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Sample records for study downhole dehydration

  1. Downhole steam generation: material studies

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, E.K.; Weirick, L.J.; Muir, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    One enhanced oil recovery technique for extracting heavy crude from deep reservoirs by steam at the bottom of an injection well. Development of a downhole steam generator that will produce steam and inject it into formations at depths greater than 2500 feet is one objective of a Department of Energy/Sandia National Laboratories development effort - Project DEEP STEAM. Extensive material studies have been performed in support of Project DEEP STEAM; current efforts are devoted primarily to the selection and evaluation of materials for use in downhole steam generators. This paper presents observations of the performance of candidate metals and refractory ceramics (combustor liners) during tests of two prototypic, high pressure, diesel/air combustion, direct contact, downhole steam generators. The first downhole test of such a generator provides data on the performance of various metals (304L, 310 and 316S stainless steels and plain carbon steel) exposed for several weeks to a warm, aerated saltwater environment. A number of corrosion mechanisms acted to cause severely degraded perforance of some of the metals. Several refractory liner designs were evaluated during ground level tests of a generator having a ceramic-lined combustion chamber. Of the two refractories employed, alumina and silicon carbide, the alumina liners exhibited more serious surface degradation and corrosion.

  2. [Study of erythrocyte dehydration using spin labels].

    PubMed

    Moiseev, V A; Mezhidov, S Kh; Nardid, O A

    1989-01-01

    Possibility of studying erythrocyte dehydration by ESR-spin probe is substantiated. Dehydration of erythrocytes in relation to osmolarity of sodium chloride solutions is investigated. The results are shown to agree with the data obtained by radioisotope method.

  3. Dehydration

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be a little more careful. Signs of dehydration in adults include Being thirsty Urinating less often ... skin Feeling tired Dizziness and fainting Signs of dehydration in babies and young children include a dry ...

  4. Downhole steam-generator study. Volume 1: Conception and feasibilty evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    A feasibility evaluation of a downhill steam generator was performed by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International, under contract to Sandia National Laboratories, from September 1978 to September 1980. The study was conducted in four phases: (1) selection of a preliminary system design, (2) parametric analysis of the selected system, (3) experimental studies to demonstrate feasibility and develop design data, and (4) development of a final system design based on the parametric and experimental results. The feasibility of a low pressure combustion, indirect contact, downhole steam generator system was demonstrated. Key results from all phases of the study are presented herein.

  5. [Use of zinc-containing dehydrating fixatives for neurohistological studies].

    PubMed

    Korzhevskiĭ, D E; Grigor'ev, I P; Otellin, V A

    2006-01-01

    The suitability of zinc-containing dehydrating fixatives for neurohistological study of paraffin sections using Nissl staining and immunocytochemical techniques was examined. It was found that zinc-containing dehydrating fixatives (zinc-ethanol-formaldehyde and zinc-acetone-isopropanol-formaldehyde) had a capacity for good preservation of both structure and antigenic properties of the nervous tissue and could be recommended for application in neurohistological studies.

  6. Downhole tool

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Muradov, Andrei; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2007-03-20

    A double shouldered downhole tool connection comprises box and pin connections having mating threads intermediate mating primary and secondary shoulders. The connection further comprises a secondary shoulder component retained in the box connection intermediate a floating component and the primary shoulders. The secondary shoulder component and the pin connection cooperate to transfer a portion of makeup load to the box connection. The downhole tool may be selected from the group consisting of drill pipe, drill collars, production pipe, and reamers. The floating component may be selected from the group consisting of electronics modules, generators, gyroscopes, power sources, and stators. The secondary shoulder component may comprises an interface to the box connection selected from the group consisting of radial grooves, axial grooves, tapered grooves, radial protrusions, axial protrusions, tapered protrusions, shoulders, and threads.

  7. Gauging the feasibility of a downhole energy harvesting system through a proof-of-concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjolsing, Eric; Todd, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocarbon well operators deploy downhole reservoir monitoring equipment in order to optimize the rate at which hydrocarbons are extracted. Alternative power sources are sought that could be deployed in these harsh environments to replace or supplement standard power sources currently in use. To this end, a three phase proof-of-concept study was performed to gauge the feasibility of such a device. In the first phase a parametric study was performed to understand how high uncertainty variables affect the natural frequency of a producing hydrocarbon well. In a follow up study, the relationship between boundary conditions and system damping was investigated. In the second phase a structural housing was designed to satisfy American Petroleum Institute load cases. Using finite element models and standard tube/casing geometries, design pressures were iterated until a permissible housing design was achieved. This preliminary design provided estimates of the radial width and volume in which energy harvesting and storage elements may be situated. In the last phase a software program was developed to estimate the energy that might be harvested from user specified harvester configurations. The program is dependent on user input production tube accelerations; this permits well operators to use well-specific vibrational data as inputs to generate well-specific energy output estimates. Results indicate that a downhole energy harvesting tool is structurally feasible under reasonable operating conditions but no conclusions can be made as to the sufficiency of generated power as no in-situ acceleration time histories are available. Future work is discussed. Approved for publication, LA-UR-16-21193.

  8. EPR study on gamma-irradiated fruits dehydrated via osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Aleksieva, K.

    2007-06-01

    The shape and time stability of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of non- and γ-irradiated papaya, melon, cherry and fig samples dehydrated via osmosis are reported. It is shown that non-irradiated samples are generally EPR silent whereas γ-irradiated exhibit "sugar-like" EPR spectra. The recorded EPR spectra are monitored for a period of 7 months after irradiation (stored at low humidity and in the dark). The results suggest longer period of unambiguous identification of the radiation processing of osmose dehydrated fruits. Therefore, the Protocol EN 13708,2001 issued by CEN is fully applicable for the studied fruit samples.

  9. Study of wound dressing structure and hydration/dehydration properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugão, A. B.; Machado, L. D. B.; Miranda, L. F.; Alvarez, M. R.; Rosiak, J. M.

    1998-06-01

    Hydrogels manufactured by radio-induced crosslinking and simultaneous sterilisation of hydrogels of PVP, PEG and agar, according to the Rosiak method, have many desirable properties for using as wound dressings. However, some properties need to be improved or better controlled. The membranes need to be strong enough to be freely used. Another important property to be controlled is the capacity of absorption of exudate and the kinetics of drying. Therefore, it was necessary to understand the role of main parameters (agar, PVP, PEG concentration and dose) in the structure of the net and in the hydration and dehydration properties. The structure of the membranes was studied by sol analysis and the hydrating/dehydrating properties were studied by isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. The gel content for all samples were always in agreement with expected values considering that only PVP undergoes crosslinking. The hydrating and dehydration results did not show variation with the tested parameters. It was concluded that the network was solely composed of crosslinked PVP plasticezed by the other compounds. The properties of hydration/dehydration is related rather to diffusion than to capillarity or osmose and to the chemical retention of water in the polymeric matrix.

  10. Subsea downhole optical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McStay, D.; Shiach, G.; McAvoy, S.

    2009-07-01

    The potential for subsea downhole optical fibre sensing to optimize hydrocarbon production and hence contribute to enhanced oil recovery is described. The components of susbea downhole optical sensing systems are reviewed and the performance of a new subsea optical fibre feed-through for downhole optical fibre sensing reported.

  11. Downhole pulse tube refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.; Gardner, D.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary design study to explore the plausibility of using pulse tube refrigeration to cool instruments in a hot down-hole environment. The original motivation was to maintain Dave Reagor`s high-temperature superconducting electronics at 75 K, but the study has evolved to include three target design criteria: cooling at 30 C in a 300 C environment, cooling at 75 K in a 50 C environment, cooling at both 75 K and 30 C in a 250 C environment. These specific temperatures were chosen arbitrarily, as representative of what is possible. The primary goals are low cost, reliability, and small package diameter. Pulse-tube refrigeration is a rapidly growing sub-field of cryogenic refrigeration. The pulse tube refrigerator has recently become the simplest, cheapest, most rugged and reliable low-power cryocooler. The authors expect this technology will be applicable downhole because of the ratio of hot to cold temperatures (in absolute units, such as Kelvin) of interest in deep drilling is comparable to the ratios routinely achieved with cryogenic pulse-tube refrigerators.

  12. Downhole telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Normann, R.A.; Kadlec, E.R.

    1994-11-08

    A downhole telemetry system is described for optically communicating to the surface operating parameters of a drill bit during ongoing drilling operations. The downhole telemetry system includes sensors mounted with a drill bit for monitoring at least one operating parameter of the drill bit and generating a signal representative thereof. The downhole telemetry system includes means for transforming and optically communicating the signal to the surface as well as means at the surface for producing a visual display of the optically communicated operating parameters of the drill bit. 7 figs.

  13. Downhole telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Normann, Randy A.; Kadlec, Emil R.

    1994-01-01

    A downhole telemetry system is described for optically communicating to the surface operating parameters of a drill bit during ongoing drilling operations. The downhole telemetry system includes sensors mounted with a drill bit for monitoring at least one operating parameter of the drill bit and generating a signal representative thereof. The downhole telemetry system includes means for transforming and optically communicating the signal to the surface as well as means at the surface for producing a visual display of the optically communicated operating parameters of the drill bit.

  14. A study of dielectric anisotropy in dehydrated cortical bone.

    PubMed

    García Sánchez, F J; De Mercato, G

    The complex permittivity of dehydrated bovine femoral bone has been studied in vitro, in the three orthogonal directions from 1 kHz to 3 MHz, as part of an analysis of the various factors involved in the dielectric behavior of fluid-saturated cortical bone. In this study the bone's physical structure reveals its anisotropic nature by its dependence on both the real and imaginary parts of permittivity on the orientation of the applied electric field. The real permittivity and the total conductivity are generally higher in the longitudinal direction than in the other two transverse directions, with the tangential direction presenting values between those of the longitudinal and radial directions and closer to the former. The high frequency limit of the real part of the permittivity was found to be around 10 and its low frequency limit is of the order of 1000. The dispersion parameters of relaxation time show values of about 0.4 and the corresponding mean relaxation frequencies are below 100 Hz.

  15. Downhole Data Transmission System

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe

    2004-04-06

    A system for transmitting data through a string of down-hole components. In accordance with one aspect, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. Each downhole component includes a pin end and a box end, with the pin end of one downhole component being adapted to be connected to the box end of another. Each pin end includes external threads and an internal pin face distal to the external threads. Each box end includes an internal shoulder face with internal threads distal to the internal shoulder face. The internal pin face and the internal shoulder face are aligned with and proximate each other when the pin end of the one component is threaded into a box end of the other component.

  16. Downhole steam quality measurement

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David O.; Montoya, Paul C.; Muir, James F.; Wayland, Jr., J. Robert

    1987-01-01

    An empirical method for the remote sensing of steam quality that can be easily adapted to downhole steam quality measurements by measuring the electrical properties of two-phase flow across electrode grids at low frequencies.

  17. Science Study Aids 1: Dehydration for Food Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeschen, John; And Others

    This publication is the first of a series of seven supplementary investigative materials for use in secondary science classes providing up-to-date research-related investigations. This unit is structured for grades 9 through 12. It is concerned with the osmatic dehydration of fruits. The guide provides students with information about food…

  18. Hypernatraemic dehydration and breast feeding: a population study

    PubMed Central

    Oddie, S; Richmond, S; Coulthard, M

    2001-01-01

    As part of a population based regional review of all neonatal readmissions, the incidence of dehydration with hypernatraemia in exclusively breast fed infants was estimated. All readmissions to hospital in the first month of life during 1998 from a population of 32 015 live births were reviewed. Eight of 907 readmissions met the case definition, giving an incidence of at least 2.5 per 10 000 live births. Serum sodium at readmission varied from 150to 175 mmol/l. One infant had convulsions. The sole explanation for hypernatraemia was unsuccessful breast feeding in all cases. The eight cases are compared with the 65 cases published in the literature since 1979. Presentation, incidence, risk factors, pathophysiology, treatment, and prevention are discussed.

 PMID:11567942

  19. Dehydration of 1-octadecanol over H-BEA: A combined experimental and computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Wenji; Liu, Yuanshuai; Barath, Eszter; Wang, Lucy; Zhao, Chen; Mei, Donghai; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2016-02-05

    Liquid phase dehydration of 1-octdecanol, which is intermediately formed during the hydrodeoxygenation of microalgae oil, has been explored in a combined experimental and computational study. The alkyl chain of C18 alcohol interacts with acid sites during diffusion inside the zeolite pores, resulting in an inefficient utilization of the Brønsted acid sites for samples with high acid site concentrations. The parallel intra- and inter- molecular dehydration pathways having different activation energies pass through alternative reaction intermediates. Formation of surface-bound alkoxide species is the rate-limiting step during intramolecular dehydration, whereas intermolecular dehydration proceeds via a bulky dimer intermediate. Octadecene is the primary dehydration product over H-BEA at 533 K. Despite of the main contribution of Brønsted acid sites towards both dehydration pathways, Lewis acid sites are also active in the formation of dioctadecyl ether. The intramolecular dehydration to octadecene and cleavage of the intermediately formed ether, however, require strong BAS. L. Wang, D. Mei and J. A. Lercher, acknowledge the partial support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). EMSL is a national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  20. Ethanol dehydration in HZSM-5 studied by density functional theory: evidence for a concerted process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seonah; Robichaud, David J; Beckham, Gregg T; Paton, Robert S; Nimlos, Mark R

    2015-04-16

    Dehydration over acidic zeolites is an important reaction class for the upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapors to hydrocarbon fuels or to precursors for myriad chemical products. Here, we examine the dehydration of ethanol at a Brønsted acid site, T12, found in HZSM-5 using density functional theory (DFT). The geometries of both cluster and mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM:MM) models are prepared from the ZSM-5 crystal structure. Comparisons between these models and different DFT methods are conducted to show similar results among the models and methods used. Inclusion of the full catalyst cavity through a QM:MM approach is found to be important, since activation barriers are computed on average as 7 kcal mol(-1) lower than those obtained with a smaller cluster model. Two different pathways, concerted and stepwise, have been considered when examining dehydration and deprotonation steps. The current study shows that a concerted dehydration process is possible with a lower (4-5 kcal mol(-1)) activation barrier while previous literature studies have focused on a stepwise mechanism. Overall, this work demonstrates that fairly high activation energies (∼50 kcal mol(-1)) are required for ethanol dehydration. A concerted mechanism is favored over a stepwise mechanism because charge separation in the transition state is minimized. QM:MM approaches appear to provide superior results to cluster calculations due to a more accurate representation of charges on framework oxygen atoms.

  1. Distributed downhole drilling network

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Fox, Joe; Pixton, David S.

    2006-11-21

    A high-speed downhole network providing real-time data from downhole components of a drilling strings includes a bottom-hole node interfacing to a bottom-hole assembly located proximate the bottom end of a drill string. A top-hole node is connected proximate the top end of the drill string. One or several intermediate nodes are located along the drill string between the bottom-hole node and the top-hole node. The intermediate nodes are configured to receive and transmit data packets transmitted between the bottom-hole node and the top-hole node. A communications link, integrated into the drill string, is used to operably connect the bottom-hole node, the intermediate nodes, and the top-hole node. In selected embodiments, a personal or other computer may be connected to the top-hole node, to analyze data received from the intermediate and bottom-hole nodes.

  2. Downhole transmission system

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2008-01-15

    A transmission system in a downhole component comprises a data transmission element in both ends of the downhole component. Each data transmission element houses an electrically conducting coil in a MCEI circular trough. An electrical conductor connects both the transmission elements. The electrical conductor comprises at least three electrically conductive elements insulated from each other. In the preferred embodiment the electrical conductor comprises an electrically conducting outer shield, an electrically conducting inner shield and an electrical conducting core. In some embodiments of the present invention, the electrical conductor comprises an electrically insulating jacket. In other embodiments, the electrical conductor comprises a pair of twisted wires. In some embodiments, the electrical conductor comprises semi-conductive material.

  3. Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bill Turner

    2006-11-28

    A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

  4. Onion dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.; Lienau, P.J.

    1994-07-01

    This article describes the onion dehydration process as generally practiced in the United States. The actual processing steps from harvest to final product, and geothermal applications for power production and energy requirements in the dehydration industry are discussed. A design of a dehydrator converted to geothermal energy usage is included.

  5. Downhole steam injector

    DOEpatents

    Donaldson, A. Burl; Hoke, Donald E.

    1983-01-01

    An improved downhole steam injector has an angled water orifice to swirl the water through the device for improved heat transfer before it is converted to steam. The injector also has a sloped diameter reduction in the steam chamber to throw water that collects along the side of the chamber during slant drilling into the flame for conversion to steam. In addition, the output of the flame chamber is beveled to reduce hot spots and increase efficiency, and the fuel-oxidant inputs are arranged to minimize coking.

  6. Method and system for downhole clock synchronization

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Johnson, Monte; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2006-11-28

    A method and system for use in synchronizing at least two clocks in a downhole network are disclosed. The method comprises determining a total signal latency between a controlling processing element and at least one downhole processing element in a downhole network and sending a synchronizing time over the downhole network to the at least one downhole processing element adjusted for the signal latency. Electronic time stamps may be used to measure latency between processing elements. A system for electrically synchronizing at least two clocks connected to a downhole network comprises a controlling processing element connected to a synchronizing clock in communication over a downhole network with at least one downhole processing element comprising at least one downhole clock. Preferably, the downhole network is integrated into a downhole tool string.

  7. Downhole heat exchanger system for Sharpstein Museum, Brannon Cottage, and the Community Center, Calistoga, CA. Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.

    1984-08-01

    Based on the results of the test drilling at the Sharpstien Museum and Community Center, a well at the site should provide space heating for the Museum and Community Center, and domestic hot water for the Community Center utilizing a downhole heat exchanger (DHE). Although the temperatures observed in the well are very low, a suitable system can be designed and installed. Not including the cost of the well and testing, which is assumed to be borne by the California Energy Commission for demonstration and scientific research purposes, the simple payback is between 4.6 and 7.5 years depending on the cost of the experimental convection promotor.

  8. Downhole steam quality measurement

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Muir, J.F.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1985-06-19

    The present invention relates to an empirical electrical method for remote sensing of steam quality utilizing flow-through grids which allow measurement of the electrical properties of a flowing two-phase mixture. The measurement of steam quality in the oil field is important to the efficient application of steam assisted recovery of oil. Because of the increased energy content in higher quality steam it is important to maintain the highest possible steam quality at the injection sandface. The effectiveness of a steaming operation without a measure of steam quality downhole close to the point of injection would be difficult to determine. Therefore, a need exists for the remote sensing of steam quality.

  9. Downhole data transmission system

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe

    2006-06-20

    A system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In one aspect, the system includes first and second magnetically conductive, electrically insulating elements at both ends of the component. Each element includes a first U-shaped trough with a bottom, first and second sides and an opening between the two sides. Electrically conducting coils are located in each trough. An electrical conductor connects the coils in each component. In operation, a varying current applied to a first coil in one component generates a varying magnetic field in the first magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element, which varying magnetic field is conducted to and thereby produces a varying magnetic field in the second magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element of a connected component, which magnetic field thereby generates a varying electrical current in the second coil in the connected component.

  10. Downhole Data Transmission System

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe

    2003-12-30

    A system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In one aspect, the system includes first and second magnetically conductive, electrically insulating elements at both ends of the component. Each element includes a first U-shaped trough with a bottom, first and second sides and an opening between the two sides. Electrically conducting coils are located in each trough. An electrical conductor connects the coils in each component. In operation, a varying current applied to a first coil in one component generates a varying magnetic field in the first magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element, which varying magnetic field is conducted to and thereby produces a varying magnetic field in the second magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element of a connected component, which magnetic field thereby generates a varying electrical current in the second coil in the connected component.

  11. Downhole hydraulic seismic generator

    DOEpatents

    Gregory, Danny L.; Hardee, Harry C.; Smallwood, David O.

    1992-01-01

    A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

  12. The mechanism of dehydration in chromophore maturation of wild-type green fluorescent protein: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yingying; Yu, Jian-Guo; Sun, Qiao; Li, Zhen; Smith, Sean C.

    2015-07-01

    An interesting aspect of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is its autocatalytic chromophore maturation. Numerous experimental studies have indicated that dehydration is the last step in the chromophore maturation process of wild-type GFP. Based on the crystal structure of wild-type GFP, the mechanism of the reverse reaction of dehydration was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) in this study. Our results proposed that the dehydration is exothermic. Moreover, the rate-limiting step of the mechanism is the proton on guanidinium of Arg96 transferring to the β-carbon anion of Tyr66, which is consistent with the experimental observation.

  13. Process optimization for osmo-dehydrated carambola (Averrhoa carambola L) slices and its storage studies.

    PubMed

    Roopa, N; Chauhan, O P; Raju, P S; Das Gupta, D K; Singh, R K R; Bawa, A S

    2014-10-01

    An osmotic-dehydration process protocol for Carambola (Averrhoacarambola L.,), an exotic star shaped tropical fruit, was developed. The process was optimized using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) following Central Composite Rotatable Design (CCRD). The experimental variables selected for the optimization were soak solution concentration (°Brix), soaking temperature (°C) and soaking time (min) with 6 experiments at central point. The effect of process variables was studied on solid gain and water loss during osmotic dehydration process. The data obtained were analyzed employing multiple regression technique to generate suitable mathematical models. Quadratic models were found to fit well (R(2), 95.58 - 98.64 %) in describing the effect of variables on the responses studied. The optimized levels of the process variables were achieved at 70°Brix, 48 °C and 144 min for soak solution concentration, soaking temperature and soaking time, respectively. The predicted and experimental results at optimized levels of variables showed high correlation. The osmo-dehydrated product prepared at optimized conditions showed a shelf-life of 10, 8 and 6 months at 5 °C, ambient (30 ± 2 °C) and 37 °C, respectively.

  14. Theoretical study of the reactions of 2-chlorophenol over the dehydrated and hydroxylated silica clusters.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenxiao; Zhong, Wenhui; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Chengbu

    2012-01-12

    Silica is the main component of combustion-generated fly ash and is expected to have an important impact on the formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in municipal waste incinerators. In this work, we theoretically studied the reactions of 2-chlorinated phenol (2-CP) over the clusters (SiO(2))(3) and (SiO(2))(3)O(2)H(4), which mimic the dehydrated and hydroxylated silica structures, respectively. The dehydrated cluster is much more active toward the attack of 2-CP to form highly stable 2-chlorophenolate than the hydroxylated silica cluster. The further dissociation of chlorophenolates to form CP radicals (CPRs) is calculated to be very difficult. The calculated energy barrier of the reaction of 2-CP over the dehydrated (SiO(2))(3) cluster and IR data are in good agreement with early experimental observations. On the basis of the calculated results, we propose that the formation of PCDD/Fs from CPs over silica surfaces may not involve CPRs, but be relevant to the further conversion of chlorophenolates over silica surfaces. This mechanism is very different from the corresponding reactions mediated by transition metal oxides. The results presented here may be helpful to understand the chemisorption mechanism of CPs on silica surfaces in real waste combustion.

  15. Using Wind and Temperature Fields to Study Dehydration Mechanisms in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, Jasna; Miller, Timothy; Robertson, Franklin

    2008-01-01

    The tropics are the main region for troposphere-to-stratosphere transport (TST) of air. One of the dominant mechanisms that control tropical TST of water vapor is freeze-drying by the cold tropical tropopause. This mechanism is supported by evidence from satellite observations of the "tape recorder", where seasonal changes in stratospheric water vapor are in phase with seasonal changes in tropopause temperatures in the tropics. Over the last few years, however, the concept of the tropical tropopause has evolved from a single material surface to a layer called the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). A recent hypothesis on dehydration mechanisms suggests that dehydration and entry point into the stratosphere are not always co-located (Holton and Gettelman, 2001). Instead, dehydration can occur during horizontal advection through Lagrangian 'cold pools', or coldest regions along a parcel's trajectory, as air ascends within the TTL while the entry point into the stratosphere occurs at a different geographical location. In this study, we investigate the impact that these Lagrangian cold pools have on TTL moisture. For this purpose, we use in situ measurements of TTL water vapor obtained aboard NASA's WB-57 aircraft over the Eastern Tropical Pacific, and we compare these measurements to minimum saturation water vapor mixing ratios obtained from three-dimensional backward trajectory calculations. Aircraft measurements show frequent unsaturated conditions, which suggest that the entry value of stratospheric water vapor in this region was not set by local saturation conditions. Trajectory calculations, driven by both ECMWF operational analysis and reanalysis winds and temperature fields, are used to explore the impact (e.g., geographical location, timing, dehydration magnitude) of the Lagrangian cold pools intercepted by the parcels sampled by the aircraft. We find noteworthy differences in the location of the Lagrangian cold pools using the two ECMWF data sets, namely

  16. Downhole hydraulic actuated pump

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, G.K.

    1988-09-06

    This patent describes a downhole hydraulically actuated pump assembly of the type having a main housing within which an engine and pump is enclosed; a connecting rod, an engine piston, a pump plunger, means by which the engine and connecting rod reciprocate the pump plunger and thereby produces fluid; the main housing has a lower end having a formation fluid inlet; and upper end having a power fluid inlet; and, a produced fluid outlet; the plunger divides one marginal end of the housing into upper and lower production chambers; the lower end of the connecting rod is hollow and extends through the plunger into fluid communication with the formation fluid inlet to provide a source of formation fluid for the upper and lower production chambers; a traveling value assembly contained within the plunger and arranged to transfer formation fluid from the hollow rod, through the plunger, and into the upper and lower production chambers, respectively, as the plunger upstrokes and downstrokes; produced fluid valve means by which fluid flows from the upper and lower production chambers and through the produced fluid outlet.

  17. Experimental Studies on Dehydration Embrittlement of Serpentinized Peridotite and Effect of Pressure on Creep of Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Gang

    The origin of intermediate depth earthquakes has been debated for 90 years yet is still under active discussion. These earthquakes are localized in double seismic zones in descending lithosphere; both zones originate very close to oceanic trenches. A leading proposed initiation mechanism for these earthquakes since 1968 has been dehydration embrittlement of serpentine under stress. Despite the considerable evidence favoring this mechanism, a major argument against it has been that the lower seismic zone initiates at ˜40 km depth almost immediately below trenches and there does not appear to be a vehicle to carry water sufficiently deep to hydrate otherwise dry lithosphere. To directly address this problem, an experimental study has been carried out to investigate the minimum amount of serpentine that is required to trigger the dehydration embrittlement instability in serpentinized peridotite at high pressure (1-3 GPa) and temperature (720-750˚C). The results show that embrittlement occurs during dehydration of antigorite (the phase of serpentine stable at elevated pressure) in a wide range of compositions but both nearly dry peridotite and extensively altered peridotite are ductile. Fresh, unaltered, synthetic harzburgite and harzburgite with 4 vol% distributed antigorite are ductile, as are specimens with greater than 65% antigorite. Only compositions between 8 vol% and 65 vol% antigorite develop the instability. We suggest that very small degrees of serpentinization do not release sufficient H 2O to trigger the instability and that extensive serpentinization avoids the instability because soft, ductile, antigorite becomes the interconnected matrix with olivine and pyroxene existing only as isolated crystals. In that case, dehydration simply facilitates flow. These systematics suggest that small amounts of H2O transported down deep normal (bending) faults at trenches are sufficient to enable the instability in the lower seismic zones, thus providing additional

  18. Downhole tool adapted for telemetry

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2010-12-14

    A cycleable downhole tool such as a Jar, a hydraulic hammer, and a shock absorber adapted for telemetry. This invention applies to other tools where the active components of the tool are displaced when the tool is rotationally or translationally cycled. The invention consists of inductive or contact transmission rings that are connected by an extensible conductor. The extensible conductor permits the transmission of the signal before, after, and during the cycling of the tool. The signal may be continuous or intermittent during cycling. The invention also applies to downhole tools that do not cycle, but in operation are under such stress that an extensible conductor is beneficial. The extensible conductor may also consist of an extensible portion and a fixed portion. The extensible conductor also features clamps that maintain the conductor under stresses greater than that seen by the tool, and seals that are capable of protecting against downhole pressure and contamination.

  19. Transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R; Fox, Joe R

    2006-05-30

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. The transmission element may include an annular housing forming a trough, an electrical conductor disposed within the trough, and an MCEI material disposed between the annular housing and the electrical conductor.

  20. NMR studies of renal phosphate metabolites in vivo: Effects of hydration and dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, S.D.; Eng, C.; Balaban, R.S. )

    1988-10-01

    The present study characterizes the {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of rabbit kidneys in vivo and evaluates the effect of hydration on phosphorous metabolites including the organic solute glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC). Cortical phosphorylethanolamine is the predominant component of the phosphomonoester region of the {sup 31}P spectrum. The contribution of blood to the spectrum is mainly from 2,3 diphosphoglycerate, which comprises {approximately}30% of the inorganic phosphate region. Acute infusion of 0.9% saline decreases the sodium content of the inner medulla by >50% in 15 min as shown by {sup 23}Na imaging. Despite this medullary Na dilution, no change in renal GPC content was observed for >1 h even with the addition of furosemide or furosemide and antidiuretic hormone. However, 20 h of chronic dehydration with 0.45% saline did result in a 30% decrease in renal GPC content when compared with dehydrated animals. These findings are consistent with GPC not playing a role in the short-term regulation of the medullary intracellular milieu in response to acute reductions in medullary Na content.

  1. Prevention of cartilage dehydration in imaging studies with a customized humidity chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Ryan J.; Firminger, Colin; Müller, Ralph; Stok, Kathryn S.

    2013-09-01

    Quantitative three-dimensional imaging methods such as micro-computed tomography (μCT) allow for the rapid and comprehensive evaluation of cartilage and bone in animal models, which can be used for drug development and related research in arthritis. However, when imaging fresh cartilage tissue in air, a common problem is tissue dehydration which causes movement artifact in the resulting images. These artifacts distort scans and can render them unusable, leading to a considerable loss of time and effort with sample preparation and measurement. The sample itself is also irretrievably damaged by the dehydration, often unable to return to its full tissue thickness upon rehydration. Additionally, imaging with ionic contrast agents such as HexabrixTM must be performed in air, otherwise the agent will be washed out if immersed in a liquid. The first goal of this study was to design a customized humidity chamber to maintain cartilage hydration without the need for immersion. Following this, the use of the humidity chamber during a synchrotron radiation-μCT scan was validated and its performance evaluated. Results showed that the loss of fluid film volume is associated with scanning at low humidity (87%), and can be avoided using the humidity chamber. Coupling this technology with advances in synchrotron imaging (e.g., phase contrast imaging) or contrast agents is promising.

  2. Cognitive performance and dehydration.

    PubMed

    Adan, Ana

    2012-04-01

    No matter how mild, dehydration is not a desirable condition because there is an imbalance in the homeostatic function of the internal environment. This can adversely affect cognitive performance, not only in groups more vulnerable to dehydration, such as children and the elderly, but also in young adults. However, few studies have examined the impact of mild or moderate dehydration on cognitive performance. This paper reviews the principal findings from studies published to date examining cognitive skills. Being dehydrated by just 2% impairs performance in tasks that require attention, psychomotor, and immediate memory skills, as well as assessment of the subjective state. In contrast, the performance of long-term and working memory tasks and executive functions is more preserved, especially if the cause of dehydration is moderate physical exercise. The lack of consistency in the evidence published to date is largely due to the different methodology applied, and an attempt should be made to standardize methods for future studies. These differences relate to the assessment of cognitive performance, the method used to cause dehydration, and the characteristics of the participants.

  3. Subsurface Rock Physical Properties by Downhole Loggings - Case Studies of Continental Deep Drilling in Kanto Distinct, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omura, K.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, many examples of physical logging have been carried out in deep boreholes. The loggings are direct in-situ measurements of rock physical properties under the ground. They provide significant basic data for the geological, geophysical and geotechnical investigations, e.g., tectonic history, seismic wave propagation, and ground motion prediction. Since about 1980's, Natl. Res. Inst. for Earth Sci. and Disast. Prev. (NIED) dug deep boreholes (from 200m to 3000m depth) in sedimentary basin of Kanto distinct, Japan, for purposes of installing seismographs and hydrological instruments, and in-situ stress and pore pressure measurements. At that time, downhole physical loggings were conducted in the boreholes: spontaneous potential, electrical resistance, elastic wave velocity, formation density, neutron porosity, total gamma ray, caliper, temperature loggings. In many cases, digital data values were provided every 2m or 1m or 0.1m. In other cases, we read printed graphs of logging plots and got digital data values. Data from about 30 boreholes are compiled. Especially, particular change of logging data at the depth of an interface between a shallow part (soft sedimentary rock) and a base rock (equivalent to hard pre-Neogene rock) is examined. In this presentation, the correlations among physical properties of rock (especially, formation density, elastic wave velocity and electrical resistance) are introduced and the relation to the lithology is discussed. Formation density, elastic wave velocity and electric resistance data indicate the data are divide in two groups that are higher or lower than 2.5g/cm3: the one correspond to a shallow part and the other correspond to a base rock part. In each group, the elastic wave velocity and electric resistance increase with increase of formation density. However the rates of increases in the shallow part are smaller than in the base rock part. The shallow part has lower degree of solidification and higher porosity

  4. West Flank Downhole Temperature Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2008-03-01

    Downhole temperature data for the three wells inside the West Flank FORGE footprint; 83-11, TCH 74-2 and TCH 48-11. TCH 74-2 and TCH 48-11 were both collected before 1990 and 83-11 was collected in 2009. The are compiled into one spreadsheet for ease of visualization.

  5. Battery switch for downhole tools

    DOEpatents

    Boling, Brian E.

    2010-02-23

    An electrical circuit for a downhole tool may include a battery, a load electrically connected to the battery, and at least one switch electrically connected in series with the battery and to the load. The at least one switch may be configured to close when a tool temperature exceeds a selected temperature.

  6. Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.L.

    1981-01-07

    Am improved apparatus is described for the downhole injection of steam into boreholes, for tertiary oil recovery. It includes an oxidant supply, a fuel supply, an igniter, a water supply, an oxidant compressor, and a combustor assembly. The apparatus is designed for efficiency, preheating of the water, and cooling of the combustion chamber walls. The steam outlet to the borehole is provided with pressure-responsive doors for closing the outlet in response to flameout. (DLC)

  7. Raman Spectroscopic Study Of The Dehydration Of Sulfates Using An Acoustic Levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotton, Stephen; Kaiser, R.

    2012-10-01

    The martian orbiters, landers, and rovers identified water-bearing sulfates on the martian surface. Furthermore, the Galileo mission suggests that hydrated salts such as magnesium sulfate are present on the surface of Europa and Ganymede. To understand the hydrologic history of Mars and some of Jupiter’s and Saturn’s moons, future missions need to identify in situ the hydration states of sulfates including magnesium sulfate (MgSO4 • nH2O n = 7, 6, . . ., 0), gypsum (CaSO4 • 2H2O), bassanite (CaSO4 • 0.5H2O) and anhydrite (CaSO4). Raman spectroscopy is ideally suited for this purpose, since the Raman spectrum for each different degree of hydration is unique. To obtain laboratory Raman spectra for comparison with the in situ measurements, we have developed a novel apparatus combining an acoustic levitator and a pressure-compatible process chamber. Particles with diameters between 10 µm and a few mm can be levitated at the pressure nodes of the ultrasonic standing wave. The chamber is interfaced to complimentary FTIR and Raman spectroscopic probes to characterize any chemical and physical modifications of the levitated particles. The particles can be heated to well-defined temperatures between 300 K and 1000 K using a carbon dioxide laser; the temperature of the particle will be probed via its black-body spectrum. The present apparatus enables (i) the production of high particle temperatures, (ii) precise measurement of the temperature, and (iii) accurate control of the environmental conditions (gas pressure and composition) within the chamber. Using this apparatus, we have studied the dehydration of sulfates including gypsum and epsomite (MgSO4 • 7H2O) in an anhydrous nitrogen atmosphere. We will present spectra showing the variation of the Raman spectra as gypsum, for example, is dehydrated to form anhydrite.

  8. Dehydration in the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Miller, Hayley J

    2015-09-01

    Dehydration affects 20% to 30% of older adults. It has a greater negative outcome in this population than in younger adults and increases mortality, morbidity, and disability. Dehydration is often caused by water deprivation in older adults, although excess water loss may also be a cause. Traditional markers for dehydration do not take into consideration many of the physiological differences present in older adults. Clinical assessment of dehydration in older adults poses different findings, yet is not always diagnostic. Treatment of dehydration should focus on prevention and early diagnosis before it negatively effects health and gives rise to comorbidities. The current article discusses what has most thoroughly been studied; the best strategies and assessment tools for evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of dehydration in older adults; and what needs to be researched further. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 41(9), 8-13.].

  9. Mechanically actuated downhole locking sub

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, M.

    1986-09-30

    A mechanically actuated locking sub is described for setting and releasing a downhole tool from an oilwell borehole, having landing nipples, without interrupting a production flow therethrough, comprising: an inner tubular member, having a central conduit and a lower end provided with means for attachment to the downhole tool to be set in or released from the oilwell bore; an outer sleeve member circumferentially encompassing at least a part of the inner tubular member, the sleeve having a plurality of apertures therein; locking dog members intermediate the inner tubular member and the outer sleeve member, having an engaging portion extending outwardly through the apertures of the outer sleeve member; slidable sleeve means intermediate the outer sleeve member and the inner tubular member, movable between a first, extended and a second, retracted position with respect to the inner tubular member; and a double acting spring means engaging the locking dogs; adapted to bias the locking dogs towards the inner tubular member.

  10. Downhole pump with pressure limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Brandell, J.T.

    1982-02-02

    A well testing assembly includes a pressure limiter located between a down-hole pump and an inflatable packer. The pressure limiter includes a housing having first and second housing parts and having an inflation passage disposed therein for communicating a discharge of the down-hole pump with the inflatable packer. A clutch is connected between the first and second housing parts. A biasing spring biases the clutch toward an engaged position. A piston spring biases the clutch toward an engaged position. A piston is associated operatively with the clutch and communicated with the inflation passage for overcoming the biasing spring and moving the clutch to a disengaged position at a predetermined fluid pressure level within the inflation passage. 50 claims.

  11. Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator

    DOEpatents

    Hardee, Harry C.; Hills, Richard G.; Striker, Richard P.

    1991-07-16

    An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  12. Long-Term Storage Studies on Dehydrated Ration Items and Food Packets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    CLASSIFICATION Of THIS f»AGeprh«n D«# Bnffd) At 100°F, storage life of cheese spread, pineapple, beef stew, chocolate brownies, and fruitcake was 12...beef steak, beef stew, frankfurters, fruitcake, pineapple, and chocolate covorad brownies and cheese spread. Freeze dehydrated ration items from... chocolate brownies .... 35 36 temperature and duration of storage on freeze dehydrated chicken stew ....... 37 temperature and duration of storage

  13. Downhole component with a pressure equalization passageway

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Reynolds, Jay T.; Breihan, James W.; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2006-08-22

    The present invention includes a downhole component adapted for transmitting downhole data. The downhole component includes a threaded end on a downhole component. The threaded end furthermore includes an interior region, and exterior region, and a mating surface wherein a cavity is formed. A data transmission element is disposed in the cavity and displaces a volume of the cavity. At least one passageway is formed in the threaded region between interior and exterior regions. The passageway is in fluid communication with both the interior and exterior regions and thereby relieves pressure build up of thread lubricant upon tool joint make up.

  14. Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P.F. II, Smith, C.C.; Keeney, R.C.; Kirk, D.K.; Conover, M.F.

    1983-03-01

    Geothermal downhole conditions that may affect the performance and reliability of selected materials and components used in the drilling, completion, logging, and production of geothermal wells are reviewed. The results of specific research and development efforts aimed at improvement of materials and components for downhole contact with the hostile physicochemical conditions of the geothermal reservoir are discussed. Materials and components covered are tubular goods, stainless steels and non-ferrous metals for high-temperature downhole service, cements for high-temperature geothermal wells, high-temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downhole pumps. (MHR)

  15. Synchrotron Powder X-ray Diffraction Study of the Structure and Dehydration Behavior of Sepiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, J. E.; Bish, D. L.; Heaney, P. J.

    2006-05-01

    Sepiolite is a hydrous Mg-silicate clay mineral with fibrous morphology that typically occurs as fine-grained, poorly crystalline masses. It occurs in a wide variety of geological environments and has been mined for centuries because of its many uses, e.g. in the pharmaceutical, fertilizer, and pesticide industries. Its versatile functionality derives from the large surface area and microporosity that are characteristic of the material. In recent years, sepiolite has received considerable attention with regard to the adsorption of organics, for use as a support for catalysts, as a molecular sieve, and as an inorganic membrane for ultrafiltration. Because of its fine-grained and poorly crystalline nature, it has not been possible to study sepiolite's crystal structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods, and consequently many details of the structure are still not well known. In this study, Rietveld refinements using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data were used to investigate the crystal structure and dehydration behavior of sepiolite from Durango, Mexico. The room- temperature (RT) sepiolite structure in air compares well with previous models but reveals an additional zeolitic water site. The RT structure under vacuum retained only ~1/8 of the zeolitic water and the volume decreased 1.3%. Real-time, temperature-resolved synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data and Rietveld refinements were used to investigate the behavior of the sepiolite structure from 300 to 925 K. Rietveld refinements revealed that most of the zeolitic water is lost by ~390 K, accompanied by a decrease in the a and c unit-cell parameters. Above ~600 K the sepiolite structure folds as one-half of the crystallographically bound water is lost. Rietveld refinements of the "anhydrous" sepiolite structure reveal that, in general, unit-cell parameters a, b, â and volume steadily decrease with increasing temperature; there is an obvious change in slope at ~820 K suggesting a phase

  16. Does Casing Material Influence Downhole Accelerometer Recordings? a Controlled Study of Earthquake and Experimental Data Recorded at the NEES@UCSB Wildlife Liquefaction Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthsing, D. A.; Seale, S. H.; Steidl, J. H.; Ratzesberger, H.; Hegarty, P.; Nees@Ucsb

    2010-12-01

    In 2004, NEES@UCSB outfitted the Wildlife Liquefaction Array (WLA) with new instrumentation and initiated an experiment to test whether casing material influences downhole recordings of strong ground motion. Two 5.5m boreholes were drilled meters apart. One of the boreholes was cased with traditional rigid PVC and the other with flexible Corex® drain pipe. Three-component strong-motion accelerometers were installed in both boreholes. Recently we have obtained a unique set of data at WLA that has allowed us to conduct a controlled study. On 15 June 2010, a Mw 5.7 event occurred near Ocotillo, CA, 57 km SW from WLA. A set of 60 aftershocks with M > 3.0 were recorded at WLA with good signal-to-noise ratio. These data are ideal for our study, as the events are approximately co-located relative to the site and they have similar focal mechanisms. We computed frequency spectra for the three components of motion for these events and we computed average spectral ratios between the data in the two boreholes. The spectral ratios are not flat ( = 1): certain frequencies within the range of engineering interest ( f < 20 Hz) recorded in the flexible borehole show amplification and damping relative to the recordings from the rigid borehole. An amplification factor of 1.4 is the maximum in this frequency range. In May 2010, NEES@UTexas visited WLA with the vibroseis truck T-Rex. We have performed spectral analysis of borehole recordings from 30 T-Rex pulses with frequencies ranging from 3 to 16 Hz. We present these spectral ratios for comparison with the ones computed from earthquake data.

  17. Effect of leaf dehydration duration and dehydration degree on PSII photochemical activity of papaya leaves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meijun; Zhang, Zishan; Gao, Huiyuan; Yang, Cheng; Fan, Xingli; Cheng, Dandan

    2014-09-01

    Although the effect of dehydration on photosynthetic apparatus has been widely studied, the respective effect of dehydration duration and dehydration degree was neglected. This study showed that, when leaves dehydrated in air, the PSII activities of leaves decreased with the decline of leaf relative water content (RWC). Unexpectedly, when leaves dehydrated to same RWC, the decreases in Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm were lower in leaves dehydrating at 43 °C than those at 25 °C. However, to reach the same RWC, leaves dehydrating at 43 °C experienced 1/6 of the dehydration duration for leaves dehydrating at 25 °C. To distinguish the respective effect of dehydration degree and dehydration duration on photosynthetic apparatus, we studied the PSII activities of leaves treated with different concentration of PEG solutions. Increasing dehydration degree aggravated the decline of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in leaves with the same dehydration duration, while prolonging the dehydration duration also exacerbated the decline of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in leaves with identical dehydration degree. With the same dehydration degree and duration, high temperature enhanced the decrease of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in the leaves. When leaves dehydrated in air, the effect of high temperature was underestimated due to reduction of dehydration duration. The results demonstrated that, dehydration degree and duration both play important roles in damage to photosynthetic apparatus. We suggest that, under combined stresses, the effects of dehydration degree and duration on plants should be considered comprehensively, otherwise, partial or incorrect results may be obtained.

  18. Small-angle Scattering Study of Mesoscopic Structures in Charged Gel and Their Evolution in Dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, M.; Annaka, M.; Hara, K.; Vigild, M. E.; Wignall, George D

    2003-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures, with length scales {approx}10{sup 2} {angstrom}, were investigated by small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) in several N-isopropylacrylamide-sodium acrylate (NIPA-SA) copolymeric hydrogels with varying [NIPA]/[SA] ratios and water contents. The SAXS experiments reveal that, depending upon the [NIPA]/[SA] ratio, the dehydrated NIPA-SA gel shows two mesoscopic structures: one consists of randomly distributed SA-rich islands in NIPA matrix, while the other is a microphase-separated structure, composed of NIPA-rich and SA-rich domains. In addition, the SANS experiments reveal the mesoscopic structural features during the dehydration process. As the concentration of the network polymers increases, NIPA-rich and water-rich domains segregate in the gel. Then, an electrostatic interaction between the segregated domains induces a microphase-separated structure in the limit of the dehydrated NIPA-SA gel.

  19. Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.L.

    1983-04-19

    Apparatus and method for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a downhole oxidant compressor is used to compress relatively low pressure (Atmospheric) oxidant, such as air, to a relatively high pressure prior to mixing with fuel for combustion. The multi-stage compressor receives motive power through a shaft driven by a gas turbine powered by the hot expanding combustion gases. The main flow of compressed oxidant passes through a velocity increasing nozzle formed by a reduced central section of the compressor housing. An oxidant bypass feedpipe leading to peripheral oxidant injection nozzles of the combustion chamber are also provided. The downhole compressor allows effective steam generation in deep wells without need for high pressure surface compressors. Feedback preheater means are provided for preheating fuel in a preheat chamber. Preheating of the water occurs in both a water feed line running from aboveground and in a countercurrent water flow channel surrounding the combustor assembly. The countercurrent water flow channels advantageously serve to cool the combustion chamber wall. The water is injected through slotted inlets along the combustion chamber wall to provide an unstable boundary layer and stripping of the water from the wall for efficient steam generation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at the steam outlet for closing and sealing the combustion chamber from entry of reservoir fluids in the event of a flameout.

  20. Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Ronald L.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a downhole oxidant compressor is used to compress relatively low pressure (atmospheric) oxidant, such as air, to a relatively high pressure prior to mixing with fuel for combustion. The multi-stage compressor receives motive power through a shaft driven by a gas turbine powered by the hot expanding combustion gases. The main flow of compressed oxidant passes through a velocity increasing nozzle formed by a reduced central section of the compressor housing. An oxidant bypass feedpipe leading to peripheral oxidant injection nozzles of the combustion chamber are also provided. The downhole compressor allows effective steam generation in deep wells without need for high pressure surface compressors. Feedback preheater means are provided for preheating fuel in a preheat chamber. Preheating of the water occurs in both a water feed line running from aboveground and in a countercurrent water flow channel surrounding the combustor assembly. The countercurrent water flow channels advantageously serve to cool the combustion chamber wall. The water is injected through slotted inlets along the combustion chamber wall to provide an unstable boundary layer and stripping of the water from the wall for efficient steam generation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at the steam outlet for closing and sealing the combustion chamber from entry of reservoir fluids in the event of a flameout.

  1. Onion dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    Onion dehydration consists of a continuous operation, belt conveyor using fairly low-temperature hot air from 38-104{degrees}C (100 to 200{degrees}F). Typical processing plants will handle 4500 kg (10,000 pounds) of raw product per hour (single line), reducing the moisture from around 83 % to 4 % (680 to 820 kg - 1,500 to 1,800 pounds finished product). An example of a geothermal processing plant is Integrate Ingredients at Empire, Nevada, in the San Emidio Desert. A total of 6.3 million kg (14 million pounds) of dry product are produced annually: 60% onion and 40% garlic. A 130{degrees}C (266{degrees}F) well provide the necessary heat for the plant.

  2. Evaporation dehydrator

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, L.

    1985-08-06

    A method and apparatus for the treatment of oilfield heavy oil emulsions is provided. The method utilizes, in combination, the steps of evaporation, vapor/liquid separation, and solids settling to dehydrate, degassify and remove solids from the heavy oil emulsion and produce oil having less than 0.5% by volume basic solids and water. The apparatus comprises an insulated, horizontal, cylindrical vessel. Mounted in the upper end of the vessel chamber is an inclined, tubular member having a closed upper end and an open lower end. At its closed end, the member forms a receiving chamber. A mechanical foam breaker extends transversely across the interior of the tubular member, downstream of the chamber. A stack of angularly inclined, heated trays, arranged in zigzag fashion, are positioned beneath the tubular member, to provide an elongate flowpath. The lower end of the tubular member is positioned to feed onto the upper end of the first tray. The flowpath formed by the stack of trays terminates at a level above the bottom of the vessel, so that a quiescent settling sump is provided by the base of the vessel. The vessel includes a feed inlet opening into the receiving chamber, a vapor outlet leading from the top of said vessel, and liquid and solids outlets leading from the sump. A stream of pre-heated heavy oil emulsion is fed to the receiving chamber, wherein part of the contained water in the vapor form breaks out. The foaming stream is contained by the tubular member and is substantially disintegrated by the foam breaker. The stream then issues onto the upper end of the stack of trays and is heated as it passes as a shallow, broad layer over the trays, to gradually evaporate the remaining water from the emulsion and solids. The dehydrated solids are settled out in the sump, leaving oil containing less than 0.5% basic solids and water.

  3. Harsh environments electronics : downhole applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, Paul Thomas

    2011-03-01

    The development and operational sustainment of renewable (geothermal) and non-renewable (fossil fuel) energy resources will be accompanied by increasingly higher costs factors: exploration and site preparation, operational maintenance and repair. Increased government oversight in the wake of the Gulf oil spill will only add to the cost burden. It is important to understand that downhole conditions are not just about elevated temperatures. It is often construed that military electronics are exposed to the upper limit in terms of extreme service environments. Probably the harshest of all service conditions for electronics and electrical equipment are those in oil, gas, and geothermal wells. From the technology perspective, advanced materials, sensors, and microelectronics devices are benefificial to the exploration and sustainment of energy resources, especially in terms of lower costs. Besides the need for the science that creates these breakthroughs - there is also a need for sustained engineering development and testing. Downhole oil, gas, and geothermal well applications can have a wide range of environments and reliability requirements: Temperature, Pressure, Vibration, Corrosion, and Service duration. All too frequently, these conditions are not well-defifined because the application is labeled as 'high temperature'. This ambiguity is problematic when the investigation turns to new approaches for electronic packaging solutions. The objective is to develop harsh environment, electronic packaging that meets customer requirements of cost, performance, and reliability. There are a number of challenges: (1) Materials sets - solder alloys, substrate materials; (2) Manufacturing process - low to middle volumes, low defect counts, new equipment technologies; and (3) Reliability testing - requirements documents, test methods and modeling, relevant standards documents. The cost to develop and sustain renewable and non-renewable energy resources will continue to escalate

  4. Downhole steam injector. [Patent application

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A.B.; Hoke, E.

    1981-06-03

    An improved downhole steam injector has an angled water orifice to swirl the water through the device for improved heat transfer before it is converted to steam. The injector also has a sloped diameter reduction in the steam chamber to throw water that collects along the side of the chamber during slant drilling into the flame for conversion to steam. In addition, the output of the flame chamber is beveled to reduce hot spots and increase efficiency, and the fuel-oxidant inputs are arranged to minimize coking.

  5. Distributed Temperature Sensing as a downhole tool in hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Read, T.; Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Coleman, T.; Krause, S.; Chalari, A.; Mondanos, M.; Ciocca, F.; Selker, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology enables downhole temperature monitoring to study hydrogeological processes at unprecedentedly high frequency and spatial resolution. DTS has been widely applied in passive mode in site investigations of groundwater flow, in-well flow, and subsurface thermal property estimation. However, recent years have seen the further development of the use of DTS in an active mode (A-DTS) for which heat sources are deployed. A suite of recent studies using A-DTS downhole in hydrogeological investigations illustrate the wide range of different approaches and creativity in designing methodologies. The purpose of this review is to outline and discuss the various applications and limitations of DTS in downhole investigations for hydrogeological conditions and aquifer geological properties. To this end, we first review examples where passive DTS has been used to study hydrogeology via downhole applications. Secondly, we discuss and categorize current A-DTS borehole methods into three types. These are thermal advection tests, hybrid cable flow logging, and heat pulse tests. We explore the various options with regards to cable installation, heating approach, duration, and spatial extent in order to improve their applicability in a range of settings. These determine the extent to which each method is sensitive to thermal properties, vertical in-well flow, or natural gradient flow. Our review confirms that the application of DTS has significant advantages over discrete point temperature measurements, particularly in deep wells, and highlights the potential for further method developments in conjunction with other emerging hydrogeophysical tools.

  6. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOEpatents

    Glowka, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

  7. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOEpatents

    Glowka, D.A.

    1994-09-06

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drill string in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drill string at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone. 6 figs.

  8. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOEpatents

    Glowka, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

  9. The application and design of downhole heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Freeston, D.H.; Pan, H.

    1985-01-01

    The direct use of low temperature geothermal fluids is finding increased usage around the world for space heating, air conditioning, etc. For non-artesian wells the conventional means of circulating the hot fluids is by a downhole turbine pump, with the geofluid being either returned to the reservoir or rejected to waste. The latter is the more common, with results, in some cases, of excessive drawdown of the reservoir and consequent environmental problems. The downhole heat exchanger, utilising a single or multiple ''U'' tube, can alleviate the above problems. Experience at Klamath Falls in Oregon, U.S.A., and at Rotorua and Taupo, New Zealand, shows that these devices are capable, given a good permeable reservoir with temperatures around 100C, of delivering up to 1 MW of thermal energy from a conventional shallow well (50 to 200 m). This paper discusses the application of the downhole heat exchanger for space heating using examples from New Zealand and Klamath Falls systems, and reports a recent study on the parameters necessary to achieve an optimum design. The discussion is based on a laboratory model, a computer simulation an full-scale tests on operational downhole heat exchangers in New Zealand.

  10. Pervaporation study for the dehydration of tetrahydrofuran-water mixtures by polymeric and ceramic membranes.

    PubMed

    McGinness, Colleen A; Slater, C Stewart; Savelski, Mariano J

    2008-12-01

    Pervaporation technology can effectively separate a tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent-water waste stream at an azeotropic concentration. The performance of a Sulzer 2210 polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) membrane and a Pervatech BV silica membrane were studied, as the operating variables feed temperature and permeate pressure, were varied. The silica membrane was found to exhibit a flux of almost double that of the PVA membrane, but both membranes had comparable separation ability in purifying the solvent-water mixture. At benchmark feed conditions of 96 wt% THF and 4 wt% water, 50 degrees C and 10 torr permeate pressure, the silica membrane flux was 0.276 kg/m(2)hr and selectivity was 365. For both membranes, flux was found to increase at an exponential rate as the feed temperature increased from 20 to 60 degrees C. The flux through the silica membrane increases at a 6% faster rate than the PVA membrane. Flux decreased as permeate pressure was increased from 5 to 25 torr for both membranes. The amount of water in the permeate decreased exponentially as the permeate pressure was increased, but increased linearly with increasing temperature. Optimum conditions for flux and selectivity are at low permeate pressure and high feed temperature. When a small amount of salt is added to the feed solution, an increase in flux is observed. Overall models for flux and permeate concentration were created from the experimental data. The models were used to predict scale-up performance in separating an azeotropic feed waste to produce dehydrated THF solvent for reuse and a permeate stream with a dilute THF concentration.

  11. The Mechanism of 2-Furaldehyde Formation from d-Xylose Dehydration in the Gas Phase. A Tandem Mass Spectrometric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Andreina; Piccolella, Simona; Pepi, Federico; Garzoli, Stefania; Giacomello, Pierluigi

    2013-07-01

    The mechanism of reactions occurring in solution can be investigated also in the gas phase by suited mass spectrometric techniques, which allow to highlight fundamental mechanistic features independent of the influence of the medium and to clarifying controversial hypotheses proposed in solution studies. In this work, we report a gas-phase study performed by electrospray triple stage quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-TSQ/MS) on the dehydration of d-xylose, leading mainly to the formation of 2-furaldehyde (2-FA). It is generally known in carbohydrate chemistry that the thermal acid catalyzed dehydration of pentoses leads to the formation of 2-FA, but several aspects on the solution-phase mechanism are controversial. Here, gaseous reactant ions corresponding to protonated xylose molecules obtained from ESI of a solution containing d-xylose and ammonium acetate as protonating reagent were allowed to undergo collisionally activated decomposition (CAD) into the triple stage quadrupole analyzer. The product ion mass spectra of protonated xylose are characterized by the presence of ionic intermediates arising from xylose dehydration, which were structurally characterized by their fragmentation patterns. As expected, the xylose triple dehydration leads to the formation of the ion at m/z 97, corresponding to protonated 2-FA. On the basis of mass spectrometric evidences, we demonstrated that in the gas phase, the formation of 2-FA involves protonation at the OH group bound to the C1 atom of the sugar, the first ionic intermediate being characterized by a cyclic structure. Finally, energy resolved product ion mass spectra allowed to obtain information on the energetic features of the d-xylose→2-FA conversion.

  12. Deep mineral water accelerates recovery after dehydrating aerobic exercise: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effect of deep mineral water (DMW) with moderate mineralization on the recovery of physical performance after prolonged dehydrating aerobic exercise in the heat was studied in nine healthy, physically active (VO2max = 45.8 ± 8.4 mL kg−1 min−1) women aged 24.0 ± 3.7 years. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover human study to evaluate the effect of ingestion of natural mineral water extracted from a depth of 689 m on recovery from prolonged fatiguing aerobic running conducted at 30°C. Results Mean body weight decreased by 2.6–2.8% following dehydrating exercise. VO2max was 9% higher after 4 h of recovery after rehydrating with DMW compared with plain water. Leg muscle power recovered better during the slow phase of recovery and was significantly higher after 48 h of recovery after rehydrating with DMW compared with plain water. Conclusions DMW with moderate mineralization was more effective in inducing recovery of aerobic capacity and leg muscle power compared with plain water following prolonged dehydrating aerobic running exercise. PMID:25002835

  13. Insights from the downhole dynamometer database

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, J.R.

    1997-03-01

    The Downhole Dynamometer Database is a compilation of test data collected with a set of five downhole tools built by Albert Engineering under contract to Sandia National Laboratories. The downhole dynamometer tools are memory tools deployed in the sucker rod string with sensors to measure pressure, temperature, load, and acceleration. The acceleration data is processed to yield position, so that a load vs. position dynagraph can be generated using data collected downhole. With five tools in the hole at one time, all measured data and computed dynagraphs from five different positions in the rod string are available. The purpose of the Database is to provide industry with a complete and high quality measurement of downhole sucker rod pumping dynamics. To facilitate use of the database, Sandia has developed a Microsoft Windows-based interface that functions as a visualizer and browser to the more than 40 MBytes of data. The interface also includes a data export feature to allow users to extract data from the database for use in their own programs. Following a brief description of the downhole dynamometer tools, data collection program, and database content, this paper will illustrate a few of the interesting and unique insights gained from the downhole data.

  14. First Aid: Dehydration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aid: Heat Illness Sun Safety Dehydration Diarrhea Vomiting Word! Dehydration What's the Big Sweat About Dehydration? How to Be Safe When You're in the Sun What's Sweat? Dehydration Is It Important to Drink a Lot of Water? Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  15. External validation of the DHAKA score and comparison with the current IMCI algorithm for the assessment of dehydration in children with diarrhoea: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Adam C; Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Modi, Payal; Nasrin, Sabiha; Atika, Bita; Rege, Soham; Robertson, Sarah; Schmid, Christopher H; Alam, Nur H

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Dehydration due to diarrhoea is a leading cause of child death worldwide, yet no clinical tools for assessing dehydration have been validated in resource-limited settings. The Dehydration: Assessing Kids Accurately (DHAKA) score was derived for assessing dehydration in children with diarrhoea in a low-income country setting. In this study, we aimed to externally validate the DHAKA score in a new population of children and compare its accuracy and reliability to the current Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) algorithm. Methods DHAKA was a prospective cohort study done in children younger than 60 months presenting to the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, with acute diarrhoea (defined by WHO as three or more loose stools per day for less than 14 days). Local nurses assessed children and classified their dehydration status using both the DHAKA score and the IMCI algorithm. Serial weights were obtained and dehydration status was established by percentage weight change with rehydration. We did regression analyses to validate the DHAKA score and compared the accuracy and reliability of the DHAKA score and IMCI algorithm with receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and the weighted κ statistic. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02007733. Findings Between March 22, 2015, and May 15, 2015, 496 patients were included in our primary analyses. On the basis of our criterion standard, 242 (49%) of 496 children had no dehydration, 184 (37%) of 496 had some dehydration, and 70 (14%) of 496 had severe dehydration. In multivariable regression analyses, each 1-point increase in the DHAKA score predicted an increase of 0·6% in the percentage dehydration of the child and increased the odds of both some and severe dehydration by a factor of 1·4. Both the accuracy and reliability of the DHAKA score were significantly greater than those of the IMCI algorithm. Interpretation The DHAKA score

  16. Downhole tool inflatable packer assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Brandell, J.T.

    1984-07-10

    A downhole tool inflatable packer assembly includes an upper packer shoe having a bypass mandrel connected thereto. A packer mandrel adapter has an upper end connected to a lower end of the bypass mandrel. A mandrel cover tube extends downwardly from the packer mandrel adapter. A packer mandrel has an upper portion connected to the packer mandrel adapter. A flow connector and a lower packer adapter are connected in that order below the packer mandrel. A packer flow tube has an upper end received in the bypass mandrel and a lower end received in the flow connector. An inflatable bladder has an upper end connected to the upper packer shoe and a lower end connected to a floating packer shoe which slidably engages the mandrel cover tube. A central flow passage, a packer bypass passage, and an inflation passage are disposed in the packer assembly.

  17. Study on ESR and inter-related properties of vacuum-dehydrated nanotubed titanic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shunli; Li, Wei; Jin, Zhensheng; Yang, Jianjun; Zhang, Jingwei; Du, Zuliang; Zhang, Zhijun

    2004-04-01

    Nanotubed titanic acid (H 2Ti 2O 4(OH) 2) is a novel kind of material. The electron spin resonance (ESR) and inter-related properties of its vacuum-dehydrated product were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopic, X-ray diffraction, ESR, diffuse reflectance spectra. The results showed that after treatment under vacuum (-0.1 MPa) at 100°C, single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancies (SETOV), characterized by a symmetrical ESR signal ( g=2.003), were generated in nanotubed H 2Ti 2O 4(OH) 2 crystal lattice. The g=2.003 ESR signal intensity ( IESR) increased with treatment time. SETOV played the role of F centers, the visible-light absorption power of vacuum-dehydrated H 2Ti 2O 4(OH) 2 was proportional to IESR. During vacuum dehydration at 100°C, the H 2Ti 2O 4(OH) 2 nanotubes shortened but its crystalline form kept unchanged. The formation mechanism of SETOV was discussed.

  18. Differential actuating system for downhole tools

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.L.; Manke, K.R.; Skinner, N.G.

    1993-08-24

    A downhole tool apparatus is described, comprising: a housing having a power chamber defined therein, and having power passage means defined in said housing for providing fluid pressure communication between said power chamber and first and second zones of a well; and pressure transfer control means for selectively applying a pressure differential between said first and second zones of said well across said power chamber to operate said downhole tool apparatus.

