Science.gov

Sample records for study flow structure

  1. A study of Hot Flow Anomalies and their internal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, Artyom; Vaisberg, Oleg

    Hot Flow Anomalies (HFAs) were studied for long time. Here we attempt to study internal structure of HFAs. Our study is based on the Interball Tail Probe data. We used data from ion-spectrometer SCA-1, magnetic field measurements from MIF and ELECTRON spectrometer measurements. We have chosen five anomalies for our investigation on the basis of well resolved structure. We calculated displacement velocity along bow shock, flow velocities within HFA and compared convection patterns within them. We checked the main criteria of HFA formation: motional electric field direction was directed toward current sheet at least at one side of it (except one case), bow shock was quasi-perpendicular at least at one side of HFA, and angle between current sheet normal and solar wind velocity was large. Convection velocities of plasma within HFA were calculated by subtracting average velocity from measured ion velocities along spacecraft trajectory through anomaly. These convection velocities, viewed in coordinate system determined by shock normal and calculated IMF current sheet normal, clearly show separation of HFA region in 3 parts: leading part, narrow central part, and trailing part. HFAs we analyzed can be separated in two groups according to pattern of convection velocities. First type of HFAs have velocities directed from central region and circulation in leading and trailing parts. Second type of HFAs show predominant motion along the current sheet. There also other differences between these two types of HFA that are discussed in presentation. Judging from plasma convection pattern within HFAs received additional evidence that central region is the source of energy and momentum near interplanetary current sheet crossing location. We calculated balance of energy within HFA using momentum equation to estimate what amount of reflected particles is needed for central region to be the energy source.

  2. Study of hairpin vortex structure in DNS channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. C.; Adrian, R. J.

    1998-11-01

    DNS of fully developed turbulent channel flows have been performed at Reynolds numbers of Re_τ = 150 and 300. A vortex identification technique based on the imaginary part of the complex conjugate eigenvalue of the velocity gradient tensor, as defined as swirling strength, has been utilized for detection and visualization of vortices in DNS velocity field in a 3D domain. The swirling strength is sensitive and advantageous for capturing vortices in velocity field: it does not depend on the framework of an observer, and it discriminates the shearing motions that have large vorticity. Interestingly, the rms of the swirling strength in the near wall region exhibits Reynolds number similarity. The peak of the rms of the swirling strength for both Reynolds numbers appears at about 20 to 25 wall units away from the wall in the buffer layer of the channel. Using iso-surface of the swirling strength successfully locates hairpin vortices as well as quasi-streamwise vortices near the walls. The results demonstrate that hairpin vortices are neither rare nor random events. They occur frequently in wall turbulence and align coherently in the quasi-streamwise direction in the form of packets with spacing of about 100-200 wall units in the spanwise direction. The present results also show that hairpin vortices and packets are associated with low-momentum streaks, Q2/Q4 events and regions of large Reynolds stress. The structure of hairpin vortices found in the present simulation is consistent with and substantiates the earlier DNS study of the evolution of a single hairpin into packets and 2D PIV experimental observations.

  3. Study of Varying Boundary Layer Height on Turret Flow Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Global Turbulence Models: 1. Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model 2. Baldwin-Barth model (1-eqn.) 3. Spalart - Allmaras model (1-eqn.)* 19 4. k-! model with...the following six cases were exam- ined: 1. Spalart - Allmaras (S-A) with Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) 2. Spalart - Allmaras (S-A) with Delayed... Allmaras (S-A) turbulence model for both the DES and DDES capability which keeps the flow attached further than shown in the experiment or the FDL3DI

  4. A water tunnel flow visualization study of the vortex flow structures on the F/A-18 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Ramirez, Edgar J.

    1991-01-01

    The vortex flow structures occurring on the F/A-18 aircraft at high angles of attack were studied. A water tunnel was used to gather flow visualization data on the forebody vortex and the wing leading edge extension vortex. The longitudinal location of breakdown of the leading edge vortex was found to be consistently dependent on the angle of attack. Other parameters such as Reynolds number, model scale, and model fidelity had little influence on the overall behavior of the flow structures studied. The lateral location of the forebody vortex system was greatly influenced by changes in the angle of sideslip. Strong interactions can occur between the leading edge extension vortex and the forebody vortex. Close attention was paid to vortex induced flows on various airframe components of the F/A-18. Reynolds number and angle of attack greatly affected the swirling intensity, and therefore the strength of the studied vortices. Water tunnel results on the F/A-18 correlated well with those obtained in similar studies at both full and sub scale levels. The water tunnel can provide, under certain conditions, good simulations of realistic flows in full scale configurations.

  5. Characterization of Unsteady Flow Structures Around Tandem Cylinders for Component Interaction Studies in Airframe Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; McGinley, Catherine B.

    2005-01-01

    A joint computational and experimental study has been performed at NASA Langley Research Center to investigate the unsteady flow generated by the components of an aircraft landing gear system. Because the flow field surrounding a full landing gear is so complex, the study was conducted on a simplified geometry consisting of two cylinders in tandem arrangement to isolate and characterize the pertinent flow phenomena. This paper focuses on the experimental effort where surface pressures, 2-D Particle Image Velocimetry, and hot-wire anemometry were used to document the flow interaction around the two cylinders at a Reynolds Number of 1.66 x 10(exp 5), based on cylinder diameter, and cylinder spacing-todiameter ratios, L/D, of 1.435 and 3.70. Transition strips were applied to the forward cylinder to produce a turbulent boundary layer upstream of the flow separation. For these flow conditions and L/D ratios, surface pressures on both the forward and rear cylinders show the effects of L/D on flow symmetry, base pressure, and the location of flow separation and attachment. Mean velocities and instantaneous vorticity obtained from the PIV data are used to examine the flow structure between and aft of the cylinders. Shedding frequencies and spectra obtained using hot-wire anemometry are presented. These results are compared with unsteady, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) computations for the same configuration in a companion paper by Khorrami, Choudhari, Jenkins, and McGinley (2005). The experimental dataset produced in this study provides information to better understand the mechanisms associated with component interaction noise, develop and validate time-accurate computer methods used to calculate the unsteady flow field, and assist in modeling of the radiated noise from landing gears.

  6. Influence of laminar flow on preorientation of coal tar pitch structural units: Raman microspectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, O.; Jehlička, J.; Pokorný, J.; Rouzaud, J. N.

    2003-08-01

    In order to estimate the role of laminar flow of viscous, aromatic matter of carbonaceous precursor on microtextural preorientation in pregraphitization stage, we performed experiments with coal tar pitch (CTP). The principal hypothesis of preorientation of basic structural units (BSUs) in the case of laminar flow (pressure impregnation of CTP into porous matrix) and secondary release of volatiles during carbonization were studied. Glass microplates, planar porous medium with average distance between single microplates 5 μm were used as suitable porous matrix. Samples of CTP were carbonized up to 2500 °C. Optical microscopy reveals large flow domains in the sample of cokes carbonized between glass microplates. Raman microspectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) show that at nanometric scale, the samples do not support the proposed hypotheses. With increasing temperature of pyrolysis, the graphitization of CTP impregnated into porous matrix proceeds to lower degree of structural ordering in comparison with single pyrolyzed CTP. This is explained by the release of volatile matter during carbonization in geometrically restricted spaces. More evident structural changes were discovered with the sample of single coke, where parts of fine grain mosaics, relicts of 'so called QI parts', reveal higher structural organization, in comparison with large and prolonged flow domains, similar to flow domains of cokes from microplates.

  7. A study of the turbulence structures of wall-bounded shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, M. S.; Soria, J.; Perry, A. E.; Chacin, J.; Na, Y.; Cantwell, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    This project extends the study of the structure of wall-bounded flows using the topological properties of eddying motions as developed by Chong et al. (1990), Soria et al. (1992, 1994), and as recently extended by Blackburn et al. (1996) and Chacin et al. (1996). In these works, regions of flow which are focal in nature are identified by being enclosed by an isosurface of a positive small value of the discriminant of the velocity gradient tensor. These regions resemble the attached vortex loops suggested first by Theodorsen (1955). Such loops are incorporated in the attached eddy model versions of Perry & Chong (1982), Perry et al. (1986), and Perry & Marusic (1995), which are extensions of a model first formulated by Townsend (1976). The DNS data of wall bounded flows studied here are from the zero pressure gradient flow of Spalart (1988) and the boundary layer with separation and reattachment of Na & Moin (1996). The flow structures are examined from the viewpoint of the attached eddy hypothesis.

  8. Study of aerodynamic structure of flow in a model of vortex furnace using Stereo PIV method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufriev, I. S.; Kuibin, P. A.; Shadrin, E. Yu.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Sharypov, O. V.

    2016-07-01

    The aerodynamic structure of flow in a lab model of a perspective design of vortex furnace was studied. The chamber has a horizontal rotation axis, tangential inlet for fuel-air jets and vertical orientation of secondary injection nozzles. The Stereo PIV method was used for visualization of 3D velocity field for selected cross sections of the vortex combustion chamber. The experimental data along with "total pressure minimum" criterion were used for reconstruction of the vortex core of the flow. Results fit the available data from LDA and simulation.

  9. An experimental study of the oscillatory flow structure of tone-producing supersonic impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark

    2005-10-01

    An experimental investigation into the structure of a supersonic jet impinging on a large plate is presented. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV), shadowgraph photography and acoustic measurements are used to understand the relationship between the unsteady jet structure and the production of tones for nozzle-to-plate spacings between 1 and 5 nozzle exit diameters at a nozzle pressure ratio equal to 4. Results indicate that the instability of the jet depends on the location of the plate in the shock cell structure of the corresponding free jet and the strength of the standoff shock wave, rather than on the occurrence of recirculation zones in the impingement region. Phase-locked studies show streamwise displacements of the stand-off shock wave, a moving recirculation zone in the subsonic flow in front of the plate, and significant oscillations of both the compression and expansion regions in the peripheral supersonic flow when tones are produced. Sound is shown to be generated by periodic pulsing of the wall jet boundary resulting from periodic motion of the flow in the impingement and near-wall regions of the flow.

  10. Flow visualization study of role of coherent structures in a tab wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elavarasan, R.; Meng, Hui

    2000-09-01

    A simple surface-mounted tapered tab has recently attracted fluids research both for its ability to enhance mixing and heat transfer (for which it is known as high-efficiency vortab mixer) and for its generation of coherent structures that are topologically similar to those found in natural turbulent boundary layers. Two types of structures, namely pressure-driven counter-rotating vortex pair (CVP) and hairpin vortices were previously identified in the tab wake, but the contribution of individual structures to the mixing enhancement process and how they interact are not known. In the present study, flow visualization using a planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique is carried out to probe into the flow dynamics in the wake of the mixing tab. By injecting dye at an appropriate location and illuminating the flow in various planes, the structures are visualized clearly. The results show, in contrary to earlier observations, that the two types of structures dominate different regions. At the Reynolds number of 700 based on tab height ( h), the CVP has more influence in the region 0< x/ h<1.5. The counter-rotating action of the vortex pair induces a pumping action along the symmetry by which the low-speed fluid from the boundary layer is transported to the high-speed outer shear layer. The displaced fluid is entrained by the recirculating counter-rotating vortices and is mixed well while convecting downstream. Beyond this region, fully developed hairpin structures contribute more to mixing in a similar way as in a turbulent boundary layer. It is observed that the shedding frequency of hairpin vortices is slightly higher than the pumping frequency of the counter-rotating vortex pair. It is also observed that the hairpin structures loses their identity beyond x/ h>15, and there is no large-scale cross-stream mixing visible in this region.

  11. Detailed Studies on the Structure and Dynamics of Reacting Dusty Flows at Normal and Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andac, M. Gurhan; Cracchiola, Brad; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Campbell, Charles S.

    1999-01-01

    Dusty reacting flows are of particular interest for a wide range of applications. Inert particles can alter the flammability and extinction limits of a combustible mixture. Reacting particles can release substantial amount of heat and can be used either for power generation or propulsion. Accumulation of combustible particles in air can result in explosions which, for example, can occur in grain elevators, during lumber milling and in mine galleries. Furthermore, inert particles are used as flow velocity markers in reacting flows, and their velocity is measured by non-intrusive laser diagnostic techniques. Despite their importance, dusty reacting flows have been less studied and understood compared to gas phase as well as sprays. The addition of solid particles in a flowing gas stream can lead to strong couplings between the two phases, which can be of dynamic, thermal, and chemical nature. The dynamic coupling between the two phases is caused by the inertia that causes the phases to move with different velocities. Furthermore, gravitational, thermophoretic, photophoretic, electrophoretic, diffusiophoretic, centrifugal, and magnetic forces can be exerted on the particles. In general, magnetic, electrophoretic, centrifugal, photophoretic, and diffusiophoretic can be neglected. On the other hand, thermophoretic forces, caused by steep temperature gradients, can be important. The gravitational forces are almost always present and can affect the dynamic response of large particles. Understanding and quantifying the chemical coupling between two phases is a challenging task. However, all reacting particles begin this process as inert particles, and they must be heated before they participate in the combustion process. Thus, one must first understand the interactions of inert particles in a combustion environment. The in-detail understanding of the dynamics and structure of dusty flows can be only advanced by considering simple flow geometries such as the opposed

  12. Structural power flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  13. Numerical Study on the Turbulent Flow Structures of a Buoyant Pool Fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Sherman C. P.; Se, Camby M. K.; Yeoh, G. H.; Tu, Jiyuan

    2010-05-01

    In attempting to capture the non-linearity of the fire turbulent flow structures, a fully-coupled Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model which incorporates all essential subgrid scale (SGS) turbulence, combustion, radiation and soot chemistry considerations has been developed. This paper presents a thorough validation study comparing predictions of the present model with a one-meter diameter methane pool fire experimental data [1] as well as numerical results from other well-known LES models [2-3]. The predicted time-averaged velocities and turbulent quantities have been found to be in good agreement with the experimental data and other model predictions. In term of transient flow structures, for the very first time, the predicted instantaneous velocity field show satisfactory agreement with the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements demonstrating the success of capturing the temporal vortical structure by the present model. Quantitative comparisons of velocity time history and pulsation frequency also show close agreement against experimentally evaluated quantities. Nonetheless, turbulent kinetic energy was slightly over-predicted by the present model. Possible sources of errors are discussed leading to the potential direction for future model.

  14. Computational extended magneto-hydrodynamical study of shock structure generated by flows past an obstacle

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xuan; Seyler, C. E.

    2015-07-15

    The magnetized shock problem is studied in the context where supersonic plasma flows past a solid obstacle. This problem exhibits interesting and important phenomena such as a bow shock, magnetotail formation, reconnection, and plasmoid formation. This study is carried out using a discontinuous Galerkin method to solve an extended magneto-hydrodynamic model (XMHD). The main goals of this paper are to present a reasonably complete picture of the properties of this interaction using the MHD model and then to compare the results to the XMHD model. The inflow parameters, such as the magnetosonic Mach number M{sub f} and the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure β, can significantly affect the physical structures of the flow-obstacle interaction. The Hall effect can also significantly influence the results in the regime in which the ion inertial length is numerically resolved. Most of the results presented are for the two-dimensional case; however, two three-dimensional simulations are presented to make a connection to the important case in which the solar wind interacts with a solid body and to explore the possibility of performing scaled laboratory experiments.

  15. Experimental and modeling studies of the micro-structures of opposed flow diffusion flames: Methane

    SciTech Connect

    Vincitore, A.M.; Senkan, S.M.; Marinov, N.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.; Melius, C.F.

    1996-01-15

    The micro-structure of an atmospheric pressure, opposed flow, methane diffusion flame has been studied using heated micro-probe sampling and chemical kinetic modeling. Mole fraction profiles of major products as well as trace aromatic, substituted aromatic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH up to C{sub 16}H{sub 10}, e.g. pyrene) were quantified by direct gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of samples withdrawn from within the flame without any pre-concentration. Mole fractions range from 0.8 to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7}. The experimental measurements are compared to results from a newly-developed chemical kinetic model that includes chemistry for the production and consumption of aromatics and PAH species. The model predictions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data for the major species profiles and for the peak concentrations of many of the trace aromatics and PAH species. 36 refs.

  16. Flow structure in continuous flow electrophoresis chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiber, J. A.; Saville, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    There are at least two ways that hydrodynamic processes can limit continiuous flow electrophoresis. One arises from the sensitivity of the flow to small temerature gradients, especially at low flow rates and power levels. This sensitivity can be suppressed, at least in principle, by providing a carefully tailored, stabilizing temperature gradient in the cooling system that surrounds the flow channel. At higher power levels another limitation arises due to a restructuring of the main flow. This restructuring is caused by buoyancy, which is in turn affected by the electro-osmotic crossflow. Approximate solutions to appropriate partial differential equations have been computed by finite difference methods. One set of results is described here to illustrate the strong coupling between the structure of the main (axial) flow and the electro-osmotic flow.

  17. A high precision gas flow cell for performing in situ neutron studies of local atomic structure in catalytic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olds, Daniel; Page, Katharine; Paecklar, Arnold; Peterson, Peter F.; Liu, Jue; Rucker, Gerald; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Mariano; Olsen, Michael; Pawel, Michelle; Overbury, Steven H.; Neilson, James R.

    2017-03-01

    Gas-solid interfaces enable a multitude of industrial processes, including heterogeneous catalysis; however, there are few methods available for studying the structure of this interface under operating conditions. Here, we present a new sample environment for interrogating materials under gas-flow conditions using time-of-flight neutron scattering under both constant and pulse probe gas flow. Outlined are descriptions of the gas flow cell and a commissioning example using the adsorption of N2 by Ca-exchanged zeolite-X (Na78-2xCaxAl78Si144O384,x ≈ 38). We demonstrate sensitivities to lattice contraction and N2 adsorption sites in the structure, with both static gas loading and gas flow. A steady-state isotope transient kinetic analysis of N2 adsorption measured simultaneously with mass spectrometry is also demonstrated. In the experiment, the gas flow through a plugged-flow gas-solid contactor is switched between 15N2 and 14N2 isotopes at a temperature of 300 K and a constant pressure of 1 atm; the gas flow and mass spectrum are correlated with the structure factor determined from event-based neutron total scattering. Available flow conditions, sample considerations, and future applications are discussed.

  18. A wind tunnel study of flow structure adjustment on deformable sand beds containing a surface-mounted obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna Neuman, Cheryl; Bédard, OttO

    2015-09-01

    Roughness elements of varied scale and geometry commonly appear on the surfaces of sedimentary deposits in a wide range of planetary environments. They perturb the local fluid flow so that the entrainment, transport, and deposition of particles surrounding each element are fundamentally altered. Fluid dynamists have expended much effort in examining the flow structures surrounding idealized elements mounted on fixed, planar walls. However self-regulation occurs in sedimentary systems as a result of the bed surface undergoing rapid topographic modification with sediment transport, until it reaches a stable form that enhances the net physical roughness. The present wind tunnel study examines how the flow pattern surrounding an isolated cylinder, a problem extensively studied in classical fluid mechanics, is altered through morphodynamic development of a deep well that envelopes the windward face and sidewalls of the roughness element. Spatial patterns in the fluid velocity, turbulence intensity, and Reynolds stress obtained from laser Doppler anemometer measurements suggest that the flow structures surrounding such a cylinder are fundamentally altered through self-regulation of the bed topography as it reaches steady state. For example, flow stagnation and the turbulent dissipation of momentum are substantially increased at selected points surrounding the upwind face and sidewalls of the cylinder, respectively. Along the center line of the wake flow to the rear of the cylinder, several structures arising from flow separation are annihilated by strong upwelling of the airflow exhausted from the terminus of the well. Feedback plays a complex, time-dependent role in this system.

  19. Setup of a Biomedical Facility to Study Physiologically Relevant Flow-Structure Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    The design and implementation of a closed loop biomedical facility to study arterial flows is presented. The facility has a test section of 25 inches, and is capable of generating both steady and pulsatile flows via a centrifugal and a dual piston pump respectively. The Reynolds and Womersley numbers occurring in major blood vessels can be matched. The working fluid is a solution of NaI that allows refractive index matching with both rigid glass and compliant polymer models to facilitate tomographic PIV and holographic PIV. The combination of these two techniques allows us to study both large scale flow features as well as flows very close to the wall. The polymer models can be made with different modulus of elasticity and can be pre-stressed using a 5-axis stage. Radially asymmetric patches can also be pre-fabricated and incorporated in the tube during the manufacturing process to simulate plaque formation in arteries. These tubes are doped with tracer particles allowing for the measurement of wall deformation. Preliminary flow data over rigid and compliant walls is presented. One of the aims of this study is to characterize the changes in flow as the compliancy of blood vessels change due to age or disease, and explore the fluid interactions with an evolving surface boundary.

  20. Stability of Carotid Artery Under Steady-State and Pulsatile Blood Flow: A Fluid–Structure Interaction Study

    PubMed Central

    Saeid Khalafvand, Seyed; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that arteries may buckle into tortuous shapes under lumen pressure, which in turn could alter blood flow. However, the mechanisms of artery instability under pulsatile flow have not been fully understood. The objective of this study was to simulate the buckling and post-buckling behaviors of the carotid artery under pulsatile flow using a fully coupled fluid–structure interaction (FSI) method. The artery wall was modeled as a nonlinear material with a two-fiber strain-energy function. FSI simulations were performed under steady-state flow and pulsatile flow conditions with a prescribed flow velocity profile at the inlet and different pressures at the outlet to determine the critical buckling pressure. Simulations were performed for normal (160 ml/min) and high (350 ml/min) flow rates and normal (1.5) and reduced (1.3) axial stretch ratios to determine the effects of flow rate and axial tension on stability. The results showed that an artery buckled when the lumen pressure exceeded a critical value. The critical mean buckling pressure at pulsatile flow was 17–23% smaller than at steady-state flow. For both steady-state and pulsatile flow, the high flow rate had very little effect (<5%) on the critical buckling pressure. The fluid and wall stresses were drastically altered at the location with maximum deflection. The maximum lumen shear stress occurred at the inner side of the bend and maximum tensile wall stresses occurred at the outer side. These findings improve our understanding of artery instability in vivo. PMID:25761257

  1. Stability of carotid artery under steady-state and pulsatile blood flow: a fluid-structure interaction study.

    PubMed

    Saeid Khalafvand, Seyed; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-06-01

    It has been shown that arteries may buckle into tortuous shapes under lumen pressure, which in turn could alter blood flow. However, the mechanisms of artery instability under pulsatile flow have not been fully understood. The objective of this study was to simulate the buckling and post-buckling behaviors of the carotid artery under pulsatile flow using a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) method. The artery wall was modeled as a nonlinear material with a two-fiber strain-energy function. FSI simulations were performed under steady-state flow and pulsatile flow conditions with a prescribed flow velocity profile at the inlet and different pressures at the outlet to determine the critical buckling pressure. Simulations were performed for normal (160 ml/min) and high (350 ml/min) flow rates and normal (1.5) and reduced (1.3) axial stretch ratios to determine the effects of flow rate and axial tension on stability. The results showed that an artery buckled when the lumen pressure exceeded a critical value. The critical mean buckling pressure at pulsatile flow was 17-23% smaller than at steady-state flow. For both steady-state and pulsatile flow, the high flow rate had very little effect (<5%) on the critical buckling pressure. The fluid and wall stresses were drastically altered at the location with maximum deflection. The maximum lumen shear stress occurred at the inner side of the bend and maximum tensile wall stresses occurred at the outer side. These findings improve our understanding of artery instability in vivo.

  2. Motivation, Instructional Design, Flow, and Academic Achievement at a Korean Online University: A Structural Equation Modeling Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joo, Young Ju; Oh, Eunjung; Kim, Su Mi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the structural relationships among self-efficacy, intrinsic value, test anxiety, instructional design, flow, and achievement among students at a Korean online university. To address research questions, the researchers administered online surveys to 963 college students at an online university in Korea…

  3. Structural isomers of C2N(+) - A selected-ion flow tube study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. S.; Petrie, S. A. H.; Freeman, C. G.; Mcewan, M. J.; Mclean, A. D.

    1988-01-01

    Reactivities of the structural isomers CCN(+) and CNC(+) were examined in a selected-ion flow tube at 300 + or - 5 K. The less reactive CNC(+) isomer was identified as the product of the reactions of C(+) + HCN and C(+) + C2N2; in these reactions only CNC(+) can be produced because of energy constraints. Rate coefficients and branching ratios are reported for the reactions of each isomer with H2, CH4, NH3, H2O, C2H2, HCN, N2, O2, N2O, and CO2. Ab initio calculations are presented for CCN(+) and CNC(+); a saddle point for the reaction CCN(+) yielding CNC(+) is calculated to be 195 kJ/mol above CNC(+). The results provide evidence that the more reactive CCN(+) isomer is unlikely to be present in measurable densities in interstellar clouds.

  4. Integrated flow field (IFF) structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pien, Shyhing M. (Inventor); Warshay, Marvin (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present disclosure relates in part to a flow field structure comprising a hydrophilic part and a hydrophobic part communicably attached to each other via a connecting interface. The present disclosure further relates to electrochemical cells comprising the aforementioned flow fields.

  5. Study of the structure of turbulent shear flows at supersonic speeds and high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, A. J.; Bogdonoff, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    A major effort to improve the accuracies of turbulence measurement techniques is described including the development and testing of constant temperature hot-wire anemometers which automatically compensate for frequency responses. Calibration and data acquisition techniques for normal and inclined wires operated in the constant temperature mode, flow geometries, and physical models to explain the observed behavior of flows are discussed, as well as cooperation with computational groups in the calculation of compression corner flows.

  6. Beyond lognormal inequality: The Lorenz Flow Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2016-11-01

    Observed from a socioeconomic perspective, the intrinsic inequality of the lognormal law happens to manifest a flow generated by an underlying ordinary differential equation. In this paper we extend this feature of the lognormal law to a general "Lorenz Flow Structure" of Lorenz curves-objects that quantify socioeconomic inequality. The Lorenz Flow Structure establishes a general framework of size distributions that span continuous spectra of socioeconomic states ranging from the pure-communism extreme to the absolute-monarchy extreme. This study introduces and explores the Lorenz Flow Structure, analyzes its statistical properties and its inequality properties, unveils the unique role of the lognormal law within this general structure, and presents various examples of this general structure. Beyond the lognormal law, the examples include the inverse-Pareto and Pareto laws-which often govern the tails of composite size distributions.

  7. Detailed Studies on the Structure and Dynamics of Reacting Dusty Flows at Normal and Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Campbell, Charles S.

    1997-01-01

    Two-phase reacting flows are substantially less understood compared to gas phase flows. While extensive work has been done on sprays, less attention has been given to the details of dusty reacting flows. Dusty flows are of particular interest for a wide range of applications. Particles can be present in a gas intentionally or unintentionally, and they can be inert or reacting. Inert particles can be also present in an otherwise reacting gas flow, and that can lead to flame cooling and modification of the extinction limits of a combustible mixture. Reacting solid particles can release substantial amounts of heat upon oxidation, and can be used either for propulsion (e.g. Al, B, Mg) or power generation (coal). Furthermore, accidents can occur when a reacting dust accumulates in air and which, in the presence of an ignition source, can cause explosion. Such explosions can occur during lumber milling, in grain elevators, and in mine galleries.

  8. Flow structure and stability analysis for back-step flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaiescu, Adrian; Wesfreid, Jose Eduardo

    2005-11-01

    The structure and stability of the flow over a backward-facing step are studied using direct numerical simulation. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are conducted at a Reynolds number between 50 and 600. The reattachment length and velocity profiles are in agreement with the experimental and numerical results reported by J.-F. Beaudoin et al.(2003). The Rayleigh discriminant and the Gortler number are calculated for the stability study. Present results identify the same regions of instability as previously found by the two-dimensional simulations of Beaudoin et al., but the values of both Rayleigh discriminant and Gortler number are significantly different. Two Eckman structures close to the lateral walls, followed inside the flow domain by two Gortler structures, located downstream the step are identified. It is shown that other Gortler structures appear when a spanwise periodic perturbation of the inflow velocity is imposed. However, these longitudinal structures depend on the inflow conditions.

  9. Reaction Rates in Chemically Heterogeneous Rock: Coupled Impact of Structure and Flow Properties Studied by X-ray Microtomography.

    PubMed

    Al-Khulaifi, Yousef; Lin, Qingyang; Blunt, Martin J; Bijeljic, Branko

    2017-04-04

    We study dissolution in a chemically heterogeneous medium consisting of two minerals with contrasting initial structure and transport properties. We perform a reactive transport experiment using CO2-saturated brine at reservoir conditions in a millimeter-scale composite core composed of Silurian dolomite and Ketton limestone (calcite) arranged in series. We repeatedly image the composite core using X-ray microtomography (XMT) and collect effluent to assess the individual mineral dissolution. The mineral dissolution from image analysis was comparable to that measured from effluent analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We find that the ratio of the effective reaction rate of calcite to that of dolomite decreases with time, indicating the influence of dynamic transport effects originating from changes in pore structure coupled with differences in intrinsic reaction rates. Moreover, evolving flow and transport heterogeneity in the initially heterogeneous dolomite is a key determinant in producing a two-stage dissolution in the calcite. The first stage is characterized by a uniform dissolution of the pore space, while the second stage follows a single-channel growth regime. This implies that spatial memory effects in the medium with a heterogeneous flow characteristic (dolomite) can change the dissolution patterns in the medium with a homogeneous flow characteristic (calcite).

  10. Characteristic flow patterns generated by macrozoobenthic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, M.; Graf, G.

    2009-02-01

    food particle capture due to altered particle pathways and residence times, but also for the exchange of gases, solutes and spawn. The present results confirm previous studies on flow interaction effects of various biogenic structures, and they add a deeper level of detail for a better understanding of the fine-scale effects.

  11. Numerical and experimental study of expiratory flow in the case of major upper airway obstructions with fluid structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouly, F.; van Hirtum, A.; Lagrée, P.-Y.; Pelorson, X.; Payan, Y.

    2008-02-01

    This study deals with the numerical prediction and experimental description of the flow-induced deformation in a rapidly convergent divergent geometry which stands for a simplified tongue, in interaction with an expiratory airflow. An original in vitro experimental model is proposed, which allows measurement of the deformation of the artificial tongue, in condition of major initial airway obstruction. The experimental model accounts for asymmetries in geometry and tissue properties which are two major physiological upper airway characteristics. The numerical method for prediction of the fluid structure interaction is described. The theory of linear elasticity in small deformations has been chosen to compute the mechanical behaviour of the tongue. The main features of the flow are taken into account using a boundary layer theory. The overall numerical method entails finite element solving of the solid problem and finite differences solving of the fluid problem. First, the numerical method predicts the deformation of the tongue with an overall error of the order of 20%, which can be seen as a preliminary successful validation of the theory and simulations. Moreover, expiratory flow limitation is predicted in this configuration. As a result, both the physical and numerical models could be useful to understand this phenomenon reported in heavy snorers and apneic patients during sleep.

  12. Sensitivity of flow evolution on turbulence structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Aashwin A.; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Duraisamy, Karthik

    2016-09-01

    Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes models represent the workhorse for studying turbulent flows in academia and in industry. Such single-point turbulence models have limitations in accounting for the influence of the nonlocal physics and flow history on turbulence evolution. In this context, we investigate the sensitivity inherent in such single-point models due to their characterization of the internal structure of homogeneous turbulent flows solely by the means of the Reynolds stresses. For a wide variety of mean flows under diverse conditions, we study the prediction intervals engendered due to this coarse-grained description. The nature of this variability and its dependence on parameters such as the mean flow topology, the initial Reynolds stress tensor, and the relative influence of linear contra nonlinear physics is identified, analyzed, and explicated.

  13. Turbulent flow structure response to a varying wall-roughness arrangement: a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakirlic, Suad; Krumbein, Benjamin; Fooroghi, Pourya; Magagnato, Franco; Frohnapfel, Bettina; Darmstadt Collaboration; Karlsruhe Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Presently adopted approach to the modelling of rough surfaces relies on introducing an additional drag term in the appropriately 'filtered' Navier-Stokes equations, accounting for the form drag and blockage effects, the roughness elements exert on the flow. A non-dimensional drag function D(y) accounting for the shape of roughness elements is introduced. It is evaluated by applying a reference DNS of an open channel flow over a wall characterized by varying arrangement (aligned/staggered) of differently-shaped/sized roughness elements at a bulk Reynolds number Re =6500 by Fooroghi et al.. The prime objective of the present work is to assess the roughness model capability to predict mean velocities and turbulent intensities in conjunction with a recently formulated hybrid LES/RANS (Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes) model, based on the Very Large Eddy Simulation (VLES) concept of Speziale. A seamless transition from RANS to LES is enabled depending on the ratio of the turbulent viscosities associated with the unresolved scales corresponding to the LES cut-off and those related to the turbulent properties of the VLES residual motion.

  14. Flow structure and channel morphodynamics of meander bend chute cutoffs: A case study of the Wabash River, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, Jessica A.; Rhoads, Bruce L.; Best, James L.; Johnson, Kevin K.

    2013-12-01

    paper documents the three-dimensional structure of flow and bed morphology of two developing chute cutoffs on a single meander bend on the lower Wabash River, USA, and relates the flow structure to patterns of morphologic change in the evolving cutoff channels. The upstream end of the cutoff channels is characterized by: (1) a zone of flow velocity reduction/stagnation and bar development in the main channel across from the cutoff entrance, (2) flow separation and bar development along the inner (left) bank of the cutoff channel immediately downstream from the cutoff entrance, and (3) helical motion and outward advection of flow momentum entering the cutoff channel, leading to erosion of the outer (right) bank of the cutoff channel. At the downstream end of the cutoff channels, the major hydrodynamic and morphologic features are: (1) flow stagnation along the bank of the main channel immediately upstream of the cutoff channel mouth, (2) convergence of flows from the cutoff and main channels, (3) helical motion of flow from the cutoff, (4) a zone of reduced velocity along the bank of the main channel immediately downstream from the cutoff channel mouth, and (5) development of a prominent bar complex that penetrates into the main channel and extends from the stagnation zone upstream to downstream of the cutoff mouth. These results provide the basis for a conceptual model of chute-cutoff dynamics in which the upstream and downstream ends of a cutoff channel are treated as a bifurcation and confluence, respectively.

  15. Bypass Flow Study

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments in the MIR (Matched Index of-Refraction) flow system at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing, and turbulence models for the flow ratios between coolant channels and bypass gaps in the interstitial regions of typical prismatic standard fuel element (SFE) or upper reflector block geometries of typical Modular High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (MHTGR) in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. The experiments use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to measure the velocity fields that will populate the bypass flow study database.

  16. Arterial stiffness, pressure and flow pulsatility and brain structure and function: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary F; van Buchem, Mark A; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Gotal, John D; Jonsdottir, Maria K; Kjartansson, Ólafur; Garcia, Melissa; Aspelund, Thor; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J

    2011-11-01

    Aortic stiffness increases with age and vascular risk factor exposure and is associated with increased risk for structural and functional abnormalities in the brain. High ambient flow and low impedance are thought to sensitize the cerebral microcirculation to harmful effects of excessive pressure and flow pulsatility. However, haemodynamic mechanisms contributing to structural brain lesions and cognitive impairment in the presence of high aortic stiffness remain unclear. We hypothesized that disproportionate stiffening of the proximal aorta as compared with the carotid arteries reduces wave reflection at this important interface and thereby facilitates transmission of excessive pulsatile energy into the cerebral microcirculation, leading to microvascular damage and impaired function. To assess this hypothesis, we evaluated carotid pressure and flow, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, brain magnetic resonance images and cognitive scores in participants in the community-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study who had no history of stroke, transient ischaemic attack or dementia (n = 668, 378 females, 69-93 years of age). Aortic characteristic impedance was assessed in a random subset (n = 422) and the reflection coefficient at the aorta-carotid interface was computed. Carotid flow pulsatility index was negatively related to the aorta-carotid reflection coefficient (R = -0.66, P<0.001). Carotid pulse pressure, pulsatility index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity were each associated with increased risk for silent subcortical infarcts (hazard ratios of 1.62-1.71 per standard deviation, P<0.002). Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was associated with higher white matter hyperintensity volume (0.108 ± 0.045 SD/SD, P = 0.018). Pulsatility index was associated with lower whole brain (-0.127 ± 0.037 SD/SD, P<0.001), grey matter (-0.079 ± 0.038 SD/SD, P = 0.038) and white matter (-0.128 ± 0.039 SD/SD, P<0.001) volumes. Carotid-femoral pulse

  17. The structure of the vorticity field in turbulent channel flow. II - Study of ensemble-averaged fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Moin, P.

    1986-01-01

    Several conditional sampling techniques are applied to a data base generated by large-eddy simulation of turbulent channel flow. It is shown that the bursting process is associated with well-organized horseshoe vortices inclined at about 45 deg to the wall. These vortical structures are identified by examining the vortex lines of three-dimensional, ensemble averaged vorticity fields. Two distinct horseshoe-shaped vortices corresponding to the sweep and ejection events are detected. These vortices are associated with high Reynolds shear stress and hence make a significant contribution to turbulent energy production. The dependency of the ensemble averaged vortical structures on the detection criteria, and the question of whether this ensemble-averaged structure is an artifact of the ensemble averaging process are examined. The ensemble-averaged pattern of these vortical structures that emerge from the analysis could provide the basis for a hypothetical model of the organized structures of wall-bounded shear flows.

  18. The structure of the vorticity field in turbulent channel flow. Part 2: Study of ensemble-averaged fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Moin, P.

    1984-01-01

    Several conditional sampling techniques are applied to a data base generated by large-eddy simulation of turbulent channel flow. It is shown that the bursting process is associated with well-organized horseshoe vortices inclined at about 45 deg. to the wall. These vortical structures are identified by examining the vortex lines of three-dimensional, ensemble averaged vorticity fields. Two distinct horseshoe-shaped vortices corresponding to the sweep and ejection events are detected. These vortices are associated with high Reynolds shear stress and hence make a significant contribution to turbulent energy production. The dependency of the ensemble averaged vortical structures on the detection criteria, and the question of whether this ensemble-averaged structure is an artifact of the ensemble averaging process are examined. The ensemble-averaged pattern of these vortical structures that emerge from the analysis could provide the basis for a hypothetical model of the organized structures of wall-bounded shear flows.

  19. A refractive index-matched facility for fluid-structure interaction studies of pulsatile and oscillating flow in elastic vessels of adjustable compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgmann, S.; Große, S.; Schröder, W.; Roggenkamp, J.; Jansen, S.; Gräf, F.; Büsen, M.

    2009-10-01

    The flow field in the respiratory and vascular system is known to be influenced by the flexibility of the walls. However, up to now, most of the experimental biofluidic investigations have been performed in rigid models due to the complexity and necessity of optical access. In this paper, a facility and measurement techniques for studying oscillating and pulsatile flow in elastic vessels will be described. The investigated vessel models have been adapted such that fluid-mechanical and structure-mechanical characteristics represent realistic blood flows in medium blood vessels. That is, characteristic parameters, i.e., the Reynolds and Womersley number, as well as mechanical properties of the flexible wall, i.e., the Young’s modulus and the material compliance, have been chosen to reasonably represent realistic flow conditions. First, a method to manufacture elastic models, which mimic the structure-mechanical properties of vascular vessels is described. The models possess a tunable compliance and are made of transparent polydimethylsiloxane. Second, the experimental setup of the flow facility will be elucidated. The flow facility allows to mimic pulsatile flow at physiologically relevant Reynolds and Womersley numbers. The precise form of the flow cycle can individually be controlled. Water/glycerine is used as flow medium for refractive index matching particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. The PIV recordings not only allow to assess the mean cross-sectional flow field but also further enable to simultaneously detect the movement of the flexible wall. Additionally, the local wall-shear stress can be obtained from the single-pixel line resolved near-wall flow field. To confirm the flow conditions of the oscillatory laminar flow inside the flow facility and to evaluate the ability to assess the flow field, measurements in a straight, uniform diameter, rigid Plexiglas pipe under identical conditions to those of the oscillating flow in the flexible vessel

  20. Lagrangian Coherent Structures in Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn

    2008-11-01

    Knowledge of fluid transport is particularly compelling in understanding the function of cardiovascular processes. Transport of chemicals, cells, and compounds in the vascular system is influenced by local flow structures in large vessels. Local flow features can also induce cell-signaling pathways and biologic response critical to maintaining health or disease progression. Complex vessel geometry, the pulsatile pumping of blood, and low Reynolds number turbulence leads to complex flow features in large vessels. However, we are gaining the ability to study transport in large vessels with unprecedented detail, which is in part allowing us to broaden the ``shear-centric'' view of hemodynamics. In this talk we will describe the application of computational fluid mechanics and the computation of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) to study transport in various cardiovascular applications. We will discuss some of the challenges of this work and some results of computing LCS in several regions of the vascular system. In collaboration with Charles Taylor, Stanford University.

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of the Solvation Structures of a High-Performance Nonaqueous Redox Flow Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Mary Y.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Mueller, Karl T.; Chen, Zhong; Hu, Jian Z.

    2016-02-09

    Understanding the solvation structures of electrolytes should prove conducive for the development of nonaqueous redox flow batteries that hold considerable potential for future large scale energy storage systems. The utilization of an emerging ionic-derivatived ferrocene compound, ferrocenylmethyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Fc1N112-TFSI), has recently overcome the issue of solubility in the supporting electrolyte. In this work, 13C, 1H and 17O NMR investigations were carried out using electrolyte solutions consisting of Fc1N112-TFSI as the solute and the mixed alkyl carbonate as the solvent. It was observed that the spectra of 13C experience changes of chemical shifts while those of 17O undergo linewidth broadening, indicating interactions between solute and solvent molecules. Quantum chemistry calculations of both molecular structures and chemical shifts (13C, 1H and 17O) are performed for interpreting experimental results and of understanding the detailed solvation structures and molecular dynamics. The results indicate that Fc1N112-TFSI is dissociated at varying degrees in mixed solvent depending on concentrations. Solvent molecules encircle Fc1N112 and TFSI respectively as solvation shells, rapidly exchanging with both bulk solvent and TFSI. Additionally, the solvent with high dielectric constant is more capable of dissociating Fc1N112-TFSI molecules compared with those with low dielectric constant. At saturated concentration, contact ion pairs are formed and the solvent molecules are interacting with the Fc rings rather than interacting with the ionic pendant arm of Fc1N112-TFSI. These studies will contribute to the development of nonaqueous electrolytes of storage systems.

  2. A visual study of the coherent structure of the turbulent boundary layer in flow with adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Qi Xiang

    1990-06-01

    Experimental investigations were carried out on the coherent structures of turbulent boundary layers in flow with adverse pressure gradient and, in the vicinity of separation, extensive visual observations using the hydrogen-bubble technique were performed. In a flow with adverse pressure gradient, the structures are larger, and thus more details were observed. By a suitable manipulation of the generation of hydrogen-bubble time lines, some new results were obtained in observing plan views near the wall. The long streaks downstream along the interface regions between low-speed and high-speed streaks are continually stretching, and their velocity may be greater than that of high-speed streaks; the hydrogen bubbles in the long streaks generally have a longer life. Streamwise (x, y) vortices were also observed along the interface regions between high-speed and low-speed streaks. Transverse (z) vortices were observed at the front of the high-speed regions.

  3. Coupled flow, thermal and structural analysis of aerodynamically heated panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1986-01-01

    A finite element approach to coupling flow, thermal and structural analyses of aerodynamically heated panels is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible flow are solved together with the energy equation and quasi-static structural equations of the panel. Interactions between the flow, panel heat transfer and deformations are studied for thin stainless steel panels aerodynamically heated by Mach 6.6 flow.

  4. Flame structure of nozzles offsetting opposite flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahagi, Yuji; Morinaga, Yuichiro; Hamaishi, Kyosuke; Makino, Ikuyo

    2016-09-01

    Effects of vortexes behind flame zone on the flame structures are investigated experimentally by nozzles offsetting opposite flows with 2D laser diagnosis. Methane air premixed gas issued from upper and lower burners with equal flow rate. An imbalanced counter flow is produced to slide the lower burner from the center axis. In our proposed flow system, the vortexes are only formed in the burnt gas region by the shear stress due to the velocity difference between the upper flow and lower flow. Three distinct flames structures, slant flames, edge shape flames, and hyperbolic flames are decided with the offsetting rate and fuel flows composition. The formed vortexes structures changed with the offsetting rate. The vortex formed behind the flame plays an important role for the flame stability.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the solvation structures of a high-performance nonaqueous redox flow electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Mary; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Mueller, Karl T.; Chen, Zhong; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the solvation structures of electrolytes is important for developing nonaqueous redox flow batteries that hold considerable potential for future large scale energy storage systems. The utilization of an emerging ionic-derivative ferrocene compounds, ferrocenylmethyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bis (triflyoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Fc1N112-TFSI), has recently overcome the issue of solubility in the supporting electrolyte. In this work, 13C1H and 17O NMR investigations were carried out using solvent. It was observed that the spectra of 13C experience changes of chemical shifts while those of 17O undergo line width broadening, indicating interactions between solute and solvent molecules

  6. Structures in the Oscillatory regime of RLDCC flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchapakesan, Nagangudy

    2015-11-01

    Rotating lid driven cubical cavity flow (RLDCC flow) is studied with a view to test structure eduction algorithms. OpenFoam software was used to simulate the RLDCC flow at Reynolds numbers higher than the critical Reynolds number for this geometry. Vortex bubble and other characteristic structures were observed in these simulations. The vector fields of the simulations were further analyzed with LCS and other methodologies to educe the structures. The structures were compared with level sets of different dynamical variables. The ability of these algorithms to present a coherent representation of the time evolution and unsteady dynamics of the bubble and other structures is evaluated. Funded by AR&DB India.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the solvation structures of a high-performance nonaqueous redox flow electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Mary; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Mueller, Karl T.; Chen, Zhong; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the solvation structures of electrolytes is important for developing nonaqueous redox flow batteries that hold considerable potential for future large scale energy storage systems. The utilization of an emerging ionic-derivatived ferrocene compound, ferrocenylmethyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Fc1N112-TFSI), has recently overcome the issue of solubility in the supporting electrolyte. In this work, 13C, 1H and 17O NMR investigations were carried out using electrolyte solutions consisting of Fc1N112-TFSI as the solute and the mixed alkyl carbonate as the solvent. It was observed that the spectra of 13C experience changes of chemical shifts while those of 17O undergo linewidth broadening, indicating interactions between solute and solvent molecules. Quantum chemistry calculations of both molecular structures and chemical shifts (13C, 1H and 17O) are performed for interpreting experimental results and for understanding the detailed solvation structures. The results indicate that Fc1N112-TFSI is dissociated at varying degrees in mixed solvent depending on concentrations. At dilute solute concentrations, most Fc1N112+ and TFSI- are fully disassociated with their own solvation shells formed by solvent molecules. At saturated concentration, Fc1N112+-TFSI- contact ion pairs are formed and the solvent molecules are preferentially interacting with the Fc rings rather than interacting with the ionic pendant arm of Fc1N112-TFSI.

  8. Topological Structures in Rotating Stratified Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, J. M.; Carrillo, A.; Perez, E.

    2003-04-01

    Detailled 2D Particle traking and PIV visualizations performed on a series of large scale laboratory experiments at the Coriolis Platform of the SINTEF in Trondheim have revealed several resonances which scale on the Strouhal, the Rossby and the Richardson numbers. More than 100 experiments spanned a wide range of Rossby Deformation Radii and the topological structures (Parabolic /Eliptic /Hyperbolic) of the quasi-balanced stratified-rotating flows were studied when stirring (akin to coastal mixing) occured at a side of the tank. The strong asymetry favored by the total vorticity produces a wealth of mixing patterns.

  9. Numerical study of the flow structures in flat plate and the wall-mounted hump induced by the unsteady DBD plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianyang, Yu; Huaping, Liu; Ruoyu, Wang; Fu, Chen

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the dielectric-barrier-discharge plasma actuator was employed to study the flow structures induced by the plasma actuator over a flat plate and a wall-mounted hump. A phenomenological dielectric-barrier-discharge plasma model which regarded the plasma effect as the body force was implemented into the Navier-Stokes equations solved by the method of large eddy simulations. The results show that a series of vortex pairs, which indicated dipole formation and periodicity distribution were generated in the boundary layer when the plasma was applied to the flow over a flat plane. They would enhance the energy exchanged between the near wall region and the free stream. Besides, their spatial trajectories are deeply affected by the actuation strength. When the actuator was engaged in the flow over a wall-mounted hump, the vortex pairs were also produced, which was able to delay flow separation as well as to promote flow reattachment and reduce the generation of a vortex, achieving the goal of reducing dissipation and decreasing flow resistance.

  10. Study on the effect of punched holes on flow structure and heat transfer of the plain fin with multi-row delta winglets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Liting; Liu, Bin; Min, Chunhua; Wang, Jin; He, Yaling

    2015-11-01

    Three dimensional numerical simulations are performed to investigate the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the plain fin with multi-row delta winglets punched out from the fin. The Reynolds number based on the tube outside diameter varies from 360 to 1440. The effects of punched holes and their orientations on flow structure and heat transfer are numerically studied. Results show that a down-wash flow is formed through the hole punched at the windward side, which has little influence on the longitudinal vortices in the main flow, and a longitudinal main vortex is formed behind each delta winglet. An up-wash flow is formed through the hole punched at the leeward side, the up-wash flow impinges the longitudinal vortices generated by the delta winglet, and then a counter-rotating pair of main vortices is generated behind each delta winglet. The windward punched holes have little effect on the flow friction and heat transfer of the plain fin with delta winglets, while the leeward punched holes deteriorate the heat transfer and decrease the flow friction of the fin channel, the Nusselt number decreases by 3.5-5.0 % with a corresponding decrease of 3.9-4.8 % in the friction factor. The effect of the punched holes on the heat transfer of the fin can be well explained by the field synergy principle. The overall analysis of the thermal performance is performed for all fin configurations, including the slit fins and the wavy fins with one-row delta winglets, the plain fin with the windward punched delta winglets shows the better thermal performance than one with the leeward punched delta winglets.

  11. A field study of the effects of soil structure and irrigation method on preferential flow of pesticides in unsaturated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodrati, Masoud; Jury, William A.

    1992-10-01

    A large number of field plot experiments were performed to characterize the downward flow of three pesticides (atrazine, napropamide and prometryn) and a water tracer (chloride) under various soil water regimes and soil surface conditions. Each experiment consisted of the uniform application of a 0.4-cm pulse of a solution containing a mixture of the four chemicals to the surface of a 1.5 × 1.5-m plot. The plot was then irrigated with 12 cm of water and soil samples were collected and analyzed to a depth of 150 cm. In all, 64 different plots were employed to study individual as well as interactive effects of such variables as irrigation method (continuous or intermittent sprinkling or ponding), pesticide formulation method (technical grade dissolved in water, wettable powder, or emulsifiable concentrate), and tillage (undisturbed or tilled and repacked surface layer) on pesticide transport. While all three pesticides were expected to be retained in the top 10-20 cm, there was considerable movement below this zone. When averaged over all the treatments, 18.8% of the recovered mass of atrazine, 9.4% of the prometryn and 16.4% of the napropamide were found between 30- and 150cm depth. Moreover, all pesticides were highly mobile in the surface 30 cm regardless of their adsorption coefficient. There were occureences of extreme mobility or "preferential flow" of pesticide under every experimental condition except where the pesticides were applied in wettable powder form to plots which had their surface tilled and repacked. This finding implies that there may be fine preferential flow pathways through which solution may move but particulates may not.

  12. Near-blade flow structure modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kura, T.; Fornalik-Wajs, E.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the importance of near-blade flow structure influence on the performance of a centrifugal compressor was discussed. The negative effects of eddies and secondary flows appearance were described, together with the proposal of their reduction. Three-dimensional analyses were performed for the rotors. Focus was placed on the blade's 3D curvature impact on the efficiency of compression, and the influence of blade-shroud tip existence. A few design proposals were investigated - their performance maps were the basis of further analysis. Proposed modification of blade shape changed the near-blade flow structure and improved the compressor performance.

  13. TV News Flow Studies Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjarvard, Stig

    1995-01-01

    Compares different theoretical approaches to the study of international news. Finds many comparative studies of the foreign news output of national broadcasters and few studies analyzing the actual flow of television news between actors at the wholesale level and the flow between wholesale and retail level. Suggests a better framework for the…

  14. Microvasculature on a chip: study of the Endothelial Surface Layer and the flow structure of Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvirkun, Daria; Grichine, Alexei; Duperray, Alain; Misbah, Chaouqi; Bureau, Lionel

    2017-03-01

    Microvasculatures-on-a-chip, i.e. in vitro models that mimic important features of microvessel networks, have gained increasing interest in recent years. Such devices have allowed investigating pathophysiological situations involving abnormal biophysical interactions between blood cells and vessel walls. Still, a central question remains regarding the presence, in such biomimetic systems, of the endothelial glycocalyx. The latter is a glycosaminoglycans-rich surface layer exposed to blood flow, which plays a crucial role in regulating the interactions between circulating cells and the endothelium. Here, we use confocal microscopy to characterize the layer expressed by endothelial cells cultured in microfluidic channels. We show that, under our culture conditions, endothelial cells form a confluent layer on all the walls of the circuit and display a glycocalyx that fully lines the lumen of the microchannels. Moreover, the thickness of this surface layer is found to be on the order of 600 nm, which compares well with measurements performed ex or in vivo on microcapillaries. Furthermore, we investigate how the presence of endothelial cells in the microchannels affects their hydrodynamic resistance and the near-wall motion of red blood cells. Our study thus provides an important insight into the physiological relevance of in vitro microvasculatures.

  15. Microvasculature on a chip: study of the Endothelial Surface Layer and the flow structure of Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsvirkun, Daria; Grichine, Alexei; Duperray, Alain; Misbah, Chaouqi; Bureau, Lionel

    2017-01-01

    Microvasculatures-on-a-chip, i.e. in vitro models that mimic important features of microvessel networks, have gained increasing interest in recent years. Such devices have allowed investigating pathophysiological situations involving abnormal biophysical interactions between blood cells and vessel walls. Still, a central question remains regarding the presence, in such biomimetic systems, of the endothelial glycocalyx. The latter is a glycosaminoglycans-rich surface layer exposed to blood flow, which plays a crucial role in regulating the interactions between circulating cells and the endothelium. Here, we use confocal microscopy to characterize the layer expressed by endothelial cells cultured in microfluidic channels. We show that, under our culture conditions, endothelial cells form a confluent layer on all the walls of the circuit and display a glycocalyx that fully lines the lumen of the microchannels. Moreover, the thickness of this surface layer is found to be on the order of 600 nm, which compares well with measurements performed ex or in vivo on microcapillaries. Furthermore, we investigate how the presence of endothelial cells in the microchannels affects their hydrodynamic resistance and the near-wall motion of red blood cells. Our study thus provides an important insight into the physiological relevance of in vitro microvasculatures. PMID:28338083

  16. Flow-Induced Vibration of Circular Cylindrical Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shoei-Sheng

    1985-06-01

    Flow-induced vibration is a term to denote those phenomena associated with the response of structures placed in or conveying fluid flow. More specifically, the terra covers those cases in which an interaction develops between fluid-dynamic forces and the inertia, damping or elastic forces in the structures. The study of these phenomena draws on three disciplines: (1) structural mechanics, (2) mechanical vibration, and (3) fluid dynamics. The vibration of circular cylinders subject to flow has been known to man since ancient times; the vibration of a wire at its natural frequency in response to vortex shedding was known in ancient Greece as aeolian tones. But systematic studies of the problem were not made until a century ago when Strouhal established the relationship between vortex shedding frequency and flow velocity for a given cylinder diameter. The early research in this area has beer summarized by Zdravkovich (1985) and Goldstein (1965). Flow-induced structural vibration has been experienced in numerous fields, including the aerospace industry, power generation/transmission (turbine blades, heat exchanger tubes, nuclear reactor components), civil engineering (bridges, building, smoke stacks), and undersea technology. The problems have usually been encountered or created accidentally through improper design. In most cases, a structural or mechanical component, designed to meet specific objectives, develops problems when the undesired effects of flow field have not been accounted for in the design. When a flow-induced vibration problem is noted in the design stage, the engineer has different options to eliminate the detrimental vibration. Unfortunately, in many situations, the problems occur after the components are already in operation; the "fix" usually is very costly. Flow-induced vibration comprises complex and diverse phenomena; subcritical vibration of nuclear fuel assemblies, galloping of transmission lines, flutter of pipes conveying fluid, and whirling

  17. Flow Structure in a Bedrock Canyon (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venditti, J. G.; Rennie, C. D.; Church, M. A.; Bomhof, J.; Lin, M.

    2013-12-01

    Bedrock canyon incision is widely recognized as setting the pace of landscape evolution. A variety of models link flow and sediment transport processes to the bedrock canyon incision rate. The model components that represent sediment transport processes are quite well developed in some models. In contrast, the model components that represent fluid flow remain rudimentary. Part of the reason is that there have been relatively few observations of flow structure in a bedrock canyon. Here, we present observations of flow obtained using an array of three acoustic Doppler current profilers during a 524 km long continuous centerline traverse of the Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada as it passes through a series of bedrock canyons. Through this portion of the river, the channel alternates between gravel-bedded reaches that are deeply incised into semi-consolidated glacial deposits and solid bedrock-bound reaches. We present observations of flow through 41 bedrock bound reaches of the river, derived from our centerline traverses and more detailed three-dimensional mapping of the flow structure in 2 canyons. Our observations suggest that flow in the most well-defined canyons (deep, laterally constrained, completely bedrock bound) is far more complex than that in a simple prismatic channel. As flow enters the canyon, a high velocity core plunges from the surface to the bed, causing a velocity inversion (high velocities at the bed and low velocities at the surface). This plunging flow then upwells along the canyon wall, resulting in a three-dimensional flow with counter-rotating, along-stream eddies that diverge near the bed. We observe centerline ridges along the canyon floors that result from the divergence and large-scale surface boils caused by the upwelling. This flow structure causes deep scour in the bedrock channel floor, and ensures the base of the canyon walls are swept of debris that otherwise may be deposited due to lower shear stresses abutting the walls. The

  18. A statistical state dynamics-based study of the structure and mechanism of large-scale motions in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Brian F.; Ioannou, Petros J.; Jiménez, Javier; Constantinou, Navid C.; Lozano-Durán, Adrián; Nikolaidis, Marios-Andreas

    2016-12-01

    The perspective of statistical state dynamics (SSD) has recently been applied to the study of mechanisms underlying turbulence in various physical systems. An example implementation of SSD is the second order closure referred to as stochastic structural stability theory (S3T), which has provided insight into the dynamics of wall turbulence and specifically the emergence and maintenance of the roll/streak structure. This closure eliminates nonlinear interactions among the perturbations has been removed, restricting nonlinearity in the dynamics to that of the mean equation and the interaction between the mean and perturbation covariance. Here, this quasi-linear restriction of the dynamics is used to study the structure and dynamics of turbulence in plane Poiseuille flow at moderately high Reynolds numbers in a closely related dynamical system, referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) system. RNL simulations reveal that the essential features of wall-turbulence dynamics are retained. Remarkably, the RNL system spontaneously limits the support of its turbulence to a small set of streamwise Fourier components giving rise to a naturally minimal representation of its turbulence dynamics. Although greatly simplified, this RNL turbulence exhibits natural-looking structures and statistics. Surprisingly, even when further truncation of the perturbation support to a single streamwise component is imposed the RNL system continues to produce self-sustaining turbulent structure and dynamics. RNL turbulence at the Reynolds numbers studied is dominated by the roll/streak structure in the buffer layer and similar very-large-scale structure (VLSM) in the outer layer. Diagnostics of the structure, spectrum and energetics of RNL and DNS turbulence are used to demonstrate that the roll/streak dynamics supporting the turbulence in the buffer and logarithmic layer is essentially similar in RNL and DNS.

  19. Study of swirling gas-dispersed flows in vortex chambers of various structures in the presence and absence of combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volchkov, É. P.; Dvornikov, N. A.; Lukashov, V. V.; Borodulya, V. A.; Teplitskii, Yu. S.; Pitsukha, E. A.

    2012-07-01

    Consideration is given to swirling gas-dispersed flows in the cylindrical combustion chamber with a lateral swirler, in the conical combustion chamber with a nonflow bed of a dispersed material, and in the cylindrical combustion chamber with lower end injection of the gas through a slot swirler.

