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Sample records for student interviewers add

  1. Using Joint Interviews to Add Analytic Value.

    PubMed

    Polak, Louisa; Green, Judith

    2016-10-01

    Joint interviewing has been frequently used in health research, and is the subject of a growing methodological literature. We review this literature, and build on it by drawing on a case study of how people make decisions about taking statins. This highlights two ways in which a dyadic approach to joint interviewing can add analytic value compared with individual interviewing. First, the analysis of interaction within joint interviews can help to explicate tacit knowledge and to illuminate the range of often hard-to-access resources that are drawn upon in making decisions. Second, joint interviews mitigate some of the weaknesses of interviewing as a method for studying practices; we offer a cautious defense of the often-tacit assumption that the "naturalness" of joint interviews strengthens their credibility as the basis for analytic inferences. We suggest that joint interviews are a particularly appropriate method for studying complex shared practices such as making health decisions.

  2. Educational Interventions for Students with ADD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salend, Spencer J.; Elhoweris, Hala; van Garderen, Delinda

    2003-01-01

    Principles of educational interventions for students with attention deficit disorder (ADD) include: (1) giving complete and thorough directions; (2) individualizing in-class and homework assignments; (3) motivating students; (4) promoting active responding and monitoring understanding; (5) employing content enhancements; (6) offering learning…

  3. Mock Interviews for Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Jill M.

    2007-01-01

    Each semester during student-teacher seminars, the author invites local administrators to come to campus and participate in mock job interviews. These practice interviews provide students an opportunity to prepare for a successful interview and give administrators the chance to meet graduating students who will help alleviate Arizona's teacher…

  4. Top 5 Ways to Help Students with ADD/ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    This article suggests five ways to help students with ADD/ADHD. These are: (1) Integrate the primitive reflexes; (2) Diet; (3) Visual attention; (4) Help for auditory attention; and (5) Cognitive training.

  5. Top 5 Ways to Help Students with ADD/ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    This article suggests five ways to help students with ADD/ADHD. These are: (1) Integrate the primitive reflexes; (2) Diet; (3) Visual attention; (4) Help for auditory attention; and (5) Cognitive training.

  6. Pharmacological Interventions for Students with ADD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Vance L.

    2003-01-01

    A review of the research on pharmacological interventions for students with attention deficit disorder finds that psychostimulants such as methylphenidate (Ritalin) are effective in improving focus and impulse control, but should be used in conjunction with psychosocial and behavioral interventions. Comprehensive medical screenings and guidelines…

  7. Pharmacological Interventions for Students with ADD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Vance L.

    2003-01-01

    A review of the research on pharmacological interventions for students with attention deficit disorder finds that psychostimulants such as methylphenidate (Ritalin) are effective in improving focus and impulse control, but should be used in conjunction with psychosocial and behavioral interventions. Comprehensive medical screenings and guidelines…

  8. Accommodating College Students with Learning Disabilities: ADD, ADHD, and Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, Melana Zyla

    2010-01-01

    Universities are providing extra time on tests, quiet exam rooms, in-class note-takers, and other assistance to college students with modest learning disabilities. But these policies are shrouded in secrecy. This paper, "Accommodating College Students with Learning Disabilities: ADD, ADHD, and Dyslexia," by Melana Zyla Vickers, examines…

  9. Serving Students Diagnosed with ADD: Avoiding Deficits in Professional Attention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoner, Gary; Carey, Sean P.

    1992-01-01

    Responds to previous article (Hakola, this issue) on legal rights of students with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). Presents contrasting perspective on educational services for children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, linked more closely to professional research and practice than to law. Concerns discussed are grounded in…

  10. Career Magnets: Interviews with Students and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heebner, Amy; And Others

    Seventy students and 62 teachers and administrators in New York City career magnet and comprehensive schools were interviewed to learn why the career magnets were successful. A statistical analysis of student outcome data for the interview sites verified they were at least as effective as the typical magnet school. Interviews with students…

  11. College Students with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD): Implications for Learning Assistance Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Shevawn; Wyland, Sharon

    1996-01-01

    Examines the research and theory about attention deficit disorder (ADD) in college students and discusses how learning assistance professionals can better assist college students with ADD. Appended in this article are strategies for faculty/learning center professionals in accommodating students with ADD and a list of suggested readings. Contains…

  12. ADD and the College Student: A Guide for High School and College Students with Attention Deficit Disorder. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Patricia O., Ed.

    This handbook contains practical information and advice to help students with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) transition from high school to college. Part 1 provides an introduction to ADD and includes a questionnaire identifying the characteristics of a person with ADD. Part 2 describes life with ADD. It explains how ADD can affect high school…

  13. Truth is at hand: How gesture adds information during investigative interviews

    PubMed Central

    Broaders, Sara C.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of information obtained in forensic interviews is critically important to credibility in our legal system. Research has shown that the way interviewers frame questions influences the accuracy of witnesses’ reports. A separate body of research has shown that speakers spontaneously gesture when they talk, and that these gestures can express information not found anywhere in the speaker’s talk. This study of children interviewed about an event that they witnessed joins these two literatures and demonstrates that (1) interviewers’ gestures serve as a source of information and, at times, misinformation that can lead witnesses to report incorrect details; (2) the gestures witnesses spontaneously produce during interviews convey substantive information that is often not conveyed anywhere in their speech, and thus would not appear in written transcripts of the proceedings. These findings underscore the need to attend to and document gestures produced in investigative interviews, particularly interviews conducted with children. PMID:20483837

  14. Using Electronic Interviews to Explore Student Understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D. J.; Rivera, J. J.; Mateycik, Fran; Jennings, Sybillyn

    2005-09-01

    This paper reports on methods used to probe student understandings of optical fibers and total internal reflection (TIR). The study was conducted as part of the expansion and improvement of web-based materials for an innovative introductory physics course. Initially, we conducted face-to-face Piaget-style interviews with a convenience sample. Our next step was to interview students taking the course at Rensselaer. Physical limitations necessitated that this be done from a distance, so we conducted "e-interviews" using a Chat Room. In this paper we focus on the e-interview experience, discussing similarities to and differences from the traditional face-to-face approach. In the process, we address how each method informs us about students' activation of prior experiences in making sense of unfamiliar phenomena (e.g., "transfer of learning").

  15. Enhancing Student Experiential Learning with Structured Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Robert M.; Johnson, Carol B.; Schwartz, William C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Learning through experience can be rewarding but intimidating. To maximize the benefits of experiential learning assignments, students need to have confidence in their abilities. The authors report how a structured-interview instrument effectively facilitated experiential learning for accounting students without extensive content-specific…

  16. Enhancing Student Experiential Learning with Structured Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Robert M.; Johnson, Carol B.; Schwartz, William C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Learning through experience can be rewarding but intimidating. To maximize the benefits of experiential learning assignments, students need to have confidence in their abilities. The authors report how a structured-interview instrument effectively facilitated experiential learning for accounting students without extensive content-specific…

  17. Discovering Focus: Helping Students with ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valkenburg, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is a neurological disorder which effects learning and that has a confusing set of diagnostic symptoms and an even more confusing set of remedies ranging from medication to meditation to nothing at all. Current neurological research suggests, however, that there are strategies that the individual with ADD can use to…

  18. Discovering Focus: Helping Students with ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valkenburg, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is a neurological disorder which effects learning and that has a confusing set of diagnostic symptoms and an even more confusing set of remedies ranging from medication to meditation to nothing at all. Current neurological research suggests, however, that there are strategies that the individual with ADD can use to…

  19. A motivational interviewing course for pharmacy students.

    PubMed

    Goggin, Kathy; Hawes, Starlyn M; Duval, Elizabeth R; Spresser, Carrie D; Martínez, David A; Lynam, Ian; Barnes, Amy; Hinton-Dampf, Amber M; Murphy, Meghan E; Marken, Patricia A; Catley, Delwyn

    2010-05-12

    To create, implement, and evaluate a pharmacy course on motivational interviewing. A 3-hour elective course was created to train doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students in brief patient-centered motivational interviewing counseling strategies that have proven effective with the types of health issues most commonly addressed in pharmacy settings. Students were assisted in developing their skills through required readings, interactive lectures, in-class demonstrations and practice sessions, out of class skills practice, one-on-one supervision provided by doctoral level clinical health psychology students, and written reflections on each class session. Students demonstrated significant improvement in motivational interviewing skills and a high level of motivation for and confidence in using these skills in their future practice. Students overall assessment of the course and supervision process was highly positive. This patient-centered counseling skills course was feasible and produced improvements in PharmD students' counseling skills and increased their motivation and confidence to use motivational interviewing skills in their future communications with patients.

  20. A Motivational Interviewing Course for Pharmacy Students

    PubMed Central

    Hawes, Starlyn M.; Duval, Elizabeth R.; Spresser, Carrie D.; Martínez, David A.; Lynam, Ian; Barnes, Amy; Hinton-Dampf, Amber M.; Murphy, Meghan E.; Marken, Patricia A.; Catley, Delwyn

    2010-01-01

    Objective To create, implement, and evaluate a pharmacy course on motivational interviewing. Design A 3-hour elective course was created to train doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students in brief patient-centered motivational interviewing counseling strategies that have proven effective with the types of health issues most commonly addressed in pharmacy settings. Students were assisted in developing their skills through required readings, interactive lectures, in-class demonstrations and practice sessions, out of class skills practice, one-on-one supervision provided by doctoral level clinical health psychology students, and written reflections on each class session. Assessment Students demonstrated significant improvement in motivational interviewing skills and a high level of motivation for and confidence in using these skills in their future practice. Students overall assessment of the course and supervision process was highly positive. Conclusion This patient-centered counseling skills course was feasible and produced improvements in PharmD students' counseling skills and increased their motivation and confidence to use motivational interviewing skills in their future communications with patients. PMID:20585431

  1. Using Trial Interviews To Enhance Student Self-Efficacy towards Pre-placement Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Richard K.; Lay, Mark

    2001-01-01

    New Zealand cooperative education students participated in mock and preemployment employer interviews. Responses from 10 students and 10 employers showed that most students had no formal interview experience and were apprehensive about preplacement interviews. Trial interviews improved self-efficacy through exposure to employer questions and…

  2. The Interview: A Neglected Issue in Research on Student Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, William G.

    1986-01-01

    The use of personal interviews with students in studying the processes and results of student learning is criticized for the variability in the context of interviews and for the bias inherent in the interview situations. (MSE)

  3. Medical Student Mock Interviews to Improve Residency Interviewing and Match Success.

    PubMed

    Hueston, William J; Holloway, Richard L

    2016-04-01

    Using a quasi-experimental approach, we examined student and faculty satisfaction with a mock residency interview program. We also examined whether self-selected participants had match rates that differed from nonparticipants. Interviews were arranged on a specified evening between students and a physician in the specialty to which the student wished to apply. Interviews were structured as similarly to residency interviews as possible, but included 10 minutes of verbal feedback and subsequent written feedback to all students. Students completed surveys indicating their satisfaction with the mock interview immediately following the interview and 5 months later (after their actual resident interviews). Faculty feedback to students and their satisfaction with the program also was collected. Out of 189 (55%) students in the senior class, 104 volunteered to participate. Immediately following the mock interview, over 90% of students who participated either strongly agreed or agreed that the interview feedback was helpful, seemed realistic, and helped them identify strengths and weaknesses. Responses collected 5 months later were still favorable, but less positive. Faculty identified 7 students who they believed had poor interview techniques and an additional 13 who interviewers believed would be unlikely to match in their specialty. Final match results for the group participating in the mock interview showed a primary match rate of 99%, which was higher than students who did not participate (94%, P < .001). In a self-selected group of students who chose to participate, mock interviews were useful in improving student match success compared to students who did not participate in the mock interview program. Because all students were not required to participate, it is unclear whether this tactic would be successful for all students.

  4. Writing Interview Protocols and Conducting Interviews: Tips for Students New to the Field of Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Stacy A.; Furgerson, S. Paige

    2012-01-01

    Students new to doing qualitative research in the ethnographic and oral traditions, often have difficulty creating successful interview protocols. This article offers practical suggestions for students new to qualitative research for both writing interview protocol that elicit useful data and for conducting the interview. This piece was originally…

  5. Best Practices in Preparing Students for Mock Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Katharine; Oliphant, Gary C.; Oliphant, Becky J.; Hansen, Randall S.

    2009-01-01

    Studies have shown the importance of employment interview preparation in boosting the confidence and performance of students and jobseekers when they interview. This article reviews several techniques for preparing students for mock job interviews and, hence, actual job interviews. For instructors who would like to enhance the learning value of…

  6. Using Student Interviews for becoming a Reflective Geographer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Madsen, Lene Møller

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case for interviewing students as an effective yet complex way to integrate reflexive practice into teaching and research. Even though many human geographers are accustomed to conducting qualitative interviews in various contexts, it is not straightforward to interview one's own students. This paper addresses three…

  7. Motivational Interviewing for Smoking Cessation among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolger, Kelly; Carter, Kimberly; Curtin, Lisa; Martz, Denise M.; Gagnon, Sandy G.; Michael, Kurt D.

    2010-01-01

    Motivational interviewing has shown some success as an intervention for college student cigarette smokers. We tested the efficacy and process of a two session motivational-interviewing-based smoking intervention compared to an assessment/information session. College student participants assigned to the motivational interviewing condition did not…

  8. Using Student Interviews for becoming a Reflective Geographer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Madsen, Lene Møller

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case for interviewing students as an effective yet complex way to integrate reflexive practice into teaching and research. Even though many human geographers are accustomed to conducting qualitative interviews in various contexts, it is not straightforward to interview one's own students. This paper addresses three…

  9. Peer interviewing in medical education research: experiences and perceptions of student interviewers and interviewees.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Elaine; Brugha, Ruairi; Clarke, Eric; Lavelle, Aisling; McGarvey, Alice

    2015-09-30

    Interviewing is one of the main methods used for data collection in qualitative research. This paper explores the use of semi-structured interviews that were conducted by students with other students in a research study looking at cultural diversity in an international medical school. Specifically this paper documents and gives 'voice' to the opinions and experiences of interviewees and interviewers (the peers and the communities) on the value of peer interviewing in the study and outlines (1) the preparation made to address some of the foreseen challenges, (2) the challenges still faced, and (3) the benefits of using peer interviews with respect to the research study, the individual and the institution. Peer interviewing was used as part of a two-year phased-study, 2012-2013, which explored and then measured the impact of cultural diversity on undergraduate students in a medical higher education institution in Ireland. In phase one 16 peer interviewers were recruited to conduct 29 semi-structured interviews with fellow students. In order to evaluate the peer interviewing process two focus group discussions were he ld and an online survey conducted. Key findings were that substantial preparations in relation to training, informed consent processes and addressing positionality are needed if peer-interviewing is to be used. Challenges still faced included were related to power, familiarity, trust and practical problems. However many benefits accrued to the research, the individual interviewer and to the university. A more nuanced approach to peer interviewing, that recognises commonalities and differences across a range of attributes, is needed. While peer interviewing has many benefits and can help reduce power differentials it does not eliminate all challenges. As part of a larger research project and as a way in which to get 'buy-in' from the student body and improve a collaborative research partnership peer interviewing was extremely useful.

  10. The Effects of Training Medical Students in Motivational Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opheim, Arild; Andreasson, Sven; Eklund, Astri Brandell; Prescott, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of brief training in Motivational interviewing (MI) for medical students. Design: Video recordings of consultations between 113 final-year medical students and simulated patients were scored blind by two independent raters with the Motivational Interviewing Skill Code (MISC). Half of the students participated in a…

  11. Strategies for Successfully Teaching Students with ADD or ADHD in Instrumental Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melago, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Teachers can easily encounter students with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in the instrumental lesson setting. Applicable to instrumental lesson settings in the public or private schools, private studios, or college studios, this article focuses on specific strategies ranging from the…

  12. A Practical Approach To Managing the Behaviors of Students with ADD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhaney, Laurel M. Garrick

    2003-01-01

    This article offers a repertoire of behavior management strategies to help students with attention deficit disorder (ADD) succeed in school. Strategies range from conducting a functional behavioral assessment to antecedents- and consequences-based strategies. The article also discusses factors that educators may consider in meeting the behavioral…

  13. Strategies for Successfully Teaching Students with ADD or ADHD in Instrumental Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melago, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Teachers can easily encounter students with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in the instrumental lesson setting. Applicable to instrumental lesson settings in the public or private schools, private studios, or college studios, this article focuses on specific strategies ranging from the…

  14. Helping Students with Disabilities Transition to College: 21 Tips for Students with LD and/or ADD/ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Making the transition from high school to college poses challenges for most students. Moving from a secure, regulated world of secondary education into an unfamiliar environment requiring greater independence can be a destabilizing experience. For students with learning disabilities (LD) and/or Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), managing this…

  15. Helping Students with Disabilities Transition to College: 21 Tips for Students with LD and/or ADD/ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Making the transition from high school to college poses challenges for most students. Moving from a secure, regulated world of secondary education into an unfamiliar environment requiring greater independence can be a destabilizing experience. For students with learning disabilities (LD) and/or Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), managing this…

  16. Using Student Interviews to Understand Theories of Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanich, Laurie B.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction and development of a course assignment that uses student interviews as an instructional tool to bridge the gap between theory and practice in a graduate educational psychology course. The first part of the article describes the student interview assignment used to examine theories of motivation. The second…

  17. The effect of videotaping students' interviews with patients for interview skill education.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Sung; Hwang, Ji Young; Lim, Ji Eun; Suh, Sang-Yeon; Park, Ki Heum; Sung, Nak-Jin

    2013-03-01

    The importance of communication between patients and physicians has been proven in many previous studies. The authors analyzed the effect of interview skill education through videotapes which recorded students' interviews with real patients in the outpatient department of family medicine. This study was conducted with all students who chose the elective course of family medicine and one randomly selected student every week from an 'infectious internal medicine' class at Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital during the period from December 2008 to March 2011. All students performed a preliminary examination of a new patient at the outpatient department of family medicine. All consultations were videotaped. Feedback to the student was given on the same day by viewing the videotape together. After feedback, all students performed another preliminary examination of one new patient at the department of family medicine the same week. Three family medicine residents scored all videotapes using 10-item interview skill checklists. Many parts of the checklists were modified using the Arizona Clinical Interview Rating Scales. Thirty-three students participated. Of 10 items, nine showed increased scores after feedback. There was a significant change in four items after feedback: 'type of question' (before 2.36 ± 0.60, after 2.73 ± 0.72), 'timeline' (before 2.82 ± 0.68, after 3.18 ± 0.73), 'positive verbal reinforcement' (before 2.24 ± 0.56, after 2.61 ± 0.90), and the total score (before 21.70 ± 2.62, after 23.39 ± 3.13) (P < 0.05). Giving feedback to medical school students on medical interview skills using videotapes of students' preliminary consultations with real patients in outpatient settings, was effective in improving the interview areas of 'type of question,' 'timeline,' 'positive verbal reinforcement,' and the total interview scores.

  18. Increasing Student Success: An Interview with Edward A. Morante.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spann, Milton G.; Calderwood, Barbara J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an interview with Edward Morante, Dean of Student Services and Learning Resources at College of the Desert (California), regarding the needs of high-risk community college students. Morante focuses on assessment, placement, basic-skills courses, student-support services, the learning-community concept, student involvement, and evaluation,…

  19. Using Motivational Interviewing to Help Your Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Motivational interviewing, which began as a counseling technique in addiction recovery, is a client-centered tool for making changes, increasing helpful behaviors and decreasing unhelpful behaviors. It relies on an individual's intrinsic motivation and interest in change, using a non-confrontational approach to frame goals in a practical,…

  20. Using Motivational Interviewing to Help Your Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Motivational interviewing, which began as a counseling technique in addiction recovery, is a client-centered tool for making changes, increasing helpful behaviors and decreasing unhelpful behaviors. It relies on an individual's intrinsic motivation and interest in change, using a non-confrontational approach to frame goals in a practical,…

  1. The objective structured interview for medical student selection

    PubMed Central

    Powis, D A; Neame, R L B; Bristow, T; Murphy, L B

    1988-01-01

    An objective structured interview is an integral part of the process of selecting and admitting applicants to study medicine at this university. During the nine years (to the end of 1986) that the interview has been used 1600 candidates were interviewed out of roughly 13 000 applicants, and from these, 584 students were admitted to the course. Analysis of the interview data was carried out based on two aspects of student progress: graduation with honours and failure to complete the course of study. The interview as a whole, and especially some of the subscales, appears to identify students who may fail to complete the course: it may also help to predict which students are likely to graduate with honours. PMID:3126966

  2. Interviewing the Experts: Student Produced Podcast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Gary R.; Tucker, Joanne M.; Massad, Victor J.

    2009-01-01

    Classroom instruction continues to change dramatically with new technology and pedagogy. Faculty aspire to develop innovative programs and creative education while seeking effective teaching strategies that capitalize on emerging technology and invoke student interest and involvement. Research shows that student involvement, hands-on projects, and…

  3. Emotional intelligence and clinical interview performance of dental students.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Annette; Lim, Bee T; Ayers, Kathryn M S

    2009-09-01

    One hundred and sixteen third-year dental students participating in a consultation skills course in Dunedin, New Zealand, completed a standardized psychometric Social Skills Inventory (SSI) and were assessed by tutors, simulated patients, and themselves. Students with higher social skills abilities obtained higher performance scores and demonstrated better interview structure. Patients reported being more likely to return to students for a dental consultation following the second interview, and students' consultation skills were rated (by tutors, patients, and students) higher at the end of the course than the beginning. Female students had higher global social skills abilities and were more emotionally expressive and sensitive than male students, while the latter had better emotional control. Female students performed better in the first interview than male students, but there was no significant gender difference in the second interview. Tutor and simulated patient ratings suggested that a consultation skills course can increase the ability of students in general, and English as a second language students in particular, to relate to their patients, manage anxiety, identify ethical issues, and recognize significant psychosocial issues that lead to more accurate diagnosis and treatment processes, ensuring the effective delivery of patient-centered dental education.

  4. Controlled Evaluation of Videotaped Interviewing for Instruction of Pharmacy Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Love, David W.

    1979-01-01

    Reported is a project that sought to evaluate the effect of videotaped practice instruction upon the ability of pharmacy students to interview patients and evaluate their drug use. Instructional objectives and a list of five audiovisual aids in the instruction of interviewing skills are appended. (JMD)

  5. Controlled Evaluation of Videotaped Interviewing for Instruction of Pharmacy Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Love, David W.

    1979-01-01

    Reported is a project that sought to evaluate the effect of videotaped practice instruction upon the ability of pharmacy students to interview patients and evaluate their drug use. Instructional objectives and a list of five audiovisual aids in the instruction of interviewing skills are appended. (JMD)

  6. Implications of a framework for student reasoning in an interview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Kara E.; Hrepic, Zdeslav; Itza-Ortiz, Salomon F.; Allbaugh, Alicia R.; Engelhardt, Paula V.; Rebello, N. Sanjay; Zollman, Dean A.

    2004-09-01

    We discuss the implications of a framework to characterize student reasoning in an interview and its underpinnings in cognitive psychology. Our framework, described in a previous paper in these Proceedings, enables a researcher to identify various cognitive elements used by a student during an interview. Our thesis is that this framework can help identify reasoning paths used by the students. We discuss how this framework can be applied to both a coarse and fine grained analysis of reasoning and how it can be used to infer a student's implicit reasoning processes.

  7. Recruiting Secondary Mathematics Teachers: Characteristics That Add Up for African American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragland, Tamra C.; Harkness, Shelly Sheats

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide portraits of three mathematics teachers: one European American man, one African American man, and one Middle Eastern woman. All three taught in secondary schools with predominantly African American student populations. Semi-structured interviews and observations were conducted to create a comparative case study…

  8. Teaching Note-Teaching Student Interviewing Competencies through Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandy, Cynthia; Vernon, Robert; Lynch, Darlene

    2017-01-01

    A prototype standardized client was created and programmed to respond to students in the 3D virtual world of Second Life. This automaton, called a "chatbot," was repeatedly interviewed by beginning MSW students in a practice course as a learning exercise. Initial results were positive and suggest the use of simulated clients in virtual…

  9. Learning Solution-Focused Interviewing Skills: BSW Student Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jong, Peter; Cronkright, Alaina

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the 15-year evolution of a course devoted to teaching solution-focused interviewing skills to BSW students and the role these students played in the course's design. We drew inspiration from the strengths perspective that implies that just as practitioners can learn much about how to practice from clients, social work…

  10. Generating Cognitive Dissonance in Student Interviews through Multiple Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2012-01-01

    This study explores what students understand about enzyme-substrate interactions, using multiple representations of the phenomenon. In this paper we describe our use of the 3 Phase-Single Interview Technique with multiple representations to generate cognitive dissonance within students in order to uncover misconceptions of enzyme-substrate…

  11. Generating Cognitive Dissonance in Student Interviews through Multiple Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2012-01-01

    This study explores what students understand about enzyme-substrate interactions, using multiple representations of the phenomenon. In this paper we describe our use of the 3 Phase-Single Interview Technique with multiple representations to generate cognitive dissonance within students in order to uncover misconceptions of enzyme-substrate…

  12. Teaching Note-Teaching Student Interviewing Competencies through Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandy, Cynthia; Vernon, Robert; Lynch, Darlene

    2017-01-01

    A prototype standardized client was created and programmed to respond to students in the 3D virtual world of Second Life. This automaton, called a "chatbot," was repeatedly interviewed by beginning MSW students in a practice course as a learning exercise. Initial results were positive and suggest the use of simulated clients in virtual…

  13. Greek University Students with Dyslexia: An Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stampoltzis, Aglaia; Polychronopoulou, Stavroula

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a study exploring the personal and educational experiences of Greek students with dyslexia in higher education. Interviews with 16 students with dyslexia (11 male and five female) were conducted to investigate how they experienced school, peer relations, labelling, family support, university, self-esteem and how they made their…

  14. Neurofeedback combined with training in metacognitive strategies: effectiveness in students with ADD.

    PubMed

    Thompson, L; Thompson, M

    1998-12-01

    data are important because they provide an extension of results from earlier studies (Lubar, Swartwood, Swartwood, & O'Donnell, 1995; Linden, Habib, & Radojevic, 1996). They also demonstrate that systematic data collection in a private educational setting produces helpful information that can be used to monitor students' progress and improve programs. Because this clinical work is not a controlled scientific study, the efficacious treatment components cannot be determined. Nevertheless, the positive outcomes of decreased ADD symptoms plus improved academic and intellectual functioning suggest that the use of neurofeedback plus training in metacognitive strategies is a useful combined intervention for students with ADD. Further controlled research is warranted.

  15. Medical students' agenda-setting abilities during medical interviews.

    PubMed

    Roh, HyeRin; Park, Kyung Hye; Jeon, Young-Jee; Park, Seung Guk; Lee, Jungsun

    2015-06-01

    Identifying patients' agendas is important; however, the extent of Korean medical students' agenda-setting abilities is unknown. The study aim was to investigate the patterns of Korean medical students' agenda solicitation. A total of 94 third-year medical students participated. One scenario involving a female patient with abdominal pain was created. Students were video-recorded as they interviewed the patient. To analyze whether students identify patients' reasons for visiting, a checklist was developed based on a modified version of the Calgary-Cambridge Guide to the Medical Interview: Communication Process checklist. The duration of the patient's initial statement of concerns was measured in seconds. The total number of patient concerns expressed before interruption and the types of interruption effected by the medical students were determined. The medical students did not explore the patients' concerns and did not negotiate an agenda. Interruption of the patient's opening statement occurred in 4.62±2.20 seconds. The most common type of initial interruption was a recompleter (79.8%). Closed-ended questions were the most common question type in the second and third interruptions. Agenda setting should be emphasized in the communication skills curriculum of medical students. The Korean Clinical Skills Exam must assess medical students' ability to set an agenda.

  16. Examining How Motivational Interviewing May Foster College Student Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iarussi, Melanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Professional counselors practicing in higher education settings aspire to meet the developmental needs of college students in addition to addressing their mental health and substance use concerns. Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based counseling approach that focuses on enhancing motivation and commitment to change. This article…

  17. Examining How Motivational Interviewing May Foster College Student Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iarussi, Melanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Professional counselors practicing in higher education settings aspire to meet the developmental needs of college students in addition to addressing their mental health and substance use concerns. Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based counseling approach that focuses on enhancing motivation and commitment to change. This article…

  18. Students' conceptions of the medical profession; an interview study.

    PubMed

    Nieuwhof, M G H; Rademakers, J J D J M; Kuyvenhoven, M M; Soethout, M B M; ten Cate, Th J

    2005-12-01

    Students' beliefs and attitudes towards the medical profession have been studied in relation to career choices, but most research has been restricted to either predetermined aspects or to a limited number of specialties. This study aimed at getting unprompted insight in the students' perceptions of their future profession in dimensions that may be determinants of study success and career choice. Undergraduate and graduated medical students were interviewed and asked to characterize the medical profession in general and four contrasting specialties in particular. Grounded Theory methodology was used to analyse the data. Participants were medical students at the start of their training (n = 16), during clerkships (n = 10) and after graduation (n = 37). Beginning students perceive the medical profession in limited dimensions: the activities of a physician, their relationship to patients and the physician's knowledge, skills and personality. They do not see many differences between specialties, in contrast with students with clinical experience and graduate students. Undergraduate students' perception is focussed more on social aspects of the profession compared to graduates.

  19. Examining Chemistry Students Visual-Perceptual Skills Using the VSCS tool and Interview Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Caroline

    The Visual-Spatial Chemistry Specific (VSCS) assessment tool was developed to test students' visual-perceptual skills, which are required to form a mental image of an object. The VSCS was designed around the theoretical framework of Rochford and Archer that provides eight distinct and well-defined visual-perceptual skills with identified problems students might have with each skill set. Factor analysis was used to analyze the results during the validation process of the VSCS. Results showed that the eight factors could not be separated from each other, but instead two factors emerged as significant to the data. These two factors have been defined and described as a general visual-perceptual skill (factor 1) and a skill that adds on a second level of complexity by involving multiple viewpoints such as changing frames of reference. The questions included in the factor analysis were bolstered by the addition of an item response theory (IRT) analysis. Interviews were also conducted with twenty novice students to test face validity of the tool, and to document student approaches at solving visualization problems of this type. Students used five main physical resources or processes to solve the questions, but the resource that was the most successful was handling or building a physical representation of an object.

  20. Linking students and lecturers - a first year student-staff interview project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjørnegaard Malm, Rie; Lilleøren, Karianne; Mattias Lundmark, Anders

    2017-04-01

    With a wish to familiarize our first year geoscience students with their lecturers, we have introduced a staff-student interview project during their first few weeks as students, a project modified from Dwyer (2001). Our main goals with this project are to tighten the (apparent) gap between the faculty members and the students by introducing the students to academia through a personal meeting. The students are grouped and asked to find an interesting staff member to interview, and are instructed to ask for a CV, a list of publications and an example of a scientific paper authored by the interviewee. During the interview the students should find out how this specific academic career was formed, and how the idea for the example paper came up and finally became a published paper. The students then present their interviewee in class. We also asked the students to answer a questionnaire before and after the exercise. After the exercise students reported a better understanding of the nature of the geosciences and a more nuanced view towards research. They express surprise in how accessible the researchers were, and that they feel more at home at the department after the project. These preliminary results are followed up by interviews of the participating students in December and January 2016/17.

