tunnel investigation of a flutter-like oscillation on a high-aspect-ratio flight research wing; results of wing-tunnel demonstration of the NASA decoupler pylon concept for passive suppression of wing/store flutter; and, new flutter testing methods which include testing at cryogenic temperatures for full scale Reynolds number simulation, subcritical response techniques for predicting onset of flutter, and a two-degree-of-freedom mount system for testing side-wall-mounted models.

  20. Selected topics in experimental aeroelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The results of selected studies that have been conducted by the NASA Langley Research Center in the last three years are presented. The topics presented focus primarily on the ever-important transonic flight regime and include the following: body-freedom flutter of a forward-swept-wing configuration with and without relaxed static stability; instabilities associated with a new tilt-rotor vehicle; effects of winglets, supercritical airfoils, and spanwise curvature on wing flutter; wind-tunnel investigation of a flutter-like oscillation on a high-aspect-ratio flight research wing; results of wind-tunnel demonstration of the NASA decoupler pylon concept for passive suppression of wing/store flutter; and, new flutter testing methods which include testing at cryogenic temperatures for full scale Reynolds number simulation, subcritical response techniques for predicting onset of flutter, and a two-degree-of-freedom mount system for testing side-wall-mounted models.

  1. ORNL R and D on advanced small and medium power reactors: Selected topics

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.D.; Trauger, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    From 1984-1985, ORNL studied several innovative small and medium power nuclear concepts with respect to viability. Criteria for assessment of market attractiveness were developed and are described here. Using these criteria and descriptions of selected advanced reactor concepts, and assessment of their projected market viability in the time period 2000-2010 was made. All of these selected concepts could be considered as having the potential for meeting the criteria but, in most cases, considerable RandD would be required to reduce uncertainties. This work and later studies of safety and licensing of advanced, passively safe reactor concepts by ORNL are described. The results of these studies are taken into account in most of the current (FY 1989) work at ORNL on advanced reactors. A brief outline of this current work is given. One of the current RandD efforts at ORNL which addresses the operability and safety of advanced reactors is the Advanced Controls Program. Selected topics from this Program are described. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Topics in cosmology: Structure formation, dark energy and recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Esfandiar

    The field of theoretical cosmology consists of numerous, inter-related branches, whose ambitious goal is to uncover the history of the universe from its beginning to its future. Achieving this, no doubt, requires a deep understanding of many areas of physics. In this thesis I touch upon a few of these areas in which I worked during my PhD studies. Chapter (2) describes our work in finding the accretion and merger history of dark matter halos. Dark matter halos are the collapsed dark matter structures in the late time evolution of the universe, whose existence is vital for the formation of galaxies in the Universe as they act as the potential wells where normal matter (collectively called Baryons) can accumulate, cool, and form stars. It is then no surprise that the properties of galaxies depends on the properties of the dark matter halo in which it resides, including its merger history, i.e. the number of times it merged with other halos. Even though these merger rates can be calculated theoretically for infinitesimal time steps, in order to find the merger history over an extended period of time one had to use either Monte-Carlo simulations to build up the total rates of merging and accreting from the infinitesimal rates or use N-body simulations. In chapter (2) we show how we used random walk formalism to write down an analytical (integral) equation for the merger history of halos. We have solved this equation numerically and find very good agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations. This work can be used in theories of galaxy formation and evolution. We then switch from the overdense regions of the Universe, halos, to the underdense ones, voids. These structures have not attracted as much attention from cosmologists as their overdense counterparts in probing the cosmological models. We show here that the shapes of voids as a probe can be of use for future surveys to pin down the equation of state of the dark energy, i.e. the ratio of its pressure to its energy

  3. Combining Chemistry and Music to Engage Student Interest: Using Songs to Accompany Selected Chemical Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Last, Arthur M.

    2009-01-01

    The use of recorded music to add interest to a variety of lecture topics is described. Topics include the periodic table, the formation of ionic compounds, thermodynamics, carbohydrates, nuclear chemistry, and qualitative analysis. (Contains 1 note.)

  4. A Comparison of Two Methods of Teaching Selected Topics in Plane Analytic Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundrick, Charles Michael

    Reported are the results of a study to determine if there is a difference in learning as measured by an achievement test between high school students who study plane analytic geometric topics via a vector approach and those who study the same topics via a traditional approach. Secondary objectives concerned the transfer to further topics in solid…

  5. PREFACE: Selected papers from the Fourth Topical Conference on Nanoscale Science and Engineering of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael S.; Lee, Gil U.

    2005-07-01

    systems and tissue engineering; nanotechnology for drug delivery and imaging; bionanotechnology in cancer and cardiovascular disease; nanostructured biomaterials; nanotechnology in bioengineering; nanofabrication of biosensing devices. We are pleased to present a selection of research papers in this special issue of Nanotechnology on behalf of the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Forum (NSEF). NSEF was established in 2001 as a new division of AIChE to promote nanotechnology efforts in chemical engineering. The chemical engineering discipline deals with the production and processing of chemicals and materials, and does so through a fundamental understanding of the core issues of transport, thermodynamics, and kinetics that exist at multiple length scales. Thus, it should come as no surprise that chemical engineers have been pursuing nanotechnology research for the last fifty years. For example, fuel production has benefited immensely from improved catalysts in which their pore structure is controlled with nanoscale precision, and polymer properties have been improved by controlling the polymer supramolecular structure at the nanometre scale. Chemical engineering will continue to make important contributions to nanotechnology, and will play a critical role in the transition from basic science and engineering research to commercial applications. We would like to thank all of the authors who contributed to this special issue; the three NSEF poster presentation award winners for their papers (Sureshkumar, Sunkara, and Rinaldi groups); Dr Nina Couzin, Publisher of Nanotechnology, for her support and enthusiasm for this project; Drs Sharon Glotzer and Dan Coy who chaired the topical conference; and Drs Meyya Meyyappan and Brett Cruden (NASA Ames Research Center) for their assistance in the initial planning stages. We also take this opportunity to thank the many people and organizations who have supported the 2004 topical conference along the way, which include all the session

  6. Preface: Special Topic Section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, Angelos; Martinez, Todd J.; Alavi, Ali; Kresse, Georg

    2015-09-14

    This Special Topic section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces contains a collection of research papers that showcase recent advances in the high accuracy prediction of materials and surface properties. It provides a timely snapshot of a growing field that is of broad importance to chemistry, physics, and materials science.

  7. The Effect of Topical Structure Analysis Instruction on University Students' Writing Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liangprayoon, Somlak; Chaya, Walaiporn; Thep-ackraphong, Tipa

    2013-01-01

    Coherence is considered one of the characteristics of effective writing. Topical structure analysis (TSA) has been taught to students as a revision strategy to raise their awareness of importance of textual coherence and helps them clearly understand its concept. This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of TSA instruction in improving…

  8. Influence of Professional Preparation and Class Structure on Sexuality Topics Taught in Middle and High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Darson L.; Kirchofer, Gregg; Hammig, Bart J.; Ogletree, Roberta J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study examined the impact of professional preparation and class structure on sexuality topics taught and use of practice-based instructional strategies in US middle and high school health classes. Methods: Data from the classroom-level file of the 2006 School Health Policies and Programs were used. A series of multivariable…

  9. A Summary of Information on the Behavior of the Yakima Fold Belt as a Structural Entity -- Topical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Last, George V.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

    2012-08-01

    This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize available data and analyses relevant to the Yakima Fold Belt (YFB) that may bear on the question of whether or not the YFB behaves as a single seismotectonic province in which activity along one fold structure is representative of behavior along all other fold structures. This topic has met with a fairly high level of contention in the expert community and has the potential to result in significant impacts on an evaluation of seismic hazard at the Hanford Site. This report defines the relevant alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, it suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

  10. Topical Corticosteroid Application and the Structural and Functional Integrity of the Epidermal Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Topical corticosteroids are a very important part of the treatment of many skin disorders, especially eczematous dermatoses. When utilized properly and judiciously these agents often achieve excellent results in clearing or markedly improving many dermatological disorders. As some studies have shown, topical corticosteroids, despite their ability to decrease inflammation through several mechanisms, induce abnormalities in lipid synthesis and intercellular bilayer structure in the stratum corneum, which appear to prolong epidermal barrier recovery. These adverse effects may contribute to eariier eczematous flaring if measures to provide barrier repair are not undertaken. In addition, although topical corticosteroids are applied only to sites affected by the skin eruption, the incorporation of “barrier friendly” excipients into the vehicle that improve stratum corneum permeability barrier function and integrity is very rational. PMID:24307921

  11. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  12. The selection of appropriate health education topics for publication in the press.

    PubMed

    al-Faris, E A

    1993-09-01

    A health survey on 22 health topics was conducted among 300 patients, 77 doctors in primary health care centers in hospitals, and 31 journalists in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, during September 1990. The self-administered questionnaire had been pretested among 30 doctors and 100 patients. Male and female patients were equally balanced by gender and about 50% were students. Most doctors and journalists were male. Priority for health topics to be covered in the media was given more by doctors than journalists or patients. Group A topics were smoking, exercise, venereal disease and AIDS, hypertension and diabetes, heart and circulatory disease, contamination and environmental cleanliness, nutrition, first aid, compliance with traffic regulations, endemic diseases in Saudi Arabia, breast feeding, treatment of childhood diarrhea, and rational use of home drugs. Group B topics (acne and cancer) were considered more important by journalists, followed by patients; doctors considered group B topics least important. Group C topics (modern diagnostic techniques, new drugs, and new means of treatment) were given more importance by patients, followed by journalists. Menstrual problems were scored lowest by journalists and highest by doctors. The findings were considered tentative, pending a more representative sample. This sample of respondents was well-educated. Patients gave less priority to smoking (44%) than cancer (66%) and acne and hair loss (71.3%). Physicians gave greater emphasis to smoking (98.7%) than acne and hair loss (58.4%) and cancer (53.2%). 28.6% of doctors and 66.3% of patients gave emphasis to modern diagnostic techniques; new drugs followed a similar pattern with 69.0% of patients and 16.9% of doctors favoring this topic. New means of treatment were accorded similar priorities by doctors and patients. Quality of health services was given a priority of 72.7% among doctors, 65.3% among patients, and 58.9% among journalists.

  13. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Task 3 -- System selection; Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.J.

    1994-07-01

    Solar Turbines Incorporated has elected to pursue an intercooled and recuperated (ICR) gas turbine system to exceed the goals of the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program, which are to develop and commercialize an industrial gas turbine system that operates at thermal efficiencies at least 15% higher than 1991 products, and with emissions not exceeding eight ppmv NOx and 20 ppmv CO and UHC. Solar`s goal is to develop a commercially viable industrial system (3--20 MW) driven by a gas turbine engine with a thermal efficiency of 50% (ATS50), with the flexibility to meet the differing operational requirements of various markets. Dispersed power generation is currently considered to be the primary future target market for the ICR in the 5--15 MW size class. The ICR integrated system approach provides an ideal candidate for the assumed dispersed power market, with its small footprint, easy transportability, and environmental friendliness. In comparison with other systems that use water or toxic chemicals such as ammonia for NOx control, the ICR has no consumables other than fuel and air. The low pressure ratio of the gas turbine engine also is favorable in that less parasitic power is needed to pump the natural gas into the combustor than for simple-cycle machines. Solar has narrowed the ICR configuration to two basic approaches, a 1-spool, and a 2-spool version of the ATS50. The 1-spool engine will have a lower first-cost but lower part-power efficiencies. The 2-spool ATS may not only have better part-power efficiency, its efficiency will also be less sensitive to reduced turbine rotor inlet temperature levels. Thus hot-end parts life can be increased with only small sacrifices in efficiency. The flexibility of the 2-spool arrangement in meeting customer needs is its major advantage over the 1-spool. This Task 3 Topical Report is intended to present Solar`s preliminary system selection based upon the initial trade-off studies performed to date.

  14. Structure biology of selective autophagy receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Won; Kwon, Do Hoon; Song, Hyun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a process tightly regulated by various autophagy-related proteins. It is generally classified into non-selective and selective autophagy. Whereas non-selective autophagy is triggered when the cell is under starvation, selective autophagy is involved in eliminating dysfunctional organelles, misfolded and/or ubiquitylated proteins, and intracellular pathogens. These components are recognized by autophagy receptors and delivered to phagophores. Several selective autophagy receptors have been identified and characterized. They usually have some common domains, such as motif, a specific cargo interacting (ubiquitin-dependent or ubiquitin-independent) domain. Recently, structural data of these autophagy receptors has been described, which provides an insight of their function in the selective autophagic process. In this review, we summarize the most up-to-date findings about the structure-function of autophagy receptors that regulates selective autophagy. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 73-80] PMID:26698872

  15. Selected Price Topical Papers for Career Education: Working Paper No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Donald J., Ed.

    Presented are 15 papers on topics relevant to Project PRICE (Programing Retarded in Career Education), a project designed to develop a methodology by which school districts can educate school, community, and family personnel to provide more relevant instruction and supportive services to retarded students. The following titles and entries are…

  16. Colloquium on Selected Topics in Behavioral Science Basic Research. (Alexandria, Virginia, April 23-25, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nogami, Glenda Y., Ed.; And Others

    The 21 summaries of research programs, funded by the United States Army Research Institute (ARI) for the Behavioral and Social Sciences which are presented are grouped in five broad topic areas: computer-based systems; information processing; learning, memory and transfer; human relations; and related issues and trends. Papers presented include:…

  17. Selected Topics in Overset Technology Development and Applications At NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a general overview of overset technology development and applications at NASA Ames Research Center. The topics include: 1) Overview of overset activities at NASA Ames; 2) Recent developments in Chimera Grid Tools; 3) A general framework for multiple component dynamics; 4) A general script module for automating liquid rocket sub-systems simulations; and 5) Critical future work.

  18. History of Research on Physical Activity and Health: Selected Topics, 1867 to the 1950s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Roberta J.

    1995-01-01

    Developments in the biomedical sciences affect how people think about health and fitness, as do social and cultural factors. This paper examines two topics of interest to educators, physicians, and researchers in the physiological sciences from 1867-1950 (the phenomenon referred to as the athlete's heart and anthropometrical/growth and development…

  19. Orientation selectivity based structure for texture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinjian; Lin, Weisi; Shi, Guangming; Zhang, Yazhong; Lu, Liu

    2014-10-01

    Local structure, e.g., local binary pattern (LBP), is widely used in texture classification. However, LBP is too sensitive to disturbance. In this paper, we introduce a novel structure for texture classification. Researches on cognitive neuroscience indicate that the primary visual cortex presents remarkable orientation selectivity for visual information extraction. Inspired by this, we investigate the orientation similarities among neighbor pixels, and propose an orientation selectivity based pattern for local structure description. Experimental results on texture classification demonstrate that the proposed structure descriptor is quite robust to disturbance.

  20. The skin health and beauty pyramid: a clinically based guide to selecting topical skincare products.

    PubMed

    Mayoral, Flor A; Kenner, Julie R; Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2014-04-01

    The use of cosmeceuticals by patients is now commonplace. Without consultation and direction from an informed clinician, marketing pressures can lead consumers to make poor product choices that can result in wasted money and unsatisfactory outcomes. Skin professionals need a scientifically based, succinct tool to guide their patients toward best topical skincare practices. The Skin Health and Beauty Pyramid is an educational framework and product guide created from extensive scientific literature and study review on ingredients, formulations and technologies affecting skin biology. This clinical tool can simplify product choices for physicians and clinicians in the process of professionally guiding patients toward the optimal use of topical products to achieve best outcomes for skin health and beauty. PMID:24719060

  1. Selected Research and Development Topics on Aerospace Communications at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Nessel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation discusses some of the efforts on communications RD that have been performed or are currently underway at NASA Glenn Research Center. The primary purpose of this presentation is to outline some RD topics to serve as talking points for a Technical Interchange Meeting with the Ohio State University. The meeting is scheduled to take place at The ElectroScience Laboratory of the Ohio State University on February 24, 2014.

  2. Selecting their Own Research Topic: An Effective Means of Engaging Undergraduates in Geoscience Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, V.; Haacker-Santos, R.

    2012-12-01

    Research experiences have been shown to successfully help draw undergraduates into STEM fields. In the SOARS and RESESS summer internship programs, which focus on the atmospheric and Earth sciences respectively, we attempt to match each intern with a project that is of specific interest to them, and to place the student with a science mentor with that expertise. Initially interns are solicited before the summer on their preferred topics of interest by having applicants or reapplicants choose fields of study from a list of topics. Follow-up conversations help to better define their area of interest. We then match those with the projects that have been proposed by prospective mentors, or seek scientists in the community who do research in that subdiscipline. Mentors also evaluate the intern's course background to determine if they have the foundation necessary for that work. Interns report that the opportunity to work on a topic that they perceive as interesting is vital to their engagement in the research. One intern wrote, "One of the most important components of internships like this is definitely letting the students somewhat chose their project. I think that a really good way to turn students OFF from research is by having them spend a summer researching something they are not even close to interested in." Another commented, "I really appreciated being matched with a project in my interest area. I think that's really important, even if it just teaches you that you might want to work in a different field than you initially thought." Being immersed in such a research group or lab provides interns with a rich opportunity to learn relevant content and skills, and to start developing a professional support network. Interns continue to engage with experts in their field of interest when they present at at scientifically relevant meeting sessions during the following academic year. Many of our interns go on to study the same subdiscipline of atmospheric or Earth

  3. Preface to Special Topic: Selected Papers from the 5th International Conference on Optofluidics.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shih-Kang; Yang, Zhenchuan

    2016-01-01

    The 5th International Conference on Optofluidics (Optofluidics 2015) was held in Taipei, Taiwan, July 26-29, 2015. The aim of this conference was to provide a forum to promote scientific exchange and to foster closer networks and collaborative ties between leading international researchers in optics and micro/nanofluidics across various disciplines. The scope of Optofluidics 2015 was deliberately broad and interdisciplinary, encompassing the latest advances and the most innovative developments in micro/nanoscale science and technology. Topics ranged from fundamental research to its applications in chemistry, physics, biology, materials, and medicine.

  4. Students fail to transfer knowledge of chromosome structure to topics pertaining to cell division.

    PubMed

    Newman, Dina L; Catavero, Christina M; Wright, L Kate

    2012-01-01

    Cellular processes that rely on knowledge of molecular behavior are difficult for students to comprehend. For example, thorough understanding of meiosis requires students to integrate several complex concepts related to chromosome structure and function. Using a grounded theory approach, we have unified classroom observations, assessment data, and in-depth interviews under the theory of knowledge transfer to explain student difficulties with concepts related to chromosomal behavior. In this paper, we show that students typically understand basic chromosome structure but do not activate cognitive resources that would allow them to explain macromolecular phenomena (e.g., homologous pairing during meiosis). To improve understanding of topics related to genetic information flow, we suggest that instructors use pedagogies and activities that prime students for making connections between chromosome structure and cellular processes.

  5. Students Fail to Transfer Knowledge of Chromosome Structure to Topics Pertaining to Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Dina L.; Catavero, Christina M.; Wright, L. Kate

    2012-01-01

    Cellular processes that rely on knowledge of molecular behavior are difficult for students to comprehend. For example, thorough understanding of meiosis requires students to integrate several complex concepts related to chromosome structure and function. Using a grounded theory approach, we have unified classroom observations, assessment data, and in-depth interviews under the theory of knowledge transfer to explain student difficulties with concepts related to chromosomal behavior. In this paper, we show that students typically understand basic chromosome structure but do not activate cognitive resources that would allow them to explain macromolecular phenomena (e.g., homologous pairing during meiosis). To improve understanding of topics related to genetic information flow, we suggest that instructors use pedagogies and activities that prime students for making connections between chromosome structure and cellular processes. PMID:23222838

  6. Actuator selection for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Ruan, Mifang

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses the process of selecting the actuator locations and the determination of the required number of actuators for large space structures. The selection is based on the definitions of the degree of controllability, the independence of actuators, and the effectiveness of the individual actuators. An algorithm is developed that can be used for the selection of the essential number of actuators and for finding some defects of the system, such as the insuffiency of the available actuator locations for effective control of the whole system or a too crowded frequency distribution. The efficiency of the algorithm was demonstrated by an application to the Space Station.

  7. Selected topics in particle accelerators: Proceedings of the CAP meetings. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1995-10-01

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Center for Accelerator Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Editing and changes to the authors` contributions in this Report were made only to fulfill the publication requirements. This volume includes notes and transparencies on eight presentations: ``Application of Accelerator-Driven Spallation Targets - Including Tritium Production and Nuclear Waste Transmutation``, ``BNL 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source Study``, ``Designing and Understanding of Magnets with the Help of Conformal Mapping``, ``Laser - Electron Beam Scattering Coherent Compton X-Ray Sources``, ``The LHC Project``, ``Optimization of the Photocathode-Linac Separation for the ATF [Accelerator Test Facility] Injection System``, ``On CEBAF Commissioning: First Results``, and ``The Proposed Booster Application Facility at BNL``. An Appendix lists dates, topics, and speakers from October 1989 to December 1994.

  8. At-Risk Students in Reading. Focused Access to Selected Topics (FAST) Bibliography No. 46.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Jerry; Desmond, Joann

    Focusing on students who are at risk of failure in reading, this 26-item annotated bibliography offers strategies, instructional approaches, and motivational techniques to help those who deal with this group of students. The selections in the bibliography date from 1983 to 1989. The bibliography is divided into sections on general information, the…

  9. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Topical report, September 8, 1992--September 7, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this research was to selectively oxidize methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol, in high space time yields using air at the oxidant under milder reaction conditions that heretofore employed over industrially practical oxide catalysts. The research carried out under this US DOE-METC contract was divided into the following three tasks: Task 1, maximizing selective methane oxidation to C{sub 2}{sup +} products over promoted SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts; Task 2, selective methane oxidation to oxygenates; and Task 3, catalyst characterization and optimization. Principal accomplishments include the following: the 1 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}/SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} promoted catalyst developed here produced over 2 kg of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons/kg catalyst/hr at 550 C; V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts have been prepared that produce up to 1.5 kg formaldehyde/kg catalyst/hr at 630 C with low CO{sub 2} selectivities; and a novel dual bed catalyst system has been designed and utilized to produce over 100 g methanol/kg catalyst/hr at 600 C with the presence of steam in the reactant mixture.

  10. Using the Nominal Group Technique to Select the Most Appropriate Topics for Postgraduate Research Students' Seminars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sandra C.

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, the Faculty of Health & Behavioural Sciences at our university offered a series of postgraduate research seminars. The series of seminars, selected by a three-person faculty team, received a mixed reaction--some seminars attracted a large proportion of the students whereas others were poorly attended. Thus, it was decided to continue…

  11. Selected Topics from LVCSR Research for Asian Languages at Tokyo Tech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furui, Sadaoki

    This paper presents our recent work in regard to building Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition (LVCSR) systems for the Thai, Indonesian, and Chinese languages. For Thai, since there is no word boundary in the written form, we have proposed a new method for automatically creating word-like units from a text corpus, and applied topic and speaking style adaptation to the language model to recognize spoken-style utterances. For Indonesian, we have applied proper noun-specific adaptation to acoustic modeling, and rule-based English-to-Indonesian phoneme mapping to solve the problem of large variation in proper noun and English word pronunciation in a spoken-query information retrieval system. In spoken Chinese, long organization names are frequently abbreviated, and abbreviated utterances cannot be recognized if the abbreviations are not included in the dictionary. We have proposed a new method for automatically generating Chinese abbreviations, and by expanding the vocabulary using the generated abbreviations, we have significantly improved the performance of spoken query-based search.

  12. Selected Topics on the Synthesis, Properties and Applications of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, B.R.; Brown, B.; Glass, J.T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In summary, MWCNTs have been examined for a variety of electronic applications due to their unique structure and chemistry. Electrodes for field emission, energy and sensor applications hold particular interest. MWCNTs provide a very high surface area, relatively easy methods of surface modification, controllable and high concentration of reactive surface sites, and high specific capacitance. Combining MWCNTs with graphene structures, oxide and metal nanoparticles and certain polymers extends their performance and functionality. Such hybrid structures have been produced in situ during CNT growth and in two-step processes. Excellent progress on understanding the mechanisms of CNT growth has enabled numerous growth methods to all yield MWCNT structures in a variety of morphologies. PMID:24910503

  13. Gas Research Institute`s appalachian basin research: Selected bibliography. Topical report, July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Picciano, L.

    1995-07-01

    The Appalachian Basin citations listed in this bibliography present select research reports that provide an overview of research and development (R&D) efforts related to the basin. The bibliography is organized in three sections, one for each of the following unconventional gas resources: coalbed methane, gas shales, and tight gas sands. Citations are further divided into geology and engineering subsections. The citations are only for those reports resulting directly from GRI`s research investment or reviews that extensively used GRI results.

  14. Development of BEACON technology: Hydrogen catalyst selection and preparation: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive form of carbon from a gas stream which contains carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane or hydrogen. Bench scale development of the methane process was completed during the second quarter 1983 and the results reported to DOE. Bench scale development of the hydrogen process is currently underway. This document summarizes the effort expended in the selection and preparation of the primary and back-up hydrogen production catalysts to be used in multi-cycle testing at bench scale. The effort comprised the Task 1 experimentation of the current BEACON program and was six weeks in duration. From 20 catalysts screened at laboratory scale as candidates for hydrogen production from BEACON carbon, two were selected as promising for exhibiting good performance (activity and selectivity) at reaction pressures above ambient. These two catalysts, No. 6 and No. 11, were subjected to extensive carbon deposition-steaming testing at 50, 75 and 100 psig (3 to 5 cycles at each pressure); 10 to 20 gram batches of solids were used in these tests. Performance comparisons led to the selection of Catalyst No. 11 as the primary catalyst for the hydrogen process. Catalyst No. 6 performed well enough at pressures up to 50 psig to be considered as a potential replacement to Catalyst No. 11 should the latter fail multi-cycle testing (long-term activity tests at elevated pressures). The multi-cycle testing (a minimum operation of 250 hours of simultaneous carbon deposition and steaming to hydrogen) will be performed in the existing Tandem Reactor apparatus under Task 2 of this program. 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Structure and selectivity in bestrophin ion channels

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Tingting; Liu, Qun; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Guo, Youzhong; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Colecraft, Henry M.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-09-25

    Human bestrophin 1 (hBest1) is a calcium-activated chloride channel from the retinal pigment epithelium, where it can suffer mutations associated with vitelliform macular degeneration, or Best disease. We describe the structure of a bacterial homolog (KpBest) of hBest1 and functional characterizations of both channels. KpBest is a pentamer that forms a five-helix transmembrane pore, closed by three rings of conserved hydrophobic residues, and has a cytoplasmic cavern with a restricted exit. From electrophysiological analysis of structure-inspired mutations in KpBest and hBest1, we find a subtle control of ion selectivity in the bestrophins, including reversal of anion/cation selectivity, and dramatic activationmore » by mutations at the exit restriction. Lastly, a homology model of hBest1 shows the locations of disease-causing mutations and suggests possible roles in regulation.« less

  16. Structure and selectivity in bestrophin ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tingting; Liu, Qun; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Guo, Youzhong; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Colecraft, Henry M.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-09-25

    Human bestrophin 1 (hBest1) is a calcium-activated chloride channel from the retinal pigment epithelium, where it can suffer mutations associated with vitelliform macular degeneration, or Best disease. We describe the structure of a bacterial homolog (KpBest) of hBest1 and functional characterizations of both channels. KpBest is a pentamer that forms a five-helix transmembrane pore, closed by three rings of conserved hydrophobic residues, and has a cytoplasmic cavern with a restricted exit. From electrophysiological analysis of structure-inspired mutations in KpBest and hBest1, we find a subtle control of ion selectivity in the bestrophins, including reversal of anion/cation selectivity, and dramatic activation by mutations at the exit restriction. Lastly, a homology model of hBest1 shows the locations of disease-causing mutations and suggests possible roles in regulation.

  17. Gas Research Institute`s coalbed methane research: Selected bibliography. (Preliminary issue). Topical report, October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Picciano, L.

    1994-10-01

    The coalbed methane citations listed here are select research reports, papers and workshop citations that were sponsored and managed by the Gas Research Institute. The initial section cites papers and reports that provide a general overview of coalbed methane production including GRI and GRI contractor paper featured in GRI publications, GRI meetings and overview volumes published by AAPG and SPE. The second section highlights general publications based on GRI`s extensive field research efforts in the eastern and western United States. The remaining sections have specific technology focuses, i.e., hydraulic fracturing. Also included is a section that features key research and results in environmental safety issues related to the production of methane from coal seams, particularly the production and disposal of produced waters.

  18. Selected topics on the interaction between cirrus clouds and embedded contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierens, K.

    2012-12-01

    Persistent contrails and natural cirrus clouds often coexist in the upper troposphere and contrails can be embedded within cirrus clouds. The present paper deals with some questions regarding the interaction of cirrus clouds and embedded contrails. I have selected only questions that can be answered by analytical means. I find that (1) the emission index for water vapour is only slightly changed when an aircraft crosses a cirrus cloud, (2) that contrail formation is not affected by an ambient cirrus, (3) that cirrus ice crystals entrained into the trailing wing tip vortex do not efficiently retard the sublimation of contrail ice crystals, and (4) that cirrus can start to dissolve an embedded contrail after a couple of hours by aggregation.

  19. EDITORIAL: Selected Papers from OMS'07, the 2nd Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society on Optical Microsystems (OMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendina, Ivo; Fazio, Eugenio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2008-06-01

    OMS'07 was the 2nd Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society (EOS) on Optical Microsystems (OMS). It was organized by the EOS in the frame of its international topical meeting activity, and after the success of the inaugural meeting was once again held in Italy, 30 September to 3 October 2007, amidst the wonderful scenery of the Island of Capri. The local organizing committee was composed of researchers from `La Sapienza' University in Rome and the National Council of Research (CNR) in Naples, Italy. A selected group of leading scientists in the field formed the international scientific committee. The conference was fully dedicated to the most recent advancements carried out in the field of optical microsystems. More then 150 scientists coming from five continents attended the conference and more than 100 papers were presented, organized into the following sessions: Photonic cystals and metamaterials Optofluidic microsystems and devices Optical microsystems and devices New characterization methods for materials and devices Application of optical systems Optical sources and photodetectors Optical resonators Nonlinear optic devices Micro-optical devices. Four keynote lecturers were invited for the Plenary sessions: Federico Capasso, Harvard University, USA; Bahram Javidi, University of Connecticut, USA (Distinguished Lecturer, Emeritus of LEOS--IEEE Society); Demetri Psaltis, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland; Ammon Yariv, California Institute of Technology, USA. Furthermore, 21 invited speakers opened each session of the conference with their talks. In addition a special session was organized to celebrate eighty years of the Isituto Nazionale di Ottica Applicata (INOA) of CNR. The special invited speaker for this session was Professor Theodor W Hänsch (Nobel Prize in Physics, 2005), who gave a lecture entitled `What can we do with optical frequency combs?' In this special issue of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics, a selection of the most interesting

  20. The potassium channel: Structure, selectivity and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. W.; Bliznyuk, A.; Rendell, A. P.; Kuyucak, S.; Chung, S.-H.

    2000-05-01

    We employ the entire experimentally determined protein structure for the KcsA potassium channel from Streptomyces lividans in molecular dynamics calculations to observe hydrated channel protein structure, ion solvation, selectivity, multiple ion configurations, and diffusion. Free energy perturbation calculations display a significant ion discrimination of ˜9 kT in favor of the larger K+ ion. The protein forming the channel is very flexible yet is unable to fully solvate the Na+ ion because of its smaller size and large solvation energy. There is evidence that acidic and basic sidechains may dissociate in the presence of multiple K+ ions to explain experimental ion density maps. K+ diffusion is found to vary from approximately 10%-90% of bulk, supporting the high channel currents observed experimentally.

  1. Acne Treatment Based on Selective Photothermolysis of Sebaceous Follicles with Topically Delivered Light-Absorbing Gold Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Paithankar, Dilip Y; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Farinelli, William A; Kositratna, Garuna; Blomgren, Richard D; Meyer, Todd J; Faupel, Linda J; Kauvar, Arielle N B; Lloyd, Jenifer R; Cheung, Wang L; Owczarek, Witold D; Suwalska, Anna M; Kochanska, Katarzyna B; Nawrocka, Agnieszka K; Paluchowska, Elwira B; Podolec, Katarzyna M; Pirowska, Magdalena M; Wojas-Pelc, Anna B; Anderson, R Rox

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of acne vulgaris depends on active sebaceous glands, implying that selective destruction of sebaceous glands could be an effective treatment. We hypothesized that light-absorbing microparticles could be delivered into sebaceous glands, enabling local injury by optical pulses. A suspension of topically applied gold-coated silica microparticles exhibiting plasmon resonance with strong absorption at 800 nm was delivered into human pre-auricular and swine sebaceous glands in vivo, using mechanical vibration. After exposure to 10–50 J cm−2, 30 milliseconds, 800 nm diode laser pulses, microscopy revealed preferential thermal injury to sebaceous follicles and glands, consistent with predictions from a computational model. Inflammation was mild; gold particles were not retained in swine skin 1 month after treatment, and uptake in other organs was negligible. Two independent prospective randomized controlled clinical trials were performed for treatment of moderate-to-severe facial acne, using unblinded and blinded assessments of disease severity. Each trial showed clinically and statistically significant improvement of inflammatory acne following three treatments given 1–2 weeks apart. In Trial 2, inflammatory lesions were significantly reduced at 12 weeks (P=0.015) and 16 weeks (P=0.04) compared with sham treatments. Optical microparticles enable selective photothermolysis of sebaceous glands. This appears to be a well-tolerated, effective treatment for acne vulgaris. PMID:25748556

  2. Freshman Health Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovde, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This article examines a cluster of health topics that are frequently selected by students in lower division classes. Topics address issues relating to addictive substances, including alcohol and tobacco, eating disorders, obesity, and dieting. Analysis of the topics examines their interrelationships and organization in the reference literature.…

  3. Lexical and Syntactic Influences on Structural Selection in Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazer, Alexandra Kate

    2016-01-01

    We still know surprisingly little about how grammatical structures are selected for use in sentence production. A major debate concerns whether structural selection is competitive or noncompetitive. Competitive accounts propose that alternative structures or structural components actively suppress one another's activation until one option reaches…

  4. How selection structures species abundance distributions

    PubMed Central

    Magurran, Anne E.; Henderson, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    How do species divide resources to produce the characteristic species abundance distributions seen in nature? One way to resolve this problem is to examine how the biomass (or capacity) of the spatial guilds that combine to produce an abundance distribution is allocated among species. Here we argue that selection on body size varies across guilds occupying spatially distinct habitats. Using an exceptionally well-characterized estuarine fish community, we show that biomass is concentrated in large bodied species in guilds where habitat structure provides protection from predators, but not in those guilds associated with open habitats and where safety in numbers is a mechanism for reducing predation risk. We further demonstrate that while there is temporal turnover in the abundances and identities of species that comprise these guilds, guild rank order is conserved across our 30-year time series. These results demonstrate that ecological communities are not randomly assembled but can be decomposed into guilds where capacity is predictably allocated among species. PMID:22787020

  5. Effect of parental selection of healthy behavior topic during well child visit on plan to change childs eating or physical activity behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current recommendations direct pediatricians to address obesity and obesity prevention routinely during well child visits and to tailor their counseling, but clinicians may feel ineffective because of time constraints and lack of parent interest. To prompt parents to select a healthy lifestyle topic...

  6. The Structure of Scientific Arguments by Secondary Science Teachers: Comparison of Experimental and Historical Science Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Ron; Kang, Nam-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Just as scientific knowledge is constructed using distinct modes of inquiry (e.g. experimental or historical), arguments constructed during science instruction may vary depending on the mode of inquiry underlying the topic. The purpose of this study was to examine whether and how secondary science teachers construct scientific arguments during…

  7. Selective Mutism Questionnaire: Measurement Structure and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letamendi, Andrea M.; Chavira, Denise A.; Hitchcock, Carla A.; Roesch, Scott C.; Shipon-Blum, Elisa; Stein, Murray B.

    2008-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Selective Mutism Questionnaire (SMQ) are evaluated using a clinical sample of children with selective mutism (SM). The study shows that SMQ is useful in determining the severity of a child's nonspeaking behaviors, the scope of these behaviors and necessary follow up assessment.

  8. Selective induction of apoptosis in the hamster flank sebaceous gland organ by a topical liposome 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor: a treatment strategy for acne.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingna; Tang, Li; Baranov, Eugene; Yang, Meng; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Katsuoka, Kensei; Hoffman, Robert M

    2010-02-01

    Acne is a very widespread cosmesis problem. Isotretinoin, a synthetic oral retinoid is used to treat acne, which is androgen dependent. Numerous side-effects occur from this treatment. 5-alpha-Reductase plays a critical role in normal and pathological androgen-dependent processes. We have taken the approach to develop a selective, effective, topically-applied 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor to modify unwanted or pathological processes in the pilosebaceous unit such as acne. Toward this goal, we have previously developed a selective liposome hair follicle targeting system. We demonstrate in this report that the 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor N,N-diethyl-4-methyl-3-oxo-4-aza-5alpha-androstane-17beta-carboxamide (4-MA) incorporated into liposomes induces apoptosis and inhibits growth of the dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-dependent hamster flank organ sebaceous gland. We have compared topical application of liposome 4-MA and solvent-formulated 4-MA and observed selective efficacy of topical application of liposome 4-MA by the reduction of size and induction of apoptosis only in the treated hamster flank organ. Apoptosis induced by liposome 4-MA in the treated flank organ sebaceous gland cells was observed both by assays for DNA fragments (transferase deoxytidyl uridine end labeling) and by observation of condensed and fragmented nuclei. When 4-MA was topically applied formulated in ethanol and glycerol without liposomes, the selective efficacy was lost. Liposome 4-MA did not significantly affect prostate weight, testosterone/DHT ratios or bodyweight gain compared to controls indicating safety as well as efficacy of topical application of liposome 4-MA for pathological processes such as acne. PMID:20175850

  9. Selected NASA research in composite Materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Various aspects of the application of composite materials to aircraft structures are considered. Failure prediction techniques, buckling and postbuckling research, laminate fatigue analysis, damage tolerance, high temperature resin matrix composites and electrical hazards of carbon fiber composites are among the topics discussed.

  10. ["Replacement Methods to Animal Testing" as the incentive topic of the German Ministry of Education and Research. Selected results on biological drugs].

    PubMed

    Diekmann, W; Hansper, M

    2001-01-01

    Since 1980, BMBF, in co-operation with the appointed project representative BEO (Biology, Energy, Environment), supports research projects with the central goal of the reduction of animal testing. Beginning with the announcement about promoting "Projects in Replacement Methods to Animal Testing" in 1984, a separate incentive topic of research was fostered within the framework of the biotechnological program of the German Federal Government. It is being updated continuously by current reports. The BMBF incentive topic represents the largest and longest running support activity in the field world-wide. During a time-span of 20 years, about 14 million German Marks (approx. 7 millions per annum) were provided, supporting about 230 projects. To date, all applications judged favourably in regard to contributing to potential and substantial savings could also be funded. The incentive topic is being realised in accordance with the 3R principle, following Russel and Burch. Primary attention is given to tests with high levels of stress or involving large numbers of animals. At present, special attention is given to the development and validation of alternatives to animal testing which are required by law. Emphasis is also put on joint projects by testing and regulation authorities together with industrial users in order to broaden the application of these methods and to aid in accelerating the amendment of respective legal regulations. The BMBF continues to adhere to the objectives of the emphasised support and will furnish funding at the present level in the future. Also, together with representatives of testing- and regulating authorities, of industry, science, respective federal authorities and animal protection, the BMBF has developed a new concept to expand funded activities in the future to include animal testing in basic research in a target-fashioned structure. This will be published shortly through a new public announcement. As a complement to the present

  11. The Effect of African Culture on African American Students' Achievement on Selected Geometry Topics in the Elementary Mathematics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses-Snipes, Pamela R.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent studying topics in a cultural context affected African American students' achievement. Mathematics achievement was measured by a pre-assessment and post-assessment. The literature addresses the fact that all students can benefit from learning about culture and mathematics. Several…

  12. Glass science tutorial lecture {number_sign}6: The melting of silicate glasses, a review of selected topics

    SciTech Connect

    Swarts, E.L.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes a two-day lecture given at Westinghouse Hanford Company in March, 1995 and includes the data used in the presentation. Topics included the special needs of a low-level waste vitrification process, glass melting, mechanisms of the formation of foam, glass refining (bubble removal), and homogenization (reduction of chemical heterogeneity to acceptable levels). 96 refs.

  13. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Selected Environmental Topics for Use With Elementary and Junior High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Alan D., Ed.

    This guide contains learning activities in environmental education developed by teachers and intended for use at the elementary or junior high school levels. Topics covered include: water, esthetics, air, soil and sediment, solid waste, energy, noise, population, and transportation. Generally, each activity contains an introduction, a listing of…

  14. Structured variable selection with q-values

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When some of the regressors can act on both the response and other explanatory variables, the already challenging problem of selecting variables when the number of covariates exceeds the sample size becomes more difficult. A motivating example is a metabolic study in mice that has diet groups and gu...

  15. Structural Implications for Selective Targeting of PARPs.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Jamin D; Brody, Jonathan R; Armen, Roger S; Pascal, John M

    2013-12-20

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are a family of enzymes that use NAD(+) as a substrate to synthesize polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR) as post-translational modifications of proteins. PARPs have important cellular roles that include preserving genomic integrity, telomere maintenance, transcriptional regulation, and cell fate determination. The diverse biological roles of PARPs have made them attractive therapeutic targets, which have fueled the pursuit of small molecule PARP inhibitors. The design of PARP inhibitors has matured over the past several years resulting in several lead candidates in clinical trials. PARP inhibitors are mainly used in clinical trials to treat cancer, particularly as sensitizing agents in combination with traditional chemotherapy to reduce side effects. An exciting aspect of PARP inhibitors is that they are also used to selectivity kill tumors with deficiencies in DNA repair proteins (e.g., BRCA1/2) through an approach termed "synthetic lethality." In the midst of the tremendous efforts that have brought PARP inhibitors to the forefront of modern chemotherapy, most clinically used PARP inhibitors bind to conserved regions that permits cross-selectivity with other PARPs containing homologous catalytic domains. Thus, the differences between therapeutic effects and adverse effects stemming from pan-PARP inhibition compared to selective inhibition are not well understood. In this review, we discuss current literature that has found ways to gain selectivity for one PARP over another. We furthermore provide insights into targeting other domains that make up PARPs, and how new classes of drugs that target these domains could provide a high degree of selectivity by affecting specific cellular functions. A clear understanding of the inhibition profiles of PARP inhibitors will not only enhance our understanding of the biology of individual PARPs, but may provide improved therapeutic options for patients.

  16. Selection of Cooperation in Spatially Structured Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyunmo; Ghim, Cheol-Min

    The social dilemma games give rise to an emergence of cooperation in which altruistic individuals survive the natural selection at higher rate than random chance. We try to extend our understanding of this spatial reciprocity by including the impact of degree-degree correlation on the propensity toward prosocial behaviour in an otherwise well-mixed population. In a stochastic death-birth process with weak selection, we find that the disassortative degree mixing, or negative correlation between the degrees of neighbouring nodes significantly promotes the fixation of cooperators whereas the assortative mixing acts to suppress it. This is consistent with the fact that the spatial heterogeneity weakens the average tendency of a population to cooperate, which we describe in a unified scheme of the effective isothermality in coarse-grained networks. We also discuss the individual-level incentives that indirectly foster restructuring the social networks toward the more cooperative topologies.

  17. Structured variable selection with q-values

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Tanya P.; Müller, Samuel; Carroll, Raymond J.; Dunn, Tamara N.; Thomas, Anthony P.; Adams, Sean H.; Pillai, Suresh D.; Walzem, Rosemary L.

    2013-01-01

    When some of the regressors can act on both the response and other explanatory variables, the already challenging problem of selecting variables when the number of covariates exceeds the sample size becomes more difficult. A motivating example is a metabolic study in mice that has diet groups and gut microbial percentages that may affect changes in multiple phenotypes related to body weight regulation. The data have more variables than observations and diet is known to act directly on the phenotypes as well as on some or potentially all of the microbial percentages. Interest lies in determining which gut microflora influence the phenotypes while accounting for the direct relationship between diet and the other variables A new methodology for variable selection in this context is presented that links the concept of q-values from multiple hypothesis testing to the recently developed weighted Lasso. PMID:23580317

  18. Structured variable selection with q-values.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Tanya P; Müller, Samuel; Carroll, Raymond J; Dunn, Tamara N; Thomas, Anthony P; Adams, Sean H; Pillai, Suresh D; Walzem, Rosemary L

    2013-09-01

    When some of the regressors can act on both the response and other explanatory variables, the already challenging problem of selecting variables when the number of covariates exceeds the sample size becomes more difficult. A motivating example is a metabolic study in mice that has diet groups and gut microbial percentages that may affect changes in multiple phenotypes related to body weight regulation. The data have more variables than observations and diet is known to act directly on the phenotypes as well as on some or potentially all of the microbial percentages. Interest lies in determining which gut microflora influence the phenotypes while accounting for the direct relationship between diet and the other variables A new methodology for variable selection in this context is presented that links the concept of q-values from multiple hypothesis testing to the recently developed weighted Lasso. PMID:23580317

  19. A pilot study on the incidence of severe photosensitivity reactions leading to hospitalization linked to topical ketoprofen and other medications in selected European regions.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, Simone; Naldi, Luigi; Lecchi, Silvia; Kürzinger, Marie-Laure; Auclert, Laurent; Gori, Mario; Chosidow, Olivier; Hercogova, Jana

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of exposure to topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), particularly ketoprofen, in a convenience sample of the population, to obtain estimates of the incidence of severe photosensitivity leading to hospitalization, and to assess causative factors in three catchment areas: the Paris metropolitan area, the Lombardy region (Italy) and the Prague area. All cases of severe photosensitivity not explained by underlying conditions and admitted to hospitals in the selected areas were included in the study. Controls were patients consecutively admitted to hospitals, in the same areas, for an acute condition or for an elective procedure not suspected of being related to medication use. From October 2012 to September 2013, 920 controls were recruited (median age 44 years, 50.8% females); 8 severe photosensitivity cases were reported in the population aged 18-74 years of the 3 geographical areas during the 1-year surveillance period, corresponding to an incidence rate of 4.81 cases per 10 million person-years (95% confidence interval - CI, 2.07-9.48). Six controls reported 1-month exposure to topical ketoprofen, with an estimated prevalence of 0.65% (95% CI, 0.24-1.42). The population attributable risk for severe photosensitivity reactions linked to ketoprofen was 11.92% (95% CI, -0.12-52.99). This study was conducted in selected European areas and showed that the incidence of severe photosensitivity reactions leading to hospitalization as well as the exposure rate to topical ketoprofen were low. Among topical NSAIDs, topical ketoprofen was the leading cause of photosensitivity reactions but accounted for a limited number of hospitalized cases. Probably most of the relevant reactions were managed in the outpatient setting and a community based case-control study is advisable.

  20. Bexarotene Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may bathe, shower, or swim during your treatment with topical bexarotene, but you should use only a mild, ... your treatment. If you become pregnant during your treatment with topical bexarotene, call your doctor immediately.tell your doctor ...

  1. Structures and Functions of Selective Attention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.

    While neuropsychology relates the neural structures damaged in traumatic brain injury with their cognitive functions in daily life, this report reviews evidence that elementary operations of cognition as defined by cognitive studies are the level at which the brain localizes its computations. Orienting of visual attention is used as a model task.…

  2. Innovative point focus solar concentrator: Volume 4, Structural and foundation design; Phase 1 topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-03-07

    The design of the structure for the Innovative Concentrator (IC) is dictated by wind loading. As noted in Volume I of this report, wind loading has become a central issue in the LaJet Energy IC design in light of the results of the Colorado State University (CSU) wind tunnel testing on the LaJet Energy IC configuration. Also, gravity loads carried by the structure increase as larger beams are required by high wind loads. The LaJet Energy Company (LEC) concentrators, including the IC, have be characterized by low cost structures. The designs have been based upon open lattice, high section modulus geometries that are characteristically light weight. Fabrication methods have been conventional with the use of welded structural steel. It is suggested that the reviewer examine the major assembly drawings prior to referencing this volume of the report. A familiarity with the drawings is helpful in understanding the descriptions and printer plots herein. Most of the analysis was accomplished with the use of IMAGES3D a finite element structural analysis program. Considerable hand analyses of small components round out the analysis. The approach and results of the major analysis efforts will be the primary scope of this report. LaJet Energy`s experience with past designs, particularly the LEC 460, provided significant amounts of prior documented analysis to aid in the design of the IC.

  3. Preface to Special Topic: Invited Papers of the 3rd International Conference on Ultrafast Structural Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to visualize the real-time dynamics of atomic, magnetic, and electronic structure is widely recognized in many fields as a key element underpinning many important processes in chemistry, materials science, and biology. The need for an improved understanding of such processes becomes acute as energy conversion processes on fast time scales become increasingly relevant to problems in science and technology. This special issue, containing invited papers from participants at the 3rd International Conference on Ultrafast Structural Dynamics held June 10–12, 2015 in Zurich, Switzerland, discusses several recent developments in this area. PMID:27191008

  4. Preface to Special Topic: Invited Papers of the 3rd International Conference on Ultrafast Structural Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S L

    2016-03-01

    The ability to visualize the real-time dynamics of atomic, magnetic, and electronic structure is widely recognized in many fields as a key element underpinning many important processes in chemistry, materials science, and biology. The need for an improved understanding of such processes becomes acute as energy conversion processes on fast time scales become increasingly relevant to problems in science and technology. This special issue, containing invited papers from participants at the 3rd International Conference on Ultrafast Structural Dynamics held June 10-12, 2015 in Zurich, Switzerland, discusses several recent developments in this area. PMID:27191008

  5. Computer model for selecting flow measuring structures in open channels

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Quantifying various pollutants in natural waterways has received increased emphasis with more stringent regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (E.P.A.). Measuring natural stream fows presents a magnitude of problems, the most significant is the type of structure needed to measure the flows at the desired level of accuracy. A computer model designed to select a structure to best fit the engineer's needs is under development. This model, given the pertinent boundary conditions, will pinpoint the structure most suitable, if one exists. This selection process greatly facilitates the old selection process of trial and error.

  6. Students Fail to Transfer Knowledge of Chromosome Structure to Topics Pertaining to Cell Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Dina L.; Catavero, Christina M.; Wright, L. Kate

    2012-01-01

    Cellular processes that rely on knowledge of molecular behavior are difficult for students to comprehend. For example, thorough understanding of meiosis requires students to integrate several complex concepts related to chromosome structure and function. Using a grounded theory approach, we have unified classroom observations, assessment data, and…

  7. Structure activity relationships of selected naphthalene derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.W.; Dumont, J.N.; Sankey, F.D.; Schmoyer, R.L. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-two derivatives of naphthalene were assayed under an acute static regime with biological activity being monitored as population growth of Tetrahymena pyriformis. Activity varied over one log unit. Substituent constant structure-activity analyses revealed the model, log BR = 0.282Ha + 0.352..pi.. + 0.692F + 0.334/sup 1/X/sub sub//sup v/ - 0.326R + 0.027, to be best and to account for 85% of the variation in log BR (BR, biological response; Ha, hydrogen acceptance; ..pi.., hydrophobic substituent constant; F, polar electronic substituent constant, /sup 1/X/sub sub//sup v/, substituent molar connectivity index; R, resonance electronic substituent constant). The Ha and ..pi.. parameters are the most important, accounting for 71% of the log BR variability. 21 references, 1 figure, 7 tables.

  8. Selection process for trade study: Graphite Composite Primary Structure (GCPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This TA 2 document describes the selection process that will be used to identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 degree inclination. The most suitable unpressurized graphite composite structures and material selections is within this configuration and will be the prototype design for subsequent design and analysis and the basis for the design and fabrication of payload bay, wing, and thrust structure full scale test articles representing segments of the prototype structures. The selection process for this TA 2 trade study is the same as that for the TA 1 trade study. As the trade study progresses additional insight may result in modifications to the selection criteria within this process. Such modifications will result in an update of this document as appropriate.

  9. A Structured Interview for the Selection of Physician's Assistant Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niebuhr, Bruce R.; And Others

    To improve the reliability of selection interviews, the faculty of the University of Texas Medical Branch physician's assistant program developed a structured fourteen-category interview. The thirty-minute interview was used to select from 94 applicants; each applicant was interviewed three times and independently rated on a five-point scale of…

  10. Preparation and Characterization of Cyanocobalamin (Vit B12) Microemulsion Properties and Structure for Topical and Transdermal Application

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Anayatollah; Sharif Makhmal Zadeh, Behzad; Moghimipour, Eskandar

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): The objective of this study was to design a topical microemulsion of Vit B12 and to study the correlation between internal structure and physicochemical properties of the microemulsions. Microemulsions are thermodynamically stable mixtures of water, oil, surfactants and usually cosurfactants with several advantages for topical and transdermal drug delivery. The formulation of microemulsions for pharmaceutical use requires a clear understanding of the properties and microstructures of the microemulsions. Materials and Methods: In this study, phase behavior and microstructure of traditional and novel microemulsions of Vit B12 have been investigated by Small-angle X-ray (SAXS), differential scanning calorimetery (DSC) and measuring density, particle size, conductivity and surface tension. Results: WO and bicontinuous microemulsion with different microstructures were found in novel and traditional formulations. In this study, amount of water, surfactant concentration, oil/ surfactant ratio and physicochemical properties of cosurfactants influenced the microstructures. In both formulations, water behavior was affected by the concentration of the surfactant. Water Solubilization capacity and enthalpy of exothermic peak of interfacial and free water of traditional formulations were more than novel ones. This means that the affinity of water to interfacial film is dependent on the surfactant properties.   Conclusion: This study showed that both microemulsions provided good solubility of Vit B12 with a wide range of internal structure. Low water solubilization capacity is a common property of microemulsions that can affect drug release and permeability through the skin.  Based on Vit B12 properties, specially, intermediate oil and water solubility, better drug partitioning into the skin may be obtained by traditional formulations with wide range of structure and high amount of free and bounded water.     PMID:23997918

  11. Efinaconazole Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat fungal toenail infections (infections that may cause nail discoloration, splitting, or pain). Efinaconazole topical solution is ... antifungals. It works by stopping the growth of nail fungus.

  12. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Supermolecular liquid-crystalline structures in solutions of amphiphilic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedenov, A. A.; Levchenko, E. B.

    1983-09-01

    This paper reviews the physical properties of liquid-crystalline phases arising in solutions containing molecules of amphiphilic substances. The basic characteristics of micelle formation in dilute solutions, models of sphere-disk or sphere-cylinder structural transformations, as well as phase transitions related to the appearance of lyotropic mesophases in the system, including nematic, lamellar, hexagonal, and others, are examined. The results of experimental and theoretical investigation of "solvation" forces acting between micelles in the solvent, as well as recently studied models of swelling of lamellar phases are presented. The phenomena occurring near the inversion point of microemulsions in amphiphile-oil-water systems are examined briefly. The role of liquid-crystalline ordering in some biological systems is discussed.

  13. The use of plants in prospecting for gold: A brief overview with a selected bibliography and topic index

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erdman, J.A.; Olson, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The focal point of this report is a bibliography of 133 references and an associated topic index - both of which could be useful to geochemists attempting to locate new Au deposits. Fifty of these references originated in the Soviet Union, where most of the initial work on biogeochemical exploration for Au had been done. The 15 topics in the index range from agriculture (Au in crop plants) to silver. As an introduction to the bibliography, we have briefly described some examples of applications and difficulties in using plants. These examples are drawn from the literature and from field experience. Because of the generally low Au concentrations found in plants, the analysis of plant tissue is critical to the successful application of the biogeochemical method of prospecting. Neuron activation analysis is the most widely used method to detect Au in plants, due largely to its sensitivity; levels in the parts per billion range are easily attained. Two general types of sampling media are used in prospecting for Au: humus and living plants. Humus has been widely used in Canada, but the sampling of plants has increased there and elsewhere in recent years. Our use of douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) at a Au-bearing stockwork in Idaho is a prime example. A maximum Au concentration of 14 ??g/g (ppm) was detected in the wood ash of this coniferous tree, well above the normal concentration of ??? 0.15 ??g/g. Among shrubs that might be useful in Au prospecting, we recommend sagebrush or wormwood (genus Artemisia), because it is extremely responsive to concealed mineralization. It has been used extensively in the Soviet Union and could be used in areas of the western United States where disseminated Au occurrences might be located. Among the problems one may encounter in using plants for Au prospecting are: (1) physiological barriers, by which many plant species simply do not absorb Au at detectable levels; (2) misconceptions of soil-plant correlations; (3) localization of

  14. Penetration Enhancer-Containing Vesicles: Does the Penetration Enhancer Structure Affect Topical Drug Delivery?

    PubMed

    Caddeo, Carla; Manconi, Maria; Sinico, Chiara; Valenti, Donatella; Celia, Christian; Monduzzi, Maura; Fadda, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of the edge activator structure on the properties of novel deformable liposomes, Penetration Enhancer-containing Vesicles (PEVs), capable of delivering drugs to the skin. The PEVs were prepared by testing five different amphiphilic penetration enhancers as edge activators in the bilayer composition, together with soy phosphatidylcholine and oleic acid. The penetration enhancers contained the same lipophilic tail (one or more C8-C10 carbon chains) and different hydrophilic heads. Conventional phospholipid liposomes were prepared and used as a control. Lidocaine was chosen as a model drug. Liquid and gelified PEVs were obtained, depending on the penetration enhancer used. The vesicular systems were characterized by measuring size distribution, zeta potential, incorporation efficiency, and monitoring these parameters over 90 days. Accelerated ageing tests were also performed to check the stability of the dispersions. The effects of the different nature of the edge activator on the features of the obtained PEVs were assessed by TEM, SAXS and WAXS, rheological and deformability studies. Higher interactions of the most lipophilic penetration enhancers with the lipid bilayers and a consequent higher stability and elasticity of the obtained PEVs were observed. In vitro experiments through pig skin confirmed the superior potential as carriers for lidocaine of the PEVs prepared with the most lipophilic penetration enhancers, even in comparison with commercial EMLA cream.