  19. On topotaxy and compaction during antigorite and chlorite dehydration: an experimental and natural study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Tommasi, Andréa; Garrido, Carlos J.; Mainprice, David

    2015-04-01

    Dehydration reactions result in minerals' replacement and a transient fluid-filled porosity. These reactions involve interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation and might therefore lead to fixed crystallographic orientation relations between reactant (protolith) and product phases (i.e. topotaxy). We investigate these two phenomena in the dehydration of a foliated antigorite (atg) serpentinite by comparing the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) developed by olivine (ol), orthopyroxene (opx) and chlorite (chl) during high-pressure antigorite and chlorite dehydration in piston-cylinder experiments and in natural samples recording the dehydration of antigorite (Cerro del Almirez, Betic Cordillera, Spain). Experiments were performed under undrained conditions resulting in fluid-filled porosity and in strong CPO of the prograde minerals, controlled by the pre-existing antigorite CPO in the reactant foliated serpentinite. The orientation of a ol,opx and is parallel to from the protolith. The Cerro del Almirez samples show similar, locally well-developed topotactic relations between orthopyroxene, chlorite and antigorite, but the product CPOs are weaker and more complex at the thin section scale. In contrast to the experiments, olivine from natural samples shows a weak correlation between b ol and the former . We relate the strengthening of local topotactic relations and the weakening of the inherited CPO at a larger scale in natural samples to compaction and associated fluid migration. Microstructural features that might be related to compaction in the natural samples include: (1) smooth bending of the former foliation, (2) gradual crystallographic misorientation (up to 16°) of prismatic orthopyroxene due to buckling by dislocation creep, (3) inversion of enstatite to low clinoenstatite (P21/c) along lamellae and (4) brittle fracturing of prismatic orthopyroxene enclosed by plastically deformed chlorite. The coexistence of orthopyroxene buckling and

  20. Active cooling for downhole instrumentation: Preliminary analysis and system selection

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1988-03-01

    A feasibility study and a series of preliminary designs and analyses were done to identify candidate processes or cycles for use in active cooling systems for downhole electronic instruments. A matrix of energy types and their possible combinations was developed and the energy conversion process for each pari was identified. The feasibility study revealed conventional as well as unconventional processes and possible refrigerants and identified parameters needing further clarifications. A conceptual design or series od oesigns for each system was formulated and a preliminary analysis of each design was completed. The resulting coefficient of performance for each system was compared with the Carnot COP and all systems were ranked by decreasing COP. The system showing the best combination of COP, exchangeability to other operating conditions, failure mode, and system serviceability is chosen for use as a downhole refrigerator. 85 refs., 48 figs., 33 tabs.

  1. Studies on Osmo-air dehydration of different Indian apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Raj, Dev; Sharma, P C; Sharera, Sanjay K

    2015-06-01

    Suitability of seven cultivars of apricot viz. New Castle, Kaisha, Royal, Suffaida, Nari, Kullu (Local) and Chulli (wild apricot) was evaluated for dehydration. Osmotic dehydration of fruits consisting of dipping prepared fruits in 70° Brix sucrose syrup containing 2,000 ppm potassium metabisulphite (KMS) for 24 h followed by cabinet air drying (55 °C) to desired moisture (20 ± 0.5 %) gave better dried product with good colour and appeal. Dried whole or halved fruits after removal of stones were preferred over whole fruits with stones with respect to appearance, texture and overall acceptability. Among different cultivars of apricot; cv. Kaisha followed by New Castle were found better with respect to yield as well as quality of dried product. Further, the quality of the osmo-air dried wild apricot fruits was found statistically at par with the quality of the osmo-air dried product obtained from cultivated apricots. Therefore, wild apricot fruits can also be utilized for preparation of acceptable quality of dried product.

  2. Lamellar spacing of photosystem II membrane fragments upon dehydration studied by neutron membrane diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieper, Jörg; Rusevich, Leonid; Hauß, Thomas; Renger, Gernot

    2016-02-01

    The effect of dehydration on the lamellar spacing of photosystem II (PS II) membrane fragments from spinach has been investigated using neutron membrane diffraction at room temperature. The diffraction data reveal a major peak at a scattering vector Q of 0.049 Å-1 at a relative humidity (r.h.) of 90% corresponding to a repeat distance D of about 129 Å. Upon dehydration to 44% r.h., this peak shifts to about 0.060 Å-1 corresponding to a distance of 104.7±2.5 Å. Within experimental error, the latter repeat distance remains almost the same at hydration levels below 44% r.h. indicating that most of the hydration water is removed. This result is consistent with the earlier finding that hydration-induced conformational protein motions in PS II membrane fragments are observed above 44% r.h. and correlated with the onset electron transfer in PS II (Pieper et al. 2008, Eur. Biophys. J. 37: 657-663).

  3. Lamellar spacing of photosystem II membrane fragments upon dehydration studied by neutron membrane diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieper, Jörg; Rusevich, Leonid; Hauß, Thomas; Renger, Gernot

    2015-12-01

    The effect of dehydration on the lamellar spacing of photosystem II (PS II) membrane fragments from spinach has been investigated using neutron membrane diffraction at room temperature. The diffraction data reveal a major peak at a scattering vector Q of 0.049 Å-1 at a relative humidity (r.h.) of 90% corresponding to a repeat distance D of about 129 Å. Upon dehydration to 44% r.h., this peak shifts to about 0.060 Å-1 corresponding to a distance of 104.7±2.5 Å. Within experimental error, the latter repeat distance remains almost the same at hydration levels below 44% r.h. indicating that most of the hydration water is removed. This result is consistent with the earlier finding that hydration-induced conformational protein motions in PS II membrane fragments are observed above 44% r.h. and correlated with the onset electron transfer in PS II (Pieper et al. 2008, Eur. Biophys. J. 37: 657-663).

  4. DHE (downhole heat exchangers). [Downhole Heat Exchangers (DHE)

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.

    1990-11-01

    The use of downhole heat exchangers (DHE) for residential or commercial space and domestic water heating and other applications has several desirable features. Systems are nearly or completely passive -- that is, no or very little geothermal water or steam is produced from the well either reducing or completely eliminating surface environmental concerns and the need for disposal systems or injection wells. Initial cost of pumps and installation are eliminated or reduced along with pumping power costs and maintenance costs associated with pumping often corrosive geothermal fluids. Many residential and small commercial systems do not require circulating pumps because the density difference in the incoming and outgoing sides of the loop are sufficient to overcome circulating friction losses in the entire system. The major disadvantage of DHEs is their dependence on natural heat flow. In areas where geological conditions provide high permeability and a natural hydraulic gradient, DHEs can provide a substantial quantity of heat. A single 500-ft (152 m) well in Klamath Falls, Oregon, supplies over one megawatt thermal and output is apparently limited by the surface area of pipe that can be installed in the well bore. In contrast, DHEs used in conjunction with heat pumps may supply less than 8 KW from a well of similar depth. Here output is limited by conductive heat flow with perhaps a small contribution from convection near the well bore. The highest capacity DHE reported to date, in Turkey, supplies 6 MW thermal from an 820-ft (250 m) well. There were two main goals for this project. The first was to gather, disseminate and exchange internationally information on DHES. The second was to perform experiments that would provide insight into well bore/aquifer interaction and thereby provide more information on which to base DHE designs. 27 refs., 31 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Downhole operations from a dry wellhead

    SciTech Connect

    Engelberg, A.; Suchy, L.

    1983-11-01

    This paper discusses the conditions, limitations, and requirements for conducting downhole operations on a live well from within a dry, 1-atm (100-kPa) production chamber. The paper begins with a description of Can Ocean Resources Ltd.'s subsea wellhead cellars (WHC's). The offshore service system and diving capsule are also described. Various kinds of downhole work are discussed together with the impact of four main operating factors: available space, mission time, safety, and payload. To illustrate better the advantages and limitations of conducting downhole work subsea, downhole operations conducted in the Garoupa field offshore Brazil are recounted. This experience included 5 hot tap operations, 26 polished rod lubricator operations, and 26 wirelining operations-all conducted from dry, 1-atm (100-kPa) WHC's on live wells. Despite the limitations imposed by space, payload, and mission time, the dry, 1-atm (100-kPa) system allows a significant number of downhole operations to be performed safely subsea. The CanOcean dry, 1-atm (100-kPa) diving system equipped with an umbilical provides operators with all necessary support for safe downhole operations. The hydrocarbon gases accumulated in the subsea chamber can be purged and a breathable atmosphere maintained during an operation. Warning and inerting systems can also be employed to prevent flammable mixture buildup. The dry, 1-atm (100-kPa) subsea completion system allows easy and convenient access for routine checkups and more complex downhole operations. The new, medium-duty wireline winch installed outside the diving system allows the service capsule to demate for crew change without cutting the wire. This winch can be used for pulling dummy valves, setting and retrieving gas-lift valves, opening and closing sliding sleeves, swaging out tubing, mechanical perforating, and other operations that require higher line speeds and stronger pulls.

  6. Variable Temperature Infrared Spectroscopy Studies of Aromatic Acid Adsorbate Effects on Montmorillonite Dehydration.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Audrey L; Nickels, Tara M; Maraoulaite, Dalia K; White, Robert L

    2017-02-01

    Molecular interactions between benzoic, salicylic, and acetylsalicylic acids and water contained within montmorillonite clay interlayer spaces are characterized by using variable temperature diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (VT-DRIFTS). By using sample perturbation and difference spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectral variations resulting from the removal of interlayer water are used to characterize aromatic acid local environment changes. Difference spectra features representing functional group perturbations are correlated with changes in IR absorptions associated with -O-H and -C = O stretching vibrations. Results suggest that adsorbate carboxylic acid functionalities participate in extensive hydrogen bonding and that the strengths of these interactions are diminished when clays are dehydrated. The nature of these interactions and their temperature-dependent properties are found to depend on adsorbate structure and concentration as well as the clay interlayer cation.

  7. 275 C Downhole Microcomputer System

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Hutchens; Hooi Miin Soo

    2008-08-31

    An HC11 controller IC and along with serial SRAM and ROM support ICs chip set were developed to support a data acquisition and control for extreme temperature/harsh environment conditions greater than 275 C. The 68HC11 microprocessor is widely used in well logging tools for control, data acquisition, and signal processing applications and was the logical choice for a downhole controller. This extreme temperature version of the 68HC11 enables new high temperature designs and additionally allows 68HC11-based well logging tools and MWD tools to be upgraded for high temperature operation in deep gas reservoirs, The microcomputer chip consists of the microprocessor ALU, a small boot ROM, 4 kbyte data RAM, counter/timer unit, serial peripheral interface (SPI), asynchronous serial interface (SCI), and the A, B, C, and D parallel ports. The chip is code compatible with the single chip mode commercial 68HC11 except for the absence of the analog to digital converter system. To avoid mask programmed internal ROM, a boot program is used to load the microcomputer program from an external mask SPI ROM. A SPI RAM IC completes the chip set and allows data RAM to be added in 4 kbyte increments. The HC11 controller IC chip set is implemented in the Peregrine Semiconductor 0.5 micron Silicon-on-Sapphire (SOS) process using a custom high temperature cell library developed at Oklahoma State University. Yield data is presented for all, the HC11, SPI-RAM and ROM. The lessons learned in this project were extended to the successful development of two high temperature versions of the LEON3 and a companion 8 Kbyte SRAM, a 200 C version for the Navy and a 275 C version for the gas industry.

  8. Loaded transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Daly, Jeffery E.

    2009-05-05

    A system for transmitting information between downhole components has a first downhole component with a first mating surface and a second downhole component having a second mating surface configured to substantially mate with the first mating surface. The system also has a first transmission element with a first communicating surface and is mounted within a recess in the first mating surface. The first transmission element also has an angled surface. The recess has a side with multiple slopes for interacting with the angled surface, each slope exerting a different spring force on the first transmission element. A second transmission element has a second communicating surface mounted proximate the second mating surface and adapted to communicate with the first communicating surface.

  9. Spectroscopic study of the dehydration and/or dehydroxylation of phyllosilicate and zeolite minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Congcong; Glotch, Timothy D.; Bish, David L.; Michalski, Joseph R.; Xu, Wenqian

    2011-05-01

    Phyllosilicates on Mars mapped by infrared spectroscopic techniques could have been affected by dehydration and/or dehydroxylation associated with chemical weathering in hyperarid conditions, volcanism or shock heating associated with meteor impact. The effects of heat-induced dehydration and/or dehydroxylation on the infrared spectra of 14 phyllosilicates from four structural groups (kaolinite, smectite, sepiolite-palygorskite, and chlorite) and two natural zeolites are reported here. Pressed powders of size-separated phyllosilicate and natural zeolite samples were heated incrementally from 100°C to 900°C, cooled to room temperature, and measured using multiple spectroscopic techniques: midinfrared (400-4000 cm-1) attenuated total reflectance, midinfrared reflectance (400-1400 cm-1), and far-infrared reflectance (50-600 cm-1) spectroscopies. Correlated thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction data were also acquired in order to clarify the thermal transformation of each sample. For phyllosilicate samples, the OH stretching (˜3600 cm-1), OH bending (˜590-950 cm-1), and/or H2O bending (˜1630 cm-1) bands all become very weak or completely disappear upon heating to temperatures > 500°C. The spectral changes associated with SiO4 vibrations (˜1000 cm-1 and ˜500 cm-1) show large variations depending on the compositions and structures of phyllosilicates. The thermal behavior of phyllosilicate IR spectra is also affected by the type of octahedral cations. For example, spectral features of Al3+-rich smectites are more stable than those of Fe3+-rich smectites. The high-temperature (>800°C) spectral changes of trioctahedral Mg2+-rich phyllosilicates such as hectorite, saponite, and sepiolite result primarily from crystallization of enstatite. Phyllosilicates with moderate Mg2+ concentration (e.g., palygorskite, clinochlore) and dioctahedral montmorillonites (e.g., SAz-1 and SCa-3) with partial Mg2+-for-Al3+ substitution all have new spectral feature developed

  10. Loaded Transducer Fpr Downhole Drilling Component

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael; Fox, Joe

    2005-07-05

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force," urging them closer together.

  11. Loaded transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael A.; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron

    2006-02-21

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force, urging them closer together."

  12. Dual-cone double-helical downhole logging device

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Jiunn S.

    1984-01-01

    A broadband downhole logging device includes a double-helix coil wrapped over a dielectric support and surrounded by a dielectric shield. The device may also include a second coil longitudinally aligned with a first coil and enclosed within the same shield for measuring magnetic permeability of downhole formations and six additional coils for accurately determining downhole parameters.

  13. Isolation of tooth pulp cells for sex chromatin studies in experimental dehydrated and cremated remains.

    PubMed

    Duffy, J B; Waterfield, J D; Skinner, M F

    1991-03-01

    In experiments designed to assess sex chromatin in artificially mummified and heated pulp tissue, a method was devised that successfully separates cells while minimizing nuclear damage. Sex chromatin (both Barr bodies and F-bodies) is shown to preserve in dehydrated human pulps up to one year. Human pulp tissue retains sex diagnostic characteristics when heated to 100 degrees C for up to 1 h. Parallel experiments on extracted teeth from young pigs reveals comparable tissue preservation. Heat penetration is retarded, however, in unextracted pig teeth in fleshed jaws such that temperatures could be raised to 300 degrees C for longer than 1 h. Heat penetration into fleshed material was further tested by the insertion of thermocouple probes to assess the temperature attained within the pulp chamber. At chamber temperatures up to 75 degrees C sex diagnosis in human pulps from extracted teeth was still possible. In outdoor incineration of fleshed pigs' heads in an open fire, 75 degrees C in the pulp chamber was reached at a fire temperature within the range 500-700 degrees C. The implications of these findings for forensic situations are described.

  14. Downhole Elemental Analysis with LIBS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreschini, Paolo; Zacny, Kris; Rickman, Doug

    2011-01-01

    vertical stage; a second actuator at the top of the downhole probe allows radial scanning of the borehole. Analysis of iron and titanium in lunar simulant with LIBS was performed in air using the method of standard addition. The results for lunar simulant NU-LHT-2M show a value for the concentration of iron ranging between 2.29% and 3.05% depending on the atomic line selected. The accepted value for the sample analyzed is 2.83%, showing the capability for the system in development to provide qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis in real-time.

  15. Downhole elemental analysis with LIBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreschini, P.; Zacny, K.; Rickman, D.

    2011-12-01

    top of the downhole probe allows radial scanning of the borehole. Analysis of iron and titanium in lunar simulant with LIBS was performed in air using the method of standard addition. The results for lunar simulant NU-LHT-2M show a value for the concentration of iron ranging between 2.29% and 3.05% depending on the atomic line selected. The accepted value for the sample analyzed is 2.83%, showing the capability for the system in development to provide qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis in real-time.

  16. Use of dehydrated waste grape skins as a natural additive for producing rosé wines: study of extraction conditions and evolution.

    PubMed

    Pedroza, Miguel Angel; Carmona, Manuel; Salinas, Maria Rosario; Zalacain, Amaya

    2011-10-26

    Dehydrated waste grape skins from the juice industry were used as an additive to produce rosé wines. Maceration time, particle size, dosage, alcoholic content, and maceration temperature were first studied in model wine solutions using two different dehydrated waste grape skins. Full factorial experimental designs together with Factor Analysis and Multifactor ANOVA allowed for the evaluation of each parameter according to the composition of color and phenolic and aroma compounds. Higher maceration time favored the extraction of anthocyanins; phenolic compound release was influenced by dosage independent from other factors studied. Rosé wines were produced by direct addition of dehydrated waste grape skins, according to selected parameters in two different white wines, achieving characteristics equivalent to commercial rosé wines. After three months of storage, rosé wine composition was stable.

  17. Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe R.

    2004-10-05

    A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

  18. Development of PDC Bits for Downhole Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Karasawa, H.; Ohno, T.

    1995-01-01

    To develop polycrystalline hamond compact (PDC) bits of the full-face type which can be applied to downhole motor drilling, drilling tests for granite and two types of andesite were conducted using bits with 98.43 and 142.88 mm diameters. The bits successfully drilled these types of rock at rotary speeds from 300 to 400 rpm.

  19. Remote down-hole well telemetry

    DOEpatents

    Briles, Scott D.; Neagley, Daniel L.; Coates, Don M.; Freund, Samuel M.

    2004-07-20

    The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

  20. Social Peptides: Measuring Urinary Oxytocin and Vasopressin in a Home Field Study of Older Adults at Risk for Dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Galinsky, Adena M.; Hoffmann, Joscelyn N.; You, Hannah M.; Ziegler, Toni E.; McClintock, Martha K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We present the novel urine collection method used during in-home interviews of a large population representative of older adults in the United States (aged 62–91, the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project). We also present a novel assay method for accurately measuring urinary peptides oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP), hormones that regulate social behaviors, stress, and kidney function. Method. Respondents in a randomized substudy (N = 1,882) used airtight containers to provide urine specimens that were aliquoted, stored under frozen refrigerant packs and mailed overnight for frozen storage (−80 °C). Assays for OT, AVP, and creatinine, including freeze-thaw cycles, were refined and validated. Weighted values estimated levels in the older U.S. population. Results. Older adults had lower OT, but higher AVP, without the marked gender differences seen in young adults. Mild dehydration, indicated by creatinine, specific gravity, acidity, and AVP, produced concentrated urine that interfered with the OT assay, yielding falsely high values (18% of OT). Creatinine levels (≥1.4mg/ml) identified such specimens that were diluted to solve the problem. In contrast, the standard AVP assay was unaffected (97% interpretable) and urine acidity predicted specimens with low OT concentrations. OT and AVP assays tolerated 2 freeze-thaw cycles, making this protocol useful in a variety of field conditions. Discussion. These novel protocols yielded interpretable urinary OT and AVP values, with sufficient variation for analyzing their social and physiological associations. The problem of mild dehydration is also likely common in animal field studies, which may also benefit from these collection and assay protocols. PMID:25360024

  1. Spectral effects of dehydration on phyllosilicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckenthal, E. A.; Singer, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    Six phyllosilicates were progressively dehydrated under controlled conditions in an effort to study the spectral effects of their dehydration. The spectra obtained at each level of hydration provide information that may be used in future spectroscopic observations of the planets, as well as a data set which compliments the existing body of terrestrial soil knowledge.

  2. Downhole geophysical observatories: best installation practices and a case history from Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevedel, Bernhard; Bulut, Fatih; Bohnhoff, Marco; Raub, Christina; Kartal, Recai F.; Alver, Fatih; Malin, Peter E.

    2015-09-01

    Downhole sensors of different types and in various environments provide substantial benefit to signal quality. They also add the depth dimension to measurements performed at the Earths' surface. Sensor types that particularly benefit from downhole installation due to the absence of near-surface noise include piezometers, seismometers, strainmeters, thermometers, and tiltmeters. Likewise, geochemical and environmental measurements in a borehole help eliminate near-surface weathering and cultural effects. Installations from a few hundred meter deep to a few kilometer deep dramatically reduce surface noise levels—the latter noticeably also reduces the hypocentral distance for shallow microearthquakes. The laying out of a borehole network is always a compromise of local boundary conditions and the involved drilling costs. The installation depth and procedure for a long-term downhole observatory can range from time limited installations, with a retrieval option, to permanently cemented sensors. Permanently cemented sensors have proven to be long-term stable with non-deteriorating coupling and borehole integrity. However, each type needs to be carefully selected and planned according to the research aims. A convenient case study is provided by a new installation of downhole seismometers along the shoreline of the eastern Marmara Sea in Turkey. These stations are being integrated into the regional net for monitoring the North Anatolian Fault Zone. Here we discuss its design, installation, and first results. We conclude that, despite the logistical challenges and installation costs, the superior quality of downhole data puts this technique at the forefront of applied and fundamental research.

  3. Thirst, Drinking Behavior, And Dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John

    1996-01-01

    Report describes review of physiological mechanisms of involuntary dehydration. Researchers considered cellular dehydration and effects of sodium on thirst, as well as extracellular dehydration and restoration of vascular volume, effects of renin on thirst, and effects of heat.

  4. Data transmission element for downhole drilling components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael

    2006-01-31

    A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

  5. Polished Downhole Transducer Having Improved Signal Coupling

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2006-03-28

    Apparatus and methods to improve signal coupling in downhole inductive transmission elements to reduce the dispersion of magnetic energy at the tool joints and to provide consistent impedance and contact between transmission elements located along the drill string. A transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools is disclosed in one embodiment of the invention as including an annular core constructed of a magnetically conductive material. The annular core forms an open channel around its circumference and is configured to form a closed channel by mating with a corresponding annular core along an annular mating surface. The mating surface is polished to provide improved magnetic coupling with the corresponding annular core. An annular conductor is disposed within the open channel.

  6. Downhole transmission system comprising a coaxial capacitor

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Johnson, Monte L.; Bartholomew, David B.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Rawle, Michael

    2011-05-24

    A transmission system in a downhole component comprises a plurality of data transmission elements. A coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer conductor is disposed within a passage in the downhole component such that at least one capacitor is disposed in the passage and having a first terminal coupled to the inner conductor and a second terminal coupled to the outer conductor. Preferably the transmission element comprises an electrically conducting coil. Preferably, within the passage a connector is adapted to electrically connect the inner conductor of the coaxial cable and the lead wire. The coaxial capacitor may be disposed between and in electrically communication with the connector and the passage. In another embodiment a connector is adapted to electrical connect a first and a second portion of the inner conductor of the coaxial cable and a coaxial capacitor is in electrical communication with the connector and the passage.

  7. Downhole drilling network using burst modulation techniques

    DOEpatents

    Hall; David R. , Fox; Joe

    2007-04-03

    A downhole drilling system is disclosed in one aspect of the present invention as including a drill string and a transmission line integrated into the drill string. Multiple network nodes are installed at selected intervals along the drill string and are adapted to communicate with one another through the transmission line. In order to efficiently allocate the available bandwidth, the network nodes are configured to use any of numerous burst modulation techniques to transmit data.

  8. Downhole pipe selection for acoustic telemetry

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1995-12-19

    A system is described for transmitting signals along a downhole string including a plurality of serially connected tubular pipes such as drill or production pipes, a transmitter for transmitting a signal along the string and a receiver for receiving the signal placed along the string at a location spaced from said transmitting means, wherein the pipes between the transmitter and the receiver are ordered according to length of tube to minimize loss of signal from said transmitter to said receiver. 7 figs.

  9. Downhole pipe selection for acoustic telemetry

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1995-01-01

    A system for transmitting signals along a downhole string including a plurality of serially connected tubular pipes such as drill or production pipes, a transmitter for transmitting a signal along the string and a receiver for receiving the signal placed along the string at a location spaced from said transmitting means, wherein the pipes between the transmitter and the receiver are ordered according to length of tube to minimize loss of signal from said transmitter to said receiver.

  10. Downhole Seismic Monitoring at the Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, J.T.; Anderson, T.D.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Albright, J.N.

    1999-10-17

    A 500-ft length, 6-level, 3-component, vertical geophone array was permanently deployed within the upper 800 ft of Unocal's well GDCF 63-29 during a plug and abandonment operation on April 7, 1998. The downhole array remains operational after a period of 1 year, at a temperature of about 150 C. Continuous monitoring and analysis of shallow seismicity (<4000 ft deep) has been conducted over that same 1-year period. The downhole array was supplemented with 4 surface stations in late-1998 and early-1999 to help constrain locations of shallow seismicity. Locations occurring within about 1 km ({approximately}3000 ft) of the array have been determined for a subset of high-frequency events detected on the downhole and surface stations for the 10-week period January 6 to March 16, 1999. These events are distinct from surface-monitored seismicity at The Geysers in that they occur predominantly above the producing reservoir, at depths ranging from about 1200 to 4000 ft depth (1450 to -1350 ft elevation). The shallow seismicity shows a northeast striking trend, similar to seismicity trends mapped deeper within the reservoir and the strike of the predominant surface lineament observed over the productive field.

  11. Method and apparatus of assessing down-hole drilling conditions

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Johnson, Monte L.; Bartholomew, David B.; Fox, Joe

    2007-04-24

    A method and apparatus for use in assessing down-hole drilling conditions are disclosed. The apparatus includes a drill string, a plurality of sensors, a computing device, and a down-hole network. The sensors are distributed along the length of the drill string and are capable of sensing localized down-hole conditions while drilling. The computing device is coupled to at least one sensor of the plurality of sensors. The data is transmitted from the sensors to the computing device over the down-hole network. The computing device analyzes data output by the sensors and representative of the sensed localized conditions to assess the down-hole drilling conditions. The method includes sensing localized drilling conditions at a plurality of points distributed along the length of a drill string during drilling operations; transmitting data representative of the sensed localized conditions to a predetermined location; and analyzing the transmitted data to assess the down-hole drilling conditions.

  12. Atomic structure and dehydration mechanism of amorphous silica: Insights from 29Si and 1H solid-state MAS NMR study of SiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Na; Lee, Sung Keun

    2013-11-01

    larger than those in 14 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles. Dehydration of 7 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles occurs at a lower temperature than that of 14 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles. 29Si MAS NMR results show that a possible simultaneous dehydroxylation can also occur with removal of the hydrogen bonded silanol in the 7 nm silica nanoparticles. The energy penalty of dehydroxylation estimated from 29Si MAS NMR spectra varies with Q species and is smaller in 7 nm than in 14 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles. These results demonstrate that the particle size of nanoparticles plays an important role in controlling the hydrogen contents, and thus overall hydrogen bond strength of hydroxyl groups and atomic structure of silanols can control dehydroxylation of amorphous silica nanoparticles. The structural information and mechanistic details obtained from the current study provide insights into the structure of hydrous species and dehydration mechanisms in crystalline and amorphous silicates in diverse geological settings, highlighting usually unknown effects of particle size on the dehydration processes.

  13. Design and Analysis of an Active Helical Drive Downhole Tractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, Yujia; LIU, Qingyou; CHEN, Yonghua; REN, Tao

    2017-03-01

    During oil-gas well drilling and completion, downhole tools and apparatus should be conveyed to the destination to complete a series of downhole works. Downhole tractors have been used to convey tools in complex wellbores, however a very large tractive force is needed to carry more downhole tools to accomplish works with high efficiency. A novel serial active helical drive downhole tractor which has significantly improved performance compared with previous work is proposed. All previously reported helical drive downhole tractors need stators to balance the torque generated by the rotator. By contrast, the proposed serial downhole tractor does not need a stator; several rotator-driven units should only be connected to one another to achieve a tractive force multifold higher than that was previously reported. As a result, the length of a single unit is shortened, and the motion flexibility of the downhole tractor is increased. The major performance indicators, namely, gear ratio, velocity, and tractive force, are analyzed. Experimental results show that the maximum tractive force of a single-unit prototype with a length of 900 mm is 165.3 kg or 1620 N. The analysis and experimental results show that the proposed design has considerable potential for downhole works.

  14. Dehydration (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Am I in a Healthy Relationship? Who ... from lots of physical activity, especially on a hot day. Even mild dehydration can affect an athlete's ...

  15. Dehydration (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sun "Stomach Flu" A Kid's Guide to Fever Word! Gastroenteritis Food Poisoning What's Sweat? Dehydration Is It Important to Drink a Lot of Water? What's a Healthy Alternative to Water? Gastrointestinal Infections ...

  16. Electrolyte Concentrates Treat Dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Wellness Brands Inc. of Boulder, Colorado, exclusively licensed a unique electrolyte concentrate formula developed by Ames Research Center to treat and prevent dehydration in astronauts returning to Earth. Marketed as The Right Stuff, the company's NASA-derived formula is an ideal measure for athletes looking to combat dehydration and boost performance. Wellness Brands also plans to expand with products that make use of the formula's effective hydration properties to help treat conditions including heat stroke, altitude sickness, jet lag, and disease.

  17. Experimental Deformation of Dehydrating Antigorite: Challenging Models of Dehydration Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, Greg; Chernak, Linda

    2010-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that intermediate depth earthquakes in subduction zones are caused by the dehydration of hydrous phases, we conducted temperature-ramping experiments on antigorite serpentinite. Cold-pressed powdered samples of antigorite were deformed to a high differential stress at 400°C and 1.0 GPa, within the antigorite stability field, where we have shown that deformation localizes. Temperature was then increased at different rates, 1800°C/hr and 180°C/hr, to cross the reaction boundary while the sample continued to deform; samples were deformed at strain rates of 10-4 s-1, 10-5 s-1 and 10-6 s-1. Two additional experiments were conducted in a similar manner at 300°C, 1.5 GPa and 10-5 s-1 but samples remained 'statically' at high stress during the temperature increase. Our results show that although the decrease in stress during temperature ramping is large, stress relaxes stably, even after dehydration. We find that the slopes of the unloading curves are approximately the same for constant values of the ratio (strain rate/ramp rate) and that the unloading slope is greater for higher values of this ratio. In addition, we find that the unloading curves with the greatest slopes are similar to the apparatus compliance, suggesting that we are generating 'slow earthquakes' in our experiments over the course 5 to 10s of minutes. A strain rate stepping experiment indicates that antigorite has velocity strengthening behavior at 700°C and 1.5 GPa suggesting that as soon as an instability develops in the antigorite, the material strengthens sufficiently to not go unstable. Our results thus suggest that antigorite dehydration does not result in 'dehydration embrittlement' but that it may promote slow earthquakes. We have also conducted a preliminary experiment to study the role of effective pressure on deformation behavior after dehydration. A cold-pressed powdered sample of antigorite with a small core of coarse-grained olivine at one end was deformed at 700

  18. Water-loss dehydration and aging.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Lee; Bunn, Diane; Jimoh, Florence O; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    This review defines water-loss and salt-loss dehydration. For older people serum osmolality appears the most appropriate gold standard for diagnosis of water-loss dehydration, but clear signs of early dehydration have not been developed. In older adults, lower muscle mass, reduced kidney function, physical and cognitive disabilities, blunted thirst, and polypharmacy all increase dehydration risk. Cross-sectional studies suggest a water-loss dehydration prevalence of 20-30% in this population. Water-loss dehydration is associated with higher mortality, morbidity and disability in older people, but evidence is still needed that this relationship is causal. There are a variety of ways we may be able to help older people reduce their risk of dehydration by recognising that they are not drinking enough, and being helped to drink more. Strategies to increase fluid intake in residential care homes include identifying and overcoming individual and institutional barriers to drinking, such as being worried about not reaching the toilet in time, physical inability to make or to reach drinks, and reduced social drinking and drinking pleasure. Research needs are discussed, some of which will be addressed by the FP7-funded NU-AGE (New dietary strategies addressing the specific needs of elderly population for a healthy ageing in Europe) trial.

  19. Dehydration Processes of Sugar Glasses and Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeong-Ah; Kwon, Hyun-Joung; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2006-05-01

    The dehydration processes of sugar glasses and sugar crystals were studied by using Thermogravimetry — Differential Thermal Analysis method. We used three monosaccharide sugars (fructose, galactose, and glucose) and three disaccharide sugars (sucrose, maltose and trehalose). It was found that a trehalose showed different dehydration process compared to the other sugars. The amount of mass reductions in sugar glasses is larger than that in sugar crystals. However, in the case of trehalose, the amount of mass reduction in trehalose glasses is smaller than that in trehalose crystals. It seems to be possible that this unique dehydration property of trehalose glasses maybe relate to the cell protection ability during an anhydrobiosis process.

  20. Experimental study on the adsorptive-distillation for dehydration of ethanol-water mixture using natural and synthetic zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megawati, Wicaksono, D.; Abdullah, M. S.

    2017-03-01

    This research studied adsorptive-distillation (AD) for dehydration of ethanol-water mixture using natural and synthetic zeolites as adsorbent for ethanol purification. Especially, the effect of purification time is recorded and studied to evaluate performance of designed AD equipment. This AD was performed in a batch condition using boiling flask covered with heating mantle and it was maintained at 78°C temperature and 1 atm pressure. The initial ethanol volume was 300 mL with 93.8% v/v concentration. The synthetic zeolite type used was zeolite 3A. The flowed vapour was condensed using water as a cooling medium. Every 5 minutes of time duration the samples were collected until the vapour could not be condensed in that condition and then be analyzed its concentration using Gas-Chromatography. Experiment shows that the designed AD equipment could increase ethanol concentration at first 5 minutes with highest ethanol concentration achieved using synthetic zeolite (97.47% v/v). However, ethanol concentration from AD process using natural zeolite only reached 96.5% v/v. Thus, synthetic zeolite as adsorbent could pass azeotropic point, but natural zeolite fail. The ratio of adsorbed water per adsorbent for natural and synthetic zeolites are about 0.023 and 0.056 gwater/gads, respectively, at 50 minutes of time. Finally, synthetic zeolite (at 55 minutes the value of C/C0 is about 0.85 and the average outlet water concentration is 4.70 mole/L) as adsorbent for AD of ethanol water is better than natural zeolite (at 55 minutes the value of C/C0 is about 0.63 and the average outlet water concentration is 6.43 mole/L).

  1. The theoretical and experimental study on dicalcium phosphate dehydrate loading with protocatechuic aldehyde.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuehua; Qu, Shuxin; Lu, Xiong; Xie, Haodong; Zhang, Hongping; Weng, Jie

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the interaction between dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO(4) x 2H(2)O, DCPD) and Protocatechuic aldehyde (C(7)H(6)O(3), Pca), which is the water-soluble constituents of Chinese Medicine, Salvia Miltiorrhiza Bunge (SMB), by calculating the absorption energy through molecular dynamics simulation. Furthermore, the effects of functional groups of Pca and temperature on Pca adsorbed by DCPD are calculated respectively. DCPD/Pca and DCPD were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TG). The simulation results showed that Pca mostly absorbed on the (0 2 0) surface of DCPD. The aldehyde group of Pca played a moren important role on the adsorption of Pca on DCPD than hydroxyl did, while temperature had no distinct effects on the adsorption. XRD results indicated that Pca induced the preferential growth of (0 2 0) crystal surface in DCPC/Pca whereas it had no influence on the crystal structure, the crystallinity and grain size of DCPD. FTIR and TG results showed that the characteristic peak of Pca was at 1295 cm(-1) and the content of Pca in DCPD was 16%, respectively. The present results show that molecular dynamics simulation is a very effective and complementary method to study the interaction between materials and medicine.

  2. Evaluation of alternatives in downhole steam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The objective is to evaluate two alternative approaches, taken by Sandia and World Energy Systems in their development of downhole steam generators, in terms of the requirements for commercialization and the technical and economic goals which each one must reach in order to satisfy those requirements. The conclusions are as follows: (1) The high-pressure downhole steam generator being developed by Sandia has potential for commercialization for production of heavy oil in the next few years. (2) The critical performance parameter is oil yield and can be expressed in terms of bbl oil/million Btu of steam generated; the yield which is required for clear economic attractiveness of the high-pressure generator is 1.2 bbl/10/sup 6/ Btu which corresponds to 5.3 bbl steam/bbl oil. (3) The downhole hydrogen/oxygen burner being developed by World Energy Systems has potential for commercialization for production of resources which are now unproducible or uneconomical. (4) The critical performance provided in nearly 1100 pre- and post-training forms returned by the solarr and 201 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Ground water data indicate that high uranium values occur almost exclusively in the western portion of the quadrangle along the eastern portion of the Williston Basin. These high uranium values occur primarily in Pleistocene delta deposits and in glacial outwash and till. Groundwater in this area is geographically associated with high values of calcium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, selenium, strontium, sulfate, and total alkalinity. Stream sediment data indicate high uranium value the relative concentration of Sm/sup 2 +/ and Sm/sup 3 +/ ions changes with the change of composition.

  3. Impedance study of membrane dehydration and compression in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Canut, Jean-Marc; Latham, Ruth; Mérida, Walter; Harrington, David A.

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to measure drying and rehydration in proton exchange membrane fuel cells running under load. The hysteresis between forward and backward acquisition of polarization curves is shown to be largely due to changes in the membrane resistance. Drying tests are carried out with hydrogen and simulated reformate (hydrogen and carbon dioxide), and quasi-periodic drying and rehydration conditions are studied. The membrane hydration state is clearly linked to the high-frequency arc in the impedance spectrum, which increases in size for dry conditions indicating an increase in membrane resistance. Changes in impedance spectra as external compression is applied to the cell assembly show that EIS can separate membrane and interfacial effects, and that changes in membrane resistance dominate. Reasons for the presence of a capacitance in parallel with the membrane resistance are discussed.

  4. Sullair low pressure downhole steam generator system

    SciTech Connect

    Klingler, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    Scientists and engineers are continually searching for techniques to release more oil from known reservoirs to improve productivity and lessen dependence on new finds. Based on a record of success dating to the early 1960s, thermal methods, and in particular methodology for steam treating deep reservoirs, have become an area of intense activity. In the U.S. alone, it has been reported that ca 300,000 bopd was produced in 1981 by traditional surface steam methods. Of the thermal techniques emerging, downhole steam generation is of particular interest in this discussion. 11 references.

  5. High pressure combustor for generating steam downhole

    SciTech Connect

    Retallick, W.B.

    1983-08-09

    A catalytic combustor for generating a mixture of steam and combustion gas is located downhole in oil well, so that the gas mixture can be injected directly into the oil reservoir to displace heavy oils from the reservoir. There can be a single stage of catalytic combustion, or there can be a stage of thermal combustion followed by a catalytic stage. In either case the purpose of the catalyst is drive the combustion to completion so that the gas mixture contains no soot that would plug the reservoir.

  6. Culture and Dehydration: A Comparative Study of Caída de la Mollera (Fallen Fontanel) in Three Latino Populations.

    PubMed

    Pachter, Lee M; Weller, Susan C; Baer, Roberta D; de Alba Garcia, Javier E Garcia; Glazer, Mark; Trotter, Robert; Klein, Robert E; Gonzalez, Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    A sunken soft-spot or fontanel is a sign for dehydration in infants. Around the world, folk illnesses, such as caída de la mollera in some Latin American cultures, often incorporate this sign as a hallmark of illness, but may or may not incorporate re-hydration therapies in treatment strategies. This report describes a study of lay descriptions of causes, symptoms, and treatments for caída de la mollera in three diverse Latin American populations. A mixed-methods approach was used. Representative community-based samples were interviewed in rural Guatemala, Guadalajara, Mexico, and Edinburgh, Texas, with a 132 item questionnaire on the causes, susceptibility, symptoms, and therapies for caída de la mollera. Cultural consensus analysis was used to estimate community beliefs about caída. Interviews conducted in rural Guatemala (n = 60), urban Mexico (n = 62), and rural Texas on the Mexican border (n = 61) indicated consistency in thematic elements within and among these three diverse communities. The high degree of consistency in the illness explanatory models indicated shared beliefs about caída de la mollera in each of the communities and a core model shared across communities. However, an important aspect of the community beliefs was that rehydration therapies were not widely endorsed. The consistency in explanatory models in such diverse communities, as well as the high degree of recognition and experience with this illness, may facilitate communication between community members, and health care providers/public health intervention planners to increase use of rehydration therapies for caída de la mollera. Recommendations for culturally informed and respectful approaches to clinical communication are provided.

  7. Method for bonding a transmission line to a downhole tool

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2007-11-06

    An apparatus for bonding a transmission line to the central bore of a downhole tool includes a pre-formed interface for bonding a transmission line to the inside diameter of a downhole tool. The pre-formed interface includes a first surface that substantially conforms to the outside contour of a transmission line and a second surface that substantially conforms to the inside diameter of a downhole tool. In another aspect of the invention, a method for bonding a transmission line to the inside diameter of a downhole tool includes positioning a transmission line near the inside wall of a downhole tool and placing a mold near the transmission line and the inside wall. The method further includes injecting a bonding material into the mold and curing the bonding material such that the bonding material bonds the transmission line to the inside wall.

  8. Downhole delay assembly for blasting with series delay

    DOEpatents

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1982-01-01

    A downhole delay assembly is provided which can be placed into a blasthole for initiation of explosive in the blasthole. The downhole delay assembly includes at least two detonating time delay devices in series in order to effect a time delay of longer than about 200 milliseconds in a round of explosions. The downhole delay assembly provides a protective housing to prevent detonation of explosive in the blasthole in response to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device. There is further provided a connection between the first and second time delay devices. The connection is responsive to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device and initiates the second detonating time delay device. A plurality of such downhole delay assemblies are placed downhole in unfragmented formation and are initiated simultaneously for providing a round of explosive expansions. The explosive expansions can be used to form an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles.

  9. Apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Wilde, Tyson; Barlow, Jonathan S.

    2010-04-13

    A method of responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a bore hole comprises detecting the anomalous change in downhole pressure, sending a signal along the segmented electromagnetic transmission path, receiving the signal, and performing a automated response. The anomalous change in downhole pressure is detected at a first location along a segmented electromagnetic transmission path, and the segmented electromagnetic transmission path is integrated into the tool string. The signal is received by at least one receiver in communication with the segmented electromagnetic transmission path. The automated response is performed along the tool string. Disclosed is an apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a downhole tool string, comprising a segmented electromagnetic transmission path connecting one or more receivers and at least one pressure sensor.

  10. An Overview of Downhole Imaging Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthi, S. M.

    In this presentation we give an overview of downhole imaging tools that can be used to image the borehole wall and its vicinity with a variety of physical methods. Among these are ultrasonic scans with a rotating transducer that performs a pulse-echo mea- surement in rapid succession. This gives a transit time and a reflected amplitude image of the borehole wall. Electrical imaging is done with a whole family of measurements that operate mostly in the low AC range. All of them feature a number of electrodes that is inversely proportional to the desired resolution and depth of investigation. They image layering, fracturing and other heterogeneities in the rocks traversed by the bore- hole. Some of these images can be recorded and transmitted to the surface in real-time while the well is being drilled. Imaging using nuclear methods is also possible, for ex- ample for the natural radioactivity, density, or neutron porosity of the rock. However, these devices have generally low spatial resolutions. Finally, optical imaging is pos- sible in translucent and slightly opaque muds with a downhole video camera. Recent developments have resulted in a device that can withstand high pressures and temper- atures and that transmits live video images to the surface in real-time. This method has the highest resolution but is of limited applicability in the oil industry where gener- ally opaque muds are used. These images can be successfully used to determined the structural and intrinsic properties of rock traversed by a borehole.

  11. Data Transmission System For A Downhole Component

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Sneddon, Cameron; Fox, Joe; Briscoe, Michael

    2005-01-18

    The invention is a system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. Each component has a first and second end, with a first communication element located at the first end and a second communication element located at the second end. Each communication element includes a first contact and a second contact. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second communication elements, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The system also includes a first and second connector for connecting the first and second communication elements respectively to the coaxial cable. Each connector includes a conductive sleeve, lying concentrically within the conductive tube, which fits around and makes electrical contact with the conductive core. The conductive sleeve is electrically isolated from the conductive tube. The conductive sleeve of the first connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the first communication element, the conductive sleeve of the second connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the second communication element, and the conductive tube is in electrical contact with both the second contact of the first communication element and the second contact of the second communication element.

  12. Data transmission system for a downhole component

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., Tracy H.; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2006-05-09

    The invention is a system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. Each component has a first and second end, with a first communication element located at the first end and a second communication element located at the second end. Each communication element includes a first contact and a second contact. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second communication elements, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The system also includes a first and second connector for connecting the first and second communication elements respectively to the coaxial cable. Each connector includes a conductive sleeve, lying concentrically within the conductive tube, which fits around and makes electrical contact with the conductive core. The conductive sleeve is electrically isolated from the conductive tube. The conductive sleeve of the first connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the first communication element, the conductive sleeve of the second connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the second communication element, and the conductive tube is in electrical contact with both the second contact of the first communication element and the second contact of the second communication element.

  13. A downhole passive sampling system to avoid bias and error from groundwater sample handling.

    PubMed

    Britt, Sanford L; Parker, Beth L; Cherry, John A

    2010-07-01

    A new downhole groundwater sampler reduces bias and error due to sample handling and exposure while introducing minimal disturbance to natural flow conditions in the formation and well. This "In Situ Sealed", "ISS", or "Snap" sampling device includes removable/lab-ready sample bottles, a sampler device to hold double end-opening sample bottles in an open position, and a line for lowering the sampler system and triggering closure of the bottles downhole. Before deployment, each bottle is set open at both ends to allow flow-through during installation and equilibration downhole. Bottles are triggered to close downhole without well purging; the method is therefore "passive" or "nonpurge". The sample is retrieved in a sealed condition and remains unexposed until analysis. Data from six field studies comparing ISS sampling with traditional methods indicate ISS samples typically yield higher volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations; in one case, significant chemical-specific differentials between sampling methods were discernible. For arsenic, filtered and unfiltered purge results were negatively and positively biased, respectively, compared to ISS results. Inorganic constituents showed parity with traditional methods. Overall, the ISS is versatile, avoids low VOC recovery bias, and enhances reproducibility while avoiding sampling complexity and purge water disposal.

  14. Downhole seismic monitoring with Virtual Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakulin, A.; Calvert, R.

    2005-12-01

    Huge quantities of remaining oil and gas reserves are located in very challenging geological environments covered by salt, basalt or other complex overburdens. Conventional surface seismology struggles to deliver images necessary to economically explore them. Even if those reserves are found by drilling successful production critically depends on our ability to ``see" in real time where fluids are drawn from and how pressure changes throughout the reservoirs. For relatively simple overburdens surface time-lapse (4D) seismic monitoring became industry choice for aerial reservoir surveillance. For complex overburdens, 4D seismic does not have enough resolution and repeatability to answer the questions of reservoir engineers. For instance, often reservoir changes are too small to be detected from surface or these changes occur in such pace that all wells will be placed before we can detect them which greatly reduces the economical impact. Two additional challenges are present in real life that further complicate active monitoring: first, near-surface condition do change between the surveys (water level movement, freezing/thawing, tide variations etc) and second, repeating exact same acquisition geometry at the surface is difficult in practice. Both of these things may lead to false 4D response unrelated to reservoir changes. Virtual Source method (VSM) has been recently proposed as a way to eliminate overburden distortions for imaging and monitoring. VSM acknowledges upfront that our data inversion techniques are unable to unravel the details of the complex overburdens to the extent necessary to remove the distortions caused by them. Therefore VSM advocates placing permanent downhole geophones below that most complex overburden while still exciting signals with a surface sources. For instance, first applications include drilling instrumented wells below complicated near-surface, basalt or salt layer. Of course, in an ideal world we would prefer to have both downhole

  15. Dehydration and delayed proton equilibria of red blood cells suspended in isosmotic phosphate buffers. Implications for studies of sickled cells.

    PubMed

    Bookchin, R M; Lew, D J; Balazs, T; Ueda, Y; Lew, V L

    1984-12-01

    PO4 buffers isosmotic with plasma or phosphate-buffered saline solution with a substantial proportion of PO4 are often used to wash and suspend red blood cells in studies of respiratory or sickling behavior. Measurements of sequential changes in mean cell hemoglobin concentration, pH, and ion content of red blood cells suspended in 295 mOsm Na-phosphate, pH 7.4, at 23 degrees or 37 degrees C, showed (1) rapid, persistent cell dehydration (mean cell hemoglobin concentration greater than 40 gm/dl) caused initially by Cl- efflux and later by replacement of monovalent Cl- by divalent HPO=4; and (2) temporary reversal of membrane pH gradients with normalization time (30 to 120 minutes) dependent on factors controlling the rate of phosphate-chloride exchange. Sequential equilibration of red blood cells in isosmotic citrate (impermeable) followed by PO4 demonstrated the two stages of the observed shifts in PO4 alone, and red blood cells suspended in 0.15 mol/L 32PO4 at 37 degrees C showed PO4 influx consistent with pH equilibrium kinetics. Sickle trait red blood cells deoxygenated at 37 degrees C, pH 7.4, in plasma or 10 mmol/L HEPES-buffered saline solution showed only 6% to 20% sickling. In isosmotic PO4, mean cell hemoglobin concentration was 40 to 41 gm/dl with approximately 80% sickling. In phosphate-buffered saline solution containing 70 mmol/L PO4, red blood cells showed smaller, similar changes (mean cell hemoglobin concentration approximately 38 gm/dl) with a longer equilibration period and deoxygenated sickle trait cells showed 40% sickling. The altered properties of red blood cells suspended in PO4 or phosphate-buffered saline solution were neither intended nor appropriate for many studies using these media, particularly with hemoglobin S-containing red blood cells, and interpretations of reported results must be reassessed in light of these findings.

  16. Time-Resolved Infrared Reflectance Studies of the Dehydration-Induced Transformation of Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate to the Trihydrate Form

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2015-10-01

    Uranyl nitrate is a key species in the nuclear fuel cycle. However, this species is known to exist in different states of hydration, including the hexahydrate ([UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] often called UNH), the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 or UNT], and in very dry environments the dihydrate form [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)2]. Their relative stabilities depend on both water vapor pressure and temperature. In the 1950s and 1960s the different phases were studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy, but were limited both by instrumental resolution and by the ability to prepare the samples for transmission. We have revisited this problem using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, which requires no sample preparation and allows dynamic analysis while the sample is exposed to a flow of N2 gas. Samples of known hydration state were prepared and confirmed via X-ray diffraction patterns of known species. In reflectance mode the hexahydrate UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm-1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample desiccates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a shoulder growing in on the blue edge but ultimately results in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm-1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT as UNT has two inequivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a structural and morphological change that has the lustrous lime green UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 crystals changing to the matte greenish yellow of the trihydrate solid. The phase transformation and crystal structures were confirmed by density functional theory calculations and optical microscopy methods, both of which showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, with but one in the hexahydrate.

  17. Time-resolved infrared reflectance studies of the dehydration-induced transformation of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate to the trihydrate form

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; ...

    2015-09-08

    Uranyl nitrate is a key species in the nuclear fuel cycle. However, this species is known to exist in different states of hydration, including the hexahydrate ([UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] often called UNH), the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 or UNT], and in very dry environments the dihydrate form [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)2]. Their relative stabilities depend on both water vapor pressure and temperature. In the 1950s and 1960s, the different phases were studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy but were limited both by instrumental resolution and by the ability to prepare the samples for transmission. We have revisited this problem using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, which requires no sample preparationmore » and allows dynamic analysis while the sample is exposed to a flow of N2 gas. Samples of known hydration state were prepared and confirmed via X-ray diffraction patterns of known species. In reflectance mode the hexahydrate UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm–1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample desiccates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a shoulder growing in on the blue edge but ultimately results in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm–1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT as UNT has two inequivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a structural and morphological change that has the lustrous lime green UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 crystals changing to the matte greenish yellow of the trihydrate solid. As a result, the phase transformation and crystal structures were confirmed by density functional theory calculations and optical microscopy methods, both of which showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, with only one in the hexahydrate.« less

  18. Reciprocating down-hole sand pump

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhle, J.L.

    1987-04-28

    This patent describes the invention of a continuously-operated reciprocating down-hole sand pump comprising: a steel polished plunger pipe that strokes back and forth within a steel honed pump barrel, and is equipped with a self-lubricating fluorocarbon V-ring system that is pressure-actuated during compression strokes; the self-lubricating fluorocarbon V-ring system also is self-actuated by means of coil springs to provide wiping action to the polished plunger pipe during suction strokes; the self-lubricating fluorocarbons V-ring system also self-adjusts by means of coil springs located adjacent the fluorocarbon V-ring so as to automatically compensate for V-ring wear; and the self-lubricating fluorocarbon V-ring system also is designed in such a manner so as to eliminate voids and discourage the extrusion of V-rings in high temperature and high-pressure applications.

  19. Signal connection for a downhole tool string

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Bradford, Kline; Fox, Joe; Briscoe, Michael

    2006-08-29

    A signal transmission connection for a tool string used in exploration and production of natural resources, namely: oil, gas, and geothermal energy resources. The connection comprises first and second annular elements deployed in cooperative association with each other. The respective elements comprise inductive transducers that are capable of two-way signal transmission between each other, with downhole components of the tool string, and with ground-level equipment. The respective inductive transducers comprise one or more conductive loops housed within ferrite troughs, or within ferrite trough segments. When energized, the conductive loops produce a magnetic field suitable for transmitting the signal. The second element may be rotational in drilling applications. The respective elements may be fitted with electronic equipment to aid and manipulate the transmission of the signal. The first element may also be in communication with the World Wide Web.

  20. Development of an Innovative Downhole Seismic Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, D.

    2005-05-01

    MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) previously designed, built, and tested an innovative downhole seismic source. The design criteria included a size limitation (the source needed to fit into a 2-inch diameter well casing), the source would use .22 caliber power loads as the energy source, it would have the ability to fire at least 12 times before reloading, it would be able to function under water (depth is limited by internal pressure from the .22 caliber power loads, which must be greater than pressure exerted by water column), and it would use no more than 24-volt dc current. MSE developed the design criteria from a need for a downhole seismic source suitable for high-resolution seismic tomography applications. Tomographic methods may provide detailed information at waste sites for both characterization and monitoring. Since borehole diameters are kept to a minimum (i.e., 2-inches or less) to reduce waste volumes from drill cuttings, or the borehole may be installed using a direct push technology such as a GeoprobeT or cone penetrometer, a small diameter source is desirable. Additionally, the use of .22 caliber power loads reduces the amount of supporting equipment required to operate the source as compared to other downhole seismic sources (e.g., air guns and piezoelectric sources). MSE tested and evaluated the completed seismic source to assess the effectiveness of the .22 caliber power loads as energy sources and to assess the operational ease of using the source. Results of the testing indicated that the power loads provided energy suitable for high-resolution cross-well seismic tomography applications. Operation of the source required significantly less supporting equipment than other downhole sources tested. However, the testing suggested the system could be improved if the number of mechanical components were reduced. Subsequent research suggested that the power loads could be fired using an electric current. As a result, MSE believes that the entire

  1. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Pantea, Cristian

    2012-05-04

    The projects objectives and purpose are to: (1) development a multipurpose acoustic sensor for downhole fluid monitoring in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) reservoirs over typical ranges of pressures and temperatures and demonstrate its capabilities and performance for different EGS systems; (2) determine in real-time and in a single sensor package several parameters - temperature, pressure, fluid flow and fluid properties; (3) needed in nearly every phase of an EGS project, including Testing of Injection and Production Wells, Reservoir Validation, Inter-well Connectivity, Reservoir Scale Up and Reservoir Sustainability. (4) Current sensors are limited to operating at lower temperatures, but the need is for logging at high temperatures. The present project deals with the development of a novel acoustic-based sensor that can work at temperatures up to 374 C, in inhospitable environments.

  2. In situ phase separation following dehydration in bimetallic sulfates: a variable-temperature X-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Swain, Diptikanta; Guru Row, Tayur N

    2009-08-03

    Phase separation resulting in a single-crystal-single-crystal transition accompanied by a polycrystalline phase following the dehydration of hydrated bimetallic sulfates [Na(2)Mn(1.167)(SO(4))(2)S(0.33)O(1.167) x 2 H(2)O and K(4)Cd(3)(SO(4))(5) x 3 H(2)O] has been investigated by in situ variable-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction. With two examples, we illustrate the possibility of generating structural frameworks following dehydration in bimetallic sulfates, which refer to the possible precursor phases at that temperature leading to the mineral formation. The room-temperature structure of Na(2)Mn(1.167)(SO(4))(2)S(0.33)O(1.167) x 2 H(2)O is trigonal, space group R3. On heating the crystal in situ on the diffractometer, the diffraction images display spherical spots and concentric rings suggesting phase separation, with the spherical spots getting indexed in a monoclinic space group, C2/c. The structure determination based on this data suggests the formation of Na(2)Mn(SO(4))(2). However, the diffraction images from concentric rings could not be indexed. In the second example, the room-temperature structure is determined to be K(4)Cd(3)(SO(4))(5) x 3 H(2)O, crystallizing in a monoclinic space group, P2(1)/n. On heating the crystal in situ, the diffraction images collected also have both spherical spots and diffuse rings. The spherical spots could be indexed to a cubic crystal system, space group P2(1)3, and the structure is K(2)Cd(2)(SO(4))(3). The possible mechanism for the phase transition in the dehydration regime resulting in this remarkable single-crystal to single-crystal transition with the appearance of a surrogate polycrystalline phase is proposed.

  3. Fruits and vegetables dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ita, A.; Flores, G.; Franco, F.

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration diagrams were determined by means of Differential Thermal Analysis, DTA, and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis, TGA, curves of several simultaneous fruits and vegetables, all under the same conditions. The greater mass loss is associated with water containing in the structure of the investigated materials at low temperature. In poblano chile water is lost in a single step. The banana shows a very sharply two stages, while jicama can be observed although with a little difficulty three stages. The major mass loss occurs in the poblano chile and the lower in banana. The velocity and temperature of dehydration vary within a small range for most materials investigated, except for banana and cactus how are very different.

  4. Time-resolved infrared reflectance studies of the dehydration-induced transformation of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate to the trihydrate form

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Edward J. Mausolf; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; Bruce K. McNamara

    2015-09-08

    Uranyl nitrate is a key species in the nuclear fuel cycle. However, this species is known to exist in different states of hydration, including the hexahydrate ([UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] often called UNH), the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 or UNT], and in very dry environments the dihydrate form [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)2]. Their relative stabilities depend on both water vapor pressure and temperature. In the 1950s and 1960s, the different phases were studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy but were limited both by instrumental resolution and by the ability to prepare the samples for transmission. We have revisited this problem using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, which requires no sample preparation and allows dynamic analysis while the sample is exposed to a flow of N2 gas. Samples of known hydration state were prepared and confirmed via X-ray diffraction patterns of known species. In reflectance mode the hexahydrate UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm–1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample desiccates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a shoulder growing in on the blue edge but ultimately results in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm–1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT as UNT has two inequivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a structural and morphological change that has the lustrous lime green UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 crystals changing to the matte greenish yellow of the

  5. Effects of Dehydration on Fish Muscles at Chilled Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Hidemasa; Seto, Fuminori; Nishimoto, Motomi; Nishimoto, Junichi

    Recently,new method of removing water from fish fillet at low temperature using dehydration sheet have been reported. The present study is concerned with the factors to affect the quality during dehydration of horse mackerel muscle at low temperature. The rate of dehydration at -3 °C was about two times faster than that at 0 °C. The rate of denaturation of fish muscle protein was kept less than about 10 % (ATPase activity) of the undenaturated initial values after removing free water content. Present results suggest the practical possibility of the dehydration at -3 °C for keeping quality of fish flesh.

  6. A computational study of Mg2+ dehydration in aqueous solution in the presence of HS- and other monovalent anions - Insights to dolomite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Sahai, Nita; Romanek, Christopher S.; Chakraborty, Suvankar

    2012-07-01

    Massive sedimentary dolomite formed at near-Earth’s surface temperatures is abundant in the ancient geological rock record compared to modern deposition. Extensive experimental work to synthesize dolomite at low temperature and to reveal the formation mechanism has been attempted previously. Sulfide, the product of bacterial sulfate reduction, has been proposed in the literature to play an active role in promoting dolomite formation by facilitating desolvation of Mg2+ in the bulk solution and, thus, incorporation into the dolomite crystal structure. Chemical intuition, however, does not suggest any particular characteristic of HS- that would render it an efficient promoter of Mg2+ desolvation in solution. In order to examine the previously proposed hypothesis, we conduct an ab initio reaction path ensemble (RPE) study along a dissociative mechanism to determine the energy penalty of removing a first-shell water molecule around Mg2+ compared to Mg2+ with HS- located in the second coordination shell. The solvent effect and specific hydrogen-bond interactions from water beyond the first-solvation shell are addressed using large cluster models, where up to the second layer of Mg2+ hydration and the first solvation-shell of HS- are included. Within the context our modeling approach, we find that HS- has little, if any, effect on lowering the Mg2+ dehydration barrier in aqueous solution. Alternative mechanisms must then be invoked to explain the apparent promotional effect of HS- on Mg2+ dehydration kinetics.

  7. Dehydration kinetics of talc at 1 bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, J.; Bose, K.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results on the dehydration kinetics of talc, which is likely to be a major potential resource for water and hydrogen in carbonaceous chondrites, is presented. The rate of dehydration of an essentially pure Mg-end member natural talc, (Mg(.99)Fe(.01))3Si4O10(OH)2, was studied by measuring in situ weight change under isothermal condition at 1 bar as a function of time in the temperature range 775 to 985 C. The grain size of the starting material was 0.7 to 1 micron. It was found that the data up to 50 to 60 percent dehydration can be fitted by an equation of the form alpha = exp(-Kt(exp n)), where alpha is the weight fraction of talc remaining, K is a rate constant and n is a numerical constant for a given temperature. For any set of isothermal data, there is a major change in the value of n for larger dehydration. For up to approximately 50 percent dehydration, all rate constants can be described by an Arrheniun relation with an activation energy of 432 (+/- 30) kJ/mol; n has a nearly constant value of 0.54 between 775 and 875 C, but increases almost linearly according to n = -10.77 + 0.012T C at T greater than or equal to 875 C.

  8. Hydraulically operated downhole oil well pump

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.A.

    1983-06-07

    A hydraulically operated downhole pump that is connected to or disposed in a string of tubing, and when operated by pressurized oil from the ground surface, is capable of discharging production fluid, gas, and pressurized oil from the well either separately or in desired combinations thereof. The pump includes an elongate housing preferably of such transverse cross section as to be longitudinally movable through a tubing string, with the pump including universal joint connected upper and lower helical screws that rotate in slidable sealing contact with upper and lower double threaded resilient stator blocks secured to the interior of the housing. As pressurized oil is discharged into the upper end of the housing the upper helical screw and associated stator act as a motor to drive the lower helical screw relative to the lower stator block. As the lower helical screw rotates relative to the lower stator block, the lower helical screw acts as a pump to discharge production fluid from the well upwardly therein either separately or in combination with the pressurized oil depending on the components associated with the pump.

  9. Continuous chain bit with downhole cycling capability

    DOEpatents

    Ritter, Don F.; St. Clair, Jack A.; Togami, Henry K.

    1983-01-01

    A continuous chain bit for hard rock drilling is capable of downhole cycling. A drill head assembly moves axially relative to a support body while the chain on the head assembly is held in position so that the bodily movement of the chain cycles the chain to present new composite links for drilling. A pair of spring fingers on opposite sides of the chain hold the chain against movement. The chain is held in tension by a spring-biased tensioning bar. A head at the working end of the chain supports the working links. The chain is centered by a reversing pawl and piston actuated by the pressure of the drilling mud. Detent pins lock the head assembly with respect to the support body and are also operated by the drilling mud pressure. A restricted nozzle with a divergent outlet sprays drilling mud into the cavity to remove debris. Indication of the centered position of the chain is provided by noting a low pressure reading indicating proper alignment of drilling mud slots on the links with the corresponding feed branches.

  10. Downhole oil/water separators - What's new?

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.

    2000-01-12

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Petroleum Technology Office is interested in new technologies that can bring oil to the surface at a lower cost or with less environment impact. DOE is particularly interested in technologies that can accomplish both of these goals, and downhole oil/water separators (DOWS) seem to achieve that. They have the potential to reduce operating costs while providing a greater degree of environmental protection. DOE learned of the innovative DOWS technology and funded a team from Argonne National Laboratory, CH2M Hill (a private-sector consulting firm), and the Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (a state agency) to conduct an independent evaluation of the technical feasibility, economic viability, and regulatory applicability of the DOWS technology. The results of that investigation were published in January 1999 and represent the most complete publicly available reference material on DOWs technology (the full text of the report can be downloaded from Argonne's website at www.ead.anl.gov). Other abbreviated versions of this information have been published during the past year. Last January, in the 1999 Produced Water Seminar, the author provided an overview of the DOWS technology. For the 2000 Produced Water Seminar, the author is providing updated information on DOWS and related technologies. To set the stage for the new information, the next few sections provided a review of previously reported information.