  1. Mental health nursing students' experiences of stress during training: a thematic analysis of qualitative interviews.

    PubMed

    Galvin, J; Suominen, E; Morgan, C; O'Connell, E-J; Smith, A P

    2015-12-01

    What is known on the subject? Stress can impact students on mental health nurse training. This can have implications at the individual level (e.g. their own mental health) and at the level of the organization (e.g. sickness absence and attrition). What this paper adds to existing knowledge? We interviewed 12 mental health nursing students regarding the stress they experienced during training. Participants described how the academic demands can at times be unbearable during clinical placements. There were also issues with 'being a student' on some placements, with participants describing negative attitudes towards them from staff. The younger participants reported feeling overwhelmed on their initial placements and described some of the main challenges of mental health work for them. Raising concerns about the quality of care on wards was also described as particularly challenging for the students. What are the implications for practice? This paper can be useful to help training providers support mental health nursing students. Recommendations include reducing academic demands during clinical placements and extending and promoting existing support services beyond normal 9 am-5 pm working hours, even if these services are limited. Younger students could be better supported by being allocated to the more well-resourced placements in the early stages of their training. Raising awareness among staff of the tasks students can and cannot perform can help improve staff/student relations. Finally, students should be educated about the issues around raising concerns on placements to help the government's drive for a more open and transparent National Health Service (NHS). Previous studies investigating stress in nursing students focus on general nursing students or adopt quantitative measures. A qualitative study focusing specifically on mental health nursing students is required. One-to-one interviews were carried out with mental health nursing students (n = 12). Data were

  2. Establishing a Comfortable Classroom from Day One: Student Perceptions of the Reciprocal Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Kim; Bartsch, Robert; McEnery, Lillian; Hall, Sharon; Hermann, Anthony; Foster, David

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined student reactions to an activity in computer science, psychology, women's studies, and education courses. The reciprocal interview involves the instructor gathering information about the students, followed by students collectively asking questions of the instructor. The interview aims to make students more comfortable in…

  3. Students' Conceptions About `Radiation': Results from an Explorative Interview Study of 9th Grade Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Susanne; Hopf, Martin

    2012-12-01

    One basis of good teaching is to know about your students' preconceptions. Studies about typical ideas that students bring to the science classroom have been and continue to be a major field in science education research. This study aims to explore associations and ideas that students have regarding `radiation', a term widely used in various fields and necessary to understand fundamental ideas in science. In an explorative study, the perceptions of 50 high school students were examined using semi-structured interviews. The students were 14-16 years old and were chosen from 7 different high schools in an urban area in Austria. Following an interview guideline, students were asked about their general associations with the term `radiation' as well as about their general understanding of different types of radiation. A qualitative analysis of these interviews following the method of Flick (2009) revealed that the students' associations were, to a great extent, very different from the scientific use of the term. Several conceptions that could inhibit students' learning processes could be identified. Consequences for the teaching of the topic `radiation' in science lessons, which are based on these preconceptions, are presented in the conclusion.

  4. Comparison of Add-a-Word and Compu Spell Programs with Low-Achieving Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuley, S. M.; McLaughlin, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of two spelling software programs on the weekly spelling performance of underachieving elementary students was studied. Students learned the programs, and data were collected over the school year. Data analyses indicated both programs generated higher accuracy in spelling than traditional procedures. Students sustained the…

  5. Does Adviser Mentoring Add Value? A Longitudinal Study of Mentoring and Doctoral Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paglis, Laura L.; Green, Stephen G.; Bauer, Talya N.

    2006-01-01

    This study of the impact of doctoral adviser mentoring on student outcomes was undertaken in response to earlier research that found (a) students with greater incoming potential received more adviser mentoring, and (b) adviser mentoring did not significantly contribute to important student outcomes, including research productivity [Green, S. G.,…

  6. Do You Care to Add Something? Articulating the Student Interlocutor's Voice in Writing Response Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scrocco, Diana Lin Awad

    2012-01-01

    In an early think-aloud protocol study that identifies which "actual" written comments help students revise, Mary Hayes and Donald Daiker examine "how students respond to educators' responses". Studying teacher feedback in a writing course focused on revision, Hayes and Daiker asked students to read aloud and analyze their instructor's written…

  7. Interview Practice U.S. Style: A Workshop for International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The author describes a practice interview workshop customized for international graduate students. The session covered cultural and communication dynamics in the interview process, practice exercises, and a question-and-answer period.

  8. Framing in Cognitive Clinical Interviews about Intuitive Science Knowledge: Dynamic Student Understandings of the Discourse Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ, Rosemary S.; Lee, Victor R.; Sherin, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers in the science education community make extensive use of cognitive clinical interviews as windows into student knowledge and thinking. Despite our familiarity with the interviews, there has been very limited research addressing the ways that students understand these interactions. In this work, we examine students' behaviors and speech…

  9. The Job Interview. Cooperative Occupational Education, Unit 11. Instructor Material and Student Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This unit, one in a series of packets of teacher and student materials for cooperative occupational education (COE) designed for special needs students, is intended to make students aware of the importance of the interview to getting a job and to prepare them for interviewing. Each unit will probably require more than a single period of…

  10. Setting up Targeted Research Interviews: A Primer for Students and New Interviewers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noy, Darren

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes key strategic considerations for setting up targeted research interviews, including human subjects and Institutional Review Board requirements, approaching respondents, the medium of contact, using technology, cultural conceptions of time and commitment, using networks, wading through bureaucracies, and watching for warning…

  11. Give Students an Engineering Edge--Add a Measurable Outcome to Bridge-Building Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotton, Samuel E.; Calkins, Celeste M.

    2011-01-01

    Problem-solving activities let students use knowledge gained in various areas of their academic education. They bring together skills and knowledge from such areas as science, math, art, and English by simulating activities and projects students will encounter later in career and life experiences. A very important feature of most problem-solving…

  12. Give Students an Engineering Edge: Add a Measurable Outcome to Bridge-Building Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotton, Samuel E.; Calkins, Celeste M.

    2011-01-01

    Problem-solving activities let students use knowledge gained in various areas of their academic education. They bring together skills and knowledge from such areas as science, math, art, and English by simulating activities and projects students will encounter later in career and life experiences. A very important feature of most problem-solving…

  13. Give Students an Engineering Edge: Add a Measurable Outcome to Bridge-Building Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotton, Samuel E.; Calkins, Celeste M.

    2011-01-01

    Problem-solving activities let students use knowledge gained in various areas of their academic education. They bring together skills and knowledge from such areas as science, math, art, and English by simulating activities and projects students will encounter later in career and life experiences. A very important feature of most problem-solving…

  14. Give Students an Engineering Edge--Add a Measurable Outcome to Bridge-Building Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotton, Samuel E.; Calkins, Celeste M.

    2011-01-01

    Problem-solving activities let students use knowledge gained in various areas of their academic education. They bring together skills and knowledge from such areas as science, math, art, and English by simulating activities and projects students will encounter later in career and life experiences. A very important feature of most problem-solving…

  15. Add and Subtract: Dual Enrollment as a State Strategy to Increase Postsecondary Success for Underrepresented Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    Dual enrollment--the arrangements by which high school students take college courses during the junior and senior year--is a promising "next best thing" for states wishing to increase the number of underrepresented students gaining a postsecondary credential. Dual enrollment also has the potential to save money for families and taxpayers…

  16. Digital Age Adds New Dimension to Incidents of Staff-Student Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on how the current must-have tools of adolescent social networks--cell phone text messaging, Web sites such as MySpace and Facebook, and e-mail--are being used by teachers and other school employees who prey on students to foster inappropriate relationships and perpetrate abuse. When the sexual abuse of students by educators…

  17. From Add-On to Mainstream: Applying Distance Learning Models for ALL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zai, Robert, III.; Wesley, Threasa L.

    2013-01-01

    The use of distance learning technology has allowed Northern Kentucky University's W. Frank Steely Library to remove traditional boundaries between both distance and on-campus students. An emerging model that applies these distance learning methodologies to all students has proven effective for enhancing reference and instructional services. This…

  18. Digital Age Adds New Dimension to Incidents of Staff-Student Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on how the current must-have tools of adolescent social networks--cell phone text messaging, Web sites such as MySpace and Facebook, and e-mail--are being used by teachers and other school employees who prey on students to foster inappropriate relationships and perpetrate abuse. When the sexual abuse of students by educators…

  19. Course Shopping in Urban Community Colleges: An Analysis of Student Drop and Add Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Maxwell, William E.; Cypers, Scott; Moon, Hye Sun; Lester, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the course shopping behaviors among a sample of approximately 5,000 community college students enrolled across nine campuses of a large urban district. The sample was purposely designed as an analytic, rather than a random, sample that sought to obtain adequate numbers of students in course areas that were of theoretical and of…

  20. Course-Shopping in the Urban Community Colleges: An Analysis of Student Drop and Add Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Maxwell, William B.; Cypers, Scott; Moon, Hye Sun; Lester, Jaime

    This study examines the course shopping behaviors of approximately 5,000 community college students enrolled across the nine campuses of the Los Angeles Community College District in spring 2001. The sample students are representative of the district. For the purpose of this analysis, the authors define course shopping as: (1) cyclic shopping, the…

  1. Course Shopping in Urban Community Colleges: An Analysis of Student Drop and Add Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Maxwell, William E.; Cypers, Scott; Moon, Hye Sun; Lester, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the course shopping behaviors among a sample of approximately 5,000 community college students enrolled across nine campuses of a large urban district. The sample was purposely designed as an analytic, rather than a random, sample that sought to obtain adequate numbers of students in course areas that were of theoretical and of…

  2. Student Nurse Attrition: Use of an Exit-Interview Procedure To Determine Students' Leaving Reasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glossop, Christine

    2002-01-01

    Attrition from a nursing program in Wales was studied through exit interviews with 105 students who left from 1996-1999. Academic difficulties, wrong career choice, and family, health, and financial problems were key reasons. Almost half had at least two reasons for leaving, suggesting a complex interplay of factors. (Contains 39 references.) (SK)

  3. STUDENT TEACHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF THEIR PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION DURING DEPTH INTERVIEWS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GARRARD, JUDITH

    THE USE OF THE EXIT INTERVIEW AS A CRITERION MEASURE OF THE STUDY OF PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS AND TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAMS WAS REPORTED. THE STUDY WAS MADE AS PART OF A LARGER INVESTIGATION MADE TO DISCOVER THE PERSONAL QUALITIES OF TEACHERS WHO REMAIN IN TEACHING AND TO DETERMINE THE PROGRAMS THAT PRODUCE TEACHERS. THE EXIT INTERVIEW WAS A…

  4. Minority Students at Risk: An Interview with Professor Shirley Chisholm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeter, Larry

    1987-01-01

    Professor Shirley Chisholm responds to questions concerning the decline in minority higher education enrollments, student financial aid considerations, ways of fostering a climate of support for minority students, faculty behaviors, racism on campus, and family pressures on minority students. (DMM)

  5. An Exploratory Assessment of the Sources of Job-Interviewing Anxiety in College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David B.; Pinkney, James W.

    1989-01-01

    The Interview Perception Questionnaire (IPQ) was developed to explore possible sources of college students' perceptions and concerns about job interviewing. Statistical analysis of business majors' responses to the IPQ identified four main factors of interviewing perceptions: self-assuredness, nervousness, powerlessness, and confidence. (Author/TE)

  6. Resumes and Interviews: A Guide for Cosmetology. Student's Manual [and] Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selke, Barbara E.

    The student's manual of this set consists of materials dealing with resume writing and job interview skills needed by individuals enrolled in cosmetology instructor training programs. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: resumes and employment applications, employment interviews, and preenrollment interviews.…

  7. Resumes and Interviews: A Guide for Cosmetology. Student's Manual [and] Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selke, Barbara E.

    The student's manual of this set consists of materials dealing with resume writing and job interview skills needed by individuals enrolled in cosmetology instructor training programs. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: resumes and employment applications, employment interviews, and preenrollment interviews.…

  8. Contextualism adds realism: nursing students' perceptions of and performance in numeracy skills tests.

    PubMed

    Ramjan, Lucie M

    2011-11-01

    This project investigated nursing students' perceptions of and performance in a de-contextualised diagnostic maths paper (i.e. questions only) and a contextualised diagnostic maths paper (i.e. visual pictures along with questions). Sampling was purposive, the criteria being that participants would be from the population of student nurses (n=700) in their second year, of a three-year Bachelor of Nursing course, undertaking a Unit 'Medical-Surgical Nursing 1' (MSN1) at one of four campuses across the University of Western Sydney (UWS), NSW, Australia. The numerical test scores for both papers were analysed with the assistance of SPSS software and a Professional Development Officer. The survey data were analysed manually and thematically by the researcher. There was a substantive improvement in scores from Test 1 (de-contextualised) to Test 2 (contextualised). It is uncertain whether the change occurred because Test 2 is a genuinely better presentation than Test 1 or just a practice effect. Nevertheless, the contextualised paper was preferred by the majority of students (80%). Students preferred the visual images and revealed that it led to a "deeper learning" of numeracy skills, reduced stress and anxiety levels and simulated 'the real life' clinical setting, thus adding "an element of realism" to the situation.

  9. The "Consulting-Your-Consultants Interview": A Final Narrative Conversation with Graduating Family Therapy Masters' Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiley, Margaret K.; Piercy, Fred P.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses a Master's program exit interview that used questions from narrative therapy to celebrate the transition of Masters students into the world of marital and family therapy professionals. This process helps to underling students' agency and competence, and elevates them to the level of consultant during the interview. (Author/MKA)

  10. Developing Teachers' Knowledge of Students as Learners of Mathematics through Structured Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Oliver F.

    2010-01-01

    A structured interview process is proffered as an effective means to advance prospective teachers' understandings of students as learners of mathematics, a key component of pedagogical content knowledge. The interview process is carried out in three phases with the primary objective of developing listening skills for accessing students'…

  11. Developing Teachers' Knowledge of Students as Learners of Mathematics through Structured Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Oliver F.

    2010-01-01

    A structured interview process is proffered as an effective means to advance prospective teachers' understandings of students as learners of mathematics, a key component of pedagogical content knowledge. The interview process is carried out in three phases with the primary objective of developing listening skills for accessing students'…

  12. Interview and Assessment: Practice of International Student Services in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isomine, Sei

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore what types of student services are useful in helping international students make a smooth transition to American college experience. Four members from an international student office at a particular four-year university in the U.S. were interviewed to discuss variables in student support services. The…

  13. Interviews with Students Enrolled in Academic CPR Workshops, Summer 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maple, Chelley

    This study focuses on students enrolled in academic CPR workshops in the summer of 2002. The goal of the study is to examine changes in the population of students with academic problems. The CPR workshops are a requirement for students that are subject to dismissal. The study was conducted in the summer of 2003 on the telephone with a random…

  14. Eliciting Student Views Using an Interview-About-Instances Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, John K.; And Others

    An exposition is made of a method to elicit students' comprehension of the meaning of words commonly used in science, which may be influential in determining what they learn. The method's aim is to elucidate features in students' understanding of childrens' science (that found before formal teaching of science), student science (that found after…

  15. Radical Flexibility and Student Success: An Interview with Homero Lopez

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2006-01-01

    In this interview with Dr. Homero Lopez, who brings thirty-two years of higher education experience to his position as the founding president of Estrella Mountain Community College, (Maricopa County Community College District of Arizona), topics centered on how learning spaces and campus design are planned and implemented on Estrella Mountain…

  16. Radical Flexibility and Student Success: An Interview with Homero Lopez

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2006-01-01

    In this interview with Dr. Homero Lopez, who brings thirty-two years of higher education experience to his position as the founding president of Estrella Mountain Community College, (Maricopa County Community College District of Arizona), topics centered on how learning spaces and campus design are planned and implemented on Estrella Mountain…

  17. Selection of physical therapy students: interview methods and academic predictors.

    PubMed

    Levine, S B; Knecht, H G; Eisen, R G

    1986-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which preprofessional academic and personal characteristics were related to academic and clinical success in a physical therapy program. Individual interviews used for the class of 1982 (N = 25) and group interviews for the class of 1983 (N = 31) were studied to determine which interview type was the stronger predictor of later performance. Correlations of grade point averages (GPAs) and interview scores with academic and clinical grades were calculated. Stepwise regressions were performed to identify the stronger relationships. Preprofessional science and cumulative GPAs for the class of 1982 were moderately, but significantly correlated with cumulative GPAs in the program (r = .54, p less than .05, and r = .50, p less than .05, respectively). Only science GPA for the class of 1982 was retained in the stepwise regression (R2 = .31, p less than .006). All other correlations were low, and correlations for the class of 1983 were lower than for the class of 1982. Neither the academic nor personal characteristics studied were strong predictors of performance in the professional physical therapy educational program.

  18. A Guided Interview Process to Improve Student Pharmacists' Identification of Drug Therapy Problems

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael J.; Koenigsfeld, Carrie; Haack, Sally; Hegge, Karly; McCleeary, Erin

    2011-01-01

    Objective To measure agreement between advanced pharmacy practice experience students using a guided interview process and experienced clinical pharmacists using standard practices to identify drug therapy problems. Methods Student pharmacists enrolled in an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) and clinical pharmacists conducted medication therapy management interviews to identify drug therapy problems in elderly patients recruited from the community. Student pharmacists used a guided interview tool, while clinical pharmacists' interviews were conducted using their usual and customary practices. Student pharmacists also were surveyed to determine their perceptions of the interview tool. Results Fair to moderate agreement was observed on student and clinical pharmacists' identification of 4 of 7 drug therapy problems. Of those, agreement was significantly higher than chance for 3 drug therapy problems (adverse drug reaction, dosage too high, and needs additional drug therapy) and not significant for 1 (unnecessary drug therapy). Students strongly agreed that the interview tool was useful but agreed less strongly on recommending its use in practice. Conclusions The guided interview process served as a useful teaching aid to assist student pharmacists to identify drug therapy problems. PMID:21451770

  19. Interviewing International Students to Understand the Process of Expatriate Acculturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Globalization is the most influential trend of the early twenty-first century. However, many students have had limited direct contact with cultures other than their own. The following teaching innovation targets such students to give them an experiential learning opportunity about the process of acculturation for expatriates. This is accomplished…

  20. Interviewing International Students to Understand the Process of Expatriate Acculturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Globalization is the most influential trend of the early twenty-first century. However, many students have had limited direct contact with cultures other than their own. The following teaching innovation targets such students to give them an experiential learning opportunity about the process of acculturation for expatriates. This is accomplished…

  1. Students' Views on the Effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing for Challenging Disaffection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snape, Laura; Atkinson, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests motivational interviewing (MI) is an effective intervention for supporting disaffected students. However, previous literature has failed to establish students' views on MI. In the present study, three students took part in an individual MI intervention, delivered by three educational psychologists (EPs). Self-report…

  2. "Secrets" to Marital Success: Using Field Interviews to Enhance Student Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Tommy M.; Wilmoth, Joe D.; Staier, Tabitha

    2009-01-01

    Students in human development and family studies can benefit from field assignments that provide first-hand, experiential learning. This article describes benefits of an assignment in which students in a family life education course interviewed couples who had been married at least 7 years. Students received suggestions for achieving a satisfying,…

  3. Assisting High School Students with Career Indecision Using a Shortened Form of the Career Construction Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfuss, Mark C.; Sickinger, Pamela H.

    2015-01-01

    A shortened form of the Career Construction Interview (CCI) was used to help high school students struggling with the career decision making process. The shortened instrument is described, as well as, its use with eleventh grade high school students who had low levels of career concern and career curiosity. Students who completed the exercise…

  4. "Secrets" to Marital Success: Using Field Interviews to Enhance Student Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Tommy M.; Wilmoth, Joe D.; Staier, Tabitha

    2009-01-01

    Students in human development and family studies can benefit from field assignments that provide first-hand, experiential learning. This article describes benefits of an assignment in which students in a family life education course interviewed couples who had been married at least 7 years. Students received suggestions for achieving a satisfying,…

  5. Can Japanese students embrace learner-centered methods for teaching medical interviewing skills? Focus groups.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Takuya; Mukohara, Kei; Otani, Takashi; Ban, Nobutaro

    2011-01-01

    Students' perceptions of learner-centered methods for teaching medical interviewing skills have not been fully explored. To explore Japanese students' perceptions of learner-centered methods for teaching medical interviewing skills such as role play with student-created scenarios, peer-assisted video reviews, and student-led small group debriefing. We conducted three focus groups with a total of 15 students who participated in the learner-centered seminars on medical interviewing skills at the Nagoya University School of Medicine. The transcripts were analyzed by two authors independently. Keywords and concepts were identified and a thematic framework was developed. Overall, students valued the experience of writing their own scenarios for role play, but some questioned their realism. Many students commented that peer-assisted video reviews provided them with more objective perspectives on their performance. However, some students expressed concerns about competitiveness during the video reviews. While students appreciated teachers' minimum involvement in the group debriefing, some criticized that teachers did not explain the objectives of the seminar clearly. Many students had difficulties in exchanging constructive feedback. We were able to gain new insights into positive and negative perceptions of students about learner-centered methods for teaching medical interviewing skills at one medical school in Japan.

  6. Attributional Retraining, Self-Esteem, and the Job Interview: Benefits and Risks for College Student Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Nathan C.; Jackson Gradt, Shannan E.; Goetz, Thomas; Musu-Gillette, Lauren E.

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of an attributional retraining program for helping upper-level undergraduates perform better in employment interviews as moderated by self-esteem levels. The sample consisted of 50 co-operative education students preparing for actual job interviews who were randomly assigned to an attributional…

  7. Engaging Study Abroad Students in Intercultural Learning through Blogging and Ethnographic Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lina

    2012-01-01

    The study involved 16 American undergraduate students who used weekly blogs and conducted ethnographic interviews with native speakers to develop their intercultural competence over the course of one semester abroad. Selected blog entries, post-surveys, and final interviews were collected and analyzed to report the findings. The results show that…

  8. Current Methods Used To Teach the Medication History Interview to Doctor of Pharmacy Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Andrea Michelle; Barnett, Candace W.; Johnson, Diane R.; Nykamp, Diane

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed pharmacy schools regarding how the medication history interview is taught to doctor of pharmacy students. Found a lack of consistency in the interviewing skills taught at different schools; slightly less than half taught it before the end of the first year. (EV)

  9. A Proposal for Overcoming Problems in Teaching Interviewing Skills to Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benbassat, Jochanan; Baumal, Reuben

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to draw attention to four features that distinguish the pedagogy of patient interviewing from the teaching of other clinical skills: (a) students are not naive to the skill to be learned, (b) they encounter role models with a wide variability in interviewing styles, (c) clinical teachers are not usually specialists…

  10. Engaging Study Abroad Students in Intercultural Learning through Blogging and Ethnographic Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lina

    2012-01-01

    The study involved 16 American undergraduate students who used weekly blogs and conducted ethnographic interviews with native speakers to develop their intercultural competence over the course of one semester abroad. Selected blog entries, post-surveys, and final interviews were collected and analyzed to report the findings. The results show that…

  11. Employer Perceptions of Student Informational Interviewing Skills and Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, Claudia; Sherony, Bruce; Steinhaus, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Employers continue to report that soft skills are critically important in obtaining employment and achieving long-term career success. Given the challenging job market for college graduates, business school faculty need to provide practical opportunities for students to develop their soft skills in professional settings. A longitudinal study was…

  12. International health electives: thematic results of student and professional interviews.

    PubMed

    Petrosoniak, Andrew; McCarthy, Anne; Varpio, Lara

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the complexities (including harms and benefits) of international health electives (IHEs) involving medical trainees. This exploration contributes to the ongoing debate about the goals and implications of IHEs for medical trainees. This qualitative study used anonymous, one-to-one, semi-structured interviews. All participants had previous international health experiences. Between September 2007 and March 2008, we interviewed a convenience sample of health care professionals (n=10) and medical trainees (n=10). Using a modified grounded theory methodology, we carried out cycles of data analysis in conjunction with data collection in an iterative and constant comparison process. The study's thematic structure was finalised when theme saturation was achieved. Participants described IHEs in both negative and positive terms. IHEs were described as unsustained short-term contributions that lacked clear educational objectives and failed to address local community needs. Ethical dilemmas were described as IHE challenges. Participants reflected that many IHEs included aspects of medical tourism and the majority of participants described the IHE in negative terms. However, a few participants acknowledged the benefits of the IHE. Specifically, it was seen as an introduction to a career in global health and as a potential foundation for more sustainable projects with positive host community impacts. Finally, despite similar understandings among participants, self-awareness of medical tourism was low. International health electives may include potential harms and benefits for both the trainee and the host community. Educational institutions should encourage and support structured IHEs for trainee participation. We recommend that faculties of medicine and global health educators establish pre-departure training courses for trainees and that IHE opportunities have sufficient structures in place to mitigate the negative effects of medical

  13. Student Understanding of Tunneling in Quantum Mechanics: Examining Interview and Survey Results for Clues to Student Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey T.; Wittmann, Michael C.; Thompson, John R.

    2004-09-01

    Members of the University of Maine Physics Education Research Laboratory are studying student understanding of the phenomenon of quantum tunneling through a potential barrier, a standard topic in most introductory quantum physics courses. When a series of interviews revealed that many students believe energy is lost in the tunneling process, a survey was designed to investigate the prevalence of the energy-loss idea. This survey was administered to populations of physics majors at the sophomore and senior levels. Data indicate that interview results are shared by a somewhat larger population of students and give insight into additional models of reasoning (e.g. analogies to macroscopic tunnels) not found in the interviews.

  14. An Interview with Mara Sapon-Shevin: Implications for Students and Teachers of Labeling Students as Learning Disabled/Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walther-Thomas, Chriss; Brownell, Mary

    1999-01-01

    This interview with Mara Sapon-Shevin discusses her interest in students with learning disabilities and giftedness, the negative effects of labeling students, what teachers can do to improve the social climate and peer acceptance in heterogeneous classrooms, and the need for teachers to teach all students as if they are gifted. (CR)

  15. Students' Conceptions of Underlying Principles in Medical Physiology: An Interview Study of Medical Students' Understanding in a PBL Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyrenius, Anna; Silen, Charlotte; Wirell, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    Medical physiology is known to be a complex area where students develop significant errors in conceptual understanding. Students' knowledge is often bound to situational descriptions rather than underlying principles. This study explores how medical students discern and process underlying principles in physiology. Indepth interviews, where…

  16. An Insight into the Educational Needs of Deaf High School Students: Interviews with School Staff and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esera, Tracey

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an insight into the educational needs, experiences and school support for deaf high school students attending a mainstream school, from the perspectives of the deaf students themselves, their teachers and support staff. Themes emerged from interviews with the students and staff around learning, communication, school culture…

  17. Peer assisted learning in patient-centred interviewing: the impact on student tutors.

    PubMed

    Nestel, Debra; Kidd, Jane

    2005-08-01

    Effective methods for teaching patient-centred interviewing skills are resource intensive. Providing students the opportunity to work in small groups with simulated patients is highly valued and has demonstrable long-term benefits. Expanding cohorts of medical students and diminishing faculty resources led to the implementation of a peer assisted learning (PAL) project in patient-centred interviewing skills. The paper reports the evaluation of a PAL project on student tutors. The methodology included direct and indirect measures of student tutors' skills in facilitation and patient-centred interviewing. The self-report evaluations strongly suggest that participating in a PAL project has substantial benefits for student tutors that included both interviewing and facilitation skills. Objective measures revealed no change in patient-centred interviewing skills after participating in the project. The study concludes that formalizing PAL may tap a valuable resource within the medical school and provide benefits for student tutors. Careful consideration needs to be given to ways in which student tutors are supported before, during and after the project.

  18. Students with Attention Deficit Disorders ADD/ADHD: Eligibility Issues and Service Options under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Univ., Logan. Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center.

    This document presents basic information and materials on eligibility and service options for students with attention deficit disorder (ADD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. An introduction notes that the three main…

  19. A proposal for overcoming problems in teaching interviewing skills to medical students.

    PubMed

    Benbassat, Jochanan; Baumal, Reuben

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to draw attention to four features that distinguish the pedagogy of patient interviewing from the teaching of other clinical skills: (a) students are not naïve to the skill to be learned, (b) they encounter role models with a wide variability in interviewing styles, (c) clinical teachers are not usually specialists in the behavioral sciences, including patient interviewing, and (d) the validity of the methods used for assessment of interviewing skills is uncertain. We propose to adjust the teaching of patient interviewing to these features by (a) gaining an insight into the students' views and using these views as a point of departure for discussions of patient interviewing; (b) helping students to understand why different clinicians use different communication styles; (c) providing the clinical tutors with additional training that will help them function as both specialists who share their expertise with the students and facilitators of small-group learning; and (d) using assessment methods that encourage joint deliberation by the learner and the examiner, rather than a judgmental right-wrong dualism by the examiner alone. The teaching approach that we suggest is consistent with current theories of adult learning, and it occurs in an egalitarian rather than a hierarchical environment. Hopefully, students will also adopt such egalitarian attitudes toward patients, thereby reducing the tendency to a paternalistic communication style.

  20. Undergraduate Social Work Students: Learning Interviewing Skills in a Hybrid Practice Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This action research case study explored undergraduate social work students' perceived learning of interviewing skills in a hybrid environment course delivery. The single case study consisted of 19 students enrolled in a practice course blending web-based and face-to-face (f2f) meetings (4 of 15 f2f) within a large urban college. As part of…

  1. A Randomized Trial of Motivational Interviewing to Improve Middle School Students' Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strait, Gerald Gill; Smith, Bradley H.; McQuillin, Sam; Terry, John; Swan, Suzanne; Malone, Patrick S.

    2012-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is an effective method of promoting change in adults, but research on adolescents is limited. This study tests the efficacy of MI for promoting academic achievement in middle school students. Participants were 103 6th-, 7th-, and 8th-grade students randomly assigned to either a MI (n = 50) or a waitlist control…

  2. A Randomized Trial of Motivational Interviewing to Improve Middle School Students' Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strait, Gerald Gill; Smith, Bradley H.; McQuillin, Sam; Terry, John; Swan, Suzanne; Malone, Patrick S.

    2012-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is an effective method of promoting change in adults, but research on adolescents is limited. This study tests the efficacy of MI for promoting academic achievement in middle school students. Participants were 103 6th-, 7th-, and 8th-grade students randomly assigned to either a MI (n = 50) or a waitlist control…

  3. Undergraduate Social Work Students: Learning Interviewing Skills in a Hybrid Practice Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This action research case study explored undergraduate social work students' perceived learning of interviewing skills in a hybrid environment course delivery. The single case study consisted of 19 students enrolled in a practice course blending web-based and face-to-face (f2f) meetings (4 of 15 f2f) within a large urban college. As part of…

  4. Segregated Groups or Inclusive Education? An Interview Study with Students Experiencing Failure in Reading and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Eva Heimdahl; Roll-Pettersson, Lise

    2007-01-01

    In this study a group of students with reading and writing difficulties relate their experiences of school to their expressed opinions concerning the possibilities of participation and influence in this setting. Twelve students at upper-level compulsory school or upper secondary school were interviewed. Mostly their reading and writing…

  5. Value Orientations and Action Conflicts in Students' Everyday Life: An Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, Sebastian; Hofer, Manfred; Dietz, Franziska; Reinders, Heinz; Fries, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    The assumption that today's German students are able to successfully combine synthesis achievement values and well-being values appears to be overly optimistic when regarded from the perspective of motivational psychology. The results of a qualitative-quantitative interview study with 25 students indicate that achievement and well-being values may…

  6. The Willed Body Donor Interview Project: Medical Student and Donor Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohl, Michael; Holman, Alexis; Mueller, Dean A.; Gruppen, Larry D.; Hildebrandt, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    The Anatomical Donations Program at the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) has begun a multiphase project wherein interviews of donors will be recorded and later shown to medical students who participate in the anatomical dissection course. The first phase of this project included surveys of both current UMMS medical students and donors…

  7. Segregated Groups or Inclusive Education? An Interview Study with Students Experiencing Failure in Reading and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Eva Heimdahl; Roll-Pettersson, Lise

    2007-01-01

    In this study a group of students with reading and writing difficulties relate their experiences of school to their expressed opinions concerning the possibilities of participation and influence in this setting. Twelve students at upper-level compulsory school or upper secondary school were interviewed. Mostly their reading and writing…

  8. Exit Interviews Reveal Why Students Leave a BA-MD Degree Program Prematurely.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Louise; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The executive committee of a combined sixth-year Baccalaureate-M.S. degree program instituted the administration of exit interviews to gain systematic information about why students leave the program prematurely. The committee hoped to assess the school's admissions procedures, its educational policies, and its student support services. (MLW)

  9. The Willed Body Donor Interview Project: Medical Student and Donor Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohl, Michael; Holman, Alexis; Mueller, Dean A.; Gruppen, Larry D.; Hildebrandt, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    The Anatomical Donations Program at the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) has begun a multiphase project wherein interviews of donors will be recorded and later shown to medical students who participate in the anatomical dissection course. The first phase of this project included surveys of both current UMMS medical students and donors…

  10. Students' Reported Justifications for Their Representational Choices in Linear Function Problems: An Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acevedo Nistal, Ana; Van Dooren, Wim; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-six secondary school students aged 14-16 were interviewed while they chose between a table, a graph or a formula to solve three linear function problems. The justifications for their choices were classified as (1) task-related if they explicitly mentioned the to-be-solved problem, (2) subject-related if students mentioned their own…

  11. Well, you have hepatic metastases: Use of technical language by medical students in simulated patient interviews.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Céline; Stiefel, Friedrich; Mast, Marianne Schmid; Bonvin, Raphael; Berney, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    This research explored medical students' use and perception of technical language in a practical training setting to enhance skills in breaking bad news in oncology. Terms potentially confusing to laypeople were selected from 108 videotaped interviews conducted in an undergraduate Communication Skills Training. A subset of these terms was included in a questionnaire completed by students (N=111) with the aim of gaining insight into their perceptions of different speech registers and of patient understanding. Excerpts of interviews were analyzed qualitatively to investigate students' communication strategies with respect to these technical terms. Fewer than half of the terms were clarified. Students checked for simulated patients' understanding of the terms palliative and metastasis/to metastasize in 22-23% of the interviews. The term ambulatory was spontaneously explained in 75% of the interviews, hepatic and metastasis/to metastasize in 22-24%. Most provided explanations were in plain language; metastasis/to metastasize and ganglion/ganglionic were among terms most frequently explained in technical language. A significant number of terms potentially unfamiliar and confusing to patients remained unclarified in training interviews conducted by senior medical students, even when they perceived the terms as technical. This exploration may offer important insights for improving future physicians' skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Medical student selection: choice of a semi-structured panel interview or an unstructured one-on-one interview.