  15. Selective reinforcement of wing structure for flutter prevention.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, P. A.; Stroud, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an analytical study are presented on the use of boron polyimide filamentary composite material for the purpose of increasing the flutter speed of a simple titanium full depth sandwich wing structure designed for strength. The results clearly demonstrate that selective reinforcement of wing surfaces, using judiciously placed filamentary composites, promises sizable mass savings in the design of advanced aircraft structures.

  16. Multi-Topic Tracking Model for dynamic social network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuhua; Liu, Changzheng; Zhao, Ming; Li, Ruixuan; Xiao, Hailing; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    The topic tracking problem has attracted much attention in the last decades. However, existing approaches rarely consider network structures and textual topics together. In this paper, we propose a novel statistical model based on dynamic bayesian network, namely Multi-Topic Tracking Model for Dynamic Social Network (MTTD). It takes influence phenomenon, selection phenomenon, document generative process and the evolution of textual topics into account. Specifically, in our MTTD model, Gibbs Random Field is defined to model the influence of historical status of users in the network and the interdependency between them in order to consider the influence phenomenon. To address the selection phenomenon, a stochastic block model is used to model the link generation process based on the users' interests to topics. Probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis (PLSA) is used to describe the document generative process according to the users' interests. Finally, the dependence on the historical topic status is also considered to ensure the continuity of the topic itself in topic evolution model. Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm is utilized to estimate parameters in the proposed MTTD model. Empirical experiments on real datasets show that the MTTD model performs better than Popular Event Tracking (PET) and Dynamic Topic Model (DTM) in generalization performance, topic interpretability performance, topic content evolution and topic popularity evolution performance.

  17. Selecting Earthquake Records for Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Mario E.

    2008-07-08

    An area in earthquake risk reduction that needs an urgent examination is the selection of earthquake records for nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures. An often-mentioned shortcoming from results of nonlinear dynamic analyses of structures is that these results are limited to the type of records that these analyses use as input data. This paper proposes a procedure for selecting earthquake records for nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures. This procedure uses a seismic damage index evaluated using the hysteretic energy dissipated by a Single Degree of Freedom System (SDOF) representing a multi-degree-of freedom structure responding to an earthquake record, and the plastic work capacity of the system at collapse. The type of structural system is considered using simple parameters. The proposed method is based on the evaluation of the damage index for a suite of earthquake records and a selected type of structural system. A set of 10 strong ground motion records is analyzed to show an application of the proposed procedure for selecting earthquake records for structural design.

  18. Inferring Selection Intensity and Allele Age from Multilocus Haplotype Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    It is a challenging task to infer selection intensity and allele age from population genetic data. Here we present a method that can efficiently estimate selection intensity and allele age from the multilocus haplotype structure in the vicinity of a segregating mutant under positive selection. We use a structured-coalescent approach to model the effect of directional selection on the gene genealogies of neutral markers linked to the selected mutant. The frequency trajectory of the selected allele follows the Wright-Fisher model. Given the position of the selected mutant, we propose a simplified multilocus haplotype model that can efficiently model the dynamics of the ancestral haplotypes under the joint influence of selection and recombination. This model approximates the ancestral genealogies of the sample, which reduces the number of states from an exponential function of the number of single-nucleotide polymorphism loci to a quadratic function. That allows parameter inference from data covering DNA regions as large as several hundred kilo-bases. Importance sampling algorithms are adopted to evaluate the probability of a sample by exploring the space of both allele frequency trajectories of the selected mutation and gene genealogies of the linked sites. We demonstrate by simulation that the method can accurately estimate selection intensity for moderate and strong positive selection. We apply the method to a data set of the G6PD gene in an African population and obtain an estimate of 0.0456 (95% confidence interval 0.0144−0.0769) for the selection intensity. The proposed method is novel in jointly modeling the multilocus haplotype pattern caused by recombination and mutation, allowing the analysis of haplotype data in recombining regions. Moreover, the method is applicable to data from populations under exponential growth and a variety of other demographic histories. PMID:23797107

  19. Tracking topic birth and death in LDA.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Andrew T.; Robinson, David Gerald

    2011-09-01

    Most topic modeling algorithms that address the evolution of documents over time use the same number of topics at all times. This obscures the common occurrence in the data where new subjects arise and old ones diminish or disappear entirely. We propose an algorithm to model the birth and death of topics within an LDA-like framework. The user selects an initial number of topics, after which new topics are created and retired without further supervision. Our approach also accommodates many of the acceleration and parallelization schemes developed in recent years for standard LDA. In recent years, topic modeling algorithms such as latent semantic analysis (LSA)[17], latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA)[10] and their descendants have offered a powerful way to explore and interrogate corpora far too large for any human to grasp without assistance. Using such algorithms we are able to search for similar documents, model and track the volume of topics over time, search for correlated topics or model them with a hierarchy. Most of these algorithms are intended for use with static corpora where the number of documents and the size of the vocabulary are known in advance. Moreover, almost all current topic modeling algorithms fix the number of topics as one of the input parameters and keep it fixed across the entire corpus. While this is appropriate for static corpora, it becomes a serious handicap when analyzing time-varying data sets where topics come and go as a matter of course. This is doubly true for online algorithms that may not have the option of revising earlier results in light of new data. To be sure, these algorithms will account for changing data one way or another, but without the ability to adapt to structural changes such as entirely new topics they may do so in counterintuitive ways.

  20. Seismic design technology for breeder reactor structures. Volume 2. Special topics in soil/structure interaction analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, D.P.

    1983-04-01

    This volume is divided into six chapters: definition of seismic input ground motion, review of state-of-the-art procedures, analysis guidelines, rock/structure interaction analysis example, comparison of two- and three-dimensional analyses, and comparison of analyses using FLUSH and TRI/SAC Codes. (DLC)

  1. Materials research at selected Japanese laboratories. Based on a 1992 visit: Overview, summary of highlights, notes on laboratories and topics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    I visited Japan from June 29 to August 1, 1992. The purpose of this visit was to assess the status of materials science research at selected governmental, university and industrial laboratories and to established acquaintances with Japanese researchers. The areas of research covered by these visits included ceramics, oxide superconductors, intermetallics alloys, superhard materials and diamond films, high-temperature materials and properties, mechanical properties, fracture, creep, fatigue, defects, materials for nuclear reactor applications and irradiation effects, high pressure synthesis, self-propagating high temperature synthesis, microanalysis, magnetic properties and magnetic facilities, and surface science.

  2. Structural basis of selective inhibition of human tankyrases.

    PubMed

    Narwal, Mohit; Venkannagari, Harikanth; Lehtiö, Lari

    2012-02-01

    Tankyrases are poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases that have many cellular functions. They play pharmaceutically important roles, at least in telomere homeostasis and Wnt signaling, by covalently ADP-ribosylating target proteins and consequently regulating their functions. These features make tankyrases potential targets for treatment of cancer. We report here crystal structures of human tankyrase 2 catalytic fragment in complex with a byproduct, nicotinamide, and with selective inhibitors of tankyrases (IWR-1) and PARPs 1 and 2 (olaparib). Binding of these inhibitors to tankyrase 2 induces specific conformational changes. The crystal structures explain the selectivity of the inhibitors, reveal the flexibility of a substrate binding loop, and explain existing structure-activity relationship data. The first crystal structure of a PARP enzyme in complex with a potent inhibitor, IWR-1, that does not bind to the widely utilized nicotinamide-binding site makes the structure valuable for development of PARP inhibitors in general. PMID:22233320

  3. Clindamycin Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... topical clindamycin.you should know that abrasive or medicated soaps and skin products that contain alcohol may ... in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from ...

  4. Fluorouracil Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by years of too much exposure to sunlight). Fluorouracil cream and topical solution are also used ... plan to avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to sunlight and UV light (such as tanning booths) and ...

  5. Mometasone Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Mometasone comes as a topical cream, ointment, and lotion. It usually is applied externally once a day. ... affected skin areas once daily.To apply the lotion, place a few drops on the affected areas ...

  6. Dapsone Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Dapsone topical is used to treat acne. Dapsone is in a class of medications called sulfone antibiotics. It works ... taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  7. Bimatoprost Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... much medication. Talk to your doctor about using topical bimatoprost if you are also using the eyedrops.tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking ...

  8. LIFE Materials: Topical Assessment Report for LIFE Volume 1 TOPIC: Solid First Wall and Structural Components TASK: Radiation Effects on First Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, A

    2008-11-26

    This report consists of the following chapters: CHAPTER A: LIFE Requirements for Materials. Part 1: The structure of the First Wall--Basic requirements; A qualitative view of the challenge; The candidate materials; and Base-line material's properties. CHAPTER B: Summary of Existing Knowledge--Brief historical introduction; Design window; The temperature window; Evolution of the design window with damage; Damage calculations; He and H production; Swelling resistance; Incubation dose for swelling; Design criterion No. 1, Strength; Design criterion No. 2, Corrosion resistance; Design criterion No. 3, Creep resistance; Design criterion No. 4, Radiation induced embrittlement; and Conclusions. CHAPTER C: Identification of Gaps in Knowledge & Vulnerabilities. CHAPTER D: Strategy and Future Work.

  9. Structural Features for Functional Selectivity at Serotonin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Chong; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Huang, Xi-Ping; Vardy, Eyal; McCorvy, John D.; Jiang, Yi; Chu, Meihua; Siu, Fai Yiu; Liu, Wei; Xu, H. Eric; Cherezov, Vadim; Roth, Bryan L.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Drugs active at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can differentially modulate either canonical or non-canonical signaling pathways via a phenomenon known as functional selectivity or biased signaling. We report biochemical studies that show that the hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), its precursor ergotamine (ERG) and related ergolines display strong functional selectivity for β-arrestin signaling at the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor 5-HT2B, while being relatively unbiased at the 5-HT1B receptor. To investigate the structural basis for biased signaling, we determined the crystal structure of the human 5-HT2B receptor bound to ERG, and compared it with the 5-HT1B/ERG structure. Given the relatively poor understanding of GPCR structure-function to date, insight into different GPCR signaling pathways are important to better understand both adverse and favorable therapeutic activities. PMID:23519215

  10. Task 2.6 - Catalyst for Utilization of Methane in Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx: Topical report, July 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) in flue gas or engine exhaust gas with hydrocarbons as the reductant has great potential for less expense, less pollution, and easier operation than SCR with ammonia. Methane is the preferred reducing gas because of its low cost and low toxicity. Stable, low-cost catalysts for SCR with methane are required to demonstrate this technology for controlling NO{sub x} emissions. Several cobalt and nickel catalysts on synthetic clay and uranium oxide supports were investigated for their activities in reducing NO{sub x} with methane in the presence of air. The efficiency of the synthetic clay-supported nickel and cobalt catalysts for nitric oxide (NO) reduction with methane as the reducing gas was poor. The nickel oxide-uranium oxide catalyst, which was chosen for its high stability, was also ineffective. Results from the two-step experiments conducted at two temperatures produced some interesting information on the reactions of methane with the catalysts and the reactivity of the carbonaceous intermediate. The carbonaceous material formed from methane dissociation at 450{degrees}C not only reduces NO to N{sub 2}O at lower temperatures, but also prevents oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. Unfortunately, the carbonaceous forms that reduce the NO are not available for reactions at 400{degrees}C in the presence of oxygen. A two-step process employing this chemistry would be difficult because the catalyst would have to be cycled between the two temperatures. Also the desired reduction to nitrogen is not very efficient.

  11. The frequency selectivity of double H-shaped metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Guozhong

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the design and numerical simulation of the double H-shaped metallic periodic structure based on finite difference time domain (FDTD) method in terahertz frequency range. The double H-shaped structure unit cell consists of two H structures overlapped in the same plane. Numerical simulation results show that the double H-shaped structure results in a distinct and strong transmission trap in 0.2~3.0THz range. The position and the full wave at half maximum (FWHM) of transmission trap are changed with different structure size. The surface current distribution of structure is numerical simulated, which clarifies the frequency selection mechanism of the transmission spectra.

  12. Refinement and Selection of Near-native Protein Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiong; Zhang, Jingfen; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong; Kosztin, Ioan

    2013-03-01

    In recent years in silico protein structure prediction reached a level where a variety of servers can generate large pools of near-native structures. However, the identification and further refinement of the best structures from the pool of decoys continue to be problematic. To address these issues, we have developed a selective refinement protocol (based on the Rosetta software package), and a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based ranking method (MDR). The refinement of the selected structures is done by employing Rosetta's relax mode, subject to certain constraints. The selection of the final best models is done with MDR by testing their relative stability against gradual heating during all atom MD simulations. We have implemented the selective refinement protocol and the MDR method in our fully automated server Mufold-MD. Assessments of the performance of the Mufold-MD server in the CASP10 competition and other tests will be presented. This work was supported by grants from NIH. Computer time was provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  13. Spotlight Topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A Spotlight Topic consists of a set of two or more review articles focused on a specific subject in surface science. The topics are recommended by the Board of Editors. A topic may be chosen because it is particularly new or fast-breaking, thus deserving introduction to the general readership. Or, it may be because a topic is especially controversial or confusing, requiring clarification by experts. Each review will give a critical assessment rather than an encyclopedic report. While our editors always will insist on fairness and accuracy, any review which forwards an opinion is bound to be somewhat subjective. Therefore, it is the editors' wish that the set of reviews written by different authors on the same subject matter will provide a broad and balanced viewpoint. It is often the case that an author who is an expert in a technique or method may be especially enthusiastic or critical about this technique or method. A companion review in the set may provide a different viewpoint. We are hopeful that the reader, after studying these reviews and checking some of the key references, will obtain an informed opinion of the subject. We think the set of reviews in a spotlight area will considerably shorten the ``learning time'' that a nonexpert would otherwise need to become knowledgeable about a subject. In this issue, we feature a spotlight topic on oxide surfaces. The set contains an overview article by Jacques Jupille, and four articles written by G. Pacchioni, F. Cosandey and T. E. Madey, B. G. Daniels, R. Lindsay and G. Thornton, and C. Noguera respectively. Of these, the article by Pacchioni has already appeared in SRL 7, 277 (2000). The other three articles appear in this issue. A reader who wishes to suggest a spotlight topic or recommend authors to write such reviews should contact the Editor-in-Chief. We would like to hear from you.

  14. Sexual networks: measuring sexual selection in structured, polyandrous populations.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Grant C; James, Richard; Krause, Jens; Pizzari, Tommaso

    2013-03-01

    Sexual selection is traditionally measured at the population level, assuming that populations lack structure. However, increasing evidence undermines this approach, indicating that intrasexual competition in natural populations often displays complex patterns of spatial and temporal structure. This complexity is due in part to the degree and mechanisms of polyandry within a population, which can influence the intensity and scale of both pre- and post-copulatory sexual competition. Attempts to measure selection at the local and global scale have been made through multi-level selection approaches. However, definitions of local scale are often based on physical proximity, providing a rather coarse measure of local competition, particularly in polyandrous populations where the local scale of pre- and post-copulatory competition may differ drastically from each other. These limitations can be solved by social network analysis, which allows us to define a unique sexual environment for each member of a population: 'local scale' competition, therefore, becomes an emergent property of a sexual network. Here, we first propose a novel quantitative approach to measure pre- and post-copulatory sexual selection, which integrates multi-level selection with information on local scale competition derived as an emergent property of networks of sexual interactions. We then use simple simulations to illustrate the ways in which polyandry can impact estimates of sexual selection. We show that for intermediate levels of polyandry, the proposed network-based approach provides substantially more accurate measures of sexual selection than the more traditional population-level approach. We argue that the increasing availability of fine-grained behavioural datasets provides exciting new opportunities to develop network approaches to study sexual selection in complex societies.

  15. Sexual networks: measuring sexual selection in structured, polyandrous populations

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Grant C.; James, Richard; Krause, Jens; Pizzari, Tommaso

    2013-01-01

    Sexual selection is traditionally measured at the population level, assuming that populations lack structure. However, increasing evidence undermines this approach, indicating that intrasexual competition in natural populations often displays complex patterns of spatial and temporal structure. This complexity is due in part to the degree and mechanisms of polyandry within a population, which can influence the intensity and scale of both pre- and post-copulatory sexual competition. Attempts to measure selection at the local and global scale have been made through multi-level selection approaches. However, definitions of local scale are often based on physical proximity, providing a rather coarse measure of local competition, particularly in polyandrous populations where the local scale of pre- and post-copulatory competition may differ drastically from each other. These limitations can be solved by social network analysis, which allows us to define a unique sexual environment for each member of a population: ‘local scale’ competition, therefore, becomes an emergent property of a sexual network. Here, we first propose a novel quantitative approach to measure pre- and post-copulatory sexual selection, which integrates multi-level selection with information on local scale competition derived as an emergent property of networks of sexual interactions. We then use simple simulations to illustrate the ways in which polyandry can impact estimates of sexual selection. We show that for intermediate levels of polyandry, the proposed network-based approach provides substantially more accurate measures of sexual selection than the more traditional population-level approach. We argue that the increasing availability of fine-grained behavioural datasets provides exciting new opportunities to develop network approaches to study sexual selection in complex societies. PMID:23339246

  16. Social dilemma structure hidden behind traffic flow with route selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Jun; Nakamura, Kousuke

    2016-10-01

    Several traffic flows contain social dilemma structures. Herein, we explored a route-selection problem using a cellular automaton simulation dovetailed with evolutionary game theory. In our model, two classes of driver-agents coexist: D agents (defective strategy), which refer to traffic information for route selection to move fast, and C agents (cooperative strategy), which are insensitive to information and less inclined to move fast. Although no evidence suggests that the social dilemma structure in low density causes vehicles to move freely and that in high density causes traffic jams, we found a structure that corresponds to an n-person (multiplayer) Chicken (n-Chicken) game if the provided traffic information is inappropriate. If appropriate traffic information is given to the agents, the n-Chicken game can be solved. The information delivered to vehicles is crucial for easing the social dilemma due to urban traffic congestion when developing technologies to support the intelligent transportation system (ITS).

  17. Item Selection, Evaluation, and Simple Structure in Personality Data

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Erik; Turkheimer, Eric

    2010-01-01

    We report an investigation of the genesis and interpretation of simple structure in personality data using two very different self-reported data sets. The first consists of a set of relatively unselected lexical descriptors, whereas the second is based on responses to a carefully constructed instrument. In both data sets, we explore the degree of simple structure by comparing factor solutions to solutions from simulated data constructed to have either strong or weak simple structure. The analysis demonstrates that there is little evidence of simple structure in the unselected items, and a moderate degree among the selected items. In both instruments, however, much of the simple structure that could be observed originated in a strong dimension of positive vs. negative evaluation. PMID:20694168

  18. Instant fabrication and selection of folded structures using drop impact

    PubMed Central

    Antkowiak, Arnaud; Audoly, Basile; Josserand, Christophe; Neukirch, Sébastien; Rivetti, Marco

    2011-01-01

    A drop impacting a target cutout in a thin polymer film is wrapped by the film in a dynamic sequence involving both capillary forces and inertia. Different 3D structures can be produced from a given target by slightly varying the impact parameters. A simplified model for a nonlinear dynamic Elastica coupled with a drop successfully explains this shape selection and yields detailed quantitative agreement with experiments. This first venture into the largely unexplored dynamics of elastocapillary assemblies opens up the perspective of mass production of 3D packages with individual shape selection. PMID:21670249

  19. Generating Topic Headings during Reading of Screen-Based Text Facilitates Learning of Structural Knowledge and Impairs Learning of Lower-Level Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Marker, Anthony W.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation considers the effects of learner-generated headings on memory. Participants (N = 63) completed a computer-based lesson with or without learner-generated text topic headings. Posttests included a cued recall test of factual knowledge and a sorting task measure of structural knowledge. A significant disordinal interaction was…

  20. Topicality and the Structure of Interactive Talk in Face-to-Face Seminar Discussions: Implications for Research in Distributed Learning Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Will; Hall, Andy; Callery, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the structure of topic movement within face-to-face postgraduate university seminar discussion forums through a conversation analytic approach. The analysis of 12 audio recordings of seminars showed that in spite of clear differences in the management style of sessions by seminar leaders there were important consistencies in…

  1. Topic-Prominence in Interlanguage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Judith W.; Gundel, Jeannette K.

    1987-01-01

    Investigates the role of topic-comment structure and the frequency of topic-prominence in the oral interlanguage of Chinese- Japanese-, Korean-, Arabic-, Farsi-, and Spanish-speaking adult students of English as a second language. Results indicate that second language learning is generally characterized by an early topic-comment stage, independent…

  2. Select topics in neurocritical care.

    PubMed

    Noto, Anthony; Marcolini, Evie

    2014-11-01

    Neurocritical care aims to improve outcomes in patients with life-threatening neurologic illness. The scope of neurocritical care extends beyond the more commonly encountered and important field of cerebrovascular disease, as described previously. This article focuses on neuromuscular, neuroinfectious, and neuroimmunologic conditions that are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in the acutely neurologically ill patient. As understanding continues to increase regarding the physiology of these conditions and the best treatment, rapid identification, triage, and treatment of these patients in the emergency department is paramount. PMID:25441043

  3. Selected topics in nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2013-06-10

    In this lectures after a brief introduction to stellar reaction rates and its implementation in nuclear networks, I discuss the nuclear physics aspects of core collapse supernova and explosive nucleosynthesis and their significance for the production of heavy elements by the rapid neutron capture process and potentially also by the recently discovered {nu}p process.

  4. Selected topics in gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, M.A.G.; Hernandez Galeana, A.

    1986-06-20

    Developments in gauge field theory in the past fourteen years are discussed. The canonical description of electroweak and strong interactions is described including the role played by QCD and QFD. The Salam-Weinberg theory of electroweak interactions is reviewed with emphasis on Higgs mass and renormalization group analysis. Implications of hyper-color theories are discussed. Composite models of quarks and leptons are considered including hyperfermions as part of a subquark multiplet. (AIP)

  5. Rapid, sensitive and selective HPLC-MS/MS method for the quantification of topically applied besifloxacin in rabbit plasma and ocular tissues: Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiao-Fei; Mao, Bai-Yang; Xia, Min; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Jia-Li; Yang, Da-Song; Wu, Wei-Xin; Du, Ying-Xiang; Di, Bin; Su, Meng-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Besifloxacin is a fourth-generation broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone registered for the topical treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis. In this study, a rapid, sensitive and selective liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for quantification of besifloxacin in rabbit plasma and ocular tissues using nateglinide as the internal standard (IS). The analyte and IS were separated on a Sepax GP-Phenyl column by isocratic elution with methanol-acetonitrile-5 mM ammonium formate-formic acid (29:55:16:0.1, v/v/v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.2 mL/min, and the total run time was 3.0 min. An electrospray ionization (ESI) source was applied and operated in the positive ion mode; multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used for quantification, and the monitored transitions were 394.2→377.1 for besifloxacin and m/z 318.3→166.1 for the IS. The calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.103-206 ng/mL for plasma and 2.06-2060 ng/mL for tears, aqueous humor, conjunctiva and cornea with correlation coefficient (r) greater than 0.99. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) for besifloxacin was 0.103 ng/mL for plasma and 2.06 ng/mL for other ocular tissues with good accuracy and precision. Intra- and inter-batch precision were both lower than 15% and accuracy ranged from 85% to 115% at all QC levels. The method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of besifloxacin in rabbit plasma and ocular tissues after single and multiple topical administrations. PMID:26340560

  6. Performance of structured lipids incorporating selected phenolic and ascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Gruczynska, Eliza; Przybylski, Roman; Aladedunye, Felix

    2015-04-15

    Conditions applied during frying require antioxidant which is stable at these conditions and provides protection for frying oil and fried food. Novel structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants were formed by enzymatic transesterification, exploring canola oil and naturally occurring antioxidants such as ascorbic and selected phenolic acids as substrates. Lipozyme RM IM lipase from Rhizomucor miehei was used as biocatalyst. Frying performance and oxidative stability of the final transesterification products were evaluated. The novel lipids showed significantly improved frying performance compared to canola oil. Oxidative stability assessment of the structured lipids showed significant improvement in resistance to oxidative deterioration compared to original canola oil. Interestingly, the presence of ascorbic acid in an acylglycerol structure protected α-tocopherol against thermal degradation, which was not observed for the phenolic acids. Developed structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants may directly affect nutritional properties of lipids also offering nutraceutical ingredients for food formulation.

  7. Structural basis for selective activation of ABA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Francis C.; Burgie, E. Sethe; Park, Sang-Youl; Jensen, Davin R.; Weiner, Joshua J.; Bingman, Craig A.; Chang, Chia-En A.; Cutler, Sean R.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-11-01

    Changing environmental conditions and lessening fresh water supplies have sparked intense interest in understanding and manipulating abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, which controls adaptive responses to drought and other abiotic stressors. We recently discovered a selective ABA agonist, pyrabactin, and used it to discover its primary target PYR1, the founding member of the PYR/PYL family of soluble ABA receptors. To understand pyrabactin's selectivity, we have taken a combined structural, chemical and genetic approach. We show that subtle differences between receptor binding pockets control ligand orientation between productive and nonproductive modes. Nonproductive binding occurs without gate closure and prevents receptor activation. Observations in solution show that these orientations are in rapid equilibrium that can be shifted by mutations to control maximal agonist activity. Our results provide a robust framework for the design of new agonists and reveal a new mechanism for agonist selectivity.

  8. Topical anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects.

  9. Topical anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects. PMID:26702198

  10. Computer Simulation of Sexual Selection on Age-Structured Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, S. G. F.; Penna, T. J. P.

    Using computer simulations of a bit-string model for age-structured populations, we found that sexual selection of older males is advantageous, from an evolutionary point of view. These results are in opposition to a recent proposal of females choosing younger males. Our simulations are based on findings from recent studies of polygynous bird species. Since secondary sex characters are found mostly in males, we could make use of asexual populations that can be implemented in a fast and efficient way.

  11. Structural foundations of optogenetics: Determinants of channelrhodopsin ion selectivity.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Andre; Lee, Soo Yeun; Wietek, Jonas; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Steinberg, Elizabeth E; Rashid, Asim J; Kim, Hoseok; Park, Sungmo; Santoro, Adam; Frankland, Paul W; Iyer, Shrivats M; Pak, Sally; Ährlund-Richter, Sofie; Delp, Scott L; Malenka, Robert C; Josselyn, Sheena A; Carlén, Marie; Hegemann, Peter; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-26

    The structure-guided design of chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins has illuminated mechanisms underlying ion selectivity of this remarkable family of light-activated ion channels. The first generation of chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins, guided in part by development of a structure-informed electrostatic model for pore selectivity, included both the introduction of amino acids with positively charged side chains into the ion conduction pathway and the removal of residues hypothesized to support negatively charged binding sites for cations. Engineered channels indeed became chloride selective, reversing near -65 mV and enabling a new kind of optogenetic inhibition; however, these first-generation chloride-conducting channels displayed small photocurrents and were not tested for optogenetic inhibition of behavior. Here we report the validation and further development of the channelrhodopsin pore model via crystal structure-guided engineering of next-generation light-activated chloride channels (iC++) and a bistable variant (SwiChR++) with net photocurrents increased more than 15-fold under physiological conditions, reversal potential further decreased by another ∼ 15 mV, inhibition of spiking faithfully tracking chloride gradients and intrinsic cell properties, strong expression in vivo, and the initial microbial opsin channel-inhibitor-based control of freely moving behavior. We further show that inhibition by light-gated chloride channels is mediated mainly by shunting effects, which exert optogenetic control much more efficiently than the hyperpolarization induced by light-activated chloride pumps. The design and functional features of these next-generation chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins provide both chronic and acute timescale tools for reversible optogenetic inhibition, confirm fundamental predictions of the ion selectivity model, and further elucidate electrostatic and steric structure-function relationships of the light-gated pore.

  12. Topical Research: Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Karen

    This lesson plan can be used in social studies, language arts, or library research. The instructional objective is for students to select a topic of study relating to Africa, write a thesis statement, collect information from media sources, and develop a conclusion. The teacher may assign the lesson for written or oral evaluation. The teacher…

  13. Structural selection of ionic-complementary peptides with electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jian; Qin, Meng; Wang, Wei

    2010-09-01

    The structures of the peptides and their assembly are largely modulated by the environment. To discover the physical principles governing the structural modulations of peptides by the environment would be useful for many applications. As the typical examples, the structures of three kinds of ionic-complementary EAK16-family peptides under various environmental conditions are studied with simulations in this work. A model with intermediate resolution is used, in which both the backbone hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions are explicitly considered. The thermodynamics of these peptides (including the free energy and heat capacity) are described for various strengths of the electrostatic interactions which reflect the variation of environment. With these results, the phase diagrams of these peptides related to the temperature and the strength of electrostatic interactions are presented and compared. Based on the differences in the phase structures of the peptide, the different aggregation behaviors are explained based on the monomeric structural features of the peptides. Through the analysis on the stability of various secondary structures of these peptides, it is demonstrated that the charge pattern is the basic reason of the different responses of the EAK16-family peptides to the environmental changes. These results provide some examples and insights for the principles of structural selection by environment and may be helpful for further analysis and designs of peptide systems. PMID:21230118

  14. Quantification of Structural Isomers via Mode-Selective Irmpd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polfer, Nicolas C.

    2016-06-01

    Mixtures of structural isomers can pose a challenge for vibrational ion spectroscopy. In cases where particular structures display diagnostic vibrations, these structures can be selectively "burned away". In ion traps, the ion population can be subjected to multiple laser shots, in order to fully deplete a particular structure, in effect allowing a quantification of this structure. Protonated para-amino benzoic acid (PABA) serves as an illustrative example. PABA is known to preferentially exist in the N-protonated (N-prot) form in solution, but in the gas phase it is energetically favorable in the O-protonated (O-prot) form. As shown in Figure 1, the N-prot structure can be kinetically trapped in the gas phase when sprayed from non-protic solvent, whereas the O-prot structure is obtained when sprayed from protic solvents, analogous to results by others [1,2]. y parking the light source on the diagnostic 3440 wn mode, the percentage of the O-prot structure can be determined, and by default the remainder is assumed to adopt the N-prot structure. It will be shown that the relative percentages of O-prot vs N-prot are highly dependent on the solvent mixture, going from close to 0% O-prot in non-protic solvents, to 99% in protic solvents. Surprisingly, water behaves much more like a non-protic solvent than methanol. It is observed that the capillary temperature, which aids droplet desolvation by black-body radiation in the ESI source, is critical to promote the appearance of O-prot structures. These results are consistent with the picture that a protic bridge mechanism is at play to facilitate proton transfer, and thus allow conversion from N-prot to O-prot, but that this mechanism is subject to appreciable kinetic barriers on the timescale of solvent evaporation. 1. J. Phys. Chem. A 2011, 115, 7625. 2. Anal. Chem. 2012, 84, 7857.

  15. Structural foundations of optogenetics: Determinants of channelrhodopsin ion selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Andre; Lee, Soo Yeun; Wietek, Jonas; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Steinberg, Elizabeth E.; Rashid, Asim J.; Kim, Hoseok; Park, Sungmo; Santoro, Adam; Frankland, Paul W.; Iyer, Shrivats M.; Pak, Sally; Ährlund-Richter, Sofie; Delp, Scott L.; Malenka, Robert C.; Josselyn, Sheena A.; Carlén, Marie; Hegemann, Peter; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The structure-guided design of chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins has illuminated mechanisms underlying ion selectivity of this remarkable family of light-activated ion channels. The first generation of chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins, guided in part by development of a structure-informed electrostatic model for pore selectivity, included both the introduction of amino acids with positively charged side chains into the ion conduction pathway and the removal of residues hypothesized to support negatively charged binding sites for cations. Engineered channels indeed became chloride selective, reversing near −65 mV and enabling a new kind of optogenetic inhibition; however, these first-generation chloride-conducting channels displayed small photocurrents and were not tested for optogenetic inhibition of behavior. Here we report the validation and further development of the channelrhodopsin pore model via crystal structure-guided engineering of next-generation light-activated chloride channels (iC++) and a bistable variant (SwiChR++) with net photocurrents increased more than 15-fold under physiological conditions, reversal potential further decreased by another ∼15 mV, inhibition of spiking faithfully tracking chloride gradients and intrinsic cell properties, strong expression in vivo, and the initial microbial opsin channel-inhibitor–based control of freely moving behavior. We further show that inhibition by light-gated chloride channels is mediated mainly by shunting effects, which exert optogenetic control much more efficiently than the hyperpolarization induced by light-activated chloride pumps. The design and functional features of these next-generation chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins provide both chronic and acute timescale tools for reversible optogenetic inhibition, confirm fundamental predictions of the ion selectivity model, and further elucidate electrostatic and steric structure–function relationships of the light-gated pore. PMID

  16. Topical Steroids.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Gretchen M; Harvey, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is an inflammatory condition with heterogeneous pathophysiology. A cornerstone of the management of this condition is the use of anti-inflammatory agents. Corticosteroids are very effective and the most commonly used, but other drugs with immunodulatory activity such as anti-IL5, doxycycline (Th2), and macrolides (anti-neutrophilic/IL8) have been shown to have efficacy. Although systemic corticosteroids have shown benefit in managing this condition, the frequency of use often required in this condition is associated with significant adverse effects. Topical corticosteroids, particularly when utilized after endoscopic sinus surgery and delivered in a high volume, high pressure manner, provide the desired anti-inflammatory effects with nearly negligible systemic absorption. Studies assessing the long-term use of second generation topical corticosteroids have demonstrated no significant effects on cortisol levels, growth rate, intraocular pressures or lens opacification, or local mucosal atrophy. Patients who often respond most favorably to corticosteroid treatment are those with a Th2-mediated, highly eosinophilic CRSwNP. However, there is a subset of patients who are steroid resistant. In the case of a predominantly neutrophilic CRSwNP, it is important to be aware that patients may respond well to the use of macrolide therapy. Additionally, the use of verapamil has shown promise in increasing steroid responsiveness in a difficult to treat group of patients with steroid resistance. Topical corticosteroids play a key role in the long term management of this complicated inflammatory condition by providing the much needed pharmacologic local control with minimal systemic adverse effects. PMID:27466854

  17. Topics, methods and challenges in health promotion for people with intellectual disabilities: a structured review of literature.

    PubMed

    Naaldenberg, Jenneken; Kuijken, Noortje; van Dooren, Kate; van Schrojenstein Lantman de Valk, Henny

    2013-12-01

    People with intellectual disabilities (ID) experience substantial health inequities compared, with the general population. Many secondary conditions and lifestyle related health problems could be, prevented with adequate health promotion. The aim of this structured review is to provide insight into, the main characteristics of published health promotion intervention studies for people with ID and, in, doing so, to identify best practice and knowledge gaps. Relevant studies were identified through a, structured literature search of multiple electronic databases (PubMed, CINHAS, Scopus, PsychINFO), the search strategy covered health promotion and intellectual disabilities for available papers, published between February 2002 and 2012. In total, 25 studies were included and analyzed. Overall, studies were diverse and explored a variety of health issues. Papers included a variety of participants (in relation to level of disability) and intervention approaches. With regard to quality, many studies, failed to report how they recruited their participants, and there were substantial challenges identified, by authors in relation to recruitment, implementation of interventions, and the selection of outcome, measures used as well as the usability of measures themselves. Our findings suggest that this field, experiences methodological weaknesses and inconsistencies that make it difficult to compare and, contrast results. Theoretically driven studies that take into account the views and expectations of, participants themselves are needed, as is research that investigates the reliability and validity of, outcome measures for the ID population. Collaboration with mainstream health promotion research is, critical.

  18. Composite Payload Fairing Structural Architecture Assessment and Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivanek, Thomas M.; Yount, Bryan C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the structural architecture assessments conducted and a recommendation for an affordable high performance composite structural concept to use on the next generation heavy-lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch System (SLS). The Structural Concepts Element of the Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) project and its follow on the Lightweight Spacecraft Structures and Materials (LSSM) project was tasked with evaluating a number of composite construction technologies for specific Ares V components: the Payload Shroud, the Interstage, and the Core Stage Intertank. Team studies strived to address the structural challenges, risks and needs for each of these vehicle components. Leveraging off of this work, the subsequent Composites for Exploration (CoEx) effort is focused on providing a composite structural concept to support the Payload Fairing for SLS. This paper documents the evaluation and down selection of composite construction technologies and evolution to the SLS Payload Fairing. Development of the evaluation criteria (also referred to as Figures of Merit or FOMs), their relative importance, and association to vehicle requirements are presented. A summary of the evaluation results, and a recommendation of the composite concept to baseline in the Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project is presented. The recommendation for the SLS Fairing is a Honeycomb Sandwich architecture based primarily on affordability and performance with two promising alternatives, Hat stiffened and Fiber Reinforced Foam (FRF) identified for eventual program block upgrade.

  19. Exploration of Nanotube Structure Selectivity Using Bimetallic Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefferle, Lisa

    2007-10-01

    Achieving selectivity for nanotube chirality is one of the holy grails for single-walled carbon nanotube research. One approach we are following is based on the ability to engineer the size and state of the initiating metal particle to constrain the type of cap formed. The chirality/structure of a nanotube is controlled by carbon cap formation on the metal particle during the nucleation step. It has been proposed that varying the carbon-metal catalyst binding energy could help lead to structure selectivity. One reason theoretically proposed for the favoring of armchair nanotubes, for example, is the proximity of low energy binding locations for two carbon atoms. Thus blocking sites or perturbing the binding energy on adjacent sites could in theory affect the structure of the carbon cap formed in the nucleation step. Our goal is to demonstrate structure selectivity in the growth of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) using a bimetallic catalyst. The catalyst used was a bimetallic CoCr-MCM 41 and the effect of different molecular ratios between the two metals on the SWNT diameter distribution was studied. We have found that by adding Cr to the Co-MCM 41 monometallic catalyst the diameter distribution shifted in a systematic manner correlated to the development of a bimetallic phase as characterized by X-Ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). We have also found that the shift is accompanied by suppression of metallic SWNT, particularly those with diameter over 0.9 nm. We are also currently exploring the possibility of a further narrowing of the distribution by lowering the reaction temperatures.

  20. The Selective Mutism Questionnaire: Measurement Structure and Validity

    PubMed Central

    Letamendi, Andrea M.; Chavira, Denise A.; Hitchcock, Carla A.; Roesch, Scott C.; Shipon-Blum, Elisa; Stein, Murray B.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the 17-item Selective Mutism Questionnaire. Method Diagnostic interviews were administered via telephone to 102 parents of children identified with selective mutism (SM) and 43 parents of children without SM from varying U.S. geographic regions. Children were between the ages of 3 and 11 inclusive and comprised 58% girls and 42% boys. SM diagnoses were determined using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children - Parent Version (ADIS-C/P); SM severity was assessed using the 17-item Selective Mutism Questionnaire (SMQ); and behavioral and affective symptoms were assessed using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted to investigate the dimensionality of the SMQ and a modified parallel analysis procedure was used to confirm EFA results. Internal consistency, construct validity, and incremental validity were also examined. Results The EFA yielded a 13-item solution consisting of three factors: a) Social Situations Outside of School, b) School Situations, and c) Home and Family Situations. Internal consistency of SMQ factors and total scale ranged from moderate to high. Convergent and incremental validity were also well supported. Conclusions Measure structure findings are consistent with the 3-factor solution found in a previous psychometric evaluation of the SMQ. Results also suggest that the SMQ provides useful and unique information in the prediction of SM phenomenon beyond other child anxiety measures. PMID:18698268

  1. Structural principles of nucleoside selectivity in a 2'-deoxyguanosine riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Pikovskaya, Olga; Polonskaia, Anna; Patel, Dinshaw J; Serganov, Alexander

    2011-10-01

    Purine riboswitches have an essential role in genetic regulation of bacterial metabolism. This family includes the 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) riboswitch, which is involved in feedback control of deoxyguanosine biosynthesis. To understand the principles that define dG selectivity, we determined crystal structures of the natural Mesoplasma florum riboswitch bound to cognate dG as well as to noncognate guanosine, deoxyguanosine monophosphate and guanosine monophosphate. Comparison with related purine riboswitch structures reveals that the dG riboswitch achieves its specificity through modification of key interactions involving the nucleobase and rearrangement of the ligand-binding pocket to accommodate the additional sugar moiety. In addition, we observe new conformational changes beyond the junctional binding pocket extending as far as peripheral loop-loop interactions. It appears that re-engineering riboswitch scaffolds will require consideration of selectivity features dispersed throughout the riboswitch tertiary fold, and structure-guided drug design efforts targeted to junctional RNA scaffolds need to be addressed within such an expanded framework. PMID:21841796

  2. Structure coefficients and strategy selection in multiplayer games.

    PubMed

    McAvoy, Alex; Hauert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary processes based on two-player games such as the Prisoner's Dilemma or Snowdrift Game are abundant in evolutionary game theory. These processes, including those based on games with more than two strategies, have been studied extensively under the assumption that selection is weak. However, games involving more than two players have not received the same level of attention. To address this issue, and to relate two-player games to multiplayer games, we introduce a notion of reducibility for multiplayer games that captures what it means to break down a multiplayer game into a sequence of interactions with fewer players. We discuss the role of reducibility in structured populations, and we give examples of games that are irreducible in any population structure. Since the known conditions for strategy selection, otherwise known as [Formula: see text]-rules, have been established only for two-player games with multiple strategies and for multiplayer games with two strategies, we extend these rules to multiplayer games with many strategies to account for irreducible games that cannot be reduced to those simpler types of games. In particular, we show that the number of structure coefficients required for a symmetric game with [Formula: see text]-player interactions and [Formula: see text] strategies grows in [Formula: see text] like [Formula: see text]. Our results also cover a type of ecologically asymmetric game based on payoff values that are derived not only from the strategies of the players, but also from their spatial positions within the population.

  3. Widespread purifying selection on RNA structure in mammals.

    PubMed

    Smith, Martin A; Gesell, Tanja; Stadler, Peter F; Mattick, John S

    2013-09-01

    Evolutionarily conserved RNA secondary structures are a robust indicator of purifying selection and, consequently, molecular function. Evaluating their genome-wide occurrence through comparative genomics has consistently been plagued by high false-positive rates and divergent predictions. We present a novel benchmarking pipeline aimed at calibrating the precision of genome-wide scans for consensus RNA structure prediction. The benchmarking data obtained from two refined structure prediction algorithms, RNAz and SISSIz, were then analyzed to fine-tune the parameters of an optimized workflow for genomic sliding window screens. When applied to consistency-based multiple genome alignments of 35 mammals, our approach confidently identifies >4 million evolutionarily constrained RNA structures using a conservative sensitivity threshold that entails historically low false discovery rates for such analyses (5-22%). These predictions comprise 13.6% of the human genome, 88% of which fall outside any known sequence-constrained element, suggesting that a large proportion of the mammalian genome is functional. As an example, our findings identify both known and novel conserved RNA structure motifs in the long noncoding RNA MALAT1. This study provides an extensive set of functional transcriptomic annotations that will assist researchers in uncovering the precise mechanisms underlying the developmental ontologies of higher eukaryotes.

  4. Widespread purifying selection on RNA structure in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Martin A.; Gesell, Tanja; Stadler, Peter F.; Mattick, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionarily conserved RNA secondary structures are a robust indicator of purifying selection and, consequently, molecular function. Evaluating their genome-wide occurrence through comparative genomics has consistently been plagued by high false-positive rates and divergent predictions. We present a novel benchmarking pipeline aimed at calibrating the precision of genome-wide scans for consensus RNA structure prediction. The benchmarking data obtained from two refined structure prediction algorithms, RNAz and SISSIz, were then analyzed to fine-tune the parameters of an optimized workflow for genomic sliding window screens. When applied to consistency-based multiple genome alignments of 35 mammals, our approach confidently identifies >4 million evolutionarily constrained RNA structures using a conservative sensitivity threshold that entails historically low false discovery rates for such analyses (5–22%). These predictions comprise 13.6% of the human genome, 88% of which fall outside any known sequence-constrained element, suggesting that a large proportion of the mammalian genome is functional. As an example, our findings identify both known and novel conserved RNA structure motifs in the long noncoding RNA MALAT1. This study provides an extensive set of functional transcriptomic annotations that will assist researchers in uncovering the precise mechanisms underlying the developmental ontologies of higher eukaryotes. PMID:23847102

  5. Identifying Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Research in Selected Journals Published from 2003 to 2012: A Content Analysis of Research Topics and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Lanqin; Huang, Ronghuai; Yu, Junhui

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to identity the emerging research trends in the field of computed-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) so as to provide insights for researchers and educators into research topics and issues for further exploration. This paper analyzed the research topics, methods and technology adoption of CSCL from 2003 to 2012. A total of 706…

  6. Transmission properties of frequency selective structures with air gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Li-Feng; Lü, Ming-Yun; Wu, Zhe

    2010-12-01

    The transmission properties of compound frequency selective structures with dielectric slab and air gaps were investigated by computation and experimentation. Mechanism analyses were also carried out. Results show that the air gaps have a distinct influence on the transmission properties. Resonant frequency of the structure would increase rapidly when the air gap appears. After the gap gets larger to a specific value, generally 1/5 wavelength corresponding to the resonant frequency, the transmission properties would change periodically with the gap thickness. The change of transmission properties in one period has a close relationship with the dielectric thickness. These results provide a new method for designing a bandpass radome of large incidence angle and low loss with the concept of stealth shield radome.

  7. Composite Interstage Structural Concept Down Select Process and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Thoma, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composites Technologies (ACT) project evaluated several composite construction options for the Ares V Interstage to support the Constellation Program's goal of reducing the mass of vehicle dry structures. In Phase 1 of the project, eight candidate construction concepts were evaluated for the Ares V Interstage design. Trade studies were performed using finite element analyses to determine weight estimates for the construction concepts. An evaluation process was then used to down select the construction concepts down to two concepts for further consideration in Phase 2 of the project. In Phase 2 of the project, additional trade studies were performed using detailed finite element analyses of the Interstage and a final down select process was used to choose the recommended Interstage construction concept. The results of the study showed that a honeycomb sandwich design was the most favorable Interstage construction concept based on advantages in manufacturing cost. Details of the Phase 1 and Phase 2 trade studies and down select process with final results are presented in the paper.

  8. Development and characterization of two nano-structured systems for topical application of flavanones isolated from Eysenhardtia platycarpa.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Villegas, Valeri; Clares-Naveros, Beatriz; García-López, María Luisa; Calpena-Campmany, Ana Cristina; Bustos-Zagal, Paola; Garduño-Ramírez, Maria Luisa

    2014-04-01

    Many of the inflammatory diseases are becoming common in ageing society throughout the world. The clinically used anti-inflammatory drugs suffer from the disadvantage of side effects. Alternative to these drugs are natural products, since ancient times traditional medicines are being used for the treatment of inflammation. In the present study, four flavanones isolated from Eysenhardtia platycarpa leaves with a potent pharmacological activity were formulated in effective drug delivery systems: nanoemulsion and polymeric nanoparticles for topical use as novel anti-inflammatory topical formulations. Nanoemulsion system exhibited droplet sizes less than 70 nm and polymeric nanoparticles with a size of 156-202 nm possessed zeta potential values less than -25 mV that provided good stability and obtained high entrapment efficiency (78-90%). In vitro release and ex vivo permeation studies were performed on Franz-type diffusion cells and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), all formulations showed steady state release profiles over time and steady increase of flavanones in the skin permeation test. The anti-inflammatory activity, tested by TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate), induced oedema in mice ear suggesting that prenylated flavanones improve significantly their anti-inflammatory activity when are vehiculized in nanosized systems. Our results suggested that 5-hydroxy-7-methoxy-6-prenyl flavanone loaded nanoemulsion and polymeric nanoparticle could be proposed as potential topical anti-inflammatory formulations with the best properties for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:24463153

  9. Flexibility of inorganic tennis ball structures inducing anion selectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Park, Jung Su; Kang, Tae Yi; Oh, Kyungeun; Seo, Mi-Sook; Sohn, Youn Soo; Jun, Moo-Jin; Nam, Wonwoo; Kim, Kwan Mook

    2006-09-18

    Inorganic tennis balls (ITBs), [[{Pt(betmp)(dach)}(2)Cu](2)(X)][X](3) (in which X=ClO(4) (-) (3), NO(3) (-) (4), Cl(-) (5) and Br(-) (6); dach=trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane and betmp=bisethylthiomethylidenepropanedioate) and [[{Pt(dteym)(dach)}(2)Cu](2)(PF(6))][PF(6)](3) (7; dteym=1,3-dithiepane-2-ylidenemalonate), were prepared as crystals. Investigation of their X-ray crystal structures revealed that shapes of the cavities in ITBs show significant distortions that depend on the properties of the encapsulated anions. The CuCu* distance was observed to be longest in 7 and shortest in 5, the difference between them being 2.05 A. The flexibility of cavity structures of ITBs makes it possible to encapsulate various anions inside the cavity, while their distortions may be a reason for the difference in the encapsulating ability for anions, that is, anion selectivity. Especially, the distortions observed in 7 are so severe that the encapsulating ability of the cavity for PF(6) (-) is very low compared to other anions. The shapes of ITBs with ClO(4) (-) and BF(4) (-) ions inside their cavities are very similar; however, ClO(4) (-) is encapsulated by the cavity better than BF(4) (-), which is explicable by the difference of metal-anion interactions. This structural study on ITBs gives a clue to the origin of the anion selectivity of the cavity in ITBs previously investigated by (19)F NMR spectroscopy of the ITBs in methanol.

  10. Flexibility of inorganic tennis ball structures inducing anion selectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Park, Jung Su; Kang, Tae Yi; Oh, Kyungeun; Seo, Mi-Sook; Sohn, Youn Soo; Jun, Moo-Jin; Nam, Wonwoo; Kim, Kwan Mook

    2006-09-18

    Inorganic tennis balls (ITBs), [[{Pt(betmp)(dach)}(2)Cu](2)(X)][X](3) (in which X=ClO(4) (-) (3), NO(3) (-) (4), Cl(-) (5) and Br(-) (6); dach=trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane and betmp=bisethylthiomethylidenepropanedioate) and [[{Pt(dteym)(dach)}(2)Cu](2)(PF(6))][PF(6)](3) (7; dteym=1,3-dithiepane-2-ylidenemalonate), were prepared as crystals. Investigation of their X-ray crystal structures revealed that shapes of the cavities in ITBs show significant distortions that depend on the properties of the encapsulated anions. The CuCu* distance was observed to be longest in 7 and shortest in 5, the difference between them being 2.05 A. The flexibility of cavity structures of ITBs makes it possible to encapsulate various anions inside the cavity, while their distortions may be a reason for the difference in the encapsulating ability for anions, that is, anion selectivity. Especially, the distortions observed in 7 are so severe that the encapsulating ability of the cavity for PF(6) (-) is very low compared to other anions. The shapes of ITBs with ClO(4) (-) and BF(4) (-) ions inside their cavities are very similar; however, ClO(4) (-) is encapsulated by the cavity better than BF(4) (-), which is explicable by the difference of metal-anion interactions. This structural study on ITBs gives a clue to the origin of the anion selectivity of the cavity in ITBs previously investigated by (19)F NMR spectroscopy of the ITBs in methanol. PMID:16800019

  11. Protein Structure Refinement through Structure Selection and Averaging from Molecular Dynamics Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Mirjalili, Vahid; Feig, Michael

    2013-02-12

    A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based protocol for structure refinement of template-based model predictions is described. The protocol involves the application of restraints, ensemble averaging of selected subsets, interpolation between initial and refined structures, and assessment of refinement success. It is found that sub-microsecond MD-based sampling when combined with ensemble averaging can produce moderate but consistent refinement for most systems in the CASP targets considered here.

  12. The age structure of selected countries in the ESCAP region.

    PubMed

    Hong, S

    1982-01-01

    The study objective was to examine the age structure of selected countries in the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) region, using available data and frequently applied indices such as the population pyramid, aged-child ratio, and median age. Based on the overall picture of the age structure thus obtained, age trends and their implication for the near future were arrived at. Countries are grouped into 4 types based on the fertility and mortality levels. Except for Japan, Hong Kong, and Singapore, the age structure in the 18 ESCAP region countries changed comparatively little over the 1950-80 period. The largest structural change occurred in Singapore, where the proportion of children under age 15 in the population declined significantly from 41-27%, while that of persons 65 years and older more than doubled. This was due primarily to the marked decline in fertility from a total fertility rate (TFR) of 6.7-1.8 during the period. Hong Kong also had a similar major transformation during the same period: the proportion of the old age population increased 2 1/2 times, from 2.5-6.3%. The age structures of the 18 ESCAP countries varied greatly by country. 10 countries of the 2 high fertility and mortality types showed a similar young age structural pattern, i.e., they have higher dependency ratios, a higher proportion of children under 15 years, a lower proportion of population 65 years and older, lower aged-child ratios, and younger median ages than the average countries in the less developed regions of the world. With minimal changes over the 1950-80 period, the gap between these countries and the average of the less developed regions widened. Unlike these 10 (mostly South Asian) countries, moderately low fertility and mortality countries (China, Korea, and Sri Lanka) are located between the world average and the less developed region in most of the indices, particularly during the last decade. Although their rate of population aging is not

  13. Selected scientific topics of the 11th International Isotope Symposium on the Synthesis and Applications of Isotopes and Isotopically Labeled Compounds.

    PubMed

    Atzrodt, Jens; Derdau, Volker

    2013-01-01

    This micro-review describes hot topics and new trends in isotope science discussed at the 11th International Isotope Symposium on the Synthesis and Applications of Isotopes and Isotopically Labeled Compounds from a personal perspective.

  14. Composite Load Spectra for Select Space Propulsion Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Hing W.; Newell, James F.

    1994-01-01

    Generic load models are described with multiple levels of progressive sophistication to simulate the composite (combined) load spectra (CLS) that are induced in space propulsion system components, representative of Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), such as transfer ducts, turbine blades and liquid oxygen (LOX) posts. These generic (coupled) models combine the deterministic models for composite load dynamic, acoustic, high-pressure and high rotational speed, etc., load simulation using statistically varying coefficients. These coefficients are then determined using advanced probabilistic simulation methods with and without strategically selected experimental data. The entire simulation process is included in a CLS computer code. Applications of the computer code to various components in conjunction with the PSAM (Probabilistic Structural Analysis Method) to perform probabilistic load evaluation and life prediction evaluations are also described to illustrate the effectiveness of the coupled model approach.

  15. Helicopter aeroelastic stability and response - Current topics and future trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents several current topics in rotary wing aeroelasticity and concludes by attempting to anticipate future trends and developments. These topics are: (1) the role of geometric nonlinearities; (2) structural modeling, and aeroelastic analysis of composite rotor blades; (3) aeroelastic stability and response in forward flight; (4) modeling of coupled rotor/fuselage aeromechanical problems and their active control; and (5) the coupled rotor-fuselage vibration problem and its alleviation by higher harmonic control. Selected results illustrating the fundamental aspects of these topics are presented. Future developments are briefly discussed.

  16. Ribozyme motif structure mapped using random recombination and selection

    PubMed Central

    WANG, QING S.; UNRAU, PETER J.