  11. Dehydration anorexia is attenuated in oxytocin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Rinaman, Linda; Vollmer, Regis R; Karam, Joseph; Phillips, Donnesha; Li, Xia; Amico, Janet A

    2005-06-01

    Evidence in rats suggests that central oxytocin (OT) signaling pathways contribute to suppression of food intake during dehydration (i.e., dehydration anorexia). The present study examined water deprivation-induced dehydration anorexia in wild-type and OT -/- mice. Mice were deprived of food alone (fasted, euhydrated) or were deprived of both food and water (fasted, dehydrated) for 18 h overnight. Fasted wild-type mice consumed significantly less chow during a 60-min refeeding period when dehydrated compared with their intake when euhydrated. Conversely, fasting-induced food intake was slightly but not significantly suppressed by dehydration in OT -/- mice, evidence for attenuated dehydration anorexia. In a separate experiment, mice were deprived of water (but not food) overnight for 18 h; then they were anesthetized and perfused with fixative for immunocytochemical analysis of central Fos expression. Fos was elevated similarly in osmo- and volume-sensitive regions of the basal forebrain and hypothalamus in wild-type and OT -/- mice after water deprivation. OT-positive neurons expressed Fos in dehydrated wild-type mice, and vasopressin-positive neurons were activated to a similar extent in wild-type and OT -/- mice. Conversely, significantly fewer neurons within the hindbrain dorsal vagal complex were activated in OT -/- mice after water deprivation compared with activation in wild-type mice. These findings support the view that OT-containing projections from the hypothalamus to the hindbrain are necessary for the full expression of compensatory behavioral and physiological responses to dehydration.

  12. Comparative Study of Subduction Zone Thermal Structure: Implications for Slab Dehydration and Fluid Supply for Mantle Wedge Serpentinization and Arc Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, I.; Wang, K.; He, J.; Hyndman, R. D.

    2007-12-01

    Aqueous fluid from the dehydrating slab is critical to the processes of forearc mantle wedge serpentinization and arc volcanism. Its availability depends mainly on the thermal structure of the subducting slab, which is strongly controlled by the age of the slab and mantle wedge flow. In this study, we develop 2-D steady state numerical thermal models for a number of subduction zones to investigate how the thermal structure affects the fluid supply. Subduction zones investigated in this comparative study include Cascadia, Chile, Colombia-Ecuador, Costa Rica, Hikurangi, Kermadec, Mariana, Mexico, Nankai, NE Japan, and Sumatra. Geophysical and geological observations indicate that the shallow part of the forearc mantle wedge is decoupled from the subducting slab and does not participate in the wedge flow. The maximum depth of the slab-mantle wedge decoupling is one of the most important parameters controlling the subduction zone thermal structure. In our models, the depth of downdip transition from decoupling to coupling is constrained by surface heat flow and the location of the arc, beneath which the mantle wedge temperature is required to be greater than 1200°C. We find that the optimal transition depth for most subduction zones is in the range of 70 to 90 km; too shallow a transition will over-predict the forearc heat flow, and too deep a transition will under-predict the mantle temperature beneath the arc. The model results show that, for all subduction zones, the stagnant part of the forearc mantle wedge is sufficiently cold to allow serpentine to be stable, but the actual degree of its serpentinization should differ between different subduction zones depending on the availability of fluids. For subduction zones with a young and warm slab such as Cascadia and Nankai, dehydration of the subducting crust peaks at depths shallower than the decoupling-coupling transition depth and therefore provides ample fluid to serpentinize the overlying stagnant mantle wedge

  13. Comparative Study of Subduction Zone Thermal Structure: Implications for Slab Dehydration and Fluid Supply for Mantle Wedge Serpentinization and Arc Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, I.; Wang, K.; He, J.; Hyndman, R. D.

    2004-12-01

    Aqueous fluid from the dehydrating slab is critical to the processes of forearc mantle wedge serpentinization and arc volcanism. Its availability depends mainly on the thermal structure of the subducting slab, which is strongly controlled by the age of the slab and mantle wedge flow. In this study, we develop 2-D steady state numerical thermal models for a number of subduction zones to investigate how the thermal structure affects the fluid supply. Subduction zones investigated in this comparative study include Cascadia, Chile, Colombia-Ecuador, Costa Rica, Hikurangi, Kermadec, Mariana, Mexico, Nankai, NE Japan, and Sumatra. Geophysical and geological observations indicate that the shallow part of the forearc mantle wedge is decoupled from the subducting slab and does not participate in the wedge flow. The maximum depth of the slab-mantle wedge decoupling is one of the most important parameters controlling the subduction zone thermal structure. In our models, the depth of downdip transition from decoupling to coupling is constrained by surface heat flow and the location of the arc, beneath which the mantle wedge temperature is required to be greater than 1200°C. We find that the optimal transition depth for most subduction zones is in the range of 70 to 90 km; too shallow a transition will over-predict the forearc heat flow, and too deep a transition will under-predict the mantle temperature beneath the arc. The model results show that, for all subduction zones, the stagnant part of the forearc mantle wedge is sufficiently cold to allow serpentine to be stable, but the actual degree of its serpentinization should differ between different subduction zones depending on the availability of fluids. For subduction zones with a young and warm slab such as Cascadia and Nankai, dehydration of the subducting crust peaks at depths shallower than the decoupling-coupling transition depth and therefore provides ample fluid to serpentinize the overlying stagnant mantle wedge

  14. Linear and radial flow targets for characterizing downhole flow in perforations

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, M. ); Tariq, S.M. ); Halleck, P.M. )

    1989-08-01

    Two types of sandstone targets are commonly used to test flow efficiency of shaped-charge jet perforations: linear targets, in which flow enters only the unperforated end of the cylindrical sample, and radial targets, in which flow enters through the end and sides of the sample. To determine which of these targets best represents downhole conditions, the flow distribution along the length of a perforation has been studied by three-dimensional (3D) finite-element analyses. Linear and radial laboratory targets have been compared with downhole perforations under varying conditions. For ideal perforations, the low-shot-density (LSD) case is adequately represented by the radial target, while the high-shot-density (HSD) case falls between the two targets. With realistic crushed and damaged zones, the HSD closely matches the linear target, and the LSD case falls between the two targets.

  15. In situ dehydration behavior of zeolite-like pentagonite: A single-crystal X-ray study

    SciTech Connect

    Danisi, Rosa Micaela; Armbruster, Thomas; Lazic, Biljana

    2013-01-15

    The structural modifications upon heating of pentagonite, Ca(VO)(Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}){center_dot}4H{sub 2}O (space group Ccm2{sub 1}, a=10.3708(2), b=14.0643(2), c=8.97810(10) A, V=1309.53(3) A{sup 3}) were investigated by in situ temperature dependent single-crystal X-ray structure refinements. Diffraction data of a sample from Poona district (India) have been measured in steps of 25 up to 250 Degree-Sign C and in steps of 50 Degree-Sign C between 250 and 400 Degree-Sign C. Pentagonite has a porous framework structure made up by layers of silicate tetrahedra connected by V{sup 4+}O{sub 5} square pyramids. Ca and H{sub 2}O molecules are extraframework occupants. Room temperature diffraction data allowed refinement of H positions. The hydrogen-bond system links the extraframework occupants to the silicate layers and also interconnects the H{sub 2}O molecules located inside the channels. Ca is seven-fold coordinated forming four bonds to O of the tetrahedral framework and three bonds to extraframework H{sub 2}O. The H{sub 2}O molecule at O9 showing a high displacement parameter is not bonded to Ca. The dehydration in pentagonite proceeds in three steps. At 100 Degree-Sign C the H{sub 2}O molecule at O8 was released while O9 moved towards Ca. As a consequence the displacement parameter of H{sub 2}O at O9 halved compared to that at room temperature. The unit-cell volume decreased to 1287.33(3) A{sup 3} leading to a formula with 3H{sub 2}O per formula unit (pfu). Ca remained seven-fold coordinated. At 175 Degree-Sign C Ca(VO)(Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}){center_dot}3H{sub 2}O transformed into a new phase with 1H{sub 2}O molecule pfu characterized by doubling of the c axis and the monoclinic space group Pn. Severe bending of specific T--O--T angles led to contraction of the porous three-dimensional framework. In addition, H{sub 2}O at O9 was expelled while H{sub 2}O at O7 approached a position in the center of the channel. The normalized volume decreased to 1069.44(9) A{sup 3

  16. Oxidative stress and its effects during dehydration.

    PubMed

    França, M B; Panek, A D; Eleutherio, E C A

    2007-04-01

    Water is usually thought to be required for the living state, but several organisms are capable of surviving complete dehydration (anhydrobiotes). Elucidation of the mechanisms of tolerance against dehydration may lead to development of new methods for preserving biological materials that do not normally support drying, which is of enormous practical importance in industry, in clinical medicine as well as in agriculture. One of the molecular mechanisms of damage leading to death in desiccation-sensitive cells upon drying is free-radical attack to phospholipids, DNA and proteins. This review aims to summarize the strategies used by anhydrobiotes to cope with the danger of oxygen toxicity and to present our recent results about the importance of some antioxidant defense systems in the dehydration tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a usual model in the study of stress response.

  17. sup 1 H NMR study of renal trimethylamine responses to dehydration and acute volume loading in man

    SciTech Connect

    Avison, M.J.; Rothman, D.L.; Nixon, T.W.; Long, W.S.; Siegel, N.J. )

    1991-07-15

    The authors have used volume-localized {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy to detect and measure changes in medullary trimethylamines (TMAs) in the human kidney in vivo. Localized water-suppressed {sup 1}H spectra were collected from a volume of interest located within the renal medulla by using a stimulated echo-based localization scheme. The principal resonances in the medullary {sup 1}H spectrum were residual water, lipid, and TMAs. The TMA line width was 7-15 Hz before filtering, and the signal-to-noise ratio was 40:1. In four normal volunteers, 15 hr of dehydration led to a significant increase in urine ismolality and decrease in body weight and an increase in medullary TMAs. A subsequent water load caused a transient water diuresis, a return to euvolemic body weight, and a significant reduction in medullary TMAs within 4 hr. These results suggest that TMAs may play an osmoregulatory role in the medulla of the normal human kidney.

  18. Engine end for a downhole hydraulically actuated pump assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, G.K.

    1992-04-14

    This patent describes a hydraulically actuated downhole pump assembly for producing a well when power fluid is pumped thereto whereupon produced fluid admixed with spent power fluid is returned therefrom. It comprises: the engine end has an engine piston connected to actuate the pump end; the engine end has an annular outer housing, the annular valve element moves axially between an uphole position and a downhole position respective to the annular housing ; the engine piston moves axially within the annular valve element between an uphole position and a downhole position respective to the engine barrel; flow passageway means connecting the valve element for conducting flow of power fluid to the engine end to provide a force against the engine piston to move the engine piston in an uphole and downhole direction, whereupon the annular valve element is moved between an uphole and downhole position in response to the movement of the engine piston and conducts flow of power fluid to alternate sides of the engine piston to provide a force against the engine piston to reciprocate the engine piston.

  19. Downhole Vibration Monitoring and Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2007-09-30

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. The key feature of this system is its use of a magnetorheological fluid (MRF) to allow the damping coefficient to be changed extensively, rapidly and reversibly without the use of mechanical valves, but only by the application of a current. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. Much of the effort was devoted to the design and testing of the MRF damper, itself. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in a drilling laboratory. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and a final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the first quarter, 2006, with the objectives of building precommercial prototypes, testing them in a drilling laboratory and the field; developing and implementing a commercialization plan. All of these have been accomplished. The Downhole Vibration Monitoring & Control System (DVMCS) prototypes have been successfully proven in testing at the TerraTek drilling facility and at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (RMOTC.) Based on the results of these tests, we have signed a definitive development and distribution agreement with Smith, and commercial deployment is underway. This current version of the DVMCS monitors and controls axial vibrations. Due to time and budget constraints of this program, it was not possible to complete a system that would also deal with lateral and torsional (stick-slip) vibrations as originally planned; however, this effort is continuing without DOE

  20. Onion dehydration: a review.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Jayeeta; Shrivastava, S L; Rao, P S

    2012-06-01

    Onion (Allium cepa), a very commonly used vegetable, ranks third in the world production of major vegetables. Apart from imparting a delicious taste and flavour due to its pungency in many culinary preparations, it serves several medicinal purposes also. Processing and preservation of onion by suitable means is a major thrust area since a long time. The various kinds of treatments followed for dehydration of onion such as convective air drying, solar drying, fluidized bed drying, vacuum microwave drying, infrared drying and osmotic drying are reviewed here. These techniques are mainly used for preservation and value addition of onion. Several researchers have tried for decades to model the drying kinetics and quality parameters, which are also compiled here briefly.

  1. 7 CFR 989.12 - Dehydrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 989.12 Dehydrator. Dehydrator means any person who produces raisins by dehydrating grapes by artificial means....

  2. RUBBER BEARINGS FOR DOWN-HOLE PUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Bob Sullivan Mammoth Pacific, L.P.

    2005-09-07

    Synopsis of project activity: 1998--Awarded cost share grant from DOE. 1st Qtr 1999--Developed fail safe lubricating system. 2nd Qtr 1999--Performed first large scale test with nitrile based bearings. It failed due to material swelling. Failure was blamed on improper tolerance. 3rd Qtr 1999--Material tests were performed with autoclaves and exposure tests to Casa Diablo fluids. Testing of Viton materials began. Alternate bearing designs were developed to limit risk of improper tolerances. 4th Qtr 1999--Site testing indicated a chemical attack on the bearing material caused the test failure and not improper bearing tolerance. 1st Qtr 2000--The assistance of Brookhaven National Laboratory was obtained in evaluating the chemical attack. The National Laboratory also began more elaborate laboratory testing on bearing materials. 2nd Qtr 2000--Testing indicated Viton was an inappropriate material due to degradation in Casa Diablo fluid. Testing of EPDM began. 3rd Qtr 2001--EPDM bearings were installed for another large scale test. Bearings failed again due to swelling. Further testing indicated that larger then expected oil concentrations existed in lubricating water geothermal fluid causing bearing failure. 2002-2003--Searched for and tested several materials that would survive in hot salt and oil solutions. Kalrez{reg_sign}, Viton{reg_sign}ETP 500 and Viton{reg_sign}GF were identified as possible candidates. 2003-2005--Kalrez{reg_sign}has shown superior resistance to downhole conditions at Casa Diablo from among the various materials tested. Viton ETP-500 indicated a life expectancy of 13 years and because it is significantly less expensive then Kalrez{reg_sign}, it was selected as the bearing material for future testing. Unfortunately during the laboratory testing period Dupont Chemical chose to stop manufacturing this specific formulation and replaced it with Viton ETP 600S. The material is available with six different fillers; three based on zinc oxide and three

  3. Dehydration in the Winter Arctic Tropopause Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Jensen, Eric; Podolske, James; Selkirk, Henry; Anderson, Bruce; Avery, Melody; Diskin. Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Recent work has shown that limited amounts of tropospheric air can penetrate as much as 1 km into the middleworld stratosphere during the arctic winter. This, coupled with temperatures that are cold enough to produce saturation mixing ratios of less than 5 ppmv at the tropopause, results in stratospheric cloud formation and upper tropospheric dehydration. Even though these "cold outbreaks" occupy only a small portion of the area in the arctic (1-2%), their importance is magnified by an order of magnitude because of the air flow through them. This is reinforced by evidence of progressive drying through the winter measured during SOLVE-1. The significance of this process lies in its effect on the upper tropospheric water content of the middle and high latitude tropopause region, which plays an important role in regulating the earth's radiative balance. There appears to be significant year-to-year variability in the incidence of the cold outbreaks. This work has two parts. First, we describe case studies of dehydration taken from the SOLVE and SOLVE2 aircraft sampling missions during the Arctic winters of 2000 and 2003 respectively. Trajectory based microphysical modeling is employed to examine the sensitivity of the dehydration to microphysical parameters and the nature of sub-grid scale temperature fluctuations. We then examine the year-to-year variations in potential dehydration using a trajectory climatology.

  4. Thermodynamic stability considerations for isostructural dehydrates.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brendan J; Casteel, Melissa J; Samas, Brian; Krzyzaniak, Joseph F

    2012-04-01

    Nonstoichiometric channel hydrates are a class of crystalline hydrates that can incorporate a range of water levels as a function of temperature and relative humidity (RH). When a nonstoichiometric channel hydrate can dehydrate to yield a physically stable isostructural crystalline lattice, it may become challenging to accurately evaluate the thermodynamic stability relationship associated with a polymorphic system using traditional methods. This work demonstrates application of a eutectic-melting method to determine the stability relationship between a nonstoichiometric channel dehydrate and an anhydrous form. A transition temperature (122°C) between the isostructural dehydrate of the nonstoichiometric channel hydrate and the anhydrous polymorph was identified, with the nonstoichiometric channel hydrate being the thermodynamically stable anhydrous form at room temperature (RT). Solid-state storage at a range of RH conditions demonstrated that the nonstoichiometric channel hydrate is also the stable form at RT above an RH of 94%. These results demonstrate that the nonstoichiometric channel hydrate is the stable form at low temperatures, independent of its hydration state. It has been demonstrated that the eutectic-melting method is applicable to the study of thermodynamic stability relationships between anhydrous forms and dehydrated channel hydrates.

  5. Pelagic sea snakes dehydrate at sea

    PubMed Central

    Lillywhite, Harvey B.; Sheehy, Coleman M.; Brischoux, François; Grech, Alana

    2014-01-01

    Secondarily marine vertebrates are thought to live independently of fresh water. Here, we demonstrate a paradigm shift for the widely distributed pelagic sea snake, Hydrophis (Pelamis) platurus, which dehydrates at sea and spends a significant part of its life in a dehydrated state corresponding to seasonal drought. Snakes that are captured following prolonged periods without rainfall have lower body water content, lower body condition and increased tendencies to drink fresh water than do snakes that are captured following seasonal periods of high rainfall. These animals do not drink seawater and must rehydrate by drinking from a freshwater lens that forms on the ocean surface during heavy precipitation. The new data based on field studies indicate unequivocally that this marine vertebrate dehydrates at sea where individuals may live in a dehydrated state for possibly six to seven months at a time. This information provides new insights for understanding water requirements of sea snakes, reasons for recent declines and extinctions of sea snakes and more accurate prediction for how changing patterns of precipitation might affect these and other secondarily marine vertebrates living in tropical oceans. PMID:24648228

  6. Pelagic sea snakes dehydrate at sea.

    PubMed

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Sheehy, Coleman M; Brischoux, François; Grech, Alana

    2014-05-07

    Secondarily marine vertebrates are thought to live independently of fresh water. Here, we demonstrate a paradigm shift for the widely distributed pelagic sea snake, Hydrophis (Pelamis) platurus, which dehydrates at sea and spends a significant part of its life in a dehydrated state corresponding to seasonal drought. Snakes that are captured following prolonged periods without rainfall have lower body water content, lower body condition and increased tendencies to drink fresh water than do snakes that are captured following seasonal periods of high rainfall. These animals do not drink seawater and must rehydrate by drinking from a freshwater lens that forms on the ocean surface during heavy precipitation. The new data based on field studies indicate unequivocally that this marine vertebrate dehydrates at sea where individuals may live in a dehydrated state for possibly six to seven months at a time. This information provides new insights for understanding water requirements of sea snakes, reasons for recent declines and extinctions of sea snakes and more accurate prediction for how changing patterns of precipitation might affect these and other secondarily marine vertebrates living in tropical oceans.

  7. Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection: Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Peter F.

    1982-10-08

    A consolidated reference of materials for downhole equipment used in geothermal energy exploitation is nearing completion. The reference is a summary of recent developments in the areas of tubular goods materials, highly alloyed metals, high temperature cements, high temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downwell pumps. A brief overview is presented in this paper.

  8. Method and apparatus for detecting orientation of downhole geophones

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.; Khalil, H.; Albers, R.

    1992-07-07

    This patent describes a downhole geophone assembly. It comprises at least one geophone; a casing enclosing at least one geophone; means for securing a high frequency electro-magnetic radiation radiating source to the geophone assembly; tubing having an internal surface and an exterior surface; and means for securing the geophone to the exterior surface of the tubing.

  9. Fallon FORGE GIS and Downhole Well Lithology Data

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Blankenship

    2015-12-23

    ArcGIS Map Package with MT Station Locations, 2D Seismic Lines, Well data, Known Regional Hydrothermal Systems, Regional Historic Earthquake Seismicity, Regional Temperature Gradient Data, Regional Heat Flow Data, Regional Radiogenic Heat Production, Local Geology, Land Status, Cultural Data, 2m Temperature Probe Data, and Gravity Data. Also a detailed down-hole lithology notes are provided.

  10. Downhole steam generator with improved preheating, combustion, and protection features

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.L.

    1981-01-07

    For tertiary oil recovery, a downhole steam generator is designed which provides for efficient counterflow cooling of the combustion chamber walls and preheating of the fuel and water. Pressure-responsive doors are provided for closing and opening the outlet in response to flameout, thereby preventing flooding of the combustion chamber. (DLC)

  11. [Dehydration due to "mouth broken"].

    PubMed

    Meijler, D P M; van Mossevelde, P W J; van Beek, R H T

    2012-09-01

    Two children were admitted to a medical centre due to dehydration after an oral injury and the extraction of a tooth. One child complained of "mouth broken". Dehydration is the most common water-electrolyte imbalance in children. Babies and young children are prone to dehydration due to their relatively large body surface area, the high percentage extracellular fluid, and the limited ability of the kidneys to conserve water. After the removal ofa tooth, after an oral trauma or in case of oral discomfort, a child is at greater risk of dehydration by reduced fluid and food intake due to oral pain and/or discomfort and anxiety to drink. In those cases, extra attention needs to be devoted to the intake of fluids.

  12. Field test of two high-pressure, direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume I. Air/diesel system

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.W.

    1983-05-01

    As a part of the Project DEEP STEAM to develop technology to more efficiently utilize steam for the recovery of heavy oil from deep reservoirs, a field test of a downhole steam generator (DSG) was performed. The DSG burned No. 2 diesel fuel in air and was a direct-contact, high pressure device which mixed the steam with the combustion products and injected the resulting mixture directly into the oil reservoir. The objectives of the test program included demonstration of long-term operation of a DSG, development of operational methods, assessment of the effects of the steam/combustion gases on the reservoir and comparison of this air/diesel DSG with an adjacent oxygen/diesel direct contact generator. Downhole operation of the air/diesel DSG was started in June 1981 and was terminated in late February 1982. During this period two units were placed downhole with the first operating for about 20 days. It was removed, the support systems were slightly modified, and the second one was operated for 106 days. During this latter interval the generator operated for 70% of the time with surface air compressor problems the primary source of the down time. Thermal contact, as evidenced by a temperature increase in the production well casing gases, and an oil production increase were measured in one of the four wells in the air/diesel pattern. Reservoir scrubbing of carbon monoxide was observed, but no conclusive data on scrubbing of SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ were obtained. Corrosion of the DSG combustor walls and some other parts of the downhole package were noted. Metallurgical studies have been completed and recommendations made for other materials that are expected to better withstand the downhole combustion environment. 39 figures, 8 tables.

  13. Comparative evaluation of surface and downhole steam-generation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, C.

    1982-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the application of heat to reservoirs containing high API gravity oils can substantially improve recovery. Although steam injection is currently the principal thermal recovery method, heat transmission losses associated with delivery of the steam from the surface generators to the oil-bearing formation has limited conventional steam injection to shallow reservoirs. The objective of the Department of Energy's Project DEEP STEAM is to develop the technology required to economically produce heavy oil from deep reservoirs. The tasks included in this effort are the development and evaluation of thermally efficient delivery systems and downhole steam generation systems. This paper compares the technical and economic performance of conventional surface steam drives, which are strongly influenced by heat losses, with (a) thermally efficient delivery (through insulated strings) of surface generated steam, (b) low pressure combustion downhole steam generation, (c) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation using air as the oxygen source, and (d) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation substituting pure oxygen for air. The selection of a preferred technology based upon either total efficiency or cost is found to be strongly influenced by reservoir depth, steam mass flow rate, and sandface steam quality. Therefore, a parametric analysis has been performed which examines varying depths, injection rates and steam qualities. Results indicate that the technologies are not readily distinguishable for low injectivity reservoirs in which conventional steam drives are feasible. However, high injection rates produce a notable cost difference between high pressure combustion systems and the other technologies. Issues that must be addressed before gaining further insight into the economic viability of downhole steam generation are discussed.

  14. Feasibility evaluation of downhole oil/water separator (DOWS) technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.; Langhus, B. G.; Belieu, S.

    1999-01-31

    to operators, particularly to small or medium-sized independent U.S. companies. One of the missions of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) is to assess the feasibility of promising oil and gas technologies that offer improved operating performance, reduced operating costs, or greater environmental protection. To further this mission, the NPTO provided funding to a partnership of three organizations a DOE national laboratory (Argonne National Laboratory), a private-sector consulting firm (CH2M-Hill), and a state government agency (Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission) to assess the feasibility of DOWS. The purpose of this report is to provide general information to the industry on DOWS by describing the existing uses of simultaneous injection, summarizing the regulatory implications of simultaneous injection, and assessing the potential future uses of the technology. Chapter 2 provides a more detailed description of the two major types of DOWS. Chapter 3 summarizes the existing U.S. and Canadian installations of DOWS equipment, to the extent that operators have been willing to share their data. Data are provided on the location and geology of existing installations, production information before and after installation of the DOWS, and costs. Chapter 4 provides an overview of DOWS-specific regulatory requirements imposed by some state agencies and discusses the regulatory implications of handling produced water downhole, rather than pumping it to the surface and reinjecting it. Findings and conclusions are presented in Chapter 5 and a list of the references cited in the report is provided in Chapter 6. Appendix A presents detailed data on DOWS installations. This report presents the findings of Phase 1 of the simultaneous injection project, the feasibility assessment. Another activity of the Phase 1 investigation is to design a study plan for Phase 2 of the project, field pilot studies. The Phase 2 study plan is

  15. Immobilisation increases yeast cells' resistance to dehydration-rehydration treatment.

    PubMed

    Borovikova, Diana; Rozenfelde, Linda; Pavlovska, Ilona; Rapoport, Alexander

    2014-08-20

    This study was performed with the goal of revealing if the dehydration procedure used in our new immobilisation method noticeably decreases the viability of yeast cells in immobilised preparations. Various yeasts were used in this research: Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that were rather sensitive to dehydration and had been aerobically grown in an ethanol-containing medium, a recombinant strain of S. cerevisiae grown in aerobic conditions which were completely non-resistant to dehydration and an anaerobically grown bakers' yeast strain S. cerevisiae, as well as a fairly resistant Pichia pastoris strain. Experiments performed showed that immobilisation of all these strains essentially increased their resistance to a dehydration-rehydration treatment. The increase of cells' viability (compared with control cells dehydrated in similar conditions) was from 30 to 60%. It is concluded that a new immobilisation method, which includes a dehydration stage, does not lead to an essential loss of yeast cell viability. Correspondingly, there is no risk of losing the biotechnological activities of immobilised preparations. The possibility of producing dry, active yeast preparations is shown, for those strains that are very sensitive to dehydration and which can be used in biotechnology in an immobilised form. Finally, the immobilisation approach can be used for the development of efficient methods for the storage of recombinant yeast strains.

  16. Effects of dehydration on performance in man: Annotated bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A compilation of studies on the effect of dehydration on human performance and related physiological mechanisms. The annotations are listed in alphabetical order by first author and cover material through June 1973.

  17. High field 27Al MAS NMR and TPD studies of active sites in ethanol dehydration using thermally treated transitional aluminas as catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Xu, Suochang; Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Mary Y.; Wan, Chuan; Zhao, Zhenchao; Szanyi, Janos; Bao, Xinhe; Han, Xiuwen; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2016-04-01

    High field quantitative 27Al MAS NMR and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of ethanol are used to study the surface and phase transformation of gamma-Al2O3 during calcination in the temperature range of 500 to 1300 degrees C. Following ethanol adsorption, ethylene is generated during TPD with a desorption temperature > 200 degrees C. With increasing calcination temperature prior to TPD, the amount of ethylene produced decreases monotonically. Significantly, 27Al MAS NMR reveals that the amount of penta-coordinate Al3+ ions (Lewis acid sites) also decreases with increasing calcination temperature. In fact, a strong correlation between the amount of penta-coordinate Al3+ ions and the amount of strongly adsorbed ethanol molecules (i.e., the ones that convert to ethylene during TPD) is obtained. This result indicates that the penta-coordinate aluminum sites are the catalytic active sites on alumina surfaces during ethanol dehydration reaction across the entire course of gamma- to alpha-Al2O3 phase transformations.

  18. Synchronizing steric and electronic effects in {Ru(II)(NNNN,P)} complexes: the catalytic dehydrative alkylation of anilines by using alcohols as a case study.

    PubMed

    Weickmann, Daniel; Frey, Wolfgang; Plietker, Bernd

    2013-02-18

    A series of new hexacoordinated {Ru(II)(NNNN,P)} complexes was prepared from [RuCl(2)(R(3)P)(3)]. Their structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. The catalytic potential of this new class of complexes was tested in the alkylation of aniline with benzyl alcohol. In this test reaction, the influence of the counteranion plus electronic influences at the tetradentate ligand and the phosphine ligand were examined. The electrochemistry of all complexes was studied by cyclic voltammetry. Depending on the substituent at the ligand backbone, the complexes showed a different behavior. For all N-benzyl substituted complexes, reversible Ru(II/III) redox potentials were observed, whereas the N-methyl substituted complex possessed an irreversible oxidation event at small scan rates. Furthermore, the electronic influence of different substituents at the ligand scaffold and at the phosphine on the Ru(II/III) redox potential was investigated. The measured E(0) values were correlated to the theoretically determined HOMO energies of the complexes. In addition, these HOMO energies correlated well with the reactivity of the single complexes in the alkylation of aniline with benzyl alcohol. The exact balance of redox potential and reactivity appears to be crucial for synchronizing the multiple hydrogen-transfer events. The optimized catalyst structure was applied in a screening on scope and limitation in the catalytic dehydrative alkylation of anilines by using alcohols.

  19. Comparison of clinical and biochemical markers of dehydration with the clinical dehydration scale in children: a case comparison trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical dehydration scale (CDS) is a quick, easy-to-use tool with 4 clinical items and a score of 1–8 that serves to classify dehydration in children with gastroenteritis as no, some or moderate/severe dehydration. Studies validating the CDS (Friedman JN) with a comparison group remain elusive. We hypothesized that the CDS correlates with a wide spectrum of established markers of dehydration, making it an appropriate and easy-to-use clinical tool. Methods This study was designed as a prospective double-cohort trial in a single tertiary care center. Children with diarrhea and vomiting, who clinically required intravenous fluids for rehydration, were compared with minor trauma patients who required intravenous needling for conscious sedation. We compared the CDS with clinical and urinary markers (urinary electrolytes, proteins, ratios and fractional excretions) for dehydration in both groups using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the area under the curve (AUC). Results We enrolled 73 children (male = 36) in the dehydration group and 143 (male = 105) in the comparison group. Median age was 32 months (range 3–214) in the dehydration and 96 months (range 2.6-214 months, p < 0.0001) in the trauma group. Median CDS was 3 (range 0–8) within the dehydration group and 0 in the comparison group (p < 0.0001). The following parameters were statistically significant (p < 0.05) between the comparison group and the dehydrated group: difference in heart rate, diastolic blood pressure, urine sodium/potassium ratio, urine sodium, fractional sodium excretion, serum bicarbonate, and creatinine measurements. The best markers for dehydration were urine Na and serum bicarbonate (ROC AUC = 0.798 and 0.821, respectively). CDS was most closely correlated with serum bicarbonate (Pearson r = -0.3696, p = 0.002). Conclusion Although serum bicarbonate is not the gold standard for dehydration, this study provides

  20. Physiologic basis for understanding quantitative dehydration assessment.

    PubMed

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W; Charkoudian, Nisha; Sawka, Michael N

    2013-03-01

    Dehydration (body water deficit) is a physiologic state that can have profound implications for human health and performance. Unfortunately, dehydration can be difficult to assess, and there is no single, universal gold standard for decision making. In this article, we review the physiologic basis for understanding quantitative dehydration assessment. We highlight how phenomenologic interpretations of dehydration depend critically on the type (dehydration compared with volume depletion) and magnitude (moderate compared with severe) of dehydration, which in turn influence the osmotic (plasma osmolality) and blood volume-dependent compensatory thresholds for antidiuretic and thirst responses. In particular, we review new findings regarding the biological variation in osmotic responses to dehydration and discuss how this variation can help provide a quantitative and clinically relevant link between the physiology and phenomenology of dehydration. Practical measures with empirical thresholds are provided as a starting point for improving the practice of dehydration assessment.

  1. Fasting headache, weight loss, and dehydration.

    PubMed

    Mosek, A; Korczyn, A D

    1999-03-01

    Recently, we showed that fasting is a strong headache precipitator unrelated to coffee, tea, or smoking withdrawal or to oversleeping. In the current study, we evaluated the role of dehydration as a possible precipitator of fasting headache. The effects of a 25-hour fast of the Jewish Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) were studied in women who participated in our previous Yom Kippur study. We asked the subjects to weigh themselves at the beginning and at the end of the Yom Kippur fast, assuming that the weight loss would largely reflect dehydration. In all but 1 of the 56 participants, the fast resulted in weight loss but only 28 (50%) reported headache. The average weight loss was 1.4 +/- 0.8 kg in those who developed headache and 1.2 +/- 0.5 kg in those who did not. This small difference was not statistically significant. We conclude that dehydration, as reflected by acute weight loss, is an unlikely cause of headache during a single day of fasting. The mechanism of fasting headache remains unclear.

  2. Voluntary dehydration and cognitive performance in trained college athletes.

    PubMed

    D'anci, Kristen E; Vibhakar, Arjun; Kanter, Jordan H; Mahoney, Caroline R; Taylor, Holly A

    2009-08-01

    Cognitive and mood decrements resulting from mild dehydration and glucose consumption were studied. Men and women (total N = 54; M age = 19.8 yr., SD = 1.2) were recruited from college athletic teams. Euhydration or dehydration was achieved by athletes completing team practices with or without water replacement. Dehydration was associated with higher thirst and negative mood ratings as well as better Digit Span performance. Participants showed better Vigilance Attention with euhydration. Hydration status and athlete's sex interacted with performance on Choice Reaction Time and Vigilance Attention. In a second study, half of the athletes received glucose prior to cognitive testing. Results for negative mood and thirst ratings were similar, but for cognitive performance the results were mixed. Effects of glucose on cognition were independent of dehydration.

  3. Hospital Admissions for Malnutrition and Dehydration in Patients With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Katherine A; Burson, Rosanne; Gall, Kristyn; Saunders, Mitzi M

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration and malnutrition are commonly experienced by patients with dementia and can result in hospitalizations and decreased quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe retrospectively, the incidence and correlations of variables that may precede hospitalizations for dehydration/malnutrition in the community-dwelling patient with dementia. Data from the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) Start of Care (SOC) on 44 patients served by a Michigan home care agency were retrieved for analysis. This study did not reveal any single or collection of variables that would predict risk for hospitalization for dehydration/malnutrition. With the lack of specific predictors of hospitalization related to dehydration and malnutrition, clinicians need to place high priority on risk-lowering strategies and preventive education for patients, family, and caregivers.

  4. Drilling jar for use in a downhole network

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; McPherson, James; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael

    2006-01-31

    Apparatus and methods for integrating transmission cable into the body of selected downhole tools, such as drilling jars, having variable or changing lengths. A wired downhole-drilling tool is disclosed in one embodiment of the invention as including a housing and a mandrel insertable into the housing. A coiled cable is enclosed within the housing and has a first end connected to the housing and a second end connected to the mandrel. The coiled cable is configured to stretch and shorten in accordance with axial movement between the housing and the mandrel. A clamp is used to fix the coiled cable with respect to the housing, the mandrel, or both, to accommodate a change of tension in the coiled cable.

  5. Dehydration kinetics of shocked serpentine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyburczy, James A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental rates of dehydration of shocked and unshocked serpentine were determined using a differential scanning calorimetric technique. Dehydration rates in shocked serpentine are enhanced by orders of magnitude over corresponding rates in unshocked material, even though the impact experiments were carried out under conditions that inhibited direct impact-induced devolatilization. Extrapolation to temperatures of the Martian surface indicates that dehydration of shocked material would occur 20 to 30 orders of magnitude more rapidly than for unshocked serpentine. The results indicate that impacted planetary surfaces and associated atmospheres would reach chemical equilibrium much more quickly than calculations based on unshocked material would indicate, even during the earliest, coldest stages of accretion. Furthermore, it is suggested that chemical weathering of shocked planetary surfaces by solid-gas reactions would be sufficiently rapid that true equilibrium mineral assemblages should form.

  6. A prospective, randomised comparative study of weekly versus biweekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft in the management of diabetic foot ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Zelen, Charles M; Serena, Thomas E; Snyder, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if weekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft reduce time to heal more effectively than biweekly application for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. This was an institutional review board-approved, registered, prospective, randomised, comparative, non-blinded, single-centre clinical trial. Patients with non-infected ulcers of ≥ 4 weeks duration were included for the study. They were randomised to receive weekly or biweekly application of allograft in addition to a non-adherent, moist dressing with compressive wrapping. All wounds were offloaded. The primary study outcome was mean time to healing. Overall, during the 12-week study period, 92·5% (37/40) ulcers completely healed. Mean time to complete healing was 4·1 ± 2·9 versus 2·4 ± 1·8 weeks (P = 0·039) in the biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively. Complete healing occurred in 50% versus 90% by 4 weeks in the biweekly and weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·014). Number of grafts applied to healed wounds was similar at 2·4 ± 1·5 and 2·3 ± 1·8 for biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·841). These results validate previous studies showing that the allograft is an effective treatment for diabetic ulcers and show that wounds treated with weekly application heal more rapidly than with biweekly application. More rapid healing may decrease clinical operational costs and prevent long-term medical complications. PMID:24618401

  7. Improvements in the order, isotropy and electron density of glypican-1 crystals by controlled dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, Wael; Svensson Birkedal, Gabriel; Thunnissen, Marjolein M. G. M.; Mani, Katrin; Logan, Derek T.

    2013-12-01

    The anisotropy of crystals of glypican-1 was significantly reduced by controlled dehydration using the HC1 device, allowing the building of previously disordered parts of the structure. The use of controlled dehydration for improvement of protein crystal diffraction quality is increasing in popularity, although there are still relatively few documented examples of success. A study has been carried out to establish whether controlled dehydration could be used to improve the anisotropy of crystals of the core protein of the human proteoglycan glypican-1. Crystals were subjected to controlled dehydration using the HC1 device. The optimal protocol for dehydration was developed by careful investigation of the following parameters: dehydration rate, final relative humidity and total incubation time T{sub inc}. Of these, the most important was shown to be T{sub inc}. After dehydration using the optimal protocol the crystals showed significantly reduced anisotropy and improved electron density, allowing the building of previously disordered parts of the structure.

  8. Apparatus and method for downhole injection of radioactive tracer

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Robert M.; Archuleta, Jacobo R.; Fink, Conrad F.

    1983-01-01

    The disclosure relates to downhole injection of radioactive .sup.82 Br and monitoring its progress through fractured structure to determine the nature thereof. An ampule containing granular .sup.82 Br is remotely crushed and water is repeatedly flushed through it to cleanse the instrument as well as inject the .sup.82 Br into surrounding fractured strata. A sensor in a remote borehole reads progress of the radioactive material through fractured structure.

  9. High power laser downhole cutting tools and systems

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2015-01-20

    Downhole cutting systems, devices and methods for utilizing 10 kW or more laser energy transmitted deep into the earth with the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems and devices for the laser cutting operations within a borehole in the earth. These systems and devices can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perform cutting operations in such boreholes deep within the earth.

  10. Apparatus and method for downhole injection of radioactive tracer

    DOEpatents

    Potter, R.M.; Archuleta, J.; Fink, C.F.

    The disclosure relates to downhole injection of radioactive /sup 82/Br and monitoring its progress through fractured structure to determine the nature thereof. An ampule containing granular /sup 82/Br is remotely crushed and water is repeatedly flushed through it to cleanse the instrument as well as inject the /sup 82/Br into surrounding fractured strata. A sensor in a remote horehole reads progress of the radioactive material through fractured structure.

  11. Prediction of the combustion characteristics in a downhole steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Naugler, David G.; Mohtadi, M. F.

    1984-02-01

    Downhole steam generation is an attractive alternative to conventional surface steam generation for recovery of heavy oils from deep reservoirs. Downhole steam generation technique has been under development in the past five years in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. The main advantages of this method are very high thermal efficiency, flexibility of operation and lower environmental pollution load. In conjunction with experimental work on the development of a downhole steam generator at the University of Calgary, two computer models for prediction of the combustion characteristics in such generators have been developed. The first model is based on the assumption of a balanced reaction and complete combustion of the fuel. It determines the reaction temperature and the enthalpy of the product gases at different pressures, air/fuel ratios and water injection rates. The second model uses a modified version of the Dixon Lewis method to determine equilibrium for all species of the reaction system, including nitrogen oxides. A non-Jacobian numerical method is used for the solution of the resulting system of non-linear equations. The results show that to a fairly good approximation, the reaction temperature and the composition of product gases may be correlated with the main operating variables by simple logarithmic plots. This facilitates extrapolation of the experimental data by the use of allocation transformations.

  12. Fate of hydraulic fracturing chemicals under down-hole conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blotevogel, J.; Kahrilas, G.; Corrin, E. R.; Borch, T.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a method to increase the yield of oil and natural gas extraction from unconventional rock formations. The process of hydrofracturing occurs via injecting water, sand, and chemicals into the production well and subjecting this mixture to high pressures to crack the rock shale, allowing increased amounts of gas and oil to seep out of the target formation. Typical constituents of the chemical mixtures are biocides, which are applied to inhibit growth of sulfate reducing bacteria in order to prevent pipe corrosion and production of hazardous gases. However, very little is known about the persistence, fate, and activity of biocides when subjected to the high temperatures and pressures of down-hole conditions. Thus, the objective of this talk is to present data from ongoing experiments focused on determining the fate of biocides commonly used for hydraulic fracturing under conditions simulating down-hole environments. Using stainless steel reactors, the high pressures and temperatures of down-hole conditions in the Marcellus shale are simulated, while concentration, speciation, and degradation of priority biocides are observed as a function of time, using primarily LC/MS techniques. The impact of water quality, shale, temperature, and pressure on the transformation kinetics and pathways of biocides will be discussed. Finally, field samples (both sediments and flowback brine) from the Marcellus shale are analyzed to verify that our lab simulations mirror real-life conditions and results.

  13. Dehydration and crystallization kinetics of zirconia-yttria gels

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, S.; Muraleedharan, R.V.; Roy, S.K.; Nayar, P.K.K.

    1995-02-01

    Zirconia and zirconia-yttria gels containing 4 and 8 mol% yttria were obtained by coprecipitation and drying at 373 K. The dehydration and crystallization behavior of the dried gels was studied by DSC, TG, and XRD. The gels undergo elimination of water over a wide temperature range of 373--673 K. The peak temperature of the endotherm corresponding to dehydration and the kinetic constants for the process were not influenced by the yttria content of the gel. The enthalpy of dehydration observed was in good agreement with the heat of vaporization data. The dehydration was followed by a sharp exothermic crystallization process. The peak temperature of the exotherm and the activation energy of the process increased with an increase in yttria content, while the enthalpy of crystallization showed a decrease. The ``glow effect`` reduced with increasing yttria content. Pure zirconia crystallizes in the tetragonal form while the zirconia containing 4 and 8 mol% yttria appears to crystallize in the cubic form.

  14. Survey of quality indicators in commercial dehydrated fruits.

    PubMed

    Megías-Pérez, Roberto; Gamboa-Santos, Juliana; Soria, Ana Cristina; Villamiel, Mar; Montilla, Antonia

    2014-05-01

    Physical and chemical quality parameters (dry matter, aw, protein, carbohydrates, vitamin C, 2-furoylmethyl amino acids, rehydration ratio and leaching loss) have been determined in 30 commercial dehydrated fruits (strawberry, blueberry, raspberry, cranberry, cherry, apple, grapefruit, mango, kiwifruit, pineapple, melon, coconut, banana and papaya). For comparison purposes, strawberry samples processed in the laboratory by freeze-drying and by convective drying were used as control samples. Overall quality of dehydrated fruits seemed to be greatly dependent on processing conditions and, in a cluster analysis, samples which were presumably subjected to osmotic dehydration were separated from the rest of fruits. These samples presented the lowest concentration of vitamin C and the highest evolution of Maillard reaction, as evidenced by its high concentration of 2-furoylmethyl amino acids. This is the first study on the usefulness of this combination of chemical and physical indicators to assess the overall quality of commercial dehydrated fruits.

  15. System for loading executable code into volatile memory in a downhole tool

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Johnson, Monte L.

    2007-09-25

    A system for loading an executable code into volatile memory in a downhole tool string component comprises a surface control unit comprising executable code. An integrated downhole network comprises data transmission elements in communication with the surface control unit and the volatile memory. The executable code, stored in the surface control unit, is not permanently stored in the downhole tool string component. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the downhole tool string component comprises boot memory. In another embodiment, the executable code is an operating system executable code. Preferably, the volatile memory comprises random access memory (RAM). A method for loading executable code to volatile memory in a downhole tool string component comprises sending the code from the surface control unit to a processor in the downhole tool string component over the network. A central processing unit writes the executable code in the volatile memory.

  16. Biomass energy analysis for crop dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, J.P.; Haase, S.G.; Quinn, M.W.; Zachritz, W.; Lansford, R.; Swanson, D.

    1995-06-01

    In 1994, an agricultural processing facility began constructing a new spice and herb dehydration facility in southern New Mexico. Because of the considerable energy intensity of the dehydration operation, management of energy costs is of special concern to the facility. Biomass energy conversion offers the potential for firms to reduce annual operating costs-especially firms with access to low-cost resources. Because the selected facility produces a biomass by-product as a result of its dehydration operation, it is appropriate to explore the technical, regulatory, institutional and economic conditions that affect the successful utilization of biomass resources. The facility is characterized as a small-scale installation, relative to other energy users. In this context, small-scale represents less than 100 million Btu per hour of thermal load and less than 1 MWe of electrical load. However, the projected annual energy bill is approximately $1.1 million and represents a significant portion of operational costs for the firm. For this study, the biomass resources in southern New Mexico and western Texas are detailed. Annual supplies of various biomass resources (i.e., wood chips, pecan shells, discarded tires and cotton gin trash) were inventoried. Further, delivered costs are projected for each of the resource forms. A technical assessment for the small-scale gasification and combustion systems is presented.

  17. Traditional Male Circumcision: Ways to Prevent Deaths Due to Dehydration.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Mbuyiselo; Maluleke, Thelmah Xavela

    2016-02-01

    Deaths of initiates occurring in the circumcision initiation schools are preventable. Current studies list dehydration as one of the underlying causes of deaths among traditional male circumcision initiates in the Eastern Cape, a province in South Africa, but ways to prevent dehydration in the initiation schools have not been adequately explored. The goals of this study were to (a) explore the underlying determinants of dehydration among initiates aged from 12 to 18 years in the traditional male circumcision initiation schools and (b) determine knowledge of participants on the actions to be taken to prevent dehydration. The study was conducted at Libode, a rural area falling under Nyandeni municipality. A simple random sampling was used to select three focus group discussions with 36 circumcised boys. A purposive sampling was used to select 10 key informants who were matured and experienced people with knowledge of traditional practices and responsible positions in the communities. The research findings indicate that the practice has been neglected to inexperienced, unskillful, and abusive traditional attendants. The overall themes collated included traditional reasons for water restriction, imbalanced food nutrients given to initiates, poor environmental conditions in the initiation hut, and actions that should be taken to prevent dehydration. This article concludes with discussion and recommendation of ways to prevent dehydration of initiates in the form of a comprehensive circumcision health promotion program.

  18. Dehydration: physiology, assessment, and performance effects.

    PubMed

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of dehydration assessment and presents a unique evaluation of the dehydration and performance literature. The importance of osmolality and volume are emphasized when discussing the physiology, assessment, and performance effects of dehydration. The underappreciated physiologic distinction between a loss of hypo-osmotic body water (intracellular dehydration) and an iso-osmotic loss of body water (extracellular dehydration) is presented and argued as the single most essential aspect of dehydration assessment. The importance of diagnostic and biological variation analyses to dehydration assessment methods is reviewed and their use in gauging the true potential of any dehydration assessment method highlighted. The necessity for establishing proper baselines is discussed, as is the magnitude of dehydration required to elicit reliable and detectable osmotic or volume-mediated compensatory physiologic responses. The discussion of physiologic responses further helps inform and explain our analysis of the literature suggesting a ≥ 2% dehydration threshold for impaired endurance exercise performance mediated by volume loss. In contrast, no clear threshold or plausible mechanism(s) support the marginal, but potentially important, impairment in strength, and power observed with dehydration. Similarly, the potential for dehydration to impair cognition appears small and related primarily to distraction or discomfort. The impact of dehydration on any particular sport skill or task is therefore likely dependent upon the makeup of the task itself (e.g., endurance, strength, cognitive, and motor skill).

  19. Preliminary Results from Downhole Osmotic Samplers in a Gas Tracer Injection Experiment in the Upper Oceanic Crust on the Eastern Flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, M. T.; Clark, J. F.; Neira, N. M.; Fisher, A. T.; Wheat, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from a gas tracer injection experiment in the ocean crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an area of hydrothermal circulation. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer was injected in Hole 1362B in 2010, during IODP Expedition 327. Fluid samples were subsequently collected from a borehole observatory (CORK) installed in this hole and similar CORKs in three additional holes (1026B, 1362A, and 1301A), located 300 to 500 m away. This array of holes is located on 3.5 My old seafloor, as an array oriented subparallel to the Endeavor Segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge. Borehole fluid samples were collected in copper coils using osmotic pumps. In addition to pumps at seafloor wellheads, downhole sampling pumps were installed in the perforated casing in the upper ocean crust. These downhole samplers were intended to produce a high-resolution continuous record of tracer concentrations, including records from the first year after tracer injection in Holes 1362A and 1362B. In contrast, wellhead samplers were not installed on these CORKs holes until 2011, and wellhead records from all CORKs have a record gap of up to one year, because of a delayed expedition in 2012. The downhole samples were recovered with the submersible Alvin in August 2014. SF6 concentrations in downhole samples recovered in 2014 are generally consistent with data obtained from wellhead samples. Of particular interest are the results from Hole 1362B, where a seafloor valve was opened and closed during various recovery expeditions. High resolution tracer curves produced from the 1362B downhole samples confirm that these operations produced an SF6 breakthrough curve corresponding to a classic push-pull test used to evaluate contaminant field locations in terrestrial setting. Complete analyses of downhole samples from these CORKs are expected to produce high-resolution breakthrough curves that will allow more precise analysis and modeling of hydrothermal flow in the study area.

  20. Seawater drinking restores water balance in dehydrated harp seals.

    PubMed

    How, Ole-Jakob; Nordøy, Erling S

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to answer the question of whether dehydrated harp seals (Phoca groenlandica) are able to obtain a net gain of water from the intake of seawater. Following 24 h of fasting, three subadult female harp seals were dehydrated by intravenous administration of the osmotic diuretic, mannitol. After another 24 h of fasting, the seals were given 1,000 ml seawater via a stomach tube. Urine and blood were collected for measurement of osmolality and osmolytes, while total body water (TBW) was determined by injections of tritiated water. In all seals, the maximum urinary concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) were higher than in seawater, reaching 540 and 620 mM, respectively, compared to 444 and 535 mM in seawater. In another experiment, the seals were given ad lib access to seawater for 48 h after mannitol-induced hyper-osmotic dehydration. In animals without access to seawater, the mean blood osmolality increased from 331 to 363 mOsm kg(-1) during dehydration. In contrast, the blood osmolality, hematocrit and TBW returned to normal when the seals were permitted ad lib access to seawater after dehydration. In conclusion, this study shows that harp seals have the capacity to gain net water from mariposa (voluntarily drinking seawater) and are able to restore water balance after profound dehydration by drinking seawater.

  1. Kinetics of volatile extraction from carbonaceous chondrites: Dehydration of talc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Ganguly, Jibamitra

    1991-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are believed to be the primary constituents of near-Earth asteroids and Phobos and Deimos, and are potential resources of fuels that may be exploited for future planetary missions. Calculations of equilibrium phase relations suggest that talc (Ta) and antigorite (Ant) are likely to be the major hydrous phases in the C1 and C2 meteorites (Ganguly and Saxena, 1989), which constitute the most volatile rich classes of carbonaceous chondrites. The dehydration kinetics of talc are studied as a function of temperature, grain size, composition and fluid fugacity, as part of a systematic study of the reaction kinetics of the volatile bearing phases that are either known or likely to be present in carbonaceous chondrites. The dehydration kinetics were investigated at 1 bar, 775 to 875 C by monitoring the in-situ weight loss as a function of time of a natural talc. The talc platelets had a dimension of 0.8 to 1 micron. The run durations varied from 233.3 hours at 775 C (48 percent dehydration) to 20.8 hours at 875 C (80 pct. dehydration). The results can be adequately represented by a given rate equation. Theoretical analysis suggests that the reduction in the concentration of H2O in the environment of dehydrating talc, as would be encountered in processing chondritic materials, will have negligible effect on the rate of dehydration, unless there is a change of reaction mechanism owing to the presence of other volatile species.

  2. EPR and DFT study on the stabilization of radiation-generated methyl radicals in dehydrated Na-A zeolite.

    PubMed

    Danilczuk, Marek; Pogocki, Dariusz; Lund, Anders; Michalik, Jacek

    2006-12-07

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was applied to study paramagnetic species stabilized in Na-A zeolite exposed to gaseous methane and gamma-irradiated at 77 K. Two types of EPR spectra were recorded during thermal annealing of zeolite up to room temperature. Owing to the results for the zeolite exposed to (13)CH(4) the multiplet observed at 110 K was assigned to a (.-)CH(3)...Na(+) complex. After decay of the multiplet, the isotropic quartet of methyl radical was recorded in the temperature range of 170-280 K. On the basis of the EPR parameters it is postulated that (.-)CH(3) radicals in this temperature region are able to freely rotate inside the zeolite cage. The structures of the (.-)CH(3)...Na(+) adsorption complex and respective hyperfine coupling constants were calculated by applying DFT quantum chemical methods. Two different models were applied to represent the zeolite framework: the 6T structure of one six-membered ring and the 3T cluster. The hyperfine coupling constants calculated for the (.-)CH(3)...Na(+) adsorption complex for both applied models show very good agreement with those obtained experimentally.

  3. Comparative analysis of steam delivery cost for surface and downhole steam drive technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, C.M.

    1981-10-01

    A basis is established for evaluating the economic performances of the technologies for enhanced recovery of heavy crude being investigated through the Department of Energy's Project DEEP STEAM. Conventional surface steam drive is compared with: (1) thermally efficient delivery (through insulated strings) of surface generated steam; (2) low pressure combustion downhole steam generation; (3) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation; (4) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation using air as the oxygen source; and (5) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation substituting pure oxygen for air. A parametric analysis is performed for varying depths, injection rates, and steam qualities.

  4. Neuropsychological Performance, Postural Stability, and Symptoms After Dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Akshay V; Mihalik, Jason P; Notebaert, Andrew J; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Prentice, William E

    2007-01-01

    Context: Dehydration and concussion are common in athletic performance. Some experts have speculated that dehydration may negatively influence performance on tests commonly used for concussion assessment. Objective: To determine how the signs and symptoms, neuropsychological performance, and postural stability are affected by dehydration. Design: Repeated-measures design assessing subjects in the euhydrated and dehydrated conditions. Setting: Sports Medicine Research Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-four healthy, male recreational athletes participated in the study. Intervention(s): Subjects participated in 2 counterbalanced sessions (euhydrated and dehydrated) separated by at least 7 days. Subjects were dehydrated using fluid restriction and an exercise task. No direct intervention was provided for the euhydrated condition. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used the Standardized Assessment of Concussion to test mental status, the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) to evaluate neuropsychological performance, the NeuroCom Sensory Organization Test and Balance Error Scoring System to test postural stability, the Graded Symptom Checklist to assess symptom presence and severity in our participants, and urine specific gravity and body mass to determine hydration status. Results: No differences were noted for the Standardized Assessment of Concussion, total Balance Error Scoring System errors, composite Sensory Organization Test, and composite ANAM scores between conditions. Subjects in the dehydrated condition had significant deterioration in visual memory (t23 = 2.130, P < .001) and fatigue measures (t23 = −7.880, P < .001) as assessed by ANAM. The dehydrated condition resulted in subjects reporting a significantly higher number (t23 = −8.585, P < .001) and severity (t23 = −7.673, P < .001) of symptoms than the euhydrated subjects on the Graded Symptom Checklist. Conclusions: Our results suggest that moderate dehydration (−2.5

  5. No evidence of dehydration with moderate daily coffee intake: a counterbalanced cross-over study in a free-living population.

    PubMed

    Killer, Sophie C; Blannin, Andrew K; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2014-01-01

    It is often suggested that coffee causes dehydration and its consumption should be avoided or significantly reduced to maintain fluid balance. The aim of this study was to directly compare the effects of coffee consumption against water ingestion across a range of validated hydration assessment techniques. In a counterbalanced cross-over design, 50 male coffee drinkers (habitually consuming 3-6 cups per day) participated in two trials, each lasting three consecutive days. In addition to controlled physical activity, food and fluid intake, participants consumed either 4×200 mL of coffee containing 4 mg/kg caffeine (C) or water (W). Total body water (TBW) was calculated pre- and post-trial via ingestion of Deuterium Oxide. Urinary and haematological hydration markers were recorded daily in addition to nude body mass measurement (BM). Plasma was analysed for caffeine to confirm compliance. There were no significant changes in TBW from beginning to end of either trial and no differences between trials (51.5±1.4 vs. 51.4±1.3 kg, for C and W, respectively). No differences were observed between trials across any haematological markers or in 24 h urine volume (2409±660 vs. 2428±669 mL, for C and W, respectively), USG, osmolality or creatinine. Mean urinary Na(+) excretion was higher in C than W (p = 0.02). No significant differences in BM were found between conditions, although a small progressive daily fall was observed within both trials (0.4±0.5 kg; p<0.05). Our data show that there were no significant differences across a wide range of haematological and urinary markers of hydration status between trials. These data suggest that coffee, when consumed in moderation by caffeine habituated males provides similar hydrating qualities to water.

  6. No Evidence of Dehydration with Moderate Daily Coffee Intake: A Counterbalanced Cross-Over Study in a Free-Living Population

    PubMed Central

    Killer, Sophie C.; Blannin, Andrew K.; Jeukendrup, Asker E.

    2014-01-01

    It is often suggested that coffee causes dehydration and its consumption should be avoided or significantly reduced to maintain fluid balance. The aim of this study was to directly compare the effects of coffee consumption against water ingestion across a range of validated hydration assessment techniques. In a counterbalanced cross-over design, 50 male coffee drinkers (habitually consuming 3–6 cups per day) participated in two trials, each lasting three consecutive days. In addition to controlled physical activity, food and fluid intake, participants consumed either 4×200 mL of coffee containing 4 mg/kg caffeine (C) or water (W). Total body water (TBW) was calculated pre- and post-trial via ingestion of Deuterium Oxide. Urinary and haematological hydration markers were recorded daily in addition to nude body mass measurement (BM). Plasma was analysed for caffeine to confirm compliance. There were no significant changes in TBW from beginning to end of either trial and no differences between trials (51.5±1.4 vs. 51.4±1.3 kg, for C and W, respectively). No differences were observed between trials across any haematological markers or in 24 h urine volume (2409±660 vs. 2428±669 mL, for C and W, respectively), USG, osmolality or creatinine. Mean urinary Na+ excretion was higher in C than W (p = 0.02). No significant differences in BM were found between conditions, although a small progressive daily fall was observed within both trials (0.4±0.5 kg; p<0.05). Our data show that there were no significant differences across a wide range of haematological and urinary markers of hydration status between trials. These data suggest that coffee, when consumed in moderation by caffeine habituated males provides similar hydrating qualities to water. PMID:24416202

  7. Reservoir characterization of marine and permafrost associated gas hydrate accumulations with downhole well logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.; Lee, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    Gas volumes that may be attributed to a gas hydrate accumulation depend on a number of reservoir parameters, one of which, gas-hydrate saturation, can be assessed with data obtained from downhole well-logging devices. This study demonstrates that electrical resistivity and acoustic transit-time downhole log data can be used to quantify the amount of gas hydrate in a sedimentary section. Two unique forms of the Archie relation (standard and quick look relations) have been used in this study to calculate water saturations (S(w)) [gas-hydrate saturation (S(h)) is equal to (1.0 - S(w))] from the electrical resistivity log data in four gas hydrate accumulations. These accumulations are located on (1) the Blake Ridge along the Southeastern continental margin of the United States, (2) the Cascadia continental margin off the pacific coast of Canada, (3) the North Slope of Alaska, and (4) the Mackenzie River Delta of Canada. Compressional wave acoustic log data have also been used in conjunction with the Timur, modified Wood, and the Lee weighted average acoustic equations to calculate gas-hydrate saturations in all four areas assessed.

  8. Fructokinase activity mediates dehydration-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Roncal Jimenez, Carlos A; Ishimoto, Takuji; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Rivard, Christopher J; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Ejaz, A Ahsan; Cicerchi, Christina; Inaba, Shinichiro; Le, MyPhuong; Miyazaki, Makoto; Glaser, Jason; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; González, Marvin A; Aragón, Aurora; Wesseling, Catharina; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    The epidemic of chronic kidney disease in Nicaragua (Mesoamerican nephropathy) has been linked with recurrent dehydration. Here we tested whether recurrent dehydration may cause renal injury by activation of the polyol pathway, resulting in the generation of endogenous fructose in the kidney that might subsequently induce renal injury via metabolism by fructokinase. Wild-type and fructokinase-deficient mice were subjected to recurrent heat-induced dehydration. One group of each genotype was provided water throughout the day and the other group was hydrated at night, after the dehydration. Both groups received the same total hydration in 24 h. Wild-type mice that received delayed hydration developed renal injury, with elevated serum creatinine, increased urinary NGAL, proximal tubular injury, and renal inflammation and fibrosis. This was associated with activation of the polyol pathway, with increased renal cortical sorbitol and fructose levels. Fructokinase-knockout mice with delayed hydration were protected from renal injury. Thus, recurrent dehydration can induce renal injury via a fructokinase-dependent mechanism, likely from the generation of endogenous fructose via the polyol pathway. Access to sufficient water during the dehydration period can protect mice from developing renal injury. These studies provide a potential mechanism for Mesoamerican nephropathy.

  9. May eclogite dehydration cause slab fracturation ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loury, Chloé; Lanari, Pierre; Rolland, Yann; Guillot, Stéphane; Ganino, Clément

    2015-04-01

    Petrological and geophysical evidences strongly indicate that fluids releases play a fundamental role in subduction zones as in subduction-related seismicity and arc magmatism. It is thus important to assess quantitatively their origin and to try to quantify the amount of such fluids. In HP metamorphism, it is well known that pressure-dependent dehydration reactions occur during the prograde path. Many geophysical models show that the variations in slab physical properties along depth could be linked to these fluid occurrences. However it remains tricky to test such models on natural sample, as it is difficult to assess or model the water content evolution in HP metamorphic rocks. This difficulty is bound to the fact that these rocks are generally heterogeneous, with zoned minerals and preservation of different paragenesis reflecting changing P-T conditions. To decipher the P-T-X(H2O) path of such heterogeneous rocks the concept of local effective bulk (LEB) composition is essential. Here we show how standardized X-ray maps can be used to constrain the scale of the equilibration volume of a garnet porphyroblast and to measure its composition. The composition of this equilibrium volume may be seen as the proportion of the rock likely to react at a given time to reach a thermodynamic equilibrium with the growing garnet. The studied sample is an eclogite coming from the carboniferous South-Tianshan suture (Central Asia) (Loury et al. in press). Compositional maps of a garnet and its surrounding matrix were obtained from standardized X-ray maps processed with the program XMapTools (Lanari et al, 2014). The initial equilibration volume was modeled using LEB compositions combined together with Gibbs free energy minimization. P-T sections were calculated for the next stages of garnet growth taking into account the fractionation of the composition at each stage of garnet growth. The modeled P-T-X(H2O) path indicates that the rock progressively dehydrates during the

  10. Downhole microseismic monitoring for low signal-to-noise ratio events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hang; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Microseismic monitoring plays an important role in the process of hydraulic fracturing for shale gas/oil production. The accuracy of event location is an essential issue in microseismic monitoring. The data obtained from downhole monitoring system usually show a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than the recorded data from the surface. For small microseismic events, however, P waves recorded in a downhole array may be very weak, while S waves are generally dominant and strong. Numerical experiments suggest that inverting S-wave arrival times alone is not sufficient to constrain event locations. In this study, we perform extensive location tests with various noise effects using a grid search method that matches the travel time data of the S wave across a recording array. We conclude that fitting S-wave travel time data along with at least one P-wave travel time of the same event can significantly improve location accuracy. In practice, picking S-wave arrival time data and at least one P-wave pick is possible for many small events. We demonstrate that fitting the combination of the travel time data is a robust approach, which can help increase the number of microseismic events to be located accurately during hydraulic fracturing.