    PubMed

    Ann Courneya, Carol; Wright, Kristin; Frinton, Vera; Mak, Edwin; Schulzer, Michael; Pachev, George

    2005-09-01

    Reliability has been shown to be higher in structured medical admissions interviews as compared to unstructured interviews. This study reports the comparison of a proposed semi-structured panel interview with a current individual unstructured medical admissions interview. Inter-rater reliability coefficients were calculated, and correlations were estimated between panel, individual and academic scores. Admission status in 2003 was related to these scores by means of logistic regression. Both individual and panel interviews were significantly correlated with admissions status. The inter rater reliability coefficient (from individual interviews) was 0.12 whereas the interpanel reliability coefficient was 0.52. Panel interview: good across panel and within panel consistency of scoring. No effect of who asked the questions, question order, or interview duration on scoring. No correlation between panel interview scores and academic variables (MCAT, GPA). We found good inter-panel reliability, a high consistency within and between interview panels, and uniformly positive questionnaire responses. The panel interview measures something different from academic variables. These data, in conjunction with a strong sense from the medical and psychological literature supporting the reliability and validity of a semi-structured panel interview, support our decision to replace our individual interview with the panel interview.

  13. The value of admission interviews in selecting accelerated second-degree baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Lisa; Perraud, Suzanne; Willis, Lucy

    2007-09-01

    Accelerated undergraduate nursing programs have attracted more qualified applicants than can be accommodated, yet higher-than-desired attrition rates continue for a variety of reasons (e.g., pace of program, poor lifestyle choices, role concerns). The financial effects of the loss of students from these programs has gone largely undocumented and is intensified by the knowledge that a better admission decision could have resulted in another nurse in the workforce. In this article, the inclusion of structured personal interviews into the admission decision-making process is discussed. Specifically, do interviews provide relevant data in making admission decisions? Attempts to reduce subjectivity through the development of a structured interview guide, the training of paired interview teams, and the institution of a "post-mortem" technique to guide revisions are also described. Interviews do result in denial of applicants who seem appropriate based on paper portfolio criteria, allowing for inclusion of other potentially successful applicants.

  14. Helping Mathematics Teachers Develop Noticing Skills: Utilizing Smartphone Technology for One-on-One Teacher/Student Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Theodore; Murray, Eileen; Star, Jon R.

    2016-01-01

    Teaching mathematics for understanding requires listening to each student's mathematical thinking, best elicited in a one-on-one interview. Interviews are difficult to enact in a teacher's busy schedule, however. In this study, the authors utilize smartphone technology to help mathematics teachers interview a student in a virtual one-on-one…

  15. A Study of the Construct Validity of the Interactive Computer Interview System (ICIS) Using Student Evaluations as the Outcome Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Robby Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare the individual teacher interview scores from the Interactive Computer Interview System (ICIS) with their students' responses to "The Steps to Excellence Student Questionnaire". Specifically, the study examined the correlation among the teacher interviews across four themes of the ICIS ("Knowledge…

  16. Students Better Be on Their Best Behavior: How to Prepare for the Most Common Job Interviewing Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Blair W.; Cunningham, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Nearly every student will go through the selection interview process to obtain a job in his or her future vocation. Regardless of the major of the student or the profession which they will pursue, the selection interview remains a constant. There has been some attention paid to the validity of the selection interview, and personality constructs…

  17. Helping Mathematics Teachers Develop Noticing Skills: Utilizing Smartphone Technology for One-on-One Teacher/Student Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Theodore; Murray, Eileen; Star, Jon R.

    2016-01-01

    Teaching mathematics for understanding requires listening to each student's mathematical thinking, best elicited in a one-on-one interview. Interviews are difficult to enact in a teacher's busy schedule, however. In this study, the authors utilize smartphone technology to help mathematics teachers interview a student in a virtual one-on-one…

  18. Trained student pharmacists' telephonic collection of patient medication information: Evaluation of a structured interview tool.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Amanda R; Martin, Beth A; Mott, David A

    2016-01-01

    To determine the feasibility and fidelity of student pharmacists collecting patient medication list information using a structured interview tool and the accuracy of documenting the information. The medication lists were used by a community pharmacist to provide a targeted medication therapy management (MTM) intervention. Descriptive analysis of patient medication lists collected with telephone interviews. Ten trained student pharmacists collected the medication lists. Trained student pharmacists conducted audio-recorded telephone interviews with 80 English-speaking, community-dwelling older adults using a structured interview tool to collect and document medication lists. Feasibility was measured using the number of completed interviews, the time student pharmacists took to collect the information, and pharmacist feedback. Fidelity to the interview tool was measured by assessing student pharmacists' adherence to asking all scripted questions and probes. Accuracy was measured by comparing the audio-recorded interviews to the medication list information documented in an electronic medical record. On average, it took student pharmacists 26.7 minutes to collect the medication lists. The community pharmacist said the medication lists were complete and that having the medication lists saved time and allowed him to focus on assessment, recommendations, and education during the targeted MTM session. Fidelity was high, with an overall proportion of asked scripted probes of 83.75% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80.62-86.88%). Accuracy was also high for both prescription (95.1%; 95% CI, 94.3-95.8%) and nonprescription (90.5%; 95% CI, 89.4-91.4%) medications. Trained student pharmacists were able to use an interview tool to collect and document medication lists with a high degree of fidelity and accuracy. This study suggests that student pharmacists or trained technicians may be able to collect patient medication lists to facilitate MTM sessions in the community pharmacy

  19. Trained student pharmacists’ telephonic collection of patient medication information: Evaluation of a structured interview tool

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Amanda R.; Martin, Beth A.; Mott, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility and fidelity of student pharmacists collecting patient medication list information using a structured interview tool and the accuracy of documenting the information. The medication lists were used by a community pharmacist to provide a targeted medication therapy management (MTM) intervention. Design Descriptive analysis of patient medication lists collected via telephone interviews. Participants 10 trained student pharmacists collected the medication lists. Intervention Trained student pharmacists conducted audio-recorded telephone interviews with 80 English-speaking community dwelling older adults using a structured interview tool to collect and document medication lists. Main outcome measures Feasibility was measured using the number of completed interviews, the time student pharmacists took to collect the information, and pharmacist feedback. Fidelity to the interview tool was measured by assessing student pharmacists’ adherence to asking all scripted questions and probes. Accuracy was measured by comparing the audio recorded interviews to the medication list information documented in an electronic medical record. Results On average it took student pharmacists 26.7 minutes to collect the medication lists. The community pharmacist said the medication lists were complete and that having the medication lists saved time and allowed him to focus on assessment, recommendations, and education during the targeted MTM session. Fidelity was high with an overall proportion of asked scripted probes of 83.75% (95%CI: 80.62–86.88%). Accuracy was also high for both prescription (95.1%, 95%CI: 94.3–95.8%) and non-prescription (90.5%, 95%CI: 89.4–91.4%) medications. Conclusion Trained student pharmacists were able to use an interview tool to collect and document medication lists with a high degree of fidelity and accuracy. This study suggests that student pharmacists or trained technicians may be able to collect patient medication

  20. Gauging the feasibility of cost-sharing and medical student interest groups to reduce interview costs.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Bryan A; Wilson, Taylor A; Bell, Randy S; Ashley, William W; Barrow, Daniel L; Wolfe, Stacey Quintero

    2014-11-01

    Indirect costs of the interview tour can be prohibitive. The authors sought to assess the desire of interviewees to mitigate these costs through ideas such as sharing hotel rooms and transportation, willingness to stay with local students, and the preferred modality to coordinate this collaboration. A survey link was posted on the Uncle Harvey website and the Facebook profile page of fourth-year medical students from 6 different medical schools shortly after the 2014 match day. There were a total of 156 respondents to the survey. The majority of the respondents were postinterview medical students (65.4%), but preinterview medical students (28.2%) and current residents (6.4%) also responded to the survey. Most respondents were pursuing a field other than neurosurgery (75.0%) and expressed a desire to share a hotel room and/or transportation (77.4%) as well as stay in the dorm room of a medical student at the program in which they are interviewing (70.0%). Students going into neurosurgery were significantly more likely to be interested in sharing hotel/transportation (89.2% neurosurgery vs 72.8% nonneurosurgery; p = 0.040) and in staying in the dorm room of a local student when on interviews (85.0% neurosurgery vs 57.1% nonneurosurgery; p = 0.040) than those going into other specialties. Among postinterview students, communication was preferred to be by private, email identification-only chat room. Given neurosurgery resident candidates' interest in collaborating to reduce interview costs, consideration should be given to creating a system that could allow students to coordinate cost sharing between interviewees. Moreover, interviewees should be connected to local students from neurosurgery interest groups as a resource.

  1. Standardized Patients versus Volunteer Patients for Physical Therapy Students' Interviewing Practice: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sue; Imam, Bita; MacIntyre, Donna L

    2015-01-01

    To compare the use of standardized patients (SPs) and volunteer patients (VPs) for physical therapy students' interviewing practice in terms of students' perception and overall costs. Students in the Master of Physical Therapy programme (n=80) at a Canadian university were divided into 20 groups of 4 and were randomly assigned to interview either an SP (10 groups) or a VP (10 groups). Students completed a survey about their perception of the usefulness of the activity and the ease and depth of information extraction. Survey responses as well as costs of the interview exercise were compared between SP and VP groups. No statistically significant between-groups difference was found for the majority of survey items. The cost of using an SP was $148, versus $50 for a VP. Students' perceptions of the usefulness of the activity in helping them to develop their interview skills and of the ease and depth of extracting information were similar for both SPs and VPs. Because the cost of using an SP is about three times that of using a VP, using VPs seem to be a more cost-effective option.

  2. The 15-Minute Family Interview as a learning strategy for senior undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Holtslander, Lorraine; Solar, Jessica; Smith, Nicole R

    2013-05-01

    Nursing care of families continues to be a challenge within complex and demanding health-care systems. Educational strategies to bridge the theory-practice gap, connecting classroom learning with clinical experiences in undergraduate nursing education, enable students to develop the skills required to form meaningful partnerships with families. This article describes how undergraduate nursing students complete a 15-Minute Family Interview in a clinical practice setting, and document the interview process in a reflective major paper. Students integrate research and theory and identify ways to improve the care of families in the clinical setting while building communication skills and confidence in interacting with families in everyday practice. The implementation of the assignment and the evaluation of the process, including quotes from 10 student papers and 2 clinical faculty members, are discussed. Implications for education and ongoing research are offered.

  3. Teaching health science students foundation motivational interviewing skills: use of motivational interviewing treatment integrity and self-reflection to approach transformative learning.

    PubMed

    M, Schoo A; S, Lawn; E, Rudnik; C, Litt J

    2015-12-21

    Many undergraduate and graduate-entry health science curricula have incorporated training in motivational interviewing (MI). However, to effectively teach skills that will remain with students after they graduate is challenging. The aims of this study were to find out self-assessed MI skills of health students and whether reflecting on the results can promote transformative learning. Thirty-six Australian occupational therapy and physiotherapy students were taught the principles of MI, asked to conduct a motivational interview, transcribe it, self-rate it using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI) tool and reflect on the experience. Student MI skills were measured using the reported MITI subscores. Student assignments and a focus group discussion were analysed to explore the student experience using the MITI tool and self-reflection to improve their understanding of MI principles. Students found MI challenging, although identified the MITI tool as useful for promoting self-reflection and to isolate MI skills. Students self-assessed their MI skills as competent and higher than scores expected from beginners. The results inform educational programs on how MI skills can be developed for health professional students and can result in transformative learning. Students may over-state their MI skills and strategies to reduce this, including peer review, are discussed. Structured self-reflection, using tools such as the MITI can promote awareness of MI skills and compliment didactic teaching methods.

  4. Using Cognitive Interviews to Explore the Many Different Meanings Undergraduate Students in China Attribute to the Term "College Teacher"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuhao, Cen

    2013-01-01

    The cognitive interview method was applied to evaluate survey questions translated and adapted from a US-based college student survey instrument. This paper draws data from cognitive interviews with 45 undergraduate students in China and explores the different meanings they attribute to the term "college teacher." Students understood…

  5. General Classroom Structural Interventions for Teaching Students with Attention Deficit Disorder-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD-HD).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Chris

    This paper examines structural antecedent classroom interventions to assist general classroom teachers in educating children with Attention Deficit Disorder-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD-HD). The effectiveness of early classroom intervention models is explored. Modifications to physical classroom arrangements are evaluated, including open…

  6. Comparison of communication skills between medical students admitted after interviews or on academic merits

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Selection of the best medical students among applicants is debated and many different methods are used. Academic merits predict good academic performance, but students admitted by other pathways need not be less successful. The aim of this study, was to compare communication skills between students admitted to medical school through interviews or on academic merits, respectively. Methods A retrospective cohort study. Communication skills at a surgical OSCE in 2008 were assessed independently by two observers using an evaluative rating scale. Correlations, t-tests and multivariate analyses by logistic regressions were employed. Academic merits were defined as upper secondary school grade point average (GPA) or scores from the Swedish Scholastic Assessment Test (SweSAT). Results The risk of showing unsatisfactory communicative performance was significantly lower among the students selected by interviews (OR 0.32, CI95 0.12-0.83), compared to those selected on the basis of academic merits. However, there was no significant difference in communication skills scores between the different admission groups; neither did the proportion of high performers differ. No difference in the result of the written examination was seen between groups. Conclusions Our results confirm previous experience from many medical schools that students selected in different ways achieve comparable results during the clinical semesters. However, selection through interview seems to reduce the number of students who demonstrate inferior communication skills at 4th year of medical school. PMID:22726308

  7. The Evidence for Student-Focused Motivational Interviewing in Educational Settings: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snape, Laura; Atkinson, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    The current systematic literature review sought to determine the effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing (MI) in educational settings. Student-focused school-based MI (SBMI) studies were assessed using qualitative and quantitative assessment frameworks and data were reported using PRISMA guidelines. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria,…

  8. An Examination of Teacher-Student Interactions in Inclusive Classrooms: Teacher Interviews and Classroom Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, David Lansing

    2014-01-01

    Teacher-student interactions in 17 inclusive classrooms were examined using a mixed-methods approach that involved quantitative analysis of interactions recorded during classroom observations and follow-up interviews with seven general educators. Observational findings suggest that classrooms were organised along traditional lines with the vast…

  9. A US-China Interview Study: Biology Students' Argumentation and Explanation about Energy Consumption Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Hui; Hokayem, Hayat; Wang, Sasha; Wei, Xin

    2016-01-01

    As China and the United States become the top two carbon emitters in the world, it is crucial for citizens in both countries to construct a sophisticated understanding of energy consumption issues. This interview study examines how U.S. and Chinese students compare in explaining and arguing about two critical energy consumption issues: burning…

  10. A US-China Interview Study: Biology Students' Argumentation and Explanation about Energy Consumption Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Hui; Hokayem, Hayat; Wang, Sasha; Wei, Xin

    2015-01-01

    As China and the United States become the top two carbon emitters in the world, it is crucial for citizens in both countries to construct a sophisticated understanding of energy consumption issues. This interview study examines how U.S. and Chinese students compare in explaining and arguing about two critical energy consumption issues: burning…

  11. AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS USING THE TYPICAL DAY INTERVIEW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOLDSTON, JEAN; WHITELEY, JOHN M.

    THIS PAPER PRESENTED RESULTS FROM AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF DIFFERENTIATION IN WHICH ADOLESCENTS WERE GIVEN THE TYPICAL DAY INTERVIEW. THE FOCUS OF THE INSTRUMENT WAS ON THE STUDENT'S ABILITY TO COGNITIVELY DIFFERENTIATE ASPECTS OF THE SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT. DIFFERENTIATION WAS DEFINED AS CAPACITY TO PERCEIVE NUANCES OF PROBLEMS, PEOPLE, AND PROGRAMS…

  12. Interviews with Seven Black High School Students. Research and Development Memorandum No. 59.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Robert W.; Roy, Larnders

    This document contains transcribed interviews with seven black high school students made in spring and summer 1969 as part of a larger study of an educational community organization program. They are presented here because it is felt the feelings and attitudes expressed are often overlooked as various groups of adults attempt to resolve issues of…

  13. Voices from the Field: Interviews with Students from Migrant Farmworker Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Yolanda G.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Studies aspects of migrant lifestyle and perceptions from a youthful viewpoint. In-depth interviewing of 84 elementary and high school students revealed that, although migrant farm workers value education, their children often confront obstacles such as mobility, poverty, and hostility that encourage them to drop out of school. Further research is…

  14. Nonverbal Communication across Eastern-Western Cultures: Facial Expressions during Interviews of Japanese Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoo, Keiko

    2007-01-01

    Background: Effective educational evaluations involve interviews, observations and nonverbal cue interpretations. Educators carry out these evaluative activities everyday as instructors, advisors or administrators, often relying on nothing but their intuition. These evaluations inform the future decisions. One must determine if students really…

  15. A US-China Interview Study: Biology Students' Argumentation and Explanation about Energy Consumption Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Hui; Hokayem, Hayat; Wang, Sasha; Wei, Xin

    2016-01-01

    As China and the United States become the top two carbon emitters in the world, it is crucial for citizens in both countries to construct a sophisticated understanding of energy consumption issues. This interview study examines how U.S. and Chinese students compare in explaining and arguing about two critical energy consumption issues: burning…

  16. Community-Based Research and Student Development: An Interview with Trisha Thorme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shea, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of universities have implemented community-based research pedagogy into their undergraduate education. Integrating academic training with community engagement has the potential to engage students in a way volunteering may not. This interview with Trisha Thorme, an anthropologist and assistant director of Princeton University's…

  17. A Randomized Trial of Motivational Interviewing and Feedback with Heavy Drinking College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juarez, Patricia; Walters, Scott T.; Daugherty, Mikyta; Radi, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is a brief intervention that has been shown to reduce heavy drinking among college students. Because all college studies of MI to date have included a personalized feedback report, it remains unclear which of the components is necessary to produce behavior change. This study evaluated the separate and collective…

  18. A Randomized Trial of Motivational Interviewing and Feedback with Heavy Drinking College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juarez, Patricia; Walters, Scott T.; Daugherty, Mikyta; Radi, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is a brief intervention that has been shown to reduce heavy drinking among college students. Because all college studies of MI to date have included a personalized feedback report, it remains unclear which of the components is necessary to produce behavior change. This study evaluated the separate and collective…

  19. Students' perspectives on promoting healthful food choices from campus vending machines: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Habiba I; Jarrar, Amjad H; Abo-El-Enen, Mostafa; Al Shamsi, Mariam; Al Ashqar, Huda

    2015-05-28

    Increasing the healthfulness of campus food environments is an important step in promoting healthful food choices among college students. This study explored university students' suggestions on promoting healthful food choices from campus vending machines. It also examined factors influencing students' food choices from vending machines. Peer-led semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 43 undergraduate students (33 females and 10 males) recruited from students enrolled in an introductory nutrition course in a large national university in the United Arab Emirates. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and coded to generate themes using N-Vivo software. Accessibility, peer influence, and busy schedules were the main factors influencing students' food choices from campus vending machines. Participants expressed the need to improve the nutritional quality of the food items sold in the campus vending machines. Recommendations for students' nutrition educational activities included placing nutrition tips on or beside the vending machines and using active learning methods, such as competitions on nutrition knowledge. The results of this study have useful applications in improving the campus food environment and nutrition education opportunities at the university to assist students in making healthful food choices.

  20. Internet heavy use and addiction among Taiwanese college students: an online interview study.

    PubMed

    Chou, C

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents empirical qualitative results of Internet heavy-use and addiction among some college students in Taiwan. It offers in-depth, online interviews of student-subjects in order to facilitate an interdisciplinary understanding of Internet heavy use, addiction and its potential impacts. A total of 83 subjects were interviewed, both as individuals and in chat-room groups. The analysis of qualitative data presented in six major themes: (1) Internet use and reasons; (2) Internet features; (3) the Internet as replacement for other media; (4) impact of Internet overuse; (5) controlling Internet use; and (6) coping with Internet withdrawal. Discussions, explanations, along with examples and quotes from subjects, are provided in each section. Implications for student affairs administrators and further research directions are also addressed.

  1. Psychiatric comorbidity of internet addiction in college students: an interview study.

    PubMed

    Ko, C-H; Yen, J-Y; Chen, C-S; Chen, C-C; Yen, C-F

    2008-02-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the association between Internet addiction and depressive disorder, social phobia and adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a sample of Taiwanese college students; and examine gender differences in the psychiatric comorbidity of Internet addiction in this student population. Two hundred sixteen college students (132 males, 84 females) were recruited. Internet addiction, major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, social phobia, and adult ADHD of all participants were diagnosed based on psychiatric diagnostic interview. This study revealed that adult ADHD and depressive disorders were associated with Internet addiction among college students. However, depressive disorders were associated with Internet addiction in the males but not the females. With these results, it seems reasonable to suggest that effective evaluation of, and treatment for, adult ADHD and depressive disorders is required for college students with Internet addiction.

  2. Reflections on Addiction in Students Using Stimulants for Neuroenhancement: A Preliminary Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, Klaus; Franke, Andreas G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of stimulants for the purpose of pharmacological neuroenhancement (NE) among students is a subject of increasing public awareness. The risk of addiction development by stimulant use for NE is still unanswered. Therefore, face-to-face interviews were carried out among 18 university students experienced in the nonmedical use of methylphenidate and amphetamines for NE assessing aspects of addiction. Interviews were tape-recorded, verbatim-transcribed, and analyzed using a qualitative approach. The interviews showed that participants—the majority had current or lifetime diagnoses of misuse or addiction to alcohol or cannabis—reported an awareness of the risk of addiction development associated with stimulant use and reported various effects which may increase their likelihood of future stimulant use, for example, euphoric effects, increase of self-confidence, and motivation. They also cited measures to counteract the development of addiction as well as measures taken to normalize again after stimulant use. Students were convinced of having control over their stimulant use and of not becoming addicted to stimulants used for NE. We can conclude that behavior and beliefs of the students in our sample appear to be risky in terms of addiction development. However, long-term empirical research is needed to estimate the true risk of addiction. PMID:26064931

  3. Examining students' understanding of electrical circuits through multiple-choice testing and interviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Paula Vetter

    Research has shown that both high school and university students have misconceptions about direct current resistive electric circuits. At present, there are no standard diagnostic examinations in electric circuits. Such an instrument would be useful in determining what conceptual problems students have either before or after instruction. The information provided by the exam can be used by classroom instructors to evaluate their instructional methods and the progress and conceptual problems of their students. It can be used to evaluate curricular packages and/or other supplemental materials for their effectiveness in overcoming students' conceptual difficulties. Two versions of a diagnostic instrument known as Determining and Interpreting Resistive Electric circuits Concepts Tests (DIRECT) were developed, each consisting of 29 questions. DIRECT was administered to groups of high school and university students in the United States, Canada and Germany. The students had completed their study of electrostatics and direct current electric circuits prior to taking the exam. Individual interviews were conducted after the administration of version 1.0 to determine how students were interpreting the questions and to uncover their reasoning behind their selections. The analyses indicate that students, especially females, tend to hold multiple misconceptions, even after instruction. The idea that the battery is a constant source of current was used most often in answering the questions. Although students tend to use different misconceptions for each question presented, they do use misconceptions associated with the global objective of the question. Students' definitions of terms used on the exam and their misconceptions were examined. Students tended to confuse terms, especially current. They assigned the properties of current to voltage and/or resistance. One of the major findings from the study was that students were able to translate easily from a "realistic" representation

  4. Students' Conceptions about "Radiation": Results from an Explorative Interview Study of 9th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Susanne; Hopf, Martin

    2012-01-01

    One basis of good teaching is to know about your students' preconceptions. Studies about typical ideas that students bring to the science classroom have been and continue to be a major field in science education research. This study aims to explore associations and ideas that students have regarding "radiation", a term widely used in…

  5. Students' Conceptions about "Radiation": Results from an Explorative Interview Study of 9th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Susanne; Hopf, Martin

    2012-01-01

    One basis of good teaching is to know about your students' preconceptions. Studies about typical ideas that students bring to the science classroom have been and continue to be a major field in science education research. This study aims to explore associations and ideas that students have regarding "radiation", a term widely used in…

  6. Using a Simple, Free Voice-over-Internet Protocol Service to Add Interest to Lectures and Enhance Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaton, Susan J.; Forster, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of students in higher education report feeling bored during lectures, for example, Mann and Robinson (2009) put this figure at 60 per cent. This short article reviews our experiences of using a simple, free Voice-over-Internet Protocol (VoIP) service, Skype, to enhance the interest and engagement of students by holding a…

  7. Schools' Actions Add Up to Success in Raising Students' Mathematics Achievement. Best Practices for Implementing HSTW and MMGW

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2005

    2005-01-01

    Quality instruction and student engagement in mathematics are strategies that are becoming more vital as the new century unfolds. To prepare for living and working in a technically intensive world, high school students need a culture of high expectations, quality college-preparatory-level courses and numeracy across the curriculum. The following…

  8. Using a Simple, Free Voice-over-Internet Protocol Service to Add Interest to Lectures and Enhance Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaton, Susan J.; Forster, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of students in higher education report feeling bored during lectures, for example, Mann and Robinson (2009) put this figure at 60 per cent. This short article reviews our experiences of using a simple, free Voice-over-Internet Protocol (VoIP) service, Skype, to enhance the interest and engagement of students by holding a…

  9. Succeeding as a Student in the STEM Fields with an Invisible Disability: A College Handbook for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Students with Autism, ADD, Affective Disorders, or Learning Diffculties and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oslund, Christy

    2013-01-01

    The STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) attract many students with autism, ADD, affective disorders and related invisible disabilities who are highly intelligent and analytical, but who, upon entering higher education, may find that they struggle with independent living and a different way of learning. This is a preparation…

  10. [Consultation skills training is necessary in medical education. Evaluation by student questionnaire and focus group interviews].

    PubMed

    Löfdahl, Therese; Nilsson, Erika; Haffling, Ann-Christin; Håkansson, Anders

    At Lund University Medical School communication skills are taught during both the preclinical and clinical part of the medical programme. As part of the training during the 5th year the students are required to videotape at least one patient consultation at a local primary health care centre. The students then meet in groups of 6-7 participants and a group leader to watch the recorded consultations and discuss them. To evaluate the quality of the consultation skills training and to identify potential weaknesses, we used both a quantitative and a qualitative method. A written questionnaire was distributed to all students and three focus group interviews, two with students and one with group leaders, were performed. The focus groups consisted of 5-6 participants each. The students were overall pleased with the training, and the majority thought that their consultation skills had improved. More commitment from the tutors at the health care centres was needed in order for the students to successfully record a complete consultation. Nearly all students found that the participants cooperated well in the groups, and that the group leader helped to create a positive atmosphere and gave constructive advice.

  11. Supervisor descriptions of veterinary student performance in the clinical workplace: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Norman, E J

    2017-06-10

    This qualitative study investigated the qualities of veterinary student performance that inform a supervisor's impression of their competency. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 15 supervisors from different veterinary subdisciplines, to elicit descriptions of excellent, weak and marginal students. Thematic analysis of transcriptions revealed 12 themes, of which engagement was frequently discussed and of stated importance, and trustworthiness was a differentiator of weak and marginal students from excellent students. Other themes were knowledge, application of knowledge, technical and animal handling skills, communication, social interaction, personal functioning, caring for animals, impact, prospects and the difficulty in judging competency. Patterns of association of themes were found, however themes were also used independently in unique combinations for most students described. The findings show the range of abilities, behaviours, attitudes and personal characteristics of students that are considered by supervisors and how these are weighted and balanced. The key contribution of engagement and trustworthiness to the overall impression aligns with research indicating their importance for success in clinical practice, as both contributors to competency and indicators of it. The findings may inform future design and investigation of workplace-based learning and in-training evaluation, as well as conceptions of veterinary competency. British Veterinary Association.

  12. Learning about general practice through qualitative interviews: lessons from a seminar course with medical students.

    PubMed

    von Unger, Hella; Werwick, Katrin; Lichte, Thomas; Herrmann, Markus

    2010-01-01

    A seminar course was developed in order to train medical students in qualitative research methods, while providing an introduction to the field of General Practice. Students were enabled to conduct semi-structured interviews with general practitioners (GPs), during which they learned about the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of frequently encountered medical problems. The course was carried out four times at two universities in Germany. The study explores the students' learning experiences focusing on their research experience. Data were collected in four focus groups and analyzed. The students perceived the course as very different from their usual medical education. This was appreciated, but also caused some difficulties. Three themes emerged: (1) Missing 'facts', (2) New horizons: 'Thinking outside the box', and (3) The challenge of interpretation: 'Reading between the lines'. Learning qualitative research methods can be particularly challenging for medical students as the tasks and epistemology of qualitative research run counter to the usual learning formats and research paradigms in medical education. When teaching qualitative research, special care should be taken to address the cognitive dissonance experienced by students and to explain the unique contribution of qualitative research to medical practice and the field of General Practice especially.

  13. Does integrating research into the prosthetics and orthotics undergraduate curriculum enhance students' clinical practice? An interview study on students' perception.

    PubMed

    Al Qaroot, Bashar S; Sobuh, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Problem-based learning (where rather than feeding students the knowledge, they look for it themselves) has long been thought of as an ideal approach in teaching because it would encourage students to acquire knowledge from an undetermined medium of wrong and right answers. However, the effect of such approach in the learning experience of prosthetics and orthotics students has never been investigated. This study explores the implications of integrating problem-based learning into teaching on the students' learning experience via implementing a research-informed clinical practice module into the curriculum of last year prosthetics and orthotics undergraduate students at the University of Jordan (Amman, Jordan). Qualitative research pilot study. Grounded theory approach was used based on the data collected from interviewing a focus group of four students. Students have identified a number of arguments from their experience in the research-informed clinical practice where, generally speaking, students described research-informed clinical practice as a very good method of education. Integrating problem-based learning into teaching has many positive implications. In particular, students pointed out that their learning experience and clinical practice have much improved after the research-informed clinical practice. Findings from this investigation demonstrate that embedding problem-based learning into prosthetics and orthotics students' curriculum has the potential to enhance students' learning experience, particularly students' evidence-based practice. This may lead to graduates who are more knowledgeable and thus who can offer the optimal patient care (i.e. clinical practice). © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  14. Patient-centered interviewing and student performance in a comprehensive clinical skills examination: is there an association?