  20. New approach to the boundary-parallel plastic / viscous diapiric flow patterns in the curvilinear boundary zones: an implication for structural geology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil

    2010-05-01

    New approach to the boundary-parallel plastic / viscous diapiric flow patterns in the curvilinear boundary zones: an implication for structural geology studies Khalil Sarkarinejad and Abdolreza Partabian Department of Earth Sciences, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran (Sarkarinejad@geology.susc.ac.ir). In the oceanic diverging away plates, the asthenospheric flow at solidus high-temperature conditions typically produces mineral foliations and lineations in peridotites. Foliation and lineation of mantle are defined by preferred flattening and alignment of olivine, pyroxene and spinel. In the areas with steep foliations trajectories which are associated with the steeply plunging stretching lineation trajectories, reflecting localized vertical flow and has been related to mantle diapir. The mantle flow patterns are well documented through detail structural mapping of the Neyriz ophiolite along the Zagros inclined dextral transpression and Oman ophiolite. Such models of the diverging asthenaspheric mantle flow and formation of mantle diapir are rarely discussed and paid any attention in the mathematical models of transpressional deformation in converging continental crusts. Systematic measurements of the mineral preferred orientations and construction of the foliation and lineation trajectories of the Zagros high-strain zone reveal two diapers with the shape of the inclined NW-SE boundary-parallel semi-ellipses shape and one rotated asymmetric diapir. These diapers made of quartzo-feldspathic gneiss and garnet amphibolite core with phyllite, phyllonite, muscovite schist and deformed conglomerate as a cover sequences. These boundary-parallel and rotated diapirs are formed by the interaction of Afro-Arabian lower to middle continental detachment and hot subdacting Tethyan oceanic crust, due to increasing effective pressure and temperature. The plastic/viscous gneissic diapers were squeezed between in Zagros transpression curvilinear boundary zones in an

  1. Internal wave structures in abyssal cataract flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarenko, Nikolay; Liapidevskii, Valery; Morozov, Eugene; Tarakanov, Roman

    2014-05-01

    We discuss some theoretical approaches, experimental results and field data concerning wave phenomena in ocean near-bottom stratified flows. Such strong flows of cold water form everywhere in the Atlantic abyssal channels, and these currents play significant role in the global water exchange. Most interesting wave structures arise in a powerful cataract flows near orographic obstacles which disturb gravity currents by forced lee waves, attached hydraulic jumps, mixing layers etc. All these effects were observed by the authors in the Romanche and Chain fracture zones of Atlantic Ocean during recent cruises of the R/V Akademik Ioffe and R/V Akademik Sergei Vavilov (Morozov et al., Dokl. Earth Sci., 2012, 446(2)). In a general way, deep-water cataract flows down the slope are similar to the stratified flows examined in laboratory experiments. Strong mixing in the sill region leads to the splitting of the gravity current into the layers having the fluids with different densities. Another peculiarity is the presence of critical layers in shear flows sustained over the sill. In the case under consideration, this critical level separates the flow of near-bottom cold water from opposite overflow. In accordance with known theoretical models and laboratory measurements, the critical layer can absorb and reflect internal waves generated by the topography, so the upward propagation of these perturbations is blocked from above. High velocity gradients were registered downstream in the vicinity of cataract and it indicates the existence of developed wave structures beyond the sill formed by intense internal waves. This work was supported by RFBR (grants No 12-01-00671-a, 12-08-10001-k and 13-08-10001-k).

  2. Vortical Structures in Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flow with Recirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran Shah, Syed

    2011-12-01

    Hairpin or horse-shoe vortices are a widely-accepted feature of the wall-bounded flows. These vortical structures have mostly been studied in canonical flows. Relatively few studies have been conducted on the characteristics of the vortical structures in wall-bounded flows with adverse pressure gradient and still fewer on the detached flows with recirculation. In the present contribution, vortices have been educed using a DNS database of incompressible flow over a 2-dimensional surface bump in a converging-diverging channel at a Reynolds number Reτ of 617, based on the friction velocity at inlet. Vortices have been educed from the instantaneous velocity field in streamwise/wall-normal and spanwise/wall-normal planes using the signed swirling strength criterion. Vortex validation is done through a fit of the vortex velocity field to the Oseen vortex model. The effects of a strong adverse pressure gradient and flow reciruclation on the population density and sizes of the streamwise and spanwise-oriented vortices have been studied. It has been found that a strong adverse pressure gradient and flow recirculation leads to the generation of a new near-wall peak of small spanwise prograde vortex population. Furthermore, this peak of vortex density has been found to coincide and hence relate to the outward movement of the peak of streamwise rms velocity fluctuations typical of adverse pressure gradient wall-bounded turbulent flows.

  3. Energy flow analysis of coupled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Phillip Eung-Ho

    1993-01-01

    Energy flow analysis (EFA) is an analytical tool for prediction of the frequency-averaged vibrational response of built-up structures at high audible frequencies. The procedure is based on two developments; firstly, the derivation of the partial differential equations that govern the propagation of energy-related quantities in simple structural elements such as rods, beams, plates, and acoustic cavities; secondly, the derivation of coupling relationships in terms of energy-related quantities that describe the transfer of energy for various joints (e.g., beam-to-beam, plate-to-plate, and structure-to acoustic field couplings). In this investigation, EFA is used to predict the vibrational response of various coupled structures. In the process of predicting the vibrational response of the coupled structures, the energy flow coupling relationships at the joints of these structures are derived. In addition, the finite element formulation of the governing energy equations are developed. Because the energy density is discontinuous at the joint, a special global assembly procedure is developed to assemble the finite element matrix equations into global matrix equations. The global matrix assembly procedure is predicated on the development of joint element matrix equations using energy flow coupling relationships for various structural joints. The results predicted by EFA for a frame structure with a three-dimensional joint, where four wave types propagate in the structure, are shown to be a reasonable approximation of the frequency-averaged 'exact' energetics, which are computed from classical displacement solutions. The accuracy of the results predicted by EFA increased with high mode count and modal overlap factor or high non-dimensional wavenumber band and non-dimensional damped wavenumber band in the frequency band of interest. An experimental investigation of vibrational response of a light truck frame structure was performed to verify the results of EFA when applied

  4. Flow structure in submarine meandering channels, a continuous discussion on secondary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, J. D.; Parker, G.; Sequeiros, O.; Spinewine, B.; Garcia, M. H.; Pirmez, C.

    2011-12-01

    The understanding of the flow structure in deep-sea turbidity currents is important for the formation of submarine meandering channels. Similarly to the case of subaerial channels, several types of secondary flows include turbulence-, curvature- and bed morphodynamic-driven flow structures that modulate sediment transport and channel bed morphodynamics. This study focuses on [1] a review of long-time research effort (Abad et al., 2011) that tackles the description of the secondary flow associated with a subaqueous bottom current (saline) in a high-curvature meandering channel and [2] ongoing numerical simulations of similar settings as the experiments to describe the entire flow structure. In the case of subaerial channels, the classical Rozovskiian paradigm is often invoked which indicates that the near-bottom secondary flow in a bend is directed inward. It has recently been suggested based on experimental and theoretical considerations, however, that this pattern is reversed (near-bottom secondary flow is directed outward) in the case of submarine meandering channels. Experimental results presented here, on the other hand, indicate near-bottom secondary flows that have the same direction as observed in a river (normal secondary flow). The implication is an apparent contradiction between experimental results. This study combines theory, experiments, reconstructions of field flows and ongoing simulations to resolve this apparent contradiction based on the flow densimetric Froude number. Three ranges of densimetric Froude number are found, such that a) in an upper regime, secondary flow is reversed, b) in a middle regime, it is normal and c) in a lower regime, it is reversed. These results are applied to field scale channel-forming turbidity currents in the Amazon submarine canyon-fan system (Amazon Channel) and the Monterey canyon and a saline underflow in the Black Sea flowing from the Bosphorus. Our analysis indicates that secondary flow should be normal

  5. Does stream flow structure woody riparian vegetation in subtropical catchments?

    PubMed

    James, Cassandra S; Mackay, Stephen J; Arthington, Angela H; Capon, Samantha J; Barnes, Anna; Pearson, Ben

    2016-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to test the relevance of hydrological classification and class differences to the characteristics of woody riparian vegetation in a subtropical landscape in Queensland, Australia. We followed classification procedures of the environmental flow framework ELOHA - Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration. Riparian surveys at 44 sites distributed across five flow classes recorded 191 woody riparian species and 15, 500 individuals. There were differences among flow classes for riparian species richness, total abundance, and abundance of regenerating native trees and shrubs. There were also significant class differences in the occurrence of three common tree species, and 21 indicator species (mostly native taxa) further distinguished the vegetation characteristics of each flow class. We investigated the influence of key drivers of riparian vegetation structure (climate, depth to water table, stream-specific power, substrate type, degree of hydrologic alteration, and land use) on riparian vegetation. Patterns were explained largely by climate, particularly annual rainfall and temperature. Strong covarying drivers (hydrology and climate) prevented us from isolating the independent influences of these drivers on riparian assemblage structure. The prevalence of species considered typically rheophytic in some flow classes implies a more substantial role for flow in these classes but needs further testing. No relationships were found between land use and riparian vegetation composition and structure. This study demonstrates the relevance of flow classification to the structure of riparian vegetation in a subtropical landscape, and the influence of covarying drivers on riparian patterns. Management of environmental flows to influence riparian vegetation assemblages would likely have most potential in sites dominated by rheophytic species where hydrological influences override other controls. In contrast, where vegetation assemblages are

  6. Secondary flow structures in large rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, H.; Devauchelle, O.; Metivier, F.; Limare, A.; Lajeunesse, E.

    2012-04-01

    Measuring the velocity field in large rivers remains a challenge, even with recent measurement techniques such as Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). Indeed, due to the diverging angle between its ultrasonic beams, an ADCP cannot detect small-scale flow structures. However, when the measurements are limited to a single location for a sufficient period of time, averaging can reveal large, stationary flow structures. Here we present velocity measurements in a straight reach of the Seine river in Paris, France, where the cross-section is close to rectangular. The transverse modulation of the streamwise velocity indicates secondary flow cells, which seem to occupy the entire width of the river. This observation is reminiscent of the longitudinal vortices observed in laboratory experiments (e.g. Blanckaert et al., Advances in Water Resources, 2010, 33, 1062-1074). Although the physical origin of these secondary structures remains unclear, their measured velocity is sufficient to significantly impact the distribution of streamwise momentum. We propose a model for the transverse profile of the depth-averaged velocity based on a crude representation of the longitudinal vortices, with a single free parameter. Preliminary results are in good agreement with field measurements. This model also provides an estimate for the bank shear stress, which controls bank erosion.

  7. Blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-05-01

    Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Volumetric blood flow velocity was supporting on constant level (1 ml/h). Silicone tube of diameter comparable with coronary arteries diameter was used as vessel model. Cell-cell interactions were studied under glucose and anticoagulants influence. Increased adhesiveness of blood cells to tube walls was revealed in patient with coronary heart disease (CHD) compare to practically healthy persons (PHP). In patients with stable angina pectoris of high functional class and patients with AMI shear stress resistant erythrocyte aggregates were predominating in blood flow structure up to microclots formation. Clotting and erythrocytes aggregation increase as response to glucose solution injection, sharply defined in patients with CHD. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with CHD and PHP. After compare our results with other author's data we can consider that method used in our study is sensible enough to investigate blood flow structure violations in patients with CHD and PHP. Several differences of cell-cell interaction in flow under glucose and anticoagulant influence were found out in patients with CHD and PHP.

  8. Application of the ultrasonic technique and high-speed filming for the study of the structure of air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, R.D.M.; Venturini, O.J.; Tanahashi, E.I.; Neves, F. Jr.; Franca, F.A.

    2009-10-15

    Multiphase flows are very common in industry, oftentimes involving very harsh environments and fluids. Accordingly, there is a need to determine the dispersed phase holdup using noninvasive fast responding techniques; besides, knowledge of the flow structure is essential for the assessment of the transport processes involved. The ultrasonic technique fulfills these requirements and could have the capability to provide the information required. In this paper, the potential of the ultrasonic technique for application to two-phase flows was investigated by checking acoustic attenuation data against experimental data on the void fraction and flow topology of vertical, upward, air-water bubbly flows in the zero to 15% void fraction range. The ultrasonic apparatus consisted of one emitter/receiver transducer and three other receivers at different positions along the pipe circumference; simultaneous high-speed motion pictures of the flow patterns were made at 250 and 1000 fps. The attenuation data for all sensors exhibited a systematic interrelated behavior with void fraction, thereby testifying to the capability of the ultrasonic technique to measure the dispersed phase holdup. From the motion pictures, basic gas phase structures and different flows patterns were identified that corroborated several features of the acoustic attenuation data. Finally, the acoustic wave transit time was also investigated as a function of void fraction. (author)

  9. Coherent structures in 3D viscous time-periodic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znaien, J. G.; Speetjens, M. F. M.; Trieling, R. R.; Clercx, H. J. H.

    2010-11-01

    Periodically driven laminar flows occur in many industrial processes from food-mixing devices to micro-mixer in lab-on-a-chip systems. The present study is motivated by better understanding fundamental transport phenomena in three-dimensional viscous time-periodic flows. Both numerical simulation and three-dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry measurements are performed to investigate the 3D advection of a passive scalar in a lid-driven cylindrical cavity flow. The flow is forced by a time-periodic in-plane motion of one endwall via a given forcing protocol. We concentrate on the formation and interaction of coherent structures due to fluid inertia, which play an important role in 3D mixing by geometrically determining the tracer transport. The disintegration of these structures by fluid inertia reflects an essentially 3D route to chaos. Data from tracking experiments of small particles will be compared with predictions from numerical simulations on transport of passive tracers.

  10. Visualization study of flow in axial flow inducer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.

    1972-01-01

    A visualization study of the flow through a three ft dia model of a four bladed inducer, which is operated in air at a flow coefficient of 0.065, is reported in this paper. The flow near the blade surfaces, inside the rotating passages, downstream and upstream of the inducer is visualized by means of smoke, tufts, ammonia filament, and lampblack techniques. Flow is found to be highly three dimensional, with appreciable radial velocity throughout the entire passage. The secondary flows observed near the hub and annulus walls agree with qualitative predictions obtained from the inviscid secondary flow theory.

  11. Flow Structure Associated with Hemodialysis Catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foust, Jason

    2005-11-01

    Insertion of a hemodialysis catheter into the superior vena cava (SVC) gives rise to complex flow patterns, which arise from the simultaneous injection and extraction of blood through different holes (ports) of the catheter. Techniques of high-image-density particle image velocimetry are employed in a scaled-up water facility. This approach allows characterization of both the instantaneous and time-averaged flow structure due to generic classes of side hole geometries. The trajectory of the injection jet is related to the ratio of the initial jet velocity to the mainstream velocity through the SVC, and to the type of distortion of the jet cross-section. Furthermore, the mean and fluctuating velocity and vorticity fields are determined. Significant turbulent stresses develop rapidly in the injection jet, which can impinge upon the wall of the simulated SVC. Immediately downstream of the injection hole, a recirculation cell of low velocity exists adjacent to the catheter surface. These and other representations of the flow structure are first evaluated for a steady throughflow, then for the case of a pulsatile waveform in the SVC, which matches that of a normal adult.

  12. Flow structure in front of the broad-crested weir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachoval, Zbyněk; Roušar, Ladislav

    2015-05-01

    The paper deals with research focused on description of flow structure in front of broad-crested weir. Based on experimental measurement, the flow structure in front of the weir (the recirculation zone of flow and tornado vortices) and flow structure on the weir crest has been described. The determined flow character has been simulated using numerical model and based on comparing results the suitable model of turbulence has been recommended.

  13. Structures in Transitional Taylor-Couette Flows Identified using POD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabani, Stavroula; Imomoh, Eboshogwe; Dusting, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    The flow in the gap between concentric cylinders, or Taylor-Couette flow, has been used to study transition to turbulence for decades, and is also utilised for various biotechnological and industrial processes. Transitional flow states depend highly on vessel geometry; they are also three-dimensional and often time dependent limiting the use of experimental techniques for their characterisation. In this talk the transition to turbulence in a Taylor-Couette flow is studied by means of time resolved PIV velocity fields and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). It is found that for the particular geometry studied the transition to turbulence occurs via a quasi periodic regime characterised by a fast moving azimuthal wave (FMAW). Aspects of the FMAW structure, such as a series of co-rotating vortices that increase in strength away from the endwalls, are also revealed by spatially resolved POD.

  14. Flow dynamics of bank-attached instream structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seokkoo

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations and experiments for flow past a bank-attached vane, a widely-used instream structure for stream restoration, are carried out to study the turbulent flow dynamics occurring around the structure. In the numerical simulation, the details of the natural rocks that constitute the vane are directly resolved by employing the recently developed computational fluid dynamics model of Kang et al. (2011). The time-averaged flowfield is shown to be in good agreement with the results of laboratory measurements. Analysis of the simulated flow shows that there exist two counter-rotating secondary flows cells downstream of the vane, one of which is located near the center of the channel and the other is located near the corner between the channel bed and the sidewall to which the vane is attached. The formation of the two counter-rotating secondary flow cells is shown to be linked to the plunging of the mean three-dimensional streamlines originating upstream of the vane onto a point downstream of the vane positioned on the lower part of the sidewall. The laboratory experiment also reveals the existence of such flow structures.

  15. Flow Structures in a Healthy and Plaqued Artificial Artery using Fully Index Matched Vascular Flow Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Jain, Akash; Sheng, Jian

    2014-11-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry measurements are made in a closed loop fully index matched flow facility to study the flow structures and flow wall interactions in healthy and diseased model arteries. The test section is 0.63 m long and the facility is capable of emulating both steady and pulsatile flows under physiologically relevant conditions. The model arteries are in-house developed compliant polymer (PDMS) tubes with 1 cm diameter and 1 mm wall thickness. The Reynolds numbers of flows vary up to 20,000. The plaque is simulated by introducing a radially asymmetric bump that can be varied in shape, size and compliancy. The overall compliancy of the model can be also controlled by varying ratio between the elastomer and the curing agent. The tubes are doped with particles allowing the simultaneous measurements of wall deformation and flows over it. The working fluid in the facility is NaI and is refractive index matched to the PDMS model. This allows flow measurement very close to the wall and measurement of wall shear stress. The aim of this study is to characterize the changes in flow as the compliancy and geometry of blood vessels change due to age or disease. These differences can be used to develop a diagnostic tool to detect early onset of vascular diseases.

  16. Large-scale structures in turbulent Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jae Hwa

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of fully developed turbulent Couette flow is performed with a large computational domain in the streamwise and spanwise directions (40 πh and 6 πh) to investigate streamwise-scale growth mechanism of the streamwise velocity fluctuating structures in the core region, where h is the channel half height. It is shown that long streamwise-scale structures (> 3 h) are highly energetic and they contribute to more than 80% of the turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds shear stress, compared to previous studies in canonical Poiseuille flows. Instantaneous and statistical analysis show that negative-u' structures on the bottom wall in the Couette flow continuously grow in the streamwise direction due to mean shear, and they penetrate to the opposite moving wall. The geometric center of the log layer is observed in the centerline with a dominant outer peak in streamwise spectrum, and the maximum streamwise extent for structure is found in the centerline, similar to previous observation in turbulent Poiseuille flows at high Reynolds number. Further inspection of time-evolving instantaneous fields clearly exhibits that adjacent long structures combine to form a longer structure in the centerline. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2014R1A1A2057031).

  17. A beam-membrane structure micromachined differential pressure flow sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Zhao, Y. L.; Tian, B. Li, C.; Li, Y. Y.

    2015-04-15

    A beam-membrane structure micromachined flow sensor is designed, depending on the principle of differential pressure caused by the mass flow, which is directly proportional to the square flow rate. The FSI (fluid structure interaction) characteristics of the differential pressure flow sensor are investigated via numerical analysis and analog simulation. The working mechanism of the flow sensor is analyzed depending on the FSI results. Then, the flow sensor is fabricated and calibrated. The calibration results show that the beam-membrane structure differential pressure flow sensor achieves ideal static characteristics and works well in the practical applications.

  18. Debris flow study in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrin Jaafar, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    The phenomenon of debris flow occurs in Malaysia occasionally. The topography of Peningsular Malysia is characterized by the central mountain ranges running from south to north. Several parts of hilly areas with steep slopes, combined with high saturation of soil strata that deliberately increase the pore water pressure underneath the hill slope. As a tropical country Malaysia has very high intensity rainfall which is triggered the landslide. In the study area where the debris flow are bound to occur, there are a few factors that contribute to this phenomenon such as high rainfall intensity, very steep slope which an inclination more than 35 degree and sandy clay soil type which is easily change to liquidity soil. This paper will discuss the study of rainfall, mechanism, modeling and design of mitigation measure to avoid repeated failure in future in same area.

  19. Studies of fluid instabilities in flows of lava and debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan H.

    1987-01-01

    At least two instabilities have been identified and utilized in lava flow studies: surface folding and gravity instability. Both lead to the development of regularly spaced structures on the surfaces of lava flows. The geometry of surface folds have been used to estimate the rheology of lava flows on other planets. One investigation's analysis assumed that lava flows have a temperature-dependent Newtonian rheology, and that the lava's viscosity decreased exponentially inward from the upper surface. The author reviews studies by other investigators on the analysis of surface folding, the analysis of Taylor instability in lava flows, and the effect of surface folding on debris flows.

  20. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S.; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H.

    1997-08-01

    Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

  1. Pulsatile Flow Studies in Atherosclerotic Carotid Bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale-Glickman, Jocelyn; Selby, Kathy; Saloner, David; Savas, Omer

    2001-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry and flow visualization techniques are used to study flows in models of atherosclerotic carotid bifurcations. The flow models exactly replicate the interior geometry of plaque excised from patients. The input flows are physiological wave forms derived from Doppler Ultrasound scans done on patients before surgery. The systolic and diastolic Reynolds numbers are 300 and 900. The complex internal geometry of the diseased artery combined with the pulsatile input flow results in exceedingly complex flow patterns. These flow patterns include internal jets, three-dimensional shear layers, stagnation lines, and multiple recirculation and separation regions. The physiological input flows are compared to flows when the wave form is sinusoidal.

  2. Characterization of flow-induced structures in carbon nanotube suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalkhal, Fatemeh

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are fibre-like nano-particles with many different applications. Due to their high specific surface area, high electric current density, thermal stability and excellent mechanical properties, they are used to reinforce physical properties of polymer matrices. The macroscopic properties of suspensions are inherited from their properties at micron and sub-micron scales. The suspensions structure can be easily influenced by many parameters such as the extent of external shear forces, the suspension concentration, temperature, the particles specifications, etc. This makes the study of the suspension structure a very challenging task and has been the subject of interest to many researchers. In this thesis, the structure of a model carbon nanotube suspension dispersed in an epoxy is studied by employing a set of rheological methods, scaling and fractal theories and a structural thixotropic model. The effect of flow history on linear viscoelastic properties of suspensions and the evolution of structure upon cessation of shear flow has been studied over a wide range of pre-shearing rates, concentration and temperature. The results of these analyses are as follows. The effect of flow history is more pronounced on the suspensions structure in dilute and semi-dilute concentration regimes. By pre-shearing at low rates, more inter-particle entanglements were induced, which resulted in reduction of rheological percolation thresholds. After cessation of shear flow, for dilute and semi-dilute suspensions, the formed metastable structures were distinguishable by different storage moduli, which were inversely related to the rate of pre-shearing. However, for the concentrated suspensions, the formed metastable structures had an approximately equal storage modulus regardless of the rate of the applied pre-shearing. It was shown that the rate of formation of these metastable structures was enhanced by increasing concentration. Furthermore, the rate of structure

  3. Dependence of advection-diffusion-reaction on flow coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenbo; Luna, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    A study on an advection-diffusion-reaction system is presented. Variability of the reaction process in such a system triggered by a highly localized source is quantified. It is found, for geophysically motivated parameter regimes, that the difference in bulk concentration subject to realizations of different source locations is highly correlated with the local flow topology of the source. Such flow topologies can be highlighted by Lagrangian coherent structures. Reaction is relatively enhanced in regions of strong stretching, and relatively suppressed in regions where vortices are present. In any case, the presence of a divergence-free background flow helps speed up the reaction process, especially when the flow is time-dependent. Probability density of various quantities characterizing the reaction processes is also obtained. This reveals the inherent complexity of the reaction-diffusion process subject to nonlinear background stirring.

  4. Flow Structure and Turbulence in Wind Farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard J. A. M.; Meneveau, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Similar to other renewable energy sources, wind energy is characterized by a low power density. Hence, for wind energy to make considerable contributions to the world's overall energy supply, large wind farms (on- and offshore) consisting of arrays of ever larger wind turbines are being envisioned and built. From a fluid mechanics perspective, wind farms encompass turbulent flow phenomena occurring at many spatial and temporal scales. Of particular interest to understanding mean power extraction and fluctuations in wind farms are the scales ranging from 1 to 10 m that comprise the wakes behind individual wind turbines, to motions reaching 100 m to kilometers in scale, inherently associated with the atmospheric boundary layer. In this review, we summarize current understanding of these flow phenomena (particularly mean and second-order statistics) through field studies, wind tunnel experiments, large-eddy simulations, and analytical modeling, emphasizing the most relevant features for wind farm design and operation.

  5. Flow structure in self-sustaining and intermittently turbulent reciprocating channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadi, Alireza; White, Christopher; Dubief, Yves; UVM Team; UNH Team

    2016-11-01

    The leading order terms in the Reynolds-averaged momentum equation are studied to better understand the underlying mechanism of transition to turbulence in reciprocating channel flow. The balance of the leading order terms confirms that fully-developed turbulence first emerges at the early phases in the decelerating portion of the cycle. The underlying mechanism of this transition appears to be the emergence of an internal layer that first develops during the late phases of the accelerating portion of the cycle. In the absence of this internal layer, the flow remains transitional over the entire cycle. The turbulent structure associated with the internal layer is investigated using different flow structure identification schemes. In particular, the Q-R criteria and the triple decomposition of the strain rate tensor.

  6. A Structured-Grid Quality Measure for Simulated Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    A structured-grid quality measure is proposed, combining three traditional measurements: intersection angles, stretching, and curvature. Quality assesses whether the grid generated provides the best possible tradeoffs in grid stretching and skewness that enable accurate flow predictions, whereas the grid density is assumed to be a constraint imposed by the available computational resources and the desired resolution of the flow field. The usefulness of this quality measure is assessed by comparing heat transfer predictions from grid convergence studies for grids of varying quality in the range of [0.6-0.8] on an 8'half-angle sphere-cone, at laminar, perfect gas, Mach 10 wind tunnel conditions.

  7. Topological structures in the Husimi flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronez, M.; de Aguiar, M. A. M.

    2016-02-01

    We study the topological properties of the quantum phase space current in the Husimi representation, focusing on the dynamical differences, induced by these properties, between the quantum and the classical flows. We show that the zeros of the Husimi function are stagnation points of the current and have a nonzero topological charge. Due to overall charge conservation, new stagnation points with opposite charge appear in pairs in the Husimi current and they have important roles in dynamical processes. As an example we show the topological effect of the zeros in the transmission rate of a particle through a potential barrier.

  8. Analysis and representation of complex structures in separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    We discuss our recent work on extraction and visualization of topological information in separated fluid flow data sets. As with scene analysis, an abstract representation of a large data set can greatly facilitate the understanding of complex, high-level structures. When studying flow topology, such a representation can be produced by locating and characterizing critical points in the velocity field and generating the associated stream surfaces. In 3D flows, the surface topology serves as the starting point. The 2D tangential velocity field near the surface of the body is examined for critical points. The tangential velocity field is integrated out along the principal directions of certain classes of critical points to produce curves depicting the topology of the flow near the body. The points and curves are linked to form a skeleton representing the 2D vector field topology. This skeleton provides a basis for analyzing the 3D structures associated with the flow separation. The points along the separation curves in the skeleton are used to start tangent curve integrations. Integration origins are successively refined to produce stream surfaces. The map of the global topology is completed by generating those stream surfaces associated with 3D critical points.

  9. Dynamical structure of magnetized dissipative accretion flow around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Biplob; Das, Santabrata

    2016-09-01

    We study the global structure of optically thin, advection dominated, magnetized accretion flow around black holes. We consider the magnetic field to be turbulent in nature and dominated by the toroidal component. With this, we obtain the complete set of accretion solutions for dissipative flows where bremsstrahlung process is regarded as the dominant cooling mechanism. We show that rotating magnetized accretion flow experiences virtual barrier around black hole due to centrifugal repulsion that can trigger the discontinuous transition of the flow variables in the form of shock waves. We examine the properties of the shock waves and find that the dynamics of the post-shock corona (PSC) is controlled by the flow parameters, namely viscosity, cooling rate and strength of the magnetic field, respectively. We separate the effective region of the parameter space for standing shock and observe that shock can form for wide range of flow parameters. We obtain the critical viscosity parameter that allows global accretion solutions including shocks. We estimate the energy dissipation at the PSC from where a part of the accreting matter can deflect as outflows and jets. We compare the maximum energy that could be extracted from the PSC and the observed radio luminosity values for several supermassive black hole sources and the observational implications of our present analysis are discussed.

  10. Irregular changes in the structure of flowing blood at low flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Pribush, Alexander; Meiselman, Herbert J; Meyerstein, Dan; Meyerstein, Naomi

    2009-12-01

    The structural organization of the dispersed phase of blood was studied by measuring the conductance (G) and the capacitance (C) of red blood cell (RBC) suspensions flowing in a vertical channel. Steady-state C and G signals exhibit erratic fluctuations around mean values; the root mean square of the fluctuating signals decreases rapidly as the average flow rate () increases from 0.21 to ~4.17 mm/s and then less rapidly at higher velocities. The intensity of oscillations is substantially reduced for suspensions with weaker aggregating media. Analysis of the fluctuations performed in the framework of the equivalent electrical circuits for flowing blood gives rise to the following conclusions: (1) Instantaneous hematocrit (Hct) and velocity cross-stream profiles are non-smooth functions of radial position. (2) Oscillations of conductance at low flow conditions reflect irregular changes in the RBC network structure caused by fluctuations of aggregation-disaggregation equilibrium in the non-uniform shear field. (3) A transformation of the rheological behavior of RBC suspensions from shear-thinning to shear-thickening in a low flow regime amplifies fluctuations of aggregation-disaggregation equilibrium.

  11. Investigation on Flow Structures of Supersonic Isolator Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Chen; Yi, Shihe; Yu, Wu; Zhu, Yangzhu

    Hypersonic vehicle of air breathing high speed flight employs a dual-mode engine that can perform scramjet and ramjet propulsion. Lots of researches have been done to gain more understanding of complex flow fields in such engines, since it was first proposed in 1963 [1].

  12. Vortex-dominated flow with viscous core structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Krause, E.; Ting, L.

    1985-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies of vortex-dominated flows are reviewed with special emphasis on those for which the viscous core structures play an important role. The problems to be described are: The interaction and merging of two-dimensional vortices and of curved vortex filaments, the roll-up and decay of trailing far wakes, and the initiation of vortex breakdown. The analysis utilizes finite-difference solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations complemented by asymptotic expansion techniques.

  13. Experimental investigation of flow-structure interaction between a model biofilm streamer and water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemifar, Farzan; Blois, Gianluca; Sinha, Sumit; Hardy, Richard; Best, James; Sambrook Smith, Gregory; Christensen, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Biofilms are permeable and deformable material whose bulk structure is composed of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) that houses bacterial colonies. The EPS is responsible for the mechanical properties of the biofilm. In this study we investigate the fluid-structure interaction between a model biofilm streamer and water flow in a closed-loop water channel in the laminar and transitional flow regimes, using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The model streamer is fabricated from acrylamide polymer hydrogel. The purpose for using this material is twofold: 1) its mechanical properties (i.e. elastic modulus) can be tuned by controlling its chemical composition, 2) the hydrogel is transparent with a refractive index (RI) very close to that of water, thus minimizing the optical distortions for flow visualization. The velocity vector fields obtained from PIV measurements are used to investigate the temporal evolution of the flow structure in the vicinity of the streamer, focusing on the vortex shedding mechanism and the resulting oscillations of the streamer.

  14. Flow visualization of turbulent boundary layer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, M. R.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    1980-01-01

    The results from flow visualization experiments performed using an argon-ion laser to illuminate longitudinal and transverse sections of the smoke filled boundary layer in zero pressure gradient are discussed. Most of the experiments were confined to the range 600 Re sub theta 10,000. Results indicate that the boundary layer consists almost exclusively of vortex loops or hairpins, some of which may extend through the complete boundary layer thickness and all of which are inclined at a more or less constant characteristic angle of approximately 45 deg to the wall. Since the cross-stream dimensions of the hairpins appear to scale roughly with the wall variables U sub tau and nu, while their length is limited only by the boundary layer thickness, there are very large scale effects on the turbulence structure. At high Reynolds numbers (Re sub theta = 10,000) there is little evidence of large-scale coherent motions, other than a slow overturning of random agglomerations of the hairpins just mentioned.

  15. Structural evolution of Colloidal Gels under Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao; Jamali, Safa

    Colloidal suspensions are ubiquitous in different industrial applications ranging from cosmetic and food industries to soft robotics and aerospace. Owing to the fact that mechanical properties of colloidal gels are controlled by its microstructure and network topology, we trace the particles in the networks formed under different attraction potentials and try to find a universal behavior in yielding of colloidal gels. Many authors have implemented different simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and Brownian dynamics (BD) to capture better picture during phase separation and yielding mechanism in colloidal system with short-ranged attractive force. However, BD neglects multi-body hydrodynamic interactions (HI) which are believed to be responsible for the second yielding of colloidal gels. We envision using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) with modified depletion potential and hydrodynamic interactions, as a coarse-grain model, can provide a robust simulation package to address the gel formation process and yielding in short ranged-attractive colloidal systems. The behavior of colloidal gels with different attraction potentials under flow is examined and structural fingerprints of yielding in these systems will be discussed.

  16. FLOWS AND WAVES IN BRAIDED SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, V.; Datta, A.; Banerjee, D.

    2015-03-01

    We study the high frequency dynamics in the braided magnetic structure of an active region (AR 11520) moss as observed by the High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C). We detect quasi-periodic flows and waves in these structures. We search for high frequency dynamics while looking at power maps of the observed region. We find that shorter periodicities (30–60 s) are associated with small spatial scales which can be resolved by Hi-C only. We detect quasi-periodic flows with a wide range of velocities, from 13–185 km s{sup −1}, associated with braided regions. This can be interpreted as plasma outflows from reconnection sites. We also find short period and large amplitude transverse oscillations associated with the braided magnetic region. Such oscillations could be triggered by reconnection or such oscillations may trigger reconnection.

  17. Development of laminar flow control wing surface porous structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M.; Pearce, W.; Anderson, C.; Thelander, J.; Boronow, W.; Gallimore, F.; Brown, W.; Matsuo, T.; Christensen, J.; Primavera, G.

    1984-01-01

    It was concluded that the chordwise air collection method, which actually combines chordwise and spanwise air collection, is the best of the designs conceived up to this time for full chord laminar flow control (LFC). Its shallower ducting improved structural efficiency of the main wing box resulting in a reduction in wing weight, and it provided continuous support of the chordwise panel joints, better matching of suction and clearing airflow requirements, and simplified duct to suction source minifolding. Laminar flow control on both the upper and lower surfaces was previously reduced to LFC suction on the upper surface only, back to 85 percent chord. The study concludes that, in addition to reduced wing area and other practical advantages, this system would be lighter because of the increase in effective structural wing thickness.

  18. Optical Flow Structure Effects in Children’s Postural Control

    PubMed Central

    Barela, José A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of distance and optic flow structure on visual information and body sway coupling in children and young adults. Thirty children (from 4 to 12 years of age) and 10 young adults stood upright inside of a moving room oscillating at 0.2 Hz, at 0.25 and 1.5 m from the front wall, and under three optical flow conditions (global, central, and peripheral). Effect of distance and optic flow structure on the coupling of visual information and body sway is age-dependent, with 4-year-olds being more affected at 0.25 m distance than older children and adults are. No such difference was observed at 1.5 m from the front wall. Moreover, 4-year-olds’ sway was larger and displayed higher variability. These results suggest that despite being able to accommodate change resulting from varying optic flow conditions, young children have difficulty in dodging stronger visual stimuli. Lastly, difference in sway performance may be due to immature inter-modality sensory reweighting. PMID:27352305

  19. Embrittlement and Flow Localization in Reactor Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xianglin Wu; Xiao Pan; James Stubbins

    2006-10-06

    Many reactor components and structural members are made from metal alloys due, in large part, to their strength and ability to resist brittle fracture by plastic deformation. However, brittle fracture can occur when structural material cannot undergo extensive, or even limited, plastic deformation due to irradiation exposure. Certain irradiation conditions lead to the development of a damage microstructure where plastic flow is limited to very small volumes or regions of material, as opposed to the general plastic flow in unexposed materials. This process is referred to as flow localization or plastic instability. The true stress at the onset of necking is a constant regardless of the irradiation level. It is called 'critical stress' and this critical stress has strong temperature dependence. Interrupted tensile testes of 316L SS have been performed to investigate the microstructure evolution and competing mechanism between mechanic twinning and planar slip which are believed to be the controlling mechanism for flow localization. Deformation twinning is the major contribution of strain hardening and good ductility for low temperatures, and the activation of twinning system is determined by the critical twinning stress. Phases transform and texture analyses are also discussed in this study. Finite element analysis is carried out to complement the microstructural analysis and for the prediction of materaials performance with and without stress concentration and irradiation.

  20. Pulsatile Flow Studies in Atherosclerotic Carotid Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale-Glickman, Jocelyn; Selby, Kathy; Saloner, David; Savas, Omer

    2002-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry and flow visualization techniques are used to study flow in models of atherosclerotic carotid bifurcations. The models exactly replicate the interior geometry of plaque excised from patients. The input flow is a physiological waveform derived from Doppler Ultrasound scans done on the patients before surgery. The systolic and diastolic Reynolds numbers are 200 and 900 respectively. The complex internal geometry of the diseased artery combined with the pulsatile input flows give exceedingly complex flow patterns. These flow patterns include internal jets, three-dimensional shear layers, stagnation lines, and multiple recirculation and separation regions. Ensemble averaged and instantaneous flow fields are compared. Wall shear stresses at the stenoses are estimated to be on the order of 10 PA. The physiological input flows are also compared to flows when the waveform is sinusoidal.

  1. Vascular structure determines pulmonary blood flow distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlastala, M. P.; Glenny, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    Scientific knowledge develops through the evolution of new concepts. This process is usually driven by new methodologies that provide observations not previously available. Understanding of pulmonary blood flow determinants advanced significantly in the 1960s and is now changing rapidly again, because of increased spatial resolution of regional pulmonary blood flow measurements.

  2. Studies of two phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Larry C.

    1994-01-01

    The development of instrumentation for the support of research in two-phase flow in simulated microgravity conditions was performed. The funds were expended in the development of a technique for characterizing the motion and size distribution of small liquid droplets dispersed in a flowing gas. Phenomena like this occur in both microgravity and normal earth gravity situations inside of conduits that are carrying liquid-vapor mixtures at high flow rates. Some effort to develop a conductance probe for the measurement of liquid film thickness was also expended.

  3. Control of Low Reynolds Number Flows with Fluid Structure Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-02

    2010, pp. 539- 544. [55] Yilmaz, T.O., and Rockwell, D., "Flow Structure on Finite-Span Wings Due to Pitch - up Motion," Journal of Fluid...flows with large separated regions are also typical for flapping - wing MAVs. Leading-edge vortices are known to enhance lift in unsteady aerodynamics...effective for delta wings [6]; 2) instability of the separation bubble [7]; and 3) wake instability [8,9]. Flow control research on separated flows

  4. Nematic Liquids in Weak Capillary Poiseuille Flow: Structure Scaling Laws and Effective Conductivity Implications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Poiseuille flow . These studies complement our earlier drag-driven structure simulations and analyses. We use the mesoscopic Doi-Marrucci-Greco model...pressure-driven, capillary Poiseuille flow . These studies complement our earlier drag-driven structure simulations and analyses. We use the mesoscopic Doi... Simulations of liquid crystals in Poiseuille flow ,” Computational and Theoretical Polymer Science 11, 389-395 (2001). [10] Doi, M., Edwards, S.F., The Theory of

  5. Proteins at flowing interfaces: From understanding structure to treating disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Young, James; Hirsa, Amir

    2012-11-01

    The field of soft matter offers vast opportunities for scientific and technological developments, with many challenges that need to be addressed by various disciplines. Fluid dynamics has a tremendous potential for greater impact, from broadening fundamental understanding to treating disease. Here we demonstrate the use of fluid dynamics in two biotechnology problems involving proteins at the air/water interface: a) 2-Dimensional protein crystallization and b) amyloid fibril formation. Protein crystallization is usually the most challenging step in X-ray diffraction analysis of protein structure. Recently it was demonstrated that flow can induce 2-D protein crystallization at conditions under which quiescent systems do not form crystals. A different form of protein structuring, namely amyloid fibrillization, is also of interest due to its association with several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein denaturation, which is the root of the fibrillization process, is also a significant concern in biotherapeutics production. Both problems are studied by using shearing free-surface flows in simple geometries. The common finding is that flow can significantly enhance the growth of protein structures.

  6. Analysis of high speed flow, thermal and structural interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.

    1994-01-01

    Research for this grant focused on the following tasks: (1) the prediction of severe, localized aerodynamic heating for complex, high speed flows; (2) finite element adaptive refinement methodology for multi-disciplinary analyses; (3) the prediction of thermoviscoplastic structural response with rate-dependent effects and large deformations; (4) thermoviscoplastic constitutive models for metals; and (5) coolant flow/structural heat transfer analyses.

  7. Unsteady Flow Structure on Low Aspect Ratio Wings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-06

    4 EFFECT OF PITCH RATE ON NEAR-SURFACE TOPOLOGY ON A DELTA WING The near-surface flow structure and topology on a delta wing of...34Investigation of Flow Structure on a Pitching Delta Wing of Moderate Sweep Angle using Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry", October, 2008. * All...for inducement of flow reattachment, were in the range fC/U = 1 to 2. The present configuration is a substantial departure from a flat delta wing

  8. Velocity dependence of biphasic flow structuration: steady-state and oscillating flow effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tore Tallakstad, Ken; Jankov, Mihailo; Løvoll, Grunde; Toussaint, Renaud; Jørgen Mâløy, Knut; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Schäfer, Gerhard; Méheust, Yves; Arendt Knudsen, Henning

    2010-05-01

    We study various types of biphasic flows in quasi-two-dimensional transparent porous models. These flows imply a viscous wetting fluid, and a lowly viscous one. The models are transparent, allowing the displacement process and structure to be monitored in space and time. Three different aspects will be presented: 1. In stationary biphasic flows, we study the relationship between the macroscopic pressure drop (related to relative permeability) and the average flow rate, and how this arises from the cluster size distribution of the lowly viscous fluid [1]. 2. In drainage situations, we study how the geometry of the invader can be explained, and how it gives rise to apparent dynamic capillary effects. We show how these can be explained by viscous effects on evolving geometries of invading fluid [2]. 3. We study the impact of oscillating pressure fields superimposed to a background flow over the flow regimes patterns [3]. Steady-State Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media: Statistics and Transport Properties. First, in stationary flow with a control of the flux of both fluids, we show how the pressure drop depends on the flow rate. We will show that the dynamics is dominated by the interplay between a viscous pressure field from the wetting fluid and bubble transport of a less viscous, nonwetting phase. In contrast with more studied displacement front systems, steady-state flow is in equilibrium, statistically speaking. The corresponding theoretical simplicity allows us to explain a data collapse in the cluster size distribution of lowly viscous fluid in the system, as well as the relation |?P|∞√Ca--. This allows to explain so called relative permeability effects by the morphological changes of the cluster size distribution. Influence of viscous fingering on dynamic saturation-pressure curves in porous media. Next, we study drainage in such models, and investigate the relationship between the pressure field and the morphology of the invading fluid. This allows to model

  9. Structural analysis of flow-related textures in lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, John V.

    2002-05-01

    The textures of coherent volcanic rocks, including lavas and volcanic intrusives, commonly contain features that are attributed to flowage. Previous applications of structural analysis to volcanic rocks are expanded here to provide a framework for analysis. Textures, defined as the crystallinity, granularity and shapes and arrangements of the components (crystals, glass and voids) of a rock, together with structures, defined as individual features composed of the disposition, attitude, arrangement or relative positions of the components of a rock, are first described. Second, the spatial fabrics (shapes and arrangements of the components of a rock and the orientation of textures and structures) are identified. Third, textures, structures and fabrics are placed in the spatial and temporal geological context. Finally, detailed interpretations of the kinematics and rheology of structures and fabrics is made, leading to an integrated flow history of the rock. Illustrative case studies include rhyolite from the basal part of the Tertiary Minyon Falls dome, northeastern New South Wales, Australia, which has a texture comprising planar domains of differing crystal abundance (flow bands), multiple folds of these domains, relatively homogeneous crystal alignment parallel to the fold axes and microfolding of these domains in the zone of interaction between phenocrysts and matrix, including retrorotation of phenocrysts on short limbs of inequant folds. Trachyte dykes on Fraser Island, Queensland, Australia have a texture comprising crystal alignment, planar concentration domains (banding), two planar domains of crystal alignment interpreted to be conjugate shear zones. Phenocrysts influence the spacing and distribution of the domains and interacted with shear zones by undergoing small amounts of rotation. The shear zones overprinted a homogeneous crystal alignment during the last stage of flow before solidification as a result of dilatant granular interactions. Lava from

  10. Method for controlling coolant flow in airfoil, flow control structure and airfoil incorporating the same

    DOEpatents

    Itzel, Gary Michael; Devine, II, Robert Henry; Chopra, Sanjay; Toornman, Thomas Nelson

    2003-07-08

    A coolant flow control structure is provided to channel cooling media flow to the fillet region defined at the transition between the wall of a nozzle vane and a wall of a nozzle segment, for cooling the fillet region. In an exemplary embodiment, the flow control structure defines a gap with the fillet region to achieve the required heat transfer coefficients in this region to meet part life requirements.

  11. Magnetically driven flows in arched plasma structures.

    PubMed

    Stenson, E V; Bellan, P M

    2012-08-17

    Laboratory experiments demonstrate high-speed plasma flows from both footpoints of arched magnetic flux tubes, resulting in bulk plasma transport into the flux tube and persistent axial collimation even as the flux tube lengthens and kinks. The measured flows are in agreement with the predictions of hoop force and collimation models involving fundamental MHD forces. These forces are expected to drive plasma acceleration in other open flux configurations with arched geometries, such as those found on the solar surface.

  12. Structure of leading-edge vortex flows including vortex breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the structure of leading-edge vortex flows on thin sharp-edged delta wings was carried out at low Reynolds numbers. Flow-visualization techniques were used to study the topology of the vortex and the phenomenon of vortex breakdown. Seven-hole probe-wake surveys and laser-doppler-anemometer measurements were obtained and compared. Delta wings with sweep angles of 70, 75, 80, and 85/sup 0/ were tested at angles of attack of 10, 20, 30, and 40/sup 0/. The test were conducted in a Reynolds number range of 8.5 x 10/sup 4/ to 6.4 x 10/sup 5/. Smoke-flow visualization revealed the presence of small Kelvin-Helmholtz type vortical structures in the shear layer of a leading-edge vortex. These shear-layer vortices follow a helical path and grow in the streamwise direction as they wind into the vortex core where the individual shear layers merge. The phenomenon of vortex breakdown was studied using high-speed cinema photography. The bubble and spiral types of breakdown were observed and appear to represent the extremes in a continuum of breakdown forms.

  13. Coherent structures in fully developed turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekakis, Ioannis Constantinos

    The structure of large scale organized motions in the turbulent flow of air through a 12.5 cm diameter pipe at 50,000 Reynolds number was studied using time delayed measurements of the three-dimensional velocity vector. A triple hot-film probe was used to measure: (1) the complete time-delayed Reynolds stress tensor R sub ij(tau) = (u sub i(x,t)u sub j(x,t + tau)), (2) the conditionally averaged velocity (u sub i (x,t + tau) / E(x,t)), where E consisted of various velocity events at (x,t), and (3) the linear stochastic estimates of the conditional averages. A new methodology was developed for the interpretation of non-orthogonal triple-sensor probe signals. This interpretation takes into consideration the uniqueness of the solution from a multiple set of possible velocity vectors corresponding to a measured set of anemometry voltages. Optimum probe geometries are shown to be a compromise between the size of the domain in which the true velocity vector can be singled out unambiguously and the overall sensitivity of the probe. A physically consistant method for the calibration of multiple sensor probes has also been developed. Triple sensor probes, together with smoke-wire flow visualization techniques, were used to study the turbulent structure in fully developed pipe flow.

  14. Stream flow and analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.G.

    1983-11-04

    Lockwood Greene Engineers, Inc. (LGE) was retained by E.I. duPont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina, to conduct on-site flow measurements and sampling of tributaries and outfalls flowing into a portion of Tim`s Branch Creek. Water samples were analyzed for chemical characteristics. This report presents the results of the flow and analytical data collected during the 24 hour monitoring period, October 5 and 6, 1983. Tim`s Branch Creek is a tributary of the Upper Three Runs Creek which in turn is a tributary of the Savannah River. A map outlining the drainage area within the Savannah River Plant is included in this report.

  15. Hybrid laminar flow control study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) in which leading edge suction is used in conjunction with wing pressure distribution tailoring to postpone boundary layer transition and reduce friction drag was examined. Airfoil design characteristics required for laminar flow control (LFC) were determined. The aerodynamic design of the HLFC wing for a 178 passenger commercial turbofan transport was developed, and a drag was estimated. Systems changes required to install HLFC were defined, and weights and fuel economy were estimated. The potential for 9% fuel reduction for a 3926-km (2120-nmi) mission is identified.

  16. FlowSim/FlowRisk: A code system for studying risk associated with material process flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, A.M.

    1993-10-01

    The need to study and assess life-cycle risks of Pu release by nuclear warheads during peace time lead to the development of a code suite which could model day to day operations involving nuclear weapons and calculate the associated risk involved in these proceedings. The life-cycle study called LIONSHARE is described in Reference 1. The code that models the flow is called FlowSim. The code that evaluates the associated risk is called FlowRisk. We shall concentrate here on the methodology used by FlowSim in modeling material flows. FlowRisk, mainly a postprocessor of FlowSim runs, will be dealt with in less detail.

  17. Numerical investigations of flow structure in gas turbine shroud gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasilczuk, F.; Flaszyński, P.; Doerffer, P.

    2016-10-01

    The structure of the flow in the labyrinth sealing of an axial gas turbine was investigated by means of numerical simulations. Additionally, the flow structure for two- and three-dimensional axisymmetric models was compared. The porous disc as a model for the pressure drop relevant to the obtained in the cascade was proposed and tested. Several flow structure features existing in the sealing cavities are investigated: vortical structure and separation bubble on the rib and the correlation between the pressure drop and the clearance size. The carried out investigations indicate that the innovation aimed at decreasing the leakage flow through implementation of the flow control devices is possible. Furthermore the comparison between 2D and 3D models shows good agreement, thus application of less demanding 2D model introduces negligible differences. It is shown that the proposed porous disc model applied to mimic pressure drop in cascade can be effectively used for rotor blade sealing simulations.

  18. Coherent Structures and Extreme Events in Rotating Multiphase Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biferale, L.; Bonaccorso, F.; Mazzitelli, I. M.; van Hinsberg, M. A. T.; Lanotte, A. S.; Musacchio, S.; Perlekar, P.; Toschi, F.

    2016-10-01

    By using direct numerical simulations (DNS) at unprecedented resolution, we study turbulence under rotation in the presence of simultaneous direct and inverse cascades. The accumulation of energy at large scale leads to the formation of vertical coherent regions with high vorticity oriented along the rotation axis. By seeding the flow with millions of inertial particles, we quantify—for the first time—the effects of those coherent vertical structures on the preferential concentration of light and heavy particles. Furthermore, we quantitatively show that extreme fluctuations, leading to deviations from a normal-distributed statistics, result from the entangled interaction of the vertical structures with the turbulent background. Finally, we present the first-ever measurement of the relative importance between Stokes drag, Coriolis force, and centripetal force along the trajectories of inertial particles. We discover that vortical coherent structures lead to unexpected diffusion properties for heavy and light particles in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the rotation axis.

  19. Effects of shaft supporting structure on performance test of axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, R.; Liu, S. L.; Li, M. X.; Zheng, S. Y.

    2016-05-01

    CFD numerical simulation combined with theoretical analysis are used to research and discuss the obstructing effect, caused by the supporting structure of torsion meter and connecting shaft, on the outlet airflow of axial-flow fan in type-C ducted inlet device. The relations between axial flow fan's total pressure efficiency and flow rate are studied when the distance between supporting structure and outlet section is different, which may provide a reference for the proper design of the performance test device.

  20. Stability of Brillouin Flow in Slow-Wave Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, David; Lau, Y. Y.; Greening, Geoffrey; Wong, Patrick; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Hoff, Brad

    2016-10-01

    For the first time, we include a slow-wave structure (SWS) to study the stability of Brillouin flow in the conventional, planar, and inverted magnetron geometry. The resonant interaction of the SWS circuit mode and the corresponding smooth-bore diocotron-like mode is found to be the dominant cause for instability, overwhelming the intrinsic negative (positive) mass property of electrons in the inverted (conventional) magnetron geometry. It severely restricts the wavenumber for instability to the narrow range in which the cold tube frequency of the SWS is within a few percent of the corresponding smooth bore diocotron-like mode in the Brillouin flow. This resonant interaction is absent in a smooth bore magnetron. Work supported by ONR N00014-13-1-0566 and N00014-16-1-2353, AFOSR FA9550-15-1-0097, and L-3 Communications Electron Device Division.

  1. Correlating Lagrangian structures with forcing in two-dimensional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Hogg, Charlie A. R.; Liao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) are the dominant transport barriers in unsteady, aperiodic flows, and their role in organizing mixing and transport has been well documented. However, nearly all that is known about LCSs has been gleaned from passive observations: they are computed in a post-processing step after a flow has been observed and used to understand why the mixing and transport proceeded as it did. In many applications, the ability instead to control the presence or location of LCSs via imposed forcing would be valuable. With this goal in mind, we study the relationship between LCSs and external forcing in an experimental quasi-two-dimensional weakly turbulent flow. We find that the likelihood of finding a repelling LCS at a given location is positively correlated with the mean strain rate injected at that point and negatively correlated with the mean speed, and that it is not correlated with the vorticity. We also find that mean time between successive LCSs appearing at a fixed location is related to the structure of the forcing field. Finally, we demonstrate a surprising difference in our results between LCSs computed forward and backward in time, with forward-time (repelling) LCSs showing much more correlation with the forcing than backwards-time (attracting) LCSs.

  2. Turbulent rotating plane Couette flow: Reynolds and rotation number dependency of flow structure and momentum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Takuya; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Plane Couette flow under spanwise, anticyclonic system rotation [rotating plane Couette flow (RPCF)] is studied experimentally using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry for different Reynolds and rotation numbers in the fully turbulent regime. Similar to the laminar regime, the turbulent flow in RPCF is characterized by roll cells, however both instantaneous snapshots of the velocity field and space correlations show that the roll cell structure varies with the rotation number. All three velocity components are measured and both the mean flow and all four nonzero Reynolds stresses are obtained across the central parts of the channel. This also allows us to determine the wall shear stress from the viscous stress and the Reynolds stress in the center of the channel, and for low rotation rates the wall shear stress increases with increasing rotation rate as expected. The results show that zero absolute vorticity is established in the central parts of the channel of turbulent RPCF for high enough rotation rates, but also that the mean velocity profile for certain parameter ranges shows an S shape giving rise to a negative velocity gradient in the center of the channel. We find that from an analysis of the Reynolds stress transport equation using the present data there is a transport of the Reynolds shear stress towards the center of the channel, which may then result in a negative mean velocity gradient there.

  3. The structure of the vorticity field in homogeneous turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Michael M.; Moin, Parviz

    1987-01-01

    The structures of the vorticity fields in several homogeneous irrotational straining flows and a homogeneous turbulent shear flow were examined using a database generated by direct numerical simulation of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. In all cases, strong evidence was found for the presence of coherent vortical structures. The initially isotropic vorticity fields were rapidly affected by imposed mean strain and the rotational component of mean shear and developed accordingly. In the homogeneous turbulent shear-flow cases, the roll-up of mean vorticity into characteristic hairpin vortices was clearly observed, supporting the view that hairpin vortices are an important vortical structure in all turbulent shear flows; the absence of mean shear in the homogeneous irrotational straining flows precludes the presence of hairpin-like vortices.

  4. Online recognition of the multiphase flow regime and study of slug flow in pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liejin, Guo; Bofeng, Bai; Liang, Zhao; Xin, Wang; Hanyang, Gu

    2009-02-01

    Multiphase flow is the phenomenon existing widely in nature, daily life, as well as petroleum and chemical engineering industrial fields. The interface structure among multiphase and their movement are complicated, which distribute random and heterogeneously in the spatial and temporal scales and have multivalue of the flow structure and state[1]. Flow regime is defined as the macro feature about the multiphase interface structure and its distribution, which is an important feature to describe multiphase flow. The energy and mass transport mechanism differ much for each flow regimes. It is necessary to solve the flow regime recognition to get a clear understanding of the physical phenomena and their mechanism of multiphase flow. And the flow regime is one of the main factors affecting the online measurement accuracy of phase fraction, flow rate and other phase parameters. Therefore, it is of great scientific and technological importance to develop new principles and methods of multiphase flow regime online recognition, and of great industrial background. In this paper, the key reasons that the present method cannot be used to solve the industrial multiphase flow pattern recognition are clarified firstly. Then the prerequisite to realize the online recognition of multiphase flow regime is analyzed, and the recognition rules for partial flow pattern are obtained based on the massive experimental data. The standard templates for every flow regime feature are calculated with self-organization cluster algorithm. The multi-sensor data fusion method is proposed to realize the online recognition of multiphase flow regime with the pressure and differential pressure signals, which overcomes the severe influence of fluid flow velocity and the oil fraction on the recognition. The online recognition method is tested in the practice, which has less than 10 percent measurement error. The method takes advantages of high confidence, good fault tolerance and less requirement of

  5. M-82 Primer Flow Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-01

    indicate the location of the pressure transducers (Reference 9) • • • • 31 2. The development of the flow at the vent hole. (a) t = 0, 52.9 [vis]; (b...x 10Ŗ [m]. Photographs courtesy of Dr. K. J. White, Propulsion Division, BRL 32 3. Comparison of calculated and experimentally observed pressure ...function of time in [s] 36 6- Vent hole temperature in degrees [K] as a function of time expressed in [s] 37 7. Vent hole pressure in units

  6. Investigating Flow-Structure Interactions in Cerebral Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-13

    Visualization of blood flow in a cerebral aneurysm. Streamlines (colored by fluid velocity magnitude) reveal the complexity of the flow, isocontours of vorticity show blood vortex structures (colored by pressure), and the flexible arterial wall is colored by the stress magnitude, where regions in red indicate areas of high stress.

  7. Structural support bracket for gas flow path

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-02

    A structural support system is provided in a can annular gas turbine engine having an arrangement including a plurality of integrated exit pieces (IEPs) forming an annular chamber for delivering gases from a plurality of combustors to a first row of turbine blades. A bracket structure is connected between an IEP and an inner support structure on the engine. The bracket structure includes an axial bracket member attached to an IEP and extending axially in a forward direction. A transverse bracket member has an end attached to the inner support structure and extends circumferentially to a connection with a forward end of the axial bracket member. The transverse bracket member provides a fixed radial position for the forward end of the axial bracket member and is flexible in the axial direction to permit axial movement of the axial bracket member.

  8. 8. Inverted siphon structure carrying ditch flow under Willow Creek, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Inverted siphon structure carrying ditch flow under Willow Creek, looking southwest - Natomas Ditch System, Blue Ravine Segment, Juncture of Blue Ravine & Green Valley Roads, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  9. 7. Inverted siphon structure carrying ditch flow under Willow Creek, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Inverted siphon structure carrying ditch flow under Willow Creek, looking east - Natomas Ditch System, Blue Ravine Segment, Juncture of Blue Ravine & Green Valley Roads, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  10. Investigation on the near-wake flow structures of a utility-scale wind turbine using snowflake based flow visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasari, Teja; Toloui, Mostafa; Guala, Michele; Hong, Jiarong

    2015-11-01

    Super-large-scale particle image velocimetry and flow visualization techniques using natural snow particles have been shown as an effective tool to probe the structure of the flow around full-scale wind turbines (Hong et al. Nature Comm. 2014). Here we present a follow-up study based on the data collected during a deployment around the 2.5 MW wind turbine at EOLOS Wind Energy Research Station on April, 4th, 2014. The dataset includes the snow visualization of flow fields from different perspectives in the near wake of the turbine. The motions of the dominant coherent structures including tip, blade root, hub and tower vortices, represented by the snow voids, are examined with the objective of quantifying and correlating their behavior with the meteorological and turbine operating conditions. Some preliminary studies on flow-structure interaction are also performed by correlating the data from strain gauges, accelerometers mounted on the turbine blades, with the flow measurements. The statistical analysis of the motions of blade induced vortices shows a clear impact of atmospheric turbulence and vortex interaction on flow development in the near wake. The result further indicates a strong connection between near-wake vorticity field, turbine operation and structure deformations. The work was supported by National Science Foundation (NSF-CBET-1454259) and the research infrastructure was supported by Department of Energy.

  11. The significance of micro-topography in generating flow structures in open channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    This poster investigates the effect of micro-topographic roughness on the generation, evolution and dissipation of turbulent flow structures in open channel flow. Primarily, a series of flume experiment were undertaken where natural fluvial gravel was placed in a flume and water worked until a stable bed with no sediment transport was obtained. The surface topography was measured to create a digital elevation model (DEM) enabling particle size characteristics to be measured and roughness lengths to be calculated. Flow was measured, at flow Reynolds numbers over two orders of magnitude, using Particle Imaging Velocimetry at data frequencies up to 100 Hz at a spatial resolution of 2×10-3 m. The flume conditions also provided the necessary boundary conditions for Large Eddy Simulation of flow over these heterogeneous surfaces. The data generated by these two separate methodologies was analyzed through a series of approaches, and included: i) standard Reynolds decomposition to the flow fields; ii) Eulerian coherent structure detection methods based on the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor; iii) Lagrangian coherent structure identification methods based upon direct Lyapunov exponents (DLE) and; iv) Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) analysis to obtain a full understanding of the turbulent flow structures. Once the LES scheme had been fully validated against the PIV data, scales of topography were removed from the DEM. The LES simulations were then recalculated to assess the influence of topography on the generation of turbulent flow structures. The results demonstrate that the generative mechanism for these bed-generated coherent flow structures are merging hairpin-type vortices that form around bed clasts and generate larger-scale roller-type structures. This mechanism of generation appears consistent over the range of Reynolds numbers but the spatial and temporal length scales appear dependent upon the bed roughness.