  11. Downhole measurements in the AND-1B borehole, ANDRILL McMurdo Ice Shelf Project, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.; Williams, T.; Henrys, S.; Crosby, T.; Hansaraj, D.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive set of downhole measurements was collected in the AND-1B drillhole as part of the on-ice scientific programme defined for the McMurdo Ice Shelf (MIS) Project. Geophysical logs were recorded over two operation phases and consisted of calliper, temperature, fluid conductivity, induction resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, natural gamma activity, acoustic televiewer, borehole deviation, and dipmeter. In addition, two standard vertical seismic profiles (VSP) and one walk-away VSP were obtained. Radioactive logs (porosity and density) were not run because of unstable borehole conditions. Although the total depth of the hole is 1285 metres below seafloor (mbsf), the depth range for in situ measurements was limited by the length of the wireline (1018 mbsf) and by the nullification of some geophysical logs due to the presence of steel casing. A depth correction was derived to account for systematic discrepancies in depth between downhole measurements and cores; consequently, log responses can be directly compared to core properties. The resulting data are amenable to studies of cyclicity and climate, heat flux and fluid flow, and stricture and stress. When integrated with physical properties and fractures measured on the core, this information should play a significant role in addressing many of the scientific objectives of the ANDRILL programme.

  12. Downhole measurements and fluid chemistry of a castle rock steam well, the Geysers, Lake County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.; Nathenson, M.; Frye, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Wellbore and reservoir processes in a steam well in the Castle Rock field of The Geysers have been studied by means of down-hole pressure and temperature measurements and analyses of ejected water and steam produced under bleed and full flow. Down-hole measurements show that below a vapor zone there is liquid water in the well in pressure equilibrium with reservoir steam at a depth of 2290 m. The progressive decreases, from 1973 to 1977, of pressure and temperature in the vapor zone indicate that wellbore heat loss is high enough to condense a large fraction of the steam inflow. The chemical composition of water ejected from the well is consistent with an origin from wellbore condensation of steam. Calculations using the differences in gas and isotopic compositions between bleed and full-flow steam show that about half of the full-flow steam originated as liquid water in the reservoir and that about 30% of the steam entering the well under bleed was condensed in the wellbore and drained downward. Heat loss calculations are also consistent with this amount of condensation. ?? 1981.

  13. 'Fortified' wines volatile composition: Effect of different postharvest dehydration conditions of wine grapes cv. Malvasia moscata (Vitis vinifera L.).

    PubMed

    Urcan, Delia Elena; Giacosa, Simone; Torchio, Fabrizio; Río Segade, Susana; Raimondi, Stefano; Bertolino, Marta; Gerbi, Vincenzo; Pop, Nastasia; Rolle, Luca

    2017-03-15

    The impact of postharvest dehydration on the volatile composition of Malvasia moscata grapes and fortified wines produced from them was assessed. The ripeness effect of fresh grapes on volatile compounds of dehydrated grapes was evaluated for the first time in this study. Fresh grape berries were densimetrically sorted, and more represented density classes were selected. Dehydration of riper berries (20.5 °Brix) led to volatile profiles richer in terpenes, particularly linalool and geraniol. The effect of dehydration rate on the volatile composition of dehydrated grapes and fortified wines was also evaluated. Fast dehydration grapes were richer in total free terpenes, and the resulting wines contained greater amounts of volatile compounds. The predominant compounds were free esters, but linalool, rose oxide, citronellol and geraniol can also contribute to wine aroma, particularly for fast dehydration. β-Damascenone can be an active odorant, although its contribution was greater in wines made from slow dehydrated grapes.

  14. Mechanistic insights into the rhenium-catalyzed alcohol-to-olefin dehydration reaction.

    PubMed

    Korstanje, Ties J; Jastrzebski, Johann T B H; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M

    2013-09-23

    Rhenium-based complexes are powerful catalysts for the dehydration of various alcohols to the corresponding olefins. Here, we report on both experimental and theoretical (DFT) studies into the mechanism of the rhenium-catalyzed dehydration of alcohols to olefins in general, and the methyltrioxorhenium-catalyzed dehydration of 1-phenylethanol to styrene in particular. The experimental and theoretical studies are in good agreement, both showing the involvement of several proton transfers, and of a carbenium ion intermediate in the catalytic cycle.

  15. Following the movement of Cu ions in a SSZ-13 zeolite during dehydration, reduction and adsorption: a combined in situ TP-XRD, XANES/DRIFTS study

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Varga, Tamas; Peden, Charles HF; Gao, Feng; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Szanyi, Janos

    2014-05-05

    Cu-SSZ-13 has been shown to possess high activity and superior N2 formation selectivity in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx under oxygen rich conditions. Here, a combination of synchrotron-based (XRD and XANES) and vibrational (DRIFTS) spectroscopy tools have been used to follow the changes in the location and coordination environment of copper ions in a Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite during calcinations, reduction with CO, and adsorption of CO and H2O. XANES spectra collected during these procedures provides critical information not only on the variation in the oxidation state of the copper species in the zeolite structure, but also on the changes in the coordination environment around these ions as they interact with the framework, and with different adsorbates (H2O and CO). Time-resolved XRD data indicate the movement of copper ions and the consequent variation of the unit cell parameters during dehydration. DRIFT spectra provide information about the adsorbed species present in the zeolite, as well as the oxidation states of and coordination environment around the copper ions. A careful analysis of the asymmetric T-O-T vibrations of the CHA framework perturbed by copper ions in different coordination environments proved to be especially informative. The results of this study will aid the identification of the location, coordination and oxidation states of copper ions obtained during in operando catalytic studies. Financial support was provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Part of this work (sample preparation) was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The EMSL is a national scientific user facility supported by the US DOE, Office of Biological and Environmental Research. PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for the US DOE by Battelle. All of the spectroscopy work reported here was

  16. Inductive coupler for downhole components and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Sneddon, Cameron; Fox, Joe; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2006-10-03

    An inductive coupler for downhole components. The inductive coupler includes an annular housing having a recess defined by a bottom portion and two opposing side wall portions. At least one side wall portion includes a lip extending toward but not reaching the other side wall portion. A plurality of generally U-shaped MCEI segments, preferably comprised of ferrite, are disposed in the recess and aligned so as to form a circular trough. The coupler further includes a conductor disposed within the circular trough and a polymer filling spaces between the segments, the annular housing and the conductor.

  17. Steam drive recovery method utilizing a downhole steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Snavely, E. S.; Hopkins, D. N.

    1984-09-18

    Viscous oil is recovered from a subterranean, viscous oil-containing formation by a steam flooding technique wherein steam is generated in a downhole steam generator located in an injection well by spontaneous combustion of a pressurized mixture of a water-soluble fuel such as sugars and alcohols dissolved in water and substantially pure oxygen. The generated mixture of steam and combustion gases pass through the formation, displacing oil and reducing the oil's viscosity and the mobilized oil is produced from the formation via a spaced-apart production well.

  18. Steam drive oil recovery method utilizing a downhole steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nopkins, D. N.; Snavely, E. S.

    1984-10-23

    Viscous oil is recovered from a subterranean, viscous oil-containing formation by a steam flooding technique wherein steam is generated in a downhole steam generator located in an injection well by spontaneous combustion of a pressurized mixture of a water-soluble fuel such as sugars and alcohols dissolved in water or a stable hydrocarbon fuel-in-water emulsion and substantially pure oxygen. The generated mixture of steam and combustion gases pass through the formation, displacing oil and reducing the oil's viscosity and the mobilized oil is produced from the formation via a spaced-apart production well.

  19. Downhole tools can increase deep drilling rig productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, D.A.; Doiron, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    Explains how there is much to be gained by better utilization of current drilling equipment, particularly for the much more expensive deep drilling. Optimized mud weight, better hydraulics, and higher rpm offer the best opportunities with increased bit weight as a fourth possibility. Current RandD in such areas as shock absorbers, downhole motors, new materials and designs for bits, and improved instrumentation will decrease drilling costs. Concludes that a reasonable projection is that drilling time for deep wells can be halved within the next decade.

  20. Working member of a helical downhole motor for drilling wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kochnev, A.M.; Vshivkov, A.N.; Goldobin, V.B.

    1993-06-22

    A working member of a helical downhole motor is described for drilling wells comprising: separate tubular sections having helical teeth arranged in succession and interconnected by connecting elements, each connecting element having the form of a ring, rigidly secured at the tubular sections and having helical teeth of a pitch and a direction equal to a pitch and a direction, respectively, of the helical teeth of the tubular sections, whereas a profile of the helical teeth of the ring is equidistant to a profile of the helical teeth of the sections.

  1. METHOD OF DEHYDRATING URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Davis, J.O.; Fogel, C.C.; Palmer, W.E.

    1962-12-18

    Drying and dehydration of aqueous-precipitated uranium tetrafluoride are described. The UF/sub 4/ which normally contains 3 to 4% water, is dispersed into the reaction zone of an operating reactor wherein uranium hexafluoride is being reduced to UF/sub 4/ with hydrogen. The water-containing UF/sub 4/ is dried and blended with the UF/sub 4/ produced in the reactor without interfering with the reduction reaction. (AEC)

  2. Ice Cloud Formation and Dehydration in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stratospheric water vapor is important not only for its greenhouse forcing, but also because it plays a significant role in stratospheric chemistry. Several recent studies have focused on the potential for dehydration due to ice cloud formation in air rising slowly through the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Holton and Gettelman showed that temperature variations associated with horizontal transport of air in the TTL can drive ice cloud formation and dehydration, and Gettelman et al. recently examined the cloud formation and dehydration along kinematic trajectories using simple assumptions about the cloud properties. In this study, a Lagrangian, one-dimensional cloud model has been used to further investigate cloud formation and dehydration as air is transported horizontally and vertically through the TTL. Time-height curtains of temperature are extracted from meteorological analyses. The model tracks the growth, advection, and sedimentation of individual cloud particles. The regional distribution of clouds simulated in the model is comparable to the subvisible cirrus distribution indicated by SAGE II. The simulated cloud properties and cloud frequencies depend strongly on the assumed supersaturation threshold for ice nucleation. The clouds typically do not dehydrate the air along trajectories down to the temperature minimum saturation mixing ratio. Rather the water vapor mixing ratio crossing the tropopause along trajectories is 10-50% larger than the saturation mixing ratio. I will also discuss the impacts of Kelvin waves and gravity waves on cloud properties and dehydration efficiency. These simulations can be used to determine whether observed lower stratospheric water vapor mixing ratios can be explained by dehydration associated with in situ TTL cloud formation alone.

  3. Dehydration affects brain structure and function in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kempton, Matthew J; Ettinger, Ulrich; Foster, Russell; Williams, Steven C R; Calvert, Gemma A; Hampshire, Adam; Zelaya, Fernando O; O'Gorman, Ruth L; McMorris, Terry; Owen, Adrian M; Smith, Marcus S

    2011-01-01

    It was recently observed that dehydration causes shrinkage of brain tissue and an associated increase in ventricular volume. Negative effects of dehydration on cognitive performance have been shown in some but not all studies, and it has also been reported that an increased perceived effort may be required following dehydration. However, the effects of dehydration on brain function are unknown. We investigated this question using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 10 healthy adolescents (mean age = 16.8, five females). Each subject completed a thermal exercise protocol and nonthermal exercise control condition in a cross-over repeated measures design. Subjects lost more weight via perspiration in the thermal exercise versus the control condition (P < 0.0001), and lateral ventricle enlargement correlated with the reduction in body mass (r = 0.77, P = 0.01). Dehydration following the thermal exercise protocol led to a significantly stronger increase in fronto-parietal blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response during an executive function task (Tower of London) than the control condition, whereas cerebral perfusion during rest was not affected. The increase in BOLD response after dehydration was not paralleled by a change in cognitive performance, suggesting an inefficient use of brain metabolic activity following dehydration. This pattern indicates that participants exerted a higher level of neuronal activity in order to achieve the same performance level. Given the limited availability of brain metabolic resources, these findings suggest that prolonged states of reduced water intake may adversely impact executive functions such as planning and visuo-spatial processing.

  4. Dehydration of football referees during a match

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, A I; Fernandez, R

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To study hydration status in referees (main) and assistant referees (linesmen) during official football matches. Methods: Twelve male football referees were evaluated; all were volunteers. Before and after each match, the referee and one of the assistants were weighed without clothes and a blood sample was taken. Total water loss was determined for each subject from the change in body weight. The main haematological variables were analysed in the blood samples. Total plasma protein concentration and osmolarity were also determined. Variation in plasma volume was determined from changes in packed cell volume and a combination of changes in packed cell volume and haemoglobin concentrations. Results: During a match, total body water loss was 1.60 (0.13) litres, equivalent to 2.05 (0.18)% of body weight. Body weight was reduced by 1.55 (0.12)%, showing that water ingestion during the interval replaces only 24.4% of the body fluids lost during the match. The assistants lost 0.79 (0.19) litre of water, equivalent to 1.05 (0.25)% of body weight. The referees showed a significant decrease in plasma volume of 4.99 (1.33)%. The assistants showed a non-significant increase in plasma volume. The reduction in plasma volume observed in the referees correlated significantly with total body water loss (r = 0.9623). From these data, it is possible to predict that a dehydration of 1% reflects a reduction in plasma volume of nearly 2.5%. Conclusions: Referees are moderately dehydrated after a football match (2%), whereas assistants show a non-significant dehydration of 1% of their body weight. PMID:14665588

  5. Cation Movements during Dehydration and NO2 Desorption in a Ba-Y,FAU zeolite: an in situ Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianqin; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-02-28

    Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis were used to probe the interactions between BaY, FAU zeolite frameworks and H2O or NO2 molecules. These results provided information about the migration of the Ba2+ cations in the zeolite framework during dehydration and during NO2 adsorption/desorption processes in a water free zeolite. In the hydrated structure water molecules form four double rings of hexagonal ice-like clusters [(H2O)6] in the 12-ring openings of the super-cage. These water rings interacted with the cations and the zeolite framework through four cation/water clusters centered over the four 6-membered rings of the super-cage (site II). Interpenetrating tetrahedral water clusters [(H2O)4] and tetrahedral Ba+2 cation clusters were observed in the sodalite cage. Consistent with the reported FT-IR results, three different ionic NOx species (NO+, NO+-NO2, and NO3-) were observed following NO2 adsorption by the dehydrated Ba-Y,FAU zeolite. The structure of the water and the NOx species were correlated with the interactions between the adsorbates, the cations, and the framework. The population of Ba2+ ions at different cationic positions strongly depended on the amount of bound water or NOx species. Both dehydration and NO2 adsorption/desorption resulted in facile migration of Ba2+ ions among the different cationic positions. Data obtained in this work have provided direct evidence for the Ba2+ cation migration to accommodate the binding of gas molecules. This important feature may play a pivotal role in the strong binding of NO2 to Ba-Y,FAU zeolite, a prerequisite for high catalytic activity in lean NOx reduction catalysis.

  6. Preparation of zeolite supported TiO2, ZnO and ZrO2 and the study on their catalytic activity in NOx reduction and 1-pentanol dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatimah, Is

    2016-03-01

    Preparation of zeolite supported TiO2, ZnO and ZrO2 and their catalytic activity was studied. Activated natural zeolite from Indonesia was utilized for the preparation and catalytic activity test on NOx reduction by NH3 and also 1-pentanol dehydration were examined. Physicochemical characterization of materials was studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement, scanning electron microscope, solid acidity determination and also gas sorption analysis. The results confirmed that the preparation gives some improvements on physicochemical characters suitable for catalysis mechanism in those reactions. Solid acidity and specific surface area contributed significantly to the activity.

  7. Dehydration

    MedlinePlus

    ... too much, for example, from exercising in hot weather Fever Vomiting or diarrhea Urinating too much (uncontrolled ... when you are well. Drink more when the weather is hot or you are exercising. If anyone ...

  8. Urinary caffeine after coffee consumption and heat dehydration.

    PubMed

    Chambaz, A; Meirim, I; Décombaz, J

    2001-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of heat-induced dehydration on urinary caffeine excretion after the consumption of a strong coffee solution. Following ingestion of coffee (caffeine 4.9+/-0.1 [SE] mg/kg, 3-4 cups), ten healthy males were intermittently exposed to heat in a sauna until they had lost 2.9 % of lean mass. On a separate occasion, they consumed the same amount of coffee but remained quiet and euhydrated (control). Urine flow was reduced 7-fold in dehydration. At these low excretion rates (< 30 ml/h), caffeine concentration was negatively correlated with flow. Peak urinary caffeine (Cmax) was 7.6 +/- 0.4 (SE) microg/ml in dehydration and 7.1 +/- 0.2 microg/ml in the control (p > 0.05). Compared with the control, dehydration delayed Cmax by 1 hour, maintained higher saliva caffeine concentration (6.1 vs 5.2 microg/ml, p < 0.05) and a lower saliva paraxanthine/caffeine ratio (p < 0.001). The 24h-recovery of caffeine in urine was reduced (1.2 vs 2.8% of dose, p < 0.001), however at least 2.6% of dose were lost in sweat. These results suggest that the rise in circulating caffeine due to delayed metabolic clearance was partly opposed by a sizeable elimination in sweat. Therefore, heat dehydration did not lead to higher concentration of caffeine in urine after coffee ingestion.

  9. A combined experimental and computational study of the catalytic dehydration of glycerol on microporous zeolites: an investigation of the reaction mechanism and acrolein selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xufeng; Lv, Yanhong; Qu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Guodong; Xi, Yanyan; Phillips, David L; Liu, Chenguang

    2013-12-14

    The catalytic activity and the acrolein selectivity for liquid phase glycerol dehydration on β zeolites (HNa-β-k) were found to be dependent on the reaction temperature as well as on the amount of acid sites on the zeolites. An increase in the reaction temperature favors the acrolein selectivity. The acrolein selectivity increases with the Na(+)/H(+) ratio and the glycerol conversion decreases with it so that a maximum acrolein yield is obtained when a certain amount of acidic sites are replaced by non-active Na(+) sites. The computational results indicate that 3-hydoxylpropanal (HPA) is an important intermediate that determines the final product selectivity. The relative rates of the different reaction pathways for HAP can be affected by the amount of water molecules involved in its homogeneous reaction. Based on the reaction mechanism proposed, it was hypothesized that smaller pores reduce activity but increase selectivity to acrolein, and results of the H-MFI zeolite were consistent with this hypothesis. Our work provides important insight into the overall landscape of the reaction mechanism and can be used to help design reaction systems that have good acrolein selectivity for the liquid phase glycerol dehydration reactions.

  10. A study of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose dissolved in ionic liquids and the factors influencing the dehydration of glucose and the formation of humins.

    PubMed

    Dee, Sean J; Bell, Alexis T

    2011-08-22

    An investigation was carried out into the hydrolysis of cellulose dissolved in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Emim][Cl]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim][Cl]) catalyzed by mineral acids. Glucose, cellobiose, and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) were observed as the primary reaction products. The initial rate of glucose formation was determined to be of first order in the concentrations of dissolved glucan and protons and of zero order in the concentration of water. The absence of a dependence on water concentration suggests that cleavage of the β-1,4-glycosidic linkages near chain ends is irreversible. The apparent activation energy for glucose formation is 96 kJ mol(-1). The absence of oligosaccharides longer than cellobiose suggests that cleavage of interior glycosidic bonds is reversible due to the slow diffusional separation of cleaved chains in the highly viscous glucan/ionic liquid solution. Progressive addition of water during the course of glucan hydrolysis inhibited the rate of glucose dehydration to 5-HMF and the formation of humins. The inhibition of glucose dehydration is attributed to stronger interaction of protons with water than the 2-OH atom of the pyranose ring of glucose, the critical step in the proposed mechanism for the formation of 5-HMF. The reduction in humin formation associated with water addition is ascribed to the lowered concentration of 5-HMF, since the formation of humins is suggested to proceed through the condensation polymerization of 5-HMF with glucose.

  11. Biomass energy analysis for crop dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, J.P.; Haase, S.G.; Quinn, M.W.

    1994-12-31

    In 1994, an agricultural processing facility was constructed in southern New Mexico for spice and herb dehydration. Annual operational costs are dominated by energy costs, due primarily to the energy intensity of dehydration. A feasibility study was performed to determine whether the use of biomass resources as a feedstock for a cogeneration system would be an economical option. The project location allowed access to unusual biomass feedstocks including cotton gin trash, pecan shells and in-house residues. A resource assessment of the immediate project area determined that approximately 120,000 bone dry tons of biomass feedstocks are available annually. Technology characterization for the plant energy requirements indicated gasification systems offer fuel flexibility advantages over combustion systems although vendor support and commercial experience are limited. Regulatory siting considerations introduce a level of uncertainty because of a lack of a precedent in New Mexico for gasification technology and because vendors of commercial gasifiers have little experience operating such a facility nor gathering emission data. A public opinion survey indicated considerable support for renewable energy use and biomass energy utilization. However, the public opinion survey also revealed limited knowledge of biomass technologies and concerns regarding siting of a biomass facility within the geographic area. The economic analysis conducted for the study is based on equipment vendor quotations, and indicates there will be difficulty competing with current prices of natural gas.

  12. Cryoprotective dehydration is widespread in Arctic springtails.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Holmstrup, Martin

    2011-08-01

    Cryoprotective dehydration (CPD) is a cold tolerance strategy employed by small invertebrates that readily lose water by evaporation when subjected to sub-zero temperatures in the presence of ice. Until now, relatively few species have been investigated using methods by which CPD can be shown. In the present study we investigated the cold tolerance strategy of seven soil arthropod species from the high Arctic Spitzbergen, and compared water content and water loss, body fluid melting points (MP) and survival under cold and desiccating conditions. We tested the hypothesis that CPD is a commonly occurring cold hardiness strategy among soil arthropods. We found that four springtail species (Hypogastrura viatica, Folsomia quadrioculata, Oligaphorura groenlandica and Megaphorura arctica; Collembola) went through severe dehydration and MP equilibration with ambient temperature, and thus overwinter by employing CPD, whereas a beetle (Atheta graminicola) and one of the springtails (Isotoma anglicana) were typical freeze avoiding species over-wintering by supercooling. Desiccation tolerance of the red velvet mite (Neomolgus littoralis) was also investigated; very low water loss rates of this species indicated that it does not survive winter by use of CPD. All in all, the results of the present study confirm the hypothesis that CPD is an effective over-wintering strategy which is widespread within soil arthropods.

  13. Dehydration-mediated cluster formation of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Joon Lee, Sang

    2015-06-01

    Drying procedure is a powerful method to modulate the bottom-up assembly of basic building component. The initially weak attraction between the components screened in a solution strengthens as the solvent evaporates, organizing the components into structures. Drying is process-dependent, irreversible, and nonequilibrated, thus the mechanism and the dynamics are influenced by many factors. Therefore, the interaction of the solvent and the elements during the drying procedure as well as the resulting pattern formations are strongly related. Nonetheless still many things are open in questions in terms of their dynamics. In this study, nanoscale dehydration procedure is experimentally investigated using a nanoparticle (NP) model system. The role of water is verified in a single NP scale and the patterns of collective NP clusters are determined. Stepwise drying procedures are proposed based on the location from which water is removed. Effective water exodus from a unit NP surface enhances the attractive interaction in nanoscale and induces heterogeneous distribution in microscale. This study provides fundamental proof of systematic relation between the dehydration process and the resultant cluster patterns in hierarchical multiscales.

  14. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2002-06-30

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period March 31, 2002 to June 30, 2002. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation Well 111-W-27 is located in section 8 T26N R6E of the North Burbank Unit (NBU), Osage County Oklahoma. It was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The rig moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has performed several core studies on the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements have been conducted. In addition Phillips has prepared a Core Petrology Report, detailing the lithology, stratigraphy and sedimentology for Well 111-W27, NBU. Phillips has also conducted the sonic stimulation core tests, the final sonic stimulation report has not yet been released. Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, began collecting both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area since May 2001. The original 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been thoroughly tested and it has been concluded that it needs to be redesigned. An engineering firm from Fayetteville AR has been retained to assist in developing a new design for the DHVT. The project participants requested from the DOE, a no-cost extension for the project through December 31, 2002. The no-cost extension amendment to the contract was signed during this reporting period. A technical paper SPE 75254 ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation, Osage County, Oklahoma'' was presented at the 2002 SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, in Tulsa OK, April 17, 2002. A one-day short course was conducted at

  15. Gas Hydrate Research Coring and Downhole Logging Operational Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, T. S.; Riedel, M.; Malone, M.

    2006-12-01

    Recent gas hydrate deep coring and downhole logging projects, including ODP Leg 204, IODP Expedition 311, and the India NGHP-01 effort have contributed greatly to our understanding of the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate. These projects have also built on the relatively sparse history of gas hydrate drilling experience to collectively develop a unique operational protocol to examine and sample gas hydrate in nature. The ideal gas hydrate research drill site in recent history, consists of at least three drill holes, with the first hole dedicated to LWD/MWD downhole logging in order to identify intervals to be pressurized cored and to collect critical petrophysical data. The second hole is usually dedicated for continuous coring operations. The third hole is used for special downhole tool measurements such as pressure coring and wire line logging. There is a strong scientific need to obtain LWD/MWD data prior to coring. The coring operations are complemented by frequent deployment of the PCS/HYACINTH pressure core systems. It is essential to know what the gas hydrate concentrations and vertical distribution are before deploying the available pressure core systems in order to choose the optimum depths for pressure coring operations. The coring operations are also complemented by frequent sampling for interstitial water, headspace gas, and microbiological analyses. Although those samples will be taken at relatively regular depths, the sampling frequency can be adjusted if gas hydrate concentrations and distribution can be forward predicted through the analysis of the LWD/MWD pre-core logging surveys. After completing the LWD/MWD logging program, usually as a dedicated drilling leg, field efforts will switch to conventional and pressure-controlled coring operations at each of the sites drilled during the LWD/MWD campaign. The standard continuous core hole will usually include APC coring to an expected refusal depth of ~100 mbsf; each hole is usually

  16. Effect of experimental and sample factors on dehydration kinetics of mildronate dihydrate: mechanism of dehydration and determination of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Bērziņš, Agris; Actiņš, Andris

    2014-06-01

    The dehydration kinetics of mildronate dihydrate [3-(1,1,1-trimethylhydrazin-1-ium-2-yl)propionate dihydrate] was analyzed in isothermal and nonisothermal modes. The particle size, sample preparation and storage, sample weight, nitrogen flow rate, relative humidity, and sample history were varied in order to evaluate the effect of these factors and to more accurately interpret the data obtained from such analysis. It was determined that comparable kinetic parameters can be obtained in both isothermal and nonisothermal mode. However, dehydration activation energy values obtained in nonisothermal mode showed variation with conversion degree because of different rate-limiting step energy at higher temperature. Moreover, carrying out experiments in this mode required consideration of additional experimental complications. Our study of the different sample and experimental factor effect revealed information about changes of the dehydration rate-limiting step energy, variable contribution from different rate limiting steps, as well as clarified the dehydration mechanism. Procedures for convenient and fast determination of dehydration kinetic parameters were offered.

  17. Detecting dehydration in older people: useful tests.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Lee; Bunn, Diane

    Dehydration is common in older people, leading to longer hospital stays and increased disability and mortality. Health professionals can diagnose water-loss dehydration by taking a blood sample and measuring serum osmolality, but a less-invasive test would be useful. Evidence that tests, clinical signs or questions tested to date are useful when screening for dehydration in older people is limited. This article looks at known risk factors, signs and test for dehydration, and outlines evidence on how useful they have proven to be. Part 2 describes how a care home has used a multicomponent strategy to improve hydration.

  18. A dehydration mechanism for the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielsen, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    Although mean circulations are generally credited with dehydration of the earth's stratosphere, convective instability in the tropics converts mean circulations to small residuals of local convective circulations. The effects of large cumulonimbus which penetrate the stratosphere and form huge anvils in the lower stratosphere are discussed with respect to hydration and dehydration of the stratosphere. Radiative heating at anvil base combined with cooling at anvil top drives a dehydration engine considered essential to explain the dry stratosphere. Seasonal and longitudinal variations in dehydration potentials are examined with maximum potential attributed to Micronesian area during winter and early spring.

  19. Structural study of hydrated/dehydrated manganese thiophene-2,5-diphosphonate metal organic frameworks, Mn2(O3P-C4H2S-PO3)·2H2O.

    PubMed

    Rueff, Jean-Michel; Perez, Olivier; Pautrat, Alain; Barrier, Nicolas; Hix, Gary B; Hernot, Sylvie; Couthon-Gourvès, Hélène; Jaffrès, Paul-Alain

    2012-10-01

    Synthesis of thiophene-2,5-diphosphonic acid 2 is reported, and its use for synthesis of the original pristine materials Mn(2)(O(3)P-C(4)H(2)S-PO(3))·2H(2)O 3 is reported. The structure of material 3 has been fully resolved from single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Mn(2)(O(3)P-C(4)H(2)S-PO(3))·2H(2)O 3 crystallizes in a monoclinic cell (space group P2) with the following parameters: a = 11.60(1) Å, b = 4.943(5) Å, c = 19.614(13) Å, β = 107.22°. A noticeable feature of the structure of compound 3 is the orientation of the thiophene heterocycles that adopt two different orientations in two successive layers (along c). Thermal analysis of compound 3 indicates that the water molecules are easily removed from 160 to 230 °C while the dehydrated structure is stable up to 500 °C. The dehydrated compound obtained from 3 can be rehydrated to give the polymorphic compound Mn(2)(O(3)P-C(4)H(2)S-PO(3))·2H(2)O 4, which crystallizes in an orthorhombic cell (space group Pnam) with the following parameters: a = 7.5359(3) Å, b = 7.5524(3) Å, c = 18.3050(9) Å. The main difference between the structures of 3 and 4 arises from both the orientation of the thiophene rings (herringbone-type organization in 4) and the structure of the inorganic layers. The thiophene-2,5-diphosphonic acid moieties engaged in materials 3 and 4 adopt a different orientation likely due to rotation around the P-C bonds and via the dehydrated state 5, which is likely more flexible than the hydrated states. Study of the magnetic properties performed on compound 3 and 4 and on the dehydrated compounds Mn(2)(O(3)P-C(4)H(2)S-PO(3)) 5 complemented by the structural study has permitted us to characterize the antiferromagnetic ground state of sample 3, a weak ferromagnetic component in sample 4, and complete paramagnetic behavior in sample 5.

  20. On baseline determination and gas saturation derivation from downhole electrical monitoring of shallow biogenic gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezard, P. A.; Celerier, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Adequate hydrogeophysical monitoring of CO2 geological storage remains a challenge as different parameters might be modified during storage. That implies to compare real-time measurements to an adequate baseline. At the Maguelone shallow experimental site a representative baseline for electrical resistivity was built from a large number of downhole geophysical measurements recorded over time. At this coastal site this issue is particularly important due to the production of biogenic gas at shallow depth (< 200 m) from the subsurface sediments.For this, a modified petrophysical model based on the Waxman-Smits model is proposed to estimate gas saturation found to vary up to 7% within shallow sand layers, indicating that natural gas production within the sedimentary pile from biological activity cannot be neglected during gas injection experiments. In the two main reservoirs located at shallow depth (R1 and R2), a variable gas content of 7% and 4% was obtained over short periods of time in the TLL6 and DSO1 boreholes, respectively. The difference might be due to the gentle stratigraphic slope identified from cross hole log and core analyses, TLL6 being located upslope from DSO1. This study also revealed a rapid dynamic mechanism resulting in transfer of biogenic gas from the bottom reservoir (R1) to the top one (R2), possibly due to gas leaking along some of the monitoring boreholes. These sand-rich layers constitute buffer reservoirs for biogenic gases before being released to the atmosphere. Future studies at Maguelone will first focus on biogenic gas sampling from a downhole multi-packer completion in order to identify and quantify the different gas phases produced over time by the sedimentary pile.

  1. Development of seals for a geothermal downhole intensifier. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Captain, K.M.; Harvey, A.C.; Caskey, B.C.

    1985-08-01

    A system using high-velocity fluid jets in conjunction with a rotary diamond bit is currently considered as the best candidate for reducing the cost of drilling geothermal wells. Technical, safety and cost considerations indicate that the required jet supply pressure can best be established by a downhole pressure intensifier. Key intensifier components are the check valve and plunger seals, which must prevent leakage of the high-pressure, high-temperature abrasive fluid (drilling mud). To achieve the required performance, novel ceramic seals are currently being developed. The check valve seal includes a tapered polymeric plug and ceramic stop acting against a ceramic seat. The ceramic plunger seal is a variant of the ''stepped-joint'' piston ring and is designed to minimize contact pressure and abrasive wear. Initial testing of these seals in the laboratory shows encouraging results; design refinement and further testing is in progress. 2 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Element for use in an inductive coupler for downhole components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2009-03-31

    An element for use in an inductive coupler for downhole components comprises an annular housing having a generally circular recess. The element further comprises a plurality of generally linear, magnetically conductive segments. Each segment includes a bottom portion, an inner wall portion, and an outer wall portion. The portions together define a generally linear trough from a first end to a second end of each segment. The segments are arranged adjacent to each other within the housing recess to form a generally circular trough. The ends of at least half of the segments are shaped such that the first end of one of the segments is complementary in form to the second end of an adjacent segment. In one embodiment, all of the ends are angled. Preferably, the first ends are angled with the same angle and the second ends are angled with the complementary angle.

  3. Comparative evaluation of surface and downhole steam-generation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, C.

    The application of heat to reservoirs containing high API gravity oils can substantially improve recovery. Although steam injection is currently the principal thermal recovery method, heat transmission losses associated with delivery of the steam from the surface generators to the oil bearing formation has limited conventional steam injection to shallow reservoirs. The objective of the Department of Energy's Project DEEP STEAM is to develop the technology required to economically produce heavy oil from deep reservoirs. The tasks included in this effort are the development and evaluation of thermally efficient delivery systems and downhole steam generation systems. The technical and economic performance of conventional surface steam drives, which are strongly influenced by heat losses are compared. The selection of a preferred technology based upon either total efficiency or cost is found to be strongly influenced by reservoir depth, steam mass flow rate, and sandface steam quality.

  4. Program for the improvement of downhole drilling motors

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, J.T.

    1983-11-01

    This report describes the work done under contract to Sandia National Labs and to the Department of Energy for improvement of downhole drilling motors. The focus of this program was the development of a better bearing-and-seal assembly that could be used in different kinds of drilling motors in a geothermal environment. Major tasks were: (1) design and construction of seal testing devices, (2) screening and evaluation of candidate seals in a simulated bearing/seal package, (3) tests of the most promising candidates in a full-scale bearing/seal package, and (4) analysis of failed seals after testing. The key results from this program were: (1) identification of seal/shaft/lubricant systems that performed well at high pressure and temperature, (2) identification of other seal designs that should be avoided for similar applications, and (3) evaluation of the test machines' design.

  5. 275 C Downhole Switched-Mode Power Supply

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Hutchens; Vijay Madhuravasal

    2008-08-31

    A vee-square (V2) control based controller IC is developed for a switch mode power supply capable of operating at extreme temperature/harsh environment conditions. A buck type regulator with silicon carbide power junction field effect transistors (JFET) as power devices is used to analyze the performance of controller. Special emphases are made on the analog sub-blocks--voltage reference, operational transconductance amplifier and comparator as individual building blocks. Transformer coupled gate drives and high temperature operable magnetic cores and capacitors are identified and tested for use in the design. Conventional ceramic chip packaging of ICs combined with lead carrier type mounting of passive filter components is introduced for hybrid packaging of the complete product. The developed SMPS is anticipated to support the operation of down-hole microcontrollers and other electronics devices that require low/medium power filtered dc inputs over an operating temperature of 275 C.

  6. Ice Cloud Formation and Dehydration in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Pfister, Leonhard; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stratospheric water vapor is important not only for its greenhouse forcing, but also because it plays a significant role in stratospheric chemistry. several recent studies have focused on the potential for dehydration due to ice cloud formation in air rising slowly through the tropical tropopause layer. Holton and Gettelman showed that temperature variations associated with horizontal transport of air in the tropopause layer can drive ice cloud formation and dehydration, and Gettelman et al. recently examined the cloud formation and dehydration along kinematic trajectories using simple assumptions about the cloud properties. In this study, we use a Lagrangian, one-dimensional cloud model to further investigate cloud formation and dehydration as air is transported horizontally and vertically through the tropical tropopause layer. Time-height curtains of temperature are extracted from meteorological analyses. The model tracks the growth and sedimentation of individual cloud particles. The regional distribution of clouds simulated in the model is comparable to the subvisible cirrus distribution indicated by SAGE II. The simulated cloud properties depend strongly on the assumed ice supersaturation threshold for ice nucleation. with effective nuclei present (low supersaturation threshold), ice number densities are high (0.1--10 cm(circumflex)-3), and ice crystals do not grow large enough to fall very far, resulting in limited dehydration. With higher supersaturation thresholds, ice number densities are much lower (less than 0.01 cm(circumflex)-3), and ice crystals grow large enough to fall substantially; however, supersaturated air often crosses the tropopause without cloud formation. The clouds typically do not dehydrate the air along trajectories down to the temperature minimum saturation mixing ratio. Rather the water vapor mixing ratio crossing the tropopause along trajectories is typically 10-50% larger than the saturation mixing ratio.

  7. Ductile Deformation of Dehydrating Serpentinite Evidenced by Acoustic Signal Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasc, J.; Hilairet, N.; Wang, Y.; Schubnel, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Serpentinite dehydration is believed to be responsible for triggering earthquakes at intermediate depths (i.e., 60-300 km) in subduction zones. Based on experimental results, some authors have proposed mechanisms that explain how brittle deformation can occur despite high pressure and temperature conditions [1]. However, reproducing microseismicity in the laboratory associated with the deformation of dehydrating serpentinite remains challenging. A recent study showed that, even for fast dehydration kinetics, ductile deformation could take place rather than brittle faulting in the sample [2]. This latter study was conducted in a multi-anvil apparatus without the ability to control differential stress during dehydration. We have since conducted controlled deformation experiments in the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) on natural serpentinite samples at sector 13 (GSECARS) of the APS. Monochromatic radiation was used with both a 2D MAR-CCD detector and a CCD camera to determine the stress and the strain of the sample during the deformation process [3]. In addition, an Acoustic Emission (AE) recording setup was used to monitor the microseismicity from the sample, using piezo-ceramic transducers glued on the basal truncation of the anvils. The use of six independent transducers allows locating the AEs and calculating the corresponding focal mechanisms. The samples were deformed at strain rates of 10-5-10-4 s-1 under confining pressures of 3-5 GPa. Dehydration was triggered during the deformation by heating the samples at rates ranging from 5 to 60 K/min. Before the onset of the dehydration, X-ray diffraction data showed that the serpentinite sustained ~1 GPa of stress which plummeted when dehydration occurred. Although AEs were recorded during the compression and decompression stages, no AEs ever accompanied this stress drop, suggesting ductile deformation of the samples. Hence, unlike many previous studies, no evidence for fluid embrittlement and anticrack generation was found

  8. Lithostratigraphy from downhole logs in Hole AND-1B, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Trevor; Morin, Roger H.; Jarrard, Richard D.; Jackolski, Chris L.; Henrys, Stuart A.; Niessen, Frank; Magens, Diana; Kuhn, Gerhard; Monien, Donata; Powell, Ross D.

    2012-01-01

    The ANDRILL (Antarctic Drilling Project) McMurdo Ice Shelf (MIS) project drilled 1285 m of sediment in Hole AND–1B, representing the past 12 m.y. of glacial history. Downhole geophysical logs were acquired to a depth of 1018 mbsf (meters below seafloor), and are complementary to data acquired from the core. The natural gamma radiation (NGR) and magnetic susceptibility logs are particularly useful for understanding lithological and paleoenvironmental change at ANDRILL McMurdo Ice Shelf Hole AND–1B. NGR logs cover the entire interval from the seafloor to 1018 mbsf, and magnetic susceptibility and other logs covered the open hole intervals between 692 and 1018 and 237–342 mbsf. In the upper part of AND–1B, clear alternations between low and high NGR values distinguish between diatomite (lacking minerals containing naturally radioactive K, U, and Th) and diamictite (containing K-bearing clays, K-feldspar, mica, and heavy minerals). In the lower open hole logged section, NGR and magnetic susceptibility can also distinguish claystones (rich in K-bearing clay minerals, relatively low in magnetite) and diamictites (relatively high in magnetite). Sandstones can be distinguished by their high resistivity values in AND–1B. On the basis of these three downhole logs, diamictite, claystones, and sandstones can be predicted correctly for 74% of the 692–1018 mbsf interval. The logs were then used to predict facies for the 6% of this interval that was unrecovered by coring. Given the understanding of the physical property characteristics of different facies, it is also possible to identify subtle changes in lithology from the physical properties and help refine parts of the lithostratigraphy, for example, the varying terrigenous content of diatomites and the transitions from subice diamictite to open-water diatomite.

  9. DOWNHOLE POWER GENERATION AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS FOR INTELLIGENT COMPLETIONS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Tubel

    2003-10-14

    The fourth quarter of the project was dedicated to the manufacturing of the mechanical system for wireless communications and the power generation module and inspection pre assembly of the mechanical components. Another emphasis for the quarter was the development of filter control and signal detection software. The tasks accomplished during this report period were: (1) Dimensional issues were resolved and revised drawings for manufacturing of the wireless communications gauge and power generator were completed and sent to a machine shop for manufacturing. (2) Finalized the requirements and fittings and connections for testing the tool in the Halliburton flow loop. (3) The new acoustic generator was manufactured successfully and it was delivered during this quarter. The assembly will be outsourced for plastic coating in preparation for hostile environment use. (4) The acoustic two-way communications development continued to progress. The real time firmware for the surface system was developed and the processor was able to detect and process the data frame transmitted from downhole. The analog section of the tool was also developed and it is being tested for filtering capabilities and signal detection and amplification. (5) The new transformer to drive the acoustic generator assembly was manufactured and was successfully tested. Spring mandrel design showed increased acoustic output on the pipe and was implemented. (6) PCBA board carrier with board set was tested for function and fit and is 100% complete. (7) Filter control software is complete and software to allow modification of communication parameters dynamically is 50% complete. (8) All mechanical parts to assemble the wireless gauge and power generator have been received and verified to be within specification. (9) Acoustic generator has been assembled in the tool mandrel and tested successfully. (10) The circuit required to harvest the power generated downhole has been designed and the power generator

  10. System to inject steam and produce oil from the same wellbore through downhole valve switching

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Various Downhole Equipment systems have been designed for typical applications in three California Oilfields,based on well data gathered from three different Operating Companies. The first system, applicable to a 2,000 ft deep reservoir (Monarch) a highly underpressured, unconsolidated sand of 200 ft net pay, located in the Midway-Sunset field, is based on the use of a new well. The second well configuration considered was the re-entry into an existing well equipped with a 7 inches casing and penetrating into two separate sandstone reservoirs, at normal pressures in the North Antelope Hills field. Only the bottom layer is presently in production through a gravel-packed 5.5 inch linear, while the upper zone is behind the cemented casing. The third case studied was the re-entry into an existing well equipped with an 8 5/8 inch casing, presently unperforated, into a thin under-pressured sand reservoir (Weber) in the Midway-Sunset field. All three California fields contain Heavy Oils of different but relatively high viscosities. A new class of potential applications of our new technology has also been considered: the recovery of Light Oil (> 20 API) by steam injection in under-pressured Carbonate reservoirs which lay at depths beyond the economic limit for conventional steam injection technology. The possibility of including this application in a Field Test proposal to the DOE, under the Class II Oil Program, is now under review by various Operators. A drilling contractor experienced in drilling multiple horizontal wells in Carbonate reservoirs and a team of reservoir engineers experienced in the recovery of Light Oil by steam in fractured reservoirs have expressed their interest in participating in such a joint Field Project. Laboratory tests on specific prototypes of Downhole Sealing Elements are underway.

  11. A combined experimental and computational study of the mechanism of fructose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in dimethylsulfoxide using Amberlyst 70, PO43-/niobic acid, or sulfuric acid catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jing; Das, Anirban; Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Weitz, Eric

    2016-02-01

    We report on a combined experimental and theoretical study of the acid catalyzed dehydration of d-fructose in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) using; Amberlyst 70, PO43-/niobic acid, and sulfuric acid as catalysts. The reaction has been studied and intermediates characterized using; 13C, 1H, and 17O NMR, and high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI–MS). High level G4MP2 theory calculations are used to understand the thermodynamic landscape for the reaction mechanism in DMSO. We have experimentally identified two key intermediates in the dehydration of fructose to form HMF that were also identified, using theory, as local minima on the potential surface for reaction. A third intermediate, a species capable of undergoing keto–enol tautomerism, was also experimentally detected. However, it was not possible to experimentally distinguish between the keto and the enol forms. These data with different catalysts are consistent with common intermediates along the reaction pathway from fructose to HMF in DMSO. The role of oxygen in producing acidic species in reactions carried out in DMSO in presence of air is also discussed.

  12. Dehydration decreases saliva antimicrobial proteins important for mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Matthew B; Diment, Bethany C; Di Felice, Umberto; Walsh, Neil P

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of exercise-induced dehydration and subsequent overnight fluid restriction on saliva antimicrobial proteins important for host defence (secretory IgA (SIgA), α-amylase, and lysozyme). On two randomized occasions, 13 participants exercised in the heat, either without fluid intake to evoke progressive body mass losses (BML) of 1%, 2%, and 3% with subsequent overnight fluid restriction until 0800 h in the following morning (DEH) or with fluids to offset losses (CON). Participants in the DEH trial rehydrated from 0800 h until 1100 h on day 2. BML, plasma osmolality (Posm), and urine specific gravity (USG) were assessed as hydration indices. Unstimulated saliva samples were assessed for flow rate (SFR), SIgA, α-amylase, and lysozyme concentrations. Posm and USG increased during dehydration and remained elevated after overnight fluid restriction (BML = 3.5% ± 0.3%, Posm = 297 ± 6 mosmol·kg⁻¹, and USG = 1.026 ± 0.002; P < 0.001). Dehydration decreased SFR (67% at 3% BML, 70% at 0800 h; P < 0.01) and increased SIgA concentration, with no effect on SIgA secretion rate. SFR and SIgA responses remained unchanged in the CON trial. Dehydration did not affect α-amylase or lysozyme concentration but decreased secretion rates of α-amylase (44% at 3% BML, 78% at 0800 h; P < 0.01) and lysozyme (46% at 3% BML, 61% at 0800 h; P < 0.01), which were lower than in CON at these time points (P < 0.05). Rehydration returned all saliva variables to baseline. In conclusion, modest dehydration (~3% BML) decreased SFR, α-amylase, and lysozyme secretion rates. Whether the observed magnitude of decrease in saliva AMPs during dehydration compromises host defence remains to be shown.

  13. Quality of frozen fruit bars manufactured through infrared pre-dehydration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, frozen restructured whole apple and strawberry bars were manufactured by partial dehydration, using infrared (IR) heating, followed by restructuring and freezing. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of IR partial dehydration on the quality of restructured f...

  14. Method and apparatus for transmitting and receiving data to and from a downhole tool

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2007-03-13

    A transmission line network system for transmitting and/or receiving data from a downhole tool. The invention is achieved by providing one or more transceiving elements, preferably rings, at either end of a downhole tool. A conduit containing a coaxial cable capable of communicating an electrical signal is attached to the transceiving element and extends through a central bore of the downhole tool and through the central bore of any tool intermediate the first transceiving element and a second transceiving element. Upon receiving an electrical signal from the cable, the second transceiving element may convert such signal to a magnetic field. The magnetic field may be detected by a third transceiving element in close proximity to the second transceiving element. In this manner, many different tools may be included in a downhole transmission network without requiring substantial modification, if any, of any particular tool.

  15. Chemical and physicochemical quality parameters in carrots dehydrated by power ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Soria, Ana Cristina; Corzo-Martínez, Marta; Montilla, Antonia; Riera, Enrique; Gamboa-Santos, Juliana; Villamiel, Mar

    2010-07-14

    Preservation of the quality and bioactivity of carrots dehydrated by power ultrasound (US) under different experimental conditions including prior blanching has been evaluated for the first time by measuring the evolution of the Maillard reaction and the changes in soluble sugars, proteins, total polyphenols, antioxidant activity, and rehydration ability. This study also includes a comparison with a freeze-dried sample and data of commercial dehydrated carrots. The synergic effect of US and temperature (60 degrees C) increased the dehydration rate of carrots (90% moisture loss in only 75 min) while still providing carrots with a level of 2-furoylmethyl-amino acids significantly lower than that of dehydrated commercial samples. Whereas a decrease in the content of reducing soluble sugars was observed with processing temperature, minor carbohydrates (scyllo- and myo-inositol and sedoheptulose) were rather stable, irrespective of the US dehydration parameters. Blanching significantly improved the rehydration ability of US-dehydrated carrots without increasing the loss of soluble sugars by leaching. As supported by the similarity of most quality indicators studied in both US-treated and freeze-dried carrots, the mild processing conditions employed in US dehydration gave rise to premium quality dehydrated carrots.

  16. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  17. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  18. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  19. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  20. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  1. A generic protocol for protein crystal dehydration using the HC1b humidity controller

    PubMed Central

    Lobley, Carina M. C.; Sandy, James; Sanchez-Weatherby, Juan; Mazzorana, Marco; Krojer, Tobias; Nowak, Radosław P.; Sorensen, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration may change the crystal lattice and affect the mosaicity, resolution and quality of X-ray diffraction data. A dehydrating environment can be generated around a crystal in several ways with various degrees of precision and complexity. This study uses a high-precision crystal humidifier/dehumidifier to provide an airstream of known relative humidity in which the crystals are mounted: a precise yet hassle-free approach to altering crystal hydration. A protocol is introduced to assess the impact of crystal dehydration systematically applied to nine experimental crystal systems. In one case, that of glucose isomerase, dehydration triggering a change of space group from I222 to P21212 was observed. This observation is supported by an extended study of the behaviour of the glucose isomerase crystal structure during crystal dehydration. PMID:27139626

  2. Time-lapse downhole electrical resistivity monitoring of subsurface CO2 storage at the Maguelone shallow experimental site (Languedoc, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denchik, Nataliya; Pezard, Philippe; Lofi, Johanna; Perroud, Hervé; Neyens, Denis; Luquot, Linda

    2015-04-01

    A shallow field experimental site for CO2 injection was established at Maguelone (Languedoc,France), in order to test in an integrated manner a suite of surface and downhole hydrogeophysical monitoring methods. The objective is to improve our understanding of gas transport in the shallow subsurface and to determine the sensitivity of CO2 monitoring systems for leakage detection. The site offers a natural laboratory to study the processes associated with CO2 injection in a clastic and clay-rich context saturated with saline fluids. Prior to CO2injection, three nitrogen (N2) injections were undertaken in 2012 to measure the site response to neutral gas injection. In 2013, a volume of 111 m3 of CO2 was injected during 3.5 hours at 15 meter depth. During each experiment, the gas plumes were successfully detected from pressure monitoring, time-lapse induction logging and downhole resistivity monitoring with downhole dipole-dipole arrays. Increases in resistivity are attributed to free gas propagation (either N2 or CO2) whereas decreases in resistivity correlate with CO2 dissolution in the pore fluid. Chemical analyses confirm this hypothesis with a decrease in pH and an increase in the concentration of dissolved species in the later case. The next stage of the project will be performing the CO2 injection experiments with improved monitoring schema using results of the present study. In perspective, besides of improving our understanding of gas transport in the shallow subsurface, the additional issues could not just show a capability of used geophysical and geochemical techniques to monitor the CO2 plume and to detect near-surface CO2 migration pathways, but to help quantifying potential CO2 migration.

  3. Report covering examination of parts from downhole steam generators. [Combustor head and sleeve parts

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, F. S.; Meier, G. H.

    1983-08-01

    Combustor head and sleeve parts were examined by using optical and scanning electron metallography after use in oxygen/diesel and air/diesel downhole steam generators. The degradation of the different alloy components is described in terms of reactions with oxygen, sulfur and carbon in the presence of cyclic stresses, all generated by the combustion process. Recommendations are presented for component materials (alloys and coatings) to extend component lives in the downhole steam generators. 9 references, 22 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Apparatus for downhole drilling communications and method for making and using the same

    DOEpatents

    Normann, R.A.; Lockwood, G.J.; Gonzales, M.

    1998-03-03

    An apparatus for downhole drilling communications is presented. The apparatus includes a spool and end pieces for maintaining the spool at the bottom of a drill string near a drill bit during drilling operations. The apparatus provides a cable for communicating signals between a downhole electronics package and a surface receiver in order to perform measurements while drilling. A method of forming the apparatus is also set forth wherein the apparatus is formed about a central spindle and lathe. 6 figs.

  5. Apparatus for downhole drilling communications and method for making and using the same

    DOEpatents

    Normann, Randy A.; Lockwood, Grant J.; Gonzales, Meliton

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus for downhole drilling communications is presented. The apparatus includes a spool and end pieces for maintaining the spool at the bottom of a drill string near a drill bit during drilling operations. The apparatus provides a cable for communicating signals between a downhole electronics package and a surface receiver in order to perform measurements while drilling. A method of forming the apparatus is also set forth wherein the apparatus is formed about a central spindle and lathe.

  6. Surface-Source Downhole Seismic Analysis in R

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Eric M.

    2007-01-01

    This report discusses a method for interpreting a layered slowness or velocity model from surface-source downhole seismic data originally presented by Boore (2003). I have implemented this method in the statistical computing language R (R Development Core Team, 2007), so that it is freely and easily available to researchers and practitioners that may find it useful. I originally applied an early version of these routines to seismic cone penetration test data (SCPT) to analyze the horizontal variability of shear-wave velocity within the sediments in the San Francisco Bay area (Thompson et al., 2006). A more recent version of these codes was used to analyze the influence of interface-selection and model assumptions on velocity/slowness estimates and the resulting differences in site amplification (Boore and Thompson, 2007). The R environment has many benefits for scientific and statistical computation; I have chosen R to disseminate these routines because it is versatile enough to program specialized routines, is highly interactive which aids in the analysis of data, and is freely and conveniently available to install on a wide variety of computer platforms. These scripts are useful for the interpretation of layered velocity models from surface-source downhole seismic data such as deep boreholes and SCPT data. The inputs are the travel-time data and the offset of the source at the surface. The travel-time arrivals for the P- and S-waves must already be picked from the original data. An option in the inversion is to include estimates of the standard deviation of the travel-time picks for a weighted inversion of the velocity profile. The standard deviation of each travel-time pick is defined relative to the standard deviation of the best pick in a profile and is based on the accuracy with which the travel-time measurement could be determined from the seismogram. The analysis of the travel-time data consists of two parts: the identification of layer-interfaces, and the

  7. DMSO induces dehydration near lipid membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Song, Jinsuk; Pas, Jolien; Meijer, Lenny H H; Han, Songi

    2015-07-21

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been broadly used in biology as a cosolvent, a cryoprotectant, and an enhancer of membrane permeability, leading to the general assumption that DMSO-induced structural changes in cell membranes and their hydration water play important functional roles. Although the effects of DMSO on the membrane structure and the headgroup dehydration have been extensively studied, the mechanism by which DMSO invokes its effect on lipid membranes and the direct role of water in this process are unresolved. By directly probing the translational water diffusivity near unconfined lipid vesicle surfaces, the lipid headgroup mobility, and the repeat distances in multilamellar vesicles, we found that DMSO exclusively weakens the surface water network near the lipid membrane at a bulk DMSO mole fraction (XDMSO) of <0.1, regardless of the lipid composition and the lipid phase. Specifically, DMSO was found to effectively destabilize the hydration water structure at the lipid membrane surface at XDMSO <0.1, lower the energetic barrier to dehydrate this surface water, whose displacement otherwise requires a higher activation energy, consequently yielding compressed interbilayer distances in multilamellar vesicles at equilibrium with unaltered bilayer thicknesses. At XDMSO >0.1, DMSO enters the lipid interface and restricts the lipid headgroup motion. We postulate that DMSO acts as an efficient cryoprotectant even at low concentrations by exclusively disrupting the water network near the lipid membrane surface, weakening the cohesion between water and adhesion of water to the lipid headgroups, and so mitigating the stress induced by the volume change of water during freeze-thaw.

  8. Diagnosis of pneumonia in children with dehydrating diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debasish; Ronan, Anne; Khan, Wasif Ali; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2014-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia are based on the history of cough or difficult breathing and age-adjusted respiration rates. Metabolic acidosis associated with dehydrating diarrhoea also influences the respiration rate. Two hundred and four children, aged 2 to 59 months, with dehydrating diarrhoea and a history of cough and/or fast breathing, were enrolled in a prospective study. Pneumonia diagnoses were made on enrollment and again 6 hours post-enrollment (after initial rehydration), using the WHO guidelines. These were compared with investigators' clinical diagnosis based on history and findings of physical examination and a chest x-ray at the same time points. Using the WHO guidelines, 149/152 (98%) infants in the 2-11 months age-group and 38/40 (95%) children in the 12-59 months age-group were diagnosed to have pneumonia on enrollment, which dropped to 107 (70%) and 30 (75%) respectively at 6 hours post-enrollment. The specificity of the WHO guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia was very low (6.9%) at enrollment but increased to 65.5% at 6 hours post-enrollment, after initial rehydration. The specificity of the WHO guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia in young children is significantly reduced in dehydrating diarrhoea. For young children with dehydrating diarrhoea, rehydration, clinical and radiological assessments are useful in identifying those with true pneumonia.

  9. [Oral rehydration in newborns with dehydration caused by diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F; Rillman-Pinagel, M L; Velásquez-Jones, L

    1990-08-01

    The clinical experience obtained while treating 43 dehydrated newborns due to diarrhea with oral rehydration solution (ORS) using the formula recommended by the World Health Organization is reported. Of the 43 patients, 26 were severely dehydrated (greater than equal to 10% of weight recovery once rehydrated). The averaged time need to correct the dehydration was 4.7 +/- 2.7 hours, with a average intake of ORS of 26.5 +/- 7.5 mL/kg/hour. Children who were being breastfed continued so during the rehydration period. Two of the patients were hospitalized for intravenous treatment, one was due to persistent vomiting during rehydration and probably due to sepsis, and the other due to necrosing enterocolitis. The oral rehydration therapy was successful in 95% of the newborns included in the study, which proved the method to be safe and adequate for the correction of dehydration due to diarrhea among these patients. Similar experiences are reported in Mexico as well as from other countries, which also suggest the use of this therapeutic procedure in children of this age.

  10. Mechanisms by Which Dehydration May Lead to Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Roncal-Jimenez, C; Lanaspa, M A; Jensen, T; Sanchez-Lozada, L G; Johnson, R J

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration, a condition that characterizes excessive loss of body water, is well known to be associated with acute renal dysfunction; however, it has largely been considered reversible and to be associated with no long-term effects on the kidney. Recently, an epidemic of chronic kidney disease has emerged in Central America in which the major risk factor seems to be recurrent heat-associated dehydration. This has led to studies investigating whether recurrent dehydration may lead to permanent kidney damage. Three major potential mechanisms have been identified, including the effects of vasopressin on the kidney, the activation of the aldose reductase-fructokinase pathway, and the effects of chronic hyperuricemia. The discovery of these pathways has also led to the recognition that mild dehydration may be a risk factor in progression of all types of chronic kidney diseases. Furthermore, there is some evidence that increasing hydration, particularly with water, may actually prevent CKD. Thus, a whole new area of investigation is developing that focuses on the role of water and osmolarity and their influence on kidney function and health.

  11. Diagnosis of Pneumonia in Children with Dehydrating Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Ronan, Anne; Khan, Wasif Ali; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia are based on the history of cough or difficult breathing and age-adjusted respiration rates. Metabolic acidosis associated with dehydrating diarrhoea also influences the respiration rate. Two hundred and four children, aged 2 to 59 months, with dehydrating diarrhoea and a history of cough and/or fast breathing, were enrolled in a prospective study. Pneumonia diagnoses were made on enrollment and again 6 hours post-enrollment (after initial rehydration), using the WHO guidelines. These were compared with investigators’ clinical diagnosis based on history and findings of physical examination and a chest x-ray at the same time points. Using the WHO guidelines, 149/152 (98%) infants in the 2-11 months age-group and 38/40 (95%) children in the 12-59 months age-group were diagnosed to have pneumonia on enrollment, which dropped to 107 (70%) and 30 (75%) respectively at 6 hours post-enrollment. The specificity of the WHO guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia was very low (6.9%) at enrollment but increased to 65.5% at 6 hours post-enrollment, after initial rehydration. The specificity of the WHO guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia in young children is significantly reduced in dehydrating diarrhoea. For young children with dehydrating diarrhoea, rehydration, clinical and radiological assessments are useful in identifying those with true pneumonia. PMID:24847588

  12. Compositional Constraints on Dehydration Embrittlement in Serpentinized Peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, G.; Zhang, J.; Green, H. W.

    2012-12-01

    Double seismic zones (DSZ) which have two parallel planes of seismicity separated by 15-40 km are a global feature of subduction zones in the 70-250 km depth range (Brudzinski et al., 2007). While the physical mechanism of lower plane seismicity is still controversial, the leading hypotheses currently are associated with dehydration of antigorite serpentine within the subducting mantle plate (Peacock, 2001; Jung et al., 2004). In this study, we are conducting high-pressure (1-3GPa), high-temperature (720-750 Celsius), deformation experiments on specimens of varying compositions of serpentine plus peridotite in our 4GPa Modified Griggs apparatus. Using samples composed of interlayered thin discs of antigorite and harzburgite, we find that dehydration embrittlement occurs down to less than ~30 vol % antigorite. Interlayered mineralogy was impractical at lower antigorite fractions so we prepared homogeneous mixtures of powders of the two rock types (35-75 μm grain-size) and "warm" pressed them to a coherent solid with little porosity. Subsequent deformation of these specimens extended the faulting regime to as little as ~8 vol % antigorite. In summary, we find that faulting occurs during dehydration in a wide range of serpentinized peridotite compositions but not during dehydration of nearly pure serpentinite nor nearly pure peridotite. We suggest that the lack of faulting in nearly pure peridotite is a consequence of too little H2O production and the lack of faulting in nearly pure serpentine is due to extensive crystal plasticity.

  13. An organ-specific role for ethylene in rose petal expansion during dehydration and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daofeng; Liu, Xiaojing; Meng, Yonglu; Sun, Cuihui; Tang, Hongshu; Jiang, Yudong; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Xue, Jingqi; Ma, Nan; Gao, Junping

    2013-05-01

    Dehydration is a major factor resulting in huge loss from cut flowers during transportation. In the present study, dehydration inhibited petal cell expansion and resulted in irregular flowers in cut roses, mimicking ethylene-treated flowers. Among the five floral organs, dehydration substantially elevated ethylene production in the sepals, whilst rehydration caused rapid and elevated ethylene levels in the gynoecia and sepals. Among the five ethylene biosynthetic enzyme genes (RhACS1-5), expression of RhACS1 and RhACS2 was induced by dehydration and rehydration in the two floral organs. Silencing both RhACS1 and RhACS2 significantly suppressed dehydration- and rehydration-induced ethylene in the sepals and gynoecia. This weakened the inhibitory effect of dehydration on petal cell expansion. β-glucuronidase activity driven by both the RhACS1 and RhACS2 promoters was dramatically induced in the sepals, pistil, and stamens, but not in the petals of transgenic Arabidopsis. This further supports the organ-specific induction of these two genes. Among the five rose ethylene receptor genes (RhETR1-5), expression of RhETR3 was predominantly induced by dehydration and rehydration in the petals. RhETR3 silencing clearly aggravated the inhibitory effect of dehydration on petal cell expansion. However, no significant difference in the effect between RhETR3-silenced flowers and RhETR-genes-silenced flowers was observed. Furthermore, RhETR-genes silencing extensively altered the expression of 21 cell expansion-related downstream genes in response to ethylene. These results suggest that induction of ethylene biosynthesis by dehydration proceeds in an organ-specific manner, indicating that ethylene can function as a mediator in dehydration-caused inhibition of cell expansion in rose petals.

  14. Effects of dehydration on cardiovascular development in the embryonic American alligator (Alligator mississipiensis).

