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Sample records for subcellular distribution

  1. Subcellular distribution of potassium in striated muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Edelmann, L.

    1984-01-01

    Microanalytical experiments have been performed to answer the question whether the main cellular cation, K+, follows the water distribution in the striated muscle cell or whether K+ follows the distribution of negative fixed charges (beta- and gamma-carboxyl groups of aspartic and glutamic acid residues). Subcellular localization of K and/or of the K surrogates Rb, Cs, and Tl has been investigated by the following methods: Chemical precipitation of K with tetraphenylborate. Autoradiography of alkali-metals and Tl in air-dried and frozen-hydrated preparations. TEM visualization of electron dense Cs and Tl in sections of freeze-dried and plastic embedded muscle. X-ray microanalysis of air-dried myofibrils and muscle cryosections. The experiments consistently show that K, Rb, Cs, and Tl do not follow the water distribution but are mainly accumulated in the A band, especially in the marginal regions, and at Z lines. The same sites preferentially accumulate Cs or uranyl cations when sections of freeze-dried, embedded muscle are exposed to these electron microscopic stains. It is concluded that the detected uneven distribution of K, Rb, Cs, and Tl in muscle is neither a freeze-drying artifact nor an embedding artifact and may result from a weak ion binding to the beta- and gamma-carboxyl groups of cellular proteins.

  2. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-02-25

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators.We find it could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.

  3. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    PubMed Central

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-01-01

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators. It could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies. PMID:26911251

  4. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-02-01

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators. It could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.

  5. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    DOE PAGES

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; ...

    2016-02-25

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cdmore » (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators.We find it could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.« less

  6. Immunocytochemical determination of the subcellular distribution of ascorbate in plants

    PubMed Central

    Stumpe, M.; Mauch, F.

    2010-01-01

    Ascorbate is an important antioxidant in plants and fulfills many functions related to plant defense, redox signaling and modulation of gene expression. We have analyzed the subcellular distribution of reduced and oxidized ascorbate in leaf cells of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum by high-resolution immuno electron microscopy. The accuracy and specificity of the applied method is supported by several observations. First, preadsorption of the ascorbate antisera with ascorbic acid or dehydroascorbic acid resulted in the reduction of the labeling to background levels. Second, the overall labeling density was reduced between 50 and 61% in the ascorbate-deficient Arabidopsis mutants vtc1-2 and vtc2-1, which correlated well with biochemical measurements. The highest ascorbate-specific labeling was detected in nuclei and the cytosol whereas the lowest levels were found in vacuoles. Intermediate labeling was observed in chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes. This method was used to determine the subcellular ascorbate distribution in leaf cells of plants exposed to high light intensity, a stress factor that is well known to cause an increase in cellular ascorbate concentration. High light intensities resulted in a strong increase in overall labeling density. Interestingly, the strongest compartment-specific increase was found in vacuoles (fourfold) and in plastids (twofold). Ascorbate-specific labeling was restricted to the matrix of mitochondria and to the stroma of chloroplasts in control plants but was also detected in the lumen of thylakoids after high light exposure. In summary, this study reveals an improved insight into the subcellular distribution of ascorbate in plants and the method can now be applied to determine compartment-specific changes in ascorbate in response to various stress situations. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00425-010-1275-x) contains supplementary material, which is available

  7. Subcellular Distribution of Glutathione Precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Koffler, Barbara Eva; Maier, Romana; Zechmann, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glutathione is an important antioxidant and has many important functions in plant development, growth and defense. Glutathione synthesis and degradation is highly compartment-specific and relies on the subcellular availability of its precursors, cysteine, glutamate, glycine and γ-glutamylcysteine especially in plastids and the cytosol which are considered as the main centers for glutathione synthesis. The availability of glutathione precursors within these cell compartments is therefore of great importance for successful plant development and defense. The aim of this study was to investigate the compartment-specific importance of glutathione precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The subcellular distribution was compared between wild type plants (Col-0), plants with impaired glutathione synthesis (glutathione deficient pad2-1 mutant, wild type plants treated with buthionine sulfoximine), and one complemented line (OE3) with restored glutathione synthesis. Immunocytohistochemistry revealed that the inhibition of glutathione synthesis induced the accumulation of the glutathione precursors cysteine, glutamate and glycine in most cell compartments including plastids and the cytosol. A strong decrease could be observed in γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) contents in these cell compartments. These experiments demonstrated that the inhibition of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) – the first enzyme of glutathione synthesis – causes a reduction of γ-EC levels and an accumulation of all other glutathione precursors within the cells. PMID:22050910

  8. Tissue distribution and subcellular localization of hyaluronan synthase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Törrönen, Kari; Nikunen, Kaisa; Kärnä, Riikka; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Rilla, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan synthases (HAS) are unique plasma membrane glycosyltransferases secreting this glycosaminoglycan directly to the extracellular space. The three HAS isoenzymes (HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3) expressed in mammalian cells differ in their enzymatic properties and regulation by external stimuli, but clearly distinct functions have not been established. To overview the expression of different HAS isoenzymes during embryonic development and their subcellular localization, we immunostained mouse embryonic samples and cultured cells with HAS antibodies, correlating their distribution to hyaluronan staining. Their subcellular localization was further studied by GFP-HAS fusion proteins. Intense hyaluronan staining was observed throughout the development in the tissues of mesodermal origin, like heart and cartilages, but also for example during the maturation of kidneys and stratified epithelia. In general, staining for one or several HASs correlated with hyaluronan staining. The staining of HAS2 was most widespread, both spatially and temporally, correlating with hyaluronan staining especially in early mesenchymal tissues and heart. While epithelial cells were mostly negative for HASs, stratified epithelia became HAS positive during differentiation. All HAS isoenzymes showed cytoplasmic immunoreactivity, both in tissue sections and cultured cells, while plasma membrane staining was also detected, often in cellular extensions. HAS1 had brightest signal in Golgi, HAS3 in Golgi and microvillous protrusions, whereas most of the endogenous HAS2 immunoreactivity was localized in the ER. This differential pattern was also observed with transfected GFP-HASs. The large proportion of intracellular HASs suggests that HAS forms a reserve that is transported to the plasma membrane for rapid activation of hyaluronan synthesis.

  9. Subcellular distribution of an inhalational anesthetic in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Eckenhoff, R.G.; Shuman, H. )

    1990-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms and sites of anesthetic action, we determined the subcellular partitioning of halothane in a tissue model. A method was found to fix the in vivo distribution of halothane in rat atrial tissue for subsequent electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis. Atrial strips were exposed to various concentrations of halothane, rapidly frozen, cryo-sectioned, and cryo-transferred into an electron microscope. Irradiation of the hydrated cryosections with the electron beam caused halothane radiolysis, which allowed retention of the halogen-containing fragments after dehydration of the sections. The bromine from halothane was detected and quantified with x-ray microanalysis in various microregions of atrial myocytes. Halothane (bromine) partitioned largely to mitochondria, with progressively lower concentrations in sarcolemma, nuclear membrane, cytoplasm, sarcomere, and nucleus. Partitioning could not be explained solely by distribution of cellular lipid, suggesting significant and differential physicochemical solubility in protein. However, we found no saturable compartment in atrial myocytes within the clinical concentration range, which implies little specific protein binding.

  10. Characterization and subcellular distribution of somatogenic receptor in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Husman, B.; Andersson, G.; Norstedt, G.; Gustafsson, J.A.

    1985-06-01

    Binding of (/sup 125/I)iodobovine GH ((/sup 125/I)iodo-bGH) to rat liver microsomes and Golgi/endosomal fractions isolated from male and female rats has been characterized. Binding of bGH to a pure somatogenic site was suggested by the finding that 50% inhibition of (/sup 125/I)iodo-bGH binding required 5-130 ng bGH, rGH, or hGH/incubation, while around 500 ng rat PRL/incubation were needed to obtain the same effect. Binding of (/sup 125/I)iodo-bGH to microsomes and Golgi/endosomes was time, temperature, and protein dependent. Maximal specific binding occurred at 15-16 and 15-20 h at 22 C in Golgi and microsomal membranes, respectively. Subcellular distribution studies demonstrated in the Golgi/endosomal fractions compared to the total particulate fraction, while residual microsomes devoid of Golgi/endosomal-derived components were approximately 2-fold enriched. Low levels of somatogenic receptors were detected in lysosome-enriched fractions. Removal of endogenous ligand by treating Golgi/endosomal membranes with 3M MgCl/sub 2/ increased specific binding of bGH about 2- to 3-fold. These results indicate that approximately 50% of specific somatogenic binding sites in the low density fractions represent internalized ligand-receptor complexes. The level of rat liver somatogenic receptors did not show a pronounced sex differentiation; however, an endocrine dependence of somatogenic receptor levels is suggested by the finding that livers from rats in the late stages of pregnancy had a level of somatogenic receptors exceeding that of nonpregnant rats.

  11. Subcellular distribution and translocation of radionuclides in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gouthu, S.; Weginwar, R.; Arie, Tsutomu; Ambe, Shizuko; Ozaki, Takuo; Enomoto, Shuichi; Ambe, Fumitoshi; Yamaguchi, Isamu

    1999-09-01

    The subcellular distribution of radionuclides in Glycine max Merr. (soybean) and Cucumis sativus L. (cucumber) and translocation of plant absorbed radionuclides with growth in soybean were studied. More than 60% of cellular incorporated Rb{sup {minus}83}, Sr{sup {minus}85}, Mn{sup {minus}54}, Nb{sup {minus}95}, and Se{sup {minus}75} remained in the supernatant fraction; 55% and 20% of Cr{sup {minus}51} was bound to soybean and cucumber cell wall fractions, respectively; 70% or more of Be{sup {minus}7}, Y{sup {minus}88}, and Fe{sup {minus}59} was fixed in the chloroplast fraction; and approx. 10% of Sc{sup {minus}46}, Fe{sup {minus}59}, V{sup {minus}48}, and As were fixed in the mitochondrial fraction. Translocation of nuclides within the soybean plant at different stages of growth has been determined. Vanadium, Y{sup {minus}88}, Be{sup {minus}7}, Se{sup {minus}75}, Nb{sup {minus}95}, Sc{sup {minus}46}, Cr{sup {minus}51}, and Zr{sup {minus}88} were predominantly accumulated in the root. Although the total percentage of plant uptake of Sc{sup {minus}46}, Zr{sup {minus}88}, Nb{sup {minus}95}, Sc{sup {minus}46}, and Cr{sup {minus}51} was high, because of low mobility and translocation to shoot, their accumulation in the fruit fraction was negligible. The translocation of mobile nuclides in plants was demonstrated clearly by Rb{sup {minus}83}, Zn{sup {minus}65}, and Fe{sup {minus}59}. Data on the nuclide fraction mobilized from vegetative parts into edible parts was used to assess the percentage of accumulated radionuclides in plants that may reach humans through beans.

  12. Sub-cellular distribution and translocation of TRP channels.

    PubMed

    Toro, Carlos A; Arias, Luis A; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Cellular electrical activity is the result of a highly complex processes that involve the activation of ion channel proteins. Ion channels make pores on cell membranes that rapidly transit between conductive and non-conductive states, allowing different ions to flow down their electrochemical gradients across cell membranes. In the case of neuronal cells, ion channel activity orchestrates action potentials traveling through axons, enabling electrical communication between cells in distant parts of the body. Somatic sensation -our ability to feel touch, temperature and noxious stimuli- require ion channels able to sense and respond to our peripheral environment. Sensory integration involves the summing of various environmental cues and their conversion into electrical signals. Members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family of ion channels have emerged as important mediators of both cellular sensing and sensory integration. The regulation of the spatial and temporal distribution of membrane receptors is recognized as an important mechanism for controlling the magnitude of the cellular response and the time scale on which cellular signaling occurs. Several studies have shown that this mechanism is also used by TRP channels to modulate cellular response and ultimately fulfill their physiological function as sensors. However, the inner-working of this mode of control for TRP channels remains poorly understood. The question of whether TRPs intrinsically regulate their own vesicular trafficking or weather the dynamic regulation of TRP channel residence on the cell surface is caused by extrinsic changes in the rates of vesicle insertion or retrieval remain open. This review will examine the evidence that sub-cellular redistribution of TRP channels plays an important role in regulating their activity and explore the mechanisms that control the trafficking of vesicles containing TRP channels.

  13. The subcellular distribution of small molecules: from pharmacokinetics to synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Nan; Tsai, Hobart Ng; Zhang, Xinyuan; Rosania, Gus R

    2011-10-03

    The systemic pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of small molecules are determined by subcellular transport phenomena. Although approaches used to study the subcellular distribution of small molecules have gradually evolved over the past several decades, experimental analysis and prediction of cellular pharmacokinetics remains a challenge. In this review, we survey the progress of subcellular distribution research since the 1960s, with a focus on the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of the various experimental techniques. Critical review of the existing body of knowledge points to many opportunities to advance the rational design of organelle-targeted chemical agents. These opportunities include (1) development of quantitative, non-fluorescence-based, whole cell methods and techniques to measure the subcellular distribution of chemical agents in multiple compartments; (2) exploratory experimentation with nonspecific transport probes that have not been enriched with putative, organelle-targeting features; (3) elaboration of hypothesis-driven, mechanistic and modeling-based approaches to guide experiments aimed at elucidating subcellular distribution and transport; and (4) introduction of revolutionary conceptual approaches borrowed from the field of synthetic biology combined with cutting edge experimental strategies. In our laboratory, state-of-the-art subcellular transport studies are now being aimed at understanding the formation of new intracellular membrane structures in response to drug therapy, exploring the function of drug-membrane complexes as intracellular drug depots, and synthesizing new organelles with extraordinary physical and chemical properties.

  14. Subcellular glucose exposure biases the spatial distribution of insulin granules in single pancreatic beta cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, Kyohei; Gel, Murat; Okonogi, Atsuhito; Fuke, Ariko; Okitsu, Teru; Tada, Takashi; Suzuki, Takaaki; Nagamatsu, Shinya; Washizu, Masao; Kotera, Hidetoshi

    2014-02-01

    In living tissues, a cell is exposed to chemical substances delivered partially to its surface. Such a heterogeneous chemical environment potentially induces cell polarity. To evaluate this effect, we developed a microfluidic device that realizes spatially confined delivery of chemical substances at subcellular resolution. Our microfluidic device allows simple setup and stable operation for over 4 h to deliver chemicals partially to a single cell. Using the device, we showed that subcellular glucose exposure triggers an intracellular [Ca2+] change in the β-cells. In addition, the imaging of a cell expressing GFP-tagged insulin showed that continuous subcellular exposure to glucose biased the spatial distribution of insulin granules toward the site where the glucose was delivered. Our approach illustrates an experimental technique that will be applicable to many biological experiments for imaging the response to subcellular chemical exposure and will also provide new insights about the development of polarity of β-cells.

  15. Characteristic subcellular distribution, in brain, heart and lung, of biperiden, trihexyphenidyl, and (-)-quinuclidinyl benzylate in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, J; Yokogawa, K; Nakashima, E; Ohkuma, S; Ichimura, F

    1998-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of biperiden (BP), trihexyphenidyl (TP) and (-)-quinuclidinyl benzylate (QNB) in brain, heart and lung following high dose (3.2 mg/kg) i.v. administration was investigated in rats. The subcellular distribution of BP or TP used clinically conformed with that of QNB, a typical potent central muscarinic antagonist. The concentration-time courses of the brain subcellular fractions for these drugs were of two types which decreased slowly and in parallel to the plasma concentration. The subcellular distribution in the brain and heart was dependent on the protein amount of each fraction. The percent post-nuclear fraction (P2) of the total concentration in the lung was characteristically about 3-5 times larger than that in the heart. It was elucidated that the distribution in the lung differs from that in the brain and heart, with high affinity which is not dependent on the protein amount in the P2 fraction containing lysosomes. On the other hand, at a low dose (650 ng/kg) of 3H-QNB, each fraction as a percentage of the total concentration in the brain increased in synaptic membrane and synaptic vesicles and decreased in nuclei and cytosol as compared with the high dose. These results show that although the tissue concentration-time courses of anticholinergic drugs appear to decrease simply in parallel to plasma concentration, the subcellular distribution exhibits a variety of patterns among various tissues.

  16. How to unveil self-quenched fluorophores and subsequently map the subcellular distribution of exogenous peptides

    PubMed Central

    Swiecicki, Jean-Marie; Thiebaut, Frédéric; Di Pisa, Margherita; Gourdin -Bertin, Simon; Tailhades, Julien; Mansuy, Christelle; Burlina, Fabienne; Chwetzoff, Serge; Trugnan, Germain; Chassaing, Gérard; Lavielle, Solange

    2016-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the most popular technique for mapping the subcellular distribution of a fluorescent molecule and is widely used to investigate the penetration properties of exogenous macromolecules, such as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), within cells. Despite the membrane-association propensity of all these CPPs, the signal of the fluorescently labeled CPPs did not colocalize with the plasma membrane. We studied the origin of this fluorescence extinction and the overall consequence on the interpretation of intracellular localizations from CLSM pictures. We demonstrated that this discrepancy originated from fluorescence self-quenching. The fluorescence was unveiled by a “dilution” protocol, i.e. by varying the ratio fluorescent/non-fluorescent CPP. This strategy allowed us to rank with confidence the subcellular distribution of several CPPs, contributing to the elucidation of the penetration mechanism. More generally, this study proposes a broadly applicable and reliable method to study the subcellular distribution of any fluorescently labeled molecules. PMID:26839211

  17. Copper and zinc contamination in oysters: subcellular distribution and detoxification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Xiong; Yang, Yubo; Guo, Xiaoyu; He, Mei; Guo, Feng; Ke, Caihuan

    2011-08-01

    Metal pollution levels in estuarine and coastal environments have been widely reported, but few documented reports exist of severe contamination in specific environments. Here, we report on a metal-contaminated estuary in Fujian Province, China, in which blue oysters (Crassostrea hongkongensis) and green oysters (Crassostrea angulata) were discovered to be contaminated with Cu and other metals. Extraordinarily high metal concentrations were found in the oysters collected from the estuary. Comparison with historical data suggests that the estuary has recently been contaminated with Cr, Cu, Ni, and Zn. Metal concentrations in blue oysters were as high as 1.4 and 2.4% of whole-body tissue dry wt for Cu and Zn, respectively. Cellular debris was the main subcellular fraction binding the metals, but metal-rich granules were important for Cr, Ni, and Pb. With increasing Cu accumulation, its partitioning into the cytosolic proteins decreased. In contrast, metallothionein-like proteins increased their importance in binding with Zn as tissue concentrations of Zn increased. In the most severely contaminated oysters, only a negligible fraction of their Cu and Zn was bound with the metal-sensitive fraction, which may explain the survival of oysters in such contaminated environments.

  18. Changing expression and subcellular distribution of karyopherins during murine oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mihalas, Bettina P; Western, Patrick S; Loveland, Kate L; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Holt, Janet E

    2015-12-01

    Mammalian oocyte growth and development is driven by a strict program of gene expression that relies on the timely presence of transcriptional regulators via nuclear pores. By targeting specific cargos for nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, karyopherin (KPN) proteins are key to the relocation of essential transcription factors and chromatin-remodelling factors into and out of the nucleus. Using multiple complementary techniques, here we establish that KPNA genes and proteins are dynamically expressed and relocalised throughout mouse oogenesis and folliculogenesis. Of the KPNAs examined (Kpna1, Kpna2, Kpna3, Kpna4, Kpna6, Kpna7, Kpnb1, Ipo5 and Xpo1), all were expressed in the embryonic ovary with up-regulation of protein levels concomitant with meiotic entry for KPNA2, accompanied by the redistribution of the cellular localisation of KPNA2 and XPO1. In contrast, postnatal folliculogenesis revealed significant up-regulation of Kpna1, Kpna2, Kpna4, Kpna6 and Ipo5 and down-regulation of Kpnb1, Kpna7 and Xpo1 at the primordial to primary follicle transition. KPNAs exhibited different localisation patterns in both oocytes and granulosa cells during folliculogenesis, with three KPNAs--KPNA1, KPNA2 and IPO5--displaying marked enrichment in the nucleus by antral follicle stage. Remarkably, varied subcellular expression profiles were also identified in isolated pre-ovulatory oocytes with KPNAs KPNA2, KPNB1 and IPO5 detected in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear rim and XPO1 in cytoplasmic aggregates. Intriguingly, meiotic spindle staining was also observed for KPNB1 and XPO1 in meiosis II eggs, implying roles for KPNAs outside of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Thus, we propose that KPNAs, by targeting specific cargoes, are likely to be key regulators of oocyte development.

  19. Calcium: Some aspects of subcellular accumulation and distribution in milk

    SciTech Connect

    Shappell, N.W.

    1989-01-01

    Distribution and bioavailability of {sup 47}calcium in milk labeled by extrinsic and intrinsic methods was investigated. Milk from Sprague Dawley rats was labeled by both methods, and milk from a cow was labeled by the extrinsic method. Retention of {sup 47}Ca from milks administered to young male Sprague Dawley rats was determined through whole body counting for 6 days after administration of milk. Percent of {sup 47}Ca dose retained was 72% for extrinsically labeled cow milk, 62% for extrinsically labeled rat milk, and 55% for intrinsically labeled rat milk. Samples were fractionated by ultracentrifugation and by gel exclusion chromatography. {sup 47}Calcium distributions in rat milk labeled intrinsically or extrinsically were similar. The majority of {sup 47}Ca was found in a particulate, >30,000 molecular weight fraction. The amount of milk calcium retained by rats appeared to be related to the amount of noncasein micelle-associated calcium. When administered by intraperitoneal injection into rats, {sup 45}Ca specific activity of milk peaked in 60 to 90 minutes. In vitro {sup 45}Ca accumulation was compared in Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum from liver and mammary gland of lactating Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs. In the presence of ATP, highest accumulation per unit total fraction protein was found in Golgi apparatus (mammary gland 28% of available {sup 45}Ca, liver 11%) while 8% was accumulated by endoplasmic reticulum fractions.

  20. c-myc protein in normal tissue. Effects of fixation on its apparent subcellular distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Loke, S. L.; Neckers, L. M.; Schwab, G.; Jaffe, E. S.

    1988-01-01

    The c-myc protein is thought to be a DNA-associated nuclear protein. However, immunohistochemical studies on normal or tumor tissues have shown conflicting findings on its subcellular distribution. By using various fixation procedures on cytospin preparations of HL60 cells, the authors found the subcellular distribution of the c-myc protein to be dependent on the method of fixation. When studying mouse tissues in frozen sections using a biotinylated monoclonal antibody against the c-myc protein, they found the protein to be widely distributed in various normal adult mouse tissues, in most cases localized to the nucleus. However, when these tissues were studied after formalin fixation and paraffin embedding, a loss of nuclear staining was observed concurrent with the appearance of c-myc protein immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm. It is concluded that immunohistochemical studies on the expression of this oncogene should take into consideration the effects of fixation when its subcellular distribution is being examined. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3281469

  1. Asymmetric subcellular distribution of glucose transporters in the endothelium of small contractile arteries.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, N; Scriven, D R L; Moore, E D W

    2006-01-01

    The authors have recently reported the presence and asymmetric distribution of the glucose transporters GLUT-1 to -5 and SGLT-1 in the endothelium of rat coronary artery (Gaudreault et al. 2004, Diabetologica, 47, 2081-2092). In the present study the authors investigate and compare the presence and subcellular distribution of the classic glucose transporter isoforms in endothelial cells of cerebral, renal, and mesenteric arteries. The GLUTs and SGLT-1 were examined with immunohistochemistry and wide-field fluorescence microscopy coupled to deconvolution in en face preparation of intact artery. We identified GLUT-1 to -5 and SGLT-1 in the endothelial cells of all three vascular beds. The relative level of expression for each isoform was found comparable amongst arteries. Clusters of the glucose transporter isoforms were found at a high density in proximity to the cell-to-cell junctions. In addition, a consistent asymmetric distribution of GLUT-1 to -5 was found, predominantly located on the abluminal side of the endothelium in all three vascular beds examined (ranging from 68% to 91%, p<.05). The authors conclude that the expression and subcellular distribution of glucose transporters are similar in endothelial cells from vascular beds of comparable diameter and suggest that their subcellular organization may facilitate transendothelial transport of glucose in small contractile arteries.

  2. Subcellular distribution of non-muscle myosin IIb is controlled by FILIP through Hsc70

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Hideshi; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Xie, Min-Jue; Kuroda, Kazuki

    2017-01-01

    The neuronal spine is a small, actin-rich dendritic or somatic protrusion that serves as the postsynaptic compartment of the excitatory synapse. The morphology of the spine reflects the activity of the synapse and is regulated by the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton inside, which is controlled by actin binding proteins such as non-muscle myosin. Previously, we demonstrated that the subcellular localization and function of myosin IIb are regulated by its binding partner, filamin-A interacting protein (FILIP). However, how the subcellular distribution of myosin IIb is controlled by FILIP is not yet known. The objective of this study was to identify potential binding partners of FILIP that contribute to its regulation of non-muscle myosin IIb. Pull-down assays detected a 70-kDa protein that was identified by mass spectrometry to be the chaperone protein Hsc70. The binding of Hsc70 to FILIP was controlled by the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of Hsc70. Further, FILIP bound to Hsc70 via a domain that was not required for binding non-muscle myosin IIb. Inhibition of ATPase activity of Hsc70 impaired the effect of FILIP on the subcellular distribution of non-muscle myosin IIb. Further, in primary cultured neurons, an inhibitor of Hsc70 impeded the morphological change in spines induced by FILIP. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Hsc70 interacts with FILIP to mediate its effects on non-muscle myosin IIb and to regulate spine morphology. PMID:28234934

  3. High Accumulation and Subcellular Distribution of Thallium in Green Cabbage (Brassica Oleracea L. Var. Capitata L.).

    PubMed

    Ning, Zengping; He, Libin; Xiao, Tangfu; Márton, László

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of thallium (Tl) in brassicaceous crops is widely known, but both the uptake extents of Tl by the individual cultivars of green cabbage and the distribution of Tl in the tissues of green cabbage are not well understood. Five commonly available cultivars of green cabbage grown in the Tl-spiked pot-culture trials were studied for the uptake extent and subcellular distribution of Tl. The results showed that all the trial cultivars mainly concentrated Tl in the leaves (101∼192 mg/kg, DW) rather than in the roots or stems, with no significant differences among cultivars (p = 0.455). Tl accumulation in the leaves revealed obvious subcellular fractionation: cell cytosol and vacuole > cell wall > cell organelles. The majority (∼ 88%) of leaf-Tl was found to be in the fraction of cytosol and vacuole, which also served as the major storage site for other major elements such as Ca and Mg. This specific subcellular fractionation of Tl appeared to enable green cabbage to avoid Tl damage to its vital organelles and to help green cabbage tolerate and detoxify Tl. This study demonstrated that all the five green cabbage cultivars show a good application potential in the phytoremediation of Tl-contaminated soils.

  4. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in two hot pepper cultivars differing in cadmium accumulation.

    PubMed

    Xin, Junliang; Huang, Baifei

    2014-01-15

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to compare the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in roots, stems, leaves, and fruits between a low-Cd cultivar (Yeshengchaotianjiao, YCT) and a high-Cd cultivar (Jinfuzaohuangjiao, JFZ) of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). The Cd concentrations in the root's subcellular fractions, and in all chemical forms in roots, were 1.85-4.88- and 1.84-4.90-fold higher, respectively, in YCT than in JFZ. Compared with JFZ, YCT had significantly lower Cd concentrations in the subcellular fractions (1.10-2.42-fold) of stems and leaves and in almost all chemical forms (1.17-2.97-fold) in the stems and leaves. Also, in fruits, the concentrations of Cd in the cell wall and soluble fractions were 1.18-2.24-fold significantly lower in YCT than in JFZ, and there were lower Cd concentrations (1.36-2.08-fold) in the chemical forms in YCT than in JFZ.

  5. Influences of calcium silicate on chemical forms and subcellular distribution of cadmium in Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Huanping; Li, Zhian; Wu, Jingtao; Shen, Yong; Li, Yingwen; Zou, Bi; Tang, Yetao; Zhuang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of calcium silicate (CS) on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in grain amaranths (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L. Cv. ‘K112’) grown in a Cd contaminated soil. Results showed that the dry weight and the photosynthetic pigments contents in grain amaranths increased significantly with the increasing doses of CS treatments, with the highest value found for the treatment of CS3 (1.65 g/kg). Compared with the control, application of CS4 (3.31 g/kg) significantly reduced Cd concentrations in the roots, stems and leaves of grain amaranths by 68%, 87% and 89%, respectively. At subcellular level, CS treatment resulted in redistribution of Cd, higher percentages of Cd in the chloroplast and soluble fractions in leaves of grain amaranths were found, while lower proportions of Cd were located at the cell wall of the leaves. The application of CS enhanced the proportions of pectate and protein integrated forms of Cd and decreased the percentages of water soluble Cd potentially associated with toxicity in grain amaranths. Changes of free Cd ions into inactive forms sequestered in subcellular compartments may indicate an important mechanism of CS for alleviating Cd toxicity and accumulation in plants.

  6. Influences of calcium silicate on chemical forms and subcellular distribution of cadmium in Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huanping; Li, Zhian; Wu, Jingtao; Shen, Yong; Li, Yingwen; Zou, Bi; Tang, Yetao; Zhuang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of calcium silicate (CS) on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in grain amaranths (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L. Cv. ‘K112’) grown in a Cd contaminated soil. Results showed that the dry weight and the photosynthetic pigments contents in grain amaranths increased significantly with the increasing doses of CS treatments, with the highest value found for the treatment of CS3 (1.65 g/kg). Compared with the control, application of CS4 (3.31 g/kg) significantly reduced Cd concentrations in the roots, stems and leaves of grain amaranths by 68%, 87% and 89%, respectively. At subcellular level, CS treatment resulted in redistribution of Cd, higher percentages of Cd in the chloroplast and soluble fractions in leaves of grain amaranths were found, while lower proportions of Cd were located at the cell wall of the leaves. The application of CS enhanced the proportions of pectate and protein integrated forms of Cd and decreased the percentages of water soluble Cd potentially associated with toxicity in grain amaranths. Changes of free Cd ions into inactive forms sequestered in subcellular compartments may indicate an important mechanism of CS for alleviating Cd toxicity and accumulation in plants. PMID:28074912

  7. Differential subcellular distribution of four phospholipase C isoforms and secretion of GPI-PLC activity.

    PubMed

    Staudt, Emanuel; Ramasamy, Pathmanaban; Plattner, Helmut; Simon, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) is an important enzyme of signal transduction pathways by generation of second messengers from membrane lipids. PLCs are also indicated to cleave glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchors of surface proteins thus releasing these into the environment. However, it remains unknown whether this enzymatic activity on the surface is due to distinct PLC isoforms in higher eukaryotes. Ciliates have, in contrast to other unicellular eukaryotes, multiple PLC isoforms as mammals do. Thus, Paramecium represents a perfect model to study subcellular distribution and potential surface activity of PLC isoforms. We have identified distinct subcellular localizations of four PLC isoforms indicating functional specialization. The association with different calcium release channels (CRCs) argues for distinct subcellular functions. They may serve as PI-PLCs in microdomains for local second messenger responses rather than free floating IP3. In addition, all isoforms can be found on the cell surface and they are found together with GPI-cleaved surface proteins in salt/ethanol washes of cells. We can moreover show them in medium supernatants of living cells where they have access to GPI-anchored surface proteins. Among the isoforms we cannot assign GPI-PLC activity to specific PLC isoforms; rather each PLC is potentially responsible for the release of GPI-anchored proteins from the surface.

  8. Bioaccumulation, subcellular distribution, and acute effects of chromium in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Li, Lixia; Chen, Hongxing; Bi, Ran; Xie, Lingtian

    2015-11-01

    Chromium (Cr) is an essential element but is toxic to aquatic organisms at elevated concentrations. In the present study, adult Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) were exposed to a sublethal hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) concentration via dissolved and dietary exposures for 6 d. Various measurements of Cr were made: bioaccumulation in different tissues, subcellular distribution in the liver, effects on antioxidants and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and Cr-induced lipid peroxidation. The results showed that bioaccumulation increased dramatically in all tested tissues from dissolved exposure but only significantly in the intestine from dietary treatment, implying that dissolved exposure may be predominant for Cr accumulation in medaka. Subcellular distribution revealed that Cr accumulated in the liver was mainly (46%) associated with the heat-stable protein fraction. Among the antioxidants examined, catalase (CAT) responded to dissolved Cr exposure in most tissues whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) was less responsive. Malondialdehyde concentrations were significantly elevated in most tissues examined in the dissolved Cr-exposed fish, but were only elevated in the liver and intestine in the dietary Cr-exposed fish. The AChE activity in the brain was stimulated by 49% in the dissolved Cr-exposed fish. Reductions in condition factor and gonadosomatic index were also observed. These data help in an understanding of Cr tissue distribution and the acute effects of Cr in Japanese medaka.

  9. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in a dark septate endophyte (DSE), Exophiala pisciphila.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Fangdong; He, Yongmei; Li, Yuan; Li, Tao; Yang, Yun-Ya; Toor, Gurpal S; Zhao, Zhiwei

    2015-11-01

    Our objective was to understand the cadmium (Cd) tolerance mechanisms by investigating the subcellular distribution, chemical forms of Cd and adsorptive groups in the mycelia of Exophiala pisciphila. We grew E. pisciphila in the liquid media with increasing Cd concentrations (0, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg L(-1)). Increased Cd in the media caused a proportional increase in the Cd uptake by E. pisciphila. Subcellular distribution indicated that 81 to 97% of Cd was associated with the cell walls. The largest amount and proportion (45-86%) of Cd was extracted with 2% acetic acid, and a concentration-dependent extraction was observed, both of which suggest that Cd-phosphate complexes were the major chemical form in E. pisciphila. A large distribution of phosphate and Cd on the mycelia surface was observed by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS). The precipitates associated with the mycelia were observed to contain Cd by transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDX). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) identified that hydroxyl, amine, carboxyl, and phosphate groups were responsible for binding Cd. We conclude that Cd associated with cell walls and integrated with phosphate might be responsible for the tolerance of E. pisciphila to Cd.

  10. Subcellular distribution of glycogen and decreased tetanic Ca2+ in fatigued single intact mouse muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Joachim; Cheng, Arthur J; Ørtenblad, Niels; Westerblad, Hakan

    2014-05-01

    In skeletal muscle fibres, glycogen has been shown to be stored at different subcellular locations: (i) between the myofibrils (intermyofibrillar); (ii) within the myofibrils (intramyofibrillar); and (iii) subsarcolemmal. Of these, intramyofibrillar glycogen has been implied as a critical regulator of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release. The aim of the present study was to test directly how the decrease in cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) during repeated tetanic contractions relates to the subcellular glycogen distribution. Single fibres of mouse flexor digitorum brevis muscles were fatigued with 70 Hz, 350 ms tetani given at 2 s (high-intensity fatigue, HIF) or 10 s (low-intensity fatigue, LIF) intervals, while force and [Ca(2+)]i were measured. Stimulation continued until force decreased to 30% of its initial value. Fibres were then prepared for analyses of subcellular glycogen distribution by transmission electron microscopy. At fatigue, tetanic [Ca(2+)]i was reduced to 70 ± 4% and 54 ± 4% of the initial in HIF (P < 0.01, n = 9) and LIF (P < 0.01, n = 5) fibres, respectively. At fatigue, the mean inter- and intramyofibrillar glycogen content was 60-75% lower than in rested control fibres (P < 0.05), whereas subsarcolemmal glycogen was similar to control. Individual fibres showed a good correlation between the fatigue-induced decrease in tetanic [Ca(2+)]i and the reduction in intermyofibrillar (P = 0.051) and intramyofibrillar (P = 0.0008) glycogen. In conclusion, the fatigue-induced decrease in tetanic [Ca(2+)]i, and hence force, is accompanied by major reductions in inter- and intramyofibrillar glycogen. The stronger correlation between decreased tetanic [Ca(2+)]i and reduced intramyofibrillar glycogen implies that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release critically depends on energy supply from the intramyofibrillar glycogen pool.

  11. Do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect cadmium uptake kinetics, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in rice?

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Luo, Na; Zhang, Li Jun; Zhao, Hai Ming; Li, Yan Wen; Cai, Quan Ying; Wong, Ming Hung; Mo, Ce Hui

    2016-11-15

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were inoculated with two species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) - Rhizophagus intraradices (RI) and Funneliformis mosseae (FM) and grown for 60days to ensure strong colonization. Subsequently, a short-term hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of AMF on cadmium (Cd) uptake kinetics, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in rice exposed to six Cd levels (0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1mM) for three days. The results showed that the uptake kinetics of Cd fitted the Michaelis-Menten model well (R(2)>0.89). AMF significantly decreased the Cd concentrations both in shoots and roots in Cd solutions. Furthermore, the decrement of Cd concentrations by FM was significantly higher than RI treatment in roots. AMF reduced the Cd concentrations markedly in the cell wall fractions at high Cd substrate (≥0.025mM). The main subcellular fraction contributed to Cd detoxification was cell wall at low Cd substrate (<0.05mM), while vacuoles at high Cd substrate (≥0.05mM). Moreover, the concentrations and proportions of Cd in inorganic and water-soluble form also reduced by AMF colonization at high Cd substrate (≥0.05mM), both in shoots and roots. This suggested that AMF could convert Cd into inactive forms which were less toxic. Therefore, AMF could enhance rice resistance to Cd through altering subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in rice.

  12. Differential subcellular distribution of rat brain dopamine receptors and subtype-specific redistribution induced by cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Voulalas, Pamela J.; Schetz, John; Undieh, Ashiwel S.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the subcellular distribution of dopamine D1, D2 and D5 receptor subtypes in rat frontal cortex, and examined whether psychostimulant-induced elevation of synaptic dopamine could alter the receptor distribution. Differential detergent solubilization and density gradient centrifugation were used to separate various subcellular fractions, followed by semi-quantitative determination of the relative abundance of specific receptor proteins in each fraction. D1 receptors were predominantly localized to detergent-resistant membranes, and a portion of these receptors also floated on sucrose gradients. These properties are characteristic of proteins found in lipid rafts and caveolae. D2 receptors exhibited variable distribution between cytoplasmic, detergent-soluble and detergent-resistant membrane fractions, yet were not present in buoyant membranes. Most D5 receptor immunoreactivity was distributed into the cytoplasmic fraction, failing to sediment at forces up to 300,000g, while the remainder was localized to detergent-soluble membranes in cortex. D5 receptors were undetectable in detergent-resistant fractions or raft-like subdomains. Following daily cocaine administration for seven days, a significant portion of D1 receptors translocated from detergent-resistant membranes to detergent-soluble membranes and the cytoplasmic fraction. The distributions of D5 and D2 receptor subtypes were not significantly altered by cocaine treatment. These data imply that D5 receptors are predominantly cytoplasmic, D2 receptors are diffusely distributed within the cell, whereas D1 receptors are mostly localized to lipid rafts within the rat frontal cortex. Dopamine receptor subtype localization is susceptible to modulation by pharmacological manipulations that elevate synaptic dopamine, however the functional implications of such drug-induced receptor warrant further investigation. PMID:21236347

  13. Subcellular distribution of mutant movement proteins of Cucumber mosaic virus fused to green fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Canto, Tomas; Palukaitis, Peter

    2005-04-01

    The subcellular distribution of the movement proteins (MPs) of nine alanine-scanning mutants of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed from CMV, was determined by confocal microscopy of infected epidermal cells of Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana benthamiana, as well as infected N. benthamiana protoplasts. Only those mutant MPs that were functional for movement in all host species tested localized to plasmodesmata of infected epidermal cells and to tubules extending from the surface of infected protoplasts, as for wild-type CMV 3a MP. Various mutant MPs that were either conditionally functional for movement or dysfunctional for movement did not localize to plasmodesmata and did not form tubules on the surface of infected protoplasts. Rather, they showed distribution to different extents throughout the infected cells, including the cytoplasm, nucleus or the plasma membrane. The CMV 3a MP also did not associate with microtubules.

  14. Distribution, isomerization and enantiomer selectivity of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereoisomers in different tissue and subcellular fractions of earthworms.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Chen, Hao; Sun, Hongwen; Lan, Zhonghui

    2017-05-01

    In this study, earthworms Eisenia fetida (E. fetida) were exposed to a soil artificially contaminated with individual hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereoisomers (α-, β- and γ-HBCDs) to investigate the distribution, isomerization and enantiomer selectivity of HBCDs at tissue and subcellular levels. At the tissue level, the concentrations of HBCDs all followed the order of gut>bodyfluid>body wall, which suggested that earthworms accumulated HBCDs mainly via ingesting soil particles. At the subcellular level, the concentrations of HBCDs in an extracellular fraction consisting of granules, tissue fragment, cell membrane and intact cells (fraction A) were higher than those in an intracellular fractions consisting of the microsomal and cytosol (fraction B+C). This confirmed the passive diffusion during the distribution of HBCDs into the intracellular compartment. The distribution proportions of HBCDs varied among different tissue and subcellular fractions, and all changed over time within 14 days. The variable distributions of HBCDs in different fractions were a result of the comprehensive effects of dynamics and thermodynamics processes. The β- and γ-HBCDs were isomerized to α-HBCD in all tissue and subcellular fractions except for fraction C, and the isomerization ratios varied a lot, which seemed to be related to HBCDs residence time. The selective enrichment of (-) α-, (-) β and (-) γ-HBCDs was found in all fractions and this is consistent with that in the whole earthworm. Besides, the extents of enantio-selectivity did not change significantly among different tissue and subcellular fractions.

  15. Expression and subcellular distribution of gephyrin in non-neuronal tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Nawrotzki, Ralph; Islinger, Markus; Vogel, Ingeborg; Völkl, Alfred; Kirsch, Joachim

    2012-04-01

    Gephyrin is a scaffolding protein required for the accumulation of inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors at neuronal postsynaptic membranes. In non-neuronal tissues, gephyrin is indispensible for the biosynthesis of molybdenum cofactor, the prosthetic group of oxidoreductases including sulfite oxidase and xanthine oxidase. However, the molecular and cellular basis of gephyrin's non-neuronal function is poorly understood; in particular, the roles of its splice variants remain enigmatic. Here, we used cDNA screening as well as Northern and immunoblot analyses to show that mammalian liver contains only a limited number of gephyrin splice variants, with the C3-containing variant being the predominant isoform. Using new and established anti-gephyrin antibodies in immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation studies, we report that gephyrin localizes to the cytoplasm of both tissue hepatocytes and cultured immortalized cells. These findings were corroborated by RNA interference studies in which the cytosolic distribution was found to be abolished. Finally, by blue-native PAGE we show that cytoplasmic gephyrin is part of a ~600 kDa protein complex of yet unknown composition. Our data suggest that the expression pattern of non-neuronal gephyrin is simpler than indicated by previous evidence. In addition, gephyrin's presence in a cytosolic 600 kDa protein complex suggests that its metabolic and/or other non-neuronal functions are exerted in the cytoplasm and are not confined to a particular subcellular compartment.

  16. Ubiquitous distribution and different subcellular localization of sorbitol dehydrogenase in fruit and leaf of apple.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Ling; Xu, Yan-Hong; Peng, Chang-Cao; Fan, Ren-Chun; Gao, Xin-Qi

    2009-01-01

    NAD(+)-dependent sorbitol dehydrogenase (NAD-SDH, EC 1.1.1.14), a key enzyme in sorbitol metabolism, plays an important role in regulating sink strength and determining the quality of apple fruit. Understanding the tissue and subcellular localization of NAD-SDH is helpful for understanding sorbitol metabolism in the apple. In this study, two NAD-SDH cDNA sequences were isolated from apple fruits (Malus domestica Borkh cv. Starkrimson) and named MdSDH5 and MdSDH6. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that NAD-SDH is distributed in both the flesh and the vascular tissue of the fruit, and the vascular tissue and mesophyll tissue in the young and old leaves, indicating that it is a ubiquitous protein expressed in both sink and source organs. Immunogold electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that NAD-SDH is localized mainly in the cytoplasm and chloroplast of the fruit and leaves. The chloroplast localization of NAD-SDH was confirmed by the transient expression of MdSDH5-GFP and MdSDH6-GFP in the mesophyll protoplast of Arabidopsis. NAD-SDH was also found in electron opaque deposits of vacuoles in young and mature leaves. These data show that NAD-SDH has different subcellular localizations in fruit and leaves, indicating that it might play a different role in sorbitol metabolism in different tissues of apple.

  17. Changes in subcellular elemental distributions accompanying the acrosome reaction in sea urchin sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Cantino, M.E.; Schackmann, R.W.; Johnson, D.E.

    1983-05-01

    Energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis was used to analyze changes in the subcellular distributions of Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, and Ca associated with the acrosome reaction of sea urchin sperm. Within 5 sec after induction of the acrosome reaction, nuclear Na and mitochondrial Ca increased and nuclear and mitochondrial K decreased. Uptake of mitochondrial P was detected after several minutes, and increases in nuclear Mg were detected only after 5-10 min of incubation following induction of the reaction. The results suggest that sudden permeability changes in the sperm plasma membrane are associated with the acrosome reaction, but that complete breakdown of membrane and cell function does not occur for several minutes.

  18. Organelle-Targeted H2S Probes Enable Visualization of the Subcellular Distribution of H2S Donors.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Leticia A; Pluth, Michael D

    2016-06-07

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an essential biological signaling molecule in diverse biological regulatory pathways. To provide new chemical tools for H2S imaging, we report here a fluorescent H2S detection platform (HSN2-BG) that is compatible with subcellular localization SNAP-tag fusion protein methodologies and use appropriate fusion protein constructs to demonstrate mitochondrial and lysosomal localization. We also demonstrate the efficacy of this detection platform to image endogenous H2S in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and use the developed constructs to report on the subcellular H2S distributions provided by common H2S donor molecules AP39, ADT-OH, GYY4137, and diallyltrisulfide (DATS). The developed constructs provide a platform poised to provide new insights into the subcellular distribution of common H2S donors and a useful tool for investigating H2S biochemistry.

  19. Role of flippases, scramblases and transfer proteins in phosphatidylserine subcellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Hankins, Hannah M; Baldridge, Ryan D; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that lipids are heterogeneously distributed throughout the cell. Most lipid species are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and then distributed to different cellular locations in order to create the distinct membrane compositions observed in eukaryotes. However, the mechanisms by which specific lipid species are trafficked to and maintained in specific areas of the cell are poorly understood and constitute an active area of research. Of particular interest is the distribution of phosphatidylserine (PS), an anionic lipid that is enriched in the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane. PS transport occurs by both vesicular and non-vesicular routes, with members of the oxysterol-binding protein family (Osh6 and Osh7) recently implicated in the latter route. In addition, the flippase activity of P4-ATPases helps build PS membrane asymmetry by preferentially translocating PS to the cytosolic leaflet. This asymmetric PS distribution can be used as a signaling device by the regulated activation of scramblases, which rapidly expose PS on the extracellular leaflet and play important roles in blood clotting and apoptosis. This review will discuss recent advances made in the study of phospholipid flippases, scramblases and PS-specific lipid transfer proteins, as well as how these proteins contribute to subcellular PS distribution.

  20. Shenmai injection enhances the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs against colorectal cancers via improving their subcellular distribution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-yue; Zhang, Jing-wei; Yao, Xue-quan; Jiang, Chao; He, Ji-chao; Ni, Pin; Liu, Jia-li; Chen, Qian-ying; Li, Qing-ran; Zang, Xiao-jie; Yao, Lan; Liu, Ya-zhong; Wang, Mu-lan; Shen, Pei-qiang; Wang, Guang-ji; Zhou, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Shenmai injection (SMI) is a Chinese patent-protected injection, which was mainly made of Red Ginseng and Radix Ophiopogonis and widely used for treating coronary heart disease and tumors by boosting Qi and nourishing Yin. In this study we examined whether SMI could produce direct synergetic effects on the cytoxicity of adriamycin (ADR) and paclitaxel (PTX) in colorectal cancers in vivo and in vitro, and explored the underlying pharmacokinetic mechanisms. BALB/c nude mice with LoVo colon cancer xenografts were intraperitoneally injected with ADR (2 mg·kg−1·3d−1) or PTX (7.5 mg·kg−1·3d−1) with or without SMI (0.01 mL·g−1·d−1) for 13 d. Co-administration of SMI significantly enhanced the chemotherapeutic efficacy of ADR and PTX, whereas administration of SMI alone at the given dosage did not produce visible anti-cancer effects, The chemosensitizing action of SMI was associated with increased concentrations of ADR and PTX in the plasma and tumors. In Caco-2 and LoVo cells in vitro, co-treatment with SMI (2 μL/mL) significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of ADR and PTX, and resulted in some favorable pharmacokinetic changes in the subcellular distribution of ADR and PTX. In addition, SMI-induced intracellular accumulation of ADR was closely correlated with the increased expression levels of P-glycoprotein in 4 colon cancer cell lines (r2=+0.8558). SMI enhances the anti-cancer effects of ADR and PTX in colon cancers in vivo and in vitro by improving the subcellular distributions of ADR and PTX. PMID:27867186

  1. Subcellular distribution of technetium-99m-N-NOEt in rat myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Uccelli, L.; Giganti, M.; Duatti, A. ||

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the subcellular distribution of bis(N-ethoxy N-ethyl)dithiocarbamato, nitrido technetium(V) ({sup 99m}TcN-NOEt) in rat heart by differential centrifugation techniques. Extraction of the activity from homogenized rat heart tissue was also performed to assess whether myocardial retention might induce changes in the chemical identity of the complex. Anesthetized rats were intravenously injected with {sup 99m}TcN-NOEt, the heart tissue was extracted and homogenized and tissue fractions were obtained by differential centrifugation. The efficiency of organelle separation was determined by assay of each centrifugal fraction using enzyme markers. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and 5{prime}-nucleotidase (5{prime}ND) activities were assayed using standard spectrophotometric methods. Succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity was determined using a p-iodo-nitrotetrazolium-linked assay. Severe cell membrane and organelle disruption were induced by prolonging the homogenization time and their effect on the subcellular distribution of {sup 99m}TcN-NOEt was studied. The activity from homogenized heart tissue was extracted using the Folch technique and analyzed by TLC and HPLC. Most of the {sup 99}TcN-NOEt activity was found to be associated with the hydrophobic components of the cell. No evidence of specific association of activity with the cytosolic and mitochondrial components was observed. Organelle and membrane cleavage did not cause release of activity into the cytosol. Approximately 90% of {sup 99m}TcN-NOEt activity was extracted from ventricular tissue and the chemical nature of {sup 99m}TcN-NOEt was not altered by uptake by myocardium. Cell membranes are the most apparent site of localization of {sup 99m}TcN-NOEt in heart tissue. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Subcellular distribution and trophic transfer of Pb from bivalves to the common prawn Palaemon serratus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Marín, Paula; Beiras, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    The edible clam Dosinia exoleta has been reported to accumulate high contents of lead (Pb) in soft tissues disregarding the levels of Pb in the environment. This is due to the retention of Pb in the form of metal rich granules (MRG) in their kidneys throughout the mollusc lifespan. The potential for trophic transfer of Pb in this form to predators is expected to be low, since metals in the form of MRG are generally supposed to be trophically unavailable, but this assumption is based on studies with other metals (Ag, Cd, Cu or Zn) and has not been demonstrated with Pb until now. This study was designed to test if the Pb present in D. exoleta in the form of MRG is available to a decapod consumer, the common prawn Palaemon serratus, in comparison with a mussel diet showing a different subcellular distribution of Pb. As hypothesised, despite the high Pb concentrations (15µgg(-1)ww) offered to the prawns as D. exoleta tissues, Pb was almost completely unavailable for trophic transfer, and the prawns fed with this diet during 28 days showed the same Pb accumulation as prawns fed with a control diet with a much lower Pb concentration. On the contrary, individuals fed with mussel tissues containing the same Pb concentrations as the diet based on D. exoleta tissues showed 10 times higher Pb bioaccumulation, corresponding to a trophic transfer factor of 1.1%. Subcellular fractionation experiments revealed that the fraction of Pb in the form of MRG was much lower for the mussel, confirming, as observed for other metals, that MRG-associated Pb is not available for trophic transfer to decapod crustaceans.

  3. Quantitative assay and subcellular distribution of enzymes acting on dolichyl phosphate in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Ravoet, A; Amar-Costesec, A; Godelaine, D; Beaufay, H

    1981-01-01

    To establish on a quantitative basis the subcellular distribution of the enzymes that glycosylate dolichyl phosphate in rat liver, preliminary kinetic studies on the transfer of mannose, glucose, and N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate from the respective (14)C- labeled nucleotide sugars to exogenous dolichyl phosphate were conducted in liver microsomes. Mannosyltransferase, glucosyltransferase, and, to a lesser extent, N- acetylglucosamine-phosphotransferase were found to be very unstable at 37 degrees C in the presence of Triton X-100, which was nevertheless required to disperse the membranes and the lipid acceptor in the aqueous reaction medium. The enzymes became fairly stable in the range of 10-17 degrees C and the reactions then proceeded at a constant velocity for at least 15 min. Conditions under which the reaction products are formed in amount proportional to that of microsomes added are described. For N- acetylglucosaminephosphotransferase it was necessary to supplement the incubation medium with microsomal lipids. Subsequently, liver homogenates were fractionated by differential centrifugation, and the microsome fraction, which contained the bulk of the enzymes glycosylating dolichyl phosphate, was analyzed by isopycnic centrifugation in a sucrose gradient without any previous treatment, or after addition of digitonin. The centrifugation behavior of these enzymes was compared to that of a number of reference enzymes for the endoplasmic reticulum, the golgi complex, the plasma membranes, and mitochondria. It was very simily to that of enzymes of the endoplasmic reticulum, especially glucose-6-phosphatase. Subcellular preparations enriched in golgi complex elements, plasma membranes, outer membranes of mitochondira, or mitoplasts showed for the transferases acting on dolichyl phosphate relative activities similar to that of glucose- 6-phosphatase. It is concluded that glycosylations of dolichyl phosphate into mannose, glucose, and N-acetylglucosamine-1

  4. The subcellular distribution of chromosome 6-encoded dystrophin-related protein in the brain

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Chromosome 6-encoded dystrophin-related-protein (DRP) shows significant structural similarities to dystrophin at the carboxyl terminus, though the two proteins are encoded on different chromosomes. Both DRP and dystrophin are expressed in muscle and brain and show some similarity in their subcellular localization. For example, in skeletal muscle both are expressed at neuromuscular and myotendinous junctions. However, while dystrophin is absent or severely reduced in Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy, DRP continues to be expressed. Within the brain, dystrophin is enriched at the postsynaptic regions of specific subsets of neurons, while the distribution of DRP is yet to be described. In this study we demonstrate a distinct though highly specific pattern of distribution of DRP in the brain. DRP is enriched in the choroid plexus, pia mater, intracerebral vasculature, and ependymal lining. Within the parenchyma proper, DRP is located at the inner plasma face of astrocytic foot processes at the abluminal aspect of the blood-brain barrier. The distribution of DRP is conserved across a large evolutionary distance, from mammals to elasmobranchs, suggesting that DRP may play a role in the maintenance of regional specializations in the brain. PMID:1400579

  5. Silicon modifies root anatomy, and uptake and subcellular distribution of cadmium in young maize plants

    PubMed Central

    Vaculík, Marek; Landberg, Tommy; Greger, Maria; Luxová, Miroslava; Stoláriková, Miroslava; Lux, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Silicon (Si) has been shown to ameliorate the negative influence of cadmium (Cd) on plant growth and development. However, the mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood. Here we describe the effect of Si on growth, and uptake and subcellular distribution of Cd in maize plants in relation to the development of root tissues. Methods Young maize plants (Zea mays) were cultivated for 10 d hydroponically with 5 or 50 µm Cd and/or 5 mm Si. Growth parameters and the concentrations of Cd and Si were determined in root and shoot by atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The development of apoplasmic barriers (Casparian bands and suberin lamellae) and vascular tissues in roots were analysed, and the influence of Si on apoplasmic and symplasmic distribution of 109Cd applied at 34 nm was investigated between root and shoot. Key Results Si stimulated the growth of young maize plants exposed to Cd and influenced the development of Casparian bands and suberin lamellae as well as vascular tissues in root. Si did not affect the distribution of apoplasmic and symplasmic Cd in maize roots, but considerably decreased symplasmic and increased apoplasmic concentration of Cd in maize shoots. Conclusions Differences in Cd uptake of roots and shoots are probably related to the development of apoplasmic barriers and maturation of vascular tissues in roots. Alleviation of Cd toxicity by Si might be attributed to enhanced binding of Cd to the apoplasmic fraction in maize shoots. PMID:22455991

  6. Subcellular distribution of folate and folate binding protein in renal proximal tubules

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, C.; Hjelle, J.T.; Selhub, J.

    1986-03-01

    High affinity folate binding protein (FBP) found in brush border membranes derived from renal cortices is thought to be involved in the renal conservation of folate. To examine the mechanisms of folate recovery, the subcellular distribution of FBP and /sup 3/H-folate in rabbit renal proximal tubules (PT) was examined using analytical cell fractionation techniques. Tubules contain 3.41 +/- 0.32 picomoles FBP/mg protein (X +/- S.D.; n = 5). Postnuclear supernates (PNS) of PT were layered atop Percoll-sucrose gradients, centrifuged, fractions collected and assayed for various marker enzymes and FBP. Pooled fractions from such gradients were subsequently treated with digitonin and centrifuged in a stoichiometric manner with the activity of the microvillar enzyme, alanylaminopeptidase (AAP); excess FBP distributed with more buoyant particles. Infusion of /sup 3/H-folate into rabbit kidneys followed by tubule isolation and fractionation revealed a time dependent shift in distribution of radiolabel from the AAP-rich gradient fractions to a region containing more buoyant particles; radiolevel was not associated with lysosomal markers. EM-radioautography revealed grains over intracellular vesicles. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that folate is recovered by a process involving receptor-mediated endocytosis or transcytosis.

  7. Uptake and subcellular distribution of triclosan in typical hydrophytes under hydroponic conditions.

    PubMed

    He, Yupeng; Nie, Enguang; Li, Chengming; Ye, Qingfu; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-01-01

    The increasing discharge of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) into the environment has generated serious public concern. The recent awareness of the environmental impact of this emerging class of pollutants and their potential adverse effects on human health have been documented in many reports. However, information regarding uptake and intracellular distribution of PPCPs in hydrophytes under hydroponic conditions, and potential human exposure is very limited. A laboratory experiment was conducted using (14)C-labeled triclosan (TCS) to investigate uptake and distribution of TCS in six aquatic plants (water spinach, purple perilla, cress, penny grass, cane shoot, and rice), and the subcellular distribution of (14)C-TCS was determined in these plants. The results showed that the uptake and removal rate of TCS from nutrient solution by hydrophytes followed the order of cress (96%) > water spinach (94%) > penny grass (87%) > cane shoot (84%) > purple perilla (78%) > rice (63%) at the end of incubation period (192 h). The range of (14)C-TCS content in the roots was 94.3%-99.0% of the added (14)C-TCS, and the concentrations in roots were 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than those in shoots. Furthermore, the subcellular fraction-concentration factor (3.6 × 10(2)-2.6 × 10(3) mL g(-1)), concentration (0.58-4.47 μg g(-1)), and percentage (30%-61%) of (14)C-TCS in organelles were found predominantly greater than those in cell walls and/or cytoplasm. These results indicate that for these plants, the roots are the primary storage for TCS, and within plant cells organelles are the major domains for TCS accumulation. These findings provide a better understanding of translocation and accumulation of TCS in aquatic plants at the cellular level, which is valuable for environmental and human health assessments of TCS.

  8. Subcellular potassium and sodium distribution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and vacuolar mutants.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Rito; Álvarez, María C; Gelis, Samuel; Ramos, José

    2013-09-15

    Living cells accumulate potassium (K⁺) to fulfil multiple functions. It is well documented that the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows at very different concentrations of external alkali cations and keeps high and low intracellular concentrations of K⁺ and sodium (Na⁺) respectively. However less attention has been paid to the study of the intracellular distribution of these cations. The most widely used experimental approach, plasma membrane permeabilization, produces incomplete results, since it usually considers only cytoplasm and vacuoles as compartments where the cations are present in significant amounts. By isolating and analysing the main yeast organelles, we have determined the subcellular location of K⁺ and Na⁺ in S. cerevisiae. We show that while vacuoles accumulate most of the intracellular K⁺ and Na⁺, the cytosol contains relatively low amounts, which is especially relevant in the case of Na⁺. However K⁺ concentrations in the cytosol are kept rather constant during the K⁺-starvation process and we conclude that, for that purpose, vacuolar K⁺ has to be rapidly mobilized. We also show that this intracellular distribution is altered in four different mutants with impaired vacuolar physiology. Finally, we show that both in wild-type and vacuolar mutants, nuclei contain and keep a relatively constant and important percentage of total intracellular K⁺ and Na⁺, which most probably is involved in the neutralization of negative charges.

  9. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of thorium in Brassica juncea var. foliosa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sai; Kai, Hailu; Zha, Zhongyong; Fang, Zhendong; Wang, Dingna; Du, Liang; Zhang, Dong; Feng, Xiaojie; Jin, Yongdong; Xia, Chuanqin

    2016-06-01

    Brassica juncea var. foliosa (B. juncea var. foliosa) is a promising species for thorium (Th) phytoextraction due to its large biomass, fast growth rate and high tolerance toward Th. To further understand the mechanisms of Th tolerance, the present study investigated the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Th found in B. juncea var. foliosa Our results indicated that in both roots and leaves, Th contents in different parts of the cells follow the order of cell wall > membranes and soluble fraction > organelles. In particular, Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) analysis showed that Th was abundantly located in cell walls of the roots. Additionally, when plants were exposed to different concentrations of Th, we have found that Th existed in B. juncea var. foliosa with different chemical forms. Much of the Th extracted by 2% acetic acid (HAc), 1 M NaCl and HCl in roots with the percentage distribution varied from 47.2% to 62.5%, while in leaves, most of the Th was in the form of residue and the subdominant amount of Th was extracted by HCl, followed by 2% HAc. This suggested that Th compartmentation in cytosol and integration with phosphate or proteins in cell wall might be responsible for the tolerance of B. juncea var. foliosa to the stress of Th.

  10. Virus-induced changes in the subcellular distribution of glutathione precursors in Cucurbita pepo (L.).

    PubMed

    Zechmann, B; Zellnig, G; Müller, M

    2007-05-01

    Changes in glutathione contents occur in plants during environmental stress situations, such as pathogen attack, as the formation of reactive oxygen species leads to the activation of the antioxidative defence system. As glutathione is synthesized out of its constituents cysteine, glycine, and glutamate the availability of these components will limit glutathione synthesis in plants especially during stress situations and therefore the ability of the plant to fight oxidative stress. To gain a deeper insight into possible limitations of glutathione synthesis during pathogen attack the present investigations were aimed to study how the subcellular distribution of glutathione precursors correlates with the subcellular distribution of glutathione during virus attack in plants. Selective antibodies against cysteine, glutamate, and glycine were used to study the impact of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) infection on glutathione precursor contents within different cell compartments of cells from Cucurbita pepo (L.) plants with the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Generally, levels of cysteine and glutamate were found to be strongly decreased in most cell compartments of younger and older leaves including glutathione-producing cell compartments such as plastids and the cytosol. The strongest decrease of cysteine was found in plastids (- 54 %) and mitochondria (- 51 %) of younger leaves and in vacuoles (- 37 %) and plastids (- 29 %) of older leaves. The strongest decrease of glutamate in younger leaves occurred in peroxisomes (- 67 %) and nuclei (- 58 %) and in peroxisomes (- 64 %) and plastids (- 52 %) of the older ones. Glycine levels were found to be strongly decreased (- 63 % in mitochondria and - 53 % in plastids) in most cell compartments of older leaves and strongly increased (about 50 % in plastids and peroxisomes) in all cell compartments of the younger ones. These results indicate that low glycine contents in the older leaves were responsible for low

  11. Distinct cellular and subcellular distributions of G protein-coupled receptor kinase and arrestin isoforms in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Bychkov, Evgeny; Zurkovsky, Lilia; Garret, Mika B; Ahmed, Mohamed R; Gurevich, Eugenia V

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling.

  12. Distinct Cellular and Subcellular Distributions of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase and Arrestin Isoforms in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Bychkov, Evgeny; Zurkovsky, Lilia; Garret, Mika B.; Ahmed, Mohamed R.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling. PMID:23139825

  13. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part II: Subcellular distribution following sediment exposure.

    PubMed

    Thit, Amalie; Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Selck, Henriette

    2016-11-01

    The use and likely incidental release of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is steadily increasing. Despite the increasing amount of published literature on metal NP toxicity in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the biological fate of NPs after sediment exposures. Here, we compare the bioavailability and subcellular distribution of copper oxide (CuO) NPs and aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq) in the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten days (d) sediment exposure resulted in marginal Cu bioaccumulation in L. variegatus for both forms of Cu. Bioaccumulation was detected because isotopically enriched (65)Cu was used as a tracer. Neither burrowing behavior or survival was affected by the exposure. Once incorporated into tissue, Cu loss was negligible over 10 d of elimination in clean sediment (Cu elimination rate constants were not different from zero). With the exception of day 10, differences in bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution between Cu forms were either not detectable or marginal. After 10 d of exposure to Cu-Aq, the accumulated Cu was primarily partitioned in the subcellular fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP, ≈40%) and cellular debris (CD, ≈30%). Cu concentrations in these fractions were significantly higher than in controls. For worms exposed to CuO NPs for 10 d, most of the accumulated Cu was partitioned in the CD fraction (≈40%), which was the only subcellular fraction where the Cu concentration was significantly higher than for the control group. Our results indicate that L. variegatus handle the two Cu forms differently. However, longer-term exposures are suggested in order to clearly highlight differences in the subcellular distribution of these two Cu forms.

  14. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part II: Subcellular distribution following sediment exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thit, Amalie; Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Selck, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    The use and likely incidental release of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is steadily increasing. Despite the increasing amount of published literature on metal NP toxicity in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the biological fate of NPs after sediment exposures. Here, we compare the bioavailability and subcellular distribution of copper oxide (CuO) NPs and aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq) in the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten days (d) sediment exposure resulted in marginal Cu bioaccumulation in L. variegatus for both forms of Cu. Bioaccumulation was detected because isotopically enriched 65Cu was used as a tracer. Neither burrowing behavior or survival was affected by the exposure. Once incorporated into tissue, Cu loss was negligible over 10 d of elimination in clean sediment (Cu elimination rate constants were not different from zero). With the exception of day 10, differences in bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution between Cu forms were either not detectable or marginal. After 10 d of exposure to Cu-Aq, the accumulated Cu was primarily partitioned in the subcellular fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP, ≈40%) and cellular debris (CD, ≈30%). Cu concentrations in these fractions were significantly higher than in controls. For worms exposed to CuO NPs for 10 d, most of the accumulated Cu was partitioned in the CD fraction (≈40%), which was the only subcellular fraction where the Cu concentration was significantly higher than for the control group. Our results indicate that L. variegatus handle the two Cu forms differently. However, longer-term exposures are suggested in order to clearly highlight differences in the subcellular distribution of these two Cu forms.

  15. Subcellular Distribution of O-Acetylserine(thiol)lyase in Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L.) Inflorescence

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Norbert; Droux, Michel; Douce, Roland

    1992-01-01

    The subcellular localization of O-acetyiserine(thiol)lyase (EC 4.2.99.8) in nongreen tissue from higher plants has been studied using purified proplastids, mitochondria, and protoplasts from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L.) buds as a source of subcellular fractions. O-Acetylserine(thiol)lyase has been detected in both organelles (proplastids and mitochondria) and a cytosolic extract obtained by protoplast fractionation. We confirmed these observations, demonstrating that a form of the enzyme different in global charge and separated from others by anion-exchange chromatography corresponded to each subcellular location. Our observations are consistent with the need for cysteine biosynthesis in each subcellular compartment where the synthesis of proteins occurs. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:16668766

  16. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and its dynamic changes under oxidative stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zechmann, Bernd; Liou, Liang-Chun; Koffler, Barbara E; Horvat, Lucija; Tomašić, Ana; Fulgosi, Hrvoje; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2011-12-01

    Glutathione is an important antioxidant in most prokaryotes and eukaryotes. It detoxifies reactive oxygen species and is also involved in the modulation of gene expression, in redox signaling, and in the regulation of enzymatic activities. In this study, the subcellular distribution of glutathione was studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by quantitative immunoelectron microscopy. Highest glutathione contents were detected in mitochondria and subsequently in the cytosol, nuclei, cell walls, and vacuoles. The induction of oxidative stress by hydrogen peroxide (H(2) O(2) ) led to changes in glutathione-specific labeling. Three cell types were identified. Cell types I and II contained more glutathione than control cells. Cell type II differed from cell type I in showing a decrease in glutathione-specific labeling solely in mitochondria. Cell type III contained much less glutathione contents than the control and showed the strongest decrease in mitochondria, suggesting that high and stable levels of glutathione in mitochondria are important for the protection and survival of the cells during oxidative stress. Additionally, large amounts of glutathione were relocated and stored in vacuoles in cell type III, suggesting the importance of the sequestration of glutathione in vacuoles under oxidative stress.

  17. The subcellular distribution and function of MTA1 in cancer differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Xu, Dongkui; Wang, Haijuan; Zhang, Ying; Chang, Yanan; Zhang, Jinlong; Wang, Jia; Li, Chunxiao; Liu, Huan; Zhao, Mei; Lin, Chen; Zhan, Qimin; Huang, Changzhi; Qian, Haili

    2014-07-15

    The functions and mechanisms of metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) in cancer progression are still unclear due to a lagged recognition of the subcellular localization. In the present study, using multiple molecular technologies we confirmed for the first time that MTA1 localizes to the nucleus, cytoplasm and nuclear envelope. MTA1 is primarily localized in the nucleus of normal adult tissues but in the cytoplasm of embryonic tissues. While in colon cancer, both distributions have been described. Further investigation revealed that MTA1 localizes on the nuclear envelope in a translocated promoter region (TPR)-dependent manner, while in the cytoplasm, MTA1 shows an obvious localization on microtubules. Both nuclear and cytoplasmic MTA1 are associated with cancer progression. However, these functions may be associated with different mechanisms because only nuclear MTA1 has been associated with cancer differentiation. Overexpression of MTA1 in HCT116 cells inhibited differentiation and promoted proliferation, whereas MTA1 knockdown resulted in cell differentiation and death. Theses results not only suggest that nuclear MTA1 is a good marker for cancer differentiation diagnosis and a potential target for the treatment of cancers but also reveal the necessity to differentially examine the functions of nuclear and cytoplasmic MTA1.

  18. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in Impatiens walleriana in relation to its phytoextraction potential.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hung-Yu

    2015-11-01

    Impatiens (Impatiens walleriana) has been shown to be a potential cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator, but its mechanisms in accumulation and detoxification have not been reported. Rooted cuttings of Impatiens were planted in artificially Cd-contaminated soils for 50 days with total target concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 40, 80, and 120 mg/kg. The subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in the different organs were analyzed after the pot experiment. Compared with the control group, various Cd treatments affected the growth exhibitions of Impatiens, but most of them were not statistically significant. The Cd accumulation of different organs increased with an increase in the soil Cd concentrations for most of the treatments, and it was in the decreasing order of root>stem>leaf. In the roots of Impatiens, Cd was mainly compartmentalized in the soluble fraction (Fs), which has a high migration capacity and will further translocate to the shoot. The Cd was mainly compartmentalized in the cell wall fraction (Fcw) in the shoots as a mechanism of tolerance. Most of the Cd in the various organs of Impatiens was mainly in the forms of pectate and protein-integrated (FNaCl), whereas a minor portion was a water soluble fraction (FW). The experimental results show that the Cd in the Fs, FW, and FNaCl in the roots of Impatiens had a high mobility and will further translocate to the shoot. They could be used to estimate the Cd accumulated in the shoots of Impatiens.

  19. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in the edible seaweed, Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanfang; Wu, Jifa; Shang, Derong; Ning, Jinsong; Zhai, Yuxiu; Sheng, Xiaofeng; Ding, Haiyan

    2015-02-01

    The subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd were investigated in the edible seaweed, Porphyra yezoensis. The seaweed was exposed to different Cd concentrations (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0mgl(-1)) for up to 96h. In both the controls (no Cd added) and treatment groups, 41.2-79.2% of Cd was localised in the cell wall, and the proportion of Cd in the cell wall increased with increasing concentrations of Cd and exposure time. In the control groups, 74.8% of Cd was extracted by 1M NaCl, followed by 2% acetic acid, HAC (18.9%). In the treatment groups, most Cd was extracted by 2% HAC. The proportion of Cd extracted by 2% HAC increased with exposure to increasing concentrations of Cd and over time. Cell wall deposition and forming of precipitates with phosphate may be a key strategy to reduce Cd toxicity in P. yezoensis.

  20. Cellular uptake, subcellular distribution and toxicity of arsenic compounds in methylating and non-methylating cells.

    PubMed

    Dopp, E; von Recklinghausen, U; Diaz-Bone, R; Hirner, A V; Rettenmeier, A W

    2010-07-01

    Arsenic is a known human carcinogen, inducing tumors of the skin, urinary bladder, liver and lung. Inorganic arsenic, existing in highly toxic trivalent and significantly less toxic pentavalent forms, is methylated to mono- and di-methylated species mainly in the liver. Due to the low toxicity of pentavalent methylated species, methylation has been regarded as a detoxification process for many years; however, recent findings of a high toxicity of trivalent methylated species have indicated the contrary. In order to elucidate the role of speciation and methylation for the toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenic, systematic studies were conducted comparing cellular uptake, subcellular distribution as well as toxic and genotoxic effects of organic and inorganic pentavalent and trivalent arsenic species in both non-methylating (urothelial cells and fibroblasts) and methylating cells (hepatocytes). The membrane permeability was found to be dependent upon both the arsenic species and the cell type. Uptake rates of trivalent methylated species were highest and exceeded those of their pentavalent counterparts by several orders of magnitude. Non-methylating cells (urothelial cells and fibroblasts) seem to accumulate higher amounts of arsenic within the cell than the methylating hepatocytes. Cellular uptake and extrusion seem to be faster in hepatocytes than in urothelial cells. The correlation of uptake with toxicity indicates a significant role of membrane permeability towards toxicity. Furthermore, cytotoxic effects are more distinct in hepatocytes. Differential centrifugation studies revealed that elevated concentrations of arsenic are present in the ribosomal fraction of urothelial cells and in nucleic and mitochondrial fractions of hepatic cells. Further studies are needed to define the implications of the observed enrichment of arsenic in specific cellular organelles for its carcinogenic activity. This review summarizes our recent research on cellular uptake

  1. Ammonium Uptake by Rice Roots (I. Fluxes and Subcellular Distribution of 13NH4+).

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M. Y.; Siddiqi, M. Y.; Ruth, T. J.; Glass, ADM.