    2005-01-01

    Isolating the core functional elements of an RNA is normally performed during the characterization of a new RNA in order to simplify further biochemical analysis. The removal of extraneous sequence is challenging and can lead to biases that result from the incomplete sampling of deletion variants. An impartial solution to this problem is to construct a library containing a large number of deletion constructs and to select functional RNA isolates that are at least as efficient as their full-length progenitors. Here, we use nonhomologous recombination and selection to isolate the catalytic core of a pyrimidine nucleotide synthase ribozyme. A variable-length pool of ~108 recombinant molecules that included deletions, inversions, and translocations of a 271-nucleotide-long ribozyme isolate was constructed by digesting and randomly religating its DNA genome. In vitro selection for functional ribozymes was then performed in a size-dependent and a size-independent manner. The final pools had nearly equivalent catalytic rates even though their length distributions were completely different, indicating that a diverse range of deletion constructs were functionally active. Four short sequence islands, requiring as little as 81 nt of sequence, were found within all of the truncated ribozymes and could be folded into a secondary structure consisting of three helix–loops. Our findings suggest that nonhomologous recombination is a highly efficient way to isolate a ribozyme’s core motif and could prove to be a useful method for evolving new ribozyme functions from pre-existing sequences in a manner that may have played an important role early in evolution. PMID:15703441

  17. Solar selective black cobalt: preparation, structure, and thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.B.; Ignatiev, A.; Zajac, G.

    1980-08-01

    In the quest for an electroplated selective black coating stable to 500 /sup 0/C in air, black cobalts have been prepared by three techniques to yield (a) plated cobalt sulphides, (b) plated cobalt oxide-hydroxide, and (c) cobalt oxide prepared by thermal oxidation of electropolated cobalt metal. The optical properties of the various coatings are analyzed before and after exposure to air for extended periods of time at temperatures in the 300 /sup 0/--500 /sup 0/C range. The sulfide black cobalt is not acceptable as a high-temperature selective absorber due to severe thermal degradation. The plated oxide is a good selective absorber to about 400 /sup 0/C, and the thermally oxidized black to a slightly higher temperature, but degrades at 500 /sup 0/C. Structure studies via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) are reported which yield a full account of the coating chemistry before and after heating. The studies reveal that the high solar absorptance of the acceptable black cobalt coatings is due to a continuation of a porous outer layer grading into nondense oxides of cobalt; either CoO or Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/, depending on the film. Absorption is intrinsic but not due to metal particles as in black chrome. A limited amount of optical degradation occurs upon heating the oxide black cobalt in air due to oxidation of hydroxide. However, the major degradation problem is shown to be substrate oxidation in contrast to black chrome where film oxidation is the principal problem.

  18. Structures of Potent Selective Peptide Mimetics Bound to Carboxypeptidase B

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, M.; Buckman, B.; Bryant, J.; Chang, Z.; Chu, K.; Emayan, K.; Hrvatin, P.; Islam, I.; Morser, J.; Sukovich, D.; West, C.; Yuan, S.; Whitlow, M.

    2009-05-11

    This article reports the crystal structures of inhibitors of the functional form of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa). In vivo experiments indicate that selective inhibitors of TAFIa would be useful in the treatment of heart attacks. Since TAFIa rapidly degrades in solution, the homologous protein porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B (pp-CpB) was used in these crystallography studies. Both TAFIa and pp-CpB are zinc-based exopeptidases that are specific for basic residues. The final development candidate, BX 528, is a potent inhibitor of TAFIa (2 nM) and has almost no measurable effect on the major selectivity target, carboxypeptidase N. BX 528 was designed to mimic the tripeptide Phe-Val-Lys. A sulfonamide replaces the Phe-Val amide bond and a phosphinate connects the Val and Lys groups. The phosphinate also chelates the active-site zinc. The electrostatic interactions with the protein mimic those of the natural substrate. The primary amine in BX 528 forms a salt bridge to Asp255 at the base of the S1 pocket. The carboxylic acid interacts with Arg145 and the sulfonamide is hydrogen bonded to Arg71. Isopropyl and phenyl groups replace the side chains of Val and Phe, respectively. A series of structures are presented here that illustrate the evolution of BX 528 from thiol-based inhibitors that mimic a free C-terminal arginine. The first step in development was the replacement of the thiol with a phosphinate. This caused a precipitous drop in binding affinity. Potency was reclaimed by extending the inhibitors into the downstream binding sites for the natural substrate.

  19. Current perspectives on the pediatric hip: selected topics in hip dysplasia, Perthes disease, and chondrolysis: synopsis of the hip subspecialty session at the POSNA Annual Meeting, May 1, 2013, Toronto.

    PubMed

    Millis, Michael B; Zaltz, Ira

    2014-01-01

    The following are proceedings from the Hip Breakout Session held at the 2013 annual meeting of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America in Toronto, Canada. The organizer's goal of the meeting was to gather experts with years of clinical experience to discuss topics based upon both experience and current clinical evidence. The topics that were selected represented the most commonly encountered pathology where there are wide variations of clinical practice. The invited speakers were asked to summarize both their clinical experience and the current scientific evidence and to summarize areas that require further scientific investigation. PMID:25207735

  20. Rapid manufacturing of lattice structures with selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehme, Olaf; Emmelmann, Claus

    2006-02-01

    Since the development of layered freeform manufacturing processes some technologies have emerged such as the Selective Laser Melting process (SLM) which uses layers of metal powder to manufacture 3D-objects from CAD-data by melting targeted geometries. The main goal using this process is to obtain functional products from engineering materials that feature desired properties such as given strength, hardness, surface roughness and residual stress behaviour. Rapid production with short throughput times due to only few process steps, a high individuality and a high degree of geometric freedom are considered to be its major advantages. However one disadvantage to all laser-based freeform manufacturing is the immense consumption of time since only considerably small quantities of material can be processed per time unit. Therefore it is desirable to review oldfashioned engineering design rules and develop part geometries that allow for hollow shaped parts with interior lattice structures providing the part with virtually the same stiffness and strength. Thus the process cost could be massively cut down due to reduced production time and less need for costly powder material. The SLM-process is meeting the requirements to fulfil this intention. Based on using fiber laser technology that delivers high beam quality the process is capable of producing thin walled structures of high tensile strength. Here development, production and testing of such lightweight yet sustainable SLM-parts will be presented along with their possible applications.

  1. High Temperature Irradiation Effects in Selected Generation IV Structural Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; McClintock, David A; Hoelzer, David T; Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Generation IV Materials Program cross-cutting task, irradiation and testing were carried out to address the issue of high temperature irradiation effects with selected current and potential candidate metallic alloys. The materials tested were (1) a high-nickel iron-base alloy (Alloy 800H); (2) a nickel-base alloy (Alloy 617); (3) two advanced nano-structured ferritic alloys (designated 14YWT and 14WT); and (4) a commercial ferritic-martensitic steel (annealed 9Cr-1MoV). Small tensile specimens were irradiated in rabbit capsules in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor at temperatures from about 550 to 700 C and to irradiation doses in the range 1.2 to 1.6 dpa. The Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 exhibited significant hardening after irradiation at 580 C; some hardening occurred at 660 C as well, but the 800H showed extremely low tensile elongations when tested at 700 C. Notably, the grain boundary engineered 800H exhibited even greater hardening at 580 C and retained a high amount of ductility. Irradiation effects on the two nano-structured ferritic alloys and the annealed 9Cr-1MoV were relatively slight at this low dose.

  2. Structural deterministic safety factors selection criteria and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1992-01-01

    Though current deterministic safety factors are arbitrarily and unaccountably specified, its ratio is rooted in resistive and applied stress probability distributions. This study approached the deterministic method from a probabilistic concept leading to a more systematic and coherent philosophy and criterion for designing more uniform and reliable high-performance structures. The deterministic method was noted to consist of three safety factors: a standard deviation multiplier of the applied stress distribution; a K-factor for the A- or B-basis material ultimate stress; and the conventional safety factor to ensure that the applied stress does not operate in the inelastic zone of metallic materials. The conventional safety factor is specifically defined as the ratio of ultimate-to-yield stresses. A deterministic safety index of the combined safety factors was derived from which the corresponding reliability proved the deterministic method is not reliability sensitive. The bases for selecting safety factors are presented and verification requirements are discussed. The suggested deterministic approach is applicable to all NASA, DOD, and commercial high-performance structures under static stresses.

  3. Structure-guided development of heterodimer-selective GPCR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Harald; Schellhorn, Tamara; Gienger, Marie; Schaab, Carolin; Kaindl, Jonas; Leeb, Laurin; Clark, Timothy; Möller, Dorothee; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structures of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand complexes allow a rational design of novel molecular probes and drugs. Here we report the structure-guided design, chemical synthesis and biological investigations of bivalent ligands for dopamine D2 receptor/neurotensin NTS1 receptor (D2R/NTS1R) heterodimers. The compounds of types 1–3 consist of three different D2R pharmacophores bound to an affinity-generating lipophilic appendage, a polyethylene glycol-based linker and the NTS1R agonist NT(8-13). The bivalent ligands show binding affinity in the picomolar range for cells coexpressing both GPCRs and unprecedented selectivity (up to three orders of magnitude), compared with cells that only express D2Rs. A functional switch is observed for the bivalent ligands 3b,c inhibiting cAMP formation in cells singly expressing D2Rs but stimulating cAMP accumulation in D2R/NTS1R-coexpressing cells. Moreover, the newly synthesized bivalent ligands show a strong, predominantly NTS1R-mediated β-arrestin-2 recruitment at the D2R/NTS1R-coexpressing cells. PMID:27457610

  4. Antimicrobial Activity of Xanthohumol and Its Selected Structural Analogues.

    PubMed

    Stompor, Monika; Żarowska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of structural analogues of xanthohumol 1, a flavonoid compound found in hops (Humulus lupulus). The agar-diffusion method using filter paper disks was applied. Biological tests performed for selected strains of Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria, fungi (Alternaria sp.), and yeasts (Rhodotorula rubra, Candida albicans) revealed that compounds with at least one hydroxyl group-all of them have it at the C-4 position-demonstrated good activity. Our research showed that the strain S. aureus was more sensitive to chalcones than to the isomers in which the heterocyclic ring C is closed (flavanones). The strain R. rubra was moderately sensitive to only one compound: 4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone 8. Loss of the hydroxyl group in the B-ring of 4'-methoxychalcones or its replacement by a halogen atom (-Cl, -Br), nitro group (-NO₂), ethoxy group (-OCH₂CH₃), or aliphatic substituent (-CH₃, -CH₂CH₃) resulted in the loss of antimicrobial activity towards both R. rubra yeast and S. aureus bacteria. Xanthohumol 1, naringenin 5, and chalconaringenin 7 inhibited growth of S. aureus, whereas 4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone 8 was active towards two strains: S. aureus and R. rubra. PMID:27187329

  5. Degeneracy-driven self-structuring dynamics in selective repertoires.

    PubMed

    Atamas, Sergei P; Bell, Jonathan

    2009-08-01

    Numerous biological interactions, such as interactions between T cell receptors or antibodies with antigens, interactions between enzymes and substrates, or interactions between predators and prey are often not strictly specific. In such less specific, or "sloppy," systems, referred to here as degenerate systems, a given unit of a diverse resource (antigens, enzymatic substrates, prey) is at risk of being recognized and consumed by multiple consumers (lymphocytes, enzymes, predators). In this study, we model generalized degenerate consumer-resource systems of Lotka-Volterra and Verhulst types. In the degenerate systems of Lotka-Volterra, there is a continuum of types of consumer and resource based on variation of a single trait (characteristic, or preference). The consumers experience competition for a continuum of resource types. This non-local interaction system is modeled with partial differential-integral equations and shows spontaneous self-structuring of the consumer population that depends on the degree of interaction degeneracy between resource and consumer, but does not mirror the distribution of resource. We also show that the classical Verhulst (i.e. logistic) single population model can be generalized to a degenerate model, which shows qualitative behavior similar to that in the degenerate Lotka-Volterra model. These results provide better insight into the dynamics of selective systems in biology, suggesting that adaptation of degenerate repertoires is not a simple "mirroring" of the environment by the "fittest" elements of population.

  6. Electronic structure and physicochemical properties of selected penicillins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano-Correa, Catalina; Ruiz, Juan F. Sánchez; Raya, A.; Esquivel, Rodolfo O.

    Traditionally, penicillins have been used as antibacterial agents due to their characteristics and widespread applications with few collateral effects, which have motivated several theoretical and experimental studies. Despite the latter, their mechanism of biological action has not been completely elucidated. We present a theoretical study at the Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (DFT) levels of theory of a selected group of penicillins such as the penicillin-G, amoxicillin, ampicillin, dicloxacillin, and carbenicillin molecules, to systematically determine the electron structure of full ?-lactam antibiotics. Our results allow us to analyze the electronic properties of the pharmacophore group, the aminoacyl side-chain, and the influence of the substituents (R and X) attached to the aminoacyl side-chain at 6? (in contrast with previous studies focused at the 3? substituents), and to corroborate the results of previous studies performed at the semiempirical level, solely on the ?-lactam ring of penicillins. Besides, several density descriptors are determined with the purpose of analyzing their link to the antibacterial activity of these penicillin compounds. Our results for the atomic charges (fitted to the electrostatic potential), the bond orders, and several global reactivity descriptors, such as the dipole moments, ionization potential, hardness, and the electrophilicity index, led us to characterize: the active sites, the effect of the electron-attracting substituent properties and their physicochemical features, which altogether, might be important to understand the biological activity of these type of molecules.

  7. Topic Model for Graph Mining.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Junyu; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Guangquan; Luo, Xiangfeng

    2015-12-01

    Graph mining has been a popular research area because of its numerous application scenarios. Many unstructured and structured data can be represented as graphs, such as, documents, chemical molecular structures, and images. However, an issue in relation to current research on graphs is that they cannot adequately discover the topics hidden in graph-structured data which can be beneficial for both the unsupervised learning and supervised learning of the graphs. Although topic models have proved to be very successful in discovering latent topics, the standard topic models cannot be directly applied to graph-structured data due to the "bag-of-word" assumption. In this paper, an innovative graph topic model (GTM) is proposed to address this issue, which uses Bernoulli distributions to model the edges between nodes in a graph. It can, therefore, make the edges in a graph contribute to latent topic discovery and further improve the accuracy of the supervised and unsupervised learning of graphs. The experimental results on two different types of graph datasets show that the proposed GTM outperforms the latent Dirichlet allocation on classification by using the unveiled topics of these two models to represent graphs.

  8. Composite load spectra for select space propulsion structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Ho, H. W.; Kurth, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The work performed to develop composite load spectra (CLS) for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) using probabilistic methods. The three methods were implemented to be the engine system influence model. RASCAL was chosen to be the principal method as most component load models were implemented with the method. Validation of RASCAL was performed. High accuracy comparable to the Monte Carlo method can be obtained if a large enough bin size is used. Generic probabilistic models were developed and implemented for load calculations using the probabilistic methods discussed above. Each engine mission, either a real fighter or a test, has three mission phases: the engine start transient phase, the steady state phase, and the engine cut off transient phase. Power level and engine operating inlet conditions change during a mission. The load calculation module provides the steady-state and quasi-steady state calculation procedures with duty-cycle-data option. The quasi-steady state procedure is for engine transient phase calculations. In addition, a few generic probabilistic load models were also developed for specific conditions. These include the fixed transient spike model, the poison arrival transient spike model, and the rare event model. These generic probabilistic load models provide sufficient latitude for simulating loads with specific conditions. For SSME components, turbine blades, transfer ducts, LOX post, and the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) discharge duct were selected for application of the CLS program. They include static pressure loads and dynamic pressure loads for all four components, centrifugal force for the turbine blade, temperatures of thermal loads for all four components, and structural vibration loads for the ducts and LOX posts.

  9. Topical urea in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, P K; Choudhury, A K; Panja, S K

    1990-03-01

    For years research has been conducted to find a cutaneous moisturizer that is effective, easily available and relatively inexpensive urea, as a atopical agent, is all of this and is also a mild keratolytic. A trial was conducted over 200 patients suffering from a variety of disorders that were selected and using urea topically as urea 10 (10%), urea-20 lotion (20%), Urea-HC (with hydrocartisanl). The agent was applied twice daily for a maximum period of 8 weeks. Results indicate that urea is an effective moisturizer and in promotes the penetration of hydrocelisone into the skin.

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Landau Migdal theory of interacting Fermi systems: a framework for effective theories in nuclear structure physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grümmer, Frank; Speth, Josef

    2006-07-01

    We review Migdal's theory of finite Fermi systems and its application to the structure of nuclei. The theory is an extension of Landau's theory of interacting Fermi systems. In the first part the basic formulae are derived within the many-body Green functions approach. The theory is applied to isovector electric giant resonances in medium and heavy mass nuclei. The parameterizations of the renormalized effective ph-interaction and the effective operators are discussed. It is shown that the number of free parameters is restricted by conservation laws. We also present an extension of Migdal's theory, where the low-lying phonons are considered in a consistent manner. The extended theory is again applied to the same isovector electric giant resonances and to the analysis of (α, α') reaction data. We point out that the extended theory is the appropriate framework for self-consistent nuclear structure calculations starting from effective Lagrangians and Hamiltonians.

  11. Value of the dorsal cutaneous guinea pig model in selecting topical antiviral formulations for the treatment of recurrent herpes simplex type 1 disease.

    PubMed

    Poli, G; Dall'Ara, P; Binda, S; Santus, G; Poli, A; Cocilovo, A; Ponti, W

    2001-01-01

    Recurrent herpes simplex labialis represents a disease still difficult to treat, despite the availability of many established antiviral drugs used in clinical research since 30 years ago. Although differences between the human disease and that obtained in experimental animal suggest caution in predicting an effective clinical response from the experimental results, some of the animal models seem to be useful in optimising the topical formulation of single antiviral drugs. In the present work the dorsal cutaneous guinea pig model was used to compare 5 different topical antiviral formulations with clinical promise (active molecule: 5% w/w micronized aciclovir, CAS 59277-89-3), using both roll-on and lipstick application systems. The aim being to evaluate which vehicle (water, oil, low melting and high melting fatty base) and application system (roll-on, lipstick) enhances the skin penetration and the antiviral activity of the drug, after an experimental intradermal infection with Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). As reference, a commercial formulation (5% aciclovir ointment) was used. The cumulative results of this study showed that the formulation A, containing 5% aciclovir in an aqueous base in a roll-on application system, has the better antiviral efficacy in reducing the severity of cutaneous lesions and the viral titer; among the lipsticks preparations, the formulation D, containing 5% aciclovir in a low melting fatty base, demonstrates a very strong antiviral activity, though slightly less than formulation A. This experimental work confirms the validity of the dorsal cutaneous guinea pig model as a rapid and efficient method to compare the antiviral efficacy of new formulations, with clinical promise, to optimise the topical formulation of the active antiviral drugs. PMID:11413746

  12. Value of the dorsal cutaneous guinea pig model in selecting topical antiviral formulations for the treatment of recurrent herpes simplex type 1 disease.

    PubMed

    Poli, G; Dall'Ara, P; Binda, S; Santus, G; Poli, A; Cocilovo, A; Ponti, W

    2001-01-01

    Recurrent herpes simplex labialis represents a disease still difficult to treat, despite the availability of many established antiviral drugs used in clinical research since 30 years ago. Although differences between the human disease and that obtained in experimental animal suggest caution in predicting an effective clinical response from the experimental results, some of the animal models seem to be useful in optimising the topical formulation of single antiviral drugs. In the present work the dorsal cutaneous guinea pig model was used to compare 5 different topical antiviral formulations with clinical promise (active molecule: 5% w/w micronized aciclovir, CAS 59277-89-3), using both roll-on and lipstick application systems. The aim being to evaluate which vehicle (water, oil, low melting and high melting fatty base) and application system (roll-on, lipstick) enhances the skin penetration and the antiviral activity of the drug, after an experimental intradermal infection with Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). As reference, a commercial formulation (5% aciclovir ointment) was used. The cumulative results of this study showed that the formulation A, containing 5% aciclovir in an aqueous base in a roll-on application system, has the better antiviral efficacy in reducing the severity of cutaneous lesions and the viral titer; among the lipsticks preparations, the formulation D, containing 5% aciclovir in a low melting fatty base, demonstrates a very strong antiviral activity, though slightly less than formulation A. This experimental work confirms the validity of the dorsal cutaneous guinea pig model as a rapid and efficient method to compare the antiviral efficacy of new formulations, with clinical promise, to optimise the topical formulation of the active antiviral drugs.

  13. Interface Pattern Selection Criterion for Cellular Structures in Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, R.; Tewari, S. N.; Kurtze, D.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to establish key scientific concepts that govern the selection of cellular and dendritic patterns during the directional solidification of alloys. We shall first address scientific concepts that are crucial in the selection of interface patterns. Next, the results of ground-based experimental studies in the Al-4.0 wt % Cu system will be described. Both experimental studies and theoretical calculations will be presented to establish the need for microgravity experiments.

  14. PREFACE: CEWQO Topical Issue CEWQO Topical Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozic, Mirjana; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-09-01

    This topical issue of Physica Scripta collects selected peer-reviewed contributions based on invited and contributed talks and posters presented at the 15th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics (CEWQO) which took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu, cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community of the workshop, we thank the referees for their careful reading and useful suggestions which helped to improve all of the submitted papers. A brief description of CEWQO The Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics is a series of conferences started informally in Budapest in 1992. Sometimes small events transform into important conferences, as in the case of CEWQO. Professor Jozsef Janszky, from the Research Institute of Solid State Physics and Optics, is the founder of this series. Margarita Man'ko obtained the following information from Jozsef Janszky during her visit to Budapest, within the framework of cooperation between the Russian and Hungarian Academies of Sciences in 2005. He organized a small workshop on quantum optics in Budapest in 1992 with John Klauder as a main speaker. Then, bearing in mind that a year before Janszky himself was invited by Vladimir Buzek to give a seminar on the same topic in Bratislava, he decided to assign the name 'Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics', considering the seminar in Bratislava to be the first workshop and the one in Budapest the second. The third formal workshop took place in Bratislava in 1993 organized by Vladimir Buzek, then in 1994 (Budapest, by Jozsef Janszky), 1995 and 1996 (Budmerice, Slovakia, by Vladimir Buzek), 1997 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 1999 (Olomouc, Czech Republic, by Zdenek Hradil), 2000 (Balatonfüred, Hungary, by Jozsef Janszky ), 2001 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 2002 (Szeged, Hungary, by Mihaly Benedict), 2003 (Rostock,Germany, by Werner Vogel and

  15. Cutaneous Injury-Related Structural Changes and Their Progression following Topical Nitrogen Mustard Exposure in Hairless and Haired Mice

    PubMed Central

    Orlicky, David J.; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    To identify effective therapies against sulfur mustard (SM)-induced skin injuries, various animals have been used to assess the cutaneous pathology and related histopathological changes of SM injuries. However, these efforts to establish relevant skin injury endpoints for efficacy studies have been limited mainly due to the restricted assess of SM. Therefore, we employed the SM analog nitrogen mustard (NM), a primary vesicating and bifunctional alkylating agent, to establish relevant endpoints for efficient efficacy studies. Our published studies show that NM (3.2 mg) exposure for 12–120 h in both the hairless SKH-1 and haired C57BL/6 mice caused clinical sequelae of toxicity similar to SM exposure in humans. The NM-induced cutaneous pathology-related structural changes were further analyzed in this study and quantified morphometrically (as percent length or area of epidermis or dermis) of skin sections in mice showing these lesions. H&E stained skin sections of both hairless and haired mice showed that NM (12–120 h) exposure caused epidermal histopathological effects such as increased epidermal thickness, epidermal-dermal separation, necrotic/dead epidermis, epidermal denuding, scab formation, parakeratosis (24–120 h), hyperkeratosis (12–120 h), and acanthosis with hyperplasia (72–120 h). Similar NM exposure in both mice caused dermal changes including necrosis, edema, increase in inflammatory cells, and red blood cell extravasation. These NM-induced cutaneous histopathological features are comparable to the reported lesions from SM exposure in humans and animal models. This study advocates the usefulness of these histopathological parameters observed due to NM exposure in screening and optimization of rescue therapies against NM and SM skin injuries. PMID:24416404

  16. (abstract) Mechanism of Selective Porosification at Heterojunctions in Group IV Multilayer Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T.; Fathauer, R. W.; Pike, W. T.; Jones, E. W.; Kesendzov, A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly selective porosification of SiGe or Ge layers is observed in multilayer Si/SiGe or Si/Ge structures grown on (100)Si. These alternating porous/nonporous structures could potentially be used to fabricate light-emitting devices. The etch-selectivity appears to be dominated by band-structure effects and other factors such as lattice strain and electrochemical potential differences play a minor role. Additional structures and electrolytic etching are being examined to confirm these results.

  17. The Structure of Three Instruments Intended for Police Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Leo S.; Barrows, Thomas S.

    A battery of instruments intended to predict on-the-job performance of patrolmen was administered to civil service police applicants, and the resulting data were factor analyzed. The factor structures which emerge closely resemble the intended structures and appear promising for planned predictive studies of criterion performance on the job. The…

  18. EDITORIAL: Special section: Selected papers from OMS'05, the 1st Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society on Optical Microsystems (OMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendina, Ivo; Fazio, Eugenio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2006-07-01

    OMS'05 is the first international conference wholly dedicated to optical microsystems. It was organized by the European Optical Society (EOS) in the frame of its international topical meeting activity and was held in Italy, September 2005, amidst the wonderful scenery of the Island of Capri. A possible definition of an optical microsystem is a complex system, able to perform one or more sensing and actuation functions, where optical devices are integrated in a smart way with electronic, mechanical and sensing components by taking advantage of the progress in micro- and nano-technologies. The increasing interest in this field arises from the expected applications that would significantly improve the quality of life. The list of possibilities offered by the optical microsystem enabling technologies is very long and seems to increase day by day. We are not only thinking about the next generation of optical telecommunication networks and computers, but also about low-cost, compact microsystems for environmental monitoring, in order to improve safety in the avionic and automotive fields, medical diagnostics and proteomic/genomic studies, or just finding general applications in several industrial fields. The goal of the conference was to involve scientists and young researchers from the main public and private laboratories, giving them the opportunity to present new scientific results and compare their know-how in the exciting and emerging field of optical microsystems. We believe that we succeeded in this. More than 200 scientists from all over the world attended the conference. We had more than 100 oral presentations and approximately 20 from the keynote lectures and invited speeches. It was an opportunity to define the most recent progress carried out in the field and to outline the possible road-map leading to the expected results in the industrial and social fields. We strongly believe that research and technology are closely interconnected at present and cannot

  19. Training set optimization under population structure in genomic selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The optimization of the training set (TRS) in genomic selection (GS) has received much interest in both animal and plant breeding, because it is critical to the accuracy of the prediction models. In this study, five different TRS sampling algorithms, stratified sampling, mean of the Coefficient of D...

  20. Reconsidering the logical structure of the theory of natural selection

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Tam

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection has been criticized as a tautology. This would be a major problem for evolutionary biology, if true, because tautological statements can't be falsified and, therefore, can't be scientific. There is merit to this critique insofar as the theory of natural selection is indeed generally described in a tautological manner. However, natural selection can be described non-tautologically if we’re careful. Natural selection should be defined as the theory that attempts to predict and retrodict evolutionary change through environmental forces acting upon organisms. However, this re-framing comes at a cost: it reveals, based on our current knowledge of evolutionary forces, the lack of ability to make accurate predictions about expected changes except in the most simple of circumstances. I suggest that evolutionary biologists should work to develop “principles of evolution,” based on an expanded and more focused research program designed to identify common trends in evolution, which will ultimately allow us to make more accurate predictions and retrodictions about evolution. PMID:26478764

  1. Reconsidering the logical structure of the theory of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Tam

    2014-12-01

    Natural selection has been criticized as a tautology. This would be a major problem for evolutionary biology, if true, because tautological statements can't be falsified and, therefore, can't be scientific. There is merit to this critique insofar as the theory of natural selection is indeed generally described in a tautological manner. However, natural selection can be described non-tautologically if we're careful. Natural selection should be defined as the theory that attempts to predict and retrodict evolutionary change through environmental forces acting upon organisms. However, this re-framing comes at a cost: it reveals, based on our current knowledge of evolutionary forces, the lack of ability to make accurate predictions about expected changes except in the most simple of circumstances. I suggest that evolutionary biologists should work to develop "principles of evolution," based on an expanded and more focused research program designed to identify common trends in evolution, which will ultimately allow us to make more accurate predictions and retrodictions about evolution.

  2. Application of composites to the selective reinforcement of metallic aerospace structures. [application of structural design criteria for weight reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, W. A., Jr.; Mathauser, E. E.; Pride, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The use of composite materials to selectively reinforce metallic structures provides a low-cost way to reduce weight and a means of minimizing the risks usually associated with the introduction of new materials. An overview is presented of the NASA Langley Research Center programs to identify the advantages and to develop the potential of the selective reinforcement approach to the use of composites. These programs have shown that selective reinforcement provides excellent strength and stiffness improvements to metallic structures. Significant weight savings can be obtained in a cost effective manner. Flight service programs which have been initiated to validate further the merits of selective reinforcement are described.

  3. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: Selected Issues, 1998

    EIA Publications

    1998-01-01

    Provides an analytical assessment of the changes taking place in the electric power industry, including market structure, consumer choice, and ratesetting and transition costs. Also presents federal and state initiatives in promoting competition.

  4. Probabilistic structural analysis methods for select space propulsion system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H. R.; Cruse, T. A.

    1989-01-01

    The Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project developed at the Southwest Research Institute integrates state-of-the-art structural analysis techniques with probability theory for the design and analysis of complex large-scale engineering structures. An advanced efficient software system (NESSUS) capable of performing complex probabilistic analysis has been developed. NESSUS contains a number of software components to perform probabilistic analysis of structures. These components include: an expert system, a probabilistic finite element code, a probabilistic boundary element code and a fast probability integrator. The NESSUS software system is shown. An expert system is included to capture and utilize PSAM knowledge and experience. NESSUS/EXPERT is an interactive menu-driven expert system that provides information to assist in the use of the probabilistic finite element code NESSUS/FEM and the fast probability integrator (FPI). The expert system menu structure is summarized. The NESSUS system contains a state-of-the-art nonlinear probabilistic finite element code, NESSUS/FEM, to determine the structural response and sensitivities. A broad range of analysis capabilities and an extensive element library is present.

  5. Prediction of formulation effects on dermal absorption of topically applied ectoparasiticides dosed in vitro on canine and porcine skin using a mixture-adjusted quantitative structure permeability relationship.

    PubMed

    Riviere, J E; Brooks, J D; Collard, W T; Deng, J; de Rose, G; Mahabir, S P; Merritt, D A; Marchiondo, A A

    2014-10-01

    Topical application of ectoparasiticides for flea and tick control is a major focus for product development in animal health. The objective of this work was to develop a quantitative structure permeability relationship (QSPeR) model sensitive to formulation effects for predicting absorption and skin deposition of five topically applied drugs administered in six vehicle combinations to porcine and canine skin in vitro. Saturated solutions (20 μL) of (14) C-labeled demiditraz, fipronil, permethrin, imidacloprid, or sisapronil were administered in single or binary (50:50 v/v) combinations of water, ethanol, and transcutol (6 formulations, n = 4-5 replicates per treatment) nonoccluded to 0.64 cm(2) disks of dermatomed pig or dog skin mounted in flow-through diffusion cells. Perfusate flux over 24 h and skin deposition at termination were determined. Permeability (logKp), absorption, and penetration endpoints were modeled using a four-term Abrahams and Martin (hydrogen-bond donor acidity and basicity, dipolarity/polarizability, and excess molar refractivity) linear free energy QSPeR equation with a mixture factor added to compensate for formulation ingredient interactions. Goodness of fit was judged by r(2) , cross-validation coefficient, coefficients (q(2) s), and Williams Plot to visualize the applicability domain. Formulation composition was the primary determinant of permeation. Compounds generally penetrated dog skin better than porcine skin. The vast majority of permeated penetrant was deposited within the dosed skin relative to transdermal flux, an attribute for ectoparasiticides. The best QSPeR logKp model for pig skin permeation (r(2) = 0.86, q(2) s = 0.85) included log octanol/water partition coefficient as the mixture factor, while for dogs (r(2) = 0.91, q(2) s = 0.90), it was log water solubility. These studies clearly showed that the permeation of topical ectoparasiticides could be well predicted using QSPeR models that account for both the physical

  6. A Novel Structural Framework for α1A/D-Adrenoceptor Selective Antagonists Identified Using Subtype Selective Pharmacophores

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Emily S.; Senadheera, Sevvandi; MacDougall, Iain J. A.; Griffith, Renate; Finch, Angela M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study four and five-feature pharmacophores for selective antagonists at each of the three α1-adrenoceptor (AR) subtypes were used to identify novel α1-AR subtype selective compounds in the National Cancer Institute and Tripos LeadQuest databases. 12 compounds were selected, based on diversity of structure, predicted high affinity and selectivity at the α1D- subtype compared to α1A- and α1B-ARs. 9 out of 12 of the tested compounds displayed affinity at the α1A and α1D -AR subtypes and 6 displayed affinity at all three α1-AR subtypes, no α1B-AR selective compounds were identified. 8 of the 9 compounds with α1-AR affinity were antagonists and one compound displayed partial agonist characteristics. This virtual screening has successfully identified an α1A/D-AR selective antagonist, with low µM affinity with a novel structural scaffold of a an isoquinoline fused three-ring system and good lead-like qualities ideal for further drug development. PMID:21572949

  7. Haplotype structure and positive selection at TLR1.

    PubMed

    Heffelfinger, Christopher; Pakstis, Andrew J; Speed, William C; Clark, Allison P; Haigh, Eva; Fang, Rixun; Furtado, Mahohar R; Kidd, Kenneth K; Snyder, Michael P

    2014-04-01

    Toll-like receptor 1, when dimerized with Toll-like receptor 2, is a cell surface receptor that, upon recognition of bacterial lipoproteins, activates the innate immune system. Variants in TLR1 associate with the risk of a variety of medical conditions and diseases, including sepsis, leprosy, tuberculosis, and others. The foremost of these is rs5743618 c.2079T>G(p.(Ile602Ser)), the derived allele of which is associated with reduced risk of sepsis, leprosy, and other diseases. Interestingly, 602Ser, which shows signatures of selection, inhibits TLR1 surface trafficking and subsequent activation of NFκB upon recognition of a ligand. This suggests that reduced TLR1 activity may be beneficial for human health. To better understand TLR1 variation and its link to human health, we have typed all 7 high-frequency missense variants (>5% in at least one population) along with 17 other variants in and around TLR1 in 2548 individuals from 56 populations from around the globe. We have also found additional signatures of selection on missense variants not associated with rs5743618, suggesting that there may be multiple functional alleles under positive selection in this gene. PMID:24002163

  8. Prey community structure affects how predators select for Mullerian mimicry.

    PubMed

    Ihalainen, Eira; Rowland, Hannah M; Speed, Michael P; Ruxton, Graeme D; Mappes, Johanna

    2012-06-01

    Müllerian mimicry describes the close resemblance between aposematic prey species; it is thought to be beneficial because sharing a warning signal decreases the mortality caused by sampling by inexperienced predators learning to avoid the signal. It has been hypothesized that selection for mimicry is strongest in multi-species prey communities where predators are more prone to misidentify the prey than in simple communities. In this study, wild great tits (Parus major) foraged from either simple (few prey appearances) or complex (several prey appearances) artificial prey communities where a specific model prey was always present. Owing to slower learning, the model did suffer higher mortality in complex communities when the birds were inexperienced. However, in a subsequent generalization test to potential mimics of the model prey (a continuum of signal accuracy), only birds that had foraged from simple communities selected against inaccurate mimics. Therefore, accurate mimicry is more likely to evolve in simple communities even though predator avoidance learning is slower in complex communities. For mimicry to evolve, prey species must have a common predator; the effective community consists of the predator's diet. In diverse environments, the limited diets of specialist predators could create 'simple community pockets' where accurate mimicry is selected for.

  9. PREFACE: CEWQO Topical Issue CEWQO Topical Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozic, Mirjana; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-09-01

    This topical issue of Physica Scripta collects selected peer-reviewed contributions based on invited and contributed talks and posters presented at the 15th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics (CEWQO) which took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu, cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community of the workshop, we thank the referees for their careful reading and useful suggestions which helped to improve all of the submitted papers. A brief description of CEWQO The Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics is a series of conferences started informally in Budapest in 1992. Sometimes small events transform into important conferences, as in the case of CEWQO. Professor Jozsef Janszky, from the Research Institute of Solid State Physics and Optics, is the founder of this series. Margarita Man'ko obtained the following information from Jozsef Janszky during her visit to Budapest, within the framework of cooperation between the Russian and Hungarian Academies of Sciences in 2005. He organized a small workshop on quantum optics in Budapest in 1992 with John Klauder as a main speaker. Then, bearing in mind that a year before Janszky himself was invited by Vladimir Buzek to give a seminar on the same topic in Bratislava, he decided to assign the name 'Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics', considering the seminar in Bratislava to be the first workshop and the one in Budapest the second. The third formal workshop took place in Bratislava in 1993 organized by Vladimir Buzek, then in 1994 (Budapest, by Jozsef Janszky), 1995 and 1996 (Budmerice, Slovakia, by Vladimir Buzek), 1997 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 1999 (Olomouc, Czech Republic, by Zdenek Hradil), 2000 (Balatonfüred, Hungary, by Jozsef Janszky ), 2001 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 2002 (Szeged, Hungary, by Mihaly Benedict), 2003 (Rostock,Germany, by Werner Vogel and

  10. Lactobionic acid as antioxidant and moisturizing active in alkyl polyglucoside-based topical emulsions: the colloidal structure, stability and efficacy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tasic-Kostov, M; Pavlovic, D; Lukic, M; Jaksic, I; Arsic, I; Savic, S

    2012-10-01

    Cosmeceutical antioxidants may protect the skin against oxidative injury, involved in the pathogenesis of many skin disorders. However, an unsuitable topical delivery system with compromising safety profile can affect the efficacy of an antioxidant active. This study investigated the antioxidant potential of lactobionic acid (LA), a newer cosmeceutical active, per se (in solution) and incorporated into natural alkyl polyglucoside (APG) emulsifier-based system using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging and lipid peroxidation inhibition assays. The α-tocopherol was used as a reference compound. The physical stability (using rheology, polarization microscopy, pH and conductivity measurements) of an Alkyl glucoside-based emulsion was evaluated with and without the active (LA); colloidal structure was assessed using polarization and transmission electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and texture analysis. Additionally, the safety profile and moisturizing potential were investigated using the methods of skin bioengineering. Good physical stability and applicative characteristics were obtained although LA strongly influenced the colloidal structure of the vehicle. LA per se and in APG-based emulsion showed satisfying antioxidant activity that promotes it as mild multifunctional cosmeceutical efficient in the treatment and prevention of the photoaged skin. Employed assays were shown as suitable for the antioxidant activity evaluation of LA in APG-based emulsions, but not for α-tocopherol in the same vehicle. PMID:22691034

  11. Topical Products for the Aging Face.

    PubMed

    McCook, John P

    2016-07-01

    This article focuses on nonprescription home-use topical treatment technologies for the aging face and is intended to serve as a guide for the core cosmeceutical technologies currently used and to help educate and assist the selection of topical antiaging products by the professional staff and their patients. Antiaging topical treatments for patient home use should be nonirritating, compatible with the patient skin type, effective, and complementary to surgical and minimally invasive office procedures, and aesthetically elegant. New topical antiaging technologies, formulated as monotherapy or as combinations with well-known cosmeceuticals, should present adequate clinical studies to support their selection for use. PMID:27363774

  12. Method of forming silicon structures with selectable optical characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); Schowalter, Leo (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Silicon and metal are coevaporated onto a silicon substrate in a molecular beam epitaxy system with a larger than stoichiometric amount of silicon so as to epitaxially grow particles of metal silicide embedded in a matrix of single crystal epitaxially grown silicon. The particles interact with incident photons by resonant optical absorption at the surface plasmon resonance frequency. Controlling the substrate temperature and deposition rate and time allows the aspect ratio of the particles to be tailored to desired wavelength photons and polarizations. The plasmon energy may decay as excited charge carriers or phonons, either of which can be monitored to indicate the amount of incident radiation at the selected frequency and polarization.

  13. Belief Structures about People Held by Selected Graduate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dole, Arthur A.; And Others

    Wrightsman has established that assumptions about human nature distinguish religious, occupational, political, gender, and other groups, and that they predict behavior in structured situations. Hjelle and Ziegler proposed a set of nine basic bipolar assumptions about the nature of people: freedom-determinism; rationality-irrationality;…

  14. A Structured Guide for Selecting Training Materials in Adjustment Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esser, Thomas J.

    This guide identifies existing materials which form a nucleus of information in the adjustment services field. Five sub-processes within the larger adjustment services process are used as the framework by which this information is structured in the guide. They are (1) behavior observation, identification, and analysis; (2) developing the…

  15. Relationships of Selected Factors to Summer Session Organizational Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Raymond J.; McDougall, William P.

    Patterns of organization for summer schools were examined for 55 American and seven Canadian public four-year colleges and universities, including research universities, doctorate-granting universities, and comprehensive universities and colleges. Relationships between organizational structure and the following factors were assessed: institutional…

  16. Structural basis of substrate selectivity of E. coli prolidase.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Jeremy; Watts, Tylan; Li, Pingwei; Rye, Hays S

    2014-01-01

    Prolidases, metalloproteases that catalyze the cleavage of Xaa-Pro dipeptides, are conserved enzymes found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In humans, prolidase is crucial for the recycling of collagen. To further characterize the essential elements of this enzyme, we utilized the Escherichia coli prolidase, PepQ, which shares striking similarity with eukaryotic prolidases. Through structural and bioinformatic insights, we have extended previous characterizations of the prolidase active site, uncovering a key component for substrate specificity. Here we report the structure of E. coli PepQ, solved at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure shows an antiparallel, dimeric protein, with each subunit containing N-terminal and C-terminal domains. The C-terminal domain is formed by the pita-bread fold typical for this family of metalloproteases, with two Mg(II) ions coordinated by five amino-acid ligands. Comparison of the E. coli PepQ structure and sequence with homologous structures and sequences from a diversity of organisms reveals distinctions between prolidases from Gram-positive eubacteria and archaea, and those from Gram-negative eubacteria, including the presence of loop regions in the E. coli protein that are conserved in eukaryotes. One such loop contains a completely conserved arginine near the catalytic site. This conserved arginine is predicted by docking simulations to interact with the C-terminus of the substrate dipeptide. Kinetic analysis using both a charge-neutralized substrate and a charge-reversed variant of PepQ support this conclusion, and allow for the designation of a new role for this key region of the enzyme active site. PMID:25354344

  17. Structural Basis of Substrate Selectivity of E. coli Prolidase

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Jeremy; Watts, Tylan; Li, Pingwei; Rye, Hays S.

    2014-01-01

    Prolidases, metalloproteases that catalyze the cleavage of Xaa-Pro dipeptides, are conserved enzymes found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In humans, prolidase is crucial for the recycling of collagen. To further characterize the essential elements of this enzyme, we utilized the Escherichia coli prolidase, PepQ, which shares striking similarity with eukaryotic prolidases. Through structural and bioinformatic insights, we have extended previous characterizations of the prolidase active site, uncovering a key component for substrate specificity. Here we report the structure of E. coli PepQ, solved at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure shows an antiparallel, dimeric protein, with each subunit containing N-terminal and C-terminal domains. The C-terminal domain is formed by the pita-bread fold typical for this family of metalloproteases, with two Mg(II) ions coordinated by five amino-acid ligands. Comparison of the E. coli PepQ structure and sequence with homologous structures and sequences from a diversity of organisms reveals distinctions between prolidases from Gram-positive eubacteria and archaea, and those from Gram-negative eubacteria, including the presence of loop regions in the E. coli protein that are conserved in eukaryotes. One such loop contains a completely conserved arginine near the catalytic site. This conserved arginine is predicted by docking simulations to interact with the C-terminus of the substrate dipeptide. Kinetic analysis using both a charge-neutralized substrate and a charge-reversed variant of PepQ support this conclusion, and allow for the designation of a new role for this key region of the enzyme active site. PMID:25354344

  18. Restoration of Retinal Structure and Function after Selective Photocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Bryan W.; Huie, Philip; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Leung, Loh-Shan S.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Beier, Corinne; Marc, Robert E.; Palanker, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    CNS neurons change their connectivity to accommodate a changing environment, form memories, or respond to injury. Plasticity in the adult mammalian retina after injury or disease was thought to be limited to restructuring resulting in abnormal retinal anatomy and function. Here we report that neurons in the mammalian retina change their connectivity and restore normal retinal anatomy and function after injury. Patches of photoreceptors in the rabbit retina were destroyed by selective laser photocoagulation, leaving retinal inner neurons (bipolar, amacrine, horizontal, ganglion cells) intact. Photoreceptors located outside of the damaged zone migrated to make new functional connections with deafferented bipolar cells located inside the lesion. The new connections restored ON and OFF responses in deafferented ganglion cells. This finding extends the previously perceived limits of restorative plasticity in the adult retina and allows for new approaches to retinal laser therapy free of current detrimental side effects such as scotomata and scarring. PMID:23595739

  19. Restoration of retinal structure and function after selective photocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Sher, Alexander; Jones, Bryan W; Huie, Philip; Paulus, Yannis M; Lavinsky, Daniel; Leung, Loh-Shan S; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Beier, Corinne; Marc, Robert E; Palanker, Daniel

    2013-04-17

    CNS neurons change their connectivity to accommodate a changing environment, form memories, or respond to injury. Plasticity in the adult mammalian retina after injury or disease was thought to be limited to restructuring resulting in abnormal retinal anatomy and function. Here we report that neurons in the mammalian retina change their connectivity and restore normal retinal anatomy and function after injury. Patches of photoreceptors in the rabbit retina were destroyed by selective laser photocoagulation, leaving retinal inner neurons (bipolar, amacrine, horizontal, ganglion cells) intact. Photoreceptors located outside of the damaged zone migrated to make new functional connections with deafferented bipolar cells located inside the lesion. The new connections restored ON and OFF responses in deafferented ganglion cells. This finding extends the previously perceived limits of restorative plasticity in the adult retina and allows for new approaches to retinal laser therapy free of current detrimental side effects such as scotomata and scarring.

  20. Composite load spectra for select space propulsion structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Kurth, R. E.; Ho, H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop generic load models with multiple levels of progressive sophistication to simulate the composite (combined) load spectra that are induced in space propulsion system components, representative of Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), such as transfer ducts, turbine blades, and liquid oxygen posts and system ducting. The first approach will consist of using state of the art probabilistic methods to describe the individual loading conditions and combinations of these loading conditions to synthesize the composite load spectra simulation. The second approach will consist of developing coupled models for composite load spectra simulation which combine the deterministic models for composite load dynamic, acoustic, high pressure, and high rotational speed, etc., load simulation using statistically varying coefficients. These coefficients will then be determined using advanced probabilistic simulation methods with and without strategically selected experimental data.

  1. Structure-based prediction of subtype-selectivity of Histamine H3 receptor selective antagonists in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Fristrup, Peter; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Histamine receptors (HRs) are excellent drug targets for the treatment of diseases such as schizophrenia, psychosis, depression, migraine, allergies, asthma ulcers, and hypertension. Among them, the human H3 Histamine receptor (hH3HR) antagonists have been proposed for specific therapeutic applications, including treatment of Alzheimer's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), epilepsy, and obesity.1 However, many of these drug candidates cause undesired side effects through the cross-reactivity with other histamine receptor subtypes. In order to develop improved selectivity and activity for such treatments it would be useful to have the three dimensional structures for all four HRs. We report here the predicted structures of four HR subtypes (H1, H2, H3, and H4) using the GEnSeMBLE (GPCR Ensemble of Structures in Membrane BiLayer Environment) Monte Carlo protocol.2 sampling ~ 35 million combinations of helix packings to predict the 10 most stable packings for each of the four subtypes. Then we used these best 10 protein structures with the DarwinDock Monte Carlo protocol to sample ~ 50,000*20 poses to predict the optimum ligand-protein structures for various agonists and antagonists. We find that E2065.46 contributes most in binding H3 selective agonists (5, 6, 7) in agreement with experimental mutation studies. We also find that conserved E5.46/ S5.43 in both of hH3HR and hH4HR are involved in H3/ H4 subtype selectivity. In addition, we find that M3786.55 in hH3HR provides additional hydrophobic interactions different from hH4HR (the corresponding amino acid of T3236.55 in hH4HR) to provide additional subtype bias. From these studies we developed a pharmacophore model based on our predictions for known hH3HR selective antagonists in clinical study [ABT-239 1, GSK-189,254 2, PF-3654746 3, and BF2.649 (Tiprolisant) 4] that suggests critical selectivity directing elements are: the basic proton interacting with D1143.32, the spacer, the aromatic

  2. Effect of parental selection of healthy behavior topic on immediate and delayed plan to change child’s eating or physical activity behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recommendations direct pediatricians to address obesity and obesity prevention routinely during well child visits and to tailor their counseling, but clinicians feel ineffective because of time constraints and lack of parent interest. This intervention was designed to maintain the structure of the o...

  3. Instructional Complements for Undergraduate World History or Western Civilization Courses: Selected Topics in the Ancient, Medieval, and Modern History of India: A Curriculum Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Wayne Hamilton

    This curriculum supplement on India consists of three modules that have been used with undergraduates in introductory world civilization courses. Module 1, "Ancient Period: Hinduism and the Caste System in India: Origin, Development, and Social Functions" discusses the religious doctrines of Hinduism, the caste system, and its structure. The…

  4. Issues in the Development of Long Term Care Gerontology Centers: The Centers Concept. Selected Topics in Long Term Care. Volume 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortenson, Lee E.; Berdes, Celia M.

    This document, one in a series developed to provide technical assistance to 22 Long-Term Care Gerontology Centers, describes the current administrative and structural phenomenon of these centers. Precedents useful in assessing both the current climate and actual prospects for development of long term care centers are cited. The first section…

  5. Factor selection and structural identification in the interaction ANOVA model.

    PubMed

    Post, Justin B; Bondell, Howard D

    2013-03-01

    When faced with categorical predictors and a continuous response, the objective of an analysis often consists of two tasks: finding which factors are important and determining which levels of the factors differ significantly from one another. Often times, these tasks are done separately using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by a post hoc hypothesis testing procedure such as Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference test. When interactions between factors are included in the model the collapsing of levels of a factor becomes a more difficult problem. When testing for differences between two levels of a factor, claiming no difference would refer not only to equality of main effects, but also to equality of each interaction involving those levels. This structure between the main effects and interactions in a model is similar to the idea of heredity used in regression models. This article introduces a new method for accomplishing both of the common analysis tasks simultaneously in an interaction model while also adhering to the heredity-type constraint on the model. An appropriate penalization is constructed that encourages levels of factors to collapse and entire factors to be set to zero. It is shown that the procedure has the oracle property implying that asymptotically it performs as well as if the exact structure were known beforehand. We also discuss the application to estimating interactions in the unreplicated case. Simulation studies show the procedure outperforms post hoc hypothesis testing procedures as well as similar methods that do not include a structural constraint. The method is also illustrated using a real data example.

  6. Structural and optical studies on selected web spinning spider silks.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyani, R; Divya, A; Mathavan, T; Asath, R Mohamed; Benial, A Milton Franklin; Muthuchelian, K

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the structural and optical properties in the cribellate silk of the sheet web spider Stegodyphus sarasinorum Karsch (Eresidae) and the combined dragline, viscid silk of the orb-web spiders Argiope pulchella Thorell (Araneidae) and Nephila pilipes Fabricius (Nephilidae). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR), Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques were used to study these three spider silk species. X-ray diffraction data are consistent with the amorphous polymer network which is arising from the interaction of larger side chain amino acid contributions due to the poly-glycine rich sequences known to be present in the proteins of cribellate silk. The same amorphous polymer networks have been determined from the combined dragline and viscid silk of orb-web spiders. From FTIR spectra the results demonstrate that, cribellate silk of Stegodyphus sarasinorum, combined dragline viscid silk of Argiope pulchella and Nephila pilipes spider silks are showing protein peaks in the amide I, II and III regions. Further they proved that the functional groups present in the protein moieties are attributed to α-helical and side chain amino acid contributions. The optical properties of the obtained spider silks such as extinction coefficients, refractive index, real and imaginary dielectric constants and optical conductance were studied extensively from UV-Vis analysis. The important fluorescent amino acid tyrosine is present in the protein folding was investigated by using fluorescence spectroscopy. This research would explore the protein moieties present in the spider silks which were found to be associated with α-helix and side chain amino acid contributions than with β-sheet secondary structure and also the optical relationship between the three different spider silks are investigated. Successful spectroscopic knowledge of the internal protein structure and optical properties of the spider silks could

  7. Structural and optical studies on selected web spinning spider silks.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyani, R; Divya, A; Mathavan, T; Asath, R Mohamed; Benial, A Milton Franklin; Muthuchelian, K

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the structural and optical properties in the cribellate silk of the sheet web spider Stegodyphus sarasinorum Karsch (Eresidae) and the combined dragline, viscid silk of the orb-web spiders Argiope pulchella Thorell (Araneidae) and Nephila pilipes Fabricius (Nephilidae). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR), Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques were used to study these three spider silk species. X-ray diffraction data are consistent with the amorphous polymer network which is arising from the interaction of larger side chain amino acid contributions due to the poly-glycine rich sequences known to be present in the proteins of cribellate silk. The same amorphous polymer networks have been determined from the combined dragline and viscid silk of orb-web spiders. From FTIR spectra the results demonstrate that, cribellate silk of Stegodyphus sarasinorum, combined dragline viscid silk of Argiope pulchella and Nephila pilipes spider silks are showing protein peaks in the amide I, II and III regions. Further they proved that the functional groups present in the protein moieties are attributed to α-helical and side chain amino acid contributions. The optical properties of the obtained spider silks such as extinction coefficients, refractive index, real and imaginary dielectric constants and optical conductance were studied extensively from UV-Vis analysis. The important fluorescent amino acid tyrosine is present in the protein folding was investigated by using fluorescence spectroscopy. This research would explore the protein moieties present in the spider silks which were found to be associated with α-helix and side chain amino acid contributions than with β-sheet secondary structure and also the optical relationship between the three different spider silks are investigated. Successful spectroscopic knowledge of the internal protein structure and optical properties of the spider silks could

  8. Considering Future Potential Regarding Structural Diversity in Selection of Forest Reserves.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Johanna; Öhman, Karin; Rönnqvist, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lena

    2016-01-01

    A rich structural diversity in forests promotes biodiversity. Forests are dynamic and therefore it is crucial to consider future structural potential when selecting reserves, to make robust conservation decisions. We analyzed forests in boreal Sweden based on 17,599 National Forest Inventory (NFI) plots with the main aim to understand how effectiveness of reserves depends on the time dimension in the selection process, specifically by considering future structural diversity. In the study both the economic value and future values of 15 structural variables were simulated during a 100 year period. To get a net present structural value (NPSV), a single value covering both current and future values, we used four discounting alternatives: (1) only considering present values, (2) giving equal importance to values in each of the 100 years within the planning horizon, (3) applying an annual discount rate considering the risk that values could be lost, and (4) only considering the values in year 100. The four alternatives were evaluated in a reserve selection model under budget-constrained and area-constrained selections. When selecting young forests higher structural richness could be reached at a quarter of the cost over almost twice the area in a budget-constrained selection compared to an area-constrained selection. Our results point to the importance of considering future structural diversity in the selection of forest reserves and not as is done currently to base the selection on existing values. Targeting future values increases structural diversity and implies a relatively lower cost. Further, our results show that a re-orientation from old to young forests would imply savings while offering a more extensive reserve network with high structural qualities in the future. However, caution must be raised against a drastic reorientation of the current old-forest strategy since remnants of ancient forests will need to be prioritized due to their role for disturbance

  9. Considering Future Potential Regarding Structural Diversity in Selection of Forest Reserves.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Johanna; Öhman, Karin; Rönnqvist, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lena

    2016-01-01

    A rich structural diversity in forests promotes biodiversity. Forests are dynamic and therefore it is crucial to consider future structural potential when selecting reserves, to make robust conservation decisions. We analyzed forests in boreal Sweden based on 17,599 National Forest Inventory (NFI) plots with the main aim to understand how effectiveness of reserves depends on the time dimension in the selection process, specifically by considering future structural diversity. In the study both the economic value and future values of 15 structural variables were simulated during a 100 year period. To get a net present structural value (NPSV), a single value covering both current and future values, we used four discounting alternatives: (1) only considering present values, (2) giving equal importance to values in each of the 100 years within the planning horizon, (3) applying an annual discount rate considering the risk that values could be lost, and (4) only considering the values in year 100. The four alternatives were evaluated in a reserve selection model under budget-constrained and area-constrained selections. When selecting young forests higher structural richness could be reached at a quarter of the cost over almost twice the area in a budget-constrained selection compared to an area-constrained selection. Our results point to the importance of considering future structural diversity in the selection of forest reserves and not as is done currently to base the selection on existing values. Targeting future values increases structural diversity and implies a relatively lower cost. Further, our results show that a re-orientation from old to young forests would imply savings while offering a more extensive reserve network with high structural qualities in the future. However, caution must be raised against a drastic reorientation of the current old-forest strategy since remnants of ancient forests will need to be prioritized due to their role for disturbance

  10. Considering Future Potential Regarding Structural Diversity in Selection of Forest Reserves

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Johanna; Öhman, Karin; Rönnqvist, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lena

    2016-01-01

    A rich structural diversity in forests promotes biodiversity. Forests are dynamic and therefore it is crucial to consider future structural potential when selecting reserves, to make robust conservation decisions. We analyzed forests in boreal Sweden based on 17,599 National Forest Inventory (NFI) plots with the main aim to understand how effectiveness of reserves depends on the time dimension in the selection process, specifically by considering future structural diversity. In the study both the economic value and future values of 15 structural variables were simulated during a 100 year period. To get a net present structural value (NPSV), a single value covering both current and future values, we used four discounting alternatives: (1) only considering present values, (2) giving equal importance to values in each of the 100 years within the planning horizon, (3) applying an annual discount rate considering the risk that values could be lost, and (4) only considering the values in year 100. The four alternatives were evaluated in a reserve selection model under budget-constrained and area-constrained selections. When selecting young forests higher structural richness could be reached at a quarter of the cost over almost twice the area in a budget-constrained selection compared to an area-constrained selection. Our results point to the importance of considering future structural diversity in the selection of forest reserves and not as is done currently to base the selection on existing values. Targeting future values increases structural diversity and implies a relatively lower cost. Further, our results show that a re-orientation from old to young forests would imply savings while offering a more extensive reserve network with high structural qualities in the future. However, caution must be raised against a drastic reorientation of the current old-forest strategy since remnants of ancient forests will need to be prioritized due to their role for disturbance

  11. Structure Selective Depth Superresolution for RGB-D Cameras.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngjung; Ham, Bumsub; Oh, Changjae; Sohn, Kwanghoon

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes a method for high-quality depth superresolution. The standard formulations of image-guided depth upsampling, using simple joint filtering or quadratic optimization, lead to texture copying and depth bleeding artifacts. These artifacts are caused by inherent discrepancy of structures in data from different sensors. Although there exists some correlation between depth and intensity discontinuities, they are different in distribution and formation. To tackle this problem, we formulate an optimization model using a nonconvex regularizer. A nonlocal affinity established in a high-dimensional feature space is used to offer precisely localized depth boundaries. We show that the proposed method iteratively handles differences in structure between depth and intensity images. This property enables reducing texture copying and depth bleeding artifacts significantly on a variety of range data sets. We also propose a fast alternating direction method of multipliers algorithm to solve our optimization problem. Our solver shows a noticeable speed up compared with the conventional majorize-minimize algorithm. Extensive experiments with synthetic and real-world data sets demonstrate that the proposed method is superior to the existing methods.