    PubMed

    Tate, Kevin B; Eme, John; Swart, Justin; Conlon, J Michael; Crossley, Dane A

    2012-07-01

    Effects of dehydration on reptilian embryonic cardiovascular function are unknown. Here, we present the first morphological and physiological data quantifying the cumulative effects of four acute dehydration events on the embryonic American alligator, Alligator mississipiensis. We hypothesized that dehydration would alter embryonic morphology, reduce blood volume and augment the response to angiotensin II (Ang II), a key osmotic and blood volume regulatory response element in adult vertebrates. Drying events at 30%, 40%, 50%, and 60% of embryonic incubation reduced total egg water content by 14.43 ± 0.37 g, a 3.4 fold increase relative to controls. However, embyronic blood volume was greater in the dehydration group at 70% of embryonic incubation compared to controls (0.39 ± 0.044 mLg(-1) and 0.22 ± 0.03 mLg(-1), respectively), however, both groups were similar at 90% of incubation (0.18 ± 0.02 mLg(-1) in the controls and 0.23 ± 0.03 mLg(-1) in the dehydrated group). Dehydration altered the morphological phenotype and resulted in an overall reduction in embryonic mass at both incubation time points measured. Dehydration also altered the physiological phenotype, resulting in embryonic alligators that were relatively bradycardic at 90% of incubation. Arterial Ang II injections resulted in a dose dependent hypertension, which increased in intensity over the span of incubation studied. While progressive incubation altered the Ang II response, dehydration had no impact on the cardiovascular responses to the peptide. Quantification of Ang II type-1 receptor protein using western blot analysis illustrated that dehydration condition and incubation time point did not alter protein quantity. Collectively, our results show that dehydration during embryonic development of the American alligator alters embryonic morphology and baseline heart rate without altering arterial pressure and response to Ang II.

  15. Downhole steam generator with improved preheating/cooling features

    DOEpatents

    Donaldson, A. Burl; Hoke, Donald E.; Mulac, Anthony J.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus for downhole steam generation employing dual-stage preheaters for liquid fuel and for the water. A first heat exchange jacket for the fuel surrounds the fuel/oxidant mixing section of the combustor assembly downstream of the fuel nozzle and contacts the top of the combustor unit of the combustor assembly, thereby receiving heat directly from the combustion of the fuel/oxidant. A second stage heat exchange jacket surrounds an upper portion of the oxidant supply line adjacent the fuel nozzle receiving further heat from the compression heat which results from pressurization of the oxidant. The combustor unit includes an inner combustor sleeve whose inner wall defines the combustion zone. The inner combustor sleeve is surrounded by two concentric water channels, one defined by the space between the inner combustor sleeve and an intermediate sleeve, and the second defined by the space between the intermediate sleeve and an outer cylindrical housing. The channels are connected by an annular passage adjacent the top of the combustor assembly and the countercurrent nature of the water flow provides efficient cooling of the inner combustor sleeve. An annular water ejector with a plurality of nozzles is provided to direct water downwardly into the combustor unit at the boundary of the combustion zone and along the lower section of the intermediate sleeve.

  16. Inductive coupler for downhole components and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Briscoe, Michael A.; Sneddon, Cameron; Fox, Joe

    2006-05-09

    The present invention includes a method of making an inductive coupler for downhole components. The method includes providing an annular housing, preferably made of steel, the housing having a recess. A conductor, preferably an insulated wire, is also provided along with a plurality of generally U-shaped magnetically conducting, electrically insulating (MCEI) segments. Preferably, the MCEI segments comprise ferrite. An assembly is formed by placing the plurality of MCEI segments within the recess in the annular housing. The segments are aligned to form a generally circular trough. A first portion of the conductor is placed within the circular trough. This assembly is consolidated with a meltable polymer which fills spaces between the segments, annular housing and the first portion of the conductor. The invention also includes an inductive coupler including an annular housing having a recess defined by a bottom portion and two opposing side wall portions. At least one side wall portion includes a lip extending toward but not reaching the other side wall portion. A plurality of generally U-shaped MCEI segments, preferably comprised of ferrite, are disposed in the recess and aligned so as to form a circular trough. The coupler further includes a conductor disposed within the circular trough and a polymer filling spaces between the segments, the annular housing and the conductor.

  17. Drilling Optimization Utilizing Surface Instrumentaton for Downhole Event Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Greg Deskins

    2006-02-01

    This DOE project was undertaken to develop and test an instrumented data-acquisition sub that is mounted in a drill string below the top drive and used to detect downhole events. Data recorded at the surface during drilling operations would then be processed and presented to the driller to discern undesirable drilling conditions and help optimize drilling rates and maximize the life of components in the BHA. This instrumented sub was originally conceived and developed solely as a single-point collection center for rig data that would be used in a number of Noble's products. The sub was designed to collect hook load, rotary torque, rotary speed, rotary position, drill pipe pressure, mud temperature, triaxial vibration, and triaxial magnetometer data. The original design and fabrication was by Sandia National Labs under Noble's direction, which was then tested with Sandia's diagnostics-while-drilling downhole package. After initial results were analyzed, the team surmised that important information describing performance and condition of the bottom-hole assembly (BHA) was embedded in the data recorded by the instrumented sub, and began investigating the potential of using surface measurements from the sub to highlight problems occurring downhole before they could be discerned by the driller. Later, a proposal was submitted to DOE for funding to more broadly investigate use of the system for detecting downhole problems while drilling. Soon after DOE awarded this contract, the Noble team responsible for the previous developments was disbanded and their work terminated (due to factors unrelated to the sub development). This change halted the complementary work that Noble had planned to conduct during the DOE project, and necessitated that all the development work be completed by the DOE project. More effort was expended on the project to develop a field-ready prototype than was originally foreseen. The sub's design had to be significantly modified during the project

  18. Evolution of the Snorre Field downhole completion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnarsson, B.; Toennessen, S.H.; Stensland, J.F.; Haut, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the development and evolution of cost-effective downhole completion systems for the Snorre Field Tension Leg Platform (TLP) and Subsea Production System (SPS). Included is a discussion of operational experiences that influenced the evolution. Also included in the paper are specific examples of how the completion times were reduced. The completion design for the subsea wells includes some new features compared to previous through flow line (TFL) completions. During the design process cost, safety and simplicity have been the driving forces for selecting equipment. Previous TFL completions have normally included a H-member, dual packers, sliding sleeves and nipples in each tail pipe. This design required plugs and standing valves to be an integral part of the completion string, requiring high reliability of the TFL retrievable components. The completion design used for the Snorre SPS wells uses a minimum amount of tubular components. The design does not require any TFL retrievable components to be installed during production or injection. This minimizes the number of flow restrictions and thereby reduces the tendency for scaling, erosion and corrosion on the TFL retrievable components. All tubing retrievable components, including the Y-block, are qualified and are considered standard today.

  19. Dehydrohalogenation and Dehydration Reactions of i-C3H7Br and i-C3H7OH by Sodium Ions Studied by Guided Ion Beam Techniques and Quantum Chemical Methods.

    PubMed

    López, E; Lucas, J M; de Andrés, J; Albertí, M; Bofill, J M; Aguilar, A

    2016-07-14

    Dehydrohalogenation and dehydration reactions of gas-phase i-C3H7Br and i-C3H7OH molecules induced by collision with Na(+), all participants being in their electronic ground state, were studied experimentally in our laboratory using a radiofrequency-guided ion beam apparatus and covering the 0.10-10.00 eV center of mass (CM) energy range. In Na(+) + i-C3H7Br collisions the formation of [C3H6-Na](+) and [HBr-Na](+) by dehydrohalogenation was observed and quantified, as well as that of the ion-molecule adduct [Na-i-C3H7Br](+) together with its decomposition products C3H7(+) and NaBr. In Na(+) + i-C3H7OH collisions the dehydration product [H2O-Na](+) was also found, while [C3H6-Na](+) was hardly detected. Moreover, the [Na-i-C3H7OH](+) adduct formation as well as its decomposition into C3H7(+) and NaOH were also quantified. For all these processes, absolute reaction cross sections were measured as a function of the CM collision energy. From measured excitation functions, rate constants for the formation of [C3H6-Na](+), [HBr-Na](+), and [H2O-Na](+) at 303 K were obtained. Complementing the experiments, exhaustive ab initio structure calculations at the MP2 level of theory were performed, giving information on the most relevant features of the potential energy surfaces (PESs) where the dehydrohalogenation, dehydration, and decomposition reactions take place adiabatically for both collision systems. On these PESs different stationary points associated with potential energy minima and transition state barriers were characterized, and their connectivity was ensured using the intrinsic-reaction-coordinate method. The main topology features of the ab initio calculated PESs allowed a qualitative interpretation of the experimental data also exposing the role of the sodium ion as a catalyst in elimination reactions.

  20. mPGES-1-derived PGE2 mediates dehydration natriuresis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhanjun; Liu, Gang; Sun, Ying; Kakizoe, Yutaka; Guan, Guangju; Zhang, Aihua; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Yang, Tianxin

    2013-01-15

    PGE(2) is a natriuretic factor whose production is elevated after water deprivation (WD) but its role in dehydration natriuresis is not well-defined. The goal of the present study was to investigate the role of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) in dehydration natriuresis. After 24-h WD, wild-type (WT) mice exhibited a significant increase in 24-h urinary Na(+) excretion accompanied with normal plasma Na(+) concentration and osmolality. In contrast, WD-induced elevation of urinary Na(+) excretion was completely abolished in mPGES-1 knockout (KO) mice in parallel with increased plasma Na(+) concentration and a trend increase in plasma osmolality. WD induced a 1.8-fold increase in urinary PGE(2) output and a 1.6-fold increase in PGE(2) content in the renal medulla of WT mice, both of which were completely abolished by mPGES-1 deletion. Similar patterns of changes were observed for urinary nitrate/nitrite and cGMP. The natriuresis in dehydrated WT mice was associated with a significant downregulation of renal medullary epithelial Na channel-α mRNA and protein, contrasting to unaltered expressions in dehydrated KO mice. By quantitative RT-PCR, WD increased the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), inducible NOS, and neuronal NOS expressions in the renal medulla of WT mice by 3.9-, 1.48-, and 2.6-fold, respectively, all of which were significantly blocked in mPGES-1 KO mice. The regulation of eNOS expression was further confirmed by immunoblotting. Taken together, our results suggest that mPGES-1-derived PGE(2) contributes to dehydration natriuresis likely via NO/cGMP.

  1. Dehydration resistance of liposomes containing trehalose glycolipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyberg, Kendra; Goulding, Morgan; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2010-03-01

    The pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has an unusual outer membrane containing trehalose glycolipids that may contribute to its ability to survive freezing and dehydration. Based on our recent discovery that trehalose glycolipids confer dehydration resistance to supported lipid monolayers (Biophys. J. 94: 4718-4724 (2008); Langmuir 25: 5193-5198, (2009)), we hypothesized that liposomes containing synthetic trehalose glycolipids may be dehydration-resistant as well. To test this, we measured the leakage of encapsulated fluorophores and larger macromolecular cargo from such liposomes subject to freeze drying. Both leakage assays and size measurements show that the liposomes are dehydration-resistant. In addition to demonstrating a possibly technologically useful encapsulation platform, our results corroborate the view that encapsulation in a trehalose-glycolipid-rich membrane is a biophysically viable route to protection of mycobacteria from environmental stresses.

  2. DEHYDRATION OF LOW WATER CONTENT ETHANOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation has emerged as an economically viable alternative technology for the dehydration of organic solvents, removal of organic compounds from water and organic/organic separations. Development of a membrane system with suitable flux and selectivity characteristics plays a...

  3. Problem: Thirst, Drinking Behavior, and Involuntary Dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenon of involuntary dehydration, the delay in full restoration of a body water deficit by drinking, has been described extensively but relatively little is known about its physiological mechanism. It occurs primarily in humans when they are exposed to various stresses including exercise, environmental heat and cold, altitude, water immersion, dehydration, and perhaps microgravity, singly and in various combinations. The level of involuntary dehydration is approximately proportional to the degree of total stress imposed on the body. Involuntary dehydration appears to be controlled by more than one factor including social customs that influence what is consumed, the capacity and rate of fluid absorption from the gastrointestinal system, the level of cellular hydration involving the osmotic-vasopressin interaction with sensitive cells or structures in the central nervous system, and, to a lesser extent, hypovolemic-angiotensin II stimuli. Since humans drink when there is no apparent physiological stimulus, the psychological component should always be considered when investigating the total mechanisms for drinking.

  4. Spatiotemporal evolution of dehydration reactions in subduction zones (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padron-Navarta, J.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale deep water cycling takes place through subduction zones in the Earth, making our planet unique in the solar system. This idiosyncrasy is the result of a precise but unknown balance between in-gassing and out-gassing fluxes of volatiles. Water is incorporated into hydrous minerals during seafloor alteration of the oceanic lithosphere. The cycling of volatiles is triggered by dehydration of these minerals that release fluids from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and eventually to the crust or to the deep mantle. Whereas the loci of such reactions are reasonably well established, the mechanisms of fluid migration during dehydration reactions are still barely known. One of the challenges is that dehydration reactions are dynamic features evolving in time and space. Experimental data on low-temperature dehydration reactions (i.e. gypsum) and numerical models applied to middle-crust conditions point to a complex spatiotemporal evolution of the dehydration process. The extrapolation of these inferences to subduction settings has not yet been explored but it is essential to understand the dynamism of these settings. Here I propose an alternative approach to tackle this problem through the textural study of high-pressure terrains that experienced dehydration reactions. Spatiotemporal evolution of dehydration reactions should be recorded during mineral nucleation and growth through variations in time and space of the reaction rate. Insights on the fluid migration mechanism could be inferred therefore by noting changes in the texture of prograde assemblages. The dehydration of antigorite in serpentinite is a perfect candidate to test this approach as it releases a significant amount of fluid and produces a concomitant porosity. Unusual alternation of equilibrium and disequilibrium textures observed in Cerro del Almirez (Betic Cordillera, S Spain)[1, 2] attest for a complex fluid migration pattern for one of the most relevant reactions in subduction zones

  5. Dehydration processes using membranes with hydrophobic coating

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Yu; Baker, Richard W; Aldajani, Tiem; Ly, Jennifer

    2013-07-30

    Processes for removing water from organic compounds, especially polar compounds such as alcohols. The processes include a membrane-based dehydration step, using a membrane that has a dioxole-based polymer selective layer or the like and a hydrophilic selective layer, and can operate even when the stream to be treated has a high water content, such as 10 wt % or more. The processes are particularly useful for dehydrating ethanol.

  6. Freeze-Dehydration by Microwave Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    MATHEMATICAL MODEL DEHYDRATED FOODS ENERGY BEEF EQUATIONS FREEZE DRIED FOODS BEATING ANALYSIS MELTING FREEZE DRYING MICROWAVES MICROWAVE DIELECTRIC ...d) 20. Abstract (continued) The model is applied to simulate the freeze-dehydration of beef meat by microwave dielectric heating at 2450 MHz . The...8 3.3 Dielectric Properties •••.•. .••••....• 8 3.4 Specific Heat of Frozen and Dried Beef

  7. Influence of environmental conditions on the kinetics and mechanism of dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Suryanarayanan, R

    1998-11-01

    The object of this project was to study the influence of temperature and water vapor pressure on the kinetics and mechanism of dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate and to establish the relationship between the dehydration mechanism and the solid-state of the anhydrous phase formed. Three experimental techniques were utilized to study the kinetics of dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate (C15H12N2O.2H2O)-thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and variable temperature powder X-ray diffractometry (VTXRD). These techniques respectively provide information about the changes in weight, heat flow and solid-state (phase) during the dehydration process. The instrumental setup was modified so that simultaneous control of both the temperature and the water vapor pressure was possible. The experiments were carried out at different temperatures, ranging from 26 to 64 degrees C. In the absence of water vapor, the dehydration followed the 2-dimensional phase boundary controlled model at all the temperatures studied. In the next stage, the water vapor pressure was altered while the studies were carried out at a single temperature of 44 degrees C. The dehydration was 2-dimensional phase boundary controlled at water vapor pressures < or = 5.1 torr while the Avrami-Erofeev kinetics (3-dimensional nucleation) was followed at water vapor pressures > or = 12.0 torr. In the former case, the anhydrous phase formed was X-ray amorphous while it was the crystalline anhydrous gamma-carbamazepine in the latter. Thus a relationship between the mechanism of dehydration and the solid-state of the product phase was evident. The dehydration conditions influence not only the mechanism but also the solid-state of the anhydrous phase formed. While the techniques of TGA and DSC have found extensive use in studying dehydration reactions, VTXRD proved to be an excellent complement in characterizing the solid-states of the reactant and product phases.

  8. The hydration/dehydration behavior of aspartame revisited.

    PubMed

    Guguta, C; Meekes, H; de Gelder, R

    2008-03-13

    Aspartame, l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine methyl ester, has two hydrates (IA and IB), a hemi-hydrate (IIA) and an anhydrate (IIB). The hydration/dehydration behavior of aspartame was investigated using hot-humidity stage X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and molecular mechanics modeling in combination with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results of this study are compared to earlier studies on aspartame as described in literature. It is shown that earlier transition studies were hampered by incomplete conversions and wrong assignment of the forms. The combination of the techniques applied in this study now shows consistent results for aspartame and yields a clear conversion scheme for the hydration/dehydration behavior of the four forms.

  9. Imaging hydraulic fractures by microseismic migration for downhole monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ye; Zhang, Haijiang

    2016-12-01

    It has been a challenge to accurately characterize fracture zones created by hydraulic fracturing from microseismic event locations. This is because generally detected events are not complete due to the associated low signal to noise ratio and some fracturing stages may not produce microseismic events even if fractures are well developed. As a result, spatial distribution of microseismic events may not well represent fractured zones by hydraulic fracturing. Here, we propose a new way to characterize the fractured zones by reverse time migration (RTM) of microseismic waveforms from some events. This is based on the fact that fractures filled with proppants and other fluids can act as strong scatterers for seismic waves. Therefore, for multi-stage hydraulic fracturing, recorded waveforms from microseismic events induced in a more recent stage may be scattered by fractured zones from previous stages. Through RTM of microseismic waveforms in the current stage, we can determine fractured zones created in previous stages by imaging area of strong scattering. We test the feasibility of this method using synthetic models with different configurations of microseismic event locations and borehole sensor positions for a 2D downhole microseismic monitoring system. Synthetic tests show that with a few events fractured zones can be directly imaged and thus the stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) can be estimated. Compared to the conventional location-based SRV estimation method, the proposed new method does not depend on the completeness of detected events and only a limited number of detected and located events are necessary for characterizing fracture distribution. For simplicity, the 2D model is used for illustrating the concept of microseismic RTM for imaging the fracture zone but the method can be adapted to real cases in the future.

  10. Downhole fluid analysis and asphaltene science for petroleum reservoir evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Oliver C; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Zuo, Julian Y; Dong, Chengli

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum reservoirs are enshrouded in mysteries associated with all manner of geologic and fluid complexities that Mother Nature can inspire. Efficient exploitation of petroleum reservoirs mandates elucidation of these complexities; downhole fluid analysis (DFA) has proven to be indispensable for understanding both fluids and reservoir architecture. Crude oil consists of dissolved gases, liquids, and dissolved solids, known as the asphaltenes. These different fluid components exhibit fluid gradients vertically and laterally, which are best revealed by DFA, with its excellent precision and accuracy. Compositional gradient analysis falls within the purview of thermodynamics. Gas-liquid equilibria can be treated with a cubic equation of state (EoS), such as the Peng-Robinson EoS, a modified van der Waals EoS. In contrast, the first EoS for asphaltene gradients, the Flory-Huggins-Zuo (FHZ) EoS, was developed only recently. The resolution of the asphaltene molecular and nanocolloidal species in crude oil, which is codified in the Yen-Mullins model of asphaltenes, enabled the development of this EoS. The combination of DFA characterization of gradients of reservoir crude oil with the cubic EoS and FHZ EoS analyses brings into view wide-ranging reservoir concerns, such as reservoir connectivity, fault-block migration, heavy oil gradients, tar mat formation, huge disequilibrium fluid gradients, and even stochastic variations of reservoir fluids. New petroleum science and DFA technology are helping to offset the increasing costs and technical difficulties of exploiting ever-more-remote petroleum reservoirs.

  11. Insights into the dehydration behavior of thiamine hydrochloride (vitamin B1) hydrates: part I.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Paroma; Berendt, Robert T; Munson, Eric J; Young, Victor G; Govindarajan, Ramprakash; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2010-02-01

    Thiamine hydrochloride (Vitamin B(1), THCl) can exist as a nonstoichiometric hydrate (NSH) and as a hemihydrate (HH). NSH can contain up to approximately 1 molar equivalent of water and be dehydrated to an isomorphic desolvate (ID) with minimal change in lattice structure. Crystallographic and spectroscopic techniques were used to characterize the influence of structure and mobility on NSH dehydration. Dehydration was accompanied by lattice contraction, as noted by a decrease in the d-spacings. Dehydration also led to the development of surface cracks parallel to the (101*) and (102*) planes in the NSH single crystal, as observed by hot stage microscopy. Step-wise dehydration of NSH produced gradual shifts in XRPD and SSNMR peaks, indicating that NSH (with approximately 1 mole water) and ID represent the two extremes of a continuum in the hydration state. Variable temperature (13)C SSNMR studies showed that water molecules move rapidly at room temperature within the NSH crystal lattice, and the thiamine molecules transiently exist in distinct hydrated and dehydrated states. It is hypothesized that, despite the lack of continuous hydration channels in the NSH crystal lattice, cooperative deformation of the thiamine molecules allows a nondisruptive departure of water molecules from the lattice during dehydration.

  12. Imaging Fracking Zones by Microseismic Reverse Time Migration for Downhole Microseismic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is an engineering tool to create fractures in order to better recover oil and gas from low permeability reservoirs. Because microseismic events are generally associated with fracturing development, microseismic monitoring has been used to evaluate the fracking process. Microseismic monitoring generally relies on locating microseismic events to understand the spatial distribution of fractures. For the multi-stage fracturing treatment, fractures created in former stages are strong scatterers in the medium and can induce strong scattering waves on the waveforms for microseismic events induced during later stages. In this study, we propose to take advantage of microseismic scattering waves to image fracking zones by using seismic reverse time migration method. For downhole microseismic monitoring that involves installing a string of seismic sensors in a borehole near the injection well, the observation geometry is actually similar to the VSP (vertical seismic profile) system. For this reason, we adapt the VSP migration method for the common shot gather to the common event gather. Microseismic reverse-time migration method involves solving wave equation both forward and backward in time for each microseismic event. At current stage, the microseismic RTM is based on 2D acoustic wave equation (Zhang and Sun, 2008), solved by the finite-difference method with PML absorbing boundary condition applied to suppress the reflections of artificial boundaries. Additionally, we use local wavefield decomposition instead of cross-correlation imaging condition to suppress the imaging noise. For testing the method, we create a synthetic dataset for a downhole microseismic monitoring system with multiple fracking stages. It shows that microseismic migration using individual event is able to clearly reveal the fracture zone. The shorter distance between fractures and the microseismic event the clearer the migration image is. By summing migration images for many

  13. Plastic and dehydration instabilities of antigorite serpentinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, J.; Katayama, I.; Ohfuji, H.; Terada, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We conducted a constant displacement rate test of antigorite serpentinite by a triaxial solid medium deformation apparatus installed at Hiroshima University. Experimental conditions were P = ca. 1.0 GPa, T = 450 C to 800 C, which cover from stability to dehydration conditions of antigorite, and strain rate of digit of 10-5 /sec. Samples were cylindrical shape cored from serpentinite and their sizes were 7 mm x 7 mm and 5 mm x 5 mm in diameter by length. Faults were observed in recovered samples from all temperature conditions. Mechanical data of faulted samples showed stress drop of several 10 MPa during experiments. The followings summarize microstructural observations of the recovered samples, and propose generation processes of fault at stability and dehydration conditions. 1) Stability field (plastic instability): Antigorite grains develop a lattice preferred orientation (LPO) along a fault, which characterized by (001) cleavage face parallel to fault plane. This fact suggests the fault is generated by the following process. i) Antigorite grains on the plane applied by maximum shear stress are preferentially deformed by plastic manner, and then develop the LPO. ii) The arrangement of cleavage face gradually reduces the strength of this plane. iii) Eventually, embrittlement occurs at the critical point when the rock strength along this weak plane becomes smaller than shear stress. 2) Dehydration condition (dehydration instability): Fine grained dehydration phases less than 1 micrometer in size such as olivine and talc are detected as a thin vein along the fault. Moreover, talc and olivine, or antigorite ca. 1 - 5 micrometers in size with angular shape are observed within the fault as a fault gauge. These facts suggest the following generation process of fault. i) Dehydration reaction of antigorite begins on the plane applied by maximum shear stress and expands along this plane. ii) The dehydration gradually reduces the strength of this plane. iii) Eventually

  14. Effect of simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration on quality characteristics of carrot slices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effects of various processing parameters on carrot slices exposed to infrared (IR) radiation heating for achieving simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration (SIRDBD). The investigated parameters were product surface temperature, slice thickness and processing ti...

  15. Haemodynamic responses to dehydration in the resting and exercising human leg.

    PubMed

    Pearson, James; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Stöhr, Eric J; Low, David A; Barker, Horace; Ali, Leena; González-Alonso, José

    2013-06-01

    Dehydration and hyperthermia reduces leg blood flow (LBF), cardiac output ([Formula: see text]) and arterial pressure during whole-body exercise. It is unknown whether the reductions in blood flow are associated with dehydration-induced alterations in arterial blood oxygen content (C aO2) and O2-dependent signalling. This study investigated the impact of dehydration and concomitant alterations in C aO2 upon LBF and [Formula: see text]. Haemodynamics, arterial and femoral venous blood parameters and plasma [ATP] were measured at rest and during one-legged knee-extensor exercise in 7 males in four conditions: (1) control, (2) mild dehydration, (3) moderate dehydration, and (4) rehydration. Relative to control, C aO2 and LBF increased with dehydration at rest and during exercise (C aO2: from 199 ± 1 to 208 ± 2, and 202 ± 2 to 210 ± 2 ml L(-1) and LBF: from 0.38 ± 0.04 to 0.77 ± 0.09, and 1.64 ± 0.09 to 1.88 ± 0.1 L min(-1), respectively). Similarly, [Formula: see text] was unchanged or increased with dehydration at rest and during exercise, whereas arterial and leg perfusion pressures declined. Following rehydration, C aO2 declined (to 193 ± 2 mL L(-1)) but LBF remained elevated. Alterations in LBF were unrelated to C aO2 (r (2) = 0.13-0.27, P = 0.48-0.64) and plasma [ATP]. These findings suggest dehydration and concomitant alterations in C aO2 do not compromise LBF despite reductions in plasma [ATP]. While an additive or synergistic effect cannot be excluded, reductions in LBF during exercise with dehydration may not necessarily be associated with alterations in C aO2 and/or intravascular [ATP].

  16. Apparatus and method for compensating for clock drift in downhole drilling components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Johnson, Monte L.; Bartholomew, David B.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy

    2007-08-07

    A precise downhole clock that compensates for drift includes a prescaler configured to receive electrical pulses from an oscillator. The prescaler is configured to output a series of clock pulses. The prescaler outputs each clock pulse after counting a preloaded number of electrical pulses from the oscillator. The prescaler is operably connected to a compensator module for adjusting the number loaded into the prescaler. By adjusting the number that is loaded into the prescaler, the timing may be advanced or retarded to more accurately synchronize the clock pulses with a reference time source. The compensator module is controlled by a counter-based trigger module configured to trigger the compensator module to load a value into the prescaler. Finally, a time-base logic module is configured to calculate the drift of the downhole clock by comparing the time of the downhole clock with a reference time source.

  17. Operating manual for the R200 downhole recorder with Tandy 102 retriever

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Roy A.; Rorabaugh, James I.

    1988-01-01

    The R200 Downhole Recorder is a battery-powered device that, when placed in a well casing, monitors water levels for a period of up to 1 year. This instrument measures a 1- to 70-ft range of water levels. These water level data can be retrieved through use of a commercially available portable microcomputer. The R200 Downhole Recorder was developed at the U. S. Geological Survey 's Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility, Stennis Space Center, Mississippi. This operating manual describes the R200 Downhole Recorder, provides initial set-up instructions, and gives directions for on-site operation. Design specifications and routine maintenance steps are included. The R200 data-retriever program is a user-friendly, menu-driven program. The manual guides the user through the procedures required to perform specific operations. Numerous screens are reproduced in the text with a discussion of user input for desired responses. Help is provided for specific problems. (USGS)

  18. Operating manual for the R200 downhole recorder with husky hunter retriever

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Roy A.; Rorabaugh, James I.

    1988-01-01

    The R200 Downhole Recorder is a battery-powered device that, when placed in a well casing, monitors water levels for a period of up to 1 year. This instrument measures a 1- to 70-foot range of water levels. These water-level data can be retrieved through use of a commercially available portable microcomputer. The R200 Downhole Recorder was developed at the U.S. Geological Survey 's Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility, Stennis Space Center, Mississippi. This operating manual describes the R200 Downhole Recorder, provides initial set-up instructions, and gives directions for on-site operation. Design specifications and routine maintenance steps are included. The R200 data-retriever program is a user-friendly, menu-driven program. The manual guides the user through the procedures required to perform specific operations. Numerous screens are reproduced in the text with a discussion of user input for desired responses. Help is provided for specific problems. (USGS)

  19. Dehydration indicators for broiler chickens at slaughter.

    PubMed

    Vanderhasselt, R F; Buijs, S; Sprenger, M; Goethals, K; Willemsen, H; Duchateau, L; Tuyttens, F A M

    2013-03-01

    Freedom of (prolonged) thirst is considered to be of paramount importance for animal welfare. This emotion normally results from dehydration, which can be measured using physiological indicators. Because no reliable physiological indicator for thirst was available for broilers, we aimed to identify such a measure in this study. This indicator would ideally be integrated into quality control systems in commercial slaughter plants. In the first experiment, water deprivation was manipulated systematically by withdrawing water for different durations (total water withdrawal for 0 (control), 24, 36, or 48 h, or a 10-d period with restricted access to water for 2 times 10 min per day). A significant decrease in drained blood content and BW occurred from 36 h of total water deprivation onward (both P = 0.03), whereas long-term restricted access tended to decrease drained blood content (P = 0.05). No effect of water deprivation or restriction on skin turgor was found. In the second experiment, water was withdrawn for 0 (control), 6, 12, 24, or 48 h. Plasma chloride concentration was increased after 6 h of water withdrawal, but did not rise further with longer withdrawal. If assessed at slaughter, chloride will thus mainly reflect the catching-to-slaughter interval. In contrast, plasma creatinine and hematocrit levels showed a numerical decrease after 6 h of water withdrawal, but rose again after prolonged withdrawal. Plasma creatinine values were significantly higher in 24-h-deprived birds than in 6-h-deprived birds (P < 0.01), allowing for discernment between water withdrawal during catching and transport from dehydration that had occurred on the farm. Blood sodium concentrations and plasma osmolality showed a steady increment between 0 and 24 h of water deprivation (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001 for both), and may thus be used to assess the combined effects of water deprivation on farm and during the catching-to-slaughter interval. These findings may form the basis of an on

  20. Downhole oil/water separators offer lower costs and greater environmental protection

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.

    1999-11-02

    Produced water management can be a significant expense for oil and gas operators. This paper summarizes a study of the technical, economic, and regulatory feasibility of a relatively new technology, downhole oil/water separators (DOWS), to reduce the volume of water pumped to the surface. The study was funded by the US Department of Energy and conducted by Argonne National Laboratory, CH2M Hill, and the Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. DOWS are devices that separate oil and gas from produced water at the bottom of the well and reinject some of the produced water into another formation or another horizon within the same formation, while the oil and gas are pumped to the surface. Since much of the produced water is not pumped to the surface, treated, and pumped from the surface back into a deep formation, the cost of handling produced water is greatly reduced. The oil production rate has increased for more than half of the DOWS installations to date.

  1. Dehydration Influences Mood and Cognition: A Plausible Hypothesis?

    PubMed Central

    Benton, David

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis was considered that a low fluid intake disrupts cognition and mood. Most research has been carried out on young fit adults, who typically have exercised, often in heat. The results of these studies are inconsistent, preventing any conclusion. Even if the findings had been consistent, confounding variables such as fatigue and increased temperature make it unwise to extrapolate these findings. Thus in young adults there is little evidence that under normal living conditions dehydration disrupts cognition, although this may simply reflect a lack of relevant evidence. There remains the possibility that particular populations are at high risk of dehydration. It is known that renal function declines in many older individuals and thirst mechanisms become less effective. Although there are a few reports that more dehydrated older adults perform cognitive tasks less well, the body of information is limited and there have been little attempt to improve functioning by increasing hydration status. Although children are another potentially vulnerable group that have also been subject to little study, they are the group that has produced the only consistent findings in this area. Four intervention studies have found improved performance in children aged 7 to 9 years. In these studies children, eating and drinking as normal, have been tested on occasions when they have and not have consumed a drink. After a drink both memory and attention have been found to be improved. PMID:22254111

  2. Dehydration influences mood and cognition: a plausible hypothesis?

    PubMed

    Benton, David

    2011-05-01

    The hypothesis was considered that a low fluid intake disrupts cognition and mood. Most research has been carried out on young fit adults, who typically have exercised, often in heat. The results of these studies are inconsistent, preventing any conclusion. Even if the findings had been consistent, confounding variables such as fatigue and increased temperature make it unwise to extrapolate these findings. Thus in young adults there is little evidence that under normal living conditions dehydration disrupts cognition, although this may simply reflect a lack of relevant evidence. There remains the possibility that particular populations are at high risk of dehydration. It is known that renal function declines in many older individuals and thirst mechanisms become less effective. Although there are a few reports that more dehydrated older adults perform cognitive tasks less well, the body of information is limited and there have been little attempt to improve functioning by increasing hydration status. Although children are another potentially vulnerable group that have also been subject to little study, they are the group that has produced the only consistent findings in this area. Four intervention studies have found improved performance in children aged 7 to 9 years. In these studies children, eating and drinking as normal, have been tested on occasions when they have and not have consumed a drink. After a drink both memory and attention have been found to be improved.

  3. Development of a High Pressure/High Temperature Down-hole Turbine Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Plamp

    2008-06-30

    As oil & natural gas deposits become more difficult to obtain by conventional means, wells must extend to deeper more heat-intensive environments. The technology of the drilling equipment required to reach these depths has exceeded the availability of electrical power sources needed to operate these tools. Historically, logging while drilling (LWD) and measure while drilling (MWD) devices utilized a wireline to supply power and communication from the operator to the tool. Lithium ion batteries were used in scenarios where a wireline was not an option, as it complicated operations. In current downhole applications, lithium ion battery (LIB) packs are the primary source for electrical power. LIB technology has been proven to supply reliable downhole power at temperatures up to 175 °C. Many of the deeper well s reach ambient temperatures above 200 °C, creating an environment too harsh for current LIB technology. Other downfalls of LIB technology are cost, limitations on charge cycles, disposal issues and possible safety hazards including explosions and fires. Downhole power generation can also be achieved by utilizing drilling fluid flow and converting it to rotational motion. This rotational motion can be harnessed to spin magnets around a series of windings to produce power proportional to the rpm experienced by the driven assembly. These generators are, in most instances, driven by turbine blades or moyno-based drilling fluid pumps. To date, no commercially available downhole power generators are capable of operating at ambient temperatures of 250 °C. A downhole power g enerator capable of operation in a 250 °C and 20,000 psi ambient environment will be an absolute necessity in the future. Dexter Magnetic Technologies’ High-Pressure High-Temperature (HPHT) Downhole Turbine Generator is capable of operating at 250 °C and 20, 000 psi, but has not been tested in an actual drilling application. The technology exists, but to date no company has been willing to

  4. Renal tubular vasopressin receptors downregulated by dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, M.; Phillips, M.I. )

    1988-03-01

    Receptors for arginine vasopressin (AVP) were characterized in tubular epithelial basolateral membranes (BL membranes) prepared from the kidneys of male Spraque-Dawley rats. Association of ({sup 3}H)AVP was rapid, reversible, and specific. Saturation studies revealed a single class of saturable binding sites with a maximal binding (B{sub max}) of 184 {plus minus} 15 fmol/mg protein. The V{sub 2} receptor antagonist was more than 3,700 times as effective in displacing ({sup 3}H)AVP than was the V{sub 1} antagonist. To investigate the physiological regulation of vasopressin receptors, the effects of elevated levels of circulating AVP on receptor characteristics were studied. Seventy-two-hour water deprivation significantly elevated plasma osmolality and caused an 11.5-fold increase in plasma (AVP). Scatchard analysis revealed a 38% decreased in the number of AVP receptors on the BL membranes from dehydrated animals. The high-affinity binding sites on the BL membranes fit the pharmacological profile for adenylate cyclase-linked vasopressin receptors (V{sub 2}), which mediate the antidiuretic action of the hormone. The authors conclude that physiologically elevated levels of AVP can downregulate vasopressin receptors in the kidney.

  5. Downhole pressure, temperature and flowrate measurements in steam wells at the Geysers field

    SciTech Connect

    Enedy, Kathleen L.

    1988-01-01

    Recently developed pressure-temperature-spinner (PTS) tools are used to collect reliable downhole measurements in geothermal systems, such as at The Geysers. PTS surveys in several flowing Geysers steam wells were used to quantify steam entry location and magnitude, wellbore heat loss, pressure drop due to friction, thermodynamic properties of the steam, and maximum rock temperature. Interwell cross flow/interference was identified in one well. Finally, a single-phase saturated steam wellbore model used to compare calculated to measured downhole values, was found to adequately predict the flowing pressure versus depth curves in vapor filled holes.

  6. When less means more: dehydration improves innate immunity in rattlesnakes.

    PubMed

    Brusch, George A; DeNardo, Dale F

    2017-04-12

    Immune function can vary based on availability of resources, and most studies of such influences have focused on the co-investment of energy into immune and other physiological functions. When energy resources are limited, trade-offs exist, which can compromise immunity for other functions. As with energy, water limitation can also alter various physiological processes, yet water has received little consideration for its role in possibly modulating immune functions. We examined the relationship between immunocompetence and hydration state using the western diamond-backed rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox). This species is known to undergo substantial seasonal fluctuations in water availability with extreme limitations during the hot, dry season. We collected blood samples from free-ranging C. atrox to compare osmolality and innate immune function (lysis, agglutination, bacterial growth inhibition) during the milder and relatively moister early spring season, the hot-dry season, and the hot-wet season. To isolate effects of dehydration from other possible seasonal influences, we complemented this field study with a laboratory study in which we withheld food and water from individually housed adult C. atrox for up to 16 weeks. We collected blood samples from each snake as it dehydrated and collected a final sample after the snake was given ad lib water at the end of the experiment. Our results demonstrate that C. atrox experience significant dehydration during the hot-dry season, and that, in general, innate immune function is highly correlated with osmolality, whether natural or artificially manipulated.

  7. System to inject steam and produce oil from the same wellbore through downhole valve switching

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    A market analysis for the Downhole Valves and associated hardware in California has shown that the main effort should be concentrated on the second case studied in the First Quarter Report, namely that of re-entry into a thermal well equipped with a 7 in. casing. An improved design,based on the use of a combination of a sliding sleeve valve with two plugs (all of them operated by wireline) is the most flexible and lowest cost configuration,for entering the largest market in California,that of existing vertical wells penetrating a relatively thin ([le] 40 ft) reservoir. At present oil prices at the California refineries, these wells, operated under cyclic steam injection are barely economic. They could become much more productive with the addition of a pair of small-diameter horizontal drainholes. A low-cost work-over program with all drilling and completion operations done through the 2 7/8 in. production tubing has been designed. Laboratory tests have confirmed the operability of the modified sliding sleeve valve with steam at temperatures ranging up to 500 F. Calculations have also determined the steam quality improvements resulting from using a low-cost Silicate foam insulation on the 2 3/8 in. steam tubing, with the 7 in. casing/tubings annulus filled with low-pressure gas.

  8. Geothermal demonstration: Zunil food dehydration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, O. ); Altseimer, J.; Thayer, G.R. ); Cooper, L. ); Caicedo, A. . Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion)

    1991-08-01

    A food dehydration facility was constructed near the town of Zunil, Guatemala, to demonstrate the use of geothermal energy for industrial applications. The facility, with some modifications to the design, was found to work quite satisfactorily. Tests using five different products were completed during the time geothermal energy was used in the plant. During the time the plant was not able to use geothermal energy, a temporary diesel-fueled boiler provided the energy to test dehydration on seven other crops available in this area. The system demonstrates that geothermal heat can be used successfully for dehydrating food products. Many other industrial applications of geothermal energy could be considered for Zunil since a considerable amount of moderate-temperature heat will become available when the planned geothermal electrical facility is constructed there. 6 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Processing and Quality Characteristics of Apple Slices under Simultaneous Infrared Dry-blanching and Dehydration with Intermittent Heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effects of three processing parameters, e.g. product surface temperature, slice thickness and processing time, on blanching and dehydration characteristics of apple slices exposed to simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration (SIRDBD) with intermittent heating. A...

  10. Skeletal muscle water and electrolytes following prolonged dehydrating exercise.

    PubMed

    Mora-Rodríguez, R; Fernández-Elías, V E; Hamouti, N; Ortega, J F

    2015-06-01

    We studied if dehydrating exercise would reduce muscle water (H2Omuscle ) and affect muscle electrolyte concentrations. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were collected prior, immediately after, and 1 and 4 h after prolonged dehydrating exercise (150 min at 33 ± 1 °C, 25% ± 2% humidity) on nine endurance-trained cyclists (VO2max  = 54.4 ± 1.05 mL/kg/min). Plasma volume (PV) changes and fluid shifts between compartments (Cl(-) method) were measured. Exercise dehydrated subjects 4.7% ± 0.3% of body mass by losing 2.75 ± 0.15 L of water and reducing PV 18.4% ± 1% below pre-exercise values (P < 0.05). Right after exercise H2Omuscle remained at pre-exercise values (i.e., 398 ± 6 mL/100 g dw muscle(-1)) but declined 13% ± 2% (342 ± 12 mL/100 g dw muscle(-1); P < 0.05) after 1 h of supine rest. At that time, PV recovered toward pre-exercise levels. The Cl(-) method corroborated the shift of fluid between extracellular and intracellular compartments. After 4 h of recovery, PV returned to pre-exercise values; however, H2Omuscle remained reduced at the same level. Muscle Na(+) and K(+) increased (P < 0.05) in response to the H2Omuscle reductions. Our findings suggest that active skeletal muscle does not show a net loss of H2O during prolonged dehydrating exercise. However, during the first hour of recovery H2Omuscle decreases seemly to restore PV and thus cardiovascular stability.

  11. ATG18 and FAB1 are involved in dehydration stress tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Gema; Margalef-Català, Mar; Salinas, Francisco; Liti, Gianni; Cordero-Otero, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, different dehydration-based technologies have been evaluated for the purpose of cell and tissue preservation. Although some early results have been promising, they have not satisfied the requirements for large-scale applications. The long experience of using quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be a good model organism for studying the link between complex phenotypes and DNA variations. Here, we use QTL analysis as a tool for identifying the specific yeast traits involved in dehydration stress tolerance. Three hybrids obtained from stable haploids and sequenced in the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project showed intermediate dehydration tolerance in most cases. The dehydration resistance trait of 96 segregants from each hybrid was quantified. A smooth, continuous distribution of the anhydrobiosis tolerance trait was found, suggesting that this trait is determined by multiple QTLs. Therefore, we carried out a QTL analysis to identify the determinants of this dehydration tolerance trait at the genomic level. Among the genes identified after reciprocal hemizygosity assays, RSM22, ATG18 and DBR1 had not been referenced in previous studies. We report new phenotypes for these genes using a previously validated test. Finally, our data illustrates the power of this approach in the investigation of the complex cell dehydration phenotype.

  12. Downhole geothermal well sensors comprising a hydrogen-resistant optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-02-08

    A new class of optical fiber based thermal sensors has been invented. The new sensors comprise hydrogen-resistant optical fibers which are able to withstand a hot, hydrogen-containing environment as is often found in the downhole well environment.

  13. Update of comparative analysis of steam delivery costs for surface and downhole steam drive technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, C.M.; Muir, J.F.

    1984-04-01

    A review and update is presented of a previous analysis which compared the economic performance of the surface and downhole steam delivery technologies investigated in the Department of Energy's Project DEEP STEAM for the enhanced recovery of heavy oil from deep reservoirs. Emphasis is placed on an examination and revision of the compression and wellbore heat loss assumptions and their effects on sandface steam delivery costs. Multistage compression with intercooling and aftercooling, increased overall compression efficiency, and waste heat scavenging all serve to decrease the cost of steam generated downhole and reduce differences among the various surface and downhole delivery system costs. Wellbore heat loss increases dramatically when water is present in the annulus, causing a reduction in the depth to which surface steaming is effective and an increase in steam delivery costs. Other concerns potentially impacting the cost comparisons are discussed. These include: crude versus diesel generator fuel, reliability of both surface and downhole hardware, capital equipment costs, surface transmission losses, and the assumption of hydrostatic reservoir pressure. 16 references, 19 figures, 1 table.

  14. Development of wireless downhole pressure and temperature telemetry tool. Annual report, April 1992-April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Guest, R.; Esfahani, F.; Dennis, J.

    1993-05-01

    The objective is to develop a wireless downhole telemetry system capable of gathering and transmitting pressure and temperature data from the bottom of a borehole to the surface. The specific objective is to determine the technical feasibility and to develop an electromagnetic telemetry system.

  15. Downhole tool apparatus with non-metallic components and methods of drilling thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Streich, S.G.; Hushbeck, D.F.; Berscheidt, K.T.; Jacobi, R.D.

    1993-07-06

    A downhole apparatus is described for use in a well bore, said apparatus comprising: a center mandrel; and slip means disposed on said mandrel for grippingly engaging said well bore when in a set position, said slip means being at least partially made of a non-metallic material.

  16. 30 CFR 250.1158 - How do I receive approval to downhole commingle hydrocarbons?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons? 250.1158 Section 250.1158 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... downhole commingle hydrocarbons? (a) Before you perforate a well, you must request and receive approval from the Regional Supervisor to commingle hydrocarbons produced from multiple reservoirs within...

  17. 30 CFR 250.1158 - How do I receive approval to downhole commingle hydrocarbons?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons? 250.1158 Section 250.1158 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... downhole commingle hydrocarbons? (a) Before you perforate a well, you must request and receive approval from the Regional Supervisor to commingle hydrocarbons produced from multiple reservoirs within...

  18. 30 CFR 250.1158 - How do I receive approval to downhole commingle hydrocarbons?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons? 250.1158 Section 250.1158 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... downhole commingle hydrocarbons? (a) Before you perforate a well, you must request and receive approval from the Regional Supervisor to commingle hydrocarbons produced from multiple reservoirs within...

  19. 30 CFR 250.1158 - How do I receive approval to downhole commingle hydrocarbons?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons? 250.1158 Section 250.1158 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND... approval to downhole commingle hydrocarbons? (a) Before you perforate a well, you must request and receive approval from the Regional Supervisor to commingle hydrocarbons produced from multiple reservoirs within...

  20. Applications of optical fiber sensors in subsea and downhole oil well environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Alexis; Dalziel, Rob; Douglas, Neil

    1999-12-01

    In this paper, an overview on the use of optical fiber sensor in subsea and downhole oil well and related applications is presented, along with the impact of this technology in the oil industry. Focus will be placed on identifying the needs and requirements for various sensing applications.

  1. Thermoelastic behavior and dehydration process of cancrinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatta, G. D.; Comboni, D.; Alvaro, M.; Lotti, P.; Cámara, F.; Domeneghetti, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    The high-temperature thermoelastic behavior of a natural cancrinite has been investigated by in situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The unit-cell volume variation as a function of temperature ( T) exhibits a continuous trend up to 748 K (hydrous expansion regime). The unit-cell edges expansion clearly shows an anisotropic expansion scheme ( α a < α c ). At 748 K, a dehydration process takes place, and a series of unit-cell parameter measurements at constant temperature (748 K) for a period of 12 days indicate that the dehydration process continued for the entire period of time, until the cell parameters were found to be constant. After the dehydration process is completed, the structure expands almost linearly with increasing temperature up to 823 K, where a sudden broadening of the diffraction peaks, likely due to the impending decomposition, did not allow the collection of further data points. Even with a very limited temperature range for the anhydrous regime, we observed that the behavior of the two (i.e., hydrous and anhydrous) high-temperature structures is similar in terms of (1) volume thermal expansion coefficient and (2) thermoelastic anisotropy. The structure refinements based on the data collected at 303, 478 and 748 K (after the dehydration), respectively, showed a change in the mechanism of tilting of the quasi-rigid (Si,Al)O4 tetrahedra, following the loss of H2O molecules, ascribable to the high-temperature Na+ coordination environment within the cages.

  2. Voluntary Dehydration and Alliesthesia for Water,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-13

    of the extracellular fluid are maintained in dynamic balance, and partially controlled by antidiuretic hormone and thirst (2). The drive to drink...dehydration which limits sweating, adversely affects cardiovascular and thermoregulatory functions , and predisposes to heat illness. Emphasis on drinking by

  3. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  4. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  5. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  6. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  7. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  8. ADVANCED DEHYDRATOR DESIGN SAVES GAS AND REDUCES HAP EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glycol dehydrators remove water from gas pipe lines. An advanced dehydrator by Engineered Concepts, Farmington, NM, saves a significant amount of gas, while reducing hazardous air pollutants, volatile organic compounds and CO2 air pollutants

  9. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2001-03-31

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the impact of downhole vibration stimulation on oil production rates in a mature waterflood field. Oil & Gas Consultants International, Inc. (OGCI) will manage the project in close cooperation with the Osage Tribe as the tests will be conducted in Osage County, Oklahoma, the mineral estate of the Osage Tribe. The field is owned and operated by Calumet Oil Company. Phillips Petroleum Company will contribute their proprietary vibration core analysis of cores recovered from the pilot test area. To achieve the project objectives, the work has been divided into nine tasks, some are concurrent, while other tasks rely on completion of previous steps. The operator, Calumet Oil Company operates several field in Osage County Oklahoma. The North Burbank Unit will be the site of the test. The team will then determine where within the field to optimally locate the vibration test well. With the location determined, the test well will be drilled, cored, logged and 7-inch production casing run and cemented. In a parallel effort, OGCI will be designing, building, and testing a new version of the downhole vibration tool based on their patented and field proven whirling orbital vibrator. With the field test tool built to run in 7-inch casing. Reliability testing of the downhole tool and surface power source will be conducted in nearby field operated by Calumet Oil Company. After the core is recovered, Phillips Petroleum Company will be conducting laboratory tests utilizing their proprietary sonic core apparatus to determine fluid flow response to a range of vibration frequencies. These results, in turn, will allow final adjustments to the frequency generation mechanisms of the downhole vibration tool. One or more offset wells, near to the vibration test well, will be equipped with downhole geophones and or hydro-phones to determine the strength of signal and if the producing formation has a characteristic resonant frequency response

  10. Repeated bouts of dehydration deplete nutrient reserves and reduce egg production in the mosquito Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Joshua B.; Patrick, Kevin R.; Desai, Karina; Hardesty, Jeffrey J.; Krause, Tyler B.; Denlinger, David L.

    2010-01-01

    In this study of the mosquito, Culex pipiens, we examined the impact of multiple bouts of dehydration and rehydration on survival, depletion of metabolic reserves and egg production in both non-diapausing and diapausing females. Mosquitoes provided with access to sugar during rehydration survived longer than those allowed to rehydrate without sugar, and their survival was similar to that of mosquitoes of the same age that were not dehydrated. Among mosquitoes not provided with sugar, each dehydration bout reduced the mosquito's dry mass – an effect likely to be due to the utilization of carbohydrates and lipid reserves. The toll on glycogen and lipid reserves is likely to be especially costly for diapausing mosquitoes that are dependent on these stored reserves for winter survival. Egg production in both non-diapausing and post-diapausing C. pipiens was also reduced in response to multiple bouts of dehydration. Although egg quality was not compromised, the number of eggs produced was reduced. Both non-diapausing and diapausing females can compensate for the nutrient loss due to dehydration by sugar feeding but the opportunity to feed on sugar is likely to be rarely available in the overwintering habitat of diapausing females, thus the impact of dehydration may be especially pronounced in overwintering populations of C. pipiens. PMID:20675546

  11. Gene expression changes governing extreme dehydration tolerance in an Antarctic insect.

    PubMed

    Teets, Nicholas M; Peyton, Justin T; Colinet, Herve; Renault, David; Kelley, Joanna L; Kawarasaki, Yuta; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2012-12-11

    Among terrestrial organisms, arthropods are especially susceptible to dehydration, given their small body size and high surface area to volume ratio. This challenge is particularly acute for polar arthropods that face near-constant desiccating conditions, as water is frozen and thus unavailable for much of the year. The molecular mechanisms that govern extreme dehydration tolerance in insects remain largely undefined. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to quantify transcriptional mechanisms of extreme dehydration tolerance in the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica, the world's southernmost insect and only insect endemic to Antarctica. Larvae of B. antarctica are remarkably tolerant of dehydration, surviving losses up to 70% of their body water. Gene expression changes in response to dehydration indicated up-regulation of cellular recycling pathways including the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome and autophagy, with concurrent down-regulation of genes involved in general metabolism and ATP production. Metabolomics results revealed shifts in metabolite pools that correlated closely with changes in gene expression, indicating that coordinated changes in gene expression and metabolism are a critical component of the dehydration response. Finally, using comparative genomics, we compared our gene expression results with a transcriptomic dataset for the Arctic collembolan, Megaphorura arctica. Although B. antarctica and M. arctica are adapted to similar environments, our analysis indicated very little overlap in expression profiles between these two arthropods. Whereas several orthologous genes showed similar expression patterns, transcriptional changes were largely species specific, indicating these polar arthropods have developed distinct transcriptional mechanisms to cope with similar desiccating conditions.

  12. Organ Specific Proteomic Dissection of Selaginella bryopteris Undergoing Dehydration and Rehydration

    PubMed Central

    Deeba, Farah; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Pandey, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    To explore molecular mechanisms underlying the physiological response of Selaginella bryopteris, a comprehensive proteome analysis was carried out in roots and fronds undergoing dehydration and rehydration. Plants were dehydrated for 7 days followed by 2 and 24 h of rehydration. In roots out of 59 identified spots, 58 protein spots were found to be up-regulated during dehydration stress. The identified proteins were related to signaling, stress and defense, protein and nucleotide metabolism, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, storage and epigenetic control. Most of these proteins remained up-regulated on first rehydration, suggesting their role in recovery phase also. Among the 90 identified proteins in fronds, about 49% proteins were up-regulated during dehydration stress. Large number of ROS scavenging proteins was enhanced on dehydration. Many other proteins involved in energy, protein turnover and nucleotide metabolism, epigenetic control were also highly upregulated. Many photosynthesis related proteins were upregulated during stress. This would have helped plant to recover rapidly on rehydration. This study provides a comprehensive picture of different cellular responses elucidated by the proteome changes during dehydration and rehydration in roots and fronds as expected from a well-choreographed response from a resurrection plant. PMID:27092152

  13. Gene expression changes governing extreme dehydration tolerance in an Antarctic insect

    PubMed Central

    Teets, Nicholas M.; Peyton, Justin T.; Colinet, Herve; Renault, David; Kelley, Joanna L.; Kawarasaki, Yuta; Lee, Richard E.; Denlinger, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Among terrestrial organisms, arthropods are especially susceptible to dehydration, given their small body size and high surface area to volume ratio. This challenge is particularly acute for polar arthropods that face near-constant desiccating conditions, as water is frozen and thus unavailable for much of the year. The molecular mechanisms that govern extreme dehydration tolerance in insects remain largely undefined. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to quantify transcriptional mechanisms of extreme dehydration tolerance in the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica, the world’s southernmost insect and only insect endemic to Antarctica. Larvae of B. antarctica are remarkably tolerant of dehydration, surviving losses up to 70% of their body water. Gene expression changes in response to dehydration indicated up-regulation of cellular recycling pathways including the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome and autophagy, with concurrent down-regulation of genes involved in general metabolism and ATP production. Metabolomics results revealed shifts in metabolite pools that correlated closely with changes in gene expression, indicating that coordinated changes in gene expression and metabolism are a critical component of the dehydration response. Finally, using comparative genomics, we compared our gene expression results with a transcriptomic dataset for the Arctic collembolan, Megaphorura arctica. Although B. antarctica and M. arctica are adapted to similar environments, our analysis indicated very little overlap in expression profiles between these two arthropods. Whereas several orthologous genes showed similar expression patterns, transcriptional changes were largely species specific, indicating these polar arthropods have developed distinct transcriptional mechanisms to cope with similar desiccating conditions. PMID:23197828

  14. Effects of dehydration and rehydration on thermoregulatory sweating in goats.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M A

    1989-01-01

    1. Measurement of rectal temperature (Tr), sweat rate, respiratory frequency (f) and respiratory evaporation (Eresp) were made in one Nubian and four Alpine-Toggenberg goats while they stood for 90 min in a climate chamber at 40 degrees C ambient temperature (Ta). The animals were studied when they were hydrated, when they had been dehydrated by 48 h water deprivation, and when they were rehydrated by voluntary drinking of water or saline or by intraruminal water administration. Plasma osmolality (Posm), plasma protein concentration (PP) and haematocrit (Hct) were measured before every experiment and before and after voluntary drinking. 2. Hydrated animals increased evaporation by panting and sweating during heat exposure and Tr rose about 1 degree C. The rate of sweating was as high or higher than Eresp. Dehydrated animals had lower sweat rates and higher Tr than hydrated animals, but f and Eresp were the same in hydrated and dehydrated animals. 3. When dehydrated goats were allowed to drink after 60 min of heat exposure, sweating began abruptly within 3 min of the start of drinking in every animal whether water or saline was drunk. Sweat rate returned to hydrated levels or higher before any change occurred in Posm, PP or Hct. Respiratory frequency was higher after drinking than in dehydrated animals which were not allowed to drink. 4. When water was administered by rumen tube after 60 min of heat exposure, sweating in the Nubian occurred with a short latency, similar to the onset after drinking. In the other four animals, sweating onset occurred on average at 13 min 42 s after intraruminal water administration. 5. It is concluded that sweating is a significant avenue of evaporative heat loss in these goats when they are hydrated and exposed to high Ta. Sweat rate is markedly reduced after water deprivation but returns to hydrated levels within 3 min after the start of drinking. The rapid recovery of sweating after voluntary drinking is not initiated by changes in

  15. Analysis of Dehydration and Strength in Elite Badminton Players

    PubMed Central

    Abián-Vicén, Javier; Del Coso, Juan; González-Millán, Cristina; Salinero, Juan José; Abián, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Background The negative effects of dehydration on aerobic activities are well established. However, it is unknown how dehydration affects intermittent sports performance. The purpose of this study was to identify the level of dehydration in elite badminton players and its relation to muscle strength and power production. Methodology Seventy matches from the National Spanish badminton championship were analyzed (46 men’s singles and 24 women’s singles). Before and after each match, jump height and power production were determined during a countermovement jump on a force platform. Participants’ body weight and a urine sample were also obtained before and after each match. The amount of liquid that the players drank during the match was also calculated by weighing their individual drinking bottles. Results and Discussion Sweat rate during the game was 1.14±0.46 l/h in men and 1.02±0.64 l/h in women. The players rehydrated at a rate of 1.10±0.55 l/h and 1.01±0.44 l/h in the male and female groups respectively. Thus, the dehydration attained during the game was only 0.37±0.50% in men and 0.32±0.83% in women. No differences were found in any of the parameters analyzed during the vertical jump (men: from 31.82±5.29 to 32.90±4.49 W/kg; p>0.05, women: from 26.36±4.73 to 27.25±4.44 W/kg; p>0.05). Post-exercise urine samples revealed proteinuria (60.9% of cases in men and 66.7% in women), leukocyturia (men = 43.5% and women = 50.0%) and erythrocyturia (men = 50.0% and women = 21.7%). Conclusions Despite a moderate sweat rate, badminton players adequately hydrated during a game and thus the dehydration attained was low. The badminton match did not cause muscle fatigue but it significantly increased the prevalence of proteinuria, leukocyturia and erythrocyturia. PMID:22666396

  16. System to inject steam and produce oil from the same wellbore through downhole valve switching. First quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Various Downhole Equipment systems have been designed for typical applications in three California Oilfields,based on well data gathered from three different Operating Companies. The first system, applicable to a 2,000 ft deep reservoir (Monarch) a highly underpressured, unconsolidated sand of 200 ft net pay, located in the Midway-Sunset field, is based on the use of a new well. The second well configuration considered was the re-entry into an existing well equipped with a 7 inches casing and penetrating into two separate sandstone reservoirs, at normal pressures in the North Antelope Hills field. Only the bottom layer is presently in production through a gravel-packed 5.5 inch linear, while the upper zone is behind the cemented casing. The third case studied was the re-entry into an existing well equipped with an 8 5/8 inch casing, presently unperforated, into a thin under-pressured sand reservoir (Weber) in the Midway-Sunset field. All three California fields contain Heavy Oils of different but relatively high viscosities. A new class of potential applications of our new technology has also been considered: the recovery of Light Oil (> 20 API) by steam injection in under-pressured Carbonate reservoirs which lay at depths beyond the economic limit for conventional steam injection technology. The possibility of including this application in a Field Test proposal to the DOE, under the Class II Oil Program, is now under review by various Operators. A drilling contractor experienced in drilling multiple horizontal wells in Carbonate reservoirs and a team of reservoir engineers experienced in the recovery of Light Oil by steam in fractured reservoirs have expressed their interest in participating in such a joint Field Project. Laboratory tests on specific prototypes of Downhole Sealing Elements are underway.

  17. Facies characterization based on physical properties from downhole logging for the sediment record of Lake Van, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarten, H.; Wonik, T.; Kwiecien, O.

    2014-11-01

    Lake Van (Turkey) is the 4th largest terminal lake in the world and is located at a key position for climatic reconstruction. The ICDP project 'PALEOVAN' is a deep-drilling campaign initiated in the summer of 2010 to enhance the understanding of paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental conditions in the Middle East for a period of 550,000 years. Multiple coring of two sites (Northern Basin and Ahlat Ridge) at a water depth of up to 360 m has been performed. The sedimentary record is mainly composed of clayey silts and tephra deposits that were supplied by four volcanic sources: 1) the Süphan volcano, located on the northern shore, 2) the Nemrut volcano, 15 km west of the westernshore, 3) the Incekaya volcano, on the southwestern shore and 4) intralake eruptive centers. The dominant chemical composition of the volcanic sources is known from studies of land deposits. High-quality downhole logs have been acquired from both sites. To construct a continuous lithological profile, 180 m of downhole logging data from the Ahlat Ridge have been analyzed by cluster analysis. To improve the differentiation of the sediments, two elemental intensity profiles from x-ray fluorescence core-scanning (calcium and zirconium) performed on the composite profile core material were added to the cluster analysis. Five cluster units were derived and transformed into three tephra and two clayey silt units. To compare the two clayey silt units with the composite profile from the visual core description (VCD) that showed 15 lithological units, the composite profile was classified into two major groups of lacustrine sediments: banded clayey silts (interpreted as glacial deposits) and laminated clayey silts (interpreted as interglacial deposits). Despite this simplification, no correlation between the two clayey silt units derived from cluster analysis and the banded and laminated clayey silts could be found. The following reasons are proposed: (a) the comparability of the datasets was limited by

  18. Dehydration triggers differential microRNA expression in Xenopus laevis brain.

    PubMed

    Luu, Bryan E; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-11-15

    African clawed frogs, Xenopus laevis, although primarily aquatic, have a high tolerance for dehydration, being capable of withstanding the loss of up to 32-35% of total water body water. Recent studies have shown that microRNAs play a role in the response to dehydration by the liver, kidney and ventral skin of X. laevis. MicroRNAs act by modulating the expression of mRNA transcripts, thereby affecting diverse biochemical pathways. In this study, 43 microRNAs were assessed in frog brains comparing control and dehydrated (31.2±0.83% of total body water lost) conditions. MicroRNAs of interest were measured using a modified protocol which employs polyadenylation of microRNAs prior to reverse transcription and qPCR. Twelve microRNAs that showed a significant decrease in expression (to 41-77% of control levels) in brains from dehydrated frogs (xla-miR-15a, -150, -181a, -191, -211, -218, -219b, -30c, -30e, -31, -34a, and -34b) were identified. Genomic analysis showed that the sequences of these dehydration-responsive microRNAs were highly conserved as compared with the comparable microRNAs of mice (91-100%). Suppression of these microRNAs implies that translation of the mRNA transcripts under their control could be enhanced in response to dehydration. Bioinformatic analysis using the DIANA miRPath program (v.2.0) predicted the top two KEGG pathways that these microRNAs collectively regulate: 1. Axon guidance, and 2. Long-term potentiation. Previous studies indicated that suppression of these microRNAs promotes neuroprotective pathways by increasing the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and activating anti-apoptotic pathways. This suggests that similar actions may be triggered in X. laevis brains as a protective response to dehydration.