    1993-01-01

    The time course of 13NH4+ uptake and the distribution of 13NH4+ among plant parts and subcellular compartments was determined for 3-week-old rice (Oryza sativa L. cv M202) plants grown hydroponically in modified Johnson's nutrient solution containing 2,100, or 1000 [mu]M NH4+ (referred to hereafter as G2, G100, or G1000 plants, respectively). At steady state, the influx of 13NH4+ was determined to be 1.31, 5.78, and 10.11 [mu]mol g-1 fresh weight h-1, respectively, for G2, G100, and G1000 plants; efflux was 11, 20, and 29%, respectively, of influx. The NH4+ flux to the vacuole was calculated to be between 1 and 1.4 [mu]mol g-1 fresh weight h-1. By means of 13NH4+ efflux analysis, three kinetically distinct phases (superficial, cell wall, and cytoplasm) were identified, with t1/2 for 13NH4+ exchange of approximately 3 s and 1 and 8 min, respectively. Cytoplasmic [NH4+] was estimated to be 3.72, 20.55, and 38.08 mM for G2, G100, and G1000 plants, respectively. These concentrations were higher than vacuolar [NH4+], yet 72 to 92% of total root NH4+ was located in the vacuole. Distributions of newly absorbed 13NH4+ between plant parts and among the compartments were also examined. During a 30-min period G100 plants metabolized 19% of the influxed 13NH4+. The remainder (81%) was partitioned among the vacuole (20%), cytoplasm (41%), and efflux (20%). Of the metabolized 13N, roughly one-half was translocated to the shoots. PMID:12232017

  2. Influence of protein or cystein deficiency on hepatic subcellular distribution of methyl mercury in two rat strains.

    PubMed

    Beije, B; Arrhenius, E

    1978-02-01

    The influence of protein deprivation and cystein deficiency on the distribution of methyl mercury between 4 subcellular fractions of liver was studied in 2 rat strains (Wistar, strain R and Sprague-Dawley). Kept on a standard diet, the 2 strains showed a similar distribution pattern, with the highest mercury level found in the cytosol, followed by the mitochondrial, microsomal and nuclei fractions. The protein free diet caused on increase in the total amount of bound mercury in both strains, the greatest increase, being found in livers from strain R rats. The cystein deficient diet, on the other hand, gave rise to diverging results. Whereas the level of mercury bound to the subcellular fractions was increased in livers from strain R rats, it was markedly reduced in livers from Sprague-Dawley rats.

  3. Diverse and pervasive subcellular distributions for both coding and long noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Ronit; Hu, Jack; Blotsky, Dmitry; Krause, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    In a previous analysis of 2300 mRNAs via whole-mount fluorescent in situ hybridization in cellularizing Drosophila embryos, we found that 70% of the transcripts exhibited some form of subcellular localization. To see whether this prevalence is unique to early Drosophila embryos, we examined ∼8000 transcripts over the full course of embryogenesis and ∼800 transcripts in late third instar larval tissues. The numbers and varieties of new subcellular localization patterns are both striking and revealing. In the much larger cells of the third instar larva, virtually all transcripts observed showed subcellular localization in at least one tissue. We also examined the prevalence and variety of localization mechanisms for >100 long noncoding RNAs. All of these were also found to be expressed and subcellularly localized. Thus, subcellular RNA localization appears to be the norm rather than the exception for both coding and noncoding RNAs. These results, which have been annotated and made available on a recompiled database, provide a rich and unique resource for functional gene analyses, some examples of which are provided. PMID:26944682

  4. Changes in the subcellular distribution of glutathione during virus infection in Cucurbita pepo (L.).

    PubMed

    Zechmann, B; Zellnig, G; Müller, M

    2005-01-01

    Changes in the subcellular distribution and quantification of glutathione were studied with electron microscopic immunogold cytochemistry in Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV)-infected Styrian pumpkin plants (Cucurbita pepo L. ssp. pepo var. styriaca Greb.) two weeks after inoculation. The amount of gold particles bound to glutathione was statistically evaluated for different cell structures, including mitochondria, plastids, nuclei, peroxisomes, and cytosol. In general, ZYMV-infected plants showed higher gold labelling density in intact mesophyll cells of the 5th (older leaves) and the youngest fully developed leaves (younger leaves), and decreased levels of glutathione within root tip cells when compared to the control. In general, within older and younger leaves the highest amount of gold particles was found in mitochondria and the lowest amount in plastids. In ZYMV-infected older leaves, an increase in glutathione was found in peroxisomes (1.7-fold), the cytosol (1.6-fold), mitochondria (1.4-fold), and nuclei (1.2-fold), whereas glutathione levels in plastids did not differ significantly when compared to control cells. In ZYMV-infected younger leaves elevated glutathione contents were found in the cytosol (3-fold), nuclei (2.1-fold), peroxisomes (1.8-fold), and plastids (1.5-fold), whereas mitochondria showed an insignificant decrease in glutathione levels in comparison to the control. In root tip cells of ZYMV-infected plants the amount of gold particles bound to glutathione was decreased in all investigated cell structures by between 0.7- to 0.8-fold. Additionally, total glutathione contents were determined in older and younger leaves using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), which revealed no significant differences between control and ZYMV-infected leaves. The relevance of the results of both methods were compared and are discussed.

  5. Age distribution patterns of human gene families: divergent for Gene Ontology categories and concordant between different subcellular localizations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gangbiao; Zou, Yangyun; Cheng, Qiqun; Zeng, Yanwu; Gu, Xun; Su, Zhixi

    2014-04-01

    The age distribution of gene duplication events within the human genome exhibits two waves of duplications along with an ancient component. However, because of functional constraint differences, genes in different functional categories might show dissimilar retention patterns after duplication. It is known that genes in some functional categories are highly duplicated in the early stage of vertebrate evolution. However, the correlations of the age distribution pattern of gene duplication between the different functional categories are still unknown. To investigate this issue, we developed a robust pipeline to date the gene duplication events in the human genome. We successfully estimated about three-quarters of the duplication events within the human genome, along with the age distribution pattern in each Gene Ontology (GO) slim category. We found that some GO slim categories show different distribution patterns when compared to the whole genome. Further hierarchical clustering of the GO slim functional categories enabled grouping into two main clusters. We found that human genes located in the duplicated copy number variant regions, whose duplicate genes have not been fixed in the human population, were mainly enriched in the groups with a high proportion of recently duplicated genes. Moreover, we used a phylogenetic tree-based method to date the age of duplications in three signaling-related gene superfamilies: transcription factors, protein kinases and G-protein coupled receptors. These superfamilies were expressed in different subcellular localizations. They showed a similar age distribution as the signaling-related GO slim categories. We also compared the differences between the age distributions of gene duplications in multiple subcellular localizations. We found that the distribution patterns of the major subcellular localizations were similar to that of the whole genome. This study revealed the whole picture of the evolution patterns of gene functional

  6. Subcellular distribution of trace elements and liver histology of landlocked Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) sampled along a mercury contamination gradient.

    PubMed

    Barst, Benjamin D; Rosabal, Maikel; Campbell, Peter G C; Muir, Derek G C; Wang, Xioawa; Köck, Günter; Drevnick, Paul E

    2016-05-01

    We sampled landlocked Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) from four lakes (Small, 9-Mile, North, Amituk) in the Canadian High Arctic that span a gradient of mercury contamination. Metals (Hg, Se, Tl, and Fe) were measured in char tissues to determine their relationships with health indices (relative condition factor and hepatosomatic index), stable nitrogen isotope ratios, and liver histology. A subcellular partitioning procedure was employed to determine how metals were distributed between potentially sensitive and detoxified compartments of Arctic char livers from a low- and high-mercury lake (Small Lake and Amituk Lake, respectively). Differences in health indices and metal concentrations among char populations were likely related to differences in feeding ecology. Concentrations of Hg, Se, and Tl were highest in the livers of Amituk char, whereas concentrations of Fe were highest in Small and 9-Mile char. At the subcellular level we found that although Amituk char had higher concentrations of Tl in whole liver than Small Lake char, they maintained a greater proportion of this metal in detoxified fractions, suggesting an attempt at detoxification. Mercury was found mainly in potentially sensitive fractions of both Small and Amituk Lake char, indicating that Arctic char are not effectively detoxifying this metal. Histological changes in char livers, mainly in the form of melano-macrophage aggregates and hepatic fibrosis, could be linked to the concentrations and subcellular distributions of essential or non-essential metals.

  7. Role of structural and functional elements of mouse methionine-S-sulfoxide reductase in its subcellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwa-Young; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2005-06-07

    Oxidized forms of methionine residues in proteins can be repaired by methionine-S-sulfoxide reductase (MsrA) and methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase (MsrB). In mammals, three MsrBs are present, which are targeted to various subcellular compartments. In contrast, only a single mammalian MsrA gene is known whose products have been detected in both cytosol and mitochondria. Factors that determine the location of the protein in these compartments are not known. Here, we found that MsrA was present in cytosol, nucleus, and mitochondria in mouse cells and tissues and that the major enzyme forms detected in various compartments were generated from a single-translation product rather than by alternative translation initiation. Both cytosolic and mitochondrial forms were processed with respect to the N-terminal signal peptide, and the distribution of the protein occurred post-translationally. Deletion of amino acids 69-108, 69-83, 84-108, or 217-233, which contained elements important for MsrA structure and function, led to exclusive mitochondrial location of MsrA, whereas a region that affected substrate binding but was not part of the overall fold had no influence on the subcellular distribution. The data suggested that proper structure-function organization of MsrA played a role in subcellular distribution of this protein in mouse cells. These findings were recapitulated by expressing various forms of mouse MsrA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting conservation of the mechanisms responsible for distribution of the mammalian enzyme among different cellular compartments.

  8. Subcellular boron and fluorine distributions with SIMS ion microscopy in BNCT and cancer research

    SciTech Connect

    Subhash Chandra

    2008-05-30

    The development of a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of Ion Microscopy in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was the main goal of this project, so that one can study the subcellular location of boron-10 atoms and their partitioning between the normal and cancerous tissue. This information is fundamental for the screening of boronated drugs appropriate for neutron capture therapy of cancer. Our studies at Cornell concentrated mainly on studies of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The early years of the grant were dedicated to the development of cryogenic methods and correlative microscopic approaches so that a reliable subcellular analysis of boron-10 atoms can be made with SIMS. In later years SIMS was applied to animal models and human tissues of GBM for studying the efficacy of potential boronated agents in BNCT. Under this grant the SIMS program at Cornell attained a new level of excellence and collaborative SIMS studies were published with leading BNCT researchers in the U.S.

  9. Current Gaps in the Understanding of the Subcellular Distribution of Exogenous and Endogenous Protein TorsinA

    PubMed Central

    Harata, N. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background An in-frame deletion leading to the loss of a single glutamic acid residue in the protein torsinA (ΔE-torsinA) results in an inherited movement disorder, DYT1 dystonia. This autosomal dominant disease affects the function of the brain without causing neurodegeneration, by a mechanism that remains unknown. Methods We evaluated the literature regarding the subcellular localization of torsinA. Results Efforts to elucidate the pathophysiological basis of DYT1 dystonia have relied partly on examining the subcellular distribution of the wild-type and mutated proteins. A typical approach is to introduce the human torsinA gene (TOR1A) into host cells and overexpress the protein therein. In both neurons and non-neuronal cells, exogenous wild-type torsinA introduced in this manner has been found to localize mainly to the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas exogenous ΔE-torsinA is predominantly in the nuclear envelope or cytoplasmic inclusions. Although these outcomes are relatively consistent, findings for the localization of endogenous torsinA have been variable, leaving its physiological distribution a matter of debate. Discussion As patients’ cells do not overexpress torsinA proteins, it is important to understand why the reported distributions of the endogenous proteins are inconsistent. We propose that careful optimization of experimental methods will be critical in addressing the causes of the differences among the distributions of endogenous (non-overexpressed) vs. exogenously introduced (overexpressed) proteins. PMID:25279252

  10. Effect of subcellular distribution on nC₆₀ uptake and transfer efficiency from Scenedesmus obliquus to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiqing; Hu, Xialin; Yin, Daqiang; Wang, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The potential uptake and trophic transfer ability of nanoparticles (NPs) in aquatic organisms have not been well understood yet. There has been an increasing awareness of the subcellular fate of NPs in organisms, but how the subcellular distribution of NPs subsequently affects the trophic transfer to predator remains to be answered. In the present study, the food chain from Scenedesmus obliquus to Daphnia magna was established to simulate the trophic transfer of fullerene aqueous suspension (nC60). The nC60 contaminated algae were separated into three fractions: cell wall (CW), cell organelle (CO), and cell membrane (CM) fractions, and we investigated the nC60 uptake amounts and trophic transfer efficiency to the predator through dietary exposure to algae or algal subcellular fractions. The nC60 distribution in CW fraction of S. obliquus was the highest, following by CO and CM fractions. nC60 uptake amounts in D. magna were found to be mainly relative to the NPs' distribution in CW fraction and daphnia uptake ability from CW fraction, whereas the nC60 trophic transfer efficiency (TE) were mainly in accordance with the transfer ability of NPs from the CO fraction. CW fed group possessed the highest uptake amount, followed by CO and CM fed groups, but the presence of humic acid (HA) significantly decreased the nC60 uptake from CW fed group. The CO fed groups acquired high TE values for nC60, while CM fed groups had low TE values. Moreover, even though CW fed group had a high TE value; it decreased significantly with the presence of HA. This study contributes to the understanding of fullerene NPs' dietary exposure to aquatic organisms, suggesting that NPs in different food forms are not necessarily equally trophically available to the predator.

  11. Characterizations of bio-accumulations, subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cesium in Brassica juncea, and Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qian; Lai, Jin-long; Tao, Zong-ya; Han, Na; Wu, Guo

    2016-04-01

    We aim to investigate the tolerance and enrichment mechanism of cesium (Cs) in hyperaccumulation plants. In this study, Brassica juncea and Vicia faba were subjected to varying doses of Cs for 21 days to investigate the differences in bio-accumulations, subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cs in two cultivars by differential centrifugation, and extraction of Cs in different chemical forms, respectively. The results showed that 49.87%-61.08% of the Cs were in the leaf of B. juncea, while in V. faba, 1.58%-79.29% of the Cs was in the root. The translocation factor (TF) arrived 2.79 to 3.71 in B. juncea, while it only reached 0.26 to 0.62 in V. faba. Cs subcellular distribution of the two plants was in sequence as follows: soluble fraction > cell wall > organelles. Cs was more easily distributed to metal-sensitive fractions of V. faba. The inorganic Cs (F-ethanol), and water-soluble Cs (F-dH2O) are the main existing types of Cs in the two plants. In B. juncea, the relative content of inorganic Cs, and organic acids/CsH2PO4 (F-dH2O) were higher than that of V. faba in the stem. This suggests that Cs may induce related transporter gene expression (such as phosphate transporter, organic cation, high affinity nitrate transporter, amino acid permease, etc.) to help the transport of Cs between root to shoot.

  12. 2-([sup 125]I) iodomelatonin binding sites in rat adrenals: Pharmacological characteristics and subcellular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Persengiev, S.P. )

    1992-01-01

    Specific binding sites for 2-[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin, a selective radiolabeled melatonin receptor ligand, were detected and characterized in rat adrenal membranes. Saturation studies demonstrated that 2-[[sup 125]I]iodomelatonin binds to a single class of sites with an affinity constant (Kd) of 541 pM and a total binding capacity (Bmax) of 3.23 fmol/mg protein. Competition experiments revealed that the relative order of potency of compounds tested was as follows: 6-chloromelatonin > 2-iodomelatonin > melatonin > 5-methoxytryptamine > 5-methoxytryptophol. The highest density of binding sites was found in membranes from nuclear and mitochondrial subcellular fractions.

  13. Chronic alcohol exposure differentially affects activation of female locus coeruleus neurons and the subcellular distribution of corticotropin releasing factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Retson, T A; Reyes, B A; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2015-01-02

    Understanding the neurobiological bases for sex differences in alcohol dependence is needed to help guide the development of individualized therapies for alcohol abuse disorders. In the present study, alcohol-induced adaptations in (1) anxiety-like behavior, (2) patterns of c-Fos activation and (3) subcellular distribution of corticotropin releasing factor receptor in locus coeruleus (LC) neurons was investigated in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats that were chronically exposed to ethanol using a liquid diet. Results confirm and extend reports by others showing that chronic ethanol exposure produces an anxiogenic-like response in both male and female subjects. Ethanol-induced sex differences were observed with increased c-Fos expression in LC neurons of female ethanol-treated subjects compared to controls or male subjects. Results also reveal sex differences in the subcellular distribution of the CRFr in LC-noradrenergic neurons with female subjects exposed to ethanol exhibiting a higher frequency of plasmalemmal CRFrs. These adaptations have implications for LC neuronal activity and its neural targets across the sexes. Considering the important role of the LC in ethanol-induced activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the present results indicate important sex differences in feed-forward regulation of the HPA axis that may render alcohol dependent females more vulnerable to subsequent stress exposure.

  14. Temperature affects cadmium-induced phytotoxicity involved in subcellular cadmium distribution and oxidative stress in wheat roots.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Zhou, Dongmei; Wang, Peng; Li, Lianzhen

    2011-10-01

    In this study, the effect of temperature on Cd toxicity to wheat roots was evaluated in terms of the relative root length and subcellular distribution of Cd as well as the antioxidant enzymatic activities after exposed to Cd for 72 h under different temperatures. The result showed that the EC(50)-values for the relative root length were 9.24, 4.91 and 3.62 μM Cd at 18, 25 and 30°C, respectively. The Cd concentrations in the cellular metal-sensitive fraction or the potentially toxic fraction (cell debris fraction-Cd) were well correlated with the toxicity of Cd. Interestingly, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in wheat roots without Cd exposure were increased at 18°C compared to those at 25°C, while decreased at 30°C. The CAT activities decreased with increasing Cd level at 25 and 18°C but did not show the same change at 30°C, which could be explained by the subcellular distribution of Cd.

  15. The subcellular distribution and properties of hexokinases in the guinea-pig cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bachelard, H. S.

    1967-01-01

    1. Hexokinase activities were estimated in primary subcellular fractions from guinea-pig cerebral cortex and in sucrose-density-gradient subfractions of the mitochondrial and microsomal fractions. 2. Appreciable activities were observed in mitochondrial, microsomal and soluble fractions. The activity in the mitochondrial fraction was associated with the mitochondria rather than with myelin or nerve endings and that in the microsomal fraction was associated with membrane fragments. 3. Most of the mitochondrial activity was extracted in soluble form by osmotic `shock'. The activity of the mitochondrial extract differed from the soluble activity in kinetic properties and in electrophoretic behaviour. 4. No evidence was obtained for the presence of a high-Km glucokinase in the brain. 5. The results are discussed in terms of relevance to considerations of glucose utilization by the brain. PMID:6035519

  16. Global Identification and Differential Distribution Analysis of Glycans in Subcellular Fractions of Bladder Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ganglong; Huang, Luyu; Zhang, Jiaxu; Yu, Hanjie; Li, Zheng; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular components and their associated biological processes is crucial for cellular function. Protein glycosylation provides a basis for diversity of protein functions. Diversity of glycan composition in animal cells remains poorly understood. We used differential centrifugation techniques to isolate four subcellular protein fractions from homogenate of metastatic bladder YTS1 cells, low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer KK47 cells and normal bladder epithelia HCV29 cells: microsomal (Mic), mitochondrial (Mito), nuclear (Nuc), and cytosolic (Cyto). An integrated strategy combining lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis was then applied to evaluate protein glycosylation of the four fractions. Lectin microarray analysis revealed significant differences among the four fractions in terms of glycan binding to the lectins LCA, AAL, MPL, WGA and PWM in YTS1 cell, STL, Jacalin, VVA, LCA and WGA in KK47, and ConA, GNA, VVA and ACA in HCV29 cell. Among a total of 40, 32 and 15 N-glycans in four fractions of three cells detected by MS analysis, high-mannose and fucosylated structures were predominant, 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 5 N-glycans in KK47 and 7 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in all four fractions; and 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 16 N-glycans in KK47, and 3 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in only one fraction. Glycans in the latter category are considered potential markers for the corresponding organelles. The integrated strategy described here allows detailed examination of glycomes subcellular fraction with high resolution and sensitivity, and will be useful for elucidation of the functional roles of glycans and corresponding glycosylated proteins in distinct organelles. PMID:27313494

  17. Differential expression and subcellular distribution of dystrophin Dp71 isoforms during differentiation process.

    PubMed

    Marquez, F G; Cisneros, B; Garcia, F; Ceja, V; Velázquez, F; Depardón, F; Cervantes, L; Rendón, A; Mornet, D; Rosas-vargas, H; Mustre, M; Montañez, C

    2003-01-01

    Dp71 is the major product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in the brain. In order to study the function of Dp71 in the nervous system we examined the expression of Dp71 isoforms in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cell line, a well-established system to study neuronal differentiation. We show by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assays that PC12 cells express two Dp71 isoforms. One isoform lacks exon 71 and the other isoform lacks exons 71 and 78 (Dp71d and Dp71f isoforms respectively). Nerve growth factor-induced neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells results in differential regulation of the expression and subcellular localization of Dp71 isoforms: a) the amount of Dp71f protein increases nine-fold in total extracts while Dp71d increases up to seven-fold in nuclear extracts; b) Dp71f relocates from the cytoplasm to neuritic processes, being prominent at varicosities and the growth cone; c) Dp71d relocates almost entirely to the nucleus and is detected to a lower extent in the cytoplasm and neuritic processes. Dp71f co-localizes with beta-dystroglycan and synaptophysin while Dp71d co-localizes with beta-dystroglycan in the nucleus. Dp71d accumulates at cell-cell contacts where Dp71f is absent. These results suggest that Dp71d and Dp71f associate with different subcellular complexes and therefore may have distinct functions in PC12 cells.

  18. Fine and distributed subcellular retinotopy of excitatory inputs to the dendritic tree of a collision-detecting neuron.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Gabbiani, Fabrizio

    2016-06-01

    Individual neurons in several sensory systems receive synaptic inputs organized according to subcellular topographic maps, yet the fine structure of this topographic organization and its relation to dendritic morphology have not been studied in detail. Subcellular topography is expected to play a role in dendritic integration, particularly when dendrites are extended and active. The lobula giant movement detector (LGMD) neuron in the locust visual system is known to receive topographic excitatory inputs on part of its dendritic tree. The LGMD responds preferentially to objects approaching on a collision course and is thought to implement several interesting dendritic computations. To study the fine retinotopic mapping of visual inputs onto the excitatory dendrites of the LGMD, we designed a custom microscope allowing visual stimulation at the native sampling resolution of the locust compound eye while simultaneously performing two-photon calcium imaging on excitatory dendrites. We show that the LGMD receives a distributed, fine retinotopic projection from the eye facets and that adjacent facets activate overlapping portions of the same dendritic branches. We also demonstrate that adjacent retinal inputs most likely make independent synapses on the excitatory dendrites of the LGMD. Finally, we show that the fine topographic mapping can be studied using dynamic visual stimuli. Our results reveal the detailed structure of the dendritic input originating from individual facets on the eye and their relation to that of adjacent facets. The mapping of visual space onto the LGMD's dendrites is expected to have implications for dendritic computation.

  19. Expression and Subcellular Distribution of GFP-Tagged Human Tetraspanin Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Karin; Korza, Henryk J.; Tarry, Michael; Sekyrova, Petra; Högbom, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins are integral membrane proteins that function as organizers of multimolecular complexes and modulate function of associated proteins. Mammalian genomes encode approximately 30 different members of this family and remotely related eukaryotic species also contain conserved tetraspanin homologs. Tetraspanins are involved in a number of fundamental processes such as regulation of cell migration, fusion, immunity and signaling. Moreover, they are implied in numerous pathological states including mental disorders, infectious diseases or cancer. Despite the great interest in tetraspanins, the structural and biochemical basis of their activity is still largely unknown. A major bottleneck lies in the difficulty of obtaining stable and homogeneous protein samples in large quantities. Here we report expression screening of 15 members of the human tetraspanin superfamily and successful protocols for the production in S. cerevisiae of a subset of tetraspanins involved in human cancer development. We have demonstrated the subcellular localization of overexpressed tetraspanin-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in S. cerevisiae and found that despite being mislocalized, the fusion proteins are not degraded. The recombinantly produced tetraspanins are dispersed within the endoplasmic reticulum membranes or localized in granule-like structures in yeast cells. The recombinantly produced tetraspanins can be extracted from the membrane fraction and purified with detergents or the poly (styrene-co-maleic acid) polymer technique for use in further biochemical or biophysical studies. PMID:26218426

  20. Global Analysis of Condition-specific Subcellular Protein Distribution and Abundance*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sunhee; Smith, Jennifer J.; von Haller, Priska D.; Dilworth, David J.; Sitko, Katherine A.; Miller, Leslie R.; Saleem, Ramsey A.; Goodlett, David R.; Aitchison, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular control of protein activities by modulation of their abundance or compartmentalization is not easily measured on a large scale. We developed and applied a method to globally interrogate these processes that is widely useful for systems-level analyses of dynamic cellular responses in many cell types. The approach involves subcellular fractionation followed by comprehensive proteomic analysis of the fractions, which is enabled by a data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry approach that samples every available mass to charge channel systematically to maximize sensitivity. Next, various fraction-enrichment ratios are measured for all detected proteins across different environmental conditions and used to group proteins into clusters reflecting changes in compartmentalization and relative conditional abundance. Application of the approach to characterize the response of yeast proteins to fatty acid exposure revealed dynamics of peroxisomes and novel dynamics of MCC/eisosomes, specialized plasma membrane domains comprised of membrane compartment occupied by Can1 (MCC) and eisosome subdomains. It also led to the identification of Fat3, a fatty acid transport protein of the plasma membrane, previously annotated as Ykl187. PMID:23349476

  1. Subcellular distribution of the 18kDa translocator protein and transcript variant PBR-S in human cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Jun; Middleton, Ryan J; Banati, Richard B

    2017-05-20

    Despite continued interest in the 18kDa translocator protein (PBR/TSPO) as a biomarker and a therapeutic target for a range of diseases, its functional role, such as in the steroid synthesis pathway and energy metabolism has either become contentious or remains to be described more precisely. The PBR/TSPO gene consists of four exons, while a shorter isoform termed PBR-S lacks exon 2. The PBR-S 102-codon open reading frame differs to that of PBR/TSPO, resulting in a protein that is completely unrelated to PBR/TSPO. To our knowledge, PBR-S protein has never been described and has no known or proposed function. To obtain possible clues on the role of this uncharacterised protein, we compared the subcellular distribution of PBR-S to that of PBR/TSPO. By expressing fluorescently tagged PBR/TSPO, we confirmed that full-length PBR/TSPO co-localises with mitochondria in HeLa, HEK-293, MDA-MB-231, BJ and U87-MG human cell lines. Unlike the strictly mitochondrial localisation of PBR/TSPO, PBR-S has a punctate distribution throughout the cytosol that co-localises with lysosomes in HeLa, HEK-293, MDA-MB-231, BJ and U87-MG cells. In summary, within the cell lines examined we confirm mitochondria rather than occasionally reported other localisations, such as the cell nucleus, to be the only site where PBR/TSPO resides. Due to the lack of any shared protein sequences and the different subcellular locations, we suggest that the previously uncharacterised PBR-S protein variant of the PBR/TSPO gene is likely to serve a different yet to be discovered function compared to PBR/TSPO.

  2. Regional, cellular, and subcellular variations in the distribution of D1 and D5 dopamine receptors in primate brain.

    PubMed

    Bergson, C; Mrzljak, L; Smiley, J F; Pappy, M; Levenson, R; Goldman-Rakic, P S

    1995-12-01

    The pathways governing signal transduction in the mesocortical and nigrostriatal dopamine systems of the brain are of central importance in a variety of drug actions and neurological diseases. We have analyzed the regional, cellular, and subcellular distribution of the closely related D1 and D5 subtypes of dopamine receptors in the cerebral cortex and selected subcortical structures of rhesus monkey using subtype specific antibodies. The distribution of D1 and D5 receptors was highly differentiated in subcortical structures. In the neostriatum, both D1 and to a lesser extent D5 antibodies labeled medium spiny neurons, while only D5 antibodies labeled the large aspiny neurons typical of cholinergic interneurons. In the caudate nucleus, D1 labeling was concentrated in the spines and shafts of projection neurons, whereas D5 antibodies predominantly labeled the shafts, and less commonly, the spines of these cells. The D1 receptor was abundantly expressed in the neuropil of the substantia nigra pars reticulata while the D5 antibodies labeled only a few scattered cell bodies in this structure. Conversely, D5 antibodies labeled cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain more intensely than D1 antibodies. Within the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, D1 and D5 antibody labeling was prominent in pyramidal cells. Double-label experiments revealed that the two receptors were frequently coexpressed in neurons of both structures. Ultrastructurally, D1 receptors were especially prominent in dendritic spines whereas dendritic shafts were more prominently labeled by the D5 receptor. The anatomical segregation of the D1 and D5 receptors at the subcellular level in cerebral cortex and at the cellular level in subcortical areas suggest that these closely related receptors may be preferentially associated with different circuit elements and may play distinct regulatory roles in synaptic transmission.

  3. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization Alters Subcellular Distribution and Chemical Forms of Cadmium in Medicago sativa L. and Resists Cadmium Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Some plants can tolerate and even detoxify soils contaminated with heavy metals. This detoxification ability may depend on what chemical forms of metals are taken up by plants and how the plants distribute the toxins in their tissues. This, in turn, may have an important impact on phytoremediation. We investigated the impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Glomus intraradices, on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) that were grown in Cd-added soils. The fungus significantly colonized alfalfa roots by day 25 after planting. Colonization of alfalfa by G. intraradices in soils contaminated with Cd ranged from 17% to 69% after 25–60 days and then decreased to 43%. The biomass of plant shoots with AM fungi showed significant 1.7-fold increases compared to no AM fungi addition under the treatment of 20 mg·kg−1 Cd. Concentrations of Cd in the shoots of alfalfa under 0.5, 5, and 20 mg·kg−1 Cd without AM fungal inoculation are 1.87, 2.92, and 2.38 times higher, respectively, than those of fungi-inoculated plants. Fungal inoculation increased Cd (37.2–80.5%) in the cell walls of roots and shoots and decreased in membranes after 80 days of incubation compared to untreated plants. The proportion of the inactive forms of Cd in roots was higher in fungi-treated plants than in controls. Furthermore, although fungi-treated plants had less overall Cd in subcellular fragments in shoots, they had more inactive Cd in shoots than did control plants. These results provide a basis for further research on plant-microbe symbioses in soils contaminated with heavy metals, which may potentially help us develop management regimes for phytoremediation. PMID:23139811

  4. Zea mays Taxilin protein negatively regulates opaque-2 transcriptional activity by causing a change in its sub-cellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Qiao, Zhenyi; Liang, Zheng; Mei, Bing; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2012-01-01

    Zea mays (maize) Opaque-2 (ZmO2) protein is an important bZIP transcription factor that regulates the expression of major storage proteins (22-kD zeins) and other important genes during maize seed development. ZmO2 is subject to functional regulation through protein-protein interactions. To unveil the potential regulatory network associated with ZmO2, a protein-protein interaction study was carried out using the truncated version of ZmO2 (O2-2) as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a maize seed cDNA library. A protein with homology to Taxilin was found to have stable interaction with ZmO2 in yeast and was designated as ZmTaxilin. Sequence analysis indicated that ZmTaxilin has a long coiled-coil domain containing three conserved zipper motifs. Each of the three zipper motifs is individually able to interact with ZmO2 in yeast. A GST pull-down assay demonstrated the interaction between GST-fused ZmTaxilin and ZmO2 extracted from developing maize seeds. Using onion epidermal cells as in vivo assay system, we found that ZmTaxilin could change the sub-cellular distribution of ZmO2. We also demonstrated that this change significantly repressed the transcriptional activity of ZmO2 on the 22-kD zein promoter. Our study suggests that a Taxilin-mediated change in sub-cellular distribution of ZmO2 may have important functional consequences for ZmO2 activity.

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization alters subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in Medicago sativa L. and resists cadmium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanpeng; Huang, Jing; Gao, Yanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Some plants can tolerate and even detoxify soils contaminated with heavy metals. This detoxification ability may depend on what chemical forms of metals are taken up by plants and how the plants distribute the toxins in their tissues. This, in turn, may have an important impact on phytoremediation. We investigated the impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Glomus intraradices, on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) that were grown in Cd-added soils. The fungus significantly colonized alfalfa roots by day 25 after planting. Colonization of alfalfa by G. intraradices in soils contaminated with Cd ranged from 17% to 69% after 25-60 days and then decreased to 43%. The biomass of plant shoots with AM fungi showed significant 1.7-fold increases compared to no AM fungi addition under the treatment of 20 mg kg(-1) Cd. Concentrations of Cd in the shoots of alfalfa under 0.5, 5, and 20 mgkg(-1) Cd without AM fungal inoculation are 1.87, 2.92, and 2.38 times higher, respectively, than those of fungi-inoculated plants. Fungal inoculation increased Cd (37.2-80.5%) in the cell walls of roots and shoots and decreased in membranes after 80 days of incubation compared to untreated plants. The proportion of the inactive forms of Cd in roots was higher in fungi-treated plants than in controls. Furthermore, although fungi-treated plants had less overall Cd in subcellular fragments in shoots, they had more inactive Cd in shoots than did control plants. These results provide a basis for further research on plant-microbe symbioses in soils contaminated with heavy metals, which may potentially help us develop management regimes for phytoremediation.

  6. Assessing the subcellular distribution of oncogenic phosphoinositide 3-kinase using microinjection into live cells

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Meredith J.; Rynkiewicz, Natalie K.; Ivetac, Ivan; Horan, Kristy A.; Mitchell, Christina A.; Phillips, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in PIK3CA lead to an increase in intrinsic phosphoinositide kinase activity, but it is thought that increased access of PI3Kα (phosphoinositide 3-kinase α) to its PM (plasma membrane) localized substrate is also required for increased levels of downstream PIP3/Akt [phosphoinositide-3,4,5-trisphosphate/also called PKB (protein kinase B)] signalling. We have studied the subcellular localization of wild-type and the two most common oncogenic mutants of PI3Kα in cells maintained in growth media, and starved or stimulated cells using a novel method in which PI3Kα is pre-formed as a 1:1 p110α:p85α complex in vitro then introduced into live cells by microinjection. Oncogenic E545K and H1047R mutants did not constitutively interact with membrane lipids in vitro or in cells maintained in 10% (v/v) FBS. Following stimulation of RTKs (receptor tyrosine kinases), microinjected PI3Kα was recruited to the PM, but oncogenic forms of PI3Kα were not recruited to the PM to a greater extent and did not reside at the PM longer than the wild-type PI3Kα. Instead, the E545K mutant specifically bound activated Cdc42 in vitro and microinjection of E545K was associated with the formation of cellular protrusions, providing some preliminary evidence that changes in protein–protein interactions may play a role in the oncogenicity of the E545K mutant in addition to the well-known changes in lipid kinase activity. PMID:27919038

  7. Quantitative evaluation of berberine subcellular distribution and cellular accumulation in non-small cell lung cancer cells by UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhong-Wen; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Fan, Xing-Xing; Zhou, Hua; Ma, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Liang; Xie, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, has been demonstrated to be a safe anti-cancer agent with multiple effects on mitochondria. Intracellular concentration and distribution around the targeting sites are determinants of efficacy, but subcellular distribution of berberine has not been fully elucidated yet, which relies on the sensitive and robustness assay. In this study, a sensitive and robust UPLC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated with optimized extraction solvents and detection conditions. Key factors such as the purity and integrity of isolated organelle fractions, and the effects of isolation procedures on the subcellular concentration of berberine were systemically evaluated. With the developed assay, we found that the intracellular accumulations of berberine in two gefitinib resistant NSCLC cell lines H1650 and H1975 were 2-3 folds higher than that of normal epithelial cells BEAS-2B. Moreover, significantly different subcellular distribution profiles in NSCLC cancer cells from that of BEAS-2B cells with a striking increase in content in most organelles may contribute to its selective cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Furthermore, a predominant accumulation of berberine was observed for the first time in microsomal fraction for all three cell lines. Therefore, this method could be used for quantitative evaluation of subcellular distribution and cellular accumulation of berberine and for further evaluation of the concentration-effects relationship.

  8. Quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy of subcellular GLUT4 distribution in human skeletal muscle: effects of endurance and sprint interval training.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Helen; Shaw, Christopher S; Worthington, Philip L; Shepherd, Sam O; Cocks, Matthew; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    2014-07-01

    Increases in insulin-mediated glucose uptake following endurance training (ET) and sprint interval training (SIT) have in part been attributed to concomitant increases in glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) protein content in skeletal muscle. This study used an immunofluorescence microscopy method to investigate changes in subcellular GLUT4 distribution and content following ET and SIT. Percutaneous muscle biopsy samples were taken from the m. vastus lateralis of 16 sedentary males in the overnight fasted state before and after 6 weeks of ET and SIT. An antibody was fully validated and used to show large (> 1 μm) and smaller (<1 μm) GLUT4-containing clusters. The large clusters likely represent trans-Golgi network stores and the smaller clusters endosomal stores and GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs). Density of GLUT4 clusters was higher at the fibre periphery especially in perinuclear regions. A less dense punctate distribution was seen in the rest of the muscle fibre. Total GLUT4 fluorescence intensity increased in type I and type II fibres following both ET and SIT. Large GLUT4 clusters increased in number and size in both type I and type II fibres, while the smaller clusters increased in size. The greatest increases in GLUT4 fluorescence intensity occurred within the 1 μm layer immediately adjacent to the PM. The increase in peripheral localisation and protein content of GLUT4 following ET and SIT is likely to contribute to the improvements in glucose homeostasis observed after both training modes.

  9. Arsenic species uptake and subcellular distribution in Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara as influenced by aquatic pH.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoliang; Liu, Xingmei; Xu, Jianming; Brookes, Philip C; Wu, Jianjun

    2014-04-01

    Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara, a widely distributed submerged aquatic plant, is a promising species for arsenic (As) removal from contaminated water. We investigated the effects of pH on the accumulation, subcellular distribution and detoxification of As in V. natans. The results showed that the optimum pH for submerged V. natans growth is close to 7.0. The accumulation of As in the plant increased with the increase of pH (p < 0.05). This may have been due to arsenic/phosphate transporters with a higher affinity for the more highly electronegative AsO4 (3-) than for HAsO4 (2-) and H2AsO4 (-). After As(V) was accumulated by plants, more than 80 % was reduced to As(III), but As reduction decreased with increased pH. The majority of accumulated As and reduced As(III) (47 %-66 %) was found in the vacuoles. Higher As concentrations in vacuoles could be considered as an important mechanism for As detoxification in submerged plants.

  10. Subcellular distribution and uptake mechanism of di-n-butyl phthalate in roots of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingqi; Yang, Xiuhong; Huang, Xiongfei; Wang, Shizhong; Chao, Yuanqing; Qiu, Rongliang

    2016-01-01

    Phthalate acid esters (PAEs) are of particular concern due to their potential environmental risk to human and nonhuman organisms. Although uptake of PAEs by plants has been reported by several researchers, information about the intracellular distribution and uptake mechanisms of PAEs is still lacking. In this study, a series of hydroponic experiments using intact pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) seedlings was conducted to investigate how di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), one of the most frequently identified PAEs in the environment, enters and is distributed in roots. DnBP was transported into subcellular tissues rapidly in the initial uptake period (<12 h). More than 80% of DnBP was detected in the cell walls and organelles, which suggests that DnBP is primarily accumulated in these two fractions due to their high affinity to DnBP. The kinetics of DnBP uptake were fitted well with the Michaelis-Menten equation, suggesting that a carrier-mediated process was involved. The application of 2,4-dinitrophenol and sodium vanadate reduced the uptake of DnBP by 37 and 26%, respectively, while aquaporin inhibitors, silver and glycerol, had no effect on DnBP uptake. These data demonstrated that the uptake of DnBP included a carrier-mediated and energy-dependent process without the participation of aquaporins.

  11. [Effects of exogenous nitric oxide on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of copper in tomato seedlings under copper stress].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chun-Hui; Wang, Xiu-Feng; Yin, Bo; Li, Xiao-Yun; Cui, Xiu-Min

    2012-11-01

    A nutrient solution culture experiment was conducted to study the effects of exogenous NO donor (sodium nitroprusside) on the subcellular distribution and chemical form of copper (Cu) in tomato seedlings under the stress of 50 micromol x L(-1) of Cu2+ (CuCl2). Under this stress, the biomass and plant height of tomato seedlings decreased by 33.7% and 23.1%, respectively. Exogenous NO alleviated this inhibition effect significantly, but the Cu concentration and accumulation in the seedling organs still had a significant increase. Under the Cu stress, the Cu concentration and accumulation in the seedling organs were in the order of root > leaf > stem > petiole. Exogenous NO limited the absorbed Cu transferred from root to shoot, but could not remove this translocation. Exogenous NO increased the Cu concentration in vacuole and cell wall significantly, and decreased the Cu concentration in organelle, which lessened the damage of Cu on the regular metabolic balance in cytoplasm and increased the tolerance of organelle against Cu. Exogenous NO increased the acetic acid-extractable Cu (F(HAc)) in root, sodium chloride-extractable Cu (F(NaCl)) in stem, F(HAc) in petiole, and ethanol-extractable Cu (F(E)) and F(NaCl) in leaf, while decreased the concentration and distribution of water-extractable Cu (F(W)) in different organs, which efficiently reduced the bio-toxicity of excessive copper.

  12. 3H-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol tissue and subcellular distribution in the central nervous system and tissue distribution in peripheral organs of tolerant and nontolerant dogs.

    PubMed

    Martin, B R; Dewey, W L; Harris, L S; Beckner, J S

    1976-01-01

    Tolerant and nontolerant dogs received one i.v. administration of 0.5 mg/kg of 3H-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol 30 minutes before they were sacrificed. Plasma, peripheral and brain tissues, as well as subcellular fractions of brain tissues from both treatment groups, were analyzed for radioactivity. Throughout the time period before sacrifice, the plasma concentrations of radioactivity in the tolerant and nontolerant dogs were not significantly different. The percentage of radioactivity in brain and plasma that was due to either unchanged delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol or a major metabolite was the same in each group. Of the radioactivity in brain, 46% was identified as delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Regardless of treatment, there was a specific accumulation of radioactivity in adrenals, liver, kidney, heart and pancreas. The only significant differences in radioactivity between tolerant and nontolerant peripheral tissues were found in liver, kidney cortex, heart and lymph nodes. Although all brain areas from tolerant dogs contained less radioactivity than the comparable brain areas from nontolerant animals, only pituitary and putamen were significantly less. There was a specific accumulation of radioactivity in some brain areas that could be associated with behavioral effects. The concentration in cerebellar and cerebral gray was significantly greater than that in white, and there was a marked reduction in the concentration in gray after tolerance developed. The mean percentage of radioactivity in each subcellular fraction was as follows: 23% crude nuclei, 44% mitochondria, 8% cholinergic nerve endings, 7% noncholinergic nerve endings, 2% free mitochondria and 6% synaptic vesicles. The quantity of radioactivity in homogenates of brains from tolerant dogs was 17% less than brains of nontolerant animals, which was merely a reflection of the respective plasma concentrations. The distribution of radioactivity was similar in both groups, although most of the subcellular

  13. Distribution and Characterization of Antigens Found in Subcellular Fractions of African Trypanosomes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    measured for relative fluorescence. These details are ndicated in Fig. A. ii. Lecting affinity chromatography. Either lentil lectin seph- arose 4B or...Zwaal, R.F.A. 1976. The use of phospholipases in the determination of asymmetric phospholipid distribution in membranes. In Methods in Membrane Biology 7...research. In Methods in Membrane Biology , Vol. 8 (Korn, E.D., ed.), pp. 1-50. 26 Enzyme Membrane Fraction Phosphatase SM FPM -glycerophosphate 10 15

  14. Computational approaches to analyse and predict small molecule transport and distribution at cellular and subcellular levels.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Zhang, Xinyuan; Yu, Jing-yu; Rosania, Gus R

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies and mechanistic mathematical modeling approaches have been independently employed for analysing and predicting the transport and distribution of small molecule chemical agents in living organisms. Both of these computational approaches have been useful for interpreting experiments measuring the transport properties of small molecule chemical agents, in vitro and in vivo. Nevertheless, mechanistic cell-based pharmacokinetic models have been especially useful to guide the design of experiments probing the molecular pathways underlying small molecule transport phenomena. Unlike QSAR models, mechanistic models can be integrated from microscopic to macroscopic levels, to analyse the spatiotemporal dynamics of small molecule chemical agents from intracellular organelles to whole organs, well beyond the experiments and training data sets upon which the models are based. Based on differential equations, mechanistic models can also be integrated with other differential equations-based systems biology models of biochemical networks or signaling pathways. Although the origin and evolution of mathematical modeling approaches aimed at predicting drug transport and distribution has occurred independently from systems biology, we propose that the incorporation of mechanistic cell-based computational models of drug transport and distribution into a systems biology modeling framework is a logical next step for the advancement of systems pharmacology research.

  15. Immunocytochemical analysis of the subcellular distribution of ferritin in Imperata cylindrica (L.) Raeuschel, an iron hyperaccumulator plant.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Vicenta; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amils, Ricardo

    2012-05-01

    Ferritin is of interest at the structural and functional level not only as storage for iron, a critical element, but also as a means to prevent cell damage produced by oxidative stress. The main objective of this work was to confirm by immunocytochemistry the presence and the subcellular distribution of the ferritin detected by Mösbauer spectroscopy in Imperata cylindrica, a plant which accumulates large amounts of iron. The localization of ferritin was performed in epidermal, parenchymal and vascular tissues of shoots and leaves of I. cylindrica. The highest density of immunolabeling in shoots appeared in the intracellular space of cell tissues, near the cell walls and in the cytoplasm. In leaves, ferritin was detected in the proximity of the dense network of the middle lamella of cell walls, following a similar path to that observed in shoots. Immunolabeling was also localized in chloroplasts. The abundance of immunogold labelling in mitochondria for I. cylindrica was rather low, probably because the study dealt with tissues from old plants. These results further expand the localization of ferritin in cell components other than chloroplasts and mitochondria in plants.

  16. Cellular Distribution and Subcellular Localization of Molecular Components of Vesicular Transmitter Release in Horizontal Cells of Rabbit Retina

    PubMed Central

    HIRANO, ARLENE A.; BRANDSTÄTTER, JOHANN H.; BRECHA, NICHOLAS C.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism underlying transmitter release from retinal horizontal cells is poorly understood. We investigated the possibility of vesicular transmitter release from mammalian horizontal cells by examining the expression of synaptic proteins that participate in vesicular transmitter release at chemical synapses. Using immunocytochemistry, we evaluated the cellular and subcellular distribution of complexin I/II, syntaxin-1, and synapsin I in rabbit retina. Strong labeling for complexin I/II, proteins that regulate a late step in vesicular transmitter release, was found in both synaptic layers of the retina, and in somata of A- and B-type horizontal cells, of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)- and glycinergic amacrine cells, and of ganglion cells. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated the presence of complexin I/II in horizontal cell processes postsynaptic to rod and cone ribbon synapses. Syntaxin-1, a core protein of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex known to bind to complexin, and synapsin I, a synaptic vesicle-associated protein involved in the Ca2+-dependent recruitment of synaptic vesicles for transmitter release, were also present in the horizontal cells and their processes at photoreceptor synapses. Photoreceptors and bipolar cells did not express any of these proteins at their axon terminals. The presence of complexin I/II, syntaxin-1, and synapsin I in rabbit horizontal cell processes and tips suggests that a vesicular mechanism may underlie transmitter release from mammalian horizontal cells. PMID:15912504

  17. Subcellular distribution, modulation of antioxidant and stress-related genes response to arsenic in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad A; Gill, Rafaqat A; Ali, Basharat; Wang, Jian; Islam, Faisal; Ali, Shafaqat; Zhou, Weijun

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is an environmental toxin pollutant that affects the numerous physiological processes of plants. In present study, two Brassica napus L. cultivars were subjected to various concentrations (0, 50, 100, and 200 µM) of As for 14 days, plants were examined for As subcellular distribution, photosynthesis parameters, oxidative stress, and ultrastructural changes under As-stress. Differential fraction analysis showed that significant amount of As was accumulated in the cell wall as compared to other organelles. Decline in photosynthetic efficiency under As stress was observed in term of reduced pigment contents and gas exchange parameters. Differential responses of antioxidants at both enzymatic and gene levels to higher As stress were more pronounced in cultivar ZS 758 as compared to Zheda 622. The qRT-PCR analysis showed that heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and metallothionein were over-expressed in As stressed B. napus plants. Disorganization of cell structure and the damages in different organelles were some of the obvious variations in cultivar Zheda 622 as compared to ZS 758.

  18. Transmembrane topology, subcellular distribution and turnover of the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodizaepine receptor in chick brain cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were performed utilizing trypsinization of the GABA/BZD-R in intact cells to determine (1) the subcellular distribution of membrane-associated GABA/BZD-Rs and (2) aspects of the transmembrane topology of the BZD-R. Additionally, R07-0213, a positively charged benzodiazepine, was used to distinguish between cell surface and intracellular BZD-Rs. Following trypsin treatment of intact cells a cleaved receptor fragment of M{sub r} = 24,000 (xRF24) is generated. It remains anchored in the plasma membrane and not only retains the ability to bind ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepan reversibly and irreversibly but also retains the ability to be modulated by GABA. xRF24 is not observed following trypsinization of saponin-treated cells or cell homogenates, indicating that it has a cytoplasmic domain as well as a cell surface domain, as expected for a transmembrane fragment of the BZD-R. By utilizing ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam as an irreversible photoaffinity label, BZD-R turnover was also investigated.

  19. Dietary toxicity of field-contaminated invertebrates to marine fish: effects of metal doses and subcellular metal distribution.

    PubMed

    Dang, Fei; Rainbow, Philip S; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2012-09-15

    There is growing awareness of the toxicological effects of metal-contaminated invertebrate diets on the health of fish populations in metal-contaminated habitats, yet the mechanisms underlying metal bioaccumulation and toxicity are complex. In the present study, marine fish Terapon jurbua terepon were fed a commercial diet supplemented with specimens of the polychaete Nereis diversicolor or the clam Scrobicularia plana, collected from four metal-impacted estuaries (Tavy, Restronguet Creek, West Looe, Gannel) in southwest England, as environmentally realistic metal sources. A comparative toxicological evaluation of both invertebrates showed that fish fed S. plana for 21 d exhibited evident mortality compared to those fed N. diversicolor. Furthermore, a spatial effect on mortality was observed. Differences in metal doses rather than subcellular metal distributions between N. diversicolor and S. plana appeared to be the cause of such different mortalities. Partial least squares regression was used to evaluate the statistical relationship between multiple-metal doses and fish mortality, revealing that Pb, Fe, Cd and Zn in field-collected invertebrates co-varied most strongly with the observed mortality. This study provides a step toward exploring the underlying mechanism of dietary toxicity and identifying the potential causality in complex metal mixture exposures in the field.

  20. Subcellular Distribution of Heavy Metals in Organs of Bivalve Modiolus Modiolus Living Along a Metal Contamination Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgurskaya, Olga V.; Kavun, Victor Ya.

    2006-03-01

    Concentration and distribution of Fe, Zn, Cu, Cd, Mn, Pb, Ni among subcellular fractions (cellular membrane structures and cytosol) and Zn, Cu, Cd among cytoplasmic proteins in the kidney and digestive gland of mussel Modiolus modiolus living along a polymetallic concentration gradient were studied. It was found in the kidney of M. modiolus from contaminated sites that the Fe percent increased in the “membrane” fraction, whereas Zn, Pb, Ni and Mn percent increased in the cytosol compared to the kidney of the control mussel. Note kidney cytosol of M. modiolus from clean and contaminated sites sequestered major parts of Cu and Cd. In the digestive gland of M. modiolus from contaminated sites Fe, Zn, Cd, Mn, Ni percent increased in the “membrane” fraction, whereas Cu, Pb percent increased in the cytosol compared to digestive gland of control mussel. Gel-filtration chromatography shows kidney of M. modiolus contains increased metallothionein-like protein levels irrespective of ambient dissolved metal concentrations. It was shown that the metal detoxification system in the kidney and digestive gland of M. modiolus was efficient under extremely high ambient metal levels. However, under complex environmental contamination in the kidney of M. modiolus, the metal detoxification capacity of metallothionein-like proteins was damaged.

  1. Subcellular distribution and early signalling events of P2X7 receptors from mouse cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Nogueiro, Jesús; Marín-García, Patricia; Bustillo, Diego; Olivos-Oré, Luis Alcides; Miras-Portugal, María Teresa; Artalejo, Antonio R

    2014-12-05

    The subcellular distribution and early signalling events of P2X7 receptors were studied in mouse cerebellar granule neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings evidenced inwardly directed non-desensitizing currents following adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP; 600 µM) or 2'-3'-o-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BzATP; 100 µM) administration to cells bathed in a medium with no-added divalent cations (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)). Nucleotide-activated currents were inhibited by superfusion of 2.5 mM Ca(2+), 1.2 mM Mg(2+) or 100 nM Brilliant Blue G (BBG), hence indicating the expression of ionotropic P2X7 receptors. Fura-2 calcium imaging showed [Ca(2+)]i elevations in response to ATP or BzATP at the somas and at a small number of axodendritic regions of granule neurons. Differential sensitivity of these [Ca(2+)]i increases to three different P2X7 receptor antagonists (100 nM BBG, 10 μM 4-[(2S)-2-[(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)methylamino]-3-oxo-3-(4-phenyl-1-piperazinyl)propyl] phenyl isoquinolinesulfonic acid ester, KN-62, and 1 μM 3-(5-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-1H-tetrazol-1-yl)methyl pyridine hydrochloride hydrate, A-438079) revealed that P2X7 receptors are co-expressed with different P2Y receptors along the plasmalemma of granule neurons. Finally, experiments with the fluorescent dye YO-PRO-1 indicated that prolonged stimulation of P2X7 receptors does not lead to the opening of a membrane pore permeable to large cations. Altogether, our results emphasise the expression of functional P2X7 receptors at both the axodendritic and somatic levels in mouse cerebellar granule neurons, and favour the notion that P2X7 receptors might function in a subcellular localisation-specific manner: presynaptically, by controlling glutamate release, and on the cell somas, by supporting granule neuron survival against glutamate excytotoxicity.

  2. Subcellular cadmium distribution and antioxidant enzymatic activities in the leaves of two castor (Ricinus communis L.) cultivars exhibit differences in Cd accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanzhi; Guo, Qingjun; Yang, Junxing; Shen, Jianxiu; Chen, Tongbin; Zhu, Guangxu; Chen, Hui; Shao, Chunyan

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) the study of cadmium (Cd) accumulation and toxicity in different castor cultivars (Ricinus communis L.); (2) to investigate changes in antioxidant enzymatic activities and the subcellular distribution of Cd in young and old leaves from two different castor cultivars, after exposure to two different Cd concentrations, and explore the underlying mechanism of Cd detoxification focusing on antioxidant enzymes and subcellular compartmentalization. The Cd concentration, toxicity, and subcellular distribution, as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) activities were measured in Zibo-3 and Zibo-9 cultivars after exposure to two different concentrations of Cd (2mg/L and 5mg/L) for 10 days. This research revealed Cd accumulation characteristics in castor are root>stem>young leaf>old leaf. Castor tolerance was Cd dose exposure and the cultivars themselves dependent. Investigation of subcellular Cd partitioning showed that Cd accumulated mainly in the heat stable protein (HSP) and cellular debris fractions, followed by the Cd rich granule (MRG), heat denatured protein (HDP), and organelle fractions. With increasing Cd concentration in nutrient solution, the decreased detoxified fractions (BDM) and the increased Cd-sensitive fractions (MSF) in young leaves may indicate the increased Cd toxicity in castor cultivars. The BDM-Cd fractions or MSF-Cd in old leaves may be linked with Cd tolerance of different cultivars of castor. The antioxidant enzymes that govern Cd detoxification were not found to be active in leaves. Taken together, these results indicate Cd tolerance and toxicity in castor can be explained by subcellular partitioning.

  3. Subcellular Distribution of Enzymes of Glycolate Metabolism in the Alga Cyanidium caldarium1

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Wolfgang; Beevers, Harry

    1989-01-01

    The intracellular distribution of enzymes capable of catalyzing the reactions from phosphoglycolate to glycerate in the bluegreen colored eucaryotic alga Cyanidium caldarium has been studied. After separating the organelles from a crude homogenate on a linear flotation gradient, the enzymes glycolate oxidase and glutamate-glyoxylate aminotransferase along with catalase were present in the peroxisomal fraction (density: 1.23 grams per cubic centimeter). Serine hydroxymethyltransferase was found in the mitochondrial fraction (density: 1.18 grams per cubic centimeter). In contrast to the observations in green leaves of higher plants, the enzymes for the conversion of serine to glycerate (serine-glyoxylate aminotransferase and hydroxypyruvate reductase) were found only in the soluble fraction of the gradient. The partial characterization of enzymes from Cyanidium participating in glycolate metabolism revealed only slight differences from the corresponding enzymes from higher plants. The phylogenetic implications of the observed similarities between the enigmatic alga Cyanidium and higher plants are discussed. PMID:16666880

  4. Cellular distribution, subcellular localization and possible functions of basic and acidic fibroblast growth factors.

    PubMed

    Eckenstein, F P; Kuzis, K; Nishi, R; Woodward, W R; Meshul, C; Sherman, L; Ciment, G

    1994-01-13

    The distribution in the rat nervous system of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) was analysed by a combination of biochemical and anatomical methods. Acidic FGF (aFGF) was found to be present exclusively in specific neuronal populations, such as motor neurons and basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. Basic FGF (bFGF) was found in astrocytes and in neurons in hippocampal area CA2. Within labelled astrocytes and CA2-neurons, bFGF was detected in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. The levels of intracellular bFGF were manipulated by antisense oligonucleotide treatment of cultures of developing neural crest cells. Results indicated that the amount of melanogenesis in the cultures is likely to be regulated by intracellular, possibly nuclear bFGF.

  5. SNX27 and SORLA Interact to Reduce Amyloidogenic Subcellular Distribution and Processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Timothy Y.; Zhao, Yingjun; Li, Xiaoguang; Wang, Xin; Tseng, I-Chu; Thompson, Robert; Tu, Shichun; Willnow, Thomas E.; Zhang, Yun-wu

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic generation of amyloidogenic amyloid β (Aβ) fragments from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) significantly contributes to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although amyloidogenic APP proteolysis can be affected by trafficking through genetically associated AD components such as SORLA, how SORLA functionally interacts with other trafficking components is yet unclear. Here, we report that SNX27, an endosomal trafficking/recycling factor and a negative regulator of the γ-secretase complex, binds to the SORLA cytosolic tail to form a ternary complex with APP. SNX27 enhances cell surface SORLA and APP levels in human cell lines and mouse primary neurons, and depletion of SNX27 or SORLA reduces APP endosome-to-cell surface recycling kinetics. SNX27 overexpression enhances the generation of cell surface APP cleavage products such as soluble alpha-APP C-terminal fragment (CTFα) in a SORLA-dependent manner. SORLA-mediated Aβ reduction is attenuated by downregulation of SNX27. This indicates that an SNX27/SORLA complex functionally interacts to limit APP distribution to amyloidogenic compartments, forming a non-amyloidogenic shunt to promote APP recycling to the cell surface. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many genes have been identified as risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and a large proportion of these genes function to limit production or toxicity of the AD-associated amyloid β (Aβ) peptide. Whether and how these genes precisely operate to limit AD onset remains an important question. We identify binding and trafficking interactions between two of these factors, SORLA and SNX27, and demonstrate that SNX27 can direct trafficking of SORLA and the Aβ precursor APP to the cell surface to limit the production of Aβ. Diversion APP to the cell surface through modulation of this molecular complex may represent a complimentary strategy for future development in AD treatment. PMID:27466343

  6. Arabidopsis profilin isoforms, PRF1 and PRF2 show distinctive binding activities and subcellular distributions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Jing, Yanping; Wang, Zhen; Mao, Tonglin; Samaj, Jozef; Yuan, Ming; Ren, Haiyun

    2009-02-01

    Profilin is an actin-binding protein that shows complex effects on the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton. There are five profilin isoforms in Arabidopsis thaliana L. However, it is still an open question whether these isoforms are functionally different. In the present study, two profilin isoforms from Arabidopsis, PRF1 and PRF2 were fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag and expressed in Escherichia coli and A. thaliana in order to compare their biochemical properties in vitro and their cellular distributions in vivo. Biochemical analysis revealed that fusion proteins of GFP-PRF1 and GFP-PRF2 can bind to poly-L-proline and G-actin showing remarkable differences. GFP-PRF1 has much higher affinities for both poly-L-proline and G-actin compared with GFP-PRF2. Observations of living cells in stable transgenic A. thaliana lines revealed that 35S::GFP-PRF1 formed a filamentous network, while 35S::GFP-PRF2 formed polygonal meshes. Results from the treatment with latrunculin A and a subsequent recovery experiment indicated that filamentous alignment of GFP-PRF1 was likely associated with actin filaments. However, GFP-PRF2 localized to polygonal meshes resembling the endoplasmic reticulum. Our results provide evidence that Arabidopsis profilin isoforms PRF1 and PRF2 have different biochemical affinities for poly-L-proline and G-actin, and show distinctive localizations in living cells. These data suggest that PRF1 and PRF2 are functionally different isoforms.

  7. Subcellular Size

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Wallace F.

    2016-01-01

    All of the same conceptual questions about size in organisms apply equally at the level of single cells. What determines the size, not only of the whole cell, but of all its parts? What ensures that subcellular components are properly proportioned relative to the whole cell? How does alteration in organelle size affect biochemical function? Answering such fundamental questions requires us to understand how the size of individual organelles and other cellular structures is determined. Knowledge of organelle biogenesis and dynamics has advanced rapidly in recent years. Does this knowledge give us enough information to formulate reasonable models for organelle size control, or are we still missing something? PMID:25957302

  8. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection. - Highlights: • UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins required for fusion. • Sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins varies in cell-type dependent manner. • Drugs targeting actin microfilaments affect formation of UL24-related syncytia in HFFs.

  9. Analysis of sublethal arsenic toxicity to Ceratophyllum demersum: subcellular distribution of arsenic and inhibition of chlorophyll biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Seema; Alfeld, Matthias; Sobotka, Roman; Andresen, Elisa; Falkenberg, Gerald; Küpper, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) pollution is a serious concern worldwide. Recent studies under environmentally relevant conditions revealed that, in the aquatic plant Ceratophyllum demersum, pigments are the first observable target of toxicity, prior to any effect on photosynthetic parameters or to oxidative stress. Lethal toxicity was initiated by a change of As species and their distribution pattern in various tissues. Here, the localization of As was investigated at the subcellular level through X-ray fluorescence using a submicron beam and a Maia detector. Further, it was possible to obtain useful tissue structural information from the ratio of the tomogram of photon flux behind the sample to the tomogram of Compton scattering. The micro-X-ray fluorescence tomograms showed that As predominantly accumulated in the nucleus of the epidermal cells in young mature leaves exposed to sublethal 1 µM As. This suggests that As may exert toxic effects in the nucleus, for example, by interfering with nucleic acid synthesis by replacing phosphorous with As. At higher cellular concentrations, As was mainly stored in the vacuole, particularly in mature leaves. An analysis of precursors of chlorophyll and degradation metabolites revealed that the observed decrease in chlorophyll concentration was associated with hindered biosynthesis, and was not due to degradation. Coproporphyrinogen III could not be detected after exposure to only 0.5 µM As. Levels of subsequent precursors, for example, protoporphyrin IX, Mg-protoporphyrin, Mg-protoporphyrin methyl ester, and divinyl protochlorophyllide, were significantly decreased at this concentration as well, indicating that the pathway was blocked upstream of tetrapyrrole synthesis. PMID:27340233

  10. Imaging P2X4 receptor subcellular distribution, trafficking, and regulation using P2X4-pHluorin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ji; Chai, Hua; Ehinger, Konstantin; Egan, Terrance M; Srinivasan, Rahul; Frick, Manfred; Khakh, Baljit S

    2014-07-01

    P2X4 receptors are adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-gated cation channels present on the plasma membrane (PM) and also within intracellular compartments such as vesicles, vacuoles, lamellar bodies (LBs), and lysosomes. P2X4 receptors in microglia are up-regulated in epilepsy and in neuropathic pain; that is to say, their total and/or PM expression levels increase. However, the mechanisms underlying up-regulation of microglial P2X4 receptors remain unclear, in part because it has not been possible to image P2X4 receptor distribution within, or trafficking between, cellular compartments. Here, we report the generation of pH-sensitive fluorescently tagged P2X4 receptors that permit evaluations of cell surface and total receptor pools. Capitalizing on information gained from zebrafish P2X4.1 crystal structures, we designed a series of mouse P2X4 constructs in which a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein, superecliptic pHluorin (pHluorin), was inserted into nonconserved regions located within flexible loops of the P2X4 receptor extracellular domain. One of these constructs, in which pHluorin was inserted after lysine 122 (P2X4-pHluorin123), functioned like wild-type P2X4 in terms of its peak ATP-evoked responses, macroscopic kinetics, calcium flux, current-voltage relationship, and sensitivity to ATP. P2X4-pHluorin123 also showed pH-dependent fluorescence changes, and was robustly expressed on the membrane and within intracellular compartments. P2X4-pHluorin123 identified cell surface and intracellular fractions of receptors in HEK-293 cells, hippocampal neurons, C8-B4 microglia, and alveolar type II (ATII) cells. Furthermore, it showed that the subcellular fractions of P2X4-pHluorin123 receptors were cell and compartment specific, for example, being larger in hippocampal neuron somata than in C8-B4 cell somata, and larger in C8-B4 microglial processes than in their somata. In ATII cells, P2X4-pHluorin123 showed that P2X4 receptors were secreted onto the PM when LBs

  11. Uptake of injected 125I-ricin by rat liver in vivo. Subcellular distribution and characterization of the internalized ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Frénoy, J P; Turpin, E; Janicot, M; Gehin-Fouque, F; Desbuquois, B

    1992-01-01

    Subcellular-fractionation techniques were used to characterize the endocytic pathway followed by ricin in rat liver in vivo and tentatively identify the site(s) at which the ricin interchain disulphide bridge is split. After injection of 125I-ricin, hepatic uptake of radioactivity was maximum at 30 min (40% of injected dose). At 5 min, about 80% of the radioactivity in the homogenate was recovered in the microsomal (P) fraction, but later on the recovery of the radioactivity in the mitochondrial-lysosomal (ML) fractions progressively increased (50% at 30 min) at the expense of that in the P fraction. Subfractionation of the P and ML fractions on analytical sucrose-density gradients revealed a time-dependent translocation of the radioactivity from low- to high-density endocytic structures, with median relative densities at 5 and 60 min of about 1.15 and 1.16 (P fraction) and 1.19 and 1.22 (ML fraction) respectively. The late distribution of the radioactivity in the ML fraction was similar to that of the lysosomal marker acid phosphatase. Studies with co-injected lactose and mannan showed that ricin was internalized mainly via the mannose receptor. In the presence of mannan, the late recovery of radioactivity in the ML fraction was decreased, and the distribution of the radioactivity associated with the P fraction was shifted toward lower densities (median relative density 1.13), indicating a different pathway of endocytosis. Analysis of the radioactivity associated with the ML and S fractions by SDS/PAGE revealed a time-dependent increase in the amount of intact A- and B-chains and low-molecular-mass products. When ML fractions containing partially processed ricin were incubated at 37 degrees C at pH 5 or at pH 7.2 in the presence of ATP, only low-molecular-mass products were generated. We conclude that internalized ricin associates with endocytic structures whose size and density of equilibration increase with time, and that, although detectable in these structures

  12. The influence of metal speciation on the bioavailability and sub-cellular distribution of cadmium to the terrestrial isopod, Porcellio dilatatus.

    PubMed

    Calhôa, Carla Filipa; Monteiro, Marta S; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Mann, Reinier M

    2011-04-01

    Cadmium is a non-essential toxic metal that is able to bioaccumulate in both flora fauna and has the potential to biomagnify in some food chains. However, the form in which cadmium is presented to consumers can alter the bioavailability and possibly the internal distribution of assimilated Cd. Previous studies in our laboratory highlighted differences in Cd assimilation among isopods when they were provided with a plant-based food with either Cd biologically incorporated into plant tissue or superficially amended with ionic Cd(2+). Cd is known for its high affinity for sulphur ligands in cysteine residues which form the basis for metal-binding proteins such as metallothionein. This study compares Cd assimilation efficiency (AE) in Porcellio dilatatus fed with food amended with either cadmium cysteinate or cadmium nitrate in an examination of the influence of Cd speciation on metal bioavailability followed by an examination of the sub-cellular distribution using a centrifugal fractionation protocol. As hypothesized the AE of Cd among isopods fed with Cd(NO(3))(2) (64%, SE=5%) was higher than AE for isopods fed with Cd(Cys)(2) (20%, SE=3%). The sub-cellular distribution also depended on the Cd species provided. Those isopods fed Cd(Cys)(2) allocated significantly more Cd to the cell debris and organelles fractions at the expense of allocation to metal-rich granules (MRG). The significance of the difference in sub-cellular distribution with regard to toxicity is discussed. This paper demonstrates that the assimilation and internal detoxification of Cd is dependent on the chemical form of Cd presented to the isopod.

  13. Uses of subcellular metal distribution in prey to predict metal bioaccumulation and internal exposure in a predator.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ma-Shan; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2008-05-01

    In the present study, rock oysters (Saccostrea cucullata) were first exposed to cadmium and zinc for two weeks to modify their subcellular metal partitionings. The relationship between subcellular metal (Cd and Zn) partitioning in the oysters and metal bioaccumulation and fractionation in predatory gastropods (Thais clavigera) was then examined by feeding to the predator oysters that were preexposed to metal for two to four weeks. We also investigated the relationship between the PAM in the oysters and the biochemical biomarkers in the gastropods. Thais clavigera accumulated Cd effectively from their prey, but no correlation was found between the Cd body concentrations in T. clavigera and the internal metal partitioning in the prey. A significant positive correlation was found between the Cd in the trophically available metal (TAM) fraction of oysters and the Cd in the metal-sensitive fraction of T. clavigera and between the Cd in the TAM fraction of oysters and the metallothionein induction in whelks. Zinc was highly regulated by both S. cucullata and T. clavigera, and their Zn body concentrations remained constant throughout the exposure period. No relationship between Zn bioaccumulation and any of the subcellular fractions was found. The present study may lead to a better understanding of the dietary metal exposure mechanism.

  14. Interaction of HSP20 with a viral RdRp changes its sub-cellular localization and distribution pattern in plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Xiang, Cong-Ying; Yang, Jian; Chen, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Heng-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) perform a fundamental role in protecting cells against a wide array of stresses but their biological function during viral infection remains unknown. Rice stripe virus (RSV) causes a severe disease of rice in Eastern Asia. OsHSP20 and its homologue (NbHSP20) were used as baits in yeast two-hybrid (YTH) assays to screen an RSV cDNA library and were found to interact with the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of RSV. Interactions were confirmed by pull-down and BiFC assays. Further analysis showed that the N-terminus (residues 1–296) of the RdRp was crucial for the interaction between the HSP20s and viral RdRp and responsible for the alteration of the sub-cellular localization and distribution pattern of HSP20s in protoplasts of rice and epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana. This is the first report that a plant virus or a viral protein alters the expression pattern or sub-cellular distribution of sHSPs. PMID:26359114

  15. Regulation of the Regulators: Post-Translational Modifications, Subcellular, and Spatiotemporal Distribution of Plant 14-3-3 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rashaun S.; Swatek, Kirby N.; Thelen, Jay J.

    2016-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins bind to and modulate the activity of phosphorylated proteins that regulate a variety of metabolic processes in eukaryotes. Multiple 14-3-3 isoforms are expressed in most organisms and display redundancy in both sequence and function. Plants contain the largest number of 14-3-3 isoforms. For example, Arabidopsis thaliana contains thirteen 14-3-3 genes, each of which is expressed. Interest in the plant 14-3-3 field has swelled over the past decade, largely due to the vast number of possibilities for 14-3-3 metabolic regulation. As the field progresses, it is essential to understand these proteins' activities at both the spatiotemporal and subcellular levels. This review summarizes current knowledge of 14-3-3 proteins in plants, including 14-3-3 interactions, regulatory functions, isoform specificity, and post-translational modifications. We begin with a historical overview and structural analysis of 14-3-3 proteins, which describes the basic principles of 14-3-3 function, and then discuss interactions and regulatory effects of plant 14-3-3 proteins in specific tissues and subcellular compartments. We conclude with a summary of 14-3-3 phosphorylation and current knowledge of the functional effects of this modification in plants. PMID:27242818

  16. Subcellular distribution and potential detoxification mechanisms of mercury in the liver of the Javan mongoose (Herpestes javanicus) in Amamioshima Island, Japan.

    PubMed

    Horai, Sawako; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Ando, Tetsuo; Akiba, Suminori; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamada, Katsushi; Kuno, Katsuji; Abe, Shintaro; Watanabe, Izumi

    2008-06-01

    In a previous study, we showed that Hg accumulated to high levels in the liver of the Javan mongoose (Herpestes javanicus), a terrestrial mammal that lives on Amamioshima Island, Japan. This suggests a sophisticated mechanism of hepatic Hg detoxication. Assay of the subcellular localization of Hg and the expression of protective enzymes provides important clues for elucidating the mechanism of Hg detoxication. In the present study, the concentrations of 11 elements (Mg, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Rb, Cd, total Hg [T-Hg] and organic Hg [O-Hg], and Pb) were determined in the liver and in five liver subcellular fractions (plasma membrane, mitochondria, nuclei, microsome, and cytosol) of this species. As the T-Hg level increased, T-Hg markedly distributed to the plasma membrane. The T-Hg levels in all subcellular fractions correlated with Se levels. Although the T-Hg level in the microsomal fraction was relatively low, the ratio of O-Hg to T-Hg was significantly lower in the microsomes than in the other fractions. Significant positive correlations were found between the level of glutathione-S-transferase-pi, a marker of oxidative stress, and the O-Hg and T-Hg levels, but the correlation was better with O-Hg than with T-Hg. Western blot analysis of thioredoxin reductase 2 (TrxR2), a protein involved in protecting cells from mitochondrial oxidative stress, showed that the level of TrxR2 correlated with that of T-Hg. High TrxR2 levels may be one mechanism by which the Javan mongoose attenuates the toxicity of the high Hg levels present in the liver.