  12. Coexistence of structured populations with size-based prey selection.

    PubMed

    Hartvig, Martin; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2013-11-01

    Species with a large adult-offspring size ratio and a preferred predator-prey mass ratio undergo ontogenetic trophic niche shift(s) throughout life. Trophic interactions between such species vary throughout life, resulting in different species-level interaction motifs depending on the maximum adult sizes and population size distributions. We explore the assembly and potential for coexistence of small communities where all species experience ontogenetic trophic niche shifts. The life-history of each species is described by a physiologically structured model and species identity is characterised by the trait: size at maturation. We show that a single species can exist in two different states: a 'resource driven state' and a 'cannibalistic state' with a large scope for emergent Allee effects and bistable states. Two species can coexist in two different configurations: in a 'competitive coexistence' state when the ratio between sizes at maturation of the two species is less than a predator-prey mass ratio and the resource level is low to intermediate, or in a 'trophic ladder' state if the ratio of sizes at maturation is larger than the predator-prey mass ratio at all resource levels. While there is a large scope for coexistence of two species, the scope for coexistence of three species is limited and we conclude that further trait differentiation is required for coexistence of more species-rich size-structured communities. PMID:23927897

  13. Selective visualization of gene structure with ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Becker, M.M.

    1988-02-01

    The ability of the ultraviolet (UV) footprinting technique to detect chromatin has been investigated in vitro. Two basic types of chromatin, a phased nucleosome and a phased nucleosome containing a phased H1 protein, have been reconstituted onto a cloned 5S ribosomal RNA gene from sea urchin. The histone-DNA interactions in each complex have been probed with exonuclease III, DNase I, dimethyl sulfate, and UV light. Whereas DNase I and exonuclease III readily detect interactions between histones and DNA, UV light and dimethyl sulfate do not. In contrast to histone-DNA interactions, we demonstrate that intimate sequence-specific contacts between the same sea urchin 5S DNA and the Xenopus laevis transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) are readily detected with UV light. Since the sensitivity of UV light for TFIIIA contacts is similar to its sensitivity for other regulatory protein-DNA contacts, these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using UV light to selectively visualize regulatory protein-DNA interactions in vivo with little or no interference from histone-DNA interactions.

  14. Analytical techniques for selection of repair-or-replace options for cast-iron gas piping systems--Phase I. Topical report, March 1985-June 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, R.B.; Golabi, K.; Chuang, J.

    1986-01-01

    A Cast Iron Maintenance Optimization System (CIMOS) was developed to identify failure-prone segments of cast-iron gas-piping systems and to determine the most-economical timing for replacing specific segments of such piping systems. The CIMOS provides a practical analytical tool that can be used by the gas industry to: (a) estimate probabilities of breaks and leaks on different cast-iron piping-system segments; (b) evaluate whether it is more economical (in terms of total current and future expected costs) to replace any given pipeline segment in the current year or to continue maintaining it with repairs as needed; (c) find the optimal group of pipeline segments to be replaced, and their priority order, for any designated budget; and (d) select the most cost-effective repair policy for those segments which would not be replaced. The CIMOS was fully developed and tested by one gas utility.

  15. Composite load spectra for select space propulsion structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Kurth, R. E.; Ho, H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop generic load models with multiple levels of progressive sophistication to simulate the composite load spectra that are induced in space propulsion system components, representative of Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), such as transfer ducts, turbine blades, and liquid oxygen (LOX) posts and system ducting. These models will be developed using two independent approaches. The first approach consists of using state-of-the-art probabilistic methods to describe the individual loading conditions and combinations of these loading conditions to synthesize the composite load spectra simulation. The methodology required to combine the various individual load simulation models (hot-gas dynamic, vibrations, instantaneous position, centrifugal field, etc.) into composite load spectra simulation models will be developed under this program. A computer code incorporating the various individual and composite load spectra models will be developed to construct the specific load model desired. The second approach, which is covered under the options portion of the contract, will consist of developing coupled models for composite load spectra simulation which combine the (deterministic) models for composite load dynamic, acoustic, high-pressure and high rotational speed, etc., load simulation using statistically varying coefficients. These coefficients will then be determined using advanced probabilistic simulation methods with and without strategically selected experimental data. This report covers the efforts of the third year of the contract. The overall program status is that the turbine blade loads have been completed and implemented. The transfer duct loads are defined and are being implemented. The thermal loads for all components are defined and coding is being developed. A dynamic pressure load model is under development. The parallel work on the probabilistic methodology is essentially completed. The overall effort is being

  16. Haloprogin: a Topical Antifungal Agent

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, E. F.; Zwadyk, P.; Bequette, R. J.; Hamlow, E. E.; Tavormina, P. A.; Zygmunt, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Haloprogin was shown to be a highly effective agent for the treatment of experimentally induced topical mycotic infections in guinea pigs. Its in vitro spectrum of activity also includes yeasts, yeastlike fungi (Candida species), and certain gram-positive bacteria. The in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of haloprogin against dermatophytes was equal to that observed with tolnaftate. The striking differences between the two agents were the marked antimonilial and selective antibacterial activities shown by haloprogin, contrasted with the negligible activities found with tolnaftate. Addition of serum decreased the in vitro antifungal activity of haloprogin to a greater extent than that of tolnaftate; however, diminished antifungal activity was not observed when haloprogin was applied topically to experimental dermatophytic infections. Based on its broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, haloprogin may prove to be a superior topical agent in the treatment of dermatophytic and monilial infections in man. PMID:5422306

  17. Structure-activity relationships for selected fragrance allergens.

    PubMed

    Patlewicz, G Y; Wright, Z M; Basketter, D A; Pease, C K; Lepoittevin, J-P; Arnau, E Giménez

    2002-10-01

    Fragrance substances represent a very diverse group of chemicals, a proportion of them providing not only desirable aroma characteristics, but also being associated with adverse effects, notably the ability to cause allergic reactions in the skin. However, efforts to find substitute materials are hampered by the need to undertake animal testing to evaluate both the presence and the degree of skin sensitization hazard. One potential route to avoid such testing is to understand the relationships between chemical structure and skin sensitization. In the present work we have evaluated two groups of fragrance chemicals, saturated aldehydes (aryl substituted and aliphatic aldehydes) and alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes. Data on their skin sensitization potency defined using the local lymph node assay has been evaluated in relation to their physicochemical properties. The initial outcome has been consistent with the concept that alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes react largely via Michael addition, whilst the group of saturated aldehydes form Schiff bases with proteins. Simple models of chemical reactivity based on these mechanisms suggest that it may be possible to predict allergenic potency. Accordingly, the evaluation of an additional group of similar aldehydes is now underway to assess the robustness of these models, with some emphasis being based on ensuring a wider spread of chemical reactivity.

  18. Selective Reinforcement to Enhance the Structural Performance of Metallic Compression Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation of the influence of selective reinforcement on metallic panels with cutouts was conducted. Selective reinforcement was shown to be a weight effective concept for increasing structural performance of panels with cutouts designed to carry loads into the post-buckled regime. For instance, a selectively reinforced aluminum panel under shear load exhibited a 68 percent increase in specific-buckling load as compared to a geometrically comparable unreinforced aluminum panel. In comparison, a quasi-isotropic carbon-fiber-reinforced-polymer composite panel only produced a 45 percent higher specific-buckling load than the same unreinforced aluminum panel. Selective reinforcement offers the potential to tailor structural response through local strengthening and stiffening the structure for a broad range of structural application.

  19. HierarchicalTopics: visually exploring large text collections using topic hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wenwen; Yu, Li; Wang, Xiaoyu; Ma, Zhiqiang; Ribarsky, William

    2013-12-01

    Analyzing large textual collections has become increasingly challenging given the size of the data available and the rate that more data is being generated. Topic-based text summarization methods coupled with interactive visualizations have presented promising approaches to address the challenge of analyzing large text corpora. As the text corpora and vocabulary grow larger, more topics need to be generated in order to capture the meaningful latent themes and nuances in the corpora. However, it is difficult for most of current topic-based visualizations to represent large number of topics without being cluttered or illegible. To facilitate the representation and navigation of a large number of topics, we propose a visual analytics system--HierarchicalTopic (HT). HT integrates a computational algorithm, Topic Rose Tree, with an interactive visual interface. The Topic Rose Tree constructs a topic hierarchy based on a list of topics. The interactive visual interface is designed to present the topic content as well as temporal evolution of topics in a hierarchical fashion. User interactions are provided for users to make changes to the topic hierarchy based on their mental model of the topic space. To qualitatively evaluate HT, we present a case study that showcases how HierarchicalTopics aid expert users in making sense of a large number of topics and discovering interesting patterns of topic groups. We have also conducted a user study to quantitatively evaluate the effect of hierarchical topic structure. The study results reveal that the HT leads to faster identification of large number of relevant topics. We have also solicited user feedback during the experiments and incorporated some suggestions into the current version of HierarchicalTopics.

  20. Seven topics in perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Buras, A.J.

    1980-09-01

    The following topics of perturbative QCD are discussed: (1) deep inelastic scattering; (2) higher order corrections to e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, to photon structure functions and to quarkonia decays; (3) higher order corrections to fragmentation functions and to various semi-inclusive processes; (4) higher twist contributions; (5) exclusive processes; (6) transverse momentum effects; (7) jet and photon physics.

  1. Structural Analysis of Triacylglycerols by Using a MALDI-TOF/TOF System with Monoisotopic Precursor Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Ayumi; Satoh, Takaya; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Tamura, Jun; Cody, Robert B.

    2013-05-01

    A new MALDI-TOF/TOF system with monoisotopic precursor selection was applied to the analysis of triacylglycerols in an olive oil sample. Monoisotopic precursor selection made it possible to obtain product-ion mass spectra without interference from species that differed by a single double bond. Complete structure determination of all triacylglycerols, including structural isomers, was made possible by interpreting the charge-remote fragmentation resulting from high-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the sodiated triacylglycerols.

  2. The Structure of Genealogies in the Presence of Purifying Selection: A Fitness-Class Coalescent

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Nicolaisen, Lauren E.; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Desai, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Compared to a neutral model, purifying selection distorts the structure of genealogies and hence alters the patterns of sampled genetic variation. Although these distortions may be common in nature, our understanding of how we expect purifying selection to affect patterns of molecular variation remains incomplete. Genealogical approaches such as coalescent theory have proven difficult to generalize to situations involving selection at many linked sites, unless selection pressures are extremely strong. Here, we introduce an effective coalescent theory (a “fitness-class coalescent”) to describe the structure of genealogies in the presence of purifying selection at many linked sites. We use this effective theory to calculate several simple statistics describing the expected patterns of variation in sequence data, both at the sites under selection and at linked neutral sites. Our analysis combines a description of the allele frequency spectrum in the presence of purifying selection with the structured coalescent approach of Kaplan et al. (1988), to trace the ancestry of individuals through the distribution of fitnesses within the population. We also derive our results using a more direct extension of the structured coalescent approach of Hudson and Kaplan (1994). We find that purifying selection leads to patterns of genetic variation that are related but not identical to a neutrally evolving population in which population size has varied in a specific way in the past. PMID:22135349

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: Black silicon method X: a review on high speed and selective plasma etching of silicon with profile control: an in-depth comparison between Bosch and cryostat DRIE processes as a roadmap to next generation equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, H V; de Boer, M J; Unnikrishnan, S; Louwerse, M C; Elwenspoek, M C

    2009-03-01

    An intensive study has been performed to understand and tune deep reactive ion etch (DRIE) processes for optimum results with respect to the silicon etch rate, etch profile and mask etch selectivity (in order of priority) using state-of-the-art dual power source DRIE equipment. The research compares pulsed-mode DRIE processes (e.g. Bosch technique) and mixed-mode DRIE processes (e.g. cryostat technique). In both techniques, an inhibitor is added to fluorine-based plasma to achieve directional etching, which is formed out of an oxide-forming (O2) or a fluorocarbon (FC) gas (C4F8 or CHF3). The inhibitor can be introduced together with the etch gas, which is named a mixed-mode DRIE process, or the inhibitor can be added in a time-multiplexed manner, which will be termed a pulsed-mode DRIE process. Next, the most convenient mode of operation found in this study is highlighted including some remarks to ensure proper etching (i.e. step synchronization in pulsed-mode operation and heat control of the wafer). First of all, for the fabrication of directional profiles, pulsed-mode DRIE is far easier to handle, is more robust with respect to the pattern layout and has the potential of achieving much higher mask etch selectivity, whereas in a mixed-mode the etch rate is higher and sidewall scalloping is prohibited. It is found that both pulsed-mode CHF3 and C4F8 are perfectly suited to perform high speed directional etching, although they have the drawback of leaving the FC residue at the sidewalls of etched structures. They show an identical result when the flow of CHF3 is roughly 30 times the flow of C4F8, and the amount of gas needed for a comparable result decreases rapidly while lowering the temperature from room down to cryogenic (and increasing the etch rate). Moreover, lowering the temperature lowers the mask erosion rate substantially (and so the mask selectivity improves). The pulsed-mode O2 is FC-free but shows only tolerable anisotropic results at -120 °C. The

  4. Structural insights into ligand recognition and selectivity for class A, B, and C GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Min; Booe, Jason M.; Pioszak, Augen A.

    2015-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily constitutes the largest collection of cell surface signaling proteins with approximately 800 members in the human genome. GPCRs regulate virtually all aspects of physiology and they are an important class of drug targets with ~30% of drugs on the market targeting a GPCR. Breakthroughs in GPCR structural biology in recent years have significantly expanded our understanding of GPCR structure and function and ushered in a new era of structure-based drug design for GPCRs. Crystal structures for nearly thirty distinct GPCRs are now available including receptors from each of the major classes, A, B, C, and F. These structures provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of GPCR pharmacology. Here, we review structural mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity of GPCRs with a focus on selected examples from classes A, B, and C, and we highlight major unresolved questions for future structural studies. PMID:25981303

  5. Improving a consensus approach for protein structure selection by removing redundancy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingguo; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong

    2011-01-01

    In protein tertiary structure prediction, a crucial step is to select near-native structures from a large number of predicted structural models. Over the years, extensive research has been conducted for the protein structure selection problem with most approaches focusing on developing more accurate energy or scoring functions. Despite significant advances in this area, the discerning power of current approaches is still unsatisfactory. In this paper, we propose a novel consensus-based algorithm for the selection of predicted protein structures. Given a set of predicted models, our method first removes redundant structures to derive a subset of reference models. Then, a structure is ranked based on its average pairwise similarity to the reference models. Using the CASP8 data set containing a large collection of predicted models for 122 targets, we compared our method with the best CASP8 quality assessment (QA) servers, which are all consensus based, and showed that our QA scores correlate better with the GDT-TSs than those of the CASP8 QA servers. We also compared our method with the state-of-the-art scoring functions and showed its improved performance for near-native model selection. The GDT-TSs of the top models picked by our method are on average more than 8 percent better than the ones selected by the best performing scoring function. PMID:21519117

  6. The structure of XIAP BIR2: understanding the selectivity of the BIR domains

    SciTech Connect

    Lukacs, Christine Belunis, Charles; Crowther, Robert; Danho, Waleed; Gao, Lin; Goggin, Barry; Janson, Cheryl A.; Li, Shirley; Remiszewski, Stacy; Schutt, Andrew; Thakur, Manish K.; Singh, Saroj K.; Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Pandey, Rajat; Tyagi, Rajiv; Gosu, Ramachandraiah; Kamath, Ajith V.; Kuglstatter, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    The high-resolution crystal structures of apo and peptide-bound XIAP BIR2 are presented and compared with BIR3 structures to understand their selectivity. This crystal system can be used to determine the structures of BIR2–inhibitor complexes. XIAP, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of proteins, is a critical regulator of apoptosis. Inhibition of the BIR domain–caspase interaction is a promising approach towards treating cancer. Previous work has been directed towards inhibiting the BIR3–caspase-9 interaction, which blocks the intrinsic apoptotic pathway; selectively inhibiting the BIR2–caspase-3 interaction would also block the extrinsic pathway. The BIR2 domain of XIAP has successfully been crystallized; peptides and small-molecule inhibitors can be soaked into these crystals, which diffract to high resolution. Here, the BIR2 apo crystal structure and the structures of five BIR2–tetrapeptide complexes are described. The structural flexibility observed on comparing these structures, along with a comparison with XIAP BIR3, affords an understanding of the structural elements that drive selectivity between BIR2 and BIR3 and which can be used to design BIR2-selective inhibitors.

  7. Identifying Topics in Microblogs Using Wikipedia.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Ahmet; Üsküdarlı, Suzan; Özgür, Arzucan

    2016-01-01

    Twitter is an extremely high volume platform for user generated contributions regarding any topic. The wealth of content created at real-time in massive quantities calls for automated approaches to identify the topics of the contributions. Such topics can be utilized in numerous ways, such as public opinion mining, marketing, entertainment, and disaster management. Towards this end, approaches to relate single or partial posts to knowledge base items have been proposed. However, in microblogging systems like Twitter, topics emerge from the culmination of a large number of contributions. Therefore, identifying topics based on collections of posts, where individual posts contribute to some aspect of the greater topic is necessary. Models, such as Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA), propose algorithms for relating collections of posts to sets of keywords that represent underlying topics. In these approaches, figuring out what the specific topic(s) the keyword sets represent remains as a separate task. Another issue in topic detection is the scope, which is often limited to specific domain, such as health. This work proposes an approach for identifying domain-independent specific topics related to sets of posts. In this approach, individual posts are processed and then aggregated to identify key tokens, which are then mapped to specific topics. Wikipedia article titles are selected to represent topics, since they are up to date, user-generated, sophisticated articles that span topics of human interest. This paper describes the proposed approach, a prototype implementation, and a case study based on data gathered during the heavily contributed periods corresponding to the four US election debates in 2012. The manually evaluated results (0.96 precision) and other observations from the study are discussed in detail. PMID:26991442

  8. Identifying Topics in Microblogs Using Wikipedia

    PubMed Central

    Yıldırım, Ahmet; Üsküdarlı, Suzan; Özgür, Arzucan

    2016-01-01

    Twitter is an extremely high volume platform for user generated contributions regarding any topic. The wealth of content created at real-time in massive quantities calls for automated approaches to identify the topics of the contributions. Such topics can be utilized in numerous ways, such as public opinion mining, marketing, entertainment, and disaster management. Towards this end, approaches to relate single or partial posts to knowledge base items have been proposed. However, in microblogging systems like Twitter, topics emerge from the culmination of a large number of contributions. Therefore, identifying topics based on collections of posts, where individual posts contribute to some aspect of the greater topic is necessary. Models, such as Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA), propose algorithms for relating collections of posts to sets of keywords that represent underlying topics. In these approaches, figuring out what the specific topic(s) the keyword sets represent remains as a separate task. Another issue in topic detection is the scope, which is often limited to specific domain, such as health. This work proposes an approach for identifying domain-independent specific topics related to sets of posts. In this approach, individual posts are processed and then aggregated to identify key tokens, which are then mapped to specific topics. Wikipedia article titles are selected to represent topics, since they are up to date, user-generated, sophisticated articles that span topics of human interest. This paper describes the proposed approach, a prototype implementation, and a case study based on data gathered during the heavily contributed periods corresponding to the four US election debates in 2012. The manually evaluated results (0.96 precision) and other observations from the study are discussed in detail. PMID:26991442

  9. Identifying Topics in Microblogs Using Wikipedia.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Ahmet; Üsküdarlı, Suzan; Özgür, Arzucan

    2016-01-01

    Twitter is an extremely high volume platform for user generated contributions regarding any topic. The wealth of content created at real-time in massive quantities calls for automated approaches to identify the topics of the contributions. Such topics can be utilized in numerous ways, such as public opinion mining, marketing, entertainment, and disaster management. Towards this end, approaches to relate single or partial posts to knowledge base items have been proposed. However, in microblogging systems like Twitter, topics emerge from the culmination of a large number of contributions. Therefore, identifying topics based on collections of posts, where individual posts contribute to some aspect of the greater topic is necessary. Models, such as Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA), propose algorithms for relating collections of posts to sets of keywords that represent underlying topics. In these approaches, figuring out what the specific topic(s) the keyword sets represent remains as a separate task. Another issue in topic detection is the scope, which is often limited to specific domain, such as health. This work proposes an approach for identifying domain-independent specific topics related to sets of posts. In this approach, individual posts are processed and then aggregated to identify key tokens, which are then mapped to specific topics. Wikipedia article titles are selected to represent topics, since they are up to date, user-generated, sophisticated articles that span topics of human interest. This paper describes the proposed approach, a prototype implementation, and a case study based on data gathered during the heavily contributed periods corresponding to the four US election debates in 2012. The manually evaluated results (0.96 precision) and other observations from the study are discussed in detail.

  10. The Structural Basis of Cryptosporidium-Specific IMP Dehydrogenase Inhibitor Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    MacPherson, Iain S.; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Riera, Thomas V.; D’Aquino, J. Alejandro; Zhang, Minjia; Cuny, Gregory D.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2010-03-29

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a potential biowarfare agent, an important AIDS pathogen, and a major cause of diarrhea and malnutrition. No vaccines or effective drug treatment exist to combat Cryptosporidium infection. This parasite relies on inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) to obtain guanine nucleotides, and inhibition of this enzyme blocks parasite proliferation. Here, we report the first crystal structures of CpIMPDH. These structures reveal the structural basis of inhibitor selectivity and suggest a strategy for further optimization. Using this information, we have synthesized low-nanomolar inhibitors that display 10{sup 3} selectivity for the parasite enzyme over human IMPDH2.

  11. ACEE Composite Structures Technology: Review of selected NASA research on composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program was designed to develop technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Research on composite materials, aircraft structures, and aircraft design is presented herein. The following parameters of composite materials were addressed: residual strength, damage tolerance, toughness, tensile strength, impact resistance, buckling, and noise transmission within composite materials structures.

  12. [Topical therapy of rosacea].

    PubMed

    Schöfer, H

    2013-07-01

    Metronidazole and azelaic acid are the only topical medications approved for rosacea. All other topical treatments for rosacea and its special forms are used off-label. Topical steroids are not indicated in rosacea, because of their side effects (induction of steroid rosacea, high risk of facial skin atrophy, and high risk of rebound after cessation of therapy). Topical as well as systemic steroids are allowed only as initial and short term therapy for acute forms of rosacea (e.g. rosacea fulminans). Papular and pustular rosacea is the major indication for topical therapy. Sebaceous gland and connective tissue hyperplasia in glandular-hypertrophic rosacea as well as erythema in erythematous rosacea do not respond well to topical measures. A new active substance, the alpha-2-adrenoreceptor agonist brimonidine, will be approved soon for the topical treatment of erythema in rosacea. All severe forms of rosacea should initially be treated with a combination of topical and systemic agents. After improvement of the clinical symptoms, topical treatment alone is usually adequate to maintain the control.

  13. IT vendor selection model by using structural equation model & analytical hierarchy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Sarit; Dominic, P. D. D.

    2012-11-01

    Selecting and evaluating the right vendors is imperative for an organization's global marketplace competitiveness. Improper selection and evaluation of potential vendors can dwarf an organization's supply chain performance. Numerous studies have demonstrated that firms consider multiple criteria when selecting key vendors. This research intends to develop a new hybrid model for vendor selection process with better decision making. The new proposed model provides a suitable tool for assisting decision makers and managers to make the right decisions and select the most suitable vendor. This paper proposes a Hybrid model based on Structural Equation Model (SEM) and Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) for long-term strategic vendor selection problems. The five steps framework of the model has been designed after the thorough literature study. The proposed hybrid model will be applied using a real life case study to assess its effectiveness. In addition, What-if analysis technique will be used for model validation purpose.

  14. Kin groups and trait groups: population structure and epidemic disease selection.

    PubMed

    Fix, A G

    1984-10-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation based on the population structure of a small-scale human population, the Semai Senoi of Malaysia, has been developed to study the combined effects of group, kin, and individual selection. The population structure resembles D.S. Wilson's structured deme model in that local breeding populations (Semai settlements) are subdivided into trait groups (hamlets) that may be kin-structured and are not themselves demes. Additionally, settlement breeding populations are connected by two-dimensional stepping-stone migration approaching 30% per generation. Group and kin-structured group selection occur among hamlets the survivors of which then disperse to breed within the settlement population. Genetic drift is modeled by the process of hamlet formation; individual selection as a deterministic process, and stepping-stone migration as either random or kin-structured migrant groups. The mechanism for group selection is epidemics of infectious disease that can wipe out small hamlets particularly if most adults become sick and social life collapses. Genetic resistance to a disease is an individual attribute; however, hamlet groups with several resistant adults are less likely to disintegrate and experience high social mortality. A specific human gene, hemoglobin E, which confers resistance to malaria, is studied as an example of the process. The results of the simulations show that high genetic variance among hamlet groups may be generated by moderate degrees of kin-structuring. This strong microdifferentiation provides the potential for group selection. The effect of group selection in this case is rapid increase in gene frequencies among the total set of populations. In fact, group selection in concert with individual selection produced a faster rate of gene frequency increase among a set of 25 populations than the rate within a single unstructured population subject to deterministic individual selection. Such rapid evolution with plausible rates of

  15. Improving the correlation structure selection approach for generalized estimating equations and balanced longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Westgate, Philip M

    2014-06-15

    Generalized estimating equations are commonly used to analyze correlated data. Choosing an appropriate working correlation structure for the data is important, as the efficiency of generalized estimating equations depends on how closely this structure approximates the true structure. Therefore, most studies have proposed multiple criteria to select the working correlation structure, although some of these criteria have neither been compared nor extensively studied. To ease the correlation selection process, we propose a criterion that utilizes the trace of the empirical covariance matrix. Furthermore, use of the unstructured working correlation can potentially improve estimation precision and therefore should be considered when data arise from a balanced longitudinal study. However, most previous studies have not allowed the unstructured working correlation to be selected as it estimates more nuisance correlation parameters than other structures such as AR-1 or exchangeable. Therefore, we propose appropriate penalties for the selection criteria that can be imposed upon the unstructured working correlation. Via simulation in multiple scenarios and in application to a longitudinal study, we show that the trace of the empirical covariance matrix works very well relative to existing criteria. We further show that allowing criteria to select the unstructured working correlation when utilizing the penalties can substantially improve parameter estimation.

  16. Salicylic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin blemishes in people who have acne. Topical salicylic acid is also used to treat skin conditions that involve scaling or overgrowth of skin ... water for 15 minutes.Do not apply topical salicylic acid to skin that is broken, red, swollen, irritated, or infected. ...

  17. Selected topics related to occupational exposures.

    PubMed

    Leikin, J B; Davis, A; Klodd, D A; Thunder, T; Kelafant, G A; Paquette, D L; Rothe, M J; Rubin, R

    2000-04-01

    The auditory and nonauditory effects of noise can be quite profound, affecting approximately 15 to 20 million Americans. As with most occupational toxins, recognition and careful assessment of noise exposure are the foundation on which preventive measures and treatment are based. Dosimeters can measure noise exposure over specific time periods. Pure tone air conduction audiometric monitoring should be performed on an annual basis in workers at risk for significant noise exposure. Occupational infectious disease involves far more than hepatitis and tuberculosis. Periodic fever, dermatologic manifestations and other symptoms peculiar to a specific disease may be important clues to an occupationally related exposure. Whereas strict attention to hand washing and isolation are cornerstones of prevention, use of protective gear is mandated in certain situations. Zoonotic disease, agriculture exposure, water transmission, and biologic contaminants in buildings can be important but subtle exposures sources. Recognition of these infections often depends on the alertness of the primary care giver. PMID:10830610

  18. School Chemistry, Trends in Reform, Selected Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisman, D. G.

    Trends, from 1960 to 1963, in the teaching of chemistry in secondary schools in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, and the United States of America are outlined in the first part of this report of a 1963 working session on the teaching of school…

  19. Application of value-focused thinking on the environmental selection of wall structures.

    PubMed

    Hassan, O A B

    2004-02-01

    The decision of selecting building structures with respect to the environmental demand is an issue commonly addressed in environmental management. In this paper, the importance of considering the decision analysis technique value-focused thinking in the environmental selection of wall structures is investigated. In this context, a qualitative value model is developed in which the external and internal environmental factors are considered. The model is applied on a case study in which a decision should be made on three categories of exterior wall structures: wood, masonry and concrete. It is found that the wall structure made of wood is the most compatible option with respect to the external and internal environmental requirements of building structures. PMID:15160743

  20. Itch Management: Topical Agents.

    PubMed

    Metz, Martin; Staubach, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pruritus is a common problem in patients with inflammatory skin diseases as well as in subjects with dry or sensitive skin. Regardless of the underlying cause of the pruritus, a topical therapy is not only useful but most often necessary to achieve symptom control. A good topical therapy should fulfill different functions. An optimal basic therapy based on the condition of the skin is important to repair epithelial barrier defects and to rehydrate the skin. An adequate disease-specific topical therapy is crucial for inflamed skin, e.g. anti-inflammatory topical therapy is an important part in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Finally, the use of specific antipruritic substances can help to improve pruritus in patients irrespective of the underlying disease. Here, we summarize topical agents used in the treatment of chronic pruritus. PMID:27578070

  1. Topic Maps e-Learning Portal Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsevicova, Kamila

    2006-01-01

    Topic Maps, ISO/IEC 13250 standard, are designed to facilitate the organization and navigation of large collections of information objects by creating meta-level perspectives of their underlying concepts and relationships. The underlying structure of concepts and relations is expressed by domain ontologies. The Topics Maps technology can become…

  2. Selection of optimal artificial boundary condition (ABC) frequencies for structural damage identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Lei; Lu, Yong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the sensitivities of artificial boundary condition (ABC) frequencies to the damages are investigated, and the optimal sensors are selected to provide the reliable structural damage identification. The sensitivity expressions for one-pin and two-pin ABC frequencies, which are the natural frequencies from structures with one and two additional constraints to its original boundary condition, respectively, are proposed. Based on the expressions, the contributions of the underlying mode shapes in the ABC frequencies can be calculated and used to select more sensitive ABC frequencies. Selection criteria are then defined for different conditions, and their performance in structural damage identification is examined with numerical studies. From the findings, conclusions are given.

  3. Cation Selectivity in Biological Cation Channels Using Experimental Structural Information and Statistical Mechanical Simulation.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Justin John; Peyser, Alexander; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cation selective channels constitute the gate for ion currents through the cell membrane. Here we present an improved statistical mechanical model based on atomistic structural information, cation hydration state and without tuned parameters that reproduces the selectivity of biological Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. The importance of the inclusion of step-wise cation hydration in these results confirms the essential role partial dehydration plays in the bacterial Na+ channels. The model, proven reliable against experimental data, could be straightforwardly used for designing Na+ and Ca2+ selective nanopores. PMID:26460827

  4. Selective Adsorption of CO2 from Light Gas Mixtures Using a Structurally Dynamic Porous Coordination Polymer**

    SciTech Connect

    Kristi L. Kauffman, Jeffrey T. Culp, Andrew J. Allen, Laura Espinal, Winnie Wong-Ng, Thomas D. Brown, Angela Goodman, Mark P. Bernardo, Russel J. Pancoast, Danielle Chirdon, Christopher Matranga*

    2010-01-01

    The selective adsorption of CO{sub 2} from mixtures with N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O in a dynamic porous coordination polymer (see monomer structure) was evaluated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, GC, and SANS. All three techniques indicate highly selective adsorption of CO{sub 2} from CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures at 30 C, with no selectivity observed for the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O system.

  5. Cation Selectivity in Biological Cation Channels Using Experimental Structural Information and Statistical Mechanical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Justin John

    2015-01-01

    Cation selective channels constitute the gate for ion currents through the cell membrane. Here we present an improved statistical mechanical model based on atomistic structural information, cation hydration state and without tuned parameters that reproduces the selectivity of biological Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. The importance of the inclusion of step-wise cation hydration in these results confirms the essential role partial dehydration plays in the bacterial Na+ channels. The model, proven reliable against experimental data, could be straightforwardly used for designing Na+ and Ca2+ selective nanopores. PMID:26460827

  6. Usage-Oriented Topic Maps Building Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellouze, Nebrasse; Lammari, Nadira; Métais, Elisabeth; Ben Ahmed, Mohamed

    In this paper, we present a collaborative and incremental construction approach of multilingual Topic Maps based on enrichment and merging techniques. In recent years, several Topic Map building approaches have been proposed endowed with different characteristics. Generally, they are dedicated to particular data types like text, semi-structured data, relational data, etc. We note also that most of these approaches take as input monolingual documents to build the Topic Map. The problem is that the large majority of resources available today are written in various languages, and these resources could be relevant even to non-native speakers. Thus, our work is driven towards a collaborative and incremental method for Topic Map construction from textual documents available in different languages. To enrich the Topic Map, we take as input a domain thesaurus and we propose also to explore the Topic Map usage which means available potential questions related to the source documents.

  7. Topical diclofenac solution.

    PubMed

    Moen, Marit D

    2009-01-01

    Topical diclofenac solution (Pennsaid) is a liquid formulation containing the NSAID diclofenac sodium (1.5% w/w). The solution base contains 45% w/w dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to enhance the absorption of diclofenac through the skin. Topical diclofenac solution is applied directly to the knee for treatment of symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee. In well designed 4- to 12-week trials in patients with primary osteoarthritis of the knee, topical diclofenac solution (40 drops four times daily) was significantly more effective than placebo or vehicle control (carrier solution without diclofenac) for improving Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index pain and physical function, and improving patient global assessment (PGA) and/or patient overall health assessment scores from baseline to the final assessments. Topical diclofenac solution (50 drops three times daily) was as effective as oral diclofenac 150 mg/day for improving WOMAC pain and physical function and PGA scores in a 12-week double-blind study in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Topical diclofenac solution was generally well tolerated. The most common treatment-emergent adverse event experienced by topical diclofenac solution recipients was dry skin at the application site. Gastrointestinal adverse events and abnormal laboratory parameters were less common with topical diclofenac solution than with oral diclofenac. PMID:19943711

  8. Topical diclofenac solution.

    PubMed

    Moen, Marit D

    2009-01-01

    Topical diclofenac solution (Pennsaid) is a liquid formulation containing the NSAID diclofenac sodium (1.5% w/w). The solution base contains 45% w/w dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to enhance the absorption of diclofenac through the skin. Topical diclofenac solution is applied directly to the knee for treatment of symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee. In well designed 4- to 12-week trials in patients with primary osteoarthritis of the knee, topical diclofenac solution (40 drops four times daily) was significantly more effective than placebo or vehicle control (carrier solution without diclofenac) for improving Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index pain and physical function, and improving patient global assessment (PGA) and/or patient overall health assessment scores from baseline to the final assessments. Topical diclofenac solution (50 drops three times daily) was as effective as oral diclofenac 150 mg/day for improving WOMAC pain and physical function and PGA scores in a 12-week double-blind study in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Topical diclofenac solution was generally well tolerated. The most common treatment-emergent adverse event experienced by topical diclofenac solution recipients was dry skin at the application site. Gastrointestinal adverse events and abnormal laboratory parameters were less common with topical diclofenac solution than with oral diclofenac.

  9. Broadband frequency-selective spoof surface plasmon polaritons on ultrathin metallic structure.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia Yuan; Ren, Jian; Zhang, Hao Chi; Pan, Bai Cao; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-01-01

    We propose an ultrathin metallic structure to produce frequency-selective spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in the microwave and terahertz frequencies. Designed on a thin dielectric substrate, the ultrathin metallic structure is composed of two oppositely oriented single-side corrugated strips, which are coupled to two double-side corrugated strips. The structure is fed by a traditional coplanar waveguide (CPW). To make a smooth conversion between the spatial modes in CPW and SPP modes, two transition sections are also designed. We fabricate and measure the frequency-selective spoof SPP structure in microwave frequencies. The measurement results show that the reflection coefficient is less than -10 dB with the transmission loss around 1.5 dB in the selective frequency band from 7 to 10 GHz, which are in good agreements with numerical simulations. The proposed structure can be used as an SPP filter with good performance of low loss, high transmission, and wide bandwidth in the selective frequency band. PMID:25641730

  10. Broadband Frequency-Selective Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons on Ultrathin Metallic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jia Yuan; Ren, Jian; Zhang, Hao Chi; Pan, Bai Cao; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-02-01

    We propose an ultrathin metallic structure to produce frequency-selective spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in the microwave and terahertz frequencies. Designed on a thin dielectric substrate, the ultrathin metallic structure is composed of two oppositely oriented single-side corrugated strips, which are coupled to two double-side corrugated strips. The structure is fed by a traditional coplanar waveguide (CPW). To make a smooth conversion between the spatial modes in CPW and SPP modes, two transition sections are also designed. We fabricate and measure the frequency-selective spoof SPP structure in microwave frequencies. The measurement results show that the reflection coefficient is less than -10 dB with the transmission loss around 1.5 dB in the selective frequency band from 7 to 10 GHz, which are in good agreements with numerical simulations. The proposed structure can be used as an SPP filter with good performance of low loss, high transmission, and wide bandwidth in the selective frequency band.

  11. Structures of the Four Subfamilies of Phosphodiesterase-4 Provide Insight into the Selectivity of Their Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Peng, M; Chen , Y; Geng, J; Robinson, H; Houslay , M; Cai, J; Ke, H

    2007-01-01

    PDE4 (phosphodiesterase-4)-selective inhibitors have attracted much attention as potential therapeutics for the treatment of both depression and major inflammatory diseases, but their practical application has been compromised by side effects. A possible cause for the side effects is that current PDE4-selective inhibitors similarly inhibit isoforms from all four PDE4 subfamilies. The development of PDE4 subfamily-selective inhibitors has been hampered by a lack of structural information. In the present study, we rectify this by providing the crystal structures of the catalytic domains of PDE4A, PDE4B and PDE4D in complex with the PDE4 inhibitor NVP 4-[8-(3-nitrophenyl)-[1,7]naphthyridin-6-yl]benzoic acid as well as the unliganded PDE4C structure. NVP binds in the same conformation to the deep cAMP substrate pocket and interacts with the same residues in each instance. However, detailed structural comparison reveals significant conformational differences. Although the active sites of PDE4B and PDE4D are mostly comparable, PDE4A shows significant displacements of the residues next to the invariant glutamine residue that is critical for substrate and inhibitor binding. PDE4C appears to be more distal from other PDE4 subfamilies, with certain key residues being disordered. Our analyses provide the first structural basis for the development of PDE4 subfamily-selective inhibitors.

  12. Broadband Frequency-Selective Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons on Ultrathin Metallic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jia Yuan; Ren, Jian; Zhang, Hao Chi; Pan, Bai Cao; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-01-01

    We propose an ultrathin metallic structure to produce frequency-selective spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in the microwave and terahertz frequencies. Designed on a thin dielectric substrate, the ultrathin metallic structure is composed of two oppositely oriented single-side corrugated strips, which are coupled to two double-side corrugated strips. The structure is fed by a traditional coplanar waveguide (CPW). To make a smooth conversion between the spatial modes in CPW and SPP modes, two transition sections are also designed. We fabricate and measure the frequency-selective spoof SPP structure in microwave frequencies. The measurement results show that the reflection coefficient is less than -10 dB with the transmission loss around 1.5 dB in the selective frequency band from 7 to 10 GHz, which are in good agreements with numerical simulations. The proposed structure can be used as an SPP filter with good performance of low loss, high transmission, and wide bandwidth in the selective frequency band. PMID:25641730

  13. Polarization Selectivity of Artificial Anisotropic Structures Based on DNA-Like Helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semchenko, I. V.; Khakhomov, S. A.; Balmakov, A. P.

    2010-11-01

    Currently, 2D and 3D structures of different symmetries can be formed from DNA molecules. The electromagnetic properties of this new natural chiral material can be changed by metalizing DNA. Spatial structures of this type can be used in nanotechnology to prepare metamaterials for the far-UV region. It is shown by the example of an octahedron and a cube composed of DNA-like helices that these structures may exhibit polarization selectivity to electromagnetic radiation. In addition, it is suggested that the effect of the polarization selectivity of DNA-like artificial structures may also occur in the soft X-ray region for all living organisms in nature due to the universal DNA form.

  14. Sentence processing selectivity in Broca’s area: evident for structure but not syntactic movement

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Diogo; Sprouse, Jon; Hickok, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The role of Broca’s area in sentence processing is hotly debated. Prominent hypotheses include that Broca’s area supports sentence comprehension via syntax-specific processes (“syntactic movement” in particular), hierarchical structure building or working memory. In the present fMRI study we adopt a within subject, across task approach using targeted sentence-level contrasts and non-sentential comparison tasks to address these hypotheses regarding the role of Broca’s area in sentence processing. For clarity, we have presented findings as three experiments: (i) Experiment 1 examines selectivity for a particular type of sentence construction, namely those containing syntactic movement. Standard syntactic movement distance effects in Broca’s area were replicated but no difference was found between movement and non-movement sentences in Broca’s area at the group level or consistently in individual subjects. (ii) Experiment 2 examines selectivity for sentences versus non-sentences, to assess claims regarding the role of Broca’s area in hierarchical structure building. Group and individual results differ, but both identify subregions of Broca’s area that are selective for sentence structure. (iii) Experiment 3 assesses whether activations in Broca’s area are selective for sentences when contrasted with simple subvocal articulation. Group results suggest shared resources for sentence processing and articulation in Broca’s area, but individual subject analyses contradict this finding. We conclude that Broca’s area is not selectively involved in processing syntactic movement, but that subregions are selectively responsive to sentence structure. Our findings also reinforce Fedorenko & Kanwishser’s call for the use of more individual subject analyses in functional imaging studies of sentence processing in Broca’s area, as group findings can obscure selective response patterns. PMID:27135039

  15. The pharmacology of topical analgesics.

    PubMed

    Barkin, Robert L

    2013-07-01

    Pain management of patients continues to pose challenges to clinicians. Given the multiple dimensions of pain--whether acute or chronic, mild, moderate, or severe, nociceptive or neuropathic--a multimodal approach may be needed. Fortunately, clinicians have an array of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment choices; however, each modality must be chosen carefully, because some often used oral agents are associated with safety and tolerability issues that restrict their use in certain patients. In particular, orally administered nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, opioids, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants are known to cause systemic adverse effects in some patients. To address this problem, a number of topical therapies in various therapeutic classes have been developed to reduce systemic exposure and minimize the risks of patients developing adverse events. For example, topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug formulations produce a site-specific effect (ie, cyclo-oxygenase inhibition) while decreasing the systemic exposure that may lead to undesired effects in patients. Similarly, derivatives of acetylsalicylic acid (ie, salicylates) are used in topical analgesic formulations that do not significantly enter the patient's systemic circulation. Salicylates, along with capsaicin, menthol, and camphor, compose the counterirritant class of topical analgesics, which produce analgesia by activating and then desensitizing epidermal nociceptors. Additionally, patches and creams that contain the local anesthetic lidocaine, alone or co-formulated with other local anesthetics, are also used to manage patients with select acute and chronic pain states. Perhaps the most common topical analgesic modality is the cautious application of cutaneous cold and heat. Such treatments may decrease pain not by reaching the target tissue through systemic distribution, but by acting more directly on the affected tissue. Despite the tolerability benefits associated with avoiding

  16. Artificial selection for structural color on butterfly wings and comparison with natural evolution.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Bethany R; Liew, Seng Fatt; Lilien, David A; Dinwiddie, April J; Noh, Heeso; Cao, Hui; Monteiro, Antónia

    2014-08-19

    Brilliant animal colors often are produced from light interacting with intricate nano-morphologies present in biological materials such as butterfly wing scales. Surveys across widely divergent butterfly species have identified multiple mechanisms of structural color production; however, little is known about how these colors evolved. Here, we examine how closely related species and populations of Bicyclus butterflies have evolved violet structural color from brown-pigmented ancestors with UV structural color. We used artificial selection on a laboratory model butterfly, B. anynana, to evolve violet scales from UV brown scales and compared the mechanism of violet color production with that of two other Bicyclus species, Bicyclus sambulos and Bicyclus medontias, which have evolved violet/blue scales independently via natural selection. The UV reflectance peak of B. anynana brown scales shifted to violet over six generations of artificial selection (i.e., in less than 1 y) as the result of an increase in the thickness of the lower lamina in ground scales. Similar scale structures and the same mechanism for producing violet/blue structural colors were found in the other Bicyclus species. This work shows that populations harbor large amounts of standing genetic variation that can lead to rapid evolution of scales' structural color via slight modifications to the scales' physical dimensions.

  17. Artificial selection for structural color on butterfly wings and comparison with natural evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, Bethany R.; Liew, Seng Fatt; Lilien, David A.; Dinwiddie, April J.; Noh, Heeso; Cao, Hui; Monteiro, Antónia

    2014-01-01

    Brilliant animal colors often are produced from light interacting with intricate nano-morphologies present in biological materials such as butterfly wing scales. Surveys across widely divergent butterfly species have identified multiple mechanisms of structural color production; however, little is known about how these colors evolved. Here, we examine how closely related species and populations of Bicyclus butterflies have evolved violet structural color from brown-pigmented ancestors with UV structural color. We used artificial selection on a laboratory model butterfly, B. anynana, to evolve violet scales from UV brown scales and compared the mechanism of violet color production with that of two other Bicyclus species, Bicyclus sambulos and Bicyclus medontias, which have evolved violet/blue scales independently via natural selection. The UV reflectance peak of B. anynana brown scales shifted to violet over six generations of artificial selection (i.e., in less than 1 y) as the result of an increase in the thickness of the lower lamina in ground scales. Similar scale structures and the same mechanism for producing violet/blue structural colors were found in the other Bicyclus species. This work shows that populations harbor large amounts of standing genetic variation that can lead to rapid evolution of scales’ structural color via slight modifications to the scales’ physical dimensions. PMID:25092295

  18. Women's Health Topics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women's Health 10903 New Hampshire Avenue WO32-2333 Silver Spring, MD 20993 More in Women's Health Topics ... Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver Spring, MD 20993 1-888-INFO-FDA (1- ...

  19. Environmental Topics for Introductory Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Laurent

    1974-01-01

    Presents selected environmental references with comparatively detailed descriptions for the purpose of helping high school and college physics teachers in selecting materials for their course. The topics include thermal pollution, space heating and cooling, atmospheric temperature distribution, radiation balance of the earth, sound and noises, and…

  20. Structural insights into human heme oxygenase-1 inhibition by potent and selective azole-based compounds

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2013-01-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors, especially those that are isozyme-selective, promises powerful pharmacological tools to elucidate the regulatory characteristics of the HO system. It is already known that HO has cytoprotective properties and may play a role in several disease states, making it an enticing therapeutic target. Traditionally, the metalloporphyrins have been used as competitive HO inhibitors owing to their structural similarity with the substrate, heme. However, given heme's important role in several other proteins (e.g. cytochromes P450, nitric oxide synthase), non-selectivity is an unfortunate side-effect. Reports that azalanstat and other non-porphyrin molecules inhibited HO led to a multi-faceted effort to develop novel compounds as potent, selective inhibitors of HO. This resulted in the creation of non-competitive inhibitors with selectivity for HO, including a subset with isozyme selectivity for HO-1. Using X-ray crystallography, the structures of several complexes of HO-1 with novel inhibitors have been elucidated, which provided insightful information regarding the salient features required for inhibitor binding. This included the structural basis for non-competitive inhibition, flexibility and adaptability of the inhibitor binding pocket, and multiple, potential interaction subsites, all of which can be exploited in future drug-design strategies. PMID:23097500

  1. Structure Based Prediction of Subtype-Selectivity for Adenosine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Katritch, Vsevolod; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    One of the major hurdles in the development of safe and effective drugs targeting G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is finding ligands that are highly selective for a specific receptor subtype. Structural understanding of subtype-specific binding pocket variations and ligand-receptor interactions may greatly facilitate design of selective ligands. To gain insights into the structural basis of ligand subtype selectivity within the family of adenosine receptors (AR: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) we generated 3D models of all four subtypes using the recently determined crystal structure of the AA2AR as a template, and employing the methodology of ligand-guided receptor optimization for refinement. This approach produced 3D conformational models of AR subtypes that effectively explain binding modes and subtype selectivity for a diverse set of known AR antagonists. Analysis of the subtype-specific ligand-receptor interactions allowed identification of the major determinants of ligand selectivity, which may facilitate discovery of more efficient drug candidates. PMID:20637786

  2. Much Needed Structure [Structured Decision-Making with DMRCS. Define-Measure-Reduce-Combine-Select

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.; Lu, Lu

    2015-10-01

    We have described a new DMRCS process for structured decision making, which mirrors the approach of the DMAIC process which has become so popular within Lean Six Sigma. By dividing a complex often unstructured process into distinct steps, we hope to have made the task of balancing multiple competing objectives less daunting.

  3. Structural basis for the design of selective phosphodiesterase 4B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fox, David; Burgin, Alex B; Gurney, Mark E

    2014-03-01

    Phosphodiesterase-4B (PDE4B) regulates the pro-inflammatory Toll Receptor -Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα) pathway in monocytes, macrophages and microglial cells. As such, it is an important, although under-exploited molecular target for anti-inflammatory drugs. This is due in part to the difficulty of developing selective PDE4B inhibitors as the amino acid sequence of the PDE4 active site is identical in all PDE4 subtypes (PDE4A-D). We show that highly selective PDE4B inhibitors can be designed by exploiting sequence differences outside the active site. Specifically, PDE4B selectivity can be achieved by capture of a C-terminal regulatory helix, now termed CR3 (Control Region 3), across the active site in a conformation that closes access by cAMP. PDE4B selectivity is driven by a single amino acid polymorphism in CR3 (Leu674 in PDE4B1 versus Gln594 in PDE4D). The reciprocal mutations in PDE4B and PDE4D cause a 70-80 fold shift in selectivity. Our structural studies show that CR3 is flexible and can adopt multiple orientations and multiple registries in the closed conformation. The new co-crystal structure with bound ligand provides a guide map for the design of PDE4B selective anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:24361374

  4. Genome Scan for Selection in Structured Layer Chicken Populations Exploiting Linkage Disequilibrium Information.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Mahmood; Reimer, Christian; Erbe, Malena; Preisinger, Rudolf; Weigend, Annett; Weigend, Steffen; Servin, Bertrand; Simianer, Henner

    2015-01-01

    An increasing interest is being placed in the detection of genes, or genomic regions, that have been targeted by selection because identifying signatures of selection can lead to a better understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships. A common strategy for the detection of selection signatures is to compare samples from distinct populations and to search for genomic regions with outstanding genetic differentiation. The aim of this study was to detect selective signatures in layer chicken populations using a recently proposed approach, hapFLK, which exploits linkage disequilibrium information while accounting appropriately for the hierarchical structure of populations. We performed the analysis on 70 individuals from three commercial layer breeds (White Leghorn, White Rock and Rhode Island Red), genotyped for approximately 1 million SNPs. We found a total of 41 and 107 regions with outstanding differentiation or similarity using hapFLK and its single SNP counterpart FLK respectively. Annotation of selection signature regions revealed various genes and QTL corresponding to productions traits, for which layer breeds were selected. A number of the detected genes were associated with growth and carcass traits, including IGF-1R, AGRP and STAT5B. We also annotated an interesting gene associated with the dark brown feather color mutational phenotype in chickens (SOX10). We compared FST, FLK and hapFLK and demonstrated that exploiting linkage disequilibrium information and accounting for hierarchical population structure decreased the false detection rate.

  5. A Study of the Structure and Content of Principal Selection Interviews in Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The principal plays a key role in student success. The employment interview is a critical element in the principal selection process. This study examined the interview structure and the content of the interview questions that districts used in their principal search for the 2011-2012 school year. The research-based practices for interview…

  6. SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) enrich for RNA structure signal in SHAPE sequencing-based probing data.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Line Dahl; Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan; Salama, Sofie R; Krogh, Anders; Vinther, Jeppe

    2015-05-01

    Selective 2' Hydroxyl Acylation analyzed by Primer Extension (SHAPE) is an accurate method for probing of RNA secondary structure. In existing SHAPE methods, the SHAPE probing signal is normalized to a no-reagent control to correct for the background caused by premature termination of the reverse transcriptase. Here, we introduce a SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) reagent, N-propanone isatoic anhydride (NPIA), which retains the ability of SHAPE reagents to accurately probe RNA structure, but also allows covalent coupling between the SHAPES reagent and a biotin molecule. We demonstrate that SHAPES-based selection of cDNA-RNA hybrids on streptavidin beads effectively removes the large majority of background signal present in SHAPE probing data and that sequencing-based SHAPES data contain the same amount of RNA structure data as regular sequencing-based SHAPE data obtained through normalization to a no-reagent control. Moreover, the selection efficiently enriches for probed RNAs, suggesting that the SHAPES strategy will be useful for applications with high-background and low-probing signal such as in vivo RNA structure probing.

  7. Selective Auditory Attention in Adults: Effects of Rhythmic Structure of the Competing Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reel, Leigh Ann; Hicks, Candace Bourland

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors assessed adult selective auditory attention to determine effects of (a) differences between the vocal/speaking characteristics of different mixed-gender pairs of masking talkers and (b) the rhythmic structure of the language of the competing speech. Method: Reception thresholds for English sentences were measured for 50…

  8. Structured Post-IQ Domain Governs Selectivity of Myosin X for Fascin-Actin Bundles*

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Stanislav; Rock, Ronald S.

    2010-01-01

    Without guidance cues, cytoskeletal motors would traffic components to the wrong destination with disastrous consequences for the cell. Recently, we identified a motor protein, myosin X, that identifies bundled actin filaments for transport. These bundles direct myosin X to a unique destination, the tips of cellular filopodia. Because the structural and kinetic features that drive bundle selection are unknown, we employed a domain-swapping approach with the nonselective myosin V to identify the selectivity module of myosin X. We found a surprising role of the myosin X tail region (post-IQ) in supporting long runs on bundles. Moreover, the myosin X head is adapted for initiating processive runs on bundles. We found that the tail is structured and biases the orientation of the two myosin X heads because a targeted insertion that introduces flexibility in the tail abolishes selectivity. Together, these results suggest how myosin motors may manage to read cellular addresses. PMID:20538587

  9. An Innovative Structural Mode Selection Methodology: Application for the X-33 Launch Vehicle Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hidalgo, Homero, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An innovative methodology for determining structural target mode selection and mode selection based on a specific criterion is presented. An effective approach to single out modes which interact with specific locations on a structure has been developed for the X-33 Launch Vehicle Finite Element Model (FEM). We presented Root-Sum-Square (RSS) displacement method computes resultant modal displacement for each mode at selected degrees of freedom (DOF) and sorts to locate modes with highest values. This method was used to determine modes, which most influenced specific locations/points on the X-33 flight vehicle such as avionics control components, aero-surface control actuators, propellant valve and engine points for use in flight control stability analysis and for flight POGO stability analysis. Additionally, the modal RSS method allows for primary or global target vehicle modes to also be identified in an accurate and efficient manner.