    PubMed

    Rouf, Emran; Chumley, Heidi; Dobbie, Alison

    2009-04-01

    Communication skills, including patient-centered interviewing (PCI), have become a major priority for educational and licensing organizations in the United States. While patient-centered interviewing is associated with positive patient outcomes and improved diagnostic accuracy, it is unknown if an association exists between patient-centered interviewing and student performance in high-stakes clinical skills assessment (CSA) examinations. The purpose of this study was to determine if generic communication skills and patient-centered interviewing skills were associated with students' overall student performance on a multi-station clinical skills assessment (CSA) examination. This was a cross-sectional study to assess student performance with standardized patients (SPs). We conducted a retrospective review of 30 videotaped SP encounters of Third year medical students (class of 2006) at the University of Kansas School of Medicine. We measured correlations between observed PCI scores, overall CSA scores and CSA interpersonal and communication (ICS) skills scores of student-SP encounters. PCI scores, as measured with the Four Habits Coding Scheme, a measurement tool of patient-centered communication, were not correlated with either overall CSA scores or ICS scores. Students' PCI scores were lower than the ICS scores (57% vs. 85% of correct items). The students performed poorly (30% mean score of correct items) in eliciting patient perspectives, compared to three other domains (Invest in the beginning, Demonstrate empathy, and Invest in end) of patient-centered interviewing. Our study failed to demonstrate any association between student performance and patient-centered interviewing skills (PCI) in the setting of a comprehensive in-house CSA examination. Third-year medical students in our study did not practice some elements of patient-centered interviewing. Given the increasing importance of patient-centered communication, the high-stakes in-house clinical skills

  15. Questions and Reflections: The Use of Motivational Interviewing Microskills in a Peer-Led Brief Alcohol Intervention for College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tollison, Sean J.; Lee, Christine M.; Neighbors, Clayton; Neil, Teryl A.; Olson, Nichole D.; Larimer, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between peer facilitator adherence to motivational interviewing (MI) microskills and college student drinking behavior. First year students (N=67) took part in a Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) led by peer facilitators trained in MI and BASICS.…

  16. A Comparison of Teacher and Student Functional Behavior Assessment Interview Information from Low-risk and High-risk Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinch, Carol; Lewis-Palmer, Teri; Hagan-Burke, Shanna; Sugai, George

    2001-01-01

    A study examined the usefulness of information secured from eight students displaying substantially more problem behaviors in one classroom (high-risk) than another, and 16 teachers. Students were able to provide reliable information in the functional assessment interview. Moderate to high agreement was obtained between students and teachers in…

  17. How Chemistry Graduate Students and Researchers Are Finding and Using Chemical Information: Findings from Interviews in a Chinese University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yuening

    2017-01-01

    Although scholarship has addressed issues around serving international students in U.S. and Canadian libraries, reports on how Chinese graduate students use information in Chinese universities, especially for a particular discipline, are rare. In this study, the author interviewed 15 graduate students and researchers in a top-ranked chemistry…

  18. How Can Medical Students Add Value? Identifying Roles, Barriers, and Strategies to Advance the Value of Undergraduate Medical Education to Patient Care and the Health System.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Dekhtyar, Michael; Hawkins, Richard E; Wolpaw, Daniel R

    2017-09-01

    As health systems evolve, the education community is seeking to reimagine student roles that combine learning with meaningful contributions to patient care. The authors sought to identify potential stakeholders regarding the value of student work, and roles and tasks students could perform to add value to the health system, including key barriers and associated strategies to promote value-added roles in undergraduate medical education. In 2016, 32 U.S. medical schools in the American Medical Association's (AMA's) Accelerating Change in Education Consortium met for a two-day national meeting to explore value-added medical education; 121 educators, systems leaders, clinical mentors, AMA staff leadership and advisory board members, and medical students were included. A thematic qualitative analysis of workshop discussions and written responses was performed, which extracted key themes. In current clinical roles, students can enhance value by performing detailed patient histories to identify social determinants of health and care barriers, providing evidence-based medicine contributions at the point-of-care, and undertaking health system research projects. Novel value-added roles include students serving as patient navigators/health coaches, care transition facilitators, population health managers, and quality improvement team extenders. Six priority areas for advancing value-added roles are student engagement, skills, and assessments; balance of service versus learning; resources, logistics, and supervision; productivity/billing pressures; current health systems design and culture; and faculty factors. These findings provide a starting point for collaborative work to positively impact clinical care and medical education through the enhanced integration of value-added medical student roles into care delivery systems.

  19. "Recombinant Protein of the Day": Using Daily Student Presentations to Add Real-World Aspects to a Biotechnology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Justin F.

    2013-01-01

    To provide a realistic view of the biotechnology industry for students, a novel course focusing on recombinant proteins and their importance in medicine, pharmaceuticals, industry, scientific research, and agriculture was developed. ''Designer Proteins and Society,'' an upper-division elective, was taught in the Fall 2012 semester to 16 junior,…

  20. "Recombinant Protein of the Day": Using Daily Student Presentations to Add Real-World Aspects to a Biotechnology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Justin F.

    2013-01-01

    To provide a realistic view of the biotechnology industry for students, a novel course focusing on recombinant proteins and their importance in medicine, pharmaceuticals, industry, scientific research, and agriculture was developed. ''Designer Proteins and Society,'' an upper-division elective, was taught in the Fall 2012 semester to 16 junior,…

  1. Peer-Assisted History-Taking Groups: A Subjective Assessment of their Impact Upon Medical Students' Interview Skills.

    PubMed

    Keifenheim, Katharina Eva; Petzold, Ernst Richard; Junne, Florian; Erschens, Rebecca Sarah; Speiser, Natalie; Herrmann-Werner, Anne; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Among the clinical skills needed by all physicians, history taking is one of the most important. The teaching model for peer-assisted history-taking groups investigated in the present study consists of small-group courses in which students practice conducting medical interviews with real patients. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the expectations, experiences, and subjective learning progress of participants in peer-assisted history-taking groups. Methods: The 42 medical student participants completed a 4-month, peer-assisted, elective history-taking course, which both began and ended with a subjective assessment of their interview skills by way of a pseudonymized questionnaire. Measures comprised the students' self-assessment of their interview skills, their expectations of, and their experiences with the course and especially with the peer tutors. Results: Medical students' most important motivations in attending peer-assisted history-taking groups were becoming able to complete a structured medical interview, to mitigate difficult interviewing situations, and to address patients' emotional demands appropriately. By the end of the course, students' self-assessment of both their interview skills and management of emotional issues improved significantly. Students especially benefitted from individual feedback regarding interview style and relationship formation, as well as generally accepted and had their expectations met by peer tutors. Conclusions: To meet the important learning objectives of history-taking and management of emotional issues, as well as self-reflection and reflection of student-patient interactions, students in the field greatly appreciate practicing medical interviewing in small, peer-assisted groups with real patients. At the same time, peer tutors are experienced to be helpful and supportive and can help students to overcome inhibitions in making contact with patients.

  2. Teaching dental students motivational interviewing techniques: analysis of a third-year class assignment.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Jessica G

    2010-12-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) has been promoted in recent years as an effective method for engaging patients in positive health behaviors and increasing adherence to treatment regimens. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a brief training of MI techniques provided within the dental school curriculum. Third-year dental students received three hours of instruction on MI theory and techniques and then were assigned to use the method with a patient and report on their attempt in a paper. To determine if the brief training and paper assignment were effective methods for training students and assessing their understanding of MI methods, the papers were analyzed to assess aspects of the students' self-reported use of MI-related methods. Effective use of MI techniques was demonstrated by students who appropriately matched their intervention to the patient's stage of readiness to change, accurately recognized patient resistance, and responded to resistance. The paper assignment appeared to be an effective method to assess the students' use and understanding of MI-related techniques.

  3. The Impact of Motivational Interviewing Feedback and Coaching on School Counseling Graduate Students' Motivational Interviewing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart-Donaldson, Carla

    2012-01-01

    School counselors have potential to make significant gains in closing the achievement gap for all students as advocated for by the American School Counseling Association. School counseling is moving away from the no-model model of services delivery that places counselors at the whim of principals, parents and teachers who traditionally define…

  4. Multiple mini interviews for selection of dental students: influence of gender and starting station.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Michele E; Sandy, Jonathan R

    2014-04-01

    Multiple Mini Interviews (MMI) are an increasingly popular tool for selecting entrants to undergraduate degree programs in dentistry in the United Kingdom. This article reports on the use of MMI to select dental students at the University of Bristol, United Kingdom, over two successive admissions cycles (2011-12 and 2012-13). MMI provided an efficient means to discriminate between the performance of applicants who were all academically highly qualified, with total scores ranging from 35 percent to 87 percent of the maximum possible score. Female candidates performed significantly better than male candidates when assessed by total score (p=0.011; mean score 94.4 for female applicants and 91.9 for male applicants) and by outcome (offer/decline; p=0.016; 58.6 percent of female and 46.4 percent of male interviewees received an offer of study following interview). There was no statistically significant effect of starting station on candidate performance (p=0.359), indicating that a candidate's overall chance of success in the MMI was not influenced by which station he or she experienced first. Stakeholder acceptance was good, with 75 percent of candidates and 95 percent of assessors preferring MMI over traditional interviews.

  5. Can Multiple Mini-Interviews Predict Academic Performance of Dental Students? A Two-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Alaki, Sumer M; Yamany, Ibrahim A; Shinawi, Lana A; Hassan, Mona H A; Tekian, Ara

    2016-11-01

    Prior research has shown that students' previous grade point average (GPA) is the best predictor for future academic success. However, it can only partly predict the variability in dental school performance. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of multiple mini-interviews (MMI) as an admission criterion by comparing them with the academic performance of dental students over a two-year period. All incoming undergraduate dental students at the King Abdulaziz University Faculty of Dentistry (KAUFD) during academic year 2013-14 were invited to participate in MMI. Students rotated through six objective structured clinical exam (OSCE)-like stations for 30 minutes total and were interviewed by two trained faculty interviewers at each station. The stations were focused on noncognitive skills thought to be essential to academic performance at KAUFD. The academic performance of these students was then followed for two years and linked to their MMI scores. A total of 146 students (71 males and 75 females) participated in an interview (response rate=92.9%). Most students scored in the acceptable range at each MMI station. Students' total MMI score, ambitions, and motives were significant predictors of GPA during the two years of follow-up (p<0.038 and p<0.001, respectively). In this study, MMI was found to be able to predict future academic performance of undergraduate dental students.

  6. What Factors Affect Nursing Students' Decisions of Whether to Take Rural Jobs: An Exploratory Interview Study in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, Yuexian; Haycock-Stuart, Elaine; Rodgers, Sheila E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore factors that effect nursing students' decisions of whether to take rural jobs in China. Methods: An exploratory interview study was conducted in China during May and June 2011. Eleven final year nursing students were purposively recruited from four nursing schools in one eastern area in China. The…

  7. Linking Rhetorical Sensitivity with the Ability of an Athletic Training Student to Successfully Perform a Patient Medical Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertoncino, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which the self-reported rhetorical sensitivity of a sample of athletic training students is positively related to successfully performing a patient medical interview. Particularly, the study focused on if athletic training students' reported communication behaviors is related to their…

  8. Attitudes to Teaching Ethics to Bioscience Students: An Interview-Based Study Comparing British and American University Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, John A.; Morgan, Cindy L.

    2007-01-01

    An interview-based survey was carried out with British and American university teachers. In both countries there was widespread (but in the UK, not unanimous) support for the proposition that ethics should be taught to Bioscience students. Reasons included a need to help students engage with the ethical issues associated with their subject and the…

  9. Attitudes to Teaching Ethics to Bioscience Students: An Interview-Based Study Comparing British and American University Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, John A.; Morgan, Cindy L.

    2007-01-01

    An interview-based survey was carried out with British and American university teachers. In both countries there was widespread (but in the UK, not unanimous) support for the proposition that ethics should be taught to Bioscience students. Reasons included a need to help students engage with the ethical issues associated with their subject and the…

  10. Linking Rhetorical Sensitivity with the Ability of an Athletic Training Student to Successfully Perform a Patient Medical Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertoncino, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which the self-reported rhetorical sensitivity of a sample of athletic training students is positively related to successfully performing a patient medical interview. Particularly, the study focused on if athletic training students' reported communication behaviors is related to their…

  11. Qualitative Investigation of the "Cooking with Kids" Program: Focus Group Interviews with Fourth-Grade Students, Teachers, and Food Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukas, Catherine V.; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Focus group (FG) interviews with students and adults were used to obtain a rich understanding of the "Cooking with Kids" classroom experience from the child and adult participant perspectives. Methods: FG topics included students' cooking experiences at school and home and perceptions of "Cooking with Kids". Verified transcripts of…

  12. Qualitative Investigation of the "Cooking with Kids" Program: Focus Group Interviews with Fourth-Grade Students, Teachers, and Food Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukas, Catherine V.; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Focus group (FG) interviews with students and adults were used to obtain a rich understanding of the "Cooking with Kids" classroom experience from the child and adult participant perspectives. Methods: FG topics included students' cooking experiences at school and home and perceptions of "Cooking with Kids". Verified transcripts of…

  13. Postgraduate career intentions of medical students and recent graduates in Malawi: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2004, the Malawian Ministry of Health declared a human resource crisis and launched a six year Emergency Human Resources Programme. This included salary supplements for key health workers and a tripling of doctors in training. By 2010, the number of medical graduates had doubled and significantly more doctors were working in rural district hospitals. Yet there has been little research into the views of this next generation of doctors in Malawi, who are crucial to the continuing success of the programme. The aim of this study was to explore the factors influencing the career plans of medical students and recent graduates with regard to four policy-relevant aspects: emigration outside Malawi; working at district level; private sector employment and postgraduate specialisation. Methods Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with fourth year medical students and first year graduates, recruited through purposive and snowball sampling. Key informant interviews were also carried out with medical school faculty. Recordings were transcribed and analysed using a framework approach. Results Opportunities for postgraduate training emerged as the most important factor in participants’ career choices, with specialisation seen as vital to career progression. All participants intended to work in Malawi in the long term, after a period of time outside the country. For nearly all participants, this was in the pursuit of postgraduate study rather than higher salaries. In general, medical students and young doctors were enthusiastic about working at district level, although this is curtailed by their desire for specialist training and frustration with resource shortages. There is currently little intention to move into the private sector. Conclusions Future resourcing of postgraduate training opportunities is crucial to preventing emigration as graduate numbers increase. The lesser importance put on salary by younger doctors may be an indicator of the success

  14. Nursing and Dental Hygiene Selection Procedures. Part I: The Structured Interview as a Tool for Selecting Students into an Associate of Arts Degree Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatham, Elaine L.; And Others

    A structured interview procedure was used during the spring of 1975 as a tool in selecting nursing and dental hygiene students at Johnson County Community College. Potential students had two 20-minute interviews: one by a staff member of the program to which application was made, and one by another staff member. Interviewers rated the applicants…

  15. How many schools adopt interviews during the student admission process across the health professions in the United States of America?

    PubMed

    Glazer, Greer; Startsman, Laura F; Bankston, Karen; Michaels, Julia; Danek, Jennifer C; Fair, Malika

    2016-01-01

    Health profession schools use interviews during the admissions process to identify certain non-cognitive skills that are needed for success in diverse, inter-professional settings. This study aimed to assess the use of interviews during the student admissions process across health disciplines at schools in the United States of America in 2014. The type and frequency of non-cognitive skills assessed were also evaluated. Descriptive methods were used to analyze a sample of interview rubrics collected as part of a national survey on admissions in the health professions, which surveyed 228 schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and public health. Of the 228 schools, 130 used interviews. The most desirable non-cognitive skills from 34 schools were identified as follows: communication skills (30), motivation (22), readiness for the profession (17), service (12), and problem-solving (12). Ten schools reported using the multiple mini-interview format, which may indicate potential for expanding this practice. Disparities in the use of interviewing across health professions should be verified to help schools adopt interviews during student admissions processes.

  16. Factors perceived to influence risky sexual behaviours among university students in the United Kingdom: a qualitative telephone interview study.

    PubMed

    Chanakira, Elton; O'Cathain, Alicia; Goyder, Elizabeth C; Freeman, Jennifer V

    2014-10-09

    In the United Kingdom people under the age of 25 years are at increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections. Most university students belong to this age group but little is known about their sexual behaviours. The aim of the study was to explore university students' perspectives of factors and mechanisms that influence risky sexual behaviours among university students in the United Kingdom. All students at a university in a northern city of England were invited via email to participate in qualitative telephone interviews. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Framework analytical approach was used. Twenty interviews were conducted with a diverse sample of students. The social context of university lifestyle was perceived to affect risky sex through high levels of alcohol consumption, increased sexual opportunities, liberation from moral surveillance and expectations of the stereotypical highly sexually active student. Individual and cultural differences were also perceived to account for some patterns of risky sex with older students, overseas students and religious students perceived to be less likely to engage in risky sex due to academic priorities and a tendency to be more likely to adhere to moral values. Risk denial was also a key factor that led students to engage in risky sex. Poor access to sexual health services including inconvenient opening times, lack of confidentiality and stigma were perceived to contribute to the limited use of sexually transmitted infections testing and contraceptive services. Lifestyle, individual and structural factors seem to play an important role in influencing the risky sexual behaviours of university students. Therefore preventive interventions that focus on these factors could be very useful in this sub-population of young people. This study provides useful baseline information that helps us understand how and why some United Kingdom university students engage in risky sexual behaviours

  17. Selection Interviews of Students for Master's Programs in Counseling: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagpal, Smita; Ritchie, Martin H.

    2002-01-01

    Counselor education faculty were interviewed regarding the evaluation criteria and decision-making processes used during selection interviews. Ten characteristics were identified that participants looked for during interviews. There was a high degree of agreement among participants on the evaluation criteria they used. However, the same…

  18. Interview Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detroit Public Schools, MI.

    The questions in this interview guide pertain to the Detroit Public Schools Uniform Code of Student Conduct and City Wide Attendance Regulations. They are directed to school principals and assistant principals. The questions help to determine if the Uniform Code and Attendance Regulations were disseminated, if orientations were carried out, and…

  19. An Analysis of the Relationship between Principal Employment Interview Scores and the Achievement Scores of Students with Specific Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostmeyer, Susan S.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between five of ISSLC's 2008 leadership standards as measured by a standardized employment interview (ICIS Principal) and the achievement of students with specific learning disabilities in core areas of instruction. Findings did not support the rejection of the null hypothesis.…

  20. "Bigger Number Means You Plus!"--Teachers Learning to Use Clinical Interviews to Understand Students' Mathematical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heng, Mary Anne; Sudarshan, Akhila

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the perceptions and understandings of ten grades 1 and 2 Singapore mathematics teachers as they learned to use clinical interviews (Ginsburg, "Human Development" 52:109-128, 2009) to understand students' mathematical thinking. This study challenged teachers' pedagogical assumptions about what it means to teach for…

  1. High-School Students' Approaches to Solving Algebra Problems that Are Posed Symbolically: Results from an Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntley, Mary Ann; Davis, Jon D.

    2008-01-01

    A cross-curricular structured-probe task-based clinical interview study with 44 pairs of third year high-school mathematics students, most of whom were high achieving, was conducted to investigate their approaches to a variety of algebra problems. This paper presents results from three problems that were posed in symbolic form. Two problems are…

  2. High-School Students' Approaches to Solving Algebra Problems that Are Posed Symbolically: Results from an Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntley, Mary Ann; Davis, Jon D.

    2008-01-01

    A cross-curricular structured-probe task-based clinical interview study with 44 pairs of third year high-school mathematics students, most of whom were high achieving, was conducted to investigate their approaches to a variety of algebra problems. This paper presents results from three problems that were posed in symbolic form. Two problems are…

  3. Dosage Effects of Motivational Interviewing on Middle-School Students' Academic Performance: Randomized Evaluation of One versus Two Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, John; Strait, Gill; McQuillin, Sam; Smith, Bradley H.

    2014-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is a brief client-centred intervention that increases intrinsic motivation for change. Little research has been conducted on MI to promote academic behaviours, but two studies found that one session of MI did improve middle-school students' math grades [Strait, G., Smith, B., McQuillin, S., Terry, J., Swan, S., &…

  4. Dosage Effects of Motivational Interviewing on Middle-School Students' Academic Performance: Randomized Evaluation of One versus Two Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, John; Strait, Gill; McQuillin, Sam; Smith, Bradley H.

    2014-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is a brief client-centred intervention that increases intrinsic motivation for change. Little research has been conducted on MI to promote academic behaviours, but two studies found that one session of MI did improve middle-school students' math grades [Strait, G., Smith, B., McQuillin, S., Terry, J., Swan, S., &…

  5. Keeping Up Appearances: How Practitioners Can Help Students Make Positive Impressions (and Avoid Fashion Faux Pas) During the Interview Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansen, Karol A. D.; Steele, Markell

    1999-01-01

    Presents results of the UCLA career center's 1999 Business Attire Survey. The survey polled recruiters about appropriate apparel and accessories for students interviewing for entry-level jobs. Also discusses recruiters' responses beyond the survey questions that reflect corporate policy and personal opinions and help illuminate the quantitative…

  6. Career advising in family medicine: a theoretical framework for structuring the medical student/faculty advisor interview.

    PubMed

    Bradner, Melissa; Crossman, Steven H; Vanderbilt, Allison A; Gary, Judy; Munson, Paul

    2013-08-13

    There are unique challenges to recruiting students into the specialty of family medicine within academic medical centers. At Virginia Commonwealth University, we developed an advising framework to help students address institutional and personal obstacles to choosing family medicine as a career. The role of a faculty advisor is not to direct the student to a career choice but rather to foster a mentor relationship and help the student come to his or her own realizations regarding career choice. The faculty advisor/medical student interview is conceptualized as five discussion topics: self-knowledge, perception, organizational voice, cognitive dissonance, and anticipatory counseling. This framework is intended to assist faculty in their efforts to encourage students to consider a career in family medicine.

  7. Career advising in family medicine: a theoretical framework for structuring the medical student/faculty advisor interview.

    PubMed

    Bradner, Melissa; Crossman, Steven H; Vanderbilt, Allison A; Gary, Judy; Munson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background There are unique challenges to recruiting students into the specialty of family medicine within academic medical centers. Methods At Virginia Commonwealth University, we developed an advising framework to help students address institutional and personal obstacles to choosing family medicine as a career. Results The role of a faculty advisor is not to direct the student to a career choice but rather to foster a mentor relationship and help the student come to his or her own realizations regarding career choice. The faculty advisor/medical student interview is conceptualized as five discussion topics: self-knowledge, perception, organizational voice, cognitive dissonance, and anticipatory counseling. Conclusion This framework is intended to assist faculty in their efforts to encourage students to consider a career in family medicine.

  8. Dunno if you've any plans for the future: medical student indirect questioning in simulated oncology interviews.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Céline; Stiefel, Friedrich; Berney, Alexandre; Singy, Pascal

    2012-03-02

    This exploratory study investigated the motives of medical students (N = 63) for using indirect questions of the type I don't know if [you have already heard about chemotherapies], I don't know how [you are], or I don't know what [you do for a living] in simulated patient interviews during a communication skills course. I don't know questions (IDK-Qs) were observed during the initial evaluation of students' communication skills; they were systematically identified through video screening and subjected to a qualitative content and discourse analysis considering their context, their content, their intent and their effect on the simulated patients. To evaluate the specificity of medical students' IDK-Qs, the data were compared with a data set of oncologists (N = 31) conducting simulated patient interviews in the context of a Communication Skills Training (CST). During the interviews, 41.3% of the students asked 1-6 IDK-Qs. The IDK-Qs were attributed to three content categories: medical/treatment questions (N = 24); lifestyle/psychosocial questions (N = 18); and "inviting questions" questions (N = 11). Most of the IDK-Qs had an exploratory function (46/53), with simulated patients providing detailed responses or asking for more information (36/53). IDK-Qs were rare in the oncologist sample compared to the student sample (5 vs. 53 occurrences). IDK-Qs showed a question design difference between medical students and oncologists in simulated patient interviews. Among other reasons for this difference, the possible function of IDK-Qs as a protective linguistic strategy and marker for psychological discomfort is discussed.

  9. Constructed-Response as an Alternative to Interviews in Conceptual Change Studies: Students' Explanations of Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleigh, Sharon Price; Clark, Douglas B.; Menekse, Muhsin

    2015-01-01

    Although interview formats support rich data collection in conceptual change studies, interview formats limit sample sizes. This study explores the possibility of using constructed-response formats as an alternative or supplement for collecting similarly rich data across larger pools of subjects in conceptual change studies. While research in…

  10. Utilizing the Walking Interview to Explore Campus Climate for Students of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the walking interview as a qualitative tool to assess campus climate. Using examples from a study that employed the walking interview, the author elucidates how this method of data collection allows for in situ understandings of participants' perceptions, spatial practices, biographies, social architecture, and social realms…

  11. Relationship of Medical Students' Admission Interview Scores to Their Dean's Letter Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Frances R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study found that the admission interview scores for 62 Dartmouth Medical School (New Hampshire) applicants correlated positively with dean's letter ratings given 4 years later and that interview scores were better predictors of ratings than were total Medical College Admission Test scores or science grade point averages. (Author/MSE)

  12. Utilizing the Walking Interview to Explore Campus Climate for Students of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the walking interview as a qualitative tool to assess campus climate. Using examples from a study that employed the walking interview, the author elucidates how this method of data collection allows for in situ understandings of participants' perceptions, spatial practices, biographies, social architecture, and social realms…

  13. Interview with a Cyber-Student: A Look behind Online Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Julia

    2014-01-01

    This case study offers insights into the motivation and experiences of a cyber-student, an individual who completes all or portions of an online class for the registered student. The cyber-student shares information on the inner-workings of online companies specializing in matching cyber-students with potential clients. A portrait of both a…

  14. Interview with a Cyber-Student: A Look behind Online Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Julia

    2014-01-01

    This case study offers insights into the motivation and experiences of a cyber-student, an individual who completes all or portions of an online class for the registered student. The cyber-student shares information on the inner-workings of online companies specializing in matching cyber-students with potential clients. A portrait of both a…

  15. Students' exposure and career aspirations in ecology: A study using semi-structured interviews to gain knowledge of public school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Heather C.

    Ecology as a field is dominated by white males, McCarter (2003) has noted that women and minorities are underrepresented in the discipline of ecology across the United States. The contribution of this research is to assess and quantify, in a scientific manner, students' exposure, and career aspirations towards ecology; 226 student responses were coded from semi-structured interviews. The main objectives of this study, using student interviews, were the following: (1) assess the importance of exposure to ecology and ecological related topics to: gender, ethnicity, region, grades in science, grades in non-science, grade level, and interest in ecology career. (2) determine if early exposure to ecology (i.e. gained in high school) and ecological related topics is related to an increased interest of students continuing in an ecologically related field and (3) assess if high school students who have been involved in more outdoor related activities such as camping, hiking, hunting, and/or fishing, will be more likely to be interested in an ecological career. Overall, the results indicated that students interviewed for this study generally responded in a positive manner, and were generally interested in ecology. Some students were even interested in pursuing a career in ecology. The study revealed significant differences in the exposure of ecology between school locations, girls and boys, and whites and non-whites. The results of this research and avenues for future research are discussed.

  16. Perspective: moving students beyond an organ-based approach when teaching medical interviewing and physical examination skills.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Erik K

    2008-10-01

    Medical interviewing and physical examination skills are core pillars of clinical medicine. Though nearly all U.S. medical students participate in preclinical courses designed to teach these skills, medical school faculty often comment that students' abilities remain limited on entering their clinical clerkships. The reason for this contention is not clear.The author briefly describes the current preclinical curricula at most medical schools that are designed to teach patient interviewing and examination. An organ-based curriculum is commonly employed, although the limitations of such an approach readily become apparent. For example, many hospitalized patients do not suffer from single-organ illnesses, but rather from infections or metabolic derangements, which cause numerous abnormalities to several body systems. Furthermore, clinical reasoning skills are rarely taught in such preclinical courses, though these abilities form the foundation for effective doctoring. These findings suggest an opportunity for content development surrounding patient interviewing and examination. The author proposes an educational approach that depicts how the confluence of both content knowledge skills and clinical reasoning skills can work synergistically to enhance preclinical teaching of the medical interview and physical examination.

  17. Effect of a Direct Instruction Flashcard System for Increasing the Performance of Basic Division Facts for a Middle School Student with ADD/OHI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjordahl, Michaelyn; Talboy, Rebeccah; Neyman, Jennifer; McLaughlin, T. F.; Hoenike, Richelle

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a Direct Instruction (DI) flashcard system on the mastery, accuracy and fluency of basic division math facts (numbers 0-12) for a seventh grade boy, diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). The effects of the DI flashcard system were examined in a multiple baseline design across…

  18. ADD: How Does It Add Up in the Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumpter, R. David; Kidd, Libby

    1998-01-01

    Gives a short history of attention-deficit disorder (ADD), describes characteristics of ADD, discusses a four-step plan for identification of ADD, and presents four types of management techniques: medical, environmental, classroom activity, and behavioral management. Stresses importance of cooperation and communication among teacher, parent, and…

  19. Teaching Motivational Interviewing Skills to Third-Year Psychiatry Clerkship Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole; Morrison, Ann K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite a large percentage of health care costs being related to smoking, obesity, and substance abuse, most physicians are not confident in motivating patients to change health behaviors. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a directive, patient-centered approach for eliciting behavior change. The purpose of this study was to teach…

  20. Developing Student Critical Thinking Skills through Teaching Psychology: An Interview with Claudio S. Hutz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy-Tucker, Sherri

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Claudio S. Hutz, who is dean of Instituto de Psicologia at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre, Brazil, where he has been teaching psychology since 1977. Discusses topics such as teaching psychology in Brazil and developing critical thinking skills. (CMK)

  1. Psychology of Women and the Potential for Influencing Students' Lives: An Interview with Margaret W. Matlin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Wallendael, Lori R.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Margaret Matlin, a teaching professor at the State University of New York (SUNY) Geneseo. Focuses on the courses Matlin taught when first at SUNY Geneseo, what she currently teaches, her psychology of women course, special techniques she uses, and whether she feels she is a natural born teacher. (CMK)

  2. A Medical Interviewing Curriculum Intervention for Medical Students' Assessment of Suicide Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Tate, Jodi; Miller, Anthony C.; Franklin, Ellen M.; Gourley, Ryan; Rosenbaum, Marcy

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Effective communication strategies are required to assess suicide risk. The authors determined whether a 2-hour simulated-patient activity during a psychiatry clerkship improved self-assessment of medical interviewing skills relevant to suicide risk-assessment. Methods: In the 2-hour simulated-patient intervention, at least one…

  3. Getting a Foot in the Door: Helping Education Students "Kick It" during Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huss, Robyn; Johnson, Christie; Butler, Judy

    2016-01-01

    The college of education involved in this study has programs for preservice teachers and educational leadership candidates. Each spring these groups participate in a hiring simulation, when aspiring leaders interview aspiring teachers through role-play in a mock setting. This endeavor provides a simulated hiring environment designed to better…

  4. Motivational Interviewing: An Evidence-Based Practice for Improving Student Practice Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohman, Melinda; Pierce, Paloma; Barnett, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based communication method to assist clients in resolving their ambivalence regarding change. With a school emphasis on evidence-based practice and learning outcomes, a social work department implemented a semester-long course on MI. The purpose of this study was to determine baseline skills and…

  5. Teaching Motivational Interviewing Skills to Third-Year Psychiatry Clerkship Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole; Morrison, Ann K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite a large percentage of health care costs being related to smoking, obesity, and substance abuse, most physicians are not confident in motivating patients to change health behaviors. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a directive, patient-centered approach for eliciting behavior change. The purpose of this study was to teach…

  6. Developing Student Critical Thinking Skills through Teaching Psychology: An Interview with Claudio S. Hutz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy-Tucker, Sherri

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Claudio S. Hutz, who is dean of Instituto de Psicologia at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre, Brazil, where he has been teaching psychology since 1977. Discusses topics such as teaching psychology in Brazil and developing critical thinking skills. (CMK)

  7. A Course in Medical Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froelich, Robert E.

    1969-01-01

    Course develops medical interviewing skills of students through a programed manual, role-playing exercises, programed patients and medical interviewing films, and the writing of medical histories. (IR)

  8. Weight Training Adds Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutter, June

    1995-01-01

    Secondary level physical education teachers can have their students use math concepts while working out on the weight-room equipment. The article explains how students can reinforce math skills while weightlifting by estimating their strength, estimating their power, or calculating other formulas. (SM)

  9. What Community College Developmental Mathematics Students Understand about Mathematics, Part 2: The Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givvin, Karen B.; Stigler, James W.; Thompson, Belinda J.