  12. Deterministic modelling of the cumulative impacts of underground structures on urban groundwater flow and the definition of a potential state of urban groundwater flow: example of Lyon, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, Guillaume; Rossier, Yvan; Winiarski, Thierry; Cuvillier, Loann; Eisenlohr, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Underground structures have been shown to have a great influence on subsoil resources in urban aquifers. A methodology to assess the actual and the potential state of the groundwater flow in an urban area is proposed. The study develops a three-dimensional modeling approach to understand the cumulative impacts of underground infrastructures on urban groundwater flow, using a case in the city of Lyon (France). All known underground structures were integrated in the numerical model. Several simulations were run: the actual state of groundwater flow, the potential state of groundwater flow (without underground structures), an intermediate state (without impervious structures), and a transient simulation of the actual state of groundwater flow. The results show that underground structures fragment groundwater flow systems leading to a modification of the aquifer regime. For the case studied, the flow systems are shown to be stable over time with a transient simulation. Structures with drainage systems are shown to have a major impact on flow systems. The barrier effect of impervious structures was negligible because of the small hydraulic gradient of the area. The study demonstrates that the definition of a potential urban groundwater flow and the depiction of urban flow systems, which involves understanding the impact of underground structures, are important issues with respect to urban underground planning.

  13. Flow structures and sandbar dynamics in a canyon river during a controlled flood, Colorado River, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, S.A.; Kaplinski, M.

    2011-01-01

    In canyon rivers, debris fan constrictions create rapids and downstream pools characterized by secondary flow structures that are closely linked to channel morphology. In this paper we describe detailed measurements of the three-dimensional flow structure and sandbar dynamics of two pools along the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon during a controlled flood release from Glen Canyon Dam. Results indicate that the pools are characterized by large lateral recirculation zones (eddies) resulting from flow separation downstream from the channel constrictions, as well as helical flow structures in the main channel and eddy. The lateral recirculation zones are low-velocity areas conducive to fine sediment deposition, particularly in the vicinity of the separation and reattachment points and are thus the dominant flow structures controlling sandbar dynamics. The helical flow structures also affect morphology but appear secondary in importance to the lateral eddies. During the controlled flood, sandbars in the separation and reattachment zones at both sites tended to build gradually during the rising limb and peak flow. Deposition in shallow water on the sandbars was accompanied by erosion in deeper water along the sandbar slope at the interface with the main channel. Erosion occurred via rapid mass failures as well as by gradual boundary shear stress driven processes. The flow structures and morphologic links at our study sites are similar to those identified in other river environments, in particular sharply curved meanders and channel confluences where the coexistence of lateral recirculation and helical flows has been documented. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Slat Cove Unsteadiness Effect of 3D Flow Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that 2D, time accurate computations based on a pseudo-laminar zonal model of the slat cove region (within the framework of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations) are inadequate for predicting the full unsteady dynamics of the slat cove flow field. Even though such computations could capture the large-scale, unsteady vorticity structures in the slat cove region without requiring any external forcing, the simulated vortices were excessively strong and the recirculation zone was unduly energetic in comparison with the PIV measurements for a generic high-lift configuration. To resolve this discrepancy and to help enable physics based predictions of slat aeroacoustics, the present paper is focused on 3D simulations of the slat cove flow over a computational domain of limited spanwise extent. Maintaining the pseudo-laminar approach, current results indicate that accounting for the three-dimensionality of flow fluctuations leads to considerable improvement in the accuracy of the unsteady, nearfield solution. Analysis of simulation data points to the likely significance of turbulent fluctuations near the reattachment region toward the generation of broadband slat noise. The computed acoustic characteristics (in terms of the frequency spectrum and spatial distribution) within short distances from the slat resemble the previously reported, subscale measurements of slat noise.

  15. Study of the velocity gradient tensor in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Wei-Ping; Cantwell, Brian

    1996-01-01

    The behavior of the velocity gradient tensor, A(ij)=delta u(i)/delta x(j), was studied using three turbulent flows obtained from direct numerical simulation The flows studies were: an inviscid calculation of the interaction between two vortex tubes, a homogeneous isotropic flow, and a temporally evolving planar wake. Self-similar behavior for each flow was obtained when A(ij) was normalized with the mean strain rate. The case of the interaction between two vortex tubes revealed a finite sized coherent structure with topological characteristics predictable by a restricted Euler model. This structure was found to evolve with the peak vorticity as the flow approached singularity. Invariants of A(ij) within this structure followed a straight line relationship of the form: gamma(sup 3)+gammaQ+R=0, where Q and R are the second and third invariants of A(ij), and the eigenvalue gamma is nearly constant over the volume of this structure. Data within this structure have local strain topology of unstable-node/saddle/saddle. The characteristics of the velocity gradient tensor and the anisotropic part of a related acceleration gradient tensor H(ij) were also studied for a homogeneous isotropic flow and a temporally evolving planar wake. It was found that the intermediate principal eigenvalue of the rate-of-strain tensor of H(ij) tended to be negative, with local strain topology of the type stable-node/saddle/saddle. There was also a preferential eigenvalue direction. The magnitude of H(ij) in the wake flow was found to be very small when data were conditioned at high local dissipation regions. This result was not observed in the relatively low Reynolds number simulation of homogeneous isotropic flow. A restricted Euler model of the evolution of A(ij) was found to reproduce many of the topological features identified in the simulations.

  16. The Flow Structure in the Vicinity of the Inner Lagrangian Point in Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakova, P. B.; Zhilkin, A. G.; Bisikalo, D. V.

    2017-03-01

    The mass transfer between the components of the magnetic cataclysmic variables occurs through the inner Lagrangian point. The results of 3D numerical simulations of the flow structure in magnetic cataclysmic variables show that the magnetic field of the accretor essentially influences the flow structure. In polars (with magnetic fields of 10–100 MG at the surface of the white dwarf) the material streaming from the donor splits into the several flows as soon as it leaves the inner Lagrangian point. These flows move along the magnetic field lines and reach the magnetic poles of the accretor. This picture does not correspond to the classical situation of the flow formation when material flows from the donor into the Roche lobe of the accretor along the ballistic trajectory. The aim of our study is to investigate in detail the features of the flow splitting in the vicinity of the inner Lagrangian point in classic polars.

  17. Heat flow anomalies in oil- and gas-bearing structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sergiyenko, S.I.

    1988-02-01

    The main features of the distribution of heat flow values in oil, gas and gas-condensate fields on the continents have been discussed by Makarenko and Sergiyenko. The method of analysis used made it possible to establish that the presence of hydrocarbons in formations leads to high heat-flow, regardless of the age of folding of the potentially oil- and gas-bearing zones. Only in regions adjacent to marginal Cenozoic folded mountain structures and in zones of Cenozoic volcanism is the world average higher, by 2.5 to 10%, than in the oil- and gas-bearing structures in those regions. The earlier analysis of the distribution of heat flow values in oil and gas structures was based on 403 measurements. The author now has nearly doubled the sample population, enabling him substantially to revise the ideas on the distribution of heat flow values and the development of the thermal regime of local oil and gas structures. He notes that the method previously used, comparing heat flow values on young continental platforms with values in local oil and gas structures, makes it possible to estimate the thermal effect of the presence of oil and gas. This conclusion stems from the fact that the overwhelming majority of heat flow measurements were made on various kinds of positive structural forms, and distortions of the thermal field caused by thermal anisotropy phenomena are equally characteristic of both productive and nonproductive structures. As a result, for the first time a continuous time series of heat flow measurements over oil and gas structures in various tectonic regions, with ages of consolidation ranging from the Precambrian to the Cenozoic, was established. 26 references.

  18. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Flow Structures During Insect Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badrya, Camli; Baeder, James D.

    2015-11-01

    Insect flight kinematics involves complex interplay between aerodynamics structural response and insect body control. Features such as cross-coupling kinematics, high flapping frequencies and geometrical small-scales, result in experiments being challenging to perform. In this study OVERTURNS, an in-house 3D compressible Navier-Stokes solver is utilized to simulate the simplified kinematics of an insect wing in hover and forward flight. The flapping wings simulate the full cycle of wing motion, i.e., the upstroke, downstroke, pronation and supination.The numerical results show good agreement against experimental data in predicting the lift and drag over the flapping cycle. The flow structures around the flapping wing are found to be highly unsteady and vortical. Aside from the tip vortex on the wings, the formation of a prominent leading edge vortex (LEV) during the up/down stroke portions, and the shedding of a trailing edge vortex (TEV) at end of each stroke were observed. Differences in the insect dynamics and the flow features of the LEV are observed between hover and forward flight. In hover the up and downstroke cycles are symmetric, whereas in forward flight, these up and downstroke are asymmetric and LEV strength varies as a function of the kinematics and advance ratio. This work was supported by the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) CTA at the Univer- sity of Maryland.

  19. Visualizing the internal structure of subaqueous, high-concentration sediment-laden flows: implication of rheology to flow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perillo, M. M.; Buttles, J.; Mohrig, D. C.; Kane, I.; Pontén, A.; Brown, D.; Minton, B. W.

    2013-12-01

    Subaqueous sediment-laden flows are thought to be the main mechanism transporting sediments to the deep sea. Understanding the processes governing these flows is crucial to building predictive models of flow behaviour, sediment transport and deposition and is applicable to a wide range of disciplines. Physical modelling using a wide range of experimental facilities and measurement techniques has significantly advanced our understanding of these sediment-laden flows and their ability to erode, transport and deposit sediments. However, for the case of high-sediment concentration flows, measuring flow and depositional properties is still a challenge. Here, we present results from an acoustic reflection technique that allows for direct and noninvasive visualization of the internal structure of high concentration, clay-rich, sand-laden flows with a range of initial yield strengths (0-26 Pa). As the acoustic signal travels through the sediment-laden flow, it encounters zones of varying acoustic impedance that are due to temporal and spatial changes in sediment concentration, grain size and sorting, and flow mixing. The reflected signal is processed and interpreted using seismic techniques developed in exploration geophysics. The ultrasonic reflection data captured two distinct flow stages, an active stage and a post-depositional creeping stage. The clay-rich sand-laden flows showed stratification expressed by three clear vertical zones: (a) an upper relatively dilute turbulent zone, (b) a zone with high sediment concentration and significantly reduced mixing and (c) an aggrading bed of static grains.

  20. Flow structure on a rotating wing: Effect of steady incident flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, M.; Ozen, C. A.; Rockwell, D.

    2013-08-01

    The flow structure along a rotating wing in steady incident flow is compared to the structure on a rotating wing in quiescent fluid, in order to clarify the effect of advance ratio J (ratio of free-stream velocity to tip velocity of wing). Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry leads to patterns of vorticity, velocity, and Q-criterion (constant values of the second invariant of the velocity gradient tensor), as well as streamlines, which allow identification of critical points of the flow. The effective angle of attack is held constant over the range of J, and the wing rotates from rest to a large angle that corresponds to attainment of the asymptotic state of the flow structure. Prior to the onset of motion, the wing is at high angle of attack and the steady incident flow yields a fully stalled state along the wing. After the onset of rotation, the stalled region quickly gives rise to a stable leading edge vortex. Throughout the rotation maneuver, the development of the flow structure in the leading edge region is relatively insensitive to the value of J. In the trailing-edge region, however, the structure of the shed vorticity layer is strongly dependent on the value of J. Further insight into the effects of J is provided by three-dimensional patterns of spanwise-oriented vorticity, spanwise velocity, and Q-criterion.

  1. Correlations of Flow Structure and Particle Deposition with Structural Alterations in Severe Asthmatic Lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sanghun; Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A.; Wenzel, Sally; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-11-01

    Severe asthmatics are characterized by alterations of bifurcation angle, hydraulic diameter, circularity of the airways, and local shift of air-volume functional change. The characteristics altered against healthy human subjects can affect flow structure and particle deposition. A large-eddy-simulation (LES) model for transitional and turbulent flows is utilized to study flow characteristics and particle deposition with representative healthy and severe asthmatic lungs. For the subject-specific boundary condition, local air-volume changes are derived with two computed tomography images at inspiration and expiration. Particle transport simulations are performed on LES-predicted flow fields. In severe asthmatics, the elevated air-volume changes of apical lung regions affect the increased particle distribution toward upper lobes, especially for small particles. The constricted airways are significantly correlated with high wall shear stress, leading to the increased pressure drop and particle deposition. The structural alterations of bifurcation angle, circularity and hydraulic diameter in severe asthmatics are associated with the increase of particle deposition, wall shear stress and wall thickness. NIH Grants: U01-HL114494, R01-HL094315 and S10-RR022421. Computer time: XSEDE.

  2. High frequency flow-structural interaction in dense subsonic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Baw-Lin; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Prediction of the detailed dynamic behavior in rocket propellant feed systems and engines and other such high-energy fluid systems requires precise analysis to assure structural performance. Designs sometimes require placement of bluff bodies in a flow passage. Additionally, there are flexibilities in ducts, liners, and piping systems. A design handbook and interactive data base have been developed for assessing flow/structural interactions to be used as a tool in design and development, to evaluate applicable geometries before problems develop, or to eliminate or minimize problems with existing hardware. This is a compilation of analytical/empirical data and techniques to evaluate detailed dynamic characteristics of both the fluid and structures. These techniques have direct applicability to rocket engine internal flow passages, hot gas drive systems, and vehicle propellant feed systems. Organization of the handbook is by basic geometries for estimating Strouhal numbers, added mass effects, mode shapes for various end constraints, critical onset flow conditions, and possible structural response amplitudes. Emphasis is on dense fluids and high structural loading potential for fatigue at low subsonic flow speeds where high-frequency excitations are possible. Avoidance and corrective measure illustrations are presented together with analytical curve fits for predictions compiled from a comprehensive data base.

  3. Hyperbolic regions in flows through three-dimensional pore structures.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Jeffrey D; Winter, C Larrabee

    2013-12-01

    Finite time Lyapunov exponents are used to determine expanding, contracting, and hyperbolic regions in computational simulations of laminar steady-state fluid flows within realistic three dimensional pore structures embedded within an impermeable matrix. These regions correspond approximately to pores where flow converges (contraction) or diverges (expansion), and to throats between pores where the flow mixes (hyperbolic). The regions are sparse and disjoint from one another, occupying only a small percentage of the pore space. Nonetheless, nearly every percolating fluid particle trajectory passes through several hyperbolic regions indicating that the effects of in-pore mixing are distributed throughout an entire pore structure. Furthermore, the observed range of fluid dynamics evidences two scales of heterogeneity within each of these flow fields. There is a larger scale that affects dispersion of fluid particle trajectories across the connected network of pores and a relatively small scale of nonuniform distributions of velocities within an individual pore.

  4. Grand valley irrigation return flow case study

    SciTech Connect

    Keys, J.W.

    1981-06-01

    Irrigation water supply is furnished annually to about 71,500 acres of land in the Grand Valley of western Colorado. Return flows from that irrigation contribute about 780,000 tpy of salt to the Colorado River, causing an increase of 77 mg/l in the salinity concentration at Imperial Dam. A case study of water quality in this region is focused on: water quality data for irrigation and return flows/ identification of regulations that affect irrigation and return flows/ and a proposed program for controlling salinity levels. (1 map, 9 references, 8 tables)

  5. Flow structure and vorticity transport on a plunging wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslam Panah, Azar

    The structure and dynamics of the flow field created by a plunging flat plate airfoil are investigated at a chord Reynolds number of 10,000 while varying plunge amplitude and Strouhal number. Digital particle image velocimetry measurements are used to characterize the shedding patterns and the interactions between the leading and trailing edge vortex structures (LEV and TEV), resulting in the development of a wake classification system based on the nature and timing of interactions between the leading- and trailing-edge vortices. The convection speed of the LEV and its resulting interaction with the TEV is primarily dependent on reduced frequency; however, at Strouhal numbers above approximately 0.4, a significant influence of Strouhal number (or plunge amplitude) is observed in which LEV convection is retarded, and the contribution of the LEV to the wake is diminished. It is shown that this effect is caused by an enhanced interaction between the LEV and the airfoil surface, due to a significant increase in the strength of the vortices in this Strouhal number range, for all plunge amplitudes investigated. Comparison with low-Reynolds-number studies of plunging airfoil aerodynamics reveals a high degree of consistency and suggests applicability of the classification system beyond the range examined in the present work. Some important differences are also observed. The three-dimensional flow field was characterized for a plunging two-dimensional flat-plate airfoil using three-dimensional reconstructions of planar PIV data. Whereas the phase-averaged description of the flow field shows the secondary vortex penetrating the leading-edge shear layer to terminate LEV formation on the airfoil, time-resolved, instantaneous PIV measurements show a continuous and growing entrainment of secondary vorticity into the shear layer and LEV. A planar control volume analysis on the airfoil indicated that the generation of secondary vorticity produced approximately one half the

  6. On the Vertical Structure of Seasonal, Interannual and Intraseasonal Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    the Vertical Structure of Seasonal, Interannual and Intraseasonal Flows b, AUTHOR(S) Steven Reino Gilbert,Major -. Pf.IFORI.MINt ORGAN!?ATION NAMW(S...AND INTRASEASONAL FLOWS by Steven Reino Gilbert A dissertation submitted to the faculty of The University of Utah in partial fulffifment of the...requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Department of Meteorology The University of Utah La ! December 1992 Copyright @ Steven Reino Gilbert 1992

  7. Spectacular ionospheric flow structures associated with substorm auroral onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo-Lacourt, B. I.; Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.; Zou, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E.; Mende, S. B.; Ruohoniemi, J.; McWilliams, K. A.; Nishitani, N.

    2013-12-01

    Auroral observations have shown that brightening at substorm auroral onset consists of azimuthally propagating beads forming along a pre-existing arc. However, the ionospheric flow structure related to this wavy auroral structure has not been previously identified. We present 2-d line-of-sight flow observations and auroral images from the SuperDARN radars and the THEMIS ground-based all-sky-imager array to investigate the ionospheric flow pattern associated with the onset. We have selected events where SuperDARN was operating in the THEMIS mode, which provides measurements along the northward looking radar beam that have time resolution (6 s) comparable to the high time resolution of the imagers and gives us a unique tool to detect properties of flows associated with the substorm onset instability. We find very fast flows (~1000 m/s) that initiated simultaneously with the onset arc beads propagating across the THEMIS-mode beam meridian. The flows show oscillations at ~9 mHz, which corresponds to the periodicity of the auroral beads propagating across the radar beam. 2-d radar measurements also show a wavy pattern in the azimuthal direction with a wavelength of ~74 km, which is close to the azimuthal separation of individual beads, although this determination is limited by the 2 minute radar scan period. These strong correlations (in time and space) between auroral beading and the fast ionospheric flows suggest that these spectacular flows are an important feature of the substorm onset instability within the inner plasma sheet. Also, a clockwise flow shear was observed in association with individual auroral beads, suggesting that such flow shear is a feature of the unstable substorm onset waves.

  8. A thermal stack structure for measurement of fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hao; Mitchell, S. J. N.; Campbell, D. H.; Gamble, Harold S.

    2003-03-01

    A stacked thermal structure for fluid flow sensing has been designed, fabricated, and tested. A double-layer polysilicon process was employed in the fabrication. Flow measurement is based on the transfer of heat from a temperature sensor element to the moving fluid. The undoped or lightly doped polysilicon temperature sensor is located on top of a heavily doped polysilicon heater element. A dielectric layer between the heater and the sensor elements provides both thermal coupling and electrical isolation. In comparison to a hot-wire flow sensor, the heating and sensing functions are separated, allowing the electrical characteristics of each to be optimized. Undoped polysilicon has a large temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) up to 7 %/K and is thus a preferred material for the sensor. However, heavily doped polysilicon is preferred for the heater due to its lower resistance. The stacked flow sensor structure offers a high thermal sensitivity making it especially suitable for medical applications where the working temperatures are restricted. Flow rates of various fluids can be measured over a wide range. The fabricated flow sensors were used to measure the flow rate of water in the range μl - ml/min and gas (Helium) in the range 10 - 100ml/min.

  9. Observations and Measurements on Unsteady Cloud Cavitation Flow Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, L. X.; Yan, G. J.; Huang, B.

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this paper are to investigate the unsteady structures and hydrodynamics of cavitating flows. Experimental results are presented for a Clark-Y hydrofoil, which is fixed at α=0°, 5° and 8°. The high-speed video camera and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are applied to investigate the transient flow structures. The dynamic measurement system is used to record the dynamic characteristics. The cloud cavitation exhibits noticeable unsteady characteristics. For the case of α=0°, there exit strong interactions between the attached cavity and the re-entrant flow. While for the case of α=8°, the re-entrant flow is relatively thin and the interaction between the cavity and re-entrant flow is limited. The results also present that the periodic collapse and shedding of the large-scale cloud cavitation, which leads to substantial increase of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the cavity region. Experimental evidence indicates that the hydrodynamics are clearly affected by the cavitating flow structures, the amplitude of load fluctuation are much higher for the cloud cavitating cases.

  10. Code validation study for base flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascoli, Edward P.; Heiba, Adel H.; Lagnado, Ronald R.; Ungewitter, Ronald J.; Williams, Morgan

    1993-07-01

    New and old rocket launch concepts recommend the clustering of motors for improved lift capability. The flowfield of the base region of the rocket is very complex and can contain high temperature plume gases. These hot gases can cause catastrophic problems if not adequately designed for. To assess the base region characteristics, advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used. As a precursor to these calculations the CFD code requires validation on base flows. The primary objective of this code validation study was to establish a high level of confidence in predicting base flows with the USA CFD code. USA has been extensively validated for fundamental flows and other applications. However, base heating flows have a number of unique characteristics so it was necessary to extend the existing validation for this class of problems. In preparation for the planned NLS 1.5 Stage base heating analysis, six case sets were studied to extend the USA code validation data base. This presentation gives a cursive review of three of these cases. The cases presented include a 2D axi-symmetric study, a 3D real nozzle study, and a 3D multi-species study. The results of all the studies show good general agreement with data with no adjustments to the base numerical algorithms or physical models in the code. The study proved the capability of the USA code for modeling base flows within the accuracy of available data.

  11. Code Validation Study for Base Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ascoli, Edward P.; Heiba, Adel H.; Lagnado, Ronald R.; Ungewitter, Ronald J.; Williams, Morgan

    1993-01-01

    New and old rocket launch concepts recommend the clustering of motors for improved lift capability. The flowfield of the base region of the rocket is very complex and can contain high temperature plume gases. These hot gases can cause catastrophic problems if not adequately designed for. To assess the base region characteristics, advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used. As a precursor to these calculations the CFD code requires validation on base flows. The primary objective of this code validation study was to establish a high level of confidence in predicting base flows with the USA CFD code. USA has been extensively validated for fundamental flows and other applications. However, base heating flows have a number of unique characteristics so it was necessary to extend the existing validation for this class of problems. In preparation for the planned NLS 1.5 Stage base heating analysis, six case sets were studied to extend the USA code validation data base. This presentation gives a cursive review of three of these cases. The cases presented include a 2D axi-symmetric study, a 3D real nozzle study, and a 3D multi-species study. The results of all the studies show good general agreement with data with no adjustments to the base numerical algorithms or physical models in the code. The study proved the capability of the USA code for modeling base flows within the accuracy of available data.

  12. Asymmetrical reverse vortex flow due to induced-charge electro-osmosis around carbon stacking structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2011-05-01

    Broken symmetry of vortices due to induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) around stacking structures is important for the generation of a large net flow in a microchannel. Following theoretical predictions in our previous study, we herein report experimental observations of asymmetrical reverse vortex flows around stacking structures of carbon posts with a large height (~110 μm) in water, prepared by the pyrolysis of a photoresist film in a reducing gas. Further, by the use of a coupled calculation method that considers boundary effects precisely, the experimental results, except for the problem of anomalous flow reversal, are successfully explained. That is, unlike previous predictions, the precise calculations here show that stacking structures accelerate a reverse flow rather than suppressing it for a microfluidic channel because of the deformation of electric fields near the stacking portions; these structures can also generate a large net flow theoretically in the direction opposite that of a previous prediction for a standard vortex flow. Furthermore, by solving the one-dimensional Poisson-Nernst-Plank (PNP) equations in the presence of ac electric fields, we find that the anomalous flow reversal occurs by the phase retardation between the induced diffuse charge and the tangential electric field. In addition, we successfully explain the nonlinearity of the flow velocity on the applied voltage by the PNP analysis. In the future, we expect to improve the pumping performance significantly by using stacking structures of conductive posts along with a low-cost process.

  13. Englacial Structures as Indicators of the Controls on Ice Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holschuh, N.; Parizek, B. R.; Alley, R. B.; Anandakrishnan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Direct sampling of the subglacial environment is costly, and will therefore never supply the spatial coverage needed to determine the basal boundary conditions required for large-scale ice-sheet modeling. Studies of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) show that the frictional and rheologic properties of the bed are a leading control on the evolution of the system, so developing geophysical methods to help constrain the basal characteristics of WAIS will reduce uncertainty in predictions of the timing and magnitude of future sea-level rise. Radar-imaged structures within the ice are an attractive data set for this pursuit, as they contain information about the flow dynamics that transform the horizontally deposited layers to their modern configuration; however, they can be challenging to interpret, given the number of processes acting to deform the internal layers and the difficulty in automating their analysis. In this study, we move away from the layer-tracing paradigm in favor of an automated slope extraction algorithm. This has several advantages: it does not require feature-continuity, providing a more stable result in regions of intense deformation, and it results in a data product that maps directly to model output. For steady-state features, layer slopes reflect the horizontal and vertical velocity structure, making quantitative comparison of the model and observations simple compared to the more qualitative, particle tracer comparisons done in the past. Using a higher order ice-flow model, we attempt to refine our understanding of basal properties using reflector slope fields at the grounding line of Whillans Ice Stream and the shear margin of the North East Greenland Ice Stream, with the hope of eventually using this method for basin-scale inversions.

  14. Structure and flow properties of block copolyelectrolyte hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Samanvaya; Tirrell, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Polyelectrolyte complexes (PEC) are dense, polymer-rich phases that form when oppositely charged polyelectrolyte chains spontaneously associate and phase separate in aqueous mediums. Bulk phase separation of the PECs can be evaded by combining one or both of the polyelectrolytes with a neutral polymer, thus engineering pathways for self-assembly of PEC based micelles and hydrogels with large-scale ordering of the nanoscale PEC domains. The PEC domains in these assemblies can encapsulate both hydrophobic and hydrophilic therapeutics and thus have tremendous potential in drug delivery, diagnostic and tissue engineering applications. This study will present insights on the equilibrium structure and self-assembly kinetics of PEC hybrid hydrogels through detailed rheology studies of self-assembled materials comprising of functionalized polyallyl glycidyl ethers (PAGE) connected to either single poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain to form diblock copolymers or as functionalized end-groups on a triblock copolymer with a PEG midblock. The effect of key parameters such as polymer concentration, polymer block lengths, salt, ionic strength, and degree of charge mismatch on the equilibrium materials properties will be discussed, with a special emphasis on the temporal evolution of flow properties, and will lead to comparisons with the rheology models for associating polymers. Complementary studies with extensive static and dynamic light, X-ray and neutron scattering investigations will also be presented, thus providing a comprehensive structural description of these materials.

  15. Shock-Induced Separated Structures in Symmetric Corner Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAmbrosio, Domenic; Marsilio, Roberto

    1995-01-01

    Three-dimensional supersonic viscous laminar flows over symmetric corners are considered in this paper. The characteristic features of such configurations are discussed and an historical survey on the past research work is presented. A new contribution based on a numerical technique that solves the parabolized form of the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. Such a method makes it possible to obtain very detailed descriptions of the flowfield with relatively modest CPU time and memory storage requirements. The numerical approach is based on a space-marching technique, uses a finite volume discretization and an upwind flux-difference splitting scheme (developed for the steady flow equations) for the evaluation of the inviscid fluxes. Second order accuracy is reached following the guidelines of the ENO schemes. Different free-stream conditions and geometrical configurations are considered. Primary and secondary streamwise vortical structures embedded in the boundary layer and originated by the interaction of the latter with shock waves are detected and studied. Computed results are compared with experimental data taken from literature.

  16. Effect of submerged flexible vegetation on flow structure and resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvelä, Juha

    2005-06-01

    Flume studies were carried out to investigate flow structure above flexible vegetation. A new data set of mean velocity profiles and turbulence characteristics is reported from experiments with wheat. The flow above the wheat reasonably followed the log law. Maximum values of the turbulence intensity urms and Reynolds stress -uw¯ were found approximately at the level of the maximum observed deflected plant height. A recent approach for describing vertical velocity profiles above aquatic vegetation [Stephan, U., 2002. Zum Fließwiderstandsverhalten flexibler Vegetation. Wiener Mitteilungen 180. Doctoral Thesis. Institute of Hydraulics, Hydrology and Water Resources Management, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Vienna.] was evaluated with these new data, which represent a different vegetal roughness type. The approach proved to be successful beyond the original scope. However, a new definition for the shear velocity based on the deflected plant height is suggested. The benefit of this modification is that complex turbulence measurements can be avoided, which enhances the practical applicability of the approach.

  17. A study of thin liquid sheet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Calfo, Frederick D.; Mcconley, Marc W.; Mcmaster, Matthew S.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    1993-01-01

    This study was a theoretical and experimental investigation of thin liquid sheet flows in vacuum. A sheet flow created by a narrow slit of width, W, coalesces to a point at a distance, L, as a result of surface tension forces acting at the sheet edges. As the flow coalesces, the fluid accumulates in the sheet edges. The observed triangular shape of the sheet agrees with the calculated triangular result. Experimental results for L/W as a function of Weber number, We, agree with the calculated result, L/W = the sq. root of 8We. The edge cross sectional shape is found to oscillate from elliptic to 'cigar' like to 'peanut' like and then back to elliptic in the flow direction. A theoretical one-dimensional model was developed that yielded only elliptic solutions for the edge cross section. At the points where the elliptic shapes occur, there is agreement between theory and experiment.

  18. Comparative Study of Airfoil Flow Separation Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Nick; Kahouli, Waad; Epps, Brenden

    2015-11-01

    Airfoil flow separation impacts a multitude of applications including turbomachinery, wind turbines, and bio-inspired micro-aerial vehicles. In order to achieve maximum performance, some devices operate near the edge of flow separation, and others use dynamic flow separation advantageously. Numerous criteria exist for predicting the onset of airfoil flow separation. This talk presents a comparative study of a number of such criteria, with emphasis paid to speed and accuracy of the calculations. We evaluate the criteria using a two-dimensional unsteady vortex lattice method, which allows for rapid analysis (on the order of seconds instead of days for a full Navier-Stokes solution) and design of optimal airfoil geometry and kinematics. Furthermore, dynamic analyses permit evaluation of dynamic stall conditions for enhanced lift via leading edge vortex shedding, commonly present in small flapping-wing flyers such as the bumblebee and hummingbird.

  19. Dynamics of generalized Gaussian polymeric structures in random layered flows.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Divya; Kant, Rama

    2015-04-01

    We develop a formalism for the dynamics of a flexible branched polymer with arbitrary topology in the presence of random flows. This is achieved by employing the generalized Gaussian structure (GGS) approach and the Matheron-de Marsily model for the random layered flow. The expression for the average square displacement (ASD) of the center of mass of the GGS is obtained in such flow. The averaging is done over both the thermal noise and the external random flow. Although the formalism is valid for branched polymers with various complex topologies, we mainly focus here on the dynamics of the flexible star and dendrimer. We analyze the effect of the topology (the number and length of branches for stars and the number of generations for dendrimers) on the dynamics under the influence of external flow, which is characterized by their root-mean-square velocity, persistence flow length, and flow exponent α. Our analysis shows two anomalous power-law regimes, viz., subdiffusive (intermediate-time polymer stretching and flow-induced diffusion) and superdiffusive (long-time flow-induced diffusion). The influence of the topology of the GGS is unraveled in the intermediate-time regime, while the long-time regime is only weakly dependent on the topology of the polymer. With the decrease in the value of α, the magnitude of the ASD decreases, while the temporal exponent of the ASD increases in both the time regimes. Also there is an increase in both the magnitude of the ASD and the crossover time (from the subdiffusive to the superdiffusive regime) with an increase in the total mass of the polymeric structure.

  20. Dynamics of generalized Gaussian polymeric structures in random layered flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katyal, Divya; Kant, Rama

    2015-04-01

    We develop a formalism for the dynamics of a flexible branched polymer with arbitrary topology in the presence of random flows. This is achieved by employing the generalized Gaussian structure (GGS) approach and the Matheron-de Marsily model for the random layered flow. The expression for the average square displacement (ASD) of the center of mass of the GGS is obtained in such flow. The averaging is done over both the thermal noise and the external random flow. Although the formalism is valid for branched polymers with various complex topologies, we mainly focus here on the dynamics of the flexible star and dendrimer. We analyze the effect of the topology (the number and length of branches for stars and the number of generations for dendrimers) on the dynamics under the influence of external flow, which is characterized by their root-mean-square velocity, persistence flow length, and flow exponent α . Our analysis shows two anomalous power-law regimes, viz., subdiffusive (intermediate-time polymer stretching and flow-induced diffusion) and superdiffusive (long-time flow-induced diffusion). The influence of the topology of the GGS is unraveled in the intermediate-time regime, while the long-time regime is only weakly dependent on the topology of the polymer. With the decrease in the value of α , the magnitude of the ASD decreases, while the temporal exponent of the ASD increases in both the time regimes. Also there is an increase in both the magnitude of the ASD and the crossover time (from the subdiffusive to the superdiffusive regime) with an increase in the total mass of the polymeric structure.

  1. Observations of pockmark flow structure in Belfast Bay, Maine, Part 2: evidence for cavity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandel, Christina L.; Lippmann, Thomas C.; Foster, Diane L.; Brothers, Laura L.

    2017-02-01

    Pockmark flow circulation patterns were investigated through current measurements along the rim and center of two pockmarks in Belfast Bay, Maine. Observed time-varying current profiles have a complex vertical and directional structure that rotates significantly with depth and is strongly dependent on the phase of the tide. Observations of the vertical profiles of horizontal velocities in relation to relative geometric parameters of the pockmark are consistent with circulation patterns described qualitatively by cavity flow models (Ashcroft and Zhang 2005). The time-mean behavior of the shear layer is typically used to characterize cavity flow, and was estimated using vorticity thickness to quantify the growth rate of the shear layer horizontally across the pockmark. Estimated positive vorticity thickness spreading rates are consistent with cavity flow predictions, and occur at largely different rates between the two pockmarks. Previously modeled flow (Brothers et al. 2011) and laboratory measurements (Pau et al. 2014) over pockmarks of similar geometry to those examined herein are also qualitatively consistent with cavity flow circulation, suggesting that cavity flow may be a good first-order flow model for pockmarks in general.

  2. Observations of pockmark flow structure in Belfast Bay, Maine, Part 2: evidence for cavity flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fandel, Christina L.; Lippmann, Thomas C.; Foster, Diane L.; Brothers, Laura L.

    2017-01-01

    Pockmark flow circulation patterns were investigated through current measurements along the rim and center of two pockmarks in Belfast Bay, Maine. Observed time-varying current profiles have a complex vertical and directional structure that rotates significantly with depth and is strongly dependent on the phase of the tide. Observations of the vertical profiles of horizontal velocities in relation to relative geometric parameters of the pockmark are consistent with circulation patterns described qualitatively by cavity flow models (Ashcroft and Zhang 2005). The time-mean behavior of the shear layer is typically used to characterize cavity flow, and was estimated using vorticity thickness to quantify the growth rate of the shear layer horizontally across the pockmark. Estimated positive vorticity thickness spreading rates are consistent with cavity flow predictions, and occur at largely different rates between the two pockmarks. Previously modeled flow (Brothers et al. 2011) and laboratory measurements (Pau et al. 2014) over pockmarks of similar geometry to those examined herein are also qualitatively consistent with cavity flow circulation, suggesting that cavity flow may be a good first-order flow model for pockmarks in general.

  3. Study on an undershot cross-flow water turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yasuyuki; Inagaki, Terumi; Li, Yanrong; Omiya, Ryota; Fukutomi, Junichiro

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to develop a water turbine suitable for ultra-low heads in open channels, with the end goal being the effective utilization of unutilized hydroelectric energy in agricultural water channels. We performed tests by applying a cross-flow runner to an open channel as an undershot water turbine while attempting to simplify the structure and eliminate the casing. We experimentally investigated the flow fields and performance of water turbines in states where the flow rate was constant for the undershot cross-flow water turbine mentioned above. In addition, we compared existing undershot water turbines with our undershot cross-flow water turbine after attaching a bottom plate to the runner. From the results, we were able to clarify the following. Although the effective head for cross-flow runners with no bottom plate was lower than those found in existing runners equipped with a bottom plate, the power output is greater in the high rotational speed range because of the high turbine efficiency. Also, the runner with no bottom plate differed from runners that had a bottom plate in that no water was being wound up by the blades or retained between the blades, and the former received twice the flow due to the flow-through effect. As a result, the turbine efficiency was greater for runners with no bottom plate in the full rotational speed range compared with that found in runners that had a bottom plate.

  4. A high-performance flow-field structured iron-chromium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y. K.; Zhou, X. L.; An, L.; Wei, L.; Zhao, T. S.

    2016-08-01

    Unlike conventional iron-chromium redox flow batteries (ICRFBs) with a flow-through cell structure, in this work a high-performance ICRFB featuring a flow-field cell structure is developed. It is found that the present flow-field structured ICRFB reaches an energy efficiency of 76.3% with a current density of 120 mA cm-2 at 25 °C. The energy efficiency can be as high as 79.6% with an elevated current density of 200 mA cm-2 at 65 °C, a record performance of the ICRFB in the existing literature. In addition, it is demonstrated that the energy efficiency of the battery is stable during the cycle test, and that the capacity decay rate of the battery is 0.6% per cycle. More excitingly, the high performance of the flow-field structured battery significantly lowers the capital cost at 137.6 kWh-1, which is 28.2% lower than that of the conventional ICRFB for 8-h energy storage.

  5. Thermo-Flow Structure and Epitaxial Uniformity in Large-Scale Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactors with Rotating Susceptor and Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soong, Chyi-Yeou; Chyuan, Chung-Hsing; Tzong, Ruey-Yau

    1998-10-01

    The transport phenomena in large-scale metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactors with a rotating susceptor are investigated by numerical simulation of thin-film epitaxial growth of gallium arsenide. We are mainly concerned with the thermo-flow structure, its influence on epitaxial growth rate, and the means of improving epilayer flatness. The effects of susceptor rotation and thermo-flow conditions on gas flow, temperature and concentration fields are studied. The present results show the flow structure and transport characteristics in various flow regimes. A parameter map and the associated correlations of boundary curves of the flow-mode transition are proposed. It is demonstrated that the epilayer flatness can be tuned either by properly controlling the vortex strength in a rotation-dominated flow regime and/or by employing an inlet flow control technique proposed in the present work.

  6. Near field flow structure of isothermal swirling flows and reacting non-premixed swirling flames

    SciTech Connect

    Olivani, Andrea; Solero, Giulio; Cozzi, Fabio; Coghe, Aldo

    2007-04-15

    Two confined lean non-premixed swirl-stabilized flame typologies were investigated in order to achieve detailed information on the thermal and aerodynamic field in the close vicinity of the burner throat and provide correlation with the exhaust emissions. Previous finding indicated the generation of a partially premixed flame with radial fuel injection and a purely diffusive flame with co-axial injection in a swirling co-flow. In the present work, the experimental study is reported which has been conducted on a straight exit laboratory burner with no quarl cone, fuelled by natural gas and air, and fired vertically upwards with the flame stabilized at the end of two concentric pipes with the annulus supplying swirled air and the central pipe delivering the fuel. Two fuel injection typologies, co-axial and radial (i.e., transverse), leading to different mixing mechanisms, have been characterized through different techniques: particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) for a comprehensive analysis of the velocity field, still photography for the detection of flame front and main visible features, and thermocouples for the temperature distribution. Isothermal flow conditions have been included in the experimental investigation to provide a basic picture of the flow field and to comprehend the modifications induced by the combustion process. The results indicated that, although the global mixing process and the main flame structure are governed by the swirl motion imparted to the air stream, the two different fuel injection methodologies play an important role on mixture formation and flame stabilization in the primary mixing zone. Particularly, it has been found that, in case of axial injection, the turbulent interaction between the central fuel jet and the backflow generated by the swirl can induce an intermittent fuel penetration in the recirculated hot products and the formation of a central sooting luminous plume, a phenomenon totally

  7. Studies of magnetopause structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speiser, Theodore W.

    1991-01-01

    From the International Sun-Earth Explorers (ISEE) 1 magnetopause crossings on November 10, 1977, three-dimensional distribution functions for energetic ions were studied in the magnetosphere, through the magnetopause, and in the magnetosheath (Speiser and Williams, 1982). The particle distributions were particularly examined at and near the times that Russell and Elphic (1978) identified as flux transfer events (FTE). Using a simple, one-dimensional, quasi-static model, particle orbits were followed numerically, from the magnetosphere into the sheath. The inner, trapped, distribution initializes the distribution function. Liouville's theorem allows the inner distribution to be mapped into the sheath following the orbits. This mapping is shown for four mangetosheath ion flows (MIF's) corresponding to four flux transfer events. Results from the studies are discussed. A brief discussion of current sheet particle motion is presented.

  8. Structures and scaling laws of turbulent Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberlack, Martin; Avsarkisov, Victor; Hoyas, Sergio; Rosteck, Andreas; Garcia-Galache, Jose P.; Frank, Andy

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a set of large scale DNS of turbulent Couette flow with the two key objectives: (i) to better understand large scale coherent structures and (ii) to validate new Lie symmetry based turbulent scaling laws for the mean velocity and higher order moments. Though frequently reported in the literature large scale structures pose a serious constraint on our ability to conduct DNS of turbulent Couette flow as the largest structures grow with increasing Re#, while at the same time Kolmogorov scale decreases. Other than for the turbulent Poiseuille flow a too small box is immediately visible in low order statistics such as the mean and limited our DNS to Reτ = 550 . At the same time we observed that scaling of the mean is peculiar as it involves a certain statistical symmetry which has never been observed for any other parallel wall-bounded turbulent shear flow. Symmetries such as Galilean group lie at the heart of fluid dynamics, while for turbulence statistics due to the multi-point correlation equations (MPCE) additional statistical symmetries are admitted. Most important, symmetries are the essential to construct exact solutions to the MPCE, which with the new above-mentioned special statistical symmetry led to a new turbulent scaling law for the Couette flow. DFG Grant No; KH 257/2-1.

  9. Structure formation of surfactant membranes under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Hayato; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2013-07-01

    Shear-flow-induced structure formation in surfactant-water mixtures is investigated numerically using a meshless-membrane model in combination with a particle-based hydrodynamics simulation approach for the solvent. At low shear rates, uni-lamellar vesicles and planar lamellae structures are formed at small and large membrane volume fractions, respectively. At high shear rates, lamellar states exhibit an undulation instability, leading to rolled or cylindrical membrane shapes oriented in the flow direction. The spatial symmetry and structure factor of this rolled state agree with those of intermediate states during lamellar-to-onion transition measured by time-resolved scatting experiments. Structural evolution in time exhibits a moderate dependence on the initial condition.

  10. Vortex structures in turbulent channel flow behind an orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Soichiro; Iwamoto, Kaoru; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a channel flow with an orifice has been performed for Reτ0=10 - 600, where uτ0 is the friction velocity calculated from the mean pressure gradient, δ the channel half width and ν the kinematic viscosity. In the wake region, the mean flow becomes asymmetric by the Coanda effect. The degree of asymmetry increases with increasing the Reynolds number for the laminar flow at Reτ0< 50. The degree decreases abruptly at Reτ0=50, where the transition from the laminar to the turbulent flow take places. Large-scale spanwise vortices generated at the orifice edges. They become deformed and break up into disordered small-scale structures in shear layer. The small-scale vortices are convected towards the channel center. The large-scale vortices have an important effect upon the reattachment locations and streamwise vortices near the wall in the wake region.

  11. Stochastic estimation of organized turbulent structure - Homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adrian, Ronald J.; Moin, Parviz

    1988-01-01

    A generalization of the conditional-eddy concept is proposed in which the conditional event specifies the local kinematic state in terms of the velocity and the deformation. Results are presented for stochastically estimated conditional eddies given the local kinematics. The equation governing the probability density function of a kinematic state has been derived for constant-property incompressible flow, providing a link between coherent flow structures corresponding to the conditional eddies and the modelling of turbulent transport. The primary contributions to the second-quadrant and fourth-quadrant Reynolds-stress events in homogeneous shear flow are shown to come from flow induced through the 'legs' and close to the 'heads' of upright and inverted 'hairpins', respectively.

  12. Structural integrated sensor and actuator systems for active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Christian; Schwerter, Martin; Leester-Schädel, Monika; Wierach, Peter; Dietzel, Andreas; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive flow separation control system is designed and implemented as an essential part of a novel high-lift device for future aircraft. The system consists of MEMS pressure sensors to determine the flow conditions and adaptive lips to regulate the mass flow and the velocity of a wall near stream over the internally blown Coanda flap. By the oscillating lip the mass flow in the blowing slot changes dynamically, consequently the momentum exchange of the boundary layer over a high lift flap required mass flow can be reduced. These new compact and highly integrated systems provide a real-time monitoring and manipulation of the flow conditions. In this context the integration of pressure sensors into flow sensing airfoils of composite material is investigated. Mechanical and electrical properties of the integrated sensors are investigated under mechanical loads during tensile tests. The sensors contain a reference pressure chamber isolated to the ambient by a deformable membrane with integrated piezoresistors connected as a Wheatstone bridge, which outputs voltage signals depending on the ambient pressure. The composite material in which the sensors are embedded consists of 22 individual layers of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) prepreg. The results of the experiments are used for adapting the design of the sensors and the layout of the laminate to ensure an optimized flux of force in highly loaded structures primarily for future aeronautical applications. It can be shown that the pressure sensor withstands the embedding process into fiber composites with full functional capability and predictable behavior under stress.

  13. On the flow structures and hysteresis of laminar swirling jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogus, G.; Baelmans, M.; Vanierschot, M.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper different flow patterns of an annular jet with a stepped-conical nozzle as well as the transition between these patterns are numerically investigated as a function of the swirl number S which is the ratio of tangential momentum flux to axial momentum flux. The Reynolds number of the jet based on the axial velocity and the nozzle hydraulic diameter is 180. The 3D Navier Stokes equations are solved using the direct numerical simulation. Four different flow patterns are identified and their associated flow structures are discussed. Starting from an annular jet at zero swirl, spinning vortices around the central axis originate with increasing swirl. As the swirl is further increased, the onset of vortex breakdown occurs, followed by jet attachment to the nozzle. Decreasing the swirl number back from this flow pattern, the Coanda effect near the nozzle outlet creates a wall jet. This wall jet remains till the decreasing swirl number equals to zero, showing hysteresis in flow patterns between an increase and a subsequent decrease in swirl. The determined flow states are experimentally validated. Potential applications related to these flow patterns and their hysteretic behavior are also briefly discussed.

  14. Two-phase flow interfacial structures in a rod bundle geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Sidharth S.

    Interfacial structure of air-water two-phase flow in a scaled nuclear reactor rod bundle geometry was studied in this research. Global and local flow regimes were obtained for the rod bundle geometry. Local two-phase flow parameters were measured at various axial locations in order to understand the transport of interfacial structures. A one-dimensional two-group interfacial area transport model was evaluated using the local parameter database. Air-water two-phase flow experiments were performed in an 8 X 8 rod bundle test section to obtain flow regime maps at various axial locations. Area averaged void fraction was measured using parallel plate type impedance void meters. The cumulative probability distribution functions of the signals from the impedance void meters were used along with a self organizing neural network to identify flow regimes. Local flow regime maps revealed the cross-sectional distribution of flow regimes in the bundle. Local parameters that characterize interfacial structure, that is, void fraction alpha, interfacial area concentration, ai, bubble Sauter mean diameter, DSm and bubble velocity, vg were measured using four sensor conductivity probe technique. The local data revealed the distribution of the interfacial structure in the radial direction, as well as its development in the axial direction. In addition to this, the effect of spacer grid on the flow structure at different gas and liquid velocities was revealed by local parameter measurements across the spacer grids. A two-group interfacial area transport equation (IATE) specific to rod bundle geometry was derived. The derivation of two-group IATE required certain assumption on the bubble shapes in the subchannels and the bubbles spanning more than a subchannel. It was found that the geometrical relationship between the volume and the area of a cap bubble distorted by rods was similar to the one derived for a confined channel under a specific geometrical transformation. The one

  15. Simulation and study of stratified flows around finite bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushchin, V. A.; Matyushin, P. V.

    2016-06-01

    The flows past a sphere and a square cylinder of diameter d moving horizontally at the velocity U in a linearly density-stratified viscous incompressible fluid are studied. The flows are described by the Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation. Variations in the spatial vortex structure of the flows are analyzed in detail in a wide range of dimensionless parameters (such as the Reynolds number Re = Ud/ ν and the internal Froude number Fr = U/( Nd), where ν is the kinematic viscosity and N is the buoyancy frequency) by applying mathematical simulation (on supercomputers of Joint Supercomputer Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences) and three-dimensional flow visualization. At 0.005 < Fr < 100, the classification of flow regimes for the sphere (for 1 < Re < 500) and for the cylinder (for 1 < Re < 200) is improved. At Fr = 0 (i.e., at U = 0), the problem of diffusion-induced flow past a sphere leading to the formation of horizontal density layers near the sphere's upper and lower poles is considered. At Fr = 0.1 and Re = 50, the formation of a steady flow past a square cylinder with wavy hanging density layers in the wake is studied in detail.

  16. Lower Three Runs Instream Flow Study

    SciTech Connect

    del Carmen, B.R.; Paller, M.H.

    1993-12-31

    An Instream Flow Study was conducted to identify the minimum discharge from PAR Pond that will support a balanced biological fish community in Lower Three Runs. Hydraulic and habitat models of the Physical Habitat simulation System (PHABSIM), the major component of the US Fish and Wildlife Service`s Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) were applied. Following calibration of the Water Surface Profile (WSP)Model for three study reaches, hydraulic data was input to the AVDEPTH habitat model to develop relationships between discharge and reaches, hydraulic data was input to the AVDEPTH habitat model to development relationship between discharge and available habitat.

  17. Statistical Characterization of the Flow Structure in the Rhine Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, Philippe; Debas, Alain M.; Haeberli, Christian; Flamant, Pierre H.

    The flow structure at the intersection between the Rhine and the Seez valleys nearthe Swiss city of Bad Ragaz has been documented by means of wind and pressuremeasurements collected from 9 September to 10 November 1999 during the MesoscaleAlpine Programme (MAP) experiment. To understand better the dynamics of theageostrophic winds that develop in this part of the Rhine valley, some key questionsare answered in this paper including the following: (i) How does air blow at theintersection of the Rhine and Seez valleys? and (ii) what are the dynamical processes(mechanical or thermal) driving the flow circulations in the valleys?Statistical analysis of the wind and pressure patterns at synoptic scale and at the scaleof the valley shows that five main flow patterns, SE/S, NW/W, NW/N, NW/S, SE/N(wind direction in the Seez valley/wind direction in the Rhine valley) prevail. The SE/S regime is the flow splitting situation. It is mainly driven by a strong pressure gradient across the Alps leading to foehn, even though some nocturnal cases are generated bylocal thermal gradients. The NW/W and NW/N regimes are mechanically forced bythe synoptic pressure gradient (as the flow splitting case). The difference between thetwo regimes is due to the synoptic flow direction [westerly (northerly) synoptic flowfor the NW/W (NW/N) regime], showing that the Rhine valley (particularly from BadRagaz to Lake Constance) is less efficient in channelling the flow than the Seez valley.The NW/S (occurring mainly during nighttime) and SE/N (occurring mainly duringdaytime) regimes are mainly katabatic flows. However, the SE/N regime is also partlyforced at the synoptic scale during the foehn case that occurred between 18 October and 20 October 1999, with a complex layered vertical structure.

  18. Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a reactor with mechanical mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Lecheva, A.; Zheleva, I.

    2015-10-28

    Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a cylindrical reactor with mechanical mixing is studied and numerical results are presented in this article. The model area is complex because of the presence of convex corners of the mixer in the fluid flow. Proper boundary conditions for the vorticity calculated on the base of the stream function values near solid boundaries of the examined area are presented. The boundary value problem of motion of swirling incompressible viscous fluid in a vertical tank reactor with a mixer is solved numerically. The calculations are made by a computer code, written in MATLAB. The complex structure of the flow around the mixing disk is described and commented.

  19. Similarity of organized structures in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, Parviz

    1990-01-01

    Recent analysis of databases generated by direct numerical simulations of homogeneous turbulent shear flows have revealed the presence of coherent structures similar to those in turbulent boundary layers. In this paper these findings and tentative conclusions on their significance are discussed.

  20. Flow-induced structured phase in nonionic micellar solutions.

    PubMed

    Cardiel, Joshua J; Tonggu, Lige; de la Iglesia, Pablo; Zhao, Ya; Pozzo, Danilo C; Wang, Liguo; Shen, Amy Q

    2013-12-17

    In this work, we consider the flow of a nonionic micellar solution (precursor) through an array of microposts, with focus on its microstructural and rheological evolution. The precursor contains polyoxyethylene(20) sorbitan monooleate (Tween-80) and cosurfactant monolaurin (ML). An irreversible flow-induced structured phase (NI-FISP) emerges after the nonionic precursor flows through the hexagonal micropost arrays, when subjected to strain rates ~10(4) s(-1) and strain ~10(3). NI-FISP consists of close-looped micellar bundles and multiconnected micellar networks as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). We also conduct small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements in both precursor and NI-FISP to illustrate the structural transition. We propose a potential mechanism for the NI-FISP formation that relies on the micropost arrays and the flow kinematics in the microdevice to induce entropic fluctuations in the micellar solution. Finally, we show that the rheological variation from a viscous precursor solution to a viscoelastic micellar structured phase is associated with the structural evolution from the precursor to NI-FISP.

  1. Aircraft energy efficiency laminar flow control wing design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, T. F., Jr.; Pride, J. D., Jr.; Fernald, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    An engineering design study was performed in which laminar flow control (LFC) was integrated into the wing of a commercial passenger transport aircraft. A baseline aircraft configuration was selected and the wing geometry was defined. The LFC system, with suction slots, ducting, and suction pumps was integrated with the wing structure. The use of standard aluminum technology and advanced superplastic formed diffusion bonded titanium technology was evaluated. The results of the design study show that the LFC system can be integrated with the wing structure to provide a structurally and aerodynamically efficient wing for a commercial transport aircraft.

  2. Review: Impact of underground structures on the flow of urban groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, Guillaume; Winiarski, Thierry; Rossier, Yvan; Eisenlohr, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Property economics favours the vertical development of cities but flow of groundwater can be affected by the use of underground space in them. This review article presents the state of the art regarding the impact of disturbances caused by underground structures (tunnels, basements of buildings, deep foundations, etc.) on the groundwater flow in urban aquifers. The structures built in the underground levels of urban areas are presented and organised in terms of their impact on flow: obstacle to the flow or disturbance of the groundwater budget of the flow system. These two types of disturbance are described in relation to the structure area and the urban area. The work reviewed shows, on one hand, the individual impacts of different urban underground structures, and on the other, their cumulative impacts on flow, using real case studies. Lastly, the works are placed in perspective regarding the integration of underground structures with the aim of operational management of an urban aquifer. The literature presents deterministic numerical modelling as a tool capable of contributing to this aim, in that it helps to quantify the effect of an underground infrastructure project on groundwater flow, which is crucial for decision-making processes. It can also be an operational decision-aid tool for choosing construction techniques or for formulating strategies to manage the water resource.

  3. Fluid Structural Analysis of Urine Flow in a Stented Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Blanco, J. Carlos; Martínez-Reina, F. Javier; Cruz, Domingo; Pagador, J. Blas; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M.; Soria, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Many urologists are currently studying new designs of ureteral stents to improve the quality of their operations and the subsequent recovery of the patient. In order to help during this design process, many computational models have been developed to simulate the behaviour of different biological tissues and provide a realistic computational environment to evaluate the stents. However, due to the high complexity of the involved tissues, they usually introduce simplifications to make these models less computationally demanding. In this study, the interaction between urine flow and a double-J stented ureter with a simplified geometry has been analysed. The Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) of urine and the ureteral wall was studied using three models for the solid domain: Mooney-Rivlin, Yeoh, and Ogden. The ureter was assumed to be quasi-incompressible and isotropic. Data obtained in previous studies from ex vivo and in vivo mechanical characterization of different ureters were used to fit the mentioned models. The results show that the interaction between the stented ureter and urine is negligible. Therefore, we can conclude that this type of models does not need to include the FSI and could be solved quite accurately assuming that the ureter is a rigid body and, thus, using the more simple Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach. PMID:27127535

  4. The generation of coherent flow structures in a gravel bed river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, R. J.; Best, J.; Parsons, D.; Christensen, K.

    2010-12-01

    Turbulence in rivers is not a simple random field: visualisation and multipoint measurements show it is possible to decompose complex, multi-scaled, quasi-random flow fields into elementary organized structures which posses both spatial and temporal coherence termed either eddies or coherent flow structures (CFS). Quantifying the kinematic (size, scaling, shape, vorticity and energy) and dynamic (origin, stability, growth, genesis into new forms and contribution to averages) characteristics of CFS in gravel-bed rivers are central to improving our understanding of turbulent flow, and the contribution of CFS to shear stress, and hence sediment transport. Much of our uncertainty in understanding CFS over gravel-beds stems from two fundamental shortcomings: i) previous studies have used Reynolds decomposition of Eulerian time series to quantitatively determine processes, which may be interpolated to examine the whole flow field, rather than studying the complete instantaneous flow field; and ii) whole flow field visualization provides a qualitative understanding, but very little quantitative information. Here, we demonstrate a new experimental methodology to quantify simultaneously both the kinematic and dynamic characteristics of coherent flow structures based upon combined planar Laser Induced Fluorescence and Particle Imaging Velocimetry (pLIF-PIV) over a gravel surface for a range of Reynolds numbers. Snapshot POD is applied to the PIV results to determine the initiation of the structures. Initial results agree with the model of Falco (1991) that divides the outer flow into two distinct types of motion; large-scale motions, which are clearly being detected by the pLIF, and smaller ‘typical’ eddies, which the PIV is detecting within these large-scale structures. These results also conform with classical boundary layer hydraulics, where the dominant motions of flow have been shown to be the large-scale regions of momentum deficit that are elongated in the

  5. The Effect of Flow Structure on Corrosion: Circling-Foil Studies on 90/ 10 Copper-Nickel, and Hydrodynamic Modeling of the Erosion-Corrosion Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    Possible Corrosion Product Compounds Copper-based products: Oxides: cuprous oxide, natural cuprite Cu2 0 (red) cupric oxide, natural tenorite CuO (black...peroxide CuO 2 ’ H20 (brown or brownish black) Chlorides: hyroxychloride CuCl 2’ 3Cu(OH) 3 (green) cuprous chloride Cucl (brown) Sulfides: cupric ...C .................... W1~ j Ovnk 0 ý’ INTRODUCT ION When the corrosion rate of a metal is higher in a flowing electrolyte than in a stagnant

  6. Invariant-tori-like Lagrangian coherent structures in geophysical flows.

    PubMed

    Beron-Vera, Francisco J; Olascoaga, María J; Brown, Michael G; Koçak, Huseyin; Rypina, Irina I

    2010-03-01

    The term "Lagrangian coherent structure" (LCS) is normally used to describe numerically detected structures whose properties are similar to those of stable and unstable manifolds of hyperbolic trajectories. The latter structures are invariant curves, i.e., material curves of fluid that serve as transport barriers. In this paper we use the term LCS to describe a different type of structure whose properties are similar to those of invariant tori in certain classes of two-dimensional incompressible flows. Like stable and unstable manifolds, invariant tori are invariant curves that serve as transport barriers. There are many differences, however, between traditional LCSs and invariant-tori-like LCSs. These differences are discussed with an emphasis on numerical techniques that can be used to identify invariant-tori-like LCSs. Structures of this type are often present in geophysical flows where zonal jets are present. A prime example of an invariant-torus-like LCS is the transport barrier near the core of the polar night jet in the Earth's lower and middle stratospheres in the austral winter and early spring; this is the barrier that traps ozone-depleted air inside the ozone hole. This example is investigated using both a simple analytically prescribed flow and a velocity field produced by a general circulation model of the Earth's atmosphere.

  7. Flow-induced oscillation of collapsed tubes and airway structures.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Christopher D

    2008-11-30

    The self-excited oscillation of airway structures and flexible tubes in response to flow is reviewed. The structures range from tiny airways deep in the lung causing wheezing at the end of a forced expiration, to the pursed lips of a brass musical instrument player. Other airway structures that vibrate include the vocal cords (and their avian equivalent, the syrinx) and the soft palate of a snorer. These biological cases are compared with experiments on and theories for the self-excited oscillation of flexible tubes conveying a flow on the laboratory bench, with particular reference to those observations dealing with the situation where the inertia of the tube wall is dominant. In each case an attempt is made to summarise the current state of understanding. Finally, some outstanding challenges are identified.

  8. Relationships between internal structures and petrographic textures of basalt flows: example from a continental flood tholeiite province

    SciTech Connect

    Long, P.E.; Snow, M.G.; Davidson, N.J.