  17. Dynamic changes in the subcellular distribution of the tobacco ROS-producing enzyme RBOHD in response to the oomycete elicitor cryptogein

    PubMed Central

    Noirot, Elodie; Der, Christophe; Lherminier, Jeannine; Robert, Franck; Moricova, Pavla; Kiêu, Kiên; Leborgne-Castel, Nathalie; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Bouhidel, Karim

    2014-01-01

    Plant NADPH oxidases, also known as respiratory burst oxidase homologues (RBOHs), have been identified as a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during plant–microbe interactions. The subcellular localization of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) ROS-producing enzyme RBOHD was examined in Bright Yellow-2 cells before and after elicitation with the oomycete protein cryptogein using electron and confocal microscopy. The plasma membrane (PM) localization of RBOHD was confirmed and immuno-electron microscopy on purified PM vesicles revealed its distribution in clusters. The presence of the protein fused to GFP was also seen in intracellular compartments, mainly Golgi cisternae. Cryptogein induced, within 1h, a 1.5-fold increase in RBOHD abundance at the PM and a concomitant decrease in the internal compartments. Use of cycloheximide revealed that most of the proteins targeted to the PM upon elicitation were not newly synthesized but may originate from the Golgi pool. ROS accumulation preceded RBOHD transcript- and protein-upregulation, indicating that ROS resulted from the activation of a PM-resident pool of enzymes, and that enzymes newly addressed to the PM were inactive. Taken together, the results indicate that control of RBOH abundance and subcellular localization may play a fundamental role in the mechanism of ROS production. PMID:24987013

  18. Distribution and processing of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor in the rat hepatocyte: morphological and biochemical characterization of subcellular fractions.

    PubMed

    Solari, R; Racine, L; Tallichet, C; Kraehenbuhl, J P

    1986-01-01

    The transepithelial transport of polymeric immunoglobulins is an essential process in the mucosal immune system. Transport across the epithelial cells of mucous or exocrine glands is affected by an integral membrane glycoprotein receptor known as membrane secretory component (SCm) or as polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). This receptor binds polymeric immunoglobulins at the basolateral cell surface and mediates their transcellular translocation and their release from the apical plasma membrane into external secretions. Release depends on cleavage of the membrane-anchoring domain of the receptor, resulting in liberation of polymeric immunoglobulin bound to the ectoplasmic domain of the receptor (secreted SC or SCs) into extracellular secretions. Using a monoclonal antibody directed against the cytoplasmic tail of the receptor and a polyclonal antibody directed against the secreted ectoplasmic domain, we have combined cell fractionation and Western blotting techniques to examine the fate of these receptor domains in the hepatocyte. In this study, we characterize biochemically and morphologically the various subcellular components separated by our fractionation scheme, and correlate this with biochemical analysis of the receptor in each fraction.

  19. Glutamine synthetase stability and subcellular distribution in astrocytes are regulated by γ-aminobutyric type B receptors.

    PubMed

    Huyghe, Deborah; Nakamura, Yasuko; Terunuma, Miho; Faideau, Mathilde; Haydon, Philip; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J

    2014-10-17

    Emerging evidence suggests that functional γ-aminobutyric acid B receptors (GABABRs) are expressed by astrocytes within the mammalian brain. GABABRs are heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors that are composed of R1/R2 subunits. To date, they have been characterized in neurons as the principal mediators of sustained inhibitory signaling; however their roles in astrocytic physiology have been ill defined. Here we reveal that the cytoplasmic tail of the GABABR2 subunit binds directly to the astrocytic protein glutamine synthetase (GS) and that this interaction determines the subcellular localization of GS. We further demonstrate that the binding of GS to GABABR2 increases the steady state expression levels of GS in heterologous cells and in mouse primary astrocyte culture. Mechanistically this increased stability of GS in the presence of GABABR2 occurs via reduced proteasomal degradation. Collectively, our results suggest a novel role for GABABRs as regulators of GS stability. Given the critical role that GS plays in the glutamine-glutamate cycle, astrocytic GABABRs may play a critical role in supporting both inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission.

  20. Effect of DA-6 and EDTA alone or in combination on uptake, subcellular distribution and chemical form of Pb in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    He, Shanying; Wu, Qiuling; He, Zhenli

    2013-11-01

    The effects of growth-promoting hormone diethyl aminoethyl hexanoate (DA-6) and EDTA, either alone or in combination applied to original soil or lead (Pb) spiked soil on Pb phytoextraction, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in Lolium perenne were studied. EDTA addition alone significantly reduced plant biomass though it increased Pb accumulation (P<0.05). Foliar spray of DA-6 alone increased both plant biomass and Pb accumulation (P<0.05), with 10μM DA-6 being the most effective. DA-6 combined with EDTA compensated the adverse effect of the latter on plant growth, and resulted in a synergistic effect on Pb uptake and translocation, with the maximum accumulation occurring in the EDTA+10μM DA-6 treatment. At the subcellular level, about 35-66% of Pb was distributed in cell wall and 21-42% in soluble fraction, with a minority present in cellular organelles fraction. EDTA addition alone increased the proportion of Pb in soluble and cellular organelles fraction, while DA-6 detoxified Pb in plant by storing additional Pb in cell wall, and 10μM DA-6 was the most effective. Of the total Pb in plant shoot, 27-52% was NaCl extractable, 22-47% HAc extractable, followed by other fractions. Contrary to EDTA, DA-6 significantly decreased Pb migration in plant. These results suggest that Pb fixation by pectates and proteins in cell wall and compartmentalization by vacuole might be responsible for Pb detoxification in plant, and the combined use of EDTA and 10μM DA-6 appears to be optimal for improving the remediation efficiency of L. perenne for Pb contaminated soil.

  1. Subcellular distribution of ( sup 3 H)-dexamethasone mesylate binding sites in Leydig cells using electron microscope radioautography

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T. )

    1991-01-01

    The present view is that glucocorticoid hormones bind to their cytoplasmic receptors before reaching their nuclear target sites, which include specific DNA sequences. Although it is believed that cytoplasmic sequestration of steroid receptors and other transcription factors (such as NFKB) may regulate the overall activity of these factors, there is little information on the exact subcellular sites of steroid receptors or even of any other transcription factors. Tritiated (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate (DM) is an affinity label that binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thereby allowing morphological localization of the receptor at the light and electron microscope levels as well as for quantitative radioautographic (RAG) analysis. After injection of 3H-DM into the testis, a specific radioautographic signal was observed in Leydig cells, which correlated with a high level of immunocytochemically demonstrable GR in these cells at the light-microscope level. To localize the 3H-DM binding sites at the electron microscope (EM) level, the testes of 5 experimental and 3 control adrenalectomized rats were injected directly with 20 microCi 3H-DM; control rats received simultaneously a 25-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone; 15 min later, rats were fixed with glutaraldehyde and the tissue was processed for EM RAG analysis combined with quantitative morphometry. The radioautographs showed that the cytosol, nucleus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER), and mitochondria were labeled. Since the cytosol was always adjacent to tubules of the sER, the term sER-rich cytosol was used to represent label over sER networks, which may also represent cytosol labeling due to the limited resolution of the radioautographic technique. Labeling was highest in sER-rich cytosol and mitochondria, at 53% and 31% of the total, respectively.

  2. Alterations in the characteristic size distributions of subcellular scatterers at the onset of apoptosis: effect of Bcl-xL and Bax/Bak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing-Yi; Boustany, Nada N.

    2010-07-01

    Optical scatter imaging is used to estimate organelle size distributions in immortalized baby mouse kidney cells treated with 0.4 μM staurosporine to induce apoptosis. The study comprises apoptosis competent iBMK cells (W2) expressing the proapoptotic proteins Bax/Bak, apoptosis resistant Bax/Bak null cells (D3), and W2 and D3 cells expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) or YFP fused to the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL (YFP-Bcl-xL). YFP expression is diffuse within the transfected cells, while YFP-Bcl-xL is localized to the mitochondria. Our results show a significant increase in the mean subcellular particle size from approximately 1.1 to 1.4 μm in both Bax/Bak expressing and Bax/Bak null cells after 60 min of STS treatment compared to DMSO-treated control cells. This dynamic is blocked by overexpression of YFP-Bcl-xL in Bax/Bak expressing cells, but is less significantly inhibited by YFP-Bcl-xL in Bax/Bak null cells. Our data suggest that the increase in subcellular particle size at the onset of apoptosis is modulated by Bcl-xL in the presence of Bax/Bak, but it occurs upstream of the final commitment to programmed cell death. Mitochondrial localization of YFP-Bcl-xL and the finding that micron-sized particles give rise to the scattering signal further suggest that alterations in mitochondrial morphology may underlie the observed changes in light scattering.

  3. Autophagosome Proteins LC3A, LC3B and LC3C Have Distinct Subcellular Distribution Kinetics and Expression in Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Koukourakis, Michael I.; Kalamida, Dimitra; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Zois, Christos E.; Sivridis, Efthimios; Pouliliou, Stamatia; Mitrakas, Achilleas; Gatter, Kevin C.; Harris, Adrian L.

    2015-01-01

    LC3s (MAP1-LC3A, B and C) are structural proteins of autophagosomal membranes, widely used as biomarkers of autophagy. Whether these three LC3 proteins have a similar biological role in autophagy remains obscure. We examine in parallel the subcellular expression patterns of the three LC3 proteins in a panel of human cancer cell lines, as well as in normal MRC5 fibroblasts and HUVEC, using confocal microscopy and western blot analysis of cell fractions. In the cytoplasm, there was a minimal co-localization between LC3A, B and C staining, suggesting that the relevant autophagosomes are formed by only one out of the three LC3 proteins. LC3A showed a perinuclear and nuclear localization, while LC3B was equally distributed throughout the cytoplasm and localized in the nucleolar regions. LC3C was located in the cytoplasm and strongly in the nuclei (excluding nucleoli), where it extensively co-localized with the LC3A and the Beclin-1 autophagy initiating protein. Beclin 1 is known to contain a nuclear trafficking signal. Blocking nuclear export function by Leptomycin B resulted in nuclear accumulation of all LC3 and Beclin-1 proteins, while Ivermectin that blocks nuclear import showed reduction of accumulation, but not in all cell lines. Since endogenous LC3 proteins are used as major markers of autophagy in clinical studies and cell lines, it is essential to check the specificity of the antibodies used, as the kinetics of these molecules are not identical and may have distinct biological roles. The distinct subcellular expression patterns of LC3s provide a basis for further studies. PMID:26378792

  4. [Effects of Different Modifier Concentrations on Lead-Zinc Tolerance, Subcellular Distribution and Chemical Forms for Four Kinds of Woody Plants].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-hua; Zhang, Fu-yun; Wu, Xiao-fu; Liang, Xi; Yuan, Si-wen

    2015-10-01

    Four kinds of lead-zinc tolerant woody plants: Nerium oleander, Koelreuteria paniculata, Paulownia and Boehmeria were used as materials to estimate their enrichment and transferable capacity of lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) and analyze the subcellular distribution and chemical speciation of Zn and Ph in different parts of plants, under different modifier concentrations (CK group: 100% lead-zinc slag plus a small amount of phosphate fertilizer, improved one: 85% of lead-zinc slag ± 10% peat ± 5% bacterial manure plus a small amount of phosphate fertilizer, improved two: 75% lead-zinc slag ± 20% peat ± 5% bacterial manure ± a small amount of phosphate). Results showed that: (1) The content of Pb, Zn in matrix after planting four kinds of plants was lower than before, no significant difference between improved one and improved two of Nerium oleander and Boehmeria was found, but improved two was better than improved one of Paulownia, while improved one was better than improved two of Koelreuteria paniculata; Four plants had relatively low aboveground enrichment coefficient of Pb and Zn, but had a high transfer coefficient, showed that the appropriate modifier concentration was able to improve the Pb and Zn enrichment and transfer ability of plants. (2) In subcellular distribution, most of Pb and Zn were distributed in plant cell wall components and soluble components while the distribution in cell organelles such as mitochondria, chloroplasts and nucleus component were less. Compared with CK group, two improved group made soluble components of the cell walls of Pb fixation and retention of zinc role in the enhancement. (3) As for the chemical forms of Pb and Zn in plants, the main chemical forms of Pb were hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride and ethanol extractable forms, while other chemical form contents were few, the main chemical forms of Zn were different based on plant type. Compared with CK group, the proportion of the active Pb chemical form in different plant

  5. Distribution and linkage of domoic acid (amnesic shellfish poisoning toxins) in subcellular fractions of the digestive gland of the scallop Pecten maximus.

    PubMed

    Mauriz, Aida; Blanco, Juan

    2010-01-01

    The king scallop Pecten maximus accumulates domoic acid, the main amnesic shellfish poisoning toxin, in the digestive gland for a long time. To try to find if the cause of this characteristic is the binding of the toxin to some cellular component, the subcellular distribution of domoic acid in the cells of the digestive gland was studied, by means of serial centrifugation, ultrafiltration and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Domoic acid was found to be present mostly in soluble form in the cytosol, as more than 90% was found in the supernatant after a centrifugation of 1h at 45,000 x g, and passed a 10 kDa ultrafilter. The retention time of the peak with an absorption maximum of 242 nm--the one characteristic of domoic acid--observed in the SEC chromatograms of the scallop samples was found identical to be one of a reference solution of the toxin, indicating therefore, that domoic acid is free in the cytosol of the digestive gland of Pecten maximus. This finding turns the focus from binding to the lack of membrane transporters in this species of the scallop as the cause of the long retention time of domoic acid in this species.

  6. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela

    2013-09-01

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection.

  7. PCSK9 deficiency unmasks a sex- and tissue-specific subcellular distribution of the LDL and VLDL receptors in mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Roubtsova, Anna; Chamberland, Ann; Marcinkiewicz, Jadwiga; Essalmani, Rachid; Fazel, Ali; Bergeron, John J.; Seidah, Nabil G.; Prat, Annik

    2015-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9), the last member of the family of Proprotein Convertases related to Subtilisin and Kexin, regulates LDL-cholesterol by promoting the endosomal/lysosomal degradation of the LDL receptor (LDLR). Herein, we show that the LDLR cell surface levels dramatically increase in the liver and pancreatic islets of PCSK9 KO male but not female mice. In contrast, in KO female mice, the LDLR is more abundant at the cell surface enterocytes, as is the VLDL receptor (VLDLR) at the cell surface of adipocytes. Ovariectomy of KO female mice led to a typical KO male pattern, whereas 17β-estradiol (E2) treatment restored the female pattern without concomitant changes in LDLR adaptor protein 1 (also known as ARH), disabled-2, or inducible degrader of the LDLR expression levels. We also show that this E2-mediated regulation, which is observed only in the absence of PCSK9, is abolished upon feeding the mice a high-cholesterol diet. The latter dramatically represses PCSK9 expression and leads to high surface levels of the LDLR in the hepatocytes of all sexes and genotypes. In conclusion, the absence of PCSK9 results in a sex- and tissue-specific subcellular distribution of the LDLR and VLDLR, which is determined by E2 levels. PMID:26323289

  8. Characterization of the human SLC2A11 (GLUT11) gene: alternative promoter usage, function, expression, and subcellular distribution of three isoforms, and lack of mouse orthologue.

    PubMed

    Scheepers, Andrea; Schmidt, Stefan; Manolescu, Andrei; Cheeseman, Chris I; Bell, Andreas; Zahn, Claudia; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schürmann, Annette

    2005-01-01

    GLUT11 (SLC2A11) is a class II sugar transport facilitator which exhibits highest similarity with the fructose transporter GLUT5 (about 42%). Here we demonstrate that separate exons 1 (exon 1A, exon 1B, and exon 1C) of the SLC2A11 gene generate mRNAs of three GLUT11 variants (GLUT11-A, GLUT11-B, and GLUT11-C) that differ in the amino acid sequence of their N-termini. All three 5'-flanking regions of exon 1A, exon 1B and exon 1C exhibited promoter activity when expressed as luciferase fusion constructs in COS-7 cells. 5'-RACE-PCR, quantitative real-time PCR, and Northern blot analysis performed with specific probes for exon 1A, 1B and 1C demonstrated that GLUT11-A is expressed in heart, skeletal muscle, and kidney, GLUT11-B in kidney, adipose tissue, and placenta, and GLUT11-C in adipose tissue, heart, skeletal muscle, and pancreas. Surprisingly, mice and rats lack the SLC2A11 gene. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, all three GLUT11 isoforms transport glucose and fructose but not galactose. There was no apparent difference in the subcellular distribution of the three isoforms expressed in COS-7 cells. Our data indicate that different promoters and splicing of the human SLC2A11 gene generate three GLUT11 isoforms which are expressed in a tissue specific manner but do not appear to differ in their functional characteristics.

  9. Regional distribution and subcellular associations of Type II calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Erondu, N.E.

    1986-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies generated against the Type II CaM kinase have been characterized. Two of these antibodies were used to confirm that both alpha and beta subunits were part of the holoenzyme complex. I also developed liquid phase and solid phase radioimmunoassays for the kinase. With the solid phase radioimmunoassay, the distribution of the kinase in rat brain was examined. This study revealed that the concentration of the kinase varies markedly in different brain regions. It is most highly concentrated in the telencephalon where it comprises approximately 2% of total hippocampal protein, 1.3% of cortical protein and 0.7% of striatal protein. It is less concentrated in lower brain regions ranging from 0.3% of hypothalamic protein to 0.1% of protein in the pons/medulla.

  10. High Resolution Imaging of Temporal and Spatial Changes of Subcellular Ascorbate, Glutathione and H2O2 Distribution during Botrytis cinerea Infection in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Uwe K.; Polanschütz, Lisa M.; Koffler, Barbara E.; Zechmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the mechanisms behind the infection process of the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea, the subcellular distribution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was monitored over a time frame of 96 h post inoculation (hpi) in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 leaves at the inoculation site (IS) and the area around the IS which was defined as area adjacent to the inoculation site (AIS). H2O2 accumulation was correlated with changes in the compartment-specific distribution of ascorbate and glutathione and chloroplast fine structure. This study revealed that the severe breakdown of the antioxidative system, indicated by a drop in ascorbate and glutathione contents at the IS at later stages of infection correlated with an accumulation of H2O2 in chloroplasts, mitochondria, cell walls, nuclei and the cytosol which resulted in the development of chlorosis and cell death, eventually visible as tissue necrosis. A steady increase of glutathione contents in most cell compartments within infected tissues (up to 600% in chloroplasts at 96 hpi) correlated with an accumulation of H2O2 in chloroplasts, mitochondria and cell walls at the AIS indicating that high glutathione levels could not prevent the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which resulted in chlorosis. Summing up, this study reveals the intracellular sequence of events during Botrytis cinerea infection and shows that the breakdown of the antioxidative system correlated with the accumulation of H2O2 in the host cells. This resulted in the degeneration of the leaf indicated by severe changes in the number and ultrastructure of chloroplasts (e.g. decrease of chloroplast number, decrease of starch and thylakoid contents, increase of plastoglobuli size), chlorosis and necrosis of the leaves. PMID:23755284

  11. The subcellular distribution of myeloid-related protein 8 (MRP8) and MRP14 in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Stroncek, David F; Shankar, Raji A; Skubitz, Keith M

    2005-01-01

    Background Myeloid-related protein 8 (MRP8) and MRP14 are S100 family calcium binding proteins that form a heterodimer known as calprotectin or MRP8/14 that is present in the cytosol of neutrophils and monocytes. MRP8/14 becomes associated with endothelium at sites of monocyte and neutrophil adhesion and transmigration and induces a thrombogenic and inflammatory response by increasing the endothelial transcription of proinflamatory chemokines and adhesion molecules. The distribution of MRP8/MRP14 among neutrophil granules and plasma membranes is unclear and was investigated to better understand the role of this molecule in acute inflammation. Study design Three monoclonal antibodies specific for MRP8 and MRP14 were characterized and used in immunoblotting assays of neutrophil whole cell extracts, and isolated plasma membranes, primary granules, secondary granules and cytosol. Results MRP8 and MRP14 were detected in neutrophil cytosol, plasma membrane, primary granule and secondary granule fractions. MRP8/14 demonstrated a calcium-dependent adherence to plasma membranes and primary granules and could be removed by washing with EGTA in a high ionic strength buffer. In contrast, MRP8/14 was found within the contents of the secondary granules. Activated neutrophils released secondary granules and MRP8/14. Conclusion MRP8/14 is located in neutrophil cytosol and secondary granule fractions and is loosely associated with plasma membranes. MRP8/14 released with secondary granules by activated neutrophils likely binds to endothelium and plays an important role in acute inflammation. PMID:16191197

  12. Studies on nitrosamine metabolism. III. Comparison of the subcellular distribution of radioactivity in tissues of REM and BALB/c mice following administration of (/sup 14/C)diethylnitrosamine

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, J.P.; Clapp, N.K.

    1981-10-01

    The tissue distribution of radioactivity in male RFM and BALB/c mice was investigated following a single dose of (/sup 14/C)-labeled diethylnitrosamine (DEN). The radiolabel was associated with all the subcellular fractions, and the majority of the radioactivity was located in the cytosol fraction. The majority of the radiolabel was usually eliminated from the fractions within 16-24 hrs after (/sup 14/C)DEN administration.

  13. Subcellular localization and clues for the function of the HetN factor influencing heterocyst distribution in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Mariscal, Vicente; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Elhai, Jeff; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2014-10-01

    In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, heterocysts are formed in the absence of combined nitrogen, following a specific distribution pattern along the filament. The PatS and HetN factors contribute to the heterocyst pattern by inhibiting the formation of consecutive heterocysts. Thus, inactivation of any of these factors produces the multiple contiguous heterocyst (Mch) phenotype. Upon N stepdown, a HetN protein with its C terminus fused to a superfolder version of green fluorescent protein (sf-GFP) or to GFP-mut2 was observed, localized first throughout the whole area of differentiating cells and later specifically on the peripheries and in the polar regions of mature heterocysts, coinciding with the location of the thylakoids. Polar localization required an N-terminal stretch comprising residues 2 to 27 that may represent an unconventional signal peptide. Anabaena strains expressing a version of HetN lacking this fragment from a mutant gene placed at the native hetN locus exhibited a mild Mch phenotype. In agreement with previous results, deletion of an internal ERGSGR sequence, which is identical to the C-terminal sequence of PatS, also led to the Mch phenotype. The subcellular localization in heterocysts of fluorescence resulting from the fusion of GFP to the C terminus of HetN suggests that a full HetN protein is present in these cells. Furthermore, the full HetN protein is more conserved among cyanobacteria than the internal ERGSGR sequence. These observations suggest that HetN anchored to thylakoid membranes in heterocysts may serve a function besides that of generating a regulatory (ERGSGR) peptide.

  14. Increased Activity and Altered Subcellular Distribution of Lysosomal Enzymes Determine Neuronal Vulnerability in Niemann-Pick Type C1-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Amritraj, Asha; Peake, Kyle; Kodam, Anitha; Salio, Chiara; Merighi, Adalberto; Vance, Jean E.; Kar, Satyabrata

    2009-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC), caused by mutations in the Npc1 or Npc2 genes, is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by intracellular accumulation/redistribution of cholesterol in a number of tissues including the brain. This is accompanied by a severe loss of neurons in selected brain regions. In this study, we evaluated the role of lysosomal enzymes, cathepsins B and D, in determining neuronal vulnerability in NPC1-deficient (Npc1−/−) mouse brains. Our results showed that Npc1−/− mice exhibit an age-dependent degeneration of neurons in the cerebellum but not in the hippocampus. The cellular level/expression and activity of cathepsins B and D are increased more predominantly in the cerebellum than in the hippocampus of Npc1−/− mice. In addition, the cytosolic levels of cathepsins, cytochrome c, and Bax2 are higher in the cerebellum than in the hippocampus of Npc1−/− mice, suggesting a role for these enzymes in the degeneration of neurons. This suggestion is supported by our observation that degeneration of cultured cortical neurons treated with U18666A, which induces an NPC1-like phenotype at the cellular level, can be attenuated by inhibition of cathepsin B or D enzyme activity. These results suggest that the increased level/activity and altered subcellular distribution of cathepsins may be associated with the underlying cause of neuronal vulnerability in Npc1−/− brains. Therefore, their inhibitors may have therapeutic potential in attenuating NPC pathology. PMID:19893049

  15. Subcellular distribution and dynamics of active proteasome complexes unraveled by a workflow combining in vivo complex cross-linking and quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Bertrand; Lambour, Thomas; Delobel, Julien; Amalric, François; Monsarrat, Bernard; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Bousquet-Dubouch, Marie-Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Through protein degradation, the proteasome plays fundamental roles in different cell compartments. Although the composition of the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) has been well documented, little is known about the composition and dynamics of the regulatory complexes that play a crucial role in its activity, or about how they associate with the CP in different cell compartments, different cell lines, and in response to external stimuli. Because of difficulties performing acceptable cell fractionation while maintaining complex integrity, it has been challenging to characterize proteasome complexes by proteomic approaches. Here, we report an integrated protocol, combining a cross-linking procedure on intact cells with cell fractionation, proteasome immuno-purification, and robust label-free quantitative proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry to determine the distribution and dynamics of cellular proteasome complexes in leukemic cells. Activity profiles of proteasomes were correlated fully with the composition of protein complexes and stoichiometry. Moreover, our results suggest that, at the subcellular level, proteasome function is regulated by dynamic interactions between the 20S CP and its regulatory proteins-which modulate proteasome activity, stability, localization, or substrate uptake-rather than by profound changes in 20S CP composition. Proteasome plasticity was observed both in the 20S CP and in its network of interactions following IFNγ stimulation. The fractionation protocol also revealed specific proteolytic activities and structural features of low-abundance microsomal proteasomes from U937 and KG1a cells. These could be linked to their important roles in the endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation pathway in leukemic cells.

  16. Regulation of gene expression and subcellular protein distribution in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells by lysophosphatidic acid: Relevance to dendrite outgrowth.

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Karin, Norman J.

    2011-02-26

    Osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are highly responsive to the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) but the mechanisms by which LPA alters bone cell functions are largely unknown. A major effect of LPA on osteocytic cells is the stimulation of dendrite membrane outgrowth, a process that we predicted to require changes in gene expression and protein distribution. We employed DNA microarrays for global transcriptional profiling of MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells grown for 6 and 24h in the presence or absence of LPA. We identified 932 transcripts that displayed statistically significant changes in abundance of at least 1.25-fold in response to LPA treatment. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the regulated gene products were linked to diverse cellular processes, including DNA repair, response to unfolded protein, ossification, protein-RNA complex assembly, and amine biosynthesis. Gene products associated with the regulation of actin microfilament dynamics displayed the most robust expression changes, and LPA-induced dendritogenesis in vitro was blocked by the stress fiber inhibitor cytochalasin D. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of MLO-Y4 cells revealed significant LPA-induced changes in the abundance of 284 proteins at 6h and 844 proteins at 24h. GO analysis of the proteomic data linked the effects of LPA to cell processes that control of protein distribution and membrane outgrowth, including protein localization, protein complex assembly, Golgi vesicle transport, cytoskeleton-dependent transport, and membrane invagination/endocytosis. Dendrites were isolated from LPA-treated MLO-Y4 cells and subjected to proteomic analysis to quantitatively assess the subcellular distribution of proteins. Sets of 129 and 36 proteins were enriched in the dendrite fraction as compared to whole cells after 6h and 24h of LPA exposure, respectively. Protein markers indicated that membranous organelles were largely excluded from the dendrites. Highly represented among

  17. Synchronization by Daytime Restricted Food Access Modulates the Presence and Subcellular Distribution of β-Catenin and Its Phosphorylated Forms in the Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    De Ita-Pérez, Dalia Luz; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    characterize the effect food synchronization has on the presence, subcellular distribution, and liver zonation of β-catenin variants. These results are relevant to understand the set of metabolic and structural liver adaptations that are associated with the expression of the food entrained oscillator (FEO). PMID:28220106

  18. Evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 peroxisomal and mitochondrial targeting. A survey of its subcellular distribution in the livers of various representatives of the classes Mammalia, Aves and Amphibia.

    PubMed

    Danpure, C J; Fryer, P; Jennings, P R; Allsop, J; Griffiths, S; Cunningham, A

    1994-08-01

    As part of a wider study on the molecular evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT1) intracellular compartmentalization, we have determined the subcellular distribution of immunoreactive AGT1, using postembedding protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopy, in the livers of various members of the classes Mammalia, Aves, and Amphibia. As far as organellar distribution is concerned, three categories could be distinguished. In members of the first category (type I), all, or nearly all, of the immunoreactive AGT1 was concentrated within the peroxisomes. In the second category (type II), AGT1 was found more evenly distributed in both peroxisomes and mitochondria. In the third category (type III), AGT1 was localized mainly within the mitochondria with much lower, but widely variable, amounts in the peroxisomes. Type I animals include the human, two great apes (gorilla, orangutan), two Old World monkeys (anubis baboon, Japanese macaque), a New World monkey (white-faced Saki monkey), a lago, morph (European rabbit), a bat (Seba's short-tailed fruit bat), two caviomorph rodents (guinea pig, orange-rumped agouti), and two Australian marsupials (koala, Bennett's wallaby). Type II animals include two New World monkeys (common marmoset, cotton-top tamarin), three prosimians (brown lemur, fat-tailed dwarf lemur, pygmy slow loris), five rodents (a hybrid crested porcupine, Colombian ground squirrel, laboratory rat, laboratory mouse, golden hamster), an American marsupial (grey short-tailed opossum), and a bird (raven). Type III animals include the large tree shrew, three insectivores (common Eurasian mole, European hedgehog, house shrew), four carnivores (domestic cat, ocelot, domestic dog, polecat ferret), and an amphibian (common frog). In addition to these categories, some animals (e.g. guinea pig, common frog) possessed significant amounts of cytosolic AGT1. Whereas the subcellular distribution of AGT1 in some orders (e.g. Insectivora and Carnivora) did not appear

  19. Sub-cellular proteomics of Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeonghoon; Lei, Zhentian; Watson, Bonnie S.; Sumner, Lloyd W.

    2013-01-01

    Medicago truncatula is a leading model species and substantial molecular, genetic, genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics resources have been developed for this species to facilitate the study of legume biology. Currently, over 60 proteomics studies of M. truncatula have been published. Many of these have focused upon the unique symbiosis formed between legumes and nitrogen fixing rhizobia bacteria, while others have focused on seed development and the specialized proteomes of distinct tissues/organs. These include the characterization of sub-cellular organelle proteomes such as nuclei and mitochondria, as well as proteins distributed in plasma or microsomal membranes from various tissues. The isolation of sub-cellular proteins typically requires a series of steps that are labor-intensive. Thus, efficient protocols for sub-cellular fractionation, purification, and enrichment are necessary for each cellular compartment. In addition, protein extraction, solubilization, separation, and digestion prior to mass spectral identification are important to enhance the detection of low abundance proteins and to increase the overall detectable proportion of the sub-cellular proteome. This review summarizes the sub-cellular proteomics studies in M. truncatula. PMID:23641248

  20. Unique subcellular distribution of phosphorylated Plk1 (Ser137 and Thr210) in mouse oocytes during meiotic division and pPlk1Ser137 involvement in spindle formation and REC8 cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Cao, Yan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Nana; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Dandan; Liu, Xiaoyun; Xu, Qunyuan; Ma, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is pivotal for proper mitotic progression, its targeting activity is regulated by precise subcellular positioning and phosphorylation. Here we assessed the protein expression, subcellular localization and possible functions of phosphorylated Plk1 (pPlk1Ser137 and pPlk1Thr210) in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. Western blot analysis revealed a peptide of pPlk1Ser137 with high and stable expression from germinal vesicle (GV) until metaphase II (MII), while pPlk1Thr210 was detected as one large single band at GV stage and 2 small bands after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), which maintained stable up to MII. Immunofluorescence analysis showed pPlk1Ser137 was colocalized with microtubule organizing center (MTOC) proteins, γ-tubulin and pericentrin, on spindle poles, concomitantly with persistent concentration at centromeres and dynamic aggregation between chromosome arms. Differently, pPlk1Thr210 was persistently distributed across the whole body of chromosomes after meiotic resumption. The specific Plk1 inhibitor, BI2536, repressed pPlk1Ser137 accumulation at MTOCs and between chromosome arms, consequently disturbed γ-tubulin and pericentrin recruiting to MTOCs, destroyed meiotic spindle formation, and delayed REC8 cleavage, therefore arresting oocytes at metaphase I (MI) with chromosome misalignment. BI2536 completely reversed the premature degradation of REC8 and precocious segregation of chromosomes induced with okadaic acid (OA), an inhibitor to protein phosphatase 2A. Additionally, the protein levels of pPlk1Ser137 and pPlk1Thr210, as well as the subcellular distribution of pPlk1Thr210, were not affected by BI2536. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Plk1 activity is required for meiotic spindle assembly and REC8 cleavage, with pPlk1Ser137 is the action executor, in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. PMID:26654596

  1. Determination of elemental distribution in green micro-algae using synchrotron radiation nano X-ray fluorescence (SR-nXRF) and electron microscopy techniques--subcellular localization and quantitative imaging of silver and cobalt uptake by Coccomyxa actinabiotis.

    PubMed

    Leonardo, T; Farhi, E; Boisson, A-M; Vial, J; Cloetens, P; Bohic, S; Rivasseau, C

    2014-02-01

    The newly discovered unicellular micro-alga Coccomyxa actinabiotis proves to be highly radio-tolerant and strongly concentrates radionuclides, as well as large amounts of toxic metals. This study helps in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the accumulation and detoxification of silver and cobalt. Elemental distribution inside Coccomyxa actinabiotis cells was determined using synchrotron nano X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy at the ID22 nano fluorescence imaging beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The high resolution and high sensitivity of this technique enabled the assessment of elemental associations and exclusions in subcellular micro-algae compartments. A quantitative treatment of the scans was implemented to yield absolute concentrations of each endogenous and exogenous element with a spatial resolution of 100 nm and compared to the macroscopic content in cobalt and silver determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The nano X-ray fluorescence imaging was complemented by transmission electron microscopy coupled to X-ray microanalysis (TEM-EDS), yielding differential silver distribution in the cell wall, cytosol, nucleus, chloroplast and mitochondria with unique resolution. The analysis of endogenous elements in control cells revealed that iron had a unique distribution; zinc, potassium, manganese, molybdenum, and phosphate had their maxima co-localized in the same area; and sulfur, copper and chlorine were almost homogeneously distributed among the whole cell. The subcellular distribution and quantification of cobalt and silver in micro-alga, assessed after controlled exposure to various concentrations, revealed that exogenous metals were mainly sequestered inside the cell rather than on mucilage or the cell wall, with preferential compartmentalization. Cobalt was homogeneously distributed outside of the chloroplast. Silver was localized in the cytosol at low concentration and in the whole cell excluding the

  2. Combined thermotherapy and cryotherapy for efficient virus eradication: relation of virus distribution, subcellular changes, cell survival and viral RNA degradation in shoot tips.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiaochun; Cuellar, Wilmer J; Rajamäki, Minna-Liisa; Hirata, Yukimasa; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2008-03-01

    Accumulation of viruses in vegetatively propagated plants causes heavy yield losses. Therefore, supply of virus-free planting materials is pivotal to sustainable crop production. In previous studies, Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) was difficult to eradicate from raspberry (Rubus idaeus) using the conventional means of meristem tip culture. As shown in the present study, it was probably because this pollen-transmitted virus efficiently invades leaf primordia and all meristematic tissues except the least differentiated cells of the apical dome. Subjecting plants to thermotherapy prior to meristem tip culture heavily reduced viral RNA2, RNA3 and the coat protein in the shoot tips, but no virus-free plants were obtained. Therefore, a novel method including thermotherapy followed by cryotherapy was developed for efficient virus eradication. Heat treatment caused subcellular alterations such as enlargement of vacuoles in the more developed, virus-infected cells, which were largely eliminated following subsequent cryotherapy. Using this protocol, 20-36% of the treated shoot tips survived, 30-40% regenerated and up to 35% of the regenerated plants were virus-free, as tested by ELISA and reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification. Novel cellular and molecular insights into RBDV-host interactions and the factors influencing virus eradication were obtained, including invasion of shoot tips and meristematic tissues by RBDV, enhanced viral RNA degradation and increased sensitivity to freezing caused by thermotherapy, and subcellular changes and subsequent death of cells caused by cryotherapy. This novel procedure should be helpful with many virus-host combinations in which virus eradication by conventional means has proven difficult.

  3. Sub-cellular distribution of UNC-104(KIF1A) upon binding to adaptors as UNC-16(JIP3), DNC-1(DCTN1/Glued) and SYD-2(Liprin-α) in C. elegans neurons.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C-C; Moncaleano, J D; Wagner, O I

    2011-03-10

    The accumulation of cargo (tau, amyloid precursor protein, neurofilaments etc.) in neurons is a hallmark of various neurodegenerative diseases while we have only little knowledge how axonal transport is regulated. Kinesin-3 UNC-104(KIF1A) is the major transporter of synaptic vesicles and recent reports suggest that a cargo itself can affect the motor's activity. Inspecting an interactome map, we identify three putative UNC-104 interactors, namely UNC-16(JIP3), DNC-1(DCTN1/Glued) and SYD-2(Liprin-α), known to be adaptors in essential neuronal protein complexes. We then employed the novel method bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay to visualize motor-adaptor complexes in the nervous system of living C. elegans. Interestingly, the binding of UNC-104 to each adaptor protein results in different sub-cellular distributions and has distinctive effects on the motor's motility. Specifically, if UNC-104 bound to UNC-16, the motor is primarily localized in the soma of neurons while bound to DNC-1, the motor is basically found in axonal termini. On the other hand, if UNC-104 is bound to SYD-2 we identify motor populations mostly along axons. Therefore, these three adaptors inherit different functions in steering the motor to specific sub-cellular locations in the neuron.

  4. Metal-induced stress in bivalves living along a gradient of Cd contamination: relating sub-cellular metal distribution to population-level responses.

    PubMed

    Perceval, Olivier; Couillard, Yves; Pinel-Alloul, Bernadette; Giguère, Anik; Campbell, Peter G C

    2004-09-20

    The use of biomarkers to assess the impacts of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems has noticeably increased over the past few years. Few of these studies, however, have contributed to the prediction of ecologically significant effects (i.e., at the population or community levels). The present field study was designed to evaluate the potential of metallothionein (MT) and sub-cellular metal partitioning measurements for predicting toxic effects at higher levels of the biological organization in freshwater bivalves (Pyganodon grandis) chronically exposed to Cd. For that purpose, we quantitatively sampled P. grandis populations in the littoral zone of nine lakes on the Precambrian Canadian Shield during two consecutive summers (1998 and 1999); lakes were characterized by contrasting Cd levels but similar trophic status. We tested relationships between the population status of P. grandis (i.e., growth parameters, density, biomass, secondary production, turnover ratio and cumulative fecundity) and (i) ambient Cd concentrations, (ii) sub-organismal responses (MT concentrations in the gill cytosol of individuals and Cd concentrations in three metal-ligand pools identified as M-HMW, the high molecular weight pool, M-MT, the metallothionein-like pool and M-LMW, the low molecular weight pool) and (iii) ecological confounding factors (food resources, presence of host fishes for the obligatory parasitic larval stage of P. grandis). Our results show that littoral density, live weight, dry viscera biomass, production and cumulative fecundity decreased with increasing concentrations of the free-cadmium ion in the environment (Pearson's r ranging from -0.63 to -0.78). On the other hand, theoretical maximum shell lengths (L( infinity )) in our populations were related to both the dissolved Ca concentration and food quality (sestonic C and N concentrations). Overall, Cd concentrations in the gill cytosolic HMW pool of the individual molluscs were the biomarker response that was most

  5. Subcellular proteomics in neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Li, Ka Wan; Smit, August B

    2008-05-01

    The brain is the most complex and dynamically organized organ of the human body, with a high degree of computation capability enabling the execution of a wide spectrum of physiological processes and behaviors. In the past decades a large number of genomics studies have been undertaken to investigate brain function and brain disorders, but despite these efforts many of the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain largely unknown. The implementation of mass spectrometry based quantitative proteomics in recent years enabled to tap into condition-specific protein trafficking and protein interaction that are the key to organelle proteome (dys)function. The technology for neuroproteomics is still evolving; currently there are no standardized protocols. In this review we describe the most commonly used methods to prepare brain subcellular fractions suitable for proteomics analysis, and highlight the various approaches for quantitative neuroproteomics.

  6. Fluorescent probe based subcellular distribution of Cu(II) ions in living electrotrophs isolated from Cu(II)-reduced biocathodes of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ye; Xue, Hua; Huang, Liping; Zhou, Peng; Yang, Wei; Quan, Xie; Yuan, Jinxiu

    2017-02-01

    Based on the four indigenous electrotrophs (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia JY1, Citrobacter sp. JY3, Pseudomonas aeruginosa JY5 and Stenotrophomonas sp. JY6) isolated from well adapted Cu(II)-reduced biocathodes of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), a rhodamine based Cu(II) fluorescent probe was used to imaginably and quantitatively track subcellular Cu(II) ions in these electrotrophs. Cathodic electrons led to more Cu(II) ions (14.3-30.1%) in the intracellular sites at operation time of 2-3h with Cu(II) removal rates of 2.90-3.64mg/Lh whereas the absence of cathodic electrons prolonged the appearance of more Cu(II) ions (16.6-22.5%) to 5h with Cu(II) removal rates of 1.96-2.28mg/Lh. This study illustrates that cathodic electrons directed more Cu(II) ions for quicker entrance into the electrotrophic cytoplasm, and gives an alternative approach for developing imaging and functionally tracking Cu(II) ions in the electrotrophs of MFCs.

  7. Aging impairs the hepatic subcellular distribution of ChREBP in response to fasting/feeding in rats: Implications on hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Salamanca, Aurora; Bárcena, Brenda; Arribas, Carmen; Fernández-Agulló, Teresa; Martínez, Carmen; Carrascosa, José Ma; Ros, Manuel; Andrés, Antonio; Gallardo, Nilda

    2015-09-01

    Aging is associated with alterations of lipid metabolism and increased prevalence of non alcoholic hepatic steatosis. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which fat is accumulated in the liver during aging remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we investigated potential alterations that might contribute to the development of hepatic steatosis with aging. To this end, we analyzed the expression and the subcellular localization of key transcriptional factors involved in lipid metabolism such as ChREBP, Foxo1, Foxa2 and SREBP-1c in the liver of 3- and 24-month old Wistar rats. In addition, we studied the intracellular redistribution of ChREBP in response to fasting/refeeding transition. Old rats were characterized by hepatic steatosis, low serum ketone body levels and postprandial hyperinsulinemia. These observations were paralleled by the cytoplasmic localization and decreased expression of Foxa2, while ChREBP expression was markedly up-regulated and mainly localized in the nucleus. Consequently, the expression of lipogenic and β-oxidation genes was up-regulated or down-regulated, respectively. Besides, the intracellular redistribution of ChREBP in response to fasting/refeeding transition was also impaired in old animals. Additionally, a negative correlation between serum ketone body levels and the nuclear localization of ChREBP was observed only in adult but not in old rats. Taken together, these data suggest that an age-related dysfunctional adaptation of ChREBP, in response to changes in the nutritional state, might contribute to the development of liver steatosis with aging.

  8. Protein kinase C gamma interneurons in the rat medullary dorsal horn: distribution and synaptic inputs to these neurons, and subcellular localization of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Peirs, Cédric; Patil, Sudarshan; Bouali-Benazzouz, Rabia; Artola, Alain; Landry, Marc; Dallel, Radhouane

    2014-02-01

    The γ isoform of protein kinase C (PKCγ), which is concentrated in interneurons in the inner part of lamina II (IIi ) of the dorsal horn, has been implicated in the expression of tactile allodynia. Lamina IIi PKCγ interneurons were shown to be activated by tactile inputs and to participate in local circuits through which these inputs can reach lamina I, nociceptive output neurons. That such local circuits are gated by glycinergic inhibition and that A- and C-fibers low threshold mechanoreceptors (LTMRs) terminate in lamina IIi raise the general issue of synaptic inputs to lamina IIi PKCγ interneurons. Combining light and electron microscopic immunochemistry in the rat spinal trigeminal nucleus, we show that PKCγ-immunoreactivity is mostly restricted to interneurons in lamina IIi of the medullary dorsal horn, where they constitute 1/3 of total neurons. The majority of synapses on PKCγ-immunoreactive interneurons are asymmetric (likely excitatory). PKCγ-immunoreactive interneurons appear to receive exclusively myelinated primary afferents in type II synaptic glomeruli. Neither large dense core vesicle terminals nor type I synaptic glomeruli, assumed to be the endings of unmyelinated nociceptive terminals, were found on these interneurons. Moreover, there is no vesicular glutamate transporter 3-immunoreactive bouton, specific to C-LTMRs, on PKCγ-immunoreactive interneurons. PKCγ-immunoreactive interneurons contain GABAA ergic and glycinergic receptors. At the subcellular level, PKCγ-immunoreactivity is mostly concentrated on plasma membranes, close to, but not within, postsynaptic densities. That only myelinated primary afferents were found to contact PKCγ-immunoreactive interneurons suggests that myelinated, but not unmyelinated, LTMRs play a critical role in the expression of mechanical allodynia.

  9. Reversible Oxidation of a Conserved Methionine in the Nuclear Export Sequence Determines Subcellular Distribution and Activity of the Fungal Nitrate Regulator NirA.

    PubMed

    Gallmetzer, Andreas; Silvestrini, Lucia; Schinko, Thorsten; Gesslbauer, Bernd; Hortschansky, Peter; Dattenböck, Christoph; Muro-Pastor, María Isabel; Kungl, Andreas; Brakhage, Axel A; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Strauss, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    The assimilation of nitrate, a most important soil nitrogen source, is tightly regulated in microorganisms and plants. In Aspergillus nidulans, during the transcriptional activation process of nitrate assimilatory genes, the interaction between the pathway-specific transcription factor NirA and the exportin KapK/CRM1 is disrupted, and this leads to rapid nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity of NirA. In this work by mass spectrometry, we found that in the absence of nitrate, when NirA is inactive and predominantly cytosolic, methionine 169 in the nuclear export sequence (NES) is oxidized to methionine sulfoxide (Metox169). This oxidation depends on FmoB, a flavin-containing monooxygenase which in vitro uses methionine and cysteine, but not glutathione, as oxidation substrates. The function of FmoB cannot be replaced by alternative Fmo proteins present in A. nidulans. Exposure of A. nidulans cells to nitrate led to rapid reduction of NirA-Metox169 to Met169; this reduction being independent from thioredoxin and classical methionine sulfoxide reductases. Replacement of Met169 by isoleucine, a sterically similar but not oxidizable residue, led to partial loss of NirA activity and insensitivity to FmoB-mediated nuclear export. In contrast, replacement of Met169 by alanine transformed the protein into a permanently nuclear and active transcription factor. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis of NirA-KapK interactions and subcellular localization studies of NirA mutants lacking different parts of the protein provided evidence that Met169 oxidation leads to a change in NirA conformation. Based on these results we propose that in the presence of nitrate the activation domain is exposed, but the NES is masked by a central portion of the protein (termed nitrate responsive domain, NiRD), thus restricting active NirA molecules to the nucleus. In the absence of nitrate, Met169 in the NES is oxidized by an FmoB-dependent process leading to loss of protection by the Ni

  10. Scaling factors: transcription factors regulating subcellular domains.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jason C; Taghert, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    Developing cells acquire mature fates in part by selective (i.e. qualitatively different) expression of a few cell-specific genes. However, all cells share the same basic repertoire of molecular and subcellular building blocks. Therefore, cells must also specialize according to quantitative differences in cell-specific distributions of those common molecular resources. Here we propose the novel hypothesis that evolutionarily-conserved transcription factors called scaling factors (SFs) regulate quantitative differences among mature cell types. SFs: (1) are induced during late stages of cell maturation; (2) are dedicated to specific subcellular domains; and, thus, (3) allow cells to emphasize specific subcellular features. We identify candidate SFs and discuss one in detail: MIST1 (BHLHA15, vertebrates)/DIMM (CG8667, Drosophila); professional secretory cells use this SF to scale up regulated secretion. Because cells use SFs to develop their mature properties and also to adapt them to ever-changing environmental conditions, SF aberrations likely contribute to diseases of adult onset.

  11. Differential subcellular distribution of neurolysin (EC 3.4.24.16) and thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15) in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Massarelli, E E; Casatti, C A; Kato, A; Camargo, A C; Bauer, J A; Glucksman, M J; Roberts, J L; Hirose, S; Ferro, E S

    1999-12-18

    Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the rat brain distribution of thimet oligopeptidase and neurolysin. Both enzymes appear ubiquitously distributed within the entire rat brain. However, neuronal perikarya and processes stained for neurolysin, while intense nuclear labeling was only observed for thimet oligopeptidase. These data suggest that neurolysin and thimet oligopeptidase, endopeptidases sharing several functional and structural similarities, are present in distinctive intracellular compartments in neuronal cells.

  12. Subcellular compartmentation of glutathione in dicotyledonous plants

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the subcellular distribution of glutathione in roots and leaves of different plant species (Arabidopsis, Cucurbita, and Nicotiana). Glutathione is an important antioxidant and redox buffer which is involved in many metabolic processes including plant defense. Thus information on the subcellular distribution in these model plants especially during stress situations provides a deeper insight into compartment specific defense reactions and reflects the occurrence of compartment specific oxidative stress. With immunogold cytochemistry and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy glutathione could be localized in highest contents in mitochondria, followed by nuclei, peroxisomes, the cytosol, and plastids. Within chloroplasts and mitochondria, glutathione was restricted to the stroma and matrix, respectively, and did not occur in the lumen of cristae and thylakoids. Glutathione was also found at the membrane and in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. It was also associated with the trans and cis side of dictyosomes. None or only very little glutathione was detected in vacuoles and the apoplast of mesophyll and root cells. Additionally, glutathione was found in all cell compartments of phloem vessels, vascular parenchyma cells (including vacuoles) but was absent in xylem vessels. The specificity of this method was supported by the reduction of glutathione labeling in all cell compartments (up to 98%) of the glutathione-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana rml1 mutant. Additionally, we found a similar distribution of glutathione in samples after conventional fixation and rapid microwave-supported fixation. Thus, indicating that a redistribution of glutathione does not occur during sample preparation. Summing up, this study gives a detailed insight into the subcellular distribution of glutathione in plants and presents solid evidence for the accuracy and specificity of the applied method. PMID:20186447

  13. Subcellular distribution of cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) is regulated through phosphorylation by dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A).

    PubMed

    Oi, Ami; Katayama, Syouichi; Hatano, Naoya; Sugiyama, Yasunori; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2017-01-08

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase primarily expressed in the central nervous system and is known to cause X-linked neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome. However, the mechanisms regulating CDKL5 have not yet been fully clarified. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the protein kinase that directly phosphorylates CDKL5, identifying it as dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A), an enzyme binding to and phosphorylating CDKL5. We showed that subcellular distribution of CDKL5 was regulated by its phosphorylation by DYRK1A. In mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a cells, CDKL5 was localized in both the cytosol and nucleus, whereas DYRK1A showed a typical nuclear localization. When CDKL5 and DYRK1A were co-expressed, the cytosolic localization of CDKL5 was significantly increased. Results of site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the phosphorylation site was Ser-308, in the vicinity of the nuclear localization signal. A mutation mimicking the phosphorylated serine residue by aspartate substitution (S308D) changed CDKL5 localization to the cytosol, whereas the corresponding alanine-substituted analog, CDKL5(S308A), was primarily localized to the nucleus. Taken together, these results strongly suggested that DYRK1A bound to CDKL5 and phosphorylated it on Ser-308, thus interfering with its nuclear localization.

  14. Expression pattern and sub-cellular distribution of phosphoinositide specific phospholipase C enzymes after treatment with U-73122 in rat astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita; Fabrizi, Cinzia; Panetta, Barbara; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Cocco, Lucio

    2010-07-01

    Phosphoinositide specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzymes interfere with the metabolism of inositol phospholipids (PI), molecules involved in signal transduction, a complex process depending on various components. Many evidences support the hypothesis that, in the glia, isoforms of PI-PLC family display different expression and/or sub cellular distribution under non-physiological conditions such as the rat astrocytes activation during neurodegeneration, the tumoural progression of some neoplasms and the inflammatory cascade activation after lipopolysaccharide administration, even if their role remains not completely elucidated. Treatment of a cultured established glioma cell line (C6 rat astrocytoma cell line) induces a modification in the pattern of expression and of sub cellular distribution of PI-PLCs compared to untreated cells. Special attention require PI-PLC beta3 and PI-PLC gamma2 isoforms, whose expression and sub cellular localization significantly differ after U-73122 treatment. The meaning of these modifications is unclear, also because the use of this N-aminosteroid compound remains controversial, inasmuch it has further actions which might contribute to the global effect recorded on the treated cells.

  15. Comparison of GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 mRNA and the subcellular distribution of their proteins in normal human muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, C. A.; Wen, G.; Gustafson, W. C.; Thompson, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Basal, "insulin-independent" glucose uptake into skeletal muscle is provided by glucose transporters positioned at the plasma membrane. The relative amount of the three glucose transporters expressed in muscle has not been previously quantified. Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) methods, we found in normal human muscle that GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 mRNA were expressed at 90 +/- 10, 46 +/- 4, and 156 +/- 12 copies/ng RNA, respectively. Muscle was fractionated by DNase digestion and differential sedimentation into membrane fractions enriched in plasma membranes (PM) or low-density microsomes (LDM). GLUT1 and GLUT4 proteins were distributed 57% to 67% in LDM, whereas GLUT3 protein was at least 88% in the PM-enriched fractions. These data suggest that basal glucose uptake into resting human muscle could be provided in part by each of these three isoforms.

  16. Subcellular distribution and cellular self-repair ability of fluorescent quantum dots emitting in the visible to near-infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Fei; Su, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Yiling; He, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor II-VI quantum dots (QDs), as high-performance fluorescent biological probes, have garnered significant attention due to their superior optical properties. To enable QDs for wide-ranging bioapplications, concerns about their in vitro behavior need to be fully addressed. Herein, for the first time, cellular behaviors of aqueous synthesized-QDs (aqQDs), whose maximum emission wavelength (λ emission) covers the visible to near-infrared spectral window, are systematically investigated. Our results demonstrate that three different sized aqQDs feature distinct cellular distributions, i.e. aqQD530 (aqQDs whose λ emission is 530 nm) and aqQD620 (aqQDs whose λ emission is 620 nm) mainly distribute in the cytoplasm and nucleus, while aqQD730 (aqQDs whose λ emission is 730 nm) mainly accumulates in the cytoplasm. Most significantly, the phenomenon that cellular self-repair ability is dependent on diameters of aqQDs is revealed for the first time. In particular, small-sized QDs (e.g. aqQD530 and aqQD620) severely deteriorate cellular self-repair ability, leading to an irreversible decrease in cell viability. In striking contrast, large-sized QDs (e.g. aqQD730) have little effect on cellular self-repair ability, and the cell viability is restored after removal of aqQD730 from the culture medium. Our results provide invaluable information for QD-relevant biosafety analysis, as well as suggest available guidance for the design of biocompatible QDs for wide utilization in biological and biomedical studies.

  17. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of avian p95-APP2, an ARF-GAP orthologous to mammalian paxillin kinase linker.

    PubMed

    Paris, Simona; Za, Lorena; Sporchia, Barbara; de Curtis, Ivan

    2002-07-01

    We describe here the identification and characterization of avian p95-APP2, a multi-domain protein of a recently identified family of ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF)-GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) including mammalian G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRK)-interactor 1 (GIT1), paxillin kinase linker (PKL), and GIT2, as well as avian p95-APP1. The p95-APP2 is eluted from Rac-GTP-gamma-S, but not from Rac-GDP-beta-S columns. As other members of the family, p95-APP2 has binding regions for the focal adhesion protein paxillin, and for the Rac exchanging factor PIX. Sequence comparison indicates that p95-APP2 is the avian orthologue of mammalian PKL. Expression studies showed a largely diffuse distribution of the full length p95-APP2, without evident effects on cell morphology. We observed a dramatic difference between the localization of the amino-terminal portion of the protein, including the ARF-GAP domain and the three ankyrin repeats, and the carboxy-terminal portion including the paxillin-binding site. Moreover, the expression of truncated carboxy-terminal polypeptides including both the PIX- and paxillin-binding regions leads to a marked localization of the protein together with paxillin at large vesicles. Comparison of the expression of corresponding ARF-GAP-deficient constructs from p95-APP2 and p95-APP1 shows their distribution at distinct endocytic compartments. Altogether, these data support a role of distinct members of this family of ARF-GAPs in the regulation of different steps of membrane traffic during cell motility, and suggest that p95-APP2 may shuttle between an intracellular compartment and the cell periphery, although, further work will be needed to address this point.

  18. Identification of a multifunctional protein, PhaM, that determines number, surface to volume ratio, subcellular localization and distribution to daughter cells of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate), PHB, granules in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Daniel; Wahl, Andreas; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2011-11-01

    A two-hybrid approach was applied to screen for proteins with the ability to interact with PHB synthase (PhaC1) of Ralstonia eutropha. The H16_A0141 gene (phaM) was identified in the majority of positive clones. PhaM (26.6 kDa) strongly interacted with PhaC1 and with phasin PhaP5 but not with PhaP1 or other PHB granule-associated proteins. A ΔphaM mutant accumulated only one or two large PHB granules instead of three to six medium-sized PHB granules of the wild type, and distribution of granules to daughter cells was disordered. All three phenotypes (number, size and distribution of PHB granules) were reversed by reintroduction of phaM. Purified PhaM revealed DNA-binding properties in gel mobility shift experiments. Expression of a fusion of the yellow fluorescent protein (eYfp) with PhaM resulted in formation of many small fluorescent granules that were bound to the nucleoid region. Remarkably, an eYfp-PhaP5 fusion localized at the cell poles in a PHB-negative background and overexpression of eYfp-PhaP5 in the wild type conferred binding of PHB granules to the cell poles. In conclusion, subcellular localization of PHB granules in R. eutropha depends on a concerted expression of at least three PHB granule-associated proteins, namely PhaM, PhaP5 and PHB synthase PhaC1.

  19. Subcellular distribution of swine vesicular disease virus proteins and alterations induced in infected cells: A comparative study with foot-and-mouth disease virus and vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Acebes, Miguel A.; Gonzalez-Magaldi, Monica; Rosas, Maria F.; Borrego, Belen; Brocchi, Emiliana; Armas-Portela, Rosario; Sobrino, Francisco

    2008-05-10

    The intracellular distribution of swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) proteins and the induced reorganization of endomembranes in IBRS-2 cells were analyzed. Fluorescence to new SVDV capsids appeared first upon infection, concentrated in perinuclear circular structures and colocalized to dsRNA. As in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV)-infected cells, a vesicular pattern was predominantly found in later stages of SVDV capsid morphogenesis that colocalized with those of non-structural proteins 2C, 2BC and 3A. These results suggest that assembly of capsid proteins is associated to the replication complex. Confocal microscopy showed a decreased fluorescence to ER markers (calreticulin and protein disulfide isomerase), and disorganization of cis-Golgi gp74 and trans-Golgi caveolin-1 markers in SVDV- and FMDV-, but not in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-infected cells. Electron microscopy of SVDV-infected cells at an early stage of infection revealed fragmented ER cisternae with expanded lumen and accumulation of large Golgi vesicles, suggesting alterations of vesicle traffic through Golgi compartments. At this early stage, FMDV induced different patterns of ER fragmentation and Golgi alterations. At later stages of SVDV cytopathology, cells showed a completely vacuolated cytoplasm containing vesicles of different sizes. Cell treatment with brefeldin A, which disrupts the Golgi complex, reduced SVDV ({approx} 5 log) and VSV ({approx} 4 log) titers, but did not affect FMDV growth. Thus, three viruses, which share target tissues and clinical signs in natural hosts, induce different intracellular effects in cultured cells.

  20. Tissue distribution and subcellular localization of trace metals in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis with special reference to the role of lysosomal granules in metal sequestration.

    PubMed

    Desouky, Mahmoud M A

    2006-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the cellular mechanisms, which govern metal sequestration and detoxification in gastropods. For this purpose the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis was exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of three species of metals (Al, Zn and Cd) for 30 days and the localization and fate of these metals were followed in different tissues of the snails. The measurement of relative distribution of metals between tissues revealed that the digestive gland and kidney account for most of the accumulated metals. Al and Cd (non-essential metals) were redistributed to the digestive gland, possibly because of the presence of specific binding entities in the digestive glands of the herein species. This study focuses on the role of intracellular metal-containing granules on metal sequestration. Three main types of granules were identified in the digestive gland cells namely small, green and yellow granules. The morphological examination and the progressive accumulation of elements within these granules revealed that they are developmental stages with the yellow granule being the mature one. The total number of these granules was found to be significantly increased upon exposure of the snails to Al only. This increase may be a response to the large amount of Al that is accumulated through feeding route of this grazing snail. X-ray microanalysis (XRMA) revealed that metals were localized in all three types of digestive gland granules. The increased amount of ligands (P and S) in the granules may give evidence for their role in metal sequestration. Levels of Al and P were positively correlated in the digestive gland granules. It is possible that aluminium is bound to phosphorus to render it insoluble and so to both immobilize it within the lysosome and to be excreted in a highly insoluble form. On the other hand, both Zn and Cd induced marked upregulation of S in mature (yellow) granules by 26- and 11-folds, respectively. The lysosomal

  1. Feature Fusion Based SVM Classifier for Protein Subcellular Localization Prediction.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Julia; Mondal, Md Nazrul Islam; Islam, Md Khaled Ben; Hasan, Md Al Mehedi

    2016-12-18

    For the importance of protein subcellular localization in different branches of life science and drug discovery, researchers have focused their attentions on protein subcellular localization prediction. Effective representation of features from protein sequences plays a most vital role in protein subcellular localization prediction specially in case of machine learning techniques. Single feature representation-like pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC), physiochemical property models (PPM), and amino acid index distribution (AAID) contains insufficient information from protein sequences. To deal with such problems, we have proposed two feature fusion representations, AAIDPAAC and PPMPAAC, to work with Support Vector Machine classifiers, which fused PseAAC with PPM and AAID accordingly. We have evaluated the performance for both single and fused feature representation of a Gram-negative bacterial dataset. We have got at least 3% more actual accuracy by AAIDPAAC and 2% more locative accuracy by PPMPAAC than single feature representation.

  2. p38 MAP kinase-dependent regulation of the expression level and subcellular distribution of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 and its involvement in cellular senescence in normal human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Naoko; Rios, Ileana; Moran, Heriberto; Sayers, Brendan; Hubbard, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a RNA binding protein that plays important role in the biogenesis of mRNA, such as alternative splicing and mRNA stability. We have previously demonstrated that hnRNP A1 has diminished protein levels and shows cytoplasmic accumulation in senescent human diploid fibroblasts. Recent reports showed that p38 MAP kinase (p38 MAPK), a member of the MAP kinase family is necessary and sufficient for the cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 by stress stimuli such as osmotic shock. p38 MAP kinase has been shown to be involved in cell proliferation and the induction of senescence in response to extracellular stimuli. However, the relationship between hnRNP A1 and p38 MAPK and the roles of hnRNP A1 in cellular senescence have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that hnRNP A1 forms a complex with phospho-p38 MAPK in vivo. Inhibition of p38 MAPK activity with SB203580 elevated hnRNP A1 protein levels and prohibited the cytoplasmic accumulation of the protein, but not hnRNP A2, in senescent cells. The phosphorylation level of hnRNP A1 was elevated in senescent cells. Reduction of hnRNP A1 and A2 levels by siRNA transfection induced a senescence-like morphology and elevated the level of F-actin, a marker of senescence. These results suggest that the expression levels and subcellular distribution of hnRNP A1 are regulated in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner, probably via its phosphorylation. Our results also suggest that hnRNP A2 in addition to hnRNP A1 may play a role in establishing the senescence phenotype. PMID:19430204

  3. Subcellular localization of the yeast proteome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj; Agarwal, Seema; Heyman, John A; Matson, Sandra; Heidtman, Matthew; Piccirillo, Stacy; Umansky, Lara; Drawid, Amar; Jansen, Ronald; Liu, Yang; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Miller, Perry; Gerstein, Mark; Roeder, G Shirleen; Snyder, Michael

    2002-03-15

    Protein localization data are a valuable information resource helpful in elucidating eukaryotic protein function. Here, we report the first proteome-scale analysis of protein localization within any eukaryote. Using directed topoisomerase I-mediated cloning strategies and genome-wide transposon mutagenesis, we have epitope-tagged 60% of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome. By high-throughput immunolocalization of tagged gene products, we have determined the subcellular localization of 2744 yeast proteins. Extrapolating these data through a computational algorithm employing Bayesian formalism, we define the yeast localizome (the subcellular distribution of all 6100 yeast proteins). We estimate the yeast proteome to encompass approximately 5100 soluble proteins and >1000 transmembrane proteins. Our results indicate that 47% of yeast proteins are cytoplasmic, 13% mitochondrial, 13% exocytic (including proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and secretory vesicles), and 27% nuclear/nucleolar. A subset of nuclear proteins was further analyzed by immunolocalization using surface-spread preparations of meiotic chromosomes. Of these proteins, 38% were found associated with chromosomal DNA. As determined from phenotypic analyses of nuclear proteins, 34% are essential for spore viability--a percentage nearly twice as great as that observed for the proteome as a whole. In total, this study presents experimentally derived localization data for 955 proteins of previously unknown function: nearly half of all functionally uncharacterized proteins in yeast. To facilitate access to these data, we provide a searchable database featuring 2900 fluorescent micrographs at http://ygac.med.yale.edu.

  4. Subcellular localization of the yeast proteome

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anuj; Agarwal, Seema; Heyman, John A.; Matson, Sandra; Heidtman, Matthew; Piccirillo, Stacy; Umansky, Lara; Drawid, Amar; Jansen, Ronald; Liu, Yang; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Miller, Perry; Gerstein, Mark; Roeder, G. Shirleen; Snyder, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Protein localization data are a valuable information resource helpful in elucidating eukaryotic protein function. Here, we report the first proteome-scale analysis of protein localization within any eukaryote. Using directed topoisomerase I-mediated cloning strategies and genome-wide transposon mutagenesis, we have epitope-tagged 60% of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome. By high-throughput immunolocalization of tagged gene products, we have determined the subcellular localization of 2744 yeast proteins. Extrapolating these data through a computational algorithm employing Bayesian formalism, we define the yeast localizome (the subcellular distribution of all 6100 yeast proteins). We estimate the yeast proteome to encompass ∼5100 soluble proteins and >1000 transmembrane proteins. Our results indicate that 47% of yeast proteins are cytoplasmic, 13% mitochondrial, 13% exocytic (including proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and secretory vesicles), and 27% nuclear/nucleolar. A subset of nuclear proteins was further analyzed by immunolocalization using surface-spread preparations of meiotic chromosomes. Of these proteins, 38% were found associated with chromosomal DNA. As determined from phenotypic analyses of nuclear proteins, 34% are essential for spore viability—a percentage nearly twice as great as that observed for the proteome as a whole. In total, this study presents experimentally derived localization data for 955 proteins of previously unknown function: nearly half of all functionally uncharacterized proteins in yeast. To facilitate access to these data, we provide a searchable database featuring 2900 fluorescent micrographs at http://ygac.med.yale.edu. PMID:11914276

  5. Regulating Subcellular Metal Homeostasis: The Key to Crop Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Khurram; Rasheed, Sultana; Kobayashi, Takanori; Seki, Motoaki; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), and copper (Cu) are essential micronutrient mineral elements for living organisms, as they regulate essential cellular processes, such as chlorophyll synthesis and photosynthesis (Fe, Cu, and Mn), respiration (Fe and Cu), and transcription (Zn). The storage and distribution of these minerals in various cellular organelles is strictly regulated to ensure optimal metabolic rates. Alteration of the balance in uptake, distribution, and/or storage of these minerals severely impairs cellular metabolism and significantly affects plant growth and development. Thus, any change in the metal profile of a cellular compartment significantly affects metabolism. Different subcellular compartments are suggested to be linked through complex retrograde signaling networks to regulate cellular metal homeostasis. Various genes regulating cellular and subcellular metal distribution have been identified and characterized. Understanding the role of these transporters is extremely important to elaborate the signaling between various subcellular compartments. Moreover, modulation of the proteins involved in cellular metal homeostasis may help in the regulation of metabolism, adaptability to a diverse range of environmental conditions, and biofortification. Here, we review progress in the understanding of different subcellular metal transport components in plants and discuss the prospects of regulating cellular metabolism and strategies to develop biofortified crop plants. PMID:27547212

  6. Bioavailability of purified subcellular metals to a marine fish.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Yao, Jie; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, the authors used a supply of naturally contaminated oysters to investigate how the subcellular metal distribution and the metal burden in prey affected the transfer of metals to a marine fish, the grunt Terapon jarbua. The oysters, Crassostrea hongkongensis, each with different contamination histories, were collected and separated into 3 subcellular fractions: 1) metal-rich granules, 2) cellular debris, and 3) a combined fraction of organelles, heat-denatured proteins, and metallothionein-like proteins, defined as the trophically available metal (TAM). These purified fractions showed a wide range of metal concentrations and were fed to the fish for a period of 7 d at a daily comparable feeding rate of 3% of fish body weight. After 7 d exposure, the newly absorbed metals were mainly distributed in the intestine and liver, indicating a significant tissue-specific trophic transfer, especially for Cd and Cu. The trophic transfer factors (TTFs) showed a sequence of cellular debris >TAM > metal-rich granules, suggesting the impact of subcellular distribution in prey on metal bioavailability. However, significant inverse relationships between the TTFs and the metal concentrations in diets were also found in the present study, especially for Cd and Zn. The subcellular metal compartmentalization might be less important than the metal concentration in prey influencing the trophic transfer. The authors' results have important implications for bioavailability and environmental assessment of dietary metals.

  7. Plasma effects on subcellular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gweon, Bomi; Kim, Dan Bee; Jung, Heesoo; Choe, Wonho; Kim, Daeyeon; Shin, Jennifer H.

    2010-03-08

    Atmospheric pressure helium plasma treated human hepatocytes exhibit distinctive zones of necrotic and live cells separated by a void. We propose that plasma induced necrosis is attributed to plasma species such as oxygen radicals, charged particles, metastables and/or severe disruption of charged cytoskeletal proteins. Interestingly, uncharged cytoskeletal intermediate filaments are only minimally disturbed by plasma, elucidating the possibility of plasma induced electrostatic effects selectively destroying charged proteins. These bona fide plasma effects, which inflict alterations in specific subcellular structures leading to necrosis and cellular detachment, were not observed by application of helium flow or electric field alone.

  8. Cholesterol Depletion Alters Cardiomyocyte Subcellular Signaling and Increases Contractility

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Victoria J.; Abou Samra, Abdul B.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.; Lasley, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane cholesterol levels play an important factor in regulating cell function. Sarcolemmal cholesterol is concentrated in lipid rafts and caveolae, which are flask-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane. The scaffolding protein caveolin permits the enrichment of cholesterol in caveolae, and caveolin interactions with numerous proteins regulate their function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute reductions in cardiomyocyte cholesterol levels alter subcellular protein kinase activation, intracellular Ca2+ and contractility. Methods: Ventricular myocytes, isolated from adult Sprague Dawley rats, were treated with the cholesterol reducing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, 5 mM, 1 hr, room temperature). Total cellular cholesterol levels, caveolin-3 localization, subcellular, ERK and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, contractility, and [Ca2+]i were assessed. Results: Treatment with MβCD reduced cholesterol levels by ~45 and shifted caveolin-3 from cytoskeleton and triton-insoluble fractions to the triton-soluble fraction, and increased ERK isoform phosphorylation in cytoskeletal, cytosolic, triton-soluble and triton-insoluble membrane fractions without altering their subcellular distributions. In contrast the primary effect of MβCD was on p38 subcellular distribution of p38α with little effect on p38 phosphorylation. Cholesterol depletion increased cardiomyocyte twitch amplitude and the rates of shortening and relaxation in conjunction with increased diastolic and systolic [Ca2+]i. Conclusions: These results indicate that acute reductions in membrane cholesterol levels differentially modulate basal cardiomyocyte subcellular MAPK signaling, as well as increasing [Ca2+]i and contractility. PMID:27441649

  9. RNALocate: a resource for RNA subcellular localizations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Tan, Puwen; Wang, Liqiang; Jin, Nana; Li, Yana; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Huan; Hu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Lining; Hu, Chunyu; Li, Chunhua; Qian, Kun; Zhang, Changjian; Huang, Yan; Li, Kongning; Lin, Hao; Wang, Dong

    2017-01-04

    Increasing evidence has revealed that RNA subcellular localization is a very important feature for deeply understanding RNA's biological functions after being transported into intra- or extra-cellular regions. RNALocate is a web-accessible database that aims to provide a high-quality RNA subcellular localization resource and facilitate future researches on RNA function or structure. The current version of RNALocate documents more than 37 700 manually curated RNA subcellular localization entries with experimental evidence, involving more than 21 800 RNAs with 42 subcellular localizations in 65 species, mainly including Homo sapiens, Mus musculus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae etc. Besides, RNA homology, sequence and interaction data have also been integrated into RNALocate. Users can access these data through online search, browse, blast and visualization tools. In conclusion, RNALocate will be of help in elucidating the entirety of RNA subcellular localization, and developing new prediction methods. The database is available at http://www.rna-society.org/rnalocate/.