  10. Structural Basis for Binding and Selectivity of Antimalarial and Anticancer Ethylenediamine Inhibitors to Protein Farnesyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Michael A.; Fletcher, Steven; Cummings, Christopher G.; Pusateri, Erin E.; Blaskovich, Michelle A.; Rivas, Kasey; Gelb, Michael H.; Voorhis, Wesley C.Van; Sebti, Said M.; Hamilton, Andrew D.; Beese, Lorena S. ); ); ); )

    2009-03-20

    Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes an essential posttranslational lipid modification of more than 60 proteins involved in intracellular signal transduction networks. FTase inhibitors have emerged as a significant target for development of anticancer therapeutics and, more recently, for the treatment of parasitic diseases caused by protozoan pathogens, including malaria (Plasmodium falciparum). We present the X-ray crystallographic structures of complexes of mammalian FTase with five inhibitors based on an ethylenediamine scaffold, two of which exhibit over 1000-fold selective inhibition of P. falciparum FTase. These structures reveal the dominant determinants in both the inhibitor and enzyme that control binding and selectivity. Comparison to a homology model constructed for the P. falciparum FTase suggests opportunities for further improving selectivity of a new generation of antimalarial inhibitors.

  11. Quantitative structure-activity relationships of selective antagonists of glucagon receptor using QuaSAR descriptors.

    PubMed

    Manoj Kumar, Palanivelu; Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Hari Narayana Moorthy, Narayana Subbiah; Trivedi, Piyush

    2006-11-01

    In the present paper, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach was applied to understand the affinity and selectivity of a novel series of triaryl imidazole derivatives towards glucagon receptor. Statistically significant and highly predictive QSARs were derived for glucagon receptor inhibition by triaryl imidazoles using QuaSAR descriptors of molecular operating environment (MOE) employing computer-assisted multiple regression procedure. The generated QSAR models revealed that factors related to hydrophobicity, molecular shape and geometry predominantly influences glucagon receptor binding affinity of the triaryl imidazoles indicating the relevance of shape specific steric interactions between the molecule and the receptor. Further, QSAR models formulated for selective inhibition of glucagon receptor over p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase of the compounds in the series highlights that the same structural features, which influence the glucagon receptor affinity, also contribute to their selective inhibition.

  12. Biochemical And Structural Evaluation of Highly Selective 2-Arylbenzoxazole-Based Transthyretin Amyloidogenesis Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.; Connelly, S.; Wilson, I.A.; Kelly, J.W.

    2009-05-18

    To develop potent transthyretin (TTR) amyloidogenesis inhibitors that also display high binding selectivity in blood, it proves useful to systematically optimize each of the three substructural elements that comprise a typical inhibitor: the two aryl rings and the linker joining them. In the first study, described herein, structural modifications to one aryl ring were evaluated by screening a library of 2-arylbenzoxazoles bearing thyroid hormone-like aryl substituents on the 2-aryl ring. Several potent and highly selective amyloidogenesis inhibitors were identified that exhibit minimal thyroid hormone nuclear receptor and COX-1 binding. High resolution crystal structures (1.3-1.5 A) of three inhibitors (2f, 4f, and 4d) in complex with TTR were obtained to characterize their binding orientation. Collectively, the results demonstrate that thyroid hormone-like substitution patterns on one aryl ring lead to potent and highly selective TTR amyloidogenesis inhibitors that lack undesirable thyroid hormone receptor or COX-1 binding.

  13. Selective Negative Allosteric Modulation Of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors – A Structural Perspective of Ligands and Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Isberg, Vignir; Tehan, Benjamin G.; Weiss, Dahlia; Arsova, Angela; Marshall, Fiona H.; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Gloriam, David E.

    2015-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors have a wide range of modulatory functions in the central nervous system. They are among the most highly pursued drug targets, with relevance for several neurological diseases, and a number of allosteric modulators have entered clinical trials. However, so far this has not led to a marketed drug, largely because of the difficulties in achieving subtype-selective compounds with desired properties. Very recently the first crystal structures were published for the transmembrane domain of two metabotropic glutamate receptors in complex with negative allosteric modulators. In this analysis, we make the first comprehensive structural comparison of all metabotropic glutamate receptors, placing selective negative allosteric modulators and critical mutants into the detailed context of the receptor binding sites. A better understanding of how the different mGlu allosteric modulator binding modes relates to selective pharmacological actions will be very valuable for rational design of safer drugs. PMID:26359761

  14. Selective logging: does the imprint remain on tree structure and composition after 45 years?

    PubMed Central

    Osazuwa-Peters, Oyomoare L.; Chapman, Colin A.; Zanne, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Selective logging of tropical forests is increasing in extent and intensity. The duration over which impacts of selective logging persist, however, remains an unresolved question, particularly for African forests. Here, we investigate the extent to which a past selective logging event continues to leave its imprint on different components of an East African forest 45 years later. We inventoried 2358 stems ≥10 cm in diameter in 26 plots (200 m × 10 m) within a 5.2 ha area in Kibale National Park, Uganda, in logged and unlogged forest. In these surveys, we characterized the forest light environment, taxonomic composition, functional trait composition using three traits (wood density, maximum height and maximum diameter) and forest structure based on three measures (stem density, total basal area and total above-ground biomass). In comparison to unlogged forests, selectively logged forest plots in Kibale National Park on average had higher light levels, different structure characterized by lower stem density, lower total basal area and lower above-ground biomass, and a distinct taxonomic composition driven primarily by changes in the relative abundance of species. Conversely, selectively logged forest plots were like unlogged plots in functional composition, having similar community-weighted mean values for wood density, maximum height and maximum diameter. This similarity in functional composition irrespective of logging history may be due to functional recovery of logged forest or background changes in functional attributes of unlogged forest. Despite the passage of 45 years, the legacy of selective logging on the tree community in Kibale National Park is still evident, as indicated by distinct taxonomic and structural composition and reduced carbon storage in logged forest compared with unlogged forest. The effects of selective logging are exerted via influences on tree demography rather than functional trait composition. PMID:27293697

  15. A Method for Selecting Structure-switching Aptamers Applied to a Colorimetric Gold Nanoparticle Assay

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer A.; Smith, Joshua E.; Warren, Mercedes; Chávez, Jorge L.; Hagen, Joshua A.; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Small molecules provide rich targets for biosensing applications due to their physiological implications as biomarkers of various aspects of human health and performance. Nucleic acid aptamers have been increasingly applied as recognition elements on biosensor platforms, but selecting aptamers toward small molecule targets requires special design considerations. This work describes modification and critical steps of a method designed to select structure-switching aptamers to small molecule targets. Binding sequences from a DNA library hybridized to complementary DNA capture probes on magnetic beads are separated from nonbinders via a target-induced change in conformation. This method is advantageous because sequences binding the support matrix (beads) will not be further amplified, and it does not require immobilization of the target molecule. However, the melting temperature of the capture probe and library is kept at or slightly above RT, such that sequences that dehybridize based on thermodynamics will also be present in the supernatant solution. This effectively limits the partitioning efficiency (ability to separate target binding sequences from nonbinders), and therefore many selection rounds will be required to remove background sequences. The reported method differs from previous structure-switching aptamer selections due to implementation of negative selection steps, simplified enrichment monitoring, and extension of the length of the capture probe following selection enrichment to provide enhanced stringency. The selected structure-switching aptamers are advantageous in a gold nanoparticle assay platform that reports the presence of a target molecule by the conformational change of the aptamer. The gold nanoparticle assay was applied because it provides a simple, rapid colorimetric readout that is beneficial in a clinical or deployed environment. Design and optimization considerations are presented for the assay as proof-of-principle work in buffer to

  16. Thermal stability of the cellular structure of an austenitic alloy after selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazaleeva, K. O.; Tsvetkova, E. V.; Balakirev, E. V.; Yadroitsev, I. A.; Smurov, I. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    The thermal stability of the cellular structure of an austenitic Fe-17% Cr-12% Ni-2% Mo-1% Mn-0.7% Si-0.02% C alloy produced by selective laser melting in the temperature range 20-1200°C is investigated. Metallographic analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy show that structural changes in the alloy begin at 600-700°C and are fully completed at ~1150°C. Differential scanning calorimetry of the alloy with a cellular structure reveals three exothermic processes occurring upon annealing within the temperature ranges 450-650, 800-1000, and 1050-1200°C.

  17. 3D printing of weft knitted textile based structures by selective laser sintering of nylon powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beecroft, M.

    2016-07-01

    3D printing is a form of additive manufacturing whereby the building up of layers of material creates objects. The selective laser sintering process (SLS) uses a laser beam to sinter powdered material to create objects. This paper builds upon previous research into 3D printed textile based material exploring the use of SLS using nylon powder to create flexible weft knitted structures. The results show the potential to print flexible textile based structures that exhibit the properties of traditional knitted textile structures along with the mechanical properties of the material used, whilst describing the challenges regarding fineness of printing resolution. The conclusion highlights the potential future development and application of such pieces.

  18. Differential visualisation of a spectrally selective structure of strongly scattering objects

    SciTech Connect

    Kuratov, A S; Rudenko, V N; Shuvalov, V V

    2014-07-31

    We describe a modification of the algorithm for the fast approximate solution of the diffuse optical tomography inverse problem. In this modification the amount of a priori (auxiliary) information necessary for the visualisation of the internal structure of the object is reduced by using a differential measurement scheme. The experiment is performed at two different wavelengths, and some a priori information, necessary to reconstruct only the spectrally selective component of the internal structure (the difference structure of the spatial distributions of the extinction coefficient at the wavelength employed), is replaced by the data of one of these measurements. (laser biophotonics)

  19. Topic Prominence in Japanese EFL Students' Existential Constructions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasaki, Miyuki

    1990-01-01

    Investigations of Japanese speakers' interlanguage constructions of English existential sentences with a locative sentential topic found a general shift from topic-comment to subject-predicate structures as proficiency increased. (24 references) (Author/CB)

  20. Structural inheritance and selective reactivation in the central Andes: Cenozoic deformation guided by pre-Andean structures in southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Nicholas D.; Horton, Brian K.; Carlotto, Victor

    2016-03-01

    Structural, stratigraphic, and geochronologic constraints from the Eastern Cordillera in the central Andean plateau of southern Peru (14-15°S) demonstrate the existence and position of major pre-Andean structures that controlled the accumulation of Triassic synrift fill and guided subsequent Cenozoic deformation. The timing of initial clastic deposition of the Triassic Mitu Group is here constrained to ~ 242-233 Ma on the basis of detrital and volcanic zircon U-Pb geochronology. Regionally distinct provenance variations, as provided by U-Pb age populations from localized synrift accumulations, demonstrate Triassic erosion of multiple diagnostic sources from diverse rift-flank uplifts. Stratigraphic correlations suggest synchronous initiation of extensional basins containing the Mitu Group, in contrast with previous interpretations of southward rift propagation. Triassic motion along the NE-dipping San Anton normal fault accommodated up to 7 km of throw and hanging-wall deposition of a synrift Mitu succession > 2.5 km thick. The contrasting orientation of a non-reactivated Triassic normal fault suggests selective inversion of individual structures in the Eastern Cordillera was dependent on fault dip and strike. Selective preservation of a ~ 4 km thick succession of Carboniferous-Permian strata in the down-dropped San Anton hanging wall, beneath the synrift Mitu Group, suggests large-scale erosional removal in the uplifted footwall. Field and map observations identify additional pre-Andean thrust faults and folds attributed to poorly understood Paleozoic orogenic events preserved in the San Anton hanging wall. Selective thrust reactivation of normal and reverse faults during later compression largely guided Cenozoic deformation in the Eastern Cordillera. The resulting structural compartmentalization and across-strike variations in kinematics and deformation style highlight the influence of inherited Paleozoic structures and Triassic normal faults on the long

  1. Fabrication and atomic structure of size-selected, layered MoS2 clusters for catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, Martin J.; Arkill, Kenton P.; Wang, Zhi Wei; Komsa, Hannu-Pekka; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Palmer, Richard E.

    2014-10-01

    Well defined MoS2 nanoparticles having a layered structure and abundant edges would be of considerable interest for applications including photocatalysis. We report the atomic structure of MoS2 size-selected clusters with mass in a range all the way from 50 to ~2000 MoS2 units. The clusters were prepared by magnetron sputtering and gas condensation prior to size selection and soft landing on carbon supports. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) mode reveals a layered structure and Mo-Mo spacing similar to the bulk material. The mean number of layers in these lamellar clusters increases from one to three with increasing mass, consistent with density functional theory calculations of the balance between edge energies and interlayer binding.

  2. Structural determinants of ligand binding selectivity between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H. Eric; Lambert, Millard H.; Montana, Valerie G.; Plunket, Kelli D.; Moore, Linda B.; Collins, Jon L.; Oplinger, Jeffery A.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Gampe, Robert T.; McKee, David D.; Moore, John T.; Willson, Timothy M.

    2001-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are transcriptional regulators of glucose, lipid, and cholesterol metabolism. We report the x-ray crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of PPARα (NR1C1) as a complex with the agonist ligand GW409544 and a coactivator motif from the steroid receptor coactivator 1. Through comparison of the crystal structures of the ligand binding domains of the three human PPARs, we have identified molecular determinants of subtype selectivity. A single amino acid, which is tyrosine in PPARα and histidine in PPARγ, imparts subtype selectivity for both thiazolidinedione and nonthiazolidinedione ligands. The availability of high-resolution cocrystal structures of the three PPAR subtypes will aid the design of drugs for the treatments of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:11698662

  3. The effect of host structure on the selectivity and mechanism of supramolecular catalysis of Prins cyclizations

    DOE PAGES

    Hart-Cooper, William M.; Zhao, Chen; Triano, Rebecca M.; Yaghoubi, Parastou; Ozores, Haxel Lionel; Burford, Kristen N.; Toste, F. Dean; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2014-11-28

    The effect of host structure on the selectivity and mechanism of intramolecular Prins reactions is evaluated using K12Ga4L6 tetrahedral catalysts. The host structure was varied by modifying the structure of the chelating moieties and the size of the aromatic spacers. While variation in chelator substituents was generally observed to affect changes in rate but not selectivity, changing the host spacer afforded differences in efficiency and product diastereoselectivity. An extremely high number of turnovers (up to 840) was observed. Maximum rate accelerations were measured to be on the order of 105, which numbers among the largest magnitudes of transition state stabilizationmore » measured with a synthetic host-catalyst. Host/guest size effects were observed to play an important role in host-mediated enantioselectivity.« less

  4. The effect of host structure on the selectivity and mechanism of supramolecular catalysis of Prins cyclizations

    SciTech Connect

    Hart-Cooper, William M.; Zhao, Chen; Triano, Rebecca M.; Yaghoubi, Parastou; Ozores, Haxel Lionel; Burford, Kristen N.; Toste, F. Dean; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2014-11-28

    The effect of host structure on the selectivity and mechanism of intramolecular Prins reactions is evaluated using K12Ga4L6 tetrahedral catalysts. The host structure was varied by modifying the structure of the chelating moieties and the size of the aromatic spacers. While variation in chelator substituents was generally observed to affect changes in rate but not selectivity, changing the host spacer afforded differences in efficiency and product diastereoselectivity. An extremely high number of turnovers (up to 840) was observed. Maximum rate accelerations were measured to be on the order of 105, which numbers among the largest magnitudes of transition state stabilization measured with a synthetic host-catalyst. Host/guest size effects were observed to play an important role in host-mediated enantioselectivity.

  5. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) for select space propulsion system components, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The technical effort and computer code enhancements performed during the sixth year of the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods program are summarized. Various capabilities are described to probabilistically combine structural response and structural resistance to compute component reliability. A library of structural resistance models is implemented in the Numerical Evaluations of Stochastic Structures Under Stress (NESSUS) code that included fatigue, fracture, creep, multi-factor interaction, and other important effects. In addition, a user interface was developed for user-defined resistance models. An accurate and efficient reliability method was developed and was successfully implemented in the NESSUS code to compute component reliability based on user-selected response and resistance models. A risk module was developed to compute component risk with respect to cost, performance, or user-defined criteria. The new component risk assessment capabilities were validated and demonstrated using several examples. Various supporting methodologies were also developed in support of component risk assessment.

  6. Major research topics in combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Hussaini, M.Y.; Kumar, A.; Voigt, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    The Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) and NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) hosted a workshop on October 2--4, 1989 to discuss some combustion problems of technological interest to LaRC and to foster interaction with the academic community in these research areas. The topics chosen for this purpose were flame structure, flame holding/extinction, chemical kinetics, turbulence-kinetics interaction, transition to detonation, and reacting free shear layers. This document contains the papers and edited versions of general discussions on these topics. The lead paper set the stage for the meeting by discussing the status and issues of supersonic combustion relevant to the scramjet engine. Experts were then called upon to review the current knowledge in the aforementioned areas, to focus on how this knowledge can be extended and applied to high-speed combustion, and to suggest future directions of research in these areas.

  7. IP Internal Movement and Topicalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Pei-Jung

    2009-01-01

    In this dissertation, I investigate the phenomenon of internal topicalization cross-linguistically, using Chinese as a starting point. Internal topicalization refers to constructions in which a topic phrase is placed between the subject and the verb (in contrast to external topicalization, which involves a topic in the CP domain). I argue that…

  8. The p110 delta structure: mechanisms for selectivity and potency of new PI(3)K inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Alex; Miller, Simon; Williams, Olusegun; Le, Daniel D; Houseman, Benjamin T; Pacold, Joseph I; Gorrec, Fabrice; Hon, Wai-Ching; Liu, Yi; Rommel, Christian; Gaillard, Pascale; Rückle, Thomas; Schwarz, Matthias K; Shokat, Kevan M; Shaw, Jeffrey P; Williams, Roger L

    2010-02-01

    Deregulation of the phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K) pathway has been implicated in numerous pathologies including cancer, diabetes, thrombosis, rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. Recently, small-molecule and ATP-competitive PI(3)K inhibitors with a wide range of selectivities have entered clinical development. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying the isoform selectivity of these inhibitors, we developed a new expression strategy that enabled us to determine to our knowledge the first crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of the class IA PI(3)K p110 delta. Structures of this enzyme in complex with a broad panel of isoform- and pan-selective class I PI(3)K inhibitors reveal that selectivity toward p110 delta can be achieved by exploiting its conformational flexibility and the sequence diversity of active site residues that do not contact ATP. We have used these observations to rationalize and synthesize highly selective inhibitors for p110 delta with greatly improved potencies. PMID:20081827

  9. Structure-based evolution of subtype-selective neurotensin receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Schaab, Carolin; Kling, Ralf Christian; Einsiedel, Jürgen; Hübner, Harald; Clark, Tim; Seebach, Dieter; Gmeiner, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Subtype-selective agonists of the neurotensin receptor NTS2 represent a promising option for the treatment of neuropathic pain, as NTS2 is involved in the mediation of μ-opioid-independent anti-nociceptive effects. Based on the crystal structure of the subtype NTS1 and previous structure-activity relationships (SARs) indicating a potential role for the sub-pocket around Tyr11 of NT(8-13) in subtype-specific ligand recognition, we have developed new NTS2-selective ligands. Starting from NT(8-13), we replaced the tyrosine unit by β(2)-amino acids (type 1), by heterocyclic tyrosine bioisosteres (type 2) and peptoid analogues (type 3). We were able to evolve an asymmetric synthesis of a 5-substituted azaindolylalanine and its application as a bioisostere of tyrosine capable of enhancing NTS2 selectivity. The S-configured test compound 2 a, [(S)-3-(pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine-5-yl)-propionyl(11)]NT(8-13), exhibits substantial NTS2 affinity (4.8 nm) and has a nearly 30-fold NTS2 selectivity over NTS1. The (R)-epimer 2 b showed lower NTS2 affinity but more than 600-fold selectivity over NTS1. PMID:25478316

  10. Positive selection sites in tertiary structure of Leguminosae chalcone isomerase 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, R K; Zhan, S F; Zhao, T J; Zhou, X L; Wang, C E

    2015-03-20

    Isoflavonoids and the related synthesis enzyme, chalcone isomerase 1 (CHI1), are unique in the Leguminosae, with diverse biological functions. Among the Leguminosae, the soybean is an important oil, protein crop, and model plant. In this study, we aimed to detect the generation pattern of Leguminosae CHI1. Genome-wide sequence analysis of CHI in 3 Leguminosae and 3 other closely related model plants was performed; the expression levels of soybean chalcone isomerases were also analyzed. By comparing positively selected sites and their protein structures, we retrieved the evolution patterns for Leguminosae CHI1. A total of 28 CHI and 7 FAP3 (CHI4) genes were identified and separated into 4 clades: CHI1, CHI2, CHI3, and FAP3. Soybean genes belonging to the same chalcone isomerase subfamily had similar expression patterns. CHI1, the unique chalcone isomerase subfamily in Leguminosae, showed signs of significant positive selection as well as special expression characteristics, indicating an accelerated evolution throughout its divergence. Eight sites were identified as undergoing positive selection with high confidence. When mapped onto the tertiary structure of CHI1, these 8 sites were observed surrounding the enzyme substrate only; some of them connected to the catalytic core of CHI. Thus, we inferred that the generation of Leguminosae CHI1 is dependent on the positively selected amino acids surrounding its catalytic substrate. In other words, the evolution of CHI1 was driven by specific selection or processing conditions within the substrate.

  11. Selection for territory acquisition is modulated by social network structure in a wild songbird.

    PubMed

    Farine, D R; Sheldon, B C

    2015-03-01

    The social environment may be a key mediator of selection that operates on animals. In many cases, individuals may experience selection not only as a function of their phenotype, but also as a function of the interaction between their phenotype and the phenotypes of the conspecifics they associate with. For example, when animals settle after dispersal, individuals may benefit from arriving early, but, in many cases, these benefits will be affected by the arrival times of other individuals in their local environment. We integrated a recently described method for calculating assortativity on weighted networks, which is the correlation between an individual's phenotype and that of its associates, into an existing framework for measuring the magnitude of social selection operating on phenotypes. We applied this approach to large-scale data on social network structure and the timing of arrival into the breeding area over three years. We found that late-arriving individuals had a reduced probability of breeding. However, the probability of breeding was also influenced by individuals' social networks. Associating with late-arriving conspecifics increased the probability of successfully acquiring a breeding territory. Hence, social selection could offset the effects of nonsocial selection. Given parallel theoretical developments of the importance of local network structure on population processes, and increasing data being collected on social networks in free-living populations, the integration of these concepts could yield significant insights into social evolution.

  12. Lack of Spatial Immunogenetic Structure among Wolverine (Gulo gulo) Populations Suggestive of Broad Scale Balancing Selection

    PubMed Central

    Rico, Yessica; Morris-Pocock, James; Zigouris, Joanna; Nocera, Joseph J.; Kyle, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the adaptive genetic potential of wildlife populations to environmental selective pressures is fundamental for species conservation. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are highly polymorphic, and play a key role in the adaptive immune response against pathogens. MHC polymorphism has been linked to balancing selection or heterogeneous selection promoting local adaptation. However, spatial patterns of MHC polymorphism are also influenced by gene flow and drift. Wolverines are highly vagile, inhabiting varied ecoregions that include boreal forest, taiga, tundra, and high alpine ecosystems. Here, we investigated the immunogenetic variation of wolverines in Canada as a surrogate for identifying local adaptation by contrasting the genetic structure at MHC relative to the structure at 11 neutral microsatellites to account for gene flow and drift. Evidence of historical positive selection was detected at MHC using maximum likelihood codon-based methods. Bayesian and multivariate cluster analyses revealed weaker population genetic differentiation at MHC relative to the increasing microsatellite genetic structure towards the eastern wolverine distribution. Mantel correlations of MHC against geographical distances showed no pattern of isolation by distance (IBD: r = -0.03, p = 0.9), whereas for microsatellites we found a relatively strong and significant IBD (r = 0.54, p = 0.01). Moreover, we found a significant correlation between microsatellite allelic richness and the mean number of MHC alleles, but we did not observe low MHC diversity in small populations. Overall these results suggest that MHC polymorphism has been influenced primarily by balancing selection and to a lesser extent by neutral processes such as genetic drift, with no clear evidence for local adaptation. This study contributes to our understanding of how vulnerable populations of wolverines may respond to selective pressures across their range. PMID:26448462

  13. Lack of Spatial Immunogenetic Structure among Wolverine (Gulo gulo) Populations Suggestive of Broad Scale Balancing Selection.

    PubMed

    Rico, Yessica; Morris-Pocock, James; Zigouris, Joanna; Nocera, Joseph J; Kyle, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the adaptive genetic potential of wildlife populations to environmental selective pressures is fundamental for species conservation. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are highly polymorphic, and play a key role in the adaptive immune response against pathogens. MHC polymorphism has been linked to balancing selection or heterogeneous selection promoting local adaptation. However, spatial patterns of MHC polymorphism are also influenced by gene flow and drift. Wolverines are highly vagile, inhabiting varied ecoregions that include boreal forest, taiga, tundra, and high alpine ecosystems. Here, we investigated the immunogenetic variation of wolverines in Canada as a surrogate for identifying local adaptation by contrasting the genetic structure at MHC relative to the structure at 11 neutral microsatellites to account for gene flow and drift. Evidence of historical positive selection was detected at MHC using maximum likelihood codon-based methods. Bayesian and multivariate cluster analyses revealed weaker population genetic differentiation at MHC relative to the increasing microsatellite genetic structure towards the eastern wolverine distribution. Mantel correlations of MHC against geographical distances showed no pattern of isolation by distance (IBD: r = -0.03, p = 0.9), whereas for microsatellites we found a relatively strong and significant IBD (r = 0.54, p = 0.01). Moreover, we found a significant correlation between microsatellite allelic richness and the mean number of MHC alleles, but we did not observe low MHC diversity in small populations. Overall these results suggest that MHC polymorphism has been influenced primarily by balancing selection and to a lesser extent by neutral processes such as genetic drift, with no clear evidence for local adaptation. This study contributes to our understanding of how vulnerable populations of wolverines may respond to selective pressures across their range. PMID:26448462

  14. Physical Ingredients Controlling Stability and Structural Selection of Empty Viral Capsids.

    PubMed

    Aznar, María; Reguera, David

    2016-07-01

    One of the crucial steps in the viral replication cycle is the self-assembly of its protein shell. Typically, each native virus adopts a unique architecture, but the coat proteins of many viruses have the capability to self-assemble in vitro into different structures by changing the assembly conditions. However, the mechanisms determining which of the possible capsid shapes and structures is selected by a virus are still not well-known. We present a coarse-grained model to analyze and understand the physical mechanisms controlling the size and structure selection in the assembly of empty viral capsids. Using this model and Monte Carlo simulations, we have characterized the phase diagram and stability of T = 1,3,4,7 and snub cube shells. In addition, we have studied the tolerance of different shells to changes in physical parameters related to ambient conditions, identifying possible strategies to induce misassembly or failure. Finally, we discuss the factors that select the shape of a capsid as spherical, faceted, elongated, or decapsidated. Our model sheds important light on the ingredients that control the assembly and stability of viral shells. This knowledge is essential to get capsids with well-defined size and structure that could be used for promising applications in medicine or bionanotechnology. PMID:27114062

  15. Topical Therapies for Pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Elmariah, Sarina B.; Lerner, Ethan A.

    2011-01-01

    Itch, or pruritus, is the predominant symptom associated with acute and chronic cutaneous disease and in some cases, may be debilitating. To date, there is no single universally effective anti-itch treatment. As the pathophysiology of itch in most cutaneous or systemic disorders remains unclear, anti-pruritic therapy is often directed against a variety of targets, including the epidermal barrier, immune system, or the nervous system. Topical therapy is the mainstay of dermatologic management of acute or localized itch or in patients with contraindications to systemic therapies. This review will summarize current topical therapies to treat pruritus and discuss potential future therapies. PMID:21767774

  16. Topical ketoprofen patch.

    PubMed

    Mazières, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Although oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are effective in the treatment of a variety of acute and chronic pain conditions, their use may be associated with serious systemic adverse effects, particularly gastrointestinal disorders. In order to minimise the incidence of systemic events related to such agents, topical NSAIDs have been developed. Topical NSAIDs, applied as gels, creams or sprays, penetrate the skin, subcutaneous fatty tissue and muscle in amounts that are sufficient to exert a therapeutic effect on peripheral and central mechanisms in the absence of high plasma concentrations. Data indicate that topical NSAIDs are effective at relieving pain in a number of acute and chronic pain indications. This review article discusses the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and tolerability of a new formulation of ketoprofen available as a topical patch. The topical patch containing ketoprofen 100mg as the active principle has been developed using a novel delivery system that dispenses therapeutic doses of the drug directly to the site of injury. Pharmacokinetic data indicate that although plasma levels of ketoprofen are higher when the drug is administered as a patch versus a gel, the total systemic bioavailability of ketoprofen 100 mg administered via a patch is no more than 10% of that reported for ketoprofen 100 mg administered orally. Because the patch facilitates ketoprofen delivery over a 24-hour period, the drug remains continually present in the tissue subjacent to the site of application. High tissue but low plasma ketoprofen concentrations mean that while tissue concentrations are high enough to exert a therapeutic effect, plasma concentrations remain low enough to not result in systemic adverse events caused by elevated serum NSAID levels. Phase III clinical trials in patients with non-articular rheumatism and traumatic painful soft tissue injuries showed that the topical ketoprofen patch was significantly more effective than placebo at

  17. Survey of social health insurance structure in selected countries; providing framework for basic health insurance in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Effat; Raissi, Ahmad Reza; Barooni, Mohsen; Ferdoosi, Massoud; Nuhi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: Health system reforms are the most strategic issue that has been seriously considered in healthcare systems in order to reduce costs and increase efficiency and effectiveness. The costs of health system finance in our country, lack of universal coverage in health insurance, and related issues necessitate reforms in our health system financing. The aim of this research was to prepare a structure of framework for social health insurance in Iran and conducting a comparative study in selected countries with social health insurance. Materials and Methods: This comparative descriptive study was conducted in three phases. The first phase of the study examined the structure of health social insurance in four countries – Germany, South Korea, Egypt, and Australia. The second phase was to develop an initial model, which was designed to determine the shared and distinguishing points of the investigated structures, for health insurance in Iran. The third phase was to validate the final research model. The developed model by the Delphi method was given to 20 professionals in financing of the health system, health economics and management of healthcare services. Their comments were collected in two stages and its validity was confirmed. Findings: The study of the structure of health insurance in the selected countries shows that health social insurance in different countries have different structures. Based on the findings of the present study, the current situation of the health system, and the conducted surveys, the following framework is suitable for the health social insurance system in Iran. The Health Social Insurance Organization has a unique service by having five funds of governmental employees, companies and NGOs, self-insured, villagers, and others, which serves as a nongovernmental organization under the supervision of public law and by decision- and policy-making of the Health Insurance Supreme Council. Membership in this organization

  18. Structural determinants of host defense peptides for antimicrobial activity and target cell selectivity.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Shukla, Sanjeev K; Prakash, Om; Zhang, Guolong

    2010-09-01

    Antimicrobial host defense peptides (HDPs) are a critical component of the innate immunity with microbicidal, endotoxin-neutralizing, and immunostimulatory properties. HDPs kill bacteria primarily through non-specific membrane lysis, therefore with a less likelihood of provoking resistance. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies with a number of HDPs have revealed that net charge, amphipathicity, hydrophobicity, and structural propensity are among the most important physicochemical and structural parameters that dictate their ability to interact with and disrupt membranes. A delicate balance among these factors, rather than a mere alteration of a single factor, is critically important for HDPs to ensure the antimicrobial potency and target cell selectivity. With a better understanding of the structural determinants of HDPs for their membrane-lytic activities, it is expected that novel HDP-based antimicrobials with minimum toxicity to eukaryotic cells can be developed for resistant infections, which have become a global public health crisis.

  19. Small Angle X-ray Scattering in Structural Investigation of Selected Biological Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, Maciej

    2007-11-26

    Small angle X-ray scattering method (SAXS) is a technique complementary to the protein crystallography, allowing determination of the structural parameters such as the radius of gyration or the maximum size characterizing the macromolecules, and providing information on the conformational changes taking place in solution. The use of SAXS method enables a comparison of the protein crystal structure with the data collected in solution. Recent development of the measurement techniques (mainly those based on synchrotron radiation) and calculation methods has permitted introduction of advanced techniques also in the field of structural analysis of biomolecules (e.g. for determination of the shape of the protein molecule in solution). The paper presents a few selected methods of structural analysis of biological systems based on the SAXS data and illustrates their performance on the example of xylanase from Trichoderma longibrachiatum and a model phospholipid system.

  20. Small Angle X-ray Scattering in Structural Investigation of Selected Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, Maciej

    2007-11-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering method (SAXS) is a technique complementary to the protein crystallography, allowing determination of the structural parameters such as the radius of gyration or the maximum size characterizing the macromolecules, and providing information on the conformational changes taking place in solution. The use of SAXS method enables a comparison of the protein crystal structure with the data collected in solution. Recent development of the measurement techniques (mainly those based on synchrotron radiation) and calculation methods has permitted introduction of advanced techniques also in the field of structural analysis of biomolecules (e.g. for determination of the shape of the protein molecule in solution). The paper presents a few selected methods of structural analysis of biological systems based on the SAXS data and illustrates their performance on the example of xylanase from Trichoderma longibrachiatum and a model phospholipid system.

  1. Structure-dependent water transport across nanopores of carbon nanotubes: toward selective gating upon temperature regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kuiwen; Wu, Huiying

    2015-04-28

    Determining water structure in nanopores and its influence on water transport behaviour is of great importance for understanding and regulating the transport across nanopores. Here we report an ultrafast-slow flow transition phenomenon for water transport across nanopores of carbon nanotubes owing to the change in water structure in nanopores induced by temperature. By performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we show the dependence of water transport behaviours on water structures. Our results indicate that owing to the change in water structure in nanopores, water flux across nanopores with certain pore sizes decreases sharply (nearly 3 orders of magnitude) with the decreasing temperature. This phenomenon is very sensitive to the pore size. The threshold temperatures for the occurrence of the ultrafast-slow flow transition for water transport are also determined for various pore sizes. These findings suggest a novel protocol for selective gating of water and proton conduction across nanopores and temperature-controlled drug release.

  2. The crystal structure of a bimorphinan with highly selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbańczyk-Lipkowska, Zofia; Etter, Margaret C.; Lipkowski, Andrzej W.; Portoghese, Philip S.

    1987-07-01

    The crystal structure of the dihydrobromide heptahydrate of nor-binaltorphimine (17, 17'-bis(cyclopropylmethyl)-6,6',7,7'-tetrahydro-4,5α: 4',5'α-diepoxy-6,6'-imino[7,7' bimorphinan]-3,3',14,14'-tetraol)is presented. This structure is the first reported structure of a rigid bivalent opioid ligand. Two morphinan pharmacophores are connected by a rigid spacer, the pyrrole ring. The nor-binaltorphimine structure itself shows unique, high selectivity as a kappa opioid receptor antagonist. Crystal data: P3 2, Z = 3, a = b = 20.223 (4), c = 9.541(7) Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°; R = 0.079 (1765 reflections, Fobs > 1σ( F)).

  3. Three-dimensional virtual bone bank system workflow for structural bone allograft selection: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Lucas Eduardo; Farfalli, German Luis; Milano, Federico Edgardo; Ayerza, Miguel Angel; Muscolo, Domingo Luis; Aponte-Tinao, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Structural bone allograft has been used in bone defect reconstruction during the last fifty years with acceptable results. However, allograft selection methods were based on 2-dimensional templates using X-rays. Thanks to preoperative planning platforms, three-dimensional (3D) CT-derived bone models were used to define size and shape comparison between host and donor. The purpose of this study was to describe the workflow of this virtual technique in order to explain how to choose the best allograft using a virtual bone bank system. We measured all bones in a 3D virtual environment determining the best match. The use of a virtual bone bank system has allowed optimizing the allograft selection in a bone bank, providing more information to the surgeons before surgery. In conclusion, 3D preoperative planning in a virtual environment for allograft selection is an important and helpful tool in order to achieve a good match between host and donor.

  4. Structural Bioinformatics-Based Prediction of Exceptional Selectivity of p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor PH-797804

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Li; Shieh, Huey S.; Selness, Shaun R.; Devraj, Rajesh V.; Walker, John K.; Devadas, Balekudru; Hope, Heidi R.; Compton, Robert P.; Schindler, John F.; Hirsch, Jeffrey L.; Benson, Alan G.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Williams, Jennifer M.; Broadus, Richard M.; Walden, Zara; Monahan, Joseph B.; Pfizer

    2009-07-24

    PH-797804 is a diarylpyridinone inhibitor of p38{alpha} mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase derived from a racemic mixture as the more potent atropisomer (aS), first proposed by molecular modeling and subsequently confirmed by experiments. On the basis of structural comparison with a different biaryl pyrazole template and supported by dozens of high-resolution crystal structures of p38{alpha} inhibitor complexes, PH-797804 is predicted to possess a high level of specificity across the broad human kinase genome. We used a structural bioinformatics approach to identify two selectivity elements encoded by the TXXXG sequence motif on the p38{alpha} kinase hinge: (i) Thr106 that serves as the gatekeeper to the buried hydrophobic pocket occupied by 2,4-difluorophenyl of PH-797804 and (ii) the bidentate hydrogen bonds formed by the pyridinone moiety with the kinase hinge requiring an induced 180{sup o} rotation of the Met109-Gly110 peptide bond. The peptide flip occurs in p38{alpha} kinase due to the critical glycine residue marked by its conformational flexibility. Kinome-wide sequence mining revealed rare presentation of the selectivity motif. Corroboratively, PH-797804 exhibited exceptionally high specificity against MAP kinases and the related kinases. No cross-reactivity was observed in large panels of kinase screens (selectivity ratio of >500-fold). In cellular assays, PH-797804 demonstrated superior potency and selectivity consistent with the biochemical measurements. PH-797804 has met safety criteria in human phase I studies and is under clinical development for several inflammatory conditions. Understanding the rationale for selectivity at the molecular level helps elucidate the biological function and design of specific p38{alpha} kinase inhibitors.

  5. Introduction of structural affinity handles as a tool in selective nucleic acid separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, III, Richard Coale (Inventor); Cano, Luis Antonio (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The method is used for separating nucleic acids and other similar constructs. It involves selective introduction, enhancement, or stabilization of affinity handles such as single-strandedness in the undesired (or desired) nucleic acids as compared to the usual structure (e.g., double-strandedness) of the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids. The undesired (or desired) nucleic acids are separated from the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids due to capture by methods including but not limited to immobilized metal affinity chromatography, immobilized single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) protein, and immobilized oligonucleotides. The invention is useful to: remove contaminating genomic DNA from plasmid DNA; remove genomic DNA from plasmids, BACs, and similar constructs; selectively separate oligonucleotides and similar DNA fragments from their partner strands; purification of aptamers, (deoxy)-ribozymes and other highly structured nucleic acids; Separation of restriction fragments without using agarose gels; manufacture recombinant Taq polymerase or similar products that are sensitive to host genomic DNA contamination; and other applications.

  6. Structural and Inhibition Analysis Reveals the Mechanism of Selectivity of a Series of Aggrecanase Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorella, Micky D.; Tomasselli, Alfredo G.; Mathis, Karl J.; Schnute, Mark E.; Woodard, Scott S.; Munie, Grace; Williams, Jennifer M.; Caspers, Nicole; Wittwer, Arthur J.; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Shieh, Huey-Sheng; Pfizer

    2009-10-07

    Several inhibitors of a series of cis-1(S)2(R)-amino-2-indanol-based compounds were reported to be selective for the aggrecanases, ADAMTS-4 and -5 over other metalloproteases. To understand the nature of this selectivity for aggrecanases, the inhibitors, along with the broad spectrum metalloprotease inhibitor marimastat, were independently bound to the catalytic domain of ADAMTS-5, and the corresponding crystal structures were determined. By comparing the structures, it was determined that the specificity of the relative inhibitors for ADAMTS-5 was not driven by a specific interaction, such as zinc chelation, hydrogen bonding, or charge interactions, but rather by subtle and indirect factors, such as water bridging, ring rigidity, pocket size, and shape, as well as protein conformation flexibility.

  7. Two-photon polarization-selective etching of emergent nano-structures on diamond surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, A; Bradac, C; Mildren, R P

    2014-01-01

    Optical techniques have advanced considerably in recent years to enable processing of surfaces with a resolution less than the wavelength of light. Despite the highly selective nature of light-matter interactions, however, efforts to increase resolution to the scale of single atoms are hampered by rapid and efficient dissipation of the absorbed energy to the surrounding matrix. Here we show that two-photon surface excitation using ultraviolet light provides a method for selectively removing carbon from diamond surfaces. Polished surfaces etched by this method develop ultra-deep subwavelength structures with morphologies dependent on the polarization of the incident laser with respect to the crystal axes. As well as revealing a practical and versatile method for nano-patterning of diamond surfaces, we show that the results comprise mesoscopic evidence for bond scission via a highly localized optical interaction that may lead to the development of new optical approaches for ultra-nanoscale (<10 nm) surface structuring. PMID:24594857

  8. Selection of actuator locations for static shape control of large space structures by heuristic integer programing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Adelman, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    Orbiting spacecraft such as large space antennas have to maintain a highly accurate shape to operate satisfactorily. Such structures require active and passive controls to maintain an accurate shape under a variety of disturbances. Methods for the optimum placement of control actuators for correcting static deformations are described. In particular, attention is focused on the case were control locations have to be selected from a large set of available sites, so that integer programing methods are called for. The effectiveness of three heuristic techniques for obtaining a near-optimal site selection is compared. In addition, efficient reanalysis techniques for the rapid assessment of control effectiveness are presented. Two examples are used to demonstrate the methods: a simple beam structure and a 55m space-truss-parabolic antenna.

  9. Selection of actuator locations for static shape control of large space structures by heuristic integer programing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Adelman, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    Orbiting spacecraft such as large space antennas have to maintain a highly accurate space to operate satisfactorily. Such structures require active and passive controls to mantain an accurate shape under a variety of disturbances. Methods for the optimum placement of control actuators for correcting static deformations are described. In particular, attention is focused on the case were control locations have to be selected from a large set of available sites, so that integer programing methods are called for. The effectiveness of three heuristic techniques for obtaining a near-optimal site selection is compared. In addition, efficient reanalysis techniques for the rapid assessment of control effectiveness are presented. Two examples are used to demonstrate the methods: a simple beam structure and a 55m space-truss-parabolic antenna.

  10. Spatial localization of the K+ channel selectivity filter by mutant cycle-based structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, R; Lewis, J H; MacKinnon, R

    1996-01-01

    The structurally well-characterized scorpion toxin Agitoxin2 inhibits ion permeation through Shaker K+ channels by binding to the external pore entryway. Scanning mutagenesis identified a set of inhibitor residues critical for making energetic contacts with the channel. Using thermodynamic mutant cycle analysis, we have mapped channel residues relative to the known inhibitor structure. This study constrains the position of multiple channel residues within the pore-forming loops; in one stretch, we have been able to map five out of seven contiguous residues to the inhibitor interaction surface, including those involved in ion selectivity. One interaction in particular, that of K27M on the inhibitor with Y445F on the channel, is unique in that it depends on the K+ ion concentration. These results reveal a shallow vestibule formed by the pore loops at the K+ channel entryway. The selectivity filter is located at the center of the vestibule close to (approximately 5 A) the extracellular solution. PMID:8562077

  11. Wave-plate structures, power selective optical filter devices, and optical systems using same

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2012-07-03

    In an embodiment, an optical filter device includes an input polarizer for selectively transmitting an input signal. The device includes a wave-plate structure positioned to receive the input signal, which includes first and second substantially zero-order, zero-wave plates arranged in series with and oriented at an angle relative to each other. The first and second zero-wave plates are configured to alter a polarization state of the input signal passing in a manner that depends on the power of the input signal. Each zero-wave plate includes an entry and exit wave plate each having a fast axis, with the fast axes oriented substantially perpendicular to each other. Each entry wave plate is oriented relative to a transmission axis of the input polarizer at a respective angle. An output polarizer is positioned to receive a signal output from the wave-plate structure and selectively transmits the signal based on the polarization state.

  12. Structural basis and selectivity of tankyrase inhibition by a Wnt signaling inhibitor WIKI4.

    PubMed

    Haikarainen, Teemu; Venkannagari, Harikanth; Narwal, Mohit; Obaji, Ezeogo; Lee, Hao-Wei; Nkizinkiko, Yves; Lehtiö, Lari

    2013-01-01

    Recently a novel inhibitor of Wnt signaling was discovered. The compound, WIKI4, was found to act through tankyrase inhibition and regulate β-catenin levels in many cancer cell lines and human embryonic stem cells. Here we confirm that WIKI4 is a high potency tankyrase inhibitor and that it selectively inhibits tankyrases over other ARTD enzymes tested. The binding mode of the compound to tankyrase 2 was determined by protein X-ray crystallography to 2.4 Å resolution. The structure revealed a novel binding mode to the adenosine subsite of the donor NAD(+) binding groove of the catalytic domain. Our results form a structural basis for further development of potent and selective tankyrase inhibitors based on the WIKI4 scaffold. PMID:23762361

  13. Structural Basis and Selectivity of Tankyrase Inhibition by a Wnt Signaling Inhibitor WIKI4

    PubMed Central

    Haikarainen, Teemu; Venkannagari, Harikanth; Narwal, Mohit; Obaji, Ezeogo; Lee, Hao-Wei; Nkizinkiko, Yves; Lehtiö, Lari

    2013-01-01

    Recently a novel inhibitor of Wnt signaling was discovered. The compound, WIKI4, was found to act through tankyrase inhibition and regulate β-catenin levels in many cancer cell lines and human embryonic stem cells. Here we confirm that WIKI4 is a high potency tankyrase inhibitor and that it selectively inhibits tankyrases over other ARTD enzymes tested. The binding mode of the compound to tankyrase 2 was determined by protein X-ray crystallography to 2.4 Å resolution. The structure revealed a novel binding mode to the adenosine subsite of the donor NAD+ binding groove of the catalytic domain. Our results form a structural basis for further development of potent and selective tankyrase inhibitors based on the WIKI4 scaffold. PMID:23762361

  14. Feature selection and the information content of Thematic Mapper simulator data for forest structural assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanner, M. A.; Brass, J. A.; Peterson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment is made of the information content of Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) data for the case of a forested region, in order to determine the sensitivity of such data to forest crown closure and tree size class. Principal components analysis and Monte Carlo simulation indicated that channels 4, 7, 5 and 3 were optimal for four-channel forest structure analysis. As the number of channels supplied to the Monte Carlo feature selection routine increased, classification accuracy increased. The greatest sensitivity to the forest structural parameters, which included succession within clearcuts as well as crown closure and size class, was obtained from the 7-channel TMS data.

  15. Crystal Structure of Oxidative Stress Sensor Keap1 in Complex with Selective Autophagy Substrate p62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Hirofumi

    Keap1, an adaptor protein of cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase complex, represses cytoprotective transcription factor Nrf2 in an oxidative stress-dependent manner. The accumulation of selective autophagy substrate p62 also activates Nrf2 target genes, but the detailed mechanism has not been elucidated. Crystal structure of Keap1-p62 complex revealed the structural basis for the Nrf2 activation in which Keap1 is inactivated by p62. The accumulation of p62 is observed in hepatocellular carcinoma. The activation of Nrf2 target genes, including detoxifying enzymes and efflux transporters, by p62 may protect the cancer cells from anti-cancer drugs.

  16. Model-based fault detection and identification with online aerodynamic model structure selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombaerts, T.

    2013-12-01

    This publication describes a recursive algorithm for the approximation of time-varying nonlinear aerodynamic models by means of a joint adaptive selection of the model structure and parameter estimation. This procedure is called adaptive recursive orthogonal least squares (AROLS) and is an extension and modification of the previously developed ROLS procedure. This algorithm is particularly useful for model-based fault detection and identification (FDI) of aerospace systems. After the failure, a completely new aerodynamic model can be elaborated recursively with respect to structure as well as parameter values. The performance of the identification algorithm is demonstrated on a simulation data set.

  17. Selective extraction of PAHs from a sediment with structural preservation of Natural Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Merdy, Patricia; Achard, Romain; Samaali, Ismahen; Lucas, Yves

    2014-07-01

    Selective extraction of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) without structural modification of the Natural Organic Matter (NOM) from a heavily contaminated sediment was investigated using various solvents mixtures. Structural modification of the NOM was monitored after extraction using 3D-fluorescence spectroscopy. Better results were obtained with a 15-h PAH extraction under reflux with a dichloromethane/cyclohexane 20/80 mixture. The experimental procedure was validated with NOM standard materials before to be applied on natural sediments. It could be applied to any environmental solid sample such as sediments and soils.

  18. Economic sensor/actuator selection and its application to flexible structure control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelton, Robert E.; Li, Faming

    2004-07-01

    A systematic design method is proposed for the selecting of actuators and sensors in the structural control in order to minimize the instrumental cost. With actuators and sensors placed at all the admissible locations initially, an iterative minimization algorithm is carried out to identify the sensor/actuator that requires the least precision. By deleting the roughest sensor/actuator each time till loss of feasibility, one can conclude simultaneously the necessary number and type of sensor/actuator, and the location and precision for each sensor/actuator. A tensegrity structure example has been solved as an application of the proposed algorithm.

  19. Novel sst(4)-selective somatostatin (SRIF) agonists. 4. Three-dimensional consensus structure by NMR.

    PubMed

    Grace, Christy Rani R; Koerber, Steven C; Erchegyi, Judit; Reubi, Jean Claude; Rivier, Jean; Riek, Roland

    2003-12-18

    The three-dimensional NMR structures of eight cyclic octapeptide analogues of somatostatin (SRIF) are described. These analogues, with the basic sequence H-c[Cys(3)-Phe(6)-Xxx(7)-Yyy(8)-Lys(9)-Thr(10)-Zzz(11)-Cys(14)]-OH (the numbering refers to the position in native SRIF), with Xxx(7) being Phe/Ala/Tyr, Yyy(8) being Trp/DTrp/D-threo-beta-Me2Nal/L-threo-beta-Me2Nal, and Zzz(11) being Phe/Ala, exhibit potent and highly selective binding to human SRIF type 4 (sst(4)) receptors. The conformations reveal that the backbones of these analogues do not have the usual type-II' beta-turn reported in the literature for sst(2)-subtype-selective analogues. Instead, the structures contain a unique arrangement of side chains of Yyy(8), Lys(9), and Phe(6) or Phe(11). The conformational preferences and results from biological analyses of these analogues (parts 1-3 of this series, Rivier et al., Erchegyi et al., and Erchegyi et al., J. Med. Chem. 2003, preceding papers in this issue) allow a detailed study of the structure-activity relationship of SRIF. The proposed consensus structural motif at the binding pocket for the sst(4)-selective analogues requires a unique set of distances between an indole/2-naphthyl ring, a lysine side chain, and another aromatic ring. This motif is necessary and sufficient to explain the binding affinities of all of the analogues studied and is distinct from the existing model suggested for sst(2)/sst(5) selectivity. PMID:14667215

  20. Characterization of Two Distinct Structural Classes of Selective Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Cynthia A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) catalyze the irreversible oxidation of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acid. Alterations in ALDH1A1 activity are associated with such diverse diseases as cancer, Parkinson’s disease, obesity, and cataracts. Inhibitors of ALDH1A1 could aid in illuminating the role of this enzyme in disease processes. However, there are no commercially available selective inhibitors for ALDH1A1. Here we characterize two distinct chemical classes of inhibitors that are selective for human ALDH1A1 compared to eight other ALDH isoenzymes. The prototypical members of each structural class, CM026 and CM037, exhibit sub-micromolar inhibition constants, but have different mechanisms of inhibition. The crystal structures of these compounds bound to ALDH1A1 demonstrate that they bind within the aldehyde binding pocket of ALDH1A1 and exploit the presence of a unique Glycine residue to achieve their selectivity. These two novel and selective ALDH1A1 inhibitors may serve as chemical tools to better understand the contributions of ALDH1A1 to normal biology and to disease states. PMID:25634381

  1. Selective COX-2 Inhibitors: A Review of Their Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Zarghi, Afshin; Arfaei, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the competitive inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX), the enzyme which mediates the bioconversion of arachidonic acid to inflammatory prostaglandins (PGs). Their use is associated with the side effects such as gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. The therapeutic anti-inflammatory action of NSAIDs is produced by the inhibition of COX-2, while the undesired side effects arise from inhibition of COX-1 activity. Thus, it was though that more selective COX-2 inhibitors would have reduced side effects. Based upon a number of selective COX-2 inhibitors (rofecoxib, celecoxib, valdecoxibetc.) were developed as safer NSAIDs with improved gastric safety profile. However, the recent market removal of some COXIBs such as rofecoxib due to its adverse cardiovascular side effects clearly encourages the researchers to explore and evaluate alternative templates with COX-2 inhibitory activity. Recognition of new avenues for selective COX-2 inhibitors in cancer chemotherapy and neurological diseases such as Parkinson and Alzheimer’s diseases still continues to attract investigations on the development of COX-2 inhibitors. This review highlights the various structural classes of selective COX-2 inhibitors with special emphasis on their structure-activity relationships. PMID:24250402

  2. Evolutionary ecology of plant-microbe interactions: soil microbial structure alters selection on plant traits.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jennifer A; Lennon, Jay T

    2011-10-01

    • Below-ground microbial communities influence plant diversity, plant productivity, and plant community composition. Given these strong ecological effects, are interactions with below-ground microbes also important for understanding natural selection on plant traits? • Here, we manipulated below-ground microbial communities and the soil moisture environment on replicated populations of Brassica rapa to examine how microbial community structure influences selection on plant traits and mediates plant responses to abiotic environmental stress. • In soils with experimentally simplified microbial communities, plants were smaller, had reduced chlorophyll content, produced fewer flowers, and were less fecund when compared with plant populations grown in association with more complex soil microbial communities. Selection on plant growth and phenological traits also was stronger when plants were grown in simplified, less diverse soil microbial communities, and these effects typically were consistent across soil moisture treatments. • Our results suggest that microbial community structure affects patterns of natural selection on plant traits. Thus, the below-ground microbial community can influence evolutionary processes, just as recent studies have demonstrated that microbial diversity can influence plant community and ecosystem processes.

  3. Evolutionary ecology of plant-microbe interactions: soil microbial structure alters selection on plant traits.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jennifer A; Lennon, Jay T

    2011-10-01

    • Below-ground microbial communities influence plant diversity, plant productivity, and plant community composition. Given these strong ecological effects, are interactions with below-ground microbes also important for understanding natural selection on plant traits? • Here, we manipulated below-ground microbial communities and the soil moisture environment on replicated populations of Brassica rapa to examine how microbial community structure influences selection on plant traits and mediates plant responses to abiotic environmental stress. • In soils with experimentally simplified microbial communities, plants were smaller, had reduced chlorophyll content, produced fewer flowers, and were less fecund when compared with plant populations grown in association with more complex soil microbial communities. Selection on plant growth and phenological traits also was stronger when plants were grown in simplified, less diverse soil microbial communities, and these effects typically were consistent across soil moisture treatments. • Our results suggest that microbial community structure affects patterns of natural selection on plant traits. Thus, the below-ground microbial community can influence evolutionary processes, just as recent studies have demonstrated that microbial diversity can influence plant community and ecosystem processes. PMID:21658184

  4. Housing: Topic Paper F.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    This paper, one of a series of topic papers assessing federal laws and programs affecting persons with disabilities, addresses the issue of housing. Major federal responsibilities are to develop additional housing opportunities for persons with disabilities and to assure that currently available housing is equally open to individuals with…

  5. Transportation: Topic Paper E.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    As one of a series of topic papers assessing federal laws and programs affecting persons with disabilities, this paper reviews the issue of transportation services. In the area of urban mass transit, four relevant pieces of legislation and public transportation accessibility regulations are cited, and cost issues are explored. Paratransit systems,…

  6. Topics for Mathematics Clubs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, LeRoy C., Ed.; Snyder, Henry D., Ed.