    1980-12-01

    Excellent exposures of numerous, well-preserved flows of continental flood tholeiite in south-central Washington provide opportunity to study primary internal structures of subaerial basalt flows. Typical intraflow structures (top to bottom) of a flow include: ropy to brecciated, vesicular flow top; coarsely columnar basalt (upper colonnade); hackly to columnar basalt with relatively small columns (entablature); relatively large, regular columns (lower colonnade); and a glassy basal zone that may be pillowed, vesicular, or highly fractured. One or more of these intraflow structures may be absent or present in multiples in any given flow. Predominance of certain combinations of intraflow structures define three basic types of flows. Type I flows consist principally of relatively large (> 0.9 m), irregular columns with little or no entablature and a poorly developed flow top. Type II flows exhibit alternating tiers of entablature and colonnade 1 to 5 m thick, which give way upward to a more uniform entablature that commonly contains vesicular layers. Type III flows have sharp entablature-colonnade contacts and typically exhibit an upper colonnade. Petrography of samples from different intraflow structures and flow types shows that entablature invariably has abundant black, tachylitic glass; whereas, colonnade typically has much less abundant, brown, transparent glass. Simple conductive cooling models do not explain sharp contacts between the distinctive textures of entablature and colonnade or textural differences between flow types. These textural differences require either different cooling rates or perhaps different oxygen fugacities across a relatively sharp contact within a flow.

  9. Flow-Structure-Acoustic Interaction Computational Modeling of Voice Production inside an Entire Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian

    2015-11-01

    Human voice quality is directly determined by the interplay of dynamic behavior of glottal flow, vibratory characteristics of VFs and acoustic characteristics of upper airway. These multiphysics constituents are tightly coupled together and precisely coordinate to produce understandable sound. Despite many years' research effort, the direct relationships among the detailed flow features, VF vibration and aeroacoustics still remains elusive. This study utilizes a first-principle based, flow-structure-acoustics interaction computational modeling approach to study the process of voice production inside an entire human airway. In the current approach, a sharp interface immersed boundary method based incompressible flow solver is utilized to model the glottal flow; A finite element based solid mechanics solver is utilized to model the vocal vibration; A high-order immersed boundary method based acoustics solver is utilized to directly compute sound. These three solvers are fully coupled to mimic the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. The geometry of airway is reconstructed based on the in-vivo MRI measurement reported by Story et al. (1995) and a three-layer continuum based vocal fold model is taken from Titze and Talkin (1979). Results from these simulations will be presented and further analyzed to get new insight into the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. This study is expected to improve the understanding of fundamental physical mechanism of voice production and to help to build direct cause-effect relationship between biomechanics and voice sound.

  10. Pulsed Flows Along a Cusp Structure Observed with SOO/AIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Barbara; Demoulin, P.; Mandrini, C. H.; Mays, M. L.; Ofman, L.; Driel-Gesztelyi, L. Van; Viall, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    We present observations of a cusp-shaped structure that formed after a flare and coronal mass ejection on 14 February 2011. Throughout the evolution of the cusp structure, blob features up to a few Mm in size were observed flowing along the legs and stalk of the cusp at projected speeds ranging from 50 to 150 km/sec. Around two dozen blob features, on order of 1 - 3 minutes apart, were tracked in multiple AlA EUV wavelengths. The blobs flowed outward (away from the Sun) along the cusp stalk, and most of the observed speeds were either constant or decelerating. We attempt to reconstruct the 3-D magnetic field of the evolving structure, discuss the possible drivers of the flows (including pulsed reconnect ion and tearing mode instability), and compare the observations to studies of pulsed reconnect ion and blob flows in the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere.

  11. Turbulent statistics and flow structures in spanwise-rotating turbulent plane Couette flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Jie; Xia, Zhenhua; Cai, Qingdong; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-09-01

    A series of direct numerical simulations of spanwise-rotating turbulent plane Couette flows at a Reynolds number of 1300 with rotation numbers Ro between 0 and 0.9 is carried out to investigate the effects of anticyclonic rotation on turbulent statistics and flow structures. Several typical turbulent statistics are presented, including the mean shear rate at the centerline, the wall-friction Reynolds number, and volume-averaged kinetic energies with respect to the secondary flow field, turbulent field, and total fluctuation field. Our results show that the rotation changes these quantities in different manners. Volume-averaged balance equations for kinetic energy are analyzed and it turns out that the interaction term acts as a kinetic energy bridge that transfers energy from the secondary flow to the turbulent fluctuations. Several typical flow regimes are identified based on the correlation functions across the whole channel and flow visualizations. The two-dimensional roll cells are observed at weak rotation Ro=0.01 , where alternant clustering of vortices appears. Three-dimensional roll cells emerge around Ro≈0.02 , where the clustering of vortices shows the meandering and bifurcating behavior. For moderate rotation 0.07 ≲Ro≲0.36 , well-organized structures are observed, where the herringbonelike vortices are clustered between streaks from the top view of three-dimensional flow visualization and form annuluses. More importantly, the vortices are rather confined to one side of the walls when Ro≤0.02 and are inclined from the bottom to upper walls when Ro≥0.07 .

  12. Visual study of the effect of grazing flow on the oscillatory flow in a resonator orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    Grazing flow and oscillatory flow in an orifice were studied in a plexiglass flow channel with a single side branch Helmholtz resonator using water as the fluid medium. An oscillatory flow was applied to the resonatory cavity, and color dyes were injected in both the orifice and the grazing flow field to record the motion of the fluid. The flow regimes associated with linear and nonlinear (high sound pressure level) impedances with and without grazing flows were recorded by a high-speed motion-picture camera. Appreciable differences in the oscillatory flow field were seen in the various flow regimes. With high grazing flows, the outflow and inflow from the resonator cavity are found to be asymmetric. The visual study confirms that jet energy loss during flow into a resonator cavity is much larger than the loss for ejection from the cavity into the grazing flow. For inflow into the resonator cavity, the effective orifice area was significantly reduced.

  13. Numerical Study of Tip Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacles-Mariani, Jennifer; Hafez, Mohamed

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an overview and summary of the many different research work related to tip vortex flows and wake/trailing vortices as applied to practical engineering problems. As a literature survey paper, it outlines relevant analytical, theoretical, experimental and computational study found in literature. It also discusses in brief some of the fundamental aspects of the physics and its complexities. An appendix is also included. The topics included in this paper are: 1) Analytical Vortices; 2) Experimental Studies; 3) Computational Studies; 4) Wake Vortex Control and Management; 5) Wake Modeling; 6) High-Lift Systems; 7) Issues in Numerical Studies; 8) Instabilities; 9) Related Topics; 10) Visualization Tools for Vertical Flows; 11) Further Work Needed; 12) Acknowledgements; 13) References; and 14) Appendix.

  14. Coherent Structure-Reflective Turbulent Viscous Flow Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-07

    REFLECTIVE TURBULENT VISCOUS FLOW MODELING PREPARED FOR: SELECTED Dr. James M. McMichael D Program Manager * Aerospace Sciences AFOSRINA or c...ceesM -=t ilb: t, j Dist ,,el- d I . ... " . . .. .a .1-I i1 - i | i Executive Summary The research reported upon here addresses several elements of the...here, an SBIR study of turbulence in hypersonic flow was initiated for AFOSR, the fruits of which now support an advanced R& D effort at Eglin AFB. 9 0

  15. On the flow structure of cloud cavitating flow around an axisymmetric body near the free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiwei; Wu, Xiaocui; Huang, Chenguang; Yu, XianXian

    2015-12-01

    The influence of the free surface on the cavitating flow is an important issue involved in the design of high speed surface vehicles. In the present paper, unsteady cavitating turbulent flow around an axisymmetric body near the free surface was investigated by both launching experiment and LES simulation. The vortex motion induced by cavity shedding under the effect of the free surface is emphatically analyzed by comparing with the submerged condition. The vortex shedding process around the projectile is not synchronized, while the asymmetric characteristic in collapse process is more remarkable, with the generation of multiple vortex ring structures.

  16. Solar Coronal Structure Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Marilyn E.; Saba, Julia; Strong, Keith; Nitta, Nariaki; Harvey, Karen

    1997-01-01

    The subject of this investigation is the study the physics of the solar corona through the analysis of the EUV and UV data produced by two flights (12 May 1992 and 25 April 1994) of the Lockheed Solar Plasma Diagnostics Experiment (SPDE) sounding rocket payload, in combination with Yohkoh and groundbased data. These joint datasets are useful for understanding the physical state of the solar atmosphere from the photosphere to the corona at the time of the rocket flights. Each rocket flight produced both spectral and imaging data. Highlights of this initial year of the contract included compilation, scaling and co-alignment of image sets, substantial progress on the Bright Point study, initial work on the Active Region and Large Scale Structure studies, DRSC slit-aspect determination work and calibration activities. One paper was presented at the 1997 Annual Meeting of the AAS/SPD in Bozeman, Montana. An initial set of calibrated spectra were placed into the public domain via the World Wide Web. Three Quarterly Progress Reports have been submitted; progress for the fourth quarter of the contract is summarized in this Final Contract Report. The intent of the investigation is to compare the physics of small- and medium-scale structure with that of large-scale structures with weak fields. A study has been identified in each size domain. The calibration of the rocket data forms an important element of the work. Of equal importance is the slit-aspect solution, which determines the correspondence between locations along the spectrograph slit and points on the solar disk.

  17. B-1 AFT Nacelle Flow Visualization Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celniker, Robert

    1975-01-01

    A 2-month program was conducted to perform engineering evaluation and design tasks to prepare for visualization and photography of the airflow along the aft portion of the B-1 nacelles and nozzles during flight test. Several methods of visualizing the flow were investigated and compared with respect to cost, impact of the device on the flow patterns, suitability for use in the flight environment, and operability throughout the flight. Data were based on a literature search and discussions with the test personnel. Tufts were selected as the flow visualization device in preference to several other devices studied. A tuft installation pattern has been prepared for the right-hand aft nacelle area of B-1 air vehicle No.2. Flight research programs to develop flow visualization devices other than tufts for use in future testing are recommended. A design study was conducted to select a suitable motion picture camera, to select the camera location, and to prepare engineering drawings sufficient to permit installation of the camera. Ten locations on the air vehicle were evaluated before the selection of the location in the horizontal stabilizer actuator fairing. The considerations included cost, camera angle, available volume, environmental control, flutter impact, and interference with antennas or other instrumentation.

  18. Granular flows on erodible layers: type and evolution of flow and deposit structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, G.; De Blasio, F.; De Caro, M.; Volpi, G.; Frattini, P.

    2012-04-01

    The interaction of a fast moving landslide mass with the basal layer over which movement takes place has been discussed in previous contributions. Nevertheless, the evolution of the structures within the moving mass and the erodible layer are still to be described in detail (Hungr and Evans, 2004; Crosta et al., 1992, 2006, 2009, 2011; Dufresne et al., 2010; Mangeney et al., 2010) and modeling results (Crosta et al., 2006, 2009, 2011; Mangeney et al., 2010). We present some of the results from a campaign of laboratory experiments aimed at studying the evolution of a granular flow at the impact with and during the successive spreading over a cohesionless erodible layer. We performed these test to study the processes and to collect data and evidences to compare them with the results of numerical simulations and to verify capabilities of numerical codes. The laboratory setup consists of an inclined slope and an horizontal sector where release and transport, and deposition take place, respectively. Materials used for the tests are: a uniform rounded siliceous sand (Hostun sand; 0.125-0.5 mm) commonly adopted in lab tests because free of scale effects, and a gravel made of angular elements (12 mm in ave. size). Both the materials have been tested in dry conditions. Different slope angles have been tested (40, 45, 50, 55, 50, 66°) as well as different thicknesses of the erodible layer (0, 0.5, 1, 2 cm) and volumes of the released material (1.5, 3, 5, 9.6 liters). Tests have been monitored by means of a high speed camera and the pre- and post-failure geometries have been surveyed by means of a laser scanner. Deposit description allowed also the computation of volumes and the characterization of the different structures developed and frozen into the deposit. Experiments allowed us to observe the extreme processes occurring during the movement and the mise en place of the deposits. In particular, we observe the formation of a clear wave-like feature developing during the

  19. Structural analysis of red blood cell aggregates under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Chesnutt, J K W; Marshall, J S

    2010-03-01

    A set of measures of red blood cell (RBC) aggregates are developed and applied to examine the aggregate structure under plane shear and channel flows. Some of these measures are based on averages over the set of red blood cells which are in contact with each other at a given time. Other measures are developed by first fitting an ellipse to the planar projection of the aggregate, and then examining the area and aspect ratio of the fit ellipse as well as the orientations of constituent RBCs with respect to the fit ellipse axes. The aggregate structural measures are illustrated using a new mesoscale computational model for blood cell transport, collision and adhesion. The sensitivity of this model to change in adhesive surface energy density and shear rate on the aggregate structure is examined. It is found that the mesoscale model predictions exhibit reasonable agreement with experimental and theoretical data for blood flow in plane shear and channel flows. The new structural measures are used to examine the differences between predictions of two- and three-dimensional computations of the aggregate formation, showing that two-dimensional computations retain some of the important aspects of three-dimensional computations.

  20. Characterisation of Aerogel Inner Structure with Superfluid Helium Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, S.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2006-09-07

    We have developed a numerical technique that firstly obtains the shape of an adsorbed film on a fractal structure via minimisation of the grand potential functional of the system. This film shape is then used to define the geometry of a potential flow problem, which models the flow of the superfluid film due to an external pressure gradient, with the assumption that the flow velocities are so small so as not to alter the shape of the film. Using a microscopic definition of tortuosity, it is found that in 2D, tortuosity scales with the amount of fluid condensed on the substrate, with an exponent {epsilon} = -1.5. These results are in qualitative agreement with previous experimental results using aerogel as the substrate. Our results also show that {epsilon} is a function of the fractal dimension, Df, and the random walk dimension, Dw of the aerogel, in contrast with previous theories.

  1. Performance study of a data flow architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, George

    1985-01-01

    Teams of scientists studied data flow concepts, static data flow machine architecture, and the VAL language. Each team mapped its application onto the machine and coded it in VAL. The principal findings of the study were: (1) Five of the seven applications used the full power of the target machine. The galactic simulation and multigrid fluid flow teams found that a significantly smaller version of the machine (16 processing elements) would suffice. (2) A number of machine design parameters including processing element (PE) function unit numbers, array memory size and bandwidth, and routing network capability were found to be crucial for optimal machine performance. (3) The study participants readily acquired VAL programming skills. (4) Participants learned that application-based performance evaluation is a sound method of evaluating new computer architectures, even those that are not fully specified. During the course of the study, participants developed models for using computers to solve numerical problems and for evaluating new architectures. These models form the bases for future evaluation studies.

  2. Numerical Studies of a Fluidic Diverter for Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Culley, Dennis E.; Raghu, Surya

    2009-01-01

    The internal flow structure in a specific fluidic diverter is studied over a range from low subsonic to sonic inlet conditions by a time-dependent numerical analysis. The understanding will aid in the development of fluidic diverters with minimum pressure losses and advanced designs of flow control actuators. The velocity, temperature and pressure fields are calculated for subsonic conditions and the self-induced oscillatory behavior of the flow is successfully predicted. The results of our numerical studies have excellent agreement with our experimental measurements of oscillation frequencies. The acoustic speed in the gaseous medium is determined to be a key factor for up to sonic conditions in governing the mechanism of initiating the oscillations as well as determining its frequency. The feasibility of employing plasma actuation with a minimal perturbation level is demonstrated in steady-state calculations to also produce oscillation frequencies of our own choosing instead of being dependent on the fixed-geometry fluidic device.

  3. Kinetic approach to the formation of 3D electromagnetic structures in flows of expanding plasma coronas. II. flow anisotropy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubchenko, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of magnetic structures in moving hot solar coronal plasma and hot collisionless laser-produced plasma, as determined by nonlinear criteria for weak and strong magnetization on the basis of the friction parameter Γ B and Alfven number M A, is considered within the Vlasov and Maxwell equations in the second part of the work. The flow velocities are lower then the thermal electron velocity. The energy and pulse anisotropy parameters of a flow, which determine its electromagnetic properties in the Cherenkov resonance line, are calculated by shape of particle distribution function (PDF). The ratio of these parameters is the Q-factor G V ; it characterizes the electromagnetic properties of a plasma flow and is expressed via the ratio of diamagnetic and resistive current densities or via the ratio of irregular and diamagnetic plasma scales. A particle flow is similar to a conductive medium at G V ≪ 1 and a diamagnetic medium at G V ≫ 1. The following cases are considered. (1) A plasma flow is specified by an isotropic PDF and interacts with distributed magnetization. Expressions for anisotropy parameters are derived, 3D field structures in the tail wake are found, and a possibility of topological reconstruction into a compact state under variation in the parameter G V is shown. (2) A plasma flow is specified by an isotropic PDF; a steady-state diamagnetic current layer, characterized by an anisotropic PDF, is immersed inside it. The system is in the diamagnetic state G ≫ 1. The generalized anisotropy parameter is calculated and a possibility of the excitation of three types of diamagnetic structures with low resistive currents is shown. (3) The nonlinear dynamics of anisotropic quasi-current-free plasma ( G =-1), in which the diamagnetic and resistive current densities locally compensate each other in the phase space of particle velocities, is studied. This dynamics is implemented in the long wavelength limit in plasma with an anisotropic PDF.

  4. Study of Boundary Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE .......... 11 - 4 TRANSITIONS AND PHASE EQUILIBRIA AMONG GRAIN BOUNDARY STRUCTURES...19 B THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE .......... 37 C TRANSITIONS AND PHASE EQUILIBRIA AMONG GRAIN BOUNDARY...layer structure. 10 SECTION 3 THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE The (111) planes of the fcc structure is stacked as ABCABC... as

  5. Flow-structure-acoustic interaction in a human voice model.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stefan; Kniesburges, Stefan; Müller, Stefan; Delgado, Antonio; Link, Gerhard; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Döllinger, Michael

    2009-03-01

    For the investigation of the physical processes of human phonation, inhomogeneous synthetic vocal folds were developed to represent the full fluid-structure-acoustic coupling. They consisted of polyurethane rubber with a stiffness in the range of human vocal folds and were mounted in a channel, shaped like the vocal tract in the supraglottal region. This test facility permitted extensive observations of flow-induced vocal fold vibrations, the periodic flow field, and the acoustic signals in the far field of the channel. Detailed measurements were performed applying particle-image velocimetry, a laser-scanning vibrometer, a microphone, unsteady pressure sensors, and a hot-wire probe, with the aim of identifying the physical mechanisms in human phonation. The results support the existence of the Coanda effect during phonation, with the flow attaching to one vocal fold and separating from the other. This behavior is not linked to one vocal fold and changes stochastically from cycle to cycle. The oscillating flow field generates a tonal sound. The broadband noise is presumed to be caused by the interaction of the asymmetric flow with the downstream-facing surfaces of the vocal folds, analogous to trailing-edge noise.

  6. Dislocation structures and anomalous flow in L12 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimiduk, D. M.

    1991-06-01

    The theory of the anomalous flow behavior of LI2 compounds has developed over the last 30 years. This theory has a foundation in the early estimates of the crystallographic anisotropy of antiphase boundary (APB) energy in these compounds. In spite of this critical aspect of the theory, it is only in the last five years that electron microscopy has been employed to quantify the APB energies and to determine the detailed nature of dislocation structures at each stage of deformation. The recent studies of several research groups have provided essentially consistent new details about the nature of dislocations in Ni3AI and a few other LI2 compounds which exhibit anomalous flow behavior. These studies have introduced several new concepts for the controlling dislocation mechanisms. Additionally, these studies have shown that in Ni3AI, the APB energies have only small variations in magnitude with change of the APB plane (they are nearly isotropic), are relatively insensitive to changes in solute content, and the anisotropy ratio does not correlate with alloy strength. The present manuscript provides a critical review of the new transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results along with the new concepts for the mechanism of anomalous flow. Inconsistencies and deficiencies within these new concepts are identified and discussed. The collective set of electron-microscopy results is discussed within the context of both the mechanical behavior of LI2 compounds and the Greenberg and Paidar, Pope and Vitek (PPV) models for anomalous flow. Conceptual consistency with these models can only be constructed if the Kear-Wilsdorf (K-W) configurations are treated as an irreversible work hardening or relaxation artifact and, specific details of these two models cannot be shown by electron microscopy. Alternatively, the structural features recently revealed by electron microscopy have not been assembled into a self-consistent model for yielding which fully addresses the mechanical behavior

  7. Experimental Study of Flow in a Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresconi, Frank; Prasad, Ajay

    2003-11-01

    An instability known as the Dean vortex occurs in curved pipes with a longitudinal pressure gradient. A similar effect is manifest in the flow in a converging or diverging bifurcation, such as those found in the human respiratory airways. The goal of this study is to characterize secondary flows in a bifurcation. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments were performed in a clear, plastic model. Results show the strength and migration of secondary vortices. Primary velocity features are also presented along with dispersion patterns from dye visualization. Unsteadiness, associated with a hairpin vortex, was also found at higher Re. This work can be used to assess the dispersion of particles in the lung. Medical delivery systems and pollution effect studies would profit from such an understanding.

  8. Brittle, flowing structures focused on subtle crustal heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soden, A. M.; Shipton, Z. K.; Lunn, R. J.; Pytharouli, S.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Fundamental to the development of groundwater flow models are geological models that accurately account for the spatial distribution and geometrical attributes of fracture systems in three dimensions, at both seismic and sub-seismic resolution. Accurate characterization of fracture populations in crystalline rock is of particular importance, as these are the principal targets for nuclear waste repositories and enhanced geothermal systems. Fracture models are populated using average properties from site specific outcrop and borehole data, geophysical imaging and empirical scaling relationships such as the decrease of fracture density with distance from a fault surface However, host rock heterogeneity is likely to be of equal importance in influencing fracture attributes. Our study focuses on brittle structures associated with a regional NE-SW ductile shear zone in NE Brazil. Detailed field mapping shows two phases of brittle structure overprinting a ductile shear zone: 1) a brittle fault zone, which is largely "sealed" to flow, 2) a later set of open fractures. The earliest brittle fault is 1.4 - 2.6m wide zone of chaotic breccia bound by two sub-vertical fault walls. Extremely indurated breccias branching from the fault core have an orientation consistent with sinistral motion on the fault. The breccia is composed of centimeter to meter scale clasts in a fine-grained matrix. The host rock is intensely fractured by centimeter-scale fractures up to 60 m away from the fault. Veining is predominantly concentrated within 15 meters of the fault wall, and joints beyond this are unmineralised. The latest brittle deformation is represented by meter-scale open discrete fractures and fracture zones, up to 80 meters from the main fault. The fractures are unmineralised suggesting formation at relatively shallow depths. Fracture zones vary from decimeters long en echelon fractures to intensely fractured zones where the host rock is completely fragmented. This final phase of

  9. Structure and Response to Flow of the Glycocalyx Layer

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.; Malafeev, Alexander; Pajarskas, Tautrimas; Pivkin, Igor V.; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2014-01-01

    The glycocalyx is a sugar-rich layer located at the luminal part of the endothelial cells. It is involved in key metabolic processes and its malfunction is related to several diseases. To understand the function of the glycocalyx, a molecular level characterization is necessary. In this article, we present large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations that provide a comprehensive description of the structure and dynamics of the glycocalyx. We introduce the most detailed, to-date, all-atom glycocalyx model, composed of lipid bilayer, proteoglycan dimers, and heparan sulfate chains with realistic sequences. Our results reveal the folding of proteoglycan ectodomain and the extended conformation of heparan sulfate chains. Furthermore, we study the glycocalyx response under shear flow and its role as a flypaper for binding fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), which are involved in diverse functions related to cellular differentiation, including angiogenesis, morphogenesis, and wound healing. The simulations show that the glycocalyx increases the effective concentration of FGFs, leading to FGF oligomerization, and acts as a lever to transfer mechanical stimulus into the cytoplasmic side of endothelial cells. PMID:24411255

  10. Structure and response to flow of the glycocalyx layer.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R; Malafeev, Alexander; Pajarskas, Tautrimas; Pivkin, Igor V; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2014-01-07

    The glycocalyx is a sugar-rich layer located at the luminal part of the endothelial cells. It is involved in key metabolic processes and its malfunction is related to several diseases. To understand the function of the glycocalyx, a molecular level characterization is necessary. In this article, we present large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations that provide a comprehensive description of the structure and dynamics of the glycocalyx. We introduce the most detailed, to-date, all-atom glycocalyx model, composed of lipid bilayer, proteoglycan dimers, and heparan sulfate chains with realistic sequences. Our results reveal the folding of proteoglycan ectodomain and the extended conformation of heparan sulfate chains. Furthermore, we study the glycocalyx response under shear flow and its role as a flypaper for binding fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), which are involved in diverse functions related to cellular differentiation, including angiogenesis, morphogenesis, and wound healing. The simulations show that the glycocalyx increases the effective concentration of FGFs, leading to FGF oligomerization, and acts as a lever to transfer mechanical stimulus into the cytoplasmic side of endothelial cells.

  11. LiDAR observation of the flow structure in typhoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Hsuan, Chung-Yao; Lin, Ta-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Taiwan is subject to 3.4 landfall typhoons each year in average, generally occurring in the third quarter of every year (July-September). Understanding of boundary-layer turbulence characteristics of a typhoon is needed to ensure the safety of both onshore and offshore wind turbines used for power generation. In this study, a floating LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) was deployed in a harbor to collect data of wind turbulence, atmospheric pressure, and temperature in three typhoon events (Matmo typhoon, Soulik typhoon, Trami typhoon). Data collected from the floating LiDAR and from meteorological stations located at Taipei, Taichung and Kaohsiung are adopted to analyse the wind turbulence characteristics in the three typhoon events. The measurement results show that the maximum 10-min average wind speed measured with the floating LiDAR is up to 24 m/s at a height of 200 m. Compared with other normal days, the turbulence intensity is lower in the three typhoon events where the wind speed has a rapid increase. Changes of wind direction take place clearly as the typhoons cross Taiwan from East to West. Within the crossing intervals, the vertical momentum flux is observed to have a significant pattern with both upward and downward propagating waves which are relevant to the flow structure of the typhoons.

  12. Numerical study of tokamak equilibria with arbitrary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.; Manickam, J.; Kaye, S.

    2004-02-01

    The effects of toroidal and poloidal flows on the equilibrium of tokamak plasmas are numerically investigated using the code FLOW. The code is used to determine the changes in the profiles induced by large toroidal flows on NSTX-like equilibria [with NSTX being the National Spherical Torus Experiment, M. Ono, S.M. Kaye, Y.-K.M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] where flows exceeding the sound speed lead to a considerable outward shift of the plasma. The code is also used to study the effects of poloidal flow when the flow velocity profile varies from subsonic to supersonic with respect to the poloidal sound speed. It is found that pressure and density profiles develop a pedestal structure characterized by radial discontinuities at the transonic surface where the poloidal velocity abruptly jumps from subsonic to supersonic values. These results confirm the conclusions of the analytic theory of R. Betti and J. P. Freidberg [Phys. Plasmas 7, 2439 (2000)], derived for a low-β, large aspect ratio tokamak with a circular cross section.

  13. Study of argon-oxygen flowing afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazánková, V.; Trunec, D.; Navrátil, Z.; Raud, J.; Krčma, F.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction kinetics in argon-oxygen flowing afterglow (post-discharge) was studied using NO titration and optical emission spectroscopy. The flowing DC post-discharge in argon-oxygen mixture was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 90 W. The O(3P) atom concentration was determined by NO titration at different places along the flow tube. The optical emission spectra were also measured along the flow tube. Argon spectral lines, oxygen lines at 777 nm and 844.6 nm and atmospheric A-band of {{\\text{O}}2} were identified in the spectra. Rotational temperature of {{\\text{O}}2} was determined from the oxygen atmospheric A-band and also the outer wall temperature of the flow tube was measured by a thermocouple and by an IR thermometer. A zero-dimensional kinetic model for the reactions in the afterglow was developed. This model allows the time dependencies of particle concentrations and of gas temperature to be calculated. The wall recombination probability for O(3P) atoms {γ\\text{O≤ft(\\text{P}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.63+/- 0.06\\right)× {{10}-3} and wall deactivation probability for {{\\text{O}}2} (b {{}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) molecules {γ{{\\text{O}2}≤ft(\\text{b}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.7+/- 0.1\\right)× {{10}-3} were determined from the fit of model results to experimental data. Sensitivity analysis was applied for the analysis of kinetic model in order to reveal the most important reactions in the model. The calculated gas temperature increases in the afterglow and then decreases at later afterglow times after reaching the maximum. This behavior is in good agreement with the spatial rotational temperature dependence. A similar trend was also observed at outer wall temperature measurement.

  14. Experimental study of vortex breakdown in a cylindrical, swirling flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, J. L.; Celik, Z. Z.; Cantwell, B. J.; Lopez, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The stability of a steady, vortical flow in a cylindrical container with one rotating endwall has been experimentally examined to gain insight into the process of vortex breakdowwn. The dynamics of the flow are governed by the Reynolds number (Re) and the aspect ratio of the cylinder. Re is given by Omega R(sup 2)/nu, where Omega is the speed of rotation of the endwall, R is the cylinder radius, and nu is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid filling the cylinder. The aspect ratio is H/R, where H is the height of the cylinder. Numerical simulation studies disagree whether or not the steady breakdown is stable beyond a critical Reynolds number, Re(sub c). Previous experimental researches have considered the steady and unsteady flows near Re(sub c), but have not explored the stability of the steady breakdown structures beyond this value. In this investigation, laser induced fluorescence was utilized to observe both steady and unsteady vortex breakdown at a fixed H/R of 2.5 with Re varying around Re(sub c). When the Re of a steady flow was slowly increased beyond Re(sub c), the breakdown structure remained steady even though unsteadiness was possible. In addition, a number of hysteresis events involving the oscillation periods of the unsteady flow were noted. The results show that both steady and unsteady vortex breakdown occur for a limited range of Re above Re(sub c). Also, with increasing Re, complex flow transformations take place that alter the period at which the unsteady flow oscillates.

  15. Study of the application of superplastically formed and diffusion bonded (SPF/DB) titanium structure to laminar flow control (LFC) wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcquilkin, F. T.

    1979-01-01

    Eighteen design concepts for a LFC wing cover, using various SPF/DB approaches, were developed. After evaluation of producibility, compatibility with LFC requirements, structural efficiency and fatigue requirements, three candidates were selected for fabrication of demonstration panels. Included were both sandwich and stiffened semi-sandwich panels with slotted and perforated surfaces. Subsequent to the evaluation of the three demonstration panels, one concept was selected for fabrication of a 0.3 x 1.0 meter (12 x 42 inch) feasibility panel. It was a stiffened, semi-sandwich panel with a slotted surface, designed to meet the requirements of the upper wing cover at the maximum wing bending moment of the baseline configuration.

  16. Using 3D CFD to reconcile different views of confluence flow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, S. N.

    2001-05-01

    River channel confluences have seen considerable attention in recent years. The aim of this presentation is to demonstrate how CFD has been used to evaluate and expand some of the results that have emerged from field and laboratory studies. Central to this research has been the use of three-dimensional numerical modelling techniques that are able to represent key hydrodynamic processes in confluences (e.g. water surface super-elevation, topographic forcing of flow, shear-driven turbulence), and to provide predictions of important explanatory variables (e.g. dynamic pressure). The research design is based upon using numerical simulation to explore interactions between amongst governing variables (e.g. tributary momentum ratio, degree of asymmetry, junction angle, tributary bed discordance). On the basis of more than 50 simulations of 'laboratory-style' confluences and a smaller number of field cases, this paper identifies the key controls upon confluence flow structures, and the potential influence of these structures upon geomorphological processes within the confluence. This demonstrates: (i) how divergence of opinion over confluence flow processes has resulted from different methods of instrument rotation in the field; (ii) the importance of both streamline curvature and flow separation as controls upon flow structure development; and (iii) the periodic nature of the flow structures that are seen in confluence environments, and which may be misunderstood when a series of time-averaged measurements are made in the field.

  17. Directed weighted network structure analysis of complex impedance measurements for characterizing oil-in-water bubbly flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Dang, Wei-Dong; Xue, Le; Zhang, Shan-Shan

    2017-03-01

    Characterizing the flow structure underlying the evolution of oil-in-water bubbly flow remains a contemporary challenge of great interests and complexity. In particular, the oil droplets dispersing in a water continuum with diverse size make the study of oil-in-water bubbly flow really difficult. To study this issue, we first design a novel complex impedance sensor and systematically conduct vertical oil-water flow experiments. Based on the multivariate complex impedance measurements, we define modalities associated with the spatial transient flow structures and construct modality transition-based network for each flow condition to study the evolution of flow structures. In order to reveal the unique flow structures underlying the oil-in-water bubbly flow, we filter the inferred modality transition-based network by removing the edges with small weight and resulting isolated nodes. Then, the weighted clustering coefficient entropy and weighted average path length are employed for quantitatively assessing the original network and filtered network. The differences in network measures enable to efficiently characterize the evolution of the oil-in-water bubbly flow structures.

  18. Flow visualization of time-varying structural characteristics of dean vortices in a curved channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bella, David Wayne

    1988-12-01

    The time varying development and structure of Dean vortices were studied using flow visualization. Observations were made over a range of Dean numbers from 40 to 200 using a transparent channel with mild curvature, 40:1 aspect ratio, and an inner to outer radius ratio of 0.979. Seven flow visualization techniques were tried but only one, a wood burning smoke generator, produced usable results. Different vortex characteristics were observed and documented in sequences of photographs spaced one quarter of a second apart at locations ranging from 85 to 135 degrees from the start of curvature. Evidence is presented that supports the twisting/rocking nature of the flow.

  19. Cross-flow vortex structure and transition measurements using multi-element hot films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, Naval K.; Mangalam, Siva M.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Collier, Fayette S., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment on a 45-degree swept wing was conducted to study three-dimensional boundary-layer characteristics using surface-mounted, micro-thin, multi-element hot-film sensors. Cross-flow vortex structure and boundary-layer transition were measured from the simultaneously acquired signals of the hot films. Spanwise variation of the root-mean-square (RMS) hot-film signal show a local minima and maxima. The distance between two minima corresponds to the stationary cross-flow vortex wavelength and agrees with naphthalene flow-visualization results. The chordwise and spanwise variation of amplified traveling (nonstationary) cross-flow disturbance characteristics were measured as Reynolds number was varied. The frequency of the most amplified cross-flow disturbances agrees with linear stability theory.

  20. Cell-cell interaction in blood flow in patients with coronary heart disease (in vitro study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Blood cell-cell and cell-vessel wall interactions are one of the key patterns in blood and vascular pathophysiology. We have chosen the method of reconstruction of pulsative blood flow in vitro in the experimental set. Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Studied flow was of constant volumetric blood flow velocity (1 ml/h). Diameter of tube in use was comparable with coronary arteries diameter. Glucose solution and unfractured heparin were used as the nonspecial irritants of studied flow. Erythrocytes space structure in flow differs in all groups of patients in our study (men with stable angina pectoris (SAP), myocardial infarction (MI) and practically healthy men (PHM). Intensity of erythrocytes aggregate formation was maximal in patients with SAP, but time of their "construction/deconstruction" at glucose injection was minimal. Phenomena of primary clotting formation in patients with SAP of high function class was reconstructed under experimental conditions. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with SAP, MI and PHP but modulated the cell profile in the flow. Received data correspond with results of animal model studies and noninvasive blood flow studies in human. Results of our study reveal differences in blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease and PHP under irritating conditions as the possible framework of metabolic model of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  1. Pressure calculation for two-dimensional flow inside hydraulic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, R. S.

    1986-04-01

    When static pressure inside a hydraulic structure falls below some critical value, voids containing water vapor form therein. The voids then collapse with great force, pitting and eroding the internal surfaces of the structure. The formation/collapse of these voids is called cavitation, and the prevention thereof is a prime concern in structural design. The VORTEX code has been used to calculate pressure distributions for three distinct flow conditions in the outlet works for Taylorsville Lake, Salt River, Kentucky. A method has been developed for computing the two-dimensional pressure distributions inside hydraulic structures. Velocities are first obtained by finite difference solution of the Navier-Stokes equations in stream-function/vorticity form. Pressure is then calculated by numerical integration of the momentum equation. The method was incorporated for arbitrary geometry in the VORTEX computer code, which uses boundary-fitted grids generated by the WESCOR code. Computed results compare well with piezometric data from physical-model tests for the Taylorsville outlet works, indicating that the VORTEX code may be useful in identifying and eliminating flow conditions that promote cavitation.

  2. Shock and soliton structures induced by poloidal flow in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniuti, T.; Watanabe, K.; Ishii, Y.; Wakatani, M.

    1991-04-01

    When poloidal flow velocity, Up, becomes close to epsilon C sub s in tokamaks, fluid motion inside the flux surface is governed by a forced KdV equation in the small dissipation limit, where epsilon is an inverse aspect ratio and C sub s is a sound velocity. This implies that a stationary soliton structure appears at the inside region of toroidal plasma or theta is approx. pi, where theta is a poloidal angle. In the limit of large dissipation a forced Burgers equation is more appropriate. This case corresponds to an appearance of shock structure. When an averaged poloidal flow velocity is very close to epsilon C sub s, a shock may be seen in the outer region of toroidal plasma or theta is approx. 0. With the increase of the absolute vakue of (Up-epsilon C sub s) the shock position moves from theta is approx. 0 to theta is approx. pi. Recent tokamak experiments show the existence of poloidal flow with Up is approx. epsilon C sub s in the transition phase from L mode to H mode. Implications of the results in the experiment are discussed.

  3. Study of flow through a bowl mill model

    SciTech Connect

    Murty, G.V.R.; Babu, U.S.

    1998-07-01

    Bowl Mills are used in Thermal Power plants for pulverizing the raw coal, while drying, to the required fineness and achieve the desired combustion efficiency in the boiler. The Indian coals contain high ash content (some times as high as 60%) and as such the primary air has to handle media of different density namely the coal and the quartz. In this context, the distribution of air in the mill plays a significant role in the lifting of particles from the mill. The wear on the rotating components is increased through repetitive grinding because of improper distribution of air within the mill. Reduction of wear and enhancement of life of mill internals including the rotating components is a continuing goal and few more studies have been carried out in this direction. One such study is the replacement of rotating vane wheel and deflector in the separator body with an air guide ring and air diversion plate. Model studies have been carried out by traversing a five hole prove at different locations within the mill to study the distribution of flow as a result of this modification. The variation of absolute velocity and the associated flow direction has been calculated to describe the flow structure within the mill. The results are presented in non dimensional form to draw suitable conclusions. The present study indicated the possibility of improvement in the distribution of flow within the mill with increased magnitude of velocity at different locations.

  4. Eddy structure and mean flow effects in strong convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J.; Zilitinkevich, S.; Nieuwstadt, F.; Fernando, H.; Princevac, M.

    2003-04-01

    Recent research has shown how in turbulent thermal convection above a horizontal plane where a buoyancy flux is produced (e.g. by heat or by diffusion of dense fluid) characteristic forms of eddy structure interact with processes at the horizontal plane and with horizontal mean velocity field (1). If the flux is produced through a diffusive solid geophysical flow, surface, (e.g. in the solid part of Earth's core or in freezing ice) the eddy structure takes the form of unsteady puffs, because the fluid motion causes variations in the temperature buoyancy at the liquid/solid interface. But if the flux is constant and independent of the fluid motion (e.g. by radiative flux) then the usual quasi-steady plumes are formed. A geophysically significant effect of these differences in eddy structure is the influence on the entrainment rate at inversion layers/thermocline bounding the convective turbulent regions. In the presence of a weak mean velocity gradient no greater than the turbulence intensity, any plumes may be advected (and their structure changed to become puff-like) and/or may be bent over, depending on the strength and vertical extent of the shear. Laboratory experiments, numerical simulation and a simple model demonstrate that in the latter situation the mean flow is amplified by the turbulence, a form of anisotropic, inhomogeneous upscale eddy transport with wide geophysical applications (2). (1) Hunt, J.C.R., Vrieling, A.J., Nieuwstadt, F.T.M. and Fernando, H.J.S., `The influence of the thermal conductivity of the lower boundary on eddy motion in convection', J. Fluid Mech. - submitted 2003. (2) Krishnamurti, R. and Howard, L.N., `Mean flow set up by tilted plumes in a confined space', Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 78, 1981.

  5. Fan Stall Flutter Flow Mechanism Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Modern turbofan engines employ a highly loaded fan stage with transonic or low-supersonic velocities in the blade-tip region. The fan blades are often prone to flutter at off-design conditions. Flutter is a highly undesirable and dangerous self-excited mode of blade oscillations that can result in high-cycle fatigue blade failure. The origins of blade flutter are not fully understood yet. Experimental data that can be used to clarify the origins of blade flutter in modern transonic fan designs are very limited. The Transonic Flutter Cascade Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center was developed to experimentally study the details of flow mechanisms associated with fan flutter. The cascade airfoils are instrumented to measure high-frequency unsteady flow variations in addition to the steady flow data normally recorded in cascade tests. The test program measures the variation in surface pressure in response to the oscillation of one or more of the cascade airfoils. However, during the initial phases of the program when all airfoils were in fixed positions, conditions were found where significant time variations in the pressures near the airfoil leading edges could be observed.

  6. Coherent structures in ion temperature gradient turbulence-zonal flow

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rameswar; Singh, R.; Kaw, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; Diamond, P. H.

    2014-10-15

    Nonlinear stationary structure formation in the coupled ion temperature gradient (ITG)-zonal flow system is investigated. The ITG turbulence is described by a wave-kinetic equation for the action density of the ITG mode, and the longer scale zonal mode is described by a dynamic equation for the m = n = 0 component of the potential. Two populations of trapped and untrapped drift wave trajectories are shown to exist in a moving frame of reference. This novel effect leads to the formation of nonlinear stationary structures. It is shown that the ITG turbulence can self-consistently sustain coherent, radially propagating modulation envelope structures such as solitons, shocks, and nonlinear wave trains.

  7. Social dilemma structure hidden behind traffic flow with route selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Jun; Nakamura, Kousuke

    2016-10-01

    Several traffic flows contain social dilemma structures. Herein, we explored a route-selection problem using a cellular automaton simulation dovetailed with evolutionary game theory. In our model, two classes of driver-agents coexist: D agents (defective strategy), which refer to traffic information for route selection to move fast, and C agents (cooperative strategy), which are insensitive to information and less inclined to move fast. Although no evidence suggests that the social dilemma structure in low density causes vehicles to move freely and that in high density causes traffic jams, we found a structure that corresponds to an n-person (multiplayer) Chicken (n-Chicken) game if the provided traffic information is inappropriate. If appropriate traffic information is given to the agents, the n-Chicken game can be solved. The information delivered to vehicles is crucial for easing the social dilemma due to urban traffic congestion when developing technologies to support the intelligent transportation system (ITS).

  8. Flow and structure of fluids in functionalized nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordin, José Rafael; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate through non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations the structure and flow of fluids in functionalized nanopores. The nanopores are modeled as cylindrical structures with solvophilic and solvophobic sites. Two fluids are modeled. The first is a standard Lennard Jones fluid. The second one is modeled with an isotropic two-length scale potential, which exhibits in bulk water-like anomalies. Our results indicate distinct dependence of the overall mass flux for each species of fluid with the number of solvophilic sites for different nanotubes' radii. Also, the density and fluid structure are dependent on the nanotube radius and the solvophilic properties of the nanotube. This indicates that the presence of a second length scale in the fluid-fluid interaction will lead to distinct behavior. Also, our results show that chemically functionalized nanotubes with different radii will have distinct nanofluidic features. Our results are explained on the basis of the characteristic scale fluid properties and the effects of nanoconfinement.

  9. Space shuttle orbiter flow visualization study. [water tunnel study of vortex flow during atmospheric entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorincz, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The vortex flows generated at subsonic speed during the final portion of atmospheric reentry were defined using a 0.01 scale model of the orbiter in a diagnostic water tunnel. Flow visualization photographs were obtained over an angle-of-attack range to 40 deg and sideslip angles up to 10 deg. The vortex flow field development, vortex path, and vortex breakdown characteristics were determined as a function of angle-of-attack at zero sideslip. Vortex flows were found to develop on the highly swept glove, on the wing, and on the upper surface of the fuselage. No significant asymmetries were observed at zero sideslip in the water tunnel tests. The sensitivity of the upper surface vortex flow fields to variations in sideslip angle was also studied. The vortex formed on the glove remained very stable in position above the wing up through the 10 deg of sideslip tested. There was a change in the vortex lifts under sideslip due to effective change in leading-edge sweep angles. Asymmetric flow separation occurred on the upper surface of the fuselage at small sideslip angles. The influence of vortex flow fields in sideslip on the lateral/ directional characteristics of the orbiter is discussed.

  10. Structure parameters in rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, George H.; Sather, D.

    1986-01-01

    It is well-known that a number of steady state problems in fluid mechanics involving systems of nonlinear partial differential equations can be reduced to the problem of solving a single operator equation of the form: v + lambda Av + lambda B(v) = 0, v is the summation of H, lambda is the summation of one-dimensional Euclid space, where H is an appropriate (real or complex) Hilbert space. Here lambda is a typical load parameter, e.g., the Reynolds number, A is a linear operator, and B is a quadratic operator generated by a bilinear form. In this setting many bifurcation and stability results for problems were obtained. A rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flow was studied, and it showed that, in general, the superposition of a Poiseuille flow on a rotating Couette channel flow is destabilizing.

  11. Field implementation of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) for studying flow dynamics at river confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Q. W.; Rhoads, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    The complex hydrodynamics of river confluences have been the focus of numerous investigations over the past several decades. Confluences are locations in river systems characterized by complex patterns of turbulent flow structure, especially within the mixing interface that develops between the two flows. To date, most field investigations of flow structure at stream confluences have been based on point measurements of velocity time series (e.g using ADVs) or on time-averaged data with high spatial resolution, but poor temporal resolution (e.g. using ADCPs). Past approaches have failed to capture the spatial and temporal density of velocity measurements needed to adequately characterize complex turbulent flow structures. In contrast, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been used successfully in laboratory studies to define in considerable detail the characteristics of turbulent structures. This study uses field-based PIV to characterize surficial flow structure within a small stream confluence. Landscape mulch served as seeding material for the PIV. Particle motion was recorded at a high frame rate using a small action camera mounted above the surface of the flow. Near-surface 3D velocities of flow were measured with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) to evaluate velocity data generated by the PIV analysis. Results show that field-based PIV captures nicely complex patterns of fluid motion at the surface of the flow, revealing the two-dimensional characteristics of coherent flow structures. Velocities resulting from the PIV analysis match measured velocities most closely where the flow is least complex and where seeding material remains uniformly distributed throughout the flow. Overall the method appears promising for qualitatively assessing flow structure and for quantifying the size, duration, and vorticity of turbulent structures. Field-based PIV is a valuable technique that can be used along with traditional velocity measurements to more completely and

  12. SSME LOX post flow analysis/fluid structure interaction. Volume 1: Flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Roger W.

    1989-01-01

    The realization of measures to improve the performance of the Space Shuttle is, to a large extent, dependent on an improved understanding of the fluid flow phenomena occurring in the main engine. The overall arrangement of the primary components of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are presented. The impingement of the hot gases from the transfer ducts onto the LOX posts causes them to be subjected to severe thermal and gas dynamic loads, which in the past have resulted in the occasional breakage of some elements of the outer row of posts during test firings of the engine, particularly at higher power levels. Large velocities in the gap between the LOX posts may also be a contributing factor in causing dynamic stability problems. The deforming structural response of the posts to the pressure loading may likely affect the gas flowfield by producing a moving flowfield boundary, thereby creating a dynamically coupled unsteady fluid-structure system. The objective was to investigate the three-dimensional, turbulent flow around a simplified SSME LOX post array using an existing Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver and a suitable turbulence model to parameterize the turbulent shear stresses. Numerical computations were performed to analyze the effect on the flowfield of varying the spacing between the LOX posts, which were modeled as rigid, three-dimensional circular cylinders. The methodology used in the computations is described. Results are presented.

  13. Structure and Mixing Characterization of Variable Density Transverse Jet Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorkyan, Levon

    (CVP) and the generation of strong upstream shear layer instability. In contrast, weak, convectively unstable upstream shear layers corresponded with asymmetries in the jet cross-sectional shape and/or lack of a CVP structure. While momentum flux ratio J and density ratio S most significantly determined the strength of the instabilities and CVP structures, an additional dependence on jet Reynolds number for CVP formation was found, with significant increases in jet Reynolds number resulting in enhanced symmetry and CVP generation. The mixing characteristics of Rej = 1900 jets of various J, S, and injector type were explored in detail in the present studies using jet centerplane and cross-sectional PLIF measurements. Various mixing metrics such as the jet fluid centerline concentration decay, Unmixedness, and Probability Density Function (PDF) were applied systematically using a novel method for comparing jets with different mass flux characteristics. It was found that when comparing mixing metrics along the jet trajectory, strengthening the upstream shear layer instability by reducing J, and achieving absolutely unstable conditions, enhanced overall mixing. Reducing density ratio S for larger J values, which under equidensity (S = 1.00) conditions would create a convectively unstable shear layer, was also observed to enhance mixing. On the other hand, reducing S for low J conditions, which are known to produce absolutely unstable upstream shear layers even for equidensity cases, was actually observed to reduce mixing, a result attributed to a reduction in crossfiow fluid entrainment into shear layer vortex cores as jet density was reduced. Comparing injectors, the flush-mounted pipe was generally the best mixer, whereas the worst mixer was the nozzle that was elevated above the crossfiow boundary layer due to upstream shear layer co-flow generated by the elevated nozzle contour; this co-flow was observed here and in prior studies to stabilize the shear layer. The

  14. Cross-Diffusion Systems with Excluded-Volume Effects and Asymptotic Gradient Flow Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruna, Maria; Burger, Martin; Ranetbauer, Helene; Wolfram, Marie-Therese

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss the analysis of a cross-diffusion PDE system for a mixture of hard spheres, which was derived in Bruna and Chapman (J Chem Phys 137:204116-1-204116-16, 2012a) from a stochastic system of interacting Brownian particles using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The resulting cross-diffusion system is valid in the limit of small volume fraction of particles. While the system has a gradient flow structure in the symmetric case of all particles having the same size and diffusivity, this is not valid in general. We discuss local stability and global existence for the symmetric case using the gradient flow structure and entropy variable techniques. For the general case, we introduce the concept of an asymptotic gradient flow structure and show how it can be used to study the behavior close to equilibrium. Finally, we illustrate the behavior of the model with various numerical simulations.

  15. Structural Efficiency of Percolated Landscapes in Flow Networks

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, M. Ángeles; De Los Rios, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    The large-scale structure of complex systems is intimately related to their functionality and evolution. In particular, global transport processes in flow networks rely on the presence of directed pathways from input to output nodes and edges, which organize in macroscopic connected components. However, the precise relation between such structures and functional or evolutionary aspects remains to be understood. Here, we investigate which are the constraints that the global structure of directed networks imposes on transport phenomena. We define quantitatively under minimal assumptions the structural efficiency of networks to determine how robust communication between the core and the peripheral components through interface edges could be. Furthermore, we assess that optimal topologies in terms of access to the core should look like “hairy balls” so to minimize bottleneck effects and the sensitivity to failures. We illustrate our investigation with the analysis of three real networks with very different purposes and shaped by very different dynamics and time-scales–the Internet customer-provider set of relationships, the nervous system of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, and the metabolism of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Our findings prove that different global connectivity structures result in different levels of structural efficiency. In particular, biological networks seem to be close to the optimal layout. PMID:18985157

  16. Flow structure and unsteadiness in the supersonic wake of a generic space launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Stephan, Sören; Radespiel, Rolf

    2015-11-01

    At the junction between the rocket engine and the main body of a classical space launcher, a separation-dominated and highly unstable flow field develops and induces strong wall-pressure oscillations. These can excite structural vibrations detrimental to the launcher. It is desirable to minimize these effects, for which a better understanding of the flow field is required. We study the wake flow of a generic axisymmetric space-launcher model with and without propulsive jet (cold air). Experimental investigations are performed at Mach 2.9 and a Reynolds number ReD = 1 . 3 .106 based on model diameter D. The jet exits the nozzle at Mach 2.5. Velocity measurements by means of Particle Image Velocimetry and mean and unsteady wall-pressure measurements on the main-body base are performed simultaneously. Additionally, we performed hot-wire measurements at selected points in the wake. We can thus observe the evolution of the wake flow along with its spectral content. We describe the mean and turbulent flow topology and evolution of the structures in the wake flow and discuss the origin of characteristic frequencies observed in the pressure signal at the launcher base. The influence of a propulsive jet on the evolution and topology of the wake flow is discussed in detail. The German Research Foundation DFG is gratefully acknowledged for funding this research within the SFB-TR40 ``Technological foundations for the design of thermally and mechanically highly loaded components of future space transportation systems.''

  17. Gold recycling; a materials flow study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amey, Earle B.

    2000-01-01

    This materials flow study includes a description of trends in consumption, loss, and recycling of gold-containing materials in the United States in 1998 in order to illustrate the extent to which gold is presently being recycled and to identify recycling trends. The quantity of gold recycled, as a percent of the apparent supply of gold, was estimated to be about 30 percent. Of the approximately 446 metric tons of gold refined in the United States in 1998, the fabricating and industrial use losses were 3 percent.

  18. Multi-scale symbolic time reverse analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongmei; Zhai, Lusheng; Jin, Ningde; Wang, Youchen

    Gas-liquid two-phase flows are widely encountered in production processes of petroleum and chemical industry. Understanding the dynamic characteristics of multi-scale gas-liquid two-phase flow structures is of great significance for the optimization of production process and the measurement of flow parameters. In this paper, we propose a method of multi-scale symbolic time reverse (MSTR) analysis for gas-liquid two-phase flows. First, through extracting four time reverse asymmetry measures (TRAMs), i.e. Euclidean distance, difference entropy, percentage of constant words and percentage of reversible words, the time reverse asymmetry (TRA) behaviors of typical nonlinear systems are investigated from the perspective of multi-scale analysis, and the results show that the TRAMs are sensitive to the changing of dynamic characteristics underlying the complex nonlinear systems. Then, the MSTR analysis is used to study the conductance signals from gas-liquid two-phase flows. It is found that the multi-scale TRA analysis can effectively reveal the multi-scale structure characteristics and nonlinear evolution properties of the flow structures.

  19. On the turbulent flow structure around an instream structure with realistic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seokkoo; Hill, Craig; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics around a rock vane, a widely used instream structure for stream restoration, by conducting laboratory flume experiments, and carrying out high-resolution Large Eddy Simulation (LES) taking advantage of parallel computing. The flume experiments are conducted under fixed- and mobile-bed conditions, where the velocities and bed elevations are measured, respectively. The LES is carried out for the fixed-bed experiment by directly resolving the details of the rocks that constitute the vane and the individual roughness elements on the channel bed. The LES-computed mean flow statistics show good agreement with the measurements, and the analysis of the computed flow field reveals the existence of two counter-rotating secondary flow cells downstream of the vane, which originate from the plunging of the three-dimensional streamlines onto a lower part of the sidewall downstream of the vane. To further examine the role of the secondary flow cells under a mobile-bed condition, the LES results are compared with the equilibrium bed elevation measured in the mobile bed experiment. The mobile-bed experiment reveals the existence of an oblique sand ridge downstream of the vane that is aligned with the line of flow convergence caused by the collision of the two secondary flow cells. The results indicate that the two counter-rotating cells downstream of the rock vane has a profound impact on the mean flow and bed shear stress as well as on the bed morphodynamics.

  20. Coherent structure coloring: identification of coherent structures from sparse flow trajectories using graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlueter, Kristy; Dabiri, John

    2016-11-01

    Coherent structure identification is important in many fluid dynamics applications, including transport phenomena in ocean flows and mixing and diffusion in turbulence. However, many of the techniques currently available for measuring such flows, including ocean drifter datasets and particle tracking velocimetry, only result in sparse velocity data. This is often insufficient for the use of current coherent structure detection algorithms based on analysis of the deformation gradient. Here, we present a frame-invariant method for detecting coherent structures from Lagrangian flow trajectories that can be sparse in number. The method, based on principles used in graph coloring algorithms, examines a measure of the kinematic dissimilarity of all pairs of flow trajectories, either measured experimentally, e.g. using particle tracking velocimetry; or numerically, by advecting fluid particles in the Eulerian velocity field. Coherence is assigned to groups of particles whose kinematics remain similar throughout the time interval for which trajectory data is available, regardless of their physical proximity to one another. Through the use of several analytical and experimental validation cases, this algorithm is shown to robustly detect coherent structures using significantly less flow data than is required by existing methods. This research was supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  1. Solar Coronal Structure Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Saba, Julia; Strong, Keith; Harvey, Karen

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this investigation is to study the physics of the solar corona through the analysis of the EUV and UV data produced by two flights (12 May 1992 and 25 April 1994) of the Lockheed Solar Plasma Diagnostics Experiment (SPDE) sounding rocket payload, in combination with Yohkoh and ground-based data. Each rocket flight produced both spectral and imaging data. These joint datasets are useful for understanding the physical state of various features in the solar atmosphere at different heights ranging from the photosphere to the corona at the time of the, rocket flights, which took place during the declining phase of a solar cycle, 2-4 years before the minimum. The investigation is narrowly focused on comparing the physics of small- and medium-scale strong-field structures with that of large-scale, weak fields. As we close th is investigation, we have to recall that our present position in the understanding of basic solar physics problems (such as coronal heating) is much different from that in 1995 (when we proposed this investigation), due largely to the great success of SOHO and TRACE. In other words, several topics and techniques we proposed can now be better realized with data from these missions. For this reason, at some point of our work, we started concentrating on the 1992 data, which are more unique and have more supporting data. As a result, we discontinued the investigation on small-scale structures, i.e., bright points, since high-resolution TRACE images have addressed more important physics than SPDE EUV images could do. In the final year, we still spent long time calibrating the 1992 data. The work was complicated because of the old-fashioned film, which had problems not encountered with more modern CCD detectors. After our considerable effort on calibration, we were able to focus on several scientific topics, relying heavily on the SPDE UV images. They include the relation between filaments and filament channels, the identification of hot

  2. The role of coherent flow structures in the sensible heat fluxes of an Alaskan boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkenburg, Derek; Fochesatto, Gilberto J.; Prakash, Anupma; Cristóbal, Jordi; Gens, Rudiger; Kane, Douglas L.

    2013-08-01

    Accelerations in the flow over forests generate coherent structures which locally enhance updrafts and downdrafts, forcing rapid exchanges of energy and matter. Here, observations of the turbulent flow are made in a highly heterogeneous black spruce boreal forest in Fairbanks, Alaska at ~2.6 h (12 m) and ~0.6 h (3 m), where h is the mean canopy height of 4.7 m. Wavelet analysis is used to detect coherent structures. The sonic temperature and wind data cover 864 half-hour periods spanning winter, spring, and summer. When mean global statistics of structures are analyzed at the two levels independently, results are similar to other studies. Specifically, an average of eight structures occurs per period, their mean duration is 85 s, and their mean heat flux contribution is 48%. However, this analysis suggests that 31% of the structures detected at 2.6 h, and 13% at 0.6 h, may be influenced by wave-like flow organization. Remarkably, less than 25% of the structures detected occur synchronously in the subcanopy and above canopy levels, which speaks robustly to the lack of flow interaction within only nine vertical meters of the forest.

  3. A study of grout flow pattern analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Hyun, S.

    2013-01-10

    A new disposal unit, designated as Salt Disposal Unit no. 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt nuclear waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System plan. The unit is cylindrical disposal vault of 380 ft diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has about 30 million gallons of capacity. Primary objective was to develop the computational model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as function of elevation of grout discharge port, and slurry rheology. A Bingham plastic model was basically used to represent the grout flow behavior. A two-phase modeling approach was taken to achieve the objective. This approach assumes that the air-grout interface determines the shape of the accumulation mound. The results of this study were used to develop the design guidelines for the discharge ports of the Saltstone feed materials in the SDU6 facility. The focusing areas of the modeling study are to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor under the baseline modeling conditions, to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation of discharge port, discharge pipe diameter, and grout properties, and to determine the changes in grout density as it is related to grout drop height. An axi-symmetric two-phase modeling method was used for computational efficiency. Based on the nominal design and operating conditions, a transient computational approach was taken to compute flow fields mainly driven by pumping inertia and natural gravity. Detailed solution methodology and analysis results are discussed here.

  4. Relationships Between Watershed Emergy Flow and Coastal New England Salt Marsh Structure, Function, and Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the link between watershed activities and salt marsh structure, function, and condition using spatial emergy flow density (areal empower density) in the watershed and field data from 10 tidal salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, RI. The field-collected data wer...

  5. Structural Relationships among E-Learners' Sense of Presence, Usage, Flow, Satisfaction, and Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joo, Young Ju; Joung, Sunyoung; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the structural relationships among teaching presence, cognitive presence, usage, learning flow, satisfaction, and learning persistence in corporate e-learners. The research participants were 462 e-learners registered for cyber-lectures through an electronics company in South Korea. The extrinsic variables were sense…

  6. Bodies in flowing plasmas - Laboratory studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review of early rudimentary laboratory studies of bodies in flowing, rarefied plasmas is presented (e.g., Birkeland, 1908), along with a discussion of more recent parametric studies conducted in steady plasma wind tunnels, which includes the study by Hall et al. (1964), in which a strong ion density enhancement in the center of the ion void created downstream from the body was observed. Good agreement was found between the experimental results and theoretical calculations which omit ion thermal motion. Examples in which in situ data on the interaction between satellites and the ionospheric plasma have been elucidated by the laboratory results are presented, and include evidence for a midwake axial ion peak, and ion current density in the near-wake region. The application of the ionospheric laboratory to basic space plasma physics is discussed, and its application to some types of solar system plasma phenomena is illustrated.