  10. RNALocate: a resource for RNA subcellular localizations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Tan, Puwen; Wang, Liqiang; Jin, Nana; Li, Yana; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Huan; Hu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Lining; Hu, Chunyu; Li, Chunhua; Qian, Kun; Zhang, Changjian; Huang, Yan; Li, Kongning; Lin, Hao; Wang, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence has revealed that RNA subcellular localization is a very important feature for deeply understanding RNA's biological functions after being transported into intra- or extra-cellular regions. RNALocate is a web-accessible database that aims to provide a high-quality RNA subcellular localization resource and facilitate future researches on RNA function or structure. The current version of RNALocate documents more than 37 700 manually curated RNA subcellular localization entries with experimental evidence, involving more than 21 800 RNAs with 42 subcellular localizations in 65 species, mainly including Homo sapiens, Mus musculus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae etc. Besides, RNA homology, sequence and interaction data have also been integrated into RNALocate. Users can access these data through online search, browse, blast and visualization tools. In conclusion, RNALocate will be of help in elucidating the entirety of RNA subcellular localization, and developing new prediction methods. The database is available at http://www.rna-society.org/rnalocate/. PMID:27543076

  11. Subcellular localization of pituitary enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.

    1970-01-01

    A cytochemical procedure is reported for identifying subcellular sites of enzymes hydrolyzing beta-naphthylamine substrates, and to study the sites of reaction product localization in cells of various tissues. Investigations using the substrate Leu 4-methoxy-8-naphthylamine, a capture with hexonium pararosaniline, and the final chelation of osmium have identified the hydrolyzing enzyme of rat liver cells; this enzyme localized on cell membranes with intense deposition in the areas of the parcanaliculi. The study of cells in the anterior pituitary of the rat showed the deposition of reaction product on cell membrane; and on the membranes of secretion granules contained within the cell. The deposition of reaction product on the cell membrane however showed no increase or decrease with changes in the physiological state of the gland and release of secretion granules from specific cells.

  12. Intracellular And Subcellular Partitioning Of Nickel In Aureococcus Anophagefferens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Axe, L.; Wei, L.; Bagheri, S.; Michalopoulou, Z.

    2008-12-01

    Brown tides are caused by Aureococcus anophagefferens, a species of Pelagophyceae, and have been observed in NY/NJ waterways effecting ecosystems by attenuating light, changing water color, reducing eelgrass beds, decreasing shellfisheries, and further impacting the food web by reducing phytoplankton. Although the impact of macronutrients and iron on A. anophagefferens has been well studied, contaminants, and specifically trace metals have not. In long-term experiments designed to investigate the growth and toxicity, Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn exposure was evaluated over 10-13 to 10-7 M for the free metal ion. While growth was inhibited or terminated from exposure to Cd and Cu, nickel addition ([Ni2+]: 10-11.23 to 10-10.23 M) promoted A. anophagefferens growth. Short-term experiments are being conducted to better understand mechanistically nickel speciation and distribution. Both total intracellular and subcellular metal concentrations are being assessed with radio-labeled 63Ni. Subcellular fractions are defined as metal-sensitive fractions (MSF) constituting organelles, cell debris, and heat-denatured protein [HDP] and biologically detoxified metal comprising heat-stabilized protein [HSP] and metal-rich granules [MRG]. Based on subcellular distribution, aqueous [Ni2+] concentrations, and A. anophagefferens growth rates, potential reaction pathways promoting A. anophagefferens growth can be addressed.

  13. Global subcellular characterization of protein degradation using quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Larance, Mark; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Kirkwood, Kathryn J; Ly, Tony; Lamond, Angus I

    2013-03-01

    Protein degradation provides an important regulatory mechanism used to control cell cycle progression and many other cellular pathways. To comprehensively analyze the spatial control of protein degradation in U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we have combined drug treatment and SILAC-based quantitative mass spectrometry with subcellular and protein fractionation. The resulting data set analyzed more than 74,000 peptides, corresponding to ~5000 proteins, from nuclear, cytosolic, membrane, and cytoskeletal compartments. These data identified rapidly degraded proteasome targets, such as PRR11 and highlighted a feedback mechanism resulting in translation inhibition, induced by blocking the proteasome. We show this is mediated by activation of the unfolded protein response. We observed compartment-specific differences in protein degradation, including proteins that would not have been characterized as rapidly degraded through analysis of whole cell lysates. Bioinformatic analysis of the entire data set is presented in the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics, a web-based resource, with proteins annotated for stability and subcellular distribution.

  14. Subcellular characterization of glucose uptake in coronary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, N; Scriven, D R L; Laher, I; Moore, E D W

    2008-01-01

    Despite all the evidence linking glucose toxicity to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, very little is known about the regulation of glucose uptake in endothelial cells. We have previously reported an asymmetric distribution of the GLUTs (1-5) and SGLT-1 in en face preparations of rat coronary artery endothelia [Gaudreault N., Scriven D.R., Moore E.D., 2004. Characterisation of glucose transporters in the intact coronary artery endothelium in rats: GLUT-2 upregulated by long-term hyperglycaemia. Diabetologia 47(12),2081-2092]. We assessed this time, through immunocytochemistry and wide field fluorescence microscopy coupled to deconvolution, the presence and subcellular distribution of glucose transporters in cultures of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). HCAECs express GLUT-1 to 5 and SGLT-1, but their subcellular distribution lacks the luminal/abluminal asymmetry and the proximity to cell-to-cell junctions observed in intact endothelium. To determine the impact of the transporters' distribution on intracellular glucose accumulation, a fluorescent glucose analog (2-NBDG) was used in conjunction with confocal microscopy to monitor uptake in individual cells; the arteries were mounted in an arteriograph chamber with physiological flow rates. The uptake in both preparations was inhibited by cytochalasin-B and d-glucose and stimulated by insulin, but the distribution of the incorporated 2-NBDG mirrored that of the transporters. In HCAEC it was distributed throughout the cell and in the intact arterial endothelium it was restricted to the narrow cytosolic volume adjacent to the cell-to-cell junctions. We suggest that the latter subcellular organization and compartmentalization may facilitate transendothelial transport of glucose in intact coronary artery.

  15. A Benchtop Fractionation Procedure for Subcellular Analysis of the Plant Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Fürtauer, Lisa; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Nägele, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Although compartmentation is a key feature of eukaryotic cells, biological research is frequently limited by methods allowing for the comprehensive subcellular resolution of the metabolome. It has been widely accepted that such a resolution would be necessary in order to approximate cellular biochemistry and metabolic regulation, yet technical challenges still limit both the reproducible subcellular fractionation and the sample throughput being necessary for a statistically robust analysis. Here, we present a method and a detailed protocol which is based on the non-aqueous fractionation technique enabling the assignment of metabolites to their subcellular localization. The presented benchtop method aims at unraveling subcellular metabolome dynamics in a precise and statistically robust manner using a relatively small amount of tissue material. The method is based on the separation of cellular fractions via density gradients consisting of organic, non-aqueous solvents. By determining the relative distribution of compartment-specific marker enzymes together with metabolite profiles over the density gradient it is possible to estimate compartment-specific metabolite concentrations by correlation. To support this correlation analysis, a spreadsheet is provided executing a calculation algorithm to determine the distribution of metabolites over subcellular compartments. The calculation algorithm performs correlation of marker enzyme activity and metabolite abundance accounting for technical errors, reproducibility and the resulting error propagation. The method was developed, tested and validated in three natural accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana showing different ability to acclimate to low temperature. Particularly, amino acids were strongly shuffled between subcellular compartments in a cold-sensitive accession while a cold-tolerant accession was characterized by a stable subcellular metabolic homeostasis. Finally, we conclude that subcellular metabolome analysis is

  16. Analysis of Ras/ERK Compartmentalization by Subcellular Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Agudo-Ibañez, Lorena; Crespo, Piero; Casar, Berta

    2017-01-01

    A vast number of stimuli use the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling cascade to transmit signals from their cognate receptors, in order to regulate multiple cellular functions, including key processes such as proliferation, cell cycle progression, differentiation, and survival. The duration, intensity and specificity of the responses are, in part, controlled by the compartmentalization/subcellular localization of the signaling intermediaries. Ras proteins are found in different plasma membrane microdomains and endomembranes. At these localizations, Ras is subject to site-specific regulatory mechanisms, distinctively engaging effector pathways and switching-on diverse genetic programs to generate a multitude of biological responses. The Ras effector pathway leading to ERKs activation is also subject to space-related regulatory processes. About half of ERK1/2 substrates are found in the nucleus and function mainly as transcription factors. The other half resides in the cytosol and other cellular organelles. Such subcellular distribution enhances the complexity of the Ras/ERK cascade and constitutes an essential mechanism to endow variability to its signals, which enables their participation in the regulation of a broad variety of functions. Thus, analyzing the subcellular compartmentalization of the members of the Ras/ERK cascade constitutes an important factor to be taken into account when studying specific biological responses evoked by Ras/ERK signals. Herein, we describe methods for such purpose.

  17. Intracellular mannose binding lectin mediates subcellular trafficking of HIV-1 gp120 in neurons.

    PubMed

    Teodorof, C; Divakar, S; Soontornniyomkij, B; Achim, C L; Kaul, M; Singh, K K

    2014-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enters the brain early during infection and leads to severe neuronal damage and central nervous system impairment. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120), a neurotoxin, undergoes intracellular trafficking and transport across neurons; however mechanisms of gp120 trafficking in neurons are unclear. Our results show that mannose binding lectin (MBL) that binds to the N-linked mannose residues on gp120, participates in intravesicular packaging of gp120 in neuronal subcellular organelles and also in subcellular trafficking of these vesicles in neuronal cells. Perinuclear MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes were observed and MBL facilitated the subcellular trafficking of gp120 via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi vesicles. The functional carbohydrate recognition domain of MBL was required for perinuclear organization, distribution and subcellular trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes. Nocodazole, an agent that depolymerizes the microtubule network, abolished the trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicles, suggesting that these vesicular complexes were transported along the microtubule network. Live cell imaging confirmed the association of the MBL:gp120 complexes with dynamic subcellular vesicles that underwent trafficking in neuronal soma and along the neurites. Thus, our findings suggest that intracellular MBL mediates subcellular trafficking and transport of viral glycoproteins in a microtubule-dependent mechanism in the neurons.

  18. Intracellular Mannose Binding Lectin Mediates Subcellular Trafficking of HIV-1 gp120 in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Teodorof, C; Divakar, S; Soontornniyomkij, B; Achim, CL; Kaul, M; Singh, KK

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus -1 (HIV-1) enters the brain early during infection and leads to severe neuronal damage and central nervous system impairment. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120), a neurotoxin, undergoes intracellular trafficking and transport across neurons; however mechanisms of gp120 trafficking in neurons are unclear. Our results show that mannose binding lectin (MBL) that binds to the N-linked mannose residues on gp120, participates in intravesicular packaging of gp120 in neuronal subcellular organelles and also in subcellular trafficking of these vesicles in neuronal cells. Perinuclear MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes were observed and MBL facilitated the subcellular trafficking of gp120 via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi vesicles. The functional carbohydrate recognition domain of MBL was required for perinuclear organization, distribution and subcellular trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes. Nocodazole, an agent that depolymerizes the microtubule network, abolished the trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicles, suggesting that these vesicular complexes were transported along the microtubule network. Live cell imaging confirmed the association of the MBL:gp120 complexes with dynamic subcellular vesicles that underwent trafficking in neuronal soma and along the neurites. Thus, our findings suggest that intracellular MBL mediates subcellular trafficking and transport of viral glycoproteins in a microtubule-dependent mechanism in the neurons. PMID:24825317

  19. The cellular and subcellular localization of zinc transporter 7 in the mouse spinal cord

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present work addresses the cellular and subcellular localization of the zinc transporter 7 (ZNT7, SLC30a7) protein and the distribution of zinc ions (Zn2+) in the mouse spinal cord. Our results indicated that the ZNT7 immunoreactive neurons were widely distributed in the Rexed’s laminae of the g...

  20. Role of calcium ions in the control of embryogenesis of Xenopus. Changes in the subcellular distribution of calcium in early cleavage embryos after treatment with the ionophore A23187

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Treatment of stage 5 Xenopus embryos with the ionophore A23187 for only 10 min, in the absence of extracellular Mg2+ and Ca2+, causes cortical contractions and a high incidence of abnormal embryos during subsequent development. Cation analysis shows that divalent ions are not lost from the embryos, but that Ca2+ is redistributed within the subcellular fractions. Ca2+ is probably released from yolk platelets and/or pigment granules by the action of A23187, [Ca2+] rises in the cytosol, and the mitochondria attempt to take up this free Ca2+. The mitochondria concomitantly undergo characteristic ultrastructural transformations, changing towards energized-twisted and energized-zigzag conformations. A23187 allows these changes to be demonstrated in situ. Extracellular divalent cations (10(-4) M) interfere with this intracellular action of A23187. Intracellular accumulation of Na+ (by treatment with ouabain) or Li+ also causes abnormal development, probably by promoting a release of Ca2+ from the mitochondria. It is suggested (a) that all these treatments cause a rise in [Ca2+]i which interferes with normal, integrated cell division, so causing, in turn, abnormal embryogenesis, (b) that levels of [Ca2+]i are of importance in regulating cleavage, (c) that the mitochondria could well have a function in regulating [Ca2+]i during embryogenesis in Xenopus, and (d) that vegetalizing agents may well act by promoting a rise in [Ca2+]i in specific cells in the amphibian embryo. PMID:379014

  1. Self-calibrating viscosity probes: design and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Dakanali, Marianna; Do, Thai H; Horn, Austin; Chongchivivat, Akaraphon; Jarusreni, Tuptim; Lichlyter, Darcy; Guizzunti, Gianni; Haidekker, Mark A; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A

    2012-07-15

    We describe the design, synthesis and fluorescence profiles of new self-calibrating viscosity dyes in which a coumarin (reference fluorophore) has been covalently linked with a molecular rotor (viscosity sensor). Characterization of their fluorescence properties was made with separate excitation of the units and through resonance energy transfer from the reference to the sensor dye. We have modified the linker and the substitution of the rotor in order to change the hydrophilicity of these probes thereby altering their subcellular localization. For instance, hydrophilic dye 12 shows a homogeneous distribution inside the cell and represents a suitable probe for viscosity measurements in the cytoplasm.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF RAT LIVER SUBCELLULAR MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    DeHeer, David H.; Olson, Merle S.; Pinckard, R. Neal

    1974-01-01

    The induction of acute hepatocellular necrosis in rats resulted in the production of complement fixing, IgM autoantibodies directed toward inner and outer mitochondrial membranes, microsomal membrane, lysosomal membrane, nuclear membrane, cytosol, but not to plasma membrane. Utilizing selective absorption procedures it was demonstrated that each subcellular membrane fraction possessed unique autoantigenic activity with little or no cross-reactivity between the various membrane fractions. It is proposed that the development of membrane-specific autoantibodies may provide an immunological marker useful in the differential characterization of various subcellular membranes. PMID:4813214

  3. Fluorescent tags influence the enzymatic activity and subcellular localization of procaspase-1.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Michael C; Rabe, Sabrina; Ruß, Susanne; Kapplusch, Franz; Schulze, Felix; Stein, Robert; Winkler, Stefan; Hedrich, Christian M; Rösen-Wolff, Angela; Hofmann, Sigrun R

    2015-10-01

    Subcellular localization studies and life cell imaging approaches usually benefit from fusion-reporter proteins, such as enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and mCherry to the proteins of interest. However, such manipulations have several risks, including protein misfolding, altered protein shuttling, or functional impairment when compared to the wild-type proteins. Here, we demonstrate altered subcellular distribution and function of the pro-inflammatory enzyme procaspase-1 as a result of fusion with the reporter protein mCherry. Our observations are of central importance to further investigations of subcellular behavior and possible protein-protein interactions of naturally occurring genetic variants of human procaspase-1 which have recently been linked to autoinflammatory disorders.

  4. Subcellular partitioning of metals in Aporrectodea caliginosa along a gradient of metal exposure in 31 field-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Beaumelle, Léa; Gimbert, Frédéric; Hedde, Mickaël; Guérin, Annie; Lamy, Isabelle

    2015-07-01

    Subcellular fractionation of metals in organisms was proposed as a better way to characterize metal bioaccumulation. Here we report the impact of a laboratory exposure to a wide range of field-metal contaminated soils on the subcellular partitioning of metals in the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa. Soils moderately contaminated were chosen to create a gradient of soil metal availability; covering ranges of both soil metal contents and of several soil parameters. Following exposure, Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations were determined both in total earthworm body and in three subcellular compartments: cytosolic, granular and debris fractions. Three distinct proxies of soil metal availability were investigated: CaCl2-extractable content dissolved content predicted by a semi-mechanistic model and free ion concentration predicted by a geochemical speciation model. Subcellular partitionings of Cd and Pb were modified along the gradient of metal exposure, while stable Zn partitioning reflected regulation processes. Cd subcellular distribution responded more strongly to increasing soil Cd concentration than the total internal content, when Pb subcellular distribution and total internal content were similarly affected. Free ion concentrations were better descriptors of Cd and Pb subcellular distribution than CaCl2 extractable and dissolved metal concentrations. However, free ion concentrations and soil total metal contents were equivalent descriptors of the subcellular partitioning of Cd and Pb because they were highly correlated. Considering lowly contaminated soils, our results raise the question of the added value of three proxies of metal availability compared to soil total metal content in the assessment of metal bioavailability to earthworm.

  5. Subcellular localization of the simian virus 40 agnoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, S; Khoury, G; Jay, G

    1983-01-01

    The intracellular distribution of the simian virus 40 agnoprotein in infected cells was determined by indirect immunofluorescence and biochemical fractionation followed by indirect immunoprecipitation. The specific antibodies used in these studies were directed against either purified agnoprotein or a synthetic oligopeptide homologous to the N-terminus of the processed protein. Both procedures showed predominant localization of the agnoprotein to the cytosol and to the perinuclear region in association with the outer nuclear membrane. A minor but detectable fraction of the protein was also found in the nucleus. The definition of its subcellular distribution, as well as its high lability in vivo and affinity for nucleic acid, provide a basis for speculation on the function of this gene product. Images PMID:6296448

  6. Microscopic spiral waves reveal positive feedback in subcellular calcium signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Lipp, P; Niggli, E

    1993-01-01

    The regenerative Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release mechanism is an important amplifier of signal transduction in diverse cells. In heart muscle cells, this mechanism contributes to the Ca2+ transient activating the mechanical contraction, but it is also believed to drive Ca2+ waves propagating within the cytosol. We investigated the subcellular Ca2+ distribution in heart muscle cells during spontaneous Ca2+ release using laser scanning confocal microscopy with a ratiometric fluorescent indicator technique. Besides planar Ca2+ waves with linear propagation, sequences of confocal optical sections also revealed spiral Ca2+ waves spinning around a subcellular core at approximately 1 Hz. Although the Ca2+ spirals were continuous processes they frequently exhibited an apparently oscillatory output function into the elongated cell body. These oscillatory waves emanating from the spiral at regular intervals were formally considered to be short outer segments of the spiral but could not be distinguished from planar Ca2+ waves propagating along the longitudinal cell axis. The complex spatiotemporal pattern of spiral Ca2+ waves implies the participation of an active process exhibiting a large degree of positive feedback, most likely the Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release mechanism. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8312468

  7. Recent advances in imaging subcellular processes.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kenneth A; Janetopoulos, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology came about with the ability to first visualize cells. As microscopy techniques advanced, the early microscopists became the first cell biologists to observe the inner workings and subcellular structures that control life. This ability to see organelles within a cell provided scientists with the first understanding of how cells function. The visualization of the dynamic architecture of subcellular structures now often drives questions as researchers seek to understand the intricacies of the cell. With the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques, better and new optical techniques, and more sensitive and faster cameras, a whole array of questions can now be asked. There has been an explosion of new light microscopic techniques, and the race is on to build better and more powerful imaging systems so that we can further our understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms controlling molecular cell biology.

  8. Recent advances in imaging subcellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kenneth A.; Janetopoulos, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology came about with the ability to first visualize cells. As microscopy techniques advanced, the early microscopists became the first cell biologists to observe the inner workings and subcellular structures that control life. This ability to see organelles within a cell provided scientists with the first understanding of how cells function. The visualization of the dynamic architecture of subcellular structures now often drives questions as researchers seek to understand the intricacies of the cell. With the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques, better and new optical techniques, and more sensitive and faster cameras, a whole array of questions can now be asked. There has been an explosion of new light microscopic techniques, and the race is on to build better and more powerful imaging systems so that we can further our understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms controlling molecular cell biology. PMID:27408708

  9. Multitask learning for protein subcellular location prediction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Pan, Sinno Jialin; Xue, Hannah Hong; Yang, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Protein subcellular localization is concerned with predicting the location of a protein within a cell using computational methods. The location information can indicate key functionalities of proteins. Thus, accurate prediction of subcellular localizations of proteins can help the prediction of protein functions and genome annotations, as well as the identification of drug targets. Machine learning methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs) have been used in the past for the problem of protein subcellular localization, but have been shown to suffer from a lack of annotated training data in each species under study. To overcome this data sparsity problem, we observe that because some of the organisms may be related to each other, there may be some commonalities across different organisms that can be discovered and used to help boost the data in each localization task. In this paper, we formulate protein subcellular localization problem as one of multitask learning across different organisms. We adapt and compare two specializations of the multitask learning algorithms on 20 different organisms. Our experimental results show that multitask learning performs much better than the traditional single-task methods. Among the different multitask learning methods, we found that the multitask kernels and supertype kernels under multitask learning that share parameters perform slightly better than multitask learning by sharing latent features. The most significant improvement in terms of localization accuracy is about 25 percent. We find that if the organisms are very different or are remotely related from a biological point of view, then jointly training the multiple models cannot lead to significant improvement. However, if they are closely related biologically, the multitask learning can do much better than individual learning.

  10. Cellular and subcellular localization of Marlin-1 in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, René L; Valenzuela, José I; Luján, Rafael; Couve, Andrés

    2009-01-01

    Background Marlin-1 is a microtubule binding protein that associates specifically with the GABAB1 subunit in neurons and with members of the Janus kinase family in lymphoid cells. In addition, it binds the molecular motor kinesin-I and nucleic acids, preferentially single stranded RNA. Marlin-1 is expressed mainly in the central nervous system but little is known regarding its cellular and subcellular distribution in the brain. Results Here we have studied the localization of Marlin-1 in the rodent brain and cultured neurons combining immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and pre-embedding electron microscopy. We demonstrate that Marlin-1 is enriched in restricted areas of the brain including olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. Marlin-1 is abundant in dendrites and axons of GABAergic and non-GABAergic hippocampal neurons. At the ultrastructural level, Marlin-1 is present in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of CA1 neurons in the hippocampus. In the cytoplasm it associates to microtubules in the dendritic shaft and occasionally with the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and dendritic spines. In the nucleus, clusters of Marlin-1 associate to euchromatin. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that Marlin-1 is expressed in discrete areas of the brain. They also confirm the microtubule association at the ultrastructural level in neurons. Together with the abundance of the protein in dendrites and axons they are consistent with the emerging role of Marlin-1 as an intracellular protein linking the cytoskeleton and transport. Our study constitutes the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of Marlin-1 in the brain. As such, it will set the basis for future studies on the functional implications of Marlin-1 in protein trafficking. PMID:19386132

  11. Subcellular taxonomy: An ultrastructural classification system with diagnostic applications

    SciTech Connect

    McLay, A.L.C.; Toner, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    Contents of this work include: Ultrastructure, Nomenclature, and Disease; Numerical Listing: YX Cellular and Subcellular Structure; Alphabetical Listing; and Appendix: Proposed Revised Listing of M-6 Codes.

  12. Subcellular distribution of the different platelet proteins phosphorylated on exposure of intact platelets to ionophore A23187 or to prostaglandin E1. Possible role of a membrane phosphopolypeptide in the regulation of calcium-ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, J E; Say, A K; Haslam, R J

    1979-01-01

    Exposure of 32P-labelled human platelets to ionophore A23187 results in an increased incorporation of 32P into polypeptides with apparent mol.wts. of 47 000 (P47) and 20 000 (P20), whereas exposure to prostaglandin E1 results in increased labelling of polypeptides with apparent mol.wts. of 24 000 (P24) and 22 000 (P22) [Haslam, Lynham & Fox (1979) Biochem. J. 178, 397-406]. Labelled platelets that had been incubated with ionophore A23187 or prostaglandin E1 were sonicated and rapidly separated into three fractions by differential centrifugation. Electron microscopy and measurement of marker enzymes indicated that the 1300-19 000 gav. particulate fraction was enriched in granules, mitochondria and plasma membranes, that the 19 000-90 000 gav. particulate fraction was enriched in both intracellular and plasma membranes and that the 90 000 gav. supernatant contained only soluble proteins. 32P-labelled phosphopolypeptide P47 was present almost exclusively in the 90 000 gav. supernatant, whereas phosphopolypeptide P20 was largely dephosphorylated under fractionation conditions that protected other phosphopolypeptides. 32P-labelled phosphopolypeptide P24 was enriched in both particulate fractions, but particularly in the 19 000-90 000 gav. fraction, and may therefore be present in both the intracellular and plasma membranes. Phosphopolypeptide P22 appeared to be similarly distributed. Both particulate fractions were capable of the ATP-dependent oxalate-stimulated uptake of Ca2+. When the 19 000-90 000 gav. membrane fraction was prepared from platelets that had been incubated with ionophore A23187, active uptake of Ca2+ did not occur, but when this fraction was isolated from platelets that had been exposed to prostaglandin E1, uptake of Ca2+ was significantly greater than observed with the corresponding membranes from control platelets. It is suggested that phosphorylation of polypeptide P24 (or P22) by a cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase may promote the active

  13. Precise Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer via Subcellular Dynamic Tracing of Dual-loaded Upconversion Nanophotosensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yulei; Li, Xiaodan; Zhang, Li; Xia, Lu; Liu, Xiaomin; Li, Cuixia; Zhang, Youlin; Tu, Langping; Xue, Bin; Zhao, Huiying; Zhang, Hong; Kong, Xianggui

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in upconversion nanophotosensitizers (UCNPs-PS) excited by near-infrared (NIR) light have led to substantial progress in improving photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. For a successful PDT, subcellular organelles are promising therapeutic targets for reaching a satisfactory efficacy. It is of vital importance for these nanophotosensitizers to reach specifically the organelles and to perform PDT with precise time control. To do so, we have in this work traced the dynamic subcellular distribution, especially in organelles such as lysosomes and mitochondria, of the poly(allylamine)-modified and dual-loaded nanophotosensitizers. The apoptosis of the cancer cells induced by PDT with the dependence of the distribution status of the nanophotosensitizers in organelles was obtained, which has provided an in-depth picture of intracellular trafficking of organelle-targeted nanophotosensitizers. Our results shall facilitate the improvement of nanotechnology assisted photodynamic therapy of cancers. PMID:28361967

  14. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Docken, Steffen S; Lewis, Timothy J; McCulloch, Andrew D; Harvey, Robert D; Clancy, Colleen E

    2016-07-01

    distribution of cAMP at the subcellular level could be important for developing new strategies for the prevention or treatment of unfavorable responses associated with different disease states.

  15. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W.; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Lewis, Timothy J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Harvey, Robert D.; Clancy, Colleen E.

    2016-01-01

    distribution of cAMP at the subcellular level could be important for developing new strategies for the prevention or treatment of unfavorable responses associated with different disease states. PMID:27409243

  16. Controlling subcellular delivery to optimize therapeutic effect

    PubMed Central

    Mossalam, Mohanad; Dixon, Andrew S; Lim, Carol S

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on drug targeting to specific cellular organelles for therapeutic purposes. Drugs can be delivered to all major organelles of the cell (cytosol, endosome/lysosome, nucleus, nucleolus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, peroxisomes and proteasomes) where they exert specific effects in those particular subcellular compartments. Delivery can be achieved by chemical (e.g., polymeric) or biological (e.g., signal sequences) means. Unidirectional targeting to individual organelles has proven to be immensely successful for drug therapy. Newer technologies that accommodate multiple signals (e.g., protein switch and virus-like delivery systems) mimic nature and allow for a more sophisticated approach to drug delivery. Harnessing different methods of targeting multiple organelles in a cell will lead to better drug delivery and improvements in disease therapy. PMID:21113240

  17. [The contractile heart. Cellular and subcellular aspects].

    PubMed

    Larsen, T H

    1994-12-10

    The excitation-contraction coupling can be defined as the mechanisms involved when the action potential initiates a contraction response of the cardiac muscle cell. The action potential is conducted from cell to cell, resulting in a synchronized contraction of the myocardium. Both the propagation of the action potential and the myofibrillar contraction are dependent on changes in free Ca++ concentrations. Recently, the mediators and the molecular and structural components involved in the subcellular transforming of the action potential into a contraction have been characterized. The opening of voltage-dependent L-type Ca(++)-channels in the cell membrane stimulates a release of Ca++ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This Ca(++)-mediated Ca(++)-release appears to be a graded mechanism and is associated with the presence of structural couplings (Ca++ synapses) in the cardiac muscle cell.

  18. Analysis of curated and predicted plastid subproteomes of Arabidopsis. Subcellular compartmentalization leads to distinctive proteome properties.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Emanuelsson, Olof; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2004-06-01

    Carefully curated proteomes of the inner envelope membrane, the thylakoid membrane, and the thylakoid lumen of chloroplasts from Arabidopsis were assembled based on published, well-documented localizations. These curated proteomes were evaluated for distribution of physical-chemical parameters, with the goal of extracting parameters for improved subcellular prediction and subsequent identification of additional (low abundant) components of each membrane system. The assembly of rigorously curated subcellular proteomes is in itself also important as a parts list for plant and systems biology. Transmembrane and subcellular prediction strategies were evaluated using the curated data sets. The three curated proteomes differ strongly in average isoelectric point and protein size, as well as transmembrane distribution. Removal of the cleavable, N-terminal transit peptide sequences greatly affected isoelectric point and size distribution. Unexpectedly, the Cys content was much lower for the thylakoid proteomes than for the inner envelope. This likely relates to the role of the thylakoid membrane in light-driven electron transport and helps to avoid unwanted oxidation-reduction reactions. A rule of thumb for discriminating between the predicted integral inner envelope membrane and integral thylakoid membrane proteins is suggested. Using a combination of predictors and experimentally derived parameters, four plastid subproteomes were predicted from the fully annotated Arabidopsis genome. These predicted subproteomes were analyzed for their properties and compared to the curated proteomes. The sensitivity and accuracy of the prediction strategies are discussed. Data can be extracted from the new plastid proteome database (http://ppdb.tc.cornell.edu).

  19. Subcellular distribution of tail-anchored proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Shaw, Rowena; Mukherjee, Joy; Bowsher, Caroline G; Harrison, Anne-Marie; Abell, Ben M

    2009-12-01

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins function in key cellular processes in eukaryotic cells, such as vesicle trafficking, protein translocation and regulation of transcription. They anchor to internal cell membranes by a C-terminal transmembrane domain, which also serves as a targeting sequence. Targeting occurs post-translationally, via pathways that are specific to the precursor, which makes TA proteins a model system for investigating post-translational protein targeting. Bioinformatics approaches have previously been used to identify potential TA proteins in yeast and humans, yet little is known about TA proteins in plants. The identification of plant TA proteins is important for extending the post-translational model system to plastids, in addition to general proteome characterization, and the identification of functional homologues characterized in other organisms. We identified 454 loci that potentially encode TA proteins in Arabidopsis, and combined published data with new localization experiments to assign localizations to 130 proteins, including 29 associated with plastids. By analysing the tail anchor sequences of characterized proteins, we have developed a tool for predicting localization and estimate that 138 TA proteins are localized to plastids.

  20. Subcellular localization of calcium deposits during zebrafish (Danio rerio) oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Golpour, Amin; Pšenička, Martin; Niksirat, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Calcium plays prominent roles in regulating a broad range of physiological events in reproduction. The aim of this study was to describe the subcellular distribution of calcium deposits during stages of oogenesis in zebrafish using a combined oxalate-pyroantimonate technique. The oocyte development of zebrafish was categorized into four stages: primary growth, cortical-alveolus, vitellogenic, and maturation, based on morphological criteria. Calcium deposits in the primary growth stage were detected in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus, and follicular cells. At the cortical-alveolus stage, calcium particles were transported from follicular cells and deposited in the cortical alveoli. In the vitellogenic stage, some cortical alveoli were compacted and transformed from flocculent electron-lucent to electron-dense objects with the progression of the stage. Calcium deposits were transformed from larger to smaller particles, coinciding with compaction of cortical alveoli. In the maturation stage, calcium deposits in all oocyte compartments decreased, with the exception of those in mitochondria. The proportion of area covered by calcium deposits in the mitochondria and cortical alveoli of oocytes at different stages of development was significantly different (p<0.05). The extent of calcium deposits in the cortical alveoli of mature oocytes was substantially lower than in earlier stages. Basic information about calcium distribution during zebrafish oogenesis may contribute to better understanding of its role in oogenesis.

  1. Subcellular domain-restricted GABAergic innervation in primary visual cortex in the absence of sensory and thalamic inputs.

    PubMed

    Di Cristo, Graziella; Wu, Caizhi; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Ango, Fabrice; Knott, Graham; Welker, Egbert; Svoboda, Karel; Huang, Z Josh

    2004-11-01

    Distinct classes of GABAergic synapses target restricted subcellular domains, thereby differentially regulating the input, integration and output of principal neurons, but the underlying mechanism for such synapse segregation is unclear. Here we show that the distributions of two major classes of GABAergic synapses along the perisomatic and dendritic domains of pyramidal neurons were indistinguishable between primary visual cortex in vivo and cortical organotypic cultures. Therefore, subcellular synapse targeting is independent of thalamic input and probably involves molecular labels and experience-independent forms of activity.

  2. Proteomics reveals the importance of the dynamic redistribution of the subcellular location of proteins in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Gabriella; Alhaiek, Abdulrab Ahmed M; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka

    2015-02-01

    At the molecular level, living cells are enormously complicated complex adaptive systems in which intertwined genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic networks all play a crucial role. At the same time, cells are spatially heterogeneous systems in which subcellular compartmentalization of different functions is ubiquitous and requires efficient cross-compartmental communication. Dynamic redistribution of multitudinous proteins to different subcellular locations in response to cellular functional state is increasingly recognized as a crucial characteristic of cellular function that seems to be at least as important as overall changes in protein abundance. Characterization of the subcellular spatial dynamics of protein distribution is a major challenge for proteomics and recent results with MCF7 breast cancer cells suggest that this may be of particular importance for cancer cells.

  3. Spatiotemporal control of apical and basal living subcellular chemical environments through vertical phase separation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jui-Ming; Didier, Jonathan E; Cassino, Theresa R; LeDuc, Philip R

    2009-09-01

    Molecular distribution within living cells is organized through multiscaled compartmentalization that enables specialized processes to occur with high efficiency. The ability to control the chemical environment at a subcellular level is limited due to deficient positional control over the aqueous stimulant. Here, a multilayered microfluidic system built from polydimethylsiloxane to separate chemical stimulants over single living cells vertically through aqueous-phase separation under laminar flow is demonstrated. Cells are cultured on top of single micrometer-scale channels inside a larger channel, allowing labeling of the apical domain of single cells through the main channel with simultaneous and distinct labeling of the basal domain via the lower microchannels. The system is transparent, which allows the use of optical microscopy to investigate the spatiotemporal response of labeled components. By employing this technique, the examination of localized subcellular domain responses in polarization, lipid bilayer mobility, and apical-to-basal signal transduction can be explored.

  4. Subcellular localization of the heparin-neutralizing factor in blood platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Da Prada, M; Jakábová, M; Lüscher, E F; Pletscher, A; Richards, J G

    1976-01-01

    1. The distribution of the heparin-neutralizing factor (platelet factor 4, PF4) in subcellular organelles of blood platelets of rabbits and man was investigated. 2. In both species the organelles storing 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT storage organelles) contained only trivial amounts of PF4. 3. In contrast, the content of PF4 was highest in the subcellular fractions rich in alpha-granules. 4. In conclusion, PF4 is probably localized in the alpha-granules and therefore the platelets contain at least two types of organelles (5-HT organelles and alpha-granules) capable of releasing their contents in response to the same stimuli, such as exposure to collagen, thrombin, etc. Images Plate 1 Plate 2 PMID:950602

  5. Subcellular analysis of starch metabolism in developing barley seeds using a non-aqueous fractionation method

    PubMed Central

    Tiessen, Axel; Nerlich, Annika; Faix, Benjamin; Hümmer, Christine; Fox, Simon; Trafford, Kay; Weber, Hans; Weschke, Winfriede; Geigenberger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Compartmentation of metabolism in developing seeds is poorly understood due to the lack of data on metabolite distributions at the subcellular level. In this report, a non-aqueous fractionation method is described that allows subcellular concentrations of metabolites in developing barley endosperm to be calculated. (i) Analysis of subcellular volumes in developing endosperm using micrographs shows that plastids and cytosol occupy 50.5% and 49.9% of the total cell volume, respectively, while vacuoles and mitochondria can be neglected. (ii) By using non-aqueous fractionation, subcellular distribution between the cytosol and plastid of the levels of metabolites involved in sucrose degradation, starch synthesis, and respiration were determined. With the exception of ADP and AMP which were mainly located in the plastid, most other metabolites of carbon and energy metabolism were mainly located outside the plastid in the cytosolic compartment. (iii) In developing barley endosperm, the ultimate precursor of starch, ADPglucose (ADPGlc), was mainly located in the cytosol (80–90%), which was opposite to the situation in growing potato tubers where ADPGlc was almost exclusively located in the plastid (98%). This reflects the different subcellular distribution of ADPGlc pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) in these tissues. (iv) Cytosolic concentrations of ADPGlc were found to be close to the published Km values of AGPase and the ADPGlc/ADP transporter at the plastid envelope. Also the concentrations of the reaction partners glucose-1-phosphate, ATP, and inorganic pyrophosphate were close to the respective Km values of AGPase. (v) Knock-out of cytosolic AGPase in Riso16 mutants led to a strong decrease in ADPGlc level, in both the cytosol and plastid, whereas knock-down of the ADPGlc/ADP transporter led to a large shift in the intracellular distribution of ADPGlc. (v) The thermodynamic structure of the pathway of sucrose to starch was determined by calculating the mass–action ratios

  6. Subcellular proteomics of Trypanosoma cruzi reservosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Celso; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Pereira, Miria G.; Lourenço, Daniela; de Souza, Wanderley; Almeida, Igor C.; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa L.

    2009-01-01

    Reservosomes are the endpoint of the endocytic pathway in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. These organelles have the particular ability to concentrate proteins and lipids obtained from medium together with the main proteolytic enzymes originated from the secretory pathway, being at the same time a storage organelle and the main site of protein degradation. Subcellular proteomics have been extensively used for profiling organelles in different cell types. Here, we combine cell fractionation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis to identify reservosome-resident proteins. Starting from a purified reservosome fraction, we established a protocol to isolate reservosome membranes. Transmission electron microscopy was applied to confirm the purity of the fractions. To achieve a better coverage of identified proteins we analyzed the fractions separately and combined the results. LC-MS/MS analysis identified in total 709 T. cruzi-specific proteins; of these, 456 had predicted function and 253 were classified as hypothetical proteins. We could confirm the presence of most of the proteins validated by previous work and identify new proteins from different classes such as enzymes, proton pumps, transport proteins and others. The definition of the reservosome protein profile is a good tool to assess their molecular signature, identify molecular markers, and understand their relationship with different organelles. PMID:19288526

  7. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  8. Subcellular storage compartments of bacteriopheophorbide sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Joerg G.; Dembeck, U.; Hubert, M.; Spengler, Bernhard; Bayer, Rainer; Wagner, Birgit

    1994-03-01

    Fluorescence colocalization with the Golgi specific stain, NBD-ceramide, and the mitochondrial localizing stain, Rhodamine 123, confirmed the earlier assumption that the Golgi apparatus is one of the prominent storage compartments for bacteriopheophorbide esters in OAT 75 SCLC cells and several amelanotic melanoma cell lines (A375, Melur SP18, SkAMel 25). Furthermore, a diffuse staining of mitochondria, of non-structured cytoplasm, and an additional storage in melanine vesicles of the amelanotic melanoma cells suggests further storage compartments with quantitatively different contributions to the phototoxicity of bacteriochlorophyll-derived photosensitizers. Independent observations of early phototoxic effects on microfilamentous networks, enzymatic activities (succinate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase), and redistribution phenomena following primary uptake of the sensitizers let us assume that only a part of the 108 molecules taken up by a cell contribute directly to phototoxicity. Thus it may be asked if a proper subcellular positioning of only a few sensitizer molecules may have similar phototoxic effects as the huge amounts stored at apparently ineffective sites.

  9. Imaging subcellular features of a sectioned rat brain using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, H.-Y.; Francis, J. T.; Taylor, A. R.; Walzak, M. J.; Chang, W. H.; MacFabe, D. F.; Lau, W. M.

    2008-12-01

    Coronal sections of unfixed rat brain samples were prepared on a flat substrate in order to reveal hippocampal formation (CA1-4 pyramidal neurons) and adjacent neocortical white matter. We demonstrate the feasibility of using surface sensitive techniques such as time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to probe lipid distribution, as well as the subcellular features of neurons. In the same anatomical areas, the phase shift image in SPM is especially useful in revealing the cross-section of subcellular structures. We show that the phase shift images reveal distinctive subcellular features and ion images of CN - and PO 2- fragments from ToF-SIMS appear to define some of the subcellular features.

  10. Predicting multisite protein subcellular locations: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Du, Pufeng; Xu, Chao

    2013-06-01

    In the last two decades, predicting protein subcellular locations has become a hot topic in bioinformatics. A number of algorithms and online services have been developed to computationally assign a subcellular location to a given protein sequence. With the progress of many proteome projects, more and more proteins are annotated with more than one subcellular location. However, multisite prediction has only been considered in a handful of recent studies, in which there are several common challenges. In this special report, the authors discuss what these challenges are, why these challenges are important and how the existing studies gave their solutions. Finally, a vision of the future of predicting multisite protein subcellular locations is given.

  11. Trimethyltin retinopathy: relationship of subcellular response to neuronal subspecialization

    SciTech Connect

    Bouldin, T.W.; Goines, N.D.; Krigman, M.R.

    1984-03-01

    Retinal neurons from rats acutely intoxicated with trimethyltin (TMT) were examined by light and electron microscopy to determine if there is a relationship between the subcellular response of a neuron to TMT and its morphologic subspecialization. Subcellular pathologic alterations were present in neurons from all three cellular layers of the sensory retina. However, the type and degree of subcellular response varied among the highly subspecialized neurons of the different retinal layers. Clusters of dense-cored vesicles and tubules were mainly limited to neurons of the ganglion-cell layer, large accumulations of dense bodies were mainly limited to neurons of the inner nuclear layer, and neuronal necrosis was mainly limited to the photoreceptor cells. The inner segment of the photoreceptor cell shared with the perikaryon of more conventional neurons a special vulnerability to TMT cytotoxicity. Our results suggest that the subspecialization of neurons affects the type and the degree of subcellular response to TMT.

  12. Spatiotemporal visualization of subcellular dynamics of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Serag, Maged F; Braeckmans, Kevin; Habuchi, Satoshi; Kaji, Noritada; Bianco, Alberto; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2012-12-12

    To date, there is no consensus on the relationship between the physicochemical characteristics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their biological behavior; however, there is growing evidence that the versatile characteristics make their biological fate largely unpredictable and remain an issue of limited knowledge. Here we introduce an experimental methodology for tracking and visualization of postuptake behavior and the intracellular fate of CNTs based on the spatial distribution of diffusion values throughout the plant cell. By using raster scan image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), we were able to generate highly quantitative spatial maps of CNTs diffusion in different cell compartments. The spatial map of diffusion values revealed that the uptake of CNTs is associated with important subcellular events such as carrier-mediated vacuolar transport and autophagy. These results show that RICS is a useful methodology to elucidate the intracellular behavior mechanisms of carbon nanotubes and potentially other fluorescently labeled nanoparticles, which is of relevance for the important issues related to the environmental impact and health hazards.

  13. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  14. Subcellular location of MMACHC and MMADHC, two human proteins central to intracellular vitamin B(12) metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mah, Wayne; Deme, Justin C; Watkins, David; Fung, Stephen; Janer, Alexandre; Shoubridge, Eric A; Rosenblatt, David S; Coulton, James W

    2013-02-01

    MMACHC and MMADHC are the genes responsible for cblC and cblD defects of vitamin B(12) metabolism, respectively. Patients with cblC and cblD defects present with various combinations of methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) and homocystinuria (HC). Those with cblC mutations have both MMA and HC whereas cblD patients can present with one of three distinct biochemical phenotypes: isolated MMA, isolated HC, or combined MMA and HC. Based on the subcellular localization of these enzymatic pathways it is thought that MMACHC functions in the cytoplasm while MMADHC functions downstream of MMACHC in both the cytoplasm and the mitochondrion. In this study we determined the subcellular location of MMACHC and MMADHC by immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation. We show that MMACHC is cytoplasmic while MMADHC is both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic, consistent with the proposal that MMADHC acts as a branch point for vitamin B(12) delivery to the cytoplasm and mitochondria. The factors that determine the distribution of MMADHC between the cytoplasm and mitochondria remain unknown. Functional complementation experiments showed that retroviral expression of the GFP tagged constructs rescued all biochemical defects in cblC and cblD fibroblasts except propionate incorporation in cblD-MMA cells, suggesting that the endogenous mutant protein interferes with the function of the transduced wild type construct.

  15. Structural and functional plasticity of subcellular tethering, targeting and processing of RPGRIP1 by RPGR isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Hemangi; Guruju, Mallikarjuna R.; Cho, Kyoung-in; Yi, Haiqing; Orry, Andrew; Kim, Hyesung; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mutations affecting the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator-interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1) interactome cause syndromic retinal dystrophies. RPGRIP1 interacts with the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) through a domain homologous to RCC1 (RHD), a nucleotide exchange factor of Ran GTPase. However, functional relationships between RPGR and RPGRIP1 and their subcellular roles are lacking. We show by molecular modeling and analyses of RPGR disease-mutations that the RPGR-interacting domain (RID) of RPGRIP1 embraces multivalently the shared RHD of RPGR1–19 and RPGRORF15 isoforms and the mutations are non-overlapping with the interface found between RCC1 and Ran GTPase. RPGR disease-mutations grouped into six classes based on their structural locations and differential impairment with RPGRIP1 interaction. RPGRIP1α1 expression alone causes its profuse self-aggregation, an effect suppressed by co-expression of either RPGR isoform before and after RPGRIP1α1 self-aggregation ensue. RPGR1–19 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas RPGRORF15 presents cytosolic distribution and they determine uniquely the subcellular co-localization of RPGRIP1α1. Disease mutations in RPGR1–19, RPGRORF15, or RID of RPGRIP1α1, singly or in combination, exert distinct effects on the subcellular targeting, co-localization or tethering of RPGRIP1α1 with RPGR1–19 or RPGRORF15 in kidney, photoreceptor and hepatocyte cell lines. Additionally, RPGRORF15, but not RPGR1–19, protects the RID of RPGRIP1α1 from limited proteolysis. These studies define RPGR- and cell-type-dependent targeting pathways with structural and functional plasticity modulating the expression of mutations in RPGR and RPGRIP1. Further, RPGR isoforms distinctively determine the subcellular targeting of RPGRIP1α1, with deficits in RPGRORF15-dependent intracellular localization of RPGRIP1α1 contributing to pathomechanisms shared by etiologically distinct syndromic retinal dystrophies. PMID

  16. Proteome-wide Subcellular Topologies of E. coli Polypeptides Database (STEPdb)*

    PubMed Central

    Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Economou, Anastassios

    2014-01-01

    Cell compartmentalization serves both the isolation and the specialization of cell functions. After synthesis in the cytoplasm, over a third of all proteins are targeted to other subcellular compartments. Knowing how proteins are distributed within the cell and how they interact is a prerequisite for understanding it as a whole. Surface and secreted proteins are important pathogenicity determinants. Here we present the STEP database (STEPdb) that contains a comprehensive characterization of subcellular localization and topology of the complete proteome of Escherichia coli. Two widely used E. coli proteomes (K-12 and BL21) are presented organized into thirteen subcellular classes. STEPdb exploits the wealth of genetic, proteomic, biochemical, and functional information on protein localization, secretion, and targeting in E. coli, one of the best understood model organisms. Subcellular annotations were derived from a combination of bioinformatics prediction, proteomic, biochemical, functional, topological data and extensive literature re-examination that were refined through manual curation. Strong experimental support for the location of 1553 out of 4303 proteins was based on 426 articles and some experimental indications for another 526. Annotations were provided for another 320 proteins based on firm bioinformatic predictions. STEPdb is the first database that contains an extensive set of peripheral IM proteins (PIM proteins) and includes their graphical visualization into complexes, cellular functions, and interactions. It also summarizes all currently known protein export machineries of E. coli K-12 and pairs them, where available, with the secretory proteins that use them. It catalogs the Sec- and TAT-utilizing secretomes and summarizes their topological features such as signal peptides and transmembrane regions, transmembrane topologies and orientations. It also catalogs physicochemical and structural features that influence topology such as abundance

  17. A novel form of actin in Leishmania: molecular characterisation, subcellular localisation and association with subpellicular microtubules.

    PubMed

    Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A; Bajpai, Virendra K; Gupta, Chhitar M

    2004-03-01

    To study the occurrence and subcellular distribution of actin in trypanosomatid parasites, we have cloned and overexpressed Leishmania donovani actin gene in bacteria, purified the protein, and employed the affinity purified rabbit polyclonal anti-recombinant actin antibodies as a probe to study the organisation and subcellular distribution of actin in Leishmania cells. The Leishmania actin did not cross react with antimammalian actin antibodies but was readily recognized by the anti-Leishmania actin antibodies in both the promastigote and amastigote forms of the parasite. About 10(6) copies per cell of this protein (M(r) 42.05 kDa) were present in the Leishmania promastigote. Unlike other eukaryotic actins, the oligomeric forms of Leishmania actin were not stained by phalloidin nor were dissociated by actin filament-disrupting agents, like Latrunculin B and Cytochalasin D. Analysis of the primary structure of this protein revealed that these unusual characteristics may be related to the presence of highly diverged amino acids in the DNase I-binding loop (amino acids 40-50) and the hydrophobic plug (amino acids 262-272) regions of Leishmania actin. The subcellular distribution of actin was studied in the Leishmania promastigotes by employing immunoelectron and immunofluorescence microscopies. This protein was present not only in the flagella, flagellar pocket, nucleus and the kinetoplast but it was also localized on the nuclear, vacuolar and cytoplasmic face of the plasma membranes. Further, the plasma membrane-associated actin was colocalised with subpellicular microtubules, while most of the actin present in the kinetoplast colocalised with the k-DNA network. These results clearly indicate that Leishmania contains a novel form of actin which may structurally and functionally differ from other eukaryotic actins. The functional significance of these observations is discussed.

  18. Correlation of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 subcellular localization and lymph node metastases of colorectal neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yan; Lv, Liyang; Du, Juan; Yue, Longtao; Cao, Lili

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •We clarified NDRG1 subcellular location in colorectal cancer. •We found the changes of NDRG1 distribution during colorectal cancer progression. •We clarified the correlation between NDRG1 distribution and lymph node metastasis. •It is possible that NDRG1 subcellular localization may determine its function. •Maybe NDRG1 is valuable early diagnostic markers for metastasis. -- Abstract: In colorectal neoplasms, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a primarily cytoplasmic protein, but it is also expressed on the cell membrane and in the nucleus. NDRG1 is involved in various stages of tumor development in colorectal cancer, and it is possible that the different subcellular localizations may determine the function of NDRG1 protein. Here, we attempt to clarify the characteristics of NDRG1 protein subcellular localization during the progression of colorectal cancer. We examined NDRG1 expression in 49 colorectal cancer patients in cancerous, non-cancerous, and corresponding lymph node tissues. Cytoplasmic and membrane NDRG1 expression was higher in the lymph nodes with metastases than in those without metastases (P < 0.01). Nuclear NDRG1 expression in colorectal neoplasms was significantly higher than in the normal colorectal mucosa, and yet the normal colorectal mucosa showed no nuclear expression. Furthermore, our results showed higher cytoplasmic NDRG1 expression was better for differentiation, and higher membrane NDRG1 expression resulted in a greater possibility of lymph node metastasis. These data indicate that a certain relationship between the cytoplasmic and membrane expression of NDRG1 in lymph nodes exists with lymph node metastasis. NDRG1 expression may translocate from the membrane of the colorectal cancer cells to the nucleus, where it is involved in lymph node metastasis. Combination analysis of NDRG1 subcellular expression and clinical variables will help predict the incidence of lymph node metastasis.

  19. Subcellular and intranuclear localization of neptunium-237 (V) in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Paquet, F; Verry, M; Grillon, G; Landesman, C; Masse, R; Taylor, D M

    1995-08-01

    The present investigation was aimed at establishing the distribution of 237Np within the different structures of hepatocytes. Rats were contaminated experimentally by intravenous injection of 237Np (V) and the subcellular structures of the liver were separated by ultracentrifugation. Twenty-four hours after contamination, the nuclear and cytosolic fractions bound 54 and 32%, respectively, of the total radionuclide. Purification of the nuclei followed by dissociation of the protein components in medium of increasing ionic strength showed a specific binding of neptunium to the structural proteins of the nuclear matrix.

  20. Phosphodiesterases and subcellular compartmentalized cAMP signaling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Stangherlin, Alessandra; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases are key enzymes in the cAMP signaling cascade. They convert cAMP in its inactive form 5'-AMP and critically regulate the intensity and the duration of cAMP-mediated signals. Multiple isoforms exist that possess different intracellular distributions, different affinities for cAMP, and different catalytic and regulatory properties. This complex repertoire of enzymes provides a multiplicity of ways to modulate cAMP levels, to integrate more signaling pathways, and to respond to the specific needs of the cell within distinct subcellular domains. In this review we summarize key findings on phosphodiesterase compartmentalization in the cardiovascular system.

  1. Subcellular Localization of Thiol-Capped CdTe Quantum Dots in Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Mi, Lan; Xiong, Rongling; Wang, Pei-Nan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Yang, Wuli; Wang, Changchun; Peng, Qian

    2009-07-01

    Internalization and dynamic subcellular distribution of thiol-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) in living cells were studied by means of laser scanning confocal microscopy. These unfunctionalized QDs were well internalized into human hepatocellular carcinoma and rat basophilic leukemia cells in vitro. Co-localizations of QDs with lysosomes and Golgi complexes were observed, indicating that in addition to the well-known endosome-lysosome endocytosis pathway, the Golgi complex is also a main destination of the endocytosed QDs. The movement of the endocytosed QDs toward the Golgi complex in the perinuclear region of the cell was demonstrated.

  2. Classification of protein motifs based on subcellular localization uncovers evolutionary relationships at both sequence and functional levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most proteins have evolved in specific cellular compartments that limit their functions and potential interactions. On the other hand, motifs define amino acid arrangements conserved between protein family members and represent powerful tools for assigning function to protein sequences. The ideal motif would identify all members of a protein family but in practice many motifs identify both family members and unrelated proteins, referred to as True Positive (TP) and False Positive (FP) sequences, respectively. Results To address the relationship between protein motifs, protein function and cellular localization, we systematically assigned subcellular localization data to motif sequences from the comprehensive PROSITE sequence motif database. Using this data we analyzed relationships between localization and function. We find that TPs and FPs have a strong tendency to localize in different compartments. When multiple localizations are considered, TPs are usually distributed between related cellular compartments. We also identified cases where FPs are concentrated in particular subcellular regions, indicating possible functional or evolutionary relationships with TP sequences of the same motif. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the systematic examination of subcellular localization has the potential to uncover evolutionary and functional relationships between motif-containing sequences. We believe that this type of analysis complements existing motif annotations and could aid in their interpretation. Our results shed light on the evolution of cellular organelles and potentially establish the basis for new subcellular localization and function prediction algorithms. PMID:23865897

  3. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  4. Subcellular optogenetics – controlling signaling and single-cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Karunarathne, W. K. Ajith; O'Neill, Patrick R.; Gautam, Narasimhan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Variation in signaling activity across a cell plays a crucial role in processes such as cell migration. Signaling activity specific to organelles within a cell also likely plays a key role in regulating cellular functions. To understand how such spatially confined signaling within a cell regulates cell behavior, tools that exert experimental control over subcellular signaling activity are required. Here, we discuss the advantages of using optogenetic approaches to achieve this control. We focus on a set of optical triggers that allow subcellular control over signaling through the activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases and downstream signaling proteins, as well as those that inhibit endogenous signaling proteins. We also discuss the specific insights with regard to signaling and cell behavior that these subcellular optogenetic approaches can provide. PMID:25433038

  5. Cellular and Subcellular Immunohistochemical Localization and Quantification of Cadmium Ions in Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Nan, Tiegui; Tan, Guiyu; Zhao, Hongwei; Tan, Weiming; Meng, Fanyun; Li, Zhaohu; Li, Qing X.; Wang, Baomin

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of metallic ions in plant tissues is associated with their toxicity and is important for understanding mechanisms of toxicity tolerance. A quantitative histochemical method can help advance knowledge of cellular and subcellular localization and distribution of heavy metals in plant tissues. An immunohistochemical (IHC) imaging method for cadmium ions (Cd2+) was developed for the first time for the wheat Triticum aestivum grown in Cd2+-fortified soils. Also, 1-(4-Isothiocyanobenzyl)-ethylenediamine-N,N,N,N-tetraacetic acid (ITCB-EDTA) was used to chelate the mobile Cd2+. The ITCB-EDTA/Cd2+ complex was fixed with proteins in situ via the isothiocyano group. A new Cd2+-EDTA specific monoclonal antibody, 4F3B6D9A1, was used to locate the Cd2+-EDTA protein complex. After staining, the fluorescence intensities of sections of Cd2+-positive roots were compared with those of Cd2+-negative roots under a laser confocal scanning microscope, and the location of colloidal gold particles was determined with a transmission electron microscope. The results enable quantification of the Cd2+ content in plant tissues and illustrate Cd2+ translocation and cellular and subcellular responses of T. aestivum to Cd2+ stress. Compared to the conventional metal-S coprecipitation histochemical method, this new IHC method is quantitative, more specific and has less background interference. The subcellular location of Cd2+ was also confirmed with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The IHC method is suitable for locating and quantifying Cd2+ in plant tissues and can be extended to other heavy metallic ions. PMID:25941807

  6. Cellular and Subcellular Immunohistochemical Localization and Quantification of Cadmium Ions in Wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Nan, Tiegui; Tan, Guiyu; Zhao, Hongwei; Tan, Weiming; Meng, Fanyun; Li, Zhaohu; Li, Qing X; Wang, Baomin

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of metallic ions in plant tissues is associated with their toxicity and is important for understanding mechanisms of toxicity tolerance. A quantitative histochemical method can help advance knowledge of cellular and subcellular localization and distribution of heavy metals in plant tissues. An immunohistochemical (IHC) imaging method for cadmium ions (Cd2+) was developed for the first time for the wheat Triticum aestivum grown in Cd2+-fortified soils. Also, 1-(4-Isothiocyanobenzyl)-ethylenediamine-N,N,N,N-tetraacetic acid (ITCB-EDTA) was used to chelate the mobile Cd2+. The ITCB-EDTA/Cd2+ complex was fixed with proteins in situ via the isothiocyano group. A new Cd2+-EDTA specific monoclonal antibody, 4F3B6D9A1, was used to locate the Cd2+-EDTA protein complex. After staining, the fluorescence intensities of sections of Cd2+-positive roots were compared with those of Cd2+-negative roots under a laser confocal scanning microscope, and the location of colloidal gold particles was determined with a transmission electron microscope. The results enable quantification of the Cd2+ content in plant tissues and illustrate Cd2+ translocation and cellular and subcellular responses of T. aestivum to Cd2+ stress. Compared to the conventional metal-S coprecipitation histochemical method, this new IHC method is quantitative, more specific and has less background interference. The subcellular location of Cd2+ was also confirmed with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The IHC method is suitable for locating and quantifying Cd2+ in plant tissues and can be extended to other heavy metallic ions.

  7. Spatial and temporal changes in Bax subcellular localization during NPe6-PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R.; Wan, Qingling; Zhou, Feifan

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employing photosensiter N-aspartyl chlorin e6 (NPe6) can induce lysosome disruption and initiate the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Bax, a member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, is an essential regulator of apoptosis. Bax is normally found in the cytosol of healthy cells, and translocates to mitochondria in response to many apoptotic stimuli. In this study, using real-time single-cell analysis, we have investigated the kinetics of Bax distribution during NPe6-induced apoptosis in ASTC-a-1 cells. In order to monitor Bax subcellular distribution, cells were stained with GFP-Bax and Mito Tracker Red. The results show that Bax redistribution occurred at about 170 min after treated with NPe6-PDT, and then sequestered into clusters associated with the mitochondira within 30 min. Our data clearly showed the spatial and temporal changes in Bax distribution in living cells during NPe6-induced apoptosis.

  8. Imaging Subcellular Structures in the Living Zebrafish Embryo.

    PubMed

    Engerer, Peter; Plucinska, Gabriela; Thong, Rachel; Trovò, Laura; Paquet, Dominik; Godinho, Leanne

    2016-04-02

    In vivo imaging provides unprecedented access to the dynamic behavior of cellular and subcellular structures in their natural context. Performing such imaging experiments in higher vertebrates such as mammals generally requires surgical access to the system under study. The optical accessibility of embryonic and larval zebrafish allows such invasive procedures to be circumvented and permits imaging in the intact organism. Indeed the zebrafish is now a well-established model to visualize dynamic cellular behaviors using in vivo microscopy in a wide range of developmental contexts from proliferation to migration and differentiation. A more recent development is the increasing use of zebrafish to study subcellular events including mitochondrial trafficking and centrosome dynamics. The relative ease with which these subcellular structures can be genetically labeled by fluorescent proteins and the use of light microscopy techniques to image them is transforming the zebrafish into an in vivo model of cell biology. Here we describe methods to generate genetic constructs that fluorescently label organelles, highlighting mitochondria and centrosomes as specific examples. We use the bipartite Gal4-UAS system in multiple configurations to restrict expression to specific cell-types and provide protocols to generate transiently expressing and stable transgenic fish. Finally, we provide guidelines for choosing light microscopy methods that are most suitable for imaging subcellular dynamics.

  9. Subcellular localization of mammalian type II membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Aturaliya, Rajith N; Fink, J Lynn; Davis, Melissa J; Teasdale, Melvena S; Hanson, Kelly A; Miranda, Kevin C; Forrest, Alistair R R; Grimmond, Sean M; Suzuki, Harukazu; Kanamori, Mutsumi; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Teasdale, Rohan D

    2006-05-01

    Application of a computational membrane organization prediction pipeline, MemO, identified putative type II membrane proteins as proteins predicted to encode a single alpha-helical transmembrane domain (TMD) and no signal peptides. MemO was applied to RIKEN's mouse isoform protein set to identify 1436 non-overlapping genomic regions or transcriptional units (TUs), which encode exclusively type II membrane proteins. Proteins with overlapping predicted InterPro and TMDs were reviewed to discard false positive predictions resulting in a dataset comprised of 1831 transcripts in 1408 TUs. This dataset was used to develop a systematic protocol to document subcellular localization of type II membrane proteins. This approach combines mining of published literature to identify subcellular localization data and a high-throughput, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach to experimentally characterize subcellular localization. These approaches have provided localization data for 244 and 169 proteins. Type II membrane proteins are localized to all major organelle compartments; however, some biases were observed towards the early secretory pathway and punctate structures. Collectively, this study reports the subcellular localization of 26% of the defined dataset. All reported localization data are presented in the LOCATE database (http://www.locate.imb.uq.edu.au).

  10. Regulation of intracellular heme trafficking revealed by subcellular reporters

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Rietzschel, Nicole; Walter Nuno, Ana Beatriz; Hanna, David A.; Phillips, John D.; Raven, Emma L.; Reddi, Amit R.; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Heme is an essential prosthetic group in proteins that reside in virtually every subcellular compartment performing diverse biological functions. Irrespective of whether heme is synthesized in the mitochondria or imported from the environment, this hydrophobic and potentially toxic metalloporphyrin has to be trafficked across membrane barriers, a concept heretofore poorly understood. Here we show, using subcellular-targeted, genetically encoded hemoprotein peroxidase reporters, that both extracellular and endogenous heme contribute to cellular labile heme and that extracellular heme can be transported and used in toto by hemoproteins in all six subcellular compartments examined. The reporters are robust, show large signal-to-background ratio, and provide sufficient range to detect changes in intracellular labile heme. Restoration of reporter activity by heme is organelle-specific, with the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum being important sites for both exogenous and endogenous heme trafficking. Expression of peroxidase reporters in Caenorhabditis elegans shows that environmental heme influences labile heme in a tissue-dependent manner; reporter activity in the intestine shows a linear increase compared with muscle or hypodermis, with the lowest heme threshold in neurons. Our results demonstrate that the trafficking pathways for exogenous and endogenous heme are distinct, with intrinsic preference for specific subcellular compartments. We anticipate our results will serve as a heuristic paradigm for more sophisticated studies on heme trafficking in cellular and whole-animal models. PMID:27528661

  11. SUBCELLULAR PHARMACOKINETICS AND ITS POTENTIAL FOR LIBRARY FOCUSING (R826652)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Subcellular pharmacokinetics (SP) optimizes biology-related factors in the design of libraries for high throughput screening by defining comparatively narrow ranges of properties (lipophilicity, amphiphilicity, acidity, reactivity, 3D-structural features) of t...

  12. Changes in architecture of the Golgi complex and other subcellular organelles during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Myogenesis involves changes in both gene expression and cellular architecture. Little is known of the organization, in muscle in vivo, of the subcellular organelles involved in protein synthesis despite the potential importance of targeted protein synthesis for formation and maintenance of functional domains such as the neuromuscular junction. A panel of antibodies to markers of the ER, the Golgi complex, and the centrosome were used to localize these organelles by immunofluorescence in myoblasts and myotubes of the mouse muscle cell line C2 in vitro, and in intact single muscle fibers from the rat flexor digitorum brevis. Antibodies to the ER stained structures throughout the cytoplasm of both C2 myoblasts and myotubes. In contrast, the spatial relationship between nucleus, centrosome, and Golgi complex was dramatically altered. These changes could also be observed in a low- calcium medium that allowed differentiation while preventing myoblast fusion. Muscle fibers in vivo resembled myotubes except that the ER occupied a smaller volume of cytoplasm and no staining was found for one of the Golgi complex markers, the enzyme alpha-mannosidase II. Electron microscopy, however, clearly showed the presence of stacks of Golgi cisternae in both junctional and extrajunctional regions of muscle fibers. The perinuclear distribution of the Golgi complex was also observed in live muscle fibers stained with a fluorescent lipid. Thus, the distribution of subcellular organelles of the secretory pathway was found to be similar in myotubes and muscle fibers, and all organelles were found in both junctional and extrajunctional areas of muscle. PMID:7678420

  13. Expression and tissue and subcellular localization of anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiling; Wang, Wei; Li, Hui; Zhang, Ping; Zhan, Jicheng; Huang, Weidong

    2011-04-01

    Anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) is one of the key enzymes in the biosynthesis of both anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins in grapevine. Although substantial researches have investigated ANS gene expression and regulation at the transcriptional level, little is yet known about protein expression and distribution in grapevine. Here, the expression and tissue and subcellular localization of ANS in different Cabernet sauvignon grapevine tissues were investigated by using the techniques of Western blotting, immunohistochemical localization, immuno-electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy. The results showed that the ANS was expressed in the grape berries, leaves, stems, petioles, and leaf buds. In grape berry skin and flesh, ANS expression is developmental dependent. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that ANS is primarily distributed in the exocarp, mesocarp, and seed of the fruit; in palisade and spongy tissues of the leaves; in the primary phloem and pith ray in the stems; and in the growth point and leaf primordium of the leaf buds. Furthermore, at the subcellular level, the ANS was mainly localized in the cytoplasm regardless of cell types and some ANS were also found in the nucleus in the mesocarp vascular bundle and leaf bud cells. This research will give further insight for the biosynthesis and regulation of different flavonoid compounds in grapevine.

  14. New application of a subcellular fractionation method to kidney and testis for the determination of conjugated linoleic acid in selected cell organelles of healthy and cancerous human tissues.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Kristina; Blaudszun, Jörg; Brunken, Claus; Höpker, Wilhelm-Wolfgang; Tauber, Roland; Steinhart, Hans

    2005-03-01

    To clarify the mechanism of the anticarcinogenic effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), its intracellular distribution needs to be determined. Subcellular fractionation using centrifugation techniques is a method that is frequently used for isolation of cell organelles from different tissues. But as the size and density of the organelles differ, the method needs to be optimised for every type of tissue. The novelty of this study is the application of a subcellular fractionation method to human healthy and cancerous renal and testicular tissue. Separation of total tissue homogenate into nuclei, cytosol, and a mixture of mitochondria and plasma membranes was achieved by differential centrifugation. As mitochondria and plasma membranes seemed to be too similar in size and weight to be separated by differential centrifugation, discontinuous density-gradient centrifugation was carried out successfully. The purity of the subcellular fractions was checked by measuring the activity of marker enzymes. All fractions were highly enriched in their corresponding marker enzyme. However, the nuclear fractions of kidney and renal cell carcinoma were slightly contaminated with mitochondria and plasma membrane fractions of all tissues with lysosomes. The fraction designated the cytosolic fraction contained not only cytosol, but also microsomes and lysosomes. The CLA contents of the subcellular fractions were in the range 0.13-0.37% of total fatty acids and were lowest in the plasma membrane fractions of all types of tissue studied. C16:0, C18:0, C18:1 c9, C18:2 n-6, and C20:4 n-6 were found to be the major fatty acids in all the subcellular fractions studied. However, marked variations in fatty acid content between subcellular fractions and between types of tissue were detectable. Because of these differences between tissues, no general statement on characteristic fatty acid profiles of single subcellular fractions is possible.

  15. Subcellular localization of proteasomes and their regulatory complexes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, P; Fuertes, G; Murray, R Z; Bose, S; Knecht, E; Rechsteiner, M C; Hendil, K B; Tanaka, K; Dyson, J; Rivett, J

    2000-01-01

    Proteasomes can exist in several different molecular forms in mammalian cells. The core 20S proteasome, containing the proteolytic sites, binds regulatory complexes at the ends of its cylindrical structure. Together with two 19S ATPase regulatory complexes it forms the 26S proteasome, which is involved in ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. The 20S proteasome can also bind 11S regulatory complexes (REG, PA28) which play a role in antigen processing, as do the three variable gamma-interferon-inducible catalytic beta-subunits (e.g. LMP7). In the present study, we have investigated the subcellular distribution of the different forms of proteasomes using subunit specific antibodies. Both 20S proteasomes and their 19S regulatory complexes are found in nuclear, cytosolic and microsomal preparations isolated from rat liver. LMP7 was enriched approximately two-fold compared with core alpha-type proteasome subunits in the microsomal preparations. 20S proteasomes were more abundant than 26S proteasomes, both in liver and cultured cell lines. Interestingly, some significant differences were observed in the distribution of different subunits of the 19S regulatory complexes. S12, and to a lesser extent p45, were found to be relatively enriched in nuclear fractions from rat liver, and immunofluorescent labelling of cultured cells with anti-p45 antibodies showed stronger labelling in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm. The REG was found to be localized predominantly in the cytoplasm. Three- to six-fold increases in the level of REG were observed following gamma-interferon treatment of cultured cells but gamma-interferon had no obvious effect on its subcellular distribution. These results demonstrate that different regulatory complexes and subpopulations of proteasomes have different distributions within mammalian cells and, therefore, that the distribution is more complex than has been reported for yeast proteasomes. PMID:10657252

  16. Model-based segmentation and quantification of subcellular structures in 2D and 3D fluorescent microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörz, Stefan; Heinzer, Stephan; Weiss, Matthias; Rohr, Karl

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a model-based approach for segmenting and quantifying GFP-tagged subcellular structures of the Golgi apparatus in 2D and 3D microscopy images. The approach is based on 2D and 3D intensity models, which are directly fitted to an image within 2D circular or 3D spherical regions-of-interest (ROIs). We also propose automatic approaches for the detection of candidates, for the initialization of the model parameters, and for adapting the size of the ROI used for model fitting. Based on the fitting results, we determine statistical information about the spatial distribution and the total amount of intensity (fluorescence) of the subcellular structures. We demonstrate the applicability of our new approach based on 2D and 3D microscopy images.

  17. Hepatic Subcellular Compartmentation of Cytoplasmic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Determined by Immunogold Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kuixiong; Cardell, Emma Lou; Morris, Randal E.; Giffin, Bruce F.; Cardell, Robert R.

    1995-08-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is the rate-limiting gluconeogenic enzyme and in liver occurs in a lobular gradient from periportal to pericentral regions. The subcellular distribution of cytoplasmic PEPCK molecules within hepatocytes and its relationship to organelles have not been determined previously. In this study, we have used immunogold electron microscopy to evaluate the subcellar distribution of the enzyme, in addition to brightfield and epipolarized light microscopy. Cryosections (10 [mu]m) of perfusion-fixed rat liver were collected on silanated slides and immunostained using goat anti-rat PEPCK followed by 5-nm gold-labeled secondary and tertiary antibodies. Additionally, free-floating vibratome sections (25, 50, and 100 [mu]m) of perfusion-immersion-fixed rat liver were immunogold stained using goat anti-rat PEPCK and 5-nm gold-labeled secondary antibody, with and without silver enhancement. The immunogold labeled sections from both procedures were embedded in epoxy resin for the preparation of thin sections for electron microscopy. The results showed that the gold-labeled antibodies penetrated the entire thickness of cryosections, resulting in a high signal for PEPCK, but membranes in general, the smooth endoplasmic reticulum in particular, were not identifiable as electron dense unit membranes. On the other hand, the vibratome sections of well-fixed tissue allowed good visualization of the ultrastructure of cellular organelles, with the smooth endoplasmic reticulum appearing as vesicles and tubules with electron dense unit membranes; however, the penetration of the gold-labeled antibody was limited to cells at the surface of the vibratome sections. In both procedures, PEPCK, as indicated by gold particles, is predominantly in the glycogen areas of the cytosome and not in mitochondria, nuclei, Golgi apparatus, or other cell organelles. Hepatocytes in periportal regions have a compact subcellular distribution of PEPCK shown by gold particles

  18. Cloning, characterization and subcellular localization of Nuclear LIM interactor interacting factor gene from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Ravinder, R; Goyal, N

    2017-05-05

    LIM domains are zinc-binding motifs that mediate protein-protein interactions and are found in a wide variety of cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins. The nuclear LIM domain family members have a number of different functions including transcription factors, gene regulation, cell fate determination, organization of the cytoskeleton and tumour formation exerting their function through various LIM domain interacting protein partners/cofactors. Nuclear LIM domain interacting proteins/factors have not been reported in any protozoan parasites including Leishmania. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and subcellular localization of nuclear LIM interactor-interacting factor (NLI) like protein from Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdNLI revealed presence of characteristic features of nuclear LIM interactor-interacting factor. However, leishmanial NLI represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. The sub-cellular distribution of LdNLI revealed the discreet localization in nucleus and kinetoplast only, suggesting that the gene may have a role in parasite gene expression.