  19. Permeability control on transient slip weakening during gypsum dehydration: Implications for earthquakes in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclère, Henri; Faulkner, Daniel; Wheeler, John; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2016-05-01

    A conflict has emerged from recent laboratory experiments regarding the question of whether or not dehydration reactions can promote unstable slip in subduction zones leading to earthquakes. Although reactions produce mechanical weakening due to pore-fluid pressure increase, this weakening has been associated with both stable and unstable slip. Here, new results monitoring strength, permeability, pore-fluid pressure, reaction progress and microstructural evolution during dehydration reactions are presented to identify the conditions necessary for mechanical instability. Triaxial experiments are conducted using gypsum and a direct shear sample assembly with constant normal stress that allows the measurement of permeability during sliding. Tests are conducted with temperature ramp from 70 to 150 °C and with different effective confining pressures (50, 100 and 150 MPa) and velocities (0.1 and 0.4 μm s-1). Results show that gypsum dehydration to bassanite induces transient stable-slip weakening that is controlled by pore-fluid pressure and permeability evolution. At the onset of dehydration, the low permeability promoted by pore compaction induces pore-fluid pressure build-up and stable slip weakening. The increase of bassanite content during the reaction shows clear evidence of dehydration related with the development of R1 Riedel shears and P foliation planes where bassanite is preferentially localized along these structures. The continued production of bassanite, which is stronger than gypsum, provides a supporting framework for newly formed pores, thus resulting in permeability increase, pore-fluid pressure drop and fault strength increase. After dehydration reaction, deformation is characterized by unstable slip on the fully dehydrated reaction product, controlled by the transition from velocity-strengthening to velocity-weakening behaviour of bassanite at temperature above ∼140 °C and the localization of deformation along narrow Y-shear planes. This study

  20. Treatment of Dredged Sludge By Mechanical Dehydration,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    there is an urgent need to reduce both the volume of dredged sludge and the size of the disposal area. This mechanical method is different from the...conventional engineering dehydration by loading, consolidation, and drainage in that the dredged sludge is separated into sludge cakes and clean water...turbidity in water. This mechanical sludge treatment technique can be most efficient when used in combination with a pump dredge. This method offers

  1. Dehydration, Hyperthermia, and Athletes: Science and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To present the recent research that underscores the value of preventing both dehydration and hyperthermia. Such efforts will improve the athlete's capacity to perform physical activity and reduce the risk of heat-related problems. Data Sources: Data were drawn from an extensive review of the scientific literature over the past 50 years with an emphasis on recent research (> 1990) that focuses on the physiological and performance benefits of fluid replacement. Data Synthesis: Even low levels of dehydration (eg, less than a 2% loss of body weight) impair cardiovascular and thermoregulatory response and reduce the capacity for exercise. Heat exposure also reduces the athlete's ability to train and compete, an effect that can be independent of hydration status. Even if athletes are well hydrated, hot weather alone will reduce their capacity to exercise. Optimal performance is possible only when dehydration and hyperthermia are minimized by ingesting ample volumes of fluid during exercise and by taking common-sense precautions in keeping cool. Recent research has demonstrated that consuming fluid in volumes approximating sweat loss maintains important physiological functions and significantly improves exercise performance, even during exercise lasting only 1 hour. Carbohydrate ingestion also improves exercise performance, an effect that is independent of, and additive to, preventing dehydration. Conclusion/Application: Athletes should follow an aggressive fluid replacement and temperature regulation regimen. Successful implementation of this regimen requires that athletic trainers, coaches, athletes, and support personnel are made aware of the benefits of adequate fluid replacement, that appropriate fluid replacement strategies are developed and implemented, that athletes have the opportunity to train themselves to ingest larger volumes of fluid more frequently, and that other practical steps are taken to keep athletes cool during both training and

  2. Downhole well log and core montages from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.; Lewis, R.E.; Winters, W.J.; Lee, M.W.; Rose, K.K.; Boswell, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    The BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well was an integral part of an ongoing project to determine the future energy resource potential of gas hydrates on the Alaska North Slope. As part of this effort, the Mount Elbert well included an advanced downhole geophysical logging program. Because gas hydrate is unstable at ground surface pressure and temperature conditions, a major emphasis was placed on the downhole-logging program to determine the occurrence of gas hydrates and the in-situ physical properties of the sediments. In support of this effort, well-log and core data montages have been compiled which include downhole log and core-data obtained from the gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary section in the Mount Elbert well. Also shown are numerous reservoir parameters, including gas-hydrate saturation and sediment porosity log traces calculated from available downhole well log and core data. ?? 2010.

  3. Microcrystalline hexagonal tungsten bronze. 2. Dehydration dynamics.

    PubMed

    Luca, Vittorio; Griffith, Christopher S; Hanna, John V

    2009-07-06

    Low-temperature (25-600 degrees C) thermal transformations have been studied for hydrothermally prepared, microcrystalline hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) phases A(x)WO(3+x/2).zH(2)O as a function of temperature, where A is an exchangeable cation (in this case Na(+) or Cs(+)) located in hexagonal structural tunnels. Thermal treatment of the as-prepared sodium- and cesium-exchanged phases in air were monitored using a conventional laboratory-based X-ray diffractometer, while thermal transformations in vacuum were studied using synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction. Concurrent thermogravimetric, diffuse reflectance infrared (DRIFT), and (23)Na and (133)Cs magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopic studies have also been undertaken. For the cesium variant, cell volume contraction occurred from room temperature to about 350 degrees C, the regime in which water was "squeezed" out of tunnel sites. This was followed by a lattice expansion in the 350-600 degrees C temperature range. Over the entire temperature range, a net thermal contraction was observed, and this was the result of an anisotropic change in the cell dimensions which included a shortening of the A-O2 bond length. These changes explain why Cs(+) ions are locked into tunnel positions at temperatures as low as 400 degrees C, subsequently inducing a significant reduction in Cs(+) extractability under low pH (nitric acid) conditions. The changing Cs(+) speciation as detected by (133)Cs MAS NMR showed a condensation from multiple Cs sites, presumably associated with differing modes of Cs(+) hydration in the tunnels, to a single Cs(+) environment upon thermal transformation and water removal. While similar lattice contraction was observed for the as-prepared sodium variant, the smaller radius of Na(+) caused it to be relatively easily removed with acid in comparison to the Cs(+) variant. From (23)Na MAS NMR studies of the parent material, complex Na(+) speciation was observed with dehydrated and various

  4. Dehydration-induced drinking in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The human tendency to experience a delay in rehydration (involuntary dehydration) after fluid loss is considered. The two primary factors contributing to involuntary dehydration are probably upright posture, and extracellular fluid and electrolyte loss by sweating from exercise and heat exposure. First, as the plasma sodium and osmotic concentrations remain virtually unchanged for supine to upright postural changes, the major stimuli for drinking appear to be associated with the hypovolemia and increase in the renin-angiotension system. Second, voluntary drinking during the heat experiments was 146% greater than in cool experiments; drinking increased by 109% with prior dehydration as opposed to normal hydration conditions; and drinking was increased by 41% after exercise as compared with the resting condition. Finally, it is concluded that the rate of sweating and the rate of voluntary fluid intake are highly correlated, and that the dispogenic factors of plasma volume, osmolality, and plasma renin activity are unrelated to sweat rate, but are likely to induce drinking in humans.

  5. An in situ FTIR spectroscopic and thermogravimetric analysis study of the dehydration and dihydroxylation of SnO2: the contribution of the (100), (110) and (111) facets.

    PubMed

    Christensen, P A; Attidekou, P S; Egdell, R G; Maneelok, S; Manning, D A C

    2016-08-17

    Nanoparticulate SnO2 produced by a hydrothermal method was characterised by BET, XRD, TGA-MS and in situ variable temperature diffuse reflectance infra red spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to determine the surface behaviour of water. For the (100) facets, hydrogen bonding does not occur, and water adsorption is less strong than for the (111) and (110) facets where hydrogen bonding does occur. Reversible uptake of oxygen was observed. These findings have implications for other surface-gas reactions in which Ni and Sb co-doped SnO2 (NATO) anodes are used for ozone generation. BET showed the relatively high surface area and nanometer scale of the SnO2 particles, whilst XRD confirmed the nano dimension of the crystallites and showed only the cassiterite phase. TGA analysis indicated four temperature regions over which mass loss was observed. These and the in situ DRIFTS studies revealed the existence of various forms of water associated with specific crystal facets of the SnO2, as well as the existence of isolated O-H groups and adsorbed oxygen species. Electronic absorptions were also observed and the data rationalised in terms of the existence of both free electron absorptions, and absorptions from oxygen vacancy states. The role of adsorbed molecular oxygen in electrochemical ozone generation at Ni and Sb co-doped SnO2 (NATO) anodes was strongly suggested by this work.

  6. High Prevalence of Dehydration and Inadequate Nutritional Knowledge Among University and Club Level Athletes.

    PubMed

    Magee, Pamela J; Gallagher, Alison M; McCormack, Jacqueline M

    2016-10-06

    Although dehydration of ≥2% body weight (BW) loss significantly impairs endurance performance, dehydration remains prevalent among athletes and may be owing to a lack of knowledge in relation to fluid requirements. The aim of this study was to assess the hydration status of university/club level athletes (n=430) from a range of sports/activities (army officer cadet training; bootcamp training; cycling; Gaelic Athletic Association camogie, football and hurling; golf; hockey; netball; rugby; running (sprinting and endurance); Shotokan karate and soccer) immediately before and after training/competition and to assess their nutritional knowledge. Urine specific gravity (USG) was measured immediately before and after exercise and BW loss during exercise was assessed. Nutritional knowledge was assessed using a validated questionnaire. 31.9% of athletes commenced exercise in a dehydrated state (USG >1.020) with 43.6% of participants dehydrated post-training/competition. Dehydration was particularly prevalent (>40% of cohort) among karateka, female netball players, army officer cadets, and golfers. Golfers that commenced a competitive 18 hole round dehydrated took a significantly higher number of strokes to complete the round in comparison to their euhydrated counterparts (79.5 ± 2.1 vs. 75.7 ± 3.9 strokes, p = .049). Nutritional knowledge was poor among participants (median total score [IQR]; 52.9% [46.0, 59.8]), albeit athletes who were euhydrated at the start of exercise had a higher overall score in comparison to dehydrated athletes (55.2% vs. 50.6%, p = .001). Findings from the current study, therefore, have significant implications for the education of athletes in relation to their individual fluid requirements around exercise.

  7. Correlation of rock dehydration and dynamic micro state-rate friction law to coseismic fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.; Shi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the relationship between the coseismic fault rock dehydration and micro state-rate friction law have been explored at multi temporal scales level by using hybrid hypersingular integral equation & Lattice Boltzmann method (HHIE-LBM) under parallel CPU and GPU platform. First, seven standard rock specimens from Continental Scientific Drilling Project in China were studied. Based on the micro tomography technology, digital restructure technology and first principle, molecular scale (10nm) virtual modules, micro crystal scale (30~50nm) and meso crystals scale (2um~10um) were established, respectively. The mechanism of structural OH and molecular H2O translate through internal crystal structure, the mechanism of molecular H2O translate through crystal spaces and the supercritical water through crystal spaces and dislocations were explored and the relatively critical temperature and pressure to these specimens were obtained. The simulation results show that the diffusion, transport and dehydration energy of structural OH is two orders of magnitude than molecular H2O, and the diffusion, transport and dehydration energy of molecular H2O is one order of magnitude than supercritical water. Second, the diffusion, transport and dehydration process of structural OH, molecular H2O and supercritical water on the coseismic fault is studied and the relationship between micro dynamics friction coefficient, dehydration process and ultra temperature and pressure is presentation. The classical state and rate friction law is revised and extended micro state and rate friction law which consider the effect of fault interface rock dehydration and thermal diffusion is obtained, and these formulation will helpful understand the earthquake triggering mechanism and provide theoretical suggestion for earthquake early warning system. Key words Structural HO, molecular H2O and supercritical water, Diffusion transport and dehydration; Ultra high temperature and pressure; Developed

  8. High field 27Al MAS NMR and TPD studies of active sites in ethanol dehydration using thermally treated transitional aluminas as catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Xu, Suochang; Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Mary Y.; Wan, Chuan; Zhao, Zhenchao; Szanyi, Janos; Bao, Xinhe; Han, Xiuwen; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2016-04-01

    Gamma-, sigma- and theta-Al2O3 are well known metastable “transitional” alumina structural polymorphs. Upon heating, Al2O3 transitions to the so-called and Al2O3 polymorphs and finally forms the thermally stable Al2O3. The poorly developed crystallinity and co-existence of the , , and Al2O3 prior to forming all Al2O3, making it difficult to characterize the structures as well as to quantify the various phases of the transition alumina. As a result, there are significant controversies in the literatures. In this work, a detailed NMR analysis was carried out at high magnetic field on three special aluminum oxide samples where the, , , Al2O3 phases are made dominant, respectively, by controlling the synthesis conditions. The goal is to simplify, including making unambiguous, spectral assignments in 27Al MAS NMR spectra of transition alumina that have not yet been commonly agreed previously. Specifically, quantitative 1D 27Al MAS NMR was used to quantify the ratios of the different alumina structural units, 2D MQMAS 27Al MAS was used for obtaining the highest spectral resolution to guide the analysis of the 1D spectrum, and a saturation pulse sequence was integrated into the 1D NMR to select the amorphous structures, including obtain spectra where the penta-coordinate sites are observed with enhanced relative intensity. Collectively, this study uniquely assigns Al-peaks (both octahedral and tetrahedral) to the Al2O3 and the Al2O3 phases and offers a new way of understanding, including quantifying, the different structural units and sites in transition alumina samples.

  9. Banana Dehydration Utilizing Infrared Radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzyme of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been found to be the main cause of browning in bananas. Infrared radiation (IR) drying could be used to minimize biochemical degradation hence eliminating the need for pre-treatments. This study was to investigate quality characteristics of bananas dried ...

  10. Dehydrative cross-coupling reactions of allylic alcohols with olefins.

    PubMed

    Gumrukcu, Yasemin; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2014-08-25

    The direct dehydrative activation of allylic alcohols and subsequent cross-coupling with alkenes by using palladium catalyst containing a phosphoramidite ligand is described. The activation of the allyl alcohol does not require stoichiometric additives, thus allowing clean, waste-free reactions. The scope is demonstrated by application of the protocol to a series allylic alcohols and vinyl arenes, leading to variety of 1,4-diene products. Based on kinetic studies, a mechanism is proposed that involves a palladium hydride species that activates the allyl alcohol to form the allyl intermediate.

  11. Impact of postharvest dehydration process of winegrapes on mechanical and acoustic properties of the seeds and their relationship with flavanol extraction during simulated maceration.

    PubMed

    Río Segade, Susana; Torchio, Fabrizio; Gerbi, Vincenzo; Quijada-Morín, Natalia; García-Estévez, Ignacio; Giacosa, Simone; Escribano-Bailón, M Teresa; Rolle, Luca

    2016-05-15

    This study represents the first time that the extraction of phenolic compounds from the seeds is assessed from instrumental texture properties for dehydrated grapes. Nebbiolo winegrapes were postharvest dehydrated at 20°C and 41% relative humidity. During the dehydration process, sampling was performed at 15%, 30%, 45% and 60% weight loss. The extractable fraction and extractability of phenolic compounds from the seeds were determined after simulated maceration. The evolution of mechanical and acoustic attributes of intact seeds was also determined during grape dehydration to evaluate how these changes affected the extraction of phenolic compounds. The extractable content and extractability of monomeric flavanols and proanthocyanidins, as well as the galloylation percentage of flavanols, might be predicted easily and quickly from the mechanical and acoustic properties of intact seeds. This would help in decision-making on the optimal dehydration level of winegrapes and the best management of winemaking of dehydrated grapes.

  12. Effect of acute mild dehydration on cognitive-motor performance in golf.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark F; Newell, Alex J; Baker, Mistrelle R

    2012-11-01

    Whether mild dehydration (-1 to 3% body mass change [ΔBM]) impairs neurophysiological function during sport-specific cognitive-motor performance has yet to be fully elucidated. To investigate this within a golfing context, 7 low-handicap players (age: 21 ± 1.1 years; mass: 76.1 ± 11.8 kg; stature: 1.77 ± 0.07 m; handicap: 3.0 ± 1.2) completed a golf-specific motor and cognitive performance task in a euhydrated condition (EC) and dehydrated condition (DC) (randomized counterbalanced design; 7-day interval). Dehydration was controlled using a previously effective 12-hour fluid restriction, monitored through ΔBM and urine color assessment (UCOL). Mild dehydration reduced the mean BM by 1.5 ± 0.5% (p = 0.01), with UCOL increasing from 2 (EC) to 4 (DC) (p = 0.02). Mild dehydration significantly impaired motor performance, expressed as shot distance (114.6 vs. 128.6 m; p < 0.001) and off-target accuracy (7.9 vs. 4.1 m; p = 0.001). Cognitive performance, expressed as the mean error in distance judgment to target increased from 4.1 ± 3.0 m (EC) to 8.8 ± 4.7 m (DC) (p < 0.001). The findings support those of previous research that indicates mild dehydration (-1 to 2% ΔBM) significantly impairs cognitive-motor task performance. This study is the first to show that mild dehydration can impair distance, accuracy, and distance judgment during golf performance.

  13. Dehydration and drinking behavior of the marine file snake Acrochordus granulatus.

    PubMed

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Heatwole, Harold; Sheehy, Coleman M

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration and drinking behaviors were investigated in the little file snake (Acrochordus granulatus) collected from marine populations in the Philippines and in Australia. File snakes dehydrate in seawater and do not drink seawater when dehydrated in air and offered seawater to drink. Dehydrated file snakes drink freshwater, and the threshold of dehydration for first drinking response is a deficit of -7.4% ± 2.73% (mean ± SD) of original body mass. The thirst mechanism in this species is more sensitive than that recently studied in sea snakes. The volume of water ingested increases with increasing dehydration. Mean plasma osmolality was 278.89 ± 33.17 mMol/kg, mean hematocrit was 59% ± 5.45%, and both decreased in snakes that drank freshwater following acclimation in seawater. Snakes always drank freshwater at the water's surface, testing water with tongue flicks between each swallowing of water. Some snakes ingested large volumes of freshwater, approaching 50% of body mass. Visual observations and measurements of osmolality in plasma and stomach fluids suggest that water is taken up from the gut and dilutes body fluids slowly over the course of 48 h or longer. Eighty percent of snakes that were collected during the dry season (following >4 mo of drought) in Australia drank freshwater immediately following their capture, indicating that snakes were dehydrated in their marine environment even when known to have been feeding at the time. Snakes kept in seawater maintained a higher state of body condition when freshwater was periodically available. These results support a growing conclusion that diverse taxa of marine snakes require environmental sources of freshwater to maintain water balance, contrary to earlier belief. Identifying the freshwater requirements of secondarily marine vertebrates is important for better understanding how they maintain water balance in marine habitats, especially with respect to conservation in changing environments.

  14. Water Temperature, Voluntary Drinking and Fluid Balance in Dehydrated Taekwondo Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Khamnei, Saeed; Hosseinlou, Abdollah; Zamanlu, Masumeh

    2011-01-01

    Voluntary drinking is one of the major determiners of rehydration, especially as regards exercise or workout in the heat. The present study undertakes to search for the effect of voluntary intake of water with different temperatures on fluid balance in Taekwondo athletes. Six young healthy male Taekwondo athletes were dehydrated by moderate exercise in a chamber with ambient temperature at 38-40°C and relative humidity between 20-30%. On four separate days they were allowed to drink ad libitum plane water with the four temperatures of 5, 16, 26, and 58°C, after dehydration. The volume of voluntary drinking and weight change was measured; then the primary percentage of dehydration, sweat loss, fluid deficit and involuntary dehydration were calculated. Voluntary drinking of water proved to be statistically different in the presented temperatures. Water at 16°C involved the greatest intake, while fluid deficit and involuntary dehydration were the lowest. Intake of water in the 5°C trial significantly correlated with the subject’s plasma osmolality change after dehydration, yet it showed no significant correlation with weight loss. In conclusion, by way of achieving more voluntary intake of water and better fluid state, recommending cool water (~16°C) for athletes is in order. Unlike the publicly held view, drinking cold water (~5°C) does not improve voluntary drinking and hydration status. Key points For athletes dehydrated in hot environments, maximum voluntary drinking and best hydration state occurs with 16°C water. Provision of fluid needs and thermal needs could be balanced using 16°C water. Drinking 16°C water (nearly the temperature of cool tap water) could be recommended for exercise in the heat. PMID:24149564

  15. Transcriptome sequencing and whole genome expression profiling of chrysanthemum under dehydration stress

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chrysanthemum is one of the most important ornamental crops in the world and drought stress seriously limits its production and distribution. In order to generate a functional genomics resource and obtain a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms regarding chrysanthemum responses to dehydration stress, we performed large-scale transcriptome sequencing of chrysanthemum plants under dehydration stress using the Illumina sequencing technology. Results Two cDNA libraries constructed from mRNAs of control and dehydration-treated seedlings were sequenced by Illumina technology. A total of more than 100 million reads were generated and de novo assembled into 98,180 unique transcripts which were further extensively annotated by comparing their sequencing to different protein databases. Biochemical pathways were predicted from these transcript sequences. Furthermore, we performed gene expression profiling analysis upon dehydration treatment in chrysanthemum and identified 8,558 dehydration-responsive unique transcripts, including 307 transcription factors and 229 protein kinases and many well-known stress responsive genes. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment and biochemical pathway analyses showed that dehydration stress caused changes in hormone response, secondary and amino acid metabolism, and light and photoperiod response. These findings suggest that drought tolerance of chrysanthemum plants may be related to the regulation of hormone biosynthesis and signaling, reduction of oxidative damage, stabilization of cell proteins and structures, and maintenance of energy and carbon supply. Conclusions Our transcriptome sequences can provide a valuable resource for chrysanthemum breeding and research and novel insights into chrysanthemum responses to dehydration stress and offer candidate genes or markers that can be used to guide future studies attempting to breed drought tolerant chrysanthemum cultivars. PMID:24074255

  16. Water temperature, voluntary drinking and fluid balance in dehydrated taekwondo athletes.

    PubMed

    Khamnei, Saeed; Hosseinlou, Abdollah; Zamanlu, Masumeh

    2011-01-01

    Voluntary drinking is one of the major determiners of rehydration, especially as regards exercise or workout in the heat. The present study undertakes to search for the effect of voluntary intake of water with different temperatures on fluid balance in Taekwondo athletes. Six young healthy male Taekwondo athletes were dehydrated by moderate exercise in a chamber with ambient temperature at 38-40°C and relative humidity between 20-30%. On four separate days they were allowed to drink ad libitum plane water with the four temperatures of 5, 16, 26, and 58°C, after dehydration. The volume of voluntary drinking and weight change was measured; then the primary percentage of dehydration, sweat loss, fluid deficit and involuntary dehydration were calculated. Voluntary drinking of water proved to be statistically different in the presented temperatures. Water at 16°C involved the greatest intake, while fluid deficit and involuntary dehydration were the lowest. Intake of water in the 5°C trial significantly correlated with the subject's plasma osmolality change after dehydration, yet it showed no significant correlation with weight loss. In conclusion, by way of achieving more voluntary intake of water and better fluid state, recommending cool water (~16°C) for athletes is in order. Unlike the publicly held view, drinking cold water (~5°C) does not improve voluntary drinking and hydration status. Key pointsFor athletes dehydrated in hot environments, maximum voluntary drinking and best hydration state occurs with 16°C water.Provision of fluid needs and thermal needs could be balanced using 16°C water.Drinking 16°C water (nearly the temperature of cool tap water) could be recommended for exercise in the heat.

  17. Slow slip generated by dehydration reaction coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Teruo; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-10-01

    Sustained slow slip, which is a distinctive feature of slow slip events (SSEs), is investigated theoretically, assuming a fault embedded within a fluid-saturated 1D thermo-poro-elastic medium. The object of study is specifically SSEs occurring at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone in hot subduction zones, where mineral dehydrations (antigorite, lawsonite, chlorite, and glaucophane) are expected to occur near locations where deep slow slip events are observed. In the modeling, we introduce dehydration reactions, coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization, and slip evolution is assumed to interact with fluid pressure change through Coulomb's frictional stress. Our calculations show that sustained slow slip events occur when the dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Specifically, slow slip is favored by a low initial stress drop, an initial temperature of the medium close to that of the dehydration reaction equilibrium temperature, a low permeability, and overall negative volume change associated with the reaction (i.e., void space created by the reaction larger than the space occupied by the fluid released). Importantly, if we do not assume slip-induced dilatancy, slip is accelerated with time soon after the slip onset even if the dehydration reaction is assumed. This suggests that slow slip is sustained for a long time at hot subduction zones because dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Such slip-induced dilatancy may occur at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone at hot subduction zones because of repetitive occurrence of dehydration reaction there.

  18. Biased insert for installing data transmission components in downhole drilling pipe

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Briscoe, Michael A.; Garner, Kory K.; Wilde, Tyson J.

    2007-04-10

    An apparatus for installing data transmission hardware in downhole tools includes an insert insertable into the box end or pin end of drill tool, such as a section of drill pipe. The insert typically includes a mount portion and a slide portion. A data transmission element is mounted in the slide portion of the insert. A biasing element is installed between the mount portion and the slide portion and is configured to create a bias between the slide portion and the mount portion. This biasing element is configured to compensate for varying tolerances encountered in different types of downhole tools. In selected embodiments, the biasing element is an elastomeric material, a spring, compressed gas, or a combination thereof.

  19. High-Temperature Motor Windings for Downhole Pumps Used in Geothermal Energy Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, Matthew; Hazelton, Craig; Kano, Kimi

    2010-12-31

    The development of highly reliable downhole equipment is an essential element in enabling the widespread utilization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The downhole equipment used in these systems will be required to operate at high voltages and temperatures on the order of 200 to 250°C (and eventually to 300°C). These conditions exceed the practical operating ranges of currently available thermoplastic wire insulations, and thus limit the operating lifetime of tools such as Electric Submersible Pumps (ESPs). In this work, high-temperature insulations based on composite materials were developed and demonstrated. The products of this work were found to exhibit electrical resistivities and dielectric breakdown strengths that PEEK at temperatures above 250C. In addition, sub-scale motor windings were fabricated and tested to validate the performance of this technology

  20. Tracking CO2 Geosequestration Using Downhole Gravity Gradiometry, Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, S.; O'Neill, C.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration is a vital technique for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and anthropogenic global warming. The viability of CO2 geosequestration, and the ability to prevent any leakage or migration depends on the capacity to monitor, and model, the CO2 reservoir. Downhole gravity gradiometry offers an additional capability to CO2 monitoring, and here we demonstrate the downhole gradient effect of CO2 injection at the Otway Basin, Victoria, by the CO2CRC corporation. Data from reservoir modelling has been simulated to calculate gravity gradients to gain an understanding of the behaviour of CO2 once injected into geological storage. Monte Carlo simulations were utilised to determine the uncertainties inherent in the deep subsurface. Presently; models have been created to demonstrate the response caused by the injection of CO2, and we present a statistical analysis to constrain the uncertainties posed by the results.

  1. An Internal Coaxial Cable Electrical Connector For Use In Downhole Tools

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael

    2005-11-29

    A coaxial cable electrical connector more specifically an internal coaxial cable connector placed within a coaxial cable and its constituent components. A coaxial cable connector is in electrical communcation with an inductive transformer and a coaxial cable. The connector is in electrical communication with the outer housing of the inductive transfonner. A generally coaxial center conductor, a portion of which could be the coil in the inductive transformer, passes through the connector, is electrically insulated from the connector, and is in electrical communication with the conductive care of the coaxial cable. A plurality of bulbous pliant tabs on the coaxial cable connector mechanically engage the inside diameter of the coaxial cable thus grounding the transformer to the coaxial cable. The coaxial cable and inductive transformer are disposed within downhole tools to transmit electrical signals between downhole tools within a drill string.

  2. Downhole steam generator using low-pressure fuel and air supply

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.L.

    1981-01-07

    For tertiary oil recovery, an apparatus for downhole steam generation is designed in which water is not injected directly onto the flame in the combustor, the combustion process is isolated from the reservoir pressure, the fuel and oxidant are supplied to the combustor at relatively low pressures, and the hot exhaust gases is prevented from entering the earth formation but is used to preheat the fuel and oxidant and water. The combustion process is isolated from the steam generation process. (DLC)

  3. Fluid flow monitoring in oilfields using downhole measurements of electrokinetic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. D.; Saunders, J. H.; Pain, C. C.

    2006-12-01

    Permanently installed downhole sensors are increasingly being deployed to provide `real-time' reservoir data during hydrocarbon production, which helps to reduce uncertainty in the reservoir description and contributes to reservoir management decisions. Where wells are equipped with inflow control valves (so called `intelligent' wells), it is possible to develop a feedback loop between measurement and control to optimize production. We suggest that measurements of electrokinetic potential during production, using permanently installed downhole electrodes, could be used to detect water encroachment towards an intelligent oil well. Downhole electrodes mounted at the production well on the outside of insulated casing, have been successfully applied in subsurface resistivity surveys during oil production. Similar technology could be used to measure electrokinetic potential. Moreover, recent and ongoing work has changed our understanding of electrokinetic coupling under two-phase conditions. We present the results of numerical simulations of fluid movement during hydrocarbon production, using a new formulation which captures both the changing fluid distributions and the resulting electrical potentials. We suggest that encroaching water causes changes in electrokinetic potential at the production well which could be resolved above background electrical noise; indeed, changes in water saturation could be detected several 10's to 100's of metres away from the well. This contrasts with most other downhole monitoring techniques, which sample only the region immediately adjacent to the wellbore. Signal resolution is improved if the water has a relatively low salinity, and the pressure gradient into the well is large. However, significant uncertainties remain concerning the nature of electrokinetic coupling during the flow of oil and water, particularly in mixed and oil-wet reservoirs.

  4. Deformation-induced dehydration structures in the Nankai accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famin, V.; Byrne, T.; Lewis, J. C.; Kanagawa, K.; Behrmann, J.; Iodp 314/315/316 Scientists, E.

    2008-12-01

    This study investigates the chemical changes caused by deformation in the hanging wall of a major, probably seismogenic thrust fault in the Kumano forearc basin, Nankai Trough. In cores from IODP Expedition 315 (site C0001), the clay sediments display numerous deformation structures including tilted beddings, decimeter scale faults and shear zones with normal or thrust offsets, and clusters of parallel curviplanar veins interpreted as earthquake-induced dewatering structures. Curviplanar veins are often observed to merge into small oblique shear zones with millimeter offsets, or to branch on larger shear zones with a ~30° angle. This suggests that some shear zones may form by the coalescence of veins. Curviplanar veins and shear zones appear darker than the surrounding clay at the macroscopic observation scale, and brighter and therefore denser under CT-scan imaging. At the micro-scale, clay has a preferred crystallographic orientation in the deformation structures and no preferred orientation outside. Electron probe micro-analysis reveals that the dark material has a higher sum of major elements (65-80 wt%), i.e. a lower volatile content (assumed to be mostly water) than the host sediment (50-60 wt%). All the major elements are equally enriched in proportion to the volatile depletion. Mass balance calculation indicates that a 20-30 wt% water loss is required to account for chemical change in the deformation microstructures. The water loss may be due to clay dehydration or to pore collapse. Shear zones are equally dehydrated as the curviplanar veins from the mass balance standpoint. In 1 m3 of sediment, a deformed volume of 1 % should produce about 6.2 L of water. Given the low permeability of the sediment, dehydration may increase the pore pressure and enhance further deformation. Deformation localization would be self-sustained by fluid overpressure, suggesting that dewatering veins may evolve into larger deformation structures after an earthquake.

  5. An Internal Coaxial Cable Electrical Connector For Use In Downhole Tools

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael

    2005-09-20

    A seal for a coaxial cable electrical connector more specifically an internal seal for a coaxial cable connector placed within a coaxial cable and its constituent components. A coaxial cable connector is in electrical communcation with an inductive transformer and a coaxial cable. The connector is in electrical communication with the outer housing of the inductive transformer. A generally coaxial center conductor, a portion of which could be the coil in the inductive transformer, passes through the connector, is electrically insulated from the connector, and is in electrical communication with the conductive core of the coaxial cable. The electrically insulating material also doubles as a seal to safegaurd against penetration of fluid, thus protecting against shorting out of the electrical connection. The seal is a multi-component seal, which is pre-compressed to a desired pressure rating. The coaxial cable and inductive transformer are disposed within downhole tools to transmit electrical signals between downhole tools within a drill string. The internal coaxial cable connector and its attendant seal can be used in a plurality of downhole tools, such as sections of pipe in a drill string, drill collars, heavy weight drill pipe, and jars.

  6. Echo State Networks for data-driven downhole pressure estimation in gas-lift oil wells.

    PubMed

    Antonelo, Eric A; Camponogara, Eduardo; Foss, Bjarne

    2017-01-01

    Process measurements are of vital importance for monitoring and control of industrial plants. When we consider offshore oil production platforms, wells that require gas-lift technology to yield oil production from low pressure oil reservoirs can become unstable under some conditions. This undesirable phenomenon is usually called slugging flow, and can be identified by an oscillatory behavior of the downhole pressure measurement. Given the importance of this measurement and the unreliability of the related sensor, this work aims at designing data-driven soft-sensors for downhole pressure estimation in two contexts: one for speeding up first-principle model simulation of a vertical riser model; and another for estimating the downhole pressure using real-world data from an oil well from Petrobras based only on topside platform measurements. Both tasks are tackled by employing Echo State Networks (ESN) as an efficient technique for training Recurrent Neural Networks. We show that a single ESN is capable of robustly modeling both the slugging flow behavior and a steady state based only on a square wave input signal representing the production choke opening in the vertical riser. Besides, we compare the performance of a standard network to the performance of a multiple timescale hierarchical architecture in the second task and show that the latter architecture performs better in modeling both large irregular transients and more commonly occurring small oscillations.

  7. Downhole seismic logging for high-resolution reflection surveying in unconsolidated overburden

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J.A.; Pullan, S.E.; Burns, R.A.; Good, R.L.; Harris, J.B.; Pugin, A.; Skvortsov, A.; Goriainov, N.N.

    1998-07-01

    Downhole seismic velocity logging techniques have been developed and applied in support of high-resolution reflection seismic surveys. Data obtained from downhole seismic logging can provide accurate velocity-depth functions and directly correlate seismic reflections to depth. The methodologies described in this paper are designed for slimhole applications in plastic-cased boreholes (minimum ID of 50 mm) and with source and detector arrays that yield similar frequency ranges and vertical depth resolutions as the surface reflection surveys. Compressional- (P-) wave logging uses a multichannel hydrophone array with 0.5-m detector spacings in a fluid-filled borehole and a high-frequency, in-hole shotgun source at the surface. Overlapping array positions downhole results in redundant first-arrival data which can be processed to provide accurate interval velocities. The data also can be displayed as a record suite, showing reflections and directly correlating reflection events with depths. Example applications include identification of gas zones, lithological boundaries within unconsolidated sediments, and the overburden-bedrock interface. Shear- (S-) wave logging uses a slimhole, well-locked, three-component (3-C) geophone pod and a horizontally polarized, hammer-and-loaded-plate source at ground surface. In unconsolidated sediments, shear-wave velocity contrasts can be associated with changes in material density or dynamic shear modulus, which in turn can be related to consolidation. Example applications include identification of a lithological boundary for earthquake hazard applications and mapping massive ice within permafrost materials.

  8. Back azimuth constrained double-difference seismic location and tomography for downhole microseismic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yukuan; Zhang, Haijiang; Miao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yinsheng; Liu, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a new seismic tomography method, back azimuth constrained double-difference (DD) seismic tomography, which is suitable for downhole microseismic monitoring of hydraulic fracturing. The new method simultaneously locates microseismic events and determines three-dimensional (3D) Vp and Vs models for the fracturing zone using differential arrival times from pairs of events and event back azimuths in addition to absolute arrival times. Compared to the existing DD location and tomography method, our method incorporates back azimuth information to better constrain microseismic event locations in the case of poor spatial station coverage such as the linear downhole seismic array generally used for microseismic monitoring. By incorporating the relative arrival time and back azimuth information of events, the extended DD method can provide better relative event locations, and thus can better characterize the fracture distribution. In addition to microseismic locations, seismic velocity anomalies determined around the fracturing zone may also provide valuable information for fracture development. Due to the existence of fractures and fluids, the seismic velocity is expected to be lower in the fractured zone compared to the surrounding regions. Therefore the area of low seismic velocity anomaly may be used as a proxy for the stimulated reservoir volume. We have applied the new method to a downhole microseismic dataset from shale gas hydraulic fracturing. The microseismic events are more accurately relocated than the conventional grid search location method, and they are generally associated with low velocity anomalies.

  9. Downhole Transformation of the Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Biocide Glutaraldehyde: Implications for Flowback and Produced Water Quality.

    PubMed

    Kahrilas, Genevieve A; Blotevogel, Jens; Corrin, Edward R; Borch, Thomas

    2016-10-18

    Hydraulic fracturing fluid (HFF) additives are used to enhance oil and gas extraction from unconventional shale formations. Several kilometers downhole, these organic chemicals are exposed to temperatures up to 200 °C, pressures above 10 MPa, high salinities, and a pH range from 5-8. Despite this, very little is known about the fate of HFF additives under these extreme conditions. Here, stainless steel reactors are used to simulate the downhole chemistry of the commonly used HFF biocide glutaraldehyde (GA). The results show that GA rapidly (t1/2 < 1 h) autopolymerizes, forming water-soluble dimers and trimers, and eventually precipitates out at high temperatures (∼140 °C) and/or alkaline pH. Interestingly, salinity was found to significantly inhibit GA transformation. Pressure and shale did not affect GA transformation and/or removal from the bulk fluid. On the basis of experimental pseudo-second-order rate constants, a kinetic model for GA downhole half-life predictions for any combination of these conditions within the limits tested was developed. These findings illustrate that the biocidal GA monomer has limited time to control microbial activity in hot and/or alkaline shales, and may return along with its aqueous transformation products to the surface via flowback and produced water in cooler, more acidic, and saline shales.

  10. Colour, phenolic content and antioxidant capacity of some fruits dehydrated by a combination of different methods.

    PubMed

    Chong, Chien Hwa; Law, Chung Lim; Figiel, Adam; Wojdyło, Aneta; Oziembłowski, Maciej

    2013-12-15

    The objective of this study was to improve product quality of dehydrated fruits (apple, pear, papaya, mango) using combined drying techniques. This involved investigation of bioactivity, colour, and sensory assessment on colour of the dried products as well as the retention of the bio-active ingredients. The attributes of quality were compared in regard to the quality of dehydrated samples obtained from continuous heat pump (HP) drying technique. It was found that for apple, pear and mango the total colour change (ΔE) of samples dried using continuous heat pump (HP) or heat pump vacuum-microwave (HP/VM) methods was lower than of samples dried by other combined methods. However, for papaya, the lowest colour change exhibited by samples dried using hot air-cold air (HHC) method and the highest colour change was found for heat pump (HP) dehydrated samples. Sensory evaluation revealed that dehydrated pear with higher total colour change (ΔE) is more desirable because of its golden yellow appearance. In most cases the highest phenol content was found from fruits dried by HP/VM method. Judging from the quality findings on two important areas namely colour and bioactivity, it was found that combined drying method consisted of HP pre-drying followed by VM finish drying gave the best results for most dehydrated fruits studied in this work as the fruits contain first group of polyphenol compounds, which preferably requires low temperature followed by rapid drying strategy.

  11. ABI3 mediates dehydration stress recovery response in Arabidopsis thaliana by regulating expression of downstream genes.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Sonia; Sengupta, Sourabh; Ray, Anagh; Nag Chaudhuri, Ronita

    2016-09-01

    ABI3, originally discovered as a seed-specific transcription factor is now implicated to act beyond seed physiology, especially during abiotic stress. In non-seed plants, ABI3 is known to act in desiccation stress signaling. Here we show that ABI3 plays a role in dehydration stress response in Arabidopsis. ABI3 gene was upregulated during dehydration stress and its expression was maintained during subsequent stress recovery phases. Comparative gene expression studies in response to dehydration stress and stress recovery were done with genes which had potential ABI3 binding sites in their upstream regulatory regions. Such studies showed that several genes including known seed-specific factors like CRUCIFERIN1, CRUCIFERIN3 and LEA-group of genes like LEA76, LEA6, DEHYDRIN LEA and LEA-LIKE got upregulated in an ABI3-dependent manner, especially during the stress recovery phase. ABI3 got recruited to regions upstream to the transcription start site of these genes during dehydration stress response through direct or indirect DNA binding. Interestingly, ABI3 also binds to its own promoter region during such stress signaling. Nucleosomes covering potential ABI3 binding sites in the upstream sequences of the above-mentioned genes alter positions, and show increased H3 K9 acetylation during stress-induced transcription. ABI3 thus mediates dehydration stress signaling in Arabidopsis through regulation of a group of genes that play a role primarily during stress recovery phase.

  12. Heat stress and dehydration in adapting for performance: Good, bad, both, or neither?

    PubMed Central

    Akerman, Ashley Paul; Tipton, Michael; Minson, Christopher T.; Cotter, James David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Physiological systems respond acutely to stress to minimize homeostatic disturbance, and typically adapt to chronic stress to enhance tolerance to that or a related stressor. It is legitimate to ask whether dehydration is a valuable stressor in stimulating adaptation per se. While hypoxia has had long-standing interest by athletes and researchers as an ergogenic aid, heat and nutritional stressors have had little interest until the past decade. Heat and dehydration are highly interlinked in their causation and the physiological strain they induce, so their individual roles in adaptation are difficult to delineate. The effectiveness of heat acclimation as an ergogenic aid remains unclear for team sport and endurance athletes despite several recent studies on this topic. Very few studies have examined the potential ergogenic (or ergolytic) adaptations to ecologically-valid dehydration as a stressor in its own right, despite longstanding evidence of relevant fluid-regulatory adaptations from short-term hypohydration. Transient and self-limiting dehydration (e.g., as constrained by thirst), as with most forms of stress, might have a time and a place in physiological or behavioral adaptations independently or by exacerbating other stressors (esp. heat); it cannot be dismissed without the appropriate evidence. The present review did not identify such evidence. Future research should identify how the magnitude and timing of dehydration might augment or interfere with the adaptive processes in behaviorally constrained versus unconstrained humans. PMID:28349082

  13. Differential dehydration effects on globular proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins during film formation.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Juliana Sakamoto; Miles, Andew J; Araujo, Ana Paula Ulian; Wallace, B A

    2017-04-01

    Globular proteins composed of different secondary structures and fold types were examined by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy to determine the effects of dehydration on their secondary structures. They exhibited only minor changes upon removal of bulk water during film formation, contrary to previously reported studies of proteins dehydrated by lyophilization (where substantial loss of helical structure and gain in sheet structure was detected). This near lack of conformational change observed for globular proteins contrasts with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) dried in the same manner: the IDPs, which have almost completely unordered structures in solution, exhibited increased amounts of regular (mostly helical) secondary structures when dehydrated, suggesting formation of new intra-protein hydrogen bonds replacing solvent-protein hydrogen bonds, in a process which may mimic interactions that occur when IDPs bind to partner molecules. This study has thus shown that the secondary structures of globular and intrinsically disordered proteins behave very differently upon dehydration, and that films are a potentially useful format for examining dehydrated soluble proteins and assessing IDPs structures.

  14. Differential dehydration effects on globular proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins during film formation

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Juliana Sakamoto; Miles, Andew J.; Araujo, Ana Paula Ulian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Globular proteins composed of different secondary structures and fold types were examined by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy to determine the effects of dehydration on their secondary structures. They exhibited only minor changes upon removal of bulk water during film formation, contrary to previously reported studies of proteins dehydrated by lyophilization (where substantial loss of helical structure and gain in sheet structure was detected). This near lack of conformational change observed for globular proteins contrasts with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) dried in the same manner: the IDPs, which have almost completely unordered structures in solution, exhibited increased amounts of regular (mostly helical) secondary structures when dehydrated, suggesting formation of new intra‐protein hydrogen bonds replacing solvent‐protein hydrogen bonds, in a process which may mimic interactions that occur when IDPs bind to partner molecules. This study has thus shown that the secondary structures of globular and intrinsically disordered proteins behave very differently upon dehydration, and that films are a potentially useful format for examining dehydrated soluble proteins and assessing IDPs structures. PMID:28097742

  15. Photosynthetic responses of thalli and isolated protoplasts of Bryopsis hypnoides (Bryopsidales, Chlorophyta) during dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Fang; Wang, Guangce; Jin, Haochen

    2011-03-01

    Bryopsis hypnoides Lamouroux is a unique intertidal siphonous green alga whose extruded protoplasm can aggregate spontaneously in seawater to form numerous new cells that can develop into mature algal thalli. In this study, the photosynthetic responses during dehydration of both the thalli and protoplasts isolated from B. hypnoides were measured using a Dual-PAM (pulse amplitude modulation)-100 fluorometer. The results show that the photosynthetic rates of B. hypnoides thalli were maintained for an initial period, beyond which continued desiccation resulted in reduced rates of PSI and PSII. However, the photosynthetic performances of the isolated protoplasts dehydrated in air (CO2 concentration 600-700 mg/L) showed a slight increase of Y(II) at 20% water loss, but the rates decreased thereafter with declining water content. When protoplasts were dehydrated in CO2 deficient conditions (CO2 concentration 40-80 mg/L), the values of Y(II) declined steadily with increased dehydration without an initial rise. These results indicated that the thalli and isolated protoplasts of this alga can utilize CO2 in ambient air effectively, and the photosynthetic performances of the isolated protoplasts were significantly different from that of the thalli during dehydration. Thus the protoplasts may be an excellent system for the study of stress tolerance.

  16. Metabolic Dysfunction and Unabated Respiration Precede the Loss of Membrane Integrity during Dehydration of Germinating Radicles1

    PubMed Central

    Leprince, Olivier; Harren, Frans J.M.; Buitink, Julia; Alberda, Mark; Hoekstra, Folkert A.

    2000-01-01

    This study shows that dehydration induces imbalanced metabolism before loss of membrane integrity in desiccation-sensitive germinated radicles. Using a photoacoustic detection system, responses of CO2 emission and fermentation to drying were analyzed non-invasively in desiccation-tolerant and -intolerant radicles of cucumber (Cucumis sativa) and pea (Pisum sativum). Survival after drying and a membrane integrity assay showed that desiccation tolerance was present during early imbibition and lost in germinated radicles. However, tolerance could be re-induced in germinated cucumber radicles by incubation in polyethylene glycol before drying. Tolerant and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced tolerant radicles exhibited a much-reduced CO2 production before dehydration compared with desiccation-sensitive radicles. This difference was maintained during dehydration. In desiccation-sensitive tissues, dehydration induced an increase in the emission of acetaldehyde and ethanol that peaked well before the loss of membrane integrity. Acetaldehyde emission from sensitive radicles was significantly reduced when dehydration occurred in 50% O2 instead of air. Acetaldehyde/ethanol were not detected in dehydrating tolerant radicles of either species or in polyethylene glycol-induced tolerant cucumber radicles. Thus, a balance between down-regulation of metabolism during drying and O2 availability appears to be associated with desiccation tolerance. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, acetaldehyde was found to disturb the phase behavior of phospholipid vesicles, suggesting that the products resulting from imbalanced metabolism in seeds may aggravate membrane damage induced by dehydration. PMID:10677452

  17. Anomalous dehydration of the TTL during January 2013: evidence from balloon, aircraft and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaykin, Sergey; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Hauchecorne, Alain; Rivière, Emmanuel; Amarouche, Nadir; Ghysel, Melanie; Wienhold, Frank; Held, Gerard; Evan, Stephanie; Thornberry, Troy; Rollins, Andrew; Fahey, David; Vömel, Holger; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Rosenlof, Karen

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study is to comprehensively document an anomalous dehydration of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) related to a major Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW) in January 2013. The analysis involves the data of balloon soundings of water vapour at various tropical locations using FLASH-B, Pico-SDLA and CFH hygrometers as well as NOAA Water instrument flown onboard high-altitude Global Hawk aircraft. Simultaneous water vapour and backscatter measurements by FLASH-B and COBALD sondes provide information on tropopause clouds formation process. Satellite observations of water vapour by Aura MLS are used to derive the deviation from climatological values. Trajectory modeling is applied for locating the dehydration source spots. Spatiotemporal evolution of dehydration at different scales is characterized after combining the consistent in situ and satellite water vapour observations. All data sets provide evidence of rapid and severe dehydration of the TTL throughout the tropical belt shortly after the onset of SSW. In situ measurements around the Cold Point Tropopause (CPT) show up to 2 ppmv of negative deviation from MLS 10-year climatology with extreme water mixing ratios below 1 ppmv in the Western Pacific region. The TTL dehydration case of 2013 is compared with previous similar occurrences and the role of extra-tropical dynamics in setting the global stratospheric water budget through thermal response in the TTL is pointed out

  18. The dehydration kinetics of gypsum at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuanjiang; Zheng, Haifei; Wang, Duojun

    2015-07-01

    An in situ dehydration kinetics study of gypsum under water-saturated condition was performed in the temperature and pressure ranges of 383-423 K and 343-1085 MPa by using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell and Raman spectroscopy. Kinetic analysis shows that the dehydration rate k increases with pressure, suggesting a negative pressure dependence on dehydration rate. The elevation of temperature can contribute to the dehydration. The n values increase with pressure, indicating that the nucleation process becomes slower relative to the growth process. According to the n values of ∼1.0, the dehydration of gypsum is dominated by an instantaneous nucleation and diffusion-controlled growth mechanism. The obtained average activation volume ▵V is equal to 5.69 cm3/mol and the calculated activation energy Ea and the pre-exponential factor A are 66.9 kJ/mol and 4.66 × 105 s-1. The activation energy may be dependent upon grain size, shape, temperature and pressure, and surrounding water.

  19. Simulation of mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of apple: a power law approximation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi Souraki, B.; Tondro, H.; Ghavami, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, unsteady one-dimensional mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of apple was modeled using an approximate mathematical model. The mathematical model has been developed based on a power law profile approximation for moisture and solute concentrations in the spatial direction. The proposed model was validated by the experimental water loss and solute gain data, obtained from osmotic dehydration of infinite slab and cylindrical shape samples of apple in sucrose solutions (30, 40 and 50 % w/w), at different temperatures (30, 40 and 50 °C). The proposed model's predictions were also compared with the exact analytical and also a parabolic approximation model's predictions. The values of mean relative errors respect to the experimental data were estimated between 4.5 and 8.1 %, 6.5 and 10.2 %, and 15.0 and 19.1 %, for exact analytical, power law and parabolic approximation methods, respectively. Although the parabolic approximation leads to simpler relations, the power law approximation method results in higher accuracy of average concentrations over the whole domain of dehydration time. Considering both simplicity and precision of the mathematical models, the power law model for short dehydration times and the simplified exact analytical model for long dehydration times could be used for explanation of the variations of the average water loss and solute gain in the whole domain of dimensionless times.

  20. Quantitative analysis of dehydration in porcine skin for assessing mechanism of optical clearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tingting; Wen, Xiang; Tuchin, Valery V.; Luo, Qingming; Zhu, Dan

    2011-09-01

    Dehydration induced by optical clearing agents (OCAs) can improve tissue optical transmittance; however, current studies merely gave some qualitative descriptions. We develop a model to quantitatively evaluate water content with partial least-squares method based on the measurements of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy and weight of porcine skin. Furthermore, a commercial spectrometer with an integrating sphere is used to measure the transmittance and reflectance of skin after treatment with different OCAs, and then the water content and optical properties of sample are calculated, respectively. The results show that both the reduced scattering coefficient and dehydration of skin decrease with prolongation of action of OCAs, but the relative change in former is larger than that in latter after a 60-min treatment. The absorption coefficient at 1450 nm decreases completely coincident with dehydration of skin. Further analysis illustrates that the correlation coefficient between the relative changes in the reduced scattering coefficient and dehydration is ~1 during the 60-min treatment of agents, but there is an extremely significant difference between the two parameters for some OCAs with more hydroxyl groups, especially, glycerol or D-sorbitol, which means that the dehydration is a main mechanism of skin optical clearing, but not the only mechanism.

  1. (100) facets of γ-Al2O3: the active surfaces for alcohol dehydration reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Mei, Donghai; Peden, Charles HF; Rousseau, Roger J.; Szanyi, Janos

    2011-05-01

    Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of ethanol, and methanol dehydration reaction were studied on γ-Al2O3 in order to identify the catalytic active sites for alcohol dehydration reactions. Two high temperature (> 473 K) desorption features were observed following ethanol adsorption. Samples calcined at T≤473 K displayed a desorption feature in the 523-533 K temperature range, while those calcined at T ≥ 673 K showed a single desorption feature at 498 K. The switch from the high to low temperature ethanol desorption correlated well with the dehydroxylation of the (100) facets of γ-Al2O3 that was predicted at 550 K DFT calculations. Theoretical DFT simulations of the mechanism of dehydration. on clean and hydroxylated γ-Al2O3(100) surfaces, find that a concerted elimination of ethylene from an ethanol molecule chemisorbed at an Al3+ pentacoordinated site is the rate limiting step for catalytic cycle on both surfaces. Furthermore, titration of the pentacoordinate Al3+ sites on the (100) facets of γ-Al2O3 by BaO completely turned off the methanol dehydration reaction activity. These results unambiguously demonstrate that only the (100) facets on γ-Al2O3 are the catalytic active surfaces for alcohol dehydration.

  2. Pyropia yezoensis can utilize CO2 in the air during moderate dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; He, Linwen; Yang, Fang; Lin, Apeng; Zhang, Baoyu; Niu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guangce

    2014-03-01

    Pyropia yezoensis, an intertidal seaweed, experiences regular dehydration and rehydration with the tides. In this study, the responses of P. yezoensis to dehydration and rehydration under high and low CO2 concentrations ((600-700)×10-6 and (40-80)×10-6, named Group I and Group II respectively) were investigated. The thalli of Group I had a significantly higher effective photosystem II quantum yield than the thalli of Group II at 71% absolute water content (AWC). There was little difference between thalli morphology, total Rubisco activity and total protein content at 100% and 71% AWC, which might be the basis for the normal performance of photosynthesis during moderate dehydration. A higher effective photosystem I quantum yield was observed in the thalli subjected to a low CO2 concentration during moderate dehydration, which might be caused by the enhancement of cyclic electron flow. These results suggested that P. yezoensis can directly utilize CO2 in ambient air during moderate dehydration.

  3. Dehydration kinetics and thermochemistry of selected hydrous phases, and simulated gas release pattern in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Ganguly, J.

    1992-01-01

    As part of our continued program of study on the volatile bearing phases and volatile resource potential of carbonaceous chondrite, results of our experimental studies on the dehydration kinetics of talc as a function of temperature and grain size (50 to 0.5 microns), equilibrium dehydration boundary of talc to 40 kbars, calorimetric study of enthalpy of formation of both natural and synthetic talc as a function of grain size, and preliminary results on the dehydration kinetics of epsomite are reported. In addition, theoretical calculations on the gas release pattern of Murchison meteorite, which is a C2(CM) carbonaceous chondrite, were performed. The kinetic study of talc leads to a dehydration rate constant for 40-50 microns size fraction of k = (3.23 x 10(exp 4))exp(-Q/RT)/min with the activation energy Q = 376 (plus or minus 20) kJ/mole. The dehydration rate was found to increase somewhat with decreasing grain size. The enthalpy of formation of talc from elements was measured to be -5896(10) kJ/mol. There was no measurable effect of grain size on the enthalpy beyond the limits of precision of the calorimetric studies. Also the calorimetric enthalpy of both synthetic and natural talc was found to be essentially the same, within the precision of measurements, although the natural talc had a slightly larger field of stability in our phase equilibrium studies. The high pressure experimental data the dehydration equilibrium of talc (talc = enstatite + coesite + H2O) is in strong disagreement with that calculated from the available thermochemical data, which were constrained to fit the low pressure experimental results. The calculated gas release pattern of Murchison meteorite were in reasonable agreement with that determined by stepwise heating in a gas chromatograph.

  4. Comparison Between the Continuous and Intermittent Heating Methods for Simultaneous Infrared Dry-Blanching and Dehydration of Apple Slices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration (SIRDBD) can be operated in two heating modes, continuous and intermittent heating. Under continuous heating, infrared radiation intensity was kept constant while the product temperature remained constant under intermittent heating in this study. ...

  5. Characterization of dehydration behavior of untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate powders.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Yukoh; Shiraishi, Sumihiro; Otsuka, Makoto

    2004-06-01

    Creatine, which is well known as an important substance for muscular activity, is synthesized from amino acids such as glycine, arginine and ornithine in liver and kidney. It then accumulates in skeletal muscle as creatine phosphoric acid. The aim of this study was to understand the dehydration behavior of untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate at various temperatures. The removal of crystal water was investigated by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The X-ray diffraction pattern of untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate agreed with reported data for creatine monohydrate. However, the diffraction peaks of the (100), (200) and (300) planes of pulverized creatine monohydrate were much stronger than those of untreated creatine monohydrate. On the other hand, the diffraction peaks of the (012) and (013) planes of untreated creatine monohydrate were much stronger than those of pulverized creatine monohydrate. The dehydration of untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate was investigated at various storage temperatures, and the results indicated that untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate were transformed into the anhydrate at more than 30 degrees C. After dehydration, the particles of untreated and pulverized creatine anhydrate had many cracks. The dehydration kinetics of untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate were analyzed by the Hancock-Sharp equation on the basis of the isothermal DSC data. The dehydrations of untreated and pulverized creatine monohydrate both followed a zero-order mechanism (Polany-Winger equation). However, the transition rate constant, calculated from the slope of the straight line, was about 2.2-7.7 times higher for pulverized creatine monohydrate than for untreated creatine monohydrate. The Arrhenius plots (natural logarithm of the dehydration rate constant versus the reciprocal of absolute temperature) of the isothermal DSC data for

  6. Cryopreservation by encapsulation-dehydration of plumules of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.).

    PubMed

    N'Nan, Oulo; Hocher, Valérie; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Konan, Jean-Louis; Ballo, Koffi; Mondeil, Fanja; Malaurie, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the use of an encapsulation-dehydration cryopreservation technique on coconut plumules (apical dome with three or four leaf primordia) excised from embryos. In order to establish a reliable cryopreservation process for plumules, several different key factors were tested: pretreatment duration, sugar concentration, dehydration period and freezing. In parallel, histological studies were performed to describe the structural changes of tissues and plumule cells subjected to dehydration and freezing. A good survival level of around 60% was obtained. However, after 8 months culture regrowth, this level decreased to a maximum of 20 % which was achieved using sucrose treatment. In this paper we report for the first time the regeneration of leafy shoots from coconut plumules after cryopreservation.

  7. Accuracy of Inferior Vena Cava Ultrasound for Predicting Dehydration in Children with Acute Diarrhea in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Payal; Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Nasrin, Sabiha; Guy, Allysia; Rege, Soham; Noble, Vicki E.; Alam, Nur H.; Levine, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although dehydration from diarrhea is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five, existing methods of assessing dehydration status in children have limited accuracy. Objective To assess the accuracy of point-of-care ultrasound measurement of the aorta-to-IVC ratio as a predictor of dehydration in children. Methods A prospective cohort study of children under five years with acute diarrhea was conducted in the rehydration unit of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b). Ultrasound measurements of aorta-to-IVC ratio and dehydrated weight were obtained on patient arrival. Percent weight change was monitored during rehydration to classify children as having “some dehydration” with weight change 3–9% or “severe dehydration” with weight change > 9%. Logistic regression analysis and Receiver-Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the accuracy of aorta-to-IVC ratio as a predictor of dehydration severity. Results 850 children were enrolled, of which 771 were included in the final analysis. Aorta to IVC ratio was a significant predictor of the percent dehydration in children with acute diarrhea, with each 1-point increase in the aorta to IVC ratio predicting a 1.1% increase in the percent dehydration of the child. However, the area under the ROC curve (0.60), sensitivity (67%), and specificity (49%), for predicting severe dehydration were all poor. Conclusions Point-of-care ultrasound of the aorta-to-IVC ratio was statistically associated with volume status, but was not accurate enough to be used as an independent screening tool for dehydration in children under five years presenting with acute diarrhea in a resource-limited setting. PMID:26766306

  8. Crystal structures of phosphoketolase: thiamine diphosphate-dependent dehydration mechanism.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Katayama, Takane; Kim, Byung-Jun; Wakagi, Takayoshi; Shoun, Hirofumi; Ashida, Hisashi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2010-10-29

    Thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes are ubiquitously present in all organisms and catalyze essential reactions in various metabolic pathways. ThDP-dependent phosphoketolase plays key roles in the central metabolism of heterofermentative bacteria and in the pentose catabolism of various microbes. In particular, bifidobacteria, representatives of beneficial commensal bacteria, have an effective glycolytic pathway called bifid shunt in which 2.5 mol of ATP are produced per glucose. Phosphoketolase catalyzes two steps in the bifid shunt because of its dual-substrate specificity; they are phosphorolytic cleavage of fructose 6-phosphate or xylulose 5-phosphate to produce aldose phosphate, acetyl phosphate, and H(2)O. The phosphoketolase reaction is different from other well studied ThDP-dependent enzymes because it involves a dehydration step. Although phosphoketolase was discovered more than 50 years ago, its three-dimensional structure remains unclear. In this study we report the crystal structures of xylulose 5-phosphate/fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase from Bifidobacterium breve. The structures of the two intermediates before and after dehydration (α,β-dihydroxyethyl ThDP and 2-acetyl-ThDP) and complex with inorganic phosphate give an insight into the mechanism of each step of the enzymatic reaction.

  9. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, Jr., Jerry; Avens, Larry R.; Trujillo, Eddie A.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride is provided.

  10. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

    1992-03-24

    A process is described for preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride.

  11. Intrastab Earthquakes: Dehydration of the Cascadia Slab

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Preston, L.A.; Creager, K.C.; Crosson, R.S.; Brocher, T.M.; Trehu, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    We simultaneously invert travel times of refracted and wide-angle reflected waves for three-dimensional compressional-wave velocity structure, earthquake locations, and reflector geometry in northwest Washington state. The reflector, interpreted to be the crust-mantle boundary (Moho) of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, separates intrastab earthquakes into two groups, permitting a new understanding of the origins of intrastab earthquakes in Cascadia. Earthquakes up-dip of the Moho's 45-kilometer depth contour occur below the reflector, in the subducted oceanic mantle, consistent with serpentinite dehydration; earthquakes located down-dip occur primarily within the subducted crust, consistent with the basalt-to-eclogite transformation.

  12. Lithological controls on gas hydrate saturation: Insights from signal classification of NMR downhole data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Klaus; Kulenkampff, Johannes; Henninges, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) downhole data are analyzed with a new strategy to study gas hydrate-bearing sediments in the Mackenzie Delta (NW Canada). NMR logging is a powerful tool to study geological reservoir formations. The measurements are based on interactions between the magnetic moments of protons in geological formation water and an external magnetic field. Inversion of the measured raw data provides so-called transverse relaxation time (T2) distribution curves or spectra. Different parts of the T2 curve are related with distinct pore radii and corresponding fluid components. A common practice in the analysis of T2 distribution curves is to extract single-valued parameters such as apparent total porosity. Moreover, the derived total NMR apparent porosity and the gamma-gamma density log apparent porosity can be combined to estimate gas hydrate saturation in hydrate-bearing sediments. To avoid potential loss of information, in our new approach we analyze the entire T2 distribution curves as quasi-continuous signals to characterize the rock formation. The approach is applied to NMR data measured in gas hydrate research well Mallik 5L-38. We use self-organizing maps, a neural network clustering technique, to subdivide the data set of NMR T2 distribution curves into classes with a similar and distinctive signal shape. The method includes (1) preparation of data vectors, (2) unsupervised learning, (3) cluster definition, and (4) classification and depth mapping of all NMR signals. Each signal class thus represents a specific pore size distribution which can be interpreted in terms of distinct lithologies and reservoir types. A key step in the interpretation strategy is to reconcile the NMR classes with other log data not considered in the clustering analysis, such as gamma ray, photo-electric factor, hydrate saturation, and other logs. Our results defined six main lithologies within the target zone. Gas hydrate layers were recognized by their low signal

  13. Dehydration of isopropanol by pervaporation using aromatic polyetherimide membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.Y.M.; Feng, X. )

    1993-08-01

    Aromatic polyetherimide membranes were prepared by the phase inversion method and tested for the pervaporation separation of water from isopropanol with emphasis on the breaking of azcotropic composition and the dehydration of high concentrations of isopropanol. It was found that the membrane selectivity was enhanced by partial evaporation of the solvent in the cast polymer films prior to the gelation step during membrane formation. The membrane performance was shown to be dependent on the feed concentration and the operating temperature. At a feed temperature of 25[degree]C and a permeate pressure of 133 Pa, separation factors of 173 and 384 were achieved for the dehydration of isopropanol solutions at 0.68 (azeotropic composition) and 0.96 mole fractions isopropanol, respectively, with reasonably high permeation rates. The utility of the membranes for the proposed separation was demonstrated; however, these membranes were not prepared under optimized conditions and thus a continuous study is required to rationalize the effects of membrane preparation parameters on membrane performance. 20 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Dehydration-induced amorphous phases of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Saharay, Moumita; Yazaydin, A Ozgur; Kirkpatrick, R James

    2013-03-28

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a critical transient phase in the inorganic precipitation of CaCO3 and in biomineralization. The calcium carbonate crystallization pathway is thought to involve dehydration of more hydrated ACC to less hydrated ACC followed by the formation of anhydrous ACC. We present here computational studies of the transition of a hydrated ACC with a H2O/CaCO3 ratio of 1.0 to anhydrous ACC. During dehydration, ACC undergoes reorganization to a more ordered structure with a significant increase in density. The computed density of anhydrous ACC is similar to that of calcite, the stable crystalline phase. Compared to the crystalline CaCO3 phases, calcite, vaterite, and aragonite, the computed local structure of anhydrous ACC is most-similar to those of calcite and vaterite, but the overall structure is not well described by either. The strong hydrogen bond interaction between the carbonate ions and water molecules plays a crucial role in stabilizing the less hydrated ACC compositions compared to the more hydrated ones, leading to a progressively increasing hydration energy with decreasing water content.