  7. Wake structure of an oscillating cylinder in a flowing soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stremler, Mark; Yang, Wenchao

    2016-11-01

    When a circular cylinder oscillates with respect to a uniform background flow, a variety of wake patterns can be observed in which multiple vortices are generated during each shedding cycle. Thorough investigations of the possible wake patterns behind a cylinder undergoing forced oscillations have been conducted by C.H.K. Williamson using two-dimensional characterization of a three-dimensional flow. Attempts to reproduce the structural bifurcations using two-dimensional computational models have been only moderately successful. A flowing soap film, an experimental system with quasi-two-dimensional flow, provides an alternative method for investigating the role of system dimensionality in the structure and dynamics of complex vortex wakes. Wake patterns are observed directly through interference fringes caused by thickness variations in the soap film. Such systems have been used for decades to visualize wake structure, but they have not previously been used to conduct an analog of Williamson's work. We will discuss the results of an ongoing parametric study of the wake structure produced by a circular cylinder undergoing forced oscillations transverse to the background flow in an inclined soap film system.

  8. PIV measurement of the vertical cross-flow structure over tube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaki, C.; Cheong, K. H.; Monji, H.; Matsui, G.

    Shell and tube heat exchangers are among the most commonly used types of heat exchangers. Shell-side cross-flow in tube bundles has received considerable attention and has been investigated extensively. However, the microscopic flow structure including velocity distribution, wake, and turbulent structure in the tube bundles needs to be determined for more effective designs. Therefore, in this study, in order to clarify the detailed structure of cross-flow in tube bundles with particle image velocimetry (PIV), experiments were conducted using two types of model; in-line and staggered bundles with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5, containing 20 rows of five 15 mm O.D. tubes in each row. The velocity data in the whole flow field were measured successfully by adjusting the refractive index of the working fluid to that of the tube material. The flow features were characterized in different tube bundles with regards to the velocity vector field, vortex structure, and turbulent intensity.

  9. Experimental Investigation of the Unsteady Flow Structures of Two Interacting Pitching Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Melike; Moored, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Birds, insects and fish propel themselves with unsteady motions of their wings and fins. Many of these animals are also found to fly or swim in three-dimensional flocks and schools. Numerous studies have explored the three-dimensional steady flow interactions and the two-dimensional unsteady flow interactions in collectives. Yet, the characterization of the three-dimensional unsteady interactions remains relatively unexplored. This study aims to characterize the flow structures and interactions between two sinusoidally pitching finite-span wings. The arrangement of the wings varies from a tandem to a bi-plane configuration. The vortex structures for these various arrangements are quantified by using particle image velocimetry. The vortex-wing interactions are also characterized as the synchrony between the wings is modified.

  10. Ion flow and sheath structure near positively biased electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, R.; Scheiner, B.; Baalrud, S. D.; Hopkins, M. M.; Barnat, E. V.; Yee, B. T.; Merlino, R. L.; Skiff, F.

    2016-11-01

    What effect does a dielectric material surrounding a small positively biased electrode have on the ion flow and sheath structure near the electrode? Measurements of the ion velocity distribution function and plasma potential near positively biased electrodes were made using laser-induced fluorescence and an emissive probe. The results were compared with 2D particle-in-cell simulations. Both measurements and simulations showed that when the positive electrode was surrounded by the dielectric material, ions were accelerated toward the electrode to approximately 0.5 times the ion sound speed before being deflected radially by the electron sheath potential barrier of the electrode. The axial potential profile in this case contained a virtual cathode. In comparison, when the dielectric material was removed from around the electrode, both the ion flow and virtual cathode depth near the electrode were dramatically reduced. These measurements suggest that the ion presheath from the dielectric material surrounding the electrode may enclose the electron sheath of the electrode, resulting in a virtual cathode that substantially influences the ion flow profile in the region.

  11. Characteristics of electrohydrodynamic roll structures in laminar planar Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourmatzis, Agisilaos; Shrimpton, John S.

    2016-02-01

    The behaviour of an incompressible dielectric liquid subjected to a laminar planar Couette flow with unipolar charge injection is investigated numerically in two dimensions. The computations show new morphological characteristics of roll structures that arise in this forced electro-convection problem. The charge and velocity magnitude distributions between the two parallel electrodes are discussed as a function of the top wall velocity and the EHD Rayleigh number, T for the case of strong charge injection. A wide enough parametric space is investigated such that the observed EHD roll structures progress through three regimes. These regimes are defined by the presence of a single or double-roll free convective structure as observed elsewhere (Vazquez et al 2008 J. Phys. D 41 175303), a sheared or stretched roll structure, and finally by a regime where the perpendicular velocity gradient is sufficient to prevent the generation of a roll. These three regimes have been delineated as a function of the wall to ionic drift velocity {{U}\\text{W}}/κ E , and the T number. In the stretched regime, an increase in {{U}\\text{W}}/κ E can reduce charge and momentum fluctuations whilst in parallel de-stratify charge in the region between the two electrodes. The stretched roll regime is also characterised by a substantial influence of {{U}\\text{W}}/κ E on the steady development time, however in the traditional non-stretched roll structure regime, no influence of {{U}\\text{W}}/κ E on the development time is noted.

  12. Laser direct writing 3D structures for microfluidic channels: flow meter and mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Liu, Yi-Jui; Lin, Zheng-Da; Wu, Bo-Long; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Shin, Chow-Shing; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2015-03-01

    The 3D laser direct-writing technology is aimed at the modeling of arbitrary three-dimensional (3D) complex microstructures by scanning a laser-focusing point along predetermined trajectories. Through the perspective technique, the details of designed 3D structures can be properly fabricated in a microchannel. This study introduces a direct reading flow meter and a 3D passive mixer fabricated by laser direct writing for microfluidic applications. The flow meter consists of two rod-shaped springs, a pillar, an anchor, and a wedge-shaped indicator, installed inside a microfluidic channel. The indicator is deflected by the flowing fluid while restrained by the spring to establish an equilibrium indication according to the flow rate. The measurement is readily carried out by optical microscopy observation. The 3D passive Archimedes-screw-shaped mixer is designed to disturb the laminar flow 3D direction for enhancing the mixing efficiency. The simulation results indicate that the screw provides 3D disturbance of streamlines in the microchannel. The mixing demonstration for fluids flowing in the micrchannel approximately agrees with the simulation result. Thanks to the advantage of the laser direct writing technology, this study performs the ingenious applications of 3D structures for microchannels.

  13. Numerical Studies of a Supersonic Fluidic Diverter Actuator for Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Culley, Dennis e.; Raghu, Surya

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of the internal flow structure and performance of a specific fluidic diverter actuator, previously studied by time-dependent numerical computations for subsonic flow, is extended to include operation with supersonic actuator exit velocities. The understanding will aid in the development of fluidic diverters with minimum pressure losses and advanced designs of flow control actuators. The self-induced oscillatory behavior of the flow is successfully predicted and the calculated oscillation frequencies with respect to flow rate have excellent agreement with our experimental measurements. The oscillation frequency increases with Mach number, but its dependence on flow rate changes from subsonic to transonic to supersonic regimes. The delay time for the initiation of oscillations depends on the flow rate and the acoustic speed in the gaseous medium for subsonic flow, but is unaffected by the flow rate for supersonic conditions

  14. Structure identification in pipe flow using proper orthogonal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellström, Leo H. O.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2017-03-01

    The energetic motions in direct numerical simulations of turbulent pipe flow at Reτ=685 are investigated using proper orthogonal decomposition. The procedure is extended such that a pressure component is identified in addition to the three-component velocity field for each mode. The pressure component of the modes is shown to align with the streamwise velocity component associated with the large-scale motions, where positive pressure coincides with positive streamwise velocity, and vice versa. The streamwise evolution of structures is then visualized using a conditional mode, which exhibit a strong similarity to the large-scale, low-momentum motions. A low-pressure region is present in the downstream section of the structure, and a high-pressure region is present in the upstream section.

  15. Flow around new wind fence with multi-scale fractal structure in an atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Sarah; Lee, Sang-Joon; Zhang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Understanding and controlling atmospheric boundary-layer flows with engineered structures, such as porous wind fences or windbreaks, has been of great interest to the fluid mechanics and wind engineering community. Previous studies found that the regular mono-scale grid fence of 50% porosity and a bottom gap of 10% of the fence height are considered to be optimal over a flat surface. Significant differences in turbulent flow structure have recently been noted behind multi-scale fractal wind fences, even with the same porosity. In this study, wind-tunnel tests on the turbulent flow and the turbulence kinetic energy transport of 1D and 2D multi-scale fractal fences under atmospheric boundary-layer were conducted. Velocity fields around the fractal fences were systematically measured using Particle Image Velocimetry to uncover effects of key parameters on turbulent flows around the fences at a Reynolds number of approximately 3.6x104 based on the free-stream speed and fence height. The turbulent flow structures induced by specific 1D/2D multi-scale fractal wind fences were compared to those of a conventional grid fence. The present results would contribute to the design of new-generation wind fences to reduce snow/sand deposition on critical infrastructure such as roads and bridges.

  16. Effects of organized turbulence structures on the phase distortion in a coherent optical beam propagating through a turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truman, C. Randall; Lee, Moon Joo

    1990-01-01

    Phase distortion in a coherent optical beam propagating through a turbulent shear flow is studied. The instantaneous distribution of the index refraction is represented by a passive-scalar field in a computed homogeneous shear flow. The flow contains organized vortical structures (hairpin eddies), which are characteristic of turbulent shear flows. The phase distortion induced by turbulent fluctuations is calculated from the optical path difference through the flow. A conceptual model is proposed for the distribution of scalar fluctuations produced by the hairpin vortices in the shear flow. It is shown that the phase distortion of an optical beam can be minimized by propagating the beam at an angle approximately normal to the organized vortical structures in a turbulent shear flow.

  17. A study of temporal estaurine flow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mairs, R. L.; Clark, D. K.

    1972-01-01

    Multispectral photography,infrared imagery, image enhancement, and oceanographic, radiometric, and meteorological data were used in the study of temporal estuarine flow dynamics, nearshore circulation, and the resulting dispersal of suspended and dissolved substances introduced from the continent. Repetitive multispectral photography, IR imagery, total radiance and irradiance, water surface temperatures, salinity, total suspended solids, visibility, current velocity, winds, dye implants, and high contrast image enhancement were used to observe and describe water mass boundaries in the nearshore zone and to attempt to establish on what repetitive scale these coastal features should be observed to better understand their behavior. Water mass variability patterns, seen naturally and with the use of dyes, along the North Carolina coast and in the Chesapeake Bay are being studied as synoptic data on the basic dynamics of circulation, flushing, and mixing in coastal waters.

  18. Robust Feedback Control of Flow Induced Structural Radiation of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heatwole, Craig M.; Bernhard, Robert J.; Franchek, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    A significant component of the interior noise of aircraft and automobiles is a result of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the vehicular structure. In this work, active robust feedback control of the noise due to this non-predictable excitation is investigated. Both an analytical model and experimental investigations are used to determine the characteristics of the flow induced structural sound radiation problem. The problem is shown to be broadband in nature with large system uncertainties associated with the various operating conditions. Furthermore the delay associated with sound propagation is shown to restrict the use of microphone feedback. The state of the art control methodologies, IL synthesis and adaptive feedback control, are evaluated and shown to have limited success for solving this problem. A robust frequency domain controller design methodology is developed for the problem of sound radiated from turbulent flow driven plates. The control design methodology uses frequency domain sequential loop shaping techniques. System uncertainty, sound pressure level reduction performance, and actuator constraints are included in the design process. Using this design method, phase lag was added using non-minimum phase zeros such that the beneficial plant dynamics could be used. This general control approach has application to lightly damped vibration and sound radiation problems where there are high bandwidth control objectives requiring a low controller DC gain and controller order.

  19. Continuous-Flow Bioseparation Using Microfabricated Anisotropic Nanofluidic Sieving Structures

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jianping; Mao, Pan; Han, Jongyoon

    2010-01-01

    The anisotropic nanofluidic filter (nanofilter) array (ANA) is a unique molecular sieving structure for separating biomolecules. Here we describe fabrication of planar and vertical ANA chips and how to perform continuous-flow bioseparation using them. This protocol is most useful for bioengineers that are interested in developing automated multistep chip-based bioanalysis systems and assumes prior cleanroom microfabrication knowledge. The ANA consists of a two-dimensional periodic nanofilter array, and the designed structural anisotropy of the ANA causes different sized- or charged-biomolecules to follow distinct trajectories under applied electric fields, leading to efficient continuous-flow separation. Using microfluidic channels surrounding the ANA, the fractionated biomolecule streams are collected and routed to different fluid channels or reservoirs for convenient sample recovery and downstream bioanalysis. The ANA is physically robust and can be reused repeatedly. Compared to conventional gel-based separation techniques, the ANA offers the potential for faster separation, higher throughput, and more convenient sample recovery. PMID:19876028

  20. Coherent Flow Structures and Suspension Events over Low-angle Dunes: Fraser River, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, R. W.; Venditti, J. G.; Kostaschuk, R. A.; Hendershot, M. L.; Allison, M. A.; Church, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Increasing observations show that dunes with low-angle lee-sides (< 30°) and symmetrical shapes are the most common bedform morphology in large sand-bedded alluvial channels. Flume studies have revealed much about flow and sediment dynamics over high-angle (~30°) asymmetric dunes, however much less is known about low-angle dune dynamics. This study examines mean flow, coherent flow structures and suspension events over low-angle dunes in the unsteady flow of the estuarine reach of the Fraser River, Canada. Dune field topography was mapped using a multibeam echo sounder (MBES) while an acoustic Doppler current profiler (aDcp) simultaneously provided flow and suspended sediment measurements over a range of flows through tidal cycles. At high tide, river flow nearly ceases and a salt wedge enters the channel, forcing plumes of salt water towards the surface into the downstream moving fresh water above as the wedge moves upstream over the dunes. The salt wedge persists in the channel causing stratification in water column and one-sided instabilities along the saline-fresh water interface until the late in the falling tide. At low tide, mean velocities peak and force the saline water out of the channel. Flow over the low-angle dunes displays topographically induced flow patterns similar to previously observed over high-angle dunes, but permanent flow separation is notably absent. Sediment-laden kolks emerge as important suspended sediment transport agents during low tide but become more coherent, yet less frequent, structures as the tide begins to rise. Kolks appear to form downstream of dune crests along the shear layer that is likely formed by intermittent flow separation. Kolks also form at the reattachment point and grow over the stoss slope of the dunes. This is consistent with the generation of hairpin vortices formed near the bed that lift into the flow and grow to the surface through an 'autogeneration' mechanism. Persistent downwelling and periodic sweeps at

  1. Performance Mapping Studies in Redox Flow Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoberecht, M. A.; Thaller, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    Pumping power requirements in any flow battery system constitute a direct parasitic energy loss. It is therefore useful to determine the practical lower limit for reactant flow rates. Through the use of a theoretical framework based on electrochemical first principles, two different experimental flow mapping techniques were developed to evaluate and compare electrodes as a function of flow rate. For the carbon felt electrodes presently used in NASA-Lewis Redox cells, a flow rate 1.5 times greater than the stoichiometric rate seems to be the required minimum.

  2. Qualitative comparison of intra-aneurysmal flow structures determined from conventional and virtual angiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebral, Juan R.; Radaelli, Alessandro; Frangi, Alejandro; Putman, Christopher M.

    2007-03-01

    In this study we qualitatively compare the flow structures observed in cerebral aneurysms using conventional angiography and virtual angiograms produced from patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. For this purpose, high frame rate biplane angiograms were obtained during a rapid injection of contrast agent in three patients with intracranial aneurysms. Patient-specific CFD models were then constructed from 3D rotational angiography images of each aneurysm. Time dependent flow fields were obtained from the numerical solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations under pulsatile flow conditions derived from phase-contrast magnetic resonance measurements performed on normal subjects. These flow fields were subsequently used to simulate the transport of a contrast agent by solving the advection-diffusion equation. Both the fluid and transport equations were solved with an implicit finite element formulation on unstructured grids. Virtual angiograms were then constructed by volume rendering of the simulated dye concentration field. The flow structures observed in the conventional and virtual angiograms were then qualitatively compared. It was found that the finite element models showed distinct flow types for each aneurysm, ranging from simple to complex. The virtual angiograms showed good agreement with the images from the conventional angiograms for all three aneurysms. Analogous size and orientation of the inflow jet, regions of flow impaction, major intraaneurysmal vortices and regions of outflow were observed in both the conventional and virtual angiograms. In conclusion, patient-specific image-based computational models of intracranial aneurysms can realistically reproduce the major intraaneurysmal flow structures observed with conventional angiography.

  3. Recent Development in Hot Flow Anomaly Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wang, S.; Zong, Q.

    2013-05-01

    Hot flow anomalies (HFAs) are events observed near the bow shock that are characterized by greatly heated solar wind plasmas and substantial flow deflection from the Sun-Earth direction, with duration of a few minutes and scale size of the order of a few Re. HFAs are thought to be produced by the interaction of some very special interplanetary current sheets that satisfy several strict conditions with planetary bow shocks. When the current sheet (discontinuity) is connected to the bow shock and the motional electric fields point towards the discontinuity, ions reflected from the bow shock are trapped in the current sheet. The relative streaming energy of the original solar wind beam and the reflected beam is converted to the thermal energy. However, we found recently that HFAs can be generated spontaneously (in the absence of any current sheets) at quasi-parallel bow shocks where the interplanetary magnetic field lies nearly parallel to the shock normal. Statistical studies show that 60% of the HFAs are not associated with clear discontinuities. In addition, there are 13% of the HFAs with the motional electric fields on neither leading nor trailing edge pointing towards the discontinuity. These new results indicate that this phenomenon is still not well understood although it was discovered almost 30 years ago.

  4. Recent Development in Hot Flow Anomaly Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wang, S.; Zong, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Hot flow anomalies (HFAs) are events observed near the bow shock that are characterized by greatly heated solar wind plasmas and substantial flow deflection from the Sun-Earth direction, with duration of a few minutes and scale size of the order of a few RE. HFAs are thought to be produced by the interaction of some very special interplanetary current sheets that satisfy several strict conditions with planetary bow shocks. When the current sheet (discontinuity) is connected to the bow shock and the motional electric fields point towards the discontinuity, ions reflected from the bow shock are trapped in the current sheet. The relative streaming energy of the original solar wind beam and the reflected beam is converted to the thermal energy. However, we found recently that HFAs can be generated spontaneously (in the absence of any current sheets) at quasi-parallel bow shocks where the interplanetary magnetic field lies nearly parallel to the shock normal. Statistical studies show that 60% of the HFAs are not associated with clear discontinuities. In addition, there are 13% of the HFAs with the motional electric fields on neither leading nor trailing edge pointing towards the discontinuity. These new results indicate that this phenomenon is still not well understood although it was discovered almost 30 years ago.

  5. Reconstructing Flow Patterns from Tsunami Deposits with No Visible Sedimentary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kain, C. L.; Chague-Goff, C.; Goff, J. R.; Wassmer, P.; Gomez, C. A.; Hart, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    High energy coastal events, such as tsunamis, commonly leave sediment deposits in the landscape that may be preserved in the geological record. A set of anomalous sand and silt layers intercalated between soil units was identified alongside an estuary in Okains Bay, Banks Peninsula, New Zealand. Okains Bay, comprised of a coastal plain of Holocene progradational dune ridges, was flooded by tsunamis in 1868 and 1960. Previous research has assessed the relationship between tsunami flow patterns and sediment deposits for recent events, and we aim to extend this application to older deposits where flow patterns were not recorded and sedimentary structures are not visually apparent. A multi-proxy approach was used to investigate the sediment deposits at twelve sites along a 2 km length of the estuary margin and map inundation patterns. Measurements of Magnetic Fabric (MF: Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility) were used to determine the flow direction during deposition, alongside stratigraphy and particle size analyses to assess wave energy. Flow direction results were overlaid on a digital elevation model of the study site to interpret flow patterns. Deposits became thinner and particle size decreased with distance from the coast, indicating waning flow energy with distance inland. MF results indicate that inundation occurred via the estuary channel, with primary flow directions oriented perpendicular or sub-perpendicular to the channel at each site. On a smaller scale, results showed evidence of current reversal at some sites, with flow directed alternately away from and towards the estuary channel. This is consistent with uprush and backwash patterns observed in tsunami wave sequences. Topographic control of flow patterns is also evident from the data. This research demonstrates a method for investigating older, structurally-degraded deposits and has implications for the reconstruction of paleotsunami inundation from their sedimentary deposits.

  6. Undulating fins produce off-axis thrust and flow structures.

    PubMed

    Neveln, Izaak D; Bale, Rahul; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Curet, Oscar M; Patankar, Neelesh A; MacIver, Malcolm A

    2014-01-15

    While wake structures of many forms of swimming and flying are well characterized, the wake generated by a freely swimming undulating fin has not yet been analyzed. These elongated fins allow fish to achieve enhanced agility exemplified by the forward, backward and vertical swimming capabilities of knifefish, and also have potential applications in the design of more maneuverable underwater vehicles. We present the flow structure of an undulating robotic fin model using particle image velocimetry to measure fluid velocity fields in the wake. We supplement the experimental robotic work with high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics, simulating the hydrodynamics of both a virtual fish, whose fin kinematics and fin plus body morphology are measured from a freely swimming knifefish, and a virtual rendering of our robot. Our results indicate that a series of linked vortex tubes is shed off the long edge of the fin as the undulatory wave travels lengthwise along the fin. A jet at an oblique angle to the fin is associated with the successive vortex tubes, propelling the fish forward. The vortex structure bears similarity to the linked vortex ring structure trailing the oscillating caudal fin of a carangiform swimmer, though the vortex rings are distorted because of the undulatory kinematics of the elongated fin.

  7. Statistical growths of turbulent structures in a pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Junsun; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    The streamwise and spanwise (or azimuthal) growths of turbulent coherent structures in a turbulent pipe flow (Reτ = 3008) are explored. Two-point correlation and 1-D pre-multiplied energy spectra of the streamwise velocity fluctuations are obtained to analyze the statistical growths of the streamwise and spanwise structures. The streamwise and spanwise length scales linearly grow along the wall-normal distance and the relationship between both length scales is shown to be linear, which support the attached eddy hypothesis. Furthermore, the statistical scalings of the coherent structures are demonstrated and compared to 2-D pre-multiplied energy spectra of the streamwise velocity fluctuations. Finally, the relationship between the streamwise and spanwise structures is analyzed by using the POD based on the translational invariance method (Duggleby et al. 2009). Several representative energetic modes are observed. The combinations of the energetic modes are used to examine the behaviors of the large- and very-large-scale motions. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2016-004749) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP) and partially supported by KISTI under the Strategic Supercomputing Support Program.

  8. Temperature and density structure of thermal proton flows. [in magnetosphere and ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.; Schunk, R. W.; Raitt, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal proton flows along magnetic field lines are an important feature of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. In this paper we report the results of a theoretical study of the thermal structure of such flows. The adopted steady state model is based upon O+, H+, and electrons with self-consistent solutions for the separate O+, H+, and electron temperatures, the O+ and H+ densities and the H+ drift velocity. Through investigation of a number of parameters affecting the model, it is shown that Joule heating arising from the flow of H+ through O+ preferentially heats H+, so that the H+ temperature is substantially greater than the O+ temperature. Low O+ densities characteristic of the trough region appear to give high H+/O+ temperature ratios. Typical O+ densities characteristic of polar wind flow regions give moderate H+/O3 temperature ratios. The Mach number of H+ outflow is substantially reduced in the present models in comparison with the older fixed temperature calculations.

  9. Cell Structure Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrom, James V.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use microscopes and digital images to examine Elodea, a fresh water plant, before and after the process of plasmolysis, identify plant cellular structures before and after plasmolysis, and calculate the size of the plant's vacuole. (ASK)

  10. Structural studies of intercalants

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    The structure of stage 2 potassium intercalated graphite, KC/sub 24/, is discussed in both the ordered and disordered phases. A one-dimensional model is used to illustrate the qualitative features of the KC/sub 24/ diffraction patterns.

  11. The dynamics of coherent flow structures within a submerged permeable bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blois, G.; Best, J.; Sambrook Smith, G.; Hardy, R. J.; Lead, J.

    2009-12-01

    The existence of complex 3D coherent vortical structures in turbulent boundary layers has been widely reported from experimental observations (Adrian et al., 2007, Christensen and Adrian, 2001) and investigations of natural open channel flows (e.g. Kostaschuk and Church, 1993; Best, 2005). The interaction between these flow structures and the solid boundary that is responsible for their generation is also receiving increasing attention due to the central role played by turbulence in governing erosion-deposition processes. Yet, for the majority of studies, the bed roughness has been represented using rough impermeable surfaces. While not inherently acknowledged, most research in this area is thus only strictly applicable to those natural river beds composed either of bedrock or clay, or that have armoured, impermeable, surfaces. Recently, many researchers have noted the need to account for the role of bed permeability in order to accurately reproduce the true nature of flow over permeable gravel-bed rivers. For these cases, the near-bed flow is inherently and mutually linked to the interstitial-flow occurring in the porous solid matrix. This interaction is established through turbulence mechanisms occurring across the interface that may be important for influencing the incipient motion of cohesionless sediment. However, the nature of this turbulence and the formation of coherent structures within such permeable beds remain substantially unresolved due to the technical challenges of collecting direct data in this region. In this paper, we detail the existence and dynamic nature of coherent vortical structures within the individual pore spaces of a permeable bed submerged by a free stream flow. Laboratory experiments are reported in which a permeable flume bed was constructed using spheres packed in an offset cubic arrangement. We applied a high resolution E-PIV (Endoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry) approach in order to fully resolve the instantaneous structure of

  12. Effect of Iron(II) on Arsenic Sequestration by δ-MnO2: Desorption Studies Using Stirred-Flow Experiments and X-Ray Absorption Fine-Structure Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yun; Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L

    2015-11-17

    Arsenic (As) mobility in the environment is greatly affected by its oxidation state and the degree to which it is sorbed on metal oxide surfaces. Manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) oxides are ubiquitous solids in terrestrial systems and have high sorptive capacities for many trace metals, including As. Although numerous studies have studied the effects of As adsorption and desorption onto Fe and Mn oxides individually, the fate of As within mixed systems representative of natural environments has not been resolved. In this research, As(III) was initially reacted with a poorly crystalline phyllomanganate (δ-MnO2) in the presence of Fe(II) prior to desorption. This initial reaction resulted in the sorption of both As(III) and As(V) on mixed Fe/Mn-oxides surfaces. A desorption study was carried out using two environmentally significant ions, phosphate (PO4(3-)) and calcium (Ca(2+)). Both a stirred-flow technique and X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) analysis were used to investigate As desorption behavior. Results showed that when As(III)/Fe(II) = 1:1 in the initial reaction, only As(V) was desorbed, agreeing with a previous study showing that As(III) is not associated with the Fe/Mn-oxides. When As(III)/Fe(II) = 1:10 in the initial reaction, both As(III) and As(V) can be desorbed from the Fe/Mn-oxide surface, and more As(III) is desorbed than As(V). Neither of the desorbents used in this study completely removed As(III) or As(V) from the Fe/Mn-oxides surface. However, the As desorption fraction decreases with increasing Fe(II) concentration in the initial reactions.

  13. Study of a downward bubbly flow in a vertical pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, R.S.; Kashinskii, O.N.; Nakoryakov, V.E.

    1987-07-01

    This paper reports on an experimental study of downward bubble-diffused concurrent flow in a vertical pipe. Two-phase flow was induced by introducing gas into a liquid with a special mixer which made it possible to obtain a gas-liquid flow with consistent bubble size. Visualization was performed by photography and flow rate was monitored by friction transducers. Shear stress and hydraulic conductivity were determined for various flow rates and Reynolds numbers. It was found that the stabilizing effect of the gas phase is determined by the fact that the flow rate pulsations introduced into the liquid flow have a negative sign; that the flow rate of the liquid near the bubbles, in other words, is lower than the mean flow rate of the liquid. This effect is not seen in ascending flows.

  14. Characterization of Unsteady Flow Structures Near Landing-Edge Slat. Part 2; 2D Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Jenkins, Luther N.

    2004-01-01

    In our previous computational studies of a generic high-lift configuration, quasi-laminar (as opposed to fully turbulent) treatment of the slat cove region proved to be an effective approach for capturing the unsteady dynamics of the cove flow field. Combined with acoustic propagation via Ffowes Williams and Hawkings formulation, the quasi-laminar simulations captured some important features of the slat cove noise measured with microphone array techniques. However. a direct assessment of the computed cove flow field was not feasible due to the unavailability of off-surface flow measurements. To remedy this shortcoming, we have undertaken a combined experiment and computational study aimed at characterizing the flow structures and fluid mechanical processes within the slat cove region. Part I of this paper outlines the experimental aspects of this investigation focused on the 30P30N high-lift configuration; the present paper describes the accompanying computational results including a comparison between computation and experiment at various angles of attack. Even through predictions of the time-averaged flow field agree well with the measured data, the study indicates the need for further refinement of the zonal turbulence approach in order to capture the full dynamics of the cove's fluctuating flow field.

  15. Fluid Flow through Porous Sandstone with Overprinting and Intersecting Geological Structures of Various Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Karimi-Fard, M.; Durlofsky, L.; Aydin, A.

    2010-12-01

    Impact of a wide variety of structural heterogeneities on fluid flow in an aeolian sandstone in the Valley of Fire State Park (NV), such as (1) dilatant fractures (joints), (2) shear fractures (faults), and (3) contraction/compaction structures (compaction bands), are considered. Each type of these structures has its own geometry, spacing, distribution, connectivity, and hydraulic properties, which either enhance or impede subsurface fluid flow. Permeability of these structures may, on average, be a few orders of magnitude higher or lower than those of the corresponding matrix rocks. In recent years, the influence of a single type of these heterogeneities on fluid flow has been studied individually, such as joints, compaction bands or faults. However, as different types of geological structures are commonly present together in the same rock volume, their combined effect requires a more detailed assessment. In this study, fluid flow simulations are performed using a special finite-volume discretization technique that was developed by Karimi-Fard et al. (2004; 2006). Using this approach, thin features such as fractures and compaction bands are represented as linear elements in unstructured 2D models and as planar elements in 3D models, which significantly reduces the total number of cells and simplifies grid generation. The cell geometric information and the cell-to-cell transmissibility obtained from this discretization technique are input to Stanford’s General Purpose Research Simulator (GPRS) for fluid flow simulation. To account for the effects of the various geological structures on subsurface flow, we perform permeability upscaling over regions corresponding to large-scale simulation grid blocks in order to obtain equivalent permeability components in two principal directions. We will focus on the following problems: (1) compaction bands of multisets; (2) compartmentalization of compaction bands of high-angle, low-angle and horizontal; (3) joints overprinting

  16. The development of laser speckle velocimetry for the study of vortical flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krothapalli, A.

    1991-01-01

    A new experimental technique commonly known as PIDV (particle image displacement velocity) was developed to measure an instantaneous two dimensional velocity fluid in a selected plane of the flow field. This technique was successfully applied to the study of several problems: (1) unsteady flows with large scale vortical structures; (2) the instantaneous two dimensional flow in the transition region of a rectangular air jet; and (3) the instantaneous flow over a circular bump in a transonic flow. In several other experiments PIDV is routinely used as a non-intrusive measurement technique to obtain instantaneous two dimensional velocity fields.

  17. Structural studies on resids

    SciTech Connect

    Strausz, O.P. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1988-01-01

    Investigations aimed at elucidating structural elements in Alberta oil and asphaltenes and heavy ends have yielded important and unforeseen results. Athabasca asphaltene has been separated into five different molecular weight fractions, each of which was analyzed by high-resolution /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy. In all these fractions, as well as in the whole asphaltene, the aliphatic and aromatic carbon and hydrogen types were determined quantitatively, from which it was concluded that there exists a large network of straight-chain aliphatic side chains and bridging units. Only 43% of the asphaltene is aromatic and the average n-alkyl chain length is 9. Further insights into the aspahaltene structure were obtained using the Ru(VIII)-catalyzed oxidation technique. This reagent selectively and quantitatively oxidizes aromatic carbons to CO/sub 2/ while converting side chains to alkanoic acids, alkyl bridging units to {alpha}, {omega}-dicarboxylic acids, and di- and triaromatic moieties to benzene polycarboxylic acids. In this way the authors were able to determine, quantitatively, the extents and concentration distributions of the numerous n-alkyl side chains and bridging units connected to aromatic nuclei, and of the aromatic clusters. Examination of the aromatic-free oxidized residue gave further information on the alkyl substituents attached to saturated, cyclic systems. A schematic model of the gross structural features of the asphaltene is presented. A brief overview of the heterocyclic compound classes identified in the asphaltene and maltene fractions of the bitumen is presented. The nature and concentration distributions of the carboxylic acids, sulfides and thiophenes in the two fractions are different and possible explanations for these observations are discussed.

  18. Development of laminar flow control wing surface composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lineberger, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    The dramatic increases in fuel costs and the potential for periods of limited fuel availability provided the impetus to explore technologies to reduce transport aircraft fuel consumption. NASA sponsored the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program beginning in 1976 to develop technologies to improve fuel efficiency. This report documents the Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplishments under NAS1-16235 LFC Laminar-Flow-Control Wing Panel Structural Design And Development (WSSD); Design, manufacturing, and testing activities. An in-depth preliminary design of the baseline 1993 LFC wing was accomplished. A surface panel using the Lockheed graphite/epoxy integrated LFC wing box structural concept was designed. The concept was shown by analysis to be structurally efficient and cost effective. Critical details of the surface and surface joints were demonstrated by fabricating and testing complex, concept selection specimens. Cost of the baseline LFC aircraft was estimated and compared to the turbulent aircraft. The mission fuel weight was 21.7 percent lower for the LFC aircraft. The calculation shows that the lower fuel costs for LFC offset the higher incremental costs of LFC in less than six months.

  19. Fluid-structure interactions in compressible cavity flows

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; ...

    2015-06-08

    Experiments were performed to understand the complex fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage. A cylindrical store was installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 3.33 and a length-to-width ratio of 1. The Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 2.5 and the incoming boundary layer was turbulent. Fast-response pressure measurements provided aeroacoustic loading in the cavity, while triaxial accelerometers provided simultaneous store response. Despite occupying only 6% of the cavity volume, the store significantly altered the cavity acoustics. The store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionallymore » dependent response to cavity resonance. Specifically, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas a spanwise response was observed only occasionally. Also, the streamwise and wall-normal responses were attributed to the longitudinal pressure waves and shear layer vortices known to occur during cavity resonance. Although the spanwise response to cavity tones was limited, broadband pressure fluctuations resulted in significant spanwise accelerations at store natural frequencies. As a result, the largest vibrations occurred when a cavity tone matched a structural natural frequency, although energy was transferred more efficiently to natural frequencies having predominantly streamwise and wall-normal motions.« less

  20. Fluid-structure interactions in compressible cavity flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Henfling, John F.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-06-08

    Experiments were performed to understand the complex fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage. A cylindrical store was installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 3.33 and a length-to-width ratio of 1. The Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 2.5 and the incoming boundary layer was turbulent. Fast-response pressure measurements provided aeroacoustic loading in the cavity, while triaxial accelerometers provided simultaneous store response. Despite occupying only 6% of the cavity volume, the store significantly altered the cavity acoustics. The store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionally dependent response to cavity resonance. Specifically, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas a spanwise response was observed only occasionally. Also, the streamwise and wall-normal responses were attributed to the longitudinal pressure waves and shear layer vortices known to occur during cavity resonance. Although the spanwise response to cavity tones was limited, broadband pressure fluctuations resulted in significant spanwise accelerations at store natural frequencies. As a result, the largest vibrations occurred when a cavity tone matched a structural natural frequency, although energy was transferred more efficiently to natural frequencies having predominantly streamwise and wall-normal motions.

  1. Commodity Flow Study - Clark County, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, S.Ph.D.; Navis, I.

    2008-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy has designated Clark County, Nevada as an 'Affected Unit of Local Government' due to the potential for impacts by activities associated with the Yucca Mountain High Level Nuclear Waste Repository project. Urban Transit, LLC has led a project team of transportation including experts from the University of Nevada Las Vegas Transportation Research Center to conduct a hazardous materials community flow study along Clark County's rail and truck corridors. In addition, a critical infrastructure analysis has also been carried out in order to assess the potential impacts of transportation within Clark County of high level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel to a proposed repository 90 miles away in an adjacent county on the critical infrastructure in Clark County. These studies were designed to obtain information relating to the transportation, identification and routing of hazardous materials through Clark County. Coordinating with the United States Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U. S. Federal Highway Administration, the Nevada Department of Transportation, and various other stakeholders, these studies and future research will examine the risk factors along the entire transportation corridor within Clark County and provide a context for understanding the additional vulnerability associated with shipping spent fuel through Clark County. (authors)

  2. Flow structures in the wake of heaving and pitching foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najdzin, Derek; Pardo, Enrique; Leftwich, Megan C.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2012-11-01

    A 10-bar mechanism drives a cambering hydrofoil in an oscillatory heaving and pitching motion that replicates the flapping motion of a dolphin tail. The mechanism sits on a force-balance with six strain gages that together measure the forces and moments experienced by the fin during an oscillation. Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence is used to image the flow structures created downstream of the cambering fin for a range of Reynolds and Strouhal numbers. The images are taken in the mid-plane, parallel to the bottom of the water tunnel. These results are compared to a rigid foil at matching conditions to investigate the role of camber changes during the flapping cycle.

  3. [Correlation of substrate structure and hydraulic characteristics in subsurface flow constructed wetlands].

    PubMed

    Bai, Shao-Yuan; Song, Zhi-Xin; Ding, Yan-Li; You, Shao-Hong; He, Shan

    2014-02-01

    The correlation of substrate structure and hydraulic characteristics was studied by numerical simulation combined with experimental method. The numerical simulation results showed that the permeability coefficient of matrix had a great influence on hydraulic efficiency in subsurface flow constructed wetlands. The filler with a high permeability coefficient had a worse flow field distribution in the constructed wetland with single layer structure. The layered substrate structure with the filler permeability coefficient increased from surface to bottom could avoid the short-circuited flow and dead-zones, and thus, increased the hydraulic efficiency. Two parallel pilot-scale constructed wetlands were built according to the numerical simulation results, and tracer experiments were conducted to validate the simulation results. The tracer experiment result showed that hydraulic characteristics in the layered constructed wetland were obviously better than that in the single layer system, and the substrate effective utilization rates were 0.87 and 0.49, respectively. It was appeared that numerical simulation would be favorable for substrate structure optimization in subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

  4. Heat transfer and flow structure in end-wall boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. R.; Walker, J. D.

    1993-08-01

    Research progress is described for a combined analytical/experimental program examining the flow structure and resultant surface heat transfer in end-wall boundary layers (e.g. wing-body. type junctures). Emphasis is placed on flow structure development and correlation of vortex-induced surface interactions with transient, local surface heat transfer. Analytically, numerical studies using an impulsively-started approach flow have documented the flow development and surface heat transfer on the symmetry plane for several end-wall flows; highly unsteady vortex formation and ejection are observed, with concomitant sharp, transient variations in surface heat transfer. Analysis of the complete three-dimensional behavior indicates the presence of strong interactions between the end-wall (surface) and the side-wall (bluff-body) boundary layers. Experimentally, a constant heat flux test system has been developed and instrumented for surface temperature detection using temperature-sensitive liquid crystals and color computer-image analysis; tests indicate dramatic effects of transient end-wall vortices on surface heat transfer, confirming the analytical results. A systematic visualization study indicates a very strong influence of the junction-induced pressure gradient on the approach boundary layer in promoting the unsteady vortex formation processes in the end-wall region.

  5. Time-Dependent Thermally-Driven Interfacial Flows in Multilayered Fluid Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Borhan, A.

    1996-01-01

    A computational study of thermally-driven convection in multilayered fluid structures will be performed to examine the effect of interactions among deformable fluid-fluid interfaces on the structure of time-dependent flow in these systems. Multilayered fluid structures in two models configurations will be considered: the differentially heated rectangular cavity with a free surface, and the encapsulated cylindrical liquid bridge. An extension of a numerical method developed as part of our recent NASA Fluid Physics grant will be used to account for finite deformations of fluid-fluid interfaces.

  6. Quantitative characterizations of phasic structure developments by local measurement methods in two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C.S.; Leung, W.H.; Wu, Q.; Ueno, T.; Ishii, M.

    1995-06-01

    An experimental study on the internal structure an a out in a 25.4 mm ID pipe. The local void fraction and interfacial area concentration were measured by a double-sensor probe. The flow structure development was visualized by measuring the radial distribution of these two parameters at three axial, locations (L/D = 12, 62, and 112). A more detailed study on the fully developed flow structure was conducted at L/D = 120. The interfacial structure were measured by the double- and four-sensor probes. A bubbly to-=slug transition region was defined according to the local data.The area-averaged void fraction measurements were given by a gamma densitometer. Other parameters such as the Taylor bubble film thickness, bubble length and slug unit length in slug flow were measured by a film robe. The redundant measurements were made to calibrate the local probe measurements. The quantitative representation of the phasic structure can then be used for modeling.

  7. Structural modeling of carbonaceous mesophase amphotropic mixtures under uniaxial extensional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmohammadi, Mojdeh; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2010-07-01

    The extended Maier-Saupe model for binary mixtures of model carbonaceous mesophases (uniaxial discotic nematogens) under externally imposed flow, formulated in previous studies [M. Golmohammadi and A. D. Rey, Liquid Crystals 36, 75 (2009); M. Golmohammadi and A. D. Rey, Entropy 10, 183 (2008)], is used to characterize the effect of uniaxial extensional flow and concentration on phase behavior and structure of these mesogenic blends. The generic thermorheological phase diagram of the single-phase binary mixture, given in terms of temperature (T) and Deborah (De) number, shows the existence of four T-De transition lines that define regions that correspond to the following quadrupolar tensor order parameter structures: (i) oblate (⊥,∥), (ii) prolate (⊥,∥), (iii) scalene O(⊥,∥), and (iv) scalene P(⊥,∥), where the symbols (⊥,∥) indicate alignment of the tensor order ellipsoid with respect to the extension axis. It is found that with increasing T the dominant component of the mixture exhibits weak deviations from the well-known pure species response to uniaxial extensional flow (uniaxial ⊥nematic→biaxial nematic→uniaxial∥paranematic). In contrast, the slaved component shows a strong deviation from the pure species response. This deviation is dictated by the asymmetric viscoelastic coupling effects emanating from the dominant component. Changes in conformation (oblate⇄prolate) and orientation (⊥⇄∥) are effected through changes in pairs of eigenvalues of the quadrupolar tensor order parameter. The complexity of the structural sensitivity to temperature and extensional flow is a reflection of the dual lyotropic/thermotropic nature (amphotropic nature) of the mixture and their cooperation/competition. The analysis demonstrates that the simple structures (biaxial nematic and uniaxial paranematic) observed in pure discotic mesogens under uniaxial extensional flow are significantly enriched by the interaction of the lyotropic

  8. Transition and acoustic response of recirculation structures in an unconfined co-axial isothermal swirling flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, R.; Miglani, Ankur; Basu, Saptarshi

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports the first observations of transition from a pre-vortex breakdown (Pre-VB) flow reversal to a fully developed central toroidal recirculation zone in a non-reacting, double-concentric swirling jet configuration and its response to longitudinal acoustic excitation. This transition proceeds with the formation of two intermediate, critical flow regimes. First, a partially penetrated vortex breakdown bubble (VBB) is formed that indicates the first occurrence of an enclosed structure as the centre jet penetration is suppressed by the growing outer roll-up eddy; resulting in an opposed flow stagnation region. Second, a metastable transition structure is formed that marks the collapse of inner mixing vortices. In this study, the time-averaged topological changes in the coherent recirculation structures are discussed based on the non-dimensional modified Rossby number (Rom) which appears to describe the spreading of the zone of swirl influence in different flow regimes. Further, the time-mean global acoustic response of pre-VB and VBB is measured as a function of pulsing frequency using the relative aerodynamic blockage factor (i.e., maximum radial width of the inner recirculation zone). It is observed that all flow modes except VBB are structurally unstable as they exhibit severe transverse radial shrinkage (˜20%) at the burner Helmholtz resonant modes (100-110 Hz). In contrast, all flow regimes show positional instability as seen by the large-scale, asymmetric spatial shifting of the vortex core centres. Finally, the mixing transfer function M (f) and magnitude squared coherence λ2(f) analysis is presented to determine the natural coupling modes of the system dynamic parameters (u', p'), i.e., local acoustic response. It is seen that the pre-VB flow mode exhibits a narrow-band, low pass filter behavior with a linear response window of 100-105 Hz. However, in the VBB structure, presence of critical regions such as the opposed flow stagnation region

  9. Measurements of the tip-gap turbulent flow structure in a low-speed compressor cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Genglin

    This dissertation presents results from a thorough study of the tip-gap turbulent flow structure in a low-speed linear compressor cascade wind tunnel at Virginia Tech that includes a moving belt system to simulate the relative motion between the tip and the casing. The endwall pressure measurements and the surface oil flow visualizations were made on a stationary endwall to obtain the flow features and to determine the measurement profiles of interest. A custom-made miniature 3-orthogonal-velocity-component fiber-optic laser-Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system was used to measure all three components of velocity within a 50 mum spherical measurement volume within the gap between the endwall and the blade tip, mainly for the stationary wall with 1.65% and 3.30% tip gaps as well as some initial experiments for the moving wall. Since all of the vorticity in a flow originates from the surfaces under the action of strong pressure gradient, it was very important to measure the nearest-wall flow on the endwall and around the blade tip. The surface skin friction velocity was measured by using viscous sublayer velocity profiles, which verified the presence of an intense lateral shear layer that was observed from surface oil flow visualizations. All second- and third-order turbulence quantities were measured to provide detailed data for any parallel CFD efforts. The most complete data sets were acquired for 1.65% and 3.30% tip gap/chord ratios in a low-speed linear compressor cascade. This study found that tip gap flows are complex pressure-driven, unsteady three-dimensional turbulent flows. The crossflow velocity normal to the blade chord is nearly uniform in the and tip-gap and changes substantially from the pressure to suction side. The crossflow velocity relies on the local tip pressure loading that is different from the mid-span pressure loading because of tip leakage vortex influence. The tip gap flow is highly skewed three-dimensional flow throughout the full gap

  10. Two-phase flow stability structure in a natural circulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhiwei

    1995-09-01

    The present study reports a numerical analysis of two-phase flow stability structures in a natural circulation system with two parallel, heated channels. The numerical model is derived, based on the Galerkin moving nodal method. This analysis is related to some design options applicable to integral heating reactors with a slightly-boiling operation mode, and is also of general interest to similar facilities. The options include: (1) Symmetric heating and throttling; (2) Asymmetric heating and symmetric throttling; (3) Asymmetric heating and throttling. The oscillation modes for these variants are discussed. Comparisons with the data from the INET two-phase flow stability experiment have qualitatively validated the present analysis.

  11. Basic studies of microstructure of combusting turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Fazle

    1991-03-01

    The goal is to develop a state-of-the-art measurement technique, Holographic Particle Displacement Velocimetry (HPV), which can provide instantaneous velocities everywhere in the flow field simultaneously. Another goal is to use the power of supercomputers to simulate 3D flows with heat release to study the physics of combusting turbulent flows. Computations suffer from limited flow times and Reynolds number but can provide flow properties in more detail than possible by any existing experimental techniques. Moreover, numerical simulations can provide quantities almost impossible to measure experimentally. This article discusses efforts to develop the holographic particle displacement velocimetry system and results of direct numerical numerical simulations of combusting flows.

  12. Strongly coupled partitioned approach for fluid structure interaction in free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facci, Andrea Luigi; Ubertini, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe and validate a methodology for the numerical simulation of the fluid structure interaction in free surface flows. Specifically, this study concentrates on the vertical impact of a rigid body on the water surface, (i.e. on the hull slamming problem). The fluid flow is modeled through the volume of fluid methodology, and the structure dynamics is described by the Newton's second law. An iterative algorithm guarantees the tight coupling between the fluid and solid solvers, allowing the simulations of lightweight (i.e. buoyant) structures. The methodology is validated comparing numerical results to experimental data on the free fall of different rigid wedges. The correspondence between numerical results and independent experimental findings from literature evidences the reliability and the accuracy of the proposed approach.

  13. Interfacial structures of confined air-water two-phase bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; McCreary, D.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-08-01

    The interfacial structure of the two-phase flows is of great importance in view of theoretical modeling and practical applications. In the present study, the focus is made on obtaining detailed local two-phase parameters in the air-water bubbly flow in a rectangular vertical duct using the double-sensor conductivity probe. The characteristic wall-peak is observed in the profiles of the interracial area concentration and the void fraction. The development of the interfacial area concentration along the axial direction of the flow is studied in view of the interfacial area transport and bubble interactions. The experimental data is compared with the drift flux model with C{sub 0} = 1.35.

  14. Structural properties of mobile armors formed at different flow strengths in gravel-bed rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, D. Mark; Ockelford, Annie; Rice, Stephen P.; Hillier, John K.; Nguyen, Thao; Reid, Ian; Tate, Nicholas J.; Ackerley, David

    2016-08-01

    Differences in the structure of mobile armors formed at three different flow strengths have been investigated in a laboratory flume. The temporal evolution of the bed surfaces and the properties of the final beds were compared using metrics of surface grain size, microtopography, and bed organization at both grain and mesoscales. Measurements of the bed condition were obtained on nine occasions during each experiment to describe the temporal evolution of the beds. Structured mobile armors formed quickly in each experiment. At the grain scale (1-45 mm; 9 ≤ Ds50 ≤ 17 mm where Ds50 is the median surface particle size), surface complexity decreased and bed roughness increased in response to surface coarsening and the development of the mobile armor. Particles comprising the armor also became flow aligned and developed imbrication. At a larger scale (100-200 mm), the surface developed a mesoscale topography through the development of bed patches with lower and higher elevations. Metrics of mobile armor structure showed remarkable consistency over prolonged periods of near-constant transport, demonstrating for the first time that actively transporting surfaces maintain an equilibrium bed structure. Bed structuring was least developed in the experiments conducted at the lowest flow strength. However, little difference was observed in the structural metrics of the mobile armors generated at higher flows. Although the range of transport rates studied was limited, the results suggest that the structure of mobile armors is insensitive to the formative transport rate except when rates are low (τ* ≈ 0.03 where τ* is the dimensionless shear stress).

  15. Comparative study of heat transfer and pressure drop during flow boiling and flow condensation in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Andrzejczyk, Rafał; Jakubowska, Blanka; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2014-09-01

    In the paper a method developed earlier by authors is applied to calculations of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient for flow boiling and also flow condensation for some recent data collected from literature for such fluids as R404a, R600a, R290, R32,R134a, R1234yf and other. The modification of interface shear stresses between flow boiling and flow condensation in annular flow structure are considered through incorporation of the so called blowing parameter. The shear stress between vapor phase and liquid phase is generally a function of nonisothermal effects. The mechanism of modification of shear stresses at the vapor-liquid interface has been presented in detail. In case of annular flow it contributes to thickening and thinning of the liquid film, which corresponds to condensation and boiling respectively. There is also a different influence of heat flux on the modification of shear stress in the bubbly flow structure, where it affects bubble nucleation. In that case the effect of applied heat flux is considered. As a result a modified form of the two-phase flow multiplier is obtained, in which the nonadiabatic effect is clearly pronounced.

  16. Effect of cavitation on flow structure of a tip vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthieu, Dreyer; Reclari, Martino; Farhat, Mohamed

    2013-11-01

    Tip vortices, which may develop in axial turbines and marine propellers, are often associated with the occurrence of cavitation because of the low pressure in their core. Although this issue has received a great deal of attention, it is still unclear how the phase transition affects the flow structure of such a vortex. In the present work, we investigate the change of the vortex structure due to cavitation incipience. The measurement of the velocity field is performed in the case of a tip vortex generated by an elliptical hydrofoil placed in the test section of EPFL high speed cavitation tunnel. To this end, a 3D stereo PIV is used with fluorescent seeding particles. A cost effective method is developed to produce in-house fluorescent seeding material, based on polyamide particles and Rhodamine-B dye. The amount of cavitation in the vortex core is controlled by the inlet pressure in the test section, starting with the non-cavitating case. We present an extensive analysis of the vorticity distribution, the vortex intensity and core size for various cavitation developments. This research is supported by CCEM and swisselectric research.

  17. A Method for Flow Simulation About Complex Geometries Using Both Structured and Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debonis, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics code which utilizes both structured and unstructured grids was developed. The objective of this study was to develop and demonstrate the ability of such a code to achieve solutions about complex geometries in two dimensions. An unstructured grid generator and flow solver were incorporated into the PARC2D structured flow solver. This new unstructured grid generator capability allows for easier generation and manipulation of complex grids. Several examples of the grid generation capabilities are provided. The coupling of different grid topologies and the manipulation of individual grids is shown. Also, grids for realistic geometries, a NACA 0012 airfoil and a wing/nacelle installation, were created. The flow over a NACA 0012 airfoil was used as a test case for the flow solver. Eight separate cases were run. They were both the inviscid and viscous solutions for two freestream Mach numbers and airfoil angle of attacks of 0 to 3.86 degrees. The Mach numbers chosen were for a subsonic case, Mach 0.6, and a case where supersonic regions and a shock wave exists, Mach 0.8. These test case conditions were selected to match experimentally obtained data for code comparison. The results show that the code accurately predicts the flow field for all cases.

  18. Buoyancy Effects on Flow Structure and Instability of Low-Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap Sriramachandra

    2004-01-01

    A low-density gas jet injected into a high-density ambient gas is known to exhibit self-excited global oscillations accompanied by large vortical structures interacting with the flow field. The primary objective of the proposed research is to study buoyancy effects on the origin and nature of the flow instability and structure in the near-field of low-density gas jets. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and Linear stability analysis were the techniques employed to scale the buoyancy effects. The formation and evolution of vortices and scalar structure of the flow field are investigated in buoyant helium jets discharged from a vertical tube into quiescent air. Oscillations at identical frequency were observed throughout the flow field. The evolving flow structure is described by helium mole percentage contours during an oscillation cycle. Instantaneous, mean, and RMS concentration profiles are presented to describe interactions of the vortex with the jet flow. Oscillations in a narrow wake region near the jet exit are shown to spread through the jet core near the downstream location of the vortex formation. The effects of jet Richardson number on characteristics of vortex and flow field are investigated and discussed. The laminar, axisymmetric, unsteady jet flow of helium injected into air was simulated using CFD. Global oscillations were observed in the flow field. The computed oscillation frequency agreed qualitatively with the experimentally measured frequency. Contours of helium concentration, vorticity and velocity provided information about the evolution and propagation of vortices in the oscillating flow field. Buoyancy effects on the instability mode were evaluated by rainbow schlieren flow visualization and concentration measurements in the near-field of self-excited helium jets undergoing gravitational change in the microgravity environment of 2.2s drop tower at NASA John H. Glenn Research Center. The jet

  19. Three-dimensional flow structure and bed morphology in large elongate meander loops with different outer bank roughness characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konsoer, Kory M.; Rhoads, Bruce L.; Best, James L.; Langendoen, Eddy J.; Abad, Jorge D.; Parsons, Dan R.; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2016-12-01

    Few studies have examined the three-dimensional flow structure and bed morphology within elongate loops of large meandering channels. The present study focuses on the spatial patterns of three-dimensional flow structure and bed morphology within two elongate meander loops and examines how differences in outer bank roughness influence near-bank flow characteristics. Three-dimensional velocities were measured during two different events - a near-bankfull flow and an overbank event. Detailed data on channel bathymetry and bed form geometry were obtained during a near-bankfull event. Flow structure within the loops is characterized by strong topographic steering by the point bar, by the development of helical motion associated with flow curvature, and by acceleration of flow where bedrock is exposed along the outer bank. Near-bank velocities during the overbank event are less than those for the near-bankfull flow, highlighting the strong influence of the point bar on redistribution of mass and momentum of the flow at subbankfull stages. Multiple outer bank pools are evident within the elongate meander loop with low outer bank roughness, but are not present in the loop with high outer bank roughness, which may reflect the influence of abundant large woody debris on near-bank velocity characteristics. The positions of pools within both loops can be linked to spatial variations in planform curvature. The findings indicate that flow structure and bed morphology in these large elongate loops is similar to that in small elongate loops, but differs somewhat from flow structure and bed morphology reported for experimental elongate loops.

  20. Prospects of Elliptic Flow Studies at NICA/MPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraksiev, Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    As a key observable, anisotropic flow presents a unique insight into heavy ion collision physics. The presented poster reveals the prospects of studying elliptic flow at the NICA/MPD facility through the UrQMD model. Here, results for the elliptic flow of simulated and reconstructed hadrons at the planned NICA energy range are presented.

  1. Numerical Studies of Flow Past Isolated Seamounts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    al., 1993). This work confirmed the amplification of these waves under certain conditions and showed that a rectified mean anti-cyclonic flow is generated as well, consistent with observations near Fieberling Guyot .

  2. Cavitation, Flow Structure and Turbulence in the Tip Region of a Rotor Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Miorini, R.; Soranna, F.; Katz, J.; Michael, T.; Jessup, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Measure the flow structure and turbulence within a Naval, axial waterjet pump. Create a database for benchmarking and validation of parallel computational efforts. Address flow and turbulence modeling issues that are unique to this complex environment. Measure and model flow phenomena affecting cavitation within the pump and its effect on pump performance. This presentation focuses on cavitation phenomena and associated flow structure in the tip region of a rotor blade.

  3. The art and science of flow control - case studies using flow visualization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvi, F. S.; Cattafesta, L. N., III

    2010-04-01

    Active flow control (AFC) has been the focus of significant research in the last decade. This is mainly due to the potentially substantial benefits it affords. AFC applications range from the subsonic to the supersonic (and beyond) regime for both internal and external flows. These applications are wide and varied, such as controlling flow transition and separation over various external components of the aircraft to active management of separation and flow distortion in engine components and over turbine and compressor blades. High-speed AFC applications include control of flow oscillations in cavity flows, supersonic jet screech, impinging jets, and jet-noise control. In this paper we review some of our recent applications of AFC through a number of case studies that illustrate the typical benefits as well as limitations of present AFC methods. The case studies include subsonic and supersonic canonical flowfields such as separation control over airfoils, control of supersonic cavity flows and impinging jets. In addition, properties of zero-net mass-flux (ZNMF) actuators are also discussed as they represent one of the most widely studied actuators used for AFC. In keeping with the theme of this special issue, the flowfield properties and their response to actuation are examined through the use of various qualitative and quantitative flow visualization methods, such as smoke, shadowgraph, schlieren, planar-laser scattering, and Particle image velocimetry (PIV). The results presented here clearly illustrate the merits of using flow visualization to gain significant insight into the flow and its response to AFC.

  4. Investigation on 3D t wake flow structures of swimming bionic fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, G.-X.; Tan, G.-K.; Lai, G.-J.

    2012-10-01

    A bionic experimental platform was designed for the purpose of investigating time accurate three-dimensional flow field, using digital particle image velocimetry (DSPIV). The wake behind the flapping trail of a robotic fish model was studied at high spatial resolution. The study was performed in a water channel. A robot fish model was designed and built. The model was fixed onto a rigid support framework using a cable-supporting method, with twelve stretched wires. The entire tail of the model can perform prescribed motions in two degrees of freedom, mainly in carangiform mode, by driving its afterbody and lunate caudal fin respectively. The DSPIV system was set up to operate in a translational manner, measuring velocity field in a series of parallel slices. Phase locked measurements were repeated for a number of runs, allowing reconstruction of phase average flow field. Vortex structures with phase history of the wake were obtained. The study reveals some new and complex three-dimensional flow structures in the wake of the fish, including "reverse hairpin vortex" and "reverse Karman S-H vortex rings", allowing insight into physics of this complex flow.

  5. Liquid-gas relative permeabilities in fractures: Effects of flow structures, phase transformation and surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Ying

    2005-11-01

    Two-phase flow through fractured media is important in petroleum, geothermal, and environmental applications. However, the actual physics and phenomena that occur inside fractures are poorly understood, and oversimplified relative permeability curves are commonly used in fractured reservoir simulations. In this work, an experimental apparatus equipped with a high-speed data acquisition system, real-time visualization, and automated image processing technology was constructed to study three transparent analog fractures with distinct surface roughnesses: smooth, homogeneously rough, and randomly rough. Air-water relative permeability measurements obtained in this study were compared with models suggested by earlier studies and analyzed by examining the flow structures. A method to evaluate the tortuosities induced by the blocking phase, namely the channel tortuosity, was proposed from observations of the flow structure images. The relationship between the coefficients of channel tortuosity and the relative permeabilities was studied with the aid of laboratory experiments and visualizations. Experimental data from these fractures were used to develop a broad approach for modeling two-phase flow behavior based on the flow structures. Finally, a general model deduced from these data was proposed to describe two-phase relative permeabilities in both smooth and rough fractures. For the theoretical analysis of liquid-vapor relative permeabilities, accounting for phase transformations, the inviscid bubble train models coupled with relative permeability concepts were developed. The phase transformation effects were evaluated by accounting for the molecular transport through liquid-vapor interfaces. For the steam-water relative permeabilities, we conducted steam-water flow experiments in the same fractures as used for air-water experiments. We compared the flow behavior and relative permeability differences between two-phase flow with and without phase transformation effects

  6. Mantle heat flow and thermal structure of the northern block of Southern Granulite Terrain, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manglik, Ajay

    2006-07-01

    Continental shield regions are normally characterized by low-to-moderate mantle heat flow. Archaean Dharwar craton of the Indian continental shield also follows the similar global pattern. However, some recent studies have inferred significantly higher mantle heat flow for the Proterozoic northern block of Southern Granulite Terrain (SGT) in the immediate vicinity of the Dharwar craton by assuming that the radiogenic elements depleted exposed granulites constitute the 45-km-thick crust. In this study, we use four-layered model of the crustal structure revealed by integrated geophysical studies along a geo-transect in this region to estimate the mantle heat flow. The results indicate that: (i) the mantle heat flow of the northern block of SGT is 17 ± 2 mW/m 2, supporting the global pattern, and (ii) the lateral variability of 10-12 mW/m 2 in the surface heat flow within the block is of crustal origin. In terms of temperature, the Moho beneath the eastern Salem-Namakkal region appears to be at 80-100 °C higher temperature than that beneath the western Avinashi region.