    2011-01-01

    In a prior issue of "MathAMATYC Educator," we reported on our efforts to find out what community college developmental mathematics students understand about mathematics (Stigler, Givvin, & Thompson, 2010). Our work painted a distressing picture of students' mathematical knowledge. No matter what kind of mathematical question we…

  10. Student-Driven Interviewing: Practical Strategies for Building Strength-Based Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The principles and practices of positive psychology are gaining wider acceptance among school psychologists (Gilman, Huebner, & Furlong, 2009). Unlike traditional assessment and intervention practices that focus primarily on what is wrong and missing with students, positive practices focus on what is right and working with students--strengths,…

  11. The Neglected Minority: Interviews with Successful Community College Students from Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollifield-Hoyle, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Poverty in the US is growing at an alarming rate. The current economic climate demands higher education to embrace the economic diversity of all students and to prepare them, regardless of economic class, for a globally competitive workplace. Unfortunately, the higher education community is not as adept at serving low-income students, as it is…

  12. Challenges Confronted by Korean Students in a Chinese University: An Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ying; Liu, Meihua

    2015-01-01

    During recent decades, both institutions of higher education and university students of the world are trying to become international by offering or gaining some form of international education, which has caught the attention of increasingly more researchers (Jackson, 2004; Trenchs-Parera, 2009). As East Asian students have increasingly become the…

  13. Seventh-Grade Students' Understanding of Chemical Reactions: Reflections from an Action Research Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eilks, Ingo; Moellering, Jens; Valanides, Nicos

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses seventh-grade students' explanations of dissolution and combustion and also identifies their understanding of the differences between physical and chemical changes. A teaching strategy was initially negotiated within an action research group and this strategy was then employed in teaching seventh-grade students. The teaching…

  14. Developing Students' Cultural Intelligence through an Experiential Learning Activity: A Cross-Cultural Consumer Behavior Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurpis, Lada Helen; Hunter, James

    2017-01-01

    Business schools can increase their competitiveness by offering students intercultural skills development opportunities integrated into the traditional curricula. This article makes a contribution by proposing an approach to developing students' cultural intelligence that is based on the cultural intelligence (CQ) model, experiential learning…

  15. Seventh-Grade Students' Understanding of Chemical Reactions: Reflections from an Action Research Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eilks, Ingo; Moellering, Jens; Valanides, Nicos

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses seventh-grade students' explanations of dissolution and combustion and also identifies their understanding of the differences between physical and chemical changes. A teaching strategy was initially negotiated within an action research group and this strategy was then employed in teaching seventh-grade students. The teaching…

  16. The Neglected Minority: Interviews with Successful Community College Students from Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollifield-Hoyle, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Poverty in the US is growing at an alarming rate. The current economic climate demands higher education to embrace the economic diversity of all students and to prepare them, regardless of economic class, for a globally competitive workplace. Unfortunately, the higher education community is not as adept at serving low-income students, as it is…

  17. Exploration of the impacts of distributed-site Research Experiences for Undergraduates using pre-/post- student interviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, H.; Hubenthal, M.; Brudzinski, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The benefits for student participants of undergraduate research opportunities have been well documented. However, advancements in information and communications technologies (ICT) and cultural shifts around online education and virtual peer-to-peer interaction have lead to new models in which to structure such experiences. Currently, these ICT-enabled Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) programs connect geographically distributed interns in supportive e-learning communities while maintaining a traditional local mentoring arrangement. To document and explore the effects of distributed REU Sites in more depth, six interns from such a program, the Incorporated Research Institution for Seismology (IRIS) REU, were selected at random and asked to be interviewed about the REU experience. The primary targets of the interviews are to understand the mentor/mentee relationships, feeling of support and development and value of near-peer and far-peer relationships throughout their internship in a distributed REU program, and whether they receive the training necessary to gain confidence as a researcher. We also examine the various communication technologies as well as best practices and strategies that can increase intern connectedness. Pre-internship interviews were conducted in-person at the start of the centralized internship orientation week, while post-internship interviews were virtual (e.g. video chat with Skype or Google Hangout). These semi-structured interviews have full audio recordings and subsequent transcriptions. An additional, virtual follow-up interview will be conducted next spring after the interns have an opportunity to attend and present their research at a national conference (e.g., AGU). Interview material will be analyzed through a process of coding, sorting, local integration, and inclusive integration. Results will also be triangulated with pre- and post- survey data both from participants and other survey data from previous years of the IRIS

  18. A generalizability study of the medical judgment vignettes interview to assess students' noncognitive attributes for medical school

    PubMed Central

    Donnon, Tyrone; Paolucci, Elizabeth Oddone

    2008-01-01

    Background Although the reliability of admission interviews has been improved through the use of objective and structured approaches, there still remains the issue of identifying and measuring relevant attributes or noncognitive domains of interest. In this present study, we use generalizability theory to determine the estimated variance associated with participants, judges and stations from a semi-structured, Medical Judgment Vignettes interview used as part of an initiative to improve the reliability and content validity of the interview process used in the selection of students for medical school. Methods A three station, Medical Judgment Vignettes interview was conducted with 29 participants and scored independently by two judges on a well-defined 5-point rubric. Generalizability Theory provides a method for estimating the variability of a number of facets. In the present study each judge (j) rated each participant (p) on all three Medical Judgment Vignette stations (s). A two-facet crossed designed generalizability study was used to determine the optimal number of stations and judges to achieve a 0.80 reliability coefficient. Results The results of the generalizability analysis showed that a three station, two judge Medical Judgment Vignettes interview results in a G coefficient of 0.70. As shown by the adjusted Eρ2 scores, since interviewer variability is negligible, increasing the number of judges from two to three does not improve the generalizability coefficient. Increasing the number of stations, however, does have a substantial influence on the overall dependability of this measurement. In a decision study analysis, increasing the number of stations to six with a single judge at each station results in a G coefficient of 0.81. Conclusion The Medical Judgment Vignettes interview provides a reliable approach to the assessment of candidates' noncognitive attributes for medical school. The high inter-rater reliability is attributed to the greater

  19. Questions and Reflections: The Use of Motivational Interviewing Microskills in a Peer-Led Brief Alcohol Intervention for College Students

    PubMed Central

    Tollison, Sean J.; Lee, Christine M.; Neighbors, Clayton; Neil, Teryl A.; Olson, Nichole D.; Larimer, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between peer facilitator adherence to motivational interviewing (MI) microskills and college student drinking behavior. First year students (N=67) took part in a Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) led by peer facilitators trained in MI and BASICS. Participants were assessed pre- and 2 weeks post-intervention on contemplation to change, as well as, pre- and 3 months post-intervention on drinking quantity. Independent coders used the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity scale (MITI, Moyers, Martin, Manuel, & Miller, 2003) to evaluate therapist MI adherence. Peer facilitators met beginning proficiency in MI on scores of empathy, the ratio of MI adherent behaviors to non-adherent behaviors and the ratio of open questions to total questions as defined by the MITI. Results indicated that a higher number of closed questions was related to less contemplation and a higher number of open questions was related to more contemplation post intervention. A higher number of simple reflections was associated with increased drinking at the 3 month assessment, however, complex reflections were found to attenuate the effect of simple reflections on changes in drinking. These findings highlight the importance of competent reflective listening skills and the need for continual training and supervision for peer facilitators. PMID:18502251

  20. Interviewing Coaches and Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosier, Joel

    1990-01-01

    Offers advice to student sports reporters on how to get the best interviews with coaches and athletes. States that good sports interviewing should start before the game, and follow up with an in-depth interview as soon as possible once the game is over. (MG)

  1. Storytelling Adds Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selby, Victor M.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes several enrichment activities that connect mathematics to science in an algebra 1 curriculum. It provides a basis and suggestions for teachers to include student-produced essays about the role of mathematics in the history of civilization. (Contains 6 figures and 1 table.)

  2. Teaching Reluctant Students: Using the Principles and Techniques of Motivational Interviewing to Foster Better Student-Teacher Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Harvey; Jones, Anna; Jones, Sue C.

    2014-01-01

    In formal learning settings, there will always be instances of resistance to learning from students, resulting in either open conflict or withdrawal and consequent disillusionment on the part of both students and teachers. This paper presents a set of principles and associated practices for responding to disengagement from learning in constructive…

  3. Teaching Communication/Interviewing Skills to Urban Undergraduate Social Work Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Marjorie Hinton

    1979-01-01

    The use of the Interpersonal Communication Inventory (ICI) with urban undergraduate social work students is described. ICI measures the patterns, characteristics, and styles of communication along the dimensions of: self-concept, listening, clarity of expression, coping with angry feelings, and self-disclosure. (Author/MLW)

  4. Studying Learning Processes of Student Teachers with Stimulated Recall Interviews through Changes in Interactive Cognitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schepens, Annemie; Aelterman, Antonia; Van Keer, Hilde

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative study into student teachers' learning processes through changes in their interactive cognitions. First, theoretical propositions about the relation between learning to teach, professional development, and practical knowledge are defined. Next, the procedure to grasp interactive cognitions as part of practical…

  5. A Group Motivational Interviewing Intervention Reduces Drinking and Alcohol-Related Consequences in Adjudicated College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBrie, Joseph W.; Lamb, Toby F.; Pedersen, Eric R.; Quinlan, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a single-session group motivational enhancement intervention with college students adjudicated for violation of alcohol policy. The intervention consisted of a timeline Followback assessment of drinking, social norms re-education, decisional balance for behavior change, relapse prevention, expectancy…

  6. The Developing Role of Student Advising: An Interview with Charlie Nutt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harborth, Arlene

    2015-01-01

    Charlie Nutt has been an active member of the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) since 1991 and currently is the NACADA Executive Director. NACADA promotes and supports quality academic advising in institutions of higher education to enhance the educational development of students. Nutt's current responsibilities as executive director…

  7. Examining Chemistry Students Visual-Perceptual Skills Using the VSCS Tool and Interview Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    The Visual-Spatial Chemistry Specific (VSCS) assessment tool was developed to test students' visual-perceptual skills, which are required to form a mental image of an object. The VSCS was designed around the theoretical framework of Rochford and Archer that provides eight distinct and well-defined visual-perceptual skills with identified problems…

  8. Latino Student Success at Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs): Summaries from Presidential Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    In 2003-04 representatives from six baccalaureate-granting Hispanic-Serving Institutions in three state public university systems participated in a project entitled, "Latino Student Success at Hispanic-Serving Institutions." These institutions include two from California State University--(Los Angeles and Dominguez Hills), two from City…

  9. Psychosocial determinants of fruit and vegetable consumption among students in a New Zealand university. Results of focus group interviews.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Hilde; Wadsworth, Daniel P; Penny, Suzi; van Assema, Patricia; Page, Rachel

    2013-06-01

    The '5+ a day' fruit and vegetable servings recommendation was introduced in New Zealand in 1994, but consumption has remained low in young adults ever since. This study aimed to identify psychosocial determinants of fruit and vegetable consumption among New Zealand university students approximately a decade after the guidelines' introduction. Twenty-nine students, aged 18-24 years, took part in focus group interviews. Important determinants included taste and health awareness/knowledge. Flatmates and partners had the greatest social influence. Cost and availability were major barriers to consumption. To improve consumption participants suggested: cooking sessions providing quick/easy recipes; more-varied nutritional information; 'made-to-measure' interventions; increasing awareness of cheap sources of fruit/vegetables; and increasing campus availability of fruit. Determinants including a negative attitude, a lack of self-efficacy and an unawareness of dietary guidelines/health consequences should be considered when developing interventions for this group, whilst a variety of different delivery channels should be used. Participants in the study were not representative of all university students, who generally have a different lifestyle to other young adults and specific determinants for fruit/vegetable consumption. Consequently, additional research is required among other young adults and university students with lower fruit and vegetable intake, so that promotional strategies can be specifically targeted.

  10. A meta-ethnography of interview-based qualitative research studies on medical students' views and experiences of empathy.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, David

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative research suggests that medical students' empathy declines during their training. This meta-ethnography asks: What new understanding may be gained by a synthesis of interview-based qualitative research on medical students' views and experiences of empathy? How can such a synthesis be undertaken? A meta-ethnography synthesizes individual qualitative studies to generate knowledge increasing understanding and informing debate. A literature search yielded eight qualitative studies which met the inclusion criteria. These were analyzed from a phenomenological and interpretative perspective. The meta-ethnography revealed a conceptual confusion around empathy and a tension in medical education between distancing and connecting with patients. Barriers to empathy included a lack of patient contact and a strong emphasis on the biomedical over the psycho-social aspects of the curriculum. A number of influences discussed in the paper lead students to adopt less overt ways of showing their empathy. These insights deepen our understanding of the apparent decline in empathy in medical students. The lessons from these studies suggest that future curriculum development should include earlier patient contact, more emphasis on psycho-social aspects of care and address the barriers to empathy to ensure that tomorrow's doctors are empathetic as well as competent.

  11. ADD: Does It Really Exist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    Questions the existence of attention deficit disorder (ADD), a commonly diagnosed "disease" based on behavioral characteristics. There may be no medical or physiological basis for ADD. The National Association of School Psychologists deplores labeling children and creating categories of exclusion. Instead, educators should respond to individual…

  12. The "What Is a System" Reflection Interview as a Knowledge Integration Activity for High School Students' Understanding of Complex Systems in Human Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripto, Jaklin; Ben-Zvi Assaraf, Orit; Snapir, Zohar; Amit, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the reflection interview as a tool for assessing and facilitating the use of "systems language" amongst 11th grade students who have recently completed their first year of high school biology. Eighty-three students composed two concept maps in the 10th grade--one at the beginning of the school year and one at its end.…

  13. The "What Is a System" Reflection Interview as a Knowledge Integration Activity for High School Students' Understanding of Complex Systems in Human Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripto, Jaklin; Ben-Zvi Assaraf, Orit; Snapir, Zohar; Amit, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the reflection interview as a tool for assessing and facilitating the use of "systems language" amongst 11th grade students who have recently completed their first year of high school biology. Eighty-three students composed two concept maps in the 10th grade--one at the beginning of the school year and one at its end.…

  14. Observing Engineering Student Teams from the Organization Behavior Perspective Using Linguistic Analysis of Student Reflections and Focus Group Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Kerri S.; Damron, Rebecca; Sohoni, Sohum

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates group/team development in computer engineering courses at a University in the Central USA from the perspective of organization behavior theory, specifically Tuckman's model of the stages of group development. The investigation, conducted through linguistic analysis of student reflection essays, and through focus group…

  15. Understanding the Interview and Ranking Behaviors of Unmatched International Medical Students and Graduates in the 2013 Main Residency Match

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mei; Curtin, Laurie S.; Signer, Mona M.; Savoia, Maria C.

    2015-01-01

    Background  Over the past decade, the number of unfilled positions in the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) Main Residency Match has declined by one-third, while the number of unmatched applicants has grown by more than 50%, largely due to a rise in the number of international medical school students and graduates (IMGs). Although only half of IMG participants historically have matched to a first-year position, the Match experiences of unmatched IMGs have not been studied. Objective  We examined differences in interview and ranking behaviors between matched and unmatched IMGs participating in the 2013 Match and explored strategic errors made by unmatched IMGs when creating rank order lists. Methods  Rank order lists of IMGs who failed to match were analyzed in conjunction with their United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 scores and responses on the 2013 NRMP Applicant Survey. IMGs were categorized as “strong,” “solid,” “marginal,” or “weak” based on the perceived competitiveness of their USMLE Step 1 scores compared to other IMG applicants who matched in the same specialty. We examined ranking preferences and strategies by Match outcome. Results  Most unmatched IMGs were categorized as “marginal” or “weak”. However, unmatched IMGs who were non-US citizens presented more competitive USMLE Step 1 scores compared to unmatched IMGs who were US citizens. Unmatched IMGs were more likely than matched IMGs to rank programs at which they did not interview and to rank programs based on their perceived likelihood of matching. Conclusions  The interview and ranking behaviors of IMGs can have far-reaching consequences on their Match experience and outcomes. PMID:26692974

  16. Evaluating the Validity of the Client Evaluation of Motivational Interviewing Scale in a Brief Motivational Intervention for College Student Drinkers.

    PubMed

    Madson, Michael B; Villarosa, Margo C; Schumacher, Julie A; Mohn, Richard S

    2016-06-01

    The Client Evaluation of Motivational Interviewing scale (CEMI) is a measure for assessing client perceptions of clinicians' use of motivational interviewing (MI). This study explored the factorial, convergent and predictive validity of the CEMI with a sample of 137 college students who completed a brief motivational intervention for alcohol harm reduction. A two factor structure was confirmed, supporting previous findings of relational and technical subscales. The CEMI technical subscale partially mediated an increase in readiness to change drinking, while the relational subscale did not. Higher scores on CEMI technical subscale predicted higher scores on the tasks, bond and goals subscales of the Working Alliance Inventory while higher scores on the CEMI relationship subscale predicted an increase in the goals subscale. Finally, the correlations between the CEMI subscales and observer-rated MI spirit score and MI adherent and non-adherent behavioral counts were in the expected directions but did not reach statistical significance. Further revision and evaluation of the CEMI is recommended. Clinical, training and research implications are provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Technology and science in classroom and interview talk with Swiss lower secondary school students: a Marxist sociological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2013-06-01

    In much of science education research, the content of talk tends to be attributed to the persons who produce the sound-words in a speech situation. A radically different, sociological perspective on language-in-use grounded in Marxism derives from the work of L. S. Vygotsky and the members of the circle around M. M. Bakhtin. Accordingly, each word belongs to speaker and recipient simultaneously. It represents collective consciousness and, therefore, shared ideology, which can no longer be attributed to the individual. The purpose of this study is to develop a sociological perspective on language in science education, a perspective in which language continuously changes. I articulate this position in the context of classroom and interview talk with 14-year-old Swiss non-academically streamed lower secondary students about technology and science. In this context, science classrooms and interviews are shown to be microcosms of Swiss (German) culture and society reproduced in and through the situated talk about science and technology.

  18. Assessing DSM-5 level of personality functioning from videotaped clinical interviews: a pilot study with untrained and clinically inexperienced students.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Johannes; Benecke, Cord; Bender, Donna S; Skodol, Andrew E; Schauenburg, Henning; Cierpka, Manfred; Leising, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Several authors have raised the concern that the DSM-5 Level of Personality Functioning Scale (LPFS) is relatively complex and theory laden, and thus might put high requirements on raters. We addressed this concern by having 22 untrained and clinically inexperienced students assess the personality functioning of 10 female psychotherapy inpatients from videotaped clinical interviews, using a multi-item version of the LPFS. Individual raters' LPFS total scores showed acceptable interrater reliability, and were significantly associated with 2 distinct expert-rated measures of the severity of personality pathology. These findings suggest that, contrary to the previously mentioned concerns, successfully applying the LPFS to clinical cases might require neither extensive clinical experience nor training.

  19. Life Satisfaction among Highly Achieving Students in Hong Kong: Do Gratitude and the "Good-Enough Mindset" Add to the Contribution of Perfectionism in Prediction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether gratitude and the "good-enough mindset" added to the contribution of perfectionism in predicting life satisfaction in 245 Chinese highly achieving students in Hong Kong. Participants completed self-report questionnaires that included scales on life satisfaction, positive and negative perfectionism…

  20. Life Satisfaction among Highly Achieving Students in Hong Kong: Do Gratitude and the "Good-Enough Mindset" Add to the Contribution of Perfectionism in Prediction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether gratitude and the "good-enough mindset" added to the contribution of perfectionism in predicting life satisfaction in 245 Chinese highly achieving students in Hong Kong. Participants completed self-report questionnaires that included scales on life satisfaction, positive and negative perfectionism…

  1. Interview With Leland Melvin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Middle school student Molly Moore interviews NASA's Associate Administrator for Education, Leland Melvin. She asks about his career as an engineer and astronaut and what it was like to live and wor...

  2. Narrative interviewing.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Claire; Kirkpatrick, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Narrative interviews place the people being interviewed at the heart of a research study. They are a means of collecting people's own stories about their experiences of health and illness. Narrative interviews can help researchers to better understand people's experiences and behaviours. Narratives may come closer to representing the context and integrity of people's lives than more quantitative means of research. Methodology Researchers using narrative interview techniques do not set out with a fixed agenda, rather they tend to let the interviewee control the direction, content and pace of the interview. The paper describes the interview process and the suggested approach to analysis of narrative interviews, We draw on the example from a study that used series of narrative interviews about people's experiences of taking antidepressants. Limitations Some people may find it particularly challenging to tell their story to a researcher in this way rather than be asked a series of questions like in a television or radio interview. Narrative research like all qualitative research does not set out to be generalisable and may only involve a small set of interviews.

  3. The Art of the Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Rhonda

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the qualities it takes for journalism students to be good interviewers and outlines several guidelines to follow. Lists seven "Boy Scout rules of interviewing." Gives a list of eight points on how to "punctuate what people say." (SC)

  4. Clinical Experiences as Related to Standard Precautions Compliance among Nursing Students: A Focus Group Interview Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Mi; Oh, Hyunjin

    2015-06-01

    During clinical placements, nursing students who come into close contact with patients and provide nursing interventions may be exposed to harmful pathogens. However, little is known about nursing students' experiences with standard precautions (SP) in clinical settings. We conducted interviews with six focus groups of nursing students (n = 38) from two universities in South Korea. The focus group interviews each took 90-120 minutes and included 6-7 participants from two different universities. The meetings used semi-structured interview protocols. Qualitative content analysis was employed. Four themes and 9 subthemes were identified: (a) attitudes (knowledge deficit, sensitivity), (b) subjective norms (negative role models, classroom and in-field gaps, blind spots), (c) perceived behavioral control (psychological barriers, physical barriers, lack of information), and (d) intention (changes in compliance awareness). These focus groups revealed that many nursing students worked in vulnerable environments and risked pathogen exposure. Nursing students expressed the importance of SP but reported witnessing many instances of failure to comply with established measures. Several barriers were explored as reasons of SP noncompliance. By removing the barriers presented in this study, nursing students would be able to perform their duties in a safe clinical environment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. 'I wish someone watched me interview:' medical student insight into observation and feedback as a method for teaching communication skills during the clinical years.

    PubMed

    Schopper, Heather; Rosenbaum, Marcy; Axelson, Rick

    2016-11-09

    Experts suggest observation and feedback is a useful tool for teaching and evaluating medical student communication skills during the clinical years. Failing to do this effectively risks contributing to deterioration of students' communication skills during the very educational period in which they are most important. While educators have been queried about their thoughts on this issue, little is known about what this process is like for learners and if they feel they get educational value from being observed. This study explored student perspectives regarding their experiences with clinical observation and feedback on communication skills. A total of 125 senior medical students at a U.S. medical school were interviewed about their experiences with observation and feedback. Thematic analysis of interview data identified common themes among student responses. The majority of students reported rarely being observed interviewing, and they reported receiving feedback even less frequently. Students valued having communication skills observed and became more comfortable with observation the more it occurred. Student-identified challenges included supervisor time constraints and grading based on observation. Most feedback focused on information gathering and was commonly delayed until well after the observed encounter. Eliciting students' perspectives on the effect of observation and feedback on the development of their communication skills is a unique way to look at this topic, and brings to light many student-identified obstacles and opportunities to maximize the educational value of observation and feedback for teaching communication, including increasing the number of observations, disassociating observation from numerically scored evaluation, training faculty to give meaningful feedback, and timing the observation/feedback earlier in clerkships.

  6. Interviews with Students of High Confidence and Low Achievement. Mathematics Education Diagnostic and Instructional Centre (MEDIC) Report No. 5-76.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feghali, Issa

    A previous study had confirmed that a substantial number of low achievers in grades 5 through 8 had high algorithmic confidence in each of the four arithmetic operations with whole numbers. The purpose of the present study was to follow up the results through interviewing low achievement-high confidence students in order to ascertain if they…

  7. Methodological Reflections on Researching Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender University Students in Hong Kong: To What Extent Are They Vulnerable Interview Subjects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suen, Yiu Tung

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, the importance of reflexivity has been acknowledged in higher education research. In this paper, I reflect on my experience of researching lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) university students in Hong Kong. The focus is not on the findings that emerge from the in-depth interviews conducted per se, but on the…

  8. An Exploratory Study of the Concept Map as a Tool To Facilitate the Externalization of Students' Understandings about Global Atmospheric Change in the Interview Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rye, James A.; Rubba, Peter A.

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of two different types of post-instruction concept interviews: one that did and one that did not embed a concept mapping process as means of eliciting students' post-instruction conceptual understandings about the nature of, source of, and problems caused by chlorofluorocarbons…

  9. Methodological Reflections on Researching Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender University Students in Hong Kong: To What Extent Are They Vulnerable Interview Subjects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suen, Yiu Tung

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, the importance of reflexivity has been acknowledged in higher education research. In this paper, I reflect on my experience of researching lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) university students in Hong Kong. The focus is not on the findings that emerge from the in-depth interviews conducted per se, but on the…

  10. An Exploration of the Concept Map as an Interview Tool To Facilitate the Externalization of Students' Understandings about Global Atmospheric Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rye, James A.; Rubba, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of two different types of interviews: one that embeds a concept map, and one that does not embed a concept map in order to elicit post-instructional understandings. Focuses on students' understandings of chlorofluorocarbons and their role in global atmospheric change. Contains 71 references. (DDR)

  11. The Relationship between Baseline Drinking Status, Peer Motivational Interviewing Microskills, and Drinking Outcomes in a Brief Alcohol Intervention for Matriculating College Students: A Replication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tollison, Sean J.; Mastroleo, Nadine R.; Mallett, Kimberly A.; Witkiewitz, Katie; Lee, Christine M.; Ray, Anne E.; Larimer, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate and extend previous findings (Tollison et al., 2008) on the association between peer facilitator adherence to motivational interviewing (MI) microskills and college student drinking behavior. This study used a larger sample size, multiple follow-up time-points, and latent variable analyses allowing for…

  12. An Exploration of the Concept Map as an Interview Tool To Facilitate the Externalization of Students' Understandings about Global Atmospheric Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rye, James A.; Rubba, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of two different types of interviews: one that embeds a concept map, and one that does not embed a concept map in order to elicit post-instructional understandings. Focuses on students' understandings of chlorofluorocarbons and their role in global atmospheric change. Contains 71 references. (DDR)

  13. 'Thinking on my feet': an improvisation course to enhance students' confidence and responsiveness in the medical interview.

    PubMed

    Shochet, Robert; King, Julie; Levine, Rachel; Clever, Sarah; Wright, Scott

    2013-02-01

    by patients such that they must be adept at improvising. Because of the gap that currently exists in interview skills training programmes, we hypothesised that the field of improvisational theatre would effectively supplement the traditional curriculum. Improvisation relies on listening, confidence and responding instinctively and spontaneously. 13,14 In this paper, we describe our efforts to develop a brief curriculum for medical students providing training in the art of theatre improvisation, with the goal of enhancing students' confidence and performance in clinical encounters. We hoped that this innovative curricular experience would establish a venue where secondyear medical students could learn and practise improvisational skills that might prove helpful in their communications with patients during medical encounters.

  14. Interviewing Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzen, Elizabeth A.; And Others

    Directed especially at graduating college seniors, this paper contains information about employment interviews and how to prepare for them. Subjects discussed include the following: preparing for interviews (analyzing strengths and weaknesses, gathering information about the company); points to remember (dress codes, follow up thank-you letters);…

  15. The `What is a system' reflection interview as a knowledge integration activity for high school students' understanding of complex systems in human biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripto, Jaklin; Ben-Zvi Assaraf, Orit; Snapir, Zohar; Amit, Miriam

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the reflection interview as a tool for assessing and facilitating the use of 'systems language' amongst 11th grade students who have recently completed their first year of high school biology. Eighty-three students composed two concept maps in the 10th grade-one at the beginning of the school year and one at its end. The first part of the interview is dedicated to guiding the students through comparing their two concept maps and by means of both explicit and non-explicit teaching. Our study showed that the explicit guidance in comparing the two concept maps was more effective than the non-explicit, eliciting a variety of different, more specific, types of interactions and patterns (e.g. 'hierarchy', 'dynamism', 'homeostasis') in the students' descriptions of the human body system. The reflection interview as a knowledge integration activity was found to be an effective tool for assessing the subjects' conceptual models of 'system complexity', and for identifying those aspects of a system that are most commonly misunderstood.

  16. The relationship between baseline drinking status, peer motivational interviewing microskills, and drinking outcomes in a brief alcohol intervention for matriculating college students: a replication.

    PubMed

    Tollison, Sean J; Mastroleo, Nadine R; Mallett, Kimberly A; Witkiewitz, Katie; Lee, Christine M; Ray, Anne E; Larimer, Mary E

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate and extend previous findings (Tollison et al., 2008) on the association between peer facilitator adherence to motivational interviewing (MI) microskills and college student drinking behavior. This study used a larger sample size, multiple follow-up time-points, and latent variable analyses allowing for more complex models to be tested in a sample with different characteristics than Tollison et al. Matriculating students who participated in high school sports (N=327) took part in a Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students led by peer facilitators trained in motivational interviewing (MI). Participants were assessed pre- and immediately postintervention on contemplation to change, as well as pre-, 5months, and 10months postintervention on drinking quantity. Independent coders used the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity scale (Moyers, Martin, Manuel, & Miller, 2003) to evaluate therapist MI adherence. Contrary to our previous study, results indicated that a higher number of open questions was positively related to increases in drinking, especially for heavier drinkers. Congruent with the previous study, more simple reflections was positively related to increases in drinking. Finally, this study revealed that heavier baseline drinking was associated with more simple reflections. There were no significant results found for changes in contemplation. Results corroborate previous findings that the excessive use of simple reflections may be indicative of countertherapeutic outcomes while raising questions about the relationship between the frequency of open questions and therapeutic outcomes.

  17. ‘He's going to be a doctor in August’: a narrative interview study of medical students' and their educators' experiences of aligned and misaligned assistantships

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Owen Meurig; Okeke, Chiemeka; Bullock, Alison; Wells, Stephanie E; Monrouxe, Lynn V

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore final-year students’ and clinical supervisors’ experiences of alignment and misalignment with future Foundation Year 1 (F1) posts in an assistantship programme in the UK. Setting Assistantships are clinical placements in which students assist junior doctors by undertaking similar duties under supervision. Models of assistantship programmes vary across curricula. Some actively seek to align with students’ initial postgraduate F1 post. To date, no research has examined the implications of this association for teaching and learning. Qualitative individual and group narrative interviews were conducted with students and supervisors of 2 Welsh medical schools to address: RQ1: How do students and supervisors understand the purpose of the longitudinal assistantship? RQ2: Does alignment/misalignment of the assistantship with students’ initial F1 post influence students’ and supervisors’ teaching and learning experiences? Audio-recordings of interviews were transcribed, participants anonymised and framework analysis was used. Participants A convenience sample of 4 participant groups comprised (1) final-year medical students whose assistantship and F1 post were aligned (n=27), (2) final-year medical students whose assistantship and F1 post were misaligned (n=18) and (3) supervisors (n=10, junior doctors; n=11, consultants). Results All participant groups highlighted increased student confidence in undertaking the duties of an F1 doctor arising from their assistantship period. Learning transferable skills was also highlighted. Many students considered themselves to be team members, ‘learning the trade’ as they shadowed their F1. Opportunities for caring for acutely unwell patients were scarce. The evidence shows enhanced engagement for students aligned to their first F1 post with greater opportunities for workplace acclimatisation. Those who were misaligned were perceived as being disadvantaged. Conclusions Our findings suggest that

  18. Teaching the Struggling ADD/ADHD Student: The Contrast between Best Practices Identified by Researchers to be Successful and What Practices Teachers Implement with Students in the Public Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louden, Perry F., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Students who are diagnosed with ADHD spend the majority of the school day in the regular education classroom. This research looked at best practices being used in the classroom and how effective teachers perceive those interventions to be. The questions of what are the attitudes of teachers towards students with ADHD, how do teachers feel about…

  19. Job Interviews: Keys for Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Donald S.; Catt, Stephen E.; Slocombe, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Many students seem disinterested in learning to handle employment interviews effectively. This article discusses students' motivation to become skilled interviewees and steps educators and counselors can take to increase students' interest in this crucial career activity. The article also discusses mistakes students frequently make during…

  20. Janus Job Interview Guide. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingstone, Arnold

    Designed for below-average-reading-level students, the purpose of this interview guide is to help young job seekers prepare for the job interview process. The first three chapters explain the nature of the personal job interview, the steps to be followed in preparing for a job interview, and the do's and don't's of the interview itself. The…

  1. Janus Job Interview Guide. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingstone, Arnold

    Designed for below-average-reading-level students, the purpose of this interview guide is to help young job seekers prepare for the job interview process. The first three chapters explain the nature of the personal job interview, the steps to be followed in preparing for a job interview, and the do's and don't's of the interview itself. The…

  2. Entrevista/Interview: Q: How to Raise Money for Your Hispanic Students? A: Involve Your Alumni and Their Corporate Contacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Karla

    1983-01-01

    An interview with Raul Vargas, the director of the University of Southern California's Office for Mexican American Programs is presented. The office provides scholarships for some of USC's Hispanic undergraduates, raises scholarship money through alumni and corporate contacts, and acts as a liaison between the university and the Hispanic…

  3. Entrevista/Interview: Q: How to Raise Money for Your Hispanic Students? A: Involve Your Alumni and Their Corporate Contacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Karla

    1983-01-01

    An interview with Raul Vargas, the director of the University of Southern California's Office for Mexican American Programs is presented. The office provides scholarships for some of USC's Hispanic undergraduates, raises scholarship money through alumni and corporate contacts, and acts as a liaison between the university and the Hispanic…

  4. Improving Vignette Descriptions and Question Formats to Measure Distance Vision: Evidence from Cognitive Interviews among Students in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Yanfang; Willis, Gordon; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2017-01-01

    Vignette design has been largely neglected in anchoring vignette studies. This study aimed to contribute to the science of vignette design by developing and evaluating vignettes for measuring vision in rural China. Cognitive interviews were conducted among 36 participants in a Chinese middle school. The respondents either directly evaluated vision…

  5. Secondary Students' Responses to Perceptions of the Relationship between Science and Religion: Stances Identified from an Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Keith S.; Billingsley, Berry; Riga, Fran; Newdick, Helen

    2011-01-01

    It has been argued that learning science may be complicated, and even compromised, when students hold worldviews that may seem at odds with what is presented in science lessons. In particular, in some parts of the world, there has been considerable concern that students from particular religious backgrounds may reject some science teaching if…

  6. Improving Student Outcomes with mCLASS: Math, a Technology-Enhanced CBM and Diagnostic Interview Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ye; Gushta, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act resulted in increased school-level implementation of assessment-based school interventions that aim to improve student performance. Diagnostic assessments are included among these interventions, designed to help teachers use evidence about student performance to modify and differentiate instruction and improve student…

  7. Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). Digest #445.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Mary E.