  19. Analysis of potato virus X replicase and TGBp3 subcellular locations

    SciTech Connect

    Bamunusinghe, Devinka; Hemenway, Cynthia L.; Nelson, Richard S.; Sanderfoot, Anton A.; Ye, Chang M.; Silva, Muniwarage A.T.; Payton, M.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2009-10-25

    Potato virus X (PVX) infection leads to certain cytopathological modifications of the host endomembrane system. The subcellular location of the PVX replicase was previously unknown while the PVX TGBp3 protein was previously reported to reside in the ER. Using PVX infectious clones expressing the green fluorescent protein reporter, and antisera detecting the PVX replicase and host membrane markers, we examined the subcellular distribution of the PVX replicase in relation to the TGBp3. Confocal and electron microscopic observations revealed that the replicase localizes in membrane bound structures that derive from the ER. A subset of TGBp3 resides in the ER at the same location as the replicase. Sucrose gradient fractionation showed that the PVX replicase and TGBp3 proteins co-fractionate with ER marker proteins. This localization represents a region where both proteins may be synthesized and/or function. There is no evidence to indicate that either PVX protein moves into the Golgi apparatus. Cerulenin, a drug that inhibits de novo membrane synthesis, also inhibited PVX replication. These combined data indicate that PVX replication relies on ER-derived membrane recruitment and membrane proliferation.

  20. Fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify sub-cellular oxygen measurements in live macrophage during bacterial invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragavon, Joe; Amiri, Megdouda; Marteyn, Benoit; Sansonetti, Philipe; Shorte, Spencer

    2011-03-01

    Fluorophore concentration, the surrounding microenvironment, and photobleaching greatly influence the fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore, increasing the difficulty to directly observe micro-environmental factors such as pH and oxygen. However, the fluorescence lifetime of a fluorophore is essentially independent of both the fluorophore concentration and photobleaching, providing a viable alternative to intensity measurements. The development of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) allows for the direct measurement of the microenvironment surrounding a fluorophore. Pt-porphyrin is a fluorophore whose optical properties include a very stable triplet excited state. This energy level overlaps strongly with the ground triplet state of oxygen, making the phosphorescent lifetime directly proportional to the surrounding oxygen concentration. Initial experiments using this fluorophore involved the use of individual microwells coated with the porphyrin. Cells were allowed to enter the micro-wells before being sealed to create a diffusionally isolated volume. The decrease in the extracellular oxygen concentration was observed using FLI. However, this isolation technique provides only the consumption rate but cannot indicate the subcellular oxygen distribution. To improve upon this, live macrophages are loaded with the porphyrin and the fluorescence lifetime determined using a Lambert Instruments Lifa-X FLI system. Initial results indicate that an increase in subcellular oxygen is observed upon initial exposure to invasive bacteria. A substantial decrease in oxygen is observed after about 1 hour of exposure. The cells remain in this deoxygenated state until the bacteria are removed or cell death occurs.

  1. Subcellular targeting and dynamic regulation of PTEN: implications for neuronal cells and neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kreis, Patricia; Leondaritis, George; Lieberam, Ivo; Eickholt, Britta J.

    2014-01-01

    PTEN is a lipid and protein phosphatase that regulates a diverse range of cellular mechanisms. PTEN is mainly present in the cytosol and transiently associates with the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate PI(3,4,5)P3, thereby antagonizing the PI3-Kinase signaling pathway. Recently, PTEN has been shown to associate also with organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the mitochondria, or the nucleus, and to be secreted outside of the cell. In addition, PTEN dynamically localizes to specialized sub-cellular compartments such as the neuronal growth cone or dendritic spines. The diverse localizations of PTEN imply a tight temporal and spatial regulation, orchestrated by mechanisms such as posttranslational modifications, formation of distinct protein–protein interactions, or the activation/recruitment of PTEN downstream of external cues. The regulation of PTEN function is thus not only important at the enzymatic activity level, but is also associated to its spatial distribution. In this review we will summarize (i) recent findings that highlight mechanisms controlling PTEN movement and sub-cellular localization, and (ii) current understanding of how PTEN localization is achieved by mechanisms controlling posttranslational modification, by association with binding partners and by PTEN structural or activity requirements. Finally, we will discuss the possible roles of compartmentalized PTEN in developing and mature neurons in health and disease. PMID:24744697

  2. Subcellular targeting of nine calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dammann, Christian; Ichida, Audrey; Hong, Bimei; Romanowsky, Shawn M.; Hrabak, Estelle M.; Harmon, Alice C.; Pickard, Barbara G.; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are specific to plants and some protists. Their activation by calcium makes them important switches for the transduction of intracellular calcium signals. Here, we identify the subcellular targeting potentials for nine CDPK isoforms from Arabidopsis, as determined by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in transgenic plants. Subcellular locations were determined by fluorescence microscopy in cells near the root tip. Isoforms AtCPK3-GFP and AtCPK4-GFP showed a nuclear and cytosolic distribution similar to that of free GFP. Membrane fractionation experiments confirmed that these isoforms were primarily soluble. A membrane association was observed for AtCPKs 1, 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, and 28, based on imaging and membrane fractionation experiments. This correlates with the presence of potential N-terminal acylation sites, consistent with acylation as an important factor in membrane association. All but one of the membrane-associated isoforms targeted exclusively to the plasma membrane. The exception was AtCPK1-GFP, which targeted to peroxisomes, as determined by covisualization with a peroxisome marker. Peroxisome targeting of AtCPK1-GFP was disrupted by a deletion of two potential N-terminal acylation sites. The observation of a peroxisome-located CDPK suggests a mechanism for calcium regulation of peroxisomal functions involved in oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

  3. Classification of Subcellular Phenotype Images by Decision Templates for Classifier Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bailing

    2010-01-01

    Subcellular localization is a key functional characteristic of proteins. An automatic, reliable and efficient prediction system for protein subcellular localization is needed for large-scale genome analysis. The automated cell phenotype image classification problem is an interesting "bioimage informatics" application. It can be used for establishing knowledge of the spatial distribution of proteins within living cells and permits to screen systems for drug discovery or for early diagnosis of a disease. In this paper, three well-known texture feature extraction methods including local binary patterns (LBP), Gabor filtering and Gray Level Coocurrence Matrix (GLCM) have been applied to cell phenotype images and the multiple layer perceptron (MLP) method has been used to classify cell phenotype image. After classification of the extracted features, decision-templates ensemble algorithm (DT) is used to combine base classifiers built on the different feature sets. Different texture feature sets can provide sufficient diversity among base classifiers, which is known as a necessary condition for improvement in ensemble performance. For the HeLa cells, the human classification error rate on this task is of 17% as reported in previous publications. We obtain with our method an error rate of 4.8%.

  4. Protein expression and subcellular localization of the general purine transporter UapC from Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Valdez-Taubas, J; Diallinas, G; Scazzocchio, C; Rosa, A L

    2000-07-01

    The uapC gene of Aspergillus nidulans belongs to a family of nucleobase-specific transporters conserved in prokaryotic and eucaryotic organisms. We report the use of immunological and green fluorescent protein based strategies to study protein expression and subcellular distribution of UapC. A chimeric protein containing a plant-adapted green fluorescent protein (sGFP) fused to the C-terminus of UapC was shown to be functional in vivo, as it complements a triple mutant (i.e., uapC(-) uapA(-) azgA(-)) unable to grow on uric acid as the sole nitrogen source. UapC-GFP is located in the plasma membrane and, secondarily, in internal structures observed as fluorescent dots. A strong correlation was found between cellular levels of UapC-GFP fluorescence and known patterns of uapC gene expression. This work represents the first in vivo study of protein expression and subcellular localization of a filamentous fungal nucleobase transporter.

  5. Subcellular Localization of the Sigma-1 Receptor in Retinal Neurons — an Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Epstein, Miles; Guo, Lian-Wang

    2015-01-01

    The Sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is known to play a protective role in the central nervous system including the retina. A major barrier for understanding the underlying mechanism is an ambiguity of S1R subcellular localizations. We thus conducted the first electron microscopy (EM) study of S1R subcellular distribution in the mouse retina. Immuno-EM imaging showed previously under-appreciated S1R presence in photoreceptor cells. Unlike in other cell types in previous reports, in photoreceptor cells S1R was found in the nuclear envelope but not localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), raising a possibility of S1R-mediated modulatory mechanisms different than conventionally thought. While in bipolar cells S1R was detected only in the nuclear envelope, in ganglion cells S1R was identified predominantly in the nuclear envelope and found in the ER as well. A predominant localization of S1R in the nuclear envelope in all three retinal neurons implicates a potential role of S1R in modulating nuclear activities. Moreover, its absence in the plasma membrane and presence in the subsurface ER cisternae that are juxtaposed to the plasma membrane in ganglion cells may lend mechanistic insights generally important for frequently reported S1R modulations of ion channels in neurons. PMID:26033680

  6. Biomechanics of subcellular structures by non-invasive Brillouin microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Antonacci, Giuseppe; Braakman, Sietse

    2016-01-01

    Cellular biomechanics play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of several diseases. Unfortunately, current methods to measure biomechanical properties are invasive and mostly limited to the surface of a cell. As a result, the mechanical behaviour of subcellular structures and organelles remains poorly characterised. Here, we show three-dimensional biomechanical images of single cells obtained with non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin microscopy with an unprecedented spatial resolution. Our results quantify the longitudinal elastic modulus of subcellular structures. In particular, we found the nucleoli to be stiffer than both the nuclear envelope (p < 0.0001) and the surrounding cytoplasm (p < 0.0001). Moreover, we demonstrate the mechanical response of cells to Latrunculin-A, a drug that reduces cell stiffness by preventing cytoskeletal assembly. Our technique can therefore generate valuable insights into cellular biomechanics and its role in pathophysiology. PMID:27845411

  7. Mechanosensitive subcellular rheostasis drives emergent single-cell mechanical homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqiang; Fu, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical homeostasis - a fundamental process by which cells maintain stable states under environmental perturbations - is regulated by two subcellular mechanotransducers: cytoskeleton tension and integrin-mediated focal adhesions (FAs)1-5. Here, we show that single-cell mechanical homeostasis is collectively driven by the distinct, graduated dynamics (rheostasis) of subcellular cytoskeleton tension and FAs. Such rheostasis involves a mechanosensitive pattern wherein ground states of cytoskeleton tension and FA determine their distinct reactive paths via either relaxation or reinforcement. Pharmacological perturbations of the cytoskeleton and molecularly modulated integrin catch-slip bonds biased the rheostasis and induced non-homeostasis of FAs, but not of cytoskeleton tension, suggesting a unique sensitivity of FAs in regulating homeostasis. Theoretical modeling revealed myosin-mediated cytoskeleton contractility and catch-slip-bond-like behaviors in FAs and the cytoskeleton as sufficient and necessary mechanisms for quantitatively recapitulating mechanosensitive rheostasis. Our findings highlight previously underappreciated physical nature of the mechanical homeostasis of cells. PMID:27240108

  8. Mechanosensitive subcellular rheostasis drives emergent single-cell mechanical homeostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Shinuo; Shao, Yue; Chen, Weiqiang; Fu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical homeostasis--a fundamental process by which cells maintain stable states under environmental perturbations--is regulated by two subcellular mechanotransducers: cytoskeleton tension and integrin-mediated focal adhesions (FAs). Here, we show that single-cell mechanical homeostasis is collectively driven by the distinct, graduated dynamics (rheostasis) of subcellular cytoskeleton tension and FAs. Such rheostasis involves a mechanosensitive pattern wherein ground states of cytoskeleton tension and FA determine their distinct reactive paths through either relaxation or reinforcement. Pharmacological perturbations of the cytoskeleton and molecularly modulated integrin catch-slip bonds biased the rheostasis and induced non-homeostasis of FAs, but not of cytoskeleton tension, suggesting a unique sensitivity of FAs in regulating homeostasis. Theoretical modelling revealed myosin-mediated cytoskeleton contractility and catch-slip-bond-like behaviours in FAs and the cytoskeleton as sufficient and necessary mechanisms for quantitatively recapitulating mechanosensitive rheostasis. Our findings highlight the previously underappreciated physical nature of the mechanical homeostasis of cells.

  9. Genetically Targeted Fluorogenic Macromolecules for Subcellular Imaging and Cellular Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Magenau, Andrew J. D.; Saurabh, Saumya; Andreko, Susan K.; Telmer, Cheryl A.; Schmidt, Brigitte F.; Waggoner, Alan S.; Bruchez, Marcel P.

    2015-01-01

    The alteration of cellular functions by anchoring macromolecules to specified organelles may reveal a new area of therapeutic potential and clinical treatment. In this work, a unique phenotype was evoked by influencing cellular behavior through the modification of subcellular structures with genetically targetable macromolecules. These fluorogen-functionalized polymers, prepared via controlled radical polymerization, were capable of exclusively decorating actin, cytoplasmic, or nuclear compartments of living cells expressing localized fluorgen-activating proteins. The macromolecular fluorogens were optimized by establishing critical polymer architecture-biophysical property relationships which impacted binding rates, binding affinities, and the level of internalization. Specific labeling of subcellular structures was realized at nanomolar concentrations of polymer, in the absence of membrane permeabilization or transduction domains, and fluorogen-modified polymers were found to bind to protein intact after delivery to the cytosol. Cellular motility was found to be dependent on binding of macromolecular fluorogens to actin structures causing rapid cellular ruffling without migration. PMID:26183934

  10. Biomechanics of subcellular structures by non-invasive Brillouin microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonacci, Giuseppe; Braakman, Sietse

    2016-11-01

    Cellular biomechanics play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of several diseases. Unfortunately, current methods to measure biomechanical properties are invasive and mostly limited to the surface of a cell. As a result, the mechanical behaviour of subcellular structures and organelles remains poorly characterised. Here, we show three-dimensional biomechanical images of single cells obtained with non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin microscopy with an unprecedented spatial resolution. Our results quantify the longitudinal elastic modulus of subcellular structures. In particular, we found the nucleoli to be stiffer than both the nuclear envelope (p < 0.0001) and the surrounding cytoplasm (p < 0.0001). Moreover, we demonstrate the mechanical response of cells to Latrunculin-A, a drug that reduces cell stiffness by preventing cytoskeletal assembly. Our technique can therefore generate valuable insights into cellular biomechanics and its role in pathophysiology.

  11. Geometric modeling of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Kelin; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the structure, function, stability, and dynamics of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes have emerged as a leading interest in structural biology. Geometric modeling not only provides visualizations of shapes for large biomolecular complexes but also fills the gap between structural information and theoretical modeling, and enables the understanding of function, stability, and dynamics. This paper introduces a suite of computational tools for volumetric data processing, information extraction, surface mesh rendering, geometric measurement, and curvature estimation of biomolecular complexes. Particular emphasis is given to the modeling of cryo-electron microscopy data. Lagrangian-triangle meshes are employed for the surface presentation. On the basis of this representation, algorithms are developed for surface area and surface-enclosed volume calculation, and curvature estimation. Methods for volumetric meshing have also been presented. Because the technological development in computer science and mathematics has led to multiple choices at each stage of the geometric modeling, we discuss the rationales in the design and selection of various algorithms. Analytical models are designed to test the computational accuracy and convergence of proposed algorithms. Finally, we select a set of six cryo-electron microscopy data representing typical subcellular complexes to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed algorithms in handling biomolecular surfaces and explore their capability of geometric characterization of binding targets. This paper offers a comprehensive protocol for the geometric modeling of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes.

  12. TESTLoc: protein subcellular localization prediction from EST data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The eukaryotic cell has an intricate architecture with compartments and substructures dedicated to particular biological processes. Knowing the subcellular location of proteins not only indicates how bio-processes are organized in different cellular compartments, but also contributes to unravelling the function of individual proteins. Computational localization prediction is possible based on sequence information alone, and has been successfully applied to proteins from virtually all subcellular compartments and all domains of life. However, we realized that current prediction tools do not perform well on partial protein sequences such as those inferred from Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data, limiting the exploitation of the large and taxonomically most comprehensive body of sequence information from eukaryotes. Results We developed a new predictor, TESTLoc, suited for subcellular localization prediction of proteins based on their partial sequence conceptually translated from ESTs (EST-peptides). Support Vector Machine (SVM) is used as computational method and EST-peptides are represented by different features such as amino acid composition and physicochemical properties. When TESTLoc was applied to the most challenging test case (plant data), it yielded high accuracy (~85%). Conclusions TESTLoc is a localization prediction tool tailored for EST data. It provides a variety of models for the users to choose from, and is available for download at http://megasun.bch.umontreal.ca/~shenyq/TESTLoc/TESTLoc.html PMID:21078192

  13. Subcellular fractionation and chemical speciation of uranium to elucidate its fate in gills and hepatopancreas of crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Frelon, S; Mounicou, S; Lobinski, R; Gilbin, R; Simon, O

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge of the organ and subcellular distribution of metals in organisms is fundamental for the understanding of their uptake, storage, elimination and toxicity. Detoxification via MTLP and MRG formation and chelation by some proteins are necessary to better assess the metal toxic fraction in aquatic organisms. This work focused on uranium, natural element mainly used in nuclear industry, and its subcellular fractionation and chemical speciation to elucidate its accumulation pattern in gills and hepatopancreas of crayfish Procambarus clarkii, key organs of uptake and detoxification, respectively. Crayfish waterborne exposure was performed during 4 and 10d at 0, 30, 600 and 4000 μg UL(-1). After tissue dissection, uranium subcellular fractionation was performed by successive ultracentrifugations. SEC-ICP MS was used to study uranium speciation in cytosolic fraction. The uranium subcellular partitioning patterns varied according to the target organ studied and its biological function in the organism. The cytosolic fraction accounted for 13-30% of the total uranium amount in gills and 35-75% in hepatopancreas. The uranium fraction coeluting with MTLPs in gills and hepatopancreas cytosols showed that roughly 55% of uranium remained non-detoxified and thus potentially toxic in the cytosol. Furthermore, the sum of uranium amount in organelle fractions and in the non-detoxified part of cytosol, possibly equivalent to available fraction, accounted for 20% (gills) and 57% (hepatopancreas) of the total uranium. Finally, the SEC-ICP MS analysis provided information on potential competition of U for biomolecules similar than the ones involved in endogenous essential metal (Fe, Cu) chelation.

  14. High Sequence Variability, Diverse Subcellular Localizations, and Ecological Implications of Alkaline Phosphatase in Dinoflagellates and Other Eukaryotic Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Zhang, Huan; Cui, Yudong; Lin, Senjie

    2012-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is a key enzyme for phytoplankton to utilize dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) when dissolved inorganic phosphorus is limited. While three major types of AP and their correspondingly diverse subcellular localization have been recognized in bacteria, little is known about AP in eukaryotic phytoplankton such as dinoflagellates. Here, we isolated a full-length AP cDNA from a latest-diverging dinoflagellate genus Alexandrium, and conducted comparative analyses with homologs from a relatively basal (Amphidinium carterae) and late-diverging (Karenia brevis) lineage of dinoflagellates as well as other eukaryotic algae. New data and previous studies indicate that AP is common in dinoflagellates and most other major eukaryotic groups of phytoplankton. AP sequences are more variable than many other genes studied in dinoflagellates, and are divergent among different eukaryotic phytoplankton lineages. Sequence comparison to the other characterized APs suggests that dinoflagellates and some other eukaryotic phytoplankton possess the putative AP as phoA type, but some other eukaryotic phytoplankton seem to have other types. Phylogenetic analyses based on AP amino acid sequences indicated that the “red-type” eukaryotic lineages formed a monophyletic group, suggesting a common origin of their APs. As different amino acid sequences have been found to predictably determine different spatial distribution in the cells, which may facilitate access to different pools of DOP, existing computational models were adopted to predict the subcellular localizations of putative AP in the three dinoflagellates and other eukaryotic phytoplankton. Results showed different subcellular localizations of APs in different dinoflagellates and other lineages. The linkage between AP sequence divergence, subcellular localization, and ecological niche differentiation requires rigorous experimental verification, and this study now provides a framework for such a future effort

  15. Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Wayne A.

    This monograph was written for the Conference of the New Instructional Materials in Physics, held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for students who have had an introductory college physics course. It seeks to provide an introduction to the idea of distributions in general, and to some aspects of the subject in…

  16. Subcellular localization of alkaline phosphatase in Bacillus licheniformis 749/C by immunoelectron microscopy with colloidal gold

    SciTech Connect

    Tinglu, G.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, B.K.

    1984-08-01

    Subcellular distribution of the alkaline phosphatase of Bacillus licheniformis 749/C was determined by an immunoelectron microscopy method. Anti-alkaline phosphatase antibody labeled with 15- to 18-nm colloidal gold particles (gold-immunoglobulin G (IgG) complex) were used for the study. Both the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic material were labeled with the gold-IgG particles. These particles formed clusters in association with the plasma membrane; in contrast, in the cytoplasm the particles were largely dispersed, and only a few clusters were found. The gold-IgG binding was quantitatively estimated by stereological analysis of labeled, frozen thin sections. This estimation of a variety of control samples showed that the labeling was specific for the alkaline phosphatase. Cluster formation of the gold -IgG particles in association with the plasma membrane suggests that existence of specific alkaline phosphatase binding sites (receptors) in the plasma membrane of B. licheniformis 749/C. 27 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  17. In vivo imaging of specific drug target binding at subcellular resolution

    PubMed Central

    Dubach, J.M.; Vinegoni, C.; Mazitschek, R.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Cameron, L.A.; Weissleder, R.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to measure binding of small molecule drugs to desired targets in live cells could provide a better understanding of drug action. However, current approaches mostly yield static data, require lysis or rely on indirect assays and thus often provide an incomplete understanding of drug action. Here, we present a multiphoton fluorescence anisotropy microscopy live cell imaging technique to measure and map drug-target interaction in real time at subcellular resolution. This approach is generally applicable using any fluorescently labeled drug and enables high resolution spatial and temporal mapping of bound and unbound drug distribution. To illustrate our approach we measure intracellular target engagement of the chemotherapeutic Olaparib, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, in live cells and within a tumor in vivo. These results are the first generalizable approach to directly measure drug-target binding in vivo and present a promising tool to enhance understanding of drug activity. PMID:24867710

  18. Subcellular Topography of Visually Driven Dendritic Activity in the Vertebrate Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Johann H.; Engert, Florian

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural pathways projecting from sensory organs to higher brain centers form topographic maps in which neighbor relationships are preserved from a sending to a receiving neural population. Sensory input can generate compartmentalized electrical and biochemical activity in the dendrites of a receiving neuron. Here, we show that in the developing retinotectal projection of young Xenopus tadpoles, visually driven Ca2+ signals are topographically organized at the subcellular, dendritic scale. Functional in vivo two-photon Ca2+ imaging revealed that the sensitivity of dendritic Ca2+ signals to stimulus location in visual space is correlated with their anatomical position within the dendritic tree of individual neurons. This topographic distribution was dependent on NMDAR activation, whereas global Ca2+ signals were mediated by Ca2+ influx through dendritic, voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. These findings suggest a framework for plasticity models that invoke local dendritic Ca2+ signaling in the elaboration of neural connectivity and dendrite-specific information storage. PMID:19323998

  19. Trehalose Alters Subcellular Trafficking and the Metabolism of the Alzheimer-associated Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    PubMed

    Tien, Nguyen T; Karaca, Ilker; Tamboli, Irfan Y; Walter, Jochen

    2016-05-13

    The disaccharide trehalose is commonly considered to stimulate autophagy. Cell treatment with trehalose could decrease cytosolic aggregates of potentially pathogenic proteins, including mutant huntingtin, α-synuclein, and phosphorylated tau that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we demonstrate that trehalose also alters the metabolism of the Alzheimer disease-related amyloid precursor protein (APP). Cell treatment with trehalose decreased the degradation of full-length APP and its C-terminal fragments. Trehalose also reduced the secretion of the amyloid-β peptide. Biochemical and cell biological experiments revealed that trehalose alters the subcellular distribution and decreases the degradation of APP C-terminal fragments in endolysosomal compartments. Trehalose also led to strong accumulation of the autophagic marker proteins LC3-II and p62, and decreased the proteolytic activation of the lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin D. The combined data indicate that trehalose decreases the lysosomal metabolism of APP by altering its endocytic vesicular transport.

  20. Subcellular localization of the PGE2 synthesis activity in mouse resident peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish, on a quantitative basis, the subcellular distribution of the enzyme system that converts arachidonic acid into prostaglandin (PG) E2 in mouse resident peritoneal (MRP) macrophages. Kinetic studies were conducted on cell-free extracts derived from cells cultivated for 1 d, using [1-14C]arachidonic acid as substrate and measuring the label in PGE2 after extraction and thin layer chromatography. The activity was synergistically enhanced by L- adrenaline and reduced glutathione, inhibited by indomethacin, and linearly related to the concentration of the cell-free extract. It was labile at 0 degrees C in the medium used for homogenization and fractionation of the cells (half-life less than 2 h). Addition of catalase (0.15 mg/ml) to the suspension medium increased the initial activity (by congruent to 70%) and the stability (half-life congruent to 6 h) of the enzyme in cytoplasmic extracts. It enabled us to establish the density distribution after isopycnic centrifugation in a linear gradient of sucrose. The sample centrifuged consisted of untreated cytoplasmic extracts, or cytoplasmic extracts treated with digitonin and Na pyrophosphate. Comparison of the centrifugation behavior of PGE2 synthesis activity with that of various enzymes used as reference for the major subcellular entities has revealed that PGE2 synthesis fairly fits the density profile of sulfatase C in each case. The conclusion is that at least the rate-limiting reaction in the conversion of arachidonic acid into PGE2 is catalyzed by an enzyme associated with the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:6420497

  1. Classification of Subcellular Location by Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Native and Density-shifted Lysosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Della Valle, Maria Cecilia; Sleat, David E.; Zheng, Haiyan; Moore, Dirk F.; Jadot, Michel; Lobel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    One approach to the functional characterization of the lysosome lies in the use of proteomic methods to identify proteins in subcellular fractions enriched for this organelle. However, distinguishing between true lysosomal residents and proteins from other cofractionating organelles is challenging. To this end, we implemented a quantitative mass spectrometry approach based on the selective decrease in the buoyant density of liver lysosomes that occurs when animals are treated with Triton-WR1339. Liver lysosome-enriched preparations from control and treated rats were fractionated by isopycnic sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Tryptic peptides derived from gradient fractions were reacted with isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation eight-plex labeling reagents and analyzed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight MS. Reporter ion intensities were used to generate relative protein distribution profiles across both types of gradients. A distribution index was calculated for each identified protein and used to determine a probability of lysosomal residence by quadratic discriminant analysis. This analysis suggests that several proteins assigned to the lysosome in other proteomics studies are not true lysosomal residents. Conversely, results support lysosomal residency for other proteins that are either not or only tentatively assigned to this location. The density shift for two proteins, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and ATP-binding cassette subfamily B (MDR/TAP) member 6, was corroborated by quantitative Western blotting. Additional balance sheet analyses on differential centrifugation fractions revealed that Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase is predominantly cytosolic with a secondary lysosomal localization whereas ATP-binding cassette subfamily B (MDR/TAP) member 6 is predominantly lysosomal. These results establish a quantitative mass spectrometric/subcellular fractionation approach for

  2. Conserved roles of the prion protein domains on subcellular localization and cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Solis, Gonzalo P; Radon, Yvonne; Sempou, Emily; Jechow, Katharina; Stuermer, Claudia A O; Málaga-Trillo, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of cultured cells and transgenic mice expressing prion protein (PrP) deletion mutants have revealed that some properties of PrP -such as its ability to misfold, aggregate and trigger neurotoxicity- are controlled by discrete molecular determinants within its protein domains. Although the contributions of these determinants to PrP biosynthesis and turnover are relatively well characterized, it is still unclear how they modulate cellular functions of PrP. To address this question, we used two defined activities of PrP as functional readouts: 1) the recruitment of PrP to cell-cell contacts in Drosophila S2 and human MCF-7 epithelial cells, and 2) the induction of PrP embryonic loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes in zebrafish. Our results show that homologous mutations in mouse and zebrafish PrPs similarly affect their subcellular localization patterns as well as their in vitro and in vivo activities. Among PrP's essential features, the N-terminal leader peptide was sufficient to drive targeting of our constructs to cell contact sites, whereas lack of GPI-anchoring and N-glycosylation rendered them inactive by blocking their cell surface expression. Importantly, our data suggest that the ability of PrP to homophilically trans-interact and elicit intracellular signaling is primarily encoded in its globular domain, and modulated by its repetitive domain. Thus, while the latter induces the local accumulation of PrPs at discrete punctae along cell contacts, the former counteracts this effect by promoting the continuous distribution of PrP. In early zebrafish embryos, deletion of either domain significantly impaired PrP's ability to modulate E-cadherin cell adhesion. Altogether, these experiments relate structural features of PrP to its subcellular distribution and in vivo activity. Furthermore, they show that despite their large evolutionary history, the roles of PrP domains and posttranslational modifications are conserved between mouse and zebrafish.

  3. Subcellular localization of ubiquitin and ubiquitinated proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Beers, E P; Moreno, T N; Callis, J

    1992-08-05

    Ubiquitin is a highly conserved, 76-amino acid, eukaryotic protein. Its widely accepted role as a proteolytic cofactor depends on its unique ability to covalently ligate to other cellular proteins. While there is good evidence for the existence of such ubiquitinated proteins in the cytosolic and nuclear compartments, relatively little is known about the presence of free ubiquitin and ubiquitinated proteins in other subcellular compartments. This is especially true of higher plants, which have not previously been the subject of extensive biochemical subcellular localizations of ubiquitinated proteins. We extracted cell wall proteins and purified nuclei, vacuoles, chloroplasts, and microsomes from chlorophyllous tissues of Arabidopsis. Immunoblot analyses were used to compare the profiles of ubiquitinated proteins from purified subcellular fractions to those from unfractionated extracts. Purified nuclei contained, in addition to a complex mixture of high molecular mass ubiquitinated proteins, a strongly immunoreactive 28-kDa protein. In the apoplastic extract, we did not detect any ubiquitinated proteins enriched above the background level of those due to cytosolic contamination. Vacuoles appeared to contribute significantly to the ubiquitinated proteins present in the whole protoplast extract. At least three high molecular mass ubiquitinated proteins were unique to the vacuolar extract. Chloroplast stromal proteins did not react specifically with anti-ubiquitin antibodies. When microsomal ubiquitinated proteins were compared to those found in a whole protoplast extract, a distinct pattern was evident. Microsomal ubiquitinated proteins were not visible in the 10,000 x g supernatant used to prepare the 100,000 x g pellet, indicating that they were probably low abundance proteins in the protoplast extract.

  4. Subcellular Biological Effects of Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Juergen F.; Stacey, Michael

    Membranes of biological cells can be charged by exposure to pulsed electric fields. After the potential difference across the barrier reaches critical values on the order of 1 V, pores will form. For moderate pulse parameters of duration and amplitude, the effect is limited to the outer cell membrane. With the exposure to nanosecond pulses of several tens of kilovolts per centimeter, a similar effect is also expected for subcellular membranes and structures. Cells will respond to the disruption by different biochemical processes. This offers possibilities for the development of novel medical therapies, the manipulation of cells and microbiological decontamination.

  5. Dynamic neuroanatomy at subcellular resolution in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Faucherre, Adèle; López-Schier, Hernán

    2014-01-01

    Genetic means to visualize and manipulate neuronal circuits in the intact animal have revolutionized neurobiology. "Dynamic neuroanatomy" defines a range of approaches aimed at quantifying the architecture or subcellular organization of neurons over time during their development, regeneration, or degeneration. A general feature of these approaches is their reliance on the optical isolation of defined neurons in toto by genetically expressing markers in one or few cells. Here we use the afferent neurons of the lateral line as an example to describe a simple method for the dynamic neuroanatomical study of axon terminals in the zebrafish by laser-scanning confocal microscopy.

  6. Chemical potential constraints on the composition and subcellular localization of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, J. M.; Helgeson, H. C.

    2004-12-01

    The distribution and speciation of the metallome in organisms is amenable to study using thermodynamic calculations that take into account the chemical potentials obtaining in living cells. In particular, subcellular spatial gradients of the negative logarithms of the activities of the electron and proton (pe and pH, respectively) strongly influence the speciation of aqueous metals and other inorganic species, as well as aqueous organic and biomacromolecular species. Although pe-pH diagrams are commonly used to describe speciation in inorganic aqueous systems, they have not been applied to assess and quantify the relative stabilities of biomacromolecules in living organisms. Nevertheless, there is much to be gained by doing so. The purpose of the present communication is to demonstrate this by generating pe-pH and other equilibrium activity diagrams for proteins in the system C-H-N-O-S. The relative abundances of amino acid residues in the proteins considered are representative of proteins found in different subcellular locations. For example, the boundaries of the stability fields for extracellular, cytoplasmic, and nuclear proteins can be assessed and portrayed on pe-pH diagrams. By overlaying pe-pH diagrams for proteins with those for metals, one can predict the oxidation states of metals compatible with the proteins found in the different subcellular locations. The standard molal thermodynamic properties of these proteins can be estimated from group additivity algorithms that include provision for protein ionization as a function of solution pH. The temperature and pressure dependence of these properties can be computed with the aid of the revised HKF equations of state. Because quantifying the relative stabilities of proteins is a multidimensional problem, a Gibbs free energy minimization software package was used to carry out a plethora of computer experiments for specified temperatures, pressures, and bulk compositions. Plotting the results of the Gibbs free

  7. Subcellular Neural Probes from Single-Crystal Gold Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Size reduction of neural electrodes is essential for improving the functionality of neuroprosthetic devices, developing potent therapies for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, and long-term brain–computer interfaces. Typical neural electrodes are micromanufactured devices with dimensions ranging from tens to hundreds of micrometers. Their further miniaturization is necessary to reduce local tissue damage and chronic immunological reactions of the brain. Here we report the neural electrode with subcellular dimensions based on single-crystalline gold nanowires (NWs) with a diameter of ∼100 nm. Unique mechanical and electrical properties of defect-free gold NWs enabled their implantation and recording of single neuron-activities in a live mouse brain despite a ∼50× reduction of the size compared to the closest analogues. Reduction of electrode dimensions enabled recording of neural activity with improved spatial resolution and differentiation of brain activity in response to different social situations for mice. The successful localization of the epileptic seizure center was also achieved using a multielectrode probe as a demonstration of the diagnostics potential of NW electrodes. This study demonstrated the realism of single-neuron recording using subcellular-sized electrodes that may be considered a pivotal point for use in diverse studies of chronic brain diseases. PMID:25112683

  8. Alternative splicing affects the subcellular localization of Drosha

    PubMed Central

    Link, Steffen; Grund, Stefanie E.; Diederichs, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The RNase III enzyme Drosha is a key factor in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and as such indispensable for cellular homeostasis and developmental processes. Together with its co-factor DGCR8, it converts the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) into the precursor hairpin (pre-miRNA) in the nucleus. While the middle and the C-terminal domain are crucial for pri-miRNA processing and DGCR8 binding, the function of the N-terminus remains cryptic. Different studies have linked this region to the subcellular localization of Drosha, stabilization and response to stress. In this study, we identify alternatively spliced Drosha transcripts that are devoid of a part of the arginine/serine-rich (RS-rich) domain and expressed in a large set of human cells. In contrast to their expected habitation, we find two isoforms also present in the cytoplasm, while the other two isoforms reside exclusively in the nucleus. Their processing activity for pri-miRNAs and the binding to co-factors remains unaltered. In multiple cell lines, the endogenous mRNA expression of the Drosha isoforms correlates with the localization of endogenous Drosha proteins. The pri-miRNA processing efficiency is not significantly different between groups of cells with or without cytoplasmic Drosha expression. In summary, we discovered novel isoforms of Drosha with differential subcellular localization pointing toward additional layers of complexity in the regulation of its activity. PMID:27185895

  9. Subcellular localization and regulation of coenzyme A synthase.

    PubMed

    Zhyvoloup, Alexander; Nemazanyy, Ivan; Panasyuk, Ganna; Valovka, Taras; Fenton, Tim; Rebholz, Heike; Wang, Mong-Lien; Foxon, Richard; Lyzogubov, Valeriy; Usenko, Vasylij; Kyyamova, Ramziya; Gorbenko, Olena; Matsuka, Genadiy; Filonenko, Valeriy; Gout, Ivan T

    2003-12-12

    CoA synthase mediates the last two steps in the sequence of enzymatic reactions, leading to CoA biosynthesis. We have recently identified cDNA for CoA synthase and demonstrated that it encodes a bifunctional enzyme possessing 4'-phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase and dephospho-CoA kinase activities. Molecular cloning of CoA synthase provided us with necessary tools to study subcellular localization and the regulation of this bifunctional enzyme. Transient expression studies and confocal microscopy allowed us to demonstrate that full-length CoA synthase is associated with the mitochondria, whereas the removal of the N-terminal region relocates the enzyme to the cytosol. In addition, we showed that the N-terminal sequence of CoA synthase (amino acids 1-29) exhibits a hydrophobic profile and targets green fluorescent protein exclusively to mitochondria. Further analysis, involving subcellular fractionation and limited proteolysis, indicated that CoA synthase is localized on the mitochondrial outer membrane. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time that phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, which are the main components of the mitochondrial outer membrane, are potent activators of both enzymatic activities of CoA synthase in vitro. Taken together, these data provide the evidence that the final stages of CoA biosynthesis take place on mitochondria and the activity of CoA synthase is regulated by phospholipids.

  10. Understanding metal homeostasis in primary cultured neurons. Studies using single neuron subcellular and quantitative metallomics.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Robert A; Lai, Barry; Holmes, William R; Lee, Daewoo

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how single cell quantitative and subcellular metallomics inform us about both the spatial distribution and cellular mechanisms of metal buffering and homeostasis in primary cultured neurons from embryonic rat brain, which are often used as models of human disease involving metal dyshomeostasis. The present studies utilized synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) and focused primarily on zinc and iron, two abundant metals in neurons that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Total single cell contents for calcium, iron, zinc, copper, manganese, and nickel were determined. Resting steady state zinc showed a diffuse distribution in both soma and processes, best defined by the mass profile of the neuron with an enrichment in the nucleus compared with the cytoplasm. Zinc buffering and homeostasis was studied using two modes of cellular zinc loading - transporter and ionophore (pyrithione) mediated. Single neuron zinc contents were shown to statistically significantly increase by either loading method - ionophore: 160 million to 7 billion; transporter 160 million to 280 million atoms per neuronal soma. The newly acquired and buffered zinc still showed a diffuse distribution. Soma and processes have about equal abilities to take up zinc via transporter mediated pathways. Copper levels are distributed diffusely as well, but are relatively higher in the processes relative to zinc levels. Prior studies have observed iron puncta in certain cell types, but others have not. In the present study, iron puncta were characterized in several primary neuronal types. The results show that iron puncta could be found in all neuronal types studied and can account for up to 50% of the total steady state content of iron in neuronal soma. Although other metals can be present in iron puncta, they are predominantly iron containing and do not appear to be

  11. Targeting of endopeptidase 24.16 to different subcellular compartments by alternative promoter usage.

    PubMed

    Kato, A; Sugiura, N; Saruta, Y; Hosoiri, T; Yasue, H; Hirose, S

    1997-06-13

    Endopeptidase 24.16 or mitochondrial oligopeptidase, abbreviated here as EP 24.16 (MOP), is a thiol- and metal-dependent oligopeptidase that is found in multiple intracellular compartments in mammalian cells. From an analysis of the corresponding gene, we found that the distribution of the enzyme to appropriate subcellular locations is achieved by the use of alternative sites for the initiation of transcription. The pig EP 24.16 (MOP) gene spans over 100 kilobases and is organized into 16 exons. The core protein sequence is encoded by exons 5-16 which match perfectly with exons 2-13 of the gene for endopeptidase 24.15, another member of the thimet oligopeptidase family. These two sets of 11 exons share the same splice sites, suggesting a common ancestor. Multiple species of mRNA for EP 24.16 (MOP) were detected by the 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends and they were shown to have been generated from a single gene by alternative choices of sites for the initiation of transcription and splicing. Two types of transcript were prepared, corresponding to transcription from distal and proximal sites. Their expression in vitro in COS-1 cells indicated that they encoded two isoforms (long and short) which differed only at their amino termini: the long form contained a cleavable mitochondrial targeting sequence and was directed to mitochondria; the short form, lacking such a signal sequence, remained in the cytosol. The complex structure of the EP 24.16 (MOP) gene thus allows, by alternative promoter usage, a fine transcriptional regulation of coordinate expression, in the different subcellular compartments, of the two isoforms arising from a single gene.

  12. Expression and subcellular localization of myogenic regulatory factors during the differentiation of skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Paola; Barbieri, Elena; Burattini, Sabrina; Guescini, Michele; D'Emilio, Alessandra; Biagiotti, Laura; Del Grande, Paolo; De Luca, Antonio; Stocchi, Vilberto; Falcieri, Elisabetta

    2009-12-15

    It is known that the MyoD family members (MyoD, Myf5, myogenin, and MRF4) play a pivotal role in the complex mechanism of skeletal muscle cell differentiation. However, fragmentary information on transcription factor-specific regulation is available and data on their post-transcriptional and post-translational behavior are still missing. In this work, we combined mRNA and protein expression analysis with their subcellular localization. Each myogenic regulator factor (MRF) revealed a specific mRNA trend and a protein quantitative analysis not overlapping, suggesting the presence of post-transcriptional mechanisms. In addition, each MRF showed a specific behavior in situ, characterized by a differentiation stage-dependent localization suggestive of a post-translational regulation also. Consistently with their transcriptional activity, immunogold electron microscopy data revealed MRFs distribution in interchromatin domains. Our results showed a MyoD and Myf5 contrasting expression profile in proliferating myoblasts, as well as myogenin and MRF4 opposite distribution in the terminally differentiated myotubes. Interestingly, MRFs expression and subcellular localization analysis during C2C12 cell differentiation stages showed two main MRFs regulation mechanisms: (i) the protein half-life regulation to modulate the differentiation stage-dependent transcriptional activity and (ii) the cytoplasmic retention, as a translocation process, to inhibit the transcriptional activity. Therefore, our results exhibit that MRFs nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking is involved in muscle differentiation and suggest that, besides the MRFs expression level, also MRFs subcellular localization, related to their functional activity, plays a key role as a regulatory step in transcriptional control mechanisms.

  13. Microscopy with spatial filtering for monitoring subcellular morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing-Yi

    Dynamic alteration in organelle morphology is an important indicator of cellular function and many efforts have been made to monitor the subcellular morphology. Optical scatter imaging (OSI), which combines light scattering spectroscopy with microscopic imaging, was developed to non-invasively track real-time changes in particle morphology in situ. Using a variable diameter iris as a Fourier spatial filter, the technique consisted of collecting images that encoded the intensity ratio of wide-to-narrow angle scatter (OSIR, optical scatter imaging ratio) at each pixel in the full field of view. For spherical particles, the OSIR was shown to decrease monotonically with diameter. In living cells, we reported this technique is able to detect mitochondrial morphological alterations, which were mediated by the Bcl- xL transmembrane domain, but could not be observed by fluorescence or DIC images1. However, the initial design was based on Mie theory of scattering by spheres, and hence only adequate for measuring spherical particles. This limits the applicability of OSI to cellular functional studies involving organelles, which are naturally non-spherical. In this project, we aim to enhance the current capability of the existing optical scatter microscope to assess size and shape information for both spherical and non-spherical particles, and eventually apply this technique for monitoring and quantifying subcellular morphology within living cells. To reach this goal, we developed an improved system, in which the variable diameter iris is replaced with a digital micromirror device and adopted the concept of Gabor filtering to extend our assessment of morphology to the characterization of particle shape and orientation. Using bacteria and polystyrene spheres, we show how this system can be used to assess particle aspect ratio even when imaged at low resolution. We also show the feasibility of detecting alterations in organelle aspect ratio in situ within living cells. This

  14. Torso RTK controls Capicua degradation by changing its subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Oliver; Zini, Victoria Sanchez; Kim, Yoosik; Casanova, Jordi; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.; Wieschaus, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor Capicua (Cic) controls multiple aspects of Drosophila embryogenesis and has been implicated in vertebrate development and human diseases. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can antagonize Cic-dependent gene repression, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are not fully understood. Based on genetic and imaging studies in the early Drosophila embryo, we found that Torso RTK signaling can increase the rate of Cic degradation by changing its subcellular localization. We propose that Cic is degraded predominantly in the cytoplasm and show that Torso reduces the stability of Cic by controlling the rates of its nucleocytoplasmic transport. This model accounts for the experimentally observed spatiotemporal dynamics of Cic in the early embryo and might explain RTK-dependent control of Cic in other developmental contexts. PMID:23048183

  15. Sizing Subcellular Organelles and Nanoparticles Confined within Aqueous Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Gadd, Jennifer C.; Kuyper, Christopher L.; Fujimoto, Bryant S.; Allen, Richard W.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes two complementary techniques, single-particle tracking and correlation spectroscopy, for accurately sizing nanoparticles confined within picoliter-volume aqueous droplets. Single-particle tracking works well with bright particles that can be continuously illuminated and imaged, and we demonstrated this approach for sizing single fluorescent beads. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy detects small intensity bursts from particles or molecules diffusing through the confocal probe volume, which works well with dim and rapidly diffusing particles or molecules; we demonstrated FCS for sizing synaptic vesicles confined in aqueous droplets. In combination with recent advances in droplet manipulations and analysis, we anticipate this capability to size single nanoparticles and molecules in free solution will complement existing tools for probing cellular systems, subcellular organelles, and nanoparticles. PMID:18363409

  16. The sub-cellular localization of Sulfolobus DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Gristwood, Tamzin; Duggin, Iain G; Wagner, Michaela; Albers, Sonja V; Bell, Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    Analyses of the DNA replication-associated proteins of hyperthermophilic archaea have yielded considerable insight into the structure and biochemical function of these evolutionarily conserved factors. However, little is known about the regulation and progression of DNA replication in the context of archaeal cells. In the current work, we describe the generation of strains of Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that allow the incorporation of nucleoside analogues during DNA replication. We employ this technology, in conjunction with immunolocalization analyses of replisomes, to investigate the sub-cellular localization of nascent DNA and replisomes. Our data reveal a peripheral localization of replisomes in the cell. Furthermore, while the two replication forks emerging from any one of the three replication origins in the Sulfolobus chromosome remain in close proximity, the three origin loci are separated.

  17. Subcellular Localization of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Selstam, Eva; Norling, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis pathway of carotenoids in cyanobacteria is partly described. However, the subcellular localization of individual steps is so far unknown. Carotenoid analysis of different membrane subfractions in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 shows that “light” plasma membranes have a high carotenoid/protein ratio, when compared to “heavier” plasma membranes or thylakoids. The localization of CrtQ and CrtO, two well-defined carotenoid synthesis pathway enzymes in Synechocystis, was studied by epitope tagging and western blots. Both enzymes are locally more abundant in plasma membranes than in thylakoids, implying that the plasma membrane has higher synthesis rates of β-carotene precursor molecules and echinenone. PMID:26083372

  18. Specific subcellular localization of siRNAs delivered by lipoplex in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Carole; Thierry, Alain R

    2007-10-01

    In order to better understand the mechanism of delivery of siRNAs by lipid-based vectors, we investigated the subcellular distribution of siRNAs directed against cyclin D1 delivered by the DLS system in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Cells were treated with cyclopentenone or 17beta-estradiol to modulate the level of expression of cyclin D1 mRNA. We qualitatively observed that siRNA localized to specific cytoplasmic compartments in the periphery of the nucleus in granular-like structures that do not correspond to early endosomal vesicles. In cells treated with either cyclopentenone or 17beta-estradiol cellular distribution of siRNAs was not affected but variations in the amount of siRNAs present in cells were found. We suggest these variations might be associated with the effects of cyclopentenone and 17beta-estradiol in cyclin D1 gene expression. Low cytotoxicity and highly cellular uptake of lipoplexes was observed in the presence of serum indicating that the DLS system could be a useful tool for siRNA vectorization in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Subcellular localization of Suppressor of Hairless in Drosophila sense organ cells during Notch signalling.

    PubMed

    Gho, M; Lecourtois, M; Géraud, G; Posakony, J W; Schweisguth, F

    1996-06-01

    During imaginal development of Drosophila, Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)], an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor that mediates intracellular signalling by the Notch (N) receptor, controls successive alternative cell fate decisions leading to the differentiation of multicellular sensory organs. We describe here the distribution of the Su(H) protein in the wing disc epithelium throughout development of adult sense organs. Su(H) was found to be evenly distributed in the nuclei of all imaginal disc cells during sensory organ precursor cells selection. Thus differential expression and/or subcellular localization of Su(H) is not essential for its function. Soon after division of the pIIa secondary precursor cell, Su(H) specifically accumulates in the nucleus of the future socket cell. At the onset of differentiation of the socket cell, Su(H) is also detected in the cytoplasm. In this differentiating cell, N and deltex participate in the cytoplasmic retention of Su(H). Still, Su(H) does not colocalize with N at the apical-lateral membranes. These observations suggest that N regulates in an indirect manner the cytoplasmic localization of Su(H) in the socket cell. Finally, the pIIb, shaft and socket cells are found to adopt invariant positions along the anteroposterior axis of the notum. This raises the possibility that tissue-polarity biases these N-mediated cell fate choices.

  20. Identification and subcellular localization of human rab5b, a new member of the ras-related superfamily of GTPases.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D B; Wilson, M P

    1992-01-01

    Members of the mammalian rab family of GTPases are associated with specific subcellular compartments, where these proteins are postulated to function in vesicular transport. By screening a human umbilical vein endothelial cell library with degenerate oligonucleotide probes, we have isolated a 1.6-kb cDNA clone encoding a 215-amino-acid protein belonging to the rab family of GTPases. This newly identified rab protein is 81% identical to human rab5, the canine counterpart of which has been localized to the plasma membrane and early endosomes. In light of this homology, we have named this new member of the GTPase superfamily "rab5b." Northern analysis using the rab5b cDNA as a probe revealed a 3.6-kb mRNA in a variety of cell types, including human umbilical vein endothelial cells, K562 erythroleukemia cells, U937 monoblastic cells, and HeLa cells. A fusion protein between glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and rab5b was expressed in bacteria and purified to homogeneity. The recombinant protein was shown to bind GTP and GDP. As is typical of other recombinant rab proteins, the rab5b-GST fusion protein displayed a low intrinsic rate of GTP hydrolysis (0.005/min). An antiserum to rab5b was prepared and used to determine the apparent molecular size and subcellular distribution of the protein. Western blotting with this antibody revealed a 25-kD protein in COS cells transfected with rab5b and in nontransfected HeLa cells. Indirect immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation showed that rab5b localizes to the plasma membrane. We speculate that rab5b plays a role in vesicular trafficking at the plasma membrane in various cell types. Images PMID:1541686

  1. Effect of NGF on the subcellular localization of group IIA secretory phospholipase A(2) (GIIA) in PC12 cells: role in neuritogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ferrini, M; Nardicchi, V; Mannucci, R; Arcuri, C; Nicoletti, I; Donato, R; Goracci, G

    2010-12-01

    Phospholipases A(2) (PLA(2)s) are involved in neuritogenesis but the identity of the isoforms(s) contributing to this process is still not defined. Several reports have focused on secretory PLA(2)s (sPLA(2)) as the administration of exogenous sPLA(2)s to PC12 neuronal cells stimulates neurite outgrowth. The present study demonstrates that the endogenous group IIA sPLA(2) (GIIA), constitutively expressed in mammalian neural cells, changes its subcellular localization when PC12 cells are induced to differentiate by NGF treatment. Indeed, confocal analysis showed a time-dependent accumulation of GIIA in growth cones and neurite tips. Under identical conditions the subcellular distribution of another isoform (GV) was unaffected by NGF. Contrary to GX, another sPLA(2) isoform expressed by PC12 cells, the contribution of GIIA to neuritogenesis does not require its release in the extracellular medium.

  2. Subcellular partitioning profiles and metallothionein levels in indigenous clams Moerella iridescens from a metal-impacted coastal bay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zaosheng; Feng, Chenglian; Ye, Chun; Wang, Youshao; Yan, Changzhou; Li, Rui; Yan, Yijun; Chi, Qiaoqiao

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the effect of environmental metal exposure on the accumulation and subcellular distribution of metals in the digestive gland of clams with special emphasis on metallothioneins (MTs) was investigated. Specimens of indigenous Moerella iridescens were collected from different natural habitats in Maluan Bay (China), characterized by varying levels of metal contamination. The digestive glands were excised, homogenized and six subcellular fractions were separated by differential centrifugation procedures and analyzed for their Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb contents. MTs were quantified independently by spectrophotometric measurements of thiols. Site-specific differences were observed in total metal concentrations in the tissues, correlating well with variable environmental metal concentrations and reflecting the gradient trends in metal contamination. Concentrations of the non-essential Cd and Pb were more responsive to environmental exposure gradients than were tissue concentrations of the essential metals, Cu and Zn. Subcellular partitioning profiles for Cu, Zn and Cd were relatively similar, with the heat-stable protein (HSP) fraction as the dominant metal-binding compartment, whereas for Pb this fraction was much less important. The variations in proportions and concentrations of metals in this fraction along with the metal bioaccumulation gradients suggested that the induced MTs play an important role in metal homeostasis and detoxification for M. iridescens in the metal-contaminated bay. Nevertheless, progressive accumulation of non-essential metals (Cd, and especially Pb) resulting from "spillover" was observed in putative metal- sensitive (e.g., mitochondria and heat-denaturable protein (HDP)) or lysosome/microsome fractions, demonstrating that metal detoxification was incomplete and increased the toxicological risk to M. iridescens inhabiting the metal-impacted environments. Through multiple stepwise regression analysis, the induction of MTs was statistically

  3. Feature extraction by statistical contact potentials and wavelet transform for predicting subcellular localizations in gram negative bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Arango-Argoty, G A; Jaramillo-Garzón, J A; Castellanos-Domínguez, G

    2015-01-07

    Predicting the localization of a protein has become a useful practice for inferring its function. Most of the reported methods to predict subcellular localizations in Gram-negative bacterial proteins make use of standard protein representations that generally do not take into account the distribution of the amino acids and the structural information of the proteins. Here, we propose a protein representation based on the structural information contained in the pairwise statistical contact potentials. The wavelet transform decodes the information contained in the primary structure of the proteins, allowing the identification of patterns along the proteins, which are used to characterize the subcellular localizations. Then, a support vector machine classifier is trained to categorize them. Cellular compartments like periplasm and extracellular medium are difficult to predict, having a high false negative rate. The wavelet-based method achieves an overall high performance while maintaining a low false negative rate, particularly, on "periplasm" and "extracellular medium". Our results suggest the proposed protein characterization is a useful alternative to representing and predicting protein sequences over the classical and cutting edge protein depictions.

  4. Bioaccumulation, subcellular, and molecular localization and damage to physiology and ultrastructure in Nymphoides peltata (Gmel.) O. Kuntze exposed to yttrium.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yongyang; Li, Feifei; Xu, Ting; Cai, Sanjuan; Chu, Weiyue; Qiu, Han; Sha, Sha; Cheng, Guangyu; Xu, Qinsong

    2014-02-01

    Bioaccumulation, subcellular distribution, and acute toxicity of yttrium (Y) were evaluated in Nymphoides peltata. The effects of Y concentrations of 1-5 mg L(-1) applied for 4 days were assessed by measuring changes in photosynthetic pigments, nutrient contents, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, and ultrastructure. The accumulation of Y in subcellular fractions decreased in the order of cell wall > organelle > soluble fraction. Much more Y was located in cellulose and pectin than in other biomacromolecules. The content of some mineral elements (Mg, Ca, Fe, Mn, and Mo) increased in N. peltata, but there was an opposite effect for P and K. Meanwhile, ascorbate, and catalase activity decreased significantly for all Y concentrations. In contrast, peroxidase activity was induced, while initial rises in superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione content were followed by subsequent declines. Morphological symptoms of senescence, such as chlorosis and damage to chloroplasts and mitochondria, were observed even at the lowest Y concentration. Pigment content decreased as the Y concentration rose and the calculated EC50 and MPC of Y for N. peltata were 2 and 0.2 mg L(-1) after 4 days of exposure, respectively. The results showed that exogenous Y was highly available in water and that its high concentration in water bodies might produce harmful effects on aquatic organisms. N. peltata is proposed as a biomonitor for the assessment of metal pollution in aquatic ecosystems.

  5. Regulation of calnexin sub-cellular localization modulates endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Delom, Frédéric; Fessart, Delphine; Chevet, Eric

    2007-02-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the cellular compartment where proteins enter the secretory pathway, undergo post-translational modifications and acquire a correct conformation. If these functions are chronically altered, specific ER stress signals are triggered to promote cell death through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Here, we show that tunicamycin causes significant alteration of calnexin sub-cellular distribution in MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, this correlates with the absence of both tunicamycin-induced calnexin phosphorylation as well as tunicamycin-induced cell death. Under these conditions, calnexin-associated Bap31, an ER integral membrane protein, is subjected to a caspase-8 cleavage pattern within a specific sub-compartment of the ER. These results suggest that MCF-7 resistance to ER stress-induced apoptosis is partially mediated by the expression level of calnexin which in turn controls its sub-cellular localization, and its association with Bap31. These data may delineate a resistance mechanism to the ER stress-induced intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  6. Global, quantitative and dynamic mapping of protein subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Itzhak, Daniel N; Tyanova, Stefka; Cox, Jürgen; Borner, Georg HH

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular localization critically influences protein function, and cells control protein localization to regulate biological processes. We have developed and applied Dynamic Organellar Maps, a proteomic method that allows global mapping of protein translocation events. We initially used maps statically to generate a database with localization and absolute copy number information for over 8700 proteins from HeLa cells, approaching comprehensive coverage. All major organelles were resolved, with exceptional prediction accuracy (estimated at >92%). Combining spatial and abundance information yielded an unprecedented quantitative view of HeLa cell anatomy and organellar composition, at the protein level. We subsequently demonstrated the dynamic capabilities of the approach by capturing translocation events following EGF stimulation, which we integrated into a quantitative model. Dynamic Organellar Maps enable the proteome-wide analysis of physiological protein movements, without requiring any reagents specific to the investigated process, and will thus be widely applicable in cell biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16950.001 PMID:27278775

  7. Reconstruction of Danio rerio metabolic model accounting for subcellular compartmentalisation.

    PubMed

    Bekaert, Michaël

    2012-01-01

    Plant and microbial metabolic engineering is commonly used in the production of functional foods and quality trait improvement. Computational model-based approaches have been used in this important endeavour. However, to date, fish metabolic models have only been scarcely and partially developed, in marked contrast to their prominent success in metabolic engineering. In this study we present the reconstruction of fully compartmentalised models of the Danio rerio (zebrafish) on a global scale. This reconstruction involves extraction of known biochemical reactions in D. rerio for both primary and secondary metabolism and the implementation of methods for determining subcellular localisation and assignment of enzymes. The reconstructed model (ZebraGEM) is amenable for constraint-based modelling analysis, and accounts for 4,988 genes coding for 2,406 gene-associated reactions and only 418 non-gene-associated reactions. A set of computational validations (i.e., simulations of known metabolic functionalities and experimental data) strongly testifies to the predictive ability of the model. Overall, the reconstructed model is expected to lay down the foundations for computational-based rational design of fish metabolic engineering in aquaculture.

  8. Cancer-Related Functions and Subcellular Localizations of Septins

    PubMed Central

    Poüs, Christian; Klipfel, Laurence; Baillet, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Since the initial discovery of septin family GTPases, the understanding of their molecular organization and cellular roles keeps being refined. Septins have been involved in many physiological processes and the misregulation of specific septin gene expression has been implicated in diverse human pathologies, including neurological disorders and cancer. In this minireview, we focus on the importance of the subunit composition and subcellular localization of septins relevant to tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis. We especially underline the importance of septin polymer composition and of their association with the plasma membrane, actin, or microtubules in cell functions involved in cancer and in resistance to cancer therapies. Through their scaffolding role, their function in membrane compartmentalization or through their protective function against protein degradation, septins also emerge as critical organizers of membrane-associated proteins and of signaling pathways implicated in cancer-associated angiogenesis, apoptosis, polarity, migration, proliferation, and in metastasis. Also, the question as to which of the free monomers, hetero-oligomers, or filaments is the functional form of mammalian septins is raised and the control over their spatial and temporal localization is discussed. The increasing amount of crosstalks identified between septins and cellular signaling mediators reinforces the exciting possibility that septins could be new targets in anti-cancer therapies or in therapeutic strategies to limit drug resistance. PMID:27878118

  9. Subcellular localization of hepatitis E virus (HEV) replicase

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Shagufta; Kapur, Neeraj; Durgapal, Hemlata; Panda, Subrat Kumar

    2008-01-05

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a hepatotropic virus with a single sense-strand RNA genome of {approx} 7.2 kb in length. Details of the intracellular site of HEV replication can pave further understanding of HEV biology. In-frame fusion construct of functionally active replicase-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene was made in eukaryotic expression vector. The functionality of replicase-EGFP fusion protein was established by its ability to synthesize negative-strand viral RNA in vivo, by strand-specific anchored RT-PCR and molecular beacon binding. Subcellular co-localization was carried out using organelle specific fluorophores and by immuno-electron microscopy. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) demonstrated the interaction of this protein with the 3' end of HEV genome. The results show localization of replicase on the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. The protein regions responsible for membrane localization was predicted and identified by use of deletion mutants. Endoplasmic reticulum was identified as the site of replicase localization and possible site of replication.

  10. Robust prediction of protein subcellular localization combining PCA and WSVMs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiang; Gu, Hong; Liu, Wenqi; Gao, Chiyang

    2011-08-01

    Automated prediction of protein subcellular localization is an important tool for genome annotation and drug discovery, and Support Vector Machines (SVMs) can effectively solve this problem in a supervised manner. However, the datasets obtained from real experiments are likely to contain outliers or noises, which can lead to poor generalization ability and classification accuracy. To explore this problem, we adopt strategies to lower the effect of outliers. First we design a method based on Weighted SVMs, different weights are assigned to different data points, so the training algorithm will learn the decision boundary according to the relative importance of the data points. Second we analyse the influence of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) on WSVM classification, propose a hybrid classifier combining merits of both PCA and WSVM. After performing dimension reduction operations on the datasets, kernel-based possibilistic c-means algorithm can generate more suitable weights for the training, as PCA transforms the data into a new coordinate system with largest variances affected greatly by the outliers. Experiments on benchmark datasets show promising results, which confirms the effectiveness of the proposed method in terms of prediction accuracy.

  11. Expression and subcellular localization of ORC1 in Leishmania major

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Diwakar; Mukherji, Agnideep; Saha, Swati

    2008-10-10

    The mechanism of DNA replication is highly conserved in eukaryotes, with the process being preceded by the ordered assembly of pre-replication complexes (pre-RCs). Pre-RC formation is triggered by the association of the origin replication complex (ORC) with chromatin. Leishmania major appears to have only one ORC ortholog, ORC1. ORC1 in other eukaryotes is the largest of the ORC subunits and is believed to play a significant role in modulating replication initiation. Here we report for the first time, the cloning of ORC1 from L. major, and the analysis of its expression in L. major promastigotes. In human cells ORC1 levels have been found to be upregulated in G1 and subsequently degraded, thus playing a role in controlling replication initiation. We examine the subcellular localization of L. major ORC1 in relation to the different stages of the cell cycle. Our results show that, unlike what is widely believed to be the case with ORC1 in human cells, ORC1 in L. major is nuclear at all stages of the cell cycle.

  12. Pulse energy dependence of subcellular dissection by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisterkamp, A.; Maxwell, I. Z.; Mazur, E.; Underwood, J. M.; Nickerson, J. A.; Kumar, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    2005-01-01

    Precise dissection of cells with ultrashort laser pulses requires a clear understanding of how the onset and extent of ablation (i.e., the removal of material) depends on pulse energy. We carried out a systematic study of the energy dependence of the plasma-mediated ablation of fluorescently-labeled subcellular structures in the cytoskeleton and nuclei of fixed endothelial cells using femtosecond, near-infrared laser pulses focused through a high-numerical aperture objective lens (1.4 NA). We find that the energy threshold for photobleaching lies between 0.9 and 1.7 nJ. By comparing the changes in fluorescence with the actual material loss determined by electron microscopy, we find that the threshold for true material ablation is about 20% higher than the photobleaching threshold. This information makes it possible to use the fluorescence to determine the onset of true material ablation without resorting to electron microscopy. We confirm the precision of this technique by severing a single microtubule without disrupting the neighboring microtubules, less than 1 micrometer away. c2005 Optical Society of America.

  13. Subcellular and in-vivo Nano-Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheemalapati, Surya Venkatasekhar; Winskas, John; Wang, Hao; Konnaiyan, Karthik; Zhdanov, Arseny; Roth, Alison; Adapa, Swamy Rakesh; Deonarine, Andrew; Noble, Mark; Das, Tuhin; Gatenby, Robert; Westerheide, Sandy D.; Jiang, Rays H. Y.; Pyayt, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of individual cells at the subcellular level is important for understanding diseases and accelerating drug discovery. Nanoscale endoscopes allow minimally invasive probing of individual cell interiors. Several such instruments have been presented previously, but they are either too complex to fabricate or require sophisticated external detectors because of low signal collection efficiency. Here we present a nanoendoscope that can locally excite fluorescence in labelled cell organelles and collect the emitted signal for spectral analysis. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulations have shown that with an optimized nanoendoscope taper profile, the light emission and collection was localized within ~100 nm. This allows signal detection to be used for nano-photonic sensing of the proximity of fluorophores. Upon insertion into the individual organelles of living cells, the nanoendoscope was fabricated and resultant fluorescent signals collected. This included the signal collection from the nucleus of Acridine orange labelled human fibroblast cells, the nucleus of Hoechst stained live liver cells and the mitochondria of MitoTracker Red labelled MDA-MB-231 cells. The endoscope was also inserted into a live organism, the yellow fluorescent protein producing nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and a fluorescent signal was collected. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of in vivo, local fluorescence signal collection on the sub-organelle level. PMID:27694854

  14. Dual subcellular compartment delivery of doxorubicin to overcome drug resistant and enhance antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yan-feng; Liu, Dao-zhou; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Miao; Ye, Wei-liang; Zhang, Bang-le; Liu, Xin-you; Zhou, Si-yuan

    2015-01-01

    In order to overcome drug resistant and enhance antitumor activity of DOX, a new pH-sensitive micelle (DOX/DQA-DOX@DSPE-hyd-PEG-AA) was prepared to simultaneously deliver DOX to nucleus and mitochondria. Drug released from DOX/DQA-DOX@DSPE-hyd-PEG-AA showed a pH-dependent manner. DOX/DQA-DOX@DSPE-hyd-PEG-AA induced the depolarization of mitochondria and apoptosis in MDA-MB-231/ADR cells and A549 cells, which resulted in the high cytotoxicity of DOX/DQA-DOX@DSPE-hyd-PEG-AA against MDA-MB-231/ADR cells and A549 cells. Confocal microscopy confirmed that DOX/DQA-DOX@DSPE-hyd-PEG-AA simultaneously delivered DQA-DOX and DOX to the mitochondria and nucleus of tumor cell. After DOX/DQA-DOX@DSPE-hyd-PEG-AA was injected to the tumor-bearing nude mice by the tail vein, DOX was mainly found in tumor tissue. But DOX was widely distributed in the whole body after the administration of free DOX. Compared with free DOX, the same dose of DOX/DQA-DOX@DSPE-hyd-PEG-AA significantly inhibited the growth of DOX-resistant tumor in tumor-bearing mice without obvious systemic toxicity. Therefore, dual subcellular compartment delivery of DOX greatly enhanced the antitumor activity of DOX on DOX-resistant tumor. DOX/DQA-DOX@DSPE-hyd-PEG-AA has the potential in target therapy for DOX-resistant tumor. PMID:26530454

  15. Subcellular localization of PUMA regulates its pro-apoptotic activity in Burkitt's lymphoma B cells

    PubMed Central

    Ambroise, Gorbatchev; Portier, Alain; Roders, Nathalie; Arnoult, Damien; Vazquez, Aimé

    2015-01-01

    The BH3-only protein PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a major regulator of apoptosis. It belongs to the Bcl-2 family of proteins responsible for maintaining mitochondrial outer membrane integrity by controlling the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway. We describe here a new pathway regulating PUMA activation through the control of its subcellular distribution. Surprisingly, neither PUMA upregulation in normal activated human B lymphocytes nor high levels of PUMA in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) were associated with cell death. We show that PUMA is localized to the cytosol in these cells. By contrast, various apoptosis-triggering signals were found to promote the translocation of PUMA to the mitochondria in these cells, leading to their death by apoptosis. This apoptosis was associated with the binding of mitochondrial PUMA to anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bcl-2 and Mcl-1. This translocation was caspase-independent but was prevented by inhibiting or knocking down the expression of the MAPK kinase p38. Our data suggest that the accumulation of PUMA in the cytosol may be important for the participation of this protein in apoptosis without the need for prior transcription. This regulatory pathway may be an important feature of differentiation and tumorigenic processes. PMID:26431330

  16. Immunocytochemical localization and subcellular site of lectin synthesis in developing wheat embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Raikhel, N.V.; Peumans, W.J.

    1986-04-01

    Appearance of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) during wheat germ embryogenesis was studied using indirect immunocytochemical methods at the light and electron microscope levels. Developing embryos were labelled with (/sup 35/S) cysteine in pulse and pulse-chase experiments to study the synthesis and transport of the lectin to protein bodies (PB). The radical, and coleorhiza first accumulated WGA around 10 days post anthesis (DPA), while WGA was found in the epiblast and coleoptile 15 and 20 DPA respectively. At the subcellular level WGA can be seen first in a small developing PB which later fused with larger ones. WGA was distributed evenly throughout the PB. When tissue was pulse-labelled, fractionated on an isopycnic sucrose gradient and exposed to detergent, the incorporated radioactivity of released lectin coincided with the position of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker enzyme NADH-cytochrome c reductase. Both radioactivity and enzyme activity shifted to a higher density in the presence of 2 mM Mg acetate, indicating that radioactive lectin was associated with the rough ER.

  17. Numb directs the subcellular localization of EAAT3 through binding the YxNxxF motif.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin-Feng; Wei, Jian; Li, Pei-Shan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Ma, Yong-Chao; Qu, Yu-Xiu; Xu, Jie; Qin, Jie; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang; Xu, Zheng-Ping; Luo, Jie

    2016-08-15

    Excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3, also known as SLC1A1) is a high-affinity, Na(+)-dependent glutamate carrier that localizes primarily within the cell and at the apical plasma membrane. Although previous studies have reported proteins and sequence regions involved in EAAT3 trafficking, the detailed molecular mechanism by which EAAT3 is distributed to the correct location still remains elusive. Here, we identify that the YVNGGF sequence in the C-terminus of EAAT3 is responsible for its intracellular localization and apical sorting in rat hepatoma cells CRL1601 and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, respectively. We further demonstrate that Numb, a clathrin adaptor protein, directly binds the YVNGGF motif and regulates the localization of EAAT3. Mutation of Y503, N505 and F508 within the YVNGGF motif to alanine residues or silencing Numb by use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) results in the aberrant localization of EAAT3. Moreover, both Numb and the YVNGGF motif mediate EAAT3 endocytosis in CRL1601 cells. In summary, our study suggests that Numb is a pivotal adaptor protein that mediates the subcellular localization of EAAT3 through binding the YxNxxF (where x stands for any amino acid) motif.

  18. Lesion profiling and subcellular prion localization of cervid chronic wasting disease in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Seelig, D M; Nalls, A V; Flasik, M; Frank, V; Eaton, S; Mathiason, C K; Hoover, E A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an efficiently transmitted, fatal, and progressive prion disease of cervids with an as yet to be fully clarified host range. While outbred domestic cats (Felis catus) have recently been shown to be susceptible to experimental CWD infection, the neuropathologic features of the infection are lacking. Such information is vital to provide diagnostic power in the event of natural interspecies transmission and insights into host and strain interactions in interspecies prion infection. Using light microscopy and immunohistochemistry, we detail the topographic pattern of neural spongiosis (the "lesion profile") and the distribution of misfolded prion protein in the primary and secondary passage of feline CWD (Fel(CWD)). We also evaluated cellular and subcellular associations between misfolded prion protein (PrP(D)) and central nervous system neurons and glial cell populations. From these studies, we (1) describe the novel neuropathologic profile of Fel(CWD), which is distinct from either cervid CWD or feline spongiform encephalopathy (FSE), and (2) provide evidence of serial passage-associated interspecies prion adaptation. In addition, we demonstrate through confocal analysis the successful co-localization of PrP(D) with neurons, astrocytes, microglia, lysosomes, and synaptophysin, which, in part, implicates each of these in the neuropathology of Fel(CWD). In conclusion, this work illustrates the simultaneous role of both host and strain in the development of a unique Fel(CWD) neuropathologic profile and that such a profile can be used to discriminate between Fel(CWD) and FSE.

  19. Subcellular localization of proflavine derivative and induction of oxidative stress--in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Ipóthová, Z; Paulíková, H; Cižeková, L; Hunáková, L; Labudová, M; Grolmusová, A; Janovec, L; Imrich, J

    2013-11-01

    Acridines have been studied for several decades because of their numerous biological effects, especially anticancer activity. Recently, cytotoxicity of novel acridine derivatives, 3,6-bis((1-alkyl-5-oxo-imidazolidin-2-yliden)imino)acridine hydrochlorides (AcrDIMs), was confirmed for leukemic cell lines [Bioorg. Med. Chem.2011, 19, 1790]. The mechanism of action of the most cytotoxic hexyl-AcrDIM was studied in this paper focusing attention on a subcellular distribution of the drug. Accumulation of hexyl-AcrDIM in mitochondria was confirmed after labeling mitochondria with MitoRED using ImageStream Imaging Flow Cytometer. The derivative significantly decreased intracellular ATP level (reduction of ATP level was decreased by vitamin E), and induced oxidative stress (ROS production detected by DHE assay) as well as cell cycle arrest in the S-phase (flow cytometry analysis) already after short-time incubation and induction of apoptosis. Cytotoxicity of hexyl-AcrDIM is closely connected with induction of oxidative stress in cells.