  7. Flow Characteristics over a Gravel Bedform: Kaj River Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddahi, Mohammad Reza; Afzalimehr, Hossein; Rowinski, Paweł M.

    2016-10-01

    The present study deals with the turbulence structure in order to better understand the interaction of bedform and flow characteristics in a gravel-bed river. Data measured above a bedform is used to analyze the importance of coherent structures in turbulent transfer. The Reynolds stress and turbulence intensity in stream-wise direction illustrate significant difference along the bedform, showing a three-layer distribution at the crest and a convex one at the downstream of bedform. Quadrant analysis technique is used to picture momentum exchange above the considered bedform and to find the dominant event in bursting process of the gravel bedform. Quadrant analysis demonstrates that the mechanisms of bedforms generation in sand and gravel-bed rivers are similar and sweep is the dominant event in both rivers.

  8. Modelling rapid flow response of a tile drained hillslope with explicit representation of preferential flow paths and consideration of equifinal model structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, Julian; Zehe, Erwin

    2010-05-01

    Rapid water flow along spatially connected - often biologically mediated - flow paths of minimum flow resistance is widely acknowledged to play a key role in runoff generation at the hillslope and small catchment scales but also in the transport of solutes like agro chemicals and nutrients in cohesive soils. Especially at tile drained fields site connected vertical flow structures such as worm burrows, roots or shrinkage cracks act as short cuts allowing water flow to bypass the soil matrix. In the present study we propose a spatially explicit approach to represent worm burrows as connected structures of high conductivity and low retention capacity in a 2D physically model. With this approach tile drain discharge and preferential flow patterns in soil observed during the irrigation of a tile drained hillslope in the Weiherbach catchment were modelled. The model parameters derived from measurements and are considered to be uncertain. Given this uncertainty of key factors that organise flow and transport at tile drained sites the main objectives of the present studies are to shed light on the following three questions: 1. Does a simplified approach that explicitly represents worm burrows as continuous flow paths of small flow resistance and low retention properties in a 2D physically model allow successful reproduction of event flow response at a tile drained field site in the Weiherbach catchment? 2. Does the above described uncertainty in key factors cause equifinality i.e. are there several model structural setups that reproduce event flow response in an acceptable manner without compromising our physical understanding of the system? 3. If so, what are the key factors that have to be known at high accuracy to reduce the equifinality of model structures? The issue of equifinality is usually discussed in catchment modelling to indicate that often a large set of conceptual model parameter sets allows acceptable reproduction of the behaviour of the system of interest

  9. Numerical study of transient flow phenomena in shock tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokarcik-Polsky, Susan; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1994-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to study some transient flow features that can occur during the startup process of a shoch tunnel. The investigation concentrated on two areas: (1) the flow near the endwall of the driven tube during shock reflection and (2) the transient flow in the nozzle. The driven tube calculations were inviscid and focused on the study of a vortex system that was seen to form at the driven tube's axis of symmetry. The nozzle flow calculations examined viscous and inviscid effects during nozzle startup. The CFD solutions of the nozzle flows were compared with experimental data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the numerical analysis.

  10. Water Flow Vibration Effect on the NLC RF Structure-Girder System

    SciTech Connect

    Cristian Boffo et al.

    2004-07-07

    As part of the vibration budget study for the NLC Main Linac components, the vibration sources in the NLC modules (Girder) are under investigation. The activity is focused on the effect of cooling water flow on the structures (FXB type) stability, the transmission of vibrations to the adjacent components, and the effect of different materials of construction used for the supports. Experimental data and ANSYS simulations have been compared. This paper reports on the ongoing work.

  11. Water Flow Vibration Effect on the NLC RF Structure - Girder System

    SciTech Connect

    Boffo, C

    2004-07-16

    As part of the vibration budget study for the NLC Main Linac components, the vibration sources in the NLC modules (Girder) are under investigation. The activity is focused on the effect of cooling water flow on the structures (FXB type) stability, the transmission of vibrations to the adjacent components, and the effect of different materials of construction used for the supports. Experimental data and ANSYS simulations have been compared. This paper reports on the ongoing work.

  12. Flow Studies in Basilar Tip Aneurysm Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Russell; Selby, Kathy; Saloner, David; Savas, Omer

    2001-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry and flow visualization are performed on two models of basilar tip bifurcation aneurysms. The models are intended to correspond to an aneurysm at two stages during its growth. The models are subject to steady flow conditions covering the physiological range of Reynold’s numbers while being subject to both symmetric and asymmetric outflow conditions. A brief investigation is also made using pulsatile input flow with a physiologically representative waveform. Experiment showed a general pattern of increasing unsteadiness in the aneurysm head with increasing Reynold’s number. Only for a case of a small-headed model and asymmetric outflow could a quasi-stable flow pattern be established. For the same model with symmetric outflow conditions, instability in the aneurysm head occurs at the low end of physiological Reynold’s numbers. A larger-headed aneurysm model displayed a similar onset of instability for both symmetric and asymmetric outflow conditions, with flow within the aneurysm head being less pronounced than the small-headed model.

  13. Lagrangian-based investigation of the transient flow structures around a pitching hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qin; Huang, Biao; Wang, Guoyu

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to address the transient flow structures around a pitching hydrofoil by combining physical and numerical studies. In order to predict the dynamic behavior of the flow structure effectively, the Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) defined by the ridges of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) are utilized under the framework of Navier-Stokes flow computations. In the numerical simulations, the k-ω shear stress transport (SST) turbulence model, coupled with a two-equation γ {-Re}_θ transition model, is used for the turbulence closure. Results are presented for a NACA66 hydrofoil undergoing slowly and rapidly pitching motions from 0° to 15° then back to 0° at a moderate Reynolds number Re=7.5× 105. The results reveal that the transient flow structures can be observed by the LCS method. For the slowly pitching case, it consists of five stages: quasi-steady and laminar, transition from laminar to turbulent, vortex development, large-scale vortex shedding, and reverting to laminar. The observation of LCS and Lagrangian particle tracers elucidates that the trailing edge vortex is nearly attached and stable during the vortex development stage and the interaction between the leading and trailing edge vortex caused by the adverse pressure gradient forces the vortexes to shed downstream during the large-scale vortex shedding stage, which corresponds to obvious fluctuations of the hydrodynamic response. For the rapidly pitching case, the inflection is hardly to be observed and the stall is delayed. The vortex formation, interaction, and shedding occurred once instead of being repeated three times, which is responsible for just one fluctuation in the hydrodynamic characteristics. The numerical results also show that the FTLE field has the potential to identify the transient flows, and the LCS can represent the divergence extent of infinite neighboring particles and capture the interface of the vortex region.

  14. Influence of surface clinker on the crustal structures and dynamics of 'a'ā lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegarth, L. J.; James, M. R.; van Wyk de Vries, B.; Pinkerton, H.

    2010-07-01

    Surface structures on 'a'ā and blocky lavas reflect the internal flow dynamics during emplacement and also influence the dynamics of developing flows. To investigate the effects of brittle, clinkery 'a'ā flow crusts on flow dynamics and surface structures, we conducted sand and silicone laboratory experiments that simulated the advance of lava into a preexisting channelized flow with a surface crust. Experiments carried out with relatively thin crusts produced apparently ductile surface deformation structures, while thick crusts behaved dominantly in a brittle manner. Increased crustal thickness led to increased strength under compression but favored more disruption under tension, as the flow core welled up through tensile fractures, entraining crustal material. At lava flow fronts, upwelling and entrainment would increase heat losses by radiation and advection, respectively, resulting in a positive-feedback cooling loop. Fracturing caused heterogeneous crustal distribution near the flow front, which resulted in lobate flow advance, despite the absence of the viscoelastic layer that has previously been inferred as the primary control on flow advance and lobe formation. We therefore conclude that the influence of a purely brittle crust on the dynamics and surface morphologies of lava flows is more significant than often thought. All of the surface structures produced in the experiments have been observed on lavas or glaciers and many also on landslides and debris flows, suggesting the results can assist in the understanding of a range of natural flows.

  15. Numerical study of twin-jet impingement upwash flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegues, W. J.; Vanka, S. P.

    1990-01-01

    Two horizontally spaced jets impinging normally on a flat surface create a fountain upwash flow due to the collision of the radially flowing wall jets. This fountain flow is of importance to the dynamics and propulsion of STOVL aircraft. The fountain flow influences the lift forces on the aircraft and the ingestion of hot gases and debris by the engine inlet. In this paper, a multigrid based finite-difference numerical procedure has been applied to solve the equations governing this three-dimensional flow. The standard k-epsilon turbulence model has been used. Comparisons with experimental data reveal that while the mean velocities are predicted with reasonable accuracy, the turbulent kinetic energies are seriously in error. The reasons for this discrepancy could be the intense unsteadiness and large-scale structures of the flow in the near-wall region, which cannot be captured well by any Reynolds-averaged turbulence model.

  16. Experimental flow studies in an elastic Y-model.

    PubMed

    Mijovic, Budimir; Liepsch, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    To determine the causes and history of atherosclerosis it is necessary to understand the hemodynamic parameters of blood circulation. Hemodynamic parameters play an important role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques, especially near bends and bifurcations where the flow separates from the wall. Here the flow is laminar and non-axial with eddies, secondary flow, flow separation and stagnation points. Stenoses are found predominantly in flow separation areas. Therefore, it is important to separately study the following flow parameters: steady and pulsatile flow, wall elasticity and non-Newtonian flow behavior of blood. A simplified silicon elastic y-model simulating the human carotid artery was used for the analysis of these parameters. This model can be used for numerical studies as well. Flow was visualized at steady flow using dyes and at pulsatile flow with a photoelastic apparatus and a birefringent solution. The local axial velocity at steady and pulsatile flow was determined with a one-component Laser-Doppler-Anemometer (LDA). Pulsatile flow was generated by a piston membrane pump. A glycerin-water solution was used to simulate the Newtonian flow behavior of blood. A DMSO-Separan water solution was used to simulate the non-Newtonian flow behavior. Pulsatile flow creates higher and lower shear rates so called oscillating shear rate compare to steady flow depending on the velocity amplitude. The non-Newtonian fluid showed a markedly different flow behavior than the Newtonian fluid especially in areas of flow separation. Shear gradients were calculated from these velocity measurements using a bicubic spline interpolation. Shear stresses were calculated from these velocity shear gradients and the viscosity of the non-Newtonian fluid at these shear gradients. At special areas, high shear stresses > 10 Pa were found. The elasticity of the model wall also influences the flow behavior. The measurements showed that the characteristics of pulsatile flow and the

  17. TANK MIXING STUDY WITH FLOW RECIRCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2014-06-25

    The primary objective of this work is to quantify the mixing time when two miscible fluids are mixed by one recirculation pump and to evaluate adequacy of 2.5 hours of pump recirculation to be considered well mixed in SRS tanks, JT-71/72. The work scope described here consists of two modeling analyses. They are the steady state flow pattern analysis during pump recirculation operation of the tank liquid and transient species transport calculations based on the initial steady state flow patterns. The modeling calculations for the mixing time are performed by using the 99% homogeneity criterion for the entire domain of the tank contents.

  18. Turbulent structures in wall-bounded shear flows observed via three-dimensional numerical simulators. [using the Illiac 4 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, A.

    1980-01-01

    Three recent simulations of tubulent shear flow bounded by a wall using the Illiac computer are reported. These are: (1) vibrating-ribbon experiments; (2) study of the evolution of a spot-like disturbance in a laminar boundary layer; and (3) investigation of turbulent channel flow. A number of persistent flow structures were observed, including streamwise and vertical vorticity distributions near the wall, low-speed and high-speed streaks, and local regions of intense vertical velocity. The role of these structures in, for example, the growth or maintenance of turbulence is discussed. The problem of representing the large range of turbulent scales in a computer simulation is also discussed.

  19. Noninvasive measurement of cerebrospinal fluid flow using an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Thomas; Yi, Juneyoung L; Kaufman, Bruce A; Krishnamurthy, Satish

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Mechanical failure-which is the primary cause of CSF shunt malfunction-is not readily diagnosed, and the specific reasons for mechanical failure are not easily discerned. Prior attempts to measure CSF flow noninvasively have lacked the ability to either quantitatively or qualitatively obtain data. To address these needs, this preliminary study evaluates an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor in pediatric and adult patients with external ventricular drains (EVDs). One goal was to confirm the stated accuracy of the sensor in a clinical setting. A second goal was to observe the sensor's capability to record real-time continuous CSF flow. The final goal was to observe recordings during instances of flow blockage or lack of flow in order to determine the sensor's ability to identify these changes. METHODS A total of 5 pediatric and 11 adult patients who had received EVDs for the treatment of hydrocephalus were studied in a hospital setting. The primary EVD was connected to a secondary study EVD that contained a fluid-filled pressure transducer and an in-line transit time flow sensor. Comparisons were made between the weight of the drainage bag and the flow measured via the sensor in order to confirm its accuracy. Data from the pressure transducer and the flow sensor were recorded continuously at 100 Hz for a period of 24 hours by a data acquisition system, while the hourly CSF flow into the drip chamber was recorded manually. Changes in the patient's neurological status and their time points were noted. RESULTS The flow sensor demonstrated a proven accuracy of ± 15% or ± 2 ml/hr. The flow sensor allowed real-time continuous flow waveform data recordings. Dynamic analysis of CSF flow waveforms allowed the calculation of the pressure-volume index. Lastly, the sensor was able to diagnose a blocked catheter and distinguish between the blockage and lack of flow. CONCLUSIONS The Transonic flow sensor accurately measures CSF output within ± 15% or ± 2 ml

  20. Algebraic structure of general electromagnetic fields and energy flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Algebraic structure of general electromagnetic fields in stationary spacetime. > Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the electomagnetic field tensor. > Energy-momentum in terms of eigenvectors and Killing vector. > Explicit form of reference frame with vanishing Poynting vector. > Application of formalism to Bessel beams. - Abstract: The algebraic structures of a general electromagnetic field and its energy-momentum tensor in a stationary space-time are analyzed. The explicit form of the reference frame in which the energy of the field appears at rest is obtained in terms of the eigenvectors of the electromagnetic tensor and the existing Killing vector. The case of a stationary electromagnetic field is also studied and a comparison is made with the standard short-wave approximation. The results can be applied to the general case of a structured light beams, in flat or curved spaces. Bessel beams are worked out as example.

  1. Flow and permeability structure of the Beowawe, Nevada hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Faulder, D.D.; Johnson, S.D.; Benoit, W.R.

    1997-05-01

    A review of past geologic, geochemical, hydrological, pressure transient, and reservoir engineering studies of Beowawe suggests a different picture of the reservoir than previously presented. The Beowawe hydrothermal contains buoyant thermal fluid dynamically balanced with overlying cold water, as shown by repeated temperature surveys and well test results. Thermal fluid upwells from the west of the currently developed reservoir at the intersection of the Malpais Fault and an older structural feature associated with mid-Miocene rifting. A tongue of thermal fluid rises to the east up the high permeability Malpais Fault, discharges at the Geysers area, and is in intimate contact with overlying cooler water. The permeability structure is closely related to the structural setting, with the permeability of the shallow hydrothermal system ranging from 500 to 1,000 D-ft, while the deeper system ranges from 200 to 400 D-ft.

  2. Effects of flow intermittency and pharmaceutical exposure on the structure and metabolism of stream biofilms.

    PubMed

    Corcoll, Natàlia; Casellas, Maria; Huerta, Belinda; Guasch, Helena; Acuña, Vicenç; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Serra-Compte, Albert; Barceló, Damià; Sabater, Sergi

    2015-01-15

    Increasing concentrations of pharmaceutical compounds occur in many rivers, but their environmental risk remains poorly studied in stream biofilms. Flow intermittency shapes the structure and functions of ecosystems, and may enhance their sensitivity to toxicants. This study evaluates the effects of a long-term exposure of biofilm communities to a mixture of pharmaceutical compounds at environmental concentrations on biofilm bioaccumulation capacity, the structure and metabolic processes of algae and bacteria communities, and how their potential effects were enhanced or not by the occurrence of flow intermittency. To assess the interaction between those two stressors, an experiment with artificial streams was performed. Stream biofilms were exposed to a mixture of pharmaceuticals, as well as to a short period of flow intermittency. Results indicate that biofilms were negatively affected by pharmaceuticals. The algal biomass and taxa richness decreased and unicellular green algae relatively increased. The structure of the bacterial (based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of amplified 16S rRNA genes) changed and showed a reduction of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) richness. Exposed biofilms showed higher rates of metabolic processes, such as primary production and community respiration, attributed to pharmaceuticals stimulated an increase of green algae and heterotrophs, respectively. Flow intermittency modulated the effects of chemicals on natural communities. The algal community became more sensitive to short-term exposure of pharmaceuticals (lower EC50 value) when exposed to water intermittency, indicating cumulative effects between the two assessed stressors. In contrast to algae, the bacterial community became less sensitive to short-term exposure of pharmaceuticals (higher EC50) when exposed to water intermittency, indicating co-tolerance phenomena. According to the observed effects, the environmental risk of pharmaceuticals in nature is high

  3. Mean flow stability wave models for coherent structures in open shear flows: experimental assessment of potentials and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberleithner, Kilian; Rukes, Lothar; Paschereit, Oliver; Soria, Julio

    2014-11-01

    We report on a number of experimental and theoretical investigations of shear flow instabilities in jet flows. In these studies, linear stability analysis is employed to the time-averaged flow taken from experiments, contrasting the ``classic'' stability approach that is based on a stationary base flow. The eigenmodes of the time-averaged flow are considered as models for the nonlinearly saturated state of the instability waves. The accuracy of these models is validated through a detailed comparison with experiments. In this talk we outline the potential and limitation of these flow models for convectively and globally unstable jet flows. The first author was supported by a fellowship within the Postdoc-Program of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). The support of the Australian Research Council (ARC) and the German Research Foundation (DFG) is greatfully acknowledged.

  4. Fluid-structure interaction for nonlinear response of shells conveying pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubaldi, Eleonora; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2016-06-01

    Circular cylindrical shells with flexible boundary conditions conveying pulsatile flow and subjected to pulsatile pressure are investigated. The equations of motion are obtained based on the nonlinear Novozhilov shell theory via Lagrangian approach. The flow is set in motion by a pulsatile pressure gradient. The fluid is modeled as a Newtonian pulsatile flow and it is formulated using a hybrid model that contains the unsteady effects obtained from the linear potential flow theory and the pulsatile viscous effects obtained from the unsteady time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A numerical bifurcation analysis employs a refined reduced order model to investigate the dynamic behavior. The case of shells containing quiescent fluid subjected to the action of a pulsatile transmural pressure is also addressed. Geometrically nonlinear vibration response to pulsatile flow and transmural pressure are here presented via frequency-response curves and time histories. The vibrations involving both a driven mode and a companion mode, which appear due to the axial symmetry, are also investigated. This theoretical framework represents a pioneering study that could be of great interest for biomedical applications. In particular, in the future, a more refined model of the one here presented will possibly be applied to reproduce the dynamic behavior of vascular prostheses used for repairing and replacing damaged and diseased thoracic aorta in cases of aneurysm, dissection or coarctation. For this purpose, a pulsatile time-dependent blood flow model is here considered by applying physiological waveforms of velocity and pressure during the heart beating period. This study provides, for the first time in literature, a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction model with deep insights in the nonlinear vibrations of circular cylindrical shells subjected to pulsatile pressure and pulsatile flow.

  5. Numerical studies of 2-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, G.

    1985-01-01

    A formulation of the lambda scheme for the analysis of two dimensional inviscid, compressible, unsteady transonic flows is presented. The scheme uses generalized Riemann variables to determine the appropriate two point, one sided finite difference approximation for each derivative in the unsteady Euler equations. These finite differences are applied at the predictor and corrector levels with shock updating at each level. The weaker oblique shocks are captured, but strong near normal shocks are fitted into the flow using the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. This code is demonstrated with a numerical example of a duct flow problem with developing normal and oblique shock waves. The technique is implemented in a code which has been made efficient by streamlining to a minimal number of operations and by eliminating branch statements. The scheme is shown to provide an accurate analysis of the flow, including formation, motions, and interactions of shocks; the results obtained on a relatively coarse mesh are comparable to those obtained by other methods on much finer meshes.

  6. On conditional sampling for turbulent flow studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, F. C.

    1974-01-01

    The conditional sampling technique is analyzed as a weighted time average for turbulent flow. The various conditional averages are obtained by using different types of weighting functions. A second averaging relation is obtained between the conventional averages and the conditional averages. A few examples are given in which simplified expressions are used.

  7. Numerical study of acoustic modes in ducted shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilenski, Gregory G.; Rienstra, Sjoerd W.

    2007-11-01

    The propagation of small-amplitude modes in an inviscid but sheared mean flow inside a duct is studied numerically. For isentropic flow in a circular duct with zero swirl and constant mean flow density the pressure modes are described in terms of the eigenvalue problem for the Pridmore-Brown equation. Since for sufficiently high Helmholtz and wavenumbers, which are of great interest for applications, the field equation is inherently stiff, special care is taken to insure the stability of the numerical algorithm designed to tackle this problem. The accuracy of the method is checked against the well-known analytical solution for uniform flow. The numerical method is shown to be consistent with the analytical predictions at least for Helmholtz numbers up to 100 and circumferential wavenumbers as large as 50, typical Mach numbers being up to 0.65. In order to gain further insight into the possible structure of the modal solutions and to obtain an independent verification of the robustness of the numerical scheme, comparison to the asymptotic solution of the problem based on the WKB method is performed. The asymptotic solution is also used as a benchmark for computations with high Helmholtz numbers, where numerical solutions of other authors are not available. The bulk of the analysis concentrates on the influence of the wall lining. The proposed numerical procedure is adapted in order to include Ingard-Myers boundary conditions. In parallel with this, the WKB solution is used to check the numerical predictions of the typical behaviour of the axial wavenumber in the complex plane, when the wall impedance varies in the complex plane. Numerical analysis of the problem with zero mean flow at the wall and acoustic lining shows that the use of Ingard-Myers condition in combination with an appropriate slip-stream approximation instead of the actual no-slip mean flow profile gives valid results in the limit of vanishing boundary-layer thickness, although the boundary layer

  8. Partially obstructed channel: Contraction ratio effect on the flow hydrodynamic structure and prediction of the transversal mean velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Meftah, M.; Mossa, M.

    2016-11-01

    In this manuscript, we focus on the study of flow structures in a channel partially obstructed by arrays of vertical, rigid, emergent, vegetation/cylinders. Special attention is given to understand the effect of the contraction ratio, defined as the ratio of the obstructed area width to the width of the unobstructed area, on the flow hydrodynamic structures and to analyze the transversal flow velocity profile at the obstructed-unobstructed interface. A large data set of transversal mean flow velocity profiles and turbulence characteristics is reported from experiments carried out in a laboratory flume. The flow velocities and turbulence intensities have been measured with a 3D Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV)-Vectrino manufactured by Nortek. It was observed that the arrays of emergent vegetation/cylinders strongly affect the flow structures, forming a shear layer immediately next to the obstructed-unobstructed interface, followed by an adjacent free-stream region of full velocity flow. The experimental results show that the contraction ratio significantly affects the flow hydrodynamic structure. Adaptation of the Prandtl's log-law modified by Nikuradse led to the determination of a characteristic hydrodynamic roughness height to define the array resistance to the flow. Moreover, an improved modified log-law predicting the representative transversal profile of the mean flow velocity, at the obstructed-unobstructed interface, is proposed. The benefit of this modified log-law is its easier practical applicability, i.e., it avoids the measurements of some sensitive turbulence parameters, in addition, the flow hydrodynamic variables forming it are predictable, using the initial hydraulic conditions.

  9. A Visualization Study of Wall Layer of Swirling Turbulent Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Meriam; Hager, Rachael; Savas, Omer

    2014-11-01

    The streaky vortical structure of the viscous sublayer of a turbulent boundary layer is well known. Turbulent flows in pipes also exhibit similar structures. The effect of swirl on that structure is the subject matter of this study. The experiments are conducted in water in a 5-cm diameter clear cast-acrylic pipe at Reynolds numbers up to 80,000. Initial geometric swirl angles up to 60° at the wall are generated by placing 3D printed inserts at the inlet of the pipe. Flows are visualized using reflective flakes of size distribution 10-80 μm under diffuse illumination. Flows are recorded at high framing rates. After preprocessing, the streaky structure is quantified by using autocorrelation of the images. Lateral spacing and longitudinal length scales are extracted. Also studied is the decay of the swirl angle and its influence of the wall structure. Undergraduate Researcher.

  10. Dynamics of zonal-flow-like structures in the edge of the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, J. A.; Velasco, J. L.; Arévalo, J.; Hidalgo, C.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Van Milligen, B. Ph; Carralero, D.; Silva, C.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of fluctuating electric field structures in the edge of the TJ-II stellarator, which display zonal-flow-like traits, is studied. These structures have been shown to be global and affect particle transport dynamically (Alonso J et al 2012 Nucl. Fusion 52 063010). In this paper we discuss the possible drive (Reynolds stress) and damping (neoclassical viscosity, geodesic transfer) mechanisms for the associated E × B velocity. We show that (a) while the observed turbulence-driven forces can provide the necessary perpendicular acceleration, a causal relation could not be firmly established, possibly because of the locality of the Reynolds stress measurements, (b) the calculated neoclassical viscosity and damping times are comparable to the observed zonal-flow relaxation times and (c) although an accompanying density modulation is observed to be associated with the zonal flow, it is not consistent with the excitation of pressure sidebands, as those present in geodesic acoustic oscillations, caused by the compression of the E × B flow field.

  11. Flow-Structure-Acoustic Interaction Simulation of Vocalization of a Non-song Bird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian; Have Rasmussen, Jeppe; Elemans, Coen; Complex Flow Modeling; Simulation Lab Team; Elemans Lab Team

    2016-11-01

    The myoelastic-aerodynamic mechanism of vocalization was recently evidenced in birds across a wide range of taxa, which, for a long time, was believed to generate sound based on the aerodynamic whistle mechanism. The objective of the current study is to: (1) develop a first-principle based, flow-structure-acoustics (FSA) interaction computational model of a non-song bird (rock pigeon); (2) strongly validate the computational model by comparing to the experimental data on the same bird model; (3) examine the data so as to generate new insights into the physics of vocalization of birds. In the current approach, a sharp interface immersed boundary method based incompressible flow solver is utilized to model the air flow; A finite element based solid mechanics solver is utilized to model the LVM(lateral vibratory mass) vibration; A high-order immersed boundary method based acoustics solver is utilized to directly compute sound. Geometric structure of the syrinx, including syringeal lumen, LVM, position of tracheal rings, is based on CT scan of a rock pigeon. The LVM is simulated as isotropic material according to the experimental measurements. Simulation setup about the bronchial pressure, static deformation due to air sac pressure also follows the setup in the experiments. Results including the fundamental frequency, air flow rate, gap, vibration shape will be analyzed and compared to the experimental data.

  12. Structural study of ammonium metatungstate

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Joel B. Whittingham, M. Stanley

    2008-08-15

    Several techniques have been used to study the structure of the Keggin-type polyoxometalate salt ammonium metatungstate (AMT)-(NH{sub 4}){sub 6}[H{sub 2}W{sub 12}O{sub 40}]*nH{sub 2}O, a potential fuel cell catalyst. The dehydrated salt is comprised of a mixture of crystallites of different unit cells in a centered eutactic cubic configuration, with an average unit cell of a{approx_equal}12.295. Varied orientations of the Keggin ions in the cubic arrangement create the differences, and orientational variation within each unit cell size represents an energy well. Progressive hydration of each crystallite leads to expansion of the lattice, with the degree of expansion depending on the locations of the water added in relation to the Keggin ion, which is influenced by cation location and hydrogen bonding. The structural hypothesis is supported by electron diffraction of single and multicrystal samples, by powder density measurements, X-ray powder diffraction studies, synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction, and a priori structural modeling studies. Based on the structure, projected active site densities are compared with nanostructured platinum catalysts for fuel cell application. - Graphical abstract: The structure of ammonium metatungstate powders are highly dependent on hydration and POM molecule rotation, with cation and hydrogen bonding forces directing a mixture of structures that have been studied with bulk and single-crystal methods. The illustration shows Monte Carlo simulated anion structural disorder for the fully dehydrated form of the title compound.

  13. Micro/macroscopic fluid flow in open cell fibrous structures and porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayol, Ali

    Fibrous porous materials are involved in a wide range of applications including composite fabrication, filtration, compact heat exchangers, fuel cell technology, and tissue engineering to name a few. Fibrous structures, such as metalfoams, have unique characteristics such as low weight, high porosity, high mechanical strength, and high surface to volume ratio. More importantly, in many applications the fibrous microstructures can be tailored to meet a range of requirements. Therefore, fibrous materials have the potential to be used in emerging sustainable energy conversion applications. The first step for analyzing transport phenomena in porous materials is to determine the micro/macroscopic flow-field inside the medium. In applications where the porous media is confined in a channel, the system performance is tightly related to the flow properties of the porous medium and its interaction with the channel walls, i.e., macroscopic velocity distribution. Therefore, the focus of the study has been on: developing new mechanistic model(s) for determining permeability and inertial coefficient of fibrous porous materials; investigating the effects of microstructural and mechanical parameters such as porosity, fiber orientation, mechanical compression, and fiber distribution on the flow properties and pressure drop of fibrous structures; determining the macroscopic flow-field in confined porous media where the porous structure fills the channel cross-section totally or partially. A systematic approach has been followed to study different aspects of the flow through fibrous materials. The complex microstructure of real materials has been modelled using unit cells that have been assumed to be repeated throughout the media. Implementing various exact and approximate analytical techniques such as integral technique, point matching, blending rules, and scale analysis the flow properties of such media have been modelled; the targeted properties include permeability and inertial

  14. Effect of Gravity on the Near Field Flow Structure of Helium Jet in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Parthasarathy, Ramkumar; Griffin, DeVon

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have shown that a low-density jet injected into a high-density surrounding medium undergoes periodic oscillations in the near field. Although the flow oscillations in these jets at Richardson numbers about unity are attributed to the buoyancy, the direct physical evidence has not been acquired in the experiments. If the instability were indeed caused by buoyancy, the near-field flow structure would undergo drastic changes upon removal of gravity in the microgravity environment. The present study was conducted to investigate this effect by simulating microgravity environment in the 2.2-second drop tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The non-intrusive, rainbow schlieren deflectometry technique was used for quantitative measurements of helium concentrations in buoyant and non-buoyant jets. Results in a steady jet show that the radial growth of the jet shear layer in Earth gravity is hindered by the buoyant acceleration. The jet in microgravity was 30 to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The microgravity jet showed typical growth of a constant density jet shear layer. In case of a self-excited helium jet in Earth gravity, the flow oscillations continued as the jet flow adjusted to microgravity conditions in the drop tower. The flow oscillations were however not present at the end of the drop when steady microgravity conditions were reached.

  15. Genetic structure of eelgrass Zostera marina meadows in an embayment with restricted water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munoz-Salazar, R.; Talbot, S.L.; Sage, G.K.; Ward, D.H.; Cabello-Pasini, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    Genetic structure of the seagrass Zostera marina in a coastal lagoon with restricted water flow, and with heterogeneous water residence times and oceanographic characteristics, was assessed using 8 polymorphic microsatellite loci. Analyses of genetic differentiation (??) and Bayesian clustering suggested that the Z. marina population in San Quintin Bay (SQB) is genetically substructured, with at least 4 genetically different groups: (1) West Head, (2) Mouth, (3) East Arm, and (4) East Head. The greatest ?? value was observed between the most distant sites (?? = 0.095). The lowest values were found among sites closest to the mouth of the coastal lagoon (?? = 0.000 to 0.009). The maximum likelihood approach showed that the sites at the mouth have a mixed pattern of gene flow without a unidirectional pattern. In contrast, there was a clear pattern of asymmetrical gene flow from the mouth towards the West Head. These results suggested that the restriction of water flow at the heads, current pattern, and the distance between sites can reduce genetic flow and promote genetic differences within Z. marina meadows in small water embayments such as SQB. Though the population is genetically substructured and a 14 % decline in cover has been detected, this study did not show evidence of a recent genetic bottleneck. In contrast, mouth sites have experienced a recent expansion in their population size, and also perhaps a recent influx of rare alleles from genetically distinct immigrants. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  16. Phase structure of a single urban intersection: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahim Foulaadvand, M.; Fukui, M.; Belbasi, S.

    2010-07-01

    We study the phase structure of a cellular automata model proposed by Belbasi and Foulaadvand to describe the vehicular traffic flow at the intersection of two perpendicular streets. A set of traffic lights operating in a fixed-time scheme controls the traffic flow. A closed boundary condition is applied to the streets, each of which conducts a unidirectional flow. Streets are single-lane and cars cannot turn upon reaching the intersection. Via extensive Monte Carlo simulations it is shown that the model phase diagram consists of ten phases. The flow characteristics in each phase are investigated and the types of phase transitions between phases are specified.

  17. Flow past an array of catalyst blocks with a honeycomb structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bespalov, A.V.

    1992-07-10

    There is interest in an organized stationary catalyst beds consisting of block catalysts with a honeycomb structure: The flow is directed between vertically positioned blocks, in which the through channels are oriented perpendicularly to the direction of the incident flow ({alpha} = 90{degrees}). Calculations of the flow past a single block of honey comb structure were performed for this case, and it has been shown that the surface of the through channel is accessible to the reaction flow. The authors continued this effort to quantitate the flow with honeycomb catalysts. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  18. A new methodology for the quantitative visualization of coherent flow structures in alluvial channels using multibeam echo-sounding (MBES)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Best, Jim; Simmons, Stephen; Parsons, Daniel; Oberg, Kevin; Czuba, Jonathan; Malzone, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the interactions between turbulence and suspended sediment transport in natural aqueous environments, we ideally require a technique that allows simultaneous measurement of fluid velocity and sediment concentration for the whole flow field. Here, we report on development of a methodology using the water column acoustic backscatter signal from a multibeam echo sounder to simultaneously quantify flow velocities and sediment concentrations. The application of this new technique is illustrated with reference to flow over the leeside of an alluvial sand dune, which allows, for the first time in a field study, quantitative visualization of large-scale, whole flow field, turbulent coherent flow structures associated with the dune leeside that are responsible for suspending bed sediment. This methodology holds great potential for use in a wide range of aqueous geophysical flows.

  19. Flow of structural information between four DNA conformational levels.

    PubMed

    Levin-Zaidman, S; Reich, Z; Wachtel, E J; Minsky, A

    1996-03-05

    Closed-circular supercoiled DNA molecules have been shown to form a cholesteric assembly within bacteria as well as in vitro under physiological DNA and salt concentrations. Circular dichroism and X-ray scattering studies indicate that the macroscopic structural properties of the chiral mesophase are directly and uniquely dictated by the supercoiling parameters of the constituent molecules. Specifically, we find that the pitch of the DNA cholesteric phase derived from supercoiled DNA is determined by the superhelical density, which, in turn, is modulated by secondary conformational changes. A direct interrelationship among four DNA structural levels, namely, DNA sequence, secondary structural transitions, the tertiary superhelical conformation, and the quaternary, supramolecular organization is accordingly pointed out. Since secondary conformational changes are both sequence and environment dependent, alterations of cellular conditions may effectively modulate the properties of the packed DNA organization, through their effects on secondary structural transitions and hence on the superhelical parameters. On the basis of these results we suggest that liquid crystallinity represents an effectively regulated packaging mode of plectonemic, nucleosome-free DNA molecules in living systems.

  20. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  1. Entrainment of granular substrate by pyroclastic flows: an experimental study and its implications for flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, O.; Niño, Y.; Mangeney, A.; Brand, B. D.; Valentine, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    -defined basal layer consisting of a mixture of fine particles and coarse steel beads. Further experiments with substrates of glass beads of diameter of 80 μm or 700 μm showed that particles were not dragged individually and were not uplifted. Shear at the top of the substrate caused the formation of structures of small height (1-3 mm) formed by numerous beads, which could have rendered the upward pressure gradient non operant and hence would have inhibited individual particle uplift. The height of these shear structures decreased with the size of the beads and they strongly elongated horizontally with time so that almost no evidence of entrainment was preserved in the deposits for substrates of beads of 80 μm. These results are consistent with field observations as unconsolidated granular substrates of fine particles (ash, lapillis) at the base of pyroclastic flow deposits can be well preserved whereas those made of large blocks are commonly reworked, as shown by the Peach Springs tuff for instance. At Mt St Helens, the 1980 pyroclastic flows emplaced on a debris avalanche deposit and entrained dense lava blocks of size up to several tens of cm on local slopes of only a few degrees. Application of our model assuming a bulk flow density of 500-1500 kg/m3 indicates flow velocities of ~12-27 m/s, which matches field observations.

  2. A 2D flow visualization user study using explicit flow synthesis and implicit task design.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanping; Cai, Shangshu; Swan, J Edward; Moorhead, Robert J; Martin, Joel P; Jankun-Kelly, T J

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a 2D flow visualization user study that we conducted using new methodologies to increase the objectiveness. We evaluated grid-based variable-size arrows, evenly spaced streamlines, and line integral convolution (LIC) variants (basic, oriented, and enhanced versions) coupled with a colorwheel and/or rainbow color map, which are representative of many geometry-based and texture-based techniques. To reduce data-related bias, template-based explicit flow synthesis was used to create a wide variety of symmetric flows with similar topological complexity. To suppress task-related bias, pattern-based implicit task design was employed, addressing critical point recognition, critical point classification, and symmetric pattern categorization. In addition, variable-duration and fixed-duration measurement schemes were utilized for lightweight precision-critical and heavyweight judgment intensive flow analysis tasks, respectively, to record visualization effectiveness. We eliminated outliers and used the Ryan REGWQ post-hoc homogeneous subset tests in statistical analysis to obtain reliable findings. Our study shows that a texture-based dense representation with accentuated flow streaks, such as enhanced LIC, enables intuitive perception of the flow, while a geometry-based integral representation with uniform density control, such as evenly spaced streamlines, may exploit visual interpolation to facilitate mental reconstruction of the flow. It is also shown that inappropriate color mapping (e.g., colorwheel) may add distractions to a flow representation.

  3. A Study of Bubble and Slug Gas-Liquid Flow in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, J.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of gravity on the two-phase flow dynamics is obvious.As the gravity level is reduced,there is a new balance between inertial and interfacial forces, altering the behavior of the flow. In bubbly flow,the absence of drift velocity leads to spherical-shaped bubbles with a rectilinear trajectory.Slug flow is a succession of long bubbles and liquid slug carrying a few bubbles. There is no flow reversal in the thin liquid film as the long bubble and liquid slug pass over the film. Although the flow structure seems to be simpler than in normal gravity conditions,the models developed for the prediction of flow behavior in normal gravity and extended to reduced gravity flow are unable to predict the flow behavior correctly.An additional benefit of conducting studies in microgravity flows is that these studies aide the development of understanding for normal gravity flow behavior by removing the effects of buoyancy on the shape of the interface and density driven shear flows between the gas and the liquid phases. The proposal calls to study specifically the following: 1) The dynamics of isolated bubbles in microgravity liquid flows will be analyzed: Both the dynamics of spherical isolated bubbles and their dispersion by turbulence, their interaction with the pipe wall,the behavior of the bubbles in accelerated or decelerated flows,and the dynamics of isolated cylindrical bubbles, their deformation in accelerated/decelerated flows (in converging or diverging channels), and bubble/bubble interaction. Experiments will consist of the use of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Doppler Velocimeters (LDV) to study single spherical bubble and single and two cylindrical bubble behavior with respect to their influence on the turbulence of the surrounding liquid and on the wall 2) The dynamics of bubbly and slug flow in microgravity will be analyzed especially for the role of the coalescence in the transition from bubbly to slug flow (effect of fluid properties and

  4. The Ongoing Lava Flow Eruption of Sinabung Volcano (Sumatra, Indonesia): Observations from Structure-from-Motion and Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, B. B.; Clarke, A. B.; Arrowsmith, R.; Vanderkluysen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Sinabung is a 2460 m high andesitic stratovolcano in North Sumatra, Indonesia. Its ongoing eruption has produced a 2.9 km long lava flow with two active summit lobes and frequent pyroclastic flows (≤ 5 km long) with associated plumes over 5 km high. Large viscous lava flows of this type are common at volcanoes around the world, but are rarely observed while active. This eruption therefore provides a special opportunity to observe and study the mechanisms of emplacement and growth of an active lava flow. In September 2014, we conducted a field campaign to collect ground-based photographs to analyze with Structure-from-Motion photogrammetric techniques. We built multiple 3D models from which we estimate the volume of the lava flow and identify areas where the flow was most active. Thermal infrared and visual satellite images provide information on the effusive eruption from its initiation in December 2013 to the present and allow us to estimate the eruption rate, advance rate and rheological characteristics of the flow. According to our DEMs the flow volume as of September 2014 was 100 Mm3, providing an average flow rate of 4.5 m3/s, while comparison of two DEMs from that month suggests that most growth occurred at the SE nose of the flow. Flow advancement was initially controlled by the yield strength of the flow crust while eruption and flow advance rates were at their highest in January-March 2014. A period of slow front advancement and inflation from March - October 2014 suggests that the flow's interior had cooled and that propagation was limited by the interior yield strength. This interpretation is supported by the simultaneous generation of pyroclastic flows due to collapse of the upper portion of the lava flow and consequent lava breakout and creation of new flow lobes originating from the upper reaches in October 2014 and June 2015. Both lobes remain active as of August 2015 and present a significant hazard for collapse and generation of pyroclastic flows

  5. Experimental Study of Plasma Control of an Unstarting Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Seong-Kyun; Do, Hyungrok; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2011-11-01

    Experimental studies of the control of unstarting supersonic model inlet flows using Dielectric Barrier Discharges (DBD) is demonstrated at Mach 4.7 flow conditions and a static temperature of ~60K and static pressure of ~1kPa. Planar Laser Rayleigh Scattering (PLRS) is used to visualize important flow features, such as boundary layers and shockwaves. Supersonic flow unstart is initiated by injecting mass into model inlet flows of either laminar or tripped turbulent boundary layer flow conditions. DBD discharge actuation of the tripped turbulent flow delays the unstart process, shifting the unstart dynamics closer to what is seen for the laminar boundary layer case. In all studies, a single DBD actuator pair is used, oriented parallel to the freestream flow, generating spanwise disturbances. It is proposed that strong suction flow which brings high momentum freestream flow near exposed electrode can be a mechanism of this actuation. PLRS reveals that this actuation is spatially confined to the regions close to the actuator electrodes, greatly limiting their performance. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number(s)DE-FC52-08NA28614.

  6. Asymmetric energy flow in liquid alkylbenzenes: A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, David M.; Pandey, Hari Datt

    2015-10-14

    Ultrafast IR-Raman experiments on substituted benzenes [B. C. Pein et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 10898–10904 (2013)] reveal that energy can flow more efficiently in one direction along a molecule than in others. We carry out a computational study of energy flow in the three alkyl benzenes, toluene, isopropylbenzene, and t-butylbenzene, studied in these experiments, and find an asymmetry in the flow of vibrational energy between the two chemical groups of the molecule due to quantum mechanical vibrational relaxation bottlenecks, which give rise to a preferred direction of energy flow. We compare energy flow computed for all modes of the three alkylbenzenes over the relaxation time into the liquid with energy flow through the subset of modes monitored in the time-resolved Raman experiments and find qualitatively similar results when using the subset compared to all the modes.

  7. Study of high speed combustion flows by laser velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of laser velocimetry in a high temperature jet was assessed in a model of an aircraft engine combustor. Experiments show that the problems encountered in measuring combustion flow can flow can be overcome by a carefully designed optical set-up and an appropriate signal processing and data acquisition system. Laser Doppler velocimetry provides useful information about coherent structures in hot free jets. The measurements agree with measurements in an isothermal jet.

  8. Structure and mechanism of turbulence under dynamical restriction in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, Navid; Farrell, Brian; Ioannou, Petros; Jimenez, Javier; Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Nikolaidis, Marios-Andreas

    2016-11-01

    The perspective of Statistical State Dynamics (SSD) is used to investigate plane Poiseuille turbulence at moderately high Reynolds numbers (Reτ 940). Simulations of a quasi-linear restricted nonlinear dynamics (RNL), which is an approximation to the full SSD, provide insight into the mechanism and structure of turbulent flow. RNL dynamics spontaneously limits the support of its turbulence to a small set of streamwise Fourier components giving rise to a natural minimal representation of its turbulence dynamics. Although greatly simplified, this RNL turbulence exhibits natural-looking structures and turbulent statistics. RNL turbulence at the Reynolds numbers studied is dominated by the roll/streak structure in the buffer layer and similar very-large-scale structure (VLSM) in the outer layer. Diagnostics of the structure, spectrum and energetics of RNL and DNS turbulence are used to demonstrate that the roll/streak dynamics supporting the turbulence in the buffer and logarithmic layer is essentially similar in RNL and DNS. This mechanism, which has analytical expression in the SSD, comprises a cooperative interaction between the coherent streamwise mean flow and the incoherent turbulent perturbations.

  9. Evaluation of a universal flow-through model for predicting and designing phosphorus removal structures.

    PubMed

    Penn, Chad; Bowen, James; McGrath, Joshua; Nairn, Robert; Fox, Garey; Brown, Glenn; Wilson, Stuart; Gill, Clinton

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) removal structures have been shown to decrease dissolved P loss from agricultural and urban areas which may reduce the threat of eutrophication. In order to design or quantify performance of these structures, the relationship between discrete and cumulative removal with cumulative P loading must be determined, either by individual flow-through experiments or model prediction. A model was previously developed for predicting P removal with P sorption materials (PSMs) under flow-through conditions, as a function of inflow P concentration, retention time (RT), and PSM characteristics. The objective of this study was to compare model results to measured P removal data from several PSM under a range of conditions (P concentrations and RT) and scales ranging from laboratory to field. Materials tested included acid mine drainage residuals (AMDRs), treated and non-treated electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag at different size fractions, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum. Equations for P removal curves and cumulative P removed were not significantly different between predicted and actual values for any of the 23 scenarios examined. However, the model did tend to slightly over-predict cumulative P removal for calcium-based PSMs. The ability of the model to predict P removal for various materials, RTs, and P concentrations in both controlled settings and field structures validate its use in design and quantification of these structures. This ability to predict P removal without constant monitoring is vital to widespread adoption of P removal structures, especially for meeting discharge regulations and nutrient trading programs.

  10. Structural dynamics verification facility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiraly, L. J.; Hirchbein, M. S.; Mcaleese, J. M.; Fleming, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    The need for a structural dynamics verification facility to support structures programs was studied. Most of the industry operated facilities are used for highly focused research, component development, and problem solving, and are not used for the generic understanding of the coupled dynamic response of major engine subsystems. Capabilities for the proposed facility include: the ability to both excite and measure coupled structural dynamic response of elastic blades on elastic shafting, the mechanical simulation of various dynamical loadings representative of those seen in operating engines, and the measurement of engine dynamic deflections and interface forces caused by alternative engine mounting configurations and compliances.

  11. Studies in Transition and Time Varying Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Chester E.

    2004-01-01

    The research focused on two areas: (a) the dynamics of forced turbulent flows and (b) time filtered Large Eddy Simulations (TLES). The dynamics of turbulent flows arising from external forcing of the turbulence are poorly understood. In particular, here are many unanswered questions relating the basic dynamical balances and the existence or nonexistence of statistical equilibrium of forced turbulent flows. The research used direct numerical simulations to explore these questions. The properties of the temporally filtered Navier-Stokes equations were also studied.

  12. PIV Measurement of Transient 3-D (Liquid and Gas Phases) Flow Structures Created by a Spreading Flame over 1-Propanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, M. I.; Kuwana, K.; Saito, K.

    2001-01-01

    In the past, we measured three-D flow structure in the liquid and gas phases that were created by a spreading flame over liquid fuels. In that effort, we employed several different techniques including our original laser sheet particle tracking (LSPT) technique, which is capable of measuring transient 2-D flow structures. Recently we obtained a state-of-the-art integrated particle image velocimetry (IPIV), whose function is similar to LSPT, but it has an integrated data recording and processing system. To evaluate the accuracy of our IPIV system, we conducted a series of flame spread tests using the same experimental apparatus that we used in our previous flame spread studies and obtained a series of 2-D flow profiles corresponding to our previous LSPT measurements. We confirmed that both LSPT and IPIV techniques produced similar data, but IPIV data contains more detailed flow structures than LSPT data. Here we present some of newly obtained IPIV flow structure data, and discuss the role of gravity in the flame-induced flow structures. Note that the application of IPIV to our flame spread problems is not straightforward, and it required several preliminary tests for its accuracy including this IPIV comparison to LSPT.

  13. Spatiotemporal cascades of the Poiseuille-Hagen flow in invariant elliptic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnikov, Victor

    2011-11-01

    Spatiotemporal cascades of the transitional Poiseuille-Hagen flow are considered in elliptic structures, which are invariant with respect to differential and nonlinear algebraic operations. Differentiation and algebra of the invariant structures and decomposition of smooth velocity profiles in the invariant structures are treated both theoretically and symbolically. Reduction of the invariant elliptic structures to invariant trigonometric structures and invariant hyperbolic structures is also considered. By using the invariant structures, the displayed and hidden perturbations of the basic Poiseuille-Hagen flow are represented as dual perturbations, while the series solution for the perturbed flow converges uniformly. The cascade solution for the Poiseuille-Hagen flow is constructed in a multiscale form, which explicitly shows the effect of various factors at multiple scales.

  14. The current structure of stratified tidal planetary boundary layer flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrhaug, D.; Slaattelid, O.H.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents the bottom shear stress and velocity profiles in stratified tidal planetary boundary layer flow by using similarity theory. For a given seabed roughness length, free stream current velocity components, frequency of tidal oscillation, Coriolis parameter and stratification parameter the maximum bottom shear stress is determined for flow conditions in the rough, smooth and transitional smooth-to-rough turbulent regime. Further, the direction of the bottom shear stress and the velocity profiles are given. Comparison is made with data from field measurements of time-independent as well as tidal planetary boundary layer flow for neutral conditions, and the agreement between the predictions and the data is generally good. Further, an example of application for stable stratification is given, and qualitatively the predictions show, as expected, that the bottom shear stress and the thickness of the boundary layer become smaller for stable than for neutral stratification. Other features of the tidal planetary boundary layer flow are also discussed.

  15. Similarity analysis of compressor tip clearance flow structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G. T.; Greitzer, E. M.; Tan, C. S.; Marble, F. E.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach is presented for analyzing compressor tip clearance flow. The basic idea is that the clearance velocity field can be (approximately) decomposed into independent throughflow and crossflow, since chordwise pressure gradients are much smaller than normal pressure gradients in the clearance region. As in the slender body approximation in external aerodynamics, this description implies that the three-dimensional steady clearance flow can be viewed as a two-dimensional, unsteady flow. Using this approach, a similarity scaling for the crossflow in the clearance region is developed and a generalized description of the clearance vortex is derived. Calculations based on the similarity scaling agree well with a wide range of experimental data in regard to flow features such as crossflow velocity field, static pressure field, and tip clearance vortex trajectory.

  16. Ordered and random structures in pulsatile flow through constricted tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieber, B. B.

    The poststenotic flow field in a rigid tube was investigated under pulsatile conditions. The waveform employed in the present experiment was sinusoidal and three contoured constrictions with 50, 75, and 90% area reduction were investigated. The fluid dynamic similarity parameters were chosen to represent conditions found in large arteries of humans and of experimental animals, using a Reynolds number range of 200 to 1000 and a frequency parameter value of 5.3. The analysis techniques of autoregressive modeling, correlation methods, and phase-shift averaging were employed in order to extract the maximum information about flow behavior. Analysis focuses on identification and representation of coherent flow disturbances, and examination of the influence of core flow behavior on the cyclic wall shear stress.

  17. Turbulent Compressible Convection with Rotation. Part 1; Flow Structure and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brummell, Nicholas H.; Hurlburt, Neal E.; Toomre, Juri

    1996-01-01

    The effects of Coriolis forces on compressible convection are studied using three-dimensional numerical simulations carried out within a local modified f-plane model. The physics is simplified by considering a perfect gas occupying a rectilinear domain placed tangentially to a rotating sphere at various latitudes, through which a destabilizing heat flux is driven. The resulting convection is considered for a range of Rayleigh, Taylor, and Prandtl (and thus Rossby) numbers, evaluating conditions where the influence of rotation is both weak and strong. Given the computational demands of these high-resolution simulations, the parameter space is explored sparsely to ascertain the differences between laminar and turbulent rotating convection. The first paper in this series examines the effects of rotation on the flow structure within the convection, its evolution, and some consequences for mixing. Subsequent papers consider the large-scale mean shear flows that are generated by the convection, and the effects of rotation on the convective energetics and transport properties. It is found here that the structure of rotating turbulent convection is similar to earlier nonrotating studies, with a laminar, cellular surface network disguising a fully turbulent interior punctuated by vertically coherent structures. However, the temporal signature of the surface flows is modified by inertial motions to yield new cellular evolution patterns and an overall increase in the mobility of the network. The turbulent convection contains vortex tubes of many scales, including large-scale coherent structures spanning the full vertical extent of the domain involving multiple density scale heights. Remarkably, such structures align with the rotation vector via the influence of Coriolis forces on turbulent motions, in contrast with the zonal tilting of streamlines found in laminar flows. Such novel turbulent mechanisms alter the correlations which drive mean shearing flows and affect the

  18. STRUCTURAL HETEROGENEITIES AND PALEO FLUID FLOW IN AN ANALOG SANDSTONE RESERVOIR 2001-2004

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, David; Aydin, Atilla

    2005-02-22

    Fractures and faults are brittle structural heterogeneities that can act both as conduits and barriers with respect to fluid flow in rock. This range in the hydraulic effects of fractures and faults greatly complicates the challenges faced by geoscientists working on important problems: from groundwater aquifer and hydrocarbon reservoir management, to subsurface contaminant fate and transport, to underground nuclear waste isolation, to the subsurface sequestration of CO2 produced during fossil-fuel combustion. The research performed under DOE grant DE-FG03-94ER14462 aimed to address these challenges by laying a solid foundation, based on detailed geological mapping, laboratory experiments, and physical process modeling, on which to build our interpretive and predictive capabilities regarding the structure, patterns, and fluid flow properties of fractures and faults in sandstone reservoirs. The material in this final technical report focuses on the period of the investigation from July 1, 2001 to October 31, 2004. The Aztec Sandstone at the Valley of Fire, Nevada, provides an unusually rich natural laboratory in which exposures of joints, shear deformation bands, compaction bands and faults at scales ranging from centimeters to kilometers can be studied in an analog for sandstone aquifers and reservoirs. The suite of structures there has been documented and studied in detail using a combination of low-altitude aerial photography, outcrop-scale mapping and advanced computational analysis. In addition, chemical alteration patterns indicative of multiple paleo fluid flow events have been mapped at outcrop, local and regional scales. The Valley of Fire region has experienced multiple episodes of fluid flow and this is readily evident in the vibrant patterns of chemical alteration from which the Valley of Fire derives its name. We have successfully integrated detailed field and petrographic observation and analysis, process-based mechanical modeling, and numerical

  19. Study Links Stuttering to Less Blood Flow in Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162922.html Study Links Stuttering to Less Blood Flow in Brain The more ... to speech may put people at risk for stuttering, a small study suggests. There are also signs ...

  20. Macroscopic effects of the spectral structure in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Tuan; Chakraborty, Pinaki; Guttenberg, Nicholas; Prescott, Alisia; Kellay, Hamid; Goldburg, Walter; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Gioia, Gustavo

    2010-06-01

    There is a missing link between the macroscopic properties of turbulent flows, such as the frictional drag of a wall-bounded flow, and the turbulent spectrum. The turbulent spectrum is a power law of exponent α (the `spectral exponent') that gives the characteristic velocity of a turbulent fluctuation (or `eddy') of size s as a function of s (ref. 1). Here we seek the missing link by comparing the frictional drag in soap-film flows, where α=3 (refs 9, 10), and in pipe flows, where α=5/3 (refs 11, 12). For moderate values of the Reynolds number Re, we find experimentally that in soap-film flows the frictional drag scales as Re-1/2, whereas in pipe flows the frictional drag scales as Re-1/4. Each of these scalings may be predicted from the attendant value of α by using a new theory, in which the frictional drag is explicitly linked to the turbulent spectrum.

  1. Macroscopic effects of the spectral structure in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, T.; Chakraborty, P.; Guttenberg, N.; Prescott, A.; Kellay, H.; Goldburg, W.; Goldenfeld, N.; Gioia, G.

    2010-11-01

    There is a missing link between macroscopic properties of turbulent flows, such as the frictional drag of a wall-bounded flow, and the turbulent spectrum. To seek the missing link we carry out unprecedented experimental measurements of the frictional drag in turbulent soap-film flows over smooth walls. These flows are effectively two-dimensional, and we are able to create soap-film flows with the two types of turbulent spectrum that are theoretically possible in two dimensions: the "enstrophy cascade," for which the spectral exponent α= 3, and the "inverse energy cascade," for which the spectral exponent α= 5/3. We find that the functional relation between the frictional drag f and the Reynolds number Re depends on the spectral exponent: where α= 3, f ˜Re-1/2; where α= 5/3, f ˜Re-1/4. Each of these scalings may be predicted from the attendant value of α by using a recently proposed spectral theory of the frictional drag. In this theory the frictional drag of turbulent flows on smooth walls is predicted to be f ˜Re^(1-α)/(1+α).

  2. Structure Functions in Wall-bounded Flows at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiang; Marusic, Ivan; Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    The scaling of the structure function Dij = <(ui(x +r)-ui(x))(uj(x +r)-uj(x))> (where i = 1,2,3 and r is the two-point displacement, ui is the velocity fluctuation in the xi direction), is studied in wall-bounded flows at high Reynolds number within the framework of the Townsend attached eddy model. While the scaling of Dij has been the subject of several studies, previous work focused on the scaling of D11 for r = (Δx ,0,0) (for streamwise velocity component and displacements only in the streamwise direction). Using the Hierarchical-Random-Additive formalism, a recently developed attached-eddy formalism, we propose closed-form formulae for the structure functionDij with two-point displacements in arbitrary directions, focusing on the log region . The work highlights new scalings that have received little attention, e.g. the scaling of Dij for r =(0, Δy, Δz) and for i ≠ j . As the knowledge on Dij leads directly to that of the Reynolds stress, statistics of the filtered flow field, etc., an analytical formula of Dij for arbitrary r can be quite useful for developing physics-based models for wall-bounded flows and validating existing LES and reduced order models.

  3. USANS study of wood structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Christopher J.; Knott, Robert B.; Searson, Matthew; Conroy, Jann P.

    2006-11-01

    Wood performs a vascular and structural function in trees. In this study we used the double-crystal diffractometer BT5 at the NIST Center for Neutron Scattering (Gaithersburg, USA) to study the pore structure inside wood sections. The slit-smeared intensity of scattered neutrons was measured from wood sections in directions parallel, orthogonal and transverse to the tree's trunk axis over a scattering vector range 0.00004-0.002 Å -1. The interpretation of the data in terms of a reductionist model consisting of infinitely long cylinders (cell lumens) is discussed.

  4. Gravitational Effects on Near Field Flow Structure of Low Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yep, Tze-Wing; Agrawal, Ajay K.; Griffin, DeVon; Salzman, Jack (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Earth gravity and microgravity to acquire quantitative data on near field flow structure of helium jets injected into air. Microgravity conditions were simulated in the 2.2-second drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The jet flow was observed by quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a non-intrusive line of site measurement technique for the whole field. The flow structure was characterized by distributions of angular deflection and helium mole percentage obtained from color schlieren images taken at 60 Hz. Results show that the jet flow was significantly influenced by the gravity. The jet in microgravity was up to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The jet flow oscillations observed in Earth gravity were absent in microgravity, providing direct experimental evidence that the flow instability in the low density jet was buoyancy induced. The paper provides quantitative details of temporal flow evolution as the experiment undergoes a change in gravity in the drop tower.

  5. An optical fiber Fabry-Perot flow measurement technology based on partial bend structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huijia; Jiang, Junfeng; Zhang, Xuezhi; Pan, Yuheng; Zhu, Wanshan; Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Tiegen

    2016-08-01

    An optical fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) flow measurement technology is presented, which is based on partial bend structure. A 90° partial bend structure is designed to achieve the non-probe flow measurement with a pressure difference. The fluid simulation results of partial bend structure show that the error of the pressure difference is below 0.05 kPa during steady flow. The optical fiber F-P sensor mounted on the elbow with pressure test accuracy of 1% full scale is used to measure the fluid flow. Flow test results show that when the flow varies from 1 m3/h to 6.5 m3/h at ambient temperature of 25 °C, the response time is 1 s and the flow test accuracy is 4.5% of the F-P flow test system, proving that the F-P flow test method based on partial bend structure can be used in fluid flow measurement.