    The term "attention deficit disorder" (ADD) is defined, criteria used by the American Psychiatric Association in diagnosing ADD are listed, and possible causes noted. Remediation needs of children with ADD include attention skills, self-esteem, and social skills. Early diagnosis is important, and teachers and parents need to identify…

  8. Four Simple Ways to Add Movement in Daily Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, John

    2011-01-01

    Adding movement to classroom activities not only engages students, but also may improve the classroom climate and reduce disruptions. In this article, the author discusses four simple activities to add movement in daily lessons. These activities are: (1) Vocabulary/Notes around the Room; (2) Cooperative Learning: Posting Task Assignments; (3)…

  9. Digging Postholes Adds Depth and Authenticity to a Shallow Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virtue, David C.; Buchanan, Anne; Vogler, Kenneth E.

    2012-01-01

    In the current era of high-stakes testing and accountability, many social studies teachers struggle to find creative ways to add depth and authenticity to a broad, shallow curriculum. Teachers can use the time after tests are administered for students to reflect back on the social studies curriculum and select topics they want to study more deeply…

  10. Four Simple Ways to Add Movement in Daily Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, John

    2011-01-01

    Adding movement to classroom activities not only engages students, but also may improve the classroom climate and reduce disruptions. In this article, the author discusses four simple activities to add movement in daily lessons. These activities are: (1) Vocabulary/Notes around the Room; (2) Cooperative Learning: Posting Task Assignments; (3)…

  11. Medicating for ADD/ADHD: Personal and Social Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis-Berman, Jennifer L.; Pestello, Frances G.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty college students from a private Midwestern university were interviewed about their past and present experiences with taking medication for Attention Deficit Disorder. Analysis of respondent interviews suggested the following themes that were discussed and analyzed: recruitment of the young, little personal stigma, societal issues, side…

  12. Medicating for ADD/ADHD: Personal and Social Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis-Berman, Jennifer L.; Pestello, Frances G.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty college students from a private Midwestern university were interviewed about their past and present experiences with taking medication for Attention Deficit Disorder. Analysis of respondent interviews suggested the following themes that were discussed and analyzed: recruitment of the young, little personal stigma, societal issues, side…

  13. The Small Victories Add Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his experiences as a first-year teacher. He discusses many challenges that he faced, including dealing with an aggressive student, the fear of losing control of the classroom, criticisms from parents, and balancing school life with his private life. The author offers advice to first-year teachers including the…

  14. Religion, assessment and the problem of 'normative uncertainty' for mental health student nurses: a critical incident-informed qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Bassett, A M; Baker, C; Cross, S

    2015-10-01

    There is limited research around how mental health (MH) student nurses interpret and differentiate between people's religious and cultural beliefs and the existence of psychopathological symptomatology and experiences. Here we focus on one cultural issue that arose from research exploring how MH student nurses approach and interpret religion and culture in their practice - that is, the difficulties in determining the clinical significance of the religious beliefs and experiences expressed by the people they care for. While problems with establishing the cultural boundaries of normality in clinical assessments are an important area of debate in cultural psychiatry, it remains a peripheral issue in MH nurse education. An anthropologically informed qualitative research design underpinned 'critical incident' (CI)-focused ethnographic interviews with 36 second and third-year MH nursing field students and seven undergraduate MH branch lecturers. Follow up focus groups were also carried out. Interview transcripts were subject to thematic analysis. Four subthemes were identified under the broad theme of the clinical significance of religious-type expression and experience: (1) identifying the difference between delusions and religious belief; (2) identifying whether an experience was hallucination or religious experience; (3) the clinical implications of such challenges; and (4) applying religion-specific knowledge. There are clinical implications that may result from the difficulties with assessing the clinical significance of religious beliefs and experiences, identified in both our research and within international cultural psychiatry literature and research. Misinterpretation and therefore wrongly assessing someone's experience as pathological is a significant concern. It is suggested that CI analysis could be adapted to help nurses, nursing students and nurse educators recognize the religious dimensions of mental distress, particularly those that then potentially

  15. Productive Resources in Students' Ideas about Energy: An Alternative Analysis of Watts' Original Interview Transcripts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrer, Benedikt W.; Flood, Virginia J.; Wittmann, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    For over 30 years, researchers have investigated students' ideas about energy with the intent of reforming instructional practice. In this pursuit, Watts contributed an influential study with his 1983 paper "Some alternative views of energy" ["Phys. Educ." 18, 213 (1983)]. Watts' "alternative frameworks"…

  16. Creating a Collaborative "Hot Clock": Using Smart Phones to Motivate Students' Learning in News Interviewing and Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Fang-Yi Flora

    2016-01-01

    This unit activity is integrated into the chapters on radio of the appropriate course--Survey of Mass Media, Broadcast Journalism, News Writing, Media Programing, or Communication Technology. Employing the concept of a "hot-clock radio format," the purpose of this unit activity is to motivate students' collaborative learning in news…

  17. Performance Feedback to Support Instruction with Speech-Language Pathology Students on a Family-Centered Interview Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jennifer A.; Woods, Juliann J.

    2011-01-01

    Gaining knowledge and skills in the practice of family-centered assessment procedures is an important component of the preservice education for early intervention providers. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of systematic instruction on speech-language pathology (SLP) practicum students' implementation of family-centered…

  18. Examining the Literacy Histories of Doctoral Students in an Educational Studies Program through Surveys and Interviews: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams-Budde, Melissa; Howard, Christy; Jolliff, Grant; Myers, Joy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods sequential explanatory study was to explain the relationship between literacy experiences over time and the literacy identities of the doctoral students in a teacher education and higher education program. The quantitative phase, surveying 36 participants, revealed a positive correlation between participant's…

  19. Creating a Collaborative "Hot Clock": Using Smart Phones to Motivate Students' Learning in News Interviewing and Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Fang-Yi Flora

    2016-01-01

    This unit activity is integrated into the chapters on radio of the appropriate course--Survey of Mass Media, Broadcast Journalism, News Writing, Media Programing, or Communication Technology. Employing the concept of a "hot-clock radio format," the purpose of this unit activity is to motivate students' collaborative learning in news…

  20. Productive Resources in Students' Ideas about Energy: An Alternative Analysis of Watts' Original Interview Transcripts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrer, Benedikt W.; Flood, Virginia J.; Wittmann, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    For over 30 years, researchers have investigated students' ideas about energy with the intent of reforming instructional practice. In this pursuit, Watts contributed an influential study with his 1983 paper "Some alternative views of energy" ["Phys. Educ." 18, 213 (1983)]. Watts' "alternative frameworks"…

  1. Interview: interview with Gisbert Schneider.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gisbert

    2012-10-01

    Gisbert Schneider studied biochemistry and computer science at the Free University of Berlin, Germany, where he received his doctoral degree in 1994. After several international post-doctoral research activities he joined F.Hoffmann-La Roche Pharmaceuticals in Basel, Switzerland, where he headed the cheminformatics group until 2001. He received his habilitation and venia legendi in biochemistry and bioinformatics from the University of Freiburg, Germany. From 2002 to 2009 he was Full Professor of Chem- and Bioinformatics (Beilstein Endowed Chair) at Goethe-University Frankfurt, Germany. In 2010 he joined ETH Zurich, Switzerland, as a Full Professor of Computer-Assisted Drug Design. Professor Schneider spoke to Future Medicinal Chemistry about how he became involved in the field, the effects advances in software have had on research and how computational chemistry is becoming more important in the role of a traditional medicinal chemist. Interview conducted by Isaac Bruce, Commissioning Editor.

  2. Secretarial Administraton: The Interviewing Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemesh, Anna

    1979-01-01

    Suggests classroom techniques to prepare business students for employment interviews and gives information on lawful and unlawful employment interview inquiries, as well as some fair employment legal requirements of the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1974, Civil Rights Act of 1964, Equal Pay Act of 1963, and Rehabilitation Act of 1973. (MF)

  3. Current Events. Interview: Nuyorican Dreamer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stainburn, Samantha

    2000-01-01

    Interviews Robert Torres, a Nuyorican who excelled at school and escaped the ghetto while his family remained, then made a documentary about the situation. This interview examines how poverty affects children; how teachers can help impoverished Hispanic students; how teachers helped him; how educators should be compensated; what making the…

  4. A Guide to Successful Resumes and Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Harry

    1986-01-01

    Provides tips to engineering students about developing a resume and interviewing for a job. Makes suggestions about how to word the resume and discusses common questions asked by interviewers. Proposes a set of questions that the student might ask the interviewer about the position. A sample resume is included. (TW)

  5. ADD Teacher Inservice Project. Final Grant Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Mark C.; Schulz, Eldon G.

    The report describes activities and achievements of the Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) Teacher Inservice Project. The inservice program was developed using a formal process to identify the critical issues related to ADD awareness, assessment, and intervention. Program content was designed to address critical issues identified in the research…

  6. Inviting Calm Within: ADD, Neurology, and Mindfulness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riner, Phillip S.; Tanase, Madalina

    2014-01-01

    The fourth edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM IV") describes ADD as behaviorally observed impairments in attention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Officially known as AD/HD, we use ADD here because we are dealing primarily with attention, organizational, and impulsivity issues. A more…

  7. ADD: Acronym for Any Dysfunction or Difficulty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Gay; Poillion, Mary Jo

    1992-01-01

    Review of 48 articles and books on attention deficit disorder (ADD) found a total of 69 characteristics and 38 causes cited, evidencing no clearcut pattern for identifying the condition and little agreement for what causes ADD. The label appears to have limited value for communication, planning, decision making, or research efforts. (Author/DB)

  8. Inviting Calm Within: ADD, Neurology, and Mindfulness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riner, Phillip S.; Tanase, Madalina

    2014-01-01

    The fourth edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM IV") describes ADD as behaviorally observed impairments in attention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Officially known as AD/HD, we use ADD here because we are dealing primarily with attention, organizational, and impulsivity issues. A more…

  9. The Exit Interview for Graduating Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doll, Paddy A.; Jacobs, Keith W.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the practice of holding exit interviews with graduating psychology students at Loyola University (Louisiana). Discusses the benefits and limitations of exit interviews, stating that they provide unique data unavailable from other sources. (GEA)

  10. The fairness, predictive validity and acceptability of multiple mini interview in an internationally diverse student population--a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Maureen E; Dowell, Jon; Husbands, Adrian; Newell, John; O'Flynn, Siun; Kropmans, Thomas; Dunne, Fidelma P; Murphy, Andrew W

    2014-12-21

    International medical students, those attending medical school outside of their country of citizenship, account for a growing proportion of medical undergraduates worldwide. This study aimed to establish the fairness, predictive validity and acceptability of Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) in an internationally diverse student population. This was an explanatory sequential, mixed methods study. All students in First Year Medicine, National University of Ireland Galway 2012 were eligible to sit a previously validated 10 station MMI. Quantitative data comprised: demographics, selection tool scores and First Year Assessment scores. Qualitative data comprised separate focus groups with MMI Assessors, EU and Non-EU students. 109 students participated (45% of class). Of this 41.3% (n = 45) were Non-EU and 35.8% (n = 39) did not have English as first language. Age, gender and socioeconomic class did not impact on MMI scores. Non-EU students and those for whom English was not a first language achieved significantly lower scores on MMI than their EU and English speaking counterparts (difference in mean 11.9% and 12.2% respectively, P<0.001). MMI score was associated with English language proficiency (IELTS) (r = 0.5, P<0.01). Correlations emerged between First Year results and IELTS (r = 0.44; p = 0.006; n = 38) and EU school exit exam (r = 0.52; p<0.001; n = 56). MMI predicted EU student OSCE performance (r = 0.27; p = 0.03; n = 64). In the analysis of focus group data two overarching themes emerged: Authenticity and Cultural Awareness. MMI was considered a highly authentic assessment that offered a deeper understanding of the applicant than traditional tools, with an immediate relevance to clinical practice. Cultural specificity of some stations and English language proficiency were seen to disadvantage international students. Recommendations included cultural awareness training for MMI assessors, designing and piloting culturally neutral stations, lengthening station

  11. How Do 4th, 5th, and 6th Grade Students' Categories of Cognitive Reflections in Interviews on Derivational Morphology Compare to Their Upper Level Spelling Inventory Orthographic Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Darcie D.

    2012-01-01

    Eighty-seven 4th, 5th and 6th grade students were administered the "Derivational Relatedness Interview" (DRI) (Templeton, Smith, Moloney, Van Pelt, & Ives, 2009). The purpose of this instrument is to explore students' understanding of derivational morphology. During the same week, the subjects were also administered an Upper…

  12. It All ADDs Up: Help for Children with Attention Deficit Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Marilyn

    2000-01-01

    Suggestions for working with students with attention deficit disorders (ADD) include: seek medical evaluation; discuss treatment options with the physician and school; communicate with the child's teachers; provide feedback, praise, and consequences; help the child develop social skills; understand when ADD with hyperactivity is disabling; know…

  13. Prevalence of Aggression and Defiance in Children with ADD/ADHD Tendencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Janella

    2011-01-01

    Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) appear to have become more prevalent in the past few years. Many children who display ADD/ADHD tendencies also display behaviors which cause problems in a classroom setting. Considering the fact that these behaviors could be displayed by the student population as…

  14. The effect of video interviews with STEM professionals on STEM-subject attitude and STEM-career interest of middle school students in conservative Protestant Christian schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsup, Philip R.

    Inspiring learners toward career options available in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) is important not only for economic development but also for maintaining creative thinking and innovation. Limited amounts of research in STEM education have focused on the population of students enrolled in religious and parochial schools, and given the historic conflict between religion and science, this sector of American education is worthy of examination. The purpose of this quantitative study is to extend Gottfredson's (1981) Theory of Circumscription and Compromise as it relates to occupational aspirations. Bem's (1981) Gender Schema Theory is examined as it relates to the role of gender in career expectations, and Crenshaw's (1989) Intersectionality Theory is included as it pertains to religion as a group identifier. Six professionals in STEM career fields were video recorded while being interviewed about their skills and education as well as positive and negative aspects of their jobs. The interviews were compiled into a 25-minute video for the purpose of increasing understanding of STEM careers among middle school viewers. The research questions asked whether middle school students from conservative, Protestant Christian schools in a Midwest region increased in STEM-subject attitude and STEM-career interest as a result of viewing the video and whether gender interacted with exposure to the video. A quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control groups, pretest/posttest factorial design was employed to evaluate data collected from the STEM Semantic Survey. A Two-Way ANCOVA revealed no significant differences in dependent variables from pretest to posttest. Implications of the findings are examined and recommendations for future research are made. Descriptors: STEM career interest, STEM attitude, STEM gender disparity, Occupational aspirations, Conservative Protestant education.

  15. Congruence of Behavioral Symptomatology in Children with ADD/H, ADD/WO, and Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford, Lisa D.; Hynd, George W.

    1994-01-01

    This study compared parent and teacher behavioral ratings for 77 children (ages 5-16) diagnosed as having attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity (ADD/H), attention deficit disorder without hyperactivity (ADD/WO), or learning disabilities (LD). ADD/WO and LD children were rated similarly on symptoms of withdrawal and impulsivity but differed…

  16. Assessing Proofs via Oral Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto-Johnson, Hortensia; Fuller, Evan

    2012-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we explored how oral interviews can inform instructors about students' understanding of abstract algebra and their ability to construct a proof in this setting. Our findings indicate that some students had a good understanding of the ideas needed for a subgroup proof, but could not write a coherent proof. On the other…

  17. International Students' Perceptions of Race and Socio-Economic Status in an American Higher Education Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Zachary S.

    2016-01-01

    International students add a great deal of cultural and intellectual diversity to college campuses, but they also bring racial stereotypes and socio-economic status hierarchies that can affect campus climate. Forty-seven interviews with Chinese, Japanese, and South Korean international students were conducted. Results indicated that a majority of…

  18. The Experience of Community College for Developmental Students: Challenges and Motivations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanOra, Jason

    2012-01-01

    This article adds to existing literatures on "developmental students," or those placing into non-credit-bearing reading and/or writing classes, by exploring their own personal experiences of attending community college. The findings of this qualitative study, based on a set of semistructured interviews with 18 developmental students in…

  19. Staff and students' perceptions and experiences of teaching and assessment in Clinical Skills Laboratories: interview findings from a multiple case study.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Catherine E; Casey, Dympna; Shaw, David; Murphy, Kathy

    2012-08-01

    The Clinical Skills Laboratory has become an essential structure in nurse education and several benefits of its use have been identified. However, the literature identifies the need to examine the transferability of skills learned there into the reality of practice. This research explored the role of the Clinical Skills Laboratory in preparing nursing students for the real world of practice. This paper focuses specifically on the perceptions of the teaching and assessment strategies employed there. Qualitative multiple case study design. Five case study sites. Interviewees (n=58) included academic staff, clinical staff and nursing students. Semi-structured interviews. The Clinical Skills Laboratory can provide a pathway to practice and its authenticity is significant. Teaching strategies need to incorporate communication as well as psychomotor skills. Including audio-visual recording into assessment strategies is beneficial. Effective relationships between education institutions and clinical settings are needed to enhance the transferability of the skills learned. The Clinical Skills Laboratory should provide an authentic learning environment, with the appropriate use of teaching strategies. It is crucial that effective links between educators and clinical staff are established and maintained. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Weighing Portions Adds Up to Weight Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_167159.html Weighing Portions Adds Up to Weight Loss Put an end to guesstimating calories with simple ... of calories a day. And that can slow weight loss to a snail's pace. The answer is to ...

  1. Qualitative Interviewing: The Art of Hearing Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Herbert J.; Rubin, Irene S.

    Intended for students and for researchers who conduct interviews as part of case studies or as ethnography, this book provides a comprehensive, up-to-date introduction to the theory and practice of qualitative interviewing. It shows researchers how to design research based on interview data; to stimulate conversation; to absorb what is being said;…

  2. Nonreciprocal photonic crystal add-drop filter

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Keyu; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Yin, Xiaobo

    2014-11-24

    We present a versatile add-drop integrated photonic filter (ADF) consisting of nonreciprocal waveguides in which the propagation of light is restricted in one predetermined direction. With the bus and add/drop waveguides symmetrically coupled through a cavity, the four-port device allows each individual port to add and/or drop a signal of the same frequency. The scheme is general and we demonstrate the nonreciprocal ADF with magneto-optical photonic crystals. The filter is immune to waveguide defects, allowing straightforward implementation of multi-channel ADFs by cascading the four-port designs. The results should find applications in wavelength-division multiplexing and related integrated photonic techniques.

  3. Interviewing the Interpretive Researcher: An Impressionist Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frels, Rebecca K.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we describe the use of debriefing interviews for interviewing the interpretive researcher. Further, we demonstrate the value of using debriefing questions as part of a qualitative research study, specifically, one doctoral student's dissertation study. We describe the reflexivity process of the student in her study and the…

  4. The Information Interview: Bridging College and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, Mary Kay

    2003-01-01

    Notes that university students know little about the realities of the workplace. Explains an assignment in which students interview a person currently working in a job that logically follows their major. Explains how to find the appropriate interviewee, and how to prepare, conduct, and report on the interview. Notes that end-of-class evaluations…

  5. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  6. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  7. The Information Interview: Bridging College and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, Mary Kay

    2003-01-01

    Notes that university students know little about the realities of the workplace. Explains an assignment in which students interview a person currently working in a job that logically follows their major. Explains how to find the appropriate interviewee, and how to prepare, conduct, and report on the interview. Notes that end-of-class evaluations…

  8. Shift-and-add for astronomical imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribak, Erez; Hege, E. Keith; Strobel, Nicolas V.; Christou, Julian C.

    1989-01-01

    Diffraction-limited astronomical images have been obtained utilizing a variant of the shift-and-add method. It is shown that the matched filter approach for extending the weighted shift-and-add method reduces specklegrams from extended objects and from an object dominated by photon noise. The method is aberration-insensitive and yields very high dynamic range results. The iterative method for arriving at the matched filter does not automatically converge in the case of photon-noisy specklegrams for objects with more than one maximum.

  9. Shift-and-add for astronomical imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribak, Erez; Hege, E. Keith; Strobel, Nicolas V.; Christou, Julian C.

    1989-01-01

    Diffraction-limited astronomical images have been obtained utilizing a variant of the shift-and-add method. It is shown that the matched filter approach for extending the weighted shift-and-add method reduces specklegrams from extended objects and from an object dominated by photon noise. The method is aberration-insensitive and yields very high dynamic range results. The iterative method for arriving at the matched filter does not automatically converge in the case of photon-noisy specklegrams for objects with more than one maximum.

  10. Using Moos To Help Learn English; Video Jigsaw; Practicing Speaking with Follow-Up Interviews and Student-Read Dictations; "Ask the Expert": Oral Presentations that Work; The Medium Is the Message.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, James; Reynolds, Judith; Noble, P. C.; Altschuler, Lee; Schauber, Holli

    2001-01-01

    Four short articles provide teaching tips for the English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language classroom, including the use of Moos, a video jigsaw, practicing oral language skills with interviews and student-read dictations, an ask the expert activity which builds learner confidence in speaking in front of groups of people. (Author/VWL)

  11. Selected Perspectives on ADD and ADHD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Louise

    1997-01-01

    Offers an overview of ADD and ADHD, their causes and long-term prognoses, including the complexities of the conditions, the incomplete knowledge about them, and the difficulties of diagnosis during early childhood. Summarizes assessment and treatment options and concludes that the conditions have so many secondary effects that designing an…

  12. Selected Perspectives on ADD and ADHD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Louise

    1997-01-01

    Offers an overview of ADD and ADHD, their causes and long-term prognoses, including the complexities of the conditions, the incomplete knowledge about them, and the difficulties of diagnosis during early childhood. Summarizes assessment and treatment options and concludes that the conditions have so many secondary effects that designing an…

  13. 76 FR 49508 - ``Add Us In'' Initiative

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of Disability Employment Program ``Add Us In'' Initiative AGENCY: Office of Disability Employment.... SUMMARY: The Office of Disability Employment Policy, Department of Labor is correcting the New Notice of...

  14. Shift Would Add Burden on Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killion, Joellen

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how the transition from district-centered to school-based staff development can add to the burden on principals. This column first presents a brief review of the efforts of Braxton Hinsdale, a staff development director who advocated for moving professional development resources from the district level to the…

  15. Child and Interviewer Race in Forensic Interviewing.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Amy K; Mackey, Tomiko D; Langendoen, Carol; Barnard, Marie

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential effect of child race and interviewer race on forensic interviewing outcomes. The results of the regression analysis indicated that child race and interviewer race had a significant effect on interview outcome category (no findings, inconclusive, or findings consistent with sexual abuse). Furthermore, the results indicate that the interaction of child and interviewer race had predictive value for rates of findings consistent with sexual abuse but not in the direction predicted. Cross-race dyads had significantly higher rates of interview outcomes consistent with sexual abuse. These findings suggest that more research into the effect of race on disclosure of child sexual abuse is needed.

  16. Undocumented Students and Higher Education in the State of Georgia: The "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Policy of Illegal Immigrant Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Melissa McCants

    2013-01-01

    The study detailed the life history of a family of five, Georgia high school graduates, undocumented students using semi-structured interviews. Because the five participants were all of Latino descent and undocumented students, their lived experiences were expected to add to the relatively young research concerning the sensitive, yet powerful,…

  17. Undocumented Students and Higher Education in the State of Georgia: The "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Policy of Illegal Immigrant Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Melissa McCants

    2013-01-01

    The study detailed the life history of a family of five, Georgia high school graduates, undocumented students using semi-structured interviews. Because the five participants were all of Latino descent and undocumented students, their lived experiences were expected to add to the relatively young research concerning the sensitive, yet powerful,…

  18. How to Add Philosophy Dimensions in Your Basic International Business Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thanopoulos, John

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to assist professors in introducing concepts of self, philosophy, religions, the universe, existential dilemmas, etc., in their basic international business classes. Using active learning and five-member student teams, a student organized and administered conference adds a very useful dimension of knowledge sacrificing only one…

  19. Antecedents and Correlates of Course Cancellation in a University "Drop and Add" Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babad, Elisha; Icekson, Tamar; Yelinek, Yaacov

    2008-01-01

    Most institutions of higher education allow students to drop or add courses in the first 2-3 weeks of each term (D&A). Arguing that course cancellation is not merely an administrative issue involving enrollment trends but represents complex decision making processes taken by students, this study investigated antecedents and correlates of course…

  20. Alcohol and Drug Defense Program (ADD) 1994-95. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulaney, Charles N.

    The Wake County Public School System used Alcohol and Drug Defense Program (ADD) federal funds in 1994-95 to reduce the impact of drugs and alcohol on the system's 12 high schools by implementing a Student Assistance Program (SAP). SAP provides intervention and support for students identified as being at risk of substance abuse because of academic…

  1. How to Add Philosophy Dimensions in Your Basic International Business Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thanopoulos, John

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to assist professors in introducing concepts of self, philosophy, religions, the universe, existential dilemmas, etc., in their basic international business classes. Using active learning and five-member student teams, a student organized and administered conference adds a very useful dimension of knowledge sacrificing only one…

  2. Whiffing the Airport Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David

    2008-01-01

    An airport interview is an initial interview for a senior administrative position conducted at an airport hotel not too far from the campus in question. Meeting at an airport enables a search committee to interview a large number of candidates in a short period of time with a degree of confidentiality. At the conclusion of the airport interviews,…

  3. Whiffing the Airport Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David

    2008-01-01

    An airport interview is an initial interview for a senior administrative position conducted at an airport hotel not too far from the campus in question. Meeting at an airport enables a search committee to interview a large number of candidates in a short period of time with a degree of confidentiality. At the conclusion of the airport interviews,…

  4. Students with Attention Deficit Disorders: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salend, Spencer J.; Rohena, Elba

    2003-01-01

    This article provides the American Psychiatric Association's definition of attention deficit disorder (ADD) and then gives an overview of ADD by considering the three types of ADD, the developmental impact of ADD, factors contributing to ADD, identification and assessment of students with ADD (emphasizing multimethod and consideration of…

  5. Canadian reactor delays add to agency's troubles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Elizabeth

    2009-08-01

    A plan to replace two aging nuclear reactors in Ontario, Canada, with Advanced CANDU Reactors (ACR) has been rejected by the provincial government due to concerns over ballooning costs. The rejected bid, which was made by the state-owned Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), adds to the woes of an agency that is already facing rumoured privatization of its business to build and maintain nuclear reactors.

  6. The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) Sibling Pairs Data

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Haberstick, Brett C.; Smolen, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the design and phenotype and genotype data available for sibling pairs with varying genetic relatedness in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Add Health is a nationally-representative longitudinal study of over 20,000 adolescents in the U.S. in 1994-95 who have been followed for fifteen years into adulthood. The Add Health design included oversamples of more than 3,000 pairs of individuals with varying genetic resemblance, ranging from monozygotic twins, dizygotic twins, full siblings, half siblings, and unrelated siblings who were raised in the same household. Add Health sibling pairs are therefore nationally representative and followed longitudinally from early adolescence into adulthood with 4 in-home interviews during the period 1994-2009. Add Health has collected rich longitudinal social, behavioral, environmental, and biological data, as well as buccal cell DNA from all sample members, including siblings pairs. Add Health has an enlightened dissemination policy and to date has released phenotype and genotype data to more than 10,000 researchers in the scientific community. PMID:23231780

  7. The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) sibling pairs data.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Haberstick, Brett C; Smolen, Andrew

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the design and phenotype and genotype data available for sibling pairs with varying genetic relatedness in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Add Health is a nationally representative longitudinal study of over 20,000 adolescents in the United States in 1994-1995 who have been followed for 15 years into adulthood. The Add Health design included oversamples of more than 3,000 pairs of individuals with varying genetic resemblance, ranging from monozygotic twins, dizygotic twins, full siblings, half siblings, and unrelated siblings who were raised in the same household. Add Health sibling pairs are therefore nationally representative and followed longitudinally from early adolescence into adulthood with four in-home interviews during the period 1994-2009. Add Health has collected rich longitudinal social, behavioral, environmental, and biological data, as well as buccal cell DNA from all sample members, including sibling pairs. Add Health has an enlightened dissemination policy and to date has released phenotype and genotype data to more than 10,000 researchers in the scientific community.

  8. Job Interviewing: Process and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellwig, Harold H.

    1992-01-01

    Offers ways to amplify current instruction on the all-important job interview. Discusses resumes, job application letters, oral reports, preparing for the interview, mock interview checklist, doing the interview, sample interview questions, and leaving the interview. (SR)

  9. Development of a residency interviewing preparatory seminar.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Joshua; Benavides, Sandra; Steinberg, Jennifer G; Clauson, Kevin A; Gauthier, Timothy; Borja-Hart, Nancy L; Marino, Jehan

    2012-03-01

    The development of a residency interviewing preparatory seminar (RIPS) is described. The RIPS elective at Nova Southeastern University College of Pharmacy was designed to assist pharmacy students during their last professional year in preparing for the residency application process. The learning objectives of the course focused on improving students' interviewing and presentation skills, professionalism, and developing their curriculum vitae (CV) and personal statement. Course and instructor evaluations and demographic data collected via anonymous surveys were used to ascertain students' perspectives about the course. The class was purposely scheduled to begin in October and end in November, right before the ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting in early December. Due to limited faculty availability on the scheduled evenings and the desire to provide tailored, in-depth feedback, enrollment was limited. The RIPS was an intensive eight-week elective completed by 10 fourth-year pharmacy students. The course began with an overview of the residency application process, and students submitted their CVs and personal statements to faculty mentors for critique. To simulate residency interview components, students completed several timed activities in class and participated in mock interviews. Students stated that the course improved their application materials, interview skills, and confidence in their ability to obtain a residency. Overall, 78% of RIPS participants matched with a residency program. The RIPS elective was successful in improving residency candidate confidence at the ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting. Students reported that the course was helpful and improved their confidence and ability to interview.

  10. A Motivational Interviewing Intervention for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Catherine M.; Howard Sharp, Katianne M.; Berman, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite attempts to engage students, undergraduate instructors are often challenged by low motivation among students to study outside of the classroom. The current study adapted motivational interviewing, which is often used with therapy clients ambivalent to change, to target college student motivation to study for exams. Findings indicated…

  11. A Motivational Interviewing Intervention for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Catherine M.; Howard Sharp, Katianne M.; Berman, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite attempts to engage students, undergraduate instructors are often challenged by low motivation among students to study outside of the classroom. The current study adapted motivational interviewing, which is often used with therapy clients ambivalent to change, to target college student motivation to study for exams. Findings indicated…

  12. Interview with Sandra Thompson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiung-chih

    1994-01-01

    Presents an interview of Sandra Thompson on various topics relating to the Chinese language. The interview touches on conversational data on Chinese, the lack of morphological complexity in Mandarin Chinese, and the development of Chinese functionalism. (12 references) (CK)

  13. Effects of Low- Versus High-Fidelity Simulations on the Cognitive Burden and Performance of Entry-Level Paramedicine Students: A Mixed-Methods Comparison Trial Using Eye-Tracking, Continuous Heart Rate, Difficulty Rating Scales, Video Observation and Interviews.