    The ten chapters in this booklet cover topics not ordinarily discussed in the classroom: Fibonacci sequences, projective geometry, groups, infinity and transfinite numbers, Pascal's Triangle, topology, experiments with natural numbers, non-Euclidean geometries, Boolean algebras, and the imaginary and the infinite in geometry. Each chapter is…

  7. Differential Topic Models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changyou; Buntine, Wray; Ding, Nan; Xie, Lexing; Du, Lan

    2015-02-01

    In applications we may want to compare different document collections: they could have shared content but also different and unique aspects in particular collections. This task has been called comparative text mining or cross-collection modeling. We present a differential topic model for this application that models both topic differences and similarities. For this we use hierarchical Bayesian nonparametric models. Moreover, we found it was important to properly model power-law phenomena in topic-word distributions and thus we used the full Pitman-Yor process rather than just a Dirichlet process. Furthermore, we propose the transformed Pitman-Yor process (TPYP) to incorporate prior knowledge such as vocabulary variations in different collections into the model. To deal with the non-conjugate issue between model prior and likelihood in the TPYP, we thus propose an efficient sampling algorithm using a data augmentation technique based on the multinomial theorem. Experimental results show the model discovers interesting aspects of different collections. We also show the proposed MCMC based algorithm achieves a dramatically reduced test perplexity compared to some existing topic models. Finally, we show our model outperforms the state-of-the-art for document classification/ideology prediction on a number of text collections. PMID:26353238

  8. Structural characterization of inhibitors with selectivity against members of a homologous enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Pavlovsky, Alexander G; Liu, Xuying; Faehnle, Christopher R; Potente, Nina; Viola, Ronald E

    2012-01-01

    The aspartate biosynthetic pathway provides essential metabolites for many important biological functions, including the production of four essential amino acids. As this critical pathway is only present in plants and microbes, any disruptions will be fatal to these organisms. An early pathway enzyme, l-aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produces a key intermediate at the first branch point of this pathway. Developing potent and selective inhibitors against several orthologs in the l-aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase family can serve as lead compounds for antibiotic development. Kinetic studies of two small molecule fragment libraries have identified inhibitors that show good selectivity against l-aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenases from two different bacterial species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Vibrio cholerae, despite the presence of an identical constellation of active site amino acids in this homologous enzyme family. Structural characterization of enzyme-inhibitor complexes have elucidated different modes of binding between these structurally related enzymes. This information provides the basis for a structure-guided approach to the development of more potent and more selective inhibitors.

  9. Structural Characterization of Inhibitors with Selectivity against Members of a Homologous Enzyme Family

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Liu, Xuying; Faehnle, Christopher R.; Potente, Nina; Viola, Ronald E.

    2013-01-31

    The aspartate biosynthetic pathway provides essential metabolites for many important biological functions, including the production of four essential amino acids. As this critical pathway is only present in plants and microbes, any disruptions will be fatal to these organisms. An early pathway enzyme, L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produces a key intermediate at the first branch point of this pathway. Developing potent and selective inhibitors against several orthologs in the L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase family can serve as lead compounds for antibiotic development. Kinetic studies of two small molecule fragment libraries have identified inhibitors that show good selectivity against L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenases from two different bacterial species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Vibrio cholerae, despite the presence of an identical constellation of active site amino acids in this homologous enzyme family. Structural characterization of enzyme-inhibitor complexes have elucidated different modes of binding between these structurally related enzymes. This information provides the basis for a structure-guided approach to the development of more potent and more selective inhibitors.

  10. Crystal Structure of Checkpoint Kinase 2 in Complex with Nsc 109555, a Potent and Selective Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Zhang, Di; Jobson, Andrew G.; Pommier, Yves; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Waugh, David S.

    2009-03-05

    Checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), a ser/thr kinase involved in the ATM-Chk2 checkpoint pathway, is activated by genomic instability and DNA damage and results in either arrest of the cell cycle to allow DNA repair to occur or apoptosis if the DNA damage is severe. Drugs that specifically target Chk2 could be beneficial when administered in combination with current DNA-damaging agents used in cancer therapy. Recently, a novel inhibitor of Chk2, NSC 109555, was identified that exhibited high potency (IC{sub 50} = 240 nM) and selectivity. This compound represents a new chemotype and lead for the development of novel Chk2 inhibitors that could be used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer. To facilitate the discovery of new analogs of NSC 109555 with even greater potency and selectivity, we have solved the crystal structure of this inhibitor in complex with the catalytic domain of Chk2. The structure confirms that the compound is an ATP-competitive inhibitor, as the electron density clearly reveals that it occupies the ATP-binding pocket. However, the mode of inhibition differs from that of the previously studied structure of Chk2 in complex with debromohymenialdisine, a compound that inhibits both Chk1 and Chk2. A unique hydrophobic pocket in Chk2, located very close to the bound inhibitor, presents an opportunity for the rational design of compounds with higher binding affinity and greater selectivity.

  11. Structural Basis for Receptor-Mediated Selective Autophagy of Aminopeptidase I Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Akinori; Watanabe, Yasunori; Adachi, Wakana; Suzuki, Kuninori; Matoba, Kazuaki; Kirisako, Hiromi; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Nakatogawa, Hitoshi; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Noda, Nobuo N

    2016-06-28

    Selective autophagy mediates the degradation of various cargoes, including protein aggregates and organelles, thereby contributing to cellular homeostasis. Cargo receptors ensure selectivity by tethering specific cargo to lipidated Atg8 at the isolation membrane. However, little is known about the structural requirements underlying receptor-mediated cargo recognition. Here, we report structural, biochemical, and cell biological analysis of the major selective cargo protein in budding yeast, aminopeptidase I (Ape1), and its complex with the receptor Atg19. The Ape1 propeptide has a trimeric coiled-coil structure, which tethers dodecameric Ape1 bodies together to form large aggregates. Atg19 disassembles the propeptide trimer and forms a 2:1 heterotrimer, which not only blankets the Ape1 aggregates but also regulates their size. These receptor activities may promote elongation of the isolation membrane along the aggregate surface, enabling sequestration of the cargo with high specificity. PMID:27320913

  12. Structure-Based Evolution of Subtype-Selective Neurotensin Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Schaab, Carolin; Kling, Ralf Christian; Einsiedel, Jürgen; Hübner, Harald; Clark, Tim; Seebach, Dieter; Gmeiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Subtype-selective agonists of the neurotensin receptor NTS2 represent a promising option for the treatment of neuropathic pain, as NTS2 is involved in the mediation of μ-opioid-independent anti-nociceptive effects. Based on the crystal structure of the subtype NTS1 and previous structure–activity relationships (SARs) indicating a potential role for the sub-pocket around Tyr11 of NT(8–13) in subtype-specific ligand recognition, we have developed new NTS2-selective ligands. Starting from NT(8–13), we replaced the tyrosine unit by β2-amino acids (type 1), by heterocyclic tyrosine bioisosteres (type 2) and peptoid analogues (type 3). We were able to evolve an asymmetric synthesis of a 5-substituted azaindolylalanine and its application as a bioisostere of tyrosine capable of enhancing NTS2 selectivity. The S-configured test compound 2 a, [(S)-3-(pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine-5-yl)-propionyl11]NT(8–13), exhibits substantial NTS2 affinity (4.8 nm) and has a nearly 30-fold NTS2 selectivity over NTS1. The (R)-epimer 2 b showed lower NTS2 affinity but more than 600-fold selectivity over NTS1. PMID:25478316

  13. Structural Basis for Selective Small Molecule Kinase Inhibition of Activated c-Met

    SciTech Connect

    Rickert, Keith W.; Patel, Sangita B.; Allison, Timothy J.; Byrne, Noel J.; Darke, Paul L.; Ford, Rachael E.; Guerin, David J.; Hall, Dawn L.; Kornienko, Maria; Lu, Jun; Munshi, Sanjeev K.; Reid, John C.; Shipman, Jennifer M.; Stanton, Elizabeth F.; Wilson, Kevin J.; Young, Jonathon R.; Soisson, Stephen M.; Lumb, Kevin J.

    2012-03-15

    The receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met is implicated in oncogenesis and is the target for several small molecule and biologic agents in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Binding of the hepatocyte growth factor to the cell surface receptor of c-Met induces activation via autophosphorylation of the kinase domain. Here we describe the structural basis of c-Met activation upon autophosphorylation and the selective small molecule inhibiton of autophosphorylated c-Met. MK-2461 is a potent c-Met inhibitor that is selective for the phosphorylated state of the enzyme. Compound 1 is an MK-2461 analog with a 20-fold enthalpy-driven preference for the autophosphorylated over unphosphorylated c-Met kinase domain. The crystal structure of the unbound kinase domain phosphorylated at Tyr-1234 and Tyr-1235 shows that activation loop phosphorylation leads to the ejection and disorder of the activation loop and rearrangement of helix {alpha}C and the G loop to generate a viable active site. Helix {alpha}C adopts a orientation different from that seen in activation loop mutants. The crystal structure of the complex formed by the autophosphorylated c-Met kinase domain and compound 1 reveals a significant induced fit conformational change of the G loop and ordering of the activation loop, explaining the selectivity of compound 1 for the autophosphorylated state. The results highlight the role of structural plasticity within the kinase domain in imparting the specificity of ligand binding and provide the framework for structure-guided design of activated c-Met inhibitors.

  14. Selecting a separable parametric spatiotemporal covariance structure for longitudinal imaging data.

    PubMed

    George, Brandon; Aban, Inmaculada

    2015-01-15

    Longitudinal imaging studies allow great insight into how the structure and function of a subject's internal anatomy changes over time. Unfortunately, the analysis of longitudinal imaging data is complicated by inherent spatial and temporal correlation: the temporal from the repeated measures and the spatial from the outcomes of interest being observed at multiple points in a patient's body. We propose the use of a linear model with a separable parametric spatiotemporal error structure for the analysis of repeated imaging data. The model makes use of spatial (exponential, spherical, and Matérn) and temporal (compound symmetric, autoregressive-1, Toeplitz, and unstructured) parametric correlation functions. A simulation study, inspired by a longitudinal cardiac imaging study on mitral regurgitation patients, compared different information criteria for selecting a particular separable parametric spatiotemporal correlation structure as well as the effects on types I and II error rates for inference on fixed effects when the specified model is incorrect. Information criteria were found to be highly accurate at choosing between separable parametric spatiotemporal correlation structures. Misspecification of the covariance structure was found to have the ability to inflate the type I error or have an overly conservative test size, which corresponded to decreased power. An example with clinical data is given illustrating how the covariance structure procedure can be performed in practice, as well as how covariance structure choice can change inferences about fixed effects.

  15. Selecting a Separable Parametric Spatiotemporal Covariance Structure for Longitudinal Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    George, Brandon; Aban, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies allow great insight into how the structure and function of a subject’s internal anatomy changes over time. Unfortunately, the analysis of longitudinal imaging data is complicated by inherent spatial and temporal correlation: the temporal from the repeated measures, and the spatial from the outcomes of interest being observed at multiple points in a patients body. We propose the use of a linear model with a separable parametric spatiotemporal error structure for the analysis of repeated imaging data. The model makes use of spatial (exponential, spherical, and Matérn) and temporal (compound symmetric, autoregressive-1, Toeplitz, and unstructured) parametric correlation functions. A simulation study, inspired by a longitudinal cardiac imaging study on mitral regurgitation patients, compared different information criteria for selecting a particular separable parametric spatiotemporal correlation structure as well as the effects on Type I and II error rates for inference on fixed effects when the specified model is incorrect. Information criteria were found to be highly accurate at choosing between separable parametric spatiotemporal correlation structures. Misspecification of the covariance structure was found to have the ability to inflate the Type I error or have an overly conservative test size, which corresponded to decreased power. An example with clinical data is given illustrating how the covariance structure procedure can be done in practice, as well as how covariance structure choice can change inferences about fixed effects. PMID:25293361

  16. Intrinsic Selectivity and Structure Sensitivity of Rhodium Catalysts for C(2+) Oxygenate Production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nuoya; Medford, Andrew J; Liu, Xinyan; Studt, Felix; Bligaard, Thomas; Bent, Stacey F; Nørskov, Jens K

    2016-03-23

    Synthesis gas (CO + H2) conversion is a promising route to converting coal, natural gas, or biomass into synthetic liquid fuels. Rhodium has long been studied as it is the only elemental catalyst that has demonstrated selectivity to ethanol and other C2+ oxygenates. However, the fundamentals of syngas conversion over rhodium are still debated. In this work a microkinetic model is developed for conversion of CO and H2 into methane, ethanol, and acetaldehyde on the Rh (211) and (111) surfaces, chosen to describe steps and close-packed facets on catalyst particles. The model is based on DFT calculations using the BEEF-vdW functional. The mean-field kinetic model includes lateral adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, and the BEEF-vdW error estimation ensemble is used to propagate error from the DFT calculations to the predicted rates. The model shows the Rh(211) surface to be ∼6 orders of magnitude more active than the Rh(111) surface, but highly selective toward methane, while the Rh(111) surface is intrinsically selective toward acetaldehyde. A variety of Rh/SiO2 catalysts are synthesized, tested for catalytic oxygenate production, and characterized using TEM. The experimental results indicate that the Rh(111) surface is intrinsically selective toward acetaldehyde, and a strong inverse correlation between catalytic activity and oxygenate selectivity is observed. Furthermore, iron impurities are shown to play a key role in modulating the selectivity of Rh/SiO2 catalysts toward ethanol. The experimental observations are consistent with the structure-sensitivity predicted from theory. This work provides an improved atomic-scale understanding and new insight into the mechanism, active site, and intrinsic selectivity of syngas conversion over rhodium catalysts and may also guide rational design of alloy catalysts made from more abundant elements. PMID:26958997

  17. Target Selection and Deselection at the Berkeley StructuralGenomics Center

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-03-22

    At the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center (BSGC), our goalis to obtain a near-complete structural complement of proteins in theminimal organisms Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae, two closelyrelated pathogens. Current targets for structure determination have beenselected in six major stages, starting with those predicted to be mosttractable to high throughput study and likely to yield new structuralinformation. We report on the process used to select these proteins, aswell as our target deselection procedure. Target deselection reducesexperimental effort by eliminating targets similar to those recentlysolved by the structural biology community or other centers. We measurethe impact of the 69 structures solved at the BSGC as of July 2004 onstructure prediction coverage of the M. pneumoniae and M. genitaliumproteomes. The number of Mycoplasma proteins for which thefold couldfirst be reliably assigned based on structures solved at the BSGC (24 M.pneumoniae and 21 M. genitalium) is approximately 25 percent of the totalresulting from work at all structural genomics centers and the worldwidestructural biology community (94 M. pneumoniae and 86M. genitalium)during the same period. As the number of structures contributed by theBSGC during that period is less than 1 percent of the total worldwideoutput, the benefits of a focused target selection strategy are apparent.If the structures of all current targets were solved, the percentage ofM. pneumoniae proteins for which folds could be reliably assigned wouldincrease from approximately 57 percent (391 of 687) at present to around80 percent (550 of 687), and the percentage of the proteome that could beaccurately modeled would increase from around 37 percent (254 of 687) toabout 64 percent (438 of 687). In M. genitalium, the percentage of theproteome that could be structurally annotated based on structures of ourremaining targets would rise from 72 percent (348 of 486) to around 76percent (371 of 486), with the

  18. Selective enumeration method for identification of dominant failure paths of large structures

    SciTech Connect

    Shetty, N.K.

    1994-12-31

    Identification of dominant failure paths forms one of the major tasks in the system reliability evaluation of redundant structures using a failure-tree approach. The Branch-and-Bound method, commonly used for this purpose, is computationally very expensive when applied for the analysis of large structures, such as offshore jackets. A more efficient method is proposed in this paper which features selective enumeration and preferential branching. Based on the study of a number of influencing factors such as: component safety margins, structure`s closeness to failure, reliability indices of individual components and failure paths etc, a strategy for ordering of failure elements is derived. Enumeration from each node of the tree follows the order of importance of components and it is stopped once the truncation criterion is satisfied for one of the resulting branches. A truncation criterion is established in advance and is applied at each level of the analysis. The branch selection criterion accounts for statistical correlation between paths and the importance of the branch to system reliability. The proposed method has been implemented into the RASOS software and is demonstrated on a shallow-water jacket platform.

  19. Mutant p53 proteins bind DNA in a DNA structure-selective mode

    PubMed Central

    Göhler, Thomas; Jäger, Stefan; Warnecke, Gabriele; Yasuda, Hideyo; Kim, Ella; Deppert, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Despite the loss of sequence-specific DNA binding, mutant p53 (mutp53) proteins can induce or repress transcription of mutp53-specific target genes. To date, the molecular basis for transcriptional modulation by mutp53 is not understood, but increasing evidence points to the possibility that specific interactions of mutp53 with DNA play an important role. So far, the lack of a common denominator for mutp53 DNA binding, i.e. the existence of common sequence elements, has hampered further characterization of mutp53 DNA binding. Emanating from our previous discovery that DNA structure is an important determinant of wild-type p53 (wtp53) DNA binding, we analyzed the binding of various mutp53 proteins to oligonucleotides mimicking non-B DNA structures. Using various DNA-binding assays we show that mutp53 proteins bind selectively and with high affinity to non-B DNA. In contrast to sequence-specific and DNA structure-dependent binding of wtp53, mutp53 DNA binding to non-B DNA is solely dependent on the stereo-specific configuration of the DNA, and not on DNA sequence. We propose that DNA structure-selective binding of mutp53 proteins is the basis for the well-documented interaction of mutp53 with MAR elements and for transcriptional activities mediates by mutp53. PMID:15722483

  20. Selection of optimal threshold to construct recurrence plot for structural operational vibration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Ren, Wei-Xin; Hu, Yi-Ding; Li, Dan

    2015-08-01

    The structural health monitoring (SHM) involves the sampled operational vibration measurements over time so that the structural features can be extracted accordingly. The recurrence plot (RP) and corresponding recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) have become a useful tool in various fields due to its efficiency. The threshold selection is one of key issues to make sure that the constructed recurrence plot contains enough recurrence points. Different signals have in nature different threshold values. This paper is aiming at presenting an approach to determine the optimal threshold for the operational vibration measurements of civil engineering structures. The surrogate technique and Taguchi loss function are proposed to generate reliable data and to achieve the optimal discrimination power point where the threshold is optimum. The impact of selecting recurrence thresholds on different signals is discussed. It is demonstrated that the proposed method to identify the optimal threshold is applicable to the operational vibration measurements. The proposed method provides a way to find the optimal threshold for the best RP construction of structural vibration measurements under operational conditions.

  1. The Structural Diversity of Carbohydrate Antigens of Selected Gram-Negative Marine Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nazarenko, Evgeny L.; Crawford, Russell J.; Ivanova, Elena P.

    2011-01-01

    Marine microorganisms have evolved for millions of years to survive in the environments characterized by one or more extreme physical or chemical parameters, e.g., high pressure, low temperature or high salinity. Marine bacteria have the ability to produce a range of biologically active molecules, such as antibiotics, toxins and antitoxins, antitumor and antimicrobial agents, and as a result, they have been a topic of research interest for many years. Among these biologically active molecules, the carbohydrate antigens, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs, O-antigens) found in cell walls of Gram-negative marine bacteria, show great potential as candidates in the development of drugs to prevent septic shock due to their low virulence. The structural diversity of LPSs is thought to be a reflection of the ability for these bacteria to adapt to an array of habitats, protecting the cell from being compromised by exposure to harsh environmental stress factors. Over the last few years, the variety of structures of core oligosaccharides and O-specific polysaccharides from LPSs of marine microrganisms has been discovered. In this review, we discuss the most recently encountered structures that have been identified from bacteria belonging to the genera Aeromonas, Alteromonas, Idiomarina, Microbulbifer, Pseudoalteromonas, Plesiomonas and Shewanella of the Gammaproteobacteria phylum; Sulfitobacter and Loktanella of the Alphaproteobactera phylum and to the genera Arenibacter, Cellulophaga, Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Flexibacter of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum. Particular attention is paid to the particular chemical features of the LPSs, such as the monosaccharide type, non-sugar substituents and phosphate groups, together with some of the typifying traits of LPSs obtained from marine bacteria. A possible correlation is then made between such features and the environmental adaptations undertaken by marine bacteria. PMID:22073003

  2. Evaluating supervised topic models in the presence of OCR errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Daniel; Ringger, Eric; Seppi, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Supervised topic models are promising tools for text analytics that simultaneously model topical patterns in document collections and relationships between those topics and document metadata, such as timestamps. We examine empirically the effect of OCR noise on the ability of supervised topic models to produce high quality output through a series of experiments in which we evaluate three supervised topic models and a naive baseline on synthetic OCR data having various levels of degradation and on real OCR data from two different decades. The evaluation includes experiments with and without feature selection. Our results suggest that supervised topic models are no better, or at least not much better in terms of their robustness to OCR errors, than unsupervised topic models and that feature selection has the mixed result of improving topic quality while harming metadata prediction quality. For users of topic modeling methods on OCR data, supervised topic models do not yet solve the problem of finding better topics than the original unsupervised topic models.

  3. Femtosecond laser structuring of silver-containing glass: Silver redistribution, selective etching, and surface topology engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Desmoulin, Jean-Charles; Petit, Yannick; Cardinal, Thierry; Canioni, Lionel; Dussauze, Marc; Lahaye, Michel; Gonzalez, Hernando Magallanes; Brasselet, Etienne

    2015-12-07

    Femtosecond direct laser writing in silver-containing phosphate glasses allows for the three-dimensional (3D) implementation of complex photonic structures. Sample translation along or perpendicular to the direction of the beam propagation has been performed, which led to the permanent formation of fluorescent structures, either corresponding to a tubular shape or to two parallel planes at the vicinity of the interaction voxel, respectively. These optical features are related to significant modifications of the local material chemistry. Indeed, silver depletion areas with a diameter below 200 nm were evidenced at the center of the photo-produced structures while photo-produced luminescence properties are attributed to the formation of silver clusters around the multiphoton interaction voxel. The laser-triggered oxidation-reduction processes and the associated photo-induced silver redistribution are proposed to be at the origin of the observed original 3D luminescent structures. Thanks to such material structuring, surface engineering has been also demonstrated. Selective surface chemical etching of the glass has been obtained subsequently to laser writing at the location of the photo-produced structures, revealing features with nanometric depth profiles and radial dimensions strongly related to the spatial distributions of the silver clusters.

  4. Structural evolution of an intermetallic Pd-Zn catalyst selective for propane dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, James R; Childers, David J; Zhao, Haiyan; Winans, Randall E; Meyer, Randall J; Miller, Jeffrey T

    2015-11-14

    We report the structural evolution of Pd-Zn alloys in a 3.6% Pd-12% Zn/Al2O3 catalyst which is selective for propane dehydrogenation. High signal-to-noise, in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used quantitatively, in addition to in situ diffuse-reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) to follow the structural changes in the catalyst as a function of reduction temperature. XRD in conjunction with DRIFTS of adsorbed CO indicated that the β1-PdZn intermetallic alloy structure formed at reduction temperatures as low as 230 °C, likely first at the surface, but did not form extensively throughout the bulk until 500 °C which was supported by in situ EXAFS. DRIFTS results suggested there was little change in the surfaces of the nanoparticles above 325 °C. The intermetallic alloy which formed was Pd-rich at all temperatures but became less Pd-rich with increasing reduction temperature as more Zn incorporated into the structure. In addition to the β1-PdZn alloy, a solid solution phase with face-center cubic structure (α-PdZn) was present in the catalyst, also becoming more Zn-rich with increasing reduction temperature.

  5. Femtosecond laser structuring of silver-containing glass: Silver redistribution, selective etching, and surface topology engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmoulin, Jean-Charles; Petit, Yannick; Canioni, Lionel; Dussauze, Marc; Lahaye, Michel; Gonzalez, Hernando Magallanes; Brasselet, Etienne; Cardinal, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Femtosecond direct laser writing in silver-containing phosphate glasses allows for the three-dimensional (3D) implementation of complex photonic structures. Sample translation along or perpendicular to the direction of the beam propagation has been performed, which led to the permanent formation of fluorescent structures, either corresponding to a tubular shape or to two parallel planes at the vicinity of the interaction voxel, respectively. These optical features are related to significant modifications of the local material chemistry. Indeed, silver depletion areas with a diameter below 200 nm were evidenced at the center of the photo-produced structures while photo-produced luminescence properties are attributed to the formation of silver clusters around the multiphoton interaction voxel. The laser-triggered oxidation-reduction processes and the associated photo-induced silver redistribution are proposed to be at the origin of the observed original 3D luminescent structures. Thanks to such material structuring, surface engineering has been also demonstrated. Selective surface chemical etching of the glass has been obtained subsequently to laser writing at the location of the photo-produced structures, revealing features with nanometric depth profiles and radial dimensions strongly related to the spatial distributions of the silver clusters.

  6. Structural requirements to obtain highly potent and selective 18 kDa Translocator Protein (TSPO) Ligands.

    PubMed

    Taliani, Sabrina; Pugliesi, Isabella; Da Settimo, Federico

    2011-01-01

    The (18 kDa) Translocator Protein (TSPO), was initially identified in 1977 as peripheral binding site for the benzodiazepine diazepam and named "Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR)". It is an evolutionarily well-conserved protein particularly located at the outer/inner mitochondrial membrane contact sites, in closely association with the 32 kDa voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and the 30 kDa adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), thus forming the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). TSPO is ubiquitary expressed in peripheral tissues (steroid producing tissues, liver, heart, kidney, lung, immune system) and in lower levels in the central nervous system, where it is mainly located in glial cells, and in neurons. TSPO is involved in a variety of biological processes such as cholesterol transport, steroidogenesis, calcium homeostasis, lipid metabolism, mitochondrial oxidation, cell growth and differentiation, apoptosis induction, and regulation of immune functions. In the last decade, many studies have reported that TSPO basal expression is altered in a number of human pathologies, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders (Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases), as well as in various forms of brain injury and inflammation and anxiety. Consequently, TSPO has not only been suggested as a promising drug target for a number of therapeutic applications (anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, immunomodulating, etc.), but also as valid diagnostic marker for related-disease state and progression, prompting the development of specific labelled ligands as powerful tools for imaging techniques. A number of structurally different classes of ligands have been reported, showing high affinity and selectivity towards TSPO. Indeed, most of these ligands have been designed starting from selective CBR ligands which were structurally modified in order to shift their affinity towards TSPO. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies were performed allowing to

  7. Structure and selectivity trends in crystalline urea-functionalized anion-binding capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Rajbanshi, Arbin; Custelcean, Radu

    2012-01-01

    A tripodal trisurea receptor (L1) persistently self-assembles with various divalent oxoanion salts M{sub n}X (M = Na, K, Mg, Ca, Cd; X = SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, SO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) into isomorphous series of crystalline frameworks in three different compositions: MX(L1){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6} (M = Mg, Ca, Cd) (1), Na{sub 2}X(L1){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} (2) and K{sub 2}X(L1){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (3). Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis revealed that all three series of structures adopt a NaCl-type topology, consisting of alternating anionic X(L1){sub 2}{sup 2-} capsules and M(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup 2+}, Na{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}{sup 2+} or K{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}{sup 2+} hydrated cations. The capsules provide a complementary environment to tetrahedral oxoanions via 12 hydrogen bonds from six urea groups lining the cavities of the capsules. The persistent formation of the capsules facilitated the investigation of structural trends and structure-selectivity relationships across series 1-3. First, it was found that the size of the capsules is relatively unresponsive to the change in the encapsulated anion, resulting in good shape and size recognition in the separation of anions by competitive crystallizations. Second, it was found that the size of the capsules varies linearly with the size of the external cation, which provides a way for tuning the anion encapsulation selectivity. However, no straightforward dependence was found between the size of the capsules and the relative selectivity for different-sized tetrahedral oxoanions in competitive crystallizations.

  8. Kinetic and Structural Studies of Phosphodiesterase-8A and Implication on the Inhibitor Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Yan, Z; Yang, S; Cai, J; Robinson, H; Ke, H

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase-8 (PDE8) is a family of cAMP-specific enzymes and plays important roles in many biological processes, including T-cell activation, testosterone production, adrenocortical hyperplasia, and thyroid function. However, no PDE8 selective inhibitors are available for trial treatment of human diseases. Here we report kinetic properties of the highly active PDE8A1 catalytic domain prepared from refolding and its crystal structures in the unliganded and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) bound forms at 1.9 and 2.1 Angstroms resolutions, respectively. The PDE8A1 catalytic domain has a KM of 1.8 eM, Vmax of 6.1 emol/min/mg, a kcat of 4.0 s-1 for cAMP, and a KM of 1.6 mM, Vmax of 2.5 emol/min/mg, a kcat of 1.6 s-1 for cGMP, thus indicating that the substrate specificity of PDE8 is dominated by KM. The structure of the PDE8A1 catalytic domain has similar topology as those of other PDE families but contains two extra helices around Asn685-Thr710. Since this fragment is distant from the active site of the enzyme, its impact on the catalysis is unclear. The PDE8A1 catalytic domain is insensitive to the IBMX inhibition (IC50 = 700 eM). The unfavorable interaction of IBMX in the PDE8A1-IBMX structure suggests an important role of Tyr748 in the inhibitor binding. Indeed, the mutation of Tyr748 to phenylalanine increases the PDE8A1 sensitivity to several nonselective or family selective PDE inhibitors. Thus, the structural and mutagenesis studies provide not only insight into the enzymatic properties but also guidelines for design of PDE8 selective inhibitors.

  9. Identification and Structure-Function Analysis of Subfamily Selective G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Larimore, Kelly M.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2015-02-13

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson’s disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  10. Identification and structure-function analysis of subfamily selective G protein-coupled receptor kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Homan, Kristoff T; Larimore, Kelly M; Elkins, Jonathan M; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J G

    2015-01-16

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson's disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  11. Topical diphenhydramine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, D T

    1991-08-01

    This paper will review an acute onset of mental confusion associated with hallucinations secondary to vigorous administration of topical Caladryl lotion and Benadryl spray in an 8-year-old boy with chickenpox. The article discusses the toxicity of both oral and topical diphenhydramine use, along with the differentiation of varicella encephalitis from diphenhydramine toxicity. Delirium can be described as an acute clouding of consciousness associated with visual and tactile hallucinations, disorientation, and misperceptions. In a child who is already suffering from an infectious illness, encephalitis must be high on the list of the physician's differential diagnosis. The physician, however, must never overlook ingestions, even from topical, over-the-counter medications. The case described illustrates this point. Although this appears to be the fourth case report on this subject, the diagnosis was partially obscured by the fact that the local pharmacist could not find any documented cases despite a computer search of diphenhydramine toxicity at the time of admission and the report of only one or two cases by the Parke-Davis pharmacist.

  12. Highly selective nanocomposite sorbents for the specific recognition of S-ibuprofen from structurally related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooraj, M. P.; Mathew, Beena

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to synthesize highly homogeneous synthetic recognition units for the selective and specific separation of S-ibuprofen from its closely related structural analogues using molecular imprinting technology. The molecular imprinted polymer wrapped on functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-MIP) was synthesized using S-ibuprofen as the template in the imprinting process. The characterization of the products and intermediates were done by FT-IR spectroscopy, PXRD, TGA, SEM and TEM techniques. The high regression coefficient value for Langmuir adsorption isotherm ( R 2 = 0.999) showed the homogeneous imprint sites and surface adsorption nature of the prepared polymer sorbent. The nano-MIP followed a second-order kinetics ( R 2 = 0.999) with a rapid adsorption rate which also suggested the formation of recognition sites on the surface of MWCNT-MIP. MWCNT-MIP showed 83.6 % higher rebinding capacity than its non-imprinted counterpart. The higher relative selectivity coefficient ( k') of the imprinted sorbent towards S-ibuprofen than that for its structural analogues evidenced the capability of the nano-MIP to selectively and specifically rebind the template rather than its analogues.

  13. Diversity and coverage of structural sublibraries selected using the SAGE and SCA algorithms.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, C H; Tropsha, A; Pfahler, L B; Druker, R; Chakravorty, S; Ethiraj, G; Zheng, W

    2001-01-01

    It is often impractical to synthesize and test all compounds in a large exhaustive chemical library. Herein, we discuss rational approaches to selecting representative subsets of virtual libraries that help direct experimental synthetic efforts for diverse library design. We compare the performance of two stochastic sampling algorithms, Simulating Annealing Guided Evaluation (SAGE; Zheng, W.; Cho, S. J.; Waller, C. L.; Tropsha, A. J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci. 1999, 39, 738-746.) and Stochastic Cluster Analysis (SCA; Reynolds, C. H.; Druker, R.; Pfahler, L. B. Lead Discovery Using Stochastic Cluster Analysis (SCA): A New Method for Clustering Structurally Similar Compounds J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci. 1998, 38, 305-312.) for their ability to select both diverse and representative subsets of the entire chemical library space. The SAGE and SCA algorithms were compared using u- and s-optimal metrics as an independent assessment of diversity and coverage. This comparison showed that both algorithms were capable of generating sublibraries in descriptor space that are diverse and give reasonable coverage (i.e. are representative) of the original full library. Tests were carried out using simulated two-dimensional data sets and a 27 000 compound proprietary structural library as represented by computed Molconn-Z descriptors. One of the key observations from this work is that the algorithmically simple SCA method is capable of selecting subsets that are comparable to the more computationally intensive SAGE method.

  14. Strategies for Selection from Protein Libraries Composed of de Novo Designed Secondary Structure Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Tomoaki; Plückthun, Andreas

    2004-02-01

    As more and more protein structures are determined, it has become clear that there is only a limited number of protein folds in nature. To explore whether the protein folds found in nature are the only solutions to the protein folding problem, or that a lack of evolutionary pressure causes the paucity of different protein folds found, we set out to construct protein libraries without any restriction on topology. We generated different libraries (all α-helix, all β-strand and α-helix plus β-strand) with an average length of 100 amino acid residues, composed of designed secondary structure modules (α-helix, β-strand and β-turn) in various proportions, based primarily on the patterning of polar and non-polar residues. From the analysis of proteins chosen randomly from the libraries, we found that a substantial portion of pure α-helical proteins show properties similar to native proteins. Using these libraries as a starting point, we aim to establish a selection system which allows us to enrich proteins with favorable folding properties (non-aggregating, compactly folded) from the libraries. We have developed such a method based on ribosome display. This selection is based on two concepts: (1) misfolded proteins are more sensitive to proteolysis, (2) misfolded and/or aggregated proteins are more hydrophobic. We show that by applying each of these selection criteria proteins that are compactly folded and soluble can be enriched over insoluble and random coil proteins.

  15. Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2004-07-14

    The structural genomics project is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy which is medically and biologically relevant, of good value, and tractable. As an option to consider, we present the Pfam5000 strategy, which involves selecting the 5000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. We compare the Pfam5000 strategy to several other proposed strategies that would require similar numbers of targets. These include including complete solution of several small to moderately sized bacterial proteomes, partial coverage of the human proteome, and random selection of approximately 5000 targets from sequenced genomes. We measure the impact that successful implementation of these strategies would have upon structural interpretation of the proteins in Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and 131 complete proteomes (including 10 of eukaryotes) from the Proteome Analysis database at EBI. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 68 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 59 percent of residues) and 61 percent of eukaryotic proteins (40 percent of residues). More fine-grained coverage which would allow accurate modeling of these proteins would require an order of magnitude more targets. The Pfam5000 strategy may be modified in several ways, for example to focus on larger families, bacterial sequences, or eukaryotic sequences; as long as secondary consideration is given to large families within Pfam, coverage results vary only slightly. In contrast, focusing structural genomics on a single tractable genome would have only a limited impact in structural knowledge of other proteomes: a significant fraction (about 30-40 percent of the proteins, and 40-60 percent of the residues) of each proteome is classified in small

  16. Impact of migration on the multi-strategy selection in finite group-structured populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanling; Liu, Aizhi; Sun, Changyin

    2016-01-01

    For large quantities of spatial models, the multi-strategy selection under weak selection is the sum of two competition terms: the pairwise competition and the competition of multiple strategies with equal frequency. Two parameters σ1 and σ2 quantify the dependence of the multi-strategy selection on these two terms, respectively. Unlike previous studies, we here do not require large populations for calculating σ1 and σ2, and perform the first quantitative analysis of the effect of migration on them in group-structured populations of any finite sizes. The Moran and the Wright-Fisher process have the following common findings. Compared with well-mixed populations, migration causes σ1 to change with the mutation probability from a decreasing curve to an inverted U-shaped curve and maintains the increase of σ2. Migration (probability and range) leads to a significant change of σ1 but a negligible one of σ2. The way that migration changes σ1 is qualitatively similar to its influence on the single parameter characterizing the two-strategy selection. The Moran process is more effective in increasing σ1 for most migration probabilities and the Wright-Fisher process is always more effective in increasing σ2. Finally, our findings are used to study the evolution of cooperation under direct reciprocity. PMID:27767074

  17. Structural plasticity and dynamic selectivity of acid-sensing ion channel-spider toxin complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Baconguis, Isabelle; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-07-29

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-independent, amiloride-sensitive channels involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from nociception to taste. Despite the importance of ASICs in physiology, we know little about the mechanism of channel activation. Here we show that psalmotoxin activates non-selective and Na+-selective currents in chicken ASIC1a at pH7.25 and 5.5, respectively. Crystal structures of ASIC1a–psalmotoxin complexes map the toxin binding site to the extracellular domain and show how toxin binding triggers an expansion of the extracellular vestibule and stabilization of the open channel pore. At pH7.25 the pore is approximately 10Å in diameter, whereas at pH5.5 the pore is largely hydrophobic and elliptical in cross-section with dimensions of approximately 5 by 7Å, consistent with a barrier mechanism for ion selectivity. These studies define mechanisms for activation of ASICs, illuminate the basis for dynamic ion selectivity and provide the blueprints for new therapeutic agents.

  18. Structure-Guided Evolution of Potent and Selective CHK1 Inhibitors through Scaffold Morphing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Pyrazolopyridine inhibitors with low micromolar potency for CHK1 and good selectivity against CHK2 were previously identified by fragment-based screening. The optimization of the pyrazolopyridines to a series of potent and CHK1-selective isoquinolines demonstrates how fragment-growing and scaffold morphing strategies arising from a structure-based understanding of CHK1 inhibitor binding can be combined to successfully progress fragment-derived hit matter to compounds with activity in vivo. The challenges of improving CHK1 potency and selectivity, addressing synthetic tractability, and achieving novelty in the crowded kinase inhibitor chemical space were tackled by multiple scaffold morphing steps, which progressed through tricyclic pyrimido[2,3-b]azaindoles to N-(pyrazin-2-yl)pyrimidin-4-amines and ultimately to imidazo[4,5-c]pyridines and isoquinolines. A potent and highly selective isoquinoline CHK1 inhibitor (SAR-020106) was identified, which potentiated the efficacies of irinotecan and gemcitabine in SW620 human colon carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. PMID:22111927

  19. Hot topics in flavor physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Soon Yung; /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2005-01-01

    Hot topics in flavor physics at CDF are reviewed. Selected results of top, beauty, charm physics and exotic states in about 200 pb{sup -1} data collected by the CDF II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron are presented.

  20. Structural analysis of ion selectivity in the NaK channel

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Amer; Jiang, Youxing

    2009-09-15

    Here, we present a detailed characterization of ion binding in the NaK pore using the high resolution structures of NaK in complex with various cations. These structures reveal four ion binding sites with similar chemical environments but vastly different ion preference. The most non selective of all is site 3, which is formed exclusively by backbone carbonyl oxygen atoms and resides deep within the selectivity filter. Additionally, four water molecules in combination with four backbone carbonyl oxygen atoms are seen to participate in K{sup +} and Rb{sup +} ion chelation both at the external entrance and vestibule of the NaK filter, confirming the preference for an octahedral ligand configuration for K{sup +} and Rb{sup +} binding. In contrast, Na{sup +} binding in the NaK filter, particularly at site 4, utilizes a pyramidal ligand configuration requiring the participation of a water molecule in the cavity. Therefore, the ability of the NaK filter to bind both Na{sup +} and K{sup +} ions seemingly arises from the ions' ability to utilize the existing environment in unique ways rather than any structural rearrangements of the filter itself.

  1. Electrically tunable selective reflection of light by heliconical cholesteric structures (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Xiang, Jie; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V.; Li, Quan

    2015-10-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals with helicoidal molecular architecture are known for their ability to selectively reflect light with the wavelength that is determined by the periodicity of molecular orientations. Resulting interference colors are highly saturated, they add like colored lights and produce a color gamut greater than that obtained with inks, dyes, and pigments. The periodicity of the helical structure and thus the wavelength of the reflected light can be controlled by chemical composition and sometimes by temperature, but tuning with the electric field has been so far elusive. Here we demonstrate that by using a cholesteric with oblique helicoidal (heliconical) structure, as opposed to the classic "right-angle" helicoid, one can vary the wavelength of selectively reflected light in a broad spectral range, by simply adjusting the electric field applied parallel to the helicoidal axis. The effect can enable many applications that require dynamically controlled transmission and reflection of light, from energy-saving smart windows to tunable organic lasers, and transparent "see-through" displays. Since the material is non-absorbing and transparent everywhere except the electrically preselected reflection band, the effect can be used in creating multilayered structures with a dynamic additive mixture of colors.

  2. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L.; Adir, Noam; Baasov, Timor

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)—the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and has yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We also evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3, as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL. PMID:26264664

  3. Practical guidelines to select and scale earthquake records for nonlinear response history analysis of structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkan, Erol; Chopra, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Earthquake engineering practice is increasingly using nonlinear response history analysis (RHA) to demonstrate performance of structures. This rigorous method of analysis requires selection and scaling of ground motions appropriate to design hazard levels. Presented herein is a modal-pushover-based scaling (MPS) method to scale ground motions for use in nonlinear RHA of buildings and bridges. In the MPS method, the ground motions are scaled to match (to a specified tolerance) a target value of the inelastic deformation of the first-'mode' inelastic single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system whose properties are determined by first-'mode' pushover analysis. Appropriate for first-?mode? dominated structures, this approach is extended for structures with significant contributions of higher modes by considering elastic deformation of second-'mode' SDF system in selecting a subset of the scaled ground motions. Based on results presented for two bridges, covering single- and multi-span 'ordinary standard' bridge types, and six buildings, covering low-, mid-, and tall building types in California, the accuracy and efficiency of the MPS procedure are established and its superiority over the ASCE/SEI 7-05 scaling procedure is demonstrated.

  4. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: Aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics

    DOE PAGES

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L.; Adir, Noam; et al

    2015-08-11

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)—the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and hasmore » yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3, as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL.« less

  5. Update on the Pfam5000 Strategy for Selection of StructuralGenomics Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-06-27

    Structural Genomics is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy that is medically and biologically relevant, of good financial value, and tractable. In 2003, we presented the ''Pfam5000'' strategy, which involves selecting the 5,000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. In this update, we show that although both the Pfam database and the number of sequenced genomes have increased in size, the expected benefits of the Pfam5000 strategy have not changed substantially. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5,000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 65 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 54 percent of residues) and 63 percent of eukaryotic proteins (42 percent of residues). Fewer than 2,300 of the largest families on this list remain to be solved, making the project feasible in the next five years given the expected throughput to be achieved in the production phase of the Protein Structure Initiative.

  6. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: Aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L.; Adir, Noam; Baasov, Timor

    2015-08-11

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)—the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and has yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3, as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL.

  7. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L; Adir, Noam; Baasov, Timor

    2015-09-30

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)-the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and has yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We also evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3: , as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL.

  8. Using a two-phase evolutionary framework to select multiple network spreaders based on community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Chung-Yuan; Sun, Chuen-Tsai

    2016-11-01

    Using network community structures to identify multiple influential spreaders is an appropriate method for analyzing the dissemination of information, ideas and infectious diseases. For example, data on spreaders selected from groups of customers who make similar purchases may be used to advertise products and to optimize limited resource allocation. Other examples include community detection approaches aimed at identifying structures and groups in social or complex networks. However, determining the number of communities in a network remains a challenge. In this paper we describe our proposal for a two-phase evolutionary framework (TPEF) for determining community numbers and maximizing community modularity. Lancichinetti-Fortunato-Radicchi benchmark networks were used to test our proposed method and to analyze execution time, community structure quality, convergence, and the network spreading effect. Results indicate that our proposed TPEF generates satisfactory levels of community quality and convergence. They also suggest a need for an index, mechanism or sampling technique to determine whether a community detection approach should be used for selecting multiple network spreaders.

  9. Structural principles of nucleoside selectivity in a 2′-deoxyguanosine riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Pikovskaya, Olga; Polonskaia, Anna; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Serganov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Purine riboswitches play an essential role in genetic regulation of bacterial metabolism. This family includes the 2′-deoxyguanosine (dG) riboswitch, involved in feedback control of deoxyguanosine biosynthesis. To understand the principles that define dG selectivity, we determined crystal structures of natural Mesoplasma florum riboswitch bound to cognate dG, as well as non-cognate guanosine, deoxyguanosine monophosphate and guanosine monophosphate. Comparison with related purine riboswitch structures reveals that the dG riboswitch achieves its specificity by modifying key interactions involving the nucleobase and through rearrangement of the ligand-binding pocket, so as to accommodate the additional sugar moiety. In addition, we observe novel conformational changes beyond the junctional binding pocket, extending as far as peripheral loop-loop interactions. It appears that re-engineering riboswitch scaffolds will require consideration of selectivity features dispersed throughout the riboswitch tertiary fold, and that structure-guided drug design efforts targeted to junctional RNA scaffolds need to be addressed within such an expanded framework. PMID:21841796

  10. Search tool plug-in: imploements latent topic feedback

    2011-09-23

    IRIS is a search tool plug-in that is used to implement latent topic feedback for enhancing text navigation. It accepts a list of returned documents from an information retrieval wywtem that is generated from keyword search queries. Data is pulled directly from a topic information database and processed by IRIS to determine the most prominent and relevant topics, along with topic-ngrams, associated with the list of returned documents. User selected topics are then used tomore » expand the query and presumabley refine the search results.« less

  11. Search tool plug-in: imploements latent topic feedback

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-23

    IRIS is a search tool plug-in that is used to implement latent topic feedback for enhancing text navigation. It accepts a list of returned documents from an information retrieval wywtem that is generated from keyword search queries. Data is pulled directly from a topic information database and processed by IRIS to determine the most prominent and relevant topics, along with topic-ngrams, associated with the list of returned documents. User selected topics are then used to expand the query and presumabley refine the search results.

  12. Crystal structures of the structure-selective nuclease Mus81-Eme1 bound to flap DNA substrates

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Gwang Hyeon; Jo, Aera; Baek, Kyuwon; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Fu, Yaoyao; Lee, Jong-Bong; Kim, YoungChang; Cho, Yunje

    2014-01-01

    The Mus81-Eme1 complex is a structure-selective endonuclease with a critical role in the resolution of recombination intermediates during DNA repair after interstrand cross-links, replication fork collapse, or double-strand breaks. To explain the molecular basis of 3′ flap substrate recognition and cleavage mechanism by Mus81-Eme1, we determined crystal structures of human Mus81-Eme1 bound to various flap DNA substrates. Mus81-Eme1 undergoes gross substrate-induced conformational changes that reveal two key features: (i) a hydrophobic wedge of Mus81 that separates pre- and post-nick duplex DNA and (ii) a “5′ end binding pocket” that hosts the 5′ nicked end of post-nick DNA. These features are crucial for comprehensive protein-DNA interaction, sharp bending of the 3′ flap DNA substrate, and incision strand placement at the active site. While Mus81-Eme1 unexpectedly shares several common features with members of the 5′ flap nuclease family, the combined structural, biochemical, and biophysical analyses explain why Mus81-Eme1 preferentially cleaves 3′ flap DNA substrates with 5′ nicked ends. PMID:24733841

  13. A hybrid algorithm for selecting head-related transfer function based on similarity of anthropometric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Shu-Guang; Gao, Li-Ping

    2010-09-01

    As the basic data for virtual auditory technology, head-related transfer function (HRTF) has many applications in the areas of room acoustic modeling, spatial hearing and multimedia. How to individualize HRTF fast and effectively has become an opening problem at present. Based on the similarity and relativity of anthropometric structures, a hybrid HRTF customization algorithm, which has combined the method of principal component analysis (PCA), multiple linear regression (MLR) and database matching (DM), has been presented in this paper. The HRTFs selected by both the best match and the worst match have been applied into obtaining binaurally auralized sounds, which are then used for subjective listening experiments and the results are compared. For the area in the horizontal plane, the localization results have shown that the selection of HRTFs can enhance the localization accuracy and can also abate the problem of front-back confusion.

  14. Structure-guided design of selective Epac1 and Epac2 agonists.

    PubMed

    Schwede, Frank; Bertinetti, Daniela; Langerijs, Carianne N; Hadders, Michael A; Wienk, Hans; Ellenbroek, Johanne H; de Koning, Eelco J P; Bos, Johannes L; Herberg, Friedrich W; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Janssen, Richard A J; Rehmann, Holger

    2015-01-01

    The second messenger cAMP is known to augment glucose-induced insulin secretion. However, its downstream targets in pancreatic β-cells have not been unequivocally determined. Therefore, we designed cAMP analogues by a structure-guided approach that act as Epac2-selective agonists both in vitro and in vivo. These analogues activate Epac2 about two orders of magnitude more potently than cAMP. The high potency arises from increased affinity as well as increased maximal activation. Crystallographic studies demonstrate that this is due to unique interactions. At least one of the Epac2-specific agonists, Sp-8-BnT-cAMPS (S-220), enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion in human pancreatic cells. Selective targeting of Epac2 is thus proven possible and may be an option in diabetes treatment. PMID:25603503

  15. Structural characterizations of nonpeptidic thiadiazole inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases reveal the basis for stromelysin selectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Finzel, B. C.; Baldwin, E. T.; Bryant, G. L.; Hess, G. F.; Wilks, J. W.; Trepod, C. M.; Mott, J. E.; Marshall, V. P.; Petzold, G. L.; Poorman, R. A.; O'Sullivan, T. J.; Schostarez, H. J.; Mitchell, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    The binding of two 5-substituted-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thione inhibitors to the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin (MMP-3) have been characterized by protein crystallography. Both inhibitors coordinate to the catalytic zinc cation via an exocyclic sulfur and lay in an unusual position across the unprimed (P1-P3) side of the proteinase active site. Nitrogen atoms in the thiadiazole moiety make specific hydrogen bond interactions with enzyme structural elements that are conserved across all enzymes in the matrix metalloproteinase class. Strong hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the side chain of tyrosine-155 appear to be responsible for the very high selectivity of these inhibitors for stromelysin. In these enzyme/inhibitor complexes, the S1' enzyme subsite is unoccupied. A conformational rearrangement of the catalytic domain occurs that reveals an inherent flexibility of the substrate binding region leading to speculation about a possible mechanism for modulation of stromelysin activity and selectivity. PMID:9792098

  16. Population Structure, Genetic Variation, and Linkage Disequilibrium in Perennial Ryegrass Populations Divergently Selected for Freezing Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kovi, Mallikarjuna Rao; Fjellheim, Siri; Sandve, Simen R; Larsen, Arild; Rudi, Heidi; Asp, Torben; Kent, Matthew Peter; Rognli, Odd Arne

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature is one of the abiotic stresses seriously affecting the growth of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), and freezing tolerance is a complex trait of major agronomical importance in northern and central Europe. Understanding the genetic control of freezing tolerance would aid in the development of cultivars of perennial ryegrass with improved adaptation to frost. The plant material investigated in this study was an experimental synthetic population derived from pair-crosses among five European perennial ryegrass genotypes, representing adaptations to a range of climatic conditions across Europe. A total number of 80 individuals (24 of High frost [HF]; 29 of Low frost [LF], and 27 of Unselected [US]) from the second generation of the two divergently selected populations and an unselected (US) control population were genotyped using 278 genome-wide SNPs derived from perennial ryegrass transcriptome sequences. Our studies investigated the genetic diversity among the three experimental populations by analysis of molecular variance and population structure, and determined that the HF and LF populations are very divergent after selection for freezing tolerance, whereas the HF and US populations are more similar. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay varied across the seven chromosomes and the conspicuous pattern of LD between the HF and LF population confirmed their divergence in freezing tolerance. Furthermore, two F st outlier methods; finite island model (fdist) by LOSITAN and hierarchical structure model using ARLEQUIN, both detected six loci under directional selection. These outlier loci are most probably linked to genes involved in freezing tolerance, cold adaptation, and abiotic stress. These six candidate loci under directional selection for freezing tolerance might be potential marker resources for breeding perennial ryegrass cultivars with improved freezing tolerance.

  17. Widespread signatures of local mRNA folding structure selection in four Dengue virus serotypes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background It is known that mRNA folding can affect and regulate various gene expression steps both in living organisms and in viruses. Previous studies have recognized functional RNA structures in the genome of the Dengue virus. However, these studies usually focused either on the viral untranslated regions or on very specific and limited regions at the beginning of the coding sequences, in a limited number of strains, and without considering evolutionary selection. Results Here we performed the first large scale comprehensive genomics analysis of selection for local mRNA folding strength in the Dengue virus coding sequences, based on a total of 1,670 genomes and 4 serotypes. Our analysis identified clusters of positions along the coding regions that may undergo a conserved evolutionary selection for strong or weak local folding maintained across different viral variants. Specifically, 53-66 clusters for strong folding and 49-73 clusters for weak folding (depending on serotype) aggregated of positions with a significant conservation of folding energy signals (related to partially overlapping local genomic regions) were recognized. In addition, up to 7% of these positions were found to be conserved in more than 90% of the viral genomes. Although some of the identified positions undergo frequent synonymous / non-synonymous substitutions, the selection for folding strength therein is preserved, and thus cannot be trivially explained based on sequence conservation alone. Conclusions The fact that many of the positions with significant folding related signals are conserved among different Dengue variants suggests that a better understanding of the mRNA structures in the corresponding regions may promote the development of prospective anti- Dengue vaccination strategies. The comparative genomics approach described here can be employed in the future for detecting functional regions in other pathogens with very high mutations rates. PMID:26449467

  18. Selective Constraint on Human Pre-mRNA Splicing by Protein Structural Properties

    PubMed Central

    de Brevern, Alexandre G.; Chuang, Trees-Juen; Chen, Feng-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a major mechanism of increasing proteome diversity in complex organisms. Different AS transcript isoforms may be translated into peptide sequences of significantly different lengths and amino acid compositions. One important question, then, is how AS is constrained by protein structural requirements while peptide sequences may be significantly changed in AS events. Here, we address this issue by examining whether the intactness of three-dimensional protein structural units (compact units in protein structures, namely protein units [PUs]) tends to be preserved in AS events in human. We show that PUs tend to occur in constitutively spliced exons and to overlap constitutive exon boundaries. Furthermore, when PUs are located at the boundaries between two alternatively spliced exons (ASEs), these neighboring ASEs tend to co-occur in different transcript isoforms. In addition, such PU-spanned ASE pairs tend to have a higher frequency of being included in transcript isoforms. ASE regions that overlap with PUs also have lower nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution rate ratios than those that do not overlap with PUs, indicating stronger negative selection pressure in PU-overlapped ASE regions. Of note, we show that PUs have protein domain- and structural orderness-independent effects on messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing. Overall, our results suggest that fine-scale protein structural requirements have significant influences on the splicing patterns of human mRNAs. PMID:22936073

  19. Effect of the aerated structure on selected properties of freeze-dried hydrocolloid gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciurzyńska, Agnieszka; Lenart, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The ability to create diverse structures and studies on the effect of the aerated structure on selected properties with the use of freeze-dried gels may provide knowledge about the properties of dried foods. Such gels can be a basis for obtaining innovative food products. For the gel preparation, 3 types of hydrocolloids were used: low-methoxyl pectin, a mixture of xanthan gum and locust-bean gum, and a mixture of xanthan gum and guar gum. Gels were aerated for 3 and 7 min, frozen at a temperature of -45°C 2 h-1, and freeze-dried at a temperature of 30°C. For the samples obtained, structure, porosity, shrinkage, rehydration, and colour were investigated. It was shown that the type of the hydrocolloid and aeration time influence the structure of freeze-dried gels, which determines such properties of samples as porosity, shrinkage, density, rehydration, and colour. The bigger pores of low-methoxyl pectin gels undergo rehydration in the highest degree. The delicate and aerated structure of gels with the mixture of xanthan gum and locust-bean gum was damaged during freeze-drying and shrinkage exhibited the highest value. Small pores of samples with the mixture of xanthan gum and guar gum were responsible for the lower rehydration properties, but the highest porosity value contributed to the highest lightness value.