  6. Fluid-Structure Interaction for Coolant Flow in Research-type Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Franklin G; Ekici, Kivanc; Freels, James D

    2011-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is scheduled to undergo a conversion of the fuel used and this proposed change requires an extensive analysis of the flow through the reactor core. The core consists of 540 very thin and long fuel plates through which the coolant (water) flows at a very high rate. Therefore, the design and the flow conditions make the plates prone to dynamic and static deflections, which may result in flow blockage and structural failure which in turn may cause core damage. To investigate the coolant flow between fuel plates and associated structural deflections, the Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) module in COMSOL will be used. Flow induced flutter and static deflections will be examined. To verify the FSI module, a test case of a cylinder in crossflow, with vortex induced vibrations was performed and validated.

  7. Channel morphology and flow structure of an abandoned channel under varying stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigan, Katie H.; Gerken, Joseph E.

    2016-07-01

    Abandoned channels are those channels left behind as meandering rivers migrate over their floodplains and remain among the most enigmatic features of the riverscape, especially related to their hydraulics and geomorphology. Abandoned channels are being considered and implemented as restoration and rehabilitation strategies for large rivers but we do not yet have a sound understanding of their hydromorphodynamics. The overall objectives of this work were to assess the bed morphology and flow structure of a large, dynamically connected abandoned channel (e.g., the channel is inundated during annual or decadal floods through bank overflow) under varying stages. Here we document the hydromorphodynamics of an abandoned channel during 3.4, 9.2, and 37.9 return interval discharges using an acoustic Doppler current profiler. Flow separation was observed along the channel entrance during the lowest flow surveying campaign but was not seen during the higher flow campaign. Width to depth ratio and channel width at the exit both progressively decreased from the first surveying campaign, despite the final campaign having the highest measured discharge. Large zones of flow stagnation and recirculation were observed, with depth-averaged velocity vectors not aligning in one direction, in the abandoned channel where water from the entrance was meeting water coming up from the exit during moderate discharges. The abandoned channel has been maintained for at least 25 years due to its low diversion angle and it being perched above the Kansas River. Results of this study provide insights of how flow hydraulics and physical characteristics of abandoned channel change under varying stages.

  8. Structural Studies of Ciliary Components

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Naoko; Taschner, Michael; Engel, Benjamin D.; Lorentzen, Esben

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are organelles found on most eukaryotic cells, where they serve important functions in motility, sensory reception, and signaling. Recent advances in electron tomography have facilitated a number of ultrastructural studies of ciliary components that have significantly improved our knowledge of cilium architecture. These studies have produced nanometer‐resolution structures of axonemal dynein complexes, microtubule doublets and triplets, basal bodies, radial spokes, and nexin complexes. In addition to these electron tomography studies, several recently published crystal structures provide insights into the architecture and mechanism of dynein as well as the centriolar protein SAS-6, important for establishing the 9-fold symmetry of centrioles. Ciliary assembly requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process that moves macromolecules between the tip of the cilium and the cell body. IFT relies on a large 20-subunit protein complex that is thought to mediate the contacts between ciliary motor and cargo proteins. Structural investigations of IFT complexes are starting to emerge, including the first three‐dimensional models of IFT material in situ, revealing how IFT particles organize into larger train-like arrays, and the high-resolution structure of the IFT25/27 subcomplex. In this review, we cover recent advances in the structural and mechanistic understanding of ciliary components and IFT complexes. PMID:22683354

  9. Identification of the Dominant Flow Structure in the Viscous Wall Region of a Turbulent Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    Pipe flows. 20. ABSTRPACT (Conltinue an reverse aide If necessary end Identify by block nmnI.) Simultaneous measurements of the fluctuating velocity...fully developed tur- bulent pipe flow. Multiple wall probes were used to measure the velocity gradients in the axial and spanwise directions at the...experiments of Beatty, Ferrell and Richardson * (Corrsin 1956) who pumped a dye solution through a pipe and then observed the formation of residual dye into

  10. Population genetic structure and gene flow in a gleaning bat, Plecotus auritus

    PubMed Central

    Burland, T. M.; Barratt, E. M.; Beaumont, M. A.; Racey, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    During summer the brown long-eared bat Plecotus auritus (Vespertilionidae) forms stable colonies, comprised of both adult females and males and young of the year. A long-term ringing study conducted in north-east Scotland has established that little movement occurs among colonies and that both sexes are recruited into their natal colony. The aim of the present study was to investigate, using microsatellite DNA markers, if genetic structure within the population reflects the spatial structure indicated by ringing. Inter-colony FST estimates obtained for all colony members, and for females and males separately, were low (0.019, 0.026 and 0.011, respectively), but all values differed significantly from zero. These data indicate high gene flow between colonies, although some coancestry among colony members is evident in both sexes. On combining the ringing and genetic data, it is concluded that gene flow occurs via extra-colony copulation, rather than natal dispersal, and that each colony behaves as a distinct subpopulation. Microgeographical genetic isolation by distance was demonstrated for, to our knowledge, the first time in a bat species, and found to be apparent both across the entire study area and along one river valley. The results suggest that extensive macrogeographical population genetic structure may be evident across the species' range.

  11. On the dependence of structural and sensing properties of sputtered MoO3 thin films on argon gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojier, K.; Savaloni, H.; Zolghadr, S.

    2014-11-01

    Nitrogen and carbon oxides (CO, NO and NO2), released from combustion facilities and automobiles, are known to be extremely harmful to the human body and also are the main cause of air pollution. Therefore, effective methods to monitor and suppress the carbon and nitrogen oxides have been highly demanded for atmospheric environmental measurements and controls. It is known that molybdenum oxide (MoO3) can be a good semiconductor material for use as a gas sensor in monitoring CO, NO and NO2. In this paper we report the structural characteristics and sensing properties of the sputtered MoO3 thin films as a function of argon gas flow. MoO3 thin films were deposited by DC reactive magnetron sputtering technique on glass substrates at different argon gas flows in the range of 5-20 sccm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was used for studying crystallographic structure. XRD results showed that all of our films were of polycrystalline structure and of α-MoO3 stable orthorhombic phase. Results also showed that crystallite size increases while compressive nano-strain in the structure of the films decreases with increasing the argon gas flow. Atomic force microscope and the field emission scanning electron microscope studies showed granular structures for all samples, which increased in size consistent with the XRD results, with argon gas flow, while the surface roughness of the films also increased with argon gas flow. Chemical composition study showed optimum reaction between oxygen and molybdenum atoms for films produced at 15 sccm flow of argon gas. The electrical response of samples was measured in the vacuum and the CO environments in the temperature range of 150-350 K. All samples showed Ohmic behavior and the electrical resistances of the films measured in the CO environment were lower than those measured in vacuum. This study showed that the sensing ability of MoO3 for CO improves with increasing the argon gas flow.

  12. Probing High School Students' Cognitive Structures and Key Areas of Learning Difficulties on Ethanoic Acid Using the Flow Map Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Qing; Wang, Tingting; Zheng, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was primarily to explore high school students' cognitive structures and to identify their learning difficulties on ethanoic acid through the flow map method. The subjects of this study were 30 grade 1 students from Dong Yuan Road Senior High School in Xi'an, China. The interviews were conducted a week after the students…

  13. Air-structure coupling features analysis of mining contra-rotating axial flow fan cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. G.; Sun, W.; Li, F.; Zhang, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between contra-rotating axial flow fan blade and working gas has been studied by means of establishing air-structure coupling control equation and combining Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational solid mechanics (CSM). Based on the single flow channel model, the Finite Volume Method was used to make the field discrete. Additionally, the SIMPLE algorithm, the Standard k-ε model and the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian dynamic grids technology were utilized to get the airflow motion by solving the discrete governing equations. At the same time, the Finite Element Method was used to make the field discrete to solve dynamic response characteristics of blade. Based on weak coupling method, data exchange from the fluid solver and the solid solver was processed on the coupling interface. Then interpolation was used to obtain the coupling characteristics. The results showed that the blade's maximum amplitude was on the tip of the last-stage blade and aerodynamic force signal could reflect the blade working conditions to some extent. By analyzing the flow regime in contra-rotating axial flow fan, it could be found that the vortex core region was mainly in the blade surface, the hub and the blade clearance. In those regions, the turbulence intensity was very high. The last-stage blade's operating life is shorter than that of the pre-stage blade due to the fatigue fracture occurs much more easily on the last-stage blade which bears more stress.

  14. Numerical simulation on macro-instability of coupling flow field structure in jet-stirred tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, D. Y.; Lu, J. P.; Bu, Q. X.; Zhang, S. F.; Zheng, S. X.

    2016-05-01

    The velocity field macro-instability (MI) can help to improve the mixing efficiency. In this work, the MI features of flow field induced by jet-stirred coupling action is studied by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The numerical simulation method of jet-stirred model was established based on standard turbulent equations, and the impeller rotation was modeled by means of the Sliding Mesh (SM) technology. The numerical results of test fluid (water) power consumption were compared with the data obtained by power test experiments. The effects of jet flow velocity and impeller speed on MI frequency were analyzed thoroughly. The results show that the calculated values of power consumption agree well with the experiment measured data, which validates the turbulent model, and the flow structure and MI frequency distribution are affected by both impeller speed and jet flow rate. The amplitude of MI frequency increases obviously with the increasing rotation speed of impeller and the eccentric jet rate, and it can be enhanced observably by eccentric jet rate, in condition of comparatively high impeller speed. At this time, the MI phenomenon disappears with the overall chaotic mixing.

  15. Stability of Brillouin flow in the presence of slow-wave structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, D. H.; Lau, Y. Y.; Greening, G.; Wong, P.; Hoff, B.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2016-09-01

    Including a slow-wave structure (SWS) on the anode in the conventional, planar, and inverted magnetron, we systematically study the linear stability of Brillouin flow, which is the prevalent flow in crossed-field devices. The analytic treatment is fully relativistic and fully electromagnetic, and it incorporates the equilibrium density profile, flow profile, and electric field and magnetic field profiles in the linear stability analysis. Using parameters similar to the University of Michigan's recirculating planar magnetron, the numerical data show that the resonant interaction of the vacuum circuit mode and the corresponding smooth-bore diocotron-like mode is the dominant cause for instability. This resonant interaction is far more important than the intrinsic negative (positive) mass property of electrons in the inverted (conventional) magnetron geometry. It is absent in either the smooth-bore magnetron or under the electrostatic assumption, one or both of which was almost always adopted in prior analytical formulation. This resonant interaction severely restricts the wavenumber for instability to the narrow range in which the cold tube frequency of the SWS is within a few percent of the corresponding smooth bore diocotron-like mode in the Brillouin flow.

  16. Methods for Computationally Efficient Structured CFD Simulations of Complex Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrick, Gregory P.; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2012-01-01

    This research presents more efficient computational methods by which to perform multi-block structured Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbomachinery, thus facilitating higher-fidelity solutions of complicated geometries and their associated flows. This computational framework offers flexibility in allocating resources to balance process count and wall-clock computation time, while facilitating research interests of simulating axial compressor stall inception with more complete gridding of the flow passages and rotor tip clearance regions than is typically practiced with structured codes. The paradigm presented herein facilitates CFD simulation of previously impractical geometries and flows. These methods are validated and demonstrate improved computational efficiency when applied to complicated geometries and flows.

  17. Numerical Study of Unsteady Flow in Centrifugal Cold Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Peng; Wu, Jihao; Li, Qing

    In helium refrigeration system, high-speed centrifugal cold compressor is utilized to pumped gaseous helium from saturated liquid helium tank at low temperature and low pressure for producing superfluid helium or sub-cooled helium. Stall and surge are common unsteady flow phenomena in centrifugal cold compressors which severely limit operation range and impact efficiency reliability. In order to obtain the installed range of cold compressor, unsteady flow in the case of low mass flow or high pressure ratio is investigated by the CFD. From the results of the numerical analysis, it can be deduced that the pressure ratio increases with the decrease in reduced mass flow. With the decrease of the reduced mass flow, backflow and vortex are intensified near the shroud of impeller. The unsteady flow will not only increase the flow loss, but also damage the compressor. It provided a numerical foundation of analyzing the effect of unsteady flow field and reducing the flow loss, and it is helpful for the further study and able to instruct the designing.

  18. Near-wake flow structure of elliptic cylinders close to a free surface: effect of cylinder aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daichin, K. V.; Lee, Sang Joon

    The flow fields behind elliptic cylinders adjacent to a free surface were investigated experimentally in a circulating water channel. A range of cylinder aspect ratios (AR=2, 3, 4) were considered, while the cross-sectional area of the elliptical cylinder was kept constant. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of cylinder aspect ratio and a free surface on the flow structure in the near-wake behind elliptic cylinders. For each elliptic cylinder, the flow structure was analyzed for various values of the submergence depth of the cylinder beneath the free surface. The flow fields were measured using a single-frame double-exposure PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) system. For each experimental condition, 350 instantaneous velocity fields were obtained and ensemble-averaged to obtain the mean velocity field and spatial distribution of the mean vorticity statistics. The results show that near-wake can be classified into three typical flow patterns: formation of a Coanda flow, generation of substantial jet-like flow, and attachment of this jet flow to the free surface. The general flow structure observed behind the elliptic cylinders resembles the structure previously reported for a circular cylinder submerged near a free surface. However, the wake width and the angle of downward deflection of the shear layer developed from the lower surface of the elliptic cylinder differ from those observed for a circular cylinder. These trends are enhanced as cylinder aspect ratio is increased. In addition, the free surface distortion is also discussed in the paper.

  19. Flow structure and heat exchange analysis in internal cooling channel of gas turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwaba, Ryszard; Kaczynski, Piotr; Doerffer, Piotr; Telega, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the study of the flow structure and heat transfer, and also their correlations on the four walls of a radial cooling passage model of a gas turbine blade. The investigations focus on heat transfer and aerodynamic measurements in the channel, which is an accurate representation of the configuration used in aeroengines. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient and the pressure drop used in the design of radial cooling passages are often developed from simplified models. It is important to note that real engine passages do not have perfect rectangular cross sections, but include corner fillet, ribs with fillet radii and special orientation. Therefore, this work provides detailed fluid flow and heat transfer data for a model of radial cooling geometry which possesses very realistic features.

  20. Effect of a bubble nucleation model on cavitating flow structure in rarefaction wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, N.; Schmidt, A.

    2016-12-01

    This paper explains research examining processes accompanying underwater explosions near the free surface. Particular attention is paid to the effect of heterogeneous nucleation on cavitating flow induced by underwater explosions near the free surface. Variation of the size spectrum of produced bubbles and influence of this process on flow structure are studied. The cavitating liquid is considered as a two-phase bubbly medium described in the framework of the Euler-Lagrange approach treating the carrier phase (liquid) as a continuum and the dispersed phase (bubbles) as a set of test particles. More detailed descriptions of a mathematical model, numerical method, and algorithm validation are observed in the authors' previous paper [see, Petrov and Schmidt (Exp Thermal Fluid Sci 60:367-373, 2015)].

  1. Stratified shear flow in an inclined duct: coherent structures and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefauve, Adrien; Partridge, Jamie; Dalziel, Stuart; Linden, Paul

    2016-11-01

    We present laboratory experiments on the exchange flow in an inclined square duct connecting two reservoirs at different densities. This system generates and maintains a stratified shear flow, which can be laminar, wavy or turbulent depending on the density difference and inclination angle. It is believed that the mean dissipation is set by the angle, and that high buoyancy Reynolds numbers (i.e. turbulent intensity) can be maintained, making this system suited for the study of continuously forced stratified turbulence. The talk will focus on the analysis of time-resolved, near-instantaneous 3D velocity and density data obtained by stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF). This data allow for the visualisation of 3D coherent structures as well as turbulent mixing properties, which are key in understanding the dynamics of stratified turbulence. Supported by EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K034529/1 entitled "Mathematical Underpinnings of Stratified Turbulence".

  2. Structural Effects of Biodiesel on Soot Volume Fraction in a Laminar Co-Flow Diffusion Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarten, Jason

    An experimental study was performed to determine the structural effects of biodiesel on soot volume fraction in a laminar co-flow diffusion flame. These include the effects of the ester function group, the inclusion of a double bond, and its positional effect. The soot volume fraction and temperature profiles of a biodiesel surrogate, n-Decane, 1-Decene, and 5-Decene fuels were measured. Improvements were made to existing laser extinction and rapid thermocouple insertion apparatus and were used to measure soot volume fraction and temperature profiles respectively. Flow rates of each fuel were determined in order to keep the temperature effects on soot negligible. Using n-Decane as a baseline, the double bond increased soot production and was further increased with a more centrally located double bond. The ester function group containing oxygen decreased soot production. The order of most to least sooting fuels were as follows 5-Decene > 1-Decene > n-Decane > Biodiesel Surrogate.

  3. Three-dimensional flow structure and aerodynamic loading on a revolving wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmann, Daniel J.; Visbal, Miguel R.; Orkwis, Paul D.

    2013-03-01

    A numerical study is conducted to examine the vortex structure and aerodynamic loading on a revolving wing in quiescent flow. A high-fidelity, implicit large eddy simulation technique is employed to simulate a revolving wing configuration consisting of a single, aspect-ratio-one rectangular plate extended out a distance of half a chord from the rotational axis at a fixed angle relative to the axis. Shortly after the onset of the motion, the rotating wing generates a coherent vortex system along the leading-edge. This vortex system remains attached throughout the motion for the range of Reynolds numbers explored, despite the unsteadiness and vortex breakdown observed at higher Reynolds numbers. The average and instantaneous wing loading also increases with Reynolds number. At a fixed Reynolds number, the attachment of the leading-edge vortex is also shown to be insensitive to the geometric angle of the wing. Additionally, the flow structure and forcing generated by a purely translating wing is investigated and compared with that of the revolving wing. Similar features are present at the inception of the motion, however, the two flows evolve very differently for the remainder of the maneuver. Comparisons of the revolving wing simulations with recent experimental particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements using a new PIV-like data reduction technique applied to the computational solution show very favorable agreement. The success of the data reduction technique demonstrates the need to compare computations and experiments of differing resolutions using similar data-analysis techniques.

  4. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of the flow through a stenotic aortic valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Hoda; Labrosse, Michel R.; Durand, Louis-Gilles; Kadem, Lyes

    2009-11-01

    In Europe and North America, aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent valvular heart disease and cardiovascular disease after systemic hypertension and coronary artery disease. Understanding blood flow through an aortic stenosis and developing new accurate non-invasive diagnostic parameters is, therefore, of primarily importance. However, simulating such flows is highly challenging. In this study, we considered the interaction between blood flow and the valve leaflets and compared the results obtained in healthy valves with stenotic ones. One effective method to model the interaction between the fluid and the structure is to use Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach. Our two-dimensional model includes appropriate nonlinear and anisotropic materials. It is loaded during the systolic phase by applying pressure curves to the fluid domain at the inflow. For modeling the calcified stenotic valve, calcium will be added on the aortic side of valve leaflets. Such simulations allow us to determine the effective orifice area of the valve, one of the main parameters used clinically to evaluate the severity of an AS, and to correlate it with changes in the structure of the leaflets.

  5. Viscoelastic polymer flows and elastic turbulence in three-dimensional porous structures.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan; Lyons, Kyle; Howe, Andrew M; Clarke, Andrew

    2016-01-14

    Viscoelastic polymer solutions flowing through reservoir rocks have been found to improve oil displacement efficiency when the aqueous-phase shear-rate exceeds a critical value. A possible mechanism for this enhanced recovery is elastic turbulence that causes breakup and mobilization of trapped oil ganglia. Here, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion measurements in a novel way to detect increased motion of disconnected oil ganglia. The data are acquired directly from a three-dimensional (3D) opaque porous structure (sandstone) when viscoelastic fluctuations are expected to be present in the continuous phase. The measured increase in motion of trapped ganglia provides unequivocal evidence of fluctuations in the flowing phase in a fully complex 3D system. This work provides direct evidence of elastic turbulence in a realistic reservoir rock - a measurement that cannot be readily achieved by conventional laboratory methods. We support the NMR data with optical microscopy studies of fluctuating ganglia in simple two-dimensional (2D) microfluidic networks, with consistent apparent rheological behaviour of the aqueous phase, to provide conclusive evidence of elastic turbulence in the 3D structure and hence validate the proposed flow-fluctuation mechanism for enhanced oil recovery.

  6. CFD study on electrolyte distribution in redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolin, S.; Toninelli, P.; Maggiolo, D.; Guarnieri, M.; Del, D., Col

    2015-11-01

    The most important component in a redox flow battery (RFB) cell is the MEA (membrane electrode assembly), a sandwich consisting of two catalyzed electrodes with an interposed polymeric membrane. In order to allow electrolyte flow toward the electroactive sites, the electrodes have a porous structure that can be obtained with carbon base materials such as carbon felts. The RFB cell is closed by two plates containing the distribution flow channels. Considering that a uniform electrolyte distribution in the reaction region is a prerequisite for high-efficiency operation, the flow pattern is an important parameter to be investigated for the optimization of the cell. In the present work, the effect of different channels patterns on the electrolyte distribution and on the pressure drop is numerically investigated. Three-dimensional simulations have been carried out with ANSYS Fluent code and four different layouts have been considered. Calculations have been performed both in the distribution channels and in the felt porous region.

  7. Numerical study of cavitation flows inside a tubular pumping station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. L.; Huang, W.; Wang, F. J.; Yang, W.; Wu, Y. L.

    2012-11-01

    Based on RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the full cavitation model, the cavitation flows inside a low-head tubular-pump model were predicted by using the FLUENT software. For a operating case of given flow rate, cavitation happens near the inlet on the suction surfaces of the impeller blades at the initial cavitating stage, and the cavitating area spreads to the impeller passage and hub as NPSH (net positive suction head) decreases, which will affect energy transformation. For various operating cases of cavitation flows at the given flow rates, the predicted velocity and pressure distributions as well as the vapor volumetric fraction are systematically analyzed. Finally, the cavitation performance curve of the tubular-pump model is obtained by means of the further post-processing. All the comparisons and analysis can be further employed to optimize the hydraulic and structural design of the tubular pump and to guide its safe operation.

  8. Multi-frequency complex network from time series for uncovering oil-water flow structure

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Fang, Peng-Cheng; Jin, Ning-De; Xia, Cheng-Yi; Hu, Li-Dan

    2015-01-01

    Uncovering complex oil-water flow structure represents a challenge in diverse scientific disciplines. This challenge stimulates us to develop a new distributed conductance sensor for measuring local flow signals at different positions and then propose a novel approach based on multi-frequency complex network to uncover the flow structures from experimental multivariate measurements. In particular, based on the Fast Fourier transform, we demonstrate how to derive multi-frequency complex network from multivariate time series. We construct complex networks at different frequencies and then detect community structures. Our results indicate that the community structures faithfully represent the structural features of oil-water flow patterns. Furthermore, we investigate the network statistic at different frequencies for each derived network and find that the frequency clustering coefficient enables to uncover the evolution of flow patterns and yield deep insights into the formation of flow structures. Current results present a first step towards a network visualization of complex flow patterns from a community structure perspective. PMID:25649900

  9. Experimental Studies of Low-Pressure Turbine Flows and Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volino, Ralph J.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes research performed in support of the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Low-Pressure Turbine (LPT) Flow Physics Program. The work was performed experimentally at the U.S. Naval Academy faculties. The geometry corresponded to "Pak B" LPT airfoil. The test section simulated LPT flow in a passage. Three experimental studies were performed: (a) Boundary layer measurements for ten baseline cases under high and low freestream turbulence conditions at five Reynolds numbers of 25,000, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000, and 300,000, based on passage exit velocity and suction surface wetted length; (b) Passive flow control studies with three thicknesses of two-dimensional bars, and two heights of three-dimensional circular cylinders with different spanwise separations, at same flow conditions as the 10 baseline cases; (c) Active flow control with oscillating synthetic (zero net mass flow) vortex generator jets, for one case with low freestream turbulence and a low Reynolds number of 25,000. The Passive flow control was successful at controlling the separation problem at low Reynolds numbers, with varying degrees of success from case to case and varying levels of impact at higher Reynolds numbers. The active flow control successfully eliminated the large separation problem for the low Reynolds number case. Very detailed data was acquired using hot-wire anemometry, including single and two velocity components, integral boundary layer quantities, turbulence statistics and spectra, turbulent shear stresses and their spectra, and intermittency, documenting transition, separation and reattachment. Models were constructed to correlate the results. The report includes a summary of the work performed and reprints of the publications describing the various studies.

  10. Comparison of Comet Enflow and VA One Acoustic-to-Structure Power Flow Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2010-01-01

    Comet Enflow is a commercially available, high frequency vibroacoustic analysis software based on the Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA). In this method the same finite element mesh used for structural and acoustic analysis can be employed for the high frequency solutions. Comet Enflow is being validated for a floor-equipped composite cylinder by comparing the EFEA vibroacoustic response predictions with Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) results from the commercial software program VA One from ESI Group. Early in this program a number of discrepancies became apparent in the Enflow predicted response for the power flow from an acoustic space to a structural subsystem. The power flow anomalies were studied for a simple cubic, a rectangular and a cylindrical structural model connected to an acoustic cavity. The current investigation focuses on three specific discrepancies between the Comet Enflow and the VA One predictions: the Enflow power transmission coefficient relative to the VA One coupling loss factor; the importance of the accuracy of the acoustic modal density formulation used within Enflow; and the recommended use of fast solvers in Comet Enflow. The frequency region of interest for this study covers the one-third octave bands with center frequencies from 16 Hz to 4000 Hz.

  11. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOEpatents

    Del Grande, Nancy K.; Durbin, Philip F.; Dolan, Kenneth W.; Perkins, Dwight E.

    1995-01-01

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features.

  12. Structure of Turbulent Flow in Subchannel of Rod Bundle Downstream of Spacer Grid With Hybrid Flow Mixing Device

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Seok Oh; Wang Kee In; Tae Hyun Chun

    2002-07-01

    An experiment was performed in a wind tunnel to investigate the flow structure in a rod bundle with a hybrid vane grid. The hybrid vane is a flow-mixing device, which consists of two pairs of primary and secondary vanes in a cell. The test section is a rectangular channel (300 mm x 300 mm x 2400 mm) including 3 x 3 rod (75 mm diameter) array with a spacer grid. The pitch to diameter ratio of the rod array is 1.33. The flow structures downstream the grid are measured at Reynolds number of 1.2 X 105 for 35-degree deflecting angle of the hybrid flow-mixing vane. The data are obtained for the distributions of the time mean axial velocity, lateral velocity, and turbulent intensities in 3 component directions over a center subchannel along axial locations and compared with the previous results of split vane grid that has two vanes in a cell. The results show that the mixing efficiency of the hybrid vane grid could be similar with that of the split vane grid because swirl factor of the hybrid vane grid is higher than that of split vane grid and the magnitude of axial turbulent intensity, turbulent diffusion coefficient, and cross flow factor is similar to each other in spite of differences of the vane numbers and shape in a cell between hybrid and split vane grids. (authors)

  13. Intense transport of bed load - modeling based on experimentally observed flow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoušek, Václav

    2016-04-01

    A modeling approach is discussed which enables to predict characteristics of steady uniform open-channel flow carrying a large amount of sediment (bed load). The approach considers a layered structure of the sediment-laden flow and employs conditions at layer interfaces to evaluate the flow slope, depth, the thickness of the layers and flow rates of both the sediment and sediment-water mixture. It is based on experimental observations obtained for lightweight granular materials in a laboratory tilting flume. Besides visual observations of a development of the layered structure of the flow, detailed profiles of the longitudinal velocity were collected together with integral characteristics of the flow (depths and slopes, flow rates) in the flume. Values of the grain velocity and concentration at the interfaces were determined from the measurements and observations. In the upper plane bed regime of bed load transport, the flow structure appears to be composed of up to three distinct layers (water layer, linear collisional layer and dense sliding layer). Depending on a value of the bed Shields parameter (and associated flow conditions) the number of layers may change and the thicknesses of the particular layers vary. It appears that collisional layers in flows in which they dominate the flow depth (typically Shields bigger than 1) exhibit a virtually constant value of the collisional-layer Richardson number. Velocity and concentration profiles across the collisional layer can be considered linear. At the bottom of the flow, the Coulomb yield criterion with the assumption of the zero fluid contribution balances the bed shear stress applied by the flowing mixture of water and sediment. These features are employed in the discussed modeling approach and lead to a depth-averaged flow model composed of a set of balance and constitutive equations. A kinetic-theory based formula for granular shear stress at the bottom of the collisional layer is added to close the set of

  14. Propulsion of micro-structures in Oscillatory Stokes Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Ikhee; Huang, Yangyang; Zimmerman, Walter; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Drug delivery often necessitates specific site-targeting within the human body. The use of micro and/or nano devices swimming through the bloodstream provides an attractive mechanism for targeted drug targeting, however the design and practical implementation of such devices remain very challenging. Inspired by flapping wings, we construct a two-dimensional wedge-like device, consisting of two links connected by a linear torsional spring and released in an oscillatory Stokes flow. We vary the stiffness and rest angle of the linear spring and the oscillation amplitude and frequency of the background flow to explore the behavior of the device. We find that the device achieves a net displacement, or propulsion, in oscillatory flows even when no elastic energy is stored initially, thus breaking Purcell's scallop's theorem. More importantly, the vehicle tends to align with the background flow under perturbations. We conclude by commenting on how to control the parameters of the device and the fluid to achieve desired behavior of the device. These findings may have significant implications on the design of micro devices in viscous fluids.

  15. Computational studies of flow through cross flow fans - effect of blade geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govardhan, M.; Sampat, D. Lakshmana

    2005-09-01

    This present paper describes three dimensional computational analysis of complex internal flow in a cross flow fan. A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software code CFX was used for the computation. RNG k-ɛ two equation turbulence model was used to simulate the model with unstructured mesh. Sliding mesh interface was used at the interface between the rotating and stationary domains to capture the unsteady interactions. An accurate assessment of the present investigation is made by comparing various parameters with the available experimental data. Three impeller geometries with different blade angles and radius ratio are used in the present study. Maximum energy transfer through the impeller takes place in the region where the flow follows the blade curvature. Radial velocity is not uniform through blade channels. Some blades work in turbine mode at very low flow coefficients. Static pressure is always negative in and around the impeller region.

  16. Synchronization of chemical noise-sustained structures in asymmetrically coupled differential-flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Izús, Gonzalo G; Sánchez, Alejandro D

    2013-12-01

    The differential-flow-induced chemical instability is investigated in the context of two coupled reactors with cubic autocatalytic kinetics (the Gray-Scott model). Previous results for master-slave arrangement [Izús, Deza, and Sánchez, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 234112 (2010)] are extended in this study to include bidirectional coupling between reactions. Numerical simulations in the convectively unstable regime show that synchronized noise-sustained structures are developed in both reactors due to the selective amplification of noise. A theoretical analysis shows that the nature of the synchronization and the stability of the synchronized manifold are related with the properties of the critical modes.

  17. Transitional flow structure on classic and wavy wings at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverkov, I.; Kozlov, V.; Kryukov, A.

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents experimental results on the boundary-layer structure and laminar-turbulent transition on a wavy wing designed for unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). The study has been performed at the chord Reynolds number of the order of 105 to compare the wings with smooth and wavy surfaces at similar conditions. The flow past Z-15-25 airfoil was investigated with a particle-image velocimetry (PIV). The method made it possible to obtain a spatial pattern of velocity perturbations on the wing with wavy surface.

  18. Conditionally-averaged structures in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guezennec, Yann G.; Piomelli, Ugo; Kim, John

    1987-01-01

    The quadrant-splitting and the wall-shear detection techniques were used to obtain ensemble-averaged wall layer structures. The two techniques give similar results for Q4 events, but the wall-shear method leads to smearing of Q2 events. Events were found to maintain their identity for very long times. The ensemble-averaged structures scale with outer variables. Turbulence producing events were associated with one dominant vortical structure rather than a pair of counter-rotating structures. An asymmetry-preserving averaging scheme was devised that allowed a picture of the average structure which more closely resembles the instantaneous one, to be obtained.

  19. Gravitational Effects on Near Field Flow Structure of Low Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, D. W.; Yep, T. W.; Agrawal, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Earth gravity and microgravity to acquire quantitative data on near field flow structure of helium jets injected into air. Microgravity conditions were simulated in the 2.2- second drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The jet flow was observed by quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a non-intrusive line of site measurement technique for the whole field. The flow structure was characterized by distributions of angular deflection and helium mole percentage obtained from color schlieren images taken at 60 Hz. Results show that the jet in microgravity was up to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The global jet flow oscillations observed in Earth gravity were absent in microgravity, providing direct experimental evidence that the flow instability in the low density jet was buoyancy induced. The paper provides quantitative details of temporal flow evolution as the experiment undergoes change in gravity in the drop tower.

  20. Survey of shock-wave structures of smooth-particle granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, D. A.; Mazzoleni, A. P.; Faw, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    We show the effects of simulated supersonic granular flow made up of smooth particles passing over two prototypical bodies: a wedge and a disk. We describe a way of computationally identifying shock wave locations in granular flows and tabulate the shock wave locations for flow over wedges and disks. We quantify the shock structure in terms of oblique shock angle for wedge impediments and shock standoff distance for disk impediments. We vary granular flow parameters including upstream volume fraction, average upstream velocity, granular temperature, and the collision coefficient of restitution. Both wedges and disks have been used in the aerospace community as prototypical impediments to flowing air in order to investigate the fundamentally different shock structures emanating from sharp and blunt bodies, and we present these results in order to increase the understanding of the fundamental behavior of supersonic granular flow.

  1. Microfluidic Device for Studying Controllable Hydrodynamic Flow Induced Cellular Responses.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunhong; Zhang, Xiannian; Li, Chunmei; Pang, Yuhong; Huang, Yanyi

    2017-03-07

    Hydrodynamic flow is an essential stimulus in many cellular functions, regulating many mechanical sensitive pathways and closely associating with human health status and diseases. The flow pattern of blood in vessels is the key factor in causing atherosclerosis. Hemodynamics has great effect on endothelial cells' gene expression and biological functions. There are various tools that can be used for studying flow-induced cellular responses but most of them are either bulky or lack precise controllability. We develop an integrated microfluidic device that can precisely generate different flow patterns to human endothelial cells cultured on-chip. We monitored cell morphology and used small-input RNA-seq technology to depict the transcriptome profiles of human umbilical vein endothelial cells under uni- or bidirectional flow. Such integrated and miniatured device has greatly facilitated our understanding of endothelial functions with shear stimulus, not only providing new data on the transcriptomic scale but also building the connection between cell phenotypic changes and expression alternations.

  2. Simulation Study of Traffic Flow At a Three Way Intersection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    INTERSECTION by Chong Chul Song September 1988 Thesis Advisor: Peter A. W. Lewis Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited i~ K...II Title (Include security classification) SIMULATION STUDY OF TRAFFIC FLOW AT A THREE WAY INTERSECTION 12 Personal Author(s) Chong Chul Song 13a...distribution is unlimited. Simulation Study of Traffic Flow at a Three Way Intersection by Chong Chul Song Major, Republic Of Korea Army B.S., Korea

  3. Analytical studies of hypersonic viscous dissociated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inger, George R.

    1995-01-01

    This project primarily dealt with integral boundary-layer solution techniques that are directly applicable to the problem of determining aerodynamic heating rates of hypersonic vehicles like X-33 in the vicinity of stagnation points, windward centerlines, and swept-wing leading edges. The analyses include effects of finite-rate gas chemistry across the boundary layer and finite-rate catalysis of atom recombination at the surface. A new approach for combining the insight afforded by integral boundary-layer analysis with comprehensive (and expensive) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) flowfield solutions of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations was developed. The approach extracts CFD derived quantities at the wall and at the boundary layer edge for inclusion in a post-processing boundary-layer analysis. The post-processed data base allows a designer at a workstation to ask and answer the following questions: (1) How much does the heating change if one uses a thermal protection system (TPS) with different catalytic properties than was used in the original CFD solution? (2) How does the heating change when one moves the interface of two different TPS materials with different catalytic efficiencies for the purpose of reducing vehicle weight and expense? The answer to the second question is particularly critical, because abrupt changes from low catalytic efficiency to high catalytic efficiency can lead to localized increase in heating which exceeds the usually conservative estimate provided by a fully catalytic wall assumption. A secondary issue that was addressed involves the prediction of heating levels in the vicinity of sharp corners that are transverse to or aligned with the flow. An example of the first case is heating at the edge of the COMET reentry module. An example of the second case is heating along the side edge of a deflected body flap on an SSV. The difficulty of putting grids in the vicinity of such corners with continuously varying metric coefficients

  4. Structure of hydrogen-rich transverse jets in a vitiated turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lyra, Sgouria; Wilde, Benjamin; Kolla, Hemanth; Seitzman, Jerry M.; Lieuwen, Timothy C.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2014-11-24

    Our paper reports the results of a joint experimental and numerical study of the flow characteristics and flame structure of a hydrogen rich jet injected normal to a turbulent, vitiated crossflow of lean methane combustion products. Simultaneous high-speed stereoscopic PIV and OH PLIF measurements were obtained and analyzed alongside three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of inert and reacting JICF with detailed H2/COH2/CO chemistry. Both the experiment and the simulation reveal that, contrary to most previous studies of reacting JICF stabilized in low-to-moderate temperature air crossflow, the present conditions lead to a burner-attached flame that initiates uniformly around the burner edge. Significant asymmetry is observed, however, between the reaction zones located on the windward and leeward sides of the jet, due to the substantially different scalar dissipation rates. The windward reaction zone is much thinner in the near field, while also exhibiting significantly higher local and global heat release than the much broader reaction zone found on the leeward side of the jet. The unsteady dynamics of the windward shear layer, which largely control the important jet/crossflow mixing processes in that region, are explored in order to elucidate the important flow stability implications arising in the inert and reacting JICF. The paper concludes with an analysis of the ignition, flame characteristics, and global structure of the burner-attached flame. FurthermoreChemical explosive mode analysis (CEMA) shows that the entire windward shear layer, and a large region on the leeward side of the jet, are highly explosive prior to ignition and are dominated by non-premixed flame structures after ignition. The predominantly mixing limited nature of the flow after ignition is examined by computing the Takeno flame index, which shows that ~70% of the heat release occurs in non-premixed regions.

  5. Structure of hydrogen-rich transverse jets in a vitiated turbulent flow

    DOE PAGES

    Lyra, Sgouria; Wilde, Benjamin; Kolla, Hemanth; ...

    2014-11-24

    Our paper reports the results of a joint experimental and numerical study of the flow characteristics and flame structure of a hydrogen rich jet injected normal to a turbulent, vitiated crossflow of lean methane combustion products. Simultaneous high-speed stereoscopic PIV and OH PLIF measurements were obtained and analyzed alongside three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of inert and reacting JICF with detailed H2/COH2/CO chemistry. Both the experiment and the simulation reveal that, contrary to most previous studies of reacting JICF stabilized in low-to-moderate temperature air crossflow, the present conditions lead to a burner-attached flame that initiates uniformly around the burner edge. Significantmore » asymmetry is observed, however, between the reaction zones located on the windward and leeward sides of the jet, due to the substantially different scalar dissipation rates. The windward reaction zone is much thinner in the near field, while also exhibiting significantly higher local and global heat release than the much broader reaction zone found on the leeward side of the jet. The unsteady dynamics of the windward shear layer, which largely control the important jet/crossflow mixing processes in that region, are explored in order to elucidate the important flow stability implications arising in the inert and reacting JICF. The paper concludes with an analysis of the ignition, flame characteristics, and global structure of the burner-attached flame. FurthermoreChemical explosive mode analysis (CEMA) shows that the entire windward shear layer, and a large region on the leeward side of the jet, are highly explosive prior to ignition and are dominated by non-premixed flame structures after ignition. The predominantly mixing limited nature of the flow after ignition is examined by computing the Takeno flame index, which shows that ~70% of the heat release occurs in non-premixed regions.« less

  6. The influence of contact zone configuration on the flow structure in a dissolved air flotation pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Lundh, Måns; Jönsson, Lennart; Dahlquist, Jan

    2002-03-01

    The dissolved air flotation process is used in water and wastewater treatment. Among many parameters the fluid dynamics determine the capacity of the process. The contact zone is assumed to be important for the removal function, as it is believed to be the location for the aggregation of bubbles and flocs. This paper presents an experimental study on the flow structure in a contact zone of a DAF pilot tank and the influence of contact zone configuration. The flow structure in the contact zone was examined for different horizontal lengths of the zone and for different heights and inclinations of the shaft wall. The hydraulic surface loading was 11 m/h over the total tank surface area and the recycle rate was constant at 10% of the main flow. The examined hydraulic surface loading over the contact zone ranged from 40 to 98 m/h. Water velocities in the longitudinal, central section of the tank were measured with an acoustical Doppler velocimeter in a grid net for the different contact zone configurations, giving an insight into the flow structure. The result showed that the flow structure in the contact zone was characterised by a turbulent lower region and a plug-flow higher region. The hydraulic surface loading, a function of the length of the contact zone, seemingly determined the extension of the turbulent region. A higher hydraulic surface loading decreased the turbulent region while the lower loading increased it. A hydraulic surface loading of 65 m/h was suggested for design. It was not possible to determine the turbulent intensity quantitatively due to the measurement method. The height and inclination of the shaft wall did not seem to have a significant influence on the turbulent region. However, an increased height of the contact zone enhanced the higher, plug flow region and a recommended height of 0.81 m or higher for the recommended hydraulic surface loading was suggested when both mixing and plug-flow are desired. The separation zone was characterised by

  7. Studies of Flame Structure in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.; Sung, C. J.; Zhu, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    The present research endeavor is concerned with gaining fundamental understanding of the configuration, structure, and dynamics of laminar premixed and diffusion flames under conditions of negligible effects of gravity. Of particular interest is the potential to establish and hence study the properties of spherically- and cylindrically-symmetric flames and their response to external forces not related to gravity. For example, in an earlier experimental study of the burner-stabilized cylindrical premixed flames, the possibility of flame stabilization through flow divergence was established, while the resulting one-dimensional, adiabatic, stretchless flame also allowed an accurate means of determining the laminar flame speeds of combustible mixtures. We have recently extended our studies of the flame structure in microgravity along the following directions: (1) Analysis of the dynamics of spherical premixed flames; (2) Analysis of the spreading of cylindrical diffusion flames; (3) Experimental observation of an interesting dual luminous zone structure of a steady-state, microbuoyancy, spherical diffusion flame of air burning in a hydrogen/methane mixture environment, and its subsequent quantification through computational simulation with detailed chemistry and transport; (4) Experimental quantification of the unsteady growth of a spherical diffusion flame; and (5) Computational simulation of stretched, diffusionally-imbalanced premixed flames near and beyond the conventional limits of flammability, and the substantiation of the concept of extended limits of flammability. Motivation and results of these investigations are individually discussed.

  8. Optical instrumentation and study of gas-solid suspension flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, S.C.; Pao, H.P.

    1990-09-01

    A new technique and particle detecting system for the quantification of local fluid flow velocities, particle concentrations and size distributions in gas-solid suspension flows has been successfully developed and constructed. A new 2-inch diameter pneumatic-pipe test-loop facility for study of solids transport flows has been built and in operation. In order to check scaling law developed from the experimental results in the 2-inch pipe, a 4-inch pipe test-loop facility was also designed and constructed. In the past, the mechanics of suspended-solid flow have not been solved in a closed form due to the lack of a model for the turbulent field to pick up solid particles from the flow boundary. In this research project, we have identified the existence of micro-hairpin vortices as a major mechanism for the lifting of solid particles from the flow boundary. This permits one to formulate a realistic model. That is, the introduction of a particle source term in the governing transport equation for the suspended particles. The resultant solution predicts the correct critical flow conditions for the initial pickup of different sizes of solid particles and their subsequent concentrations in the flow field. 21 figs.

  9. Theoretical study on the constricted flow phenomena in arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, S.; Chakravarty, S.

    2012-12-01

    The present study is dealt with the constricted flow characteristics of blood in arteries by making use of an appropriate mathematical model. The constricted artery experiences the generated wall shear stress due to flow disturbances in the presence of constriction. The disturbed flow in the stenosed arterial segment causes malfunction of the cardiovascular system leading to serious health problems in the form of heart attack and stroke. The flowing blood contained in the stenosed artery is considered to be non-Newtonian while the flow is treated to be two-dimensional. The present pursuit also accounts for the motion of the arterial wall and its effect on local fluid mechanics. The flow analysis applies the time-dependent, two-dimensional incompressible nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations for non-Newtonian fluid representing blood. An extensive quantitative analysis presented at the end of the paper based on large scale numerical computations of the quantities of major physiological significance enables one to estimate the constricted flow characteristics in the arterial system under consideration which deviates significantly from that of normal physiological flow conditions.

  10. Large-scale flows and coherent structure phenomena in flute turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, I.; Andrushchenko, Zh.N.; Pavlenko, V.P.

    2005-04-15

    The properties of zonal and streamer flows in the flute mode turbulence are investigated. The stability criteria and the frequency of these flows are determined in terms of the spectra of turbulent fluctuations. Furthermore, it is shown that zonal flows can undergo a further nonlinear evolution leading to the formation of long-lived coherent structures which consist of self-bound wave packets supporting stationary shear layers, and thus can be characterized as regions with a reduced level of anomalous transport.

  11. Gene flow and population structure of a solitary top carnivore in a human-dominated landscape.

    PubMed

    McManus, Jeannine S; Dalton, Desiré L; Kotzé, Antoinette; Smuts, Bool; Dickman, Amy; Marshal, Jason P; Keith, Mark

    2015-01-01

    While African leopard populations are considered to be continuous as demonstrated by their high genetic variation, the southernmost leopard population exists in the Eastern and Western Cape, South Africa, where anthropogenic activities may be affecting this population's structure. Little is known about the elusive, last free-roaming top predator in the region and this study is the first to report on leopard population structuring using nuclear DNA. By analyzing 14 microsatellite markers from 40 leopard tissue samples, we aimed to understand the populations' structure, genetic distance, and gene flow (Nm). Our results, based on spatially explicit analysis with Bayesian methods, indicate that leopards in the region exist in a fragmented population structure with lower than expected genetic diversity. Three population groups were identified, between which low to moderate levels of gene flow were observed (Nm 0.5 to 3.6). One subpopulation exhibited low genetic differentiation, suggesting a continuous population structure, while the remaining two appear to be less connected, with low emigration and immigration between these populations. Therefore, genetic barriers are present between the subpopulations, and while leopards in the study region may function as a metapopulation, anthropogenic activities threaten to decrease habitat and movement further. Our results indicate that the leopard population may become isolated within a few generations and suggest that management actions should aim to increase habitat connectivity and reduce human-carnivore conflict. Understanding genetic diversity and connectivity of populations has important conservation implications that can highlight management of priority populations to reverse the effects of human-caused extinctions.

  12. Gene flow and population structure of a solitary top carnivore in a human-dominated landscape

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Jeannine S; Dalton, Desiré L; Kotzé, Antoinette; Smuts, Bool; Dickman, Amy; Marshal, Jason P; Keith, Mark

    2015-01-01

    While African leopard populations are considered to be continuous as demonstrated by their high genetic variation, the southernmost leopard population exists in the Eastern and Western Cape, South Africa, where anthropogenic activities may be affecting this population's structure. Little is known about the elusive, last free-roaming top predator in the region and this study is the first to report on leopard population structuring using nuclear DNA. By analyzing 14 microsatellite markers from 40 leopard tissue samples, we aimed to understand the populations' structure, genetic distance, and gene flow (Nm). Our results, based on spatially explicit analysis with Bayesian methods, indicate that leopards in the region exist in a fragmented population structure with lower than expected genetic diversity. Three population groups were identified, between which low to moderate levels of gene flow were observed (Nm 0.5 to 3.6). One subpopulation exhibited low genetic differentiation, suggesting a continuous population structure, while the remaining two appear to be less connected, with low emigration and immigration between these populations. Therefore, genetic barriers are present between the subpopulations, and while leopards in the study region may function as a metapopulation, anthropogenic activities threaten to decrease habitat and movement further. Our results indicate that the leopard population may become isolated within a few generations and suggest that management actions should aim to increase habitat connectivity and reduce human–carnivore conflict. Understanding genetic diversity and connectivity of populations has important conservation implications that can highlight management of priority populations to reverse the effects of human-caused extinctions. PMID:25691961

  13. Bandwidth turbulence control based on flow community structure in the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Gu, Rentao; Ji, Yuefeng

    2016-10-01

    Bursty flows vary rapidly in short period of time, and cause fierce bandwidth turbulence in the Internet. In this letter, we model the flow bandwidth turbulence process by constructing a flow interaction network (FIN network), with nodes representing flows and edges denoting bandwidth interactions among them. To restrain the bandwidth turbulence in FIN networks, an immune control strategy based on flow community structure is proposed. Flows in community boundary positions are immunized to cut off the inter-community turbulence spreading. By applying this control strategy in the first- and the second-level flow communities separately, 97.2% flows can effectively avoid bandwidth variations by immunizing 21% flows, and the average bandwidth variation degree reaches near zero. To achieve a similar result, about 70%-90% immune flows are needed with targeted control strategy based on flow degrees and random control strategy. Moreover, simulation results showed that the control effect of the proposed strategy improves significantly if the immune flow number is relatively smaller in each control step.

  14. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOEpatents

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Dolan, K.W.; Perkins, D.E.

    1995-08-22

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation is disclosed. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features. 1 fig.

  15. High-speed holocinematographic velocimeter for studying turbulent flow control physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, L. M.; Beeler, G. B.; Lindemann, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Use of a dual view, high speed, holographic movie technique is examined for studying turbulent flow control physics. This approach, which eliminates some of the limitations of previous holographic techniques, is termed a holocinematographic velocimeter (HCV). The data from this system can be used to check theoretical turbulence modeling and numerical simulations, visualize and measure coherent structures in 'non-simple' turbulent flows, and examine the mechanisms operative in various turbulent control/drag reduction concepts. This system shows promise for giving the most complete experimental characterization of turbulent flows yet available.

  16. Fluid-thermal-structural study of aerodynamically heated leading edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deuchamphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.; Wieting, Allan R.

    1988-01-01

    A finite element approach for integrated fluid-thermal-structural analysis of aerodynamically heated leading edges is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for high speed compressible flow, the energy equation, and the quasi-static equilibrium equations for the leading edge are solved using a single finite element approach in one integrated, vectorized computer program called LIFTS. The fluid-thermal-structural coupling is studied for Mach 6.47 flow over a 3-in diam cylinder for which the flow behavior and the aerothermal loads are calibrated by experimental data. Issues of the thermal-structural response are studied for hydrogen-cooled, super thermal conducting leading edges subjected to intense aerodynamic heating.

  17. A low-order model for flow control studies in cylinder wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Ganapathi; Olinger, David J.; Demetriou, Michael

    1998-11-01

    Control of three-dimensional wake structures behind circular cylinders is investigated using a previously developed coupled map lattice. The map consists of circle map oscillators along the cylinder span coupled by a diffusion model. Our goal is to develop an efficient model for flow control studies in cylinder wakes. Complex vortex shedding patterns, such as vortex dislocations and frequency cells, are observed behind vibrating cables in uniform freestream flows and stationary cylinders in sheared flows. These structures are controlled by the addition of periodic control signals to the forcing term in the map. Discontinuous nonlinear control theory is used to derive the control laws. Parallel shedding is realized for the case of uniform flow and oblique shedding is achieved for sheared inflows. The effectiveness of the discontinuous nonlinear control theory is compared with the previous application of chaos control theory to the coupled map lattice.

  18. μPIV methodology using model systems for flow studies in heterogeneous biopolymer gel microstructures.

    PubMed

    Sott, Kristin; Gebäck, Tobias; Pihl, Maria; Lorén, Niklas; Hermansson, Anne-Marie; Heintz, Alexei; Rasmuson, Anders

    2013-05-15

    A methodology for studying flow in heterogeneous soft microstructures has been developed. The methodology includes: (1) model fractal or random heterogeneous microstructures fabricated in PDMS and characterised using CLSM; (2) μPIV measurements; (3) Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of flow. It has been found that the flow behaviour in these model materials is highly dependent on pore size as well as on the connectivity and occurrence of dead ends. The experimental flow results show good agreement with predictions from the Lattice-Boltzmann modelling. These simulations were performed in geometries constructed from 3D CLSM images of the actual PDMS structures. Given these results, mass transport behaviour may be predicted for even more complex structures, like gels or composite material in, e.g., food or biomaterials. This is a step in the direction towards predictive science with regards to tailoring soft biomaterials for specific mass transport properties.

  19. Structure of Three-Dimensional Separated Flow on Symmetric Bumps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-30

    7300 and of thickness 6 over 2 circular based axisymmetric bumps of height H = 6 and 26 and one rectangular based symmetric bump of H = 26. LDV data...8217 v’) Re,, Reynolds number based on bump height, II / 1 , Reo, Momentum thickness Reynolds number. U,, 0 / m’ S Skewness, / (u )’ 1/S Reynolds stresses...analysis and the critical point saddle, node and focus theory which arc based on flow visualization ([Delery. 1992; Hunt et al.. 1978: Tobak and Peake

  20. The Stability and Dynamics of Elastic Structures and Fluid Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    stable) for R > RH (< RH). We find that, depending on the length of the observation time and on the initial conditions, the system may appear to be...either in a single steady state, or jumping between multiple steady states, or in a periodic state, or in a transient state. If the observation time is... disturbance to the flow that results from experimental imperfections, or as an externally imposed motion. The -4- frequency of this disturbance depends

  1. Study of Near-Stall Flow Behavior in a Modern Transonic Fan with Composite Sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Shin, Hyoun-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Detailed flow behavior in a modern transonic fan with a composite sweep is investigated in this paper. Both unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods are applied to investigate the flow field over a wide operating range. The calculated flow fields are compared with the data from an array of high-frequency response pressure transducers embedded in the fan casing. The current study shows that a relatively fine computational grid is required to resolve the flow field adequately and to calculate the pressure rise across the fan correctly. The calculated flow field shows detailed flow structure near the fan rotor tip region. Due to the introduction of composite sweep toward the rotor tip, the flow structure at the rotor tip is much more stable compared to that of the conventional blade design. The passage shock stays very close to the leading edge at the rotor tip even at the throttle limit. On the other hand, the passage shock becomes stronger and detaches earlier from the blade passage at the radius where the blade sweep is in the opposite direction. The interaction between the tip clearance vortex and the passage shock becomes intense as the fan operates toward the stall limit, and tip clearance vortex breakdown occurs at near-stall operation. URANS calculates the time-averaged flow field fairly well. Details of measured RMS static pressure are not calculated with sufficient accuracy with URANS. On the other hand, LES calculates details of the measured unsteady flow features in the current transonic fan with composite sweep fairly well and reveals the flow mechanism behind the measured unsteady flow field.

  2. Simulated measurement of power flow in structures near to simple sources and simple boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgary, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    Advances in electronics technology along with the advent of low cost multichannel Fast Fourier analyzers have made it practical to use higher order central difference formulas to measure power flow in 1- and 2-D structures. The method discussed uses five point differencing for the spatial derivatives in 1-D and a thirteen point difference pattern for the spatial derivatives in 2-D plates and shells. It is assumed that the measuring transducers are accelerometers. An analytical study of the higher order differencing method and the conventional two accelerometer method was performed as a preliminary to the application of these methods to actual aircraft structures. Some classical problems were analyzed in order to simulate and compare the performance of the two methods under near field measurement conditions. These near field conditions include examples of power flows near simple sources and simple boundaries. The estimates produced by the two methods were compared to the exact solution in each example. Presented are the theory and selected results of the study, which indicate that the bias errors of the two accelerometer method under near field measurement conditions may be much larger than previous studies have suggested.

  3. Numerical studies on the performance of a flow distributor in tank

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Soo Jai Kim, Young In; Ryu, Seungyeob; Bae, Youngmin; Kim, Keung Koo

    2015-03-10

    Flow distributors are generally observed in several nuclear power plants. During core make-up tank (CMT) injection into the reactor, the condensation and thermal stratification are observed in the CMT, and rapid condensation disturbs the injection operation. To reduce the condensation phenomena in the tank, CMT was equipped with a flow distributor. The optimal design of the flow distributor is very important to ensure the structural integrity the CMT and its safe operation during certain transient or accident conditions. In the present study, we numerically investigated the performance of a flow distributor in tank with different shape factors such as the total number of holes, pitch-to-hole diameter ratios, diameter of the hole, and the area ratios. These data will contribute to a design of the flow distributor.

  4. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gurau, Bogdan

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  5. Viscoelastic fluid-structure interaction between a non-Newtonian fluid flow and flexible cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Anita; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that when a flexible or flexibly-mounted structure is placed perpendicular to the flow of a Newtonian fluid, it can oscillate due to the shedding of separated vortices at high Reynolds numbers. If the same flexible object is placed in non-Newtonian flows, however, the structure's response is still unknown. Unlike Newtonian fluids, the flow of viscoelastic fluids can become unstable at infinitesimal Reynolds numbers due to a purely elastic flow instability. In this talk, we will present a series of experiments investigating the response of a flexible cylinder placed in the cross flow of a viscoelastic fluid. The elastic flow instabilities occurring at high Weissenberg numbers can exert fluctuating forces on the flexible cylinder thus leading to nonlinear periodic oscillations of the flexible structure. These oscillations are found to be coupled to the time-dependent state of viscoelastic stresses in the wake of the flexible cylinder. The static and dynamic responses of the flexible cylinder will be presented over a range of flow velocities, along with measurements of velocity profiles and flow-induced birefringence, in order to quantify the time variation of the flow field and the state of stress in the fluid.

  6. Nuclear mgnetic resonance study of granular flows. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    We have demonstrated the efficacy of NMRI to granular flow studies of objects that yield NMR signals (seeds, pharmaceutical pills) in confined spaces (rotating cylinders, shaking boxes). Excellent results for velocity and concentration of flowing and colliding particles have been obtained non-invasively. We studied flows in geometries that are otherwise impossible to study because of the optical opacity of the materials. In addition, we obtained data for diffusion and collisional losses which must be related to granular temperature. We also measured the global collisional and frictional energy loss for a rotating cylinder containing granular material and compared it to that obtained from the NMRI velocity and acceleration data. We used the same NMR technique to study the interplay between radial and axial segregation of heterogeneous particles in a partially filled rotating cylinder. We also measured flow and diffusion of vibrating particles in the NMRI apparatus to ascertain that such experiments are, indeed, possible. Some theoretical studies were initiated to explain some of the velocity profiles and free surface shapes of rotating drum flow. A direct numerical simulation of the drum flow successfully predicted a number of features, including velocity, concentration, and dissipation profiles in rotating cylinders.

  7. Anthraquinone with tailored structure for a nonaqueous metal-organic redox flow battery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-07-07

    A nonaqueous, hybrid metal-organic redox flow battery based on tailored anthraquinone structure is demonstrated to have an energy efficiency of ~82% and a specific discharge energy density similar to those of aqueous redox flow batteries, which is due to the significantly improved solubility of anthraquinone in supporting electrolytes.

  8. Origin and Control of the Flow Structure on Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Prescrtbed by ANSI Ski Z3S.18 AFOSR Final Repot 013108 ORIGIN AND CONTROL OF THE FLOW STRUCTURE ON UNMANNED COMBAT AIR VEHICLES AFOSR GRANT #FA9550-05...1991) described low-dimensional models for flows past a grooved channel and circular cylinders. By employing a Galerkin method, a governing partial

  9. Expandable and retractable self-rolled structures based on metal/polymer thin film for flow sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianzhong; White, Carl; Saadat, Mehdi; Bart-Smith, Hilary

    2015-11-01

    Most aquatic animals such as fish rely heavily on their ability of detect and respond to ambient flows in order to explore and inhabit various habitats or survive predator-prey encounters. Fish utilize neuromasts in their skin surface and lateral lines in their bodies to align themselves while swimming upstream for migration, avoid obstacles, reduce locomotion cost, and detect flow variations caused by potential predators. In this study, a thin film MEMS sensor analogous to a fish neuromast has been designed for flow sensing. Residual stress arises in many thin film materials during processing. Metal and polymer thin film materials with a significant difference in elastic modular were chosen to form a multiple-layer structure. Upon releasing, the structure rolls into a tube due to mechanical property mismatch. The self-rolled tube can expand or retract, depending on the existence of external force such as flow. An embedded strain sensor detects the deformation of the tube and hence senses the ambient flow. Numerical simulations were conducted to optimize the structural design. Experiments were performed in a flow tank to quantify the performance of the sensor. This research is supported by the Office of Naval Research under the MURI Grant N00014-14-1-0533.

  10. Three-dimensional flow structure and patterns of bed shear stress in an evolving compound meander bend

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, Frank; Rhoads, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    Compound meander bends with multiple lobes of maximum curvature are common in actively evolving lowland rivers. Interaction among spatial patterns of mean flow, turbulence, bed morphology, bank failures and channel migration in compound bends is poorly understood. In this paper, acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements of the three-dimensional (3D) flow velocities in a compound bend are examined to evaluate the influence of channel curvature and hydrologic variability on the structure of flow within the bend. Flow structure at various flow stages is related to changes in bed morphology over the study timeframe. Increases in local curvature within the upstream lobe of the bend reduce outer bank velocities at morphologically significant flows, creating a region that protects the bank from high momentum flow and high bed shear stresses. The dimensionless radius of curvature in the upstream lobe is one-third less than that of the downstream lobe, with average bank erosion rates less than half of the erosion rates for the downstream lobe. Higher bank erosion rates within the downstream lobe correspond to the shift in a core of high velocity and bed shear stresses toward the outer bank as flow moves through the two lobes. These erosion patterns provide a mechanism for continued migration of the downstream lobe in the near future. Bed material size distributions within the bend correspond to spatial patterns of bed shear stress magnitudes, indicating that bed material sorting within the bend is governed by bed shear stress. Results suggest that patterns of flow, sediment entrainment, and planform evolution in compound meander bends are more complex than in simple meander bends. Moreover, interactions among local influences on the flow, such as woody debris, local topographic steering, and locally high curvature, tend to cause compound bends to evolve toward increasing planform complexity over time rather than stable configurations.