  15. Apex cryopreservation of several strawberry genotypes by two encapsulation-dehydration methods.

    PubMed

    Clavero-Ramírez, I; Gálvez-Farfán, J; López-Aranda, J M; González-Benito, M E

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents results from a study to develop cryopreservation procedures for apices of several strawberry genotypes. Five Fragaria x ananassa Duch. cultivars and two wild species (F. chiloensis and F. virginiana) have been screened using the encapsulation-dehydration method and/or a protocol which compromises vitrification and encapsulation-dehydration. Apices were encapsulated in an alginate gel, precultured on media containing high levels of sucrose (0.8 M, conventional protocol), or a combination of 0.4 M sucrose and 2 M glycerol. Recovery rates varied among genotypes (23-63%). The latter method reduced considerably the time needed for the cryogenic procedure by eliminating the pre-treatment with 0.8 M sucrose for 19 h prior to dehydration, as required by the conventional procedure.

  16. Dehydration-driven topotaxy in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Tommasi, Andréa; Garrido, Carlos J.

    2014-05-01

    Mineral replacement reactions play a fundamental role in the chemistry and the strength of the lithosphere. When externally or internally derived fluids are present, interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation is the driving mechanism for such reactions [1]. One of the microstructural features of this process is a 3D arrangement of crystallographic axes across internal interfaces (topotaxy) between reactant and product phases. Dehydration reactions are a special case of mineral replacement reaction that generates a transient fluid-filled porosity. Among others, the dehydration serpentinite is of special relevance in subduction zones because of the amount of fluids involved (potentially up to 13 wt.%). Two topotatic relationships between olivine and antigorite (the serpentine mineral stable at high temperature and pressure) have been reported in partially hydrated mantle wedge xenoliths [2]. Therefore, if precursor antigorite serpentine has a strong crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) its dehydration might result in prograde peridotite with a strong inherited CPO. However for predicting the importance of topotactic reactions for seismic anisotropy of subduction zones we also need to consider the crystallization orthopyroxene + chlorite in the prograde reaction and, more importantly, the fact that this dehydration reaction produces a transient porosity of ca. 20 % vol. that results in local fluctuations of strain during compaction and fluid migration. We address this issue by a microstructural comparison between the CPO developed in olivine, orthopyroxene and chlorite during high-pressure antigorite dehydration in piston cylinder experiments (at 750ºC and 20 kbar and 1000ºC and 30 kbar, 168 h) and that recorded in natural samples (Cerro del Almirez, Betic Cordillera, Spain). Experimentally developed CPOs are strong. Prograde minerals show a significant inheritance of the former antigorite foliation. Topotactic relations are dominated by (001)atg//(100)ol

  17. Glycerol Dehydration to Acrolein Catalyzed by ZSM‐5 Zeolite in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Medium

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Bin; Ren, Shoujie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC‐CO2) has been used for the first time as a reaction medium for the dehydration of glycerol to acrolein catalyzed by a solid acid. Unprecedented catalyst stability over 528 hours of time‐on‐stream was achieved and the rate of coke deposition on the zeolite catalyst was the lowest among extensive previous studies, showing potential for industrial application. Coking pathways in SC‐CO2 were also elucidated for future development. The results have potential implications for other dehydration reactions catalyzed by solid acids. PMID:27796088

  18. Understanding the physics of kappa (κ): insights from a downhole array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ktenidou, Olga-Joan; Abrahamson, Norman A.; Drouet, Stéphane; Cotton, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    At high frequencies, the acceleration spectral amplitude decreases rapidly; this has been modelled with the spectral decay factor κ. Its site component, κ0, is used widely today in ground motion prediction and simulation, and numerous approaches have been proposed to compute it. In this study, we estimate κ for the EUROSEISTEST valley, a geologically complex and seismically active region with a permanent strong motion array consisting of 14 surface and 6 downhole stations. Site conditions range from soft sediments to hard rock. First, we use the classical approach to separate local and regional attenuation and measure κ0. Second, we take advantage of the existing knowledge of the geological profile and material properties to examine the correlation of κ0 with different site characterization parameters. κ0 correlates well with Vs30, as expected, indicating a strong effect from the geological structure in the upper 30 m. But it correlates equally well with the resonant frequency and depth-to-bedrock of the stations, which indicates strong effects from the entire sedimentary column, down to 400 m. Third, we use our results to improve our physical understanding of κ0. We propose a conceptual model of κ0 with Vs, comprising two new notions. On the one hand, and contrary to existing correlations, we observe that κ0 stabilizes for high Vs values. This may indicate the existence of regional values for hard rock κ0. If so, we propose that borehole measurements (almost never used up to now for κ0) may be useful in determining these values. On the other hand, we find that material damping, as expressed through travel times, may not suffice to account for the total κ0 measured at the surface. We propose that, apart from material damping, additional site attenuation may be caused by scattering from small-scale variability in the profile. If this is so, then geotechnical damping measurements may not suffice to infer the overall crustal attenuation under a site; but

  19. Observations on saliva osmolality during progressive dehydration and partial rehydration.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nigel A S; van den Heuvel, Anne M J; Kerry, Pete; McGhee, Sheena; Peoples, Gregory E; Brown, Marc A; Patterson, Mark J

    2012-09-01

    A need exists to identify dehydrated individuals under stressful settings beyond the laboratory. A predictive index based on changes in saliva osmolality has been proposed, and its efficacy and sensitivity was appraised across mass (water) losses from 1 to 7%. Twelve euhydrated males [serum osmolality: 286.1 mOsm kg(-1) H(2)O (SD 4.3)] completed three exercise- and heat-induced dehydration trials (35.6°C, 56% relative humidity): 7% dehydration (6.15 h), 3% dehydration (with 60% fluid replacement: 2.37 h), repeat 7% dehydration (5.27 h). Expectorated saliva osmolality, measured at baseline and at each 1% mass change, was used to predict instantaneous hydration state relative to mass losses of 3 and 6%. Saliva osmolality increased linearly with dehydration, although its basal osmolality and its rate of change varied among and within subjects across trials. Receiver operating characteristic curves indicated a good predictive power for saliva osmolality when used with two, single-threshold cutoffs to differentiate between hydrated and dehydrated individuals (area under curve: 3% cutoff = 0.868, 6% cutoff = 0.831). However, when analysed using a double-threshold detection technique (3 and 6%), as might be used in a field-based monitor, <50% of the osmolality data could correctly identify individuals who exceeded 3% dehydration. Indeed, within the 3-6% dehydration range, its sensitivity was 64%, while beyond 6% dehydration, this fell to 42%. Therefore, while expectorated saliva osmolality tracked mass losses within individuals, its large intra- and inter-individual variability limited its predictive power and sensitivity, rendering its utility questionable within a universal dehydration monitor.

  20. Cryoprotective dehydration and the resistance to inoculative freezing in the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica.

    PubMed

    Elnitsky, Michael A; Hayward, Scott A L; Rinehart, Joseph P; Denlinger, David L; Lee, Richard E

    2008-02-01

    During winter, larvae of the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica (Diptera, Chironomidae), must endure 7-8 months of continuous subzero temperatures, encasement in a matrix of soil and ice, and severely desiccating conditions. This environment, along with the fact that larvae possess a high rate of water loss and are extremely tolerant of desiccation, may promote the use of cryoprotective dehydration as a strategy for winter survival. This study investigates the capacity of larvae to resist inoculative freezing and undergo cryoprotective dehydration at subzero temperatures. Slow cooling to -3 degrees C in an environment at equilibrium with the vapor pressure of ice reduced larval water content by approximately 40% and depressed the body fluid melting point more than threefold to -2.6 degrees C. This melting point depression was the result of the concentration of existing solutes (i.e. loss of body water) and the de novo synthesis of osmolytes. By day 14 of the subzero exposure, larval survival was still >95%, suggesting larvae have the capacity to undergo cryoprotective dehydration. However, under natural conditions the use of cryoprotective dehydration may be constrained by inoculative freezing as result of the insect's intimate contact with environmental ice. During slow cooling within a substrate of frozen soil, the ability of larvae to resist inoculative freezing and undergo cryoprotective dehydration was dependent upon the moisture content of the soil. As detected by a reduction of larval water content, the percentage of larvae that resisted inoculative freezing increased with decreasing soil moisture. These results suggest that larvae of the Antarctic midge have the capacity to resist inoculative freezing at relatively low soil moisture contents and likely undergo cryoprotective dehydration when exposed to subzero temperatures during the polar winter.

  1. Identification of Circular RNAs and Their Targets in Leaves of Triticum aestivum L. under Dehydration Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexia; Yang, Ming; Wei, Shimei; Qin, Fujun; Zhao, Huijie; Suo, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a type of newly identified non-coding RNAs through high-throughput deep sequencing, which play important roles in miRNA function and transcriptional controlling in human, animals, and plants. To date, there is no report in wheat seedlings regarding the circRNAs identification and roles in the dehydration stress response. In present study, the total RNA was extracted from leaves of wheat seedlings under dehydration-stressed and well-watered conditions, respectively. Then, the circRNAs enriched library based deep sequencing was performed and the circRNAs were identified using bioinformatics tools. Around 88 circRNAs candidates were isolated in wheat seedlings leaves while 62 were differentially expressed in dehydration-stressed seedlings compared to well-watered control. Among the dehydration responsive circRNAs, six were found to act as 26 corresponding miRNAs sponges in wheat. Sixteen circRNAs including the 6 miRNAs sponges and other 10 randomly selected ones were further validated to be circular by real-time PCR assay, and 14 displayed consistent regulation patterns with the transcriptome sequencing results. After Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis of the targeted mRNAs functions, the circRNAs were predicted to be involved in dehydration responsive process, such as photosynthesis, porphyrin, and chlorophyll metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, amino acid biosynthesis, and metabolism, as well as plant hormone signal transduction, involving auxin, brassinosteroid, and salicylic acid. Herein, we revealed a possible connection between the regulations of circRNAs with the expressions of functional genes in wheat leaves associated with dehydration resistance. PMID:28105043

  2. Buffering and inhibition of glycol in gas dehydration applications: An alternative to amines

    SciTech Connect

    Stefl, B.A.; Bosen, S.F.

    1995-12-01

    Corrosion in gas dehydration systems can be attributed to many factors, including chloride intrusion, acid gas absorption, and glycol degradation. Inhibition systems for glycol dehydration systems must incorporate both corrosion inhibition and buffering, utilizing stable, non-scaling, non-depleting additives. Traditional amine treatments are unstable in CO{sub 2} containing gas streams; traditional inorganic salt glycol inhibitors are unstable and cause scaling in the presence of intruded mineral salts. An alternative inhibitor technology was tested in three field test programs, under various dehydration conditions. Traditional nitrite, molybdate, and amine inhibitors were tested in combination with the alternative technology; uninhibited and amine inhibited control units were included in the study. Corrosion rates and dehydration fluid chemistries were monitored. The field tests demonstrated the effectiveness of the non-amine-based alternative technology in reducing corrosion rates and maintaining the alkalinity of the glycol dehydration fluid. Corrosion rates at the reboiler in systems treated with the alternative technology averaged ten times less than the average rate in the control units, and had a substantially lower incidence of localized corrosion. The pH of the treated glycol stayed alkaline throughout the testing, varying within 0.85 pH units; whereas corresponding control units showed wide swings in pH, ranging from an acidic 4.1 to an alkaline 10.3. No operational difficulties, including foaming, inadequate drying, or excess glycol loss, were experienced in the treated dehydration units. Testing of the alternative technology in combination with more traditional technologies revealed no significant benefits over the alternative technology alone; however, the alternate technology showed significant improvements in both corrosion control and stability over traditional amine inhibition.

  3. Dehydration and acute weight gain in mixed martial arts fighters before competition.

    PubMed

    Jetton, Adam M; Lawrence, Marcus M; Meucci, Marco; Haines, Tracie L; Collier, Scott R; Morris, David M; Utter, Alan C

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the magnitude of acute weight gain (AWG) and dehydration in mixed martial arts (MMA) fighters before competition. Urinary measures of hydration status and body mass were determined approximately 24 hours before and then again approximately 2 hours before competition in 40 MMA fighters (mean ± SE, age: 25.2 ± 0.65 years, height: 1.77 ± 0.01 m, body mass: 75.8 ± 1.5 kg). The AWG was defined as the amount of body weight the fighters gained in the approximately 22-hour period between the official weigh-in and the actual competition. On average, the MMA fighters gained 3.40 ± 2.2 kg or 4.4% of their body weight in the approximately 22-hour period before competition. Urine specific gravity significantly decreased (p < 0.001) from 1.028 ± 0.001 to 1.020 ± 0.001 during the approximately 22-hour rehydration period. Results demonstrated that 39% of the MMA fighters presented with a Usg of >1.021 immediately before competition indicating significant or serious dehydration. The MMA fighters undergo significant dehydration and fluctuations in body mass (4.4% avg.) in the 24-hour period before competition. Urinary measures of hydration status indicate that a significant proportion of MMA fighters are not successfully rehydrating before competition and subsequently are competing in a dehydrated state. Weight management guidelines to prevent acute dehydration in MMA fighters are warranted to prevent unnecessary adverse health events secondary to dehydration.

  4. Overpressure Caused by the Smectite Dehydration Influences on the triggering of fault slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wen-Sheng; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Chang, Han-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Overpressure, which is pore fluid pressure higher than hydrostatic pressure, is observed in numerous mechanical processes along major faults. Many investigations currently show that the pore fluid pressure has been observed to influence the thrust fault strength and slip behavior and updip limit of the seismogenic zone. Clay dehydration is one key control on overpressure generation under undrained condition in thermal pressurization processes. Increasing pressure and temperature with depth depending on the local geological setting and conditions can cause clay dehydration which has been proposed as an explanation for the generation of overpressure. However, study about the effect of excess pore pressure caused by clay dehydration on the triggering of earthquake is seldom addressed in Taiwan. In fault zones like the Chelungpu Fault, clay minerals are abundant in the fault gouge. Therefore, to quantify the effect of overpressure caused by clay dehydration on the triggering of earthquake under undrained condition, we adopt the chemical thermodynamic model and chemical kinetic model to calculate the amount of water expelled from clay dehydration; derive the three-dimensional governing equation of groundwater flow with clay dehydration varied with pressure and temperature; follow the Coulomb-Mohr frictional failure model of earthquake occurrence to evaluate the influence of the pore pressure on the change of effective Coulomb stress. Finally, development of numerical model to simulate the effect of excess pore pressure caused by clay dehydration on the coulomb failure stress coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical has been performed. Moreover, field application with numerical model to quantify analysis of the effect of overpressure caused by clay dehydration on the triggering of earthquake has been progressed. Coulomb stress increases of ≥0.01 MPa have been shown to be associated with seismicity rate increase and in many cases triggering earthquakes. The results

  5. Dehydration accelerates reductions in cerebral blood flow during prolonged exercise in the heat without compromising brain metabolism.

    PubMed

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Llodio, Iñaki; Garcia, Benjamin; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2015-11-01

    Dehydration hastens the decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during incremental exercise, whereas the cerebral metabolic rate for O2 (CMRO2 ) is preserved. It remains unknown whether CMRO2 is also maintained during prolonged exercise in the heat and whether an eventual decline in CBF is coupled to fatigue. Two studies were undertaken. In study 1, 10 male cyclists cycled in the heat for ∼2 h with (control) and without fluid replacement (dehydration) while internal and external carotid artery blood flow and core and blood temperature were obtained. Arterial and internal jugular venous blood samples were assessed with dehydration to evaluate CMRO2 . In study 2, in 8 male subjects, middle cerebral artery blood velocity was measured during prolonged exercise to exhaustion in both dehydrated and euhydrated states. After a rise at the onset of exercise, internal carotid artery flow declined to baseline with progressive dehydration (P < 0.05). However, cerebral metabolism remained stable through enhanced O2 and glucose extraction (P < 0.05). External carotid artery flow increased for 1 h but declined before exhaustion. Fluid ingestion maintained cerebral and extracranial perfusion throughout nonfatiguing exercise. During exhaustive exercise, however, euhydration delayed but did not prevent the decline in cerebral perfusion. In conclusion, during prolonged exercise in the heat, dehydration accelerates the decline in CBF without affecting CMRO2 and also restricts extracranial perfusion. Thus, fatigue is related to a reduction in CBF and extracranial perfusion rather than CMRO2 .

  6. Single hole multi-parameter downhole monitoring of shallow CO2 injection at Maguelone experimental site (Languedoc, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denchik, N.; Pezard, P. A.; Abdoulghafour, H.; Lofi, J.; Neyens, D.; Perroud, H.; Henry, G.; Rolland, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Maguelone experimental site for shallow subsurface hydrogeophysical monitoring, located along the Mediterranean Lido near Montpellier (Languedoc, France) has proven over the years to provide a unique setup to test gas storage monitoring methods at shallow depth. The presence of two small reservoirs (R1: 13-16 m and R2: 8-9 m) with impermeable boundaries provides an opportunity to study a saline formation for geological storage both in the field and in a laboratory context. This integrated monitoring concept was first applied at Maguelone for characterization of the reservoir state before and during N2 and CO2 injections as part of the MUSTANG FP7 project. Multimethod monitoring was shown to be sensitive to gas storage within a saline reservoir with clear data changes immediately after the beginning of injection. Pressure remains the first indicator of gas storage at ~8-9 m depth in a small permeable unit (gravels/shells) under the Holocene lagoonal sediments. A good correlation is also obtained between the resistivity response and geochemical parameters from pore fluid sampling (pH, minor and major cation concentrations) at this depth. On the basis of previous gas injection experiments, new holes were drilled as part of PANACEA (EC project) in 2014, including an injection hole targeted for injection at 8-9 m depth in the R2 reservoir in order to have gas injection and gas storage at the same depth, a single hole multi-parameter observatory, and a seismic source hole. A total volume of ~48 m3 of CO2 was injected over ~2 hours on December 4, 2014. The injection rate varied from 24 to 30 m3/h, with a well head pressure of 1.8 bars. All downhole monitoring technologies (resistivity, temperature, pressure, SP and seismic measurements) were combined in the single hole observatory. Such device allows monitoring the downhole system before and after injection and the gas migration from the injection hole, helping to characterize the transport mechanism. Decreasing the

  7. What's the Big Sweat about Dehydration? (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video: Getting an X-ray What's the Big Sweat About Dehydration? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's the Big Sweat About Dehydration? Print A A A What's in ... When it's hot outside and you've been sweating, you get thirsty. Why? Thirst can be a ...

  8. Dehydration and drinking responses in a pelagic sea snake.

    PubMed

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Brischoux, François; Sheehy, Coleman M; Pfaller, Joseph B

    2012-08-01

    Recent investigations of water balance in sea snakes demonstrated that amphibious sea kraits (Laticauda spp.) dehydrate in seawater and require fresh water to restore deficits in body water. Here, we report similar findings for Pelamis platurus, a viviparous, pelagic, entirely marine species of hydrophiine ("true") sea snake. We sampled snakes at Golfo de Papagayo, Guanacaste, Costa Rica and demonstrated they do not drink seawater but fresh water at variable deficits of body water incurred by dehydration. The threshold dehydration at which snakes first drink fresh water is -18.3 ± 1.1 % (mean ± SE) loss of body mass, which is roughly twice the magnitude of mass deficit at which sea kraits drink fresh water. Compared to sea kraits, Pelamis drink relatively larger volumes of water and make up a larger percentage of the dehydration deficit. Some dehydrated Pelamis also were shown to drink brackish water up to 50% seawater, but most drank at lower brackish values and 20% of the snakes tested did not drink at all. Like sea kraits, Pelamis dehydrate when kept in seawater in the laboratory. Moreover, some individuals drank fresh water immediately following capture, providing preliminary evidence that Pelamis dehydrate at sea. Thus, this widely distributed pelagic species remains subject to dehydration in marine environments where it retains a capacity to sense and to drink fresh water. In comparison with sea kraits, however, Pelamis represents a more advanced stage in the evolutionary transition to a fully marine life and appears to be less dependent on fresh water.

  9. Smackerels of Somethings: Dehydrating Food and How to Use It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditzler, Carmen

    1994-01-01

    Provides ideas about how to add variety, flavor, texture, and nutrition to outdoor meals by dehydrating food and using it on camping trips. The goal is to prepare nutritious and appealing meals without spending a lot of money on commercially dehydrated or freeze-dried foods. Includes instructions for rehydrating foods. (LP)

  10. Robust Ceramic Coaxial Cable Down-Hole Sensors for Long-Term In Situ Monitoring of Geologic CO2 Injection and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Nygaard, Runar; Xiao, Hai; He, Xiaoming

    2016-09-30

    Energy generation by use of fossil fuels produces large volumes of CO2 and other greenhouse gases, whose accumulation in the atmosphere is widely seen as undesirable. CO2 Capture followed by sequestration has been identified as the solution. Subsurface geologic formations offer a potential location for long-term storage of CO2 because of their requisite size. Unfortunately, the inaccessibility and complexity of the subsurface, the wide range of scales of variability, and the coupled nonlinear processes, impose tremendous challenges to determine the transport and predict the fate of the stored CO2. Among the various monitoring approaches, in situ down-hole monitoring of the various state parameters provides critical and direct data points that can be used to validate the models, optimize the injection, detect leakage and track the CO2 plume. However, down-hole sensors that can withstand the harsh conditions and operate over decades of the project lifecycle remain unavailable. Given that the widespread of carbon capture and storage will be the necessity and reality in the future, fundamental and applied research is required to address the significant challenges and technological gaps in lack of long-term reliable down-hole sensors This project focused on the development and demonstration of a novel, low-cost, distributed, robust ceramic coaxial cable sensor platform for in situ down-hole monitoring of geologic CO2 injection and storage with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The coaxial cable Fabry-Perot interferometer (CCFPI) has been studied as a general sensor platform for in situ, long-term, measurement of temperature, pressure and strain, which are critical to CO2 injection and storage. A novel signal processing scheme has been developed and demonstrated for dense multiplexing of the sensors for low-cost distributed sensing with high spatial resolution. The developed temperature

  11. CO2FieldLab project. Near-surface downhole electrical resistivity monitoring for CO2 shallow injection at the Svelvik ridge (Norway).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denchik, N.; Pezard, P.; Paris, J.; Geeraert, M.; Henry, G.; Baqué, L.; Barry, S.; Neyens, D.

    2012-04-01

    The CO2FieldLab shallow injection experiment is a collaborative effort aimed at developing, verifying, and evaluating near-surface monitoring techniques for geological sequestration of CO2. The objective is to create a downhole leakage of CO2 in order to demonstrate whether existing monitoring techniques have the ability to detect and quantify the CO2 loss. The CO2FieldLab project associates collaboration from several research groups and organizations (SINTEF, NGI, BRGM, BGS, CNRS, imaGeau and Schlumberger). For this, the field Laboratory for monitoring CO2 migration and leakage was established in Holocene deposits of the Svelvik ridge, located in the Drammensfjord 50 km south of Oslo (Norway). It is a glaciofluvial-glaciomarine terminal deposit formed during the last deglaciation. The depth to the bedrock is located between 300 and 400 m. The central part of the ridge is aerially exposed up to 70 m above sea level, constituting a phreatic aquifer. The characterization phase and associated modelling suggest that the site is suitable for studying both gas migration and leakage at shallow depths. The shallow aquifer (down to 50 m) consists in a relatively homogeneous sand body with a depositional dip of about 10° to the North. The shallow injection experiment took place in September of 2011 and consisted in an injection of CO2 at a depth of 20 m from a 45° inclined well. The purpose of this phase was to simulate a point source leakage, which could possibly occur due to failure of a deep well completion. A total mass of 1.67 ton of CO2 was injected over a period of 6 days. The water table was located at 60 cm depth during the experiment and a transition from fresh to salt pore water was found below 12 m depth. An integrated set of surface and downhole strategies was deployed across a 64 m2 square monitoring area: cross-hole radar, water and gas phases physico-chemical parameters (BRGM); multi-hole electrical ALERT system (BGS), CO2 concentration in soils and gas

  12. Surviving the cold: molecular analyses of insect cryoprotective dehydration in the Arctic springtail Megaphorura arctica (Tullberg)

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Melody S; Thorne, Michael AS; Purać, Jelena; Burns, Gavin; Hillyard, Guy; Popović, Željko D; Grubor-Lajšić, Gordana; Worland, M Roger

    2009-01-01

    Background Insects provide tractable models for enhancing our understanding of the physiological and cellular processes that enable survival at extreme low temperatures. They possess three main strategies to survive the cold: freeze tolerance, freeze avoidance or cryoprotective dehydration, of which the latter method is exploited by our model species, the Arctic springtail Megaphorura arctica, formerly Onychiurus arcticus (Tullberg 1876). The physiological mechanisms underlying cryoprotective dehydration have been well characterised in M. arctica and to date this process has been described in only a few other species: the Antarctic nematode Panagrolaimus davidi, an enchytraied worm, the larvae of the Antarctic midge Belgica antarctica and the cocoons of the earthworm Dendrobaena octaedra. There are no in-depth molecular studies on the underlying cold survival mechanisms in any species. Results A cDNA microarray was generated using 6,912 M. arctica clones printed in duplicate. Analysis of clones up-regulated during dehydration procedures (using both cold- and salt-induced dehydration) has identified a number of significant cellular processes, namely the production and mobilisation of trehalose, protection of cellular systems via small heat shock proteins and tissue/cellular remodelling during the dehydration process. Energy production, initiation of protein translation and cell division, plus potential tissue repair processes dominate genes identified during recovery. Heat map analysis identified a duplication of the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) gene in M. arctica and also 53 clones co-regulated with TPS, including a number of membrane associated and cell signalling proteins. Q-PCR on selected candidate genes has also contributed to our understanding with glutathione-S-transferase identified as the major antioxdidant enzyme protecting the cells during these stressful procedures, and a number of protein kinase signalling molecules involved in recovery

  13. Response of Chinese wampee axes and maize embryos to dehydration at different rates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Song, Song-Quan; Wu, Xian-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Survival of wampee (Clausena lansiumSkeels) axes and maize (Zea mays L.) embryos decreased with rapid and slow dehydration. Damage of wampee axes by rapid dehydration was much less than by slow dehydration, and that was contrary to maize embryos. The malondialdehyde contents of wampee axes and maize embryos rapidly increased with dehydration, those of wampee axes were lower during rapid dehydration than during slow dehydration, and those of maize embryos were higher during rapid dehydration than during slow dehydration. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) of wampee axes markedly increased during the early phase of dehydration, and then rapidly decreased, and those of rapidly dehydrated axes were higher than those of slow dehydrated axes when they were dehydrated to low water contents. Activities of SOD and APX of maize embryos notable decreased with dehydration. There were higher SOD activities and lower APX activities of slowly dehydrated maize embryos compared with rapidly dehydrated maize embryos. CAT activities of maize embryos markedly increased during the early phase of dehydration, and then decreased, and those of slowly dehydrated embryos were higher than those of rapidly dehydrated embryos during the late phase of dehydration.

  14. Two-stage dehydration of sugars

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Johnathan E.; Hu, Jianli; Wang, Yong; Werpy, Todd A.

    2009-11-10

    The invention includes methods for producing dianhydrosugar alcohol by providing an acid catalyst within a reactor and passing a starting material through the reactor at a first temperature. At least a portion of the staring material is converted to a monoanhydrosugar isomer during the passing through the column. The monoanhydrosugar is subjected to a second temperature which is greater than the first to produce a dianhydrosugar. The invention includes a method of producing isosorbide. An initial feed stream containing sorbitol is fed into a continuous reactor containing an acid catalyst at a temperature of less than 120.degree. C. The residence time for the reactor is less than or equal to about 30 minutes. Sorbitol converted to 1,4-sorbitan in the continuous reactor is subsequently provided to a second reactor and is dehydrated at a temperature of at least 120.degree. C. to produce isosorbide.

  15. Analysis of Data from a Downhole Oil/Water Separator Field Trial in East Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, John A.; Layne, Arthur Langhus

    2001-04-19

    Downhole oil/water separator (DOWS) technology is available to separate oil from produced water at the bottom of an oil well. Produced water can be injected directly to a disposal formation rather than lifting it to the surface, treating it there, and reinjecting it. Because of a lack of detailed performance data on DOWS systems, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided funding to secure DOWS performance data. A large U.S. oil and gas operator offered to share its data with Argonne National Laboratory. This report summarizes data from the DOWS installation in eastern Texas.

  16. ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY WITH DOWNHOLE VIBRATION STIMULATION IN OSAGE COUNTY OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Westermark; J. Ford Brett

    2003-11-01

    This Final Report covers the entire project from July 13, 2000 to June 30, 2003. The report summarizes the details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma'' under DOE Contract Number DE-FG26-00BC15191. The project was divided into nine separate tasks. This report is written in an effort to document the lessons learned during the completion of each task. Therefore each task will be discussed as the work evolved for that task throughout the duration of the project. Most of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, but certain tasks were dependent on earlier tasks being completed. During the three years of project activities, twelve quarterly technical reports were submitted for the project. Many individual topic and task specific reports were included as appendices in the quarterly reports. Ten of these reports have been included as appendices to this final report. Two technical papers, which were written and accepted by the Society of Petroleum Engineers, have also been included as appendices. The three primary goals of the project were to build a downhole vibration tool (DHVT) to be installed in seven inch casing, conduct a field test of vibration stimulation in a mature waterflooded field and evaluate the effects of the vibration on both the produced fluid characteristics and injection well performance. The field test results are as follows: In Phase I of the field test the DHVT performed exceeding well, generating strong clean signals on command and as designed. During this phase Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory had installed downhole geophones and hydrophones to monitor the signal generated by the downhole vibrator. The signals recorded were strong and clear. Phase II was planned to be ninety-day reservoir stimulation field test. This portion of the field tests was abruptly ended after one week of operations, when the DHVT became stuck in the well during a routine

  17. Active cooling for downhole instrumentation: design criteria and conceptual design summary

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1986-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a literature survey that describes successful tests of geophysical instruments and their thermal protection systems. The conditions to which an instrument is subjected are formulated into relevant thermal and mechanical design criteria that have proved useful for improving passive thermal protection systems and selecting the preliminary feasibility of active refrigeration systems. A brief summary of the results of a series of conceptual designs on seven different active refrigeration systems is given. The systems are ranked according to feasibility for use in downhole active cooling applications.

  18. Downhole tool for use with a ball and seat traveling valve for a fluid pump

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, H.L.

    1989-07-18

    This paper describes a downhole tool for use with a ball and seat travelling valve associated with a movable plunger, having upper and lower ends, for pumping well fluids. It comprises: an upper housing; a lower housing adapted to be associated with the upper end of the plunger; and means for causing relative movement between the upper and lower housings and abutment of the upper housing against the lower housing to impart a bumping force to the plunger during the downward movement of the plunger, whereby the ball is moved from its seat to permit the passage of well fluids through the travelling valve.

  19. Program for the improvement of downhole drilling motor bearings and seals. Phase V. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeLafosse, P.H.; Tibbitts, G.A.; Black, A.D.; DiBona, B.G.

    1983-08-01

    The work done during the fifth and final phase of a program to improve downhole drilling motor bearing and seals is described. The principal activities in this phase were: (a) testing seals with abrasive-laden mud on the low-pressure side; (b) test second and third generation designs of both elastomeric chevron seals and Teflon U-seals; and (c) testing a full-scale bearing/seal package. Several operating parameters which have a radical effect on seal life were identified, and some promising designs and materials were tested.

  20. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibrations Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2001-09-30

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2001 to September 30, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well is permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has begun analyzing the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements will be conducted. They will then begin the sonic stimulation core tests Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has begun to collect both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area. Green Country Submersible Pump Company, a subsidiary of Calumet Oil Company, will provide both the surface equipment and downhole tools to allow the Downhole Vibration Tool to be operated by a surface rod rotating system. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and is ready for initial shallow testing. The shallow testing will be done in a temporarily abandoned well operated by Calumet Oil Co. in the Wynona waterflood unit. The data acquisition doghouse and rod rotating equipment have been placed on location in anticipation of the shallow test in Well No.20-12 Wynona Waterflood Unit. A notice of invention disclosure was submitted to the DOE Chicago Operations Office. DOE Case No.S-98,124 has been assigned to follow the documentation following the invention disclosure. A paper covering the material presented to the Oklahoma Geologic Survey (OGS)/DOE Annual Workshop in

  1. Improving diffraction resolution using a new dehydration method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qingqiu; Szebenyi, Doletha M E

    2016-02-01

    The production of high-quality crystals is one of the major obstacles in determining the three-dimensional structure of macromolecules by X-ray crystallography. It is fairly common that a visually well formed crystal diffracts poorly to a resolution that is too low to be suitable for structure determination. Dehydration has proven to be an effective post-crystallization treatment for improving crystal diffraction quality. Several dehydration methods have been developed, but no single one of them is suitable for all crystals. Here, a new convenient and effective dehydration method is reported that makes use of a dehydrating solution that will not dry out in air for several hours. Using this dehydration method, the resolution of Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cas5a crystals has been increased from 3.2 to 1.95 Å and the resolution of Escherichia coli LptA crystals has been increased from <5 to 3.4 Å.

  2. Formation and dehydration enthalpy of potassium hexaniobate

    DOE PAGES

    Sahu, Sulata K.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2016-09-15

    The formation energetics of hydrous and dehydrated potassium hexaniobates are investigated using high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The enthalpies of formation of K4Nb6O17 and K4Nb6O17•3H2O from oxides are (–864.42 ± 10.63) and (–899.32 ± 11.48) kJ/mol, respectively. The formation enthalpy of K4Nb6O17 from elements is (–7289.64 ± 12.50) kJ/mol, and of K4Nb6O17•3H2O is (–8181.94 ± 13.24) kJ/mol. The enthalpy of dehydration (ΔHdehy) for the reaction K4Nb6O173H2O (xl, 25 °C) = K4Nb6O17 (xl, 25 °C) + 3H2O (l, 25 °C) is endothermic and is 34.60 ± 7.56 kJ/mol. The ΔHdehy per mole of water, 11.53 ± 2.52 kJ/mol, indicates the watermore » molecules in K4Nb6O17•3H2O are not just physically adsorbed, but loosely bonded in the K4Nb6O17 phase, presumably in specific interlayer sites. As a result, the loss of this water near 100 °C on heating is consistent with the weak bonding of water.« less

  3. Dehydration and vernalization treatments identify overlapping molecular networks impacting endodormancy maintenance in leafy spurge crown buds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula L.) is an herbaceous perennial weed that reproduces vegetatively from an abundance of underground adventitious buds (UABs), which undergo well-defined phases of seasonal dormancy (para-, endo- and eco-dormancy). In this study, the effects of dehydration-stress on vegeta...

  4. Photosynthetic parameters of sexually different parts of Porphyra katadai var. hemiphylla (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) during dehydration and re-hydration.

    PubMed

    Lin, A-Peng; Wang, Guang-Ce; Yang, Fang; Pan, Guang-Hua

    2009-03-01

    Physiological data from extreme habitat organisms during stresses are vital information for comprehending their survival. The intertidal seaweeds are exposed to a combination of environmental stresses, the most influential one being regular dehydration and re-hydration. Porphyra katadai var. hemiphylla is a unique intertidal macroalga species with two longitudinally separated, color distinct, sexually different parts. In this study, the photosynthetic performance of both PSI and PSII of the two sexually different parts of P. katadai thalli during dehydration and re-hydration was investigated. Under low-grade dehydration the variation of photosystems of male and female parts of P. katadai were similar. However, after the absolute water content reached 42%, the PSI of the female parts was nearly shut down while that of the male parts still coordinated well and worked properly with PSII. Furthermore, after re-hydration with a better conditioned PSI, the dehydrated male parts were able to restore photosynthesis within 1 h, while the female parts did not. It is concluded that in P. katadai the susceptibility of photosynthesis to dehydration depends on the accommodative ability of PSI. The relatively lower content of phycobiliprotein in male parts may be the cause for a stronger PSI after severe dehydration.

  5. Experimental Study of Dehydration and Partial Melting of Biotite-Amphibole Gneiss Under Influence of the H2O-CO2-(K, Na)cl Fluids at 5.5 Kbar and 750 and 800 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, O.; Kosova, S.

    2012-12-01

    Chloride-rich brines coexisting with CO2-rich fluids are an important agent of high-grade metamorphism and metasomatism in the lower to middle crust. Thermodynamic and transport properties of the chloride-rich fluids are well constrained both theoretically and experimentally. Nevertheless, their effects on complex natural assemblages are poorly understood and demand systematic experimental study. We report results of the experiments on interaction of the biotite-amphibole gneiss from the Sand River formation (Limpopo Complex, South Africa) with the H2O-CO2, H2O-CO2-KCl, H2O-CO2-NaCl, and H2O-CO2-(K, Na)Cl fluids at 5.5 kbar, 750 and 800 C, the chloride/(H2O+CO2) ratio varying from 0 to 0.1, and molar CO2/(CO2+H2O) = 0.5. Experiments were carried out using internally-heated gas pressure vessel. Major purposes of the experiments were to trace changes in phase assemblages in dependence on temperature, salt concentration in a fluid, KCl/NaCl ratio and to show a possibility for partial melting. Heating of the gneiss both at 750 and 800 C without any fluid produced no visible changes in its phase assemblage. Interaction of the gneiss with the H2O-CO2 fluid at 750 C did not significantly influence on its phase assemblage, as well. Addition of KCl in the H2O-CO2 fluid at 750 C resulted in the formation of reaction textures consisting of clinopyroxene and K-feldspar around biotite and amphibole at the contacts with plagioclase. No evidence for partial melting was detected in the samples interacted with the H2O-CO2 and H2O-CO2-KCl fluids at 750 C. Addition of NaCl provokes melting with formation of trachytic and trachyandesitic melts along with the new assemblages Cpx+Kfs+Pl+Ti-Mt and Cpx+Amp+Pl+Ti-Mt. Characteristic of feature of amphiboles, forming in the NaCl-rich fluids is their elevated Na2O content. Products of the runs at 750 C do not contain orthopyroxene. This phase appears at 800 C as a result of biotite breakdown in presence of the H2O-CO2 fluid. It is accompanied

  6. Skeletal muscle volume following dehydration induced by exercise in heat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intracellular skeletal muscle water is redistributed into the extracellular compartment during periods of dehydration, suggesting an associated decline in muscle volume. The purpose of this study was to evaluate skeletal muscle volume in active (knee extensors (KE)) and less active (biceps/triceps brachii, deltoid) musculature following dehydration induced by exercise in heat. Methods Twelve participants (seven men, five women) cycled in the heat under two conditions: (1) dehydration (DHYD) resulting in 3% and 5% losses of estimated total body water (ETBW), which was assessed by changes in body mass, and (2) fluid replacement (FR) where 3% and 5% losses of ETBW were counteracted by intermittent (20 to 30 min) fluid ingestion via a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage. During both conditions, serum osmolality and skeletal muscle volume (assessed by magnetic resonance imaging) were measured at baseline and at the 3% and 5% ETBW loss measurement points. Results In DHYD, serum osmolality increased at 3% (p = 0.005) and 5% (p < 0.001) ETBW losses, while FR decreased serum osmolality at the 5% loss of ETBW time point (p = 0.009). In DHYD, KE muscle volume declined from 1,464 ± 446 ml to 1,406 ± 425 ml (3.9%, p < 0.001) at 3% ETBW loss and to 1,378 ± 421 ml (5.9%, p < 0.001) at 5% ETBW loss. The largest decline in KE volume in DYHD occurred in the mid-belly (31 ml, p = 0.001) and proximal (24 ml, p = 0.001) regions of the grouped vasti muscles. There were no changes in volume for the biceps/triceps (p = 0.35) or deltoid (p = 0.92) during DHYD. FR prevented the loss of KE muscle volume at 3% (1,430 ± 435 ml, p = 0.074) and 5% (1,431 ± 439 ml, p = 0.156) ETBW loss time points compared to baseline (1,445 ± 436 ml). Conclusions Following exercise in the heat, the actively contracting muscles lost volume, while replacing lost fluids intermittently during exercise in heat prevented this decline

  7. System to inject steam and produce oil from the same wellbore through downhole valve switching. Second quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    A market analysis for the Downhole Valves and associated hardware in California has shown that the main effort should be concentrated on the second case studied in the First Quarter Report, namely that of re-entry into a thermal well equipped with a 7 in. casing. An improved design,based on the use of a combination of a sliding sleeve valve with two plugs (all of them operated by wireline) is the most flexible and lowest cost configuration,for entering the largest market in California,that of existing vertical wells penetrating a relatively thin ({le} 40 ft) reservoir. At present oil prices at the California refineries, these wells, operated under cyclic steam injection are barely economic. They could become much more productive with the addition of a pair of small-diameter horizontal drainholes. A low-cost work-over program with all drilling and completion operations done through the 2 7/8 in. production tubing has been designed. Laboratory tests have confirmed the operability of the modified sliding sleeve valve with steam at temperatures ranging up to 500 F. Calculations have also determined the steam quality improvements resulting from using a low-cost Silicate foam insulation on the 2 3/8 in. steam tubing, with the 7 in. casing/tubings annulus filled with low-pressure gas.

  8. The use of titanium alloys for details of downhole hammers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelyukh, A. I.; Repin, A. A.; Alekseev, S. E.; Martyushev, N. V.; Drozdov, Yu Yu

    2016-04-01

    The influence of cementation technology of titanium alloy Ti-Al-Mn on its wear resistance is studied. It is established that after lubrication a friction pair with mineral oil the wear resistance of the cemented titanium alloy is comparable to wear resistance of the tempered steel 12HN3A, and in water medium surpasses it by 1.5 times. Decrease in the tendency to seizure with steel is the main reason for increase of wear resistance of titanium alloy. Industrial tests of the ASH43 hammer have shown that the use of titanium alloys for the manufacture of hammer strikers allows to increase impact capacity by 1.5 times and to increase drilling rate by 30 % compared to hammers with steel strikers.

  9. Geothermal well cements: current status of R and D and downhole testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1981-11-01

    The status as of October 1981 of the program to develop and test geothermal well cementing materials. The program represents the most comprehensive and thorough examination of the geothermal cementing problem undertaken thus far. To date, 27 cements identified in an R and D phase of the program or supplied by industry have been evaluated in laboratory tests. Sixteen of these materials were selected for downhole investigations currently in progress in Mexico at Cerro Prieto. Data for 3 months exposures to flowing brine at 210{sup 0}C are available. Most of the cements continue to meet the strength and permeability acceptance criteria. These results should be reassuring to operators who are using such slurries. Further evaluations are planned after 6 and 12 months exposures. Contingent upon these results, tests will be initiated at 350{sup 0}C. Since many of the cements were formulated specifically for use at temperatures above 300/sup 0/C, it is expected that significant property improvements may be observed as the downhole temperature is increased.

  10. Element for use in an inductive coupler for downhole drilling components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron

    2006-08-29

    The present invention includes an element for use in an inductive coupler in a downhole component. The element includes a plurality of ductile, generally U-shaped leaves that are electrically conductive. The leaves are less than about 0.0625" thick and are separated by an electrically insulating material. These leaves are aligned so as to form a generally circular trough. The invention also includes an inductive coupler for use in downhole components, the inductive coupler including an annular housing having a recess with a magnetically conductive, electrically insulating (MCEI) element disposed in the recess. The MCEI element includes a plurality of segments where each segment further includes a plurality of ductile, generally U-shaped electrically conductive leaves. Each leaf is less than about 0.0625" thick and separated from the otherwise adjacent leaves by electrically insulating material. The segments and leaves are aligned so as to form a generally circular trough. The inductive coupler further includes an insulated conductor disposed within the generally circular trough. A polymer fills spaces between otherwise adjacent segments, the annular housing, insulated conductor, and further fills the circular trough.

  11. Discovery of the Eureka volcanogenic massive sulphide lens using downhole electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paggi, Jacob; Macklin, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    The Eureka volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) lens forms part of the Stockman Project in north-east Victoria. Eureka was discovered in early 2013, heralding the first new VMS mineralised zone to be discovered at the project since 1979. Key drivers to the detection of Eureka included the combination of downhole electromagnetics (EM) and a robust geological model. The lens is located 350 m to the north-east of the Currawong deposit, at a vertical depth of 360 m. Surface EM methods played a significant role in the discovery of the nearby Currawong and Wilga deposits during the late 1970s. Despite this, modern day airborne and fixed-loop transient EM (FLTEM) surveys failed to detect Eureka, most likely due to its depth, moderate conductance and loop-edge effects masking anomalies. The key component in discovering the lens was the interpretation of two subtle downhole transient electromagnetics (DHTEM) responses from 2012 exploration drillholes. These responses were further strengthened by structural and short wave infrared modelling, presenting a compelling multi-component drill target. The lens was discovered soon thereafter, with a discovery intercept of 22.65 m at 1.2% Cu, 0.7% Pb, 3.9% Zn, 43 g/t Ag and 1.3 g/t Au.

  12. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2000-09-30

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2000 to September 30, 2000. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Since this is the first Quarterly report, much of the work done is of a preliminary nature. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The selection of the pilot test area has been completed. The drilling of the test well is waiting on rig availability. Phillips has begun sonic core testing of offset cores, waiting on the core from the well to be drilled. Design work is progressing for the tool, which will be built to fit the test well. Installation of monitoring equipment and the downhole vibration tool will occur after the well is drilled. Technical transfer efforts have begun with the submission of an abstract for a technical paper for the Oklahoma City Society of Petroleum Engineers meeting in March 2001.

  13. Subsurface exploration using bucket auger borings and down-hole geologic inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Scullin, C.M. )

    1994-03-01

    The down-hole geologic inspection of 24 in. bucket auger borings has been a hands-on technique for collecting valuable geologic structural and lithologic detail in southern California investigations for over 35 yr. Although it has been used for all types of investigations for hillside urban development, it is of particular benefit in landslide investigations and evaluations. The benefits of down-hole geologic inspection during detailed mapping of large landslide complexes with multiple slide planes are discussed in this paper. Many of the geotechnical investigations of these massive landslide complexes have been very limited in their determinations of accurate landslide parameters and very deficient in proper engineering analysis while based upon this limited data. This has resulted in many cases where the geotechnical consultant erroneously concludes that ancient landslides don't move and it is all right to build upon them, even though they have neither justified the landslide parameters, nor the slope stability or safety. Because this author and the many consultants contacted during the preparation of this paper were not aware of other publications regarding this method of collecting detailed geologic data, this author included the safety considerations, safety equipment, the cost and the Cal OSHA requirements for entering exploration shafts.

  14. Neuro-evolutionary event detection technique for downhole microseismic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Debotyam; Salehi, Iraj

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen a significant increase in borehole microseismic data acquisition programs associated with unconventional reservoir developments such as hydraulic fracturing programs for shale oil and gas. The data so acquired is used for hydraulic fracture monitoring and diagnostics and therefore, the quality of the data in terms of resolution and accuracy has a significant impact on its value to the industry. Borehole microseismic data acquired in such environments typically suffer from propagation effects due to the presence of thin interbedded shale layers as well as noise and interference effects. Moreover, acquisition geometry has significant impact on detectability across portions of the sensor array. Our work focuses on developing robust first arrival detection and pick selection workflow for both P and S waves specifically designed for such environments. We introduce a novel workflow for refinement of picks with immunity towards significant noise artifacts and applicability over data with very low signal-to-noise ratio provided some accurate picks have already been made. This workflow utilizes multi-step hybrid detection and classification routine which makes use of a neural network based autopicker for initial picking and an evolutionary algorithm for pick refinement. We highlight the results from an actual field case study including multiple examples demonstrating immunity towards noise and compare the effectiveness of the workflow with two contemporary autopicking routines without the application of the shared detection/refinement procedure. Finally, we use a windowed waveform cross-correlation based uncertainty estimation method for potential quality control purposes. While the workflow was developed to work with the neural network based autopicker, it can be used with any other traditional autopicker and provides significant improvements in pick detection across seismic gathers.

  15. Dehydration improves cryopreservation of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.).

    PubMed

    Sisunandar; Sopade, Peter A; Samosir, Yohannes M S; Rival, Alain; Adkins, Steve W

    2010-12-01

    Cryopreservation of coconut can be used as a strategy to back up the establishment of living collections which are expensive to maintain and are under constant threat from biotic and abiotic factors. Unfortunately, cryopreservation protocols still need to be developed that are capable of producing a sizeable number of field-grown plants. Therefore, we report on the development of an improved cryopreservation protocol which can be used on a wide range of coconut cultivars. The cryopreservation of zygotic embryos and their recovery to soil-growing plants was achieved through the application of four optimised steps viz.: (i) rapid dehydration; (ii) rapid cooling; (iii) rapid warming and recovery in vitro and (iv) acclimatization and soil-supported growth. The thermal properties of water within the embryos were monitored using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in order to ensure that the freezable component was kept to a minimum. The feasibility of the protocol was assessed using the Malayan Yellow Dwarf (MYD) cultivar in Australia and then tested on a range of cultivars which were freshly harvested and studied in Indonesia. The most efficient protocol was one based on an 8-h rapid dehydration step followed by rapid cooling step. Best recovery percentages were obtained when a rapid warming step and an optimised in vitro culture step were used. Following this protocol, 20% (when cryopreserved 12 days after harvesting) and 40% (when cryopreserved at the time of harvest) of all MYD embryos cryopreserved could be returned to normal seedlings growing in soil. DSC showed that this protocol induced a drop in embryo fresh weight to 19% and significantly reduced the amount of water remaining that could produce ice crystals (0.1%). Of the 20 cultivars tested, 16 were found to produce between 10% and 40% normal seedlings while four cultivars generated between 0% and 10% normal seedlings after cryopreservation. This new protocol is applicable to a wide range of coconut

  16. Formation and dehydration enthalpy of potassium hexaniobate

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Sulata K.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2016-09-15

    The formation energetics of hydrous and dehydrated potassium hexaniobates are investigated using high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The enthalpies of formation of K4Nb6O17 and K4Nb6O17•3H2O from oxides are (–864.42 ± 10.63) and (–899.32 ± 11.48) kJ/mol, respectively. The formation enthalpy of K4Nb6O17 from elements is (–7289.64 ± 12.50) kJ/mol, and of K4Nb6O17•3H2O is (–8181.94 ± 13.24) kJ/mol. The enthalpy of dehydration (ΔHdehy) for the reaction K4Nb6O173H2O (xl, 25 °C) = K4Nb6O17 (xl, 25 °C) + 3H2O (l, 25 °C) is endothermic and is 34.60 ± 7.56 kJ/mol. The ΔHdehy per mole of water, 11.53 ± 2.52 kJ/mol, indicates the water molecules in K4Nb6O17•3H2O are not just physically adsorbed, but loosely bonded in the K4Nb6O17 phase, presumably in specific interlayer sites. As a result, the loss of this water near 100 °C on heating is consistent with the weak bonding of water.

  17. Quantitative analysis of dehydration in porcine skin caused by optical clearing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tingting; Wen, Xiang; Duan, Shu; Zhu, Dan

    2010-11-01

    Dehydration is supposed to be one of mechanisms of optical clearing, but current studies merely gave some qualitative descriptions. Here an analysis method was established to evaluate the water content of skin with PLS method based on the measurements of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy and weight of porcine skin. Furthermore, a commercial spectrometer with integrating sphere was used to measure the reflectance and transmittance after treatment with different agents. Then the established method was used to evaluate the water content, while the Inverse Adding-Double algorithm was used to calculate the reduced scattering coefficients. The results show that both the water contents and reduced scattering coefficients decrease during the optical clearing process, and there is direct relationship between the optical clearing efficacy and dehydration. With the treating time last, the relative change in reduced scattering coefficient is larger than that in dehydration of skin, and the difference between the changes depends on the agents. Therefore, we conclude that dehydration is the main mechanism of skin optical clearing during the 60 min treatment of the agents, but for some OCAs, i.e., PEG400, glycerol, or D-sorbitol, there might be some other mechanisms contributing to the optical clearing efficacy.

  18. Dehydration of the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere by Subvisible Cirrus Clouds Near the Tropical Tropopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry B.

    1996-01-01

    The extreme dryness of the lower stratosphere is believed to be caused by freeze-drying of air as it enters the stratosphere through the cold tropical tropopause. Previous investigations have been focused on dehydration occurring at the tops of deep convective cloud systems, However, recent observations of a ubiquitous stratiform cirrus cloud layer near the tropical tropopause suggest the possibility of dehydration as air is slowly lifted by large-scale motions, In this study, we have evaluated this possibility using a detailed ice cloud model. Simulations of ice cloud formation in the temperature minima of gravity waves (wave periods of 1 - 2 hours) indicate that large numbers of ice crystals will likely form due to the low temperatures and rapid cooling. As a result, the crystals do not grow larger than about 10 microns, fallspeeds are no greater than a few cm/s, and little or no precipitation or dehydration occurs. However, ice cloud's formed by large-scale vertical motions (with lifetimes of a day or more) should have,fever crystals and more time for crystal sedimentation to occur, resulting in water vapor depletions as large as 1 ppmv near the tropopause. We suggest that gradual lifting near the tropical tropopause, accompanied by formation of thin cirrus, may account for the dehydration.

  19. Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii of dehydrated infant formula by gamma-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju-Woon; Oh, Sang-Hee; Byun, Eui-Baek; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Jang-Ho; Woon, Jae-Ho; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2007-11-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii has been implicated as a causal organism in a severe form of neonatal meningitis, with reported mortality rates of 20%. The population at greatest risk is immunocompromised infants of any age. Dried infant formula has been identified as a potential source of the organism in both outbreaks and sporadic cases. The objective of this study was to investigate theirradiation effect of the inactivation on E. sakazakii (ATCC 29544) of a dehydrated infant formula. The D10-values were 0.22-0.27 and 0.76 kGy for broth and dehydrated infant formula, respectively. The irradiation at 5.0 kGy was able to completely eliminate the E. sakazakii inoculated at 8.0 to 9.0 log CFU g -1 onto a dehydrated infant formula. There was no regrowth for all samples during the time they were stored at 10 °C for 6 h after rehydration. The present results indicated that a gamma-irradiation could potentially be used to inactivate E. sakazakii in a dehydrated powdered infant formula.

  20. Water replacement hypothesis in atomic detail--factors determining the structure of dehydrated bilayer stacks.

    PubMed

    Golovina, Elena A; Golovin, Andrey V; Hoekstra, Folkert A; Faller, Roland

    2009-07-22

    According to the water replacement hypothesis, trehalose stabilizes dry membranes by preventing the decrease of spacing between membrane lipids under dehydration. In this study, we use molecular-dynamics simulations to investigate the influence of trehalose on the area per lipid (APL) and related structural properties of dehydrated bilayers in atomic detail. The starting conformation of a palmitoyloleolylphosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer in excess water was been obtained by self-assembly. A series of molecular-dynamics simulations of palmitoyloleolylphosphatidylcholine with different degrees of dehydration (28.5, 11.7, and 5.4 waters per lipid) and different molar trehalose/lipid ratios (<1:1, 1:1, and >1:1) were carried out in the NPT ensemble. Water removal causes the formation of multilamellar "stacks" through periodic boundary conditions. The headgroups reorient from pointing outward to inward with dehydration. This causes changes in the electrostatic interactions between interfaces, resulting in interface interpenetration. Interpenetration creates self-spacing of the bilayers and prevents gel-phase formation. At lower concentrations, trehalose does not separate the interfaces, and acting together with self-spacing, it causes a considerable increase of APL. APL decreases at higher trehalose concentrations when the layer of sugar physically separates the interfaces. When interfaces are separated, the model confirms the water replacement hypothesis.

  1. Water Replacement Hypothesis in Atomic Detail—Factors Determining the Structure of Dehydrated Bilayer Stacks

    PubMed Central

    Golovina, Elena A.; Golovin, Andrey V.; Hoekstra, Folkert A.; Faller, Roland

    2009-01-01

    Abstract According to the water replacement hypothesis, trehalose stabilizes dry membranes by preventing the decrease of spacing between membrane lipids under dehydration. In this study, we use molecular-dynamics simulations to investigate the influence of trehalose on the area per lipid (APL) and related structural properties of dehydrated bilayers in atomic detail. The starting conformation of a palmitoyloleolylphosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer in excess water was been obtained by self-assembly. A series of molecular-dynamics simulations of palmitoyloleolylphosphatidylcholine with different degrees of dehydration (28.5, 11.7, and 5.4 waters per lipid) and different molar trehalose/lipid ratios (<1:1, 1:1, and >1:1) were carried out in the NPT ensemble. Water removal causes the formation of multilamellar “stacks” through periodic boundary conditions. The headgroups reorient from pointing outward to inward with dehydration. This causes changes in the electrostatic interactions between interfaces, resulting in interface interpenetration. Interpenetration creates self-spacing of the bilayers and prevents gel-phase formation. At lower concentrations, trehalose does not separate the interfaces, and acting together with self-spacing, it causes a considerable increase of APL. APL decreases at higher trehalose concentrations when the layer of sugar physically separates the interfaces. When interfaces are separated, the model confirms the water replacement hypothesis. PMID:19619463

  2. Proteome analysis of leaves from the resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica in response to dehydration and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guoqiang; Wang, Zhi; Shang, Haihong; Yang, Wenlong; Hu, Zhiang; Phillips, Jonathan; Deng, Xin

    2007-05-01

    Resurrection plants differ from other species in their unique ability to survive desiccation. In order to understand the mechanisms of desiccation tolerance, proteome studies were carried out using leaves of the resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica to reveal proteins that were differentially expressed in response to changes in relative water content. This opportunity was afforded by the rare ability of excised B. hygrometrica leaves to survive and resume metabolism following desiccation in a manner similar to intact plants. From a total of 223 proteins that were reproducibly detected and analyzed, 35% showed increased abundance in dehydrated leaves, 5% were induced in rehydrated leaves and 60% showed decreased or unchanged abundance in dehydrated and rehydrated leaves. Since the induction kinetics fall into clearly defined patterns, we suggest that programmed regulation of protein expression triggered by changes of water status. Fourteen dehydration responsive proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Eight proteins were classified as playing a role in reactive oxygen species scavenging, photosynthesis and energy metabolism. In agreement with these findings, glutathione content and polyphenol oxidase activity were found to increase upon dehydration and rapid recovery of photosynthesis was observed.

  3. Hypernatremia in the Neonate: Neonatal Hypernatremia and Hypernatremic Dehydration in Neonates Receiving Exclusive Breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Mujawar, Nilofer Salim; Jaiswal, Archana Nirmal

    2017-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Evaluation of neonatal hypernatremia and hypernatremic dehydration in neonates receiving exclusive breastfeeding. Introduction: Neonatal hypernatremia is a serious condition in the newborn period. We present infants with hypernatremic dehydration due to breast milk (BM) hypernatremia. Hypernatremic dehydration in breast-fed newborns is usually secondary to insufficient lactation. We present the neonatal hypernatremia and hypernatremic dehydration encountered between January and December, 2012, its causes and treatment. Methodology: This was a retrospective study. We analyzed records of babies admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit who were investigated and found to have hypernatremia and whose mother's BM sodium (BM Na) was done. Inclusion Criteria: (1) Babies with serum Na >145 meq/l, (2) euglycemia, (3) normocalcemic, (4) no clinical and lab evidence of sepsis, (5) exclusive breast feeds. Exclusion Criteria: Neonates not satisfying any mentioned criterion. Results: BM Na correlated strongly with neonatal hypernatremia in exclusively breast-fed babies who did not otherwise have any risk factor. Conclusion: Elevated BM Na is an important etiological factor in neonatal hypernatremia. PMID:28197048

  4. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: cell wall mannoproteins are important for yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistance to dehydration.

    PubMed

    Borovikova, Diana; Teparić, Renata; Mrša, Vladimir; Rapoport, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The state of anhydrobiosis is linked with the reversible delay of metabolism as a result of strong dehydration of cells, and is widely distributed in nature. A number of factors responsible for the maintenance of organisms' viability in these conditions have been revealed. This study was directed to understanding how changes in cell wall structure may influence the resistance of yeasts to dehydration-rehydration. Mutants lacking various cell wall mannoproteins were tested to address this issue. It was revealed that mutants lacking proteins belonging to two structurally and functionally unrelated groups (proteins non-covalently attached to the cell wall, and Pir proteins) possessed significantly lower cell resistance to dehydration-rehydration than the mother wild-type strain. At the same time, the absence of the GPI-anchored cell wall protein Ccw12 unexpectedly resulted in an increase of cell resistance to this treatment; this phenomenon is explained by the compensatory synthesis of chitin. The results clearly indicate that the cell wall structure/composition relates to parameters strongly influencing yeast viability during the processes of dehydration-rehydration, and that damage to cell wall proteins during yeast desiccation can be an important factor leading to cell death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Influence of progressive fluid restriction on mood and physiological markers of dehydration in women.

    PubMed

    Pross, Nathalie; Demazières, Agnès; Girard, Nicolas; Barnouin, Romain; Santoro, Francine; Chevillotte, Emmanuel; Klein, Alexis; Le Bellego, Laurent

    2013-01-28

    The present study evaluated, using a well-controlled dehydration protocol, the effects of 24 h fluid deprivation (FD) on selected mood and physiological parameters. In the present cross-over study, twenty healthy women (age 25 (SE 0.78) years) participated in two randomised sessions: FD-induced dehydration v. a fully hydrated control condition. In the FD period, the last water intake was between 18.00 and 19.00 hours and no beverages were allowed until 18.00 hours on the next day (23-24 h). Water intake was only permitted at fixed periods during the control condition. Physiological parameters in the urine, blood and saliva (osmolality) as well as mood and sensations (headache and thirst) were compared across the experimental conditions. Safety was monitored throughout the study. The FD protocol was effective as indicated by a significant reduction in urine output. No clinical abnormalities of biological parameters or vital signs were observed, although heart rate was increased by FD. Increased urine specific gravity, darker urine colour and increased thirst were early markers of dehydration. Interestingly, dehydration also induced a significant increase in saliva osmolality at the end of the 24 h FD period but plasma osmolality remained unchanged. The significant effects of FD on mood included decreased alertness and increased sleepiness, fatigue and confusion. The most consistent effects of mild dehydration on mood are on sleep/wake parameters. Urine specific gravity appears to be the best physiological measure of hydration status in subjects with a normal level of activity; saliva osmolality is another reliable and non-invasive method for assessing hydration status.

  6. Change in hydrogen bonding structures of a hydrogel with dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naohara, Ryo; Narita, Kentaro; Ikeda-Fukazawa, Tomoko

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of structural changes in polymer network and water during dehydration, X-ray diffraction of poly-N,N-dimethylacrylamide (PDMAA) hydrogels was measured. The variation process in the individual structures of water and PDMAA were analyzed by decomposition of the diffraction patterns to separate the respective contributions. The results show that the short-range structures of PDMAA expand during dehydration, whereas the network structure as a whole shrinks. The average length of the hydrogen bonds between water molecules increases with the process. The present results provide a direct evidence of the structural changes of water and polymer in the hydrogel during dehydration.

  7. Transient dehydration of lungs in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Steskal, J.; Morey-Holton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    The fluid balance in the lungs of rats exposed to head-down tilt is examined. Six Munich-Wister rats were suspended for 7 days and 10 Sprague-Dawley rats for 14 days using the technique of Morey (1979). The water contents of the lungs of the suspended and a control group are calculated and compared. The data reveal that the two-days suspended rats had dehydrated lungs; however, the lungs of the 14-day suspended and control group rats were similar. It is noted that the dehydration in the 2-day suspended rats is caused by general dehydration not the head-tilt position.

  8. Effects of prior experience with dehydration and water on the time course of dehydration-induced drinking in weanling rats.