    PubMed

    Mills, Brennen W; Carter, Owen B-J; Rudd, Cobie J; Claxton, Louise A; Ross, Nathan P; Strobel, Natalie A

    2016-02-01

    High-fidelity simulation-based training is often avoided for early-stage students because of the assumption that while practicing newly learned skills, they are ill suited to processing multiple demands, which can lead to "cognitive overload" and poorer learning outcomes. We tested this assumption using a mixed-methods experimental design manipulating psychological immersion. Thirty-nine randomly assigned first-year paramedicine students completed low- or high-environmental fidelity simulations [low-environmental fidelity simulations (LF(en)S) vs. high-environmental fidelity simulation (HF(en)S)] involving a manikin with obstructed airway (SimMan3G). Psychological immersion and cognitive burden were determined via continuous heart rate, eye tracking, self-report questionnaire (National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index), independent observation, and postsimulation interviews. Performance was assessed by successful location of obstruction and time-to-termination. Eye tracking confirmed that students attended to multiple, concurrent stimuli in HF(en)S and interviews consistently suggested that they experienced greater psychological immersion and cognitive burden than their LF(en)S counterparts. This was confirmed by significantly higher mean heart rate (P < 0.001) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index mental demand (P < 0.05). Although group allocation did not influence the proportion of students who ultimately revived the patient (58% vs. 30%, P < 0.10), the HF(en)S students did so significantly more quickly (P < 0.01). The LF(en)S students had low immersion resulting in greater assessment anxiety. High-environmental fidelity simulation engendered immersion and a sense of urgency in students, whereas LF(en)S created assessment anxiety and slower performance. We conclude that once early-stage students have learned the basics of a clinical skill, throwing them in the "deep end" of high-fidelity simulation creates

  14. Preparing for a Successful Job Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nienkamp, Roger L.

    Advice for students preparing for job interviews is provided in this guide. First, preliminary steps are reviewed, including ascertaining the type of job wanted, securing an appointment for an interview, researching the firm, dressing appropriately, writing a resume, being prepared to fill out job applications and to give reasons for leaving…

  15. Teaching Focus Group Interviewing: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Focus group interviewing is widely used by academic and applied researchers. Given the popularity and strengths of this method, it is surprising how rarely focus group interviewing is taught in the undergraduate classroom and how few resources exist to support instructors who wish to train students to use this technique. This article fills the gap…

  16. Interviewing Families for Effective Transition to Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Margaret P.; Renzaglia, Adelle

    1998-01-01

    Describes an interview format for use in engaging families of young people with disabilities in dialogue regarding vocational programming needs. The interview addresses parental expectations, family experiences and preferences, the student's personal needs, family support, transportation options, and wages and benefits. Ways to integrate results…

  17. Teaching Focus Group Interviewing: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Focus group interviewing is widely used by academic and applied researchers. Given the popularity and strengths of this method, it is surprising how rarely focus group interviewing is taught in the undergraduate classroom and how few resources exist to support instructors who wish to train students to use this technique. This article fills the gap…

  18. The Diagnostic/Therapeutic Preabortion Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekelheide, Priscilla Day

    1978-01-01

    The therapeutic and diagnostic aspect of the preabortion interview are discussed with attention to specifics that will identify students with the greatest likelihood for psychological problems and/or repeat abortions. (JD)

  19. An Interview with Sir Keith Joseph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Education: Forward Trends, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The interview with Britain's Secretary of State for Education focuses on special education policies, includng such topics as the role of microelectronics, parent participation, services for integrated students, and curriculum development for children with moderate learning difficultties. (CL)

  20. Using Communication Specialists in the Teaching of Interview Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, Joseph A.; Sharf, Barbara F.

    1981-01-01

    A course to teach students how to interview medical patients, to allow for discussion of student concerns about entering into clinical work, and to make students aware of the complex psychosocial factors related to medical illness is described. (MLW)

  1. The Snowball Blizzard Incident: A Reality Rub Life Space Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Nicholas J.; Pinciotti, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    Focuses on Reality Rub Interview, one type of Life Space Interview (LSI), effective intervention strategy for use during crisis work with troubled students. Presents actual Reality Rub Interview, used with students who have "social blindness, social myopia, and tunnel vision" and who, when upset, misinterpret words and behaviors of…

  2. Teaching Employment Interview Skills through Interactive Video Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Gary M.; And Others

    An interactive video program, "The Screening Interview," has been developed at Miami University (Ohio) to help prepare college and university students for on-campus employment interviews with corporate recruiters. Within the context of the simulated interview situation provided by the program, students function as the alter ego of either…

  3. A Four-Step Model for Teaching Selection Interviewing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleiman, Lawrence S.; Benek-Rivera, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The topic of selection interviewing lends itself well to experience-based teaching methods. Instructors often teach this topic by using a two-step process. The first step consists of lecturing students on the basic principles of effective interviewing. During the second step, students apply these principles by role-playing mock interviews with…

  4. An Interview with J. Dudley Herron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, Liberato

    2002-01-01

    This interview provides glimpses of Herron's private life from the time that he was a college student until he arrived at Purdue. His dedication to students and commitment to teaching are evident in many of his comments. In the interview, Herron discusses the meaning of laboratory work, preparation and in-service support of pre-college chemistry teachers, problems faced by researchers in chemical education, and some of his opinions about teaching problem solving and the proper role of textbooks in instruction.

  5. User's manual for Axisymmetric Diffuser Duct (ADD) code. Volume 3: ADD code coordinate generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.; Hankins, G. B., Jr.; Edwards, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    This User's Manual contains a complete description of the computer codes known as the Axisymmetric Diffuser Duct (ADD) code. It includes a list of references which describe the formulation of the ADD code and comparisons of calculation with experimental flows. The input/output and general use of the code is described in the first volume. The second volume contains a detailed description of the code including the global structure of the code, list of FORTRAN variables, and descriptions of the subroutines. The third volume contains a detailed description of the CODUCT code which generates coordinate systems for arbitrary axisymmetric ducts.

  6. User's manual for Axisymmetric Diffuser Duct (ADD) code. Volume 1: General ADD code description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.; Hankins, G. B., Jr.; Edwards, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    This User's Manual contains a complete description of the computer codes known as the AXISYMMETRIC DIFFUSER DUCT code or ADD code. It includes a list of references which describe the formulation of the ADD code and comparisons of calculation with experimental flows. The input/output and general use of the code is described in the first volume. The second volume contains a detailed description of the code including the global structure of the code, list of FORTRAN variables, and descriptions of the subroutines. The third volume contains a detailed description of the CODUCT code which generates coordinate systems for arbitrary axisymmetric ducts.

  7. Independents add gas reserves, forego romance

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.

    1981-08-01

    Incentive pricing for low-permeability reservoirs and tax advantages for drilling them are 2 big reasons why more independents may start making a special effort to add gas reserves to their inventories. If so, it will be a change from past practices, which saw independents build up big gas positions by circumstance rather than by intention. There are always major refiners ready and willing to buy whole crude oil reservoirs from small producers, but purchasers willing to take gas fields in a single investment are few and far between. Lower-than-normal return on equity during the first 20 years, plus the heavy front-end cost of a frac necessary to produce the tight gas might dissuade independents from drilling tight gas sands, but those liabilities are offset by the higher price tight gas gets and the peculiar tax advantages of exploring for it that make a nice fit with the small operator's way of doing business.

  8. NASA Adds Leap Second to Master Clock

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    On Dec. 31, 2016, official clocks around the world will add a leap second just before midnight Coordinated Universal Time — which corresponds to 6:59:59 p.m. EST. NASA missions will also have to make the switch, including the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which watches the sun 24/7. Clocks do this to keep in sync with Earth's rotation, which gradually slows down over time. When the dinosaurs roamed Earth, for example, our globe took only 23 hours to make a complete rotation. In space, millisecond accuracy is crucial to understanding how satellites orbit. "SDO moves about 1.9 miles every second," said Dean Pesnell, the project scientist for SDO at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. "So does every other object in orbit near SDO. We all have to use the same time to make sure our collision avoidance programs are accurate. So we all add a leap second to the end of 2016, delaying 2017 by one second." The leap second is also key to making sure that SDO is in sync with the Coordinated Universal Time, or UTC, used to label each of its images. SDO has a clock that counts the number of seconds since the beginning of the mission. To convert that count to UTC requires knowing just how many leap seconds have been added to Earth-bound clocks since the mission started. When the spacecraft wants to provide a time in UTC, it calls a software module that takes into consideration both the mission's second count and the number of leap seconds — and then returns a time in UTC.

  9. Preparing and conducting interviews to collect data.

    PubMed

    Doody, Owen; Noonan, Maria

    2013-05-01

    To describe three styles of interviews and discuss issues regarding planning and conducting interviews. Interviews are probably the approach most used to collect data in studies. They are particularly useful in uncovering the story behind a participant's experiences. Researchers can follow a line of questions to gain information about a topic, or further explore responses or findings. But the researcher needs to plan and decide the format of the interview before collecting data. The authors included papers on structured, unstructured and semi-structured interviews published in a peer-reviewed joumrnal and in English. Interviews are one of the most common metods of data collection in qualitative research. However they require the researcher to have a sound understanding of their use and appropriateness. The ability to conduct interviews is one that develops over time and to aid the researcher in developing their interview skills they should consult with other researchers, seeking comments and advice and, critically, to appraise audio recordings. This article aims to support students who are undertaking research modules as part of their academic studies, writing a research proposal or novice researchers who are about to use interviews as a means of data collection. To conduct a successful interview, researchers need to develop their interview technique, choose the right method and carefully plan for all aspects of the process.

  10. [Motivational interview: supporting change].

    PubMed

    Fond, Guillaume; Ducasse, Déborah

    2015-01-01

    The motivational interview aims to help patients to resolve their ambivalence regarding problematic behaviors and to guide them into change. It differs from other therapeutic approaches mainly through the attitude of the therapist. In motivational interviewing, the therapist defends the statu quo. By reactance, the patient defends the change and enhance her/his motivation. This article provides a summary of the other concepts of motivational interviewing and its applications in the psychiatric daily practice.

  11. "Please Consider My Request for an Interview": A Cross-Cultural Genre Analysis of Cover Letters Written by Canadian and Taiwanese College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Hsiao-I

    2013-01-01

    In this study, similarities and differences among generic structures in 80 cover letters written by Taiwanese and Canadian college students were investigated, adopting Upton and Connor's (2001) framework. The results demonstrated that Canadian students tend to write longer letters, use a greater variety of word types and sentence structures, and…

  12. Children with Attention Deficit Disorders. ADD Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Harvey C.

    This fact sheet summarizes basic information on Attention Deficit Disorders (ADD), including prevalence and characteristics, causes, identification, treatment, outcomes, and suggestions. Children with ADD comprise approximately 3-5 percent of the school age population, with boys significantly outnumbering girls. Of 14 characteristics of ADD, the…

  13. Managing the Behavior of Children with ADD in Inclusive Classrooms: A Collaborative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xin, Joy F.; Forrest, Lois

    2002-01-01

    A collaborative approach for managing behavior of children with attention deficit disorders (ADD) developed and implemented in a fourth grade inclusive classroom is outlined in this article. The approach involves teacher, parent, and student participation using multiple component treatment such as providing academic adaptations, and using…

  14. Improving Content and Technology Skills in ADD/ADHD via a Web Enhanced Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, LuAnn; Smith, Sean; Dillon, Ann S.; Algozzine, Bob; Beattie, John; Spooner, Fred; Fisher, Ashlee L.

    2004-01-01

    Attention Deficit Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD) create concerns in public education and in teacher education programs. Because of continuous advances in technology, distance learning is a viable option for delivering coursework to preservice and inservice teacher education students challenged by geography, time…

  15. Presterilization Interviewing: An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Raymond G.

    1976-01-01

    The role of interviewing in diffusing possible harmful side effects of sterilization operations was evaluated in an acute general hospital. Two simultaneous field experiments were conducted with 50 vasectomy couples and 50 tubal-ligation couples. There were no significant differences between the interview and control groups. (Author)

  16. Interview with Ron Wasserstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossmann, Allan; Wasserstein, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Ron Wasserstein is Executive Director of the American Statistical Association (ASA). He previously served as Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Professor of Statistics at Washburn University. This interview took place via email on January 21- February 24, 2014. Topics covered in this interview are as follows: 1) Beginnings, 2) Teaching…

  17. Legal Interviewing For Paralegals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statsky, William P.

    One of the training materials prepared for paralegals, or legal assistants, by the National Paralegal Institute under a Federal grant, the document presents legal interviewing techniques by focusing on an analysis of a particular legal interview conducted by a paralegal on a hypothetical case. From the analysis of the case, a number of problems,…

  18. Literacy and Informational Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decarie, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Informational interviews are valuable tools for improving writing, editing, and interviewing skills, and they are also extremely valuable in improving the soft skills that are valued by employers, such as confidence, adaptability, the ability to set and keep deadlines, the ability to manage risk, and so on. These soft skills, this article argues,…

  19. Interview with Octavio Solis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yowell, Bob

    This interview with Mexican-American, Octavio Solis, considers that many facets of his education and experience in the theater. Solis, interviewed by Bob Yowell, Northern Arizona University Theatre Department faculty member and that campus' producer of Solis' play "El Paso Blue," touches on the importance of his acting experience when…

  20. Interview with Ron Wasserstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossmann, Allan; Wasserstein, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Ron Wasserstein is Executive Director of the American Statistical Association (ASA). He previously served as Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Professor of Statistics at Washburn University. This interview took place via email on January 21- February 24, 2014. Topics covered in this interview are as follows: 1) Beginnings, 2) Teaching…

  1. Employee Exit Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulk, Larry J.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an exit interview procedure for employees leaving the school system designed to identify potential personnel problems, maintain good employee relations, provide statistics on reasons for turnover, and provide assessment data for inservice education programs. Reports statistical data based on interview implementation, 1981-83. (TE)

  2. Interview with Mark Ashwill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsberger, Joe

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Mark Ashwill, Director of the Institute of International Education-Vietnam in Ha Noi, Vietnam, a branch of the Institute of International Education (IIE). In this interview, Ashwill talks about his work as Director of the Institute of International Education-Vietnam, the role that communications technology…

  3. Literacy and Informational Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decarie, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Informational interviews are valuable tools for improving writing, editing, and interviewing skills, and they are also extremely valuable in improving the soft skills that are valued by employers, such as confidence, adaptability, the ability to set and keep deadlines, the ability to manage risk, and so on. These soft skills, this article argues,…

  4. Questions in Reference Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marilyn Domas

    1998-01-01

    Characterizes the questioning behavior in reference interviews preceding delegated online searches of bibliographic databases and relates it to questioning behavior in other types of interviews/settings. Compares questions asked by the information specialist and those asked by the client; findings show the information specialist dominates the…

  5. Interviewing for a Principalship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daresh, John C.

    2001-01-01

    When interviewing for a principal position, candidates should practice with friends and acquaintances, anticipate "sure thing" questions, listen and respond carefully, know something about the school and community, show passion and enthusiasm, and ask interviewers what the new principal ought to tackle first. (MLH)

  6. Interview with Mark Ashwill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsberger, Joe

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Mark Ashwill, Director of the Institute of International Education-Vietnam in Ha Noi, Vietnam, a branch of the Institute of International Education (IIE). In this interview, Ashwill talks about his work as Director of the Institute of International Education-Vietnam, the role that communications technology…

  7. Interview: Public Alternative Schools in Eugene, Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edcentric, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Information from interviews with a parent coordinator at Eastside Elementary School, a teacher at Silver Lea Corridor School, and a student at Action High and the Planning Course is presented to show history, relationship and function with parents, teachers, students, and administrators in the Eugene, Oregon, public alternative school system. (JT)

  8. Interview with Joyce VanTassel-Baska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula

    2001-01-01

    This interview with Joyce VanTassel-Baska discusses the growth of talent search programs to identify highly gifted students via the Scholastic Aptitude Test and the role of computer technology in what can be offered to gifted students. Also identified are key characteristics of gifted elementary, middle, and secondary school programs. (CR)

  9. Winning the interviewing game.

    PubMed

    Lyons, M F

    2000-01-01

    Those who don't "interview well" are not likely to receive the job offer, despite their qualifications. A job interview is actually a fierce competitive activity that offers only two grades: an A or F. By nature, physicians are competitive; they like to win. Infrequent interviewees are prone to making easily corrected mistakes, such as showing no enthusiasm or having poor eye contact. The key for interviewing success is preparation--doing research, developing a personal statement, and role-playing practice interviews. View the interview as a sales call whose bottom-line goal is to achieve an offer, or at least to let you leave with the option to return for future discussions.

  10. Stimulated recall interviews for describing pragmatic epistemology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubert, Christopher W.; Meredith, Dawn C.

    2015-12-01

    Students' epistemologies affect how and what they learn: do they believe physics is a list of equations, or a coherent and sensible description of the physical world? In order to study these epistemologies as part of curricular assessment, we adopt the resources framework, which posits that students have many productive epistemological resources that can be brought to bear as they learn physics. In previous studies, these epistemologies have been either inferred from behavior in learning contexts or probed through surveys or interviews outside of the learning context. We argue that stimulated recall interviews provide a contextually and interpretively valid method to access students' epistemologies that complement existing methods. We develop a stimulated recall interview methodology to assess a curricular intervention and find evidence that epistemological resources aptly describe student epistemologies.

  11. The Economic Burden of Orthopedic Surgery Residency Interviews on Applicants.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Harold A; Finkler, Elissa S; Wu, Karen; Schiff, Adam P; Nystrom, Lukas M

    2016-01-01

    The intense competition for orthopedic surgery residency positions influences the interview process. The financial impact on residency applicants is less well understood. The purpose of the present study was to define the economic burden of the orthopedic surgery residency interview process while additionally describing how applicants finance the expense. We distributed surveys to 48 nonrotating applicants at our institution's residency interview days for the 2015 match year. The survey consisted of eleven questions specific to the costs of interviewing for orthopedic surgery residency positions. The survey response rate was 90% (43/48). Applicants applied to a median of 65 orthopedic surgery residency programs (range 21-88) and targeted a median of 15 interviews (range 12-25). The mean cost estimate for a single interview was $450 (range $200-800) and the cost estimate for all interviews was $7,119 (range $2,500-15,000). Applicants spent a mean of $344 (range $0-750) traveling to our interview. Seventy-two percent borrowed money to finance their interview costs and 28% canceled interviews for financial reasons. The financial cost of interviewing for orthopedic surgery is substantial and a majority of applicants add to their educational debt by taking out loans to finance interviews. Future considerations should be made to minimize these costs for an already financially burdened population.

  12. The Economic Burden of Orthopedic Surgery Residency Interviews on Applicants

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Harold A.; Finkler, Elissa S.; Wu, Karen; Schiff, Adam P.; Nystrom, Lukas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The intense competition for orthopedic surgery residency positions influences the interview process. The financial impact on residency applicants is less well understood. The purpose of the present study was to define the economic burden of the orthopedic surgery residency interview process while additionally describing how applicants finance the expense. Methods We distributed surveys to 48 nonrotating applicants at our institution’s residency interview days for the 2015 match year. The survey consisted of eleven questions specific to the costs of interviewing for orthopedic surgery residency positions. Results The survey response rate was 90% (43/48). Applicants applied to a median of 65 orthopedic surgery residency programs (range 21-88) and targeted a median of 15 interviews (range 12-25). The mean cost estimate for a single interview was $450 (range $200-800) and the cost estimate for all interviews was $7,119 (range $2,500-15,000). Applicants spent a mean of $344 (range $0-750) traveling to our interview. Seventy-two percent borrowed money to finance their interview costs and 28% canceled interviews for financial reasons. Conclusions The financial cost of interviewing for orthopedic surgery is substantial and a majority of applicants add to their educational debt by taking out loans to finance interviews. Future considerations should be made to minimize these costs for an already financially burdened population. PMID:27528831

  13. The Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adult with Developmental Disability (PAS-ADD) Checklist: Reliability and Validity of French Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, F.; Carminati, G. Galli

    2013-01-01

    Background: The lack of psychometric measures of psychopathology especially in intellectual disabilities (ID) population was addressed by creation of the Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adult with Developmental Disability (PAS-ADD-10) in Moss et?al. This schedule is a structured interview designed for professionals in psychopathology. The…

  14. Interview: interview with P Jeffrey Conn. Interview by Hannah Coaker.

    PubMed

    Conn, P Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    Dr Conn is the Lee E Limbird Professor of Pharmacology at Vanderbilt University and Director of the Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD). Dr Conn received a PhD in Pharmacology from Vanderbilt in 1986 and pursued postdoctoral studies at Yale University. He served as a professor of Pharmacology at Emory University from 1988 to 2000, before moving to Merck and Co. (PA, USA) as head of the Department of Neuroscience. Dr Conn moved to Vanderbilt University in 2003 where he is the founding director of the VCNDD, with a primary mission of facilitating translation of recent advances in basic science to novel therapeutics. The VCNDD consists of approximately 100 full-time scientists and has advanced novel molecules from four major programs as development candidates for clinical testing with industry partners. Dr Conn has served in editorial positions with multiple international journals and has served the scientific advisory boards of multiple foundations and companies. He has received numerous awards based on the impact of his basic and translational research. Dr Conn's current research is focused on development of novel treatment strategies for schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and other serious brain disorders. Interview conducted by Hannah Coaker, Assistant Commissioning Editor.

  15. Developing Employment Interview and Interviewing Skills in Small-group Project Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindle, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the value of communications skills in geographical education. Describes the use of realistic interviews that were a part of small-group project work. Explains that students wrote job specifications, a curriculum vitae, a cover letter, and conducted interview panels. (CMK)

  16. Many Business Schools Add Classes on Entrepreneurship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    1997-01-01

    Across the country, students are flocking to graduate business schools that teach them how to start and run a business. About 400 schools now offer courses in entrepreneurship, and about 125 have organized entrepreneurship programs. Faculty being recruited for the programs have practical experience, but tend not to have doctorates. Many students…

  17. Tom Engler Interview

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-21

    Tom Engler, the deputy director of the Center Planning and Development Directorate, or CPDD, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, speaks to reporter James Dean from Florida Today newspaper during an interview at the Kennedy News Center.

  18. Instructor Interviews Joseph Featherstone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1987

    1987-01-01

    An interview with Joseph Featherstone, a teacher at Michigan State University, reveals his attitudes regarding good teaching. Good teaching is a victory over meaninglessness, giving children the chance to hope and to have faith in their future. (CB)

  19. How University Students View Themselves as Literate Beings: Implementing Literacy Self-Evaluation Interviews in the United States and Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Koomi J.; Ng, Patrick; Fahrenbruck, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how university students in the US and Hong Kong perceive themselves as literate and biliterate beings. All the participants in Hong Kong are biliterate in at least two languages (including Cantonese, Mandarin, and English), whereas only 40% of the U.S. participants are biliterate in at least two languages (including…

  20. High Rates of Pregnancy among Vocational School Students: Results of Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interview Survey in Chiang Rai, Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manopaiboon, Chomnad; Kilmarx, Peter H.; van Griensven, Frits; Chaikummao, Supaporn; Jeeyapant, Supaporn; Limpakarnjanarat, Khanchi; Uthaiworavit, Wat

    2003-01-01

    Examined prevalence of and factors associated with pregnancy and abortion among vocation school students in northern Thailand. Age, current contraceptive use, early initiation of sexual intercourse, alcohol and drug use, and sexual coercion were associated with self or partner pregnancy. High rates of pregnancy and abortion indicate the need for…

  1. Results of a Cognitive Interview Study of Immediate Feedback and Revision Opportunities for Students with Disabilities in Large Scale Assessments. Synthesis Report 92

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone, Christopher; Figueroa, Chantal; Attali, Yigal; Stone, Elizabeth; Laitusis, Cara

    2013-01-01

    Validly assessing students with disabilities has been a challenge for decades but is increasingly vital to educational policy and practice in the current era of accountability. Numerous technological and policy developments have occurred in the past several years with the emergence and decline of various forms of alternate assessments. This study…

  2. Using the Clinical Interview as a Complementary Assessment for Minority Elementary Students to Determine Their In-Depth Understanding of Mathematical Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Nicola Elinor

    2013-01-01

    While some African American students perform as well as or better than their White peers on standardized tests, African Americans as a group attain lower scores on standardized tests than their White peers. This phenomenon has been addressed extensively in educational research. However, not much empirical research has been conducted to investigate…

  3. The Use of Clinical Interviews to Develop Inservice Secondary Science Teachers' Nature of Science Knowledge and Assessment of Student Nature of Science Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters-Burton, Erin E.

    2013-01-01

    To fully incorporate nature of science knowledge into classrooms, teachers must be both proficient in their own nature of science knowledge, but also skillful in translating their knowledge into a learning environment which assesses student knowledge. Twenty-eight inservice teachers enrolled in a graduate course which in part required a clinical…

  4. The Use of Clinical Interviews to Develop Inservice Secondary Science Teachers' Nature of Science Knowledge and Assessment of Student Nature of Science Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters-Burton, Erin E.

    2013-01-01

    To fully incorporate nature of science knowledge into classrooms, teachers must be both proficient in their own nature of science knowledge, but also skillful in translating their knowledge into a learning environment which assesses student knowledge. Twenty-eight inservice teachers enrolled in a graduate course which in part required a clinical…

  5. How University Students View Themselves as Literate Beings: Implementing Literacy Self-Evaluation Interviews in the United States and Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Koomi J.; Ng, Patrick; Fahrenbruck, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how university students in the US and Hong Kong perceive themselves as literate and biliterate beings. All the participants in Hong Kong are biliterate in at least two languages (including Cantonese, Mandarin, and English), whereas only 40% of the U.S. participants are biliterate in at least two languages (including…

  6. High Rates of Pregnancy among Vocational School Students: Results of Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interview Survey in Chiang Rai, Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manopaiboon, Chomnad; Kilmarx, Peter H.; van Griensven, Frits; Chaikummao, Supaporn; Jeeyapant, Supaporn; Limpakarnjanarat, Khanchi; Uthaiworavit, Wat

    2003-01-01

    Examined prevalence of and factors associated with pregnancy and abortion among vocation school students in northern Thailand. Age, current contraceptive use, early initiation of sexual intercourse, alcohol and drug use, and sexual coercion were associated with self or partner pregnancy. High rates of pregnancy and abortion indicate the need for…

  7. Interviews in qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kath; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Interviews are a common method of data collection in nursing research. They are frequently used alone in a qualitative study or combined with other data collection methods in mixed or multi-method research. Semi-structured interviews, where the researcher has some predefined questions or topics but then probes further as the participant responds, can produce powerful data that provide insights into the participants' experiences, perceptions or opinions.

  8. Teaching the art of empathic interviewing to third-year medical students using a fairy tale--"The prince who turned into a rooster".

    PubMed

    Joachim, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Can empathy be taught? How can we protect the embryonic forms of empathy germinating in our medical students? Can we immunize them against the ravages to their humanism, astutely observed to occur by Henry Silver, Dean of the University of Colorado in 1982, when he published his clear-sighted commentary, Medical Students and Medical School (Silver, 1982; Krugman, 2008). Although studies show that empathy is damaged during medical school, the author proposes that empathic growth through medical school might be possible if enlightened teaching methods are implemented by governing boards, such as the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), The Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). The author shares a novel teaching method adapted from a technique used by child psychiatrists, storytelling.

  9. Who to Interview? Low Adherence by U.S. Medical Schools to Medical Student Performance Evaluation Format Makes Resident Selection Difficult

    PubMed Central

    Boysen-Osborn, Megan; Yanuck, Justin; Mattson, James; Toohey, Shannon; Wray, Alisa; Wiechmann, Warren; Lahham, Shadi; Langdorf, Mark I.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE) appendices provide a program director with comparative performance for a student’s academic and professional attributes, but they are frequently absent or incomplete. Methods We reviewed MSPEs from applicants to our emergency medicine residency program from 134 of 136 (99%) U.S. allopathic medical schools, over two application cycles (2012–13, 2014–15). We determined the degree of compliance with each of the five recommended MSPE appendices. Results Only three (2%) medical schools were compliant with all five appendices. The medical school information page (MSIP, appendix E) was present most commonly (85%), followed by comparative clerkship performance (appendix B, 82%), overall performance (appendix D, 59%), preclinical performance (appendix A, 57%), and professional attributes (appendix C, 18%). Few schools (7%) provided student-specific, comparative professionalism assessments. Conclusion Medical schools inconsistently provide graphic, comparative data for their students in the MSPE. Although program directors (PD) value evidence of an applicant’s professionalism when selecting residents, medical schools rarely provide such useful, comparative professionalism data in their MSPEs. As PDs seek to evaluate applicants based on academic performance and professionalism, rather than standardized testing alone, medical schools must make MSPEs more consistent, objective, and comparative. PMID:28116008

  10. I Know How to Add Them, I Didn't Know I Had to Add Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jhagroo, Jyoti R.

    2015-01-01

    Ten non-English speaking immigrant students shared their lived experiences in their secondary school mathematics classrooms in New Zealand. Through the voices of these students some understandings of the challenges they experienced as second language learners are brought to the fore. The students' perspectives of the language-related challenges…

  11. Auditory Discrimination in Depth (ADD)[R]/Lindamood Phonemic Sequencing (LiPS)[R]. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The "Auditory Discrimination in Depth (ADD) Program[R]" (currently called the "Lindamood Phonemic Sequencing (LiPS) Program[R]") is designed to teach students skills to successfully decode words and to identify individual sounds and blends in words. Initial activities engage students in discovering the lip, tongue, and mouth actions needed to…

  12. African Primary Care Research: qualitative interviewing in primary care.

    PubMed

    Reid, Steve; Mash, Bob

    2014-06-05

    This article is part of a series on African Primary Care Research and focuses on the topic of qualitative interviewing in primary care. In particular it looks at issues of study design, sample size, sampling and interviewing in relation to individual and focus group interviews.There is a particular focus on helping postgraduate students at a Masters level to write their research proposals.

  13. Successful Interviewing: A Practical Guide for the Applicant and Interviewer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitzmann, Marion; Garcia, Reloy

    This booklet offers practical examples and guidelines to assist job hunters and other applicants in effectively confronting the interview process. Chapters include "Preparing for an Interview," which traces the process from making an initial inquiry to the actual interview situation and analyzes the interviewer's role; "The Job Interview: Practice…

  14. Successful Interviewing: A Practical Guide for the Applicant and Interviewer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitzmann, Marion; Garcia, Reloy

    This booklet offers practical examples and guidelines to assist job hunters and other applicants in effectively confronting the interview process. Chapters include "Preparing for an Interview," which traces the process from making an initial inquiry to the actual interview situation and analyzes the interviewer's role; "The Job Interview: Practice…

  15. Interjections in interviews.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Daniel C; Kowal, Sabine; Ageneau, Carie

    2005-03-01

    A psycholinguistic hypothesis regarding the use of interjections in spoken utterances, originally formulated by Ameka (1992b, 1994) for the English language, but not confirmed in the German-language research of Kowal and O'Connell (2004 a & c), was tested: The local syntactic isolation of interjections is paralleled by their articulatory isolation in spoken utterances i.e., by their occurrence between a preceding and a following pause. The corpus consisted of four TV and two radio interviews of Hillary Clinton that had coincided with the publication of her book Living History (2003) and one TV interview of Robin Williams by James Lipton. No evidence was found for articulatory isolation of English-language interjections. In the Hillary Clinton interviews and Robin Williams interviews, respectively, 71% and 73% of all interjections occurred initially, i.e., at the onset of various units of spoken discourse: at the beginning of turns; at the beginning of articulatory phrases within turns, i.e., after a preceding pause; and at the beginning of a citation within a turn (either Direct Reported Speech [DRS] or what we have designated Hypothetical Speaker Formulation [HSF]. One conventional interjection (OH) occurred most frequently. The Robin Williams interview had a much higher occurrence of interjections, especially nonconventional ones, than the Hillary Clinton interviews had. It is suggested that the onset or initializing role of interjections reflects the temporal priority of the affective and the intuitive over the analytic, grammatical, and cognitive in speech production. Both this temporal priority and the spontaneous and emotional use of interjections are consonant with Wundt's (1900) characterization of the primary interjection as psychologically primitive. The interjection is indeed the purest verbal implementation of conceptual orality.

  16. Interviewing techniques: an overview.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Taking the correct precautions, being well prepared, doing the research, and reassessing the real needs when vacancies arise will assure success in hiring the best candidate for the job(s). Job descriptions, interviewing technique, communication style,and candidate evaluations are discussed as foundations for hiring successfully. Hiring managers should trust their own instincts if they have had previous success with hiring high performance employees. Often times it will come down to making a decision using best judgment based on the facts that have been gathered through the interview process.

  17. Basic Considerations in Interviewing Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Rick L.

    This manual summarizes and highlights basic considerations in interviewing children. The relationship between interviewing for data collection and interviewing within the counseling or psychotherapeutic context is discussed. The Interviewer's Functional Checklist is presented to provide a method for self-evaluating interviewer behavior, and for…

  18. Ethics of justice and ethics of care. Values and attitudes among midwifery students on adolescent sexuality and abortion in Vietnam and their implications for midwifery education: a survey by questionnaire and interview.

    PubMed

    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie; Van Tam, Vu; Nga, Nguyen Thu; Ransjo-Arvidson, Anna-Berit; Johansson, Annika

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent's sexuality and related reproductive health and rights problems are sensitive issues in Vietnam. Globalisation has had an impact on the lifestyles of young people, and rising numbers of abortion and STI/HIV risks among youth are posing major health concerns in the country. These problems need to be addressed. Midwives belong to a key category of health personnel in Vietnam, whose task it is to promote adolescents' sexual and reproductive health and prevent reproductive ill health. It is important to understand future midwives' perceptions and attitudes in order to improve their education and training programmes. The aim of this study was to investigate Vietnamese midwifery students' values and attitudes towards adolescent sexuality, abortion and contraception and their views on professional preparation. A quantitative survey including 235 midwifery students from four different secondary medical colleges in northern Vietnam was carried out in 2003. A qualitative study addressing similar questions was performed and 18 midwifery students were individually interviewed. Findings revealed a general disapproval of adolescent pre-marital sexual relations and abortion-'an ethics of justice'-but also an empathic attitude and willingness to support young women, who bear the consequences of unwanted pregnancies and social condemnation-'an ethics of care'. Gender-based imbalance in sexual relationships, limited knowledge about reproductive health issues among youth, and negative societal attitudes were concerns expressed by the students. The students saw their future tasks mainly related to childbearing and less to other reproductive health issues, such as abortion and prevention of STI/HIV. Midwifery education in Vietnam should encourage value-reflective thinking around gender inequality and ethical dilemmas, in order to prepare midwives to address adolescents' reproductive health needs.