  20. Subcellular localization of PUMA regulates its pro-apoptotic activity in Burkitt's lymphoma B cells.

    PubMed

    Ambroise, Gorbatchev; Portier, Alain; Roders, Nathalie; Arnoult, Damien; Vazquez, Aimé

    2015-11-10

    The BH3-only protein PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a major regulator of apoptosis. It belongs to the Bcl-2 family of proteins responsible for maintaining mitochondrial outer membrane integrity by controlling the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway. We describe here a new pathway regulating PUMA activation through the control of its subcellular distribution. Surprisingly, neither PUMA upregulation in normal activated human B lymphocytes nor high levels of PUMA in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) were associated with cell death. We show that PUMA is localized to the cytosol in these cells. By contrast, various apoptosis-triggering signals were found to promote the translocation of PUMA to the mitochondria in these cells, leading to their death by apoptosis. This apoptosis was associated with the binding of mitochondrial PUMA to anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bcl-2 and Mcl-1. This translocation was caspase-independent but was prevented by inhibiting or knocking down the expression of the MAPK kinase p38. Our data suggest that the accumulation of PUMA in the cytosol may be important for the participation of this protein in apoptosis without the need for prior transcription. This regulatory pathway may be an important feature of differentiation and tumorigenic processes.

  1. Arginine Methylation of hnRNP A2 Does Not Directly Govern Its Subcellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Nouwens, Amanda S.; Wei, Ying; Rothnagel, Joseph A.; Smith, Ross

    2013-01-01

    The hnRNP A/B paralogs A1, A2/B1 and A3 are key components of the nuclear 40S hnRNP core particles. Despite a high degree of sequence similarity, increasing evidence suggests they perform additional, functionally distinct roles in RNA metabolism. Here we identify and study the functional consequences of differential post-translational modification of hnRNPs A1, A2 and A3. We show that while arginine residues in the RGG box domain of hnRNP A1 and A3 are almost exhaustively, asymmetrically dimethylated, hnRNP A2 is dimethylated at only a single residue (Arg-254) and this modification is conserved across cell types. It has been suggested that arginine methylation regulates the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of hnRNP A/B proteins. However, we show that transfected cells expressing an A2R254A point mutant exhibit no difference in subcellular localization. Similarly, immunostaining and mass spectrometry of endogenous hnRNP A2 in transformed cells reveals a naturally-occurring pool of unmethylated protein but an exclusively nuclear pattern of localization. Our results suggest an alternative role for post-translational arginine methylation of hnRNPs and offer further evidence that the hnRNP A/B paralogs are not functionally redundant. PMID:24098712

  2. Molecular cloning, tissue expression, and subcellular localization of porcine peptidoglycan recognition proteins 3 and 4.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Wataru; Tohno, Masanori; Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Fujie, Hitomi; Aso, Hisashi; Kawai, Yasushi; Numasaki, Muneo; Saito, Tadao; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2011-09-15

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are innate immune molecules that are present in most invertebrates and vertebrates. Mammals have four PGRPs, PGLYRP1-4. In the present study, we cloned the cDNAs encoding porcine PGLYRP3 and 4 from the esophagus of adult swine. The length of the complete open reading frames of porcine PGLYRP3 and 4 are identical and contain 1125bp encoding 374 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequences of these two proteins were more similar to their human orthologs (78.9% [PGLYRP3] and 73.9% [PGLYRP4]) than to their mouse orthologs (71.3% [PGLYRP3] and 67.9% [PGLYRP4]). Expression analysis revealed that both PGLYRP3 and 4 were more strongly expressed in digestive tract, especially the esophagus, than in immune organs such as spleen or mesenteric lymph nodes in both newborn and adult swine. To analyze the subcellular distribution of porcine PGLYRP1-4, we constructed transfectant cell lines. Western blot and flow cytometric analyses revealed that porcine PGLYRP3 and 4 are not only secreted, but also expressed on the cell surface, unlike PGLYRP1 and 2. These results should help contribute to the understanding of PGLYRP3- and 4-mediated immune responses via their recognition of intestinal microorganisms in newborn and adult swine.

  3. Subcellular Evidence for Biogenesis of Autophagosomal Membrane during Spermiogenesis In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yufei; Yang, Ping; Liu, Tengfei; Chen, Hong; Chu, Xiaoya; Ahmad, Nisar; Zhang, Qian; Li, Quanfu; Hu, Lisi; Liu, Yi; Chen, Qiusheng

    2016-01-01

    Although autophagosome formation has attracted substantial attention, the origin and the source of the autophagosomal membrane remains unresolved. The present study was designed to investigate in vivo subcellular evidence for the biogenesis of autophagosomal membrane during spermiogenesis using transmission-electron microscopy (TEM), Western blots and immunohistochemistry in samples from the Chinese soft-shelled turtle. The testis expressed LC3-II protein, which was located within spermatids at different stages of differentiation and indicated active autophagy. TEM showed that numerous autophagosomes were developed inside spermatids. Many endoplasmic reticulum (ER) were transferred into a special “Chrysanthemum flower center” (CFC) in which several double-layer isolation membranes (IM) were formed and extended. The elongated IM always engulfed some cytoplasm and various structures. Narrow tubules connected the ends of multiple ER and the CFC. The CFC was more developed in spermatids with compact nuclei than in spermatids with granular nuclei. An IM could also be transformed from a single ER. Sometimes an IM extended from a trans-Golgi network and wrapped different structures. The plasma membrane of the spermatid invaginated to form vesicles that were distributed among various endosomes around the CFC during spermiogenesis. All this cellular evidence suggests that, in vivo, IM was developed mainly by CFC produced from ER within differentiating spermatids during spermiogenesis. Vesicles from Golgi complexes, plasma membranes and endosomes might also be the sources of the autophagosome membrane. PMID:27803675

  4. Intracellular lumen formation in Drosophila proceeds via a novel subcellular compartment.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Linda S; Metzstein, Mark M

    2015-11-15

    Cellular tubes have diverse morphologies, including multicellular, unicellular and subcellular architectures. Subcellular tubes are found prominently within the vertebrate vasculature, the insect breathing system and the nematode excretory apparatus, but how such tubes form is poorly understood. To characterize the cellular mechanisms of subcellular tube formation, we have refined methods of high pressure freezing/freeze substitution to prepare Drosophila larvae for transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis. Using our methods, we have found that subcellular tube formation may proceed through a previously undescribed multimembrane intermediate composed of vesicles bound within a novel subcellular compartment. We have also developed correlative light/TEM procedures to identify labeled cells in TEM-fixed larval samples. Using this technique, we have found that Vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) and the V-ATPase regulator Rabconnectin-3 are required for subcellular tube formation, probably in a step resolving the intermediate compartment into a mature lumen. In general, our ultrastructural analysis methods could be useful for a wide range of cellular investigations in Drosophila larvae.

  5. SUBA4: the interactive data analysis centre for Arabidopsis subcellular protein locations

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Cornelia M.; Castleden, Ian R.; Tanz, Sandra K.; Aryamanesh, Nader; Millar, A. Harvey

    2017-01-01

    The SUBcellular location database for Arabidopsis proteins (SUBA4, http://suba.live) is a comprehensive collection of manually curated published data sets of large-scale subcellular proteomics, fluorescent protein visualization, protein-protein interaction (PPI) as well as subcellular targeting calls from 22 prediction programs. SUBA4 contains an additional 35 568 localizations totalling more than 60 000 experimental protein location claims as well as 37 new suborganellar localization categories. The experimental PPI data has been expanded to 26 327 PPI pairs including 856 PPI localizations from experimental fluorescent visualizations. The new SUBA4 user interface enables users to choose quickly from the filter categories: ‘subcellular location’, ‘protein properties’, ‘protein–protein interaction’ and ‘affiliations’ to build complex queries. This allows substantial expansion of search parameters into 80 annotation types comprising 1 150 204 new annotations to study metadata associated with subcellular localization. The ‘BLAST’ tab contains a sequence alignment tool to enable a sequence fragment from any species to find the closest match in Arabidopsis and retrieve data on subcellular location. Using the location consensus SUBAcon, the SUBA4 toolbox delivers three novel data services allowing interactive analysis of user data to provide relative compartmental protein abundances and proximity relationship analysis of PPI and coexpression partners from a submitted list of Arabidopsis gene identifiers. PMID:27899614

  6. SUBA4: the interactive data analysis centre for Arabidopsis subcellular protein locations.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Cornelia M; Castleden, Ian R; Tanz, Sandra K; Aryamanesh, Nader; Millar, A Harvey

    2017-01-04

    The SUBcellular location database for Arabidopsis proteins (SUBA4, http://suba.live) is a comprehensive collection of manually curated published data sets of large-scale subcellular proteomics, fluorescent protein visualization, protein-protein interaction (PPI) as well as subcellular targeting calls from 22 prediction programs. SUBA4 contains an additional 35 568 localizations totalling more than 60 000 experimental protein location claims as well as 37 new suborganellar localization categories. The experimental PPI data has been expanded to 26 327 PPI pairs including 856 PPI localizations from experimental fluorescent visualizations. The new SUBA4 user interface enables users to choose quickly from the filter categories: 'subcellular location', 'protein properties', 'protein-protein interaction' and 'affiliations' to build complex queries. This allows substantial expansion of search parameters into 80 annotation types comprising 1 150 204 new annotations to study metadata associated with subcellular localization. The 'BLAST' tab contains a sequence alignment tool to enable a sequence fragment from any species to find the closest match in Arabidopsis and retrieve data on subcellular location. Using the location consensus SUBAcon, the SUBA4 toolbox delivers three novel data services allowing interactive analysis of user data to provide relative compartmental protein abundances and proximity relationship analysis of PPI and coexpression partners from a submitted list of Arabidopsis gene identifiers.

  7. Predicting protein subcellular location using digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu-Xi; Li, Da-Wei; Duan, Yun; Zhang, Zhi-Zhou; Xu, Ming-Qing; Feng, Guo-Yin; He, Lin

    2005-02-01

    The biological functions of a protein are closely related to its attributes in a cell. With the rapid accumulation of newly found protein sequence data in databanks, it is highly desirable to develop an automated method for predicting the subcellular location of proteins. The establishment of such a predictor will expedite the functional determination of newly found proteins and the process of prioritizing genes and proteins identified by genomic efforts as potential molecular targets for drug design. The traditional algorithms for predicting these attributes were based solely on amino acid composition in which no sequence order effect was taken into account. To improve the prediction quality, it is necessary to incorporate such an effect. However, the number of possible patterns in protein sequences is extremely large, posing a formidable difficulty for realizing this goal. To deal with such difficulty, a well-developed tool in digital signal processing named digital Fourier transform (DFT) [1] was introduced. After being translated to a digital signal according to the hydrophobicity of each amino acid, a protein was analyzed by DFT within the frequency domain. A set of frequency spectrum parameters, thus obtained, were regarded as the factors to represent the sequence order effect. A significant improvement in prediction quality was observed by incorporating the frequency spectrum parameters with the conventional amino acid composition. One of the crucial merits of this approach is that many existing tools in mathematics and engineering can be easily applied in the predicting process. It is anticipated that digital signal processing may serve as a useful vehicle for many other protein science areas.

  8. Subcellular location and properties of bactericidal factors from human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gabay, J E; Heiple, J M; Cohn, Z A; Nathan, C F

    1986-11-01

    We examined the subcellular location of bactericidal factors (BF) in human neutrophils, using an efficient fractionation scheme. Nitrogen bomb cavitates of DIFP-treated PMN were centrifuged through discontinuous Percoll gradients, each fraction extracted with 0.05 M glycine, pH 2.0, and tested for the killing of Escherichia coli. greater than 90% of BF coisolated with the azurophil granules. After lysis of azurophils, 98% of azurophil-derived BF (ADBF) sedimented with the membrane. ADBF activity was solubilized from azurophil membrane with either acid or nonionic detergent (Triton X-100, Triton X-114). Bactericidal activity was linear with respect to protein concentration over the range 0.3-30 micrograms/ml. 0.1-0.3 microgram/ml ADBF killed 10(5) E. coli within 30 min at 37 degrees C. At 1.4 micrograms/ml, 50% of 2 X 10(5) bacteria were killed within 5 min. ADBF was effective between pH 5-8, with peak activity at pH 5.5. Glucose (20 mM), EDTA (1-25 mM), and physiologic concentrations of NaCl or KCl had little or no inhibitory effect on ADBF. ADBF killed both Gram-positive and Gram-negative virulent clinical isolates, including listeria, staphylococci, beta-hemolytic streptococci, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, under these conditions of cell disruption, fractionation, extraction, and assay, almost all BF in human PMN appeared to be localized to the membrane of azurophilic granules as a highly potent, broad-spectrum, rapidly acting protein(s) effective in physiologic medium. Some of these properties appear to distinguish ADBF from previously described PMN bactericidal proteins.

  9. Oleosin of subcellular lipid droplets evolved in green algae.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nan-Lan; Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L; Huang, Anthony H C

    2013-04-01

    In primitive and higher plants, intracellular storage lipid droplets (LDs) of triacylglycerols are stabilized with a surface layer of phospholipids and oleosin. In chlorophytes (green algae), a protein termed major lipid-droplet protein (MLDP) rather than oleosin on LDs was recently reported. We explored whether MLDP was present directly on algal LDs and whether algae had oleosin genes and oleosins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that MLDP in the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was associated with endoplasmic reticulum subdomains adjacent to but not directly on LDs. In C. reinhardtii, low levels of a transcript encoding an oleosin-like protein (oleolike) in zygotes-tetrads and a transcript encoding oleosin in vegetative cells transferred to an acetate-enriched medium were found in transcriptomes and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The C. reinhardtii LD fraction contained minimal proteins with no detectable oleolike or oleosin. Several charophytes (advanced green algae) possessed low levels of transcripts encoding oleosin but not oleolike. In the charophyte Spirogyra grevilleana, levels of oleosin transcripts increased greatly in cells undergoing conjugation for zygote formation, and the LD fraction from these cells contained minimal proteins, two of which were oleosins identified via proteomics. Because the minimal oleolike and oleosins in algae were difficult to detect, we tested their subcellular locations in Physcomitrella patens transformed with the respective algal genes tagged with a Green Fluorescent Protein gene and localized the algal proteins on P. patens LDs. Overall, oleosin genes having weak and cell/development-specific expression were present in green algae. We present a hypothesis for the evolution of oleosins from algae to plants.

  10. Agent-Based Modeling of Mitochondria Links Sub-Cellular Dynamics to Cellular Homeostasis and Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Dalmasso, Giovanni; Marin Zapata, Paula Andrea; Brady, Nathan Ryan; Hamacher-Brady, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are semi-autonomous organelles that supply energy for cellular biochemistry through oxidative phosphorylation. Within a cell, hundreds of mobile mitochondria undergo fusion and fission events to form a dynamic network. These morphological and mobility dynamics are essential for maintaining mitochondrial functional homeostasis, and alterations both impact and reflect cellular stress states. Mitochondrial homeostasis is further dependent on production (biogenesis) and the removal of damaged mitochondria by selective autophagy (mitophagy). While mitochondrial function, dynamics, biogenesis and mitophagy are highly-integrated processes, it is not fully understood how systemic control in the cell is established to maintain homeostasis, or respond to bioenergetic demands. Here we used agent-based modeling (ABM) to integrate molecular and imaging knowledge sets, and simulate population dynamics of mitochondria and their response to environmental energy demand. Using high-dimensional parameter searches we integrated experimentally-measured rates of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy, and using sensitivity analysis we identified parameter influences on population homeostasis. By studying the dynamics of cellular subpopulations with distinct mitochondrial masses, our approach uncovered system properties of mitochondrial populations: (1) mitochondrial fusion and fission activities rapidly establish mitochondrial sub-population homeostasis, and total cellular levels of mitochondria alter fusion and fission activities and subpopulation distributions; (2) restricting the directionality of mitochondrial mobility does not alter morphology subpopulation distributions, but increases network transmission dynamics; and (3) maintaining mitochondrial mass homeostasis and responding to bioenergetic stress requires the integration of mitochondrial dynamics with the cellular bioenergetic state. Finally, (4) our model suggests sources of, and stress conditions amplifying

  11. Agent-Based Modeling of Mitochondria Links Sub-Cellular Dynamics to Cellular Homeostasis and Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Dalmasso, Giovanni; Marin Zapata, Paula Andrea; Brady, Nathan Ryan; Hamacher-Brady, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are semi-autonomous organelles that supply energy for cellular biochemistry through oxidative phosphorylation. Within a cell, hundreds of mobile mitochondria undergo fusion and fission events to form a dynamic network. These morphological and mobility dynamics are essential for maintaining mitochondrial functional homeostasis, and alterations both impact and reflect cellular stress states. Mitochondrial homeostasis is further dependent on production (biogenesis) and the removal of damaged mitochondria by selective autophagy (mitophagy). While mitochondrial function, dynamics, biogenesis and mitophagy are highly-integrated processes, it is not fully understood how systemic control in the cell is established to maintain homeostasis, or respond to bioenergetic demands. Here we used agent-based modeling (ABM) to integrate molecular and imaging knowledge sets, and simulate population dynamics of mitochondria and their response to environmental energy demand. Using high-dimensional parameter searches we integrated experimentally-measured rates of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy, and using sensitivity analysis we identified parameter influences on population homeostasis. By studying the dynamics of cellular subpopulations with distinct mitochondrial masses, our approach uncovered system properties of mitochondrial populations: (1) mitochondrial fusion and fission activities rapidly establish mitochondrial sub-population homeostasis, and total cellular levels of mitochondria alter fusion and fission activities and subpopulation distributions; (2) restricting the directionality of mitochondrial mobility does not alter morphology subpopulation distributions, but increases network transmission dynamics; and (3) maintaining mitochondrial mass homeostasis and responding to bioenergetic stress requires the integration of mitochondrial dynamics with the cellular bioenergetic state. Finally, (4) our model suggests sources of, and stress conditions amplifying

  12. Differential Site Accessibility Mechanistically Explains Subcellular-Specific N-Glycosylation Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ling Yen; Lin, Chi-Hung; Fanayan, Susan; Packer, Nicolle H.; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Glycoproteins perform extra- and intracellular functions in innate and adaptive immunity by lectin-based interactions to exposed glyco-determinants. Herein, we document and mechanistically explain the formation of subcellular-specific N-glycosylation determinants on glycoproteins trafficking through the shared biosynthetic machinery of human cells. LC-MS/MS-based quantitative glycomics showed that the secreted glycoproteins of eight human breast epithelial cells displaying diverse geno- and phenotypes consistently displayed more processed, primarily complex type, N-glycans than the high-mannose-rich microsomal glycoproteins. Detailed subcellular glycome profiling of proteins derived from three breast cell lines (MCF7/MDA468/MCF10A) demonstrated that secreted glycoproteins displayed significantly more α-sialylation and α1,6-fucosylation, but less α-mannosylation, than both the intermediately glycan-processed cell-surface glycoproteomes and the under-processed microsomal glycoproteomes. Subcellular proteomics and gene ontology revealed substantial presence of endoplasmic reticulum resident glycoproteins in the microsomes and confirmed significant enrichment of secreted and cell-surface glycoproteins in the respective subcellular fractions. The solvent accessibility of the glycosylation sites on maturely folded proteins of the 100 most abundant putative N-glycoproteins observed uniquely in the three subcellular glycoproteomes correlated with the glycan type processing thereby mechanistically explaining the formation of subcellular-specific N-glycosylation. In conclusion, human cells have developed mechanisms to simultaneously and reproducibly generate subcellular-specific N-glycosylation using a shared biosynthetic machinery. This aspect of protein-specific glycosylation is important for structural and functional glycobiology and discussed here in the context of the spatio-temporal interaction of glyco-determinants with lectins central to infection and immunity

  13. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Babahosseini, H; Carmichael, B; Strobl, J S; Mahmoodi, S N; Agah, M

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures.

  14. Chitin synthetases in Candida albicans: a review on their subcellular distribution and biological function.

    PubMed

    Martínez, J P; Gozalbo, D

    1994-09-01

    In the light of recent genetic advances, some results regarding chitin biosynthetic activities are reviewed in this paper. Genes coding for distinct enzymes displaying chitin synthetase activities have been characterized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as in other fungal species including Candida albicans. Several activities seem to exist in the cells: (i) one zymogenic, located in cytoplasmic vesicles called chitosomes, although the presence of other types of vesicles with zymogenic activity cannot be completely discarded, and (ii) plasma membrane associated activities (the active enzyme and probably two distinct pools of zymogenic activity). Possible relationships between these activities, if any, remain to be determined. These multiplicity of enzymes is not surprising taking into account that chitin biosynthesis is required during very well defined temporal and spatial events of the cell cycle. A general repair function for one of the chitin biosynthetic activities is proposed as a possible salvage mechanism to warrant cell survival after wall damage has been caused, since chitin appears to be the most suitable polymer to carry out this function due to its particular physico-chemical properties.

  15. Uptake, depuration and subcellular distribution of cadmium in various tissues of Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Yang, M S; Chiu, S T; Wong, M H

    1995-06-01

    Green-lipped mussels (Perna viridis) were collected from a local mariculture site and placed in pre-cleaned sea water tanks containing 0, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.3 micrograms/ml CdCl2. The level of Cd in the gill, viscera and gonad was measured. The concentration of Cd in the 3 tissues increased linearly over 4 days' of exposure. The rate of uptake depends on the concentration of Cd in the water. In the 3 tissues studied, the maximum rate of uptake (Vmax) was highest in the gill (500 micrograms/g dry weight/day), followed by viscera (100 micrograms/g dry weight/day) and gonad (56.8 micrograms/g dry weight/day). The majority of the Cd taken up was bound to a fraction of the heat-stable proteins similar to metallothioneins. The rate of Cd depuration from the tissues was poor. There was no change in Cd concentration over 8 days' depuration in clean water.

  16. Distribution and Characterization of Antigens Found in Subcellular Fractions of African Trypanosomes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    and T. brucei Voorhies et al 1979), with the possible exception of Acanthamoeba custellani (Schultz and Thompson 1969), all demonstrate low...in membrane fragments isolated from Acanthamoeba sp. Biochem. Biophys. Acta 193 203-211. Voorheis, H.P. Gale, J.S., Owen, M.J. and Edwards W. (1979

  17. Subcellular Distribution of NAD+ between Cytosol and Mitochondria Determines the Metabolic Profile of Human Cells.

    PubMed

    VanLinden, Magali R; Dölle, Christian; Pettersen, Ina K N; Kulikova, Veronika A; Niere, Marc; Agrimi, Gennaro; Dyrstad, Sissel E; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Nikiforov, Andrey A; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-11-13

    The mitochondrial NAD pool is particularly important for the maintenance of vital cellular functions. Although at least in some fungi and plants, mitochondrial NAD is imported from the cytosol by carrier proteins, in mammals, the mechanism of how this organellar pool is generated has remained obscure. A transporter mediating NAD import into mammalian mitochondria has not been identified. In contrast, human recombinant NMNAT3 localizes to the mitochondrial matrix and is able to catalyze NAD(+) biosynthesis in vitro. However, whether the endogenous NMNAT3 protein is functionally effective at generating NAD(+) in mitochondria of intact human cells still remains to be demonstrated. To modulate mitochondrial NAD(+) content, we have expressed plant and yeast mitochondrial NAD(+) carriers in human cells and observed a profound increase in mitochondrial NAD(+). None of the closest human homologs of these carriers had any detectable effect on mitochondrial NAD(+) content. Surprisingly, constitutive redistribution of NAD(+) from the cytosol to the mitochondria by stable expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana mitochondrial NAD(+) transporter NDT2 in HEK293 cells resulted in dramatic growth retardation and a metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, despite the elevated mitochondrial NAD(+) levels. These results suggest that a mitochondrial NAD(+) transporter, similar to the known one from A. thaliana, is likely absent and could even be harmful in human cells. We provide further support for the alternative possibility, namely intramitochondrial NAD(+) synthesis, by demonstrating the presence of endogenous NMNAT3 in the mitochondria of human cells.

  18. Eucalyptus tolerance mechanisms to lanthanum and cerium: subcellular distribution, antioxidant system and thiol pools.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yichang; Zhang, Shirong; Li, Sen; Xu, Xiaoxun; Jia, Yongxia; Gong, Guoshu

    2014-12-01

    Guanglin 9 (Eucalyptus grandis × Eucalyptus urophlla) and Eucalyptus grandis 5 are two eucalyptus species which have been found to grow normally in soils contaminated with lanthanum and cerium, but the tolerance mechanisms are not clear yet. In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to investigate the tolerance mechanisms of the eucalyptus to lanthanum and cerium. Cell walls stored 45.40-63.44% of the metals under lanthanum or cerium stress. Peroxidase and catalase activities enhanced with increasing soil La or Ce concentrations up to 200 mg kg(-1), while there were no obvious changes in glutathione and ascorbate concentrations. Non-protein thiols concentrations increased with increasing treatment levels up to 200 mg kg(-1), and then decreased. Phytochelatins concentrations continued to increase under La or Ce stress. Therefore, the two eucalyptus species are La and Ce tolerant plants, and the tolerance mechanisms include cell wall deposition, antioxidant system response, and thiol compound synthesis.

  19. Distribution and Characterization of Antigens Found in Subcellular Fractions of African Trypanosomes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    affinity Ca-ATPase which we have described (2). Less specific acid phosphatases were also considered as potential surface membrane 3 markers since... acid phosphatase (0-glycerophosphate), arylamidase; promito- chondria -- DCPIP linked c-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase; lysosome -- proteinase...glucose-6- phosphatase , that were present in a I. brucei surface membrane preparation (22) are almost certainly due to the tartrate resistant acid

  20. Comparative subcellular distribution of apyrase from animal and plant sources. Characterization of microsomal apyrase.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, M A; López, J; Depix, M; Mancilla, M; Kettlun, A M; Catalán, L; Chiong, M; Garrido, J; Traverso-Cori, A

    1989-01-01

    1. Apyrase (ATP: diphosphohydrolase) has been found in the microsomal fraction of rat salivary gland, mammary gland and uterus. 2. This enzyme, already described in plant tissue, is mainly present as a soluble polypeptide in tubers of Solanum tuberosum. 3. A fraction of this enzyme is associated with the microsomal fraction with a higher specific activity than the soluble one, for either ATP or ADP as substrate. 4. Apyrase bound to microsomes from rat and potato tissues was characterized in its substrate specificity and effect of inhibitors. 5. The Km values for ATP and ADP, optimum pH and metal ion requirement were determined. 6. A characteristic common to the microsomal and soluble apyrases is the stimulatory effect of a potato activator protein of soluble plant apyrase. 7. The microsomal-bound apyrase from rat and potato tissues were solubilized and subjected to size-exclusion chromatography. 8. The mammary gland and salivary gland apyrases eluted as molecular aggregates, in contrast to the uterus and potato enzyme.

  1. Trafficking regulates the subcellular distribution of voltage-gated sodium channels in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lan

    2015-09-30

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) comprise at least nine pore-forming α subunits. Of these, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are the most frequently studied in primary sensory neurons located in the dorsal root ganglion and are mainly localized to the cytoplasm. A large pool of intracellular Navs raises the possibility that changes in Nav trafficking could alter channel function. The molecular mediators of Nav trafficking mainly consist of signals within the Navs themselves, interacting proteins and extracellular factors. The surface expression of Navs is achieved by escape from the endoplasmic reticulum and proteasome degradation, forward trafficking and plasma membrane anchoring, and it is also regulated by channel phosphorylation and ubiquitination in primary sensory neurons. Axonal transport and localization of Navs in afferent fibers involves the motor protein KIF5B and scaffold proteins, including contactin and PDZ domain containing 2. Localization of Nav1.6 to the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated fibers of primary sensory neurons requires node formation and the submembrane cytoskeletal protein complex. These findings inform our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying Nav trafficking in primary sensory neurons.

  2. Lifelong maintenance of composition, function and cellular/subcellular distribution of proteasomes in human liver.

    PubMed

    Bellavista, Elena; Martucci, Morena; Vasuri, Francesco; Santoro, Aurelia; Mishto, Michele; Kloss, Alexander; Capizzi, Elisa; Degiovanni, Alessio; Lanzarini, Catia; Remondini, Daniel; Dazzi, Alessandro; Pellegrini, Sara; Cescon, Matteo; Capri, Miriam; Salvioli, Stefano; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Dahlmann, Burkhardt; Grazi, Gian Luca; Franceschi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Owing to organ shortage, livers from old donors are increasingly used for transplantation. The function and duration of such transplanted livers are apparently comparable to those from young donors, suggesting that, despite some morphological and structural age-related changes, no major functional changes do occur in liver with age. We tested this hypothesis by performing a comprehensive study on proteasomes, major cell organelles responsible for proteostasis, in liver biopsies from heart-beating donors. Oxidized and poly-ubiquitin conjugated proteins did not accumulate with age and the three major proteasome proteolytic activities were similar in livers from young and old donors. Analysis of proteasomes composition showed an age-related increased of β5i/α4 ratio, suggesting a shift toward proteasomes containing inducible subunits and a decreased content of PA28α subunit, mainly in the cytosol of hepatocytes. Thus our data suggest that, proteasomes activity is well preserved in livers from aged donors, concomitantly with subtle changes in proteasome subunit composition which might reflect the occurrence of a functional remodelling to maintain an efficient proteostasis. Gender differences are emerging and they deserve further investigations owing to the different aging trajectories between men and women. Finally, our data support the safe use of livers from old donors for transplantation.

  3. Regulation of human SRY subcellular distribution by its acetylation/deacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Thevenet, Laurie; Méjean, Catherine; Moniot, Brigitte; Bonneaud, Nathalie; Galéotti, Nathalie; Aldrian-Herrada, Gudrun; Poulat, Francis; Berta, Philippe; Benkirane, Monsef; Boizet-Bonhoure, Brigitte

    2004-01-01

    SRY, a Y chromosome-encoded DNA-binding protein, is required for testis organogenesis in mammals. Expression of the SRY gene in the genital ridge is followed by diverse early cell events leading to Sertoli cell determination/differentiation and subsequent sex cord formation. Little is known about SRY regulation and its mode of action during testis development, and direct gene targets for SRY are still lacking. In this study, we demonstrate that interaction of the human SRY with histone acetyltransferase p300 induces the acetylation of SRY both in vitro and in vivo at a single conserved lysine residue. We show that acetylation participates in the nuclear localisation of SRY by increasing SRY interaction with importin β, while specific deacetylation by HDAC3 induces a cytoplasmic delocalisation of SRY. Finally, by analysing p300 and HDAC3 expression profiles during both human or mouse gonadal development, we suggest that acetylation and deacetylation of SRY may be important mechanisms for regulating SRY activity during mammalian sex determination. PMID:15297880

  4. Distribution and Characterization of Antigens Found in Subcellular Fractions of African Trypanosomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    label- led as described previously (15). In some instances trypanosomes were surface labelled using the fluorescamine-g cyclodextrin complex (12) as...interest for further investiga- tion for either vaccine use or for developing antibodies for use in targetting liposome encapsulated drugs. The flagella...product formed per minute, with standard deviations based on five determinations. Relative fluorescence for (a) free and (b) ß- cyclodextrin complexed

  5. The accumulation and subcellular distribution of arsenic and antimony in four fern plants.

    PubMed

    Feng, R; Wang, X; Wei, C; Tu, S

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, Pteris cretica 'Albo-Lineata' (PC), Pteris fauriei (PF), Humata tyermanii Moore (HT), and Pteris ensiformis Burm (PE), were selected to explore additional plant materials for the phytoremediation of As and Sb co-contamination. To some extent, the addition of As and Sb enhanced the growth of HT, PE, and PF. Conversely, the addition of As and Sb negatively affected the growth of PC and was accompanied with the accumulation of high levels of As and Sb in the roots. The highest concentration of Sb was recorded as 6405 mg kg(-1) in the roots of PC, and that for As was 337 mg kg(-1) in the rhizome of PF. To some degree, As and Sb stimulated the uptake of each other in these ferns. Arsenic was mainly stored in the cytoplasmic supernatant (CS) fraction, followed by the cell wall (CW) fraction. In contrast, Sb was mainly found in the CW fraction and, to a lesser extent, in the CS fraction, suggesting that the cell wall and cytosol play different roles in As and Sb accumulation by fern plants. This study demonstrated that these fern plants show a good application potential in the phytoremediation of As and Sb co-contaminated environments.

  6. Subcellular localization of glycosidases and glycosyltransferases involved in the processing of N-linked oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, A.; Johnson, K.D.; Szumilo, T.; Elbein, A.D.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1987-11-01

    Using isopycnic sucrose gradients, we have ascertained the subcellular location of several enzymes involved in the processing of the N-linked oligosaccharides of glycoproteins in developing cotyledons of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. All are localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi complex as determined by co-sedimentation with the ER marker, NADH-cytochrome c reductase, or the Golgi marker, glucan synthase I. Glucosidase activity, which removes glucose residues from Glc/sub 3/Man/sub 9/(GlcNAc)/sub 2/, was found exclusively in the ER. All other processing enzymes, which act subsequent to the glucose trimming steps, are associates with Golgi. These include mannosidase I (removes 1-2 mannose residues from Man/sub 6-9/(GlcNAc)/sub 2/), mannosidase II (removes mannose residues from GlcNAcMan/sub 5/(GlcNAc)/sub 2/), and fucosyltransferase (transfers a fucose residue to the Asn-linked GlcNAc of appropriate glycans). The authors have previously reported the localization of two other glycan modifying enzymes (GlcNAc-transferase and xylosyltranferase activities) in the Golgi complex. Attempts at subfractionation of the Golgi fraction on shallow sucrose gradients yielded similar patterns of distribution for all the Golgi processing enzymes. Subfractionation on Percoll gradients resulted in two peaks of the Golgi marker enzyme inosine diphosphatase, whereas the glycan processing enzymes were all enriched in the peak of lower density. These results do not lend support to the hypothesis that N-linked oligosaccharide processing enzymes are associated with Golgi cisternae of different densities.

  7. Subcellular localization of host and viral proteins associated with tobamovirus RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yuka; Komoda, Keisuke; Yamanaka, Takuya; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Funada, Ryo; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Naito, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2003-01-15

    Arabidopsis TOM1 (AtTOM1) and TOM2A (AtTOM2A) are integral membrane proteins genetically identified to be necessary for efficient intracellular multiplication of tobamoviruses. AtTOM1 interacts with the helicase domain polypeptide of tobamovirus-encoded replication proteins and with AtTOM2A, suggesting that both AtTOM1 and AtTOM2A are integral components of the tobamovirus replication complex. We show here that AtTOM1 and AtTOM2A proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) are targeted to the vacuolar membrane (tonoplast)-like structures in plant cells. In subcellular fractionation analyses, GFP-AtTOM2A, AtTOM2A and its tobacco homolog NtTOM2A were predominantly fractionated to low-density tonoplast-rich fractions, whereas AtTOM1-GFP, AtTOM1 and its tobacco homolog NtTOM1 were distributed mainly into the tonoplast-rich fractions and partially into higher-buoyant-density fractions containing membranes from several other organelles. The tobamovirus-encoded replication proteins were co-fractionated with both NtTOM1 and viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity. The replication proteins were also found in the fractions containing non-membrane-bound proteins, but neither NtTOM1 nor the polymerase activity was detected there. These observations suggest that the formation of tobamoviral RNA replication complex occurs on TOM1-containing membranes and is facilitated by TOM2A.

  8. Subcellular localization and trafficking of phytolongins (non-SNARE longins) in the plant secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    de Marcos Lousa, Carine; Soubeyrand, Eric; Bolognese, Paolo; Wattelet-Boyer, Valerie; Bouyssou, Guillaume; Marais, Claireline; Boutté, Yohann; Filippini, Francesco; Moreau, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    SNARE proteins are central elements of the machinery involved in membrane fusion of eukaryotic cells. In animals and plants, SNAREs have diversified to sustain a variety of specific functions. In animals, R-SNARE proteins called brevins have diversified; in contrast, in plants, the R-SNARE proteins named longins have diversified. Recently, a new subfamily of four longins named ‘phytolongins’ (Phyl) was discovered. One intriguing aspect of Phyl proteins is the lack of the typical SNARE motif, which is replaced by another domain termed the ‘Phyl domain’. Phytolongins have a rather ubiquitous tissue expression in Arabidopsis but still await intracellular characterization. In this study, we found that the four phytolongins are distributed along the secretory pathway. While Phyl2.1 and Phyl2.2 are strictly located at the endoplasmic reticulum network, Phyl1.2 associates with the Golgi bodies, and Phyl1.1 locates mainly at the plasma membrane and partially in the Golgi bodies and post-Golgi compartments. Our results show that export of Phyl1.1 from the endoplasmic reticulum depends on the GTPase Sar1, the Sar1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Sec12, and the SNAREs Sec22 and Memb11. In addition, we have identified the Y48F49 motif as being critical for the exit of Phyl1.1 from the endoplasmic reticulum. Our results provide the first characterization of the subcellular localization of the phytolongins, and we discuss their potential role in regulating the secretory pathway. PMID:26962210

  9. Stress-Responsive Expression, Subcellular Localization and Protein-Protein Interactions of the Rice Metacaspase Family.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Liu, Shixia; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2015-07-17

    Metacaspases, a class of cysteine-dependent proteases like caspases in animals, are important regulators of programmed cell death (PCD) during development and stress responses in plants. The present study was focused on comprehensive analyses of expression patterns of the rice metacaspase (OsMC) genes in response to abiotic and biotic stresses and stress-related hormones. Results indicate that members of the OsMC family displayed differential expression patterns in response to abiotic (e.g., drought, salt, cold, and heat) and biotic (e.g., infection by Magnaporthe oryzae, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani) stresses and stress-related hormones such as abscisic acid, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (a precursor of ethylene), although the responsiveness to these stresses or hormones varies to some extent. Subcellular localization analyses revealed that OsMC1 was solely localized and OsMC2 was mainly localized in the nucleus. Whereas OsMC3, OsMC4, and OsMC7 were evenly distributed in the cells, OsMC5, OsMC6, and OsMC8 were localized in cytoplasm. OsMC1 interacted with OsLSD1 and OsLSD3 while OsMC3 only interacted with OsLSD1 and that the zinc finger domain in OsMC1 is responsible for the interaction activity. The systematic expression and biochemical analyses of the OsMC family provide valuable information for further functional studies on the biological roles of OsMCs in PCD that is related to abiotic and biotic stress responses.

  10. Analyzing subcellular structure with optical Fourier filtering based on Gabor filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boustany, Nada N.; Sierra, Heidy

    2013-02-01

    Label-free measurement of subcellular morphology can be used to track dynamically cellular function under various conditions and has important applications in cellular monitoring and in vitro cell assays. We show that optical filtering of scattered light by two-dimensional Gabor filters allows for direct and highly sensitive measurement of sample structure. The Gabor filters, which are defined by their spatial frequency, orientation and Gaussian envelope, can be used to track locally and in situ the characteristic size and orientation of structures within the sample. Our method consists of sequentially implementing a set of Gabor filters via a spatial light modulator placed in a conjugate Fourier plane during optical imaging and identifying the filters that yield maximum signal. Using this setup, we show that Gabor filtering of light forward-scattered by spheres yields an optical response which varies linearly with diameter between 100nm and 2000nm. The optical filtering sensitivity to changes in diameter is on the order of 20nm and can be achieved at low image resolution. We use numerical simulations to demonstrate that this linear response can be predicted from scatter theory and does not vary significantly with changes in refractive index ratio. By applying this Fourier filtering method in samples consisting of diatoms and cells, we generate false-color images of the object that encode at each pixel the size of the local structures within the object. The resolution of these encoded size maps in on the order of 0.36μm. The pixel histograms of these encoded images directly provide 20nm resolved "size spectra", depicting the size distribution of structures within the analyzed object. We use these size spectra to differentiate the morphology of apoptosis-competent and bax/bak null apoptosis-resistant cells during cell death. We also utilize the sensitivity of the Gabor filters to object orientation to track changes in organelle morphology, and detect mitochondrial

  11. Function and subcellular localization of Gcn5, a histone acetyltransferase in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng; Fan, Xueyi; Chen, Jiangye

    2015-08-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen commonly found in humans. It has the ability to switch reversibly between three growth forms: budding yeast, pseudohypha, and hypha. The transition between yeast and hyphal growth forms is critical for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. During the yeast-to-hypha morphologic transition, gene expression is regulated by transcriptional regulators including histone modifying complexes and chromatin remodeling complexes. We previously reported that Esa1, a catalytic subunit in the histone acetyltransferase complex NuA4, is essential for the hyphal development of C. albicans. In this study, we analyzed the functional roles of Gcn5, a catalytic subunit in the histone acetyltransferase complex SAGA, in C. albicans. Gcn5 is required for the invasive and filamentous growth of C. albicans. Deletion of GCN5 impaired hyphal elongation in sensing serum and attenuated the virulence of C. albicans in a mouse systemic infection model. The C. albicans gcn5/gcn5 mutant cells also exhibited sensitivity to cell wall stress. Functional analysis showed that the HAT domain and Bromodomain in Gcn5 play distinct roles in morphogenesis and cell wall stress response of C. albicans. Our results show that the conserved residue Glu188 is crucial for the Gcn5 HAT activity and for Gcn5 function during filamentous growth. In addition, the subcellular distribution of ectopically expressed GFP-Gcn5 correlates with the different growth states of C. albicans. In stationary phase, Gcn5 accumulated in the nucleus, while during vegetative growth it localized in the cytoplasm in a morpha-independent manner. Our results suggest that the nuclear localization of Gcn5 depends on the existence of its N-terminal NLS and HAT domains.

  12. Individual domains of Tensin2 exhibit distinct subcellular localisations and migratory effects.

    PubMed

    Hafizi, Sassan; Sernstad, Emma; Swinny, Jerome D; Gomez, Maria F; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2010-01-01

    Tensins are large intracellular proteins believed to link the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton via integrins. Tensins are multidomain proteins consisting of homologous C1, PTPase, C2, SH2 and PTB domains. Full-length Tensin proteins can undergo cleavage inside cells, thus yielding domains in isolation that may have discrete subcellular localisations and downstream effects. We expressed different isoforms of Tensin2 and their individual domains as recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion constructs in DU145 human prostate cancer cells. Under fluorescence confocal microscopy, the isolated domains of Tensin2 all displayed discrete distributions throughout the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In particular, partial constructs containing the C1 domain localised preferentially to the nucleus, including the isolated C1 domain and the PTPase domain. In contrast, all three full-length isoforms of Tensin2 were present exclusively in discrete punctate bodies throughout the cytoplasm. This punctate staining showed colocalisation with the tumour suppressor protein DLC-1 as well as with actin (phalloidin). Furthermore, DU145 cells transiently expressing partial Tensin2 constructs containing the PTB domain showed an increased haptotactic migration. In addition, stimulation of renal carcinoma cells stably expressing Tensin2 by the survival factor Gas6 caused phosphorylation of its receptor Axl, but no effect on Tensin2, which was already maximally phosphorylated at time 0. In conclusion, our results indicate that differential proteolytic cleavage of Tensin2 can liberate domains with discrete localisations and functions, which has implications for the role of Tensins in cancer cell survival and motility.

  13. Subcellular localization and displacement by diuretics of the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site (PBS) from rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Lukeman, S.; Fanestil, D.

    1986-03-05

    Although the PBS has been identified in many organs, its function and cellular location are speculative. Using rapid filtration, binding of (/sup 3/H)RO 5-4864 (*RO) (.75 nM) was assessed in four subcellular fractions (.3 mg/ml) derived from depapillated rat kidney by differential centrifugation: N (450g x 2 min), O (13,000 x 10), P (105,000 x 30), and S. The binding distribution was: N-18%, O-74%, P-6%, and S-2%. Marker enzyme analysis revealed that O was enriched in mitochondria (M), lysosomes (L), peroxisomes (P), and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but not plasma membrane, and that N contained small amounts (10-15%) of markers for the above. Repeated washing of O removed ER enzymes but preserved *RO binding. O was further fractionated with centrifugation (57,000g x 4 hr) on a linear sucrose gradient (18-65%); *RO binding then comigrated with M but not P and L markers. Centrifugation of isolated M (5500 x 10 min) on another linear sucrose gradient (37-65%) gave low and high density bands, which contained 65% and 35% of *RO binding activity, resp. *RO binding in O was specific, saturable, reversible, and inhibited by diuretics. Inhibitors with the highest potency were indacrinone (K/sub d/ = 35 ..mu..M), hydrochlorothiazide (100 ..mu..M), and ethacrynic acid (325 ..mu..M). Low potency inhibitors (K/sub d/ greater than or equal to 1 mM) included amiloride, triamterene, furosemide, bumetanide, and ozolinone.

  14. Resolving sub-cellular force dynamics using arrays of magnetic microposts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    The biological response of cells to mechanical forces is integral to both normal cell function and the progression of many diseases, such as hypertensive vascular wall thickening. This likely results from the fact that mechanical stresses can directly affect many cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, growth, differentiation, and survival. The need to understand the relationship between applied forces and the mechanical response of cells as a critical step towards understanding mechanotransduction calls for tools that can apply forces to cells while measuring their contractile response. This talk will describe an approach that simultaneously allows local mechanical stimulation of the adherent surface of a cell and spatially resolved measurement of the local force fields generated throughout the cell in response to this stimulation. Cells are cultured on the top surfaces of arrays of micrometer-scale posts made from a flexible elastomer (PDMS), and the contractile forces generated by an adherent cell bend the posts. Measurements of the displacement of each post allow the contractile force field of the cell to be mapped out with sub-cellular precision. To apply forces to cells, rod- shaped magnetic nanoparticles are embedded in some of the posts so that externally applied magnetic fields selectively deform these ``magnetic posts,'' thereby exerting tunable local, mechanical stresses to the adherent surface of attached cells. Alternatively, magnetic particles bound to or internalized by the cell may be employed to apply forces and torques to the cell. With either approach, measuring the deflection of the surrounding non-magnetic posts probes the full mechanical response of the cell to these stresses. Results that illustrate the temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of the non-local response of fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells to local stresses will be discussed.

  15. Geary autocorrelation and DCCA coefficient: Application to predict apoptosis protein subcellular localization via PSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli

    2017-02-01

    Apoptosis is a fundamental process controlling normal tissue homeostasis by regulating a balance between cell proliferation and death. Predicting subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful for understanding its mechanism of programmed cell death. Prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular location is still a challenging and complicated task, and existing methods mainly based on protein primary sequences. In this paper, we propose a new position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based model by using Geary autocorrelation function and detrended cross-correlation coefficient (DCCA coefficient). Then a 270-dimensional (270D) feature vector is constructed on three widely used datasets: ZD98, ZW225 and CL317, and support vector machine is adopted as classifier. The overall prediction accuracies are significantly improved by rigorous jackknife test. The results show that our model offers a reliable and effective PSSM-based tool for prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular localization.

  16. Detrended cross-correlation coefficient: Application to predict apoptosis protein subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli

    2016-12-01

    Apoptosis, or programed cell death, plays a central role in the development and homeostasis of an organism. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful for understanding the apoptosis mechanism. The prediction of subcellular localization of an apoptosis protein is still a challenging task, and existing methods mainly based on protein primary sequences. In this paper, we introduce a new position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based method by using detrended cross-correlation (DCCA) coefficient of non-overlapping windows. Then a 190-dimensional (190D) feature vector is constructed on two widely used datasets: CL317 and ZD98, and support vector machine is adopted as classifier. To evaluate the proposed method, objective and rigorous jackknife cross-validation tests are performed on the two datasets. The results show that our approach offers a novel and reliable PSSM-based tool for prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular localization.

  17. Use of correspondence discriminant analysis to predict the subcellular location of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Perrière, Guy; Thioulouse, Jean

    2003-02-01

    Correspondence discriminant analysis (CDA) is a multivariate statistical method derived from discriminant analysis which can be used on contingency tables. We have used CDA to separate Gram negative bacteria proteins according to their subcellular location. The high resolution of the discrimination obtained makes this method a good tool to predict subcellular location when this information is not known. The main advantage of this technique is its simplicity. Indeed, by computing two linear formulae on amino acid composition, it is possible to classify a protein into one of the three classes of subcellular location we have defined. The CDA itself can be computed with the ADE-4 software package that can be downloaded, as well as the data set used in this study, from the Pôle Bio-Informatique Lyonnais (PBIL) server at http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr.

  18. Subcellular localization of Gram-negative bacterial proteins using sparse learning.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhonglong; Yang, Jie

    2010-04-01

    One of the main challenges faced by biological applications is to predict protein subcellular localization in an automatic fashion accurately. To achieve this in these applications, a wide variety of machine learning methods have been proposed in recent years. Most of them focus on finding the optimal classification scheme and less of them take the simplifying the complexity of biological system into account. Traditionally such bio-data are analyzed by first performing a feature selection before classification. Motivated by CS (Compressive Sensing), we propose a method which performs locality preserving projection with a sparseness criterion such that the feature selection and dimension reduction are merged into one analysis. The proposed sparse method decreases the complexity of biological system, while increases protein subcellular localization accuracy. Experimental results are quite encouraging, indicating that the aforementioned sparse method is quite promising in dealing with complicated biological problems, such as predicting the subcellular localization of Gram-negative bacterial proteins.

  19. Human Protein Subcellular Localization with Integrated Source and Multi-label Ensemble Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaotong; Liu, Fulin; Ju, Ying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Chunyu

    2016-06-01

    Predicting protein subcellular location is necessary for understanding cell function. Several machine learning methods have been developed for computational prediction of primary protein sequences because wet experiments are costly and time consuming. However, two problems still exist in state-of-the-art methods. First, several proteins appear in different subcellular structures simultaneously, whereas current methods only predict one protein sequence in one subcellular structure. Second, most software tools are trained with obsolete data and the latest new databases are missed. We proposed a novel multi-label classification algorithm to solve the first problem and integrated several latest databases to improve prediction performance. Experiments proved the effectiveness of the proposed method. The present study would facilitate research on cellular proteomics.

  20. Automated identification of subcellular organelles by coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    El-Mashtoly, Samir F; Niedieker, Daniel; Petersen, Dennis; Krauss, Sascha D; Freier, Erik; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Mosig, Axel; Hahn, Stephan; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-05-06

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is an emerging tool for label-free characterization of living cells. Here, unsupervised multivariate analysis of CARS datasets was used to visualize the subcellular compartments. In addition, a supervised learning algorithm based on the "random forest" ensemble learning method as a classifier, was trained with CARS spectra using immunofluorescence images as a reference. The supervised classifier was then used, to our knowledge for the first time, to automatically identify lipid droplets, nucleus, nucleoli, and endoplasmic reticulum in datasets that are not used for training. These four subcellular components were simultaneously and label-free monitored instead of using several fluorescent labels. These results open new avenues for label-free time-resolved investigation of subcellular components in different cells, especially cancer cells.

  1. Identifying the singleplex and multiplex proteins based on transductive learning for protein subcellular localization prediction.

    PubMed

    Cao, Junzhe; Liu, Wenqi; He, Jianjun; Gu, Hong

    2013-07-01

    A new method is proposed to identify whether a query protein is singleplex or multiplex for improving the quality of protein subcellular localization prediction. Based on the transductive learning technique, this approach utilizes the information from the both query proteins and known proteins to estimate the subcellular location number of every query protein so that the singleplex and multiplex proteins can be recognized and distinguished. Each query protein is then dealt with by a targeted single-label or multi-label predictor to achieve a high-accuracy prediction result. We assess the performance of the proposed approach by applying it to three groups of protein sequences datasets. Simulation experiments show that the proposed approach can effectively identify the singleplex and multiplex proteins. Through a comparison, the reliably of this method for enhancing the power of predicting protein subcellular localization can also be verified.

  2. Human Protein Subcellular Localization with Integrated Source and Multi-label Ensemble Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaotong; Liu, Fulin; Ju, Ying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Predicting protein subcellular location is necessary for understanding cell function. Several machine learning methods have been developed for computational prediction of primary protein sequences because wet experiments are costly and time consuming. However, two problems still exist in state-of-the-art methods. First, several proteins appear in different subcellular structures simultaneously, whereas current methods only predict one protein sequence in one subcellular structure. Second, most software tools are trained with obsolete data and the latest new databases are missed. We proposed a novel multi-label classification algorithm to solve the first problem and integrated several latest databases to improve prediction performance. Experiments proved the effectiveness of the proposed method. The present study would facilitate research on cellular proteomics. PMID:27323846

  3. Immunogold labeling reveals subcellular localisation of silica nanoparticles in a human blood-brain barrier model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dong; Anguissola, Sergio; O'Neill, Tiina; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2015-05-01

    Subcellular location of nanoparticles has been widely investigated with fluorescence microscopy, via fluorescently labeled antibodies to visualise target antigens in cells. However, fluorescence microscopy, such as confocal or live cell imaging, has generally limited 3D spatial resolution. Conventional electron microscopy can be useful in bridging resolution gap, but still not ideal in resolving subcellular organelle identities. Using the pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopic imaging, we performed accurate examination of the intracellular trafficking and gathered further evidence of transport mechanisms of silica nanoparticles across a human in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Our approach can effectively immunolocalise a variety of intracellular compartments and provide new insights into the uptake and subcellular transport of nanoparticles.Subcellular location of nanoparticles has been widely investigated with fluorescence microscopy, via fluorescently labeled antibodies to visualise target antigens in cells. However, fluorescence microscopy, such as confocal or live cell imaging, has generally limited 3D spatial resolution. Conventional electron microscopy can be useful in bridging resolution gap, but still not ideal in resolving subcellular organelle identities. Using the pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopic imaging, we performed accurate examination of the intracellular trafficking and gathered further evidence of transport mechanisms of silica nanoparticles across a human in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Our approach can effectively immunolocalise a variety of intracellular compartments and provide new insights into the uptake and subcellular transport of nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticle characterisation data, preservation of cellular structures, staining controls, optimisation of size amplification via the silver enhancement, and more imaging results from anti-clathrin and anti-caveolin 1

  4. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64%) consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial) proteins (mt-cy families) while the remaining 33 (36%) were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families). Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1) relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2) from cytosol to mitochondria and 3) multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on the genomic scale was

  5. Multi-label multi-kernel transfer learning for human protein subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Mei, Suyu

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed much progress in computational modelling for protein subcellular localization. However, the existing sequence-based predictive models demonstrate moderate or unsatisfactory performance, and the gene ontology (GO) based models may take the risk of performance overestimation for novel proteins. Furthermore, many human proteins have multiple subcellular locations, which renders the computational modelling more complicated. Up to the present, there are far few researches specialized for predicting the subcellular localization of human proteins that may reside in multiple cellular compartments. In this paper, we propose a multi-label multi-kernel transfer learning model for human protein subcellular localization (MLMK-TLM). MLMK-TLM proposes a multi-label confusion matrix, formally formulates three multi-labelling performance measures and adapts one-against-all multi-class probabilistic outputs to multi-label learning scenario, based on which to further extends our published work GO-TLM (gene ontology based transfer learning model for protein subcellular localization) and MK-TLM (multi-kernel transfer learning based on Chou's PseAAC formulation for protein submitochondria localization) for multiplex human protein subcellular localization. With the advantages of proper homolog knowledge transfer, comprehensive survey of model performance for novel protein and multi-labelling capability, MLMK-TLM will gain more practical applicability. The experiments on human protein benchmark dataset show that MLMK-TLM significantly outperforms the baseline model and demonstrates good multi-labelling ability for novel human proteins. Some findings (predictions) are validated by the latest Swiss-Prot database. The software can be freely downloaded at http://soft.synu.edu.cn/upload/msy.rar.

  6. Identifying subcellular localizations of mammalian protein complexes based on graph theory with a random forest algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan-Chao; Lai, Yan-Hua; Chen, Li-Li; Chen, Chao; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiao-Yong

    2013-04-05

    In the post-genome era, one of the most important and challenging tasks is to identify the subcellular localizations of protein complexes, and further elucidate their functions in human health with applications to understand disease mechanisms, diagnosis and therapy. Although various experimental approaches have been developed and employed to identify the subcellular localizations of protein complexes, the laboratory technologies fall far behind the rapid accumulation of protein complexes. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a computational method to rapidly and reliably identify the subcellular localizations of protein complexes. In this study, a novel method is proposed for predicting subcellular localizations of mammalian protein complexes based on graph theory with a random forest algorithm. Protein complexes are modeled as weighted graphs containing nodes and edges, where nodes represent proteins, edges represent protein-protein interactions and weights are descriptors of protein primary structures. Some topological structure features are proposed and adopted to characterize protein complexes based on graph theory. Random forest is employed to construct a model and predict subcellular localizations of protein complexes. Accuracies on a training set by a 10-fold cross-validation test for predicting plasma membrane/membrane attached, cytoplasm and nucleus are 84.78%, 71.30%, and 82.00%, respectively. And accuracies for the independent test set are 81.31%, 69.95% and 81.00%, respectively. These high prediction accuracies exhibit the state-of-the-art performance of the current method. It is anticipated that the proposed method may become a useful high-throughput tool and plays a complementary role to the existing experimental techniques in identifying subcellular localizations of mammalian protein complexes. The source code of Matlab and the dataset can be obtained freely on request from the authors.

  7. Lipolytic enzymes in bovine thyroid tissue. I. Subcellular localization, purification and characterization of acid phospholipase A1.

    PubMed

    De Wolf, M; Lagrou, A; Hilderson, H J; Dierick, W

    1978-12-01

    In mammalian cells the catabolism of membrane phosphoglycerides proceeds probably entirely through a deacylation pathway catalysed by phospholipase A and lysophospholipase (Wise & Elwyn, 1965). In the initial attack of diacylphosphoglycerides by phospholipase A two enzymatic activities with different positional specificities have been distinguished: phospholipase A1 (phosphatidate 1-acyl hydrolase EN 3.1.1.32) and phospholipase A2 (phosphatidate 2-acyl hydrolase EN 3.1.1.4) (Van Deenen & De Haas, 1966). Studies on these intracellular phospholipases were mainly concerned with their subcellular localization. Only occasionally more detailed enzymatic investigations have been conducted on them, in contrast to export phospholipases e.g. from snake venom, bee venom and porcine pancreas, which have been extensively investigated (Brockerhoff & Jensen 1974a). In a previous paper (De Wolf et al., 1976a), the presence of phospholipase A1 and phospholipase A2 activities in bovine thyroid was demonstrated, using 1-[9, 10-3H] stearoyl-2-[1-14C] linoleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine as a substrate. Optimal activity was observed in both instances at pH 4. Addition of the anionic detergent sodium taurocholate increased the A2 type activity and decreased the A1 type activity suggesting the presence of different enzymes. The lack of influence of Ca2+-ions and EDTA and the acid pH optima could suggest lysosomal localization. In this paper the subcellular distribution of both acid phospholipase activities is described as well as a purification scheme for phospholipase A1. Some characteristics of the purified enzyme preparation are discussed.

  8. Understanding the differences in Cd and Zn bioaccumulation and subcellular storage among different populations of marine clams.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dalin; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2004-01-15

    The marine clams Mactra veneriformis were collected from three different locations in a contaminated bay in Northern China. Another species of clams Ruditapes philippinarum was collected from the same contaminated bay as well as from a relatively clean site in Hong Kong. The indices of Cd and Zn bioaccumulation (assimilation efficiency, dissolved uptake rate, and efflux rate), tissue concentration, subcellular distribution, metallothionein (MT) content, and clearance rate of the clams were subsequently quantified in these populations in the laboratory. In the two species of clams, the population with a higher Cd tissue concentration assimilated Cd and Zn more efficiently, in correlation with an increase in the Cd associated with the metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) fraction. The subcellular partitioning of Zn was similar among the different populations. The dissolved uptake rates of Cd and Zn were not influenced by the different tissue concentrations of metals in the clams. However, the clam R. philippinarum from the contaminated site reduced their Zn uptake rate constants in response to increasing Zn concentration in the water. Differences in Cd and Zn tissue concentrations had little influence on the metal efflux rate constant and the clams' clearance rate. Our results indicate that the higher Cd and Zn tissue concentrations observed in these two species may be partially caused by the high levels of metal assimilation. Populations living in contaminated environments may be able to modify their physiological and biochemical responses to metal stress, which can subsequently alter trace metal bioaccumulation to aquatic animals. The relative significance of dietary uptake and the potential trophic transfer of metals in the contaminated areas may be substantially different from those in the clean environments.

  9. Time-of-day regulates subcellular trafficking, tripartite synaptic localization and polyadenylation of the astrocytic Fabp7 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Gerstner, Jason R.; Vanderheyden, William M.; LaVaute, Timothy; Westmark, Cara J.; Rouhana, Labib; Pack, Allan I.; Wickens, Marv; Landry, Charles F.

    2012-01-01

    The astrocyte brain fatty acid binding protein (Fabp7) has previously been shown to have a coordinated diurnal regulation of mRNA and protein throughout mouse brain, and an age-dependent decline in protein expression within synaptoneurosomal fractions. Mechanisms that control time-of-day changes in expression and trafficking Fabp7 to the perisynaptic process are not known. In this study, we confirmed an enrichment of Fabp7 mRNA and protein in the astrocytic perisynaptic compartment, and observed a diurnal change in the intracellular distribution of Fabp7 mRNA in molecular layers of hippocampus. Northern blotting revealed a coordinated time-of-day dependent oscillation for the Fabp7 mRNA poly(A) tail throughout murine brain. Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-(CPE-) binding protein (CPEB1) regulates subcellular trafficking and translation of synaptic plasticity-related mRNAs. Here we show that Fabp7 mRNA co-immunoprecipitated with CPEB1 from primary mouse astrocyte extracts, and its 3′UTR contains phylogenetically conserved CPEs capable of regulating translation of reporter mRNAs during Xenopus oocyte maturation. Given that Fabp7 expression is confined to astrocytes and neural progenitors in adult mouse brain, the synchronized cycling pattern of Fabp7 mRNA is therefore novel of known CPE-regulated transcripts. These results implicate circadian, sleep and/or metabolic control of CPEB-mediated subcellular trafficking and localized translation of Fabp7 mRNA in the tripartite synapse of mammalian brain. PMID:22279223

  10. Protein subcellular localization prediction using multiple kernel learning based support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Al Mehedi; Ahmad, Shamim; Molla, Md Khademul Islam

    2017-03-28

    Predicting the subcellular locations of proteins can provide useful hints that reveal their functions, increase our understanding of the mechanisms of some diseases, and finally aid in the development of novel drugs. As the number of newly discovered proteins has been growing exponentially, which in turns, makes the subcellular localization prediction by purely laboratory tests prohibitively laborious and expensive. In this context, to tackle the challenges, computational methods are being developed as an alternative choice to aid biologists in selecting target proteins and designing related experiments. However, the success of protein subcellular localization prediction is still a complicated and challenging issue, particularly, when query proteins have multi-label characteristics, i.e., if they exist simultaneously in more than one subcellular location or if they move between two or more different subcellular locations. To date, to address this problem, several types of subcellular localization prediction methods with different levels of accuracy have been proposed. The support vector machine (SVM) has been employed to provide potential solutions to the protein subcellular localization prediction problem. However, the practicability of an SVM is affected by the challenges of selecting an appropriate kernel and selecting the parameters of the selected kernel. To address this difficulty, in this study, we aimed to develop an efficient multi-label protein subcellular localization prediction system, named as MKLoc, by introducing multiple kernel learning (MKL) based SVM. We evaluated MKLoc using a combined dataset containing 5447 single-localized proteins (originally published as part of the Höglund dataset) and 3056 multi-localized proteins (originally published as part of the DBMLoc set). Note that this dataset was used by Briesemeister et al. in their extensive comparison of multi-localization prediction systems. Finally, our experimental results indicate that

  11. Calculation of the relative metastabilities of proteins in subcellular compartments of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Jeffrey M

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein subcellular localization and differences in oxidation state between subcellular compartments are two well-studied features of the the cellular organization of S. cerevisiae (yeast). Theories about the origin of subcellular organization are assisted by computational models that can integrate data from observations of compositional and chemical properties of the system. Presentation and implications of the hypothesis I adopt the hypothesis that the state of yeast subcellular organization is in a local energy minimum. This hypothesis implies that equilibrium thermodynamic models can yield predictions about the interdependence between populations of proteins and their subcellular chemical environments. Testing the hypothesis Three types of tests are proposed. First, there should be correlations between modeled and observed oxidation states for different compartments. Second, there should be a correspondence between the energy requirements of protein formation and the order the appearance of organelles during cellular development. Third, there should be correlations between the predicted and observed relative abundances of interacting proteins within compartments. Results The relative metastability fields of subcellular homologs of glutaredoxin and thioredoxin indicate a trend from less to more oxidizing as mitochondrion – cytoplasm – nucleus. Representing the overall amino acid compositions of proteins in 23 different compartments each with a single reference model protein suggests that the formation reactions for proteins in the vacuole (in relatively oxidizing conditions), ER and early Golgi (in relatively reducing conditions) are relatively highly favored, while that for the microtubule is the most costly. The relative abundances of model proteins for each compartment inferred from experimental data were found in some cases to correlate with the predicted abundances, and both positive and negative correlations were found for some assemblages

  12. Predicting gram-positive bacterial protein subcellular localization based on localization motifs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yinxia; Li, Tonghua; Sun, Jiangming; Tang, Shengnan; Xiong, Wenwei; Li, Dapeng; Chen, Guanyan; Cong, Peisheng

    2012-09-07

    The subcellular localization of proteins is closely related to their functions. In this work, we propose a novel approach based on localization motifs to improve the accuracy of predicting subcellular localization of Gram-positive bacterial proteins. Our approach performed well on a five-fold cross validation with an overall success rate of 89.5%. Besides, the overall success rate of an independent testing dataset was 97.7%. Moreover, our approach was tested using a new experimentally-determined set of Gram-positive bacteria proteins and achieved an overall success rate of 96.3%.

  13. Probing cell mechanics with subcellular laser dissection of actomyosin networks in the early developing Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Rauzi, M; Lenne, P-F

    2015-01-01

    Laser dissection is a useful tool in developmental biology to probe mechanical forces from the subcellular to the tissue/embryo scale. During tissue morphogenesis, cells are equipped with networks of actomyosin that generate forces. Here we present a technique based on near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond (fs) pulsed laser dissection that allows subcellular ablation of actomyosin networks. This technique allows to selectively ablate actomyosin networks while preserving cell plasma membrane. The resulting relaxation of the remaining network after laser dissection is imaged and analyzed to deduce local forces responsible for tissue morphogenesis in the developing Drosophila embryo.

  14. Identifying subcellular protein localization with fluorescent protein fusions after transient expression in onion epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Nebenführ, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Most biochemical functions of plant cells are carried out by proteins which act at very specific places within these cells, for example, within different organelles. Identifying the subcellular localization of proteins is therefore a useful tool to narrow down the possible functions that a novel or unknown protein may carry out. The discovery of genetically encoded fluorescent markers has made it possible to tag specific proteins and visualize them in vivo under a variety of conditions. This chapter describes a simple method to use transient expression of such fluorescently tagged proteins in onion epidermal cells to determine their subcellular localization relative to known markers.

  15. Subcellular Redox Targeting: Bridging in Vitro and in Vivo Chemical Biology.

    PubMed

    Long, Marcus J C; Poganik, Jesse R; Ghosh, Souradyuti; Aye, Yimon

    2017-03-17

    Networks of redox sensor proteins within discrete microdomains regulate the flow of redox signaling. Yet, the inherent reactivity of redox signals complicates the study of specific redox events and pathways by traditional methods. Herein, we review designer chemistries capable of measuring flux and/or mimicking subcellular redox signaling at the cellular and organismal level. Such efforts have begun to decipher the logic underlying organelle-, site-, and target-specific redox signaling in vitro and in vivo. These data highlight chemical biology as a perfect gateway to interrogate how nature choreographs subcellular redox chemistry to drive precision redox biology.

  16. Subcellular localization-dependent changes in EGFP fluorescence lifetime measured by time-resolved flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Ali Vaziri; Cao, Ruofan; Jenkins, Patrick; Li, Wenyan; Houston, Jessica P.; Houston, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular protein transport and localization to subcellular regions are processes necessary for normal protein function. Fluorescent proteins can be fused to proteins of interest to track movement and determine localization within a cell. Currently, fluorescence microscopy combined with image processing is most often used to study protein movement and subcellular localization. In this contribution we evaluate a high-throughput time-resolved flow cytometry approach to correlate intracellular localization of human LC3 protein with the fluorescence lifetime of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Subcellular LC3 localization to autophagosomes is a marker of the cellular process called autophagy. In breast cancer cells expressing native EGFP and EGFP-LC3 fusion proteins, we measured the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of (i) diffuse EGFP (ii) punctate EGFP-LC3 and (iii) diffuse EGFP-ΔLC3 after amino acid starvation to induce autophagy-dependent LC3 localization. We verify EGFP-LC3 localization with low-throughput confocal microscopy and compare to fluorescence intensity measured by standard flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate that time-resolved flow cytometry can be correlated to subcellular localization of EGFP fusion proteins by measuring changes in fluorescence lifetime. PMID:24010001

  17. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Targeted and Single Particle Subcellular Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-03-12

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube.

  18. Integrative subcellular proteomic analysis allows accurate prediction of human disease-causing genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Chen, Yiyun; Bajaj, Amol Onkar; Eblimit, Aiden; Xu, Mingchu; Soens, Zachry T.; Wang, Feng; Ge, Zhongqi; Jung, Sung Yun; He, Feng; Li, Yumei; Wensel, Theodore G.; Qin, Jun; Chen, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic profiling on subcellular fractions provides invaluable information regarding both protein abundance and subcellular localization. When integrated with other data sets, it can greatly enhance our ability to predict gene function genome-wide. In this study, we performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis on the light-sensing compartment of photoreceptors called the outer segment (OS). By comparing with the protein profile obtained from the retina tissue depleted of OS, an enrichment score for each protein is calculated to quantify protein subcellular localization, and 84% accuracy is achieved compared with experimental data. By integrating the protein OS enrichment score, the protein abundance, and the retina transcriptome, the probability of a gene playing an essential function in photoreceptor cells is derived with high specificity and sensitivity. As a result, a list of genes that will likely result in human retinal disease when mutated was identified and validated by previous literature and/or animal model studies. Therefore, this new methodology demonstrates the synergy of combining subcellular fractionation proteomics with other omics data sets and is generally applicable to other tissues and diseases. PMID:26912414

  19. Subcellular Localization of Galloylated Catechins in Tea Plants [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] Assessed via Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanhuan; Wang, Ya; Chen, Yana; Zhang, Pan; Zhao, Yi; Huang, Yewei; Wang, Xuanjun; Sheng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Galloylated catechins, as the main secondary metabolites in the tea plant, including (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate and (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate, comprise approximately three-quarters of all the tea plant catechins and have stronger effects than non-galloylated catechins, both on the product quality in tea processing and the pharmacological efficacy to human beings. The subcellular localization of galloylated catechins has been the primary focus of studies that assess biosynthesis and physiological functions. Classical histochemical localization staining reagents can not specifically detect galloylated catechins; thus, their subcellular localization remains controversial. In the present study, we generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against galloylated catechins, which can be used for the subcellular localization of galloylated catechins in the tea plant by immunohistochemistry. Direct ELISA and ForteBio Octet Red 96 System assay indicated the mAb could recognize the galloylated catechins with high specificities and affinities. In addition, tea bud was ascertained as the optimal tissue for freezing microtomic sections for immunohistochemistry. What’s more, the high quality mAbs which exhibited excellent binding capability to galloylated catechins were utilized for the visualization of them via immunohistochemistry. Our findings demonstrated that vacuoles were the primary sites of localization of galloylated catechins at the subcellular level. PMID:27303422

  20. SubCellProt: predicting protein subcellular localization using machine learning approaches.

    PubMed

    Garg, Prabha; Sharma, Virag; Chaudhari, Pradeep; Roy, Nilanjan

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput genome sequencing projects continue to churn out enormous amounts of raw sequence data. However, most of this raw sequence data is unannotated and, hence, not very useful. Among the various approaches to decipher the function of a protein, one is to determine its localization. Experimental approaches for proteome annotation including determination of a protein's subcellular localizations are very costly and labor intensive. Besides the available experimental methods, in silico methods present alternative approaches to accomplish this task. Here, we present two machine learning approaches for prediction of the subcellular localization of a protein from the primary sequence information. Two machine learning algorithms, k Nearest Neighbor (k-NN) and Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) were used to classify an unknown protein into one of the 11 subcellular localizations. The final prediction is made on the basis of a consensus of the predictions made by two algorithms and a probability is assigned to it. The results indicate that the primary sequence derived features like amino acid composition, sequence order and physicochemical properties can be used to assign subcellular localization with a fair degree of accuracy. Moreover, with the enhanced accuracy of our approach and the definition of a prediction domain, this method can be used for proteome annotation in a high throughput manner. SubCellProt is available at www.databases.niper.ac.in/SubCellProt.

  1. Methods of biomedical optical imaging: from subcellular structures to tissues and organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchin, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    Optical bioimaging methods have a wide range of applications in the life sciences, most notably including the molecular resolution study of subcellular structures, small animal molecular imaging, and structural and functional clinical diagnostics of tissue layers and organs. We review fluorescent microscopy, fluorescent macroscopy, optical coherence tomography, optoacoustic tomography, and optical diffuse spectroscopy and tomography from the standpoint of physical fundamentals, applications, and progress.