  11. The effects of flow on schooling Devario aequipinnatus: school structure, startle response and information transmission.

    PubMed

    Chicoli, A; Butail, S; Lun, Y; Bak-Coleman, J; Coombs, S; Paley, D A

    2014-05-01

    To assess how flow affects school structure and threat detection, startle response rates of solitary and small groups of giant danio Devario aequipinnatus to visual looming stimuli were compared in flow and no-flow conditions. The instantaneous position and heading of each D. aequipinnatus was extracted from high-speed videos. Behavioural results indicate that (1) school structure is altered in flow such that D. aequipinnatus orient upstream while spanning out in a crosswise direction, (2) the probability of at least one D. aequipinnatus detecting the visual looming stimulus is higher in flow than no flow for both solitary D. aequipinnatus and groups of eight D. aequipinnatus; however, (3) the probability of three or more individuals responding is higher in no flow than in flow. These results indicate a higher probability of stimulus detection in flow but a higher probability of internal transmission of information in no flow. Finally, results were well predicted by a computational model of collective fright response that included the probability of direct detection (based on signal detection theory) and indirect detection (i.e. via interactions between group members) of threatening stimuli. This model provides a new theoretical framework for analysing the collective transfer of information among groups of fishes and other organisms.

  12. The effects of flow on schooling Devario aequipinnatus: school structure, startle response and information transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chicoli, A.; Butail, S.; Lun, Y.; Bak-Coleman, J.; Coombs, S.; Paley, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    To assess how flow affects school structure and threat detection, startle response rates of solitary and small groups of giant danio Devario aequipinnatus were compared to visual looming stimuli in flow and no-flow conditions. The instantaneous position and heading of each D. aequipinnatus were extracted from high-speed videos. Behavioural results indicate that (1) school structure is altered in flow such that D. aequipinnatus orient upstream while spanning out in a crosswise direction, (2) the probability of at least one D. aequipinnatus detecting the visual looming stimulus is higher in flow than no flow for both solitary D. aequipinnatus and groups of eight D. aequipinnatus, however, (3) the probability of three or more individuals responding is higher in no flow than flow. Taken together, these results indicate a higher probability of stimulus detection in flow but a higher probability of internal transmission of information in no flow. Finally, results were well predicted by a computational model of collective fright response that included the probability of direct detection (based on signal detection theory) and indirect detection (i.e. via interactions between group members) of threatening stimuli. This model provides a new theoretical framework for analysing the collective transfer of information among groups of fishes and other organisms. PMID:24773538

  13. Flow-induced conformational changes in gelatin structure and colloidal stabilization.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Mustafa; Reddy, Naveen K; Bechtloff, Bernd; Koltzenburg, Sebastian; Vermant, Jan; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2008-09-02

    Flow can change the rate at which solutes adsorb on surfaces by changing mass transfer to the surface, but moreover, flow can induce changes in the conformation of macromolecules in solution by providing sufficient stresses to perturb the segmental distribution function. However, there are few studies where the effect of flow on macromolecules has been shown to alter the structure of macromolecules adsorbed on surfaces. We have studied how the local energy dissipation alters the adsorption of gelatin onto polystyrene nanoparticles ( r = 85 nm). The change in the nature of the adsorbed layer is manifest in the change in the ability of the nanoparticles to resist aggregation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to assess conformational changes in gelatin, and dynamic light scattering was used to assess the colloid stability. Experiments were conducted in a vortex jet mixer where energy density and mixing times have been quantified; mixing of the gelatin and unstable nanoparticles occurs on the order of milliseconds. The adsorption of the gelatin provides steric stabilization to the nanoparticles. We found that the stability of the gelatin-adsorbed nanoparticles increased with increasing mixing velocities: when the mixing velocities were changed from 0.9 to 550 m/s, the radius of the nanoclusters (aggregates) formed 12 h after the mixing decreased from 2620 to 600 nm. Increasing temperature also gave rise to similar trends in the stability behavior with increasing temperature, leading to increasing colloid stability. Linear flow birefringence studies also suggested that the velocity fields in the mixer are sufficiently strong to produce conformational changes in the gelatin. These results suggest that the energy dissipation produced by mixing can activate conformational changes in gelatin to alter its adsorption on the surfaces of nanoparticles. Understanding how such conformational changes in gelatin can be driven by local fluid mechanics and how these changes

  14. Concentrated Flow through a Riparian Buffer: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. B.; Nogues, J. P.; Hutchinson, S. L.

    2005-05-01

    Riparian buffers are often used for in-situ treatment of agricultural runoff. Although the benefits of riparian buffers are well recongized, concentration of flow can restrict the efficiency of contaminant removal. This study evaluates flow concentration at a agricultural site near Manhattan, Kansas. Manual and automated GIS analyses of a high-resolution digital elevation model were used to determine the fraction of runoff contributing to each buffer segment. Subsequent simulation of the system in WEPP (Water Erosion and Prediction Project) demonstrates the extent to which flow concentration affects buffer efficiency. Recommendations are presented for the design of adaptive-width buffers.

  15. Three-dimensional mean flow experimental study of 'vortex unwinding'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginley, Catherine B.

    1988-01-01

    A seven-hole flow-angularity pressure probe was used to assess the effectiveness of vortex unwinding in a turbulent boundary layer. The vortex center moved in the spanwise and vertical direction with increasing longitudinal distance. Initially, the vortex moved rapidly; it achieved 60 percent of its total 41 mm spanwise travel before it had completed half of its travel in the longitudinal direction. The flow was studied behind the single vortex combined with the most successful unwinder. The unwinder was found to be very effective in reducing the amount of secondary flow in the boundary layer.

  16. Studies in Forced and Time Varying Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Chester E.

    2005-01-01

    The reasearch focused on two areas; (a) the dynamics of forced turbulent flows and (b) time filtered Large Eddy Simulations (TLES). The dynamics of turbulent flows arising from external forcing of the turbulence are poorly understood. In particular, here are many unanswered questions relating the basic dynamical balances and the existence or nonexistence of statistical equilibrium of forced turbulent flows. This research used rapid distortion theory and direct numerical simulations to explore these questions. The properties of the temporally filtered Navier-Stokes equations were also studied.

  17. Concentrated Flow through a Riparian Buffer: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. B.; Nogues, J. P.; Hutchinson, S. L.

    2004-05-01

    Riparian buffers are often used for in-situ treatment of agricultural runoff. Although the benefits of riparian buffers are well recongized, concentration of flow can restrict the efficiency of contaminant removal. This study evaluates flow concentration at a agricultural site near Manhattan, Kansas. Manual and automated GIS analyses of a high-resolution digital elevation model were used to determine the fraction of runoff contributing to each buffer segment. Subsequent simulation of the system in WEPP (Water Erosion and Prediction Project) demonstrates the extend to which flow concentration affects buffer efficiency.

  18. Parametric study on performance of cross-flow turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, C.B.; Seshadri, V.; Singh, S.N.

    1995-04-01

    In the present experimental study, the effect of blade number, nozzle entry arc, and head on the performance characteristics of a cross-flow turbine have been investigated. It has been observed that the efficiency of the turbine increases with increase in blade number, nozzle entry arc, and head. The present investigation has also shown that there is an optimum number of blades for a given nozzle entry arc beyond which the performance of the cross-flow turbine deteriorates. It has also been shown that cross-flow turbines at higher heads do not behave as pure impulse turbines.

  19. A study of vapor-liquid flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Satik, Cengiz; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    1994-01-20

    We study the heat transfer-driven liquid-to-vapor phase change in single-component systems in porous media by using pore network models and flow visualization experiments. Experiments using glass micromodels were conducted. The flow visualization allowed us to define the rules for the numerical pore network model. A numerical pore network model is developed for vapor-liquid displacement where fluid flow, heat transfer and capillarity are included at the pore level. We examine the growth process at two different boundary conditions.

  20. Advanced material distribution measurement in multiphase flows: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    George, D.L.; Ceccio, S.L.; O`Hern, T.J.; Shollenberger, K.A.; Torczynski, J.R.

    1998-08-01

    A variety of tomographic techniques that have been applied to multiphase flows are described. The methods discussed include electrical impedance tomography (EIT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT), radiative particle tracking (RDT), X-ray imaging, and acoustic tomography. Also presented is a case study in which measurements were made with EIT and GDT in two-phase flows. Both solid-liquid and gas-liquid flows were examined. EIT and GDT were applied independently to predict mean and spatially resolved phase volume fractions. The results from the two systems compared well.

  1. Computational Study of Inlet Active Flow Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    respectively. 3 Figure 2: Howard University Baseline Grid File created from Gridgen mesh Howard University also created a refined grid with... Gridgen mesh 4 Simulation Details and Results In total, three solutions were obtained from the study, one using the Howard University Baseline

  2. Flow Liner Slot Edge Replication Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    Surface replication has been proposed as a method for crack detection in space shuttle main engine flowliner slots. The results of a feasibility study show that examination of surface replicas with a scanning electron microscope can result in the detection of cracks as small as 0.005 inch, and surface flaws as small as 0.001 inch, for the flowliner material.

  3. Circumpolar Genetic Structure and Recent Gene Flow of Polar Bears: A Reanalysis.

    PubMed

    Malenfant, René M; Davis, Corey S; Cullingham, Catherine I; Coltman, David W

    2016-01-01

    Recently, an extensive study of 2,748 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from across their circumpolar range was published in PLOS ONE, which used microsatellites and mitochondrial haplotypes to apparently show altered population structure and a dramatic change in directional gene flow towards the Canadian Archipelago-an area believed to be a future refugium for polar bears as their southernmost habitats decline under climate change. Although this study represents a major international collaborative effort and promised to be a baseline for future genetics work, methodological shortcomings and errors of interpretation undermine some of the study's main conclusions. Here, we present a reanalysis of this data in which we address some of these issues, including: (1) highly unbalanced sample sizes and large amounts of systematically missing data; (2) incorrect calculation of FST and of significance levels; (3) misleading estimates of recent gene flow resulting from non-convergence of the program BayesAss. In contrast to the original findings, in our reanalysis we find six genetic clusters of polar bears worldwide: the Hudson Bay Complex, the Western and Eastern Canadian Arctic Archipelago, the Western and Eastern Polar Basin, and-importantly-we reconfirm the presence of a unique and possibly endangered cluster of bears in Norwegian Bay near Canada's expected last sea-ice refugium. Although polar bears' abundance, distribution, and population structure will certainly be negatively affected by ongoing-and increasingly rapid-loss of Arctic sea ice, these genetic data provide no evidence of strong directional gene flow in response to recent climate change.

  4. Unsteady flow structure and loading of a pitching low-aspect-ratio wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visbal, Miguel R.

    2017-02-01

    This study addresses the flow structure and unsteady loading arising over a pitching low-aspect-ratio rectangular wing under low-Reynolds-number conditions of interest in small unmanned aerial vehicle operation and gust interactions. Simulations are performed employing a high-fidelity computational approach capable of accurately capturing the complex unsteady transitional flows. The wing is pitched about its quarter-chord axis to a maximum incidence of 45∘ over time intervals ranging from four to 16 convective time scales. The Reynolds number based on the wing chord varied from 103 to 4 ×104 . For the highest pitch rate, good agreement between the computed three-dimensional (3D) flow structure and recent experimental measurements is demonstrated. The 3D dynamic stall process is characterized by the formation of an initially spanwise-oriented leading-edge vortex which evolves into an arch-type structure with legs anchored to the wing surface. The normal vorticity in the arch vortex legs establishes a low-pressure region and swirling pattern on the wing surface. A distinct characteristic of the arch vortex is its upstream propagation and persistence over the wing, postulated to be the result of the self-induced velocity of the vortex and its image underneath the plate. Increasing either pitch rate or Reynolds number promotes a more coherent arch vortex and circulation pattern, and delays the onset of stall to a higher angle of attack. Even for the lowest pitch rate considered, a significant increase in maximum lift is achieved relative to the static situation.

  5. Experimental investigation of coherent structures in turbulent pipe flow using a large-scale pipe flow facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, David

    2012-11-01

    In recent years it has been shown by various researchers, using either experimental techniques or direct numerical simulations, that coherent structures (i.e. features of the flow that persist in space and time) such as hairpin vortices, vortex packets, and very large scale motions (or superstructures) play an important role in wall-bounded turbulent flows (boundary layers, pipes and channel flows). A large-scale recirculating pipe flow facility at the University of Liverpool has been developed to enable the investigation of large and very large scale coherent motions in turbulent pipe flow. The facility includes a 100mm-diameter working section, consisting of individual modules of precision-bore borosilicate glass tubes each 1.027m long, totalling 22 metres in length. Experimental measurements using high-speed stereoscopic particle image velocimetry at approximately 210 pipe diameters downstream of the inlet are made possible using a unique mechanical arrangement for performing the calibration. Reynolds numbers of up to ReD =105 can be reached when the working fluid is water.

  6. Experimental studies of unsteady flow through compliant vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgeon, Victoria; Saloner, David; Savas, Omer

    2003-11-01

    Hemodynamic forces are a significant cause of device failure when stent-grafts are used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms and even have a strong causative relationship with the very formation and rupture of atherosclerosis. A better comprehension of the forces at play in this environment is highly desirable in furthering the understanding and treatment of aneurysmal diseases. The purpose of this experimental study is to characterize the behavior of physiologically correct pulsatile input flow in a straight compliant vessel as an analog for the behavior in an abdominal aorta. Flow visualization and particle image velocimetry are used to study the flow in simplified geometries replicating healthy and diseased segments of human abdominal aorta. The effects of external pressure are examined to shed light on the interactions between pressure differential across the vessel wall, blood flow, and vessel deformation.

  7. Experimental Studies of Unsteady Flow through Compliant Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgeon, Victoria; Tsai, William; Saloner, David; Savas, Omer

    2004-11-01

    Hemodynamic forces are a significant cause of device failure when stent-grafts are used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms and even have a causative relationship with the formation and rupture of atherosclerosis. A better comprehension of the forces at play in this environment would help further the understanding and treatment of aneurysmal diseases. In this experimental study, we characterize the behavior of physiologically correct pulsatile input flow in an straight compliant vessel as an analog for the hemodynamic behavior in an abdominal aorta. Flow visualization and particle image velocimetry are used to study the flow in simplified geometries simulating segments of human abdominal aorta in various stages of disease progression. The effects of external pressure are examined to shed light on the interactions between pressure differential across the vessel wall, blood flow, and vessel deformation.

  8. Identification of flow regimes around two staggered square cylinders by a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboueian, J.; Sohankar, A.

    2017-02-01

    The flow over two square cylinders in staggered arrangement is simulated numerically at a fixed Reynolds number (Re =150 ) for different gap spacing between cylinders from 0.1 to 6 times a cylinder side to understand the flow structures. The non-inclined square cylinders are located on a line with a staggered angle of 45° the oncoming velocity vector. All numerical simulations are carried out with a finite-volume code based on a collocated grid arrangement. The effects of vortex shedding on the various features of the flow field are numerically visualized using different flow contours such as λ 2 criterion, vorticity, pressure and magnitudes of velocity to distinguish the distinctive flow patterns. By changing the gap spacing between cylinders, five different flow regimes are identified and classified as single body, periodic gap flow, aperiodic, modulated periodic and synchronized vortex shedding regimes. This study revealed that the observed multiple frequencies in global forces of the downstream cylinder in the modulated periodic regime are more properly associated with differences in vortex shedding frequencies of individual cylinders than individual shear layers reported in some previous works; particularly, both shear layers from the downstream cylinder often shed vortices at the same multiple frequencies. The maximum Strouhal number for the upstream cylinder is also identified at {G}^{*}=1 for aperiodic flow pattern. Furthermore, for most cases studied, the downstream cylinder experiences larger drag force than the upstream cylinder.

  9. Cross flow induced vibrations in staggered arrays of cylindrical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Marn, J.

    1991-12-31

    Flow induced vibrations cause by instability is the subject of this investigation. The bulk of the work performed is theoretical in nature, the comparison with some of existing experimental data is given for each of four models described. First model encompasses the effects of prescribed motion on the cylinder. Such circumstances occur in the case of vortex shedding initiated instability. The reduced velocity within the cylinder array is low and there is no coupling between the adjacent cylinders. Second model assumes certain form of vibration and corresponding behavior of the perturbed velocity field in temporal and one of spatial coordinates thus transforming partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations and takes into account the motion of the neighboring cylinder. This corresponds to fluid elastic controlled instabilities. The resulting equations are solved analytically. The model is used for better understanding of the equations of cylinder motion as well as for quick estimates of threshold of instability. Third model relaxes an assumption about the form of vibration in spatial direction and uses the vorticity formulation of equation of fluid motion to account for fluid-solid interaction. This model analysis is of two phase (air-water mixture) flow. The void fraction distribution is found to be the single most decisive factor to determine the onset of instability for such a domain. In conclusion, two distinct mechanism were found to be responsible for flow induced vibration caused instabilities, (1) outside source controlled periodic excitation (such as vortex shedding) -- described by the first model and (2) fluid elastic forces -- described by second, third and fourth models. For the values of reduced velocity below 0.7 first model is proposed, for the values above 0.7, the rest.

  10. The structure of turbulent channel flow with passive scalar transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guezennec, Y.; Stretch, D.; Kim, J.

    1990-01-01

    The simulation of turbulent channel flow, with various passive markers, was examined to investigate the local mechanisms of passive scalar transport. We found significant differences between the local transport of heat and momentum, even when the molecular and turbulent Prandtl numbers are of order one. These discrepancies can be attributed to the role of the pressure. We also found that the heat is a poor marker of the vorticity field outside of the near wall region and that scalar transport over significant distances results from the aggregate effect of many turbulent eddies.

  11. Transonic vortical flow predicted with a structured miltiblock Euler solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, S.; Selmin, V.

    A methodology for solving the Euler equations in geometrically complex domains has been developed at Alenia (DVD). The general features of the Alenia multiblock system, which provides a grid generation and Euler solution capability for complex configuration, are discussed. A systematic multiblock grid generator has been used to make the grids. Numerical results compared with available experimental data in transonic vortical flow around delta wing, wing-body and wing-body-canard configurations with sharp leading edge are presented and explained in a physical context.

  12. Study of the Transition Flow Regime using Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, H. A.

    1999-01-01

    This NASA Cooperative Agreement presents a study of the Transition Flow Regime Using Monte Carlo Methods. The topics included in this final report are: 1) New Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) procedures; 2) The DS3W and DS2A Programs; 3) Papers presented; 4) Miscellaneous Applications and Program Modifications; 5) Solution of Transitional Wake Flows at Mach 10; and 6) Turbulence Modeling of Shock-Dominated Fows with a k-Enstrophy Formulation.

  13. Bed Stability and Debris Flow Erosion: A Dynamic "Shields Criterion" Associated with Bed Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longjas, A.; Hill, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Debris flows are mass movements that play an important role in transporting sediment from steep uplands to rivers at lower slopes. As the debris flow moves downstream, it entrains materials such as loose boulders, gravel, sand and mud deposited locally by shorter flows such as slides and rockfalls. To capture the conditions under which debris flows entrain bed sediment, some models use something akin to the Shields' criterion and an excess shear stress of the flow. However, these models typically neglect granular-scale effects in the bed which can modify the conditions under which a debris flow is erosional or depositional. For example, it is well known that repeated shearing causes denser packing in loose dry soils, which undoubtedly changes their resistance to shear. Here, we present laboratory flume experiments showing that the conditions for entrainment by debris flows is significantly dependent on the aging of an erodible bed even for narrowly distributed spherical particles. We investigate this quantitatively using particle tracking measurements to quantify instantaneous erosion rates and the evolving bed structure or "fabric". With progressive experiments we find a signature that emerges in the bed fabric that is correlated with an increasing apparent "fragility" of the bed. Specifically, a system that is originally depositional may become erosional after repeated debris flow events, and an erodible bed becomes increasingly erodible with repeated flows. We hypothesize that related effects of bed aging at the field scale may be partly responsible for the increasing destructiveness of secondary flows of landslides and debris flows.

  14. Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-01

    gradients between aquifer types are downward throughout most of the study area; however, flow from the alluvial-volcanic aquifer into the underlying carbonate aquifer, where both aquifers are present, is believed to be minor because of an intervening confining unit. Limited exchange of water between aquifer types occurs by diffuse flow through the confining unit, by focused flow along fault planes, or by direct flow where the confining unit is locally absent. Interflow between regional aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form intermediate and regional flow systems. The implications of these flow systems in controlling transport of radionuclides away from the underground test areas at the Nevada Test Site are briefly discussed. Additionally, uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers, the development of potentiometric contours, and the identification of flow systems are identified and evaluated. Eleven tributary flow systems and three larger flow systems are mapped in the Nevada Test Site area. Flow systems within the alluvial-volcanic aquifer dominate the western half of the study area, whereas flow systems within the carbonate aquifer are most prevalent in the southeastern half of the study area. Most of the flow in the regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer that moves through the underground testing area on Pahute Mesa is discharged to the land surface at springs and seeps in Oasis Valley. Flow in the regional carbonate aquifer is internally compartmentalized by major geologic structures, primarily thrust faults, which constrain flow into separate corridors. Contaminants that reach the regional carbonate aquifer from testing areas in Yucca and Frenchman Flats flow toward downgradient discharge areas through the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek Ranch or Ash Meadows flow systems and their tributaries.

  15. Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-25

    gradients between aquifer types are downward throughout most of the study area; however, flow from the alluvial-volcanic aquifer into the underlying carbonate aquifer, where both aquifers are present, is believed to be minor because of an intervening confining unit. Limited exchange of water between aquifer types occurs by diffuse flow through the confining unit, by focused flow along fault planes, or by direct flow where the confining unit is locally absent. Interflow between regional aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form intermediate and regional flow systems. The implications of these flow systems in controlling transport of radionuclides away from the underground test areas at the Nevada Test Site are briefly discussed. Additionally, uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers, the development of potentiometric contours, and the identification of flow systems are identified and evaluated. Eleven tributary flow systems and three larger flow systems are mapped in the Nevada Test Site area. Flow systems within the alluvial-volcanic aquifer dominate the western half of the study area, whereas flow systems within the carbonate aquifer are most prevalent in the southeastern half of the study area. Most of the flow in the regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer that moves through the underground testing area on Pahute Mesa is discharged to the land surface at springs and seeps in Oasis Valley. Flow in the regional carbonate aquifer is internally compartmentalized by major geologic structures, primarily thrust faults, which constrain flow into separate corridors. Contaminants that reach the regional carbonate aquifer from testing areas in Yucca and Frenchman Flats flow toward downgradient discharge areas through the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek Ranch or Ash Meadows flow systems and their tributaries.

  16. Manipulating Heat Flow through 3 Dimensional Nanoscale Phononic Crystal Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-02

    Nanoscale Phononic Crystal Structure 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA23861214047 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Baowen Li 5d...through computer simulation, how the three dimensional (3D) phononic crystal structures can confine phonon and thus reduce thermal conductivity...phononic crystal (PnC) with spherical pores, which can reduce thermal conductivity of bulk Si by a factor up to 10,000 times at room temperature. The

  17. CONNECTING STAR FORMATION QUENCHING WITH GALAXY STRUCTURE AND SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES THROUGH GRAVITATIONAL HEATING OF COOLING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fulai

    2014-12-20

    Recent observations suggested that star formation quenching in galaxies is related to galaxy structure. Here we propose a new mechanism to explain the physical origin of this correlation. We assume that while quenching is maintained in quiescent galaxies by a feedback mechanism, cooling flows in the hot halo gas can still develop intermittently. We study cooling flows in a large suite of around 90 hydrodynamic simulations of an isolated galaxy group, and find that the flow development depends significantly on the gravitational potential well in the central galaxy. If the galaxy's gravity is not strong enough, cooling flows result in a central cooling catastrophe, supplying cold gas and feeding star formation to galactic bulges. When the bulge grows prominent enough, compressional heating starts to offset radiative cooling and maintains cooling flows in a long-term hot mode without producing a cooling catastrophe. Our model thus describes a self-limited growth channel for galaxy bulges and naturally explains the connection between quenching and bulge prominence. In particular, we explicitly demonstrate that M{sub ∗}/R{sub eff}{sup 1.5} is a good structural predictor of quenching. We further find that the gravity from the central supermassive black hole also affects the bimodal fate of cooling flows, and we predict a more general quenching predictor to be M{sub bh}{sup 1.6}M{sub ∗}/R{sub eff}{sup 1.5}, which may be tested in future observational studies.

  18. Hydrodynamic Study of a Submerged Entry Nozzle with Flow Modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real-Ramirez, Cesar Augusto; Miranda-Tello, Raul; Carvajal-Mariscal, Ignacio; Sanchez-Silva, Florencio; Gonzalez-Trejo, Jesus

    2016-12-01

    The fluid flow modifier technology for continuous casting process was evaluated through numerical simulations and physical experiments in this work. In the casting of steel into the mold, the process presents liquid surface instabilities which extend along the primary cooling stage. By the use of trapezoid elements installed on the external walls of the submerged nozzle, it was observed that it is possible to obtain symmetry conditions at the top of the mold and prevent high level fluctuations. The flow modifiers have equidistant holes in the submerged surface to reduce the velocity of the liquid surface by energy and mass transfer between the generated quadrants. A flow modifier drilled with a 25 pct of the submerged surface provides stability in the mold and structural stability of the proposal is guaranteed.

  19. Hydrodynamic Study of a Submerged Entry Nozzle with Flow Modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real-Ramirez, Cesar Augusto; Miranda-Tello, Raul; Carvajal-Mariscal, Ignacio; Sanchez-Silva, Florencio; Gonzalez-Trejo, Jesus

    2017-04-01

    The fluid flow modifier technology for continuous casting process was evaluated through numerical simulations and physical experiments in this work. In the casting of steel into the mold, the process presents liquid surface instabilities which extend along the primary cooling stage. By the use of trapezoid elements installed on the external walls of the submerged nozzle, it was observed that it is possible to obtain symmetry conditions at the top of the mold and prevent high level fluctuations. The flow modifiers have equidistant holes in the submerged surface to reduce the velocity of the liquid surface by energy and mass transfer between the generated quadrants. A flow modifier drilled with a 25 pct of the submerged surface provides stability in the mold and structural stability of the proposal is guaranteed.

  20. A preliminary study to Assess Model Uncertainties in Fluid Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Oliver Delchini; Jean C. Ragusa

    2009-09-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the impact of various flow models for a simplified primary coolant loop of a light water nuclear reactor. The various fluid flow models are based on the Euler equations with an additional friction term, gravity term, momentum source, and energy source. The geometric model is purposefully chosen simple and consists of a one-dimensional (1D) loop system in order to focus the study on the validity of various fluid flow approximations. The 1D loop system is represented by a rectangle; the fluid is heated up along one of the vertical legs and cooled down along the opposite leg. A pressurizer and a pump are included in the horizontal legs. The amount of energy transferred and removed from the system is equal in absolute value along the two vertical legs. The various fluid flow approximations are compressible vs. incompressible, and complete momentum equation vs. Darcy’s approximation. The ultimate goal is to compute the fluid flow models’ uncertainties and, if possible, to generate validity ranges for these models when applied to reactor analysis. We also limit this study to single phase flows with low-Mach numbers. As a result, sound waves carry a very small amount of energy in this particular case. A standard finite volume method is used for the spatial discretization of the system.

  1. Relationships between watershed emergy flow and coastal New England salt marsh structure, function, and condition.

    PubMed

    Brandt-Williams, Sherry; Wigand, Cathleen; Campbell, Daniel E

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the link between watershed activities and salt marsh structure, function, and condition using spatial emergy flow density (areal empower density) in the watershed and field data from 10 tidal salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, RI, USA. The field-collected data were obtained during several years of vegetation, invertebrate, soil, and water quality sampling. The use of emergy as an accounting mechanism allowed disparate factors (e.g., the amount of building construction and the consumption of electricity) to be combined into a single landscape index while retaining a uniform quantitative definition of the intensity of landscape development. It expanded upon typical land use percentage studies by weighting each category for the intensity of development. At the RI salt marsh sites, an impact index (watershed emergy flow normalized for marsh area) showed significant correlations with mudflat infauna species richness, mussel density, plant species richness, the extent and density of dominant plant species, and denitrification potential within the high salt marsh. Over the 4-year period examined, a loading index (watershed emergy flow normalized for watershed area) showed significant correlations with nitrite and nitrate concentrations, as well as with the nitrogen to phosphorus ratios in stream discharge into the marshes. Both the emergy impact and loading indices were significantly correlated with a salt marsh condition index derived from intensive field-based assessments. Comparison of the emergy indices to calculated nitrogen loading estimates for each watershed also produced significant positive correlations. These results suggest that watershed emergy flow is a robust index of human disturbance and a potential tool for rapid assessment of coastal wetland condition.

  2. Spiral small-scale structures in compressible turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Thomas; Politano, Hélène; Pouquet, Annick; LarchevÊque, Michèle

    We extend the spiral vortex solution of Lundgren 1982 to compressible turbulent flows following a perfect gas law. Lundgren's model links the dynamical and spectral properties of incompressible flows, providing a k-5/3 Kolmogorov spectrum. A similar compressible spatio-temporal transformation is now derived, reducing the dynamics of three-dimensional (3D) vortices stretched by an axisymmetric incompressible strain into a 2D compressible vortex dynamics. It enables to write the 3D spectra of the incompressible and compressible square velocities u{s2/and ud2} in terms of, respectively, the 2D spectra of the enstrophy and of the square velocity divergence, by use of a temporal integration (Gomez &al. 2001). New numerical results are presented now using 10242 gridpoints; initially, the r.m.s. Mach number is 0.32, with local values up to 0.9, the Reynolds number is 1,400, and x=us2/ud2=0.1. A k-5/3 inertial behaviour is seen to result from the dynamical evolution for both the compressible and incompressible three-dimensional kinetic energy spectra.

  3. Ion flow and sheath structure near positively biased electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Ryan; Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott; Hopkins, Matthew; Barnat, Ed; Yee, Benjamin; Merlino, Robert; Skiff, Fred

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) and plasma potential were made near small positively biased electrodes using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and an emissive probe. The effect of dielectric around the electrode was tested and compared with a 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. Both measurements and simulation reveal that if the electrode is embedded within a surrounding dielectric, ions are accelerated toward the electrode to approximately 0.5 times the ion sound speed before being deflected radially by the electron sheath potential barrier. The axial potential profile in this case contains a virtual cathode. In comparison, when the surrounding dielectric is removed, both the ion flow and virtual cathode depth are dramatically reduced. These measurements suggest that the ion presheath from the dielectric may enclose the electron sheath of the electrode resulting in a virtual cathode that substantially influences the local ion flow profile. This research was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences at the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94SL85000.

  4. Versatile microbridge flow control sensor structure and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonne, Ulrich; Havey, Gary

    1992-07-01

    Availability of reliable and accurate sensors is a necessary first step in the design of control systems. This paper first describes the nature of a hot-thin-film microanemometer and then reviews its applications for Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS). This Si sensor chip measures less than 2 mm x 2 mm x 0.3 mm, consumes less than 4 mW of power, and features a 10- to 20-ms response time. For applications requiring battery operation, the average power consumption can be further reduced by more than a factor of 100 using intermittent operation. The sensor output can be expressed in STP volumetric or mass flow units; however, changes in environmental temperature or fluid composition would cause errors if left uncorrected. Such corrections have been worked out and implemented with the help of an additional sensor, so that a fully compensated flow sensor package has been achieved, with an accuracy near +1 percent over a major part of its 3000:1 dynamic range. The small mass of the 1-micron-thick sensing film makes it suitable for use in systems subject to vibration as well as for a wide range of gravitational environments, including zero-g.

  5. Canonical information flow decomposition among neural structure subsets.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daniel Y; Baccalá, Luiz A; Sameshima, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Partial directed coherence (PDC) and directed coherence (DC) which describe complementary aspects of the directed information flow between pairs of univariate components that belong to a vector of simultaneously observed time series have recently been generalized as bPDC/bDC, respectively, to portray the relationship between subsets of component vectors (Takahashi, 2009; Faes and Nollo, 2013). This generalization is specially important for neuroscience applications as one often wishes to address the link between the set of time series from an observed ROI (region of interest) with respect to series from some other physiologically relevant ROI. bPDC/bDC are limited, however, in that several time series within a given subset may be irrelevant or may even interact opposingly with respect to one another leading to interpretation difficulties. To address this, we propose an alternative measure, termed cPDC/cDC, employing canonical decomposition to reveal the main frequency domain modes of interaction between the vector subsets. We also show bPDC/bDC and cPDC/cDC are related and possess mutual information rate interpretations. Numerical examples and a real data set illustrate the concepts. The present contribution provides what is seemingly the first canonical decomposition of information flow in the frequency domain.

  6. ACCRETION OF GAS ONTO GAP-OPENING PLANETS AND CIRCUMPLANETARY FLOW STRUCTURE IN MAGNETIZED TURBULENT DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Uribe, A. L.; Klahr, H.; Henning, Th.

    2013-06-01

    We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of stellar accretion disks, using the PLUTO code, and studied the accretion of gas onto a Jupiter-mass planet and the structure of the circumplanetary gas flow after opening a gap in the disk. We compare our results with simulations of laminar, yet viscous disks with different levels of an {alpha}-type viscosity. In all cases, we find that the accretion flow across the surface of the Hill sphere of the planet is not spherically or azimuthally symmetric, and is predominantly restricted to the mid-plane region of the disk. Even in the turbulent case, we find no significant vertical flow of mass into the Hill sphere. The outer parts of the circumplanetary disk are shown to rotate significantly below Keplerian speed, independent of viscosity, while the circumplanetary disk density (therefore the angular momentum) increases with viscosity. For a simulation of a magnetized turbulent disk, where the global averaged alpha stress is {alpha}{sub MHD} = 10{sup -3}, we find the accretion rate onto the planet to be M-dot {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}M{sub J} yr{sup -1} for a gap surface density of 12 g cm{sup -2}. This is about a third of the accretion rate obtained in a laminar viscous simulation with equivalent {alpha} parameter.

  7. Comparison of Flow Structures in the Downstream Region of a Cylinder with Flexible Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekşin, Süleyman; Yayla, Sedat

    2015-05-01

    The present study investigates the details of flow structure to downstream of a circular cylinder mounted on a flat surface, in successive plan-view plane both in the boundary layer and up level region. The behavior of the flow in the wake of the bare cylinder and attached a flexible strip which has a 1400 N/mm2 modulus of elasticity vinyl PVC transperent film. The length of strip 240 mm (L/D=4) is investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique for Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter of 2500. The flow data downstream of the cylinder are presented using time-averaged velocity vector map, Vavg, streamline patterns, ψavg, vorticity contours, ωavg, and Reynolds stress correlations, u'u' avg, v'v' avg, u'v' avg and rms velocity values. The locations of the peak values of Reynolds stress correlations and other data are also presented in both bare cylinder and attached body in order to determine the regions under high fluctuations. Another L/D ratios will be investigated in other experiments.

  8. Three-Dimensional Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Flow Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Rui; Lai, Yong G.; Chandran, Krishnan B.

    2005-01-01

    The wall shear stress induced by the leaflet motion during the valve-closing phase has been implicated with thrombus initiation with prosthetic valves. Detailed flow dynamic analysis in the vicinity of the leaflets and the housing during the valve-closure phase is of interest in understanding this relationship. A three-dimensional unsteady flow analysis past bileaflet valve prosthesis in the mitral position is presented incorporating a fluid-structure interaction algorithm for leaflet motion during the valve-closing phase. Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian method is employed for incorporating the leaflet motion. The forces exerted by the fluid on the leaflets are computed and applied to the leaflet equation of motion to predict the leaflet position. Relatively large velocities are computed in the valve clearance region between the valve housing and the leaflet edge with the resulting relatively large wall shear stresses at the leaflet edge during the impact-rebound duration. Negative pressure transients are computed on the surface of the leaflets on the atrial side of the valve, with larger magnitudes at the leaflet edge during the closing and rebound as well. Vortical flow development is observed on the inflow (atrial) side during the valve impact-rebound phase in a location central to the leaflet and away from the clearance region where cavitation bubbles have been visualized in previously reported experimental studies. PMID:15636108

  9. Dynamically dominant exact coherent structures in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krygier, Michael; Grigoriev, Roman

    2016-11-01

    Unstable Exact Coherent Structures (ECS), which are solutions to the Navier-Stokes equation, provide a connection between turbulence and dynamical systems and offer a method for exploiting the low dimensionality of weakly turbulent flows. We investigate ECS in an intermittent Taylor-Couette flow (TCF) found in a small-aspect-ratio geometry with counter-rotating cylinders (η = 0 . 5 , Γ = 1 , Rei = - 1200 , Reo = 1200). The presence of end-caps breaks the axial translational symmetry of TCF, but continuous rotational symmetry remains, which suggest that typical ECS should be the relative versions of equilibria and time-periodic orbits. Indeed, previous studies (Meseguer et al., 2009 and Deguchi, Meseguer & Mellibovsky, 2014) found several unstable traveling wave solutions (relative equilibria). We have shown that the dynamically dominant ECS for weakly turbulent TCF in the small-aspect-ratio geometry are relative periodic orbits (not relative equilibria), as evidenced by the frequent visits of their neighborhoods by the turbulent flow. This work is supported by a Grant from the Army Research Office (Contract # W911NF-15-1-0471).

  10. The Structure and Evolution of an Accretion Flow Interacting with the Central Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    1995-09-01

    The mechanical and thermal structure of accretion flows interacting with the central stars via viscous stress is studied by modeling the spatial variation of dynamical viscosity with a simple one-parameter function. The latter assumption has the advantage of yielding the analytical solution of rotation laws, and the thermal balance near the disk-star interface is analyzed by means of a one-zone approximation. Based on these results, a general picture of the evolutionary changes in the accretion process is presented with the spin history of central stars taken into account. Under a constant accretion rate, there exists the maximum rotation rate of the central star which allows the structure of accretion flow in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium; it is smaller for larger accretion rates and occurs when the inflow rate of angular momentum decreases to the critical value Jdottrn, which takes the values around zero or larger, depending on the physical conditions in the flows. The equilibrium configurations with both the positive and negative inflow rate of angular momentum, as discussed by Paczynski and by Popham & Narayan are possible, in which the stellar rotation rate is no longer accelerated, and hence, the structure of accretion flow remains the same. It is shown, however, that these configurations exchange their thermal stability at this maximum rotation rate; in particular, the structures of mass accretion with the inflow rate of angular momentum below Jdottrn is secularly unstable, and hence, they cannot be realized in the course of the evolution. The evolution of the systems differs according to the stellar response to the mass accretion; corresponding to Jdottrn, there exists the critical value, Scri (≃ -3 or larger), for the changing rate of the stellar radius 5 = d log R*(t)/d log M*(t)(M* and R* being the mass and equator radius of the central star, respectively). If the central star expands or shrinks moderately during accreting mass as 5 ≥ Scri, the

  11. Entrainment-Zone Restratification and Flow Structures in Stratified Shear Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reif, B. Anders Pettersson; Werne, Joseph; Andreassen, Oyvind; Meyer, Christian; Davis-Mansour, Melissa

    2002-01-01

    Late-time dynamics and morphology of a stratified turbulent shear layer are examined using 1) Reynolds-stress and heat-flux budgets, 2) the single-point structure tensors introduced by Kassinos et al. (2001), and 3) flow visualization via 3D volume rendering. Flux reversal is observed during restratification in the edges of the turbulent layer. We present a first attempt to quantify the turbulence-mean-flow interaction and to characterize the predominant flow structures. Future work will extend this analysis to earlier times and different values of the Reynolds and Richardson numbers.

  12. Circumpolar Genetic Structure and Recent Gene Flow of Polar Bears: A Reanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Malenfant, René M.; Davis, Corey S.; Cullingham, Catherine I.; Coltman, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, an extensive study of 2,748 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from across their circumpolar range was published in PLOS ONE, which used microsatellites and mitochondrial haplotypes to apparently show altered population structure and a dramatic change in directional gene flow towards the Canadian Archipelago—an area believed to be a future refugium for polar bears as their southernmost habitats decline under climate change. Although this study represents a major international collaborative effort and promised to be a baseline for future genetics work, methodological shortcomings and errors of interpretation undermine some of the study’s main conclusions. Here, we present a reanalysis of this data in which we address some of these issues, including: (1) highly unbalanced sample sizes and large amounts of systematically missing data; (2) incorrect calculation of FST and of significance levels; (3) misleading estimates of recent gene flow resulting from non-convergence of the program BayesAss. In contrast to the original findings, in our reanalysis we find six genetic clusters of polar bears worldwide: the Hudson Bay Complex, the Western and Eastern Canadian Arctic Archipelago, the Western and Eastern Polar Basin, and—importantly—we reconfirm the presence of a unique and possibly endangered cluster of bears in Norwegian Bay near Canada’s expected last sea-ice refugium. Although polar bears’ abundance, distribution, and population structure will certainly be negatively affected by ongoing—and increasingly rapid—loss of Arctic sea ice, these genetic data provide no evidence of strong directional gene flow in response to recent climate change. PMID:26974333

  13. Lagrangian coherent structures and transport in two-dimensional incompressible flows with oceanographic and atmospheric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rypina, Irina I.

    The Lagrangian dynamics of two-dimensional incompressible fluid flows is considered, with emphasis on transport processes in atmospheric and oceanic flows. The dynamical-systems-based approach is adopted; the Lagrangian motion in such systems is studied with the aid of Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) theory, and results relating to stable and unstable manifolds and lobe dynamics. Some nontrivial extensions of well-known results are discussed, and some extensions of the theory are developed. In problems for which the flow field consists of a steady background on which a time-dependent perturbation is superimposed, it is shown that transport barriers arise naturally and play a critical role in transport processes. Theoretical results are applied to the study of transport in measured and simulated oceanographic and atmospheric flows. Two particular problems are considered. First, we study the Lagrangian dynamics of the zonal jet at the perimeter of the Antarctic Stratospheric Polar Vortex during late winter/early spring within which lies the "ozone hole". In this system, a robust transport barrier is found near the core of a zonal jet under typical conditions, which is responsible for trapping of the ozone-depleted air within the ozone hole. The existence of such a barrier is predicted theoretically and tested numerically with use of a dynamically-motivated analytically-prescribed model. The second, oceanographic, application considered is the study of the surface transport in the Adriatic Sea. The surface flow in the Adriatic is characterized by a robust three-gyre background circulation pattern. Motivated by this observation, the Lagrangian dynamics of a perturbed three-gyre system is studied, with emphasis on intergyre transport and the role of transport barriers. It is shown that a qualitative change in transport properties, accompanied by a qualitative change in the structure of stable and unstable manifolds occurs in the perturbed three-gyre system when the

  14. Effect of Relative Submergence on the Flow Structure in the Wake of Wall-Mounted Spherical Obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajimirzaie, Seyed; Tsakiris, Achilleas; Buchholz, James; Papanicolaou, Athanasios

    2012-11-01

    To understand the flow around submerged boulders in open channels, a study of a spherical obstacle on a rough bed in shallow open channel is conducted. In steep mountain streams, relative submergence (d/H, d being flow depth and H obstacle height) is introduced. In this study, through the use of PIV and thermal anemometry, the flow field surrounding a wall-mounted sphere with diameter D=5cm in two different relative submergences has been investigated on a smooth plate as a boundary layer (BL) as well as on a rough bed in shallow open channel flow. Flow patterns (velocity, vorticity) in the streamwise symmetry plane are different between the open channel and BL flow. Streamwise features are observed in the mean wakes of the sphere. In high relative submergence, an upwash (base structure) is observed in the wake of sphere in open channel flow but not in BL tests. The horseshoe vortex is not observed in the wake of the sphere in either case. Dye visualization, spectral analysis and cross-correlation show in d/H <=1, the wake in both cases has the appearance of a Karman vortex street, while in d/H > 1, the wakes are quite symmetric. A weak dominant shedding frequency is observed in BL experiments with a Strouhal number of St=fsD/U ~0.35. This work is supported by NSF grant number CBET-1033732.

  15. Experimental study of periodic flow effects on spanwise vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Molina, Cruz Daniel; Lopez Sanchez, Erick Javier; Ruiz Chavarria, Gerardo; Medina Ovando, Abraham

    2014-11-01

    We present an experimental study about the spanwise vortex produced in a flow going out of a channel in shallow waters. This vortex travels in front of the dipole. The velocity field measurement was done using the PIV technique, and DPIVsoft (https://www.irphe.fr/ ~meunier/) was used for data processing. In this case the flow has a periodic forcing to simulate ocean tides. The experiment was conducted in a channel with variable width and the measurements were made using three different values of the aspect ratio width-depth. We present results of the position, circulation of this spanwise vortex and the flow inversion effect. The change of flow direction modify the intensity of the vortex, but it does not destroy it. The vertical components of the velocity field contributes particle transport. G. Ruiz Chavarria, E. J. Lopez Sanchez and C. D. Garcia Molina acknowledge DGAPA-UNAM by support under project IN 116312 (Vorticidad y ondas no lineales en fluidos).

  16. Numerical Study of Tokamak Equilibrium with Toroidal Flow on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Qilong; Zhang, Cheng

    2006-09-01

    The effect of the toroidal flow on the equilibrium of tokamak plasmas is a sensitive point for high performance plasma and its precise control. In this paper the effect is studied numerically using the EFIT (Equilibrium Fitting) code on EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak). Firstly, the numerical calculation exhibits a clear outward shift of pressure contour from the magnetic surfaces in the plasma core and the shift grows with the increase of the toroidal velocity. The peak shift of 8% is observed when the ratio between the plasma velocity and the Alfvén speed equals to 0.15. Secondly, it is shown that the magnetic surfaces shift outwards from those without flow. With a certain plasma current the safety factor on the magnetic axis decreases as the plasma flow velocity increases. The magnetic shear increases about 10% on the plasma boundary compared with the case without flow.

  17. Systematic study of source mask optimization and verification flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, Yu; Latypov, Azat; Chua, Gek Soon; Zou, Yi

    2012-06-01

    Source mask optimization (SMO) emerged as powerful resolution enhancement technique (RET) for advanced technology nodes. However, there is a plethora of flow and verification metrics in the field, confounding the end user of the technique. Systemic study of different flows and the possible unification thereof is missing. This contribution is intended to reveal the pros and cons of different SMO approaches and verification metrics, understand the commonality and difference, and provide a generic guideline for RET selection via SMO. The paper discusses 3 different type of variations commonly arise in SMO, namely pattern preparation & selection, availability of relevant OPC recipe for freeform source and finally the metrics used in source verification. Several pattern selection algorithms are compared and advantages of systematic pattern selection algorithms are discussed. In the absence of a full resist model for SMO, alternative SMO flow without full resist model is reviewed. Preferred verification flow with quality metrics of DOF and MEEF is examined.

  18. Complex Dynamic Flows in Solar Flare Sheet Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David E.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Savage, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Observations of high-energy emission from solar flares often reveal the presence of large sheet-like structures, sometimes extending over a space comparable to the Sun's radius. Given that these structures are found between a departing coronal mass ejection and the post-eruption flare arcade, it is natural to associate the structure with a current sheet; though the relationship is unclear. Moreover, recent high-resolution observations have begun to reveal that the motions in this region are highly complex, including reconnection outflows, oscillations, and apparent wakes and eddies. We present a detailed first look at the complicated dynamics within this supra-arcade plasma, and consider implications for the interrelationship between the plasma and its embedded magnetic field.

  19. Investigation of structure of superconducting power transmission cables with LN2 counter-flow cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuse, Mitsuho; Fuchino, Shuichiro; Higuchi, Noboru

    2003-04-01

    Establishment of long-distance cooling techniques and design of a compact cross section are required for development of HTC superconducting underground power cables. To save space of return coolant, a counter-flow cooling system appears promising. However, it is difficult to cool down long cables because of heat exchange between counter-flows due to high thermal conductivity of dielectric materials which separate both flows in range of liquid nitrogen temperature. We estimated temperature distributions analytically along model HTS power cables with counter-flow. Results of calculation showed that when liquid-nitrogen-impregnated polypropylene laminated paper was chosen for a dielectric material, great thickness was required to reduce heat exchange between counter-flows. We investigated various cable structures to optimize the counter-flow cooling system and cable size.

  20. Structural optimization of porous media for fast and controlled capillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Dahua; Fan, Jintu

    2015-05-01

    A general quantitative model of capillary flow in homogeneous porous media with varying cross-sectional sizes is presented. We optimize the porous structure for the minimization of the penetration time under global constraints. Programmable capillary flows with constant volumetric flow rate and linear evolution of flow distance to time are also obtained. The controlled innovative flow behaviors are derived based on a dynamic competition between capillary force and viscous resistance. A comparison of dynamic transport on the basis of the present design with Washburn's equation is presented. The regulation and maximization of flow velocity in porous materials is significant for a variety of applications including biomedical diagnostics, oil recovery, microfluidic transport, and water management of fabrics.

  1. Efficient blood flow visualization using flowline extraction and opacity modulation based on vascular structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ohjae; Lee, Jeongjin; Kim, Bohyoung; Shin, Juneseuk; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2017-03-01

    With the recent advances regarding the acquisition and simulation of blood flow data, blood flow visualization has been widely used in medical imaging for the diagnosis and treatment of pathological vessels. In this paper, we present a novel method for the visualization of the blood flow in vascular structures. The vessel inlet or outlet is first identified using the orthogonality metric between the normal vectors of the flow velocity and vessel surface. Then, seed points are generated on the identified inlet or outlet by Poisson disk sampling. Therefore, it is possible to achieve the automatic seeding that leads to a consistent and faster flow depiction by skipping the manual location of a seeding plane for the initiation of the line integration. In addition, the early terminated line integration in the thin curved vessels is resolved through the adaptive application of the tracing direction that is based on the flow direction at each seed point. Based on the observation that blood flow usually follows the vessel track, the representative flowline for each branch is defined by the vessel centerline. Then, the flowlines are rendered through an opacity assignment according to the similarity between their shape and the vessel centerline. Therefore, the flowlines that are similar to the vessel centerline are shown transparently, while the different ones are shown opaquely. Accordingly, the opacity modulation method enables the flowlines with an unusual flow pattern to appear more noticeable, while the visual clutter and line occlusion are minimized. Finally, Hue-Saturation-Value color coding is employed for the simultaneous exhibition of flow attributes such as local speed and residence time. The experiment results show that the proposed technique is suitable for the depiction of the blood flow in vascular structures. The proposed approach is applicable to many kinds of tubular structures with embedded flow information.

  2. Flow Structures and Effects of Spatial Resolution on Turbulence Statistics in Rough Wall Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph; Hong, Jiarong; Schultz, Michael

    2009-11-01

    PIV data obtained in the roughness sublayer of a turbulent channel flow is used for examining effects of spatial resolution on the magnitude, distribution, and trends of Reynolds stresses. Starting with a vector spacing of 63um (9-12 wall units), for roughness consisting of 0.45mm high pyramids at Reτ=3400-5418, spatial filtering of data causes major reduction in the magnitude of Reynolds stresses in the roughness sublayer. Although these reductions extend to well above the log layer, they increase with decreasing distance from the wall, especially for terms involving the wall-normal velocity fluctuation component, but also for the streamwise component. As expected, these effects increase with filter size, and are much higher for 2D filters in comparison to 1D ones. Consequently, trends of Reynolds stresses, and even mean flow profile vary significantly with filter properties. Spatial energy spectra and distributions of 2D swirling strength show the increasing role of small scale eddies on 2^nd order statistics as the wall is approached, which is attenuated by filtering.

  3. Finite element methods of studying mechanical factors in blood flow.

    PubMed

    Davids, N

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews some biomechanical analyses of blood flow in large arteries based on a general computer modeling using the finite element method. We study the following question: What is the role played by the interrelated factors of mechanical stress, flow irregularities, and diffusion through the endothelium on the etiology of atherosclerosis or the aggravation of vascular injury. It presents the computational features of the method and stresses the physiological significance of the results, such as the effect of geometric complexities, material nonlinearities, and non-Newtonian rheology of the blood. The specific mechanical and fluid dynamic factors analyzed are wall shear stress, flow profiles, and pressure variations. After simulating tubes of circular cross section, we apply the analysis to a number of physiological situations of significance, including blood flow in the entrance region, at bifurcations, in the annular region between an inserted catheter of varying diameter and the vessel. A model study of pulsatile flow in a 60 degree bifurcated channel of velocity profiles provided corroborative measurements of these processes with special emphasis on reversed or distributed flow conditions. The corresponding analysis was extended to the situation in which flow separates and reverses in the neighborhood of stagnation points. This required developing the nonlinear expression for the convective velocity change in the medium. A computer algorithm was developed to handle simultaneous effects of pressure and viscous forces on velocity change across the element and applied to the canine prebranch arterial segment. For mean physiological flow conditions, low shear stresses (0-10 dynes/cm2) are predicted near the wall in the diverging plane, higher values (50 dynes/cm2) along the converging sides of the wall. Backflow is predicted along the outer wall, pressure recovery prior to and into the branches, and a peak shear at the divider lip.

  4. Use of schlieren methods to study gas flow in laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrňa, Libor; Pavelka, Jan; Horník, Petr; Hrabovský, Jozef

    2016-11-01

    Laser technologies such as welding and cutting rely on process gases. We suggest to use schlieren imaging to visualize the gas flow during these processes. During the process of laser welding, the shielding gas flows to the welded area to prevent oxidation of the weld pool by surrounding air. The gas also interacts with hot plasma spurting from the key hole induced by the laser beam incident on the molten material. This interaction is quite complicated because hot plasma mixes with the cold shielding gas while the system is moving along the weld. Three shielding gases were used in the presented experiment: Ar, He and N2. Differences in dynamics of the flow are clearly visible on schlieren images. Moreover, high speed recording reveals a structure consisting of hot gas bubbles. We were also able to determine the velocity of the bubbles from the recording. During laser cutting, the process gas flows coaxially with the laser beam from the nozzle to remove the molten material out of the kerf. The gas flow is critical for the quality of the resulting edge of the cut. Schlieren method was used to study gas flow under the nozzle and then under the material being cut. This actually creates another slot nozzle. Due to the very low speed of flow below the material the schleiren method is already at the limit of its sensitivity. Therefore, it is necessary to apply a differential technique to increase the contrast. Distinctive widening of the flow shaped by the kerf was observed.

  5. The near-wall structure of the vorticity field in atmospheric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamman, Curtis; Moin, Parviz

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by suggestions that long-lived, coherent structures are regions of high helicity (ω-> . u->) and low dissipation, Rogers & Moin (1987, PoF) examined the helicity field in turbulent channel flow, and did not find evidence to support this helicity conjecture. They concluded, however, that buoyancy forces may preferentially and chronically concentrate cork-screw eddies in wall turbulence. We examine this hypothesis by studying numerical simulation databases of thermal convection with a mean flow in large-aspect ratio channels. Roll cells generated by buoyancy forces in the bulk are contrasted with near-wall, hairpin-like vortices sustained by mean shear. At moderate bulk Richardson numbers, near-wall helicity fluctuations increase showing strong peaks in relative helicity density pdfs but less so in regions of low dissipation. Transverse strain imposed by erupting and impinging thermal plumes embedded in the streamwise-aligned, large-scale circulation is found to tilt these hairpin packets in a herringbone pattern reducing the local turbulence production but increasing the local turbulent dissipation as in 3D turbulent boundary layers. Recent simulations and implications for understanding large-eddy structures in PBLs using LES are discussed.

  6. Flow Structure and Turbulence Characteristics downstream of a Spanwise Suspended Linear Canopy through Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jundong; Delavan, Sarah

    2014-11-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to explore the mean flow structure and turbulence properties downstream of a spanwise suspended linear canopy in a 2-D open channel flow using the Particle Tracking Velocimetry technique. This canopy simulated the effect of one long-line structure of a mussel farm. Four experimental scenarios with the approach velocities 50, 80, 110, and 140 mm s-1 were under investigation. Three sub-layers formed downstream of the canopy. An internal canopy layer, where the time-averaged velocity decreases linearly with increasing distance downstream, a canopy mixing layer increasing in vertical extent with increasing distance downstream of the canopy, and an external canopy layer with higher velocity under the canopy, which may bring nutrients from the local ambient environment into this layer. The canopy turbulence results in upward momentum transport downstream of the canopy within a distance of 0.60 of the canopy depth and downward momentum transport beyond 1.20 of it. In the scenarios with relatively lower approach velocities 50 and 80 mm s1 , the wake turbulence results in upward momentum transport. The broader goal of this study is to offer guidelines for the design and site selection of more productive mussel farms. The results suggest that distance interval between the parallel long-lines in a mussel farm should be less than 0.6 times the height of a long-line dropper. Also, potential farm locations that are characterized with current velocity from 50 to 80 mm s1 are suggested.

  7. Characterization of Unsteady Flow Structures Near Leading-Edge Slat. Part 1; PIV Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Choudhari, Meelan

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive computational and experimental study has been performed at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) Program to investigate the unsteady flow near a leading-edge slat of a two-dimensional, high-lift system. This paper focuses on the experimental effort conducted in the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART) where Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) data was acquired in the slat cove and at the slat trailing edge of a three-element, high-lift model at 4, 6, and 8 degrees angle of attack and a freestream Mach Number of 0.17. Instantaneous velocities obtained from PIV images are used to obtain mean and fluctuating components of velocity and vorticity. The data show the recirculation in the cove, reattachment of the shear layer on the slat lower surface, and discrete vortical structures within the shear layer emanating from the slat cusp and slat trailing edge. Detailed measurements are used to examine the shear layer formation at the slat cusp, vortex shedding at the slat trailing edge, and convection of vortical structures through the slat gap. Selected results are discussed and compared with unsteady, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) computations for the same configuration in a companion paper by Khorrami, Choudhari, and Jenkins (2004). The experimental dataset provides essential flow-field information for the validation of near-field inputs to noise prediction tools.

  8. Computational Study of Separating Flow in a Planar Subsonic Diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DalBello, Teryn; Dippold, Vance, III; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2005-01-01

    A computational study of the separated flow through a 2-D asymmetric subsonic diffuser has been performed. The Wind Computational Fluid Dynamics code is used to predict the separation and reattachment behavior for an incompressible diffuser flow. The diffuser inlet flow is a two-dimensional, turbulent, and fully-developed channel flow with a Reynolds number of 20,000 based on the centerline velocity and the channel height. Wind solutions computed with the Menter SST, Chien k-epsilon, Spalart-Allmaras and Explicit Algebraic Reynolds Stress turbulence models are compared with experimentally measured velocity profiles and skin friction along the upper and lower walls. In addition to the turbulence model study, the effects of grid resolution and use of wall functions were investigated. The grid studies varied the number of grid points across the diffuser and varied the initial wall spacing from y(sup +) = 0.2 to 60. The wall function study assessed the applicability of wall functions for analysis of separated flow. The SST and Explicit Algebraic Stress models provide the best agreement with experimental data, and it is recommended wall functions should only be used with a high level of caution.

  9. Structure formation in a colliding flow: The Herschel view of the Draco nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Salomé, Q.; Martin, P. G.; Joncas, G.; Blagrave, K.; Dassas, K.; Abergel, A.; Beelen, A.; Boulanger, F.; Lagache, G.; Lockman, F. J.; Marshall, D. J.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The Draco nebula is a high Galactic latitude interstellar cloud observed at velocities corresponding to the intermediate velocity cloud regime. This nebula shows unusually strong CO emission and remarkably high-contrast small-scale structures for such a diffuse high Galactic latitude cloud. The 21 cm emission of the Draco nebula reveals that it is likely to have been formed by the collision of a cloud entering the disk of the Milky Way. Such physical conditions are ideal to study the formation of cold and dense gas in colliding flows of diffuse and warm gas. Aims: The objective of this study is to better understand the process of structure formation in a colliding flow and to describe the effects of matter entering the disk on the interstellar medium. Methods: We conducted Herschel-SPIRE observations of the Draco nebula. The clumpfind algorithm was used to identify and characterize the small-scale structures of the cloud. Results: The high-resolution SPIRE map reveals the fragmented structure of the interface between the infalling cloud and the Galactic layer. This front is characterized by a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability structure. From the determination of the typical length of the periodic structure (2.2 pc) we estimated the gas kinematic viscosity. This allowed us to estimate the dissipation scale of the warm neutral medium (0.1 pc), which was found to be compatible with that expected if ambipolar diffusion were the main mechanism of turbulent energy dissipation. The statistical properties of the small-scale structures identified with clumpfind are found to be typical of that seen in molecular clouds and hydrodynamical turbulence in general. The density of the gas has a log-normal distribution with an average value of 103 cm-3. The typical size of the structures is 0.1-0.2 pc, but this estimate is limited by the resolution of the observations. The mass of these structures ranges from 0.2 to 20 M⊙ and the distribution of the more massive structures

  10. Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    X. Sun; S. Kim; L. Cheng; M. Ishii; S.G. Beus

    2001-10-31

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in a cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 20-cm in width and 1-cm in gap. The miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions.

  11. Development of Interfacial Structure