    PubMed

    Myers, K P; Hall, W G

    2001-04-01

    Although cellular dehydration increases oral responding and swallowing of orally infused water in rats as young as 2 days old, it is not until well after the time of weaning that dehydration stimulates immediate water-seeking and initiation of drinking in situations where the water source must be approached voluntarily. Recent work has shown that the goal-directed appetitive sequence for drinking-orienting, approaching, and initiating contact with water-matures much later than the more precocial oral licking and swallowing behaviors, and normally comes to be elicited by dehydration only after post-weaning experience with dry food. In the current experiments we evaluate some critical features of post-weaning experience with dehydration and drinking, and find that prior experience with initiating drinking while dehydrated, but not experience with dehydration nor water per se, alters the time course of water intake during a subsequent hydrational challenge. The effects of experience are manifested as an increased proportion of water consumed in the early portion of the test, rather than a general increase in total consumption. These findings are consistent with the interpretation that prior experience is necessary for the coordination of water-oriented appetitive behaviors that lead to the initiation and maintenance of drinking bouts, and provide further evidence for an associative learning account of the acquisition of dehydration-induced drinking.

  9. The effects of dehydration, moderate alcohol consumption, and rehydration on cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Christopher; Leveritt, Michael; Shum, David; Desbrow, Ben

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated the impact of mild-moderate dehydration on alcohol-induced deteriorations in cognitive functions. Sixteen healthy males participated in a single-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over design study involving 4 experimental trials (separated by ≥7 d). In each trial, participants were dehydrated by 2.5% body mass through exercise. After 1 h recovery in a thermo-neutral environment (22 ± 2 °C, 60-70% relative humidity) 4 tasks from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were administered to the participants (test 1). In two of the trials, participants were provided with water equivalent to either 50% or 150% body mass loss and given salt (NaCl) capsules (50 mmol/L). A set volume of alcohol or placebo was then consumed in each trial, incorporating the conditions: dehydration-placebo (DP), dehydration-alcohol (DA), partial rehydration-alcohol (PA), and full rehydration-alcohol (FA). The same 4 CANTAB tasks were then re-administered (test 2). Subjective ratings of mood and estimates of alcohol intoxication and driving impairment were also recorded in each trial. Alcohol consumption caused deterioration on 3 of the 4 CANTAB measures (viz., choice reaction time, executive function and response inhibition). This reduction in performance was exacerbated when participants were dehydrated compared to trials where full rehydration occurred. Subjective ratings of impairment and intoxication were not significantly different between any of the trials where alcohol was consumed; however ratings for alcohol trials were significantly higher than in the placebo trial. These findings suggest that rehydration after exercise that causes fluid loss can attenuate alcohol-related deterioration of cognitive functions. This may pose implications for post match fluid replacement if a moderate amount of alcohol is also consumed.

  10. Effect of hydrothermal circulation on slab dehydration for the subduction zone of Costa Rica and Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, Juan Carlos; Currie, Claire A.; Harris, Robert N.; He, Jiangheng

    2016-06-01

    Dehydration of subducting oceanic plates is associated with mantle wedge melting, arc volcanism, intraslab earthquakes through dehydration embrittlement, and the flux of water into the mantle. In this study, we present two-dimensional thermal models of the Costa Rica-Nicaragua subduction zone to investigate dehydration reactions within the subducting Cocos plate. Seismic and geochemical observations indicate that the mantle wedge below Nicaragua is more hydrated than that below Costa Rica. These trends have been hypothesized to be due to a variation in either the thermal state or the hydration state of the subducting slab. Despite only small variations in plate age along strike, heat flow measurements near the deformation front reveal significantly lower heat flow offshore Nicaragua than offshore Costa Rica. These measurements are interpreted to reflect an along-strike change in the efficiency of hydrothermal circulation in the oceanic crust. We parameterize thermal models in terms of efficient and inefficient hydrothermal circulation and explore their impact on slab temperature in the context of dehydration models. Relative to models without fluid flow, efficient hydrothermal circulation reduces slab temperature by as much at 60 °C to depths of ∼75 km and increases the predicted depth of eclogitization by ∼15 km. Inefficient hydrothermal circulation has a commensurately smaller influence on slab temperatures and the depth of eclogitization. For both regions, the change in eclogitization depth better fits the observed intraslab crustal seismicity, but there is not a strong contrast in the slab thermal structure or location of the main dehydration reactions. Consistent with other studies, these results suggest that observed along-strike differences in mantle wedge hydration may be better explained by a northwestward increase in the hydration state of the Cocos plate before it is subducted.

  11. The value of body weight measurement to assess dehydration in children.

    PubMed

    Pruvost, Isabelle; Dubos, François; Chazard, Emmanuel; Hue, Valérie; Duhamel, Alain; Martinot, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Dehydration secondary to gastroenteritis is one of the most common reasons for office visits and hospital admissions. The indicator most commonly used to estimate dehydration status is acute weight loss. Post-illness weight gain is considered as the gold-standard to determine the true level of dehydration and is widely used to estimate weight loss in research. To determine the value of post-illness weight gain as a gold standard for acute dehydration, we conducted a prospective cohort study in which 293 children, aged 1 month to 2 years, with acute diarrhea were followed for 7 days during a 3-year period. The main outcome measures were an accurate pre-illness weight (if available within 8 days before the diarrhea), post-illness weight, and theoretical weight (predicted from the child's individual growth chart). Post-illness weight was measured for 231 (79%) and both theoretical and post-illness weights were obtained for 111 (39%). Only 62 (21%) had an accurate pre-illness weight. The correlation between post-illness and theoretical weight was excellent (0.978), but bootstrapped linear regression analysis showed that post-illness weight underestimated theoretical weight by 0.48 kg (95% CI: 0.06-0.79, p<0.02). The mean difference in the fluid deficit calculated was 4.0% of body weight (95% CI: 3.2-4.7, p<0.0001). Theoretical weight overestimated accurate pre-illness weight by 0.21 kg (95% CI: 0.08-0.34, p = 0.002). Post-illness weight underestimated pre-illness weight by 0.19 kg (95% CI: 0.03-0.36, p = 0.02). The prevalence of 5% dehydration according to post-illness weight (21%) was significantly lower than the prevalence estimated by either theoretical weight (60%) or clinical assessment (66%, p<0.0001).These data suggest that post-illness weight is of little value as a gold standard to determine the true level of dehydration. The performance of dehydration signs or scales determined by using post-illness weight as a gold standard has to be reconsidered.

  12. Effects of diuretic-induced hypovolemia/isosmotic dehydration on cardiorespiratory responses to hyperthermia and its physical treatment in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Brozmanova, Andrea; Jochem, Jerzy; Javorka, Kamil; Zila, Ivan; Zwirska-Korczala, Krystyna

    2006-03-01

    Under conditions of heat stress and hyperosmotic dehydration, both animals and humans reduce thermoregulatory evaporation and regulate deep body temperature at elevated levels. Regarding the mechanisms, the main role in producing these thermoregulatory changes during dehydration is attributed to the increased osmolality of body fluids, although the role of the decreased plasma volume without changes in plasma osmolality (hypovolemia/isosmotic dehydration) has not been so far investigated. There are also controversial experimental results regarding the effects of dehydration on heat stress-induced cutaneous vasodilation. Therefore, this paper studied the effects of hypovolemia/isosmotic dehydration on cardiorespiratory responses to hyperthermia and its physical treatment in 17 anaesthetized adult rabbits. The animals were divided into two groups: normovolemic group (NV; n = 10) and hypovolemic group (HV; n = 7). In the HV group, hypovolemia/isosmotic dehydration (decrease in plasma volume by 16.1 +/- 1.2%) was induced by furosemide (5 mg kg-1 i.v.) without change in measured plasma Na+ concentration. Hyperthermia (the rise in body temperature (BT) to 42 degrees C by a gradual body surface heating) caused significant increase in minute ventilation (VE) in both groups. However, VE values were significantly higher in the HV rabbits compared to the NV animals despite the lower breathing frequency (p < 0.05). The panting was absent in the HV rabbits at the BT of 42 degrees C, unlike the NV animals. From cardiovascular variables, the vasoconstrictor response in visceral (mesenteric) region during hyperthermia in hypovolemic/isosmotic animals was attenuated (p < 0.05), whereas the heat stress-induced cutaneous vasodilation was not influenced by hypovolemia. Recovery of the BT by body surface cooling was accompanied by further increase in VE in the NV group, whereas VE decreased (p < 0.05) in the HV animals. Cooling led to recovery of the cardiovascular parameters. There

  13. Hydrogen peroxide and ecdysone in the cryoprotective dehydration strategy of Megaphorura arctica (Onychiuridae: Collembola).

    PubMed

    Grubor-Lajšić, Gordana; Petri, Edward T; Kojić, Danijela; Purać, Jelena; Popović, Zeljko D; Worland, Roger M; Clark, Melody S; Mojović, Miloš; Blagojević, Duško P

    2013-02-01

    The Arctic springtail, Megaphorura arctica, survives sub-zero temperatures in a dehydrated state via trehalose-dependent cryoprotective dehydration. Regulation of trehalose biosynthesis is complex; based in part on studies in yeast and fungi, its connection with oxidative stress caused by exposure of cells to oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), or dehydration, is well documented. In this respect, we measured the amount of H₂O₂ and antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutases: copper, zinc--CuZnSOD and manganese containing--MnSOD, and catalase--CAT), as the regulatory components determining H₂O₂ concentrations, in Arctic springtails incubated at 5 °C (control) versus -2 °C (threshold temperature for trehalose biosynthesis). Because ecdysone also stimulates trehalose production in insects and regulates the expression of genes involved in redox homeostasis and antioxidant protection in Drosophila, we measured the levels of the active physiological form of ecdysone--20-hydroxyecdysone (20-HE). Significantly elevated H₂O₂ and 20-HE levels were observed in M. arctica incubated at -2 °C, supporting a link between ecdysone, H₂O₂, and trehalose levels during cryoprotective dehydration. CAT activity was found to be significantly lower in M. arctica incubated at -2 °C versus 5 °C, suggesting reduced H₂O₂ breakdown. Furthermore, measurement of the free radical composition in Arctic springtails incubated at 5 °C (controls) versus -2 °C by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy revealed melanin-derived free radicals at -2 °C, perhaps an additional source of H₂O₂. Our results suggest that H₂O₂ and ecdysone play important roles in the cryoprotective dehydration process in M. arctica, linked with the regulation of trehalose biosynthesis.

  14. Outside-Xylem Vulnerability, Not Xylem Embolism, Controls Leaf Hydraulic Decline during Dehydration.

    PubMed

    Scoffoni, Christine; Albuquerque, Caetano; Brodersen, Craig R; Townes, Shatara V; John, Grace P; Bartlett, Megan K; Buckley, Thomas N; McElrone, Andrew J; Sack, Lawren

    2017-02-01

    Leaf hydraulic supply is crucial to maintaining open stomata for CO2 capture and plant growth. During drought-induced dehydration, the leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) declines, which contributes to stomatal closure and, eventually, to leaf death. Previous studies have tended to attribute the decline of Kleaf to embolism in the leaf vein xylem. We visualized at high resolution and quantified experimentally the hydraulic vulnerability of xylem and outside-xylem pathways and modeled their respective influences on plant water transport. Evidence from all approaches indicated that the decline of Kleaf during dehydration arose first and foremost due to the vulnerability of outside-xylem tissues. In vivo x-ray microcomputed tomography of dehydrating leaves of four diverse angiosperm species showed that, at the turgor loss point, only small fractions of leaf vein xylem conduits were embolized, and substantial xylem embolism arose only under severe dehydration. Experiments on an expanded set of eight angiosperm species showed that outside-xylem hydraulic vulnerability explained 75% to 100% of Kleaf decline across the range of dehydration from mild water stress to beyond turgor loss point. Spatially explicit modeling of leaf water transport pointed to a role for reduced membrane conductivity consistent with published data for cells and tissues. Plant-scale modeling suggested that outside-xylem hydraulic vulnerability can protect the xylem from tensions that would induce embolism and disruption of water transport under mild to moderate soil and atmospheric droughts. These findings pinpoint outside-xylem tissues as a central locus for the control of leaf and plant water transport during progressive drought.

  15. NOVEL POLYMERIC MEMBRANE FOR DEHYDRATION OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation has emerged as an economically viable alternative technology for dehydration of organic solvents, removal of organic compounds and organic/organic separations. Development of a membrane system with suitable flux and selectivity characteristics plays a critical role...

  16. Experimental study of local dehydration and partial melting of biotite-amphibole gneiss with participation of the H2O-CO2-(K, Na)Cl fluids at the middle-crustal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, O.; Kozhukhantseva, S.

    2012-04-01

    . These assemblages vary from syenitic Cpx+Kfs in presence of KCl-rich fluids to alkali (sodic) amphibole-bearing in presence of NaCl-rich fluids, while melt compositions vary from granitic to Na-rich phonolitic. Experiments show different effect of NaCl and KCl on partial melting. Addition of NaCl significantly intensifies melting, while in presence of KCl melting is suppressed both at 750 and 800OC. The NaCl-rich fluid seems to interact more actively with biotite and pargasite-edenite amphibole in contrast to the KCl-rich fluid. Because of local dehydration, such interaction produces more additional water in the fluid increasing its activity and assisting to melting. Moreover, KCl has larger suppressing effect on water activity than NaCl does (Aranovich, Newton, 1997). In addition, higher solubility of chlorine in Na-rich melts would assist to melting, as well. The study is supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project 10-05-00040) and RF President Grant for young scientists (project MD-222.2012.5).

  17. External Validation and Comparison of Three Pediatric Clinical Dehydration Scales

    PubMed Central

    Jauregui, Joshua; Nelson, Daniel; Choo, Esther; Stearns, Branden; Levine, Adam C.; Liebmann, Otto; Shah, Sachita P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prospectively validate three popular clinical dehydration scales and overall physician gestalt in children with vomiting or diarrhea relative to the criterion standard of percent weight change with rehydration. Methods We prospectively enrolled a non-consecutive cohort of children ≤ 18 years of age with an acute episode of diarrhea or vomiting. Patient weight, clinical scale variables and physician clinical impression, or gestalt, were recorded before and after fluid resuscitation in the emergency department and upon hospital discharge. The percent weight change from presentation to discharge was used to calculate the degree of dehydration, with a weight change of ≥ 5% considered significant dehydration. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were constructed for each of the three clinical scales and physician gestalt. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated based on the best cut-points of the ROC curve. Results We approached 209 patients, and of those, 148 were enrolled and 113 patients had complete data for analysis. Of these, 10.6% had significant dehydration based on our criterion standard. The Clinical Dehydration Scale (CDS) and Gorelick scales both had an area under the ROC curve (AUC) statistically different from the reference line with AUCs of 0.72 (95% CI 0.60, 0.84) and 0.71 (95% CI 0.57, 0.85) respectively. The World Health Organization (WHO) scale and physician gestalt had AUCs of 0.61 (95% CI 0.45, 0.77) and 0.61 (0.44, 0.78) respectively, which were not statistically significant. Conclusion The Gorelick scale and Clinical Dehydration Scale were fair predictors of dehydration in children with diarrhea or vomiting. The World Health Organization scale and physician gestalt were not helpful predictors of dehydration in our cohort. PMID:24788134

  18. Control of Transient Slip Weakening During Gypsum Dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclere, H.; Faulkner, D.; Wheeler, J.; Mariani, E.

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of fault mechanics is of first order importance to unravel earthquake triggering. Among the parameters influencing fault reactivation and earthquake triggering, the influence of pore-fluid pressure and friction on stability of fault zones have been a focus of recent work based on geological, geophysical and experimental analyses. Here, the effects of dehydration reactions on hydraulic and mechanical properties of rock are analysed to better understand the conditions required to trigger earthquakes. Triaxial experiments are conducted using gypsum and a direct shear sample assembly that allows a constant normal stress to be applied and permeability to be measured during sliding. The evolutions of shear stress, pore-fluid pressure and permeability are continuously measured throughout the experiment until dehydration reaction reached completion. Tests are conducted with a temperature ramp from 70 to 150 °C and with different effective confining pressures (50, 100 and 150 MPa) and velocities (0.1 and 0.4 μm.s-1). Results show that gypsum dehydration induces transient stable slip weakening that is controlled by pore-fluid pressure and permeability evolutions followed by unstable slip on fully dehydrated product.The evolution of microstructures and mineralogy during the experiment are inferred from SEM and XRD analyses of deformed samples collected at different key stages during repeated tests. The microstructural analysis shows clear evidence of dehydration reactions related to the development of S-C-C' structures where dehydration product is preferentially localized along shear and schistosity planes. A conceptual model is then proposed to explain transient slip weakening during dehydration reactions incorporating the key role played by permeability, and to provide a framework to define the conditions required to trigger unstable events during dehydration reactions.

  19. The anxiogenic-like effects of dehydration in a semi-desert rodent Meriones shawi indicating the possible involvement of the serotoninergic system.

    PubMed

    Elgot, Abdeljalil; El hiba, Omar; Gamrani, Halima

    2012-10-01

    Dehydration is a powerful stimulus causing disequilibrium in homeostasis of water and electrolytes resulting from depletion in total body water. Most studies have focused on domestic and laboratory animals; however, the study of desert animals allows improved understanding about water balance and resistance to dehydration and associated behavioral changes, including those related to mood disorders. Meriones shawi (Shaw's Jird) is a desert rodent characterized by its resistance to long periods of thirst that can extend for several months. In the present study, M. shawi were subjected to water deprivation for 1 and 3 months. We used 5-HT immunohistochemistry to evaluate the effects of prolonged dehydration on the serotoninergic system in both dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DRN, MRN), which are the main sources of 5-HT input to several brain areas. In addition, a dark/light box was used to evaluate the anxiolytic-like or anxiogenic-like effects of dehydration on M. shawi. The results showed a reduction in the 5-HT immunolabelling in both DRN and MRN following 1 and 3 months of dehydration. This diminution of serotonin immunoreactivity was accompanied by noticeable changes in anxiety behavior of Meriones, with animals spending more time in the light box, suggesting anxiogenic-like effects caused by dehydration. Overall, the results indicate that dehydration is able to reduce serotoninergic neurotransmission, which might be involved in generating anxiety behavior in this desert animal.

  20. Inorganic compounds for passive solar energy storage: Solid-state dehydration materials and high specific heat materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struble, L. J.; Brown, P. W.

    1986-04-01

    Two classes of hydrated inorganic salts have been studied to assess their potential as materials for passive solar energy storage. The materials are part of the quaternary system CaO-Al2O3-SO3-H2O and related chemical systems, and the two classes are typified by ettringite, a trisubstituted salt, and Friedel's salt, a monosubstituted salt. The trisubstituted salts were studied for their possible application in latent heat storage, utilizing a low-temperature dehydration reaction, and both classes were studies for their application in sensible heat storage. In order to assess their potential for energy storage, the salts have been synthesized, characterized by several analytical techniques, and thermal properties measured. The dehydration data of that the trisubstituted salts vary somewhat with chemical composition, with the temperature of the onset of dehydration ranging from 6(0)C to 33(0)C, and enthalpy changes on dehydration ranging from 60 to 200 cal/g. Heat capacity is less variable with composition; values for the trisubstituted phases are 30 cal/g/(0)C and for the monosubstituted phases between 0.23 and 0.28 cal/g/(0)C. Preliminary experiments indicate that the dehydration is reversible, and suggest that the materials might have additional potential as solar desiccant materials. These thermal data demonstrate the trisubstituted salts have potential as latent heat storage materials, and that both classes of salts have potential as sensible heat storage materials.

  1. Downhole fluid injection systems, CO2 sequestration methods, and hydrocarbon material recovery methods

    DOEpatents

    Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-07-28

    Downhole fluid injection systems are provided that can include a first well extending into a geological formation, and a fluid injector assembly located within the well. The fluid injector assembly can be configured to inject a liquid CO2/H2O-emulsion into the surrounding geological formation. CO2 sequestration methods are provided that can include exposing a geological formation to a liquid CO2/H2O-emulsion to sequester at least a portion of the CO2 from the emulsion within the formation. Hydrocarbon material recovery methods are provided that can include exposing a liquid CO2/H2O-emulsion to a geological formation having the hydrocarbon material therein. The methods can include recovering at least a portion of the hydrocarbon material from the formation.

  2. Harsh-Environment Solid-State Gamma Detector for Down-hole Gas and Oil Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Sandvik; Stanislav Soloviev; Emad Andarawis; Ho-Young Cha; Jim Rose; Kevin Durocher; Robert Lyons; Bob Pieciuk; Jim Williams; David O'Connor

    2007-08-10

    The goal of this program was to develop a revolutionary solid-state gamma-ray detector suitable for use in down-hole gas and oil exploration. This advanced detector would employ wide-bandgap semiconductor technology to extend the gamma sensor's temperature capability up to 200 C as well as extended reliability, which significantly exceeds current designs based on photomultiplier tubes. In Phase II, project tasks were focused on optimization of the final APD design, growing and characterizing the full scintillator crystals of the selected composition, arranging the APD device packaging, developing the needed optical coupling between scintillator and APD, and characterizing the combined elements as a full detector system preparing for commercialization. What follows is a summary report from the second 18-month phase of this program.

  3. Stem drive oil recovery method utilizing a downhole steam generator and anti clay-swelling agent

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, D. N.; Snavely, E. S.

    1985-06-11

    Viscous oil is recovered from a subterranean, viscous oil-containing formation by a steam flooding technique wherein steam is generated in a downhole steam generator located in an injection well by spontaneous combustion of a pressurized mixture of a water-soluble fuel such as sugars and alcohols dissolved in water or a stable hydrocarbon fuel-in-water emulsion containing an anti clay-swelling agent and substantially pure oxygen. The generated mixture of steam and combustion gases pass through the formation, displacing oil and reducing the oil's viscosity and the mobilized oil is produced from the formation via a spaced-apart production well. Suitable anti clay-swelling agents include metal halide salts and diammonium phosphate.

  4. Solvent removes downhole NORM-contaminated BaSO{sub 4} scale

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, W.G.F.; Gadeken, L.L.; Callahan, T.J.; Jackson, D.

    1996-04-22

    A research project in Canada recently demonstrated that a solvent can remove barium sulfate (BaSO{sub 4}) scales, and all radioactive material is left downhole, eliminating costly NORM disposal. Each year, scale precipitation costs operators millions of dollars in maintenance, treatment, and lost production. Scale contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) creates further problems because NORM scales fall under strict and expensive disposal guidelines. Highly insoluble BaSO{sub 4} scales can be difficult to treat because radioactive materials often incorporate into the scale as it forms. BaSO{sub 4} scales have had to be removed by mechanical scraping or reaming, which is troublesome and costly. The strict regulations concerning disposal of NORM scale add to the costs of the treatment. This paper describes an innovative handling and disposal method for these NORM materials.

  5. DOE/GRI development and testing of a downhole pump for jet-assist drilling

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to accelerate development and commercialization of a high pressure downhole pump (DHP{trademark}) to be used for ultra-high pressure, jet-assisted drilling. The purpose of jet-assisted drilling is to increase the rate of penetration (ROP) in the drilling of deeper gas and oil wells where the rocks become harder and more difficult to drill. As a means to accomplishing this objective, a second generation commercial prototype of a DHP is to be designed, fabricated, tested in the laboratory, and eventually tested in the field. The design of the DOE commercial prototype DHP is current in progress. The layout of the complete DHP is expected to be completed by mid-April. Fabrication and laboratory experimentation is expected to be completed in September. Pending successful completion of the laboratory testing phase, the DOE commercial DHP should be ready for testing in the field by the end of the calendar year.

  6. Near-surface attenuation using traffic-induced seismic noise at a downhole array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikmen, S. Umit; Pinar, Ali; Edincliler, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach is developed for estimating the near-surface attenuation using seismic noise recordings at a downhole array. The amplitude spectrum of the traffic-induced seismic noise at the engineering bedrock level exhibits a high-frequency decay between 10 and 40 Hz. Subsequently, it yields a Kappa value of 14 ± 3 ms and a quality factor of 45 ± 10 for the profile between the highway and the sensor. Likewise, using the earthquake recordings made at the surface and the engineering bedrock levels, the Kappa values are calculated as 60 and 45 ms, respectively. The difference was attributed to near-surface attenuation where the upgoing earthquake waves and the downgoing traffic-induced seismic waves traverse similar soil profiles resulting in similar Kappa values. Hence, the near-site geology attenuation properties can be derived using the seismic noise data induced by a known source at a close distance recorded at engineering bedrock level.

  7. Development of a CO2 Chemical Sensor for Downhole CO2 Monitoring in Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning

    2016-12-12

    solution is highly demanded in carbon storage to understand the CO2 migration subsurface and to answer the public safety problem. The objective of the study is to develop a downhole CO2 sensor that can in-situ, continuously monitor CO2 concentration change in deep saline. The sensor is a Severinghaus-type CO2 sensor with small size, which renders it can be embedded in monitoring well casing or integrated with pressure/temperature transducers, enabling the development of “smart” wells. The studies included: (1) prepare and characterize metal-oxide electrodes. Test the electrodes response to pH change. Investigate different ions and brine concentration effects on the electrode’s performance. Study the stability of the electrode in brine solution; (2) fabricate a downhole CO2 sensor with the metal-oxide electrodes prepared in the laboratory. Test the performance of the CO2 sensor in brine solutions. Study high pressure effects on the performance of the sensor; (3) design and conduct CO2/brine coreflooding experiments with the CO2 sensor. Monitor CO2 movement along the core and test the performance of the sensor in coreflooding tests. Develop a data acquisition system that can digitize the sensor’s output voltage. Our completed research has resulted in deep understanding of downhole CO2 sensor development and CO2 monitoring in CO2 storage process. The developed downhole CO2 sensor included a metal-oxide electrode, a gas-permeable membrane, a porous steel cup, and a bicarbonate-based internal electrolyte solution. Iridium oxide-based electrode was prepared and used for preparation the CO2 sensor. The prepared iridium oxide-based electrode displayed a linearly response to pH change. Different factors such as different ions and ions concentration, temperature, and pressure effects on the electrode performance on pH response were

  8. Behavior of a hollow core photonic crystal fiber under high radial pressure for downhole application

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, J. Chenari, Z.; Ziaee, F.; Latifi, H.; Santos, J. L.

    2014-02-17

    Pressure fiber sensors play an important role in downhole high pressure measurements to withstand long term operation. The purpose of this paper is to present an application of hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) as a high pressure sensor head for downhole application based on dispersion variation. We used a high pressure stainless steel unit to exert pressure on the sensor. The experimental results show that different wavelengths based on sagnac loop interferometer have additive sensitivities from 5 × 10{sup −5} nm/psi at 1480 nm to 1.3 × 10{sup −3} nm/psi at 1680 nm. We developed a simulation to understand the reason for difference in sensitivity of wavelengths and also the relationship between deformation of HC-PCF and dispersion variation under pressure. For this purpose, by using the finite element method, we investigated the effect of structural variation of HC-PCF on spectral transformation of two linear polarizations under 1000 psi pressure. The simulation and experimental results show exponential decay behavior of dispersion variation from −3.4 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi to −1.3 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi and from −5 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi to −1.8 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi, respectively, which were in a good accordance with each other.

  9. A conceptual model for kappa (κ) based on downhole earthquake records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ktenidou, O. J.; Abrahamson, N. A.; Drouet, S.; Cotton, F.

    2015-12-01

    At high frequencies, the acceleration spectral amplitude decreases rapidly; this has been modeled with the spectral decay factor κ (Anderson and Hough, 1984). Its site-specific component, κ0, an index of site attenuation in the upper crust, is used widely today in ground motion prediction and simulation. Here we use accelerometric data from the EUROSEISTEST valley, a geologically complex and seismically active region in Greece. The strong motion array consists of 14 surface and 6 downhole stations. Site conditions across the stations vary greatly, ranging from soft sediments to hard rock (NEHRP class D to A). We use the results to improve our physical understanding of κ0 and propose a conceptual model of κ0 with Vs. This model comprises two new notions. On the one hand, and contrary to existing correlations, we observe that κ0 stabilizes for high Vs values. This may indicate the existence of regional κ0 values for hard rock. If so, we propose that borehole measurements (which have almost never been used up to now for κ0) may be useful in determining these values. On the other hand, we find that material damping in the soil column, as expressed through travel times, does not suffice to account for the total κ0 measured at the surface. We propose that, apart from material damping, additional site attenuation may be caused by scattering from small-scale variability in the profile. If this is so, then geotechnical damping measurements may not suffice to infer the overall attenuation underneath a site; but starting with a regional value (possibly measured from a downhole station) and adding damping, we might define a lower bound for site-specific κ0. More precise estimates would necessitate seismological site instrumentation.

  10. Stratigraphy of a proposed wind farm site southeast of Block Island: Utilization of borehole samples, downhole logging, and seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Dane P. H.

    Seismic stratigraphy, sedimentology, lithostratigraphy, downhole geophysical logging, mineralogy, and palynology were used to study and interpret the upper 70 meters of the inner continental shelf sediments within a proposed wind farm site located approximately two to three nautical miles to the southeast of Block Island, Rhode Island. Core samples and downhole logging collected from borings drilled for geotechnical purposes at proposed wind turbine sites along with seismic surveys in the surrounding area provide the data for this study. Cretaceous coastal plain sediments that consist of non-marine to marine sand, silt, and clay are found overlying bedrock at a contact depth beyond the sampling depth of this study. The upper Cretaceous sediments sampled in borings are correlated with the Magothy/Matawan formations described regionally from New Jersey to Nantucket. An unconformity formed through sub-aerial, fluvial, marine, and glacial erosion marks the upper strata of the Cretaceous sediments separating them from the overlying deposits. The majority of Quaternary deposits overlying the unconformity represent the advance, pulsing, and retreat of the Laurentide ice sheet that reached its southern terminus in the area of Block Island approximately 25,000 to 21,000 years before present. The sequence consists of a basal glacial till overlain by sediments deposited by meltwater environments ranging from deltaic to proglacial lakefloor. A late Pleistocene to early Holocene unconformity marks the top of the glacial sequence and was formed after glacial retreat through fluvial and subaerial erosion/deposition. Overlying the glacial sequence are sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene and Holocene consisting of interbedded gravel, sand, silt, and clay. Sampling of these sediments was limited and surficial reflectors in seismic profiles were masked due to a hard bottom return. However, two depositional periods are interpreted as representing fluvial and estuarine

  11. Impact of geographic variations of the convective and dehydration center on stratospheric water vapor over the Asian monsoon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Fu, Rong; Wang, Tao; Liu, Yimin

    2016-06-01

    The Asian monsoon region is the most prominent moisture center of water vapor in the lower stratosphere (LS) during boreal summer. Previous studies have suggested that the transport of water vapor to the Asian monsoon LS is controlled by dehydration temperatures and convection mainly over the Bay of Bengal and Southeast Asia. However, there is a clear geographic variation of convection associated with the seasonal and intra-seasonal variations of the Asian monsoon circulation, and the relative influence of such a geographic variation of convection vs. the variation of local dehydration temperatures on water vapor transport is still not clear. Using satellite observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and a domain-filling forward trajectory model, we show that almost half of the seasonal water vapor increase in the Asian monsoon LS are attributable to geographic variations of convection and resultant variations of the dehydration center, of which the influence is comparable to the influence of the local dehydration temperature increase. In particular, dehydration temperatures are coldest over the southeast and warmest over the northwest Asian monsoon region. Although the convective center is located over Southeast Asia, an anomalous increase of convection over the northwest Asia monsoon region increases local diabatic heating in the tropopause layer and air masses entering the LS are dehydrated at relatively warmer temperatures. Due to warmer dehydration temperatures, anomalously moist air enters the LS and moves eastward along the northern flank of the monsoon anticyclonic flow, leading to wet anomalies in the LS over the Asian monsoon region. Likewise, when convection increases over the Southeast Asia monsoon region, dry anomalies appear in the LS. On a seasonal scale, this feature is associated with the monsoon circulation, convection and diabatic heating marching towards the northwest Asia monsoon region from June to August. The march of convection

  12. Monte Carlo correlation of sediment records: Application to core and downhole log measurements from Equatorial Pacific Sites U1337 and U1338 (IODP Expedition 321)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinverno, A.

    2011-12-01

    Physical property records in coeval equatorial Pacific Ocean sediments are closely correlated even between sites drilled hundreds of kilometers apart. Site-to-site lithostratigraphic correlations are vital to build a composite record and construct a common timescale. The work described here aims to establish a detailed lithostratigraphic correlation between Sites U1337 and U1338 (IODP Expedition 321) on the basis of high-resolution bulk density measurements from core samples and downhole logs. Using core and log measurements together best constrains site-to-site correlations, but complications occur because these two data types are registered on different depth scales. The measured length of the wireline cable is typically used to determine depth in downhole logs, whereas the cumulative length of drill pipe is used for core depth. Moreover, to obtain as complete a record as possible, a composite depth scale is constructed from cores taken in different holes at the same site, typically expanding the actual thickness of the drilled interval by 10-15%. Reconciling the discrepancies among these different depth scales requires a detailed correlation to precisely align the high-resolution core and log records at each site prior to site-to-site correlation. This study uses an automated Monte Carlo algorithm to align core and log records at the same site and to determine site-to-site correlations. The distinguishing feature of this method is that it does not produce a single optimal correlation, but rather a large sample of possible values that result in a good fit to the data. The average of these sampled values gives the best correlation and their variability measures the uncertainty that is inherent to the correlation (e.g., highlighting intervals where the match is relatively poor and the correlation less reliable). This analysis assists in interpreting the quality of the lithostratigraphic correlation between Sites U1337 and U1338 and in building a composite

  13. Characterization of the promoter region of an Arabidopsis gene for 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase involved in dehydration-inducible transcription.

    PubMed

    Behnam, Babak; Iuchi, Satoshi; Fujita, Miki; Fujita, Yasunari; Takasaki, Hironori; Osakabe, Yuriko; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2013-08-01

    Plants respond to dehydration stress and tolerate water-deficit status through complex physiological and cellular processes. Many genes are induced by water deficit. Abscisic acid (ABA) plays important roles in tolerance to dehydration stress by inducing many stress genes. ABA is synthesized de novo in response to dehydration. Most of the genes involved in ABA biosynthesis have been identified, and they are expressed mainly in leaf vascular tissues. Of the products of such genes, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) is a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis. One of the five NCED genes in Arabidopsis, AtNCED3, is significantly induced by dehydration. To understand the regulatory mechanism of the early stages of the dehydration stress response, it is important to analyse the transcriptional regulatory systems of AtNCED3. In the present study, we found that an overlapping G-box recognition sequence (5'-CACGTG-3') at -2248 bp from the transcriptional start site of AtNCED3 is an important cis-acting element in the induction of the dehydration response. We discuss the possible transcriptional regulatory system of dehydration-responsive AtNCED3 expression, and how this may control the level of ABA under water-deficit conditions.

  14. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling of Soybean Two-Component System Genes in Soybean Root and Shoot Tissues under Dehydration Stress

    PubMed Central

    Le, Dung Tien; Nishiyama, Rie; Watanabe, Yasuko; Mochida, Keiichi; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2011-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) play vital functions in the adaptation of plants to environmental stresses. To identify soybean TCS genes involved in the regulation of drought stress response, we performed tissue-specific expression profiling of all 83 putative TCS genes in plants subjected to dehydration. Under well-watered conditions, the majority of soybean TCS genes were expressed higher in the root tissues. Additionally, a high variability in transcript abundance was observed for the TCS genes in both roots and shoots. Under dehydration, TCS genes were more responsive in shoots than in roots. Further analysis indicated that 50% more TCS genes were repressed by dehydration than induced. Specifically, 18 genes were induced by 2-fold or more, whereas 33 genes were down-regulated at least 2-fold by dehydration. TCS genes putatively involved in cytokinin and ethylene signallings strongly responded to dehydration, suggesting that crosstalk exists between different hormonal and stress pathways. Our study provides the first glance into the complex regulatory roles of soybean TCSs underlying their functions in response to dehydration. Additionally, these systematic expression analyses identified excellent dehydration-responsive candidate genes to further clarify soybean TCS functions in drought response and to enable the development of improved drought tolerance in transgenic soybeans. PMID:21208938

  15. Retrieve Ocean Bottom and Downhole Seismic sensors orientation using integrated low cost gyroscope and direct rotation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; D'Anna, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    To reduce the background noise level, seismic sensors are often installed in downhole. During the installation, it is not possible to determine exactly what the sensors has rotated in the horizontal plane before reaching the bottom. To monitoring the seismic activity occurred in offshore areas, Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) are often deployed in the area to be studied. During the OBS descent phase along the seawater column the sensor can undergo to significant rotations in the horizontal plane. Therefore, both for seismic sensors installed in downhole or on ocean bottom, the absolute orientation of the horizontal components are unknown. Clearly, this serious problem can be limits data analysis and interpretation. The absolute orientation of horizontal components are critical for many modern seismic analysis techniques such as receiver functions, body- and surface-wave polarization analysis, studies of anisotropy, and surface wave dispersion curves estimations. The techniques proposed to retrieve the correct sensor horizontal components orientations use different approaches (polarization analysis, cross-correlation measurements, synthetic seismograms fitting), different data set (shots, earthquakes, seismic noise) and different portion of the seismic wave-field (P or S wave arrival times, Rayleigh waves, full waveforms), but are all based on the post-processing of the acquired data. All these methods are not error-free and not always applicable. Method based on active source are not applicable in passive OBS monitoring campaigns. The method based on synthetic waveforms are strong dependent on accuracy of the source parameters estimation and are generally computationally intensive. The method based on polarization analysis are clearly strong dependent on the quality of the data in term of number of seismic events recorded, azimuthal coverage and signal to noise ratio. The methods base on events or noise cross-correlation can be applicable only if an array of sensor

  16. Chronic recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water intake exacerbates hypertension and promotes renal damage in male spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Lucinda M.; Colafella, Katrina M. Mirabito; Bulmer, Louise L.; Puelles, Victor G.; Singh, Reetu R.; Ow, Connie P. C.; Gaspari, Tracey; Drummond, Grant R.; Evans, Roger G.; Vinh, Antony; Denton, Kate M.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence links recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water intake with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, minimal attention has been paid to the long-term impact of periodic water intake on the progression of CKD and underlying mechanisms involved. Therefore we investigated the chronic effects of recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water restriction on arterial pressure and kidney function and morphology in male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Arterial pressure increased and glomerular filtration rate decreased in water-restricted SHR. This was observed in association with cyclic changes in urine osmolarity, indicative of recurrent dehydration. Additionally, water-restricted SHR demonstrated greater renal fibrosis and an imbalance in favour of pro-inflammatory cytokine-producing renal T cells compared to their control counterparts. Furthermore, urinary NGAL levels were greater in water-restricted than control SHR. Taken together, our results provide significant evidence that recurrent dehydration associated with chronic periodic drinking hastens the progression of CKD and hypertension, and suggest a potential role for repetitive bouts of acute renal injury driving renal inflammatory processes in this setting. Further studies are required to elucidate the specific pathways that drive the progression of recurrent dehydration-induced kidney disease. PMID:27653548

  17. Multichannel analysis of surface-waves and integration of downhole acoustic televiewer imaging, ultrasonic Vs and Vp, and vertical seismic profiling in an NEHRP-standard classification, South of Concordia, Kansas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raef, Abdelmoneam; Gad, Sabreen; Tucker-Kulesza, Stacey

    2015-10-01

    Seismic site characteristics, as pertaining to earthquake hazard reduction, are a function of the subsurface elastic moduli and the geologic structures. This study explores how multiscale (surface, downhole, and laboratory) datasets can be utilized to improve "constrained" average Vs30 (shear-wave velocity to a 30-meter depth). We integrate borehole, surface and laboratory measurements for a seismic site classification based on the standards of the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP). The seismic shear-wave velocity (Vs30) was derived from a geophysical inversion workflow that utilized multichannel analysis of surface-waves (MASW) and downhole acoustic televiewer imaging (DATI). P-wave and S-wave velocities, based on laboratory measurements of arrival times of ultrasonic-frequency signals, supported the workflow by enabling us to calculate Poisson's ratio, which was incorporated in building an initial model for the geophysical inversion of MASW. Extraction of core samples from two boreholes provided lithology and thickness calibration of the amplitudes of the acoustic televiewer imaging for each layer. The MASW inversion, for calculating Vs sections, was constrained with both ultrasonic laboratory measurements (from first arrivals of Vs and Vp waveforms at simulated in situ overburden stress conditions) and the downhole acoustic televiewer (DATV) amplitude logs. The Vs30 calculations enabled categorizing the studied site as NEHRP-class "C" - very dense soil and soft rock. Unlike shallow fractured carbonates in the studied area, S-wave and P-wave velocities at ultrasonic frequency for the deeper intact shale core-samples from two boreholes were in better agreement with the corresponding velocities from both a zero-offset vertical seismic profiling (VSP) and inversion of Rayleigh-wave velocity dispersion curves.

  18. Effect of zeolite catalyst on sugar dehydration for 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostapha, Marhaini; Jahar, Noorhasmiera Abu; Chin, Siew Xian; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed; Zakaria, Sarani; Aizat, Wan M.; Azizan, Kamalrul Azlan

    2016-11-01

    The effectiveness in the dehydration of sugars into 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural is related to the catalyst existence. A comprehensive synthesis of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural from fructose, glucose and sucrose (3.73 mmol) with and without addition zeolite catalyst was performed in this study. The reactions were carried out in water-methanol solvent system for 3 hours reaction time at 180°C temperature. The catalytic results from HPLC showed that the reaction with zeolite increases the yield of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural with 51.72 %, 34.01% and 50.10% for fructose, glucose and sucrose respectively. The study suggests that zeolites promote the isomerization of glucose into fructose to occur and simultaneously catalyze the dehydration of fructose into 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural. Only slight changes on FT-IR spectra of use zeolite after the reaction was observed. Thus suggest that zeolite was a potential catalyst for catalytic reaction for the conversion of sugar into 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural.

  19. Effect of Temperature, Time, and Material Thickness on the Dehydration Process of Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Correia, A. F. K.; Loro, A. C.; Zanatta, S.; Spoto, M. H. F.; Vieira, T. M. F. S.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of temperature, time, and thickness of tomatoes fruits during adiabatic drying process. Dehydration, a simple and inexpensive process compared to other conservation methods, is widely used in the food industry in order to ensure a long shelf life for the product due to the low water activity. This study aimed to obtain the best processing conditions to avoid losses and keep product quality. Factorial design and surface response methodology were applied to fit predictive mathematical models. In the dehydration of tomatoes through the adiabatic process, temperature, time, and sample thickness, which greatly contribute to the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of the final product, were evaluated. The optimum drying conditions were 60°C with the lowest thickness level and shorter time. PMID:26904666

  20. Dehydration at the Tropical Tropopause Over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohs, S.; Beuermann, J.; Gensch, I.; Kraemer, M.; MacKenzie, R.; Schiller, C.; Yushkov, V. A.

    2004-05-01

    During the APE-THESEO campaign in February/March 1999 high-resolution in-situ measurements were carried out onboard the Russian M-55 Geophysica high altitude aircraft, based on the Seychelles (-4.7° N, 55.3° E) in the western Indian Ocean. In the potential temperature range from 340 - 430 K, 36 individual (quasi)-vertical profiles of temperature, the gas-phase and total water cloud particles, and ozone were obtained. The height of the tropopause and the hygropause were highly variable for the investigated period. We attribute this to short and local perturbations to the seasonal cycle. The cold point tropopause was located at a potential temperature range from 365 - 403 K. Minimum temperatures were very low (183 - 194 K), leading to saturation mixing ratios at the tropopause of 1.1 - 8.4 ppmv. The hygropause was located on average 4 K above the tropopause with water vapour mixing ratios of 1.2 - 4.1 ppmv. These very low mixing ratios are comparable to those found in previous studies in the 'fountain region' over Micronesia. For 70 % of the vertical profiles, ice saturation was found in a wide range around the tropopause. Predominantly the saturation was corroborated by concurrently detected clouds up to the altitude of the cold point, providing evidence of active dehydration. We identify three common types of vertical profiles: coincident hygropause and cold point at relatively low potential temperatures, associated with a cirrus deck; coincident hygropause and cold point at relatively high potential temperatures, associated with thin subvisible cirrus; and unsaturated, cloud-free, profiles without a pronounced relationship between hygropause and cold point. Characteristics such as extension, number density, frequency distribution of relative humidity over ice of the cirrus clouds were different for these categories which allows to infer their different origin. The low water vapour ratios and the existence of saturation support the hypothesis that the Tropical

  1. Role of iron content on serpentinite dehydration depth in subduction zones: Experiments and thermodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, Margarita; Muñoz, Manuel; Vidal, Olivier; Brunet, Fabrice

    2016-11-01

    A series of dehydration experiments in the piston-cylinder apparatus was carried out at 2 GPa and 550-850 °C on a natural antigorite sample mixed with 5 wt.% of magnetite. Chemical analyses of experimental products show a progressive decrease of the Mg# in antigorite and clinopyroxene between 550 and 675 °C, whereas the Mg# of olivine increases. The observed behavior of Mg# signifies Fe-Mg exchange between coexisting minerals. At higher temperatures, between 700 and 850 °C, compositions remain stable for all minerals in experimental assemblages. Thermodynamic parameters of the ferrous antigorite end-member were refined with the use of Holland and Powell (1998) data set and added to the antigorite solid solution. Good agreement between theoretical calculations performed for the studied bulk composition and experimental results confirms extrapolated thermodynamic data for Fe-antigorite. Constrained parameters allowed to calculate phase relationships for various serpentinite compositions. First, we assessed the effect of bulk iron content, from 0 to 10 wt.% FeO, on the stability field of antigorite. The results show significant decrease of the antigorite thermal stability with increasing bulk Fe content. Second, we demonstrated the influence of bulk iron content on dehydration reactions in subduction zones along typical thermal gradients. Dehydration observed in pure MSH (MgO-SiO2-H2O) systems comprised of antigorite appears as a univariant reaction, which happens at 710 °C/3.7 GPa and 640 °C/6 GPa in "hot" and "cold" subduction, respectively. In contrast, more complex in composition Fe-bearing serpentinites show spread dehydration profiles through divariant reactions from 300 °C/0.8 GPa to 700 °C/3.6 GPa and from 450 °C/4 GPa to 650 °C/7.4 GPa for "hot" and "cold" thermal gradients respectively. A comparison between depths of "water-release events" and "earthquake occurrence" in the South Chile slab ("hot" subduction) highlights a clear correlation between

  2. Dehydration and Cognition in Geriatrics: A Hydromolecular Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Sfera, Adonis; Cummings, Michael; Osorio, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration is one of the ten most frequent diagnoses responsible for the hospital admission of elderly in the United States. It is associated with increased mortality, morbidity and an estimated cost of 1.14 billion per year (Xiao et al., 2004; Schlanger et al., 2010; Pretorius et al., 2013; Frangeskou et al., 2015). Older individuals are predisposed to dehydration encephalopathy as a result of decreased total body water (TBW) and diminished sensation of thirst. We hypothesize that thirst blunting in older individuals is the result of a defective microRNA-6842-3p failing to silence the expression of the vesicular GABA transporters (VGAT) and alpha 7 cholinergic nicotinic receptors in the subfornical organ (SFO) of the hypothalamus. We hypothesize further that resultant dehydration facilitates protein misfolding and aggregation, predisposing to neurocognitive disorders. We completed a search of predicted microRNA targets, utilizing the public domain tool miRDB and found that microRNA-6842-3p modulates the SLC6A1 and CHRNA7 genes both of which were previously hypothesized to inhibit the thirst sensation by their action on SFO. The primary aim of this article is to answer two questions: Can prevention and correction of dehydration in elderly lower age-related cognitive deterioration? Can exosomal miR-6842 in the peripheral blood predict dehydration encephalopathy in elderly? PMID:27252943

  3. Effects of catalyst pore structure and acid properties on the dehydration of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngbo; Park, Hongseok; Yun, Yang Sik; Yi, Jongheop

    2015-03-01

    Hierarchical porous catalysts have recently attracted increasing interest because of the enhanced accessibility to active sites on such materials. In this context, previously reported hierarchically mesoporous ASN and ASPN materials are evaluated by applying them to the dehydration of glycerol, and demonstrate excellent catalytic performance. In addition, a comprehensive understanding of the effects of pore structures and the acid properties on the reaction through comparative studies with microporous HZSM-5 and mesoporous AlMCM-41 is provided.

  4. Controlled fall in natremia in hypertonic dehydration: possible avoidance of rehydration seizures.

    PubMed

    Kahn, A; Blum, D; Casimir, G; Brachet, E

    1981-02-01

    This prospective study comprises 40 infants with severe hypernatremic dehydration due to gastroenteritis. During the first 24h, natremia was closely monitored and infusion rates were adjusted so as to keep the rate of fall in natremia below 0.5 mEq/l/h. This could be achieved by giving a 70 mEq/l Na solution at the rate of 120 ml/kg/24 h. Rehydration was uneventful in all cases, and no convulsions were observed.

  5. Dehydration as a Cause of Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of Fructokinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    of islet cell fructokinase in the development of diabetes . The liver fructokinase can also be targeted and may be responsible for the fatty liver and...Meetings (April 2016), and the Central American coalition on Mesoamerican Nephropathy (November 2015). These lectures provide an avenue for...approaches to the treatment of dehydration. What was the impact on society beyond science and technology? Our studies could lead to a reevaluation of

  6. Experimental investigation of bioethanol liquid phase dehydration using natural clinoptilolite.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Samira; Ghobadian, Barat; Omidkhah, Mohammad-Reza; Towfighi, Jafar; Tavakkoli Yaraki, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    An experimental study of bioethanol adsorption on natural Iranian clinoptilolite was carried out. Dynamic breakthrough curves were used to investigate the best adsorption conditions in bioethanol liquid phase. A laboratory setup was designed and fabricated for this purpose. In order to find the best operating conditions, the effect of liquid pressure, temperature and flow rate on breakthrough curves and consequently, maximum ethanol uptake by adsorbent were studied. The effects of different variables on final bioethanol concentration were investigated using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The results showed that by working at optimum condition, feed with 96% (v/v) initial ethanol concentration could be purified up to 99.9% (v/v). In addition, the process was modeled using Box-Behnken model and optimum operational conditions to reach 99.9% for final ethanol concentration were found equal to 10.7 °C, 4.9 bar and 8 mL/min for liquid temperature, pressure and flow rate, respectively. Therefore, the selected natural Iranian clinoptilolite was found to be a promising adsorbent material for bioethanol dehydration process.

  7. Experimental investigation of bioethanol liquid phase dehydration using natural clinoptilolite

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Samira; Ghobadian, Barat; Omidkhah, Mohammad-Reza; Towfighi, Jafar; Tavakkoli Yaraki, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study of bioethanol adsorption on natural Iranian clinoptilolite was carried out. Dynamic breakthrough curves were used to investigate the best adsorption conditions in bioethanol liquid phase. A laboratory setup was designed and fabricated for this purpose. In order to find the best operating conditions, the effect of liquid pressure, temperature and flow rate on breakthrough curves and consequently, maximum ethanol uptake by adsorbent were studied. The effects of different variables on final bioethanol concentration were investigated using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The results showed that by working at optimum condition, feed with 96% (v/v) initial ethanol concentration could be purified up to 99.9% (v/v). In addition, the process was modeled using Box–Behnken model and optimum operational conditions to reach 99.9% for final ethanol concentration were found equal to 10.7 °C, 4.9 bar and 8 mL/min for liquid temperature, pressure and flow rate, respectively. Therefore, the selected natural Iranian clinoptilolite was found to be a promising adsorbent material for bioethanol dehydration process. PMID:27222748

  8. Enhancement of mass transfer by ultrasound: Application to adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ye

    2016-07-01

    The physical mechanisms of heat and mass transfer enhancement by ultrasound have been identified by people. Basically, the effect of 'cavitation' induced by ultrasound is the main reason for the enhancement of heat and mass transfer in a liquid environment, and the acoustic streaming and vibration are the main reasons for that in a gaseous environment. The adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration are typical heat and mass transfer process, and the intensification of the two processes by ultrasound is of complete feasibility. This paper makes an overview on recent studies regarding applications of power ultrasound to adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration. The concerned adsorbents include desiccant materials (typically like silica gel) for air dehumidification and other ones (typically active carbon and polymeric resin) for water treatment. The applications of ultrasound in the regeneration of these adsorbents have been proved to be energy saving. The concerned foods are mostly fruits and vegetables. Although the ultrasonic treatment may cause food degradation or nutrient loss, it can greatly reduce the food processing time and decrease drying temperature. From the literature, it can be seen that the ultrasonic conditions (i.e., acoustic frequency and power levels) are always focused on during the study of ultrasonic applications. The increasing number of relevant studies argues that ultrasound is a very promising technology applied to the adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration.

  9. Controlled fall in natremia and risk of seizures in hypertonic dehydration.

    PubMed

    Kahn, A; Brachet, E; Blum, D

    1979-03-01

    The aim of the study was to derive some practical measurements which might help in defining a "safe" infusion rate in order to avoid seizures during treatment of hypernatremic dehydration. Forty seven infants with hypernatremic dehydration were rehydrated on a 160 ml/kg/24 h basis: 9 developed seizures during treatment (group I), 22 matched for age did not convulse (group II). Nine subsequent cases were prescribed a 120 ml/kg/24 h regimen: none convulsed (group III). The three groups were comparable in many respects, including initial plasma Na and pH. Fluids were comparable regarding (Na), their rates of administration were respectively 216, 181 and 123 ml/kg/24 h. The rate of infusion affected slopes of decreases in natremia. It was suggested that the decrease in plasma Na should not exceed 0,5 mEq/1/h.

  10. Fiber Diffraction of the Prion-Forming Domain HET-s(218-289) Shows Dehydration-Induced Deformation of a Complex Amyloid Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, William; Stubbs, Gerald

    2014-05-01

    Amyloids are filamentous protein aggregates that can be formed by many different proteins and are associated with both disease and biological functions. The pathogenicities or biological functions of amyloids are determined by their particular molecular structures, making accurate structural models a requirement for understanding their biological effects. One potential factor that can affect amyloid structures is hydration. Previous studies of simple stacked β-sheet amyloids have suggested that dehydration does not impact structure, but other studies indicated dehydration-related structural changes of a putative water-filled nanotube. Our results show that dehydration significantly affects the molecular structure of the fungal prion-forming domain HET-s(218–289), which forms a β-solenoid with no internal solvent-accessible regions. The dehydration-related structural deformation of HET-s(218–289) indicates that water can play a significant role in complex amyloid structures, even when no obvious water-accessible cavities are present.

  11. Fiber Diffraction of the Prion-Forming Domain HET-s(218–289) Shows Dehydration-Induced Deformation of a Complex Amyloid Structure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloids are filamentous protein aggregates that can be formed by many different proteins and are associated with both disease and biological functions. The pathogenicities or biological functions of amyloids are determined by their particular molecular structures, making accurate structural models a requirement for understanding their biological effects. One potential factor that can affect amyloid structures is hydration. Previous studies of simple stacked β-sheet amyloids have suggested that dehydration does not impact structure, but other studies indicated dehydration-related structural changes of a putative water-filled nanotube. Our results show that dehydration significantly affects the molecular structure of the fungal prion-forming domain HET-s(218–289), which forms a β-solenoid with no internal solvent-accessible regions. The dehydration-related structural deformation of HET-s(218–289) indicates that water can play a significant role in complex amyloid structures, even when no obvious water-accessible cavities are present. PMID:24670041

  12. Corrosion response of downhole steam generator assembly and instrumentation and supply line tubings at Long Beach field test

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.

    1983-07-01

    Three families of metals were used to make the non-combustor components for Sandia's downhole steam generator assembly and supply and instrumentation lines. These three families were: first, plain carbon steel (API Grade J 55); second, austenitic stainless steels (316 and 310); and third, a nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 600). The metals in all three of these families were found to be deficient in their corrosion response. J 55 exhibited minimal to severe general corrosion (rusting). The austenitic stainless steels pitted and cracked. Inconel 600 showed both severe pitting and some intergranular attack. For the most part, these materials were found to be unsuitable for extended life in a downhole steam generator. It is recommended that Inconel 625 be used in future systems where a moderate strength material is specified and Inconel 718 be considered where a high strength material is necessary. 11 references, 45 figures, 5 tables.

  13. Geothermal vegetable dehydration at Brady`s Hot Springs, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1994-07-01

    This article describes the utilization of the Brady`s Springs geothermal resource for heat generation used in the food dehydration process. This geothermal system is located in the Forty-Mile Desert area of Nevada. Geothermal Food Processors, Inc. of Reno, Nevada started construction of the geothermal vegetable dehydration plant in 1978, and the plant started operations in 1979. The industrial process of vegetable dehydration at the plant is described. In July of 1992, the Brady`s Springs geothermal system began being used for power generation by the Brady`s Hot Springs geothermal power plant, operated by Oxbow Power Services, Inc. As a result, the water levels in the food processing plant wells have dropped below usable levels and the geothermal brine is now being supplied by the Oxbow power plant.

  14. Isothermal dehydration of thin films of water and sugar solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Heyd, R.; Rampino, A.; Bellich, B.; Elisei, E.; Cesàro, A.; Saboungi, M.-L.

    2014-03-28

    The process of quasi-isothermal dehydration of thin films of pure water and aqueous sugar solutions is investigated with a dual experimental and theoretical approach. A nanoporous paper disk with a homogeneous internal structure was used as a substrate. This experimental set-up makes it possible to gather thermodynamic data under well-defined conditions, develop a numerical model, and extract needed information about the dehydration process, in particular the water activity. It is found that the temperature evolution of the pure water film is not strictly isothermal during the drying process, possibly due to the influence of water diffusion through the cellulose web of the substrate. The role of sugar is clearly detectable and its influence on the dehydration process can be identified. At the end of the drying process, trehalose molecules slow down the diffusion of water molecules through the substrate in a more pronounced way than do the glucose molecules.

  15. Freeze avoidance: a dehydrating moss gathers no ice.

    PubMed

    Lenné, Thomas; Bryant, Gary; Hocart, Charles H; Huang, Cheng X; Ball, Marilyn C

    2010-10-01

    Using cryo-SEM with EDX fundamental structural and mechanical properties of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. were studied in relation to tolerance of freezing temperatures. In contrast to more complex plants, no ice accumulated within the moss during the freezing event. External ice induced desiccation with the response being a function of cell type; water-filled hydroid cells cavitated and were embolized at -4 °C while parenchyma cells of the inner cortex exhibited cytorrhysis, decreasing to ∼ 20% of their original volume at a nadir temperature of -20 °C. Chlorophyll fluorescence showed that these winter acclimated mosses displayed no evidence of damage after thawing from -20 °C while GCMS showed that sugar concentrations were not sufficient to confer this level of freezing tolerance. In addition, differential scanning calorimetry showed internal ice nucleation occurred in hydrated moss at ∼-12 °C while desiccated moss showed no evidence of freezing with lowering of nadir temperature to -20 °C. Therefore the rapid dehydration of the moss provides an elegantly simple solution to the problem of freezing; remove that which freezes.

  16. The reaction mechanism for dehydration process catalyzed by type I dehydroquinate dehydratase from Gram-negative Salmonella enterica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental reaction mechanism for the dehydration process catalyzed by type I dehydroquinate dehydratase from Gram-negative Salmonella enterica has been studied by density functional theory calculations. The results indicate that the dehydration process undergoes a two-step cis-elimination mechanism, which is different from the previously proposed one. The catalytic roles of both the highly conserved residue His143 and the Schiff base formed between the substrate and Lys170 have also been elucidated. The structural and mechanistic insight presented here may direct the design of type I dehydroquinate dehydratase enzyme inhibitors as non-toxic antimicrobials, anti-fungals, and herbicides.

  17. Specimen size effect in the volumetric shrinkage of cancellous bone measured at two levels of dehydration.

    PubMed

    Lievers, W Brent; Lee, Victoria; Arsenault, Simon M; Waldman, Stephen D; Pilkey, A Keith

    2007-01-01

    Water is commonly removed from bone to study its effect on mechanical behaviour; however, dehydration also alters the bone structure. To make matters worse, measuring structural changes in cancellous bone is complicated by a number of factors. Therefore, the goals of this study were to address these issues by (1) comparing Archimedes' method and a helium pycnometer as methods for measuring cancellous bone volume; (2) measuring the apparent dimensional and volumetric tissue shrinkage of cancellous bone at two levels of dehydration; and, (3) identifying whether a size effect exists in cancellous bone shrinkage. Cylindrical specimens (3, 5 and 8.3 mm diameters) of cancellous bone were taken from the distal bovine femur. The apparent dimensions of each cylindrical specimen were measured in a fully hydrated state (HYD), after drying at room temperature (AIR), and after oven drying at 105 degrees C (OVEN). Tissue volume measurements for those three hydration states were obtained using both a helium pycnometer and Archimedes' method. Aluminium foams, which mimic the cancellous structure, were used as controls. The results suggest that the helium pycnometer and Archimedes' method yield identical results in the HYD and AIR states, but that Archimedes' method under-predicts the nominal OVEN volume by incorporating the collagen-apatite porosity. A distinct size effect on volumetric shrinkage is observed (p<0.025) using the pycnometer in both AIR and OVEN states. Apparent dimensional shrinkage (2% and 7%) at the two dehydration levels is much smaller than the measured volumetric tissue shrinkage (16% and 29%), which results in a reduced dehydrated bone volume fraction.

  18. Compression of fractionated sun-cured and dehydrated alfalfa chops into cubes--specific energy models.

    PubMed

    Adapa, Phani; Schoenau, Greg; Tabil, Lope; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Singh, Asheesh

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the specific energy requirements for the compression of fractionated sun-cured and dehydrated alfalfa chops, when subjected to different pressures and holding times. The compression behavior of fractionated sun-cured and dehydrated alfalfa chops was studied using a single cubing unit capable of making one cube in a single stroke of the plunger. The cube die dimensions were 30 mm x 30 mm in cross-section and an effective depth of compression of 0.38 m. The initial moisture content of dehydrated and sun-cured chops were 6% and 7% (wb), respectively. A stack of two sieves (instead of five) was used along with a pan to achieve leaf and stem separation. The nominal opening sizes of two sieves with square holes were 3.96 and 1.17 mm, respectively. Leaf and stem fractions were combined later to obtain five different samples each for sun-cured and dehydrated alfalfa with leaf content ranging from 0% to 100% by mass in increments of 25%. The chop moisture content and preheat temperature before compaction was 10% (wb) and 75 degrees C, respectively. The cube die temperature was maintained at 90+/-5 degrees C. The mass of chops used for making each cube was 23+/-02 g. A hydraulic press was used to apply 9.0, 12.0 and 14.0 MPa of pressures through a plunger. After compression, the plunger was held in place for 10 and 30s, before the compacted forage was extracted. Empirical equations were fitted to the data relating specific energy for cube making to pressure, residence time, and leaf content.

  19. [Nutritional evaluation of green plantain flour dehydrated soups. Starch in vitro digestibility].

    PubMed

    Pacheco de Delahaye, E

    2001-01-01

    Previous works have shown that green plantain flour (GPF) contains a considerable amount of resistant with similar effects to dietary fiber. In order to diversify the use of this fruit the purpose of present study was to formulate and elaborate powered, dehydrated, cream type soups with green plantain flour flavored with vegetables (onion, coriander and leak) which increase the dietary fiber content of the preparation. Green plantain was peeled, cut in medium size pieces and submerged in 0.1% citric acid solution. The dehydration process was forced air-drying (80 degrees C), followed by milling. The same procedure was applied to the flavoring vegetables. To obtain the cream type soups various formulations were tried containing 50-63% resistant starch, 11.7-12% dietary fiber 6.5-6.9% protein. The mineral content of the preparations is reported. Viscosity of 1:10 (w/v) soups was 630-670 cps. In vitro starch digestibility after 6 hours was 38% with porcine amylase, increasing to 48% if the enzyme was from bacterial origin, supporting previous results that suggest resistance to hydrolysis of green plantain (GP) starch granules. In conclusion this study diversifies the use of GP and suggests that dehydrated GPF soups due to their high dietary fiber, resistant starch content and to the slow starch hydrolysis may be used in special nutrition regimes.

  20. Effects of cold and hot temperature on dehydration: a mechanism of cardiovascular burden.

    PubMed

    Lim, Youn-Hee; Park, Min-Seon; Kim, Yoonhee; Kim, Ho; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2015-08-01

    The association between temperature (cold or heat) and cardiovascular mortality has been well documented. However, few studies have investigated the underlying mechanism of the cold or heat effect. The main goal of this study was to examine the effect of temperature on dehydration markers and to explain the pathophysiological disturbances caused by changes of temperature. We investigated the relationship between outdoor temperature and dehydration markers (blood urea nitrogen (BUN)/creatinine ratio, urine specific gravity, plasma tonicity and haematocrit) in 43,549 adults from Seoul, South Korea, during 1995-2008. We used piece-wise linear regression to find the flexion point of apparent temperature and estimate the effects below or above the apparent temperature. Levels of dehydration markers decreased linearly with an increase in the apparent temperature until a point between 22 and 27 °C, which was regarded as the flexion point of apparent temperature, and then increased with apparent temperature. Because the associations between temperature and cardiovascular mortality are known to be U-shaped, our findings suggest that temperature-related changes in hydration status underlie the increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity during high- or low-temperature conditions.