  19. Generalizability of Cognitive Interview-Based Measures across Cultural Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solano-Flores, Guillermo; Li, Min

    2009-01-01

    We addressed the challenge of scoring cognitive interviews in research involving multiple cultural groups. We interviewed 123 fourth- and fifth-grade students from three cultural groups to probe how they related a mathematics item to their personal lives. Item meaningfulness--the tendency of students to relate the content and/or context of an item…

  20. Dyslexia and ADD: 20 Questions Parents Ask. Children with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Joyce S.

    2002-01-01

    This article uses a question-answer format to present information for parents on dyslexia and attention deficit disorders (ADD). Information includes typical behaviors and skills of children with dyslexia or ADD, how parents can help their children, and the use of medication to control hyperactivity. (KB)

  1. Social Capital: Does It Add to the Health Inequalities Debate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.; Funk, Laura M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper empirically examines the relationship between advantage, social capital and health status to assess (a) whether social capital adds explanatory power to what we already know about the relationship between advantage and health and (b) whether social capital adds anything beyond its component parts, namely social participation and trust.…

  2. Social Capital: Does It Add to the Health Inequalities Debate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.; Funk, Laura M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper empirically examines the relationship between advantage, social capital and health status to assess (a) whether social capital adds explanatory power to what we already know about the relationship between advantage and health and (b) whether social capital adds anything beyond its component parts, namely social participation and trust.…

  3. Interview: G. Kip Bollinger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronin, Miriam; McDuffie, Thomas E., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with G. Kip Bollinger. G. Kip Bollinger currently works as a consultant for Intermediate Units, school districts, professional science societies, and science text and kit producers. He performs curriculum alignment, does assessment training, coaches science teachers, trains teachers in the use of specific…

  4. Interview: Dr. Nathan Hare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pete, Gregory

    1986-01-01

    Presents an interview with Dr. Nathan Hare, who proposes to address some of the problems of lower class, Black male youth by developing a formally supervised ritual to initiate the Black boy into adult male maturity and asserts that materialism prevents rather than promotes success. (KH)

  5. The Unstructured Clinical Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Karyn Dayle

    2010-01-01

    In mental health, family, and community counseling settings, master's-level counselors engage in unstructured clinical interviewing to develop diagnoses based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; "DSM-IV-TR"; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Although counselors receive education about…

  6. A General Interview Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ives, Edward D.

    This guide is divided into 11 sections, each containing a number of questions and suggestions for conducting successful folklore and oral history interviews. Section 1, "Settlement and Dwellings," deals with the physical environment, local inhabitants, houses and outbuildings, and public buildings. Section 2, "Livelihood and…

  7. Interview with Steve Parks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Jennifer Hitchcock interviews community activist and director of Syracuse University's Composition and Cultural Rhetoric doctoral program, Steve Parks. They discuss Parks's working-class background, career path, influences, and activism. Parks also considers the direction of the field of composition and rhetoric and expresses optimism for the…

  8. Interviewing Children: Reporter Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Interviewing children is a critical element of the education reporter's daily work. However, practices for gaining access and avoiding harm and embarrassment vary widely depending on the news organization and individual reporter in question. This document aims to provide journalists with broad guidelines, but it stops short of advocating for the…

  9. Interview with Dennis Pearl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Pearl, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Dennis Pearl is Professor of Statistics at Pennsylvania State University and Director of the Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistics Education (CAUSE). He is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association. This interview took place via email on November 18-29, 2016, and provides Dennis Pearl's background story, which describes…

  10. Interview with Deborah Andrews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Deborah Andrews about her experiences during her editorship of "Business Communication Quarterly." From June 1997 to March 2005, Debby served as editor of the journal, encouraging all readers to ask important questions about their work: How should we define business communication? On which disciplines and…

  11. Interview With Shelley Harwayne.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Peggy; Koshewa, Allen

    2003-01-01

    Interviews Shelley Harwayne, founder of the Manhattan New School, who has been named one of 10 new regional superintendents for New York City's public school system. Explains that Shelley's work is renowned in literacy. Discusses leadership, diversity, teaching, and professional development. (PM)

  12. Interview with Patrick Shannon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Peggy

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with Patrick Shannon, a professor of Education at Penn State University. Describes how he writes widely on the politics of literacy and, in particular, the marketing of literacy. Discusses his interpretation of how literacy is marketed in schools today. (SG)

  13. Interview with Christine Franklin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Franklin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Chris Franklin is Senior Lecturer, Undergraduate Coordinator, and Lothar Tresp Honoratus Honors Professor of Statistics at the University of Georgia. She is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and received the USCOTS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013. This interview took place via email on August 16, 2013-October 9, 2013. Franklin…

  14. TECHNOS Interview: Esther Dyson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raney, Mardell

    1997-01-01

    This interview with Esther Dyson, who is president and owner of EDventure Holdings which focuses on emerging information technology worldwide, discusses personal responsibility for technology; government's role; content ownership and intellectual property; Internet development; education and computers; parents' role in education; teacher…

  15. Interview with Jessica Utts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Utts, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a transcript of author Allan Rossman's interview with Jessica Utts, Professor and Chair of Statistics at the University of California-Irvine. Utts is also a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and a recipient of a Founders Award from ASA. Additionally, she has been elected as President of ASA for the year 2016. The…

  16. Interview with Louise Lonabocker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Munkwitz-Smith, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This issue of "College and University" marks a transition in the Editor-in-Chief Position, with the interview of Louise Lonabocker, who has served in this capacity for the past ten years. She has also served as President of AACRAO, and in both positions, Lonabocker has been a role model for many AACRAO leaders. Lonabocker describes the…

  17. The Unstructured Clinical Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Karyn Dayle

    2010-01-01

    In mental health, family, and community counseling settings, master's-level counselors engage in unstructured clinical interviewing to develop diagnoses based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; "DSM-IV-TR"; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Although counselors receive education about…

  18. Interview with Jessica Utts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Utts, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a transcript of author Allan Rossman's interview with Jessica Utts, Professor and Chair of Statistics at the University of California-Irvine. Utts is also a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and a recipient of a Founders Award from ASA. Additionally, she has been elected as President of ASA for the year 2016. The…

  19. Interview With Shelley Harwayne.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Peggy; Koshewa, Allen

    2003-01-01

    Interviews Shelley Harwayne, founder of the Manhattan New School, who has been named one of 10 new regional superintendents for New York City's public school system. Explains that Shelley's work is renowned in literacy. Discusses leadership, diversity, teaching, and professional development. (PM)

  20. Parent Interview Schedule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN. Educational Research Center.

    This 116-item interview schedule designed for parents who failed to respond to the Questionnaire for Parents, is individually administered to the mother of the child of elementary school age. It consists of scales measuring 14 parent variables plus a section devoted to demographic variables: (1) parent's achievement aspirations for the child, (2)…

  1. Interview with Deborah Andrews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Deborah Andrews about her experiences during her editorship of "Business Communication Quarterly." From June 1997 to March 2005, Debby served as editor of the journal, encouraging all readers to ask important questions about their work: How should we define business communication? On which disciplines and…

  2. Interview with Christine Franklin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Franklin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Chris Franklin is Senior Lecturer, Undergraduate Coordinator, and Lothar Tresp Honoratus Honors Professor of Statistics at the University of Georgia. She is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and received the USCOTS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013. This interview took place via email on August 16, 2013-October 9, 2013. Franklin…

  3. Interview with Louise Lonabocker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Munkwitz-Smith, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This issue of "College and University" marks a transition in the Editor-in-Chief Position, with the interview of Louise Lonabocker, who has served in this capacity for the past ten years. She has also served as President of AACRAO, and in both positions, Lonabocker has been a role model for many AACRAO leaders. Lonabocker describes the…

  4. Interviews to Assess Learners' Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seda, Ileana; Pearson, P. David

    1991-01-01

    Presents open-ended and semistructured interviews to assess reading comprehension. Highlights the potential value of interviews in aligning assessment practices with instruction and learning theory. (MG)

  5. "No DH, No Interview"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannapacker, William

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses digital humanities (DH) and what future it holds for graduate students who are riding the digital-humanities bandwagon. He spoke with several graduate students about their interest in the field: how they got into it and began their first projects. Laura Mandell, director of the Initiative for Digital…

  6. "No DH, No Interview"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannapacker, William

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses digital humanities (DH) and what future it holds for graduate students who are riding the digital-humanities bandwagon. He spoke with several graduate students about their interest in the field: how they got into it and began their first projects. Laura Mandell, director of the Initiative for Digital…

  7. Frances Rauscher: Music and Reasoning. Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Neal

    1995-01-01

    Reports on an interview with Frances Rauscher, a research psychologist and musician who has studied the effects of music on the brain. Maintains that students who have studied music have enhanced spatial reasoning. Recommends that music education begin at younger ages. (CFR)

  8. The Cry for Help Unheard: Dropout Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan-Davis, Walter E.

    One of the concerns expressed by educators nationwide is the alarmingly high numbers of students who withdraw from schools before graduating. In response to this concern, the Austin Independent School District interviewed 95 dropouts in their homes, asking them why they left school and what could have been done that would have enabled them to…

  9. Personal experience of conducting unstructured interviews.

    PubMed

    Gray, Morag

    1994-04-01

    I am at present conducting a PhD study into the effects supernumerary status and mentorship on student nurses. The purpose of this article is to share some of my experiences, and suggest some pointers for planning and conducting unstructured interviews.

  10. How to Survive an Academic Job Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Full, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Career development is an important issue, and there are aspects of finding the right position that are particular to science faculty. This article offers a checklist of questions to ask in an academic job interview. Some queries are more appropriate for the chairperson and other administrators; others are better asked of faculty or students. With…

  11. Vocation Project Interview Questions--Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheelahan, Leesa; Leahy, Mary; Fredman, Nick; Moodie, Gavin; Arkoudis, Sophie; Bexley, Emmaline

    2012-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "Missing Links: The Fragmented Relation between Tertiary Education and Jobs. It is an added resource for further information. It contains interview questions for: (1) graduates; (2) learning advisors; (3) managers; (4) pathways officers; (5) students; and (6)…

  12. Dropout Interviews: Summer, 1982, Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Research and Evaluation.

    In the summer of 1982, the Austin Independent School District (AISD) Office of Research and Evaluation (ORE) conducted a survey of dropouts. Dropouts are defined in this study as students who withdrew from AISD schools prior to receiving their high school diploma and are not known to have attended other schools. The dropouts were interviewed to…

  13. The Structured Interview and Interviewer Training in the Admissions Process

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Wendy C.; White-Harris, Carla; Blalock, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To determine the extent to which the structured interview is used in the PharmD admissions process in US colleges and schools of pharmacy, and the prevalence and content of interviewer training. Methods A survey instrument consisting of 7 questions regarding interviews and interviewer training was sent to 92 colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States that were accredited or seeking accreditation. Results Sixty survey instruments (65% response rate) were returned. The majority of the schools that responded (80%) used interviews as part of the PharmD admissions process. Of the schools that used an interview as part of the admissions process, 86% provided some type of interviewer training and 13% used a set of predefined questions in admissions interviews. Conclusions Most colleges and schools of pharmacy use some components of the structured interview in the PharmD admissions process; however, training for interviewers varies widely among colleges and schools of pharmacy. PMID:17998980

  14. The structured interview and interviewer training in the admissions process.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Pamela U; Cox, Wendy C; White-Harris, Carla; Blalock, Susan J

    2007-10-15

    To determine the extent to which the structured interview is used in the PharmD admissions process in US colleges and schools of pharmacy, and the prevalence and content of interviewer training. A survey instrument consisting of 7 questions regarding interviews and interviewer training was sent to 92 colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States that were accredited or seeking accreditation. Sixty survey instruments (65% response rate) were returned. The majority of the schools that responded (80%) used interviews as part of the PharmD admissions process. Of the schools that used an interview as part of the admissions process, 86% provided some type of interviewer training and 13% used a set of predefined questions in admissions interviews. Most colleges and schools of pharmacy use some components of the structured interview in the PharmD admissions process; however, training for interviewers varies widely among colleges and schools of pharmacy.

  15. Enhancing motivational interviewing training in a family medicine clerkship.

    PubMed

    Kaltman, Stacey; WinklerPrins, Vincent; Serrano, Adriana; Talisman, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of unhealthy behaviors among patients in the healthcare system, traditional medical training involves little or no exposure to effective behavior change techniques such as Motivational Interviewing. An online learning community for enhanced training in Motivational Interviewing was developed for 3rd-year medical students. The website included educational materials about Motivational Interviewing as well as problematic health behaviors, a repository of exemplar videos and student videos with feedback, and a discussion board. Student participants were given the opportunity to record an encounter with a patient and to receive feedback on their use of Motivational Interviewing from a faculty member. Student volunteers in the Family Medicine Clerkship at Georgetown University School of Medicine were randomized to enhanced training, which included the online learning community, or training as usual. All student volunteers completed a questionnaire assessing self-efficacy initially and at the end of the clerkship. Students also participated in an Observed Structured Clinical Exam, which was subsequently coded by a blinded rater for behavioral counts of Motivational Interviewing techniques, key steps in Motivational Interviewing, and overall Motivational Interviewing style. Students in the enhanced training arm were rated as having significantly higher scores in Motivational Interviewing style in the Observed Structured Clinical Exam than training as usual students. A significant increase in self-efficacy from pre- to posttest in the overall sample was observed but between-group differences were not significant. Student feedback was particularly positive regarding video recorded practice sessions with patients and individualized feedback. The results of this study as well as student feedback suggest that future work should include patient practice sessions and individualized feedback in developing Motivational Interviewing curricula.

  16. 'Pokemon Go' Players Add 2,000 Steps a Day

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pokemon Go' Players Add 2,000 Steps a Day Smartphone game benefits overweight, sedentary people most, researchers ... as likely to walk 10,000 steps a day than they were before taking up the game, ...

  17. TDRS-K to Add to Vital Space Network

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA officials discuss the launch of the TDRS-K spacecraft to add to the space network that enables communications between the International Space Station and Earth-orbiting satellites and ground c...

  18. Interviews with Mexican midwives.

    PubMed

    Bortin, S

    1993-01-01

    Mexican society contains a variety of indigenous cultures as well as European influences. Most babies in rural areas are delivered by midwives. Traditional midwives, government-trained and empirical midwives, nurse-midwives, and foreign-trained midwives all practice in Mexico. Nurse-midwives in one project are demonstrating their ability to meet the needs of urban childbearing women. A midwifery organization is developing under the leadership of midwives influenced by the contemporary midwifery movement in the United States. In this article, some traditional Mexican midwifery practices are discussed and interviews with several different Mexican midwives from a variety of backgrounds are presented.

  19. Intersubjectivity in video interview.

    PubMed

    Haddouk, Lise

    2014-01-01

    The concept of relationship has rapidly evolved over the past few years, since the emergence of the internet network and the development of remote communication and exchanges. The emergence of cyberculture with the development of the internet has led to a new representation of the social link, in which communication never stops. In this context, computer mediated intersubjective relationships represent a main line of thinking and research. Thus, can we consider for example that relationship is only composed of an informational exchange? Would there be other dimensions possibly missing in computer mediated relationships? In this case, how could we re-introduce these aspects, "re-humanize" the remote relationships? New practices in psychology emerge with the ICT usage, both in the fields of research and for therapeutic purposes. Some fields like medicine already use remote health platforms that have proven useful in certain situations. In the field of remote clinical psychology, different media are used that contribute to the framework definition of the remote clinical interview, where the concept of relation holds a central place. Videoconference enables the introduction of an important element from the point of view of sensoriality: the body image, which engages the subjects' interaction in a different way than in a written or verbal exchange. But is the use of videoconference sufficient to establish a clinical framework comparable to the traditional one? How can the computer-mediated relationship enable and establish a potential object relation, rather than a mirrored one? Thinking through an online adaptation of the clinical interview framework led to the elaboration of a specific tool dedicated to this purpose and to research into the access to intersubjectivity in clinical video interview. This study's encouraging results have fostered the pursuit of this experience in the form of a platform dedicated to the conduction of clinical interviews through

  20. Bracketing as a skill in conducting unstructured qualitative interviews.

    PubMed

    Sorsa, Minna Anneli; Kiikkala, Irma; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2015-03-01

    To provide an overview of bracketing as a skill in unstructured qualitative research interviews. Researchers affect the qualitative research process. Bracketing in descriptive phenomenology entails researchers setting aside their pre-understanding and acting non-judgementally. In interpretative phenomenology, previous knowledge is used intentionally to create new understanding. A literature search of bracketing in phenomenology and qualitative research. This is a methodology paper examining the researchers' impact in creating data in creating data in qualitative research. Self-knowledge, sensitivity and reflexivity of the researcher enable bracketing. Skilled and experienced researchers are needed to use bracketing in unstructured qualitative research interviews. Bracketing adds scientific rigour and validity to any qualitative study.

  1. Effects of Interviewing Style and Interviewer Appearance on a Child Behavioral Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mader, Lothar; Quevillon, Randal

    Clinical child interviews have received little attention in the psychological literature and in the absence of empirical findings, curent interview practices are primarily based on clinical lore. In order to investigate the effects of interviewing style and interviewer mode of dress, on the quantity and quality of information obtained from 8 to 11…

  2. Interview with Eddie Reisch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Hazel

    2013-01-01

    Eddie Reisch is currently working as a policy advisor for Te Reo Maori Operational Policy within the Student Achievement group with the Ministry of Education in New Zealand, where he has implemented and led a range of e-learning initiatives and developments, particularly the Virtual Learning Network (VLN). He is regarded as one of the leading…

  3. A Hybrid Interview Model for Medical School Interviews: Combining Traditional and Multisampling Formats.

    PubMed

    Bibler Zaidi, Nikki L; Santen, Sally A; Purkiss, Joel A; Teener, Carol A; Gay, Steven E

    2016-11-01

    Most medical schools have either retained a traditional admissions interview or fully adopted an innovative, multisampling format (e.g., the multiple mini-interview) despite there being advantages and disadvantages associated with each format. The University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) sought to maximize the strengths associated with both interview formats after recognizing that combining the two approaches had the potential to capture additional, unique information about an applicant. In September 2014, the UMMS implemented a hybrid interview model with six, 6-minute short-form interviews-highly structured scenario-based encounters-and two, 30-minute semistructured long-form interviews. Five core skills were assessed across both interview formats. Overall, applicants and admissions committee members reported favorable reactions to the hybrid model, supporting continued use of the model. The generalizability coefficients for the six-station short-form and the two-interview long-form formats were estimated to be 0.470 and 0.176, respectively. Different skills were more reliably assessed by different interview formats. Scores from each format seemed to be operating independently as evidenced through moderate to low correlations (r = 0.100-0.403) for the same skills measured across different interview formats; however, after correcting for attenuation, these correlations were much higher. This hybrid model will be revised and optimized to capture the skills most reliably assessed by each format. Future analysis will examine validity by determining whether short-form and long-form interview scores accurately measure the skills intended to be assessed. Additionally, data collected from both formats will be used to establish baselines for entering students' competencies.

  4. Sensitive Interviewing in Qualitative Research.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Laura; Dowling, Maura; Larkin, Philip; Murphy, Kathy

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we focus on important considerations when planning and conducting qualitative interviews on sensitive topics. Drawing on experiences of conducting interviews with dementia caregivers, a framework of essential elements in qualitative interviewing was developed to emphasize study participants' needs while also providing guidance for researchers. Starting with a definition of sensitive research, the framework includes preparing for interviews, interacting with gatekeepers of vulnerable groups, planning for interview timing, and location, building relationships and conducting therapeutic interactions, protecting ethically vulnerable participants, and planning for disengagement. This framework has the potential to improve the effectiveness of sensitive interviewing with vulnerable groups. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Tom Engler Interview

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Tom Engler, at left, the deputy director of the Center Planning and Development Directorate, or CPDD, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, speaks to reporter James Dean from Florida Today newspaper during an interview at the Kennedy News Center. Kennedy Space Center is working with private industry in new and innovative ways as the agency's premier launch center adapts to changing spaceflight, research and exploration goals in America. Opportunities are rich and varied, ranging from working with the private launch industry, to involvement with NASA's expendable launch vehicles programs to beginning or participating in research in a number of advancing fields. For more information on CPDD, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/business/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  6. Tom Engler Interview

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Tom Engler, the deputy director of the Center Planning and Development Directorate at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, speaks to reporter James Dean from Florida Today newspaper during an interview at the Kennedy News Center. Kennedy Space Center is working with private industry in new and innovative ways as the agency's premier launch center adapts to changing spaceflight, research and exploration goals in America. Opportunities are rich and varied, ranging from working with the private launch industry, to involvement with NASA's expendable launch vehicles programs to beginning or participating in research in a number of advancing fields. For more information on CPDD, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/business/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  7. Learning to Love Reading: Interviews With Older Children and Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strommen, Linda Teran; Mates, Barbara Fowles

    2004-01-01

    Students in sixth and ninth grades were surveyed to determine attitudes toward reading and identify factors in the lives of older children and teens associated with the development of a love of reading. A group of 14 students who love to read, as well as an equal number of students who prefer not to read, were then interviewed about their reading…

  8. Digging Deeper: The Laddering Interview, a Tool for Surfacing Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trocchia, Philip J.; Swanson, Diane L.; Orlitzky, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Personally held values play a fundamental role in business. As such, it is critical that students understand the nature of values pertaining to the workplace. Using an innovative classroom exercise, laddering, business students interview individuals to identify values that influence choices. Objectives are to help students understand the role of…

  9. Motivational Interviewing and Adolescent Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilallo, John J.; Weiss, Gony

    2009-01-01

    The use of motivational interviewing strategies in the practice of adolescent psychopharmacology is described. Motivational interviewing is an efficient and collaborative style of clinical interaction and this helps adolescent patients to integrate their psychiatric difficulties into a more resilient identity.

  10. Planning for the Job Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Close, Elizabeth, Ed.; Ramsey, Katherine, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Offers advice from middle school educators (a principal, a supervisor, and a teacher) on job interviews for teaching positions: how applicants are selected from the stack of applications, what happens during an interview, and what truly makes a difference. (SR)

  11. Job Interviewing? Try the Telephone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegel, Paul L.

    1979-01-01

    Telephone interviews can save college and candidates time and money while precluding the judging of job candidates by extraneous factors. A format for a successful telephone interview is suggested. (Author/MLF)

  12. Motivational Interviewing and Adolescent Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilallo, John J.; Weiss, Gony

    2009-01-01

    The use of motivational interviewing strategies in the practice of adolescent psychopharmacology is described. Motivational interviewing is an efficient and collaborative style of clinical interaction and this helps adolescent patients to integrate their psychiatric difficulties into a more resilient identity.

  13. Public Participation Guide: Stakeholder Interviews

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Interviews with stakeholders are one-to-one conversations about a specific topic or issue. The primary purpose of these interviews is to obtain project-relevant information and elicit stakeholder reactions and suggestions.

  14. STS-99 Crew Interviews: Mamoru Mohri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Mohri became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, his career path, and then finally, his selection by NASDA as an astronaut. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the purpose for the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Specific interest is on the importance of this SRTM flight, the knowledge that we will gain from the 3D topographic map of the Earth, and the reason why this 3D data is being recorded instead of down-linked. The two antennas that will be taking the pictures, the involvement of the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA), and EARTHCAM, a student-controlled camera on the Endeavour Orbiter, Mohri's responsibility during this 24 hour mission, and his secondary experiments with high definition TV cameras are also discussed.

  15. Structured or unstructured personnel interviews?

    PubMed

    Azarpazhooh, Amir; Ryding, William H; Leake, James L

    2008-01-01

    The challenge for health care managers is finding, hiring and retaining appropriately qualified and motivated employees. One useful method of gaining information about and insight into a candidate is interviewing, which can be classified as structured, unstructured or semi-structured. The disadvantages of unstructured interviews are reviewed; ways to enhance the psychometric properties of interviews by adding structure are reviewed and summarized; and the possible reasons for underutilization of structured interviews are explored.

  16. African Primary Care Research: Qualitative interviewing in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article is part of a series on African Primary Care Research and focuses on the topic of qualitative interviewing in primary care. In particular it looks at issues of study design, sample size, sampling and interviewing in relation to individual and focus group interviews. There is a particular focus on helping postgraduate students at a Masters level to write their research proposals. PMID:26245436

  17. Mother/daughter intergenerational interviews: insights into qualitative interviewing.

    PubMed

    Clendon, Jill

    As part of a larger study examining the social history of the Well Child/Health and Development Record Book in New Zealand, mother-daughter intergenerational dyad interviews were undertaken. The inter-generational dyad interviews were utilised to explore why mothers often keep their children's Well Child/Health and Development Record Books (Plunket Books) well beyond the five years of age that the Well Child Nurse stops visiting. Mother-daughter intergenerational dyad interviews are not a commonly used method of interview but can elicit valuable information that may otherwise be overlooked. This article discusses the method with which the interviews were undertaken and argues that successful construction of mother/daughter intergenerational dyad interviews is the result of a combination of context and the resulting interaction between the mother, daughter and interviewer/researcher.

  18. An Interview with Ralph Tyler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowakowski, Jeri Ridings

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Ralph Tyler. This interview will be of interest to those entering the field of education as well as for those who have made their home within the field for some time now. In the interview, Dr. Tyler discusses work in education and educational evaluation that spans over a half a century. He describes issues…

  19. Preparing for Your Principal Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanneut, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Being invited to the initial round of interviews for a principal opening is an opportunity; preparing for it is an investment. A successful interview requires that you create a detailed plan and take specific steps. This article provides tips on how to prepare yourself for a principal interview. Before you focus on what to do during your…

  20. Preparing for Your Principal Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanneut, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Being invited to the initial round of interviews for a principal opening is an opportunity; preparing for it is an investment. A successful interview requires that you create a detailed plan and take specific steps. This article provides tips on how to prepare yourself for a principal interview. Before you focus on what to do during your…

  1. Interviewing Skills for Supervisory Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Lawrence L.

    This book has been designed to elaborate on what interviewing is in its basic forms and how these various forms can be utilized by the operating supervisor. Its intent is to develop, in simple language, the techniques of successful interviewing. Illustrations of real interviews are presented and the supervisor is encouraged to use role playing as…

  2. ProADD: A database on Protein Aggregation Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shobana, Ramesh; Pandaranayaka, Eswari PJ

    2014-01-01

    ProADD, a database for protein aggregation diseases, is developed to organize the data under a single platform to facilitate easy access for researchers. Diseases caused due to protein aggregation and the proteins involved in each of these diseases are integrated. The database helps in classification of proteins involved in the protein aggregation diseases based on sequence and structural analysis. Analysis of proteins can be done to mine patterns prevailing among the aggregating proteins. Availability http://bicmku.in/ProADD PMID:25097386

  3. Recruiting and Interviewing in Rural School Districts: Protocol or Potluck

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Through administrator and teacher surveys and interviews, this study examined recruiting and interviewing practices of eighty-three rural school districts located in, and between, the rural Ozark Plateau and Mississippi River Delta. Survey results indicated that districts with smaller student populations were far less likely to have an identified…

  4. Delivering Higher Education to Adults: An Interview with Robert Mendenhall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finney, Joni E.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Robert Mendenhall, president of Western Governors University, who is the 2012 recipient of the Virginia B. Smith (VBS) Innovative Leadership Award. The annual award recognizes his leadership in redesigning higher education delivery for adult students. In the interview, Robert Mendenhall talks about his work…

  5. Safe at School: An Interview with Kevin Jennings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Joan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Assistant Deputy Secretary of Education Kevin Jennings on his ideas about school safety. In this interview, Jennings describes his plans for making schools safer for students and for developing a way to measure school climate that can drive such changes. Bullied in school, Jennings now devotes his life to…

  6. Hiring Excellent Teachers: Current Interviewing Theories, Techniques, and Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Terry G.

    Hiring qualified teachers is one of the most important steps toward providing a good education to students. Because of the large investment of time and money, teacher hiring is one of the costliest administrative duties. Inexperienced and unskilled interviewers can make poor hiring decisions. Research on hiring interviews shows that they are often…

  7. Safe at School: An Interview with Kevin Jennings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Joan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Assistant Deputy Secretary of Education Kevin Jennings on his ideas about school safety. In this interview, Jennings describes his plans for making schools safer for students and for developing a way to measure school climate that can drive such changes. Bullied in school, Jennings now devotes his life to…

  8. The Path Leading to Differentiation: An Interview with Carol Tomlinson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Echo H.

    2013-01-01

    The author interviewed Dr. Carol Tomlinson, who is a well-known academic scholar in gifted education. The interview focused on Dr. Tomlinson's work on differentiation, how she started, and what her suggestions for teachers are to differentiate instructions for gifted students in general education classrooms.

  9. Interviewing: Bridge-Building and Story-Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delbridge, John R.

    Students who write the least in initial prewriting are often passionate and philosophical talkers--during unplanned conversations they will freely "compose" stories. This realization led one educator to consider using interviewing as a discovery technique. From the perspective of qualitative research methods, interviews are seen as…

  10. Delivering Higher Education to Adults: An Interview with Robert Mendenhall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finney, Joni E.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Robert Mendenhall, president of Western Governors University, who is the 2012 recipient of the Virginia B. Smith (VBS) Innovative Leadership Award. The annual award recognizes his leadership in redesigning higher education delivery for adult students. In the interview, Robert Mendenhall talks about his work…

  11. The Path Leading to Differentiation: An Interview with Carol Tomlinson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Echo H.

    2013-01-01

    The author interviewed Dr. Carol Tomlinson, who is a well-known academic scholar in gifted education. The interview focused on Dr. Tomlinson's work on differentiation, how she started, and what her suggestions for teachers are to differentiate instructions for gifted students in general education classrooms.

  12. Video Taping and Abnormal Psychology: Dramatized Clinical Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Michael J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Students in an abnormal psychology course worked in teams to produce dramatizations of diagnostic interviews and then presented them in class. Positive and negative aspects of the activity are discussed. (RM)

  13. Video Taping and Abnormal Psychology: Dramatized Clinical Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Michael J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Students in an abnormal psychology course worked in teams to produce dramatizations of diagnostic interviews and then presented them in class. Positive and negative aspects of the activity are discussed. (RM)

  14. Interviews as an Aid to Selection of Psychology Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weir, C.

    1976-01-01

    The relationships between class of degree in psychology from one department and (a) interview ratings, (b) two adult intelligence tests, and (c) advanced-level examinations were examined in a sample of 145 students from four-year groups. (Editor)

  15. Issues in Communication Education: An Interview with Joe Ayers (Editor 1999-2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, Heather; Hazel, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with Joe Ayres, editor of this journal from 1999 to 2002. Addresses issues such as curriculum content, competencies for undergraduate students, graduate students, student retention, and the role of mentoring in higher education. (SG)

  16. Issues in Communication Education: An Interview with Joe Ayers (Editor 1999-2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, Heather; Hazel, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with Joe Ayres, editor of this journal from 1999 to 2002. Addresses issues such as curriculum content, competencies for undergraduate students, graduate students, student retention, and the role of mentoring in higher education. (SG)

  17. Convergent Validation of an Interview-Based Personality Assessment: A Laboratory Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, Myron D.; Ellis, Bruce J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a 2-session laboratory project in which students develop, conduct, and attempt to validate an interview-based personality assessment. In Session 1, students learn about effective interview procedures and then design and pilot-test an interview to assess 4 personality traits (emotionality, activity level, sociability, and…

  18. ADD and ADHD: An Overview for School Counselors. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pledge, Deanna S.

    School counselors are often consultants for parents and teachers on problems that children and adolescents face. Attention deficit disorder (ADD) is one such problem. It is frequently misunderstood, presenting a challenge for parents and teachers alike. The counselor is a resource for initial identification and interventions at home and in the…

  19. Meeting Learning Challenges: Working with the Child Who Has ADD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenspan, Stanley I.

    2006-01-01

    The terms ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) and ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) are applied to several symptoms, including: difficulty in paying attention, distractibility, having a hard time following through on things, and sometimes over-activity and impulsivity. There are many different reasons why children have these symptoms.…

  20. Water Softeners: How Much Sodium Do They Add?

    MedlinePlus

    ... healthy eating I'm trying to watch the sodium in my diet. Should I be concerned about sodium from water softeners? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Regular tap water contains very little sodium. The amount of sodium a water softener adds ...