  2. Critical behavior of subcellular density organization during neutrophil activation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Baker-Groberg, Sandra M.; Phillips, Kevin G.; Healy, Laura D.; Itakura, Asako; Porter, Juliana E.; Newton, Paul K.; Nan, Xiaolin; McCarty, Owen J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Physical theories of active matter continue to provide a quantitative understanding of dynamic cellular phenomena, including cell locomotion. Although various investigations of the rheology of cells have identified important viscoelastic and traction force parameters for use in these theoretical approaches, a key variable has remained elusive both in theoretical and experimental approaches: the spatiotemporal behavior of the subcellular density. The evolution of the subcellular density has been qualitatively observed for decades as it provides the source of image contrast in label-free imaging modalities (e.g., differential interference contrast, phase contrast) used to investigate cellular specimens. While these modalities directly visualize cell structure, they do not provide quantitative access to the structures being visualized. We present an established quantitative imaging approach, non-interferometric quantitative phase microscopy, to elucidate the subcellular density dynamics in neutrophils undergoing chemokinesis following uniform bacterial peptide stimulation. Through this approach, we identify a power law dependence of the neutrophil mean density on time with a critical point, suggesting a critical density is required for motility on 2D substrates. Next we elucidate a continuum law relating mean cell density, area, and total mass that is conserved during neutrophil polarization and migration. Together, our approach and quantitative findings will enable investigators to define the physics coupling cytoskeletal dynamics with subcellular density dynamics during cell migration. PMID:26640599

  3. Predicting eukaryotic protein subcellular location by fusing optimized evidence-theoretic K-Nearest Neighbor classifiers.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2006-08-01

    Facing the explosion of newly generated protein sequences in the post genomic era, we are challenged to develop an automated method for fast and reliably annotating their subcellular locations. Knowledge of subcellular locations of proteins can provide useful hints for revealing their functions and understanding how they interact with each other in cellular networking. Unfortunately, it is both expensive and time-consuming to determine the localization of an uncharacterized protein in a living cell purely based on experiments. To tackle the challenge, a novel hybridization classifier was developed by fusing many basic individual classifiers through a voting system. The "engine" of these basic classifiers was operated by the OET-KNN (Optimized Evidence-Theoretic K-Nearest Neighbor) rule. As a demonstration, predictions were performed with the fusion classifier for proteins among the following 16 localizations: (1) cell wall, (2) centriole, (3) chloroplast, (4) cyanelle, (5) cytoplasm, (6) cytoskeleton, (7) endoplasmic reticulum, (8) extracell, (9) Golgi apparatus, (10) lysosome, (11) mitochondria, (12) nucleus, (13) peroxisome, (14) plasma membrane, (15) plastid, and (16) vacuole. To get rid of redundancy and homology bias, none of the proteins investigated here had >/=25% sequence identity to any other in a same subcellular location. The overall success rates thus obtained via the jack-knife cross-validation test and independent dataset test were 81.6% and 83.7%, respectively, which were 46 approximately 63% higher than those performed by the other existing methods on the same benchmark datasets. Also, it is clearly elucidated that the overwhelmingly high success rates obtained by the fusion classifier is by no means a trivial utilization of the GO annotations as prone to be misinterpreted because there is a huge number of proteins with given accession numbers and the corresponding GO numbers, but their subcellular locations are still unknown, and that the

  4. Hypoxia elicits broad and systematic changes in protein subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Henke, Robert Michael; Dastidar, Ranita Ghosh; Shah, Ajit; Cadinu, Daniela; Yao, Xiao; Hooda, Jagmohan

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen provides a crucial energy source in eukaryotic cells. Hence, eukaryotes ranging from yeast to humans have developed sophisticated mechanisms to respond to changes in oxygen levels. Regulation of protein localization, like protein modifications, can be an effective mechanism to control protein function and activity. However, the contribution of protein localization in oxygen signaling has not been examined on a genomewide scale. Here, we examine how hypoxia affects protein distribution on a genomewide scale in the model eukaryote, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate, by live cell imaging, that hypoxia alters the cellular distribution of 203 proteins in yeast. These hypoxia-redistributed proteins include an array of proteins with important functions in various organelles. Many of them are nuclear and are components of key regulatory complexes, such as transcriptional regulatory and chromatin remodeling complexes. Under hypoxia, these proteins are synthesized and retained in the cytosol. Upon reoxygenation, they relocalize effectively to their normal cellular compartments, such as the nucleus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and cell periphery. The resumption of the normal cellular locations of many proteins can occur even when protein synthesis is inhibited. Furthermore, we show that the changes in protein distribution induced by hypoxia follow a slower trajectory than those induced by reoxygenation. These results show that the regulation of protein localization is a common and potentially dominant mechanism underlying oxygen signaling and regulation. These results may have broad implications in understanding oxygen signaling and hypoxia responses in higher eukaryotes such as humans. PMID:21753182

  5. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Babahosseini, H.; Carmichael, B.; Strobl, J.S.; Mahmoodi, S.N.; Agah, M.

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. - Highlights: • The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure using Generalized Maxwell model. • The sub-domains include membrane/cortex, cytoplasm/nucleus, and nuclear/integrin. • Biomechanics of corresponding sub-domains are compared among normal and cancer cells. • Viscoelasticity of sub-domains show a decreasing trend from normal to cancer cells. • The decreasing trend becomes most significant in the deeper sub-domain.

  6. Bile acids alter the subcellular localization of CNT2 (concentrative nucleoside cotransporter) and increase CNT2-related transport activity in liver parenchymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Huber-Ruano, Isabel; Aymerich, Ivette; Duflot, Sylvie; Casado, F. Javier; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2006-01-01

    CNT2 (concentrative nucleoside cotransporter) is a plasma membrane high-affinity Na+-coupled adenosine transporter, also localized in intracellular structures. This transporter protein may play additional roles other than nucleoside salvage, since it has recently been shown to be under purinergic control via KATP channels, by a mechanism that does not seem to involve changes in its subcellular localization. In an attempt to identify the agents that promote CNT2 trafficking, bile acids were found to increase CNT2-related transport activity in a KATP channel-independent manner in both Fao hepatoma and rat liver parenchymal cells. A maximum effect was recorded after treatment with hydrophilic anions such as TCA (taurocholate). However, this effect did not involve changes in the amount of CNT2 protein, it was instead associated with a subcellular redistribution of CNT2, resulting in an accumulation of the transporter at the plasma membrane. This was deduced from subcellular fractionation studies, biotinylation of plasma membrane proteins and subsequent CNT2 detection in streptavidin precipitates and in vivo confocal microscopic analysis of the distribution of a YFP (yellow fluorescent protein)–CNT2 construct. The induction of CNT2 translocation, triggered by TCA, was inhibited by wortmannin, dibutyryl-AMPc, PD98059 and colchicine, thus suggesting the involvement of the PI3K/ERK (phosphoinositide 3-kinase/extracellular-signal related kinase) pathway in microtubule-dependent activation of recombinant CNT2. These are novel effects of bile-acid physiology and provide the first evidence for short-term regulation of CNT2 translocation into and from the plasma membrane. PMID:16390326

  7. Phosphorylation and subcellular localization of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) are associated with altered gallbladder absorptive function after formation of cholesterol gallstones.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongsheng; Wu, Shuodong; Tian, Yu; Kong, Jing

    2017-02-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) dysfunction is thought to contribute to the altered gallbladder absorption that occurs in cholesterol gallstone disease, but the mechanism is unknown. The current study was undertaken to examine the expression, phosphorylation, and subcellular localization of NHE3 in gallbladder epithelium cells (GBECs) of male C57BL/6 mice on a control or lithogenic diet. Thirty-six 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to receive a high cholesterol diet or a regular diet for 8 weeks. Gallstone formation was recorded. Gallbladder bile cholesterol, phospholipid, and total bile acids were examined. RT-PCR was used to measure NHE3 mRNA expression. NHE3 protein expression and subcellular localization were examined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy, respectively. Gallstones were formed in all mice fed the lithogenic diet. Despite higher NHE3 mRNA expression in gallbladders of the mice on the lithogenic diet than in those on the control diet, there was no significant difference in expression of total NHE3 protein. However, a higher level of NHE3 phosphorylated at serine-552 (P-NHE3) was seen on the lithogenic diet. In immunofluorescence studies, NHE3 protein was expressed both on the apical membrane and in the cytoplasm of mouse GBEC. This pattern of subcellular distribution of NHE3 strongly corroborates an exchanger trafficking mechanism in NHE3 activity regulation in mouse GBEC. We conclude that increased phosphorylation of NHE3 following gallstone formation leads to turnover of the exchanger, resulting in decreased gallbladder concentrating function.

  8. Subcellular dynamics of type II PKA in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Haining; Sia, Gek-Ming; Sato, Takashi R.; Gray, Noah W.; Mao, Tianyi; Khuchua, Zaza; Huganir, Richard L.; Svoboda, Karel

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein kinase A (PKA) plays multiple roles in neurons. The localization and specificity of PKA are largely controlled by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). However, the dynamics of PKA in neurons, and the roles of specific AKAPs, are poorly understood. We imaged the distribution of type II PKA in hippocampal and cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in vitro and in vivo. PKA was concentrated in dendritic shafts compared to the soma, axons and dendritic spines. This spatial distribution was imposed by the microtubule-binding protein MAP2, indicating that MAP2 is the dominant AKAP in neurons. Following cAMP elevation, catalytic subunits dissociated from the MAP2-tethered regulatory subunits and rapidly moved to become enriched in nearby spines. The spatial gradient of type II PKA between dendritic shafts and spines was critical for the regulation of synaptic strength and long-term potentiation. The localization and activity-dependent translocation of type II PKA are therefore important determinants of PKA function. PMID:19447092

  9. Subcellular immunocytochemical analysis detects the highest concentrations of glutathione in mitochondria and not in plastids.

    PubMed

    Zechmann, B; Mauch, F; Sticher, L; Müller, M

    2008-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is a major antioxidant and redox buffer with multiple roles in plant metabolism. Glutathione biosynthesis is restricted to the cytosol and the plastids and the product is distributed to the various organelles by unknown mechanisms. In the present study immunogold cytochemistry based on anti-glutathione antisera and transmission electron microscopy was used to determine the relative concentration of glutathione in different organelles of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and root cells. Glutathione-specific labelling was detected in all cellular compartments except the apoplast and the vacuole. The highest glutathione content was surprisingly not found in plastids, which have been described before as a major site of glutathione accumulation, but in mitochondria which lack the capacity for glutathione biosynthesis. Mitochondria of both leaf and root cells contained 7-fold and 4-fold, respectively, higher glutathione levels than plastids while the density of glutathione labelling in the cytosol, nuclei, and peroxisomes was intermediate. The accuracy of the glutathione labelling is supported by two observations. First, pre-adsorption of the anti-glutathione antisera with glutathione reduced the density of the gold particles in all organelles to background levels. Second, the overall glutathione-labelling density was reduced by about 90% in leaves of the glutathione-deficient Arabidopsis mutant pad2-1 and increased in transgenic plants with enhanced glutathione accumulation. Hence, there was a strong correlation between immunocytochemical and biochemical data of glutathione accumulation. Interestingly, the glutathione labelling of mitochondria in pad2-1 remained very similar to wild-type plants thus suggesting that the high mitochondrial glutathione content is maintained in a situation of permanent glutathione-deficiency at the expense of other glutathione pools. High and constant levels of glutathione in mitochondria appear to be particularly

  10. Subcellular immunocytochemical analysis detects the highest concentrations of glutathione in mitochondria and not in plastids

    PubMed Central

    Zechmann, B.; Mauch, F.; Sticher, L.; Müller, M.

    2008-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is a major antioxidant and redox buffer with multiple roles in plant metabolism. Glutathione biosynthesis is restricted to the cytosol and the plastids and the product is distributed to the various organelles by unknown mechanisms. In the present study immunogold cytochemistry based on anti-glutathione antisera and transmission electron microscopy was used to determine the relative concentration of glutathione in different organelles of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and root cells. Glutathione-specific labelling was detected in all cellular compartments except the apoplast and the vacuole. The highest glutathione content was surprisingly not found in plastids, which have been described before as a major site of glutathione accumulation, but in mitochondria which lack the capacity for glutathione biosynthesis. Mitochondria of both leaf and root cells contained 7-fold and 4-fold, respectively, higher glutathione levels than plastids while the density of glutathione labelling in the cytosol, nuclei, and peroxisomes was intermediate. The accuracy of the glutathione labelling is supported by two observations. First, pre-adsorption of the anti-glutathione antisera with glutathione reduced the density of the gold particles in all organelles to background levels. Second, the overall glutathione-labelling density was reduced by about 90% in leaves of the glutathione-deficient Arabidopsis mutant pad2-1 and increased in transgenic plants with enhanced glutathione accumulation. Hence, there was a strong correlation between immunocytochemical and biochemical data of glutathione accumulation. Interestingly, the glutathione labelling of mitochondria in pad2-1 remained very similar to wild-type plants thus suggesting that the high mitochondrial glutathione content is maintained in a situation of permanent glutathione-deficiency at the expense of other glutathione pools. High and constant levels of glutathione in mitochondria appear to be particularly

  11. Altered subcellular localization of ornithine decarboxylase in Alzheimer's disease brain

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Tatjana . E-mail: Tatjana.Nilsson@ki.se; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Volkman, Inga; Winblad, Bengt; Folkesson, Ronnie; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2006-06-02

    The amyloid precursor protein can through ligand-mimicking induce expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. We report here the regional distribution and cellular localization of ODC immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. In frontal cortex and hippocampus of control cases, the most pronounced ODC immunoreactivity was found in the nucleus. In possible and definite AD the immunoreactivity had shifted to the cytoplasm. In cerebellum of control cases, ODC staining was found in a small portion of Purkinje cells, mostly in the nucleus. In AD, both possible and definite, the number of stained Purkinje cells increased significantly and immunoreactivity was shifted to the cytoplasm, even though it was still prominent in the nucleus. In conclusion, our study reveals an early shift of the ODC immunoreactivity in AD from the nuclear compartment towards the cytoplasm.

  12. Subcellular organization of UBE3A in neurons.

    PubMed

    Burette, Alain C; Judson, Matthew C; Burette, Susan; Phend, Kristen D; Philpot, Benjamin D; Weinberg, Richard J

    2017-02-01

    Ubiquitination regulates a broad array of cellular processes, and defective ubiquitination is implicated in several neurological disorders. Loss of the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome. Despite its clinical importance, the normal role of UBE3A in neurons is still unclear. As a step toward deciphering its possible functions, we performed high-resolution light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. We report a broad distribution of UBE3A in neurons, highlighted by concentrations in axon terminals and euchromatin-rich nuclear domains. Our findings suggest that UBE3A may act locally to regulate individual synapses while also mediating global, neuronwide influences through the regulation of gene transcription. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:233-251, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Three-dimensional mid-infrared tomographic imaging of endogenous and exogenous molecules in a single intact cell with subcellular resolution.

    PubMed

    Quaroni, Luca; Obst, Martin; Nowak, Marcus; Zobi, Fabio

    2015-01-02

    Microscopy in the mid-infrared spectral range provides detailed chemical information on a sample at moderate spatial resolution and is being used increasingly in the characterization of biological entities as challenging as single cells. However, a conventional cellular 2D imaging measurement is limited in its ability to associate specific compositional information to subcellular structures because of the interference from the complex topography of the sample. Herein we provide a method and protocols that overcome this challenge in which tilt-series infrared tomography is used with a standard benchtop infrared microscope. This approach gives access to the quantitative 3D distribution of molecular components based on the intrinsic contrast provided by the sample. We demonstrate the method by quantifying the distribution of an exogenous metal carbonyl complex throughout the cell and by reporting changes in its coordination sphere in different locations in the cell.

  14. Iron in seeds – loading pathways and subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Grillet, Louis; Mari, Stéphane; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is one of the most abundant elements on earth, but its limited bioavailability poses a major constraint for agriculture and constitutes a serious problem in human health. Due to an improved understanding of the mechanisms that control Fe homeostasis in plants, major advances toward engineering biofortified crops have been made during the past decade. Examples of successful biofortification strategies are, however, still scarce and the process of Fe loading into seeds is far from being well understood in most crop species. In particular in grains where the embryo represents the main storage compartment such as legumes, increasing the seed Fe content remains a challenging task. This review aims at placing the recently identified actors in Fe transport into the unsolved puzzle of grain filling, taking the differences of Fe distribution between various species into consideration. We summarize the current knowledge on Fe transport between symplasmic and apoplasmic compartments, and provide models for Fe trafficking and localization in different seed types that may help to develop high seed Fe germplasms. PMID:24427161

  15. Subcellular probes for neurochemical recording from multiple brain sites.

    PubMed

    Schwerdt, Helen N; Kim, Min Jung; Amemori, Satoko; Homma, Daigo; Yoshida, Tomoko; Shimazu, Hideki; Yerramreddy, Harshita; Karasan, Ekin; Langer, Robert; Graybiel, Ann M; Cima, Michael J

    2017-03-14

    Dysregulation of neurochemicals, in particular, dopamine, is epitomized in numerous debilitating disorders that impair normal movement and mood aspects of our everyday behavior. Neurochemical transmission is a neuron-specific process, and further exhibits region-specific signaling in the brain. Tools are needed to monitor the heterogeneous spatiotemporal dynamics of dopamine neurotransmission without compromising the physiological processes of the neuronal environment. We developed neurochemical probes that are ten times smaller than any existing dopamine sensor, based on the size of the entire implanted shaft and its sensing tip. The microfabricated probe occupies a spatial footprint (9 μm) coordinate with the average size of individual neuronal cells (∼10 μm). These cellular-scale probes were shown to reduce inflammatory response of the implanted brain tissue environment. The probes are further configured in the form of a microarray to permit electrochemical sampling of dopamine and other neurotransmitters at unprecedented spatial densities and distributions. Dopamine recording was performed concurrently from up to 16 sites in the striatum of rats, revealing a remarkable spatiotemporal contrast in dopamine transmission as well as site-specific pharmacological modulation. Collectively, the reported platform endeavors to enable high density mapping of the chemical messengers fundamentally involved in neuronal communication through the use of minimally invasive probes that help preserve the neuronal viability of the implant environment.

  16. (3H)-isoproterenol binding to subcellular fractions of mouse parotid: relationship to cyclic nucleotide formation and the stimulation of DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Durham, J P; Galanti, N

    1976-12-01

    (3H) Isoproterenol binding to subcellular fractions of mouse parotid: Relationship to cyclic nucleotide formation and the stimulation of DNA synthesis. (Unión the (3H) Isoproterenol a fracciones subcelulares de parótida de ratón y su relacón con la formacón de nucleótidos cíclicos y la estimulación de la síntesis de DNA). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 105-114, 1976. Tritiated isoproterenol binds to all subcellular fractions of mouse parotid but 70% of the binding is to the nuclear fraction. Binding to other mouse tissues was less than to the parotid. The patterns of binding did not correlate with the distribution of adenylate cyclase, guanylate cyclase or catechol-O-methyl transferase among the fractions or tissues nor with the extent of response in stimulation of DNA synthesis among the tissues. Inhibition of (3H) Isoproterenol binding to parotid fractions by catecholamine analogs was studied. There was no correlation between their ability to inhibit binding and the ability of the analogs themselves to raise cyclic AMP levels or stimulate DNA synthesis.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of phylogeny, expression profile and sub-cellular localization of SKP1-Like genes in wild tomato.

    PubMed

    Zhang, YueQin; Wang, CuiPing; Lin, QingFang; Gao, FengHua; Ma, Yan; Zhang, Min; Lin, YueHui; Ma, QingHu; Hua, XueJun

    2015-09-01

    SKP1 is a core component of SCF complex, a major type of E3 ubiquitin ligase catalyzing the last step in ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathway. In present study, SKP1 gene family in Solanum pimpinellifolium (SSK), a wild species of tomato, was investigated. A total of 19 SSK genes were identified through homologous search. Their chromosomal locations, gene structures, phylogeny, expression profiles, sub-cellular localizations and protein-protein interaction patterns with putative F-box proteins were analyzed in detail. The high homology and similar expression patterns among clustered SSK genes in chromosome suggested that they may have evolved from duplication events and are functionally redundant. Sub-cellular localization indicated that most of the SSK proteins are distributed in both cytosol and nucleus, except for SSK8, which is detected in cytosol only. Tissue-specific expression patterns suggested that many SSK genes may be involved in tomato fruit development. Furthermore, several SSK genes were found to be responsive to heat stress and salicylic acid treatment. Based on phylogenetic analysis, expression profiles and protein interaction property, we proposed that tomato SSK1 and SSK2 might have similar function to ASK1 and ASK2 in Arabidopsis.

  18. Subcellular Localization, Stability, and trans-Cleavage Competence of the Hepatitis C Virus NS3-NS4A Complex Expressed in Tetracycline-Regulated Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wölk, Benno; Sansonno, Domenico; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Dammacco, Franco; Rice, Charles M.; Blum, Hubert E.; Moradpour, Darius

    2000-01-01

    A tetracycline-regulated gene expression system and a panel of novel monoclonal antibodies were used to examine the subcellular localization, stability, and trans-cleavage competence of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3-NS4A complex in inducible cell lines. The NS3 serine protease domain and the full-length NS3 protein expressed in the absence of the NS4A cofactor were diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Coexpression of NS4A, however, directed NS3 to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or an ER-like modified compartment, as demonstrated by colocalization with 3,3′-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide, protein disulfide isomerase, and calnexin, as well as subcellular fractionation analyses. In addition, coexpression with NS4A dramatically increased the intracellular stability of NS3 (mean protein half-life of 26 versus 3 h) and allowed for NS4A-dependent trans-cleavage at the NS4B-NS5A junction. Deletion analyses revealed that the hydrophobic amino-terminal domain of NS4A was required for ER targeting of NS3. These results demonstrate the importance of studying HCV proteins in their biological context and define a well-characterized cell culture system for further analyses of the NS3-NS4A complex and the evaluation of novel antiviral strategies against hepatitis C. PMID:10666260

  19. Non-Catalytic RISCs and Kinetics Determine Mammalian siRNA Sub-Cellular Localization.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fengmin; Liu, Lianyun; Tien, Ya-Hsin; Peng, Yi-Hsien; Lee, Hoong-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are fundamental to the regulation of cell function. Much is known about its gene interfering mechanism, but a kinetic description of it is still lacking. Here, we derived a set of reaction-diffusion equations for multiple RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) pathways that give quantitative temporal and spatial descriptions of the siRNA process in mammalian cell, and are able to correctly describe all salient experimentally observed patterns of sub-cellular siRNA localization, including those that, at first glance, appear irreconcilable. These results suggest siRNA sub-cellular localization mainly concerns the non-catalytic RISC-target complex, and is caused by the selectiveness of RISC-target interaction and the permeability of the nuclear membrane to siRNA strands but not to RISC-target complexes. Our method is expected to be useful in devising RNAi based cell regulation strategies.

  20. The dynamic subcellular localization of ERK: mechanisms of translocation and role in various organelles.

    PubMed

    Wainstein, Ehud; Seger, Rony

    2016-04-01

    The dynamic subcellular localization of ERK in resting and stimulated cells plays an important role in its regulation. In resting cells, ERK localizes in the cytoplasm, and upon stimulation, it translocates to its target substrates and organelles. ERK signaling initiated from different places in resting cells has distinct outcomes. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of ERK1/2 translocation to the nucleus and mitochondria, and of ERK1c to the Golgi. We also show that ERK1/2 translocation to the nucleus is a useful anti cancer target. Unraveling the complex subcellular localization of ERK and its dynamic changes upon stimulation provides a better understanding of the regulation of ERK signaling and may result in the development of new strategies to combat ERK-related diseases.

  1. LOCALIZER: subcellular localization prediction of both plant and effector proteins in the plant cell

    PubMed Central

    Sperschneider, Jana; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; DeBoer, Kathleen; Petre, Benjamin; Gardiner, Donald M.; Singh, Karam B.; Dodds, Peter N.; Taylor, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogens secrete effector proteins and many operate inside plant cells to enable infection. Some effectors have been found to enter subcellular compartments by mimicking host targeting sequences. Although many computational methods exist to predict plant protein subcellular localization, they perform poorly for effectors. We introduce LOCALIZER for predicting plant and effector protein localization to chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nuclei. LOCALIZER shows greater prediction accuracy for chloroplast and mitochondrial targeting compared to other methods for 652 plant proteins. For 107 eukaryotic effectors, LOCALIZER outperforms other methods and predicts a previously unrecognized chloroplast transit peptide for the ToxA effector, which we show translocates into tobacco chloroplasts. Secretome-wide predictions and confocal microscopy reveal that rust fungi might have evolved multiple effectors that target chloroplasts or nuclei. LOCALIZER is the first method for predicting effector localisation in plants and is a valuable tool for prioritizing effector candidates for functional investigations. LOCALIZER is available at http://localizer.csiro.au/. PMID:28300209

  2. Direct Imaging of Single Cells and Tissue at Subcellular Spatial Resolution Using Transmission Geometry MALDI MS

    PubMed Central

    Zavalin, Andre; Todd, Erik M.; Rawhouser, Patrick D.; Yang, Junhai; Norris, Jeremy L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    The need of cellular and sub-cellular spatial resolution in LDI / MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) necessitates micron and sub-micron laser spot sizes at biologically relevant sensitivities, introducing significant challenges for MS technology. To this end we have developed a transmission geometry vacuum ion source that allows the laser beam to irradiate the back side of the sample. This arrangement obviates the mechanical / ion optic complications in the source by completely separating the optical lens and ion optic structures. We have experimentally demonstrated the viability of transmission geometry MALDI MS for imaging biological tissues and cells with sub-cellular spatial resolution. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in conjunction with new sample preparation protocols, the sensitivity of this instrument is sufficient to obtain molecular images at sub-micron spatial resolution. PMID:23147833

  3. Subcellular compartmentalization of saccharide moieties in cultured normal and malignant cells

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    We studied subcellular localization of saccharide moieties in cultured normal and malignant cells fixed in paraformaldehyde and treated with a nonionic detergent, using lectins specific for various surgar residues as probes in fluorescence microscopy. In normal cells, concanavalin A and Lens culinaris agglutinin, specific for mannose-rich carbohydrate cores in glycoproteins, labeled the endoplasmic reticulum as a wide perinuclear region. Other lectins, on the other hand, stained the Golgi apparatus as a juxtanuclear reticular structure. A similar compartmentalization was also seen in all malignant cells studied, although the Golgi apparatus in these cells was distinctly vesicular in appearance. Our results indicate that saccharide moieties in both normal and malignant cells are similarly compartmentalized, and thus speak in favor of a unidirectional subcellular flow for both membrane and secreted glycoconjugates. PMID:7372714

  4. Subcellular compartmentalization of saccharide moieties in cultured normal and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, I; Ekblom, P; Laurila, P

    1980-05-01

    We studied subcellular localization of saccharide moieties in cultured normal and malignant cells fixed in paraformaldehyde and treated with a nonionic detergent, using lectins specific for various surgar residues as probes in fluorescence microscopy. In normal cells, concanavalin A and Lens culinaris agglutinin, specific for mannose-rich carbohydrate cores in glycoproteins, labeled the endoplasmic reticulum as a wide perinuclear region. Other lectins, on the other hand, stained the Golgi apparatus as a juxtanuclear reticular structure. A similar compartmentalization was also seen in all malignant cells studied, although the Golgi apparatus in these cells was distinctly vesicular in appearance. Our results indicate that saccharide moieties in both normal and malignant cells are similarly compartmentalized, and thus speak in favor of a unidirectional subcellular flow for both membrane and secreted glycoconjugates.

  5. Subcellular Imaging of Voltage and Calcium Signals Reveals Neural Processing In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Helen H; St-Pierre, François; Sun, Xulu; Ding, Xiaozhe; Lin, Michael Z; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2016-06-30

    A mechanistic understanding of neural computation requires determining how information is processed as it passes through neurons and across synapses. However, it has been challenging to measure membrane potential changes in axons and dendrites in vivo. We use in vivo, two-photon imaging of novel genetically encoded voltage indicators, as well as calcium imaging, to measure sensory stimulus-evoked signals in the Drosophila visual system with subcellular resolution. Across synapses, we find major transformations in the kinetics, amplitude, and sign of voltage responses to light. We also describe distinct relationships between voltage and calcium signals in different neuronal compartments, a substrate for local computation. Finally, we demonstrate that ON and OFF selectivity, a key feature of visual processing across species, emerges through the transformation of membrane potential into intracellular calcium concentration. By imaging voltage and calcium signals to map information flow with subcellular resolution, we illuminate where and how critical computations arise.

  6. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Srijana; Xu, Xinping; Lowry, David; Jackson, Jennifer C; Roberson, Robert W; Lin, Xiaorong

    2016-03-22

    Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes.

  7. Emergent cell and tissue dynamics from subcellular modeling of active biomechanical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandersius, S. A.; Weijer, C. J.; Newman, T. J.

    2011-08-01

    Cells and the tissues they form are not passive material bodies. Cells change their behavior in response to external biochemical and biomechanical cues. Behavioral changes, such as morphological deformation, proliferation and migration, are striking in many multicellular processes such as morphogenesis, wound healing and cancer progression. Cell-based modeling of these phenomena requires algorithms that can capture active cell behavior and their emergent tissue-level phenotypes. In this paper, we report on extensions of the subcellular element model to model active biomechanical subcellular processes. These processes lead to emergent cell and tissue level phenotypes at larger scales, including (i) adaptive shape deformations in cells responding to slow stretching, (ii) viscous flow of embryonic tissues, and (iii) streaming patterns of chemotactic cells in epithelial-like sheets. In each case, we connect our simulation results to recent experiments.

  8. Apparatus and method for measuring single cell and sub-cellular photosynthetic efficiency

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Ryan Wesley; Singh, Seema; Wu, Huawen

    2013-07-09

    Devices for measuring single cell changes in photosynthetic efficiency in algal aquaculture are disclosed that include a combination of modulated LED trans-illumination of different intensities with synchronized through objective laser illumination and confocal detection. Synchronization and intensity modulation of a dual illumination scheme were provided using a custom microcontroller for a laser beam block and constant current LED driver. Therefore, single whole cell photosynthetic efficiency, and subcellular (diffraction limited) photosynthetic efficiency measurement modes are permitted. Wide field rapid light scanning actinic illumination is provided for both by an intensity modulated 470 nm LED. For the whole cell photosynthetic efficiency measurement, the same LED provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. For the subcellular photosynthetic efficiency measurement, a switched through objective 488 nm laser provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. A second near IR LED is employed to generate dark adapted states in the system under study.

  9. 'Unite and conquer': enhanced prediction of protein subcellular localization by integrating multiple specialized tools

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yao Qing; Burger, Gertraud

    2007-01-01

    Background Knowing the subcellular location of proteins provides clues to their function as well as the interconnectivity of biological processes. Dozens of tools are available for predicting protein location in the eukaryotic cell. Each tool performs well on certain data sets, but their predictions often disagree for a given protein. Since the individual tools each have particular strengths, we set out to integrate them in a way that optimally exploits their potential. The method we present here is applicable to various subcellular locations, but tailored for predicting whether or not a protein is localized in mitochondria. Knowledge of the mitochondrial proteome is relevant to understanding the role of this organelle in global cellular processes. Results In order to develop a method for enhanced prediction of subcellular localization, we integrated the outputs of available localization prediction tools by several strategies, and tested the performance of each strategy with known mitochondrial proteins. The accuracy obtained (up to 92%) surpasses by far the individual tools. The method of integration proved crucial to the performance. For the prediction of mitochondrion-located proteins, integration via a two-layer decision tree clearly outperforms simpler methods, as it allows emphasis of biologically relevant features such as the mitochondrial targeting peptide and transmembrane domains. Conclusion We developed an approach that enhances the prediction accuracy of mitochondrial proteins by uniting the strength of specialized tools. The combination of machine-learning based integration with biological expert knowledge leads to improved performance. This approach also alleviates the conundrum of how to choose between conflicting predictions. Our approach is easy to implement, and applicable to predicting subcellular locations other than mitochondria, as well as other biological features. For a trial of our approach, we provide a webservice for mitochondrial protein

  10. A Ca2+-stimulated, Mg2+-dependent ATPase activity in subcellular fractions from Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Cunha, V M; de Souza, W; Noël, F

    1988-12-05

    A Ca2+-stimulated, Mg2+-dependent ATPase activity was found in subcellular fractions from Schistosoma mansoni. Its specific and relative activities were higher in the heterogeneous cuticle fraction and in the microsomal fraction. The K0.5 for ATPase activation by free Ca2+ was 0.2-0.5 microM. This is the first description of an ATPase activity stimulated by Ca2+ in the micromolar range in S. mansoni.

  11. SLocX: Predicting Subcellular Localization of Arabidopsis Proteins Leveraging Gene Expression Data.

    PubMed

    Ryngajllo, Malgorzata; Childs, Liam; Lohse, Marc; Giorgi, Federico M; Lude, Anja; Selbig, Joachim; Usadel, Björn

    2011-01-01

    Despite the growing volume of experimentally validated knowledge about the subcellular localization of plant proteins, a well performing in silico prediction tool is still a necessity. Existing tools, which employ information derived from protein sequence alone, offer limited accuracy and/or rely on full sequence availability. We explored whether gene expression profiling data can be harnessed to enhance prediction performance. To achieve this, we trained several support vector machines to predict the subcellular localization of Arabidopsis thaliana proteins using sequence derived information, expression behavior, or a combination of these data and compared their predictive performance through a cross-validation test. We show that gene expression carries information about the subcellular localization not available in sequence information, yielding dramatic benefits for plastid localization prediction, and some notable improvements for other compartments such as the mitochondrion, the Golgi, and the plasma membrane. Based on these results, we constructed a novel subcellular localization prediction engine, SLocX, combining gene expression profiling data with protein sequence-based information. We then validated the results of this engine using an independent test set of annotated proteins and a transient expression of GFP fusion proteins. Here, we present the prediction framework and a website of predicted localizations for Arabidopsis. The relatively good accuracy of our prediction engine, even in cases where only partial protein sequence is available (e.g., in sequences lacking the N-terminal region), offers a promising opportunity for similar application to non-sequenced or poorly annotated plant species. Although the prediction scope of our method is currently limited by the availability of expression information on the ATH1 array, we believe that the advances in measuring gene expression technology will make our method applicable for all Arabidopsis proteins.

  12. Tissue polarity genes of Drosophila regulate the subcellular location for prehair initiation in pupal wing cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The Drosophila wing is decorated with a regular array of distally pointing hairs. In the pupal wing, the hairs are formed from micro- villus like prehairs that contain large bundles of actin filaments. The distal orientation of the actin bundles reveals the proximal-distal polarity within the pupal wing epithelium. We have used F-actin staining to examine early stages of prehair development in both wild- type and mutant pupal wings. We have found a striking correlation between hair polarity and the subcellular location for assembly of the prehair. In a wild-type wing, all of the distally pointing hairs are derived from prehairs that are formed at the distal vertex of the hexagonally shaped pupal wing cells. Mutations in six tissue polarity genes result in abnormal hair polarity on the adult wing, and all also alter the subcellular location for prehair initiation. Based on their cellular phenotypes, we can place these six genes into three phenotypic groups. Double mutant analysis indicates that these phenotypic groups correspond to epistasis groups. This suggests that the tissue polarity genes function in or on a pathway that controls hair polarity by regulating the subcellular location for prehair formation. PMID:8408199

  13. Subcellular targeting and cytoskeletal attachment of SAP97 to the epithelial lateral membrane.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Reuver, S M; Kuhlendahl, S; Chung, W J; Garner, C C

    1998-08-01

    The synapse-associated protein SAP97 is a member of a novel family of cortical cytoskeletal proteins involved in the localization of ion channels at such membrane specializations as synaptic junctions. These multidomain proteins have binding sites for protein 4.1, GKAPs/SAPAPs, voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels and cell-adhesion molecules containing C-terminal T/SXV motifs. In this study, we evaluated the contribution of individual domains in SAP97 to its selective recruitment and attachment to the cortical cytoskeleton in epithelial cells. We find that the PDZ, SH3 and GK domains, as well as the I3 insert in SAP97, are not essential for subcellular targeting, though both PDZ1-2 domains and the I3 insert affect the efficiency of localization. Instead, we show that the first 65 amino acid residues in SAP97, which are absent from SAP90/PSD-95 and SAP102, direct the selective subcellular localization and can mediate at least one point of attachment of SAP97 to the cytoskeleton assembled at sites of cell-cell contact. Our data demonstrate that it is the sequences unique to SAP97 that direct its subcellular targeting to the epithelial lateral membrane.

  14. A Comprehensive Subcellular Proteomic Survey of Salmonella Grown under Phagosome-Mimicking versus Standard Laboratory Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Sanford, James A.; Park, Jea H.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Champion, Boyd L.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2012-06-01

    Towards developing a systems-level pathobiological understanding of Salmonella enterica, we performed a subcellular proteomic analysis of this pathogen grown under standard laboratory and infection-mimicking conditions in vitro. Analysis of proteins from cytoplasmic, inner membrane, periplasmic, and outer membrane fractions yielded coverage of over 30% of the theoretical proteome. Confident subcellular location could be assigned to over 1000 proteins, with good agreement between experimentally observed location and predicted/known protein properties. Comparison of protein location under the different environmental conditions provided insight into dynamic protein localization and possible moonlighting (multiple function) activities. Notable examples of dynamic localization were the response regulators of two-component regulatory systems (e.g., ArcB, PhoQ). The DNA-binding protein Dps that is generally regarded as cytoplasmic was significantly enriched in the outer membrane for all growth conditions examined, suggestive of moonlighting activities. These observations imply the existence of unknown transport mechanisms and novel functions for a subset of Salmonella proteins. Overall, this work provides a catalog of experimentally verified subcellular protein location for Salmonella and a framework for further investigations using computational modeling.

  15. iTRAQ-based quantitative subcellular proteomic analysis of Avibirnavirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanting; Hu, Boli; Fan, Chengfei; Jia, Lu; Zhang, Yina; Du, Aifang; Zheng, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Jiyong

    2015-07-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) enters the host cells via endocytic pathway to achieve viral replication in the cytoplasm. Here, we performed LC-MS/MS coupled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification labeling of differentially abundant proteins of IBDV-infected cells using a subcellular fractionation strategy. We show that the viral infection regulates the abundance and/or subcellular localization of 3211 proteins during early infection. In total, 23 cellular proteins in the cytoplasmic proteome and 34 in the nuclear proteome were significantly altered after virus infection. These differentially abundant proteins are involved in such biological processes as immune response, signal transduction, RNA processing, macromolecular biosynthesis, energy metabolism, virus binding, and cellular apoptosis. Moreover, transcriptional profiles of the 25 genes corresponding to the identified proteins were analyzed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis clustered the differentially abundant proteins primarily into the mTOR pathway, PI3K/Akt pathway, and interferon-β signaling cascades. Confocal microscopy showed colocalization of the viral protein VP3 with host proteins heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1, nuclear factor 45, apoptosis inhibitor 5, nuclear protein localization protein 4 and DEAD-box RNA helicase 42 during the virus infection. Together, these identified subcellular constituents provide important information for understanding host-IBDV interactions and underlying mechanisms of IBDV infection and pathogenesis.

  16. Origin and evolution of metabolic sub-cellular compartmentalization in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Gabaldón, Toni; Pittis, Alexandros A

    2015-12-01

    A high level of subcellular compartmentalization is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. This intricate internal organization was present already in the common ancestor of all extant eukaryotes, and the determination of the origins and early evolution of the different organelles remains largely elusive. Organellar proteomes are determined through regulated pathways that target proteins produced in the cytosol to their final subcellular destinations. This internal sorting of proteins can vary across different physiological conditions, cell types and lineages. Evolutionary retargeting - the alteration of a subcellular localization of a protein in the course of evolution - has been rampant in eukaryotes and involves any possible combination of organelles. This fact adds another layer of difficulty to the reconstruction of the origins and evolution of organelles. In this review we discuss current themes in relation to the origin and evolution of organellar proteomes. Throughout the text, a special focus is set on the evolution of mitochondrial and peroxisomal proteomes, which are two organelles for which extensive proteomic and evolutionary studies have been performed.

  17. Subcellular Localization of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato Effector Proteins in Plants.

    PubMed

    Aung, Kyaw; Xin, Xiufang; Mecey, Christy; He, Sheng Yang

    2017-01-01

    Animal and plant pathogenic bacteria use type III secretion systems to translocate proteinaceous effectors to subvert innate immunity of their host organisms. Type III secretion/effector systems are a crucial pathogenicity factor in many bacterial pathogens of plants and animals. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 injects a total of 36 protein effectors that target a variety of host proteins. Studies of a subset of Pst DC3000 effectors demonstrated that bacterial effectors, once inside the host cell, are localized to different subcellular compartments, including plasma membrane, cytoplasm, mitochondria, chloroplast, and Trans-Golgi network, to carry out their virulence functions. Identifying the subcellular localization of bacterial effector proteins in host cells could provide substantial clues to understanding the molecular and cellular basis of the virulence activities of effector proteins. In this chapter, we present methods for transient or stable expression of bacterial effector proteins in tobacco and/or Arabidopsis thaliana for live cell imaging as well as confirming the subcellular localization in plants using fluorescent organelle markers or chemical treatment.

  18. Origin and evolution of metabolic sub-cellular compartmentalization in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Gabaldón, Toni; Pittis, Alexandros A.

    2015-01-01

    A high level of subcellular compartmentalization is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. This intricate internal organization was present already in the common ancestor of all extant eukaryotes, and the determination of the origins and early evolution of the different organelles remains largely elusive. Organellar proteomes are determined through regulated pathways that target proteins produced in the cytosol to their final subcellular destinations. This internal sorting of proteins can vary across different physiological conditions, cell types and lineages. Evolutionary retargeting – the alteration of a subcellular localization of a protein in the course of evolution – has been rampant in eukaryotes and involves any possible combination of organelles. This fact adds another layer of difficulty to the reconstruction of the origins and evolution of organelles. In this review we discuss current themes in relation to the origin and evolution of organellar proteomes. Throughout the text, a special focus is set on the evolution of mitochondrial and peroxisomal proteomes, which are two organelles for which extensive proteomic and evolutionary studies have been performed. PMID:25869000

  19. Subcellular location for the formation of the retinol/retinol-binding protein complex in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Crumbaugh, L.M.; Green, E.L.; Smith, J.E.

    1986-03-01

    Retinol complexes with retinol-binding protein (RBP) within the hepatocyte, however the subcellular location where complex formation occurs has not previously been identified. A model similar to that of lipoproteins formation has been hypothesized. The authors have identified the initial site of retinol/RBP complex formation. Furthermore, the authors have elucidated the progression of the complex through the subcellular organelles. Intravenous injections of /sup 3/H-retinol suspended in Tween 40 were administered to vitamin A depleted rats. After intervals of 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 minutes the rat livers were removed and fractions enriched in rough and smooth microsomes and Golgi apparatus were prepared. Extracts of these subcellular fractions were chromatographed on Sephadex G-100. Simultaneous elution of /sup 3/H-retinol and immunoreactive RBP indicated the presence of the complex. The retinol/RBP complex was observed in rough microsomes 2 minute after the injection of /sup 3/H-retinal. The complex appeared subsequently in smooth microsomes and Golgi apparatus. The complex was first detected serum around 10 minutes after injection. Based on the data, they believe that the retinol/RBP complex formation occurs in rough microsomes.

  20. Isotope labeling of rubisco subunits provides in vivo information on subcellular biosynthesis and exchange of amino acids between compartments.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The architecture of plant metabolism includes substantial duplication of metabolite pools and enzyme catalyzed reactions in different subcellular compartments. This poses considerable challenges for understanding the regulation of metabolism particularly in primary metabolism and amino acid biosynth...

  1. Subcellular targets of cadmium nephrotoxicity: cadmium binding to renal membrane proteins in animals with or without protective metallothionein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Nordberg, G F; Jin, T; Nordberg, M

    1994-01-01

    Nephrotoxic effects of cadmium exposure are well established in humans and experimental animals. An early manifestation of such toxicity is calciuria a few hours after injection of CdMT in rats. Protection against calciuria and other adverse effects such as proteinuria (occurring later) is offered by pretreatment with Cd, which effectively induces metallothionein synthesis. In the present experiment, one group of animals was given pretreatment with CdCl2 to induce metallothionein synthesis. The comparison group was left without pretreatment. The distribution of Cd from a normally nephrotoxic dose of 109CdMT was studied by gel chromatography in subcellular fractions of kidney cortex in both groups. In the pretreated animals, 109Cd in the plasma membrane and microsome fractions of renal cortical cells was mainly bound to metallothionein and other low molecular weight proteins at 4 hr. In nonpretreated animals the major part of 109Cd was bound to high molecular weight proteins. These findings indicate that membrane proteins may be important targets for Cd when inducing nephrotoxicity and that sequestering of Cd by metallothionein (and other low molecular weight proteins) may be a mechanism of protection. PMID:7843096

  2. A moving ParA gradient on the nucleoid directs subcellular cargo transport via a chemophoresis force.

    PubMed

    Vecchiarelli, Anthony G; Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    DNA segregation is a critical process for all life, and although there is a relatively good understanding of eukaryotic mitosis, the mechanism in bacteria remains unclear. The small size of a bacterial cell and the number of factors involved in its subcellular organization make it difficult to study individual systems under controlled conditions in vivo. We developed a cell-free technique to reconstitute and visualize bacterial ParA-mediated segregation systems. Our studies provide direct evidence for a mode of transport that does not use a classical cytoskeletal filament or motor protein. Instead, we demonstrate that ParA-type DNA segregation systems can establish a propagating ParA ATPase gradient on the nucleoid surface, which generates the force required for the directed movement of spatially confined cargoes, such as plasmids or large organelles, and distributes multiple cargos equidistant to each other inside cells. Here we present the critical principles of our diffusion-ratchet model of ParA-mediated transport and expand on the mathematically derived chemophoresis force using experimentally-determined biochemical and cellular parameters.

  3. Effect of cadmium on the physiological parameters and the subcellular cadmium localization in the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongyu; Chen, Zhifan; Sun, Ke; Yan, Dong; Kang, Mingjie; Zhao, Ye

    2013-11-01

    The pollution of agricultural soils with cadmium (Cd) has become a serious problem worldwide. The potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) was used to investigate how different concentrations of Cd (1, 5, and 25mgkg(-1)) affected the physiological parameters and the subcellular distribution of Cd in the potato. The analyses were conducted using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX). The results suggest that the leaf is the organ with the highest accumulation of Cd. The malondialdehyde (MDA) content increased and the chlorophyll content decreased in response to high level of Cd. The SEM-EDX microanalysis revealed that Cd was primarily deposited in the spongy and palisade tissues of the leaf. Furthermore, Cd was also detected in the cortex and the adjacent phloem and was observed inside the intercellular space, the interior surface of the plasma membrane, and on the surface of the elliptical starch granules in the tubers of the potato. Although low concentrations of Cd migrated from the root to the tuber, the accumulation of Cd in the tuber exceeded the standard for food security. Therefore, the planting of potato plants in farmland containing Cd should be seriously evaluated because Cd-containing potatoes might present high health risk to humans.

  4. Tissue-specific accumulation of cadmium in subcellular compartments of eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica Gmelin (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Sokolova, I M; Ringwood, A H; Johnson, C

    2005-09-10

    Cadmium distribution was studied in different subcellular fractions of gill and hepatopancreas tissues of eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica. Oysters were exposed for up to 21 days to low sublethal Cd concentrations (25 microg L(-1)). Gill and hepatopancreas tissues were sampled and divided into organelle fractions and cytosol by differential centrifugation. Organelle content of different fractions was verified by activities of marker enzymes, citrate synthase and acid phosphatase for mitochondria and lysosomes, respectively. In both tissue types, there was a significant accumulation of cadmium in cytosol reaching 230-350 ng mg(-1) protein. Among organelles, mitochondria were the main target for Cd bioaccumulation in gills (250-300 ng mg(-1) protein), whereas in hepatopancreas tissues, the highest cadmium accumulation occurred in lysosomes (90-94 ng mg(-1) protein). Although 75-83% of total cadmium burden was associated with the cytosol reflecting high volume fraction of this compartment, Cd concentrations in organelle fractions reached levels that could cause dysfunction of mitochondria and lysosomes. Organ- and organelle-specific patterns of cadmium bioaccumulation support our previous in vivo studies, which showed adverse effects of cadmium exposures on mitochondrial oxidation in gills and on the lysosomal system of hepatopancreas. This may have important implications for the development of biomarkers of effect for heavy metals and for understanding the mechanisms of toxic effects of metals.

  5. Use of fluorescently labelled calmodulins as tools to measure subcellular calmodulin activation in living dorsal root ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Milikan, J M; Bolsover, S R

    2000-01-01

    We have used fluorescently labelled calmodulins to probe the activity of calmodulin in living dorsal root ganglion cells. Calmodulin labelled with the fluorophore 5-([4,6 dichlorotriazin-2yl]amino)-fluorescein (FL-CaM) does not change its fluorescence when it binds calcium, while calmodulin labelled at lysine 75 with 2-chloro-(6-(4-N,N-diethylamino-phenyl)-1,4,5-triazin-4-yl (TA-CaM), an environment-sensitive probe, increases its fluorescence when it binds calcium. We micro-injected FL-CaM or TA-CaM into rat dorsal root ganglion cells and found that both probes localise to the cell nucleus. In contrast, endogenous cellular calmodulin, in dorsal root ganglion cells as in hippocampal neurones, is predominantly cytosolic unless the neurones are depolarised, then it moves to the nucleus. FL-CaM and TA-CaM, introduced into dorsal root ganglion cells via a patch pipette, also immediately move to the nucleus, indicating that the nuclear localisation is a property of the labelled calmodulins. Although the subcellular distribution of FL-CaM and TA-CaM does not necessarily match that of endogenous calmodulin, we show that FL-CaM can be used as a control for TA-CaM when studying calmodulin activation in different cellular compartments.

  6. Long-Term Two-Photon Calcium Imaging of Neuronal Populations with Subcellular Resolution in Adult Non-human Primates.

    PubMed

    Sadakane, Osamu; Masamizu, Yoshito; Watakabe, Akiya; Terada, Shin-Ichiro; Ohtsuka, Masanari; Takaji, Masafumi; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Ozawa, Keiya; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Matsuzaki, Masanori; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2015-12-01

    Two-photon imaging with genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) enables long-term observation of neuronal activity in vivo. However, there are very few studies of GECIs in primates. Here, we report a method for long-term imaging of a GECI, GCaMP6f, expressed from adeno-associated virus vectors in cortical neurons of the adult common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a small New World primate. We used a tetracycline-inducible expression system to robustly amplify neuronal GCaMP6f expression and up- and downregulate it for more than 100 days. We succeeded in monitoring spontaneous activity not only from hundreds of neurons three-dimensionally distributed in layers 2 and 3 but also from single dendrites and axons in layer 1. Furthermore, we detected selective activities from somata, dendrites, and axons in the somatosensory cortex responding to specific tactile stimuli. Our results provide a way to investigate the organization and plasticity of cortical microcircuits at subcellular resolution in non-human primates.

  7. Noninvasive identification of subcellular organization and nuclear morphology features associated with leukemic cells using light-scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Austin; Hunter, Martin; Greiner, Cherry; Gupta, Sharad; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2011-03-01

    Leukemia is the most common and deadly cancer among children and one of the most prevalent cancers among adults. Improvements in its diagnosis and monitoring of leukemic patients could have a significant impact in their long-term treatment. We demonstrate that light-scattering spectroscopy (LSS)-based approaches could serve as a tool to achieve this goal. Specifically, we characterize the light scattering properties of leukemic (NALM-6) cells and compare them to those of normal lymphocytes and granulocytes in the 440-710 nm range, over +/-4 deg about the exact backscattering direction. We find that the LSS spectra are well described by an inverse power-law wavelength dependence, with a power exponent insensitive to the scattering angle but significantly higher for leukemic cells than for normal leukocytes. This is consistent with differences in the subcellular morphology of these cells, detected in differential interference contrast images. Furthermore, the residual light-scattering signal, extracted after subtracting the inverse power-law fit from the data, can be analyzed assuming a Gaussian distribution of spherical scatterers using Mie theory. This analysis yields scatterer sizes that are consistent with the diameters of cell nuclei and allows the detection of the larger nuclei of NALM-6 cells compared to those of lymphocytes and granulocytes.

  8. Subcellular fractionation and localization studies reveal a direct interaction of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) with nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mohamed S; Nouri, Kazem; Milroy, Lech G; Moll, Jens M; Herrmann, Christian; Brunsveld, Luc; Piekorz, Roland P; Ahmadian, Mohammad R

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) is a well-known regulator of local translation of its mRNA targets in neurons. However, despite its ubiquitous expression, the role of FMRP remains ill-defined in other cell types. In this study we investigated the subcellular distribution of FMRP and its protein complexes in HeLa cells using confocal imaging as well as detergent-free fractionation and size exclusion protocols. We found FMRP localized exclusively to solid compartments, including cytosolic heavy and light membranes, mitochondria, nuclear membrane and nucleoli. Interestingly, FMRP was associated with nucleolin in both a high molecular weight ribosomal and translation-associated complex (≥6 MDa) in the cytosol, and a low molecular weight complex (∼200 kDa) in the nucleoli. Consistently, we identified two functional nucleolar localization signals (NoLSs) in FMRP that are responsible for a strong nucleolar colocalization of the C-terminus of FMRP with nucleolin, and a direct interaction of the N-terminus of FMRP with the arginine-glycine-glycine (RGG) domain of nucleolin. Taken together, we propose a novel mechanism by which a transient nucleolar localization of FMRP underlies a strong nucleocytoplasmic translocation, most likely in a complex with nucleolin and possibly ribosomes, in order to regulate translation of its target mRNAs.

  9. A study of SeqA subcellular localization in Escherichia coli using photo-activated localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mika, Jacek T; Vanhecke, Aster; Dedecker, Peter; Swings, Toon; Vangindertael, Jeroen; Van den Bergh, Bram; Michiels, Jan; Hofkens, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells replicate their genome once per cell cycle to pass on genetic information to the daughter cells. The SeqA protein binds the origin of replication, oriC, after DNA replication initiation and sequesters it from new initiations in order to prevent overinitiation. Conventional fluorescence microscopy studies of SeqA localization in bacterial cells have shown that the protein is localized to discrete foci. In this study we have used photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) to determine the localization of SeqA molecules, tagged with fluorescent proteins, with a localization precision of 20-30 nm with the aim to visualize the SeqA subcellular structures in more detail than previously possible. SeqA-PAmCherry was imaged in wild type E. coli, expressed from plasmid or genetically engineered into the bacterial genome, replacing the native seqA gene. Unsynchronized cells as well as cells with a synchronized cell cycle were imaged at various time points, in order to investigate the evolution of SeqA localization during the cell cycle. We found that SeqA indeed localized into discrete foci but these were not the only subcellular localizations of the protein. A significant amount of SeqA-PAmCherry molecules was localized outside the foci and in a fraction of cells we saw patterns indicating localization at the membrane. Using quantitative PALM, we counted protein copy numbers per cell, protein copy numbers per focus, the numbers of foci per cell and the sizes of the SeqA clusters. The data showed broad cell-to-cell variation and we did not observe a correlation between SeqA-PAmCherry protein numbers and the cell cycle under the experimental conditions of this study. The numbers of SeqA-PAmCherry molecules per focus as well as the foci sizes also showed broad distributions indicating that the foci are likely not characterized by a fixed number of molecules. We also imaged an E. coli strain devoid of the dam methylase (Δdam) and observed

  10. Hum-PLoc: a novel ensemble classifier for predicting human protein subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2006-08-18

    Predicting subcellular localization of human proteins is a challenging problem, especially when unknown query proteins do not have significant homology to proteins of known subcellular locations and when more locations need to be covered. To tackle the challenge, protein samples are expressed by hybridizing the gene ontology (GO) database and amphiphilic pseudo amino acid composition (PseAA). Based on such a representation frame, a novel ensemble classifier, called "Hum-PLoc", was developed by fusing many basic individual classifiers through a voting system. The "engine" of these basic classifiers was operated by the KNN (K-nearest neighbor) rule. As a demonstration, tests were performed with the ensemble classifier for human proteins among the following 12 locations: (1) centriole; (2) cytoplasm; (3) cytoskeleton; (4) endoplasmic reticulum; (5) extracell; (6) Golgi apparatus; (7) lysosome; (8) microsome; (9) mitochondrion; (10) nucleus; (11) peroxisome; (12) plasma membrane. To get rid of redundancy and homology bias, none of the proteins investigated here had > or = 25% sequence identity to any other in a same subcellular location. The overall success rates thus obtained via the jackknife cross-validation test and independent dataset test were 81.1% and 85.0%, respectively, which are more than 50% higher than those obtained by the other existing methods on the same stringent datasets. Furthermore, an incisive and compelling analysis was given to elucidate that the overwhelmingly high success rate obtained by the new predictor is by no means due to a trivial utilization of the GO annotations. This is because, for those proteins with "subcellular location unknown" annotation in Swiss-Prot database, most (more than 99%) of their corresponding GO numbers in GO database are also annotated with "cellular component unknown". The information and clues for predicting subcellular locations of proteins are actually buried into a series of tedious GO numbers, just like they

  11. Convergence of the target of rapamycin and the Snf1 protein kinase pathways in the regulation of the subcellular localization of Msn2, a transcriptional activator of STRE (Stress Response Element)-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Mayordomo, Isabel; Estruch, Francisco; Sanz, Pascual

    2002-09-20

    The subcellular localization of Msn2, a transcriptional activator of STRE (stress response element)-regulated genes, is modulated by carbon source availability. In cells growing in glucose, Msn2 is located mainly in the cytosol, whereas in carbon source-starved cells, Msn2 is located largely inside the nucleus. However, in cells lacking Reg1 (the regulatory subunit of the Reg1/Glc7 protein phosphatase complex), the regulation of subcellular distribution is absent, Msn2 being constitutively present in the cytosol. The localization defect in these mutants is specific for carbon starvation stress, and it is because of the presence of an abnormally active Snf1 protein kinase that inhibits the nuclear localization of Msn2 upon carbon starvation. Active Snf1 kinase is also able to avoid the effects of rapamycin, a drug that by inhibiting the TOR kinase pathway leads to a nuclear localization of Msn2 in wild type cells. Therefore, active Snf1 and the TOR kinase pathway may affect similar cytosolic steps in the regulation of the subcellular localization of Msn2.

  12. Analytical study of microsomes and isolated subcellular membranes from rat liver. V. Immunological localization of cytochrome b5 by electron microscopy: methodology and application to various subcellular fractions

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The localization of cytochrome b5 on the membranes of various subcellular organelles of rat liver was studied by a cytoimmunological procedure using anti-cytochrome b5/anti-ferritin hybrid antibodies and ferritin as label. For this study, highly purified and biochemically characterized membrane preparations were employed. Outer mitochondrial membranes were found to be heavily labeled by the hybrid antibodies whereas Golgi and plasma membranes were not marked by the reagent. Peroxisome membranes were moderately labeled by the hybrid antibodies, suggesting that they may contain some cytochrome b5. The preparation and purification of hybrid antibodies without peptic digestion is described and an analysis made of the composition of the final reagent product. PMID:791954

  13. Spectrin βV adaptive mutations and changes in subcellular location correlate with emergence of hair cell electromotility in mammalians.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Matteo; Papal, Samantha; Pisciottano, Francisco; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Petit, Christine; Franchini, Lucia Florencia; El-Amraoui, Aziz

    2017-02-21

    The remarkable hearing capacities of mammals arise from various evolutionary innovations. These include the cochlear outer hair cells and their singular feature, somatic electromotility, i.e., the ability of their cylindrical cell body to shorten and elongate upon cell depolarization and hyperpolarization, respectively. To shed light on the processes underlying the emergence of electromotility, we focused on the βV giant spectrin, a major component of the outer hair cells' cortical cytoskeleton. We identified strong signatures of adaptive evolution at multiple sites along the spectrin-βV amino acid sequence in the lineage leading to mammals, together with substantial differences in the subcellular location of this protein between the frog and the mouse inner ear hair cells. In frog hair cells, spectrin βV was invariably detected near the apical junctional complex and above the cuticular plate, a dense F-actin meshwork located underneath the apical plasma membrane. In the mouse, the protein had a broad punctate cytoplasmic distribution in the vestibular hair cells, whereas it was detected in the entire lateral wall of cochlear outer hair cells and had an intermediary distribution (both cytoplasmic and cortical, but restricted to the cell apical region) in cochlear inner hair cells. Our results support a scenario where the singular organization of the outer hair cells' cortical cytoskeleton may have emerged from molecular networks initially involved in membrane trafficking, which were present near the apical junctional complex in the hair cells of mammalian ancestors and would have subsequently expanded to the entire lateral wall in outer hair cells.

  14. Spectrin βV adaptive mutations and changes in subcellular location correlate with emergence of hair cell electromotility in mammalians

    PubMed Central

    Cortese, Matteo; Papal, Samantha; Pisciottano, Francisco; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Petit, Christine; Franchini, Lucia Florencia; El-Amraoui, Aziz

    2017-01-01

    The remarkable hearing capacities of mammals arise from various evolutionary innovations. These include the cochlear outer hair cells and their singular feature, somatic electromotility, i.e., the ability of their cylindrical cell body to shorten and elongate upon cell depolarization and hyperpolarization, respectively. To shed light on the processes underlying the emergence of electromotility, we focused on the βV giant spectrin, a major component of the outer hair cells' cortical cytoskeleton. We identified strong signatures of adaptive evolution at multiple sites along the spectrin-βV amino acid sequence in the lineage leading to mammals, together with substantial differences in the subcellular location of this protein between the frog and the mouse inner ear hair cells. In frog hair cells, spectrin βV was invariably detected near the apical junctional complex and above the cuticular plate, a dense F-actin meshwork located underneath the apical plasma membrane. In the mouse, the protein had a broad punctate cytoplasmic distribution in the vestibular hair cells, whereas it was detected in the entire lateral wall of cochlear outer hair cells and had an intermediary distribution (both cytoplasmic and cortical, but restricted to the cell apical region) in cochlear inner hair cells. Our results support a scenario where the singular organization of the outer hair cells’ cortical cytoskeleton may have emerged from molecular networks initially involved in membrane trafficking, which were present near the apical junctional complex in the hair cells of mammalian ancestors and would have subsequently expanded to the entire lateral wall in outer hair cells. PMID:28179572

  15. Subcellular localization of (latent) transforming growth factor beta and the latent TGF-beta binding protein in rat hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Roth-Eichhorn, S; Kühl, K; Gressner, A M

    1998-12-01

    Recently, the existence of the large latent transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) complex, consisting of TGF-beta, the N-terminal part of its precursor (latency-associated peptide [LAP]), and the latent TGF-beta binding protein (LTBP), was demonstrated in rat liver parenchymal cells (PC) and stellate cells (HSC). However, in contrast to HSC, in freshly isolated PC, no message of these proteins is detectable. This study was performed to investigate the subcellular distribution of the proteins forming the latent TGF-beta complex in PC and HSC from rat liver to obtain more information about their origin and potential intracellular functions. PC and HSC were isolated from rat liver by protease reperfusion and investigated for TGF-beta1,-2,-3, beta1-LAP, and LTBP-1 after cultivation using double-immunofluorescent staining, followed by high-resolution confocal microscopic analysis. Subcellular fractions obtained by standard differential centrifugation of rat liver homogenate were analyzed using a TGF-beta1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting for beta1-LAP and LTBP-1. By confocal microscopy, a diffuse distribution of TGF-beta and LAP in the cytoplasm of PC is noticed, whereas the LTBP immunostaining predominates at plasma membranes. In PC, distinct intracellular granules were superimposed with TGF-beta, LAP, and LTBP stainings identified as lysosomal compartments and mitochondria by ELISA and immunoblotting of subcellular fractions. In HSC, stainings of colocalized TGF-beta, LAP, and LTBP are strongest in the perinuclear area, indicating synthesis and secretion via endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, respectively. Partially, the proteins were also found in HSC nuclei. During the transformation of HSC to myofibroblasts, LAP and LTBP become strongly colocalized with other components of the cytoskeletal network like smooth muscle--actin, desmin, and talin. The results confirm biochemical data about the existence and expression of the large latent

  16. Integrating Subcellular Location for Improving Machine Learning Models of Remote Homology Detection in Eukaryotic Organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Anuj R.; Oehmen, Chris S.; Harper, Jill K.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2007-02-23

    Motivation: At the center of bioinformatics, genomics, and pro-teomics is the need for highly accurate genome annotations. Producing high-quality reliable annotations depends on identifying sequences which are related evolutionarily (homologs) on which to infer function. Homology detection is one of the oldest tasks in bioinformatics, however most approaches still fail when presented with sequences that have low residue similarity despite a distant evolutionary relationship (remote homology). Recently, discriminative approaches, such as support vector machines (SVMs) have demonstrated a vast improvement in sensitivity for remote homology detection. These methods however have only focused on one aspect of the sequence at a time, e.g., sequence similarity or motif based scores. However, supplementary information, such as the sub-cellular location of a protein within the cell would give further clues as to possible homologous pairs, additionally eliminating false relationships due to simple functional roles that cannot exist due to location. We have developed a method, SVM-SimLoc that integrates sub-cellular location with sequence similarity information into a pro-tein family classifier and compared it to one of the most accurate sequence based SVM approaches, SVM-Pairwise. Results: The SCOP 1.53 benchmark data set was utilized to assess the performance of SVM-SimLoc. As cellular location prediction is dependent upon the type of sequence, eukaryotic or prokaryotic, the analysis is restricted to the 2630 eukaryotic sequences in the benchmark dataset, evaluating a total of 27 protein families. We demonstrate that the integration of sequence similarity and sub-cellular location yields notably more accurate results than using sequence similarity independently at a significance level of 0.006.

  17. Raman micro spectroscopy for in vitro drug screening: subcellular localisation and interactions of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Farhane, Z; Bonnier, F; Casey, A; Byrne, H J

    2015-06-21

    Vibrational spectroscopy, including Raman micro spectroscopy, has been widely used over the last few years to explore potential biomedical applications. Indeed, Raman micro spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a powerful non-invasive tool in cancer diagnosis and monitoring. In confocal microscopic mode, the technique is also a molecularly specific analytical tool with optical resolution which has potential applications in subcellular analysis of biochemical processes, and therefore as an in vitro screening tool of the efficacy and mode of action of, for example, chemotherapeutic agents. In order to demonstrate and explore the potential in this field, established, model chemotherapeutic agents can be valuable. In this study paper, Raman micro spectroscopy coupled with confocal microscopy were used for the localization and tracking of the commercially available drug, doxorubicin (DOX), in the intracellular environment of the lung cancer cell line, A549. Cytotoxicity assays were employed to establish clinically relevant drug doses for 24 h exposure, and Confocal Laser Scanning Fluorescence Microscopy was conducted in parallel with Raman micro spectroscopy profiling to confirm the drug internalisation and localisation. Multivariate statistical analysis, consisting of PCA (principal components analysis) was used to highlight doxorubicin interaction with cancer cells and spectral variations due to its effects before and after DOX spectral features subtraction from nuclear and nucleolar spectra, were compared to non-exposed control spectra. Results show that Raman micro spectroscopy is not only able to detect doxorubicin inside cells and profile its specific subcellular localisation, but, it is also capable of elucidating the local biomolecular changes elicited by the drug, differentiating the responses in different sub cellular regions. Further analysis clearly demonstrates the early apoptotic effect in the nuclear regions and the initial responses of cells to this

  18. Brain glycogen—new perspectives on its metabolic function and regulation at the subcellular level

    PubMed Central

    Obel, Linea F.; Müller, Margit S.; Walls, Anne B.; Sickmann, Helle M.; Bak, Lasse K.; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia. In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies—it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms underlying glycogen metabolism. Based on (1) the compartmentation of the interconnected second messenger pathways controlling glycogen metabolism (calcium and cAMP), (2) alterations in the subcellular location of glycogen-associated enzymes and proteins induced by the metabolic status and (3) a sequential component in the intermolecular mechanisms of glycogen metabolism, we suggest that glycogen metabolism in astrocytes is compartmentalized at the subcellular level. As a consequence, the meaning and importance of conventional terms used to describe glycogen metabolism (e.g., turnover) is challenged. Overall, this review represents an overview of contemporary knowledge about brain glycogen and its metabolism and function. However, it also has a sharp focus on what we do not know, which is perhaps even more important for the future quest of uncovering the roles of glycogen in brain physiology and pathology. PMID:22403540

  19. Subcellular real-time in vivo imaging of intralymphatic and intravascular cancer-cell trafficking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, M.; Hayashi, K.; Kaushal, S.; Bouvet, M.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2008-02-01

    With the use of fluorescent cells labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus and red fluorescent protein (RFP) in the cytoplasm and a highly sensitive small animal imaging system with both macro-optics and micro-optics, we have developed subcellular real-time imaging of cancer cell trafficking in live mice. Dual-color cancer cells were injected by a vascular route in an abdominal skin flap in nude mice. The mice were imaged with an Olympus OV100 small animal imaging system with a sensitive CCD camera and four objective lenses, parcentered and parfocal, enabling imaging from macrocellular to subcellular. We observed the nuclear and cytoplasmic behavior of cancer cells in real time in blood vessels as they moved by various means or adhered to the vessel surface in the abdominal skin flap. During extravasation, real-time dual-color imaging showed that cytoplasmic processes of the cancer cells exited the vessels first, with nuclei following along the cytoplasmic projections. Both cytoplasm and nuclei underwent deformation during extravasation. Different cancer cell lines seemed to strongly vary in their ability to extravasate. We have also developed real-time imaging of cancer cell trafficking in lymphatic vessels. Cancer cells labeled with GFP and/or RFP were injected into the inguinal lymph node of nude mice. The labeled cancer cells trafficked through lymphatic vessels where they were imaged via a skin flap in real-time at the cellular level until they entered the axillary lymph node. The bright dual-color fluorescence of the cancer cells and the real-time microscopic imaging capability of the Olympus OV100 enabled imaging the trafficking cancer cells in both blood vessels and lymphatics. With the dual-color cancer cells and the highly sensitive imaging system described here, the subcellular dynamics of cancer metastasis can now be observed in live mice in real time.

  20. Subcellular localization of Arabidopsis 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed

    Leivar, Pablo; González, Víctor M; Castel, Susanna; Trelease, Richard N; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Arró, Montserrat; Boronat, Albert; Campos, Narciso; Ferrer, Albert; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    Plants produce diverse isoprenoids, which are synthesized in plastids, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and the nonorganellar cytoplasm. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the synthesis of mevalonate, a rate-limiting step in the cytoplasmic pathway. Several branches of the pathway lead to the synthesis of structurally and functionally varied, yet essential, isoprenoids. Several HMGR isoforms have been identified in all plants examined. Studies based on gene expression and on fractionation of enzyme activity suggested that subcellular compartmentalization of HMGR is an important intracellular channeling mechanism for the production of the specific classes of isoprenoids. Plant HMGR has been shown previously to insert in vitro into the membrane of microsomal vesicles, but the final in vivo subcellular localization(s) remains controversial. To address the latter in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cells, we conducted a multipronged microscopy and cell fractionation approach that included imaging of chimeric HMGR green fluorescent protein localizations in transiently transformed cell leaves, immunofluorescence confocal microscopy in wild-type and stably transformed seedlings, immunogold electron microscopy examinations of endogenous HMGR in seedling cotyledons, and sucrose density gradient analyses of HMGR-containing organelles. Taken together, the results reveal that endogenous Arabidopsis HMGR is localized at steady state within ER as expected, but surprisingly also predominantly within spherical, vesicular structures that range from 0.2- to 0.6-microm diameter, located in the cytoplasm and within the central vacuole in differentiated cotyledon cells. The N-terminal region, including the transmembrane domain of HMGR, was found to be necessary and sufficient for directing HMGR to ER and the spherical structures. It is believed, although not directly demonstrated, that these vesicle-like structures are derived from segments of

  1. Subcellular Localization of Arabidopsis 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase1

    PubMed Central

    Leivar, Pablo; González, Víctor M.; Castel, Susanna; Trelease, Richard N.; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Arró, Montserrat; Boronat, Albert; Campos, Narciso; Ferrer, Albert; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    Plants produce diverse isoprenoids, which are synthesized in plastids, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and the nonorganellar cytoplasm. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the synthesis of mevalonate, a rate-limiting step in the cytoplasmic pathway. Several branches of the pathway lead to the synthesis of structurally and functionally varied, yet essential, isoprenoids. Several HMGR isoforms have been identified in all plants examined. Studies based on gene expression and on fractionation of enzyme activity suggested that subcellular compartmentalization of HMGR is an important intracellular channeling mechanism for the production of the specific classes of isoprenoids. Plant HMGR has been shown previously to insert in vitro into the membrane of microsomal vesicles, but the final in vivo subcellular localization(s) remains controversial. To address the latter in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cells, we conducted a multipronged microscopy and cell fractionation approach that included imaging of chimeric HMGR green fluorescent protein localizations in transiently transformed cell leaves, immunofluorescence confocal microscopy in wild-type and stably transformed seedlings, immunogold electron microscopy examinations of endogenous HMGR in seedling cotyledons, and sucrose density gradient analyses of HMGR-containing organelles. Taken together, the results reveal that endogenous Arabidopsis HMGR is localized at steady state within ER as expected, but surprisingly also predominantly within spherical, vesicular structures that range from 0.2- to 0.6-μm diameter, located in the cytoplasm and within the central vacuole in differentiated cotyledon cells. The N-terminal region, including the transmembrane domain of HMGR, was found to be necessary and sufficient for directing HMGR to ER and the spherical structures. It is believed, although not directly demonstrated, that these vesicle-like structures are derived from segments of HMGR

  2. Metabolic Interplay between Peroxisomes and Other Subcellular Organelles Including Mitochondria and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Waterham, Hans R.; Ferdinandusse, Sacha

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomes are unique subcellular organelles which play an indispensable role in several key metabolic pathways which include: (1.) etherphospholipid biosynthesis; (2.) fatty acid beta-oxidation; (3.) bile acid synthesis; (4.) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) synthesis; (5.) fatty acid alpha-oxidation; (6.) glyoxylate metabolism; (7.) amino acid degradation, and (8.) ROS/RNS metabolism. The importance of peroxisomes for human health and development is exemplified by the existence of a large number of inborn errors of peroxisome metabolism in which there is an impairment in one or more of the metabolic functions of peroxisomes. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of affected patients differ depending upon the enzyme which is deficient and the extent of the deficiency, the disorders involved are usually (very) severe diseases with neurological dysfunction and early death in many of them. With respect to the role of peroxisomes in metabolism it is clear that peroxisomes are dependent on the functional interplay with other subcellular organelles to sustain their role in metabolism. Indeed, whereas mitochondria can oxidize fatty acids all the way to CO2 and H2O, peroxisomes are only able to chain-shorten fatty acids and the end products of peroxisomal beta-oxidation need to be shuttled to mitochondria for full oxidation to CO2 and H2O. Furthermore, NADH is generated during beta-oxidation in peroxisomes and beta-oxidation can only continue if peroxisomes are equipped with a mechanism to reoxidize NADH back to NAD+, which is now known to be mediated by specific NAD(H)-redox shuttles. In this paper we describe the current state of knowledge about the functional interplay between peroxisomes and other subcellular compartments notably the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum for each of the metabolic pathways in which peroxisomes are involved. PMID:26858947

  3. Neuronal ClC-3 Splice Variants Differ in Subcellular Localizations, but Mediate Identical Transport Functions.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Raul E; Miranda-Laferte, Erick; Franzen, Arne; Fahlke, Christoph

    2015-10-23

    ClC-3 is a member of the CLC family of anion channels and transporters, for which multiple functional properties and subcellular localizations have been reported. Since alternative splicing often results in proteins with diverse properties, we investigated to what extent alternative splicing might influence subcellular targeting and function of ClC-3. We identified three alternatively spliced ClC-3 isoforms, ClC-3a, ClC-3b, and ClC-3c, in mouse brain, with ClC-3c being the predominant splice variant. Whereas ClC-3a and ClC-3b are present in late endosomes/lysosomes, ClC-3c is targeted to recycling endosomes via a novel N-terminal isoleucine-proline (IP) motif. Surface membrane insertion of a fraction of ClC-3c transporters permitted electrophysiological characterization of this splice variant through whole-cell patch clamping on transfected mammalian cells. In contrast, neutralization of the N-terminal dileucine-like motifs was required for functional analysis of ClC-3a and ClC-3b. Heterologous expression of ClC-3a or ClC-3b carrying mutations in N-terminal dileucine motifs as well as WTClC-3c in HEK293T cells resulted in outwardly rectifying Cl(-) currents with significant capacitive current components. We conclude that alternative splicing of Clcn3 results in proteins with different subcellular localizations, but leaves the transport function of the proteins unaffected.