  20. Theoretical Studies on Structures, Properties and Dominant Debromination Pathways for Selected Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingyun; Hu, Jiwei; Shi, Xuedan; Ruan, Wenqian; Luo, Jin; Wei, Xionghui

    2016-01-01

    The B3LYP/6-311+G(d)-SDD method, which considers the relativistic effect of bromine, was adopted for the calculations of the selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the present study, in which the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) method was also applied. The calculated values and experimental data for structural parameters of the selected PBDEs were compared to find the suitable theoretical methods for their structural optimization. The results show that the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) method can give the better results (with the root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 0.0268 for the C-Br bond and 0.0161 for the C-O bond) than the B3LYP/6-311+G(d)-SDD method. Then, the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) method was applied to predict the structures for the other selected PBDEs (both neutral and anionic species). The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and the electron affinity are of a close relationship. The electron affinities (vertical electron affinity and adiabatic electron affinity) were discussed to study their electron capture abilities. To better estimate the conversion of configuration for PBDEs, the configuration transition states for BDE-5, BDE-22 and BDE-47 were calculated at the B3LYP/ 6-311+G(d) level in both gas phase and solution. The possible debromination pathway for BDE-22 were also studied, which have bromine substituents on two phenyl rings and the bromine on meta-position prefers to depart from the phenyl ring. The reaction profile of the electron-induced reductive debromination for BDE-22 were also shown in order to study its degradation mechanism. PMID:27322242

  1. Theoretical Studies on Structures, Properties and Dominant Debromination Pathways for Selected Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingyun; Hu, Jiwei; Shi, Xuedan; Ruan, Wenqian; Luo, Jin; Wei, Xionghui

    2016-01-01

    The B3LYP/6-311+G(d)-SDD method, which considers the relativistic effect of bromine, was adopted for the calculations of the selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the present study, in which the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) method was also applied. The calculated values and experimental data for structural parameters of the selected PBDEs were compared to find the suitable theoretical methods for their structural optimization. The results show that the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) method can give the better results (with the root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 0.0268 for the C–Br bond and 0.0161 for the C–O bond) than the B3LYP/6-311+G(d)-SDD method. Then, the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) method was applied to predict the structures for the other selected PBDEs (both neutral and anionic species). The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and the electron affinity are of a close relationship. The electron affinities (vertical electron affinity and adiabatic electron affinity) were discussed to study their electron capture abilities. To better estimate the conversion of configuration for PBDEs, the configuration transition states for BDE-5, BDE-22 and BDE-47 were calculated at the B3LYP/ 6-311+G(d) level in both gas phase and solution. The possible debromination pathway for BDE-22 were also studied, which have bromine substituents on two phenyl rings and the bromine on meta-position prefers to depart from the phenyl ring. The reaction profile of the electron-induced reductive debromination for BDE-22 were also shown in order to study its degradation mechanism. PMID:27322242

  2. Evolution of the structure of tail feathers: implications for the theory of sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, José Miguel; Bonal, Raúl; Cordero, Pedro J

    2003-02-01

    Bird tails are extraordinarily variable in length and functionality. In some species, males have evolved exaggeratedly long tails as a result of sexual selection. Changes in tail length should be associated with changes in feather structure. The study of the evolution of feather structure in bird tails could give insight to understand the causes and means of evolution in relation to processes of sexual selection. In theory, three possible means of tail length evolution in relation to structural components might be expected: (1) a positive relationship between the increase in length and size of structural components maintaining the mechanical properties of the feather; (2) no relationship; that is, enlarging feather length without changes in the structural components; and (3) a negative relationship; that is, enlarging feather length by reducing structural components. These hypotheses were tested using phylogenetic analyses to examine changes in both degree of exaggeration in tail length and structural characteristics of tail feathers (rachis width and density of barbs) in 36 species, including those dimorphic and nondimorphic in tail length. The degree of sexual dimorphism in tail length was negatively correlated with both rachis width and density of barbs in males but not in females. Reinforcing this result, we found that dimorphism in tail length was negatively associated with dimorphism in tail feather structure (rachis width and density of barbs). These results support the third hypothesis, in which the evolution of long feathers occurs at the expense of making them simpler and therefore less costly to produce. However, we do not know the effects of enfeeblement on the costs of bearing. If the total costs increased, the enfeeblement of feathers could be explained as a reinforcement of the honesty of the signal. Alternatively, if total costs were reduced, the strategy could be explained by cheating processes. The study of female preferences for fragile tail

  3. Selective extraction, structural characterisation and antifungal activity assessment of napins from an industrial rapeseed meal.

    PubMed

    Nioi, Claudia; Kapel, Romain; Rondags, Emmanuel; Marc, Ivan

    2012-10-15

    This article reports an extraction-purification of napins from an industrial rapeseed meal and the assessment of their antimicrobial activity against Fusarium langsethiae. The best extraction conditions are observed at pH 2, 12% (w/w) of rapeseed meal after 15 min of extraction in water at room temperature. Under these conditions the extraction is highly selective, allowing a simple purification process (ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by desalting size exclusion chromatography) to get purified napins. These napins possessed significant anti-Fusarium activity (IC(50)=70 μM) and a compact secondary structure rich in α-helix, which may explain this bioactivity.

  4. Selective extraction, structural characterisation and antifungal activity assessment of napins from an industrial rapeseed meal.

    PubMed

    Nioi, Claudia; Kapel, Romain; Rondags, Emmanuel; Marc, Ivan

    2012-10-15

    This article reports an extraction-purification of napins from an industrial rapeseed meal and the assessment of their antimicrobial activity against Fusarium langsethiae. The best extraction conditions are observed at pH 2, 12% (w/w) of rapeseed meal after 15 min of extraction in water at room temperature. Under these conditions the extraction is highly selective, allowing a simple purification process (ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by desalting size exclusion chromatography) to get purified napins. These napins possessed significant anti-Fusarium activity (IC(50)=70 μM) and a compact secondary structure rich in α-helix, which may explain this bioactivity. PMID:23442668

  5. Topical Review: Molecular reaction and solvation visualized by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering: Structure, dynamics, and their solvent dependence

    PubMed Central

    Hwan Kim, Kyung; Kim, Jeongho; Hyuk Lee, Jae; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved X-ray solution scattering is sensitive to global molecular structure and can track the dynamics of chemical reactions. In this article, we review our recent studies on triiodide ion (I3–) and molecular iodine (I2) in solution. For I3–, we elucidated the excitation wavelength-dependent photochemistry and the solvent-dependent ground-state structure. For I2, by combining time-slicing scheme and deconvolution data analysis, we mapped out the progression of geminate recombination and the associated structural change in the solvent cage. With the aid of X-ray free electron lasers, even clearer observation of ultrafast chemical events will be made possible in the near future. PMID:26798770

  6. Design and Synthesis of 2,2'-Diindolylmethanes to Selectively Target Certain G-Quadruplex DNA Structures.

    PubMed

    Livendahl, Madeleine; Jamroskovic, Jan; Ivanova, Svetlana; Demirel, Peter; Sabouri, Nasim; Chorell, Erik

    2016-09-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) structures carry vital biological functions, and compounds that selectively target certain G4 structures have both therapeutic potential and value as research tools. Along this line, 2,2'-diindolylmethanes have been designed and synthesized in this work based on the condensation of 3,6- or 3,7-disubstituted indoles with aldehydes. The developed class of compounds efficiently stabilizes G4 structures without inducing conformational changes in such structures. Furthermore, the 2,2'-diindolylmethanes target certain G4 structures more efficiently than others and this G4 selectivity can be altered by chemical modifications of the compounds.

  7. A General Semiparametric Hazards Regression Model: Efficient Estimation and Structure Selection

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xingwei; Zhu, Liang; Leng, Chenlei; Leisenring, Wendy; Robison, Leslie L.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a general semiparametric hazards regression model that encompasses Cox’s proportional hazards model and the accelerated failure time model for survival analysis. To overcome the nonexistence of the maximum likelihood, we derive a kernel-smoothed profile likelihood function, and prove that the resulting estimates of the regression parameters are consistent and achieve semiparametric efficiency. In addition, we develop penalized structure selection techniques to determine which covariates constitute the accelerate failure time model and which covariates constitute the proportional hazards model. The proposed method is able to estimate the model structure consistently and model parameters efficiently. Furthermore, variance estimation is straightforward. The proposed estimation performs well in simulation studies and is applied to the analysis of a real data set. Copyright PMID:23824784

  8. Orbital-Parity Selective Superconducting Pairing Structures of Fe-based Superconductors under Glide Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chiahui; Chou, Chung-Pin; Yin, Wei-Guo; Ku, Wei

    2014-03-01

    We show that the superconductivity in Fe-based superconductors consists of zero and finite momentum (π , π , 0) Cooper pairs with the same and different parities of the Fe 3 d orbitals respectively. The former develops the distinct gap structures for each orbital parity, and the latter is characteristic of spin singlet, spacial oddness and time reversal symmetry breaking. This originates from the unit cell containing two Fe atoms and two anions of staggered positioning with respect to the Fe square lattice. The in-plane translation is turned into glide translation, which dictates orbital-parity selective quasiparticles. Such novel pairing structures explain the unusual gap angular modulation on the hole pockets in recent ARPES and STS experiments. Work supported by DOE DE-AC02-98CH10886 and Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics and Ministry of Science and Technology.

  9. Selective homopolymer adsorption on structured surfaces as a model for pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Gemünden, Patrick; Behringer, Hans

    2013-01-14

    Homopolymer adsorption onto chemically structured periodic surfaces and its potential for pattern recognition is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. To analyze the surface-induced selective adsorption on a fundamental geometric level polymer chains are represented by freely jointed chains with a fixed bond length whose monomers are attracted by the sites of regular lattice patterns. The structural properties of the adsorbed low-temperature state are comprehensively discussed for different lattices by looking at the radius of gyration and the inter bond angle distributions. These observables show a non-trivial dependence on the commensurability of characteristic lengths given by the lattice constant and by the bond length. Reasons for this behavior are given by exploiting geometric and entropic arguments. The findings are examined in the context of pattern recognition by polymer adsorption. Furthermore, the adsorption transition is discussed briefly. For certain incommensurable situations the adsorption occurs in two steps due to entropic restrictions.

  10. Structure of ring-shaped Aβ42 oligomers determined by conformational selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Linh; Basdevant, Nathalie; Prévost, Chantal; Ha-Duong, Tâp

    2016-02-01

    The oligomerization of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into soluble non-fibrillar species plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. However, it has been challenging to characterize the tertiary and quaternary structures of Aβ peptides due to their disordered nature and high aggregation propensity. In this work, replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore the conformational space of Aβ42 monomer. Among the most populated transient states, we identified a particular conformation which was able to generate ring-shaped pentamers and hexamers, when docked onto itself. The structures of these aggregates were stable during microsecond all-atom MD simulations in explicit solvent. In addition to high resolution models of these oligomers, this study provides support for the conformational selection mechanism of Aβ peptide self-assembly.

  11. Topically induced diphenhydramine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Reilly, J F; Weisse, M E

    1990-01-01

    We report the case of a 2 1/2-year-old child who manifested acute anticholinergic toxicity after the applications of a topical calamine-antihistamine lotion. This mechanism of diphenhydramine toxicity is uncommon, with only a few other case reports noted in the literature. This case is also intriguing in that this child had an underlying varicella illness with fever that tended to obscure the picture. This report describes the characteristic history and physical examination pertinent to anticholinergic toxicity, varicella complication considerations, and case management.

  12. Novel topical therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bleier, Benjamin S

    2010-06-01

    Intranasal drug delivery is a rapidly growing field that offers the potential for enhanced treatment of local and systemic disease. Novel preclinical screening tools such as in vitro assays and 3-dimensional imaging are currently being used to improve drug design and delivery. In addition, new evidence has emerged underlining the importance of surgical marsupialization of the sinuses to allow for improved topical delivery. Although multiple barriers to administration and absorption exist, implantable therapeutics using new classes of drug-eluting polymers allow for prolonged, site-specific drug delivery and hold great promise in overcoming these obstacles.

  13. Recent topics in Japan.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Y

    1996-08-01

    In Japan, the concern about ethical issues in preventive medicine, especially in epidemiological investigation, has been gradually increasing in recent years. In this paper I introduce the following four topics: 1. privacy protection and the computer, 2. informed consent and publication, 3. the attitudes toward ethics among epidemiologists, 4. the attitudes toward epidemiological investigation among examinees. In my opinion, Japanese epidemiologists should give more attention to general ethical principles (Respect for persons, Beneficence) and to the practical methods to apply them in their research works.

  14. Effects of Topic Familiarity and Training in Generative Learning Activities on Poor Readers' Comprehension of Comparison/Contrast Expository Text Structure: Transfer to Real-World Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisberg, Renee; Balajthy, Ernest

    A study investigated transfer effects of training below average high school readers in the use of graphic organizers and summary writing on their recognition of compare/contrast text structure. Subjects, 32 high school students with below-expectancy standardized test scores, were placed in two groups: an experimental group (five males and 11…

  15. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of AidC, a Quorum-Quenching Lactonase With Atypical Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Romila; Thomas, Pei W.; Wu, Chun-Xiang; Nocek, Boguslaw P.; Hoang, Quyen Q.; Liu, Dali; Fast, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Quorum-quenching catalysts are of interest for potential application as biochemical tools to interrogate interbacterial communication pathways, as anti-biofouling agents, and as anti-infective agents in plants and animals. Herein, the structure and function of AidC, an N-acyl-L-homoserine (AHL) lactonase from Chryseobacterium, is characterized. Steady-state kinetics show that zinc-supplemented AidC is one of the most efficient wild-type quorum-quenching enzymes characterized to date, with a kcat/KM value of approximately 2 × 106 M−1s−1 for N-heptanoyl-L-homoserine lactone. The enzyme has stricter substrate selectivity and significantly lower KM values (ca. 50 μM for preferred substrates) than typical AHL lactonases (ca. > 1 mM). X-ray crystal structures of AidC alone, and with the product N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine were determined at resolutions of 1.09 and 1.67 Å, respectively. Each structure displays as a dimer, and dimeric oligiomerization was also observed in solution by size-exclusion chromatography coupled with multi-angle light scattering. The structures reveal two atypical features as compared to previously characterized AHL lactonases: a ‘kinked’ α-helix that forms part of a closed binding pocket which provides affinity and enforces selectivity for AHL substrates, and an active-site His substitution that is usually found in a homologous family of phosphodiesterases. Implications for the catalytic mechanism of AHL lactonases are discussed. PMID:26115006

  16. Structural and biochemical characterization of AidC, a quorum-quenching lactonase with atypical selectivity

    DOE PAGES

    Mascarenhas, Romila; Thomas, Pei W.; Wu, Chun -Xiang; Nocek, Boguslaw P.; Hoang, Quyen Q.; Liu, Dali; Fast, Walter

    2015-06-26

    Quorum-quenching catalysts are of interest for potential application as biochemical tools for interrogating interbacterial communication pathways, as antibiofouling agents, and as anti-infective agents in plants and animals. Herein, the structure and function of AidC, an N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL) lactonase from Chryseobacterium, is characterized. Steady-state kinetics show that zinc-supplemented AidC is the most efficient wild-type quorum-quenching enzymes characterized to date, with a kcat/KM value of approximately 2 × 106 M-1 s-1 for N-heptanoyl-l-homoserine lactone. The enzyme has stricter substrate selectivity and significantly lower KM values (ca. 50 μM for preferred substrates) compared to those of typical AHL lactonases (ca. >1 mM).more » X-ray crystal structures of AidC alone and with the product N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine were determined at resolutions of 1.09 and 1.67 Å, respectively. Each structure displays as a dimer, and dimeric oligiomerization was also observed in solution by size-exclusion chromatography coupled with multiangle light scattering. Lastly, the structures reveal two atypical features as compared to previously characterized AHL lactonases: a "kinked" α-helix that forms part of a closed binding pocket that provides affinity and enforces selectivity for AHL substrates and an active-site His substitution that is usually found in a homologous family of phosphodiesterases. We discuss implications for the catalytic mechanism of AHL lactonases.« less

  17. Structural and biochemical characterization of AidC, a quorum-quenching lactonase with atypical selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, Romila; Thomas, Pei W.; Wu, Chun -Xiang; Nocek, Boguslaw P.; Hoang, Quyen Q.; Liu, Dali; Fast, Walter

    2015-06-26

    Quorum-quenching catalysts are of interest for potential application as biochemical tools for interrogating interbacterial communication pathways, as antibiofouling agents, and as anti-infective agents in plants and animals. Herein, the structure and function of AidC, an N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL) lactonase from Chryseobacterium, is characterized. Steady-state kinetics show that zinc-supplemented AidC is the most efficient wild-type quorum-quenching enzymes characterized to date, with a kcat/KM value of approximately 2 × 106 M-1 s-1 for N-heptanoyl-l-homoserine lactone. The enzyme has stricter substrate selectivity and significantly lower KM values (ca. 50 μM for preferred substrates) compared to those of typical AHL lactonases (ca. >1 mM). X-ray crystal structures of AidC alone and with the product N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine were determined at resolutions of 1.09 and 1.67 Å, respectively. Each structure displays as a dimer, and dimeric oligiomerization was also observed in solution by size-exclusion chromatography coupled with multiangle light scattering. Lastly, the structures reveal two atypical features as compared to previously characterized AHL lactonases: a "kinked" α-helix that forms part of a closed binding pocket that provides affinity and enforces selectivity for AHL substrates and an active-site His substitution that is usually found in a homologous family of phosphodiesterases. We discuss implications for the catalytic mechanism of AHL lactonases.

  18. Computational selection of nucleic acid biosensors via a slip structure model.

    PubMed

    Hall, Bradley; Hesselberth, Jay R; Ellington, Andrew D

    2007-04-15

    Aptamers have been shown to undergo ligand-dependent conformational changes, and can be joined to ribozymes to create allosteric ribozymes (aptazymes). An anti-flavin (FMN) aptamer joined to the hammerhead ribozyme yielded an aptazyme that underwent small, FMN-dependent displacements in the helix that joined the aptamer and ribozyme. This 'slip structure' model in which alternative sets of base-pairs are formed in the absence and presence of ligand proved amenable to energetic and computational modeling. Initial successes in modeling the activities of known aptazymes led to the in silico selection of new ligand-dependent aptazymes from virtual pools that contained millions of members. Those aptazymes that were predicted to best fit the slip structure model were synthesized and assayed, and the best-designed aptazyme was activated 60-fold by FMN. The slip structure model proved to be generalizable, and could be applied with equal facility to computationally generate aptazymes that proved to be experimentally activated by other ligands (theophylline) or that contained other catalytic cores (hairpin ribozyme). Moreover, the slip structure model could be applied to the prediction of a ligand-dependent aptamer beacon biosensor in which the addition of the protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VegF) led to a 10-fold increase in fluorescent signal.

  19. Selection of flowing liquid lead target structural materials for accelerator driven transmutation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.J.; Buksa, J.J.

    1994-08-01

    The beam entry window and container for a liquid lead spallation target will be exposed to high fluxes of protons and neutrons that are both higher in magnitude and energy than have been experienced in proton accelerators and fission reactors, as well as in a corrosive environment. The structural material of the target should have a good compatibility with liquid lead, a sufficient mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, a good performance under an intense irradiation environment, and a low neutron absorption cross section; these factors have been used to rank the applicability of a wide range of materials for structural containment Nb-1Zr has been selected for use as the structural container for the LANL ABC/ATW molten lead target. Corrosion and mass transfer behavior for various candidate structural materials in liquid lead are reviewed, together with the beneficial effects of inhibitors and various coatings to protect substrate against liquid lead corrosion. Mechanical properties of some candidate materials at elevated temperatures and the property changes resulting from 800 MeV proton irradiation are also reviewed.

  20. Phase behavior and structure of an ABC triblock copolymer dissolved in selective solvent.

    PubMed

    Shusharina, N P; Alexandridis, P; Linse, P; Balijepalli, S; Gruenbauer, H J M

    2003-01-01

    A mean-field lattice theory is applied to predict the self-assembly into ordered structures of an ABC triblock copolymer in selective solvent. More specifically, the composition-temperature phase diagram has been constructed for the system (C)14(PO)12(EO)17/water, where C stands for methylene, PO for propylene oxide and EO for ethylene oxide. The model predicts thermotropic phase transitions between the ordered hexagonal, lamellar, reverse hexagonal, and reverse cubic phases, as well as the disordered phase. The thermotropic behavior is a result of the temperature dependence of water interaction with EO- and PO-segments. The lyotropic effect (caused by changing the solvent concentration) on the formation of different structures has been found weak. The structure in the ordered phases is described by analyzing the species volume fraction profiles and the end segment and junction distributions. A "triple-layer" structure has been found for each of the ordered phases, with each layer rich in C-, PO-, and EO-segments, respectively. The blocks forming the layers are not stretched. The dependence of the domain spacing on polymer volume fraction and temperature is also considered.

  1. Structural basis of nucleoside and nucleoside drug selectivity by concentrative nucleoside transporters

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Zachary Lee; Lee, Jun-Ho; Lee, Kiyoun; Lee, Minhee; Kwon, Do-Yeon; Hong, Jiyong; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNTs) are responsible for cellular entry of nucleosides, which serve as precursors to nucleic acids and act as signaling molecules. CNTs also play a crucial role in the uptake of nucleoside-derived drugs, including anticancer and antiviral agents. Understanding how CNTs recognize and import their substrates could not only lead to a better understanding of nucleoside-related biological processes but also the design of nucleoside-derived drugs that can better reach their targets. Here, we present a combination of X-ray crystallographic and equilibrium-binding studies probing the molecular origins of nucleoside and nucleoside drug selectivity of a CNT from Vibrio cholerae. We then used this information in chemically modifying an anticancer drug so that it is better transported by and selective for a single human CNT subtype. This work provides proof of principle for utilizing transporter structural and functional information for the design of compounds that enter cells more efficiently and selectively. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03604.001 PMID:25082345

  2. Correlation structure and variable selection in generalized estimating equations via composite likelihood information criteria.

    PubMed

    Nikoloulopoulos, Aristidis K

    2016-06-30

    The method of generalized estimating equations (GEE) is popular in the biostatistics literature for analyzing longitudinal binary and count data. It assumes a generalized linear model for the outcome variable, and a working correlation among repeated measurements. In this paper, we introduce a viable competitor: the weighted scores method for generalized linear model margins. We weight the univariate score equations using a working discretized multivariate normal model that is a proper multivariate model. Because the weighted scores method is a parametric method based on likelihood, we propose composite likelihood information criteria as an intermediate step for model selection. The same criteria can be used for both correlation structure and variable selection. Simulations studies and the application example show that our method outperforms other existing model selection methods in GEE. From the example, it can be seen that our methods not only improve on GEE in terms of interpretability and efficiency but also can change the inferential conclusions with respect to GEE. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Structural insights into the exquisite selectivity of neurexin/neuroligin synaptic interactions.

    PubMed

    Leone, Philippe; Comoletti, Davide; Ferracci, Géraldine; Conrod, Sandrine; Garcia, Simon U; Taylor, Palmer; Bourne, Yves; Marchot, Pascale

    2010-07-21

    The extracellular domains of neuroligins and neurexins interact through Ca(2+) to form flexible trans-synaptic associations characterized by selectivity for neuroligin or neurexin subtypes. This heterophilic interaction, essential for synaptic maturation and differentiation, is regulated by gene selection, alternative mRNA splicing and post-translational modifications. A new, 2.6 A-resolution crystal structure of a soluble neurexin-1beta-neuroligin-4 (Nrx1beta-NL4) complex permits a detailed description of the Ca(2+)-coordinated interface and unveils concerted positional rearrangements of several residues of NL4, not observed in neuroligin-1, associated with Nrx1beta binding. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the binding of structure-guided Nrx1beta mutants towards NL4 and neuroligin-1 shows that flexibility of the Nrx1beta-binding site in NL4 is reflected in a greater dissociation constant of the complex and higher sensitivity to ionic strength and pH variations. Analysis of neuroligin mutants points to critical functions for two respective residues in neuroligin-1 and neuroligin-2 in governing the affinity of the complexes. Although neuroligin-1 and neuroligin-2 have pre-determined conformations that respectively promote and prevent Nrx1beta association, unique conformational reshaping of the NL4 surface is required to permit Nrx1beta association.

  4. Structural Plasticity of Malaria Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Allows Selective Binding of Diverse Chemical Scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Gujjar, Ramesh; El Mazouni, Farah; Kaminsky, Werner; Malmquist, Nicholas A.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2010-01-20

    Malaria remains a major global health burden and current drug therapies are compromised by resistance. Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) was validated as a new drug target through the identification of potent and selective triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitors with anti-malarial activity in vivo. Here we report x-ray structure determination of PfDHODH bound to three inhibitors from this series, representing the first of the enzyme bound to malaria specific inhibitors. We demonstrate that conformational flexibility results in an unexpected binding mode identifying a new hydrophobic pocket on the enzyme. Importantly this plasticity allows PfDHODH to bind inhibitors from different chemical classes and to accommodate inhibitor modifications during lead optimization, increasing the value of PfDHODH as a drug target. A second discovery, based on small molecule crystallography, is that the triazolopyrimidines populate a resonance form that promotes charge separation. These intrinsic dipoles allow formation of energetically favorable H-bond interactions with the enzyme. The importance of delocalization to binding affinity was supported by site-directed mutagenesis and the demonstration that triazolopyrimidine analogs that lack this intrinsic dipole are inactive. Finally, the PfDHODH-triazolopyrimidine bound structures provide considerable new insight into species-selective inhibitor binding in this enzyme family. Together, these studies will directly impact efforts to exploit PfDHODH for the development of anti-malarial chemotherapy.

  5. Evidence for positive selection and population structure at the human MAO-A gene

    PubMed Central

    Gilad, Yoav; Rosenberg, Shai; Przeworski, Molly; Lancet, Doron; Skorecki, Karl

    2002-01-01

    We report the analysis of human nucleotide diversity at a genetic locus known to be involved in a behavioral phenotype, the monoamine oxidase A gene. Sequencing of five regions totaling 18.8 kb and spanning 90 kb of the monoamine oxidase A gene was carried out in 56 male individuals from seven different ethnogeographic groups. We uncovered 41 segregating sites, which formed 46 distinct haplotypes. A permutation test detected substantial population structure in these samples. Consistent with differentiation between populations, linkage disequilibrium is higher than expected under panmixia, with no evidence of a decay with distance. The extent of linkage disequilibrium is not typical of nuclear loci and suggests that the underlying population structure may have been accentuated by a selective sweep that fixed different haplotypes in different populations, or by local adaptation. In support of this suggestion, we find both a reduction in levels of diversity (as measured by a Hudson–Kreitman–Aguade test with the DMD44 locus) and an excess of high frequency-derived variants, as expected after a recent episode of positive selection. PMID:11805333

  6. Phenotypic variation and water selection potential in the stem structure of invasive alligator weed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Leshan; Yang, Beifen; Guan, Wenbin; Li, Junmin

    2016-02-01

    The morphological and anatomical characteristics of stems have been found to be related to drought resistance in plants. Testing the phenotypic selection of water availability on stem anatomical traits would be useful for exploring the evolutionary potential of the stem in response to water availability. To test the phenotypic variation of the stem anatomical traits of an invasive plant in response to water availability, we collected a total of 320 individuals of Alternanthera philoxeroides from 16 populations from terrestrial and aquatic habitats in 8 plots in China and then analyzed the variation, differentiation, plasticity and selection potential of water availability on the stem anatomical traits. We found that except for the thickness of the cortex, all of the examined phenotypic parameters of the A. philoxeroides stem were significantly and positively correlated with soil water availability. The phenotypic differentiation coefficient for all of the anatomical structural parameters indicated that most of the variation existed between habitats within the same plot, whereas there was little variation among plots or among individuals within the same habitat except for variation in the thickness of the cortex. A significant phenotypic plasticity response to water availability was found for all of the anatomical traits of A. philoxeroides stem except for the thickness of the cortex. The associations between fitness and some of the anatomical traits, such as the stem diameter, the cortex area-to-stem area ratio, the pith cavity area-to-stem area ratio and the density of vascular bundles, differed with heterogeneous water availability. In both the aquatic and terrestrial habitats, no significant directional selection gradient was found for the stem diameter, the cortex area-to-stem area ratio or the density of vascular bundles. These results indicated that the anatomical structure of the A. philoxeroides stem may play an important role in the adaptation to changes

  7. Structure and function based design of Plasmodium-selective proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Xie, Stanley C.; Yoo, Euna; Foe, Ian T.; Tilley, Leann; Craik, Charles S.; da Fonseca, Paula C. A.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is a multi-component protease complex responsible for regulating key processes such as the cell cycle and antigen presentation1. Compounds that target the proteasome are potentially valuable tools for the treatment of pathogens that depend on proteasome function for survival and replication. In particular, proteasome inhibitors have been shown to be toxic for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at all stages of its life cycle2-5. Most compounds that have been tested against the parasite also inhibit the mammalian proteasome resulting in toxicity that precludes their use as therapeutic agents2,6. Therefore, better definition of the substrate specificity and structural properties of the Plasmodium proteasome could enable the development of compounds with sufficient selectivity to allow their use as anti-malarial agents. To accomplish this goal, we used a substrate profiling method to uncover differences in the specificities of the human and P. falciparum proteasome. We designed inhibitors based on amino acid preferences specific to the parasite proteasome, and found that they preferentially inhibit the β 2 subunit. We determined the structure of the P. falciparum 20S proteasome bound to the inhibitor using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single particle analysis, to a resolution of 3.6 Å. These data reveal the unusually open P. falciparum β2 active site and provide valuable information regarding active site architecture that can be used to further refine inhibitor design. Furthermore, consistent with the recent finding that the proteasome is important for stress pathways associated with resistance of artemisinin (ART) family anti-malarials7,8, we observed growth inhibition synergism with low doses of this β 2 selective inhibitor in ART sensitive and resistant parasites. Finally, we demonstrated that a parasite selective inhibitor could be used to attenuate parasite growth in vivo without significant toxicity to the host. Thus, the

  8. Structure- and function-based design of Plasmodium-selective proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; van der Linden, Wouter A; Xie, Stanley C; Yoo, Euna; Foe, Ian T; Tilley, Leann; Craik, Charles S; da Fonseca, Paula C A; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-02-11

    The proteasome is a multi-component protease complex responsible for regulating key processes such as the cell cycle and antigen presentation. Compounds that target the proteasome are potentially valuable tools for the treatment of pathogens that depend on proteasome function for survival and replication. In particular, proteasome inhibitors have been shown to be toxic for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at all stages of its life cycle. Most compounds that have been tested against the parasite also inhibit the mammalian proteasome, resulting in toxicity that precludes their use as therapeutic agents. Therefore, better definition of the substrate specificity and structural properties of the Plasmodium proteasome could enable the development of compounds with sufficient selectivity to allow their use as anti-malarial agents. To accomplish this goal, here we use a substrate profiling method to uncover differences in the specificities of the human and P. falciparum proteasome. We design inhibitors based on amino-acid preferences specific to the parasite proteasome, and find that they preferentially inhibit the β2-subunit. We determine the structure of the P. falciparum 20S proteasome bound to the inhibitor using cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle analysis, to a resolution of 3.6 Å. These data reveal the unusually open P. falciparum β2 active site and provide valuable information about active-site architecture that can be used to further refine inhibitor design. Furthermore, consistent with the recent finding that the proteasome is important for stress pathways associated with resistance of artemisinin family anti-malarials, we observe growth inhibition synergism with low doses of this β2-selective inhibitor in artemisinin-sensitive and -resistant parasites. Finally, we demonstrate that a parasite-selective inhibitor could be used to attenuate parasite growth in vivo without appreciable toxicity to the host. Thus, the Plasmodium proteasome is a

  9. Structure- and function-based design of Plasmodium-selective proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; van der Linden, Wouter A; Xie, Stanley C; Yoo, Euna; Foe, Ian T; Tilley, Leann; Craik, Charles S; da Fonseca, Paula C A; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-02-11

    The proteasome is a multi-component protease complex responsible for regulating key processes such as the cell cycle and antigen presentation. Compounds that target the proteasome are potentially valuable tools for the treatment of pathogens that depend on proteasome function for survival and replication. In particular, proteasome inhibitors have been shown to be toxic for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at all stages of its life cycle. Most compounds that have been tested against the parasite also inhibit the mammalian proteasome, resulting in toxicity that precludes their use as therapeutic agents. Therefore, better definition of the substrate specificity and structural properties of the Plasmodium proteasome could enable the development of compounds with sufficient selectivity to allow their use as anti-malarial agents. To accomplish this goal, here we use a substrate profiling method to uncover differences in the specificities of the human and P. falciparum proteasome. We design inhibitors based on amino-acid preferences specific to the parasite proteasome, and find that they preferentially inhibit the β2-subunit. We determine the structure of the P. falciparum 20S proteasome bound to the inhibitor using cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle analysis, to a resolution of 3.6 Å. These data reveal the unusually open P. falciparum β2 active site and provide valuable information about active-site architecture that can be used to further refine inhibitor design. Furthermore, consistent with the recent finding that the proteasome is important for stress pathways associated with resistance of artemisinin family anti-malarials, we observe growth inhibition synergism with low doses of this β2-selective inhibitor in artemisinin-sensitive and -resistant parasites. Finally, we demonstrate that a parasite-selective inhibitor could be used to attenuate parasite growth in vivo without appreciable toxicity to the host. Thus, the Plasmodium proteasome is a

  10. Allocating structure to function: the strong links between neuroplasticity and natural selection

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michael L.; Finlay, Barbara L.

    2014-01-01

    A central question in brain evolution is how species-typical behaviors, and the neural function-structure mappings supporting them, can be acquired and inherited. Advocates of brain modularity, in its different incarnations across scientific subfields, argue that natural selection must target domain-dedicated, separately modifiable neural subsystems, resulting in genetically-specified functional modules. In such modular systems, specification of neuron number and functional connectivity are necessarily linked. Mounting evidence, however, from allometric, developmental, comparative, systems-physiological, neuroimaging and neurological studies suggests that brain elements are used and reused in multiple functional systems. This variable allocation can be seen in short-term neuromodulation, in neuroplasticity over the lifespan and in response to damage. We argue that the same processes are evident in brain evolution. Natural selection must preserve behavioral functions that may co-locate in variable amounts with other functions. In genetics, the uses and problems of pleiotropy, the re-use of genes in multiple networks have been much discussed, but this issue has been sidestepped in neural systems by the invocation of modules. Here we highlight the interaction between evolutionary and developmental mechanisms to produce distributed and overlapping functional architectures in the brain. These adaptive mechanisms must be robust to perturbations that might disrupt critical information processing and action selection, but must also recognize useful new sources of information arising from internal genetic or environmental variability, when those appear. These contrasting properties of “robustness” and “evolvability” have been discussed for the basic organization of body plan and fundamental cell physiology. Here we extend them to the evolution and development, “evo-devo,” of brain structure. PMID:24431995

  11. Investigations into the chemical structure based selectivity of the microfabricated nitrogen-phosphorus detector

    DOE PAGES

    Brocato, Terisse A.; Hess, Ryan F.; Moorman, Matthew; Simonson, Robert J.

    2015-10-28

    The nitrogen and phosphorus atoms are constituents of some of the most toxic chemical vapors. Nitrogen-phosphorus gas chromatograph detectors (NPDs) rely on selective ionization of such compounds using ionization temperatures typically greater than 600 °C. NPDs have previously been reported to be 7*104× and 105× more sensitive for nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively, than for carbon. Presented here is an investigation of the structure-based selectivity of a microfabricated nitrogen-phosphorus detector (μNPD). The μNPD presented here is smaller than a dime and can be placed in a system that is 1/100th the size of a commercial NPD. Comparison of responses of suchmore » devices to homologous anilines (p-methoxyaniline, p-fluoroaniline, and aniline) revealed that detection selectivity, determined by the ratio of μNPD to nonselective flame ionization detector (FID) peak areas, is correlated with acid disassociation pKa values for the respective analine. Selectivity was determined to be greatest for p-methoxyaniline, followed by p-fluoroaniline, with aniline having the smallest response. The limit of detection for a nitrogen containing chemical, p-methoxyaniline, using the μNPD was determined to be 0.29 ng compared to 59 ng for a carbon chemical containing no nitrogen or phosphorus, 1,3,5-trimethybenzene. The μNPD presented here has increased detection for nitrogen and phosphorus compared to the FID and with a slight increase in detection of carbon compounds compared to commercial NPD's sensitivity to nitrogen and carbon.« less

  12. Investigations into the chemical structure based selectivity of the microfabricated nitrogen-phosphorus detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Terisse A.; Hess, Ryan F.; Moorman, Matthew; Simonson, Robert J.

    2015-10-28

    The nitrogen and phosphorus atoms are constituents of some of the most toxic chemical vapors. Nitrogen-phosphorus gas chromatograph detectors (NPDs) rely on selective ionization of such compounds using ionization temperatures typically greater than 600 °C. NPDs have previously been reported to be 7*104× and 105× more sensitive for nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively, than for carbon. Presented here is an investigation of the structure-based selectivity of a microfabricated nitrogen-phosphorus detector (μNPD). The μNPD presented here is smaller than a dime and can be placed in a system that is 1/100th the size of a commercial NPD. Comparison of responses of such devices to homologous anilines (p-methoxyaniline, p-fluoroaniline, and aniline) revealed that detection selectivity, determined by the ratio of μNPD to nonselective flame ionization detector (FID) peak areas, is correlated with acid disassociation pKa values for the respective analine. Selectivity was determined to be greatest for p-methoxyaniline, followed by p-fluoroaniline, with aniline having the smallest response. The limit of detection for a nitrogen containing chemical, p-methoxyaniline, using the μNPD was determined to be 0.29 ng compared to 59 ng for a carbon chemical containing no nitrogen or phosphorus, 1,3,5-trimethybenzene. The μNPD presented here has increased detection for nitrogen and phosphorus compared to the FID and with a slight increase in detection of carbon compounds compared to commercial NPD's sensitivity to nitrogen and carbon.

  13. Topical Therapy Primer for Nondermatologists.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Jolene R; Myers, Sarah A

    2015-11-01

    A representative assortment of topical therapies is discussed here with the goal of emphasizing the most commonly encountered diagnoses and treatments for nondermatologists. When using topical therapies, carefully consider the proper active ingredient, potency, vehicle, and quantity of medication. If topical therapy is ineffective, question whether the medication is being used properly, whether the diagnosis is correct, and whether the topical may be contributing to the problem. Examples of the topical contributing to the problem include tinea incognito exacerbated by topical steroid use and allergic contact dermatitis to topical steroid excipients. For some patients, even maximum topical therapy is insufficient and systemic treatment is required. At this point, consultation with a dermatologist may be helpful.

  14. Nursing and Dental Hygiene Selection Procedures. Part I: The Structured Interview as a Tool for Selecting Students into an Associate of Arts Degree Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatham, Elaine L.; And Others

    A structured interview procedure was used during the spring of 1975 as a tool in selecting nursing and dental hygiene students at Johnson County Community College. Potential students had two 20-minute interviews: one by a staff member of the program to which application was made, and one by another staff member. Interviewers rated the applicants…

  15. Selectivity switch in the catalytic functionalization of nonprotected carbohydrates: selective synthesis in the presence of anomeric and structurally similar carbohydrates under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Wataru; Takemoto, Yuki

    2013-03-15

    A catalytic process for the chemo- and regioselective functionalization of nonprotected carbohydrates has been developed. This novel process allows selective thiocarbonylation, acylation, and sulfonylation of a particular hydroxy group in a particular carbohydrate in the simultaneous presence of structurally similar carbohydrates such as anomers. In addition, the chemoselectivity can be switched by regulating only the length of the alkyl chain in the organotin catalyst.

  16. [INVITED] Ultrafast laser photoinscription of large-mode-area waveguiding structures in bulk dielectrics. Invited paper for the section : Hot topics in Ultrafast Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoian, R.; D'Amico, C.; Bhuyan, M. K.; Cheng, G.

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast laser photoinscription and laser-based refractive index engineering develop towards a unique way for three-dimensional optical design inside bulk materials for the conception of embedded photonic applications. The specific optical functions for the light guiding elements, notably their single mode characteristics and the accessible spectral domains, depend on the achieved refractive index contrast in the material transparency window and on the characteristic dimensions of the optical modification. We give here an overview of several laser processing options, developed to increase the effective index area and contrast using pulse engineering methods in space and time, and optical design involving focal shaping, tubular concepts, evanescently coupled waveguide arrays, or structured waveguides.

  17. Activation and micropore structure determination of carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves. Topical report, 30 March 1994--14 April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, You Qing

    1995-05-19

    Progress in developing novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are activated using steam or CO{sub 2}, in order to produce uniform activation through the material and to control the pore structure and adsorptive properties. There is an overall shrinkage during activation, which is directly correlated with burnoff; burnoff above 40% results in fracture. Burnoffs higher than 10% does not produce any benefit for separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures. Five samples of CFCMS have been prepared for testing as molecular sieves; all have relatively narrow pore size distributions with average pore diameters around 6A.

  18. [Influence of data structure on the selection of statistic analysis methods].

    PubMed

    Barroso Utra, Isabel María; Cañizares Pérez, Mayilée; Lera Marqués, Lydia

    2002-01-01

    In medical research, data is grouped either as per the design of the study or the selection of the sample. This structure must be taken into account in order to make correct estimates of the of the parameters and standard errors involved. This study is of the methodological type and is aimed at illustrating methods for estimating population-related methods and regression models with grouped data. For this purpose, nine variables from the First National Risk Factor and Preventive Measure Survey conducted in Cuba in 1995 are employed. The prevalence of high blood pressure is overestimated by 15% when the conventional estimators are used as compared with the weight-based and adjusted analysis. In the regression models for the body mass index based on the conventional procedures, sex, degree of schooling, degree of sedentariness, smoking habit, diastolic and systolic blood pressure were found to be significant. However, when the method taking into account the structure of conglomerates was employed, the degree of schooling and sedentariness ceased to be significant. When the random intercept model was adjusted, the 91.3% total variability was found to be explained by individual variables, the 8.7% variability being attributed to larger units. When estimating population-related parameters based on conglomerate-structure data involving inconsistent selection probabilities, the use of sample-related weights and analysis methods that take in the correlation among subjects (potential) for one same conglomerate. When adjusting regression models, it is not only important to efficiently estimate the coefficients, but rather the focus (aggregated or disaggregated) must be taken into account for modeling the problem under study.

  19. Benzothiophene inhibitors of MK2. Part 1: structure-activity relationships, assessments of selectivity and cellular potency.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Long, Scott A; Pierce, Betsy S; Mahoney, Matthew W; Mourey, Robert J

    2009-08-15

    Identification of potent benzothiophene inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies, selectivity assessments against CDK2, cellular potency and mechanism of action are presented. Crystallographic data provide a rationale for the observed MK2 potency as well as selectivity over CDK2 for this class of inhibitors.

  20. Selective wrapping and supramolecular structures of polyfluorene-carbon nanotube hybrids.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jia; Loi, Maria Antonietta; de Carvalho, Elton José Figueiredo; Dos Santos, Maria Cristina

    2011-05-24

    We report on the photophysical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) suspensions in toluene solutions of poly[9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl](PFO). Steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy in the near-infrared and visible spectral regions are used to study the interaction of the dispersed SWNTs with the wrapped polymer. Molecular dynamics simulations of the PFO-SWNT hybrids in toluene were carried out to evaluate the energetics of different wrapping geometries. The simulated fluorescence spectra in the visible region were obtained by the quantum chemical ZINDO-CI method, using a sampling of structures obtained from the dynamics trajectories. The tested schemes consider polymer chains aligned along the nanotube axis, where chirality has a minimal effect, or forming helical structures, where a preference for high chiral angles is evidenced. Moreover, toluene affects the polymer structure favoring the helical conformation. Simulations show that the most stable hybrid system is the PFO-wrapped (8,6) nanotube, in agreement with the experimentally observed selectivity.

  1. Osteoinduction of porous Ti implants with a channel structure fabricated by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, A; Takemoto, M; Saito, T; Fujibayashi, S; Neo, M; Pattanayak, Deepak K; Matsushita, T; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Kokubo, T; Nakamura, T

    2011-05-01

    Many studies have shown that certain biomaterials with specific porous structures can induce bone formation in non-osseous sites without the need for osteoinductive biomolecules, however, the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon (intrinsic osteoinduction of biomaterials) remain unclear. In particular, to our knowledge the type of pore structure suitable for osteoinduction has not been reported in detail. In the present study we investigated the effects of interconnective pore size on osteoinductivity and the bone formation processes during osteoinduction. Selective laser melting was employed to fabricate porous Ti implants (diameter 3.3mm, length 15 mm) with a channel structure comprising four longitudinal square channels, representing pores, of different diagonal widths, 500, 600, 900, and 1200 μm (termed p500, p600, p900, and p1200, respectively). These were then subjected to chemical and heat treatments to induce bioactivity. Significant osteoinduction was observed in p500 and p600, with the highest observed osteoinduction occurring at 5mm from the end of the implants. A distance of 5mm probably provides a favorable balance between blood circulation and fluid movement. Thus, the simple architecture of the implants allowed effective investigation of the influence of the interconnective pore size on osteoinduction, as well as the relationship between bone quantity and its location for different pore sizes.

  2. Habitat selection by breeding waterbirds at ponds with size-structured fish populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloskowski, Janusz; Nieoczym, Marek; Polak, Marcin; Pitucha, Piotr

    2010-07-01

    Fish may significantly affect habitat use by birds, either as their prey or as competitors. Fish communities are often distinctly size-structured, but the consequences for waterbird assemblages remain poorly understood. We examined the effects of size structure of common carp ( Cyprinus carpio) cohorts together with other biotic and abiotic pond characteristics on the distribution of breeding waterbirds in a seminatural system of monocultured ponds, where three fish age classes were separately stocked. Fish age corresponded to a distinct fish size gradient. Fish age and total biomass, macroinvertebrate and amphibian abundance, and emergent vegetation best explained the differences in bird density between ponds. Abundance of animal prey other than fish (aquatic macroinvertebrates and larval amphibians) decreased with increasing carp age in the ponds. Densities of ducks and smaller grebes were strongly negatively associated with fish age/size gradient. The largest of the grebes, the piscivorous great crested grebe ( Podiceps cristatus), was the only species that preferred ponds with medium-sized fish and was positively associated with total fish biomass. Habitat selection by bitterns and most rallids was instead strongly influenced by the relative amount of emergent vegetation cover in the ponds. Our results show that fish size structure may be an important cue for breeding habitat choice and a factor affording an opportunity for niche diversification in avian communities.

  3. Use of selected toxicology information resources in assessing relationships between chemical structure and biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wassom, J.S.

    1985-09-01

    This paper addresses the subject of the use of the selected toxicology information resources in assessing relationships between chemical structure and specific end points. To assist the researcher in how to access the primary literature of genetic toxicology, teratogenesis, and carcinogenesis, three specific specialized information centers are discussed - Environmental Mutagen Information Center, Environmental Teratology Information Center, and Environmental Carcinogenesis Information Center. Also included are descriptions of information resources that contain evaluated (peer-reviewed) biological research results. The US Environmental Protection Agency Genetic Toxicology Program, the International Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs, and the Toxicology Data Bank are the best sources currently available to obtain peer-reviewed results for compounds tested for genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and other toxicological end points. The value of published information lies in its use. It has become evident that most information cannot be accepted at face value for interpretation and analysis when subjected to stringent quality evaluation criteria. This deficit can be corrected by rigid editorship and the cognizance of authors. Increased interest in alternative methods to in vivo animal testing will be exemplified by use of short-term bioassays and in structure-activity relationship studies. With respect to this latter area, it must be remembered that mechanically (computer generated) derived data cannot substitute, at least at this stage, for data obtained from actual animal testing. The future of structure-activity relationship studies will rest only in their use as a predictive tool.

  4. Habitat selection by breeding waterbirds at ponds with size-structured fish populations.

    PubMed

    Kloskowski, Janusz; Nieoczym, Marek; Polak, Marcin; Pitucha, Piotr

    2010-07-01

    Fish may significantly affect habitat use by birds, either as their prey or as competitors. Fish communities are often distinctly size-structured, but the consequences for waterbird assemblages remain poorly understood. We examined the effects of size structure of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) cohorts together with other biotic and abiotic pond characteristics on the distribution of breeding waterbirds in a seminatural system of monocultured ponds, where three fish age classes were separately stocked. Fish age corresponded to a distinct fish size gradient. Fish age and total biomass, macroinvertebrate and amphibian abundance, and emergent vegetation best explained the differences in bird density between ponds. Abundance of animal prey other than fish (aquatic macroinvertebrates and larval amphibians) decreased with increasing carp age in the ponds. Densities of ducks and smaller grebes were strongly negatively associated with fish age/size gradient. The largest of the grebes, the piscivorous great crested grebe (Podiceps cristatus), was the only species that preferred ponds with medium-sized fish and was positively associated with total fish biomass. Habitat selection by bitterns and most rallids was instead strongly influenced by the relative amount of emergent vegetation cover in the ponds. Our results show that fish size structure may be an important cue for breeding habitat choice and a factor affording an opportunity for niche diversification in avian communities.

  5. Selectively Structural Determination of Cellulose and Hemicellulose in Plant Cell Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Chun; Park, Yong; Cosgrove, Daniel; Maranas, Janna; Janna Maranas Team; Daniel Cosgrove Team

    2013-03-01

    Primary plant cell walls support the plant body, and regulate cell size, and plant growth. It contains several biopolymers that can be categorized into three groups: cellulose, hemicellulose and pectin. To determine the structure of plant cell wall, we use small angle neutron scattering in combination with selective deuteration and contrast matching method. We compare the structure between wild Arabidopsis thaliana and its xyloglucan-deficient mutant. Hemicellulose in both samples forms coil with similar radii of gyration, and weak scattering from the mutant suggests a limited amount of hemicellulose in the xyloglucan-deficient mutant. We observe good amount of hemicellulose coating on cellulose microfibrils only in wild Arabidopsis. The absence of coating in its xyloglucan-deficient mutation suggests the other polysaccharides do not have comparable interaction with cellulose. This highlights the importance of xyloglucan in plant cell wall. At larger scale, the average distance between cellulose fibril is found smaller than reported value, which directly reflects on their smaller matured plant size. U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Center for LignoCellulose Structure and Formation

  6. Optimization of chemical structure of Schottky-type selection diode for crossbar resistive memory.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun Hwan; Lee, Jong Ho; Jeon, Woojin; Song, Seul Ji; Seok, Jun Yeong; Yoon, Jung Ho; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Park, Tae Joo; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2012-10-24

    The electrical performances of Pt/TiO(2)/Ti/Pt stacked Schottky-type diode (SD) was systematically examined, and this performance is dependent on the chemical structures of the each layer and their interfaces. The Ti layers containing a tolerable amount of oxygen showed metallic electrical conduction characteristics, which was confirmed by sheet resistance measurement with elevating the temperature, transmission line measurement (TLM), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analysis. However, the chemical structure of SD stack and resulting electrical properties were crucially affected by the dissolved oxygen concentration in the Ti layers. The lower oxidation potential of the Ti layer with initially higher oxygen concentration suppressed the oxygen deficiency of the overlying TiO(2) layer induced by consumption of the oxygen from TiO(2) layer. This structure results in the lower reverse current of SDs without significant degradation of forward-state current. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) analysis showed the current conduction through the local conduction paths in the presented SDs, which guarantees a sufficient forward-current density as a selection device for highly integrated crossbar array resistive memory.

  7. Human fatty acid synthase: Structure and substrate selectivity of the thioesterase domain

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Bornali; Gu, Ziwei; Chirala, Subrahmanyam S.; Wakil, Salih J.; Quiocho, Florante A.

    2004-01-01

    Human fatty acid synthase is a large homodimeric multifunctional enzyme that synthesizes palmitic acid. The unique carboxyl terminal thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase hydrolyzes the growing fatty acid chain and plays a critical role in regulating the chain length of fatty acid released. Also, the up-regulation of human fatty acid synthase in a variety of cancer makes the thioesterase a candidate target for therapeutic treatment. The 2.6-Å resolution structure of human fatty acid synthase thioesterase domain reported here is comprised of two dissimilar subdomains, A and B. The smaller subdomain B is composed entirely of α-helices arranged in an atypical fold, whereas the A subdomain is a variation of the α/β hydrolase fold. The structure revealed the presence of a hydrophobic groove with a distal pocket at the interface of the two subdomains, which constitutes the candidate substrate binding site. The length and largely hydrophobic nature of the groove and pocket are consistent with the high selectivity of the thioesterase for palmitoyl acyl substrate. The structure also set the identity of the Asp residue of the catalytic triad of Ser, His, and Asp located in subdomain A at the proximal end of the groove. PMID:15507492

  8. Structural modulation of nanowire interfaces grown over selectively disrupted single crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garratt, E.; Nikoobakht, B.

    2015-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in deterministic approaches to the fabrication of nanowire arrays have demonstrated the possibility of fabricating such networks using low-cost scalable methods. In this regard, we have developed a scalable growth platform for lateral fabrication of nanocrystals with high precision utilizing lattice match and symmetry. Using this planar architecture, a number of homo- and heterostructures have been demonstrated including ZnO nanowires grown over GaN. The latter combination produces horizontal, epitaxially formed crystals aligned in the plane of the substrate containing a very low number of intrinsic defects. We use such ordered structures as model systems in the interests of gauging the interfacial structural dynamics in relation to external stimuli. Nanosecond pulses of focused ion beams are used to slightly modify the substrate surface and selectively form lattice disorders in the path of nanowire growth to examine the nanocrystal, namely: its directionality and lattice defects. High resolution electron microscopies are used to reveal some interesting structural effects; for instance, a minimum threshold of surface defects that can divert nanowires. We also discuss data indicating formation of surface strains and show their mitigation during the growth process.

  9. Osteoinduction of porous Ti implants with a channel structure fabricated by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, A; Takemoto, M; Saito, T; Fujibayashi, S; Neo, M; Pattanayak, Deepak K; Matsushita, T; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Kokubo, T; Nakamura, T

    2011-05-01

    Many studies have shown that certain biomaterials with specific porous structures can induce bone formation in non-osseous sites without the need for osteoinductive biomolecules, however, the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon (intrinsic osteoinduction of biomaterials) remain unclear. In particular, to our knowledge the type of pore structure suitable for osteoinduction has not been reported in detail. In the present study we investigated the effects of interconnective pore size on osteoinductivity and the bone formation processes during osteoinduction. Selective laser melting was employed to fabricate porous Ti implants (diameter 3.3mm, length 15 mm) with a channel structure comprising four longitudinal square channels, representing pores, of different diagonal widths, 500, 600, 900, and 1200 μm (termed p500, p600, p900, and p1200, respectively). These were then subjected to chemical and heat treatments to induce bioactivity. Significant osteoinduction was observed in p500 and p600, with the highest observed osteoinduction occurring at 5mm from the end of the implants. A distance of 5mm probably provides a favorable balance between blood circulation and fluid movement. Thus, the simple architecture of the implants allowed effective investigation of the influence of the interconnective pore size on osteoinduction, as well as the relationship between bone quantity and its location for different pore sizes. PMID:21295166

  10. Use of selected toxicology information resources in assessing relationships between chemical structure and biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Wassom, J S

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the subject of the use of selected toxicology information resources in assessing relationships between chemical structure and specific biological end points. To assist the researcher in how to access the primary literature of genetic toxicology, teratogenesis, and carcinogenesis, three specific specialized information centers are discussed--Environmental Mutagen Information Center, Environmental Teratology Information Center, and Environmental Carcinogenesis Information Center. Also included are descriptions of information resources that contain evaluated (peer-reviewed) biological research results. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Genetic Toxicology Program, the International Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs, and the Toxicology Data Bank are the best sources currently available to obtain peer-reviewed results for compounds tested for genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and other toxicological end points. The value of published information lies in its use. It has become evident that most information cannot be accepted at face value for interpretation and analysis when subjected to stringent quality evaluation criteria. This deficit can be corrected by rigid editorship and the cognizance of authors. Increased interest in alternative methods to in vivo animal testing will be exemplified by use of short-term bioassays and in structure-activity relationship studies. With respect to this latter area, it must be remembered that mechanically (computer generated) derived data cannot substitute, at least at this stage, for data obtained from actual animal testing. The future of structure-activity relationship studies will rest only in their use as a predictive tool. PMID:4065070

  11. Selection bias in species distribution models: An econometric approach on forest trees based on structural modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Ay, J. S.; Guillemot, J.; Doyen, L.; Leadley, P.