  4. Neuronal ClC-3 Splice Variants Differ in Subcellular Localizations, but Mediate Identical Transport Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Raul E.; Miranda-Laferte, Erick; Franzen, Arne; Fahlke, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ClC-3 is a member of the CLC family of anion channels and transporters, for which multiple functional properties and subcellular localizations have been reported. Since alternative splicing often results in proteins with diverse properties, we investigated to what extent alternative splicing might influence subcellular targeting and function of ClC-3. We identified three alternatively spliced ClC-3 isoforms, ClC-3a, ClC-3b, and ClC-3c, in mouse brain, with ClC-3c being the predominant splice variant. Whereas ClC-3a and ClC-3b are present in late endosomes/lysosomes, ClC-3c is targeted to recycling endosomes via a novel N-terminal isoleucine-proline (IP) motif. Surface membrane insertion of a fraction of ClC-3c transporters permitted electrophysiological characterization of this splice variant through whole-cell patch clamping on transfected mammalian cells. In contrast, neutralization of the N-terminal dileucine-like motifs was required for functional analysis of ClC-3a and ClC-3b. Heterologous expression of ClC-3a or ClC-3b carrying mutations in N-terminal dileucine motifs as well as WTClC-3c in HEK293T cells resulted in outwardly rectifying Cl− currents with significant capacitive current components. We conclude that alternative splicing of Clcn3 results in proteins with different subcellular localizations, but leaves the transport function of the proteins unaffected. PMID:26342074

  5. Non-Linear Dynamics of Cardiac Alternans: Subcellular to Tissue-Level Mechanisms of Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Gaeta, Stephen A.; Christini, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac repolarization alternans is a rhythm disturbance of the heart in which rapid stimulation elicits a beat-to-beat alternation in the duration of action potentials and magnitude of intracellular calcium transients in individual cardiac myocytes. Although this phenomenon has been identified as a potential precursor to dangerous reentrant arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, significant uncertainty remains regarding its mechanism and no clinically practical means of halting its occurrence or progression currently exists. Cardiac alternans has well-characterized tissue, cellular, and subcellular manifestations, the mechanisms and interplay of which are an active area of research. PMID:22783195

  6. Transformation of tobacco plants by Yali PPO-GFP fusion gene and observation of subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Li, Gui-Qin; Dong, Zhen; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    To explore the subcellular localization of Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) from Pyrus bretschneideri, the 1779 bp cDNA of PPO gene excluding the termination codon TAA was cloned and fused with GFP to construct a binary vector pBI121-PPO-GFP. Then, the binary vector was transformed into Nicotiana tabacum by the tumefanciens-mediated method. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, green fluorescent signals were localized in chloroplasts of the transformed Nicotiana tabacum cell, suggesting that the Polyphenol oxidase from Pyrus bretschneideri was a chloroplast protein.

  7. Subcellular compartmentalization of Cd and Zn in two bivalves. II. Significance of trophically available metal (TAM)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, W.G.; Luoma, S.N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines how the subcellular partitioning of Cd and Zn in the bivalves Macoma balthica and Potamocorbula amurensis may affect the trophic transfer of metal to predators. Results show that the partitioning of metals to organelles, 'enzymes' and metallothioneins (MT) comprise a subcellular compartment containing trophically available metal (TAM; i.e. metal trophically available to predators), and that because this partitioning varies with species, animal size and metal, TAM is similarly influenced. Clams from San Francisco Bay, California, were exposed for 14 d to 3.5 ??g 1-1 Cd and 20.5 ??g 1-1 Zn, including 109Cd and 65Zn as radiotracers, and were used in feeding experiments with grass shrimp Palaemon macrodatylus, or used to investigate the subcellular partitioning of metal. Grass shrimp fed Cd-contaminated P. amurensis absorbed ???60% of ingested Cd, which was in accordance with the partitioning of Cd to the bivalve's TAM compartment (i.e. Cd associated with organelles, 'enzymes' and MT); a similar relationship was found in previous studies with grass shrimp fed Cd-contaminated oligochaetes. Thus, TAM may be used as a tool to predict the trophic transfer of at least Cd. Subcellular fractionation revealed that ???34% of both the Cd and Zn accumulated by M. balthica was associated with TAM, while partitioning to TAM in P. amurensis was metal-dependent (???60% for TAM-Cd%, ???73% for TAM-Zn%). The greater TAM-Cd% of P. amurensis than M. balthica is due to preferential binding of Cd to MT and 'enzymes', while enhanced TAM-Zn% of P. amurensis results from a greater binding of Zn to organelles. TAM for most species-metal combinations was size-dependent, decreasing with increased clam size. Based on field data, it is estimated that of the 2 bivalves, P. amurensis poses the greater threat of Cd exposure to predators because of higher tissue concentrations and greater partitioning as TAM; exposure of Zn to predators would be similar between these species.

  8. Subcellular chemical and morphological analysis by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis techniques

    PubMed Central

    D’Arco, Annalisa; Brancati, Nadia; Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; Indolfi, Maurizio; Frucci, Maria; Sirleto, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The visualization of heterogeneous morphology, segmentation and quantification of image features is a crucial point for nonlinear optics microscopy applications, spanning from imaging of living cells or tissues to biomedical diagnostic. In this paper, a methodology combining stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis technique is presented. The basic idea is to join the potential of vibrational contrast of stimulated Raman scattering and the strength of imaging analysis technique in order to delineate subcellular morphology with chemical specificity. Validation tests on label free imaging of polystyrene-beads and of adipocyte cells are reported and discussed. PMID:27231626

  9. Challenges of biological sample preparation for SIMS imaging of elements and molecules at subcellular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2008-12-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging techniques capable of subcellular resolution characterization of elements and molecules are becoming valuable tools in many areas of biology and medicine. Due to high vacuum requirements of SIMS, the live cells cannot be analyzed directly in the instrument. The sample preparation, therefore, plays a critical role in preserving the native chemical composition for SIMS analysis. This work focuses on the evaluation of frozen-hydrated and frozen freeze-dried sample preparations for SIMS studies of cultured cells with a CAMECA IMS-3f dynamic SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing SIMS images with a spatial resolution of 500 nm. The sandwich freeze-fracture method was used for fracturing the cells. The complimentary fracture planes in the plasma membrane were characterized by field-emission secondary electron microscopy (FESEM) in the frozen-hydrated state. The cells fractured at the dorsal surface were used for SIMS analysis. The frozen-hydrated SIMS analysis of individual cells under dynamic primary ion beam (O 2+) revealed local secondary ion signal enhancements correlated with the water image signals of 19(H 3O) +. A preferential removal of water from the frozen cell matrix in the Z-axis was also observed. These complications render the frozen-hydrated sample type less desirable for subcellular dynamic SIMS studies. The freeze-drying of frozen-hydrated cells, either inside the instrument or externally in a freeze-drier, allowed SIMS imaging of subcellular chemical composition. Morphological evaluations of fractured freeze-dried cells with SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed well-preserved mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and stress fibers. SIMS analysis of fractured freeze-dried cells revealed well-preserved chemical composition of even the most highly diffusible ions like K + and Na + in physiologically relevant concentrations. The high K-low Na signature in individual cells

  10. Subcellular Investigation of Photosynthesis-Driven Carbon Assimilation in the Symbiotic Reef Coral Pocillopora damicornis

    PubMed Central

    Domart-Coulon, Isabelle; Escrig, Stephane; Humbel, Bruno M.; Hignette, Michel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Reef-building corals form essential, mutualistic endosymbiotic associations with photosynthetic Symbiodinium dinoflagellates, providing their animal host partner with photosynthetically derived nutrients that allow the coral to thrive in oligotrophic waters. However, little is known about the dynamics of these nutritional interactions at the (sub)cellular level. Here, we visualize with submicrometer spatial resolution the carbon and nitrogen fluxes in the intact coral-dinoflagellate association from the reef coral Pocillopora damicornis by combining nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) and transmission electron microscopy with pulse-chase isotopic labeling using [13C]bicarbonate and [15N]nitrate. This allows us to observe that (i) through light-driven photosynthesis, dinoflagellates rapidly assimilate inorganic bicarbonate and nitrate, temporarily storing carbon within lipid droplets and starch granules for remobilization in nighttime, along with carbon and nitrogen incorporation into other subcellular compartments for dinoflagellate growth and maintenance, (ii) carbon-containing photosynthates are translocated to all four coral tissue layers, where they accumulate after only 15 min in coral lipid droplets from the oral gastroderm and within 6 h in glycogen granules from the oral epiderm, and (iii) the translocation of nitrogen-containing photosynthates is delayed by 3 h. PMID:25670779

  11. Prediction of subcellular location apoptosis proteins with ensemble classifier and feature selection.

    PubMed

    Gu, Quan; Ding, Yong-Sheng; Jiang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Tong-Liang

    2010-04-01

    Apoptosis proteins have a central role in the development and the homeostasis of an organism. These proteins are very important for understanding the mechanism of programmed cell death. The function of an apoptosis protein is closely related to its subcellular location. It is crucial to develop powerful tools to predict apoptosis protein locations for rapidly increasing gap between the number of known structural proteins and the number of known sequences in protein databank. In this study, amino acids pair compositions with different spaces are used to construct feature sets for representing sample of protein feature selection approach based on binary particle swarm optimization, which is applied to extract effective feature. Ensemble classifier is used as prediction engine, of which the basic classifier is the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor. Each basic classifier is trained with different feature sets. Two datasets often used in prior works are selected to validate the performance of proposed approach. The results obtained by jackknife test are quite encouraging, indicating that the proposed method might become a potentially useful tool for subcellular location of apoptosis protein, or at least can play a complimentary role to the existing methods in the relevant areas. The supplement information and software written in Matlab are available by contacting the corresponding author.

  12. Long-Term Growth of Moss in Microfluidic Devices Enables Subcellular Studies in Development.

    PubMed

    Bascom, Carlisle S; Wu, Shu-Zon; Nelson, Katherine; Oakey, John; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Key developmental processes that occur on the subcellular and cellular level or occur in occluded tissues are difficult to access, let alone image and analyze. Recently, culturing living samples within polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices has facilitated the study of hard-to-reach developmental events. Here, we show that an early diverging land plant, Physcomitrella patens, can be continuously cultured within PDMS microfluidic chambers. Because the PDMS chambers are bonded to a coverslip, it is possible to image P. patens development at high resolution over long time periods. Using PDMS chambers, we report that wild-type protonemal tissue grows at the same rate as previously reported for growth on solid medium. Using long-term imaging, we highlight key developmental events, demonstrate compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy, and obtain growth rates for a slow-growing mutant. By coupling the powerful genetic tools available to P. patens with long-term growth and imaging provided by PDMS microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate the capability to study cellular and subcellular developmental events in plants directly and in real time.

  13. Using the SUBcellular database for Arabidopsis proteins to localize the Deg protease family

    PubMed Central

    Tanz, Sandra K.; Castleden, Ian; Hooper, Cornelia M.; Small, Ian; Millar, A. Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Sub-functionalization during the expansion of gene families in eukaryotes has occurred in part through specific subcellular localization of different family members. To better understand this process in plants, compiled records of large-scale proteomic and fluorescent protein localization datasets can be explored and bioinformatic predictions for protein localization can be used to predict the gaps in experimental data. This process can be followed by targeted experiments to test predictions. The SUBA3 database is a free web-service at http://suba.plantenergy.uwa.edu.au that helps users to explore reported experimental data and predictions concerning proteins encoded by gene families and to define the experiments required to locate these homologous sets of proteins. Here we show how SUBA3 can be used to explore the subcellular location of the Deg protease family of ATP-independent serine endopeptidases (Deg1–Deg16). Combined data integration and new experiments refined location information for Deg1 and Deg9, confirmed Deg2, Deg5, and Deg8 in plastids and Deg 15 in peroxisomes and provide substantial experimental evidence for mitochondrial localized Deg proteases. Two of these, Deg3 and Deg10, additionally localized to the plastid, revealing novel dual-targeted Deg proteases in the plastid and the mitochondrion. SUBA3 is continually updated to ensure that researchers can use the latest published data when planning the experimental steps remaining to localize gene family functions. PMID:25161662

  14. Analysis of subcellular localization of auxin carriers PIN, AUX/LAX and PGP in Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, SuiKang; Shen, ChenJia; Zhang, SaiNa; Xu, YanXia; Jiang, DeAn; Qi, YanHua

    2011-01-01

    Auxin transport at least correlates to the three gene families: efflux carriers PIN-formed (PIN), p-glycoprotein (PGP), and influx carrier auxin resistant 1/like aux1(AUX/LAX) in Arabidopsis thaliana. In monocotyledon Sorghum bicolor, the biological function of these genes retains unclear. Our previous study reported that the member analysis, organ-specific expression and expression profiles of the auxin transporter PIN, PGP and AUX/LAX gene families in Sorghum bicolor under IAA, brassinosteroid, polar auxin transport inhibitors and abiotic stresses. Here we further supply the prediction of subcellular localization of SbPIN, SbLAX and SbPGP proteins and discuss the potential relationship between the subcellular localization and stress response. The predicted results showed that the most of SbPIN, SbLAX and SbPGP proteins are localized to the plasma membrane, except few localized to vacuolar membrane and endoplasmic reticulum. This data set provides novel information for investigation of auxin transporters in Sorghum bicolor. PMID:22112459

  15. Subcellular Localization of RPB5-Mediating Protein and Its Putative Functional Partner

    PubMed Central

    Delgermaa, Luvsanjav; Hayashi, Naoyuki; Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Nomura, Takahiro; Thuy, Le Thi-Thu; Murakami, Seishi

    2004-01-01

    We previously identified a novel cellular protein, RPB5-mediating protein (RMP), that retains corepressor activity and functionally antagonizes transcriptional modulation via hepatitis B virus X protein. The subcellular localization of RMP was examined using green fluorescent protein-fused protein forms. We found that a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and a coiled-coil (CC) domain functioning as a cytoplasmic localization signal (CLS) are important for the subcellular localization of RMP. The CLS apparently acts dominantly, since RMP was mostly localized in the cytoplasm with weak and diffuse signals in the nucleus, and the NLS was indispensable for the nuclear localization of RMP only in the absence of the CLS. Using a yeast two-hybrid method, we isolated a putative corepressor, DNA methyltransferase 1-associating protein (DMAP1), which was found to bind to the CC domain of RMP. DMAP1 facilitated the nuclear localization of RMP and the corepressor activity of RMP in a dose-dependent manner by interacting with the CC domain of RMP. These results are discussed in light of a recent paper showing a novel evolutionarily conserved role of URI in the TOR signaling pathway. PMID:15367675

  16. The isoforms of proprotein convertase PC5 are sorted to different subcellular compartments

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The proprotein convertase PC5 is encoded by multiple mRNAs, two of which give rise to the COOH-terminal variant isoforms PC5-A (915 amino acids [aa]) and PC5-B (1877 aa). To investigate the differences in biosynthesis and sorting between these two proteins, we generated stably transfected AtT-20 cell lines expressing each enzyme individually and examined their respective processing pattern and subcellular localization. Biosynthetic analyses coupled to immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that the shorter and soluble PC5-A is sorted to regulated secretory granules. In contrast, the COOH- terminally extended and membrane-bound PC5-B is located in the Golgi. The presence of a sorting signal in the COOH-terminal 38 amino acids unique to PC5-A was demonstrated by the inefficient entry into the regulated secretory pathway of a mutant lacking this segment. EM of pancreatic cells established the presence of immunoreactive PC5 in glucagon-containing granules, demonstrating the sorting of this protein to dense core secretory granules in endocrine cells. Thus, a single PC5 gene generates COOH-terminally modified isoforms with different sorting signals directing these proteins to distinct subcellular localization, thereby allowing them to process their appropriate substrates. PMID:8947550

  17. Multi-label learning with fuzzy hypergraph regularization for protein subcellular location prediction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Tang, Yuan Yan; Chen, C L Philip; Fang, Bin; Lin, Yuewei; Shang, Zhaowei

    2014-12-01

    Protein subcellular location prediction aims to predict the location where a protein resides within a cell using computational methods. Considering the main limitations of the existing methods, we propose a hierarchical multi-label learning model FHML for both single-location proteins and multi-location proteins. The latent concepts are extracted through feature space decomposition and label space decomposition under the nonnegative data factorization framework. The extracted latent concepts are used as the codebook to indirectly connect the protein features to their annotations. We construct dual fuzzy hypergraphs to capture the intrinsic high-order relations embedded in not only feature space, but also label space. Finally, the subcellular location annotation information is propagated from the labeled proteins to the unlabeled proteins by performing dual fuzzy hypergraph Laplacian regularization. The experimental results on the six protein benchmark datasets demonstrate the superiority of our proposed method by comparing it with the state-of-the-art methods, and illustrate the benefit of exploiting both feature correlations and label correlations.

  18. A Balance Between Two Nuclear Localization Sequences and a Nuclear Export Sequence Governs Extradenticle Subcellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Katherine E.; Mann, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    During animal development, transcription factor activities are modulated by several means, including subcellular localization. The Hox cofactor Extradenticle (Exd) has a dynamic subcellular localization, such that Exd is cytoplasmic by default, but is nuclear when complexed with another homeodomain protein, Homothorax (Hth). These observations raise the question of whether dimerization with Hth simply induces Exd's nuclear localization or, alternatively, if Hth is also necessary for Exd activity. To address this question, we analyzed the nuclear transport signals in Exd, including a divergent nuclear export signal (NES) and two nuclear localization signals (NLSs). We show that, although these signals are weak compared to canonical signals, they balance each other in Exd. We also provide evidence that Exd contains an NLS mask that contributes to its cytoplasmic localization. With these signals characterized, we generated forms of Exd that are nuclear localized in the absence of Hth. Surprisingly, although these Exd forms are functional, they do not phenocopy Hth overexpression. These findings suggest that Hth is required for Exd activity, not simply for inducing its nuclear localization. PMID:17277370

  19. An Overview of Sub-Cellular Mechanisms Involved in the Action of TTFields

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, Jack A.; Wenger, Cornelia; Friesen, Douglas E.; Preto, Jordane

    2016-01-01

    Long-standing research on electric and electromagnetic field interactions with biological cells and their subcellular structures has mainly focused on the low- and high-frequency regimes. Biological effects at intermediate frequencies between 100 and 300 kHz have been recently discovered and applied to cancer cells as a therapeutic modality called Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields). TTFields are clinically applied to disrupt cell division, primarily for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In this review, we provide an assessment of possible physical interactions between 100 kHz range alternating electric fields and biological cells in general and their nano-scale subcellular structures in particular. This is intended to mechanistically elucidate the observed strong disruptive effects in cancer cells. Computational models of isolated cells subject to TTFields predict that for intermediate frequencies the intracellular electric field strength significantly increases and that peak dielectrophoretic forces develop in dividing cells. These findings are in agreement with in vitro observations of TTFields’ disruptive effects on cellular function. We conclude that the most likely candidates to provide a quantitative explanation of these effects are ionic condensation waves around microtubules as well as dielectrophoretic effects on the dipole moments of microtubules. A less likely possibility is the involvement of actin filaments or ion channels. PMID:27845746

  20. Cellular and subcellular localization of endogenous nitric oxide in young and senescent pea plants.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B; Carreras, Alfonso; Quirós, Miguel; León, Ana M; Romero-Puertas, María C; Esteban, Francisco J; Valderrama, Raquel; Palma, José M; Sandalio, Luisa M; Gómez, Manuel; del Río, Luis A

    2004-09-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of endogenous nitric oxide (NO.) in leaves from young and senescent pea (Pisum sativum) plants was studied. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of pea leaf sections with the fluorescent probe 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate revealed that endogenous NO. was mainly present in vascular tissues (xylem and phloem). Green fluorescence spots were also detected in the epidermal cells, palisade and spongy mesophyll cells, and guard cells. In senescent leaves, NO. generation was clearly reduced in the vascular tissues. At the subcellular level, by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with the spin trap Fe(MGD)(2) and fluorometric analysis with 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate, NO. was found to be an endogenous metabolite of peroxisomes. The characteristic three-line electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of NO., with g = 2.05 and a(N) = 12.8 G, was detected in peroxisomes. By fluorometry, NO. was also found in these organelles, and the level measured of NO. was linearly dependent on the amount of peroxisomal protein. The enzymatic production of NO. from l-Arg (nitric oxide synthase [NOS]-like activity) was measured by ozone chemiluminiscence. The specific activity of peroxisomal NOS was 4.9 nmol NO. mg(-1) protein min(-1); was strictly dependent on NADPH, calmodulin, and BH(4); and required calcium. In senescent pea leaves, the NOS-like activity of peroxisomes was down-regulated by 72%. It is proposed that peroxisomal NO. could be involved in the process of senescence of pea leaves.

  1. Predicting protein subcellular localization based on information content of gene ontology terms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Bo; Tang, Qiang-Rong

    2016-12-01

    Predicting the location where a protein resides within a cell is important in cell biology. Computational approaches to this issue have attracted more and more attentions from the community of biomedicine. Among the protein features used to predict the subcellular localization of proteins, the feature derived from Gene Ontology (GO) has been shown to be superior to others. However, most of the sights in this field are set on the presence or absence of some predefined GO terms. We proposed a method to derive information from the intrinsic structure of the GO graph. The feature vector was constructed with each element in it representing the information content of the GO term annotating to a protein investigated, and the support vector machines was used as classifier to test our extracted features. Evaluation experiments were conducted on three protein datasets and the results show that our method can enhance eukaryotic and human subcellular location prediction accuracy by up to 1.1% better than previous studies that also used GO-based features. Especially in the scenario where the cellular component annotation is absent, our method can achieved satisfied results with an overall accuracy of more than 87%.

  2. Mono- and Dinuclear Phosphorescent Rhenium(I) Complexes: Impact of Subcellular Localization on Anticancer Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Chen, Mu-He; Hao, Liang; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-06-01

    Elucidation of relationship among chemical structure, cellular uptake, localization, and biological activity of anticancer metal complexes is important for the understanding of their mechanisms of action. Organometallic rhenium(I) tricarbonyl compounds have emerged as potential multifunctional anticancer drug candidates that can integrate therapeutic and imaging capabilities in a single molecule. Herein, two mononuclear phosphorescent rhenium(I) complexes (Re1 and Re2), along with their corresponding dinuclear complexes (Re3 and Re4), were designed and synthesized as potent anticancer agents. The subcellular accumulation of Re1-Re4 was conveniently analyzed by confocal microscopy in situ in live cells by utilizing their intrinsic phosphorescence. We found that increased lipophilicity of the bidentate ligands could enhance their cellular uptake, leading to improved anticancer efficacy. The dinuclear complexes were more potent than the mononuclear counterparts. The molecular anticancer mechanisms of action evoked by Re3 and Re4 were explored in detail. Re3 with a lower lipophilicity localizes to lysosomes and induces caspase-independent apoptosis, whereas Re4 with higher lipophilicity specially accumulates in mitochondria and induces caspase-independent paraptosis in cancer cells. Our study demonstrates that subcellular localization is crucial for the anticancer mechanisms of these phosphorescent rhenium(I) complexes.

  3. An Improved Procedure for Subcellular Spatial Alignment during Live-Cell CLEM

    PubMed Central

    Padman, Benjamin S.; Bach, Markus; Ramm, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Live-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) offers unique insights into the ultrastructure of dynamic cellular processes. A critical and technically challenging part of CLEM is the 3-dimensional relocation of the intracellular region of interest during sample processing. We have developed a simple CLEM procedure that uses toner particles from a laser printer as orientation marks. This facilitates easy tracking of a region of interest even by eye throughout the whole procedure. Combined with subcellular fluorescence markers for the plasma membrane and nucleus, the toner particles allow for precise subcellular spatial alignment of the optical and electron microscopy data sets. The toner-based reference grid is printed and transferred onto a polymer film using a standard office printer and laminator. We have also designed a polymer film holder that is compatible with most inverted microscopes, and have validated our strategy by following the ultrastructure of mitochondria that were selectively photo-irradiated during live-cell microscopy. In summary, our inexpensive and robust CLEM procedure simplifies optical imaging, without limiting the choice of optical microscope. PMID:24755651

  4. Engineering an effective Mn-binding MRI reporter protein by subcellular targeting

    PubMed Central

    Bartelle, Benjamin B.; Mana, Miyeko D.; Suero-Abreu, Giselle A.; Rodriguez, Joe J.; Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Manganese (Mn) is an effective contrast agent and biologically active metal, which has been widely utilized for Mn-enhanced MRI (MEMRI). The purpose of this study was to develop and test a Mn binding protein for use as an genetic reporter for MEMRI. Methods The bacterial Mn-binding protein, MntR was identified as a candidate reporter protein. MntR was engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and targeted to different subcellular organelles, including the Golgi Apparatus where cellular Mn is enriched. Transfected HEK293 cells and B16 melanoma cells were tested in vitro and in vivo, using immunocytochemistry and MR imaging and relaxometry. Results Subcellular targeting of MntR to the cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus was verified with immunocytochemistry. After targeting to the Golgi, MntR expression produced robust R1 changes and T1 contrast in cells, in vitro and in vivo. Co-expression with the divalent metal transporter DMT1, a previously described Mn-based reporter, further enhanced contrast in B16 cells in culture, but in the in vivo B16 tumor model tested was not significantly better than MntR alone. Conclusion This second-generation reporter system both expands the capabilities of genetically-encoded reporters for imaging with MEMRI and provides important insights into the mechanisms of Mn biology which create endogenous MEMRI contrast. PMID:25522343

  5. Long-Term Growth of Moss in Microfluidic Devices Enables Subcellular Studies in Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Key developmental processes that occur on the subcellular and cellular level or occur in occluded tissues are difficult to access, let alone image and analyze. Recently, culturing living samples within polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices has facilitated the study of hard-to-reach developmental events. Here, we show that an early diverging land plant, Physcomitrella patens, can be continuously cultured within PDMS microfluidic chambers. Because the PDMS chambers are bonded to a coverslip, it is possible to image P. patens development at high resolution over long time periods. Using PDMS chambers, we report that wild-type protonemal tissue grows at the same rate as previously reported for growth on solid medium. Using long-term imaging, we highlight key developmental events, demonstrate compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy, and obtain growth rates for a slow-growing mutant. By coupling the powerful genetic tools available to P. patens with long-term growth and imaging provided by PDMS microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate the capability to study cellular and subcellular developmental events in plants directly and in real time. PMID:27406170

  6. Characterization and sub-cellular localization of GalNAc-binding proteins isolated from human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yaogang; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Hanjie; Zhang, Jiaxu; Sun, Xiu-Xuan; Chen, Wentian; Bian, Huijie; Li, Zheng

    2015-12-25

    Although the expression levels of total GalNAc-binding proteins (GNBPs) were up-regulated significantly in human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activated with transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1), yet little is known about the precise types, distribution and sub-cellular localization of the GNBPs in HSCs. Here, 264 GNBPs from the activated HSCs and 257 GNBPs from the quiescent HSCs were identified and annotated. A total of 46 GNBPs were estimated to be significantly up-regulated and 40 GNBPs were estimated to be significantly down-regulated in the activated HSCs. For example, the GNBPs (i.e. BTF3, COX17, and ATP5A1) responsible for the regulation of protein binding were up-regulated, and those (i.e. FAM114A1, ENO3, and TKT) responsible for the regulation of protein binding were down-regulated in the activated HSCs. The motifs of the isolated GNBPs showed that Proline residue had the maximum preference in consensus sequences. The western blotting showed the expression levels of COX17, and PRMT1 were significantly up-regulated, while, the expression level of CLIC1(B5) was down-regulated in the activated HSCs and liver cirrhosis tissues. Moreover, the GNBPs were sub-localized in the Golgi apparatus of HSCs. In conclusion, the precision alteration of the GNBPs referred to pathological changes in liver fibrosis/cirrhosis may provide useful information to find new molecular mechanism of HSC activation and discover the biomarkers for diagnosis of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis as well as development of new anti-fibrotic strategies.

  7. Subcellular redistribution of m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in striatal interneurons in vivo after acute cholinergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bernard, V; Laribi, O; Levey, A I; Bloch, B

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of our work was to investigate how the cholinergic environment influences the targeting and the intracellular trafficking of the muscarinic receptor m2 (m2R) in vivo. To address this question, we have used immunohistochemical approaches at light and electron microscopic levels to detect the m2R in control rats and rats treated with muscarinic receptor agonists. In control animals, m2Rs were located mostly at postsynaptic sites at the plasma membrane of perikarya and dendrites of cholinergic and NPY-somatostatin interneurons as autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, respectively. Presynaptic receptors were also detected in boutons. The m2Rs were usually detected at extrasynaptic sites, but they could be found rarely in association with symmetrical synapses, suggesting that the cholinergic transmission mediated by m2R occurs via synaptic and nonsynaptic mechanisms. The stimulation of muscarinic receptors with oxotremorine provoked a dramatic alteration of m2R compartmentalization, including endocytosis with a decrease of the density of m2R at the membrane (-63%) and an increase of those associated with endosomes (+86%) in perikarya. The very strong increase of m2R associated with multivesicular bodies (+732%) suggests that oxotremorine activated degradation. The slight increase in the Golgi apparatus (+26%) suggests that the m2R stimulation had an effect on the maturation of m2R. The substance P receptor located at the membrane of the same neurons was unaffected by oxotremorine. Our data demonstrate that cholinergic stimulation dramatically influences the subcellular distribution of m2R in striatal interneurons in vivo. These events may have key roles in controlling abundance and availability of muscarinic receptors via regulation of receptor endocytosis, degradation, and/or neosynthesis. Further, the control of muscarinic receptor trafficking may influence the activity of striatal interneurons, including neurotransmitter release and/or electric activity.

  8. mTOR direct interactions with Rheb-GTPase and raptor: sub-cellular localization using fluorescence lifetime imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway has a key role in cellular regulation and several diseases. While it is thought that Rheb GTPase regulates mTOR, acting immediately upstream, while raptor is immediately downstream of mTOR, direct interactions have yet to be verified in living cells, furthermore the localisation of Rheb has been reported to have only a cytoplasmic cellular localization. Results In this study a cytoplasmic as well as a significant sub-cellular nuclear mTOR localization was shown , utilizing green and red fluorescent protein (GFP and DsRed) fusion and highly sensitive single photon counting fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of live cells. The interaction of the mTORC1 components Rheb, mTOR and raptor, tagged with EGFP/DsRed was determined using fluorescence energy transfer-FLIM. The excited-state lifetime of EGFP-mTOR of ~2400 ps was reduced by energy transfer to ~2200 ps in the cytoplasm and to 2000 ps in the nucleus when co-expressed with DsRed-Rheb, similar results being obtained for co-expressed EGFP-mTOR and DsRed-raptor. The localization and distribution of mTOR was modified by amino acid withdrawal and re-addition but not by rapamycin. Conclusions The results illustrate the power of GFP-technology combined with FRET-FLIM imaging in the study of the interaction of signalling components in living cells, here providing evidence for a direct physical interaction between mTOR and Rheb and between mTOR and raptor in living cells for the first time. PMID:23311891

  9. Inflammation-induced abnormalities in the subcellular localization and trafficking of the neurokinin 1 receptor in the enteric nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Lieu, TinaMarie; Pelayo, Juan Carlos; Eriksson, Emily M.; Veldhuis, Nicholas A.; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    Activated G protein-coupled receptors traffic to endosomes and are sorted to recycling or degradative pathways. Endosomes are also a site of receptor signaling of sustained and pathophysiologically important processes, including inflammation. However, the mechanisms of endosomal sorting of receptors and the impact of disease on trafficking have not been fully defined. We examined the effects of inflammation on the subcellular distribution and trafficking of the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) in enteric neurons. We studied NK1R trafficking in enteric neurons of the mouse colon using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. The impact of inflammation was studied in IL10−/−-piroxicam and trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid colitis models. NK1R was localized to the plasma membrane of myenteric and submucosal neurons of the uninflamed colon. SP evoked NK1R endocytosis and recycling. Deletion of β-arrestin2, which associates with the activated NK1R, accelerated recycling. Inhibition of endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1), which degrades endosomal SP, prevented recycling. Inflammation was associated with NK1R endocytosis in myenteric but not submucosal neurons. Whereas the NK1R in uninflamed neurons recycled within 60 min, NK1R recycling in inflamed neurons was delayed for >120 min, suggesting defective recycling machinery. Inflammation was associated with β-arrestin2 upregulation and ECE-1 downregulation, which may contribute to the defective NK1R recycling. We conclude that inflammation evokes redistribution of NK1R from the plasma membrane to endosomes of myenteric neurons through enhanced SP release and defective NK1R recycling. Defective recycling may be secondary to upregulation of β-arrestin2 and downregulation of ECE-1. Internalized NK1R may generate sustained proinflammatory signals that disrupt normal neuronal functions. PMID:26138465

  10. The Subcellular Localization of an Aquaporin-2 Tetramer Depends on the Stoichiometry of Phosphorylated and Nonphosphorylated Monomers

    PubMed Central

    Kamsteeg, E.J.; Heijnen, I.; van Os, C.H.; Deen, P.M.T.

    2000-01-01

    In renal principal cells, vasopressin regulates the shuttling of the aquaporin (AQP)2 water channel between intracellular vesicles and the apical plasma membrane. Vasopressin-induced phosphorylation of AQP2 at serine 256 (S256) by protein kinase A (PKA) is essential for its localization in the membrane. However, phosphorylated AQP2 (p-AQP2) has also been detected in intracellular vesicles of noninduced principal cells. As AQP2 is expressed as homotetramers, we hypothesized that the number of p-AQP2 monomers in a tetramer might be critical for the its steady state distribution. Expressed in oocytes, AQP2-S256D and AQP2-S256A mimicked p-AQP2 and non–p-AQP2, respectively, as routing and function of AQP2-S256D and wild-type AQP2 (wt-AQP2) were identical, whereas AQP2-S256A was retained intracellularly. In coinjection experiments, AQP2-S256A and AQP2-S256D formed heterotetramers. Coinjection of different ratios of AQP2-S256A and AQP2-S256D cRNAs revealed that minimally three AQP2-S256D monomers in an AQP2 tetramer were essential for its plasma membrane localization. Therefore, our results suggest that in principal cells, minimally three monomers per AQP2 tetramer have to be phosphorylated for its steady state localization in the apical membrane. As other multisubunit channels are also regulated by phosphorylation, it is anticipated that the stoichiometry of their phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated subunits may fine-tune the activity or subcellular localization of these complexes. PMID:11076974

  11. Implementation of subcellular water mapping by electron energy loss spectroscopy in a medium-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Terryn, C; Michel, J; Thomas, X; Laurent-Maquin, D; Balossier, G

    2004-07-01

    The water concentration in biological cells plays a predominant role in cellular life. Using electron energy loss spectroscopy, the feasibility to measure the water content in cells has already been demonstrated. In this paper, we present an upgrade of water measurement in hydrated cryosections by spectrum imaging mode in a medium-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope. The electron energy loss spectra are recorded in spectrum imaging mode in a 2(n)x2(n) pixels array. Each spectrum is processed in order to determine the water mass content in the corresponding pixel. Then a parametric image is obtained in which grey levels are related to water concentration. In this image, it is possible to recognize the different subcellular compartments. By averaging the water concentration over the relevant pixels, we can determine the water mass content in the concerned subcellular compartment. As an example, we present water mass content measurement at subcellular level in rat hepatocytes.

  12. Quantitative subcellular imaging of boron compounds in individual mitotic and interphase human glioblastoma cells with imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS).

    PubMed

    Chandra, S; Tjarks, W; Lorey, D R; Barth, R F

    2008-01-01

    Boron measurements at subcellular scale are essential in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer as the nuclear localization of boron-10 atoms can enhance the effectiveness of killing individual tumour cells. Since tumours contain a heterogeneous population of cells in interphase as well as in the M phase (mitotic division) of the cell cycle, it is important to evaluate the subcellular distribution of boron in both phases. In this work, the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging technique of ion microscopy was used to quantitatively image boron from two BNCT agents, clinically used p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) and 3-[4-(o-carboran-1-yl)butyl]thymidine (N4), in mitotic metaphase and interphase human glioblastoma T98G cells. N4 belongs to a class of experimental BNCT agents, designated 3-carboranyl thymidine analogues (3CTAs), which presumably accumulate selectively in cancer cells due to a process referred to as kinase-mediated trapping (KMT). The cells were exposed to BPA for 1 h and N4 for 2 h. A CAMECA IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing isotopic images with 500 nm spatial resolution was used in the study. Observations were made in cryogenically prepared fast frozen, and freeze-fractured, freeze-dried cells. Three discernible subcellular regions were studied: the nucleus, a characteristic mitochondria-rich perinuclear cytoplasmic region, and the remaining cytoplasm in interphase T98G cells. In metaphase cells, the chromosomes and the cytoplasm were studied for boron localization. Intracellular concentrations of potassium and sodium also were measured in each cell in which the subcellular boron concentrations were imaged. Since the healthy cells maintain a K/Na ratio of approximately 10 due to the presence of Na-K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells, these measurements provided validation for cryogenic sample preparation and indicated the analysis healthy, well preserved cells. The BPA-treated interphase

  13. Vanadium distribution following decavanadate administration.

    PubMed

    Soares, S S; Martins, H; Aureliano, M

    2006-01-01

    An acute exposure of two vanadate solutions-metavanadate and decavanadate-containing different vanadate oligomers, induces different patterns of subcellular vanadium distribution in blood plasma, red blood cells (RBC), and cardiac muscle subcellular fractions of the fish Sparus aurata (gilthead seabream). The highest amount of vanadium was found in blood plasma 1 h after (5 mM) intravenous vanadate administration (295 +/- 64 and 383 +/- 104 microg V/g dry tissue, for metavanadate and decavanadate solutions, respectively), being 80-fold higher than in RBC. After 12 h of administration, the amount of vanadium in plasma, as well as in cardiac cytosol, decreased about 50%, for both vanadate solutions. During the period between 1 and 12 h, the ratio of vanadium in plasma/vanadium in RBC increased from 27 to 128 for metavanadate, whereas it remains constant (77) for decavanadate. Both vanadium solutions were primarily accumulated in the mitochondrial fraction (138 +/- 0 and 195 +/- 34 ng V/g dry tissue for metavanadate and decavanadate solutions, respectively, after 12 h exposure), rather than in cytosol. The amount of vanadium in cardiac mitochondria was twofold higher than in cytosol, earlier for metavanadate (6 h) than for decavanadate (12 h). It is concluded that, in fish cardiac muscle, the vanadium distribution is dependent on the administration of decameric vanadate, with vanadium being mainly distributed in plasma, before being accumulated into the mitochondrial fraction.

  14. Limited proteolysis differentially modulates the stability and subcellular localization of domains of RPGRIP1 that are distinctly affected by mutations in Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinrong; Guruju, Mallikarjuna; Oswald, John; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2005-05-15

    The retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) protein interacts with the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein-1 (RPGRIP1). Genetic lesions in the cognate genes lead to distinct and severe human retinal dystrophies. The biological role of these proteins in retinal function and pathogenesis of retinal diseases is elusive. Here, we present the first physiological assay of the role of RPGRIP1 and mutations therein. We found that the monoallelic and homozygous mutations, DeltaE1279 and D1114G, in the RPGR-interacting domain (RID) of RPGRIP1, enhance and abolish, respectively, its interaction in vivo with RPGR without affecting the stability of RID. In contrast to RID(WT) and RID(D1114G), chemical genetics shows that the interaction of RID(DeltaE1279) with RPGR is resistant to various stress treatments such as osmotic, pH and heat-shock stimuli. Hence, RID(D1114G) and RID(DeltaE1279) constitute loss- and gain-of-function mutations. Moreover, we find that the isoforms, bRPGRIP1 and bRPGRIP1b, undergo limited proteolysis constitutively in vivo in the cytoplasm compartment. This leads to the relocation and accumulation of a small and stable N-terminal domain of approximately 7 kDa to the nucleus, whereas the cytosolic C-terminal domain of RPGRIP1 is degraded and short-lived. The RID(D1114G) and RID(DeltaE1279) mutations exhibit strong cis-acting and antagonistic biological effects on the nuclear relocation, subcellular distribution and proteolytic cleavage of RPGRIP1 and/or domains thereof. These data support distinct and spatiotemporal subcellular-specific roles to RPGRIP1. A novel RPGRIP1-mediated nucleocytoplasmic crosstalk and transport pathway regulated by RID, and hence by RPGR, emerges with implications in the molecular pathogenesis of retinopathies, and a model to other diseases.

  15. Comparison of helper component-protease RNA silencing suppression activity, subcellular localization, and aggregation of three Korean isolates of Turnip mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae-Yeong; Chung, Jinsoo; Kim, Jungkyu; Seo, Eun-Young; Kilcrease, James P; Bauchan, Gary R; Lim, Seungmo; Hammond, John; Lim, Hyoun-Sub

    2016-08-01

    In 2014, we performed a nationwide survey in Korean radish fields to investigate the distribution and variability of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV). Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis sap-inoculated with three isolates of TuMV from infected radish tissue showed different symptom severities, whereas symptoms in Raphanus sativus were similar for each isolate. The helper component-protease (HC-Pro) genes of each isolate were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis showed that the three Korean isolates were clustered into the basal-BR group. The HC-Pro proteins of these isolates were tested for their RNA silencing suppressor (VSR) activity and subcellular localization in Nicotiana benthamiana. A VSR assay by co-agroinfiltration of HC-Pro with soluble-modified GFP (smGFP) showed that HC-Pro of isolate R007 and R041 showed stronger VSR activity than R065. The HC-Pros showed 98.25 % amino acid identity, and weak VSR isolate (R065) has a single variant residue in the C-terminal domain associated with protease activity and self-interaction compared to isolates with strong VSR activity. Formation of large subcellular aggregates of GFP:HC-Pro fusion proteins in N. benthamiana was only observed for HC-Pro from isolates with strong VSR activity, suggesting that R065 'weak' HC-Pro may have diminished self-association; substitution of the variant C-terminal residue largely reversed the HC-Pro aggregation and silencing suppressor characteristics. The lack of correlation between VSR efficiency and induction of systemic necrosis (SN) suggests that differences in viral accumulation due to HC-Pro are not responsible for SN.

  16. Mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous, gene-edited Tau differs from that of over-expressed human wild-type and P301L mutant Tau

    PubMed Central

    Di Xia; Gutmann, Julia M.; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and a subset of frontotemporal dementia termed FTLD-Tau are characterized by a massive, yet incompletely characterized and understood redistribution of Tau. To establish a framework for understanding this pathology, we used the genome-editing tool TALEN and generated Tau-mEOS2 knock-in mice to determine the mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous Tau in hippocampal cultures. We analysed Tau in axons, dendrites and spines at three stages of maturation using live-cell imaging, photo-conversion and FRAP assays. Tau-mEOS2 cultures were compared with those over-expressing EGFP-tagged forms of human wild-type (hWT-Tau) and P301L mutant Tau (hP301L-Tau), modelling Tau accumulation in AD and FTLD-Tau, respectively. In developing neurons, Tau-mEOS2 followed a proximo-distal gradient in axons and a subcellular distribution similar to that of endogenous Tau in neurons obtained from wild-type mice, which were abolished, when either hWT-Tau or hP301L-Tau was over-expressed. For the three conditions, FRAP analysis revealed a similar mobility in dendrites compared with axons; however, Tau-mEOS2 was less mobile than hWT-Tau and hP301L-Tau and the mobile fraction was smaller, possibly reflecting less efficient microtubule binding of Tau when over-expressed. Together, our study presents Tau-mEOS2 mice as a novel tool for the study of Tau in a physiological and a pathological context. PMID:27378256

  17. Metabolism of the environmental toxicant benzo(a)pyrene by subcellular fractions of human ovary.

    PubMed

    Rekhadevi, P V; Diggs, D L; Huderson, A C; Harris, K L; Archibong, A E; Ramesh, A

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge of the ability of the female reproductive system to metabolize environmental chemicals is critical not only from the standpoint of toxicity but also from infertility risk assessment. Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a toxicant that is released into the environment from automobile exhausts, cigarette smoke, burning of refuse, industrial emissions, and hazardous waste sites. In exposed animals, BaP becomes activated to reactive metabolites that interfere with target organ function and as a consequence cause toxicity. Studies on animal models conducted in our laboratories and those of others have shown that BaP possess endocrine disrupting properties. Thus, this chemical has the potential to cause infertility and cancers in the female genital tract. An understanding of BaP metabolism in the female reproductive system will be of importance in the diagnosis and management of female fertility as well as cancers in the reproductive tissues. Therefore, the objective of our study was to examine the metabolism of BaP by human ovarian subcellular fractions. Human ovary samples (eight individuals) were obtained from postoperative tissue removed from subjects with uterine tumors. Subcellular fractions (nuclear, cytosolic, mitochondrial, and microsomal) were prepared by differential centrifugation. BaP (1 μM and 3 μM) was individually incubated with individual subcellular fractions for 15 min and the products were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Among the different fractions tested, microsomal BaP metabolism was higher than the rest of the fractions. The BaP metabolites identified were as follows: BaP-9,10-diol, BaP-4,5-diol, BaP-7,8-diol, 9(OH) BaP, 3(OH) BaP, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, and BaP-6,12-dione. Of interest was the presence of DNA-reactive metabolites such as BaP-3,6-dione, BaP-6,12-dione, and BaP 7,8-diol, which have been implicated in the causation of infertility and cancer. Our results indicate that women who are exposed to BaP via

  18. Metabolism of the environmental toxicant benzo(a)pyrene by subcellular fractions of human ovary

    PubMed Central

    Rekhadevi, PV; Diggs, DL; Huderson, AC; Harris, KL; Archibong, AE; Ramesh, A

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the ability of the female reproductive system to metabolize environmental chemicals is critical not only from the standpoint of toxicity but also from infertility risk assessment. Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a toxicant that is released into the environment from automobile exhausts, cigarette smoke, burning of refuse, industrial emissions, and hazardous waste sites. In exposed animals, BaP becomes activated to reactive meta-bolites that interfere with target organ function and as a consequence cause toxicity. Studies on animal models conducted in our laboratories and those of others have shown that BaP possess endocrine disrupting properties. Thus, this chemical has the potential to cause infertility and cancers in the female genital tract. An understanding of BaP metabolism in the female reproductive system will be of importance in the diagnosis and management of female fertility as well as cancers in the reproductive tissues. Therefore, the objective of our study was to examine the metabolism of BaP by human ovarian subcellular fractions. Human ovary samples (eight individuals) were obtained from postoperative tissue removed from subjects with uterine tumors. Sub-cellular fractions (nuclear, cytosolic, mitochondrial, and microsomal) were prepared by differential centrifugation. BaP (1 μM and 3 μM) was individually incubated with individual subcellular fractions for 15 min and the products were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Among the different fractions tested, microsomal BaP metabolism was higher than the rest of the fractions. The BaP metabolites identified were as follows: BaP-9,10-diol, BaP-4,5-diol, BaP-7,8-diol, 9(OH) BaP, 3(OH) BaP, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, and BaP-6,12-dione. Of interest was the presence of DNA-reactive metabolites such as BaP-3,6-dione, BaP-6,12-dione, and BaP 7,8-diol, which have been implicated in the causation of infertility and cancer. Our results indicate that women who are exposed to BaP via

  19. Automated image analysis of FRET signals for subcellular cAMP quantification.

    PubMed

    Leavesley, Silas J; Nakhmani, Arie; Gao, Yi; Rich, Thomas C

    2015-01-01

    A variety of FRET probes have been developed to examine cAMP localization and dynamics in single cells. These probes offer a readily accessible approach to measure localized cAMP signals. However, given the low signal-to-noise ratio of most FRET probes and the dynamic nature of the intracellular environment, there have been marked limitations in the ability to use FRET probes to study localized signaling events within the same cell. Here, we outline a methodology to dissect kinetics of cAMP-mediated FRET signals in single cells using automated image analysis approaches. We additionally extend these approaches to the analysis of subcellular regions. These approaches offer an unique opportunity to assess localized cAMP kinetics in an unbiased, quantitative fashion.

  20. The deubiquitinating enzyme USP17 is essential for GTPase subcellular localization and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    de la Vega, Michelle; Kelvin, Alyson A.; Dunican, Dara J.; McFarlane, Cheryl; Burrows, James F.; Jaworski, Jakub; Stevenson, Nigel J.; Dib, Karim; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Scott, Christopher J.; Long, Aideen; Johnston, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes are now emerging as potential therapeutic targets that control many cellular processes, but few have been demonstrated to control cell motility. Here, we show that ubiquitin-specific protease 17 (USP17) is rapidly and transiently induced in response to chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and IL-8/CXCL8 in both primary cells and cell lines, and that its depletion completely blocks chemokine-induced cell migration and cytoskeletal rearrangements. Using live cell imaging, we demonstrate that USP17 is required for both elongated and amoeboid motility, in addition to chemotaxis. USP17 has previously been reported to disrupt Ras localization and we now find that USP17 depletion blocks chemokine-induced subcellular relocalization of GTPases Cdc42, Rac and RhoA, which are GTPases essential for cell motility. Collectively, these results demonstrate that USP17 has a critical role in cell migration and may be a useful drug target for both inflammatory and metastatic disease. PMID:21448158

  1. Combining algorithms to predict bacterial protein sub-cellular location: Parallel versus concurrent implementations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Paul D; Attwood, Teresa K; Flower, Darren R

    2006-12-06

    We describe a novel and potentially important tool for candidate subunit vaccine selection through in silico reverse-vaccinology. A set of Bayesian networks able to make individual predictions for specific subcellular locations is implemented in three pipelines with different architectures: a parallel implementation with a confidence level-based decision engine and two serial implementations with a hierarchical decision structure, one initially rooted by prediction between membrane types and another rooted by soluble versus membrane prediction. The parallel pipeline outperformed the serial pipeline, but took twice as long to execute. The soluble-rooted serial pipeline outperformed the membrane-rooted predictor. Assessment using genomic test sets was more equivocal, as many more predictions are made by the parallel pipeline, yet the serial pipeline identifies 22 more of the 74 proteins of known location.

  2. Subcellular control of Rac-GTPase signalling by magnetogenetic manipulation inside living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etoc, F.; Lisse, D.; Bellaiche, Y.; Piehler, J.; Coppey, M.; Dahan, M.

    2013-03-01

    Many cell functions rely on the coordinated activity of signalling pathways at a subcellular scale. However, there are few tools capable of probing and perturbing signalling networks with a spatial resolution matching the intracellular dimensions of their activity patterns. Here we present a generic magnetogenetic approach based on the self-assembly of signalling complexes on the surface of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles inside living cells. The nanoparticles act as nanoscopic hot spots that can be displaced by magnetic forces and trigger signal transduction pathways that bring about a cell response. We applied this strategy to Rho-GTPases, a set of molecular switches known to regulate cell morphology via complex spatiotemporal patterns of activity. We demonstrate that the nanoparticle-mediated activation of signalling pathways leads to local remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton and to morphological changes.

  3. Multi-scale Imaging of Cellular and Sub-cellular Structures using Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Rice, A. F.

    2005-03-01

    Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy is a new scanning probe capability under development within our group to reliably return to and directly interact with a specific nanobiological feature of interest. In previous work, we have successfully recognized and classified tubular versus globular biological objects from experimental atomic force microscope images using a method based on normalized central moments [ref. 1]. In this paper we extend this work to include recognition schemes appropriate for cellular and sub-cellular structures. Globular cells containing tubular actin filaments are under investigation. Thus there are differences in external/internal shapes and scales. Continuous Wavelet Transform with a differential Gaussian mother wavelet is employed for multi- scale analysis. [ref. 1] Q. Chen, V. Ayres and L. Udpa, ``Biological Investigation Using Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy,'' Proceedings 3rd IEEE Conference on Nanotechnology, vol. 2, p 863-865 (2003).

  4. Toward a Theory of the Primo Vascular System: A Hypothetical Circulatory System at the Subcellular Level

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Cheon; Park, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Seung Zhoo

    2013-01-01

    This paper suggests a theoretical framework for the primo vascular system (PVS), a hypothetical circulatory system, in which extracellular DNA microvesicles interact to form and break down cell structures. Since Bonghan Kim reported the existence of Bonghan ducts and the SNU research team reinvestigated and named it the PVS, there has been series of studies trying to examine its structure and functions. In this paper, we hypothesize that the PVS is the network system in which extracellular DNA microvesicles circulate and interact at the subcellular level, forming and breaking down cell structures. This idea integrates A. Béchamp's idea of microzymas and Bonghan Kim's idea of sanals. A proof of this idea may complement modern medical theory, perhaps providing an essential clue for an alternative solution dealing with modern healthcare problem. PMID:23853665

  5. Toward a theory of the primo vascular system: a hypothetical circulatory system at the subcellular level.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Cheon; Yoon, Ji Woong; Park, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Seung Zhoo

    2013-01-01

    This paper suggests a theoretical framework for the primo vascular system (PVS), a hypothetical circulatory system, in which extracellular DNA microvesicles interact to form and break down cell structures. Since Bonghan Kim reported the existence of Bonghan ducts and the SNU research team reinvestigated and named it the PVS, there has been series of studies trying to examine its structure and functions. In this paper, we hypothesize that the PVS is the network system in which extracellular DNA microvesicles circulate and interact at the subcellular level, forming and breaking down cell structures. This idea integrates A. Béchamp's idea of microzymas and Bonghan Kim's idea of sanals. A proof of this idea may complement modern medical theory, perhaps providing an essential clue for an alternative solution dealing with modern healthcare problem.

  6. Inheritance and subcellular localization of triose-phosphate isomerase in dwarf mountain pine (Pinus mugo).

    PubMed

    Odrzykoski, I J

    2001-01-01

    Several trees with expected heterozygous phenotype for triose-phosphate isomerase (TPI) were discovered in a population of dwarf mountain pine (Pinus mugo Turra) from southern Poland. As the inheritance of this enzyme in pines has not been reported, segregation of allelic variants was tested in eight trees with putative heterozygous phenotypes for two loci, TpiA and TPIB: Linkage between these and some other isozyme loci were studied and evidence for linkage has been found between TpiA and PgdA (r = 0.10) and between TpiB and DiaD (r = 0.36), but in single trees only. The subcellular localization of TPI isozymes was determined by comparing isoenzymes from the total extract with those found in fraction enriched in plastids, prepared by differential gradient centrifugation of cellular organelles. The more slowly migrating TPI-B isozyme is located in plastids.

  7. Subcellular localization of RNA degrading proteins and protein complexes in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena; Roppelt, Verena; Lassek, Christian; Klug, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    The archaeal exosome is a prokaryotic protein complex with RNA processing and degrading activities. Recently it was shown that the exosome is localized at the periphery of the cell in the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. This localization is most likely mediated by the archaeal DnaG protein and depends on (direct or indirect) hydrophobic interactions with the membrane. A localization of RNA degrading proteins and protein complexes was also demonstrated in several bacteria. In bacteria a subcellular localization was also shown for substrates of these proteins and protein complexes, i.e. chromosomally encoded mRNAs and a small RNA. Thus, despite the missing compartmentalization, a spatial organization of RNA processing and degradation exists in prokaryotic cells. Recent data suggest that the spatial organization contributes to the temporal regulation of these processes.

  8. Short-time movement of E. coli chromosomal loci depends on coordinate and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Javer, Avelino; Long, Zhicheng; Nugent, Eileen; Grisi, Marco; Siriwatwetchakul, Kamin; Dorfman, Kevin D; Cicuta, Pietro; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria, chromosomal architecture shows strong spatial and temporal organization, and regulates key cellular functions, such as transcription. Tracking the motion of chromosomal loci at short timescales provides information related to both the physical state of the nucleo-protein complex and its local environment, independent of large-scale motions related to genome segregation. Here we investigate the short-time (0.1-10 s) dynamics of fluorescently labelled chromosomal loci in Escherichia coli at different growth rates. At these timescales, we observe for the first time a dependence of the loci's apparent diffusion on both their subcellular localization and chromosomal coordinate, and we provide evidence that the properties of the chromosome are similar in the tested growth conditions. Our results indicate that either non-equilibrium fluctuations due to enzyme activity or the organization of the genome as a polymer-protein complex vary as a function of the distance from the origin of replication.

  9. Dlg5 Regulates Dendritic Spine Formation and Synaptogenesis by Controlling Subcellular N-Cadherin Localization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih-Hsiu J.; Celic, Ivana; Choi, Se-Young; Riccomagno, Martin; Wang, Qiang; Sun, Lu O.; Mitchell, Sarah P.; Vasioukhin, Valera; Huganir, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain are formed on dendritic spines, and spine density has a profound impact on synaptic transmission, integration, and plasticity. Membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins are intracellular scaffolding proteins with well established roles in synapse function. However, whether MAGUK proteins are required for the formation of dendritic spines in vivo is unclear. We isolated a novel disc large-5 (Dlg5) allele in mice, Dlg5LP, which harbors a missense mutation in the DLG5 SH3 domain, greatly attenuating its ability to interact with the DLG5 GUK domain. We show here that DLG5 is a MAGUK protein that regulates spine formation, synaptogenesis, and synaptic transmission in cortical neurons. DLG5 regulates synaptogenesis by enhancing the cell surface localization of N-cadherin, revealing a key molecular mechanism for regulating the subcellular localization of this cell adhesion molecule during synaptogenesis. PMID:25232112

  10. Acoustic tweezing cytometry for live-cell subcellular modulation of intracellular cytoskeleton contractility

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhenzhen; Sun, Yubing; Di Chen; Tay, Donald; Chen, Weiqiang; Deng, Cheri X.; Fu, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical forces are critical to modulate cell spreading, contractility, gene expression, and even stem cell differentiation. Yet, existing tools that can apply controllable subcellular forces to a large number of single cells simultaneously are still limited. Here we report a novel ultrasound tweezing cytometry utilizing ultrasound pulses to actuate functionalized lipid microbubbles covalently attached to single live cells to exert mechanical forces in the pN - nN range. Ultrasonic excitation of microbubbles could elicit a rapid and sustained reactive intracellular cytoskeleton contractile force increase in different adherent mechanosensitive cells. Further, ultrasound-mediated intracellular cytoskeleton contractility enhancement was dose-dependent and required an intact actin cytoskeleton as well as RhoA/ROCK signaling. Our results demonstrated the great potential of ultrasound tweezing cytometry technique using functionalized microbubbles as an actuatable, biocompatible, and multifunctional agent for biomechanical stimulations of cells. PMID:23846290

  11. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity in subcellular fractions of normal and dystrophic human muscle.

    PubMed

    Kunze, D; Rüstow, B; Olthoff, D; Jung, K

    1985-03-15

    Biopsy samples from normal and dystrophic human muscle (Duchenne type) were fractionated by differential centrifugation and microsomes, mitochondria and cytosol were assayed for phosphatidic acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.4) and marker enzymes of mitochondria and cytosol. The activity of phosphatidic acid phosphatase was significantly lower in microsomes and higher in cytosol and mitochondria of dystrophic muscle than in the corresponding subcellular fractions of normal muscle. The results support an explanation of earlier findings that there is reduced G3P incorporation into diglycerides and phosphatidylcholine and a qualitative and quantitative change in the amount of phosphatidylcholine in dystrophic microsomes. The possible reasons for the reduction in the activity of only microsomal PA-P-ase were discussed.

  12. Separation of mitochondria from contaminating subcellular structures utilizing silica sol gradient centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C; Dench, J E; Hall, D O; Moore, A L

    1979-07-01

    Discontinuous Percoll density gradients have been developed for the purification of mitochondria, permitting rapid separation under isosmotic and low viscosity conditions. Mitochondria from several etiolated tissues have been successfully separated from contaminating subcellular structures by this method. For potato tuber the ratio of washed to purified mitochondrial protein was 2.6, similar to the increase in specific activity of cytochrome c oxidase following separation. The purification of mitochondria from green leaf tissues on Percoll gradients has reduced chlorophyll contamination of spinach mitochondria from about 70 micrograms chlorophyll per milligram protein to approximately 8 micrograms chlorophyll per milligram protein.The ratio of protein content of the washed mitochondria compared to that in the purified preparation was 7 for spinach and respiratory activity was retained. The physiological integrity and oxidative properties of washed and gradient mitochondria are compared.

  13. Identification and subcellular localization of two solanesyl diphosphate synthases from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Jun, Luo; Saiki, Ryoichi; Tatsumi, Kei; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2004-12-01

    Two solanesyl diphosphate synthases, designated SPS1 and SPS2, which are responsible for the synthesis of the isoprenoid side chain of either plastoquinone or ubiquinone in Arabidopsis thaliana, were identified. Heterologous expression of either SPS1 or SPS2 allowed the generation of UQ-9 in a decaprenyl diphosphate synthase-defective strain of fission yeast and also in wild-type Escherichia coli. SPS1-GFP was found to localize in the ER while SPS2-GFP localized in the plastid of tobacco BY-2 cells. These two different subcellular localizations are thought to be the reflection of their roles in solanesyl diphosphate synthesis in two different parts: presumably SPS1 and SPS2 for the side chains of ubiquinone and plastoquinone, respectively.

  14. Memo interacts with c-Src to control Estrogen Receptor alpha sub-cellular localization.

    PubMed

    Frei, Anna; MacDonald, Gwen; Lund, Ingrid; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Hynes, Nancy E; Nalvarte, Ivan

    2016-08-30

    Understanding the complex interaction between growth factor and steroid hormone signaling pathways in breast cancer is key to identifying suitable therapeutic strategies to avoid progression and therapy resistance. The interaction between these two pathways is of paramount importance for the development of endocrine resistance. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms behind their crosstalk are still largely obscure. We previously reported that Memo is a small redox-active protein that controls heregulin-mediated migration of breast cancer cells. Here we report that Memo sits at the intersection between heregulin and estrogen signaling, and that Memo controls Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) sub-cellular localization, phosphorylation, and function downstream of heregulin and estrogen in breast cancer cells. Memo facilitates ERα and c-Src interaction, ERα Y537 phosphorylation, and has the ability to control ERα extra-nuclear localization. Thus, we identify Memo as an important key mediator between the heregulin and estrogen signaling pathways, which affects both breast cancer cell migration and proliferation.

  15. Survivin promotes oxidative phosphorylation, subcellular mitochondrial repositioning, and tumor cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Rivadeneira, Dayana B.; Caino, M. Cecilia; Seo, Jae Ho; Angelin, Alessia; Wallace, Douglas C.; Languino, Lucia R.; Altieri, Dario C.

    2015-01-01

    Survivin promotes cell division and suppresses apoptosis in many human cancers, and increased abundance correlates with metastasis and poor prognosis. Here, we showed that a pool of survivin that localized to the mitochondria of certain tumor cell lines enhanced the stability of oxidative phosphorylation Complex II, which promoted cellular respiration. Survivin also supported the subcellular trafficking of mitochondria to the cortical cytoskeleton of tumor cells, which was associated with increased membrane ruffling, increased focal adhesion complex turnover, and increased tumor cell migration and invasion in cultured cells, and enhanced metastatic dissemination in vivo. Therefore, we found that mitochondrial respiration enhanced by survivin contributes to cancer metabolism, and relocalized mitochondria may provide a “regional” energy source to fuel tumor cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:26268608

  16. Regulation of mammalian microRNA processing and function by cellular signaling and subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, Neil R.

    2008-01-01

    For many microRNAs, in many normal tissues and in cancer cells, the cellular levels of mature microRNAs are not simply determined by transcription of microRNA genes. This mini-review will discuss how microRNA biogenesis and function can be regulated by various nuclear and cytoplasmic processing events, including emerging evidence that microRNA pathway components can be selectively regulated by control of their subcellular localization and by modifications that occur during dynamic cellular signaling. Finally, I will briefly summarize studies of microRNAs in synaptic fractions of adult mouse forebrain, which may serve as a model for other cell types as well. PMID:18433727

  17. Analytical model of ionization and energy deposition by proton beams in subcellular compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, Pablo; Surdutovich, Eugene; Abril, Isabel; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2014-04-01

    We present an analytical model to evaluate in a fast, simple and effective manner the energy delivered by proton beams moving through a cell model made of nucleus and cytoplasm, taking into account the energy carried by the secondary electrons generated along the proton tracks. The electronic excitation spectra of these subcellular compartments have been modelled by means of an empirical parameterization of their dielectric properties. The energy loss rate and target ionization probability induced by swift protons are evaluated by means of the dielectric formalism. With the present model we have quantified the energy delivered, the specific energy, and the number of ionizations produced per incoming ion in a typical human cell by a typical hadrontherapy proton beam having energies usually reached around the Bragg peak (below 20 MeV). We find that the specific energy per incoming ion delivered in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm are rather similar for all the proton energy range analyzed.

  18. Subcellular Localization of GUS- and GFP-Tagged Proteins in Onion Epidermal Cells.

    PubMed

    von Arnim, Albrecht

    2007-02-01

    INTRODUCTIONRecombinant tags (i.e., reporter proteins) offer an excellent alternative to antibodies for determining the subcellular localization of proteins. The most user-friendly tags are the ß-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter enzyme from Escherichia coli and fluorescent proteins derived primarily from the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. GUS is useful primarily as a tag to address nuclear localization, whereas GFP is more versatile. Moreover, GFP is detectable directly in living cells, whereas GUS is only detected indirectly by staining of fixed tissue. This may lead to artifacts or it may obscure problems with protein solubility. In this protocol, protein localization is routinely assayed after particle-mediated transient transformation of onion epidermal cells. With this method it can be determined rapidly whether a given fusion protein is active, and preliminary targeting data can be obtained.

  19. Three-dimensional cellular and subcellular structures of human brain tissue determined by microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Ryuta; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Takekoshi, Susumu; Yoshiyuki Osamura, R.; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2009-09-01

    We report here x-ray microtomographic studies of human cerebral cortex stained with high-Z elements. Brain tissues were stained with metal elements by the Golgi and Bodian impregnation methods and subjected to x-ray microtomographic analysis. Axons and dendrites arising from cell bodies were visualized as three-dimensional networks. Spherical structures of cellular nuclei were observed in the interiors of cell bodies, indicating that hard x-ray microtomography can reveal the intracellular structure. High-Z element microcontrasting in conjunction with microtomographic analysis can be applied to any soft tissues. Our results show that the metal contrasting facilitates the three-dimensional microtomographic visualization of cellular and subcellular structures of soft tissues.

  20. Quality Control Pathways for Nucleus-Encoded Eukaryotic tRNA Biosynthesis and Subcellular Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    tRNAs perform an essential role in translating the genetic code. They are long-lived RNAs that are generated via numerous posttranscriptional steps. Eukaryotic cells have evolved numerous layers of quality control mechanisms to ensure that the tRNAs are appropriately structured, processed, and modified. We describe the known tRNA quality control processes that check tRNAs and correct or destroy aberrant tRNAs. These mechanisms employ two types of exonucleases, CCA end addition, tRNA nuclear aminoacylation, and tRNA subcellular traffic. We arrange these processes in order of the steps that occur from generation of precursor tRNAs by RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcription to end maturation and modification in the nucleus to splicing and additional modifications in the cytoplasm. Finally, we discuss the tRNA retrograde pathway, which allows tRNA reimport into the nucleus for degradation or repair. PMID:25848089

  1. In vivo subcellular resolution optical imaging in the lung reveals early metastatic proliferation and motility

    PubMed Central

    Entenberg, David; Rodriguez-Tirado, Carolina; Kato, Yu; Kitamura, Takanori; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2015-01-01

    To better understand breast cancer metastatic cell seeding, we have employed multiphoton microscopy and a vacuum stabilized window which eliminates the need for complex registration software, video rate microscopy or specialized gating electronics to observe the initial steps of tumor cell seeding within the living, breathing lung. We observe that upon arrival to the lung, tumor cells are found exclusively in capillary vessels, completely fill their volume and display an initial high level of protrusive activity that dramatically reduces over time. Further, we observe a concomitant increase in positional stability during this same period. We employ several techniques accessible to most imaging labs for optimizing signal to noise and resolution which enable us to report the first direct observation, with subcellular resolution, of the arrival, proliferation, and motility of metastatic tumor cells within the lung. PMID:26855844

  2. Subcellular localization of the K+ channel subunit Kv3.1b in selected rat CNS neurons.

    PubMed

    Sekirnjak, C; Martone, M E; Weiser, M; Deerinck, T; Bueno, E; Rudy, B; Ellisman, M

    1997-08-22

    Voltage-gated potassium channels constitute the largest group of heteromeric ion channels discovered to date. Over 20 genes have been isolated, encoding different channel subunit proteins which form functional tetrameric K+ channels. We have analyzed the subcellular localization of subunit Kv3.1b, a member of the Kv3 (Shaw-like) subfamily, in rat brain at the light and electron microscopic level, using immunocytochemical detection. Detailed localization was carried out in specific neurons of the neocortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. The identity of Kv3.1b-positive neurons was established using double labeling with markers for specific neuronal populations. In the neocortex, the Kv3.1b subunit was expressed in most parvalbumin-containing bipolar, basket or chandelier cells, and in some bipolar or double bouquet neurons containing calbindin. In the hippocampus, Kv3.1b was expressed in many parvalbumin-containing basket cells, as well as in calbindin-positive neurons in the stratum oriens, and in a small number of interneurons that did not stain for either parvalbumin or calbindin. Kv3.1b protein was not present in pyramidal cells in the neocortex and the hippocampus, but these cells were outlined by labeled presynaptic terminals from interneuron axons that surround the postsynaptic cell. In the cerebellar cortex, granule cells were the only population expressing the channel protein. Careful examination of individual granule cells revealed a non-uniform distribution of Kv3.1 staining on the somata: circular bands of labeling were present in the vicinity of the axon hillock. In cortical and hippocampal interneurons, as well as in cerebellar granule cells, the Kv3.1b subunit was present in somatic and unmyelinated axonal membranes and adjacent cytoplasm, as well as in the most proximal portion of dendritic processes, but not throughout most of the dendrite. Labeling was also seen in the terminals of labeled axons, but not at a higher concentration than in other parts

  3. Visualizing Escherichia coli sub-cellular structure using sparse deconvolution Spatial Light Interference Tomography.

    PubMed

    Mir, Mustafa; Babacan, S Derin; Bednarz, Michael; Do, Minh N; Golding, Ido; Popescu, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Studying the 3D sub-cellular structure of living cells is essential to our understanding of biological function. However, tomographic imaging of live cells is challenging mainly because they are transparent, i.e., weakly scattering structures. Therefore, this type of imaging has been implemented largely using fluorescence techniques. While confocal fluorescence imaging is a common approach to achieve sectioning, it requires fluorescence probes that are often harmful to the living specimen. On the other hand, by using the intrinsic contrast of the structures it is possible to study living cells in a non-invasive manner. One method that provides high-resolution quantitative information about nanoscale structures is a broadband interferometric technique known as Spatial Light Interference Microscopy (SLIM). In addition to rendering quantitative phase information, when combined with a high numerical aperture objective, SLIM also provides excellent depth sectioning capabilities. However, like in all linear optical systems, SLIM's resolution is limited by diffraction. Here we present a novel 3D field deconvolution algorithm that exploits the sparsity of phase images and renders images with resolution beyond the diffraction limit. We employ this label-free method, called deconvolution Spatial Light Interference Tomography (dSLIT), to visualize coiled sub-cellular structures in E. coli cells which are most likely the cytoskeletal MreB protein and the division site regulating MinCDE proteins. Previously these structures have only been observed using specialized strains and plasmids and fluorescence techniques. Our results indicate that dSLIT can be employed to study such structures in a practical and non-invasive manner.

  4. Manipulating volatile emission in tobacco leaves by expressing Aspergillus nigerbeta-glucosidase in different subcellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shu; Marton, Ira; Dekel, Mara; Shalitin, Dror; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Bravdo, Ben-Ami; Shoseyov, Oded

    2004-07-01

    Expression of the Aspergillus nigerbeta-glucosidase gene, BGL1, in Nicotiana tabacum plants (cv. Xanthi) had a profound effect on the volatile emissions of intact and crushed leaves. BGL1 was expressed under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and targeted to the cytoplasm, cell wall, lytic vacuole (LV), chloroplast or endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Subcellular localization was confirmed by gold immunolabelling, followed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Significant beta-glucosidase activity was observed in transgenic plants expressing BGL1 in the cell wall, LV and ER. Compared with controls, all intact transgenic leaves were found to emit increased levels of 2-ethylhexanol, as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the headspace volatiles. Plants expressing BGL1 in the cell wall (Tcw) emitted more trans-caryophyllene than did non-transgenic controls, whereas plants expressing BGL1 in the ER (Ter) and LV (Tvc) emitted more cembrene than did non-transgenic controls. Volatiles released from crushed transgenic leaves and collected with solid-phase microextraction (SPME) polydimethylsiloxane fibre were distinctly enhanced. Significant increases in linalool, nerol, furanoid cis-linalool oxide, 4-methyl-1-pentanol, 6-methyl-hept-5-en-2-ol and 2-ethylhexanol were detected in transgenic plants when compared with wild-type controls. 3-Hydroxyl-beta-ionone levels were increased in crushed Tcw and Ter leaves, but were undetectable in Tvc leaves. The addition of glucoimidazole, a beta-glucosidase inhibitor, abolished the increased emission of these volatiles. These results indicate that the expression of a fungal beta-glucosidase gene in different subcellular compartments