    2014-12-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) are widely used to study and predict the outcome of global changes on species. In human dominated ecosystems the presence of a given species is the result of both its ecological suitability and human footprint on nature such as land use choices. Land use choices may thus be responsible for a selection bias in the presence/absence data used in SDM calibration. We present a structural modelling approach (i.e. based on structural equation modelling) that accounts for this selection bias. The new structural species distribution model (SSDM) estimates simultaneously land use choices and species responses to bioclimatic variables. A land use equation based on an econometric model of landowner choices was joined to an equation of species response to bioclimatic variables. SSDM allows the residuals of both equations to be dependent, taking into account the possibility of shared omitted variables and measurement errors. We provide a general description of the statistical theory and a set of applications on forest trees over France using databases of climate and forest inventory at different spatial resolution (from 2km to 8km). We also compared the outputs of the SSDM with outputs of a classical SDM (i.e. Biomod ensemble modelling) in terms of bioclimatic response curves and potential distributions under current climate and climate change scenarios. The shapes of the bioclimatic response curves and the modelled species distribution maps differed markedly between SSDM and classical SDMs, with contrasted patterns according to species and spatial resolutions. The magnitude and directions of these differences were dependent on the correlations between the errors from both equations and were highest for higher spatial resolutions. A first conclusion is that the use of classical SDMs can potentially lead to strong miss-estimation of the actual and future probability of presence modelled. Beyond this selection bias, the SSDM we propose represents

  12. Population Structure of a Widespread Species under Balancing Selection: The Case of Arbutus unedo L.

    PubMed Central

    Santiso, Xabier; Lopez, Lua; Retuerto, Rubén; Barreiro, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Arbutus unedo L. is an evergreen shrub with a circum-Mediterranean distribution that also reaches the Eurosiberian region in northern Iberia, Atlantic France, and a disjunct population in southern Ireland. Due to the variety of climatic conditions across its distribution range, the populations of A. unedo were expected to display local adaptation. Conversely, common garden experiments revealed that diverse genotypes from a range of provenances produce similar phenotypes through adaptive plasticity, suggesting the action of stabilizing selection across its climatically heterogeneous range. Nonetheless, since a uniform response might also result from extensive gene flow, we have inferred the population structure of A. unedo and assessed whether its extended and largely one-dimensional range influences gene flow with the help of AFLP genotypes for 491 individuals from 19 populations covering the whole range of the species. As we had anticipated, gene flow is restricted in A. unedo, providing further support to the hypothesis that stabilizing selection is the most likely explanation for the homogeneous phenotypes along the range. The Euro-Siberian populations were not particularly isolated from the Mediterranean. Instead, there was a distinct genetic divide between the populations around the Mediterranean Sea and those sampled along Atlantic coasts from northern Africa up to Ireland. This genetic structure suggests the action of historic rather than biogeographic factors as it seems consistent with a scenario of independent glacial refugia in the Atlantic and Mediterranean portions of the range of A. unedo. Genetic exchange was likewise restricted within each set of populations. Nevertheless, isolation-by-distance (IBD) was stronger, and FST increased faster with distance, along the Atlantic, suggesting that gene flow might be larger among Mediterranean populations. Genetic diversity was significantly lower in NW Iberia and Ireland than in other populations whereas

  13. Population Structure of a Widespread Species under Balancing Selection: The Case of Arbutus unedo L.

    PubMed

    Santiso, Xabier; Lopez, Lua; Retuerto, Rubén; Barreiro, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Arbutus unedo L. is an evergreen shrub with a circum-Mediterranean distribution that also reaches the Eurosiberian region in northern Iberia, Atlantic France, and a disjunct population in southern Ireland. Due to the variety of climatic conditions across its distribution range, the populations of A. unedo were expected to display local adaptation. Conversely, common garden experiments revealed that diverse genotypes from a range of provenances produce similar phenotypes through adaptive plasticity, suggesting the action of stabilizing selection across its climatically heterogeneous range. Nonetheless, since a uniform response might also result from extensive gene flow, we have inferred the population structure of A. unedo and assessed whether its extended and largely one-dimensional range influences gene flow with the help of AFLP genotypes for 491 individuals from 19 populations covering the whole range of the species. As we had anticipated, gene flow is restricted in A. unedo, providing further support to the hypothesis that stabilizing selection is the most likely explanation for the homogeneous phenotypes along the range. The Euro-Siberian populations were not particularly isolated from the Mediterranean. Instead, there was a distinct genetic divide between the populations around the Mediterranean Sea and those sampled along Atlantic coasts from northern Africa up to Ireland. This genetic structure suggests the action of historic rather than biogeographic factors as it seems consistent with a scenario of independent glacial refugia in the Atlantic and Mediterranean portions of the range of A. unedo. Genetic exchange was likewise restricted within each set of populations. Nevertheless, isolation-by-distance (IBD) was stronger, and F ST increased faster with distance, along the Atlantic, suggesting that gene flow might be larger among Mediterranean populations. Genetic diversity was significantly lower in NW Iberia and Ireland than in other populations whereas

  14. Population Structure of a Widespread Species under Balancing Selection: The Case of Arbutus unedo L.

    PubMed

    Santiso, Xabier; Lopez, Lua; Retuerto, Rubén; Barreiro, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Arbutus unedo L. is an evergreen shrub with a circum-Mediterranean distribution that also reaches the Eurosiberian region in northern Iberia, Atlantic France, and a disjunct population in southern Ireland. Due to the variety of climatic conditions across its distribution range, the populations of A. unedo were expected to display local adaptation. Conversely, common garden experiments revealed that diverse genotypes from a range of provenances produce similar phenotypes through adaptive plasticity, suggesting the action of stabilizing selection across its climatically heterogeneous range. Nonetheless, since a uniform response might also result from extensive gene flow, we have inferred the population structure of A. unedo and assessed whether its extended and largely one-dimensional range influences gene flow with the help of AFLP genotypes for 491 individuals from 19 populations covering the whole range of the species. As we had anticipated, gene flow is restricted in A. unedo, providing further support to the hypothesis that stabilizing selection is the most likely explanation for the homogeneous phenotypes along the range. The Euro-Siberian populations were not particularly isolated from the Mediterranean. Instead, there was a distinct genetic divide between the populations around the Mediterranean Sea and those sampled along Atlantic coasts from northern Africa up to Ireland. This genetic structure suggests the action of historic rather than biogeographic factors as it seems consistent with a scenario of independent glacial refugia in the Atlantic and Mediterranean portions of the range of A. unedo. Genetic exchange was likewise restricted within each set of populations. Nevertheless, isolation-by-distance (IBD) was stronger, and F ST increased faster with distance, along the Atlantic, suggesting that gene flow might be larger among Mediterranean populations. Genetic diversity was significantly lower in NW Iberia and Ireland than in other populations whereas

  15. [Effects of maximal possible potential selection in the world population. New data on selection structure in the CIS nations].

    PubMed

    Spitsyn, V A; Agapova, R K; Spitsyna, N Kh

    1994-01-01

    New information on maximal possible potential selection and its component values in some ethno-territorial groups in CIS was presented. The heterogeneity observed in the Crow's index and its components can be explained as a result of the differences in the social economic status of the groups studied and the influence of climate geographical factors. The data gathered during the biodemographical study of 67 populations allowed to detect regularities of the effects of selective factors in world population: non-random and discrete nature of considered populations distribution in the coordinate space of selection components associated with differential mortality (I) and differential fertility (I) was shown. Differentiation of three big aggregations of populations was shown: urbanized contemporary communities with low I values; small endogamous populations, mostly of hunters and gatherers; small towns' populations and rural populations with balanced reproductive indices. Microevolutionary changes take place in the latter conglomerate even now, statistically subdividing it into two clusters. A proposition was made about the existence of "ecological optimum" for populations intermediate between advanced industrial communities and communities of hunters and gatherers, corresponding to the population size and the nature and rate of population reproduction.

  16. Current Topics in Epilepsy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    USUI, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the current topics in the field of epilepsy surgery. Each type of epilepsy is associated with a different set of questions and goals. In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), postoperative seizure outcome is satisfactory. A recent meta-analysis revealed superior seizure outcome after anterior temporal lobectomy compared with selective amygdalohippocampectomy; in terms of cognitive outcome; however, amygdalohippocampectomy may be beneficial. In temporal lobe epilepsy with normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), postoperative seizure outcome is not as favorable as it is in MTLE with HS; further improvement of seizure outcome in these cases is necessary. Focal cortical dysplasia is the most common substrate in intractable neocortical epilepsy, especially in children, as well as in MRI-invisible neocortical epilepsy. Postoperative seizure-free outcome is approximately 60–70%; further diagnostic and therapeutic improvement is required. Regarding diagnostic methodology, an important topic currently under discussion is wideband electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis. Although high-frequency oscillations and ictal direct current shifts are considered important markers of epileptogenic zones, the clinical significance of these findings should be clarified further. Regarding alternatives to surgery, neuromodulation therapy can be an option for patients who are not amenable to resective surgery. In addition to vagus nerve stimulation, intracranial stimulation such as responsive neurostimulation or anterior thalamic stimulation is reported to have a modest seizure suppression effect. Postoperative management such as rehabilitation and antiepileptic drug (AED) management is important. It has been reported that postoperative rehabilitation improves postoperative employment status. Pre- and post-operative comprehensive care is mandatory for postoperative improvement of quality of life. PMID:26984452

  17. Structure and generation mechanism of a novel degradation product formed by oxidatively induced coupling of miconazole nitrate with butylated hydroxytoluene in a topical ointment studied by HPLC-ESI-MS and organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fa; Nunes, Mathews

    2004-02-01

    In a petrolatum based topical ointment formulation containing miconazole nitrate (1) as the active ingredient and 2,6-di-t-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT) as a vehicle antioxidant, an oxidatively induced coupling reaction between miconazole nitrate and BHT occurred to form a novel adduct 1-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxy-benzyl)-3-[2-(2,4-dichloro-benzyloxy)-2-(2,4-dichloro-phenyl)-ethyl]-3H-imidazol-1-ium nitrate (2). The structure of 2 was established using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and was confirmed by comparing with a synthesized reference compound. The reaction proceeded through a quinone methide intermediate from BHT. Two synthetic methods were established for preparing 2.

  18. Topics in physico-chemical hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sivashinsky, G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: theory of turbulent flame speed; flame extinction by periodic flow-field; influence of swirl on the structure and extinction of premixed flames; propagation and extinction of nonsteady spherical flame fronts; geometrically invariant formulation of intrinsic dynamics of premixed flames; nonlinear dynamics of oscillatory regime of premixed combustion; and pattern formation in premixed flames. (LSP)

  19. Structural isomers of C2N(+) - A selected-ion flow tube study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. S.; Petrie, S. A. H.; Freeman, C. G.; Mcewan, M. J.; Mclean, A. D.

    1988-01-01

    Reactivities of the structural isomers CCN(+) and CNC(+) were examined in a selected-ion flow tube at 300 + or - 5 K. The less reactive CNC(+) isomer was identified as the product of the reactions of C(+) + HCN and C(+) + C2N2; in these reactions only CNC(+) can be produced because of energy constraints. Rate coefficients and branching ratios are reported for the reactions of each isomer with H2, CH4, NH3, H2O, C2H2, HCN, N2, O2, N2O, and CO2. Ab initio calculations are presented for CCN(+) and CNC(+); a saddle point for the reaction CCN(+) yielding CNC(+) is calculated to be 195 kJ/mol above CNC(+). The results provide evidence that the more reactive CCN(+) isomer is unlikely to be present in measurable densities in interstellar clouds.

  20. Structural isomers of C2N+: a selected-ion flow tube study.

    PubMed

    Knight, J S; Petrie, S A; Freeman, C G; McEwan, M J; McLean, A D; DeFrees, D J

    1988-01-01

    Reactivities of the structural isomers CCN+ and CNC+ were examined in a selected-ion flow tube at 300 +/- 5 K. The less reactive CNC+ isomer was identified as the product of the reactions of C(+) + HCN and C(+) + C2N2; in these reactions only CNC+ can be produced because of energy constraints. Rate coefficients and branching ratios are reported for the reactions of each isomer with H2, CH4, NH3, H2O, C2H2, HCN, N2, O2, N2O, and CO2. Ab initio calculations are presented for CCN+ and CNC+; a saddle point for the reaction CCN+ --> CNC+ is calculated to be 195 kJ mol-1 above the CNC+. The results provide evidence that the more reactive CCN+ isomer is unlikely to be present in measurable densities in interstellar clouds.

  1. An evolutionary theory of large-scale human warfare: Group-structured cultural selection.

    PubMed

    Zefferman, Matthew R; Mathew, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    When humans wage war, it is not unusual for battlefields to be strewn with dead warriors. These warriors typically were men in their reproductive prime who, had they not died in battle, might have gone on to father more children. Typically, they are also genetically unrelated to one another. We know of no other animal species in which reproductively capable, genetically unrelated individuals risk their lives in this manner. Because the immense private costs borne by individual warriors create benefits that are shared widely by others in their group, warfare is a stark evolutionary puzzle that is difficult to explain. Although several scholars have posited models of the evolution of human warfare, these models do not adequately explain how humans solve the problem of collective action in warfare at the evolutionarily novel scale of hundreds of genetically unrelated individuals. We propose that group-structured cultural selection explains this phenomenon.

  2. An evolutionary theory of large-scale human warfare: Group-structured cultural selection.

    PubMed

    Zefferman, Matthew R; Mathew, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    When humans wage war, it is not unusual for battlefields to be strewn with dead warriors. These warriors typically were men in their reproductive prime who, had they not died in battle, might have gone on to father more children. Typically, they are also genetically unrelated to one another. We know of no other animal species in which reproductively capable, genetically unrelated individuals risk their lives in this manner. Because the immense private costs borne by individual warriors create benefits that are shared widely by others in their group, warfare is a stark evolutionary puzzle that is difficult to explain. Although several scholars have posited models of the evolution of human warfare, these models do not adequately explain how humans solve the problem of collective action in warfare at the evolutionarily novel scale of hundreds of genetically unrelated individuals. We propose that group-structured cultural selection explains this phenomenon. PMID:25914359

  3. Independent seismic evaluation of the Diablo Canyon Unit 1 containment annulus structure and selected piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Reich, M.; Bezler, P.; Miller, C.; Wang, Y.K.; Subudhi, M.; Shteyngart, S.; Brown, P.

    1982-08-01

    An independent review and development of the vertical floor spectra for the Unit 1 containment annulus structure of the Diablo Canyon Power Plant was carried out using a detailed three-dimensional model. The developed floor spectra were then utilized for confirmatory evaluations of two selected piping systems. The latter were evaluated by the envelope response spectrum method, and by the independent support motion response spectrum method. ASME class 2 evaluations of the two systems were also performed. Finally, a confirmatory evaluation was carried out for the model utilized by URS/Blume for the development of the vertical floor response spectra. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of the report summarize the work scope and the results of the study. Details pertaining to the specific areas of the work are given in sections 2 to 8.

  4. Structural and Functional Evidence Indicates Selective Oxygen Signaling in Caldanaerobacter subterraneus H-NOX.

    PubMed

    Hespen, Charles W; Bruegger, Joel J; Phillips-Piro, Christine M; Marletta, Michael A

    2016-08-19

    Acute and specific sensing of diatomic gas molecules is an essential facet of biological signaling. Heme nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) proteins are a family of gas sensors found in diverse classes of bacteria and eukaryotes. The most commonly characterized bacterial H-NOX domains are from facultative anaerobes and are activated through a conformational change caused by formation of a 5-coordinate Fe(II)-NO complex. Members of this H-NOX subfamily do not bind O2 and therefore can selectively ligate NO even under aerobic conditions. In contrast, H-NOX domains encoded by obligate anaerobes do form stable 6-coordinate Fe(II)-O2 complexes by utilizing a conserved H-bonding network in the ligand-binding pocket. The biological function of O2-binding H-NOX domains has not been characterized. In this work, the crystal structures of an O2-binding H-NOX domain from the thermophilic obligate anaerobe Caldanaerobacter subterraneus (Cs H-NOX) in the Fe(II)-NO, Fe(II)-CO, and Fe(II)-unliganded states are reported. The Fe(II)-unliganded structure displays a conformational shift distinct from the NO-, CO-, and previously reported O2-coordinated structures. In orthogonal signaling assays using Cs H-NOX and the H-NOX signaling effector histidine kinase from Vibrio cholerae (Vc HnoK), Cs H-NOX regulates Vc HnoK in an O2-dependent manner and requires the H-bonding network to distinguish O2 from other ligands. The crystal structures of Fe(II) unliganded and NO- and CO-bound Cs H-NOX combined with functional assays herein provide the first evidence that H-NOX proteins from obligate anaerobes can serve as O2 sensors.

  5. Structural Insight into Mechanism and Diverse Substrate Selection Strategy of L-Ribulokinase

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rakhi; Burley, Stephen K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2011-01-01

    The araBAD operon encodes three different enzymes required for catabolism of L-arabinose, which is one of the most abundant monosaccharides in nature. L-ribulokinase, encoded by the araB gene, catalyses conversion of L-ribulose to L-ribulose-5-phosphate, the second step in the catabolic pathway. Unlike other kinases, ribulokinase exhibits diversity in substrate selectivity and catalyses phosphorylation of all four 2-ketopentose sugars with comparable kcat values. To understand ribulokinase recognition and phosphorylation of a diverse set of substrates, we have determined the X-ray structure of ribulokinase from Bacillus halodurans bound to L-ribulose and investigated its substrate and ATP co-factor binding properties. The polypeptide chain is folded into two domains, one small and the other large, with a deep cleft in between. By analogy with related sugar kinases, we identified 447GGLPQK452 as the ATP binding motif within the smaller domain. L-ribulose binds in the cleft between the two domains via hydrogen bonds with the sidechains of highly conserved Trp126, Lys208, Asp274, and Glu329 and the main chain nitrogen of Ala96. The interaction of L-ribulokinase with L-ribulose reveals versatile structural features that help explain recognition of various 2-ketopentose substrates and competitive inhibition by L-erythrulose. Comparison of our structure to that of the structures of other sugar kinases, revealed conformational variations that suggest domain-domain closure movements are responsible for establishing the observed active site environment. PMID:22072612

  6. Structural insight into mechanism and diverse substrate selection strategy of L-ribulokinase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal R.; Swaminathan S.; Burley, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    The araBAD operon encodes three different enzymes required for catabolism of L-arabinose, which is one of the most abundant monosaccharides in nature. L-ribulokinase, encoded by the araB gene, catalyzes conversion of L-ribulose to L-ribulose-5-phosphate, the second step in the catabolic pathway. Unlike other kinases, ribulokinase exhibits diversity in substrate selectivity and catalyzes phosphorylation of all four 2-ketopentose sugars with comparable k{sub cat} values. To understand ribulokinase recognition and phosphorylation of a diverse set of substrates, we have determined the X-ray structure of ribulokinase from Bacillus halodurans bound to L-ribulose and investigated its substrate and ATP co-factor binding properties. The polypeptide chain is folded into two domains, one small and the other large, with a deep cleft in between. By analogy with related sugar kinases, we identified {sup 447}{und GG}LPQ{und K}{sup 452} as the ATP-binding motif within the smaller domain. L-ribulose binds in the cleft between the two domains via hydrogen bonds with the side chains of highly conserved Trp126, Lys208, Asp274, and Glu329 and the main chain nitrogen of Ala96. The interaction of L-ribulokinase with L-ribulose reveals versatile structural features that help explain recognition of various 2-ketopentose substrates and competitive inhibition by L-erythrulose. Comparison of our structure to that of the structures of other sugar kinases revealed conformational variations that suggest domain-domain closure movements are responsible for establishing the observed active site environment.

  7. Structural insights into selective agonist actions of tamoxifen on human Estrogen Receptor alpha

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandipan; Biswas, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen, an anti-estrogenic ligand in breast tissues and being used as a first-line treatment in ER-positive breast cancers, is found to develop resistance followed by resumption of growth of the tumor in about 30% of cases. Whether tamoxifen starts assisting in proliferation in such cases or there exists any ligand-independent pathways to transcription is not fully understood; also, no ERα mutants have been detected so far which could lead to tamoxifen resistance. Performing in-silico conformational analysis of ERα ligand binding domain, in the absence and presence of selective agonist (Diethylstilbestrol; DES), antagonist (Faslodex; ICI), and SERM (4-hydroxy tamoxifen; 4-OHT) ligands, we elucidated ligand-responsive structural modulations of ERα-LBD dimer in their agonist and antagonist complexes and address the issue of “tamoxifen resistance”. We found DES and ICI to stabilize the dimer in their agonist and antagonist conformations, respectively. The ERα-LBD dimer without the presence of any bound ligand also leads to a stable structure in agonist conformation. However, the binding of 4-OHT to antagonist structure is found to lead to a flexible conformation allowing the protein visiting conformations populated by agonists as are evident from principal component analysis and radius of gyration plots. Further, the relaxed conformations of the 4-OHT bound protein is found to exhibit a diminished size of the co-repressor binding pocket at LBD, thus signaling a partial blockage of the co-repressor binding motif. Thus, the ability of 4-OHT bound ERα-LBD to assume flexible conformations visited by agonists and reduced co-repressor binding surface at LBD provide crucial structural insights into tamoxifen-resistance complementing our existing understanding. PMID:25060147

  8. Selective fluorescence functionalization of dye-doped polymerized structures fabricated by direct laser writing (DLW) lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Duocastella, Martí; Diaspro, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    The continuous development of the vast arsenal of fabrication techniques is a pivotal factor in the breakthrough of nanotechnology. Although the broad interest is generally focused on the reduction of the dimensions of the fabricated structures, localized functionalization of the nanomaterials emerges as a key factor closely linked to their potential applications. In particular, fabrication of spatially selective fluorescence nanostructures is highly demanded in nanophotonics, as for example in three-dimensional (3D) optical data storage (ODS), where massive storage capacity and fast writing-reading processes are promised. We have developed an innovative method to control the location and intensity of the fluorescence signal in dye-doped photopolymerized structures fabricated with Direct Laser Writing (DLW) lithography. Well-defined fluorescent pixels (area = 0.24 μm2) were written inside a polymer matrix with the help of a femtosecond pulsed laser (multiphoton absorption) via a thermally-induced di-aggregation of a fluorescent dye. Moreover, we have accomplished a fine control of the fluorescence intensity which can increase the storage capacity of ODS systems fabricated with this approach.The continuous development of the vast arsenal of fabrication techniques is a pivotal factor in the breakthrough of nanotechnology. Although the broad interest is generally focused on the reduction of the dimensions of the fabricated structures, localized functionalization of the nanomaterials emerges as a key factor closely linked to their potential applications. In particular, fabrication of spatially selective fluorescence nanostructures is highly demanded in nanophotonics, as for example in three-dimensional (3D) optical data storage (ODS), where massive storage capacity and fast writing-reading processes are promised. We have developed an innovative method to control the location and intensity of the fluorescence signal in dye-doped photopolymerized structures fabricated

  9. Mechanistic Insights into the Structure-Dependent Selectivity of Catalytic Furfural Conversion on Platinum Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Qiuxia; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Yang-Gang; Mei, Donghai

    2015-11-01

    The effects of structure and size on the selectivity of catalytic furfural conversion over supported Pt catalysts in the presence of hydrogen have been studied using first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations and microkinetic modeling. Four Pt model systems, i.e., periodic Pt(111), Pt(211) surfaces, as well as small nanoclusters (Pt13 and Pt55) are chosen to represent the terrace, step, and corner sites of Pt nanoparticles. Our DFT results show that the reaction routes for furfural hydrogenation and decarbonylation are strongly dependent on the type of reactive sites, which lead to the different selectivity. On the basis of the size-dependent site distribution rule, we correlate the site distributions as a function of the Pt particle size. Our microkinetic results indicate the critical particle size that controls the furfural selectivity is about 1.0 nm, which is in good agreement with the reported experimental value under reaction conditions. This work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (2013CB733501) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC-21306169, 21176221, 21136001, 21101137 and 91334103). This work was also partially supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). EMSL is a national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  10. Selective Autooxidation of Ethanol over Titania-Supported Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts: Structure and Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Carlos; Thirunavukkarasu, K; Anilkumar, M; Shiju, N R; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2012-01-01

    We study the selective catalytic oxidation of ethanol with air as a sustainable alternative route to acetaldehyde. The reaction is catalysed by molybdenum oxide supported on titania, in a flow reactor under ambient pressure. High selectivity to acetaldehyde (70%–89%, depending on the Mo loading) is obtained at 150 °C. Subsequently, we investigate the structure/performance relationship for various molybdenum oxide species using a combination of techniques including diffuse reflectance UV-visible, infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed reduction. As their surface density increases, the monomeric molybdenum oxide species undergo two-dimensional and three-dimensional oligomerisation. This results in polymolybdates and molybdenum oxide crystallites. Importantly, the ethanol oxidation rate depends not only on the overall molybdenum loading and dispersion, but also on the type of molybdenum oxide species prevalent at each surface density and on the domain size. As the molybdenum oxide oligomerisation increases, electron delocalisation becomes easier. This lowers the absorption edge energy and increases the reaction rate. PMID:23396482

  11. Structural and taxonomic components of habitat selection in the neotropical folivore Lamponius portoricensis (Phasmetodea: Phasmatidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Willig, M.R.; Sandlin, E.A. Univ. of Arizona, Tucson ); Gannon, M.R. )

    1993-06-01

    Lamponius portoricensis Rhen is a folivorous neotropical walkingstick that is a common light-gap inhabitant of the tabonuco forest in Puerto Rico. Little is known concerning the spatial distribution of this phasmatid or the manner in which it selects habitats. Based on multiple regression analysis of a suite of taxonomic and structural characteristics of understory flora, we determined that the density of walkingsticks was associated with patches that exhibit high apparency values for Piper treleaseanum Britton Wilson and Symplocos martinicensis Jacq., and low apparency values for Dryopteris deltoidea (Sw.) Kuntze. The total development of the understory regardless of taxonomic composition at 76 cm (2.5 ft) and 107 cm (3.5 ft) also contributes to high walkingstick density, based on correlative analyses. Moreover, nonparametric analysis suggests that L. portoricensis disproportionately occurs on P. treleaseanum (approximately twice as often as expected based on plant apparency). Despite these associations, only a third of the variation in walkingstick density is accounted for by this suite of floral characteristics. The low vagility of L. portoricensis may result in its having incomplete information about the abundance and distribution of forage plants, whereas patch-dynamic processes involving changes in quality of forage can confound the significance of apparency alone in predicting density. The production of aromatic attractants by Piper may act as the proximate cue affecting patch selection.

  12. Structural insights into HDAC6 tubulin deacetylation and its selective inhibition.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yasuyuki; Keusch, Jeremy J; Wang, Longlong; Saito, Makoto; Hess, Daniel; Wang, Xiaoning; Melancon, Bruce J; Helquist, Paul; Gut, Heinz; Matthias, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    We report crystal structures of zebrafish histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) catalytic domains in tandem or as single domains in complex with the (R) and (S) enantiomers of trichostatin A (TSA) or with the HDAC6-specific inhibitor nexturastat A. The tandem domains formed, together with the inter-domain linker, an ellipsoid-shaped complex with pseudo-twofold symmetry. We identified important active site differences between both catalytic domains and revealed the binding mode of HDAC6 selective inhibitors. HDAC inhibition assays with (R)- and (S)-TSA showed that (R)-TSA was a broad-range inhibitor, whereas (S)-TSA had moderate selectivity for HDAC6. We identified a uniquely positioned α-helix and a flexible tryptophan residue in the loop joining α-helices H20 to H21 as critical for deacetylation of the physiologic substrate tubulin. Using single-molecule measurements and biochemical assays we demonstrated that HDAC6 catalytic domain 2 deacetylated α-tubulin lysine 40 in the lumen of microtubules, but that its preferred substrate was unpolymerized tubulin. PMID:27454931

  13. Topic modeling for cluster analysis of large biological and medical datasets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The big data moniker is nowhere better deserved than to describe the ever-increasing prodigiousness and complexity of biological and medical datasets. New methods are needed to generate and test hypotheses, foster biological interpretation, and build validated predictors. Although multivariate techniques such as cluster analysis may allow researchers to identify groups, or clusters, of related variables, the accuracies and effectiveness of traditional clustering methods diminish for large and hyper dimensional datasets. Topic modeling is an active research field in machine learning and has been mainly used as an analytical tool to structure large textual corpora for data mining. Its ability to reduce high dimensionality to a small number of latent variables makes it suitable as a means for clustering or overcoming clustering difficulties in large biological and medical datasets. Results In this study, three topic model-derived clustering methods, highest probable topic assignment, feature selection and feature extraction, are proposed and tested on the cluster analysis of three large datasets: Salmonella pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) dataset, lung cancer dataset, and breast cancer dataset, which represent various types of large biological or medical datasets. All three various methods are shown to improve the efficacy/effectiveness of clustering results on the three datasets in comparison to traditional methods. A preferable cluster analysis method emerged for each of the three datasets on the basis of replicating known biological truths. Conclusion Topic modeling could be advantageously applied to the large datasets of biological or medical research. The three proposed topic model-derived clustering methods, highest probable topic assignment, feature selection and feature extraction, yield clustering improvements for the three different data types. Clusters more efficaciously represent truthful groupings and subgroupings in the data than

  14. Bacterial resistance and topical antimicrobial wash products.

    PubMed

    Jones, R D

    1999-08-01

    Current scientific evidence has not shown that a link exists between the use of topical antimicrobial formulations and antiseptic or antibiotic resistance. As a result of the extensive history and varied use of antiseptic products and ingredients, any selective pressure for antibiotic resistance that may be occurring or may be uncovered in the future because of antiseptic use would be expected to be insignificant compared with the selective pressure because of antibiotic use. This review illustrates the effectiveness of topical antimicrobial wash products against antibiotic-resistant and antiseptic-resistant bacteria in use settings as well as the studies performed (antiseptic, deodorant, and oral care) demonstrating the lack of development of resistance in long-term clinical studies. Although these studies illustrate that the use of topical antimicrobial products have not been shown to play a role in the fluctuations of the specific composition or resistance of the skin flora, changes in skin flora have been shown to occur. Based on current knowledge, the benefit from use of topical antimicrobial wash products in combination with standard infection control and personal hygiene practices far outweighs the risk of increased antibiotic resistance.

  15. SS316 structure fabricated by selective laser melting and integrated with strain isolated optical fiber high temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Jinesh; Havermann, Dirk; Polyzos, Dimitrios; MacPherson, William N.; Hand, Duncan P.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2015-09-01

    Smart metal having integrated high temperature sensing capability is reported. The SS316 structure is made by additive layer manufacturing via selective laser melting (SLM). Sensor component is embedded in to the structure during the SLM build process. The strain isolated in-fiber Fabry-Perot cavity sensor measures temperature up to 1100 °C inside the metal.

  16. Topics in statistical mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Elser, V.

    1984-05-01

    This thesis deals with four independent topics in statistical mechanics: (1) the dimer problem is solved exactly for a hexagonal lattice with general boundary using a known generating function from the theory of partitions. It is shown that the leading term in the entropy depends on the shape of the boundary; (2) continuum models of percolation and self-avoiding walks are introduced with the property that their series expansions are sums over linear graphs with intrinsic combinatorial weights and explicit dimension dependence; (3) a constrained SOS model is used to describe the edge of a simple cubic crystal. Low and high temperature results are derived as well as the detailed behavior near the crystal facet; (4) the microscopic model of the lambda-transition involving atomic permutation cycles is reexamined. In particular, a new derivation of the two-component field theory model of the critical behavior is presented. Results for a lattice model originally proposed by Kikuchi are extended with a high temperature series expansion and Monte Carlo simulation. 30 references.

  17. Seed selection strategy in global network alignment without destroying the entire structures of functional modules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Network alignment is one of the most common biological network comparison methods. Aligning protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks of different species is of great important to detect evolutionary conserved pathways or protein complexes across species through the identification of conserved interactions, and to improve our insight into biological systems. Global network alignment (GNA) problem is NP-complete, for which only heuristic methods have been proposed so far. Generally, the current GNA methods fall into global heuristic seed-and-extend approaches. These methods can not get the best overall consistent alignment between networks for the opinionated local seed. Furthermore These methods are lost in maximizing the number of aligned edges between two networks without considering the original structures of functional modules. Methods We present a novel seed selection strategy for global network alignment by constructing the pairs of hub nodes of networks to be aligned into multiple seeds. Beginning from every hub seed and using the membership similarity of nodes to quantify to what extent the nodes can participate in functional modules associated with current seed topologically we align the networks by modules. By this way we can maintain the functional modules are not damaged during the heuristic alignment process. And our method is efficient in resolving the fatal problem of most conventional algorithms that the initialization selected seeds have a direct influence on the alignment result. The similarity measures between network nodes (e.g., proteins) include sequence similarity, centrality similarity, and dynamic membership similarity and our algorithm can be called Multiple Hubs-based Alignment (MHA). Results When applying our seed selection strategy to several pairs of real PPI networks, it is observed that our method is working to strike a balance, extending the conserved interactions while maintaining the functional modules unchanged. In

  18. GIS based site and structure selection model for groundwater recharge: a hydrogeomorphic approach.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Ritesh; Sohony, R A

    2009-10-01

    The groundwater in India is facing a critical situation due to over exploitation, reduction in recharge potential by change in land use and land cover and improper planning and management. A groundwater development plan needs a large volume of multidisciplinary data from various sources. A geographic information system (GIS) based hydrogeomorphic approach can provide the appropriate platform for spatial analysis of diverse data sets for decision making in groundwater recharge. The paper presents development of GIS based model to provide more accuracy in identification and suitability analysis for finding out zones and locating suitable sites with suggested structures for artificial recharge. Satellite images were used to prepare the geomorphological and land use maps. For site selection, the items such as slope, surface infiltration, and order of drainage were generated and integrated in GIS using Weighted Index Overlay Analysis and Boolean logics. Similarly for identification of suitable structures, complex matrix was programmed based on local climatic, topographic, hydrogeologic and landuse conditions as per artificial recharge manual of Central Ground Water Board, India. The GIS based algorithm is implemented in a user-friendly way using arc macro language on Arc/Info platform. PMID:21117424

  19. Design and Structural Characterization of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Phosphatidylinositol 4 Kinase IIIβ.

    PubMed

    Rutaganira, Florentine U; Fowler, Melissa L; McPhail, Jacob A; Gelman, Michael A; Nguyen, Khanh; Xiong, Anming; Dornan, Gillian L; Tavshanjian, Brandon; Glenn, Jeffrey S; Shokat, Kevan M; Burke, John E

    2016-03-10

    Type III phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI4KIIIβ) is an essential enzyme in mediating membrane trafficking and is implicated in a variety of pathogenic processes. It is a key host factor mediating replication of RNA viruses. The design of potent and specific inhibitors of this enzyme will be essential to define its cellular roles and may lead to novel antiviral therapeutics. We previously reported the PI4K inhibitor PIK93, and this compound has defined key functions of PI4KIIIβ. However, this compound showed high cross reactivity with class I and III PI3Ks. Using structure-based drug design, we have designed novel potent and selective (>1000-fold over class I and class III PI3Ks) PI4KIIIβ inhibitors. These compounds showed antiviral activity against hepatitis C virus. The co-crystal structure of PI4KIIIβ bound to one of the most potent compounds reveals the molecular basis of specificity. This work will be vital in the design of novel PI4KIIIβ inhibitors, which may play significant roles as antiviral therapeutics. PMID:26885694

  20. Selective fluorescence functionalization of dye-doped polymerized structures fabricated by direct laser writing (DLW) lithography.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Duocastella, Martí; Diaspro, Alberto

    2015-12-21

    The continuous development of the vast arsenal of fabrication techniques is a pivotal factor in the breakthrough of nanotechnology. Although the broad interest is generally focused on the reduction of the dimensions of the fabricated structures, localized functionalization of the nanomaterials emerges as a key factor closely linked to their potential applications. In particular, fabrication of spatially selective fluorescence nanostructures is highly demanded in nanophotonics, as for example in three-dimensional (3D) optical data storage (ODS), where massive storage capacity and fast writing-reading processes are promised. We have developed an innovative method to control the location and intensity of the fluorescence signal in dye-doped photopolymerized structures fabricated with Direct Laser Writing (DLW) lithography. Well-defined fluorescent pixels (area = 0.24 μm(2)) were written inside a polymer matrix with the help of a femtosecond pulsed laser (multiphoton absorption) via a thermally-induced di-aggregation of a fluorescent dye. Moreover, we have accomplished a fine control of the fluorescence intensity which can increase the storage capacity of ODS systems fabricated with this approach. PMID:26572098

  1. All-benzene carbon nanocages: size-selective synthesis, photophysical properties, and crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Katsuma; Segawa, Yasutomo; Itami, Kenichiro

    2014-11-19

    The design and synthesis of a series of carbon nanocages consisting solely of benzene rings are described. Carbon nanocages are appealing molecules not only because they represent junction unit structures of branched carbon nanotubes, but also because of their potential utilities as unique optoelectronic π-conjugated materials and guest-encapsulating hosts. Three sizes of strained, conjugated [n.n.n]carbon nanocages (1, n = 4; 2, n = 5; 3, n = 6) were synthesized with perfect size-selectivity. Cyclohexane-containing units and 1,3,5-trisubstituted benzene-containing units were assembled to yield the minimally strained bicyclic precursors, which were successfully converted into the corresponding carbon nanocages via acid-mediated aromatization. X-ray crystallography of 1 confirmed the cage-shaped structure with an approximately spherical void inside the cage molecule. The present studies revealed the unique properties of carbon nanocages, including strain energies, size-dependent absorption and fluorescence, as well as unique size-dependency for the electronic features of 1-3. PMID:25361385

  2. Evaluation of selected thermal control coatings for long-life space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teichman, Louis A.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Witte, William G., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Graphite-reinforced resin matrix composites are being considered for spacecraft structural applications because of their light weight, high stiffness, and lower thermal expansion. Thin protective coatings with stable optical properties and the proper ratio of solar absorption (alpha sub s) to thermal emittance (epsilon) minimize orbital thermal extremes and protect these materials against space environment degradation. Sputtered coatings applied directly to graphite/epoxy composite surfaces and anodized coatings applied to thin aluminum foil were studied for use both as an atomic oxygen barrier and as thermal control coatings. Additional effort was made to develop nickel-based coatings which could be applied directly to composites. These coating systems were selected because their inherent tenacity made them potentially more reliable than commercial white paints for long-life space missions. Results indicate that anodized aluminum foil coatings are suitable for tubular and flat composite structures on large platforms in low Earth orbit. Anodized foil provides protection against some elements of the natural space environment (atomic oxygen, ultraviolet, and particulate radiation) and offers a broad range of tailored alpha sub s/epsilon. The foil is readily available and can be produced in large quantities, while the anodizing process is a routine commercial technique.

  3. Structural basis for phosphodependent substrate selection and orientation by the SCFCdc4 ubiquitin ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Orlicky, Steve; Tang, Xiaojing; Willems, Andrew; Tyers, Mike; Sicheri, Frank

    2010-12-01

    Cell cycle progression depends on precise elimination of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors by the ubiquitin system. Elimination of the CDK inhibitor Sic1 by the SCF{sup Cdc4} ubiquitin ligase at the onset of S phase requires phosphorylation of Sic1 on at least six of its nine Cdc4-phosphodegron (CPD) sites. A 2.7 {angstrom} X-ray crystal structure of a Skp1-Cdc4 complex bound to a high-affinity CPD phosphopeptide from human cyclin E reveals a core CPD motif, Leu-Leu-pThr-Pro, bound to an eight-bladed WD40 propeller domain in Cdc4. The low affinity of each CPD motif in Sic1 reflects structural discordance with one or more elements of the Cdc4 binding site. Reengineering of Cdc4 to reduce selection against Sic1 sequences allows ubiquitination of lower phosphorylated forms of Sic1. These features account for the observed phosphorylation threshold in Sic1 recognition and suggest an equilibrium binding mode between a single receptor site in Cdc4 and multiple low-affinity CPD sites in Sic1.

  4. Magnetically-tunable spin-selective positioning of wave functions in asymmetric semiconductor quantum structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Titova, L. V.; Furdyna, Jacek K.; Dobrowolska, M.

    2000-03-01

    It has been recently reported that the properties of self-organized CdSe quantum dots (QDs) on ZnSe change significantly when they are grown on ZnMnSe spacers separating CdSe form ZnSe.[1] To explore this effect futher, we have prepared a series of samples by depositing one monolayer (ML) of CdSe on ZnMnSe spacer layers of different thickness and different Mn concentration. The system is then capped with ZnSe. The band structure for this geometry results in an asymmetric quantum structure, where the 1 ML thick CdSe acts as a "well" between barriers comprised of ZnSe on side, and ZnMnSe on the other. When a magnetic field is applied, the Zeeman splitting of the band edges in ZnMnSe spacer moves the position of the wave function toward or away from the spacer, depending on spin orientation. Such spin-selective repositioning of the wave functions is fully confirmed by magnetic field dependence of ground state exciton transitions observed in PL. This work was supported by NSF Grant DMR 9705064. [1]C.S. Kim et.al., 9th International conference on II-VI compounds, Kyoto, Nov. 1-5, 1999.

  5. Discovering Health Topics in Social Media Using Topic Models

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Michael J.; Dredze, Mark

    2014-01-01

    By aggregating self-reported health statuses across millions of users, we seek to characterize the variety of health information discussed in Twitter. We describe a topic modeling framework for discovering health topics in Twitter, a social media website. This is an exploratory approach with the goal of understanding what health topics are commonly discussed in social media. This paper describes in detail a statistical topic model created for this purpose, the Ailment Topic Aspect Model (ATAM), as well as our system for filtering general Twitter data based on health keywords and supervised classification. We show how ATAM and other topic models can automatically infer health topics in 144 million Twitter messages from 2011 to 2013. ATAM discovered 13 coherent clusters of Twitter messages, some of which correlate with seasonal influenza (r = 0.689) and allergies (r = 0.810) temporal surveillance data, as well as exercise (r = .534) and obesity (r = −.631) related geographic survey data in the United States. These results demonstrate that it is possible to automatically discover topics that attain statistically significant correlations with ground truth data, despite using minimal human supervision and no historical data to train the model, in contrast to prior work. Additionally, these results demonstrate that a single general-purpose model can identify many different health topics in social media. PMID:25084530

  6. An update on topical therapies for mild-moderate psoriasis.

    PubMed

    van de Kerkhof, Peter C M

    2015-01-01

    Topical therapies are the mainstream treatment of psoriasis because most patients have mild disease. First-line treatments are vitamin D derivatives and corticosteroids. These treatments are usually given in combination schedules. For topical treatments the selection of the most appropriate vehicle is of major importance, thus improving adherence to the treatment, which frequently is impaired by the complexities of topical therapeutic choices. Evidence for efficacy and safety of topical treatments is readily available for vitamin D treatments and short-term treatment with corticosteroids. However, the scientific evidence for longer-term treatments is limited. Multiple new small molecules are in various stages of development and are reviewed.

  7. In vivo performance of selective electron beam-melted Ti-6Al-4V structures.

    PubMed

    Ponader, Sabine; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Widenmayer, Martin; Lutz, Rainer; Heinl, Peter; Körner, Carolin; Singer, Robert F; Nkenke, Emeka; Neukam, Friedrich W; Schlegel, Karl A

    2010-01-01

    Highly porous titanium structures are widely used for maxillofacial and orthopedic surgery because of their excellent mechanical properties similar to those of human bone and their facilitation of bone ingrowth. In contrast to common methods, the generation of porous titaniumproducts by selective electron beam melting (SEBM), an additive manufacturing technology, overcomes difficulties concerning the extreme chemical affinity of liquid titanium to atmospheric gases which consequently leads to strongly reduced ductility of the metal. The purpose of this study was to assess the suitability of a smooth compact and a porous Ti-6Al-4V structure directly produced by the SEBM process as scaffolds for bone formation. SEBM-processed titanium implants were placed into defects in the frontal skull of 15 domestic pigs. To evaluate the direct contact between bone and implant surfaces and to assess the ingrowth of osseous tissue into the porous structure, microradiographs and histomorphometric analyses were performed 14, 30, and 60 days after surgery. Bone ingrowth increased significantly during the period of this study. After 14 days the most outer regions of the implants were already filled with newly formed bone tissue (around 14%). After 30 days the bone volume inside the implants reached almost 30% and after 60 days abundant bone formation inside the implants attained 46%. During the study only scarce bone-implant contact was found around all implants, which did not exceed 9% around compact specimens and 6% around porous specimens after 60 days. This work demonstrates that highly porous titanium implants with excellent interconnectivity manufactured using the SEBM method are suitable scaffolds for bone ingrowth. This technique is a good candidate for orthopedic and maxillofacial applications.

  8. Image Search Reranking With Hierarchical Topic Awareness.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xinmei; Yang, Linjun; Lu, Yijuan; Tian, Qi; Tao, Dacheng

    2015-10-01

    With much attention from both academia and industrial communities, visual search reranking has recently been proposed to refine image search results obtained from text-based image search engines. Most of the traditional reranking methods cannot capture both relevance and diversity of the search results at the same time. Or they ignore the hierarchical topic structure of search result. Each topic is treated equally and independently. However, in real applications, images returned for certain queries are naturally in hierarchical organization, rather than simple parallel relation. In this paper, a new reranking method "topic-aware reranking (TARerank)" is proposed. TARerank describes the hierarchical topic structure of search results in one model, and seamlessly captures both relevance and diversity of the image search results simultaneously. Through a structured learning framework, relevance and diversity are modeled in TARerank by a set of carefully designed features, and then the model is learned from human-labeled training samples. The learned model is expected to predict reranking results with high relevance and diversity for testing queries. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, we collect an image search dataset and conduct comparison experiments on it. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed TARerank outperforms the existing relevance-based and diversified reranking methods.

  9. (Topics in theoretical physics). Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported in these areas: supersymmetry and conformal invariance and new structures in two dimensional critical phenomena; spinor fields and new applications and techniques for studying Ising model correlation factors; superstring compactification and high energy physics applications for novel two dimensional critical points; ordered and disordered spatial structure in dynamical systems; and fermion-boson mass relations in BCS type theories. Research is proposed in covariant formulation of the superstring, topics in superconformal field theory and new structures in two dimensional critical phenomena, ordered and disordered spatial structure in dynamical systems, and field theory over Galois fields. 48 refs. (LEW)

  10. Topics in theoretical surface science

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, R.

    1991-10-25

    The energetics and structures of clean and adsorbate covered surfaces are investigated in this dissertation. First, the formalism, within the Corrected Effective Medium (CEM) method, for calculating the surface energy of a clean surface is derived. The surface energies for many different metals and their low index surfaces are presented. The minimization of the surface energy is then used to predict the multilayer relaxation of the Al(111), (100), Ni(100), (110) and Fe(100) surfaces. Extensions of the surface CEM formalism to calculate the binding energies of ordered adsorbates on metals surfaces are also derived. The minimization of the binding energy allowed determination of the binding heights, sites and the extent of induced multilayer relaxation for H and N atoms on the Fe(110), (100) and W(110) surfaces. The last topic deals with the dynamics of the epitaxial growth of metals on metal surfaces. The CEM method was first modified by making approximations to enable faster evaluations of the potential and its corresponding forces for molecular dynamics simulations. The goal of these simulations was to identify the important steps in the formation of equilibrium epitaxial structures. 180 refs., 31 figs., 18 tabs.

  11. Topical fat reduction.

    PubMed

    Greenway, F L; Bray, G A; Heber, D

    1995-11-01

    The fat on women's thighs is more difficult to mobilize due to increased alpha-2 adrenergic receptor activity induced by estrogen. Lipolysis can be initiated through adipocyte receptor stimulation (beta adrenergic) or inhibition (adenosine or alpha-2 adrenergic) or by inhibition of phosphodiesterase. Since many women desire regional thigh fat loss, a series of clinical trials were initiated using one thigh as a double-blinded control. Trial #1: Five overweight women had injections of isoproterenol at intervals around the thigh three times a week for 4 weeks with diet and walking. Trial #2: Five overweight woman had ointment containing forskolin, yohimbine and aminophylline applied to the thigh five times a week for 4 weeks after hypertonic warm soaks with a diet and walking. Trial #3: Eighteen overweight women were divided into three groups of six and trial #2 was repeated with each agent alone vs. placebo using forskolin, yohimbine or aminophylline in separate ointments. Trial #4: Thirty overweight women had 10% aminophylline ointment applied to the thigh five times a week for 6 weeks with diet and walking. Chemistry panel, theophylline level and patch testing were performed. Trial #5: Twelve women had trial #4 repeated with 2% aminophylline cream without a diet or walking. Trial #6: Trial #5 was repeated with 0.5% aminophylline cream. All trials except yohimbine ointment gave significantly more girth loss from the treated thigh (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001). Chemistry panel showed no toxicity. Theophylline was undetectable and patch testing was negative. We conclude that topical fat reduction for women's thighs can be achieved without diet or exercise. PMID:8697059

  12. Active Labour Market Policy and Gender Mainstreaming in Germany: Gender-Specific Aspects of Participation and Destination in Selected Instruments of the Federal Employment Service. IAB Labour Market Research Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Petra; Kurtz, Beate

    The equality of the opportunities available to males and females in Germany's labor market was examined. The study compared employment patterns among women and men and the extent to which selected discretionary benefits of Germany's Federal Employment Service benefit women and men. Selected results were as follows: (1) women are under-represented…

  13. Topics in cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Olin, S S; Neumann, D A; Foran, J A; Scarano, G J

    1997-01-01

    The estimation of carcinogenic risks from exposure to chemicals has become an integral part of the regulatory process in the United States within the past decade. With it have come considerable controversy and debate over the scientific merits and shortcomings of the methods and their impact on risk management decisions. In this paper we highlight selected topics of current interest in the debate. As an indication of the level of public concern, we note the major recent reports on risk assessment from the National Academy of Sciences and the U.S Environmental Protection Agency's proposed substantial revisions to its Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment. We identify and briefly frame several key scientific issues in cancer risk assessment, including the growing recognition of the importance of understanding the mode of action of carcinogenesis in experimental animals and in humans, the methodologies and challenges in quantitative extrapolation of cancer risks, and the question of how to assess and account for human variability in susceptibility to carcinogens. In addition, we discuss initiatives in progress that may fundamentally alter the carcinogenesis testing paradigm. PMID:9114281

  14. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, John

    2015-01-21

    The uranyl cation (UO₂²⁺) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  15. Accelerating atomic orbital-based electronic structure calculation via pole expansion and selected inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Chen, Mohan; Yang, Chao; He, Lixin

    2013-07-01

    We describe how to apply the recently developed pole expansion and selected inversion (PEXSI) technique to Kohn-Sham density function theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations that are based on atomic orbital discretization. We give analytic expressions for evaluating the charge density, the total energy, the Helmholtz free energy and the atomic forces (including both the Hellmann-Feynman force and the Pulay force) without using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian. We also show how to update the chemical potential without using Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. The advantage of using PEXSI is that it has a computational complexity much lower than that associated with the matrix diagonalization procedure. We demonstrate the performance gain by comparing the timing of PEXSI with that of diagonalization on insulating and metallic nanotubes. For these quasi-1D systems, the complexity of PEXSI is linear with respect to the number of atoms. This linear scaling can be observed in our computational experiments when the number of atoms in a nanotube is larger than a few hundreds. Both the wall clock time and the memory requirement of PEXSI are modest. This even makes it possible to perform Kohn-Sham DFT calculations for 10 000-atom nanotubes with a sequential implementation of the selected inversion algorithm. We also perform an accurate geometry optimization calculation on a truncated (8, 0) boron nitride nanotube system containing 1024 atoms. Numerical results indicate that the use of PEXSI does not lead to loss of the accuracy required in a practical DFT calculation.

  16. Recovery of forest structure and spectral properties after selective logging in lowland Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Eben N; Zarin, Daniel J; Asner, Gregory P; Peña-Claros, Marielos; Cooper, Amanda; Littell, Ramon

    2006-06-01

    Effective monitoring of selective logging from remotely sensed data requires an understanding of the spatial and temporal thresholds that constrain the utility of those data, as well as the structural and ecological characteristics of forest disturbances that are responsible for those constraints. Here we assess those thresholds and characteristics within the context of selective logging in the Bolivian Amazon. Our study combined field measurements of the spatial and temporal dynamics of felling gaps and skid trails ranging from <1 to 19 months following reduced-impact logging in a forest in lowland Bolivia with remote-sensing measurements from simultaneous monthly ASTER satellite overpasses. A probabilistic spectral mixture model (AutoMCU) was used to derive per-pixel fractional cover estimates of photosynthetic vegetation (PV), non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV), and soil. Results were compared with the normalized difference in vegetation index (NDVI). The forest studied had considerably lower basal area and harvest volumes than logged sites in the Brazilian Amazon where similar remote-sensing analyses have been performed. Nonetheless, individual felling-gap area was positively correlated with canopy openness, percentage liana coverage, rates of vegetation regrowth, and height of remnant NPV. Both liana growth and NPV occurred primarily in the crown zone of the felling gap, whereas exposed soil was limited to the trunk zone of the gap. In felling gaps >400 m2, NDVI, and the PV and NPV fractions, were distinguishable from unlogged forest values for up to six months after logging; felling gaps <400 m2 were distinguishable for up to three months after harvest, but we were entirely unable to distinguish skid trails from our analysis of the spectral data. PMID:16827009

  17. Cenozoic structural history of selected areas in the eastern Great Basin, Nevada-Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R. Ernest

    1983-01-01

    axis of the CRST. The most intensely faulted and tilted rocks along the axis of the CRST are located in the Tunnel Spring Mountains where Miocene(?) extension on closely spaced listric faults produced as much as 70 percent extension locally. Three episodes of Oligocene-Miocene deformation, all interpreted to have formed in an extensional environment, are recognized in the Tunnel Spring Mountains. The nearby Burbank Hills area may have been involved in the same deformational episodes, though there the relationships are not as clear-cut nor does evidence occur of extreme extension. Tight asymmetric folds in the Burbank Hills are interpreted as drape structures formed over buried normal faults. Other structures along the southern CRST have fold-like forms, but they result from cross-strike alternations in fault-related tilt directions, and they formed in an extensional stress regime. Least-principal stress directions inferred from orientations of extensional structures vary from ENE-WSW in the southern Tunnel Spring Mountains to approximately E-W in the Disappointment Hills and NW-SE in selected areas east of the axis of the CRST. The size, geographic distribution, and new data on the age of areas of major extensional faulting preclude previously published interpretations that the extension is related to major east-directed overthrusting of the Sevier orogeny in areas east of the hinterland of west-central Utah.

  18. Multicanister overpack topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, B.D., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-25

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel MCO is a single-use container that consists of a cylindrical shell, five to six fuel baskets, a shield plug, and features necessary for maintaining the structural integrity of the MCO while providing criticality control and fuel processing capability.

  19. Refinements to the structure of graphite oxide: absolute quantification of functional groups via selective labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Chua, Chun Kiang; Pumera, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Chemical modification and functionalization of inherent functional groups within graphite oxide (GO) are essential aspects of graphene-based nano-materials used in wide-ranging applications. Despite extensive research, there remains some discrepancy in its structure, with current knowledge limited primarily to spectroscopic data from XPS, NMR and vibrational spectroscopies. We report herein an innovative electrochemistry-based approach. Four electroactive labels are chosen to selectively functionalize groups in GO, and quantification of each group is achieved by voltammetric analysis. This allows for the first time quantification of absolute amounts of each group, with a further advantage of distinguishing various carbonyl species: namely ortho- and para-quinones from aliphatic ketones. Intrinsic variations in the compositions of permanganate versus chlorate-oxidized GOs were thus observed. Principal differences include permanganate-GO exhibiting substantial quinonyl content, in comparison to chlorate-GO with the vast majority of its carbonyls as isolated ketones. The results confirm that carboxylic groups are rare in actuality, and are in fact entirely absent from chlorate-GO. These observations refine and advance our understanding of GO structure by addressing certain disparities in past models resulting from employment of different oxidation routes, with the vital implication that GO production methods cannot be used interchangeably in the manufacture of graphene-based devices.Chemical modification and functionalization of inherent functional groups within graphite oxide (GO) are essential aspects of graphene-based nano-materials used in wide-ranging applications. Despite extensive research, there remains some discrepancy in its structure, with current knowledge limited primarily to spectroscopic data from XPS, NMR and vibrational spectroscopies. We report herein an innovative electrochemistry-based approach. Four electroactive labels are chosen to selectively

  20. Hydrogen bonding as a modulator of aromaticity and electronic structure of selected ortho-hydroxybenzaldehyde derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jezierska-Mazzarello, Aneta; Panek, Jarosław J; Szatyłowicz, Halina; Krygowski, Tadeusz Marek

    2012-01-12

    Properties of hydrogen bonds can induce changes in geometric or electronic structure parameters in the vicinity of the bridge. Here, we focused primarily on the influence of intramolecular H-bonding on the molecular properties in selected ortho-hydroxybenzaldehydes, with additional restricted insight into substituent effects. Static models were obtained in the framework of density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level. The electronic structure parameters evolution was analyzed on the basis of Atoms In Molecules (AIM) and Natural Bond Orbitals methods. The aromaticity changes related to the variable proton position and presence of substituents were studied using Harmonic Oscillator Model of Aromaticity (HOMA), Nucleus-Independent Chemical Shift (NICS) and AIM-based parameter of Matta and Hernández-Trujillo. Finally, Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics was applied to study variability of the hydrogen bridge dynamics. The interplay between effects of the substitution and variable position of the bridged proton was discussed. It was found that the hydrogen bond energies are ca. 9-10 kcal/mol, and the bridged proton exhibits some degree of penetration into the acceptor region. The covalent character of the studied hydrogen bond was most observable when the bridged proton reached the middle position between the donor and acceptor regions. The aromaticity indexes showed that the aromaticity of the central phenyl ring is strongly dependent on the bridged proton position. Correlations between these parameters were found and discussed. In the applied time-scale, the analysis of time evolution of geometric parameters showed that the resonance strengthening does not play a crucial role in the studied compounds. PMID